WorldWideScience

Sample records for surgical training curricula

  1. Trends in cataract surgery training curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfipour, Mona; Rolius, Ramunas; Lehman, Erik B; Pantanelli, Seth M; Scott, Ingrid U

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate trends in cataract surgery training curricula and factors affecting timing of resident participation as a primary surgeon. Pennsylvania State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA. Cross-sectional study of anonymous survey results. A description of the study and link to an online survey was e-mailed to program directors of each ophthalmology residency training program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Fifty-one (44%) of the 116 program directors completed the survey. First-year, second-year, and third-year residents performed a mean of 2, 25, and 155 phacoemulsification surgeries, respectively, as a primary surgeon. Only 1 program (2%) required residents to perform extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) before performing phacoemulsification. Clear corneal phacoemulsification was the first technique taught to trainees at 91% of programs. More than two thirds (71%) of program directors indicated that their program had a cataract surgery training curriculum designed to transition residents gradually to the operating room. These curricula included structured wet laboratory (92%) and lecture (89%) components. Inadequate resident knowledge and surgical skill base (57%) and anticipation of increased surgical complication risk (37%) were the most commonly reported factors impeding earlier exposure to phacoemulsification in residency. Results show that residents today begin surgical training with phacoemulsification rather than ECCE, perform a higher number of phacoemulsification surgeries than is required by the ACGME, and begin performing phacoemulsification as early as their first or second year of residency. Despite these evolutions, 29% of respondent ACGME-accredited ophthalmology residency programs reported not having a formal cataract surgery training curriculum. Copyright © 2016 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evolution of surgical skills training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kurt E Roberts; Robert L Bell; Andrew J Duffy

    2006-01-01

    Surgical training is changing: one hundred years of tradition is being challenged by legal and ethical concerns for patient safety, work hours restrictions, the cost of operating room time, and complications. Surgical simulation and skills training offers an opportunity to teach and practice advanced skills outside of the operating room environment before attempting them on living patients.Simulation training can be as straight forward as using real instruments and video equipment to manipulate simulated "tissue" in a box trainer. More advanced,virtual reality simulators are now available and ready for widespread use. Early systems have demonstrated their effectiveness and discriminative ability. Newer systems enable the development of comprehensive curricula and full procedural simulations.The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME) has mandated the development of novel methods of training and evaluation. Surgical organizations are calling for methods to ensure the maintenance of skills, advance surgical training, and to credential surgeons as technically competent.Simulators in their current form have been demonstrated to improve the operating room performance of surgical residents. Development of standardized training curricula remains an urgent and important agenda, particularly for minimal invasive surgery.An innovative and progressive approach, borrowing experiences from the field of aviation, can provide the foundation for the next century of surgical training,ensuring the quality of the product. As the technology develops, the way we practice will continue to evolve, to the benefit of physicians and patients.

  3. Review of selected national surgical curricula: quantity is not the sole marker of quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pritam; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Darzi, Ara

    2014-01-01

    Despite marked global variations in length and structure of surgical training programs, their common end product is a trained surgeon capable of independent practice. If variations exist, yet the end product is similar, modifications to curricula could potentially enhance the quality and efficiency of surgical training. This review evaluates global general surgery training programs and compares their curricula against the established standards for assessment of curricula. A convenience sampling method was employed during an online search for nationally recognized general surgery curricula. Curricula of Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America were individually reviewed and subsequently evaluated against the General Medical Council's "Standards for curricula and assessment systems." Postgraduate surgical training is completed in 5 years in Canada and the United States, whereas this takes a minimum of 7, 7, and 10 years in Australia, Hong Kong, and the United Kingdom, respectively. However, when their general surgery curricula are objectively compared, they are remarkably similar. The principle disparities noted were in documentation and standardization of the structured in-training assessment system. This review highlights variations in the structure of general surgery training programs globally. There is a need for an objective method to assess training quality, not reliant upon quantity alone. An evidence-based approach is the gold standard in patient care; it is essential to invest resources into developing an evidence-based curricular approach to ensure surgical training quality can be accurately evaluated to maintain and enhance the standards. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A pilot comparison of standardized online surgical curricula for use in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Seth D; Papandria, Dominic; Linden, Allison; Azzie, Georges; Borgstein, Eric; Calland, James Forrest; Finlayson, Samuel R G; Jani, Pankaj; Klingensmith, Mary; Labib, Mohamed; Lewis, Frank; Malangoni, Mark A; O'Flynn, Eric; Ogendo, Stephen; Riviello, Robert; Abdullah, Fizan

    2014-04-01

    Surgical conditions are an important component of global disease burden, due in part to critical shortages of adequately trained surgical providers in low- and middle-income countries. To assess the use of Internet-based educational platforms as a feasible approach to augmenting the education and training of surgical providers in these settings. Access to two online curricula was offered to 75 surgical faculty and trainees from 12 low- and middle-income countries for 60 days. The Surgical Council on Resident Education web portal was designed for general surgery trainees in the United States, and the School for Surgeons website was built by the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland specifically for the College of Surgeons of East, Central and Southern Africa. Participants completed an anonymous online survey detailing their experiences with both platforms. Voluntary respondents were daily Internet users and endorsed frequent use of both print and online textbooks as references. Likert scale survey questionnaire responses indicating overall and content-specific experiences with the Surgical Council on Resident Education and School for Surgeons curricula. Survey responses were received from 27 participants. Both online curricula were rated favorably, with no statistically significant differences in stated willingness to use and recommend either platform to colleagues. Despite regional variations in practice context, there were few perceived hurdles to future curriculum adoption. Both the Surgical Council on Resident Education and School for Surgeons educational curricula were well received by respondents in low- and middle-income countries. Although one was designed for US surgical postgraduates and the other for sub-Saharan African surgical providers, there were no significant differences detected in participant responses between the two platforms. Online educational resources have promise as an effective means to enhance the education of surgical providers in low

  5. [Realistic surgical training. The Aachen model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krones, C J; Binnebösel, M; Stumpf, M; Schumpelick, V

    2010-01-01

    The Aachen model is a practical mode in teaching and advanced training, which is closely geared to the areas of academic acquisition and training. During medical education optional student courses with constitutive curricula offer practical points of contact to the surgical department at all times. Besides improvement of manual training the aims are enhancing interests and acquisition of talents. This guided structure will be intensified with progression into advanced education. Next to the formal guidelines of the curriculum, education logbook and progression conversations, quality, transparency and reliability are particularly emphasized. An evaluation of both the reforms and the surgical trainers is still to be made. In addition procurement of an affirmative occupational image is essential.

  6. Incorporating Virtual Teamwork Training into MIS Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Sager, James; Corbitt, Gail; Gardiner, Stanley C.

    2008-01-01

    Due to increasing industry demand for personnel who work effectively in virtual/distributed teams, MIS students should undergo training to improve their awareness of and competence in virtual teamwork. This paper proposes a model for virtual teamwork training and describes the implementation of the model in a class where students were located in…

  7. Language Development Provision in Teacher Training Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, George

    1994-01-01

    This article discusses the training of nonnative teachers of English as a Second Language (ESL), focusing on the need for such teachers to develop a high level of English language proficiency. A survey of Sri Lankan ESL teacher trainees found that most considered language proficiency to be the most important aspect of their curriculum. (12…

  8. Surgical Training in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borel Rinkes, I.H.M.; Gouma, D.J.; Hamming, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    Surgical training in the Netherlands has traditionally been characterized by learning on the job under the classic master-trainee doctrine. Over the past decades, it has become regionally organized with intensive structural training courses, and a peer-based quality control system. Recently, the nat

  9. Training situational awareness to reduce surgical errors in the operating room

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, M.; Schraagen, J.M.C.; Boermeester, M.A.; Bemelman, W.A.; Schijven, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical errors result from faulty decision-making, misperceptions and the application of suboptimal problem-solving strategies, just as often as they result from technical failure. To date, surgical training curricula have focused mainly on the acquisition of technical skills. The aim

  10. Training situational awareness to reduce surgical errors in the operating room

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, M.; Schraagen, J.M.C.; Boermeester, M.A.; Bemelman, W.A.; Schijven, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical errors result from faulty decision-making, misperceptions and the application of suboptimal problem-solving strategies, just as often as they result from technical failure. To date, surgical training curricula have focused mainly on the acquisition of technical skills. The aim o

  11. Training situational awareness to reduce surgical errors in the operating room

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, M.; Schraagen, J.M.C.; Boermeester, M.A.; Bemelman, W.A.; Schijven, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical errors result from faulty decision-making, misperceptions and the application of suboptimal problem-solving strategies, just as often as they result from technical failure. To date, surgical training curricula have focused mainly on the acquisition of technical skills. The aim o

  12. Surgical training in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel-Rinkes, Inne H M; Gouma, Dirk J; Hamming, Jaap F

    2008-10-01

    Surgical training in the Netherlands has traditionally been characterized by learning on the job under the classic master-trainee doctrine. Over the past decades, it has become regionally organized with intensive structural training courses, and a peer-based quality control system. Recently, the nationwide programme has been modernized further and now involves a systematic, competency-based education with structural training courses, formalized assessment and room for reflection by residents under the supervision of surgical teaching groups. To this end, a uniform web-based digital portfolio is being introduced to facilitate monitoring of the individual resident's progress. Though requiring inspirational leadership, commitment, and determination, this modernization has sparked enthusiasm among trainees and teachers.

  13. Lesson plans in surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, S E; Robson, A K R

    2007-06-01

    Lesson plans in surgery enable trainers and trainees to agree on goals that balance training needs with service commitments. Lesson plans are individualised to the trainee and encourage ownership of learning. They are based on SMART criteria and therefore have a sound educational footing. Most of the work in creating a lesson plan falls to the trainee. The total time for creation of each plan is approximately 20 min. Our use of lesson plans for surgical training has been met with favourable response from both trainer and trainees.

  14. Using dummies for surgical skills training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langebæk, Rikke

    2011-01-01

    teaching methods for veterinary surgical training. At the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, a number of low fidelity, stuffed toy animal dummies was developed for the Surgical Skills Lab in order to teach 4th year students the basic surgical skills. In the Surgical...... this a relatively low budget solution with a big ethical benefit....

  15. [Financing and control of surgical training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, W; Welcker, K

    2010-01-01

    The present analyses of different surgical training systems show that training of surgical residents significantly contributes to hospital costs. These are predominantly caused by prolonged operation times of residents with increased work load for other staff members in the operating room. In addition, the productivity of surgical residents is less compared to experienced surgeons. On the other hand, hospital managements save money by the lower standard wages paid to the residents. The amount of educational costs is difficult to determine because surgical training takes place as on the job training. Therefore, from an economic point of view, the two products patient care and surgical training are difficult to separate. There are no reliable cost analyses available for the German training system. At present surgical training is indirectly financed by the DRG (diagnosis-related groups) flat rates of the health insurance. Possible options of financing the surgical training are additional funding from the health department or redistribution with supplemental payment for those surgical departments which contribute significantly more to the residents' training. Statements of medical associations, health departments and health insurances demonstrate the difficulty to come to an agreement concerning the finances of the training system. Despite this controversial discussion it should be taken into consideration that there is no alternative to a high quality surgical training as this is the basis for an effective health system.

  16. Virtual reality simulation in endovascular surgical training.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tsang, J S

    2008-08-01

    Shortened trainingtimes duetothe European Working Time Directive (EWTD) and increased public scrutiny of surgical competency have led to a move away from the traditional apprenticeship model of training. Virtual reality (VR) simulation is a fascinating innovation allowing surgeons to develop without the need to practice on real patients and it may be a solution to achieve competency within a shortened training period.

  17. Examining the importance of incorporating emergency preparedness and disaster training core competencies into allied health curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    Preparation for responding to emergency events that does not warrant outside help beyond the local community resources or responding to disaster events that is beyond the capabilities of the local community both require first responders and healthcare professionals to have interdisciplinary skills needed to function as a team for saving lives. To date, there is no core emergency preparedness and disaster planning competencies that have been standardized at all levels across the various allied health curricula disciplines. To identify if emergency preparedness and disaster training content are currently being taught in allied health program courses, to identify possible gaps within allied health curricula, and to explore the perceptions of allied health college educators for implementing emergency preparedness and disaster training core competencies into their existing curricula, if not already included. A quantitative Internet-based survey was conducted in 2013. Convenient sample. Fifty-one allied health college educators completed the survey. Descriptive statistics indicated that the majority of allied health college instructors do not currently teach emergency preparedness and disaster training core competency content within their current allied health discipline; however, their perceived level of importance for inclusion of the competencies was high. The results of this study supported the need for developing and establishing a basic national set of standardized core emergency preparedness and disaster planning competencies at all levels across various allied health curricula disciplines to ensure victims receive the best patient care and have the best possible chance of survival.

  18. Workplace-based assessment: assessing technical skill throughout the continuum of surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Jonathan; Rowley, David; Bussey, Maria; Pitts, David

    2009-03-01

    The Royal Colleges of Surgeons and Surgical Specialty Associations in the UK have introduced competence-based syllabi and curricula for surgical training. The syllabi of the Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme (ISCP) and Orthopaedic Curriculum and Assessment Programme (OCAP) define the core competencies, that is, the observable and measureable behaviours required of a surgical trainee. The curricula define when, where and how these will be assessed. Procedure-based assessment (PBA) has been adopted as the principal method of assessing surgical skills. It combines competencies specific to the procedure with generic competencies such as safe handling of instruments. It covers the entire procedure, including preoperative and postoperative planning. A global summary of the level at which the trainee performed the assessed elements of the procedure is also included. The form has been designed to be completed quickly by the assessor (clinical supervisor) and fed-back to the trainee between operations. PBA forms have been developed for all index procedures in all surgical specialties. The forms are intended to be used as frequently as possible when performing index procedures, as their primary aim is to aid learning. At the end of a training placement the aggregated PBA forms, together with the logbook, enable the Educational Supervisor and/or Programme Director to make a summary judgement about the competence of a trainee to perform index procedures to a given standard.

  19. The Shrinking of Formalized Nutrition Education in Health Professions Curricula and Postgraduate Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Gordon S

    2017-02-01

    The quantity of formalized nutrition education is shrinking in curricula of health professions, such as physicians, nurses, dietitians, and pharmacists. The current nutrition education being taught in U.S. schools of healthcare professionals does not appropriately prepare students for identification of patients at nutrition risk or management of undernourished hospitalized patients with specialized nutrition therapies. In U.S. schools of pharmacy, parenteral nutrition is considered a highly specialized and advanced practice so little time is devoted to this area and more attention is focused on chronic disease state management (ie, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and congestive heart failure). Nutrition support fellowships for physicians and nutrition support residency programs for pharmacists have dwindled in number over the years so that only a handful of these healthcare professionals are produced each year from the remaining formalized programs. Physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and dietitians can positively affect patient care, but each profession must first determine how best to integrate basic and applied nutrition concepts into their professional curricula and training programs. There must also be consensus among the healthcare professions as to the depth of nutrition education and the stage of training at which these integrations should occur. Only by having these crucial conversations among all disciplines will we be able to develop new strategies to expand nutrition education in the training of future medical practitioners.

  20. Integrated flexible endoscopy training during surgical residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Mario P; Mancini, Gregory J; Miedema, Brent W; Rangnekar, Nitin J; Koivunen, Debra G; Ramshaw, Bruce J; Eubanks, W Stephen; Stephenson, Hugh E

    2008-09-01

    New advances in endoscopic surgery make it imperative that future gastrointestinal surgeons obtain adequate endoscopy skills. An evaluation of the 2001-02 general surgery residency endoscopy experience at the University of Missouri revealed that chief residents were graduating with an average of 43 endoscopic cases. This met American Board of Surgery (ABS) and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements but is inadequate preparation for carrying out advanced endoscopic surgery. Our aim was to determine if endoscopy volume could be improved by dedicating specific staff surgeon time to a gastrointestinal diagnostic center at an affiliated Veterans Administration Hospital. During the academic years 2002-05, two general surgeons who routinely perform endoscopy staffed the gastrointestinal endoscopy center at the Harry S. Truman Hospital two days per week. A minimum of one categorical surgical resident participated during these endoscopy training days while on the Veterans Hospital surgical service. A retrospective observational review of ACGME surgery resident case logs from 2001 to 2005 was conducted to document the changes in resident endoscopy experience. The cases were compiled by postgraduate year (PGY). Resident endoscopy case volume increased 850% from 2001 to 2005. Graduating residents completed an average of 161 endoscopies. Endoscopic experience was attained at all levels of training: 26, 21, 34, 23, and 26 mean endoscopies/year for PGY-1 to PGY-5, respectively. Having specific endoscopy training days at a VA Hospital under the guidance of a dedicated staff surgeon is a successful method to improve surgical resident endoscopy case volume. An integrated endoscopy training curriculum results in early skills acquisition, continued proficiency throughout residency, and is an efficient way to obtain endoscopic skills. In addition, the foundation of flexible endoscopic skill and experience has allowed early integration of surgery

  1. Assessment of Training Programs for Elementary Mathematics Teachers on Developed Curricula and Attitudes towards Teaching in Najran-Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Hassan Shawky; Abdulhakeem, Hassan Daker

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the training programs for Mathematics teachers at elementary stage on developed Curricula and attitudes toward teaching at Najran educational administration in Saudi Arabia. To achieve this objective, two instruments were developed, one of them measures the opinions of Mathematics teachers about the training programs…

  2. Perioperative nurse training in cardiothoracic surgical robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, M A; Reinbolt, J A; Handley, P J

    2001-12-01

    The exponential growth of OR technology during the past 10 years has placed increased demands on perioperative nurses. Proficiency is required not only in patient care but also in the understanding, operating, and troubleshooting of video systems, computers, and cutting edge medical devices. The formation of a surgical team dedicated to robotically assisted cardiac surgery requires careful selection, education, and hands-on practice. This article details the six-week training process undertaken at Sarasota Memorial Hospital, Sarasota, Fla, which enabled staff members to deliver excellent patient care with a high degree of confidence in themselves and the robotic technology.

  3. An evaluation of physical activity training in Australian medical school curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Abigail; Stoutenberg, Mark; Hobson-Powell, Anita; Hargreaves, Mark; Beeler, Halle; Stamatakis, Emmanuel

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the current level of physical activity (PA) training provided to Australian medical students. Individual interviews were completed via phone interview or online survey from June-October 2015. Program leaders from Australian medical schools, who were knowledgeable about their curriculum content, were invited to participate in the study. The number of programs, hours of PA training instruction, institutional attitude towards offering PA, barriers experienced, and content areas in which PA training was offered, were explored. Seventeen of the 19 (89%) Australian medical schools participated in the study. Among the responding schools, 15 (88.2%) reported providing specific PA training to medical students. Thirteen of these 15 schools (86.7%) taught the national aerobic guidelines while only seven (46.7%) taught the national strength training recommendations. Four, five, and six year programs reported providing an average of 6.6, 5.0, and 12.3h of PA training, respectively, across their entire curriculum. Only 42.9% of the schools that had PA training reported that it was sufficient for their medical students. Nearly half (41.2%) of the respondents reported no barriers to implementing PA training into their medical curricula. Most Australian medical schools reported including some PA training in their medical curriculum. Key topics, such as the national strength recommendations, however, were not taught by most schools. Given the importance of PA for the prevention and treatment of numerous mental and physical health outcomes, it is unlikely that the attention it currently receives adequately prepares medical students to treat patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Teaching methods and surgical training in North American graduate periodontics programs: exploring the landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiabi, Edmond; Taylor, K Lynn

    2010-06-01

    This project aimed at documenting the surgical training curricula offered by North American graduate periodontics programs. A survey consisting of questions on teaching methods employed and the content of the surgical training program was mailed to directors of all fifty-eight graduate periodontics programs in Canada and the United States. The chi-square test was used to assess whether the residents' clinical experience was significantly (Pperiodontal plastic procedures, hard tissue grafts, and implants. Furthermore, residents in programs offering a structured preclinical component performed significantly more procedures (P=0.012) using lasers than those in programs not offering a structured preclinical program. Devising new and innovative teaching methods is a clear avenue for future development in North American graduate periodontics programs.

  5. Excised Abdominoplasty Material as a Systematic Plastic Surgical Training Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Erol Demirseren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving a level of technical skill and confidence in surgical operations is the main goal of plastic surgical training. Operating rooms were accepted as the practical teaching venues of the traditional apprenticeship model. However, increased patient population, time, and ethical and legal considerations made preoperation room practical work a must for plastic surgical training. There are several plastic surgical teaching models and simulators which are very useful in preoperation room practical training and the evaluation of plastic surgery residents. The full thickness skin with its vascular network excised in abdominoplasty procedures is an easily obtainable real human tissue which could be used as a training model in plastic surgery.

  6. Virtual reality training for surgical trainees in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Palanivelu, Latha; Davidson, Brian R

    2009-01-21

    Surgical training has traditionally been one of apprenticeship, where the surgical trainee learns to perform surgery under the supervision of a trained surgeon. This is time consuming, costly, and of variable effectiveness. Training using a virtual reality simulator is an option to supplement standard training. To determine whether virtual reality training can supplement or replace conventional laparoscopic surgical training (apprenticeship) in surgical trainees with limited or no prior laparoscopic experience. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, and grey literature until March 2008. We included all randomised clinical trials comparing virtual reality training versus other forms of training including video trainer training, no training, or standard laparoscopic training in surgical trainees with little or no prior laparoscopic experience. We also included trials comparing different methods of virtual reality training. We collected the data on the characteristics of the trial, methodological quality of the trials, mortality, morbidity, conversion rate, operating time, and hospital stay. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using RevMan Analysis. For each outcome we calculated the standardised mean difference with 95% confidence intervals based on intention-to-treat analysis. We included 23 trials with 612 participants. Four trials compared virtual reality versus video trainer training. Twelve trials compared virtual reality versus no training or standard laparoscopic training. Four trials compared virtual reality, video trainer training and no training, or standard laparoscopic training. Three trials compared different methods of virtual reality training. Most of the trials were of high risk of bias. In trainees without prior surgical experience, virtual

  7. The effects of the European Working Time Directive on surgical training: the basic surgical trainee's perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, B D

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: On the 1 August 2009, the implementation of European Working Time Directive became European law and was implemented in Galway University Hospital (GUH). AIMS: The aim of the study is to ascertain the opinion of the 25 surgical SHOs in GUH on the effect of the implementation of an EWTD compliant roster had on the quality of their training. METHODS: A questionnaire was circulated to all 25 surgical SHOs. RESULTS: Twenty-two (88%) SHOs report a reduction in the quality of their training. 18 (72%) report a reduction in the development of their operative skills. The SHOs believed the EWTD Rotas would encourage Irish graduates to train abroad. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical training faces a challenge with the implementation of EWTD Rotas. Major changes need to be made to the surgical training structure to train surgeons to the highest standard and to retain Irish-trained surgeons in the Irish healthcare system.

  8. Medical School Librarians Need More Training to Support their Involvement in Evidence Based Medicine Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aislinn Conway

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To describe the self-perceived role of librarians in developing evidence based medicine (EBM curricula and identify their current and desired level of training to support these activities. Design – Multi-institutional qualitative study. Setting – Nine medical schools in Canada and the United States of America. Subjects – Nine librarians identified by medical school faculty as central to the provision of EBM training for medical students at their institution. Methods – The researchers designed a semi-structured interview schedule based on a review of the literature and their own experiences as librarians teaching EBM. The topics covered were; librarians’ perceptions of their roles in relation to the curriculum, the training required to enable them to undertake these roles, and their professional development needs. The interviews were conducted by telephone and then audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The authors present five main themes; curricular design, curricular deployment, curricular assessment, educational training, and professional development. Profiles were developed for each participant based on the latter two themes and from this information common characteristics were identified. Main Results – The participants described the importance of collaboration with faculty and student bodies when designing a curriculum. Information literacy instruction and specifically literature searching and forming a research question were taught by all of the participants to facilitate curricular deployment. Some of the librarians were involved or partly involved in curricular assessment activities such as formulating exam questions or providing feedback on assignments. Educational training of participants varied from informal observation to formal workshops offered by higher education institutions. All librarians indicated a willingness to partake in professional development focused on teaching and EBM. The subjects

  9. Development of the surgical science examination of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons surgical education and training programme: putting the chicken before the egg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jenepher; Blennerhassett, John; Hardman, David; Mundy, Julie

    2009-03-01

    Basic science knowledge is a foundational element of surgical practice. Increasing surgical specialization may merit a reconsideration of the 'whole-body' approach to basic science curriculum in favour of specialty specific depth. The conundrum of depth or breadth of basic science curriculum is currently being addressed by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, which introduced a new surgical education and training programme for nine surgical specialties in 2008. This paper describes an innovative solution to the design of a basic science curriculum in the nine different surgical specialty streams of this programme. The task was to develop a curriculum and rigorous assessment in basic sciences to meet the needs of the training programme, for implementation within the first year. A number of political/cultural and technical issues were identified as critical to success. To achieve a robust assessment within the required time frame attention was paid to engagement, governance, curriculum definition, assessment development, and implementation. The pragmatic solution to curriculum and assessment was to use the existing assessment items and blueprint to determine a new curriculum definition and assessment. The resulting curriculum comprises a generic component, undertaken by all trainees, and specialty specific components. In a time critical environment, a pragmatic solution to curriculum, applied with predetermined, structured and meticulous methodology, allowed explicit definition of breadth for the generic basic science curriculum for surgical training in Australia and New Zealand. Implicit definition of specialty specific-basic science curricula was through the creation of a blueprinted assessment.

  10. A structured strategy to combine education for advanced MIS training in surgical oncology training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, S S; Wright, F; Okrainec, A; Smith, A J

    2011-09-01

    Changing realities in surgery and surgical technique have heightened the need for agile adaptation in training programs. Current guidelines reflect the growing acceptance and adoption of the use of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in oncology. North American general surgery residents are often not adequately skilled in advanced laparoscopic surgery skills at the completion of their residency. Presently, advanced laparoscopic surgery training during surgical oncology fellowship training occurs on an ad-hoc basis in many surgical oncology programs. We present a rational and template for a structured training in advanced minimally invasive surgical techniques during surgical oncology fellowship training. The structure of the program seeks to incorporate evidence-based strategies in MIS training from a comprehensive review of the literature, while maintaining essential elements of rigorous surgical oncology training. Fellows in this stream will train and certify in the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) course. Fellows will participate in the didactic oncology seminar series continuously throughout the 27 months training period. Fellows will complete one full year of dedicated MIS training, followed by 15 months of surgical oncology training. Minimal standards for case volume will be expected for MIS cases and training will be tailored to meet the career goals of the fellows. We propose that a formalized MIS-Surgical Oncology Fellowship will allow trainees to benefit from an effective training curriculum and furthermore, that will allow for graduates to lead in a cancer surgery milieu increasingly focused on minimally invasive approaches. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Improving Fellowship Training in Microsurgery: A Threshold Concepts Perspective on the Curricula of Fellowship Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgeniou, Evgenios; Tsironi, Maria; Riley, David

    2015-10-01

    The theory of "threshold concepts" argues that within every discipline there is knowledge that transforms understanding and leads to a previously inaccessible way of thinking, without which the learner cannot progress. This study investigates the factors influencing the development of the characteristic ways of thinking and practicing as a microsurgeon during a microsurgical fellowship. We analyze the challenges in the development of these characteristics during focused fellowship training in microsurgery, of which some could potentially represent "threshold concepts." A qualitative research methodology was followed. Semistructured interviews with trainers and trainees from microsurgical units in the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States (US) were conducted. Data were analyzed using the Dedoose (Manhattan Beach, CA) qualitative data analysis software and interpreted using the theory of "threshold concepts." Five trainees and four trainers from the UK and the US participated in this research project. Although initially some trainees had particular difficulty in developing their practical microsurgical skills, this improved rapidly with adequate practice. Cognitive skills and especially the ability to expect the unexpected and the ability recognize complications presented as a significant challenge for trainees and transformed their understandings regarding the qualities of a microsurgeon. Microsurgical fellowship curricula can be redesigned using the theory of threshold concepts, creating a dynamic framework that addresses individual trainee needs to develop the practical and cognitive skills necessary for independent practice of microsurgery. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Systematic review of serious games for medical education and surgical skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graafland, M; Schraagen, J M; Schijven, M P

    2012-10-01

    The application of digital games for training medical professionals is on the rise. So-called 'serious' games form training tools that provide a challenging simulated environment, ideal for future surgical training. Ultimately, serious games are directed at reducing medical error and subsequent healthcare costs. The aim was to review current serious games for training medical professionals and to evaluate the validity testing of such games. PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PsychInfo and CINAHL were searched using predefined inclusion criteria for available studies up to April 2012. The primary endpoint was validation according to current criteria. A total of 25 articles were identified, describing a total of 30 serious games. The games were divided into two categories: those developed for specific educational purposes (17) and commercial games also useful for developing skills relevant to medical personnel (13). Pooling of data was not performed owing to the heterogeneity of study designs and serious games. Six serious games were identified that had a process of validation. Of these six, three games were developed for team training in critical care and triage, and three were commercially available games applied to train laparoscopic psychomotor skills. None of the serious games had completed a full validation process for the purpose of use. Blended and interactive learning by means of serious games may be applied to train both technical and non-technical skills relevant to the surgical field. Games developed or used for this purpose need validation before integration into surgical teaching curricula. Copyright © 2012 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The Opticker's Apprentice Training In Optics Within Traditional Non-Optics Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Donald C.

    1989-04-01

    Historically most training in optics was done at the graduate level. It was assumed that a basic grounding in physics or engineering was required and that the demand could be met by the established programs. Recently, however, with the emergence of an entire new optical technology, the training in optics has taken place at a number of different levels. As doctoral research encompassed devices and techniques that were the basis of this new technology, newly minted PhD's, including the author, joined the faculties in the usual fields of studies, but brought with them their enthusiasm for and knowledge of things optical. Going beyond the usual sophomore sequence on image formation and the standard single upper level course in geometrical and physical optics, these new faculty members, began to develop new courses and laboratories that brought some of their optics into the standard undergraduate curriculum. This paper is an attempt to assess the current range of optical training in programs within the traditional non-optics curricula. For the purpose of economy and focus, I have restricted this overview to those institutions that have award bachelor degrees in physics and electrical engineering. While there are other optics programs at other levels, the description and analysis of this selected group will, I think, provide a reasonable description of the type of training being done today. The assessment was carried out by means of a questionnaire sent to 30 schools that award bachelor degrees in physics and electrical engineering. Other data was found in the SPIE publication, "Optics in Education"1. In addition, Ken Cupery of Eastman Kodak made available to me his database, a substantial effort. I extracted those programs from Ken's database and attached the results of my own questionnaire to it. Of the 30 schools I queried I received responses from 21 of them. Two of these indicated that the program was no longer in business, so the results will be based on 19

  14. Cost-effective framework for basic surgical skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Deng-Jin; Wen, Chan; Yang, Ai-Jun; Zhu, Zhi-Li; Lei, Yan; Lan, Yang-Jun; Huang, Qing-Yuan; Hou, Xiao-Yu

    2013-06-01

    The importance of basic surgical skills is entirely agreed among surgical educators. However, restricted by ethical issues, finance etc, the basic surgical skills training is increasingly challenged. Increasing cost gives an impetus to the development of cost-effective training models to meet the trainees' acquisition of basic surgical skills. In this situation, a cost-effective training framework was formed in our department and introduced here. Each five students were assigned to a 'training unit'. The training was implemented weekly for 18 weeks. The framework consisted of an early, a transitional, an integrative stage and a surgical skills competition. Corresponding training modules were selected and assembled scientifically at each stage. The modules comprised campus intranet databases, sponge benchtop, nonliving animal tissue, local dissection specimens and simulating reality operations. The training outcomes used direct observation of procedural skills as an assessment tool. The training data of 50 trainees who were randomly selected in each year from 2006 to 2011 year, were retrospectively analysed. An excellent and good rate of the surgical skills is from 82 to 88%, but there is no significant difference among 6 years (P > 0.05). The skills scores of the contestants are markedly higher than those of non-contestants (P < 0.05). The average training cost per trainee is about $21.85-34.08. The present training framework is reliable, feasible, repeatable and cost-effective. The skills competition can promote to improve the surgical skills level of trainees. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  15. Module based training improves and sustains surgical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, C G; Lindorff-Larsen, K; Funch-Jensen, P

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Traditional surgical training is challenged by factors such as patient safety issues, economic considerations and lack of exposure to surgical procedures due to short working hours. A module-based clinical training model promotes rapidly acquired and persistent surgical skills. METHODS......: A randomised controlled trial concerning supervised hernia repair in eight training hospitals in Denmark was performed. The participants were 18 registrars [Post graduate year (PGY) 3 or more] in their first year of surgical specialist training. The intervention consisted of different modules with a skills......-lab course followed by 20 supervised Lichtenstein hernia repairs. Operative performance was video recorded and blindly rated by two consultants using a previously validated skills rating scale (8-40 points). Outcome measures were change in the ratings of operative skills and operative time. RESULTS...

  16. Integrating communication skills training in the curricula of 5 healthcare professions: nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, radiography and midwifery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annegrethe; Tørring, Birgitte; Hansen, Susanne Hjorth

    2014-01-01

    Structured training of communication skills are needed in undergraduate healthcare education in order to prepare the future professionals to cooperate with patients. Often education in communication is not integrated in the curriculum – making it seem a side activity of less importance...... for professionals. In the effort of integrating communication skills training in the undergraduate curricula of nursing, radiography, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and midwifery, we established a communication skills laboratory and arranged a 5 day course for communication teachers from all 5 educational...... programs at University College North Denmark. After the course communication skills training was offered at least once during every 3½ year program and after 3 years this is retained and in some cases developed further. The combination of getting a room where to train and developing the skills to train...

  17. Mentoring during surgical training: consensus recommendations for mentoring programmes from the Association of Surgeons in Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, P; Fitzgerald, J E F; McDermott, F D; Derbyshire, L; Shalhoub, J

    2014-11-01

    Mentoring has been present within surgical training for many years, albeit in different forms. There is evidence that formal mentoring can improve patient outcomes and facilitate learning and personal growth in the mentee. The Association of Surgeons in Training (ASiT) is an independent educational charity working to promote excellence in surgical training. This document recommends the introduction of a structured mentoring programme, which is readily accessible to all surgical trainees. A review of the available evidence--including an ASiT-led survey of its membership--highlights the desire of surgical trainees to have a mentor, whilst the majority do not have access to one. There is also limited training for those in mentoring roles. In response, ASiT have implemented a pilot mentoring scheme, with surgical trainees acting both as mentors and mentees. Based on the existing literature, survey data and pilot experience, ASiT formalises in this document consensus recommendations for mentoring in surgical training.

  18. Unsupervised Trajectory Segmentation for Surgical Gesture Recognition in Robotic Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despinoy, Fabien; Bouget, David; Forestier, Germain; Penet, Cedric; Zemiti, Nabil; Poignet, Philippe; Jannin, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Dexterity and procedural knowledge are two critical skills that surgeons need to master to perform accurate and safe surgical interventions. However, current training systems do not allow us to provide an in-depth analysis of surgical gestures to precisely assess these skills. Our objective is to develop a method for the automatic and quantitative assessment of surgical gestures. To reach this goal, we propose a new unsupervised algorithm that can automatically segment kinematic data from robotic training sessions. Without relying on any prior information or model, this algorithm detects critical points in the kinematic data that define relevant spatio-temporal segments. Based on the association of these segments, we obtain an accurate recognition of the gestures involved in the surgical training task. We, then, perform an advanced analysis and assess our algorithm using datasets recorded during real expert training sessions. After comparing our approach with the manual annotations of the surgical gestures, we observe 97.4% accuracy for the learning purpose and an average matching score of 81.9% for the fully automated gesture recognition process. Our results show that trainees workflow can be followed and surgical gestures may be automatically evaluated according to an expert database. This approach tends toward improving training efficiency by minimizing the learning curve.

  19. Exploring the Changing Landscape of Surgical Residency Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Hopmans (Niels)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractWithin the past decade, the structure and format of surgical residency training has changed radically by the introduction of competency-based training programs, the progressive fragmentation of general surgery into subspecialties, and the implementation of stringent work hour restriction

  20. The Pareto Analysis for Establishing Content Criteria in Surgical Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramp, Kelvin H.; van Det, Marc J.; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E. N.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Current surgical training is still highly dependent on expensive operating room (OR) experience. Although there have been many attempts to transfer more training to the skills laboratory, little research is focused on which technical behaviors can lead to the highest profit when they a

  1. Pig model vs sheep model in undergraduate periodontal surgical training.

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Patryk Daniel; Tronsen, Eyvind; Bøen, Kim Reisæter

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to further develop the sheep model for periodontal surgical training to undergraduate students, and compare it to the more commonly used pig model. Method: Periodontal measurements as pocket depth and gingival width were measured on a total number of 10 sheep and 9 pigs, and a pre-established list of surgical procedures were performed on both types of specimen in different areas of the dentition; gingivectomy, modified access flap w...

  2. The surgical ensemble: choreography as a simulation and training tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satava, Richard M; Hunter, Anne Marie

    2011-09-01

    Team training and interprofessional training have recently emerged as critical new simulations that enhance performance by coordinating communication, leadership, professional, and, to a certain extent, technical skills. In describing these new training tools, the term choreography has been loosely used, but no critical appraisal of the role of the science of choreography has been applied to a surgical procedure. By analogy, the surgical team, including anesthetists, surgeons, nurses, and technicians, constitutes a complete ensemble, whose physical actions and interactions constitute the "performance of surgery." There are very specific "elements" (tools) that are basic to choreography, such as space, timing, rhythm, energy, cues, transitions, and especially rehearsal. This review explores whether such a metaphor is appropriate and the possibility of applying the science of choreography to the surgical team in the operating theater.

  3. Surgical Residents training: Should eponyms be abandoned?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lazzarino

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The eponyms are closely linked to the process of knowledge transfer. Due to the amount thereof, as popularized and use as current can be generated difficulties for doctors who are in training. However, recognition to teachers who have gone before us is a moral and ethical duty

  4. Informatics Approach to Improving Surgical Skills Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Gazi

    2013-01-01

    Surgery as a profession requires significant training to improve both clinical decision making and psychomotor proficiency. In the medical knowledge domain, tools have been developed, validated, and accepted for evaluation of surgeons' competencies. However, assessment of the psychomotor skills still relies on the Halstedian model of…

  5. Enhancing Surgical Team Performance with Game-Based training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Kreutzer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available  Poor team communication has been attributed to many patient safety issues in healthcare. Efficacious team training methods are needed. The present study examines the use of a game-based training approach for enhancing surgical team communication skills. Participants who played the game achieved improved declarative knowledge, and had greater levels of training transfer relative to the control group. These results suggest that game-based training may to be a promising mechanism for improving teamwork in the healthcare industry.  

  6. Raven surgical robot training in preparation for da vinci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Deanna; White, Lee; Lewis, Andrew; King, Hawkeye; Clarke, Alicia; Glassman, Thomas; Comstock, Bryan; Hannaford, Blake; Lendvay, Thomas S

    2014-01-01

    The rapid adoption of robotic assisted surgery challenges the pace at which adequate robotic training can occur due to access limitations to the da Vinci robot. Thirty medical students completed a randomized controlled trial evaluating whether the Raven robot could be used as an alternative training tool for the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) block transfer task on the da Vinci robot. Two groups, one trained on the da Vinci and one trained on the Raven, were tested on a criterion FLS block transfer task on the da Vinci. After robotic FLS block transfer proficiency training there was no statistically significant difference between path length (p=0.39) and economy of motion scores (p=0.06) between the two groups, but those trained on the da Vinci did have faster task times (p=0.01). These results provide evidence for the value of using the Raven robot for training prior to using the da Vinci surgical system for similar tasks.

  7. Laparoscopic surgical box model training for surgical trainees with limited prior laparoscopic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Nagendran, Myura; Toon, Clare D; Davidson, Brian R

    2014-03-01

    Surgical training has traditionally been one of apprenticeship, where the surgical trainee learns to perform surgery under the supervision of a trained surgeon. This is time consuming, costly, and of variable effectiveness. Training using a box model physical simulator is an option to supplement standard training. However, the value of this modality on trainees with limited prior laparoscopic experience is unknown. To compare the benefits and harms of box model training for surgical trainees with limited prior laparoscopic experience versus standard surgical training or supplementary animal model training. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded to May 2013. We planned to include all randomised clinical trials comparing box model trainers versus other forms of training including standard laparoscopic training and supplementary animal model training in surgical trainees with limited prior laparoscopic experience. We also planned to include trials comparing different methods of box model training. Two authors independently identified trials and collected data. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using Review Manager 5. For each outcome, we calculated the risk ratio (RR), mean difference (MD), or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on intention-to-treat analysis whenever possible. We identified eight trials that met the inclusion criteria. One trial including 17 surgical trainees did not contribute to the meta-analysis. We included seven trials (249 surgical trainees belonging to various postgraduate years ranging from year one to four) in which the participants were randomised to supplementary box model training (122 trainees) versus standard training (127 trainees). Only one trial (50 trainees) was at low risk of bias. The box trainers used in all the seven trials were video trainers. Six trials were

  8. Feedback from educational supervisors and trainees on the implementation of curricula and the assessment system for core medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gavin; Barrett, James; Jones, Mike; Parry, David; Wade, Winnie

    2008-10-01

    A pilot of core medical training (CMT) was conducted in 2006-7 with 160 trainees and 130 supervisors in the 10 hospitals within the Mersey Deanery. Questionnaires and focus groups were used to gain feedback from trainees and supervisors in relation to the components of CMT (the curricula, workplace-based assessments, appraisal, and the e-portfolio). There was generally a positive attitude to the CMT package. In particular the opportunities to give and receive feedback were appreciated; the e-portfolio was identified as helpful for recording assessment outcomes and supporting educational development for the trainees. The workplace-based assessments were well received. Many of the benefits of the components of CMT depended on the skill of the supervisor. The time required for effective training supervision and workplace-based assessments was identified as an important issue. This pilot was invaluable in informing the widespread implementation of CMT in 2007.

  9. Implications of an expertise model for surgical skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, Bruce; Poolton, Jamie M; Masters, Rich S W; Patil, Niv G

    2008-12-01

    The search for improved, more efficacious means of teaching and training surgical skills is essentially a search for means to accelerate the transition of non-expert surgeons to expert surgeons and, in so doing, shorten the usual lengthy pathway to the acquisition of surgical expertise. Drawing on evidence from studies of expert and non-expert surgeons, as well as evidence from studies of expertise in other domains, this paper presents a brief overview of the aspects of skill that appear (likely) to differentiate the expert surgeon from the non-expert. Expert advantages are apparent in some specific aspects of the perceptual, cognitive, motor, attentional and feedback-monitoring components of skilled performance and it is contended that it is these elements, rather than elements on which no expert advantage is apparent, that should form the focal points for skills training programmes. Some constraints to current understanding of surgical expertise are also identified and briefly discussed.

  10. Virtual reality training for surgical trainees in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagendran, Myura; Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Loizidou, Marilena; Davidson, Brian R

    2013-08-27

    Standard surgical training has traditionally been one of apprenticeship, where the surgical trainee learns to perform surgery under the supervision of a trained surgeon. This is time-consuming, costly, and of variable effectiveness. Training using a virtual reality simulator is an option to supplement standard training. Virtual reality training improves the technical skills of surgical trainees such as decreased time for suturing and improved accuracy. The clinical impact of virtual reality training is not known. To assess the benefits (increased surgical proficiency and improved patient outcomes) and harms (potentially worse patient outcomes) of supplementary virtual reality training of surgical trainees with limited laparoscopic experience. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Science Citation Index Expanded until July 2012. We included all randomised clinical trials comparing virtual reality training versus other forms of training including box-trainer training, no training, or standard laparoscopic training in surgical trainees with little laparoscopic experience. We also planned to include trials comparing different methods of virtual reality training. We included only trials that assessed the outcomes in people undergoing laparoscopic surgery. Two authors independently identified trials and collected data. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using Review Manager 5 analysis. For each outcome we calculated the mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals based on intention-to-treat analysis. We included eight trials covering 109 surgical trainees with limited laparoscopic experience. Of the eight trials, six compared virtual reality versus no supplementary training. One trial compared virtual reality training versus box-trainer training and versus no supplementary training, and one trial compared

  11. Surgical training in your hands: organising a skills course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnand, Henry; Mutimer, Jon

    2012-12-01

    The advent of simulated surgical skills courses has brought dynamic changes to the traditional approach to acquiring practical skills in surgery. Teaching is a core part of the surgical profession, and any trainee can be involved in the organisation of skills training courses. This paper outlines the importance of organising surgical skills courses for trainees, and provides a practical guide on how to do so within busy clinical environments. The paper examines how to plan a course, how to design the programme, and provides tips on faculty staff requirements, venue, finance and participants, with additional suggestions for assessment and evaluation. We recommend the organisation of skills courses to any trainee. By following key ground rules, the surgical trainee can enable the acquisition of advanced learning opportunities and the ability to demonstrate valuable organisational skills. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  12. Training in surgical oncology - the role of VR simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, T M; Aggarwal, R; Rajaretnam, N; Grantcharov, T P; Darzi, A

    2011-09-01

    There have been dramatic changes in surgical training over the past two decades which have resulted in a number of concerns for the development of future surgeons. Changes in the structure of cancer services, working hour restrictions and a commitment to patient safety has led to a reduction in training opportunities that are available to the surgeon in training. Simulation and in particular virtual reality (VR) simulation has been heralded as an effective adjunct to surgical training. Advances in VR simulation has allowed trainees to practice realistic full length procedures in a safe and controlled environment, where mistakes are permitted and can be used as learning points. There is considerable evidence to demonstrate that the VR simulation can be used to enhance technical skills and improve operating room performance. Future work should focus on the cost effectiveness and predictive validity of VR simulation, which in turn would increase the uptake of simulation and enhance surgical training. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Subspecialist training in surgical gynecological oncology in the nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Sofie L; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B;

    2011-01-01

    To survey the centers that can provide subspecialty surgical training and education in gynecological oncology in the Nordic countries we developed an online questionnaire in cooperation with the Nordic Society of Gynecological Oncology. The link to the survey was mailed to 22 Scandinavian...... gynecological centers in charge of surgical treatment of cancer patients. Twenty centers (91%) participated. Four centers reported to be accredited European subspecialty training centers, a further six were interested in being accredited, and 11 centers were accredited by the respective National Board. Fourteen...... (74%) centers were interested in being listed for exchange of fellows. Our data show a large Nordic potential and interest in improving the gynecologic oncology standards and can be used to enhance the awareness of gynecological oncology training in Scandinavia and to facilitate the exchange...

  14. Digital Curation Education and Training: From Digitization to Graduate Curricula to MOOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen R. Tibbo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces the development of digital and data curation curricula. Due to the brief length of this paper, the focus is on North American initiatives and primarily on continuing education programs. It explores the strengths and weaknesses of professional workshops and the creation of graduate-level courses, certificates, degrees and MOOCs, as well as the role of funding agencies in this process. It concludes with an analysis of what is missing and what is needed to create the workforce required to steward digital assets in the foreseeable future.

  15. BCI-based user training in surgical robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Emidio; Barresi, Giacinto; Mattos, Leonardo S

    2015-08-01

    Human error is a critical risk in surgery, so an important aim of surgical robotic systems is to improve the performance and the safety of surgical operations. Such systems can be potentially enhanced by a brain-computer interface (BCI) able to monitor the user's mental focus and use this information to improve the level of safety of the procedures. In order to evaluate such potential usage of BCIs, this paper describes a novel framework for training the user to regulate his/her own mental state while performing surgery-like tasks using a robotic system. This self-regulation is based on augmented reality (AR) feedback representing the BCI-monitored mental state, which helps the user's effort in maintaining a high level of mental focus during the task. A comparison between a BCI-based training and a training without a BCI highlighted a reduction of post-training trial times as a result of the enhanced training setup, without any loss in performance or in user experience. Such finding allows the identification of further improvements and novel potential applications of this training and interaction paradigm.

  16. Assessment methods in surgical training in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenios Evgeniou

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A career in surgery in the United Kingdom demands a commitment to a long journey of assessment. The assessment methods used must ensure that the appropriate candidates are selected into a programme of study or a job and must guarantee public safety by regulating the progression of surgical trainees and the certification of trained surgeons. This review attempts to analyse the psychometric properties of various assessment methods used in the selection of candidates to medical school, job selection, progression in training, and certification. Validity is an indicator of how well an assessment measures what it is designed to measure. Reliability informs us whether a test is consistent in its outcome by measuring the reproducibility and discriminating ability of the test. In the long journey of assessment in surgical training, the same assessment formats are frequently being used for selection into a programme of study, job selection, progression, and certification. Although similar assessment methods are being used for different purposes in surgical training, the psychometric properties of these assessment methods have not been examined separately for each purpose. Because of the significance of these assessments for trainees and patients, their reliability and validity should be examined thoroughly in every context where the assessment method is being used.

  17. Ultrasound training in surgical residency: Is it feasible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srihari Sridhara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ultrasound training for the surgical residents is not a common practice in India. This study was undertaken to prepare a working model for surgical trainees and assess its effectiveness by training a single surgical resident. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study of 238 patients with pain abdomen. Training was given in abdominal ultrasound for a period of 2 months. Ultrasound scans were performed independently by a radiology resident and surgery resident. Inter-rater agreement between both residents was assessed using Kappa coefficient. Ultrasound results were compared with clinical diagnosis and final diagnosis. Results: The kappa agreement was 0.53, 0.56, 0.8 and 1 for urolithiasis, appendicitis, pancreatitis and urinary tract infection, respectively. Almost all cases of cholelithiasis were identified by the surgery resident. There was improvement of 21%, 31% and 100% in patients of urolithiasis, acute appendicitis and liver abscess, respectively, in the second 10 months of the study. Conclusions: Ultrasound scans can be performed by a surgery resident with similar results as that of a radiology resident. Training of the surgery resident is possible with satisfactory results.

  18. Surgical education and training in an outer metropolitan hospital: a qualitative study of surgical trainers and trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestel, Debra; Harlim, Jennifer; Bryant, Melanie; Rampersad, Rajay; Hunter-Smith, David; Spychal, Bob

    2016-07-14

    The landscape of surgical training is changing. The anticipated increase in the numbers of surgical trainees and the shift to competency-based surgical training places pressures on an already stretched health service. With these pressures in mind, we explored trainers' and trainees' experiences of surgical training in a less traditional rotation, an outer metropolitan hospital. We considered practice-based learning theories to make meaning of surgical training in this setting, in particular Actor-network theory. We adopted a qualitative approach and purposively sampled surgical trainers and trainees to participate in individual interviews and focus groups respectively. Transcripts were made and thematically analysed. Institutional human research ethics approval was obtained. Four surgical trainers and fourteen trainees participated. Almost without exception, participants' report training needs to be well met. Emergent inter-related themes were: learning as social activity; learning and programmatic factors; learning and physical infrastructure; and, learning and organizational structure. This outer metropolitan hospital is suited to the provision of surgical training with the current rotational system for trainees. The setting offers experiences that enable consolidation of learning providing a rich and varied overall surgical training program. Although relational elements of learning were paramount they occurred within a complex environment. Actor-network theory was used to give meaning to emergent themes acknowledging that actors (both people and objects) and their interactions combine to influence training quality, shifting the focus of responsibility for learning away from individuals to the complex interactions in which they work and learn.

  19. Criterion-based (proficiency) training to improve surgical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Marvin P; Kaye, Rachel J; Gibber, Marc J; Jackman, Alexis H; Paskhover, Boris P; Sadoughi, Babak; Schiff, Bradley; Fraioli, Rebecca E; Jacobs, Joseph B

    2012-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate whether training otorhinolaryngology residents to criterion performance levels (proficiency) on the Endoscopic Sinus Surgery Simulator produces individuals whose performance in the operating room is at least equal to those who are trained by performing a fixed number of surgical procedures. DESIGN Prospective cohort. SETTING Two academic medical centers in New York City. PARTICIPANTS Otorhinolaryngology junior residents composed of 8 experimental subjects and 6 control subjects and 6 attending surgeons. INTERVENTION Experimental subjects achieved benchmark proficiency criteria on the Endoscopic Sinus Surgery Simulator; control subjects repeated the surgical procedure twice. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Residents completed validated objective tests to assess baseline abilities. All subjects were videotaped performing an initial standardized surgical procedure. Residents were videotaped performing a final surgery. Videotapes were assessed for metrics by an expert panel. RESULTS Attendings outperformed the residents in most parameters on the initial procedure. Experimental and attending groups outperformed controls in some parameters on the final procedure. There was no difference between resident groups in initial performance, but the experimental subjects outperformed the control subjects in navigation in the final procedure. Most important, there was no difference in final performance between subgroups of the experimental group on the basis of the number of trials needed to attain proficiency. CONCLUSIONS Simulator training can improve resident technical skills so that each individual attains a proficiency level, despite the existence of an intrinsic range of abilities. This proficiency level translates to at least equal, if not superior, operative performance compared with that of current conventional training with finite repetition of live surgical procedures.

  20. University Curricula in Nanoelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik; Nielsen, Ivan Ring

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is having increasing impact on university curricula in electrical engineering. The advent of nanotechnology brings about new possibilities in nanoelectronics, including increasingly complex systems on chip, sophisticated technology fusion between electronic devices and non-electron...... examples of state-of-the-art curricula from major European universities are described. The possibilities for sharing of teaching material through the web via the EC-sponsored EuroTraining program is described....

  1. Comparison of expert instruction and computer-based video training in teaching fundamental surgical skills to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nousiainen, Markku; Brydges, Ryan; Backstein, David; Dubrowski, Adam

    2008-04-01

    Practice using computer-based video instruction (CBVI) leads to improvements in surgical skills proficiency. This study investigated the benefits of the introduction of (a) learner-directed, interactive video training and (b) the addition of expert instruction on the learning and retention of the basic surgical skills of suturing and knot-tying in medical students. Using bench models, students were pre-tested on a suturing and knot-tying skill after viewing an instructional video. The students were then randomly assigned to three practice conditions: self-study with video; self-study with interactive video; or the combination of self-study with interactive video with the addition of subsequent expert instruction. All participants underwent 18 trials of practice in their assigned training condition. The effectiveness of training was assessed by an immediate post-test and a retention test one month later. Performance was evaluated using expert- and computer-based assessments. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA. There were no differences in expert- and computer-based assessments between groups at pre-test. Although all three groups demonstrated significant improvements on both measures between the pre- and post-tests as well as between pre-tests and retention-tests (P instruction nor the addition of self-directed interaction with video leads to further improvements in skill development or retention. These findings further support the possible implementation of CBVI within surgical skills curricula.

  2. E-learning in surgical education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larvin, Mike

    2009-03-01

    For most surgeons and surgical educators, e-learning is relatively new and confusing. This article attempts to explain the key concepts behind e-learning, as well as its benefits and risks. E-learning has become a fixed feature within Higher and Professional Education and has been prioritized by Universities around the world, as well as all six Surgical Royal Colleges. Trainees have grown up with virtual learning environments and expect similar provision for their postgraduate studies, but have a greater need for basic science learning. Dispersal of trainees across duty rotas and geographically makes e-learning more attractive, but preserving peer and trainer communication is as important as content. Recent changes in surgical education and training have also made electronic and distance learning more attractive than previously. Initial work by the Colleges is now being evaluated and important lessons have emerged. The UK Department of Health has made medical e-learning a priority and it is now the largest e-learning provider in Europe. Changes in the World Wide Web, with a shift to more social-networking activity in education and to web-based delivery to small, ubiquitous portable devices will increase opportunities for surgical e-learning.

  3. Flexibility in individualized, competency-based workplace curricula with EPAs: Analyzing four cohorts of physician assistants in training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Fraukje; Berkvens, Josephine; Ten Cate, Olle

    2017-05-01

    Entrustable professional activities (EPAs) were introduced as a principle for individualized physician assistant (PA) workplace curricula at the University of Applied Sciences (UAS) Utrecht in 2008. We studied how the focus on EPAs served the competency-based flexibility intention of the program. We analyzed data of those 119 students who enrolled in the program 2010 through 2013, and completed the program before April 2016. We analyzed the number of EPAs per student at start and end of the program, number changed during training and the reasons for change. Data of 101 students were suitable for evaluation. Excluded were 16 students ending the program prematurely and two with study delay. Mean number of EPAs per student at the start was 6.8 (range 4-12) and at the end 6.6 (range 3-13). On average 1.5 EPAs were altered (range 0-13). Reasons included extension of the EPA package during training (n = 10), lack of proficiency at planned moments of summative entrustment decisions (n = 9) and procedures not being suitable for PAs at closer look (n = 6). All changes resulted in a curriculum meeting the school's standards for graduation. The flexibility of the EPA concept enabled changes in the individualized curriculum of students, according to the intended competency-based nature of the educational program.

  4. Getting lost in translation? Workplace based assessments in surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Jason M

    2013-10-01

    Workplace based assessments (WBA) are integral to the competence-based surgical training curriculum that currently exists in the UK. The GMC emphasise the value of WBA's as assessments for learning (formative), rather than as assessments of learning (summative). Current implementation of WBA's in the workplace though, is at odds with their intended use, with the formative functions often being overlooked in favour of the summative, as exemplified by the recent announcement that trainees are required to complete a minimum of 40 WBA's a year, an increase from 24. Even before this increase, trainees viewed WBA's as tick-box exercises that negatively impact upon training opportunities. As a result, the tools are commonly misused, often because both trainees and trainers lack understanding of the benefits of full engagement with the formative learning opportunities afforded by WBA's. To aid the transition in mind-set of trainees and trainers to the purpose of assessment in the workplace, the GMC propose the introduction of 'supervised learning events' and 'assessments of performance' to supersede 'WBA's'. The impact of this change and how these will be integrated into surgical training is yet to be seen, but is likely to be a step in the right direction.

  5. Consultant outcomes publication and surgical training: Consensus recommendations by the association of surgeons in training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Helen M; Gokani, Vimal J; Williams, Adam P; Harries, Rhiannon L

    2016-11-01

    Consultant Outcomes Publication (COP) has the longest history in cardiothoracic surgery, where it was introduced in 2005. Subsequently COP has been broadened to include all surgical specialties in NHS England in 2013-14. The Association of Surgeons in Training (ASiT) fully supports efforts to improve patient care and trust in the profession and is keen to overcome potential unintended adverse effects of COP. Identification of these adverse effects is the first step in this process: Firstly, there is a risk that COP may lead to reluctance by consultants to provide trainees with the necessary appropriate primary operator experience to become skilled consultant surgeons for the future. Secondly, COP may lead to inappropriately cautious case selection. This adjusted case mix affects both patients who are denied operations, and also limits the complexity of the case mix to which surgical trainees are exposed. Thirdly, COP undermines efforts to train surgical trainees in non-technical skills and human factors, simply obliterating the critical role of the multidisciplinary team and organisational processes in determining outcomes. This tunnel vision masks opportunities to improve patient care and outcomes at a unit level. It also misinforms the public as to the root causes of adverse events by failing to identify care process deficiencies. Finally, for safe surgical care, graduate retention and morale is important - COP may lead to high calibre trainees opting out of surgical careers, or opting to work abroad. The negative effects of COP on surgical training and trainees must be addressed as high quality surgical training and retention of high calibre graduates is essential for excellent patient care. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Developing Graduate Curricula Faithful to Professional Training and a Christian Worldview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauf-Grounds, Claudia; Edwards, Scott; Macdonald, Don; Quek, Karen Mui-Teng; Sellers, Tina Schermer

    2009-01-01

    Trends in Christian higher education indicate a growing interest in professional training programs that take Christian faith commitments and values seriously. This article explores one professional graduate program with secondary accreditation that attempts to be faithful to a Christian worldview while at the same time honoring the developments…

  7. The non-medical workforce and its role in surgical training: Consensus recommendations by the Association of Surgeons in Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokani, Vimal J; Peckham-Cooper, Adam; Bunting, David; Beamish, Andrew J; Williams, Adam; Harries, Rhiannon L

    2016-11-01

    Changes in the delivery of the healthcare structure have led to the expansion of the non-medical workforce (NMW). The non-medical practitioner in surgery (a healthcare professional without a medical degree who undertakes specialist training) is a valuable addition to a surgical firm. However, there are a number of challenges regarding the successful widespread implementation of this role. This paper outlines a number of these concerns, and makes recommendations to aid the realisation of the non-medical practitioner as a normal part of the surgical team. In summary, the Association of Surgeons in Training welcomes the development of the non-medical workforce as part of the surgical team in order to promote enhanced patient care and improved surgical training opportunities. However, establishing a workforce of independent/semi-independent practitioners who compete for the same training opportunities as surgeons in training may threaten the UK surgical training system, and therefore the care of our future patients.

  8. Internationalizing curricula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jos Walenkamp; Andreas Funk; Joyce den Heijer; Anneke Schuurmans-Brouwer

    2014-01-01

    Internationalizing curricula. Needs and wishes of alumni and employers with regard to international competencies. Internationalization has become of great importance for universities acrossthe globe. The labour market is becoming international, with internationalopportunities and international

  9. Are doctor of pharmacy curricula in developing countries adequate to train graduates to provide pharmaceutical care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingam Peraman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD program is a new dimension of pharmacy education in developing countries. The PharmD graduates are expected to participate in patient health care by providing pharmaceutical care. The graduates should have enough necessary clinical knowledge, competitiveness and skills in community, hospital and clinical pharmacy related services. There is a need of curriculum that fit into the program outcome that helps to attain graduate competency. Programs in India, Pakistan, Iran and Nepal were reviewed based on the available literature. Even though it is evident that the PharmD curriculum in developing countries has made an attempt to provide patient-oriented approach for pharmacists, the existing curriculum, training and orientation have several pitfalls. It needs assessment, evaluation and improvement.

  10. Technical and Vocational Education and Training - Curricula Reform Demand in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruque A. Haolader

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This case study investigates the Diploma-in-Engineering (Electronics Technology curriculum in Bangladesh. It includes student assessment approach and learning/ teaching outcomes, and compares them with Germany’s initial vocational training in the Dual System. The required data was collected through a selfdesigned test and a questionnaire. The test measured mainly students’ technical competencies, particularly in the case of practical relevant tasks. Both quantitative and qualitative methodologies were used to analyze the data. A comparison between the polytechnic students and vocational school trainees in Germany at different cognitive levels was made. The findings show that the polytechnic students in Bangladesh perform poorly. It was found that the differences in the categories of Apply and Understand were bigger than the difference in the category of Remember. Furthermore, this study investigated and found that the student assessment approaches in Bangladesh and Germany differ greatly regarding their theoretical requirements and practical relevance. The Diploma curriculum mainly focuses on theoretical matters. Germany’s learning field based curriculum in vocational schools focuses on practice oriented learning and teaching, and fosters the trainees’ knowledge transfer capability. The current TVET reform in Bangladesh that introduces CBTandA, among others, may address these issues and help Bangladeshi TVET graduates to compete in an international labour market.

  11. National trends in minimally invasive and open operative experience of graduating general surgery residents: implications for surgical skills curricula development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Jeffrey S; Smith, Lynette; Are, Madhuri; Edney, James; Azarow, Kenneth; Mercer, David W; Thompson, Jon S; Are, Chandrakanth

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze national trends in minimally invasive and open cases of all graduating residents in general surgery. A retrospective analysis was performed on data obtained from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education logs (1999-2008) of graduating residents from all US general surgery residency programs. Data were analyzed using Mantel-Haenszel χ(2) tests and the Bonferroni adjustment to detect trends in the number of minimally invasive and open cases. Minimally invasive procedures accounted for an increasing proportion of cases performed (3.7% to 11.1%, P pediatric surgery (P surgery residents in the United States are performing a greater number of minimally invasive and fewer open procedures for common surgical conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Accelerating surgical training and reducing the burden of surgical disease in Haiti before and after the earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGennaro, Vincent A; DeGennaro, Vincent A; Kochhar, Amit; Nathan, Nirmal; Low, Christopher; Avashia, Yash J; Thaller, Seth R

    2012-11-01

    In general, university-based global health initiatives have tended to focus on expanding access to primary care. In the past, surgical programs may have been characterized by sporadic participation with little educational focus. However, there have been some notable exceptions with plastic surgery volunteer missions. We offer another model of regularly scheduled surgical trips to rural Haiti in plastic and general surgery. The goal of these trips is to reduce the burden of surgical disease and ultimately repair every cleft lip/palate in Haiti. Another principal objective is to accelerate the training of American residents through increased case load and personal interaction with attending surgeons in a concentrated period. Diversity of the case load and the overall number of surgeries performed by residents in a typical surgical trip outpaces the experiences available during a typical week in an American hospital setting. More importantly, we continue to provide ongoing training to Haitian nurses and surgeons in surgical techniques and postoperative care. Our postoperative complication rate has been relatively low. Our follow-up rates have been lower than 70% despite intensive attempts to maintain continued communication with our patients. Through our experiences in surgical care in rural Haiti, we were able to quickly ramp up our trauma and orthopedic surgical care immediately after the earthquake. Project Medishare and the University of Miami continue to operate a trauma and acute care hospital in Port au Prince. The hospital provides ongoing orthopedic, trauma, and neurosurgical expertise from the rotating teams of American surgeons and training of Haitian surgeons in modern surgical techniques. We believe that surgical residencies in the United States can improve their training programs and reduce global surgical burden of disease through consistent trips and working closely with country partners.

  13. Supply versus demand: a review of application trends to Canadian surgical training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ryan E; Wanzel, Kyle R

    2015-04-01

    Despite increases in medical school enrolment, applications to surgical residency programs in Canada have been in decline over the past decade, with an increasing number of unmatched surgical residency positions. We examined the current status of surgical residency in Canada and analyzed application trends (2002–2013) for surgical training programs across Canada. Our findings suggest that most undergraduate medical schools across Canada are having difficulty fostering interest in surgical careers. We propose that a lack of adequate early exposure to the surgical specialties during undergraduate training is a critical factor. Moving forward, we must examine how the best-performing institutions and surgical programs have maintained interest in pursuing surgical careers and adapt our recruitment methods to both maintain and grow future interest. As Mary Engelbreit said, "If you don't like something, change it; if you can't change it, change the way you think about it."

  14. Medical students’ skills in image interpretation before and after training: A comparison between 3rd-year and 6th-year students from two different medical curricula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sendra-Portero, Francisco, E-mail: sendra@uma.es [Departamento de Radiología y Medicina Física, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Málaga, Boulevar Louis Pasteur, 32, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Torales-Chaparro, Oscar E., E-mail: oetjft@terra.es [Departamento de Radiología y Medicina Física, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Málaga, Boulevar Louis Pasteur, 32, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Ruiz-Gómez, Miguel J., E-mail: mjrg@uma.es [Departamento de Radiología y Medicina Física, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Málaga, Boulevar Louis Pasteur, 32, 29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess student's performance in the interpretation of images before and after training in radiology, by comparing two groups, 6th-year and 3rd-year students, from two different medical curricula. Students participated in an anonymous evaluation consisting of the interpretation of 12 radiological images accompanied with the salient history and clinical data by answering 60 open-ended questions about technique, anatomy, semiology, and clinics. The number of correct, incorrect and blank responses of each group was used to compare pre- and post-training results. Unpaired two-sample t-test was used to evaluate differences between groups. A significant increase in correct responses was found in both groups after training. The comparison between both groups did not show differences for incorrect answers of the whole test and correct answers about anatomy in the pre-training evaluation. The percentage of correct answers to the median question improved from 15.5% to 53.3% for 6th-year students and from 8.3% to 41.1% for 3rd-year students. The post-training evaluation showed a significant increase of correct answers of 6th-year students with respect to 3rd-year students (mean ± standard deviation 53.6 ± 31.3% and 38.7 ± 29.9% respectively), mainly due to differences in technical and clinical questions. This study provides objective and quantitative evidence of pre- and post-training student skills in image interpretation. The similarities found in the previous level of knowledge and skills of both groups emphasizes the suitable change of the first-time training in radiology, from the 6th to the 3rd year course in medical curricula.

  15. The Training of Physical-Education Teachers in France and China: A Comparative Analysis of Curricula and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriamampianina, Pierre; Moussa, Azzedine SI

    2005-01-01

    This study in comparative physical education examines the curricula followed by physical-education teachers in China and France. It explores how theories of physical education and sport in each country have developed out of specific political, cultural and educational contexts, yet resulted in strong similarities in terms of the priority given to…

  16. Nutritional risk and status of surgical patients; the relevance of nutrition training of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, C; Lavinhas, C; Fernandes, L; Camilo, Ma; Ravasco, P

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of undernutrition among surgical patients is thought to be high, and negatively influencing outcomes. However, recent evidence shows the increase of overweight/obesity in hospitalised patients. A pilot cross-sectional study was conducted in 50 patients of a Surgical Department of the University Hospital of Santa Maria (CHLN) that aimed: 1) to assess nutritional risk and status through validated methods; 2) to explore the presence of overweight/obesity; 3) to evaluate the prevalence of metabolic risk associated with obesity. Nutritional risk was assessed by Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), nutritional status by Body Mass Index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), & Subjective Global Assessment (SGA). Statistical significance was set for p nutrition discipline in the medical curricula, limits the multiprofessional management and a better understanding of the more adequate approaches to these patients. Further, the change in the clinical scenario argues for more studies to clarify the prevalence and consequences of sarcopenic obesity in surgical patients.

  17. Training or non-surgical factors-what determines a good surgical performance? A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindlohr, Cornelia; Lefering, R; Saad, S; Heiss, M M; Pape-Köhler, C

    2017-06-01

    Acquiring laparoscopic skills is a necessity for every young surgeon. Whether it is a talent or a non-surgical skill that determines the surgical performance of an endoscopic operation has been discussed for years. In other disciplines aptitude testing has become the norm. Airlines, for example, have implemented assessments to test the natural aptitude of future pilots to predict their performance later on. In the medical field, especially surgery, there are no similar comparable tests implemented or even available. This study investigates the influence of potential factors that may predict the successful performance of a complex laparoscopic operation, such as the surgeon's age, gender or learning method. This study focussed 70 surgical trainees. It was designed as a secondary analysis of data derived from a 2 × 2 factorial randomised controlled trial of practical training and/or multimedia training (four groups) in an experimental exercise. Both before and then after the training sessions, the participating trainees performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a pelvitrainer. Surgical performance was then evaluated using a modified objective structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS). Participants were classified as 'Skilled' (high score in the pre-test), 'Good Learner' (increase from pre- to post-test) or 'Others' based on the OSATS results. Based on the results of the recorded performance, the training methods as well as non-surgical skills were eventually evaluated in a univariate and in a multivariate analysis. In the pre-training performance 11 candidates were categorised as 'Skilled' (15.7%), 35 participants as 'Good Learners' (50.0%) and 24 participants were classified as 'Others'. The univariate analysis showed that the age, a residency in visceral surgery, and participation in a multimedia training were significantly associated with this grouping. Multivariate analyses revealed that residency in visceral surgery was the most predictive factor

  18. Supply and demand mismatch for flexible (part-time) surgical training in Australasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Rachel E; Jeeves, Amy E; Vasey, Carolyn E; Wright, Deborah M; O'Grady, Gregory

    2013-05-06

    To define current patterns of flexible (part-time) surgical training in Australasia, determine supply and demand for part-time positions, and identify work-related factors motivating interest in flexible training. All Royal Australasian College of Surgeons trainees (n = 1191) were surveyed in 2010. Questions assessed demographic characteristics and working patterns, interest in flexible training, work-related fatigue and work-life balance preferences. Interest in part-time training, and work-related factors motivating this interest. Of the 1191 trainees, 659 responded (response rate, 55.3%). Respondents were representative of all trainees in terms of specialty and sex. The median age of respondents was 32 2013s, and 187 (28.4%) were female. Most of the 659 respondents (627, 95.1%) were in full-time clinical training; only two (0.3%) were in part-time clinical training, and 30 (4.6%) were not in active clinical training. An interest in part-time training was reported by 208 respondents (31.6%; 54.3% of women v 25.9% of men; P work and limited their social or family life, and that they had insufficient time in life for things outside surgical training, including study or research (P flexible surgical training and the number of trainees currently in part-time training positions in Australia and New Zealand. Efforts are needed to facilitate part-time surgical training.

  19. Systematic review of serious games for medical education and surgical skills training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, M.; Schraagen, J.M.C.; Schijven, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The application of digital games for training medical professionals is on the rise. So-called ‘serious’ games form training tools that provide a challenging simulated environment, ideal for future surgical training. Ultimately, serious games are directed at reducing medical error and sub

  20. Systematic review of serious games for medical education and surgical skills training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, M.; Schraagen, J.M.C.; Schijven, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The application of digital games for training medical professionals is on the rise. So-called ‘serious’ games form training tools that provide a challenging simulated environment, ideal for future surgical training. Ultimately, serious games are directed at reducing medical error and sub

  1. Team Training (Training at Own Facility) versus Individual Surgeon’s Training (Training at Trainer’s Facility) When Implementing a New Surgical Technique:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Andresen, Kristoffer; Laursen, Jannie

    2014-01-01

    Background. When implementing a new surgical technique, the best method for didactic learning has not been settled. There are basically two scenarios: the trainee goes to the teacher's clinic and learns the new technique hands-on, or the teacher goes to the trainee's clinic and performs the teach......Background. When implementing a new surgical technique, the best method for didactic learning has not been settled. There are basically two scenarios: the trainee goes to the teacher's clinic and learns the new technique hands-on, or the teacher goes to the trainee's clinic and performs...... these issues on a discussion of barriers for adoption of the new ONSTEP technique for inguinal hernia repair after initial training. Results and Conclusions. The optimal training method would include moving the teacher to the trainee's department to obtain team-training effects simultaneous with surgical...

  2. Electronic health record training in undergraduate medical education: bridging theory to practice with curricula for empowering patient- and relationship-centered care in the computerized setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Hedy S; George, Paul; Reis, Shmuel P; Taylor, Julie Scott

    2014-03-01

    While electronic health record (EHR) use is becoming state-of-the-art, deliberate teaching of health care information technology (HCIT) competencies is not keeping pace with burgeoning use. Medical students require training to become skilled users of HCIT, but formal pedagogy within undergraduate medical education (UME) is sparse. How can medical educators best meet the needs of learners while integrating EHRs into medical education and practice? How can they help learners preserve and foster effective communication skills within the computerized setting? In general, how can UME curricula be devised for skilled use of EHRs to enhance rather than hinder provision of effective, humanistic health care?Within this Perspective, the authors build on recent publications that "set the stage" for next steps: EHR curricula innovation and implementation as concrete embodiments of theoretical underpinnings. They elaborate on previous calls for maximizing benefits and minimizing risks of EHR use with sufficient focus on physician-patient communication skills and for developing core competencies within medical education. The authors describe bridging theory into practice with systematic longitudinal curriculum development for EHR training in UME at their institution, informed by Kern and colleagues' curriculum development framework, narrative medicine, and reflective practice. They consider this innovation within a broader perspective-the overarching goal of empowering undergraduate medical students' patient- and relationship-centered skills while effectively demonstrating HCIT-related skills.

  3. Basic surgical training in Ireland: the impact of operative experience, training program allocation and mentorship on trainee satisfaction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, K E

    2013-12-01

    Application to the Irish basic surgical training (BST) program in Ireland has decreased progressively over the past 5 years. We hypothesised that this decline was secondary to dissatisfaction with training correlated with reduced operative experience and lack of mentorship among BSTs.

  4. Application and evaluation of improved surgical aseptic technique curriculum in specialty nurse training in Henan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Bai

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Novel surgical aseptic technique and application in the curriculum design of training for OR nurses should be developed to enhance their mastery of theoretical and practical skills and to modify their behaviors.

  5. Training models in laparoscopy: a systematic review comparing their effectiveness in learning surgical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willaert, W; Van De Putte, D; Van Renterghem, K; Van Nieuwenhove, Y; Ceelen, W; Pattyn, P

    2013-01-01

    Surgery has traditionally been learned on patients in the operating room, which is time-consuming, can have an impact on the patient outcomes, and is of variable effectiveness. As a result, surgical training models have been developed, which are compared in this systematic review. We searched Pubmed, CENTRAL, and Science Citation index expanded for randomised clinical trials and randomised cross-over studies comparing laparoscopic training models. Studies comparing one model with no training were also included. The reference list of identified trials was searched for further relevant studies. Fifty-eight trials evaluating several training forms and involving 1591 participants were included (four studies with a low risk of bias). Training (virtual reality (VR) or video trainer (VT)) versus no training improves surgical skills in the majority of trials. Both VR and VT are as effective in most studies. VR training is superior to traditional laparoscopic training in the operating room. Outcome results for VR robotic simulations versus robot training show no clear difference in effectiveness for either model. Only one trial included human cadavers and observed better results versus VR for one out of four scores. Contrasting results are observed when robotic technology is compared with manual laparoscopy. VR training and VT training are valid teaching models. Practicing on these models similarly improves surgical skills. A combination of both methods is recommended in a surgical curriculum. VR training is superior to unstructured traditional training in the operating room. The reciprocal effectiveness of the other models to learn surgical skills has not yet been established.

  6. Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgical Simulation Training Curriculum: Transfer Reliability and Maintenance of Skill Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, John C; Belmont, Philip J; Lanzi, Joseph; Martin, Kevin; Bader, Julia; Owens, Brett; Waterman, Brian R

    2015-01-01

    Surgical education is evolving as work hour constraints limit the exposure of residents to the operating room. Potential consequences may include erosion of resident education and decreased quality of patient care. Surgical simulation training has become a focus of study in an effort to counter these challenges. Previous studies have validated the use of arthroscopic surgical simulation programs both in vitro and in vivo. However, no study has examined if the gains made by residents after a simulation program are retained after a period away from training. In all, 17 orthopedic surgery residents were randomized into simulation or standard practice groups. All subjects were oriented to the arthroscopic simulator, a 14-point anatomic checklist, and Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET). The experimental group received 1 hour of simulation training whereas the control group had no additional training. All subjects performed a recorded, diagnostic arthroscopy intraoperatively. These videos were scored by 2 blinded, fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons and outcome measures were compared within and between the groups. After 1 year in which neither group had exposure to surgical simulation training, all residents were retested intraoperatively and scored in the exact same fashion. Individual surgical case logs were reviewed and surgical case volume was documented. There was no difference between the 2 groups after initial simulation testing and there was no correlation between case volume and initial scores. After training, the simulation group improved as compared with baseline in mean ASSET (p = 0.023) and mean time to completion (p = 0.01). After 1 year, there was no difference between the groups in any outcome measurements. Although individual technical skills can be cultivated with surgical simulation training, these advancements can be lost without continued education. It is imperative that residency programs implement a simulation curriculum and

  7. Optimising surgical training: use of feedback to reduce errors during a simulated surgical procedure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, Emily

    2011-08-01

    To assess the effect of proximate or immediate feedback during an intensive training session. The authors hypothesised that provision of feedback during a training session would improve performance and learning curves.

  8. Appraisal of face and content validity of a serious game improving situational awareness in surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graafland, Maurits; Bemelman, Willem A; Schijven, Marlies P

    2015-01-01

    Equipment-related malfunctions during minimally invasive surgery (MIS) are common and threaten patient safety. As they occur in the periphery of the surgeon's vision, the surgical team requires a high level of situational awareness in order to intercept these errors timely. A serious game has been developed to train surgical residents to deal with equipment-related errors. This study investigates to what extent surgical educators and trainees would accept a serious game as a training method. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 45 surgeons, surgical residents, and medical students who played the serious game at a scientific convention. The questionnaire contained statements on perceived realism, usefulness, teaching capability, user experience and application toward surgical training. RESULTS were analyzed according to participants' MIS experience ("expert," "intermediate," and "novice"). The majority found that important medical constructs are represented realistically (64.4%-88.9%) and indicated the game to be particularly useful for training operating room nurses and surgical residents (75%-86%). Both educators and trainees found the game to be useful for surgical training (53%). Serious gaming was viewed as positive (78%) and challenging (60%), and 66% would play the game in their leisure time. Licensed surgeons perceived the game more frequently as boring than the intermediate-level and trainee groups (23.5% versus 6.7% and 8.3%; P=.045). This is the first study to show acceptance of a serious game as a training format in surgical training by educators and trainees. Future research should investigate whether the serious game indeed improves problem-solving and situational awareness in the operating room.

  9. Digital video recordings for training, assessment, and revalidation of surgical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambadauro, Pietro; Magos, Adam

    2010-10-01

    Surgical training is undergoing drastic changes, and new strategies should be adopted to keep quality standards. The authors review and advocate the use of surgical recordings as a useful complement to current training, assessment, and revalidation modalities. For trainees, such recordings would promote quality-based and competence-based surgical training and allow for self-evaluation. Video logbooks could be used to aid interaction between trainer and trainee, and facilitate formative assessment. Recordings of surgery could also be integrated into trainees' portfolios and regular assessments. Finally, such recordings could make surgeons' revalidation more sensible. The routine use of records of surgical procedures could become an integral component of the standard of care. This would have been an unattractive suggestion until recently, as analogue recording techniques are inconvenient, cumbersome, and time consuming. Today, however, with the advent of inexpensive digital technologies, such a concept is realistic and is likely to improve patient care.

  10. Building a Generation of Physician Advocates: The Case for Including Mandatory Training in Advocacy in Canadian Medical School Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhate, Tahara D; Loh, Lawrence C

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing focus on the social accountability of physicians as individuals, and of medicine itself. This has led to increasing emphasis on physician advocacy from a wide variety of institutions. The physician advocacy concept is now part of the Health Advocacy competency mandated by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Despite its growing prominence, physician advocacy remains poorly integrated into current medical undergraduate curricula. The authors recommend how and why curricular reform should proceed; they focus on Canadian medical education, although they hope their views will be useful in other countries as well.The authors discuss conflicting definitions of physician advocacy, which have previously hampered curriculum development efforts, and suggest a way of reconciling the conflicts. They review current gaps in advocacy-related curricula, suggest that these can be addressed by incorporating practice-based and skills acquisition elements into current didactic teaching, and offer several strategies by which an advocacy curriculum could be implemented, ranging from small modifications to current curriculum to developing new competencies in medical education nationally.The authors present a case for making an advocacy curriculum mandatory for every Canadian medical trainee; they argue that teaching trainees how to fulfill their professional responsibility to advocate may also help them meet the social accountability mandate of medical school education. Finally, the authors explain why making the development and implementation of a mandatory, skill-based curriculum in advocacy should be a priority.

  11. Electromyographic correlates of learning during robotic surgical training in virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Irene H; Mukherjee, Mukul; Schrack, Ryan; Park, Shi-Hyun; Chien, Jung-Hung; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Siu, Ka-Chun

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the muscle activation and the muscle frequency response of the dominant arm muscles (flexor carpi radialis and extensor digitorum) and hand muscles (abductor pollicis and first dorsal interosseous) during robotic surgical skills training in a virtual environment. The virtual surgical training tasks consisted of bimanual carrying, needle passing and mesh alignment. The experimental group (n=5) was trained by performing four blocks of the virtual surgical tasks using the da Vinci™ surgical robot. During the pre- and post-training tests, all subjects were tested by performing a suturing task on a "life-like" suture pad. The control group (n=5) performed only the suturing task without any virtual task training. Differences between pre- and post-training tests were significantly greater in the virtual reality group, as compared to the control group in the muscle activation of the hand muscle (abductor pollicis) for both the suture tying and the suture running (pvirtual reality leads to specific changes in neuromotor control of robotic surgical tasks.

  12. Surgical residency training in the mission setting: current status and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Smith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery has traditionally been an important aspect of services offered by mission hospitals, but only in the last 20 years has surgical residency training been incorporated into the mission hospital setting. A working group of surgical educators met in conjunction with the Global Missions Health Conference in November 2015 and discussed the current status of surgical training in the mission setting. This paper outlines the current status and makes recommendations for mission groups who are contemplating starting a residency training program. Potential difficulties and the importance of regional recognition of the program are discussed. The work group felt that it was important to include a strong spiritual emphasis as part of the training. Future directions and the concern about employment opportunities are explored.

  13. Some Observations on Veterinary Undergraduate Training in Surgical Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittick, William G.

    1978-01-01

    The undergraduate surgery course of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Universiti Pertanian Malaysia, is described with focus on its experential method of teaching surgical techniques. Also discussed are the benefits of veterinary school cooperation with a large city Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA). (JMD)

  14. Gynaecological surgical training in the operating room : an exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Houwen, Clasien; Boor, Klarke; Essed, Gerard G. M.; Boendermaker, Peter M.; Scherpbier, Albert A. J. J. A.; Scheele, Fedde

    2011-01-01

    Objective: One of the challenging goals of gynaecological education is preparing trainees for independent practice of surgery. Research, however, on how to acquire surgical skills in the operating room safely, effectively and efficiently is scarce. We performed this study to explore trainers' and tr

  15. Development of laparoscopic skills in Medical students naive to surgical training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalini, Worens Luiz Pereira; Claus, Christiano Marlo Paggi; Dimbarre, Daniellson; Cury, Antonio Moris; Bonin, Eduardo Aimoré; Loureiro, Marcelo de Paula; Salvalaggio, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the acquisition of basic laparoscopic skills of Medical students trained on a surgical simulator. Methods First- and second-year Medical students participated on a laparoscopic training program on simulators. None of the students had previous classes of surgical technique, exposure to surgical practice nor training prior to the enrollment in to the study. Students´ time were collected before and after the 150-minute training. Skill acquisition was measured comparing time and scores of students and senior instructors of laparoscopic surgery Results Sixty-eight students participated of the study, with a mean age of 20.4 years, with a predominance of first-year students (62%). All students improved performance in score and time, after training (p<0,001). Score improvement in the exercises ranged from 294.1 to 823%. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified that second-year Medical students have achieved higher performance after training. Conclusions Medical students who had never been exposed to surgical techniques can acquire basic laparoscopic skills after training in simulators. Second-year undergraduates had better performance than first-year students. PMID:25628198

  16. European Working Time Directive: implications for surgical training.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donohoe, C L

    2010-02-01

    The forthcoming implementation of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) for non-consultant hospital doctors (NCHDs) poses a number of challenges in the areas of patient care, training, service provision and quality of life for workers. Surgery, as a craft-based speciality, will face a greater impact on training of future surgeons as operating time could be lost to service provision. The EWTD acts a stimulus for reform of current working practices and re-configuration of services. It will necessitate transformation of the way in which surgeons are trained, if current standards are to be maintained.

  17. The Relationship of Endoscopic Proficiency to Educational Expense for Virtual Reality Simulator Training Amongst Surgical Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raque, Jessica; Goble, Adam; Jones, Veronica M; Waldman, Lindsey E; Sutton, Erica

    2015-07-01

    With the introduction of Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery, training methods in flexible endoscopy are being augmented with simulation-based curricula. The investment for virtual reality simulators warrants further research into its training advantage. Trainees were randomized into bedside or simulator training groups (BED vs SIM). SIM participated in a proficiency-based virtual reality curriculum. Trainees' endoscopic skills were rated using the Global Assessment of Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Skills (GAGES) in the patient care setting. The number of cases to reach 90 per cent of the maximum GAGES score and calculated costs of training were compared. Nineteen residents participated in the study. There was no difference in the average number of cases required to achieve 90 per cent of the maximum GAGES score for esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 13 (SIM) versus11 (BED) (P = 0.63), or colonoscopy 21 (SIM) versus 4 (BED) (P = 0.34). The average per case cost of training for esophagogastroduodenoscopy was $35.98 (SIM) versus $39.71 (BED) (P = 0.50), not including the depreciation costs associated with the simulator ($715.00 per resident over six years). Use of a simulator appeared to increase the cost of training without accelerating the learning curve or decreasing faculty time spent in instruction. The importance of simulation in endoscopy training will be predicated on more cost-effective simulators.

  18. Virtual vitreoretinal surgery: construction of a training programme on the Eyesi Surgical Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Vestergaard, Anders Højslet; Grauslund, Jakob

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the construct validity of a full virtual reality vitreoretinal training program at the Eyesi Surgical simulator. Design and methods: A virtual vitreoretinal training program was composed on the Eyesi Surgical simulator, software version 2.9.2 (VRmagic...... GmbH, Manheim, Germany). It was completed twice by three groups: Group 1: Twenty medical students Group 2: Ten ophthalmology residents Group 3: Five vitreoretinal surgeons The program consisted of six training modules (Figure 1): Navigation level 2 (Nav2) Forceps Training level 5 (ForT5) Bimanual...... Training level 3 (BimT3) Laser Coagulation level 3 (LasC3) Posterior Hyaloid level 3 (PostH3) Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling level 3 (ILMP3). Construct validity for a module was obtained if the median score for Group 3 was higher than for Group 2, which in turn was higher than for Group 1.This...

  19. Activity analysis: measurement of the effectiveness of surgical training and operative technique.

    OpenAIRE

    Shepherd, J P; Brickley, M.

    1992-01-01

    All surgical procedures are characterised by a sequence of steps and instrument changes. Although surgical efficiency and training in operative technique closely relate to this process, few studies have attempted to analyse it quantitatively. Because efficiency is particularly important in day surgery and lower third molar removal is a high-volume procedure, the need for which is responsible for particularly long waiting-lists in almost all UK health regions, this operation was selected for e...

  20. Librarians in Evidence-Based Medicine Curricula: A Qualitative Study of Librarian Roles, Training, and Desires for Future Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Lauren A; Durieux, Nancy; Tannery, Nancy H

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to describe librarians' roles in evidence-based medicine (EBM) from the librarian perspective, identify how librarians are trained to teach, and highlight preferences for professional development. A multiinstitution qualitative study was conducted. Nine medical librarians identified by their faculty as integrated into EBM training were interviewed. Participants' descriptions indicated that they were active in curriculum development, deployment (including teaching activities), and assessment to support EBM. Participants identified direct experience and workshop participation as primary methods of learning to teach. Participants desired continuing development as teachers and requested opportunities for in-person workshops, shadowing physicians, and online training.

  1. Role and feasibility of psychomotor and dexterity testing in selection for surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Anthony G; Leonard, Gerald; Traynor, Oscar J

    2009-03-01

    The practice of Surgery has undergone major changes in the past 20 years and this is likely to continue. Knowledge, judgement and good technical skills will no longer be enough to safely practice surgery and interventional procedures. Fundamental abilities (e.g. psychomotor skills, visuospatial ability and depth perception) are critically important for catheter-based interventions, NOTES, robotic surgery and other procedural interventions of the future. Not all individuals possess the same amount of these innate fundamental abilities and those less endowed are likely to struggle during surgical training and thereafter in surgical practice. In contrast to other high-skill professions/industries (e.g. aviation) we do not have a tradition of testing prospective surgical trainees for abilities/attributes that we now recognize as being important for surgical practice. Instead, we continue to rely on surrogate markers of future potential (e.g. academic record). However, many studies have shown that psychomotor ability is an important predictor of both learning rate and performance for complex laparoscopic tasks. Psychomotor skills, visuospatial ability and depth perception can all be tested objectively by validated tests. At the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, all short-listed candidates for Higher Surgical Training now undergo formal testing of both technical skills and fundamental abilities (psychomotor skills, visuospatial ability and depth perception). Reports on each candidate's performance are supplied to the interview committee. Furthermore, a prospective database is being kept for correlation with future surgical performance. We believe that selection into surgical training should take account of attributes that we know are important for safe and efficient surgical practice.

  2. The future of surgical training in the context of the 'Shape of Training' Review: Consensus recommendations by the Association of Surgeons in Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Rhiannon L; Williams, Adam P; Ferguson, Henry J M; Mohan, Helen M; Beamish, Andrew J; Gokani, Vimal J

    2016-11-01

    ASiT has long maintained that in order to provide the best quality care to patients in the UK and Republic of Ireland, it is critical that surgeons are trained to the highest standards. In addition, it is imperative that surgery remains an attractive career choice, with opportunities for career progression and job satisfaction to attract and retain the best candidates. In 2013, the Shape of Training review report set out recommendations for the structure and delivery of postgraduate training in light of an ever increasingly poly-morbid and ageing population. This consensus statement outlines ASIT's position regarding recommendations for improving surgical training and aims to help guide discussions with regard to future proposed changes to surgical training.

  3. A framework-based approach to designing simulation-augmented surgical education and training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho, Sayra M; Moussa, Fuad; Dubrowski, Adam

    2011-09-01

    The goal of simulation-based medical education and training is to help trainees acquire and refine the technical and cognitive skills necessary to perform clinical procedures. When designers incorporate simulation into programs, their efforts should be in line with training needs, rather than technology. Designers of simulation-augmented surgical training programs, however, face particular problems related to identifying a framework that guides the curricular design activity to fulfill the particular requirements of such training programs. These problems include the lack of (1) an objective identification of training needs, (2) a systematic design methodology to match training objectives with simulation resources, (3) structured assessments of performance, and (4) a research-centered view to evaluate and validate systematically the educational effectiveness of the program. In this report, we present a process called "Aim - FineTune - FollowThrough" to enable the connection of the identified problems to solutions, using frameworks from psychology, motor learning, education and experimental design.

  4. Constraint-based soft tissue simulation for virtual surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wen; Wan, Tao Ruan

    2014-11-01

    Most of surgical simulators employ a linear elastic model to simulate soft tissue material properties due to its computational efficiency and the simplicity. However, soft tissues often have elaborate nonlinear material characteristics. Most prominently, soft tissues are soft and compliant to small strains, but after initial deformations they are very resistant to further deformations even under large forces. Such material characteristic is referred as the nonlinear material incompliant which is computationally expensive and numerically difficult to simulate. This paper presents a constraint-based finite-element algorithm to simulate the nonlinear incompliant tissue materials efficiently for interactive simulation applications such as virtual surgery. Firstly, the proposed algorithm models the material stiffness behavior of soft tissues with a set of 3-D strain limit constraints on deformation strain tensors. By enforcing a large number of geometric constraints to achieve the material stiffness, the algorithm reduces the task of solving stiff equations of motion with a general numerical solver to iteratively resolving a set of constraints with a nonlinear Gauss-Seidel iterative process. Secondly, as a Gauss-Seidel method processes constraints individually, in order to speed up the global convergence of the large constrained system, a multiresolution hierarchy structure is also used to accelerate the computation significantly, making interactive simulations possible at a high level of details. Finally, this paper also presents a simple-to-build data acquisition system to validate simulation results with ex vivo tissue measurements. An interactive virtual reality-based simulation system is also demonstrated.

  5. Two-part silicone mold. A new tool for flexible ureteroscopy surgical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Marroig

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction and objectives: Flexible ureteroscopy is a common procedure nowadays. Most of the training programs use virtual reality simulators. The aim of this study was to standardize the building of a three-dimensional silicone mold (cavity of the collecting system, on the basis of polyester resin endocasts, which can be used in surgical training programs. Materials and Methods: A yellow polyester resin was injected into the ureter to fill the collecting system of 24 cadaveric fresh human kidneys. After setting off the resin, the kidneys were immersed in hydrochloric acid until total corrosion of the organic matter was achieved and the collecting system endocasts obtained. The endocasts were used to prepare white color two-part silicone molds, which after endocasts withdrawn, enabled a ureteroscope insertion into the collecting system molds (cavities. Also, the minor calices were painted with different colors in order to map the access to the different caliceal groups. The cost of the materials used in the molds is $30.00 and two days are needed to build them. Results: Flexible ureteroscope could be inserted into all molds and the entire collecting system could be examined. Since some anatomical features, as infundular length, acute angle, and perpendicular minor calices may difficult the access to some minor calices, especially in the lower caliceal group, surgical training in models leads to better surgical results. Conclusions: The two-part silicone mold is feasible, cheap and allows its use for flexible ureteroscopy surgical training.

  6. Residents' perceptions of implant surgical training in advanced education in prosthodontic programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Lee, Damian J; Knoernschild, Kent L; Campbell, Stephen D; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess residents' perspectives on their implant surgical training in Advanced Education in Prosthodontic programs in the United States. Questionnaires were distributed to all prosthodontic residents (N = 442). The 27 questions assessed the subjective and objective aspects of implant surgical training from the view of prosthodontic residents. The data were compiled and reported as frequencies. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. One hundred and ninety-eight responses (44.8%) were received and analyzed. Forty-seven percent (94) of the respondents felt that the philosophy of their programs regarding implant placement in prosthodontics was "optional but encouraged," whereas 30% (60) felt that it was "mandatory." The majority of the respondents (73%, 144) stated that their programs allowed them to place implants for their own patients. For those respondents who placed their own implants, 40% (58) of them indicated that the level of their clinical training was "competent." Almost half of the respondents expressed that they would like to have a proficient level of clinical training in implant surgery by the completion of their residency programs. Forty-four percent (87) of the respondents felt their residency training adequately prepared them for implant surgery, whereas the other 37% (73) did not. For those who did not, 74% (55) felt their residency programs should have prepared them for implant surgical training. The current generation of prosthodontic residents has an opportunity to place implants in their programs and would like to be trained in surgical aspects of implant dentistry at the level of competency or higher. © 2010 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  7. What Type of Teachers Do We Intend to Train? An Analysis of Teacher Profiles in MERCOSUR Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliaud, Andrea; Feeney, Silvina María

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, teachers have often been identified as 'key' players for the improvement of education systems. The successive waves of reform taking place in Latin America since the 1990s have aimed at initial and continuous teacher training. The main changes intended to improve the quality and lengthen the duration of initial teacher…

  8. Meeting the Communicative Demands in Academic and Professional Training Curricula:An Overview of ELT in Tertiary Institutions in Singapore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ho Wah Kam

    2001-01-01

    @@ This paper examines the ways in which the English language capacity of a student population entering tertiary institutions in Singapore is being developed further for academic and professional training purposes. As these students begin to engage in what Widdowson (1998: 6) called "a shared schematic knowledge", they need to have the linguistic resources that such engagement demands.

  9. The effects of educational curricula and training on LGBT-specific health issues for healthcare students and professionals: a mixed-method systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekoni, Adekemi Oluwayemisi; Gale, Nicola K; Manga-Atangana, Bibiane; Bhadhuri, Arjun; Jolly, Kate

    2017-07-19

    Poor access of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people to healthcare providers with clinical and cultural competency contributes to health inequalities between heterosexual/cisgender and LGBT people. This systematic review assesses the effect of educational curricula and training for healthcare students and professionals on LGBT healthcare issues. Systematic review; the search terms, strategy and process as well as eligibility criteria were predefined and registered prospectively on PROSPERO. A systematic search of electronic databases was undertaken. Screening for eligible studies and data extraction were done in duplicate. All the eligible studies were assessed for risk of bias. The outcome of interest was a change in participants' knowledge, attitude and or practice. Out of 1171 papers identified, 16 publications reporting 15 studies were included in the review. Three were non-randomized controlled studies and 12 had a pre/post-design; two had qualitative components. Bias was reported in the selection of participants and confounding. Risk reported was moderate/mild. Most studies were from the USA, the topics revolved around key terms and terminology, stigma and discrimination, sexuality and sexual dysfunction, sexual history taking, LGBT-specific health and health disparities. Time allotted for training ranged from 1 to 42 hours, the involvement of LGBT people was minimal. The only intervention in sub-Saharan Africa focused exclusively on men who have sex with men. All the studies reported statistically significant improvement in knowledge, attitude and/or practice post-training. Two main themes were identified from the qualitative studies: the process of changing values and attitudes to be more LGBT inclusive, and the constraints to the application of new values in practice. Conclusions Training of healthcare providers will provide information and improve skills of healthcare providers which may lead to improved quality of healthcare for LGBT

  10. A pilot study of surgical training using a virtual robotic surgery simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tergas, Ana I; Sheth, Sangini B; Green, Isabel C; Giuntoli, Robert L; Winder, Abigail D; Fader, Amanda N

    2013-01-01

    Our objectives were to compare the utility of learning a suturing task on the virtual reality da Vinci Skills Simulator versus the da Vinci Surgical System dry laboratory platform and to assess user satisfaction among novice robotic surgeons. Medical trainees were enrolled prospectively; one group trained on the virtual reality simulator, and the other group trained on the da Vinci dry laboratory platform. Trainees received pretesting and post-testing on the dry laboratory platform. Participants then completed an anonymous online user experience and satisfaction survey. We enrolled 20 participants. Mean pretest completion times did not significantly differ between the 2 groups. Training with either platform was associated with a similar decrease in mean time to completion (simulator platform group, 64.9 seconds [P = .04]; dry laboratory platform group, 63.9 seconds [P virtual reality platform. The majority found the training "definitely useful" in improving robotic surgical skills (mean, 4.6) and would attend future training sessions (mean, 4.5). Training on the virtual reality robotic simulator or the dry laboratory robotic surgery platform resulted in significant improvements in time to completion and economy of motion for novice robotic surgeons. Although there was a perception that both simulators improved performance, there was a preference for the virtual reality simulator. Benefits unique to the simulator platform include autonomy of use, computerized performance feedback, and ease of setup. These features may facilitate more efficient and sophisticated simulation training above that of the conventional dry laboratory platform, without loss of efficacy.

  11. Sub-specialty training in head and neck surgical oncology in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganaris, Argyris; Black, Myles; Balfour, Alistair; Hartley, Christopher; Jeannon, Jean-Pierre; Simo, Ricard

    2009-07-01

    Sub-specialty training in otorhinolaryngology and head and neck surgery (ORL-HNS) is not standardised across European Union (EU) states and remains diverse. The objective of this study was to assess the current status of sub-specialty training programmes in head and neck surgical oncology within the European Union (EU-15). A postal questionnaire was distributed to 41 representative members of the European Federation of Otorhinolaryngological Societies (EUFOS) in the specialty of ORL-HNS in 15 EU states. The questionnaire included questions regarding the sub-specialty practice, structure, length, access, examination procedures and certification, future developments and also a space for individual comments. Thirty-one respondents (75.6%) from major training centres in 15 different European countries replied. Overall, the data revealed major diversity for all aspects analysed, between and within the different European countries. Only four EU states had formal sub-specialty training in head and neck surgical oncology. This includes Finland, Germany, The Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. In the rest of EU states, the last year of residency programmes is often spent as an introduction to one of the sub-specialties. Sub-specialty training in head and neck surgical oncology within the EU at present is clearly underdeveloped. Issuing a European diploma in ORL-HNS could be an initial step towards assessing the skills acquired during specialist training within the different European countries and formalising specialist training. This would establish a uniform measure for evaluating candidacy for sub-specialty training both across the EU and for USA, Canada or Australia.

  12. Training Surgical Residents With a Haptic Robotic Central Venous Catheterization Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepley, David F; Gordon, Adam B; Yovanoff, Mary A; Mirkin, Katelin A; Miller, Scarlett R; Han, David C; Moore, Jason Z

    2017-06-20

    Ultrasound guided central venous catheterization (CVC) is a common surgical procedure with complication rates ranging from 5 to 21 percent. Training is typically performed using manikins that do not simulate anatomical variations such as obesity and abnormal vessel positioning. The goal of this study was to develop and validate the effectiveness of a new virtual reality and force haptic based simulation platform for CVC of the right internal jugular vein. A CVC simulation platform was developed using a haptic robotic arm, 3D position tracker, and computer visualization. The haptic robotic arm simulated needle insertion force that was based on cadaver experiments. The 3D position tracker was used as a mock ultrasound device with realistic visualization on a computer screen. Upon completion of a practice simulation, performance feedback is given to the user through a graphical user interface including scoring factors based on good CVC practice. The effectiveness of the system was evaluated by training 13 first year surgical residents using the virtual reality haptic based training system over a 3 month period. The participants' performance increased from 52% to 96% on the baseline training scenario, approaching the average score of an expert surgeon: 98%. This also resulted in improvement in positive CVC practices including a 61% decrease between final needle tip position and vein center, a decrease in mean insertion attempts from 1.92 to 1.23, and a 12% increase in time spent aspirating the syringe throughout the procedure. A virtual reality haptic robotic simulator for CVC was successfully developed. Surgical residents training on the simulation improved to near expert levels after three robotic training sessions. This suggests that this system could act as an effective training device for CVC. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The future of patient safety: Surgical trainees accept virtual reality as a new training tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Rachel; Gantert, Walter A; Hamel, Christian; Metzger, Jürg; Kocher, Thomas; Vogelbach, Peter; Demartines, Nicolas; Hahnloser, Dieter

    2008-06-11

    The use of virtual reality (VR) has gained increasing interest to acquire laparoscopic skills outside the operating theatre and thus increasing patients' safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate trainees' acceptance of VR for assessment and training during a skills course and at their institution. All 735 surgical trainees of the International Gastrointestinal Surgery Workshop 2006-2008, held in Davos, Switzerland, were given a minimum of 45 minutes for VR training during the course. Participants' opinion on VR was analyzed with a standardized questionnaire. Fivehundred-twenty-seven participants (72%) from 28 countries attended the VR sessions and answered the questionnaires. The possibility of using VR at the course was estimated as excellent or good in 68%, useful in 21%, reasonable in 9% and unsuitable or useless in 2%. If such VR simulators were available at their institution, most course participants would train at least one hour per week (46%), two or more hours (42%) and only 12% wouldn't use VR. Similarly, 63% of the participants would accept to operate on patients only after VR training and 55% to have VR as part of their assessment. Residents accept and appreciate VR simulation for surgical assessment and training. The majority of the trainees are motivated to regularly spend time for VR training if accessible.

  14. The future of patient safety: Surgical trainees accept virtual reality as a new training tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogelbach Peter

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of virtual reality (VR has gained increasing interest to acquire laparoscopic skills outside the operating theatre and thus increasing patients' safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate trainees' acceptance of VR for assessment and training during a skills course and at their institution. Methods All 735 surgical trainees of the International Gastrointestinal Surgery Workshop 2006–2008, held in Davos, Switzerland, were given a minimum of 45 minutes for VR training during the course. Participants' opinion on VR was analyzed with a standardized questionnaire. Results Fivehundred-twenty-seven participants (72% from 28 countries attended the VR sessions and answered the questionnaires. The possibility of using VR at the course was estimated as excellent or good in 68%, useful in 21%, reasonable in 9% and unsuitable or useless in 2%. If such VR simulators were available at their institution, most course participants would train at least one hour per week (46%, two or more hours (42% and only 12% wouldn't use VR. Similarly, 63% of the participants would accept to operate on patients only after VR training and 55% to have VR as part of their assessment. Conclusion Residents accept and appreciate VR simulation for surgical assessment and training. The majority of the trainees are motivated to regularly spend time for VR training if accessible.

  15. Immersive virtual reality used as a platform for perioperative training for surgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzke, D B; Hoskins, J D; Mastrangelo, M J; Witzke, W O; Chu, U B; Pande, S; Park, A E

    2001-01-01

    Perioperative preparations such as operating room setup, patient and equipment positioning, and operating port placement are essential to operative success in minimally invasive surgery. We developed an immersive virtual reality-based training system (REMIS) to provide residents (and other health professionals) with training and evaluation in these perioperative skills. Our program uses the qualities of immersive VR that are available today for inclusion in an ongoing training curriculum for surgical residents. The current application consists of a primary platform for patient positioning for a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Having completed this module we can create many different simulated problems for other procedures. As a part of the simulation, we have devised a computer-driven real-time data collection system to help us in evaluating trainees and providing feedback during the simulation. The REMIS program trains and evaluates surgical residents and obviates the need to use expensive operating room and surgeon time. It also allows residents to train based on their schedule and does not put patients at increased risk. The method is standardized, allows for repetition if needed, evaluates individual performance, provides the possible complications of incorrect choices, provides training in 3-D environment, and has the capability of being used for various scenarios and professions.

  16. Does box model training improve surgical dexterity and economy of movement during virtual reality laparoscopy? A randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevin, Lotte; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2008-01-01

    Laparoscopic box model trainers have been used in training curricula for a long time, however data on their impact on skills acquisition is still limited. Our aim was to validate a low cost box model trainer as a tool for the training of skills relevant to laparoscopic surgery. Randomised, controlled trial (Canadian Task Force Classification I). University Hospital. Sixteen gynaecologic residents with limited laparoscopic experience were randomised to a group that received a structured box model training curriculum, and a control group. Performance before and after the training was assessed in a virtual reality laparoscopic trainer (LapSim and was based on objective parameters, registered by the computer system (time, error, and economy of motion scores). Group A showed significantly greater improvement in all performance parameters compared with the control group: economy of movement (p=0.001), time (p=0.001) and tissue damage (p=0.036), confirming the positive impact of box-trainer curriculum on laparoscopic skills acquisition. Structured laparoscopic skill training on a low cost box model trainer improves performance as assessed using the VR system. Trainees who used the box model trainer showed significant improvement compared to the control group. Box model trainers are valid tools for laparoscopic skills training and should be implemented in the comprehensive training curricula in gynaecology.

  17. Surgical treatment compared with eccentric training for patellar tendinopathy (Jumper's Knee). A randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Roald; Fossan, Bjørn; Løken, Sverre; Engebretsen, Lars

    2006-08-01

    Although the surgical treatment of patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee) is a common procedure, there have been no randomized, controlled trials comparing this treatment with forms of nonoperative treatment. The purpose of the present study was to compare the outcome of open patellar tenotomy with that of eccentric strength training in patients with patellar tendinopathy. Thirty-five patients (forty knees) who had been referred for the treatment of grade-IIIB patellar tendinopathy were randomized to surgical treatment (twenty knees) or eccentric strength training (twenty knees). The eccentric training group performed squats on a 25 degrees decline board as a home exercise program (with three sets of fifteen repetitions being performed twice daily) for a twelve-week intervention period. In the surgical treatment group, the abnormal tissue was removed by means of a wedge-shaped full-thickness excision, followed by a structured rehabilitation program with gradual progression to eccentric training. The primary outcome measure was the VISA (Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment) score (possible range, 0 to 100), which was calculated on the basis of answers to a symptom-based questionnaire that was developed specifically for patellar tendinopathy. The patients were evaluated after three, six, and twelve months of follow-up. There was no difference between the groups with regard to the VISA score during the twelve-month follow-up period, but both groups had improvement (p knees had no symptoms, twelve had improvement but were still symptomatic, two were unchanged, and one was worse after twelve months (p = 0.49 compared with the eccentric training group). In the eccentric training group, five knees did not respond to treatment and underwent secondary surgery after three to six months. Of the remaining fifteen knees in the eccentric training group, seven had no symptoms and eight had improvement but were still symptomatic after twelve months. No advantage was

  18. Adapting bioinformatics curricula for big data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Anna C; Giffin, Kristine A; Greene, Casey S; Moore, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    Modern technologies are capable of generating enormous amounts of data that measure complex biological systems. Computational biologists and bioinformatics scientists are increasingly being asked to use these data to reveal key systems-level properties. We review the extent to which curricula are changing in the era of big data. We identify key competencies that scientists dealing with big data are expected to possess across fields, and we use this information to propose courses to meet these growing needs. While bioinformatics programs have traditionally trained students in data-intensive science, we identify areas of particular biological, computational and statistical emphasis important for this era that can be incorporated into existing curricula. For each area, we propose a course structured around these topics, which can be adapted in whole or in parts into existing curricula. In summary, specific challenges associated with big data provide an important opportunity to update existing curricula, but we do not foresee a wholesale redesign of bioinformatics training programs.

  19. ACGME core competency training, mentorship, and research in surgical subspecialty fellowship programs.

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    Francesca Monn, M; Wang, Ming-Hsien; Gilson, Marta M; Chen, Belinda; Kern, David; Gearhart, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    To determine the perceived effectiveness of surgical subspecialty training programs in teaching and assessing the 6 ACGME core competencies including research. Cross-sectional survey. ACGME approved training programs in pediatric urology and colorectal surgery. Program Directors and recent trainees (2007-2009). A total of 39 program directors (60%) and 57 trainees (64%) responded. Both program directors and recent trainees reported a higher degree of training and mentorship (75%) in patient care and medical knowledge than the other core competencies (pcore competencies and research are effectively being taught in surgery subspecialty training programs and mentorship in areas outside of patient care and research is lacking. Emphasis should be placed on faculty supervision and feedback when designing methods to better incorporate all 6 core competencies, research, and mentorship. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Surgical training and the European Working Time Directive: The role of informal workplace learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, James A

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of European Working Time Directive, limiting doctors' working hours to 48 per week, has caused recent controversy within the profession. The Royal College of Surgeons of England in particular has been one of the loudest critics of the legislation. One of the main concerns is regarding the negative impact on training hours for those embarking on surgical careers. Simulation technology has been suggested as a method to overcome this reduction in hospital training hours, and research suggests that this is a good substitute for operative training in a theatre. However, modern educational theory emphasises the power of informal workplace learning in postgraduate education, and the essential role of experience in training future surgeons.

  1. Surgical Residency Training at a University-Based Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Rebecca L; Morris, Jon B; Kelz, Rachel R

    2016-02-01

    The past two decades have been witness to some of the most dynamic changes that have occurred in surgical education in all of its history. Political policies, social revolution, and the competing priorities of a new generation of surgical trainees are defining the needs of modern training paradigms. Although the university-based academic program's tripartite mission of clinical service, research, and education has remained steadfast, the mechanisms for achieving success in this mission necessitate adaptation and innovation. The resource-rich learning environment and the unique challenges that face university-based programs contribute to its ability to generate the future leaders of the surgical workforce. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Distance learning improves attainment of professional milestones in the early years of surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paula J W; Wigmore, Stephen J; Paisley, Anna; Lamb, Peter; Richards, Jennifer M J; Robson, Andrew J; Revie, Erica; McKeown, Dermot; Dewhurst, David; Garden, O James

    2013-11-01

    To assess the impact of a surgical sciences e-learning programme in supporting the academic development of surgical trainees during their preparation for professional examination. In 2007, a 3-year online part-time Master of Surgical Sciences (MSc) degree programme was launched, utilizing an innovative platform with virtual case scenarios based on common surgical conditions addressed by the curriculum relating to the Membership Examination of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons (MRCS). Multiple-choice questions with feedback and discussion boards facilitated by expert clinical tutors provided formative assessment. Summative assessment comprised written examination at the end of each of the first 2 years (equivalent to MRCS level), culminating in submission of a research dissertation in year 3 toward an MSc. Students' age, gender, and level at entry to the programme were documented. Anonymized student feedback from 2008 to 2012 was examined using online questionnaires, and performance in the MSc programme was compared to MRCS examination outcomes for students who had consented to release of their results. A total of 517 surgical trainees from 40 countries were recruited over the 6-year period, and 116 MSc students have graduated to date. Of 368 students, 279 (76%) were foundation doctors (interns) and had not commenced formal surgical training on enrolling in the MSc programme. However, level at entry did not influence performance (P > 0.05 across all 3 years). Average pass rates since the programme launched, for those students completing all of the required assessments, were 84% ± 11% in year 1, 85% ± 10% in year 2, and 88% ± 7% in year 3 of the MSc programme. MSc students had significantly higher MRCS pass rates than nonenrolled trainees (67% vs 51%, P < 0.01, n = 352). There was a significant correlation between MRCS examination performance and overall performance in the MSc (R = 58%; P < 0.01, n = 37). Of 248 respondents, 202 (81%) considered that the MSc would

  3. Effects of a training program after surgically treated ankle fracture: a prospective randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekdahl Charlotte S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite conflicting results after surgically treated ankle fractures few studies have evaluated the effects of different types of training programs performed after plaster removal. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a 12-week standardised but individually suited training program (training group versus usual care (control group after plaster removal in adults with surgically treated ankle fractures. Methods In total, 110 men and women, 18-64 years of age, with surgically treated ankle fracture were included and randomised to either a 12-week training program or to a control group. Six and twelve months after the injury the subjects were examined by the same physiotherapist who was blinded to the treatment group. The main outcome measure was the Olerud-Molander Ankle Score (OMAS which rates symptoms and subjectively scored function. Secondary outcome measures were: quality of life (SF-36, timed walking tests, ankle mobility tests, muscle strength tests and radiological status. Results 52 patients were randomised to the training group and 58 to the control group. Five patients dropped out before the six-month follow-up resulting in 50 patients in the training group and 55 in the control group. Nine patients dropped out between the six- and twelve-month follow-up resulting in 48 patients in both groups. When analysing the results in a mixed model analysis on repeated measures including interaction between age-group and treatment effect the training group demonstrated significantly improved results compared to the control group in subjects younger than 40 years of age regarding OMAS (p = 0.028, muscle strength in the plantar flexors (p = 0.029 and dorsiflexors (p = 0.030. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that when adjusting for interaction between age-group and treatment effect the training model employed in this study was superior to usual care in patients under the age of 40. However, as only three

  4. For Love, Not Money: The Financial Implications of Surgical Fellowship Training.

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    Inclan, Paul M; Hyde, Adam S; Hulme, Michael; Carter, Jeffrey E

    2016-09-01

    Surgical residents cite increased income potential as a motivation for pursuing fellowship training, despite little evidence supporting this perception. Thus, our goal is to quantify the financial impact of surgical fellowship training on financial career value. By using Medical Group Management Association and Association of American Medical Colleges physician income data, and accounting for resident salary, student debt, a progressive tax structure, and forgone wages associated with prolonged training, we generated a net present value (NPV) for both generalist and subspecialist surgeons. By comparing generalist and subspecialist career values, we determined that cardiovascular (NPV = 698,931), pediatric (430,964), thoracic (239,189), bariatric (166,493), vascular (96,071), and transplant (46,669) fellowships improve career value. Alternatively, trauma (11,374), colorectal (44,622), surgical oncology (203,021), and breast surgery (326,465) fellowships all reduce career value. In orthopedic surgery, spine (505,198), trauma (123,250), hip and joint (60,372), and sport medicine (56,167) fellowships improve career value, whereas shoulder and elbow (4,539), foot and ankle (173,766), hand (366,300), and pediatric (489,683) fellowships reduce career NPV. In obstetrics and gynecology, reproductive endocrinology (352,854), and maternal and fetal medicine (322,511) fellowships improve career value, whereas gynecology oncology (28,101) and urogynecology (206,171) fellowships reduce career value. These data indicate that the financial return of fellowship is highly variable.

  5. The assessment of surgical skills as a complement to the training method. Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Fernández, J; Bachiller-Burgos, J; Serrano-Pascual, Á; Cózar-Olmo, J M; Díaz-Güemes Martín-Portugués, I; Pérez-Duarte, F J; Hernández-Hurtado, L; Álvarez-Ossorio, J L; Sánchez-Margallo, F M

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition and improvement of surgical skills constitute a fundamental element in the training of any practitioner. At present, however, the assessment of these skills is a scarcely developed area of research. The aim of this study was to analyse the peculiarities of the various assessment systems and establish the minimum criteria that a skills and knowledge assessment system should meet as a method for assessing surgical skills in urological surgery. Scientific literature review aimed at the various currently available assessment systems for skills and competencies (technical and nontechnical), with a special focus on the systematic reviews and prospective studies. After conducting the review, we found that the various assessment systems for surgical competence have, in our opinion, a number of shortcomings. There is a certain degree of subjectivity in the assessment of surgeons by the evaluators. The assessment of nontechnical competencies is not formally recorded. There is no description of a follow-up assessment or any basic parameters associated with healthcare quality. There is no registration of associated competencies associated with the various surgical techniques. There is also no ranking of these competencies and the specific peculiarities for their application. We believe that the development of a new assessment system for surgical competencies (technical and nontechnical) aimed at assessing urologists in the various surgical techniques is necessary. To this end, our team has worked on developing the Evaluation System for Surgical Competencies on Laparoscopy, which is based on the definition, ranking and assessment of competencies demonstrated by surgeons. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Training for endoscopic surgical procedures should be performed in the dissection room: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitsie, Pieter J; Ten Brinke, Bart; Timman, Reinier; Busschbach, Jan J V; Theeuwes, Hilco P; Lange, Johan F; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan

    2017-04-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is associated with a shallow learning curve. AnubiFiX embalming technique enables laparoscopic surgical training on supple embalmed and hence insufflatable human specimens in the dissection room. Aim of the present trial is to test whether dissection-based anatomy education is superior to classical frontal classroom education on the short and long term. A total of 112 medical students were randomized in three groups. Group I attended classroom education, group II laparoscopic dissection-based education and group III received both. All groups completed an anatomy test on human specimens before, immediately after and 3 weeks after the anatomy training. Group II and III scored significantly better compared to group I immediately after the anatomy training (p I-II superior outcomes on the short and long term, as compared to classical frontal classroom education.

  7. Simulation-based education: understanding the socio-cultural complexity of a surgical training 'boot camp'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer; Walker, Kenneth G; Gale, Michael; Nicol, Laura G

    2016-08-01

    The focus of simulation-based education (SBE) research has been limited to outcome and effectiveness studies. The effect of social and cultural influences on SBE is unclear and empirical work is lacking. Our objective in this study was to explore and understand the complexity of context and social factors at a surgical boot camp (BC). A rapid ethnographic study, employing the theoretical lenses of complexity and activity theory and Bourdieu's concept of 'capital', to better understand the socio-cultural influences acting upon, and during, two surgical BCs, and their implications for SBE. Over two 4-day BCs held in Scotland, UK, an observer and two preceptors conducted 81 hours of observations, 14 field interviews and 11 formal interviews with faculty members (n = 10, including the lead faculty member, session leaders and junior faculty members) and participants (n = 19 core surgical trainees and early-stage residents). Data collection and inductive analysis for emergent themes proceeded iteratively. This paper focuses on three analytical themes. First, the complexity of the surgical training system and wider health care education context, and how this influenced the development of the BC. Second, participants' views of the BC as a vehicle not just for learning skills but for gaining 'insider information' on how best to progress in surgical training. Finally, the explicit aim of faculty members to use the Scottish Surgical Bootcamp to welcome trainees and residents into the world of surgery, and how this occurred. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first empirical study of a surgical BC that takes a socio-cultural approach to exploring and understanding context, complexities, uncertainties and learning associated with one example of SBE. Our findings suggest that a BC is as much about social and cultural processes as it is about individual, cognitive and acquisitive learning. Acknowledging this explicitly will help those planning similar enterprises and

  8. Training responsibly to improve global surgical and anaesthesia capacity through institutional health partnerships: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Laura; Collins, Maggie

    2017-01-01

    Urgent investment in human resources for surgical and anaesthesia care is needed globally. Responsible training and education is required to ensure healthcare providers are confident and skilled in the delivery of this care in both the rural and the urban setting. The Tropical Health and Education Trust (THET), a UK-based specialist global health organisation, is working with health training institutions, health professionals, Ministries of Health and Health Partnerships or 'links' between healthcare institutions in the UK and low- or middle-income country (LMIC) counterparts. These institutions may be hospitals, professional associations or universities whose primary focus is delivery of health services or the training and education of health workers. Since 2011, THET has been delivering the Health Partnership Scheme (HPS), a UK government-funded programme that provides grants and guidance to health partnerships and promotes the voluntary engagement of UK health professionals overseas. To date, the £30 million Scheme has supported peer-to-peer collaborations involving more than 200 UK and overseas hospitals, universities and professional associations across 25 countries in Africa, Asia and the Middle East. In this paper, we focus on four partnerships that are undertaking training initiatives focused on building capacity for surgery and anaesthesia. In order to do so, we discuss their role as a responsible and effective approach to harnessing the expertise available in the UK in order to increase surgical and anaesthesia capacity in LMICs. Specifically, how well they: (1) respond to locally identified needs; (2) are appropriate to the local context and are of high quality; and (3) have an overarching goal of making a sustainable contribution to the development of the health workforce through education and training. The HPS has now supported 24 training initiatives focused on building capacity for surgery and anaesthesia in 16 countries across sub-Saharan Africa

  9. An integrated approach to endoscopic instrument tracking for augmented reality applications in surgical simulation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, Constantinos; Lahanas, Vasileios; Georgiou, Evangelos

    2013-12-01

    Despite the popular use of virtual and physical reality simulators in laparoscopic training, the educational potential of augmented reality (AR) has not received much attention. A major challenge is the robust tracking and three-dimensional (3D) pose estimation of the endoscopic instrument, which are essential for achieving interaction with the virtual world and for realistic rendering when the virtual scene is occluded by the instrument. In this paper we propose a method that addresses these issues, based solely on visual information obtained from the endoscopic camera. Two different tracking algorithms are combined for estimating the 3D pose of the surgical instrument with respect to the camera. The first tracker creates an adaptive model of a colour strip attached to the distal part of the tool (close to the tip). The second algorithm tracks the endoscopic shaft, using a combined Hough-Kalman approach. The 3D pose is estimated with perspective geometry, using appropriate measurements extracted by the two trackers. The method has been validated on several complex image sequences for its tracking efficiency, pose estimation accuracy and applicability in AR-based training. Using a standard endoscopic camera, the absolute average error of the tip position was 2.5 mm for working distances commonly found in laparoscopic training. The average error of the instrument's angle with respect to the camera plane was approximately 2°. The results are also supplemented by video segments of laparoscopic training tasks performed in a physical and an AR environment. The experiments yielded promising results regarding the potential of applying AR technologies for laparoscopic skills training, based on a computer vision framework. The issue of occlusion handling was adequately addressed. The estimated trajectory of the instruments may also be used for surgical gesture interpretation and assessment. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Guidelines for resident training in veterinary clinical pathology. III: cytopathology and surgical pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney, Beverly A; Dial, Sharon M; Christopher, Mary M

    2009-09-01

    The Education Committee of the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology has identified a need for improved structure and guidance of training residents in clinical pathology. This article is the third in a series of articles that address this need. The goals of this article are to describe learning objectives and competencies in knowledge, abilities, and skills in cytopathology and surgical pathology (CSP); provide options and ideas for training activities; and identify resources in veterinary CSP for faculty, training program coordinators, and residents. Guidelines were developed in consultation with Education Committee members and peer experts and with evaluation of the literature. The primary objectives of training in CSP are: (1) to develop a thorough, extensive, and relevant knowledge base of biomedical and clinical sciences applicable to the practice of CSP in domestic animals, laboratory animals, and other nondomestic animal species; (2) to be able to reason, think critically, investigate, use scientific evidence, and communicate effectively when making diagnoses and consulting and to improve and advance the practice of pathology; and (3) to acquire selected technical skills used in CSP and pathology laboratory management. These guidelines define expected competencies that will help ensure proficiency, leadership, and the advancement of knowledge in veterinary CSP and will provide a useful framework for didactic and clinical activities in resident-training programs.

  11. Applied Research on Laparoscopic Simulator in the Resident Surgical Laparoscopic Operation Technical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shangxi; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Meisheng; Wang, Liming

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the effects of surgical laparoscopic operation course on laparoscopic operation skills after the simulated training for medical students with relatively objective results via data gained before and after the practice course of laparoscopic simulator of the resident standardized trainees. Experiment 1: 20 resident standardized trainees with no experience in laparoscopic surgery were included in the inexperienced group and finished simulated cholecystectomy according to simulator videos. Simulator data was collected (total operation time, path length, average speed of instrument movement, movement efficiency, number of perforations, the time cautery is applied without appropriate contact with adhesions, number of serious complications). Ten attending doctors were included in the experienced group and conducted the operation of simulated cholecystectomy directly. Data was collected with simulator. Data of two groups was compared. Experiment 2: Participants in inexperienced group were assigned to basic group (receiving 8 items of basic operation training) and special group (receiving 8 items of basic operation training and 4 items of specialized training), and 10 persons for each group. They received training course designed by us respectively. After training level had reached the expected target, simulated cholecystectomy was performed, and data was collected. Experimental data between basic group and special group was compared and then data between special group and experienced group was compared. Results of experiment 1 showed that there is significant difference between data in inexperienced group in which participants operated simulated cholecystectomy only according to instructors' teaching and operation video and data in experienced group. Result of experiment 2 suggested that, total operation time, number of perforations, number of serious complications, number of non-cauterized bleeding and the time cautery is applied

  12. Surgery for gastrointestinal malignant melanoma:Experience from surgical training center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thawatchai; Akaraviputh; Satida; Arunakul; Varut; Lohsiriwat; Cherdsak; Iramaneerat; Atthaphorn; Trakarnsanga

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To characterize clinical features,surgery,outcome,and survival of malignant melanoma(MM) of the gastrointestinal(GI) tract in a surgical training center in Bangkok,Thailand. METHODS:A retrospective review was performed for all patients with MM of the GI tract treated at our institution between 1997 and 2007. RESULTS:Fourteen patients had GI involvement either in a metastatic form or as a primary melanoma. Thirteen patients with sufficient data were reviewed. The median age of the patients was 66 years(r...

  13. Veterinary Student Confidence after Practicing with a New Surgical Training Model for Feline Ovariohysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badman, Märit; Tullberg, Marja; Höglund, Odd V; Hagman, Ragnvi

    Lack of confidence and self-efficacy are the main causes of negative emotions experienced by veterinary students when performing surgery. A surgical training model (STM) was developed to test the hypothesis that practical training on an STM before performing live surgery would enhance the students' confidence. In addition, low-cost and easily accessible materials were used for the construction. In the STM, neodymium magnets that were detached if too much traction was applied were used to ensure careful tissue handling during ligation of the ovarian pedicles and cervix. A pilot study was performed to evaluate veterinary undergraduate students' confidence when using the STM before performing their first live feline ovariohysterectomy (OHE) as lead surgeon. The results showed that the students rated their confidence level higher after performing feline OHE if they had practiced with the STM before surgery. Voluntary written comments revealed that live surgery as a learning situation could have a very negative emotional impact on some students.

  14. Addressing gaps in surgical skills training by means of low-cost simulation at Muhimbili University in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taché Stephanie

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Providing basic surgical and emergency care in rural settings is essential, particularly in Tanzania, where the mortality burden addressable by emergency and surgical interventions has been estimated at 40%. However, the shortages of teaching faculty and insufficient learning resources have hampered the traditionally intensive surgical training apprenticeships. The Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences consequently has experienced suboptimal preparation for graduates practising surgery in the field and a drop in medical graduates willing to become surgeons. To address the decline in circumstances, the first step was to enhance technical skills in general surgery and emergency procedures for senior medical students by designing and implementing a surgical skills practicum using locally developed simulation models. Methods A two-day training course in nine different emergency procedures and surgical skills based on the Canadian Network for International Surgery curriculum was developed. Simulation models for the surgical skills were created with locally available materials. The curriculum was pilot-tested with a cohort of 60 senior medical students who had completed their surgery rotation at Muhimbili University. Two measures were used to evaluate surgical skill performance: Objective Structured Clinical Examinations and surveys of self-perceived performance administered pre- and post-training. Results Thirty-six students participated in the study. Prior to the training, no student was able to correctly perform a surgical hand tie, only one student was able to correctly perform adult intubation and three students were able to correctly scrub, gown and glove. Performance improved after training, demonstrated by Objective Structured Clinical Examination scores that rose from 6/30 to 15/30. Students perceived great benefit from practical skills training. The cost of the training using low-tech simulation was four

  15. Impact of surgeon subspecialty training on surgical outcomes in open globe injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han IC

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ian C Han,1 Sidharth Puri,1 Jiangxia Wang,2 Shameema Sikder1 1Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 2Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether subspecialty training of the initial treating surgeon affects visual acuity and surgical outcomes in patients with open globe injuries.Design: This study is a single-institution, retrospective case series.Methods: The charts of adult patients with open globe injuries requiring surgical repair at the Wilmer Eye Institute between July 1, 2007 and July 1, 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical findings at presentation were recorded, and details of initial repair and follow-up surgeries were analyzed. Differences in visual acuity and surgical outcomes were compared based on subspecialty training of the initial surgeon.Results: The charts of 282 adult patients were analyzed, and 193 eyes had at least 6 months of follow-up for analysis. Eighty-six eyes (44.6% required follow-up surgery within the first year, and 39 eyes (20.2% were enucleated. Eyes initially treated by a vitreoretinal (VR surgeon were 2.3 times (P=0.003 more likely to improve by one Ocular Trauma Score (OTS visual acuity category and 1.9 times (P=0.027 more likely to have at least one more follow-up surgery at 6 months compared to eyes treated by non-VR surgeons. Patients with more anterior injuries treated by a VR surgeon were more likely to improve by one OTS visual acuity category compared to those treated by non-VR surgeons (P=0.004 and 0.016 for Zones I and II, respectively. There was no difference in visual acuity outcomes for eyes with posterior injuries (P=0.515 for Zone III.Conclusion: Eyes initially treated by a VR surgeon are more likely to improve by one OTS visual acuity category than those initially treated by a non-VR surgeon. However, patients initially treated by a VR surgeon also undergo more

  16. Perceptions of gender-based discrimination during surgical training and practice

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    Adrienne N. Bruce

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women represent 15% of practicing general surgeons. Gender-based discrimination has been implicated as discouraging women from surgery. We sought to determine women's perceptions of gender-based discrimination in the surgical training and working environment. Methods: Following IRB approval, we fielded a pilot survey measuring perceptions and impact of gender-based discrimination in medical school, residency training, and surgical practice. It was sent electronically to 1,065 individual members of the Association of Women Surgeons. Results: We received 334 responses from medical students, residents, and practicing physicians with a response rate of 31%. Eighty-seven percent experienced gender-based discrimination in medical school, 88% in residency, and 91% in practice. Perceived sources of gender-based discrimination included superiors, physician peers, clinical support staff, and patients, with 40% emanating from women and 60% from men. Conclusions: The majority of responses indicated perceived gender-based discrimination during medical school, residency, and practice. Gender-based discrimination comes from both sexes and has a significant impact on women surgeons.

  17. A Validated Orthopaedic Surgical Simulation Model for Training and Evaluation of Basic Arthroscopic Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Ryan P; Pauyo, Thierry; Sutton, J Carl; Coughlin, Larry P; Bergeron, Stephane G

    2015-09-02

    To our knowledge, there is currently no validated educational model to evaluate and teach basic arthroscopic skills that is widely accessible to orthopaedic residency training programs. The primary objective was to design and to validate a surgical simulation model by demonstrating that subjects with increasing level of training perform better on basic arthroscopic simulation tasks. The secondary objective was to evaluate inter-rater and intra-rater reliability of the model. Prospectively recruited participants were divided by level of training into four groups. Subjects performed six basic arthroscopic tasks using a box model: (1) probing, (2) grasping, (3) tissue resection, (4) shaving, (5) tissue liberation and suture-passing, and (6) knot-tying. A score was calculated according to time required to complete each task and deductions for technical errors. A priori total global score, of a possible 100 points, was calculated by averaging scores from all six tasks using equal weights. A total of forty-nine participants were recruited for this study. Participants were grouped by level of training: Group 1 (novice: fifteen medical students and interns), Group 2 (junior residents: twelve postgraduate year-2 or postgraduate year-3 residents), Group 3 (senior residents: sixteen postgraduate year-4 or postgraduate year-5 residents), and Group 4 (six arthroscopic surgeons). The mean total global score (and standard deviation) differed significantly between groups (p training between all groups (p teach and evaluate basic arthroscopic skills showing good construct validity. This arthroscopic simulation model is inexpensive, valid, and reliable and has the potential to be implemented in other training programs. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  18. Challenges to the practice of evidence-based medicine during residents' surgical training: a qualitative study using grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Montori, Victor; Devereaux, P J; Dosanjh, Sonia; Sprague, Sheila; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2003-11-01

    To examine surgical trainees' barriers to implementing and adopting evidence-based medicine (EBM) in the day-to-day care of surgical patients. In 2000, 28 surgical residents from various subspecialties at a hospital affiliated with McMaster University Faculty of Health Sciences in Ontario, Canada, participated in a focus group (n = 8) and semistructured interviews (n = 20) to explore their perceptions of barriers to the practice of EBM during their training. Additional themes were explored, such as definitions of EBM and potential strategies to implement EBM during training. The canons and procedures of the grounded theory approach to qualitative research guided the coding and content analysis of the data derived from the focus group and semistructured interviews. Residents identified personal barriers, staff-surgeon barriers, and institutional barriers that limited their ability to apply EBM in their daily activities. Residents perceived their lack of education in EBM, time constraints, lack of priority, and fear of staff disapproval as major challenges to practicing EBM. Moreover, the lack of ready access to surgical EBM resource materials proved to be an important additional factor limiting EBM surgical practice. Residents identified several strategies to overcome these barriers to EBM, including hiring staff surgeons with EBM training, offering coursework in critical appraisal for all staff, improving interdepartmental communication, and providing greater flexibility for EBM training. Surgical residents identified a general lack of education, time constraints, lack of priority, and staff disapproval as important factors limiting incorporation of EBM. Curriculum reform and surgeon education may help overcome these barriers.

  19. Self-assessment in laparoscopic surgical skills training: Is it reliable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganni, Sandeep; Chmarra, Magdalena K; Goossens, Richard H M; Jakimowicz, Jack J

    2017-06-01

    The concept of self-assessment has been widely acclaimed for its role in the professional development cycle and self-regulation. In the field of medical education, self-assessment has been most used to evaluate the cognitive knowledge of students. The complexity of training and evaluation in laparoscopic surgery has previously acted as a barrier in determining the benefits self-assessment has to offer in comparison with other fields of medical education. Thirty-five surgical residents who attended the 2-day Laparoscopic Surgical Skills Grade 1 Level 1 curriculum were invited to participate from The Netherlands, India and Romania. The competency assessment tool (CAT) for laparoscopic cholecystectomy was used for self- and expert-assessment and the resulting distributions assessed. A comparison between the expert- and self-assessed aggregates of scores from the CAT agreed with previous studies. Uniquely to this study, the aggregates of individual sub-categories-'use of instruments'; 'tissue handling'; and errors 'within the component tasks' and the 'end product' from both self- and expert-assessments-were investigated. There was strong positive correlation (r s > 0.5; p assessment in all categories with only the 'tissue handling' having a weaker correlation (r s = 0.3; p = 0.04). The distribution of the mean of the differences between self-assessment and expert-assessment suggested no significant difference between the scores of experts and the residents in all categories except the 'end product' evaluation where the difference was significant (W = 119, p = 0.03). Self-assessment using the CAT form gives results that are consistently not different from expert-assessment when assessing one's proficiency in surgical skills. Areas where there was less agreement could be explained by variations in the level of training and understanding of the assessment criteria.

  20. Activity analysis: measurement of the effectiveness of surgical training and operative technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J P; Brickley, M

    1992-11-01

    All surgical procedures are characterised by a sequence of steps and instrument changes. Although surgical efficiency and training in operative technique closely relate to this process, few studies have attempted to analyse it quantitatively. Because efficiency is particularly important in day surgery and lower third molar removal is a high-volume procedure, the need for which is responsible for particularly long waiting-lists in almost all UK health regions, this operation was selected for evaluation. A series of 80 consecutive procedures, carried out for 43 day-stay patients under general anaesthesia by seven junior staff (senior house officers and registrars: 39 procedures) and four senior staff (senior registrars and consultants: 41 procedures) were analysed. Median operating time for procedures which required retraction of periosteum was 9.5 min (range 2.7-23.3 min). Where these steps were necessary, median time for incision was 25 s (range 10-90 s); for retraction of periosteum, 79 s (range 5-340 s); for bone removal, 118 s (range 10-380 s); for tooth excision, 131 s (range 10-900 s); for debridement, 74 s (range 5-270 s); and for suture, 144 s (range 25-320 s). Junior surgeons could be differentiated from senior surgeons on the basis of omission, repetition and duration of these steps. Juniors omitted retraction of periosteum in 10% of procedures (seniors 23%) and suture in 13% (seniors 32%). Juniors repeated steps in 47% of operations; seniors, 14%. Junior surgeons took significantly more time than senior surgeons for incision, bone removal and tooth excision. No significant differences between junior and senior surgeons were found in relation to the incidence of altered lingual and labial sensation at 7 days. It was concluded that activity analysis may be a useful measure of the effectiveness of surgical training and the efficiency of operative technique.

  1. Team Training (Training at Own Facility versus Individual Surgeon’s Training (Training at Trainer’s Facility When Implementing a New Surgical Technique: Example from the ONSTEP Inguinal Hernia Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Rosenberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. When implementing a new surgical technique, the best method for didactic learning has not been settled. There are basically two scenarios: the trainee goes to the teacher’s clinic and learns the new technique hands-on, or the teacher goes to the trainee’s clinic and performs the teaching there. Methods. An informal literature review was conducted to provide a basis for discussing pros and cons. We also wanted to discuss how many surgeons can be trained in a day and the importance of the demand for a new surgical procedure to ensure a high adoption rate and finally to apply these issues on a discussion of barriers for adoption of the new ONSTEP technique for inguinal hernia repair after initial training. Results and Conclusions. The optimal training method would include moving the teacher to the trainee’s department to obtain team-training effects simultaneous with surgical technical training of the trainee surgeon. The training should also include a theoretical presentation and discussion along with the practical training. Importantly, the training visit should probably be followed by a scheduled visit to clear misunderstandings and fine-tune the technique after an initial self-learning period.

  2. 3D-printed pediatric endoscopic ear surgery simulator for surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Samuel R; Kozin, Elliott D; Dedmon, Matthew; Lin, Brian M; Lee, Kyuwon; Sinha, Sumi; Black, Nicole; Remenschneider, Aaron K; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-11-01

    Surgical simulators are designed to improve operative skills and patient safety. Transcanal Endoscopic Ear Surgery (TEES) is a relatively new surgical approach with a slow learning curve due to one-handed dissection. A reusable and customizable 3-dimensional (3D)-printed endoscopic ear surgery simulator may facilitate the development of surgical skills with high fidelity and low cost. Herein, we aim to design, fabricate, and test a low-cost and reusable 3D-printed TEES simulator. The TEES simulator was designed in computer-aided design (CAD) software using anatomic measurements taken from anthropometric studies. Cross sections from external auditory canal samples were traced as vectors and serially combined into a mesh construct. A modified tympanic cavity with a modular testing platform for simulator tasks was incorporated. Components were fabricated using calcium sulfate hemihydrate powder and multiple colored infiltrants via a commercial inkjet 3D-printing service. All components of a left-sided ear were printed to scale. Six right-handed trainees completed three trials each. Mean trial time (n = 3) ranged from 23.03 to 62.77 s using the dominant hand for all dissection. Statistically significant differences between first and last completion time with the dominant hand (p < 0.05) and average completion time for junior and senior residents (p < 0.05) suggest construct validity. A 3D-printed simulator is feasible for TEES simulation. Otolaryngology training programs with access to a 3D printer may readily fabricate a TEES simulator, resulting in inexpensive yet high-fidelity surgical simulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of verbal communication during teaching in the operating room and the potentials for surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, E M; Verdaasdonk, E G G; Stassen, L P S; Stassen, H G; Wieringa, P A; Dankelman, J

    2007-09-01

    Verbal communication in the operating room during surgical procedures affects team performance, reflects individual skills, and is related to the complexity of the operation process. During the procedural training of surgeons (residents), feedback and guidance is given through verbal communication. A classification method based on structural analysis of the contents was developed to analyze verbal communication. This study aimed to evaluate whether a classification method for the contents of verbal communication in the operating room could provide insight into the teaching processes. Eight laparoscopic cholecystectomies were videotaped. Two entire cholecystectomies and the dissection phase of six additional procedures were analyzed by categorization of the communication in terms of type (4 categories: commanding, explaining, questioning, and miscellaneous) and content (9 categories: operation method, location, direction, instrument handling, visualization, anatomy and pathology, general, private, undefinable). The operation was divided into six phases: start, dissection, clipping, separating, control, closing. Classification of the communication during two entire procedures showed that each phase of the operation was dominated by different kinds of communication. A high percentage of explaining anatomy and pathology was found throughout the whole procedure except for the control and closing phases. In the dissection phases, 60% of verbal communication concerned explaining. These explaining communication events were divided as follows: 27% operation method, 19% anatomy and pathology, 25% location (positioning of the instrument-tissue interaction), 15% direction (direction of tissue manipulation), 11% instrument handling, and 3% other nonclassified instructions. The proposed classification method is feasible for analyzing verbal communication during surgical procedures. Communication content objectively reflects the interaction between surgeon and resident. This

  4. Muscle strength and functional performance in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury treated with training and surgical reconstruction or training only: a two to five-year followup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Thomeé, Roland; Neeter, Camille

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study muscle strength and functional performance in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury with or without surgical reconstruction 2 to 5 years after injury. Good muscle function is important in preventing early-onset osteoarthritis (OA), but the role of reconstructive...... surgery in restoring muscle function is unclear. METHODS: Of 121 patients with ACL injury included in a randomized controlled trial on training and surgical reconstruction versus training only (the Knee, Anterior cruciate ligament, NON-surgical versus surgical treatment [KANON] study, ISRCTN: 84752559......), 54 (mean age at followup 30 years, range 20-39, 28% women) were assessed a mean +/- SD of 3 +/- 0.9 years after injury with reliable, valid, and responsive test batteries for strength (knee extension, knee flexion, leg press) and hop performance (vertical jump, one-leg hop, side hop). The Limb...

  5. Measuring Nontechnical Aspects of Surgical Clinician Development in an Otolaryngology Residency Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jennifer J; Cunningham, Michael J; Emerick, Kevin G; Gray, Stacey T

    2016-05-01

    Surgical competency requires sound clinical judgment, a systematic diagnostic approach, and integration of a wide variety of nontechnical skills. This more complex aspect of clinician development has traditionally been difficult to measure through standard assessment methods. This study was conducted to use the Clinical Practice Instrument (CPI) to measure nontechnical diagnostic and management skills during otolaryngology residency training; to determine whether there is demonstrable change in these skills between residents who are in postgraduate years (PGYs) 2, 4, and 5; and to evaluate whether results vary according to subspecialty topic or method of administration. Prospective study using the CPI, an instrument with previously established internal consistency, reproducibility, interrater reliability, discriminant validity, and responsiveness to change, in an otolaryngology residency training program. The CPI was used to evaluate progression in residents' ability to evaluate, diagnose, and manage case-based clinical scenarios. A total of 248 evaluations were performed in 45 otolaryngology resident trainees at regular intervals. Analysis of variance with nesting and postestimation pairwise comparisons were used to evaluate total and domain scores according to training level, subspecialty topic, and method of administration. Longitudinal residency educational initiative. Assessment with the CPI during PGYs 2, 4, and 5 of residency. Among the 45 otolaryngology residents (248 CPI administrations), there were a mean (SD) of 5 (3) administrations (range, 1-4) during their training. Total scores were significantly different among PGY levels of training, with lower scores seen in the PGY-2 level (44 [16]) compared with the PGY-4 (64 [13]) or PGY-5 level (69 [13]) (P otolaryngology (mean [SD], 72 [14]) than in subspecialties (range, 55 [12], P = .003, to 56 [19], P < .001). Neither administering the examination with an electronic scoring system, rather than a

  6. Integrated surgical emergency training plan in the internship: A step toward improving the quality of training and emergency center management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Mohammad Reza; Vafamehr, Vajiheh; Dadgostarnia, Mohammad; Dehghani, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    In this study, by using a problem-oriented approach in the needs assessment, identifying the defects and deficiencies in emergency health training centers has been determined as the basis for the requirements. The main objective of the study was the implementation of surgical emergencies integration of the five surgical groups (general surgery, urology, orthopedics, neurosurgery, and ENT) to meet the needs and determining its efficacy. THIS INTERVENTIONAL STUDY WAS CONDUCTED IN THREE PHASES: (1) Phase I (design and planning): Needs assessment, recognition of implementation barriers and providing the objectives and training program for integrated emergencies. (2) Phase II (implementation): Justification of the main stakeholders of the project, preparation of students' duties in the emergency department, preparation of on-duty plans, supervising the implementation of the program, and reviewing the plan in parallel with the implementation based on the problems. (3) Phase III (evaluation): Reviewing the evidences based on the amount of efficiency of the plan and justification for its continuation. In the first and the second phase, the data were collected through holding focus group meetings and interviews. In the third phase, the opened-reply and closed-reply researcher-made questionnaires were used. The questionnaire face and content validity were confirmed by experts and the reliability was assessed by calculating the Cronbach's alpha. ACCORDING TO THE VIEWS OF THE INTERNS, ASSISTANTS, TEACHERS, AND EMERGENCY PERSONNEL, THE POSITIVE FEATURES OF THE PLAN INCLUDED THE FOLLOWING: Increasing the patients' satisfaction, reducing the patients' stay in the Emergency Department, increasing the speed of handling the patients, balancing the workloads of the interns, direct training of interns by young teachers of emergency medicine, giving the direct responsibility of the patient to the intern, practical and operational training of emergency issues, increasing the teamwork

  7. Systematic Review of Voluntary Participation in Simulation-Based Laparoscopic Skills Training: Motivators and Barriers for Surgical Trainee Attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostlow, Hannah; Marlow, Nicholas; Babidge, Wendy; Maddern, Guy

    To examine and report on evidence relating to surgical trainees' voluntary participation in simulation-based laparoscopic skills training. Specifically, the underlying motivators, enablers, and barriers faced by surgical trainees with regard to attending training sessions on a regular basis. A systematic search of the literature (PubMed; CINAHL; EMBASE; Cochrane Collaboration) was conducted between May and July 2015. Studies were included on whether they reported on surgical trainee attendance at voluntary, simulation-based laparoscopic skills training sessions, in addition to qualitative data regarding participant's perceived barriers and motivators influencing their decision to attend such training. Factors affecting a trainee's motivation were categorized as either intrinsic (internal) or extrinsic (external). Two randomised control trials and 7 case series' met our inclusion criteria. Included studies were small and generally poor quality. Overall, voluntary simulation-based laparoscopic skills training was not well attended. Intrinsic motivators included clearly defined personal performance goals and relevance to clinical practice. Extrinsic motivators included clinical responsibilities and available free time, simulator location close to clinical training, and setting obligatory assessments or mandated training sessions. The effect of each of these factors was variable, and largely dependent on the individual trainee. The greatest reported barrier to attending voluntary training was the lack of available free time. Although data quality is limited, it can be seen that providing unrestricted access to simulator equipment is not effective in motivating surgical trainees to voluntarily participate in simulation-based laparoscopic skills training. To successfully encourage participation, consideration needs to be given to the factors influencing motivation to attend training. Further research, including better designed randomised control trials and large

  8. Impact of surgeon subspecialty training on surgical outcomes in open globe injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ian C; Puri, Sidharth; Wang, Jiangxia; Sikder, Shameema

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether subspecialty training of the initial treating surgeon affects visual acuity and surgical outcomes in patients with open globe injuries. Design This study is a single-institution, retrospective case series. Methods The charts of adult patients with open globe injuries requiring surgical repair at the Wilmer Eye Institute between July 1, 2007 and July 1, 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical findings at presentation were recorded, and details of initial repair and follow-up surgeries were analyzed. Differences in visual acuity and surgical outcomes were compared based on subspecialty training of the initial surgeon. Results The charts of 282 adult patients were analyzed, and 193 eyes had at least 6 months of follow-up for analysis. Eighty-six eyes (44.6%) required follow-up surgery within the first year, and 39 eyes (20.2%) were enucleated. Eyes initially treated by a vitreoretinal (VR) surgeon were 2.3 times (P=0.003) more likely to improve by one Ocular Trauma Score (OTS) visual acuity category and 1.9 times (P=0.027) more likely to have at least one more follow-up surgery at 6 months compared to eyes treated by non-VR surgeons. Patients with more anterior injuries treated by a VR surgeon were more likely to improve by one OTS visual acuity category compared to those treated by non-VR surgeons (P=0.004 and 0.016 for Zones I and II, respectively). There was no difference in visual acuity outcomes for eyes with posterior injuries (P=0.515 for Zone III). Conclusion Eyes initially treated by a VR surgeon are more likely to improve by one OTS visual acuity category than those initially treated by a non-VR surgeon. However, patients initially treated by a VR surgeon also undergo more follow-up surgical rehabilitation, and improvement in visual acuity is more likely for anterior (Zone I and II injuries) than posterior (Zone III) injuries. PMID:26491240

  9. A novel flight surgeon training model at a joint military and civilian surgical residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSoucy, Erik S; Zakaluzny, Scott A; Galante, Joseph M

    2017-07-01

    Graduating military preliminary interns are often required to fill flight surgeon billets. General surgery preliminary interns get experience evaluating surgical and trauma patients, but receive very little training in primary care and flight medicine. At a joint military and civilian training program, we developed a supplemental curriculum to help transition our interns into flight medicine. From 2013 to 2016, we developed a lecture series focused on aerospace medicine, primary care, and specialty topics including dermatology, ophthalmology, orthopedics, pediatrics, psychiatry, and women's health. During the 2016 iteration attended by 10 interns, pre- and post-participation 10-item Likert scale surveys were administered. Questions focused on perceived preparedness for primary care role and overall enthusiasm for flight medicine. Open-ended surveys from 2013 to 2016 were also used to gauge the effect of the curriculum. The composite number of agreement responses (indicating increased comfort with presented material) increased 63% after course completion. Disagreement responses and neutral responses decreased 78% and 30%, respectively. Open-ended surveys from 14 participants showed an overall positive impression of the curriculum with all indicating it aided their transition to flight medicine. Survey responses indicate an overall perceived benefit from participation in the curriculum with more confidence in primary care topics and improved transition to a flight medicine tour. This model for supplemental aerospace medicine and primary care didactics should be integrated into any residency program responsible for training military preliminary interns who may serve as flight surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Memory rehabilitation and brain training for surgical temporal lobe epilepsy patients: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koorenhof, Loes; Baxendale, Sallie; Smith, Natalie; Thompson, Pam

    2012-04-01

    The short term impact of a memory rehabilitation programme on verbal memory test performance and subjective ratings of memory in everyday life was assessed in healthy controls and left temporal lobe epilepsy (LTLE) surgical patients. The intervention involved training in the use of external and internal memory support strategies. Half of the sample in addition undertook computerised brain training exercises as homework. LTLE patients were seen either before surgery or 3-6 months after their operation. Improvements in verbal memory were observed in both groups. An effect of brain training was recorded but this did not occur in a consistent direction. Subjective ratings of memory indicated improvements that were significant for the LTLE group but not the controls. Positive changes in the memory outcome measures were associated with improvements in mood. Pre-operative memory rehabilitation was not associated with better outcomes than post-operative intervention. Further research is needed to explore the persistence of the changes observed and to explore if pre-operative rehabilitation offsets post-operative memory decline. Copyright © 2011 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. High-intensity interval training (HIT) for effective and time-efficient pre-surgical exercise interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Matthew; Weston, Kathryn L; Prentis, James M; Snowden, Chris P

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of perioperative medicine is leading to greater diversity in development of pre-surgical interventions, implemented to reduce patient surgical risk and enhance post-surgical recovery. Of these interventions, the prescription of pre-operative exercise training is gathering momentum as a realistic means for enhancing patient surgical outcome. Indeed, the general benefits of exercise training have the potential to pre-operatively optimise several pre-surgical risks factors, including cardiorespiratory function, frailty and cognitive function. Any exercise programme incorporated into the pre-operative pathway of care needs to be effective and time efficient in that any fitness gains are achievable in the limited period between the decision for surgery and operation (e.g. 4 weeks). Fortunately, there is a large volume of research describing effective and time-efficient exercise training programmes within the discipline of sports science. Accordingly, the objective of our commentary is to synthesise contemporary exercise training research, both from non-clinical and clinical populations, with the overarching aim of informing the development of effective and time-efficient pre-surgical exercise training programmes. The development of such exercise training programmes requires the careful consideration of several key principles, namely frequency, intensity, time, type and progression of exercise. Therefore, in light of more recent evidence demonstrating the effectiveness and time efficiency of high-intensity interval training-which involves brief bouts of intense exercise interspersed with longer recovery periods-the principles of exercise training programme design will be discussed mainly in the context of such high-intensity interval training programmes. Other issues pertinent to the development, implementation and evaluation of pre-operative exercise training programmes, such as individual exercise prescription, training session monitoring and potential

  12. Ophthalmic surgical training in Karnataka and Southern India: Present status and future interests from a survey of final-year residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Settings and Design: This study documents a survey of final-year ophthalmology postgraduates on the subject of their surgical training and their future plans after residency. Purpose: This survey aimed to answer the question, "What is the present status of surgical training in ophthalmic training centers?" by obtaining information from students about (1 various methods used in surgical training (2 numbers and types of surgeries performed by them in the training centers (3 their plans after residency. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire containing 21 questions was distributed to 155 students attending an intensive 4-day teaching program. The questions related to orientation training, wet lab training, facilities for training, free surgical camps and detailed information about numbers and types of surgeries observed and performed. Completed questionnaires were collected, and responses analyzed. Results: One hundred and seven completed responses were analyzed. The majority had not received formal orientation training. More than half had undergone wet lab training. Most residents performed their first ophthalmic surgery during the 1 st year of residency and went to the operation theatre multiple times a week. Most of the students planned to undergo further training after residency. More than half of the students found their surgical training to be fair or satisfactory. Conclusions: The number and frequency of ophthalmic surgeries done by residents appear satisfactory, but further efforts from trainers on enhancing the quality and range of surgical training would benefit students and improve their satisfaction.

  13. A review of training research and virtual reality simulators for the da Vinci surgical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, May; Curet, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    PHENOMENON: Virtual reality simulators are the subject of several recent studies of skills training for robot-assisted surgery. Yet no consensus exists regarding what a core skill set comprises or how to measure skill performance. Defining a core skill set and relevant metrics would help surgical educators evaluate different simulators. This review draws from published research to propose a core technical skill set for using the da Vinci surgeon console. Publications on three commercial simulators were used to evaluate the simulators' content addressing these skills and associated metrics. An analysis of published research suggests that a core technical skill set for operating the surgeon console includes bimanual wristed manipulation, camera control, master clutching to manage hand position, use of third instrument arm, activating energy sources, appropriate depth perception, and awareness of forces applied by instruments. Validity studies of three commercial virtual reality simulators for robot-assisted surgery suggest that all three have comparable content and metrics. However, none have comprehensive content and metrics for all core skills. INSIGHTS: Virtual reality simulation remains a promising tool to support skill training for robot-assisted surgery, yet existing commercial simulator content is inadequate for performing and assessing a comprehensive basic skill set. The results of this evaluation help identify opportunities and challenges that exist for future developments in virtual reality simulation for robot-assisted surgery. Specifically, the inclusion of educational experts in the development cycle alongside clinical and technological experts is recommended.

  14. Traditional Versus Simulation Resident Surgical Laparoscopic Salpingectomy Training: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nima R; Makai, Gretchen E; Sloan, Nancy L; Della Badia, Carl R

    2016-01-01

    levels. The intervention group experienced both increases (anatomy, steps of surgery, 2-handed surgery, and use of energy) and decreases (reading and learning in operating room) in reported comfort levels. This study demonstrates that simulation can improve surgical technique OSATs. However, of 45 possible points, both groups' average scores were training is needed to substantially increase the residents' surgical skills. Copyright © 2016 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Using optimization models to demonstrate the need for structural changes in training programs for surgical medical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jonathan; Kim, Kibaek; Mehrotra, Sanjay; DaRosa, Debra A; Daskin, Mark S; Rodriguez, Heron E

    2013-09-01

    The primary goal of a residency program is to prepare trainees for unsupervised care. Duty hour restrictions imposed throughout the prior decade require that residents work significantly fewer hours. Moreover, various stakeholders (e.g. the hospital, mentors, other residents, educators, and patients) require them to prioritize very different activities, often conflicting with their learning goals. Surgical residents' learning goals include providing continuity throughout a patient's pre-, peri-, and post-operative care as well as achieving sufficient surgical experience levels in various procedure types and participating in various formal educational activities, among other things. To complicate matters, senior residents often compete with other residents for surgical experience. This paper features experiments using an optimization model and a real dataset. The experiments test the viability of achieving the above goals at a major academic center using existing models of delivering medical education and training to surgical residents. It develops a detailed multi-objective, two-stage stochastic optimization model with anticipatory capabilities solved over a rolling time horizon. A novel feature of the models is the incorporation of learning curve theory in the objection function. Using a deterministic version of the model, we identify bounds on the achievement of learning goals under existing training paradigms. The computational results highlight the structural problems in the current surgical resident educational system. These results further corroborate earlier findings and suggest an educational system redesign is necessary for surgical medical residents.

  16. Animal model for training and improvement of the surgical skills in endolaryngeal microsurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser Kotby, Mohammad; Wahba, Hassan A; Kamal, Ehab; El-Makhzangy, Aly M Nagy; Bahaa, Nevine

    2012-05-01

    Animal models for training of surgical skills were widely used for a long time in the education of medical practitioners. It is recognized, however, that endolaryngeal microsurgery requires highly refined skills to handle the delicate structures of the vocal folds under the microscope. The availability of fresh human laryngeal specimens is markedly restricted by legal and hygienic issues. The aim of this work was to report on the design of a feasible and effective model to provide the much needed skills in an animal laryngeal model that is as close as possible to the human vocal fold structure. In the initial phase of the research, three animal larynges were studied: porcine/pig, bovine/calf, and ovine/sheep larynges. The pig/porcine larynx was chosen for this experimental training model because it closely resembled the human laryngeal/glottal configurations. A study was carried out on 10 porcine/pig larynges to assess the dimensions of the glottis and study the histology of the layered structure of the vocal fold. The study was pursued to confirm the resemblance of this animal specimen to the human vocal fold. A wooden box with a black finished interior was prepared with an acrylic bed at its floor. This bed allows placement of the porcine/pig larynx. The design of the box allows the endoscopic exposure of the porcine/pig larynx through a rubber diaphragm. The darkness and confinement of the box, apart from the light of the endoscope, approximates the situation in live endoscopy. The operating microscope is then used to expose the glottis. Routine fine microlaryngeal instruments were used for training in the prescribed skills.

  17. Determining the need for team-based training in delirium management: A needs assessment of surgical healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Tehrani, Hedieh; Kacikanis, Anna; Tan, Adrienne; Hawa, Raed; Anderson, Ruthie; Okrainec, Allan; Abbey, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of delirium in surgical units is a serious quality concern, given its impact on morbidity and mortality. While successful delirium management depends upon interdisciplinary care, training needs for surgical teams have not been studied. A needs assessment of surgical units was conducted to determine perceived comfort in managing delirium, and interprofessional training needs for team-based care. We administered a survey to 106 General Surgery healthcare professionals (69% response rate) with a focus on attitudes towards delirium and team management. Although most respondents identified delirium as important to patient outcomes, only 61% of healthcare professionals indicated that a team-based approach was always observed in practice. Less than half had a clear understanding of their role in delirium care, while just over half observed team communication of delirium care plans during handover. This is the first observation of clear gaps in perceived team performance in a General Surgery setting.

  18. Association between Fellowship Training, Surgical Volume, and Laparoscopic Suturing Techniques among Members of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objective. To compare surgical volume and techniques including laparoscopic suturing among members of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists (AAGL according to fellowship training status. Design. A web-based survey was designed using Qualtrics and sent to AAGL members. Results. Minimally invasive gynecologic surgery (FMIGS trained surgeons were more likely to perform more than 8 major conventional laparoscopic cases per month (63% versus 38%, P<0.001, OR [95% CI] = 2.78 [1.54–5.06] and were more likely to perform laparoscopic suturing during these cases (32% versus 16%, P<0.004, OR [95% CI] = 2.44 [1.25–4.71]. The non-fellowship trained (NFT surgeons in private practice were less likely to perform over 8 conventional laparoscopic cases (34% versus 51%, P=0.03, OR [95% CI] = 0.50 [0.25–0.99] and laparoscopic suturing during these cases (13% versus 27%, P=0.01, OR [95% CI] = 0.39 [0.17–0.92] compared to NFT surgeons in academic practice. Conclusion. The surgical volume and utilization of laparoscopic suturing of FMIGS trained surgeons are significantly increased compared to NFT surgeons. Academic practice setting had a positive impact on surgical volume of NFT surgeons but not on FMIGS trained surgeons.

  19. Association between Fellowship Training, Surgical Volume, and Laparoscopic Suturing Techniques among Members of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, Emad; Scott, Lauren; Miladinovic, Branko; Imudia, Anthony N; Hart, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective. To compare surgical volume and techniques including laparoscopic suturing among members of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists (AAGL) according to fellowship training status. Design. A web-based survey was designed using Qualtrics and sent to AAGL members. Results. Minimally invasive gynecologic surgery (FMIGS) trained surgeons were more likely to perform more than 8 major conventional laparoscopic cases per month (63% versus 38%, P < 0.001, OR [95% CI] = 2.78 [1.54-5.06]) and were more likely to perform laparoscopic suturing during these cases (32% versus 16%, P < 0.004, OR [95% CI] = 2.44 [1.25-4.71]). The non-fellowship trained (NFT) surgeons in private practice were less likely to perform over 8 conventional laparoscopic cases (34% versus 51%, P = 0.03, OR [95% CI] = 0.50 [0.25-0.99]) and laparoscopic suturing during these cases (13% versus 27%, P = 0.01, OR [95% CI] = 0.39 [0.17-0.92]) compared to NFT surgeons in academic practice. Conclusion. The surgical volume and utilization of laparoscopic suturing of FMIGS trained surgeons are significantly increased compared to NFT surgeons. Academic practice setting had a positive impact on surgical volume of NFT surgeons but not on FMIGS trained surgeons.

  20. Digital Curricula Evolving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Week, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This special report is the latest installment in an ongoing series about how online education is changing teaching and learning and the development of curricula. It was produced with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York. This paper contains the following articles: (1) Changing the Role of K-12…

  1. Simulation-based cutaneous surgical-skill training on a chicken-skin bench model in a medical undergraduate program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Denadai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Because of ethical and medico-legal aspects involved in the training of cutaneous surgical skills on living patients, human cadavers and living animals, it is necessary the search for alternative and effective forms of training simulation. Aims: To propose and describe an alternative methodology for teaching and learning the principles of cutaneous surgery in a medical undergraduate program by using a chicken-skin bench model. Materials and Methods: One instructor for every four students, teaching materials on cutaneous surgical skills, chicken trunks, wings, or thighs, a rigid platform support, needled threads, needle holders, surgical blades with scalpel handles, rat-tooth tweezers, scissors, and marking pens were necessary for training simulation. Results: A proposal for simulation-based training on incision, suture, biopsy, and on reconstruction techniques using a chicken-skin bench model distributed in several sessions and with increasing levels of difficultywas structured. Both feedback and objective evaluations always directed to individual students were also outlined. Conclusion: The teaching of a methodology for the principles of cutaneous surgery using a chicken-skin bench model versatile, portable, easy to assemble, and inexpensive is an alternative and complementary option to the armamentarium of methods based on other bench models described.

  2. Surgical education and the theoretical concept of communities of practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Nestel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical practice is largely learned in the workplace. Changes in health services and education provision have seen a shift from traditional apprenticeship-type learning to competency-based curricula with the workplace remaining the principal site for learning. Sociocultural learning theories offer valuable lenses through which to observe, design for, and analyze workplace-based learning. In this paper, we consider the theoretical concept of communities of practice in surgery. We describe notions of legitimate peripheral participation and development of professional identity. We highlight the benefits that communities of practice bring to surgical training, as well as the limitations. By understanding community of practice theory as applied to the surgical workplace and the factors that both drive and impede its development, surgical trainers may improve the learning environment, enhancing the attainment of competencies by surgical trainees.

  3. Objective assessment of surgical performance and its impact on a national selection programme of candidates for higher surgical training in plastic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Sean M

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to develop and validate a transparent, fair and objective assessment programme for the selection of surgical trainees into higher surgical training (HST) in plastic surgery in the Republic of Ireland. METHODS: Thirty-four individuals applied for HST in plastic surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) in the academic years 2005-2006 and 2006-2007. Eighteen were short-listed for interview and further assessment. All applicants were required to report on their undergraduate educational performance and their postgraduate professional development. Short-listed applicants completed validated objective assessment simulations of surgical skills, an interview and assessment of their suitability for a career in surgery. RESULTS: When applicants\\' short-listing scores were combined with their interview scores and assessment of their suitability for a career in surgery, individuals who were selected for HST in plastic surgery performed significantly better than those who were not (P<0.002). However, when the assessment of technical skills scores were added the significance level of this difference increased further (P<0.0001) as did the statistical power of the difference to 99.9%, thus increasing the robustness of the selection package. CONCLUSION: The results from this study suggest that the assessment protocol we used to select individuals for HST in plastic surgery reliably and statistically significantly discriminated between the performances of candidates.

  4. Self-reported tobacco smoking practices among medical students and their perceptions towards training about tobacco smoking in medical curricula: A cross-sectional, questionnaire survey in Malaysia, India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Mohsin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco smoking issues in developing countries are usually taught non-systematically as and when the topic arose. The World Health Organisation and Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS have suggested introducing a separate integrated tobacco module into medical school curricula. Our aim was to assess medical students' tobacco smoking habits, their practices towards patients' smoking habits and attitude towards teaching about smoking in medical schools. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was carried out among final year undergraduate medical students in Malaysia, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. An anonymous, self-administered questionnaire included items on demographic information, students' current practices about patients' tobacco smoking habits, their perception towards tobacco education in medical schools on a five point Likert scale. Questions about tobacco smoking habits were adapted from GHPSS questionnaire. An 'ever smoker' was defined as one who had smoked during lifetime, even if had tried a few puffs once or twice. 'Current smoker' was defined as those who had smoked tobacco product on one or more days in the preceding month of the survey. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results Overall response rate was 81.6% (922/1130. Median age was 22 years while 50.7% were males and 48.2% were females. The overall prevalence of 'ever smokers' and 'current smokers' was 31.7% and 13.1% respectively. A majority (> 80% of students asked the patients about their smoking habits during clinical postings/clerkships. Only a third of them did counselling, and assessed the patients' willingness to quit. Majority of the students agreed about doctors' role in tobacco control as being role models, competence in smoking cessation methods, counseling, and the need for training about tobacco cessation in medical schools. About 50% agreed that current curriculum teaches about tobacco smoking but not

  5. Development of a surgical skills curriculum for the training and assessment of manual skills in orthopedic surgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohn, Eric A; Brooks, Adam G; Leasure, Jeremi; Camisa, William; van Warmerdam, Jennifer; Kondrashov, Dimitriy; Montgomery, William; McGann, William

    2015-01-01

    To develop and conduct a pilot study of a curriculum of 4 surrogate bone training modules to assess and track progress in basic orthopedic manual skills outside the operating room. Four training modules were developed with faculty and resident input. The modules include (1) cortical drilling, (2) drill trajectory, (3) oscillating saw, and (4) pedicle probing. Orthopedic resident's performance was evaluated. Validity and reliability results were calculated using standard analysis of variance and multivariate regression analysis accounting for postgraduate year (PGY) level, number of attempts, and specific outcome target results specific to the simulation module. St. Mary's Medical Center in San Francisco, CA. These modules were tested on 15 orthopedic surgery residents ranging from PGY 1 to PGY 5 experience. The cortical drilling module had a mean success rate of 56% ± 5%. There was a statistically significant difference in performance according to the diameter of the drill used from 33% ± 7% with large diameter to 70% ± 6% with small diameter. The drill trajectory module had a success rate of 85% ± 3% with a trend toward improvement across PGY level. The oscillating saw module had a mean success rate of 25% ± 5% (trajectory) and 84% ± 6% (depth). We observed a significant improvement in trajectory performance during the second attempt. The pedicle probing module had a success rate of 46% ± 10%. The results of this pilot study on a small number of residents are promising. The modules were inexpensive and easy to administer. Conclusions of statistical significance include (1) residents who could easily detect changes in surrogate bone thickness with a smaller diameter drill than with a larger diameter drill and (2) residents who significantly improved saw trajectory with an additional attempt at the module. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effects of educational curricula and training on LGBT-specific health issues for healthcare students and professionals: a mixed-method systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adekemi Oluwayemisi Sekoni

    2017-01-01

    Results: Out of 1171 papers identified, 16 publications reporting 15 studies were included in the review. Three were non-randomized controlled studies and 12 had a pre/post-design; two had qualitative components. Bias was reported in the selection of participants and confounding. Risk reported was moderate/mild. Most studies were from the USA, the topics revolved around key terms and terminology, stigma and discrimination, sexuality and sexual dysfunction, sexual history taking, LGBT-specific health and health disparities. Time allotted for training ranged from 1 to 42 hours, the involvement of LGBT people was minimal. The only intervention in sub-Saharan Africa focused exclusively on men who have sex with men. All the studies reported statistically significant improvement in knowledge, attitude and/or practice post-training. Two main themes were identified from the qualitative studies: the process of changing values and attitudes to be more LGBT inclusive, and the constraints to the application of new values in practice.Conclusions: Training of healthcare providers will provide information and improve skills of healthcare providers which may lead to improved quality of healthcare for LGBT people. This review reports short-term improvement in knowledge, attitudes and practice of healthcare students and professionals with regards to sexual and LGBT-specific healthcare. However, a unified conceptual model for training in-terms of duration, content and training methodology was lacking.

  7. Toward competency-based curricula in patient-centered spiritual care: recommended competencies for family medicine resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandarajah, Gowri; Craigie, Frederic; Hatch, Robert; Kliewer, Stephen; Marchand, Lucille; King, Dana; Hobbs, Richard; Daaleman, Timothy P

    2010-12-01

    Spiritual care is increasingly recognized as an important component of medical care. Although many primary care residency programs incorporate spiritual care into their curricula, there are currently no consensus guidelines regarding core competencies necessary for primary care training. In 2006, the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine's Interest Group on Spirituality undertook a three-year initiative to address this need. The project leader assembled a diverse panel of eight educators with dual expertise in (1) spirituality and health and (2) family medicine. The multidisciplinary panel members represented different geographic regions and diverse faith traditions and were nationally recognized senior faculty. They underwent three rounds of a modified Delphi technique to achieve initial consensus regarding spiritual care competencies (SCCs) tailored for family medicine residency training, followed by an iterative process of external validation, feedback, and consensus modifications of the SCCs. Panel members identified six knowledge, nine skills, and four attitude core SCCs for use in training and linked these to competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. They identified three global competencies for use in promotion and graduation criteria. Defining core competencies in spiritual care clarifies training goals and provides the basis for robust curricula evaluation. Given the breadth of family medicine, these competencies may be adaptable to other primary care fields, to medical and surgical specialties, and to medical student education. Effective training in this area may enhance physicians' ability to attend to the physical, mental, and spiritual needs of patients and better maintain sustainable healing relationships.

  8. Use of portfolios as a learning and assessment tool in a surgical practical session of urology during undergraduate medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsellem-Ouazana, Delphine; Van Pee, Dominique; Godin, Veronique

    2006-06-01

    We chose to introduce a portfolio as a learning and assessment tool in a practical training session of urological surgery for undergraduate medical students. Our primary objectives were to develop the students' self reflexive ability in front of complex medical cases and to teach them how to identify their learning needs in a short period of time, on a specific topic. Students completed, during their training session, a portfolio on a urological topic under the constant supervision of a tutor. The students were evaluated on their portfolio's presentation with a 20-point grade grid known in advance. Even in a surgical training session, a portfolio can be a useful learning and assessment tool. It clearly encourages self-reflection and pre-professional practice.

  9. The learning effect of intraoperative video-enhanced surgical procedure training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Det, M. J.; Meijerink, W. J. H. J.; Hoff, C.; Middel, L. J.; Koopal, S. A.; Pierie, J. P. E. N.

    2011-01-01

    Background The transition from basic skills training in a skills lab to procedure training in the operating theater using the traditional master-apprentice model (MAM) lacks uniformity and efficiency. When the supervising surgeon performs parts of a procedure, training opportunities are lost. To min

  10. Implementation of simulation in surgical practice: minimally invasive surgery has taken the lead: the Dutch experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuder, Henk W R; Oei, Guid; Maas, Mario; Borleffs, Jan C C; Schijven, Marlies P

    2011-01-01

    Minimal invasive techniques are rapidly becoming standard surgical techniques for many surgical procedures. To develop the skills necessary to apply these techniques, box trainers and/or inanimate models may be used, but these trainers lack the possibility of inherent objective classification of results. In the past decade, virtual reality (VR) trainers were introduced for training minimal invasive techniques. Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is, by nature, very suitable for this type of training. The specific psychomotor skills and eye-hand coordination needed for MIS can be mastered largely using VR simulation techniques. It is also possible to transfer skills learned on a simulator to real operations, resulting in error reduction and shortening of procedural operating time. The authors aim to enlighten the process of gaining acceptance in the Netherlands for novel training techniques. The Dutch Societies of Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Urology each developed individual training curricula for MIS using simulation techniques, to be implemented in daily practice. The ultimate goal is to improve patient safety. The authors outline the opinions of actors involved, such as different simulators, surgical trainees, surgeons, surgical societies, hospital boards, government, and the public. The actual implementation of nationwide training curricula for MIS is, however, a challenging step.

  11. Financial impact of surgical training on hospital economics: an income analysis of 1184 out-patient clinic consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J E F; Ravindra, P; Lepore, M; Armstrong, A; Bhangu, A; Maxwell-Armstrong, C A

    2013-01-01

    In many countries healthcare commissioning bodies (state or insurance-based) reimburse hospitals for their activity. The costs associated with post-graduate clinical training as part of this are poorly understood. This study quantified the financial revenue generated by surgical trainees in the out-patient clinic setting. A retrospective analysis of surgical out-patient ambulatory care appointments under 6 full-time equivalent Consultants (Attendings) in one hospital over 2 months. Clinic attendance lists were generated from the Patient Access System. Appointments were categorised as: 'new', 'review' or 'procedure' as per the Department of Health Payment by Results (PbR) Outpatient Tariff (Outpatient Treatment Function Code 104; Outpatient Procedure Code OPRSI1). During the study period 78 clinics offered 1184 appointments; 133 of these were not attended (11.2%). Of those attended 1029 had sufficient detail for analysis (98%). 261 (25.4%) patients were seen by a trainee. Applying PbR reimbursement criteria to these gave a projected annual income of £GBP 218,712 (€EU 266,527; $USD 353,657) generated by 6 surgical trainees (Residents). This is equivalent to approximately £GBP 36,452 (€EU 44,415; $USD 58,943) per trainee annually compared to £GBP 48,732 (€EU 59,378; $USD 78,800) per Consultant. This projected yearly income off-set 95% of the trainee's basic salary. Surgical trainees generated a quarter of the out-patient clinic activity related income in this study, with each trainee producing three-quarters of that generated by a Consultant. This offers considerable commercial value to hospitals. Although this must offset productivity differences and overall running costs, training bodies should ensure hospitals offer an appropriate return. In a competitive market hospitals could be invited to compete for trainees, with preference given to those providing excellence in training. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  12. Using virtual reality technology and hand tracking technology to create software for training surgical skills in 3D game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakirova, A. A.; Ganiev, B. A.; Mullin, R. I.

    2015-11-01

    The lack of visible and approachable ways of training surgical skills is one of the main problems in medical education. Existing simulation training devices are not designed to teach students, and are not available due to the high cost of the equipment. Using modern technologies such as virtual reality and hands movements fixation technology we want to create innovative method of learning the technics of conducting operations in 3D game format, which can make education process interesting and effective. Creating of 3D format virtual simulator will allow to solve several conceptual problems at once: opportunity of practical skills improvement unlimited by the time without the risk for patient, high realism of environment in operational and anatomic body structures, using of game mechanics for information perception relief and memorization of methods acceleration, accessibility of this program.

  13. How to train surgical residents to perform laparoscopic roux-en-Y gastric bypass safely

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.I.T. Iordens (Gijs); R.A. Klaassen (René); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); B.I. Cleffken (Berry); E. van der Harst (Erwin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground As a result of increasing numbers of patients with morbid obesity there is a worldwide demand for bariatric surgeons. The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, nowadays performed mostly laparoscopically (LRYGB), has been proven to be a highly effective surgical treatment for morbid

  14. [Study nurses in Germany--a survey of job-related activities in clinical trials as a basis for a job description and for training curricula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, Bettina; Beier, Jutta

    2007-10-01

    Until now, the conducting of clinical trials by nurses has scarcely come under scientific examination. Particularly in Germany, the field of activity has only been treated marginally in the health-care and nursing sciences. In Germany, the term 'Study Nurse' is used not only for members of the nursing profession but across disciplines; it is one of the most widely used terms. An explorative, descriptive study has been conducted employing a modified version of the Work Sampling Method. 79 Study Nurses were anonymously surveyed using a self-administered workload catalogue. 85 participated in the survey that focused on demographics, qualifications, and salary. In every workload catalogue, contact with other colleagues as well as job activities and the time spent on each activity were documented over twenty days. Study Nurses are mostly members of the nursing profession. They work mostly at university clinics and are responsible for conducting clinical trials. This applies to all trials that license medicinal products but also for trials initiated by investigators. While trial-specific documentation is their most time-intensive task, the overall role of Study Nurses encompasses a very broad range of activities. For the most part, they work alone and independently but have various contacts mainly to patients and the investigator. Future research should take into consideration the motivation for opting for the job of Study Nurse and the question of whether through their training and experience nurses are better qualified than other healthcare professionals.

  15. Is there a role for the use of aviation assessment instruments in surgical training preparation? A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk-Vos, Aline C; Heres, Marion H; Kesteloo, Jasper; Verburg, Dick; Hiddema, Frans; Lie, Desiree A; de Korne, Dirk F

    2017-01-01

    Selection for surgical residency programmes could potentially be improved through pretraining preparation, after assessment of surgical candidates' sensorimotor skills and personality traits. Existing aviation pilot selection instruments are available to test sensorimotor skills and personality traits. This study examined selected instruments to assess medical trainees' sensorimotor skills and personality traits. Aviation's validated computer-based Computerized Pilot Aptitude and Screening System (COMPASS) and Checklist Professional Profile (CPP) were applied to 166 final year medical students during a surgical clerkship between 2013 and 2015. All trainees completed COMPASS and CPP within the prescribed 2 hours. Compared with an age-matched and gender-matched cohort of 165 pilot candidates, medical trainees scored significantly higher on eye-hand coordination (peye-hand-foot coordination (pdominance (p<0.001), ambition (p<0.001) and resilience (p<0.001). Final year medical trainees from one medical school were able to complete aviation's sensorimotor skills and personality traits selection instruments within the set time frame. They scored differently from aviation trainees on selected skills and personality traits. The applicability and utility of aviation instruments to presurgical training preparation remains to be tested. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Micro Computer Technician Course. Course Design, Course Curricula, Learning Units, Resource Requirements. InfoTVE 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech. (Australia).

    This guide to the core curricula for the training of microcomputer technicians is designed for school leavers after 10 or more years of general/vocational education with a science and mathematics background. The 2-year course is to be administered in four semesters. An introductory outline of course design and curricula provides the rationale,…

  17. The effect of video-assisted oral feedback versus oral feedback on surgical communicative competences in undergraduate training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesseler, M; Sterz, J; Bender, B; Hoefer, S; Walcher, F

    2017-08-01

    Feedback can significantly improve future performance. Reviewing one's performance by video is discussed as useful adjunct to debriefing, particularly for non-technical skills. Communicative competencies are an essential part of daily clinical practice; thus should be taught and assessed during undergraduate training. The aim of this study was to compare the educational value of video-assisted feedback versus oral feedback in communicative competencies in the surgical context. Fourth-year medical students completed a 210-min training unit of 'taking patient's history and obtaining informed consents prior to surgery' using role plays. Oral feedback was received directly thereafter using agenda-led, outcome-based guidelines (ALOBA). In the study group, the role plays were video-taped and reviewed thereafter. Afterwards, students completed two OSCE stations, where they were assessed regarding their communicative competencies and the content of the clinical scenario. One-hundred students (49 receiving video-assisted feedback, 51 oral) participated in the study. Those receiving video-assisted feedback performed significantly better in overall score in both OSCE stations (p communicative competencies at taking patient history (p = 0.029 or better), and in 2 of 5 items at obtaining informed consent (p = 0.008, <0.001). The educational effect size for both tasks was large. Using our methodology, video-assisted feedback offered a significant educational benefit over oral feedback alone during a simulated patient encounter in a surgical context.

  18. Man versus Machine: Software Training for Surgeons-An Objective Evaluation of Human and Computer-Based Training Tools for Cataract Surgical Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Nizar; Smith, Phillip; Emeriewen, Krisztina; Sharma, Anant; Jones, Simon; Wawrzynski, James; Tang, Hongying; Sullivan, Paul; Caputo, Silvestro; Saleh, George M

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to address two queries: firstly, the relationship between two cataract surgical feedback tools for training, one human and one software based, and, secondly, evaluating microscope control during phacoemulsification using the software. Videos of surgeons with varying experience were enrolled and independently scored with the validated PhacoTrack motion capture software and the Objective Structured Assessment of Cataract Surgical Skill (OSACCS) human scoring tool. Microscope centration and path length travelled were also evaluated with the PhacoTrack software. Twenty-two videos correlated PhacoTrack motion capture with OSACCS. The PhacoTrack path length, number of movements, and total procedure time were found to have high levels of Spearman's rank correlation of -0.6792619 (p = 0.001), -0.6652021 (p = 0.002), and -0.771529 (p = 0001), respectively, with OSACCS. Sixty-two videos evaluated microscope camera control. Novice surgeons had their camera off the pupil centre at a far greater mean distance (SD) of 6.9 (3.3) mm, compared with experts of 3.6 (1.6) mm (p ≪ 0.05). The expert surgeons maintained good microscope camera control and limited total pupil path length travelled 2512 (1031) mm compared with novices of 4049 (2709) mm (p ≪ 0.05). Good agreement between human and machine quantified measurements of surgical skill exists. Our results demonstrate that surrogate markers for camera control are predictors of surgical skills.

  19. Impact of surgical training on the performance of proposed quality measures for hysterectomy for pelvic organ prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams-Piper, Emily R; Guaderrama, Noelani M; Chen, Qiaoling; Whitcomb, Emily L

    2017-06-01

    Recent healthcare reform has led to increased emphasis on standardized provision of quality care. Use of government- and organization-approved quality measures is 1 way to document quality care. Quality measures, to improve care and aid in reimbursement, are being proposed and vetted in many areas of medicine. We aimed to assess performance of proposed quality measures that pertain to hysterectomy for pelvic organ prolapse stratified by surgical training. The 4 quality measures that we assessed were (1) the documentation of offering conservative treatment of pelvic organ prolapse, (2) the quantitative assessment of pelvic organ prolapse (Pelvic Organ Prolapse-Quantification or Baden-Walker), (3) the performance of an apical support procedure, and (4) the performance of cystoscopy at time of hysterectomy. Patients who underwent hysterectomy for pelvic organ prolapse from January 1 to December 31, 2008, within a large healthcare maintenance organization were identified by diagnostic and procedural codes within the electronic medical record. Medical records were reviewed extensively for demographic and clinical data that included the performance of the 4 proposed quality measures and the training background of the primary surgeon (gynecologic generalist, fellowship-trained surgeon in Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, and "grandfathered" Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery). Data were analyzed with the use of descriptive statistics. Inferential statistics with chi-squared tests were used to compare performance rates of quality measures that were stratified by surgical training. Probability values trained surgeons performed 302 hysterectomies for pelvic organ prolapse; grandfathered Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery surgeons performed 98 hysterectomies, and gynecologic generalist surgeons performed 230 hysterectomies. Fellowship-trained surgeons had the highest performance rates for individual quality measures (91

  20. Laparoscopic Appendicectomy: The Ideal Procedure for Laparoscopic Skill Training for Surgical Registrars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan D. Tata

    2008-04-01

    CONCLUSION: We conclude that laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe laparoscopic training tool for registrars with basic laparoscopic knowledge who have had a proper apprenticeship, and can be done in a clinical setting.

  1. Implications of Surgical Training on Operating Room Throughput at Wilford Hall Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-26

    its physician specialists, 85 percent of dental specialists, and a full spectrum of other training. The medical center’s fourth mission is clinical...dedicated to training dental officers of the three services in one facility. The medical center’s support of San Antonio’s emergency medicine structure...P. (2006). Resident teaching versus the operating room schedule: An independent observer- based study of 1558 cases. Anesthesia and Analgesia , 103

  2. Undermining and bullying in surgical training: A review and recommendations by the Association of Surgeons in Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, J R L; Ferguson, H J M; McDermott, F D; Hornby, S T; Gokani, V J

    2015-11-01

    The 2012 General Medical Council National Trainees' Survey found that 13% of UK trainees had experienced undermining or bullying in the workplace. The Association of Surgeons in Training subsequently released a position statement raising concerns stemming from these findings, including potential compromise to patient safety. This article considers the impact of such behaviour on the NHS, and makes recommendations for creating a positive learning environment within the NHS at national, organisational, and local levels. The paper also discusses the nature of issues within the UK, and pathways through which trainees can seek help.

  3. Making Curricula Competence-oriented at Vietnamese Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosma, RH.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many academic curricula suffer from a teacher-centred focus on knowledge transfer and do not consider the societal needs for competences. This paper reflects on the transformation from theory-centred towards competency-oriented curricula at three Vietnamese Agriculture Universities with support of a Netherlands-funded project. Experts guided the implementation, from analysis of labour market to evaluation of new courses. Based on students' evaluation and lecturers' experiences, both types of respondents reported that after having been exposed to a series of trainings and hands-on experience in and outside classrooms, they gained new sets of knowledge and skills. However, some issues emerged in the process. Among these are the lack of competence among lecturers to design curricula based on outcomes, particularly addressing competence of students' knowledge, skills and attitudes; lack of staff to develop and implement a competence-based curricula; non- aggregation of closely related courses in modules that avoid repetitions and provides time for training of skills and attitudes. There is also a need to train students for competency in performing more complex learning outcomes, such as critical thinking. For this change to happen, lecturers need continuous training in didactics for active teaching, and Universities need to provide means for participative learning.

  4. Application of Mental Skills Training in Surgery: A Review of Its Effectiveness and Proposed Next Steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Nicholas E; Bean, Eric A; Hammonds, Samuel C; Stefanidis, Dimitrios

    2017-05-01

    Mental skills training, which refers to the teaching of performance enhancement and stress management psychological strategies, may benefit surgeons. Our objective was to review the application of mental skills training in surgery and contrast it to other domains, examine the effectiveness of this approach in enhancing surgical performance and reducing stress, and provide future directions for mental skills training in surgery. A systematic literature search of MEDLINE, PubMed, PsycINFO, and ClinicalKey was performed between 1996 and 2016. Keywords included were mental readiness, mental competency, mental skill, mental practice, imagery, mental imagery, mental rehearsal, stress management training, stress coping, mental training, performance enhancement, and surgery. Reviews of mental skills interventions in sport and well-regarded sport psychology textbooks were also reviewed. Primary outcome of interest was the effect of mental skills on surgical performance in the simulated or clinical environment. Of 490 identified abstracts, 28 articles met inclusion criteria and were reviewed. The majority of the literature provides evidence that mental imagery and stress management training programs are effective at enhancing surgical performance and reducing stress. Studies from other disciplines suggest that comprehensive mental skills programs may be more effective than imagery and stress management techniques alone. Given the demonstrated efficacy of mental imagery and stress management training in surgery and the incremental value of comprehensive mental skills curricula used in other domains, a concerted effort should be made to apply comprehensive mental skills curricula during surgical training.

  5. Development and evaluation of the e-learning teaching materials for surgical nursing training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoshimi; Takeuchi, Tomiko; Takahashi, Yukiko; Ozawa, Kazuhiro; Nishimoto, Yutaka; Terauti, Hidemasa

    2006-01-01

    We investigated e-learning teaching materials with a questionnaire for 55 nursing students. Students thought the materials easy to use. In addition, the teaching materials which we developed gave them the confidence of thinking, "I can do it". We affect training by imaging a nursing procedure and think anxiety to training to be be relieved. However, load of PC became high in these teaching materials to display of two motion pictures simultaneously in one screen, so it would be necessary to produce the teaching materials considered transmission rate.

  6. Surgical scene generation for virtual reality-based training in medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Harders, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Provides an extensive overview of related work in the three different directions of scene generation and introduces specific solutions in detailIdeal reference for any reader involved in generating training scenarios, as well as in VR-based training in generalDiscusses theoeretically unlimited automatic generation of healthy anatomy within natural variability allowing tedious and time-intensive manual segmentation to be avoidedPresents high-quality synthesis of new textures based on samples and automatic mapping to complex geometries enabling the drawing and mapping of textures to 3D models to

  7. Features that contribute to the usefulness of low-fidelity models for surgical skills training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langebæk, Rikke; Berendt, Mette; Pedersen, Lene Tanggaard

    2012-01-01

    of the usefulness of the models in applying the trained skills to live animal surgery. One hundred and forty-six veterinary fourth-year students evaluated the models on a four-point Likert scale. Of these, 26 additionally participated in individual semistructured interviews. The survey results showed that 75 per...

  8. terrain analysis in the course curricula of the south african army ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a_lodi

    curricula presented by the South African Army School of Engineers. Methodology involved .... terrain to determine the manoeuvre potential, ways to reduce natural and .... terrain analysis knowledge throughout their formal training. The next ...

  9. Assessment of health promotion content in undergraduate physiotherapy curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kebogile Mokwena

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The integration of health promotion in the treatment of patients should be included in all academic curricula in primary training of health professionals. However, the extent to which health promotion is included in the various curricula at undergraduate level is not known.Objective: To assess the extent to which health promotion content is integrated in undergraduate physiotherapy training programmes in South Africa. Method: This was a qualitative and descriptive study, using in-depth interviews with representatives of physiotherapy academic departments.Results: All universities have some content of health promotion, with the weighting varying between 12% and 40%. Health promotion is taught at various levels of study, and health promotion training blocks are in both urban and rural settings and include communities, schools and old-age homes. The theories of advocacy, enabling and mediation are covered, but there is limited practical training on these elements. There are limited human resources trained in health promotion, as well as a lack of clear processes of developing and reviewing teaching and training materials.Conclusion: There is lack of consensus on the weighting of health promotion, the level at which it is taught and how it is evaluated across universities. Challenges to integrate health promotion in physiotherapy curricula include lack of frequent curricula reviews, inadequate training of lecturers and lack of conducive practical sites.The physiotherapy profession needs to reach a consensus on minimum standards for integration of health promotion in undergraduate training, and the physiotherapy professional board has the potential to provide the required leadership.

  10. Achieving Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty hours compliance within advanced surgical training: a simulation-based feasibility assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obi, Andrea; Chung, Jennifer; Chen, Ryan; Lin, Wandi; Sun, Siyuan; Pozehl, William; Cohn, Amy M; Daskin, Mark S; Seagull, F Jacob; Reddy, Rishindra M

    2015-11-01

    Certain operative cases occur unpredictably and/or have long operative times, creating a conflict between Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) rules and adequate training experience. A ProModel-based simulation was developed based on historical data. Probabilistic distributions of operative time calculated and combined with an ACGME compliant call schedule. For the advanced surgical cases modeled (cardiothoracic transplants), 80-hour violations were 6.07% and the minimum number of days off was violated 22.50%. There was a 36% chance of failure to fulfill any (either heart or lung) minimum case requirement despite adequate volume. The variable nature of emergency cases inevitably leads to work hour violations under ACGME regulations. Unpredictable cases mandate higher operative volume to ensure achievement of adequate caseloads. Publically available simulation technology provides a valuable avenue to identify adequacy of case volumes for trainees in both the elective and emergency setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Resident training in urology: Bipolar transurethral resection of the prostate - a safe method in learning endoscopic surgical procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Del Rosso

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Modern medicine uses increasingly innovative techniques that require more and more capabilities for acquisition. In the urological department is increasing the presence of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS and transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP is the standard of care in their surgical treatment. We report our surgical experience and learning curve of using bipolar plasmakinetic devices in the training of urological residents to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH treatment. Materials and Methods: 80 patients with benign prostatic enlargement due to BPH were enrolled in the study. TURP has been performed by three urological residents and by an expe- rienced urologist. Patients were evaluated before and 6 months after the endoscopic bipolar plasmakinetic resection using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS, maximum uri- nary flow rate (Qmax, postvoid residual urine (PVR and prostate specific antigen (PSA. Results: Overall 60 procedures were performed, 18 PlasmaKinetic (PK-TURP procedures were completed by the three residents. In the other 42 cases the procedures were completed by the experienced urologist. In eight cases there was a capsular perforation and the experienced urol- ogist replaced the resident to complete the resection. No complications have been reported in the procedures completed by the senior urologist. All complications caused by the residents were man- aged intraoperatively without changing the course of the procedure. Statistical differences were observed regarding IPSS, quality of life (QoL, and PVR at 6-month follow-up when procedures completed by urological residents were compared to those completed by the senior urologist. Conclusion: Bipolar device represents appropriate tools to acquire endoscopic skills. It is safe and it can be used at the first experience of BPH treatment by a resident who has not previ- ously approached this endoscopic surgical procedure.

  12. The effect of surgical training and hospital characteristics on patient outcomes after pediatric surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ceri; van Woerden, Hugo C

    2011-11-01

    A systematic review aimed to compare patient outcomes after (1) appendicectomy and (2) pyloromyotomy performed by different surgical specialties, surgeons with different annual volumes, and in different hospital types, to inform the debate surrounding children's surgery provision. Embase, Medline, Cochrane Library, and Health Management Information Consortium were searched from January 1990 to February 2010 to identify relevant articles. Further literature was sought by contacting experts, citation searching, and hand-searching appropriate journals. Seventeen relevant articles were identified. These showed that (1) rates of wrongly diagnosed appendicitis were higher among general surgeons, but there were little differences in other outcomes and (2) outcomes after pyloromyotomy were superior in patients treated by specialist surgeons. Surgical specialty was a better predictor of morbidity than hospital type, and surgeons with higher operative volumes had better results. Existing evidence is largely observational and potentially subject to selection bias, but general pediatric surgery outcomes were clearly dependent on operative volumes. Published evidence suggests that (1) pediatric appendicectomy should not be centralized because children can be managed effectively by general surgeons; (2) pyloromyotomy need not be centralized but should be carried out in children's units by appropriately trained surgeons who expect to see more than 4 cases per year. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Notes From the Field: Secondary Task Precision for Cognitive Load Estimation During Virtual Reality Surgical Simulation Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Sebastian R; Konge, Lars; Mikkelsen, Peter T; Sørensen, Mads S; Andersen, Steven A W

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive load (CL) theory suggests that working memory can be overloaded in complex learning tasks such as surgical technical skills training, which can impair learning. Valid and feasible methods for estimating the CL in specific learning contexts are necessary before the efficacy of CL-lowering instructional interventions can be established. This study aims to explore secondary task precision for the estimation of CL in virtual reality (VR) surgical simulation and also investigate the effects of CL-modifying factors such as simulator-integrated tutoring and repeated practice. Twenty-four participants were randomized for visual assistance by a simulator-integrated tutor function during the first 5 of 12 repeated mastoidectomy procedures on a VR temporal bone simulator. Secondary task precision was found to be significantly lower during simulation compared with nonsimulation baseline, p precision. This finding suggests that even though considerable changes in CL are reflected in secondary task precision, it lacks sensitivity. In contrast, secondary task reaction time could be more sensitive, but requires substantial postprocessing of data. Therefore, future studies on the effect of CL modifying interventions should weigh the pros and cons of the various secondary task measurements.

  14. Basic Endovascular Skills Trainer: A surgical simulator for the training of novice practitioners of endovascular procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinceri, S; Carbone, M; Marconi, M; Moglia, A; Ferrari, M; Ferrari, V

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the clinical interest for structured training in endovascular procedures has increased. Such procedures respect the physical integrity of the patient and at the same time ensure good therapeutic results. This study describes the development and testing of the B.E.S.T. (Basic Endovascular Skills Trainer) simulator. The B.E.S.T is an innovative physical endovascular simulator to learn basic skills of endovascular surgery. The simulator was tested by 25 clinicians with different levels of experience: novices, intermediates, and experts. All clinicians agree on affirming the importance of training in endovascular surgery; in particular they consider the B.E.S.T a valid simulator to learn specific basic skills of vascular surgery.

  15. Evidence-based surgical training in orthopaedics: how many arthroscopies of the knee are needed to achieve consultant level performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, A J; Erturan, G; Akhtar, K; Judge, A; Alvand, A; Rees, J L

    2015-10-01

    Despite being one of the most common orthopaedic operations, it is still not known how many arthroscopies of the knee must be performed during training in order to develop the skills required to become a Consultant. A total of 54 subjects were divided into five groups according to clinical experience: Novices (n = 10), Junior trainees (n = 10), Registrars (n = 18), Fellows (n = 10) and Consultants (n = 6). After viewing an instructional presentation, each subject performed a simple diagnostic arthroscopy of the knee on a simulator with visualisation and probing of ten anatomical landmarks. Performance was assessed using a validated global rating scale (GRS). Comparisons were made against clinical experience measured by the number of arthroscopies which had been undertaken, and ROC curve analysis was used to determine the number of procedures needed to perform at the level of the Consultants. There were marked differences between the groups. There was significant improvement in performance with increasing experience (p < 0.05). ROC curve analysis identified that approximately 170 procedures were required to achieve the level of skills of a Consultant. We suggest that this approach to identify what represents the level of surgical skills of a Consultant should be used more widely so that standards of training are maintained through the development of an evidenced-based curriculum. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  16. "Best Case/Worst Case": Training Surgeons to Use a Novel Communication Tool for High-Risk Acute Surgical Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruser, Jacqueline M; Taylor, Lauren J; Campbell, Toby C; Zelenski, Amy; Johnson, Sara K; Nabozny, Michael J; Steffens, Nicole M; Tucholka, Jennifer L; Kwekkeboom, Kris L; Schwarze, Margaret L

    2017-04-01

    Older adults often have surgery in the months preceding death, which can initiate postoperative treatments inconsistent with end-of-life values. "Best Case/Worst Case" (BC/WC) is a communication tool designed to promote goal-concordant care during discussions about high-risk surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate a structured training program designed to teach surgeons how to use BC/WC. Twenty-five surgeons from one tertiary care hospital completed a two-hour training session followed by individual coaching. We audio-recorded surgeons using BC/WC with standardized patients and 20 hospitalized patients. Hospitalized patients and their families participated in an open-ended interview 30 to 120 days after enrollment. We used a checklist of 11 BC/WC elements to measure tool fidelity and surgeons completed the Practitioner Opinion Survey to measure acceptability of the tool. We used qualitative analysis to evaluate variability in tool content and to characterize patient and family perceptions of the tool. Surgeons completed a median of 10 of 11 BC/WC elements with both standardized and hospitalized patients (range 5-11). We found moderate variability in presentation of treatment options and description of outcomes. Three months after training, 79% of surgeons reported BC/WC is better than their usual approach and 71% endorsed active use of BC/WC in clinical practice. Patients and families found that BC/WC established expectations, provided clarity, and facilitated deliberation. Surgeons can learn to use BC/WC with older patients considering acute high-risk surgical interventions. Surgeons, patients, and family members endorse BC/WC as a strategy to support complex decision making. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment of the role of aptitude in the acquisition of advanced laparoscopic surgical skill sets: results from a virtual reality-based laparoscopic colectomy training programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Emmeline

    2012-09-01

    The surgeons of the future will need to have advanced laparoscopic skills. The current challenge in surgical education is to teach these skills and to identify factors that may have a positive influence on training curriculums. The primary aim of this study was to determine if fundamental aptitude impacts on ability to perform a laparoscopic colectomy.

  18. American Pediatric Surgical Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Pediatric Surgical Association Search for: Login Resources + For Members For Professionals For Training Program Directors For Media For ... Surgical Outcomes Surveys & Results Publications Continuing Education + ExPERT Pediatric Surgery NaT Annual Meeting CME MOC Requirements Residents / ...

  19. LGBTQ-Inclusive Curricula: Why Supportive Curricula Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapp, Shannon D.; McGuire, Jenifer K.; Sinclair, Katarina O.; Gabrion, Karlee; Russell, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing attention to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning (LGBTQ) issues in schools, including efforts to address such issues through the curriculum. This study examines whether students' perceptions of personal safety and school climate safety are stronger when curricula that include LGBTQ people are present and…

  20. Effects of implementation of an urgent surgical care service on subspecialty general surgery training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Leanne; Buczkowski, Andrzej; Panton, Ormond M.N.; Sidhu, Ravi S.; Hameed, S. Morad

    2010-01-01

    Background In July 2007, a large Canadian teaching hospital realigned its general surgery services into elective general surgery subspecialty-based services (SUBS) and a new urgent surgical care (USC) service (also know in the literature as an acute care surgery service). The residents on SUBS had their number of on-call days reduced to enable them to focus on activities related to SUBS. Our aim was to examine the effect of the creation of the USC service on the educational experiences of SUBS residents. Methods We enrolled residents who were on SUBS for the 6 months before and after the introduction of the USC service. We collected data by use of a survey, WEB eVAL and recorded attendance at academic half days. Our 2 primary outcomes were residents’ attendance at ambulatory clinics and compliance with the reduction in the number of on-call days. Our secondary outcomes included residents’ time for independent study, attendance at academic half days, operative experience, attendance at multidisciplinary rounds and overall satisfaction with SUBS. Results Residents on SUBS had a decrease in the mean number of on-call days per resident per month from 6.28 to 1.84 (p = 0.006), an increase in mean attendance at academic half days from 65% to 87% (p = 0.028), at multidisciplinary rounds (p = 0.002) and at ambulatory clinics and an increase in independent reading time (p = 0.015), and they reported an improvement in their work environment. There was no change in the amount of time residents spent in the operating room or in their overall satisfaction with SUBS. Conclusion Residents’ education in the SUBS structure was positively affected by the creation of a USC service. Compliance with the readjustment of on-call duties was high and was identified as the single most significant factor in enabling residents to take full advantage of the unique educational opportunities available only while on SUBS. PMID:20334744

  1. Presentation of a Nanoelectronics Curricula Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik; Nielsen, Ivan Ring

    2008-01-01

    Future developments in nanoelectronics call for major changes in university curricula within engineering. It is found that three major factors influence the curricula: technology development, development of industrial environment, and development of university structures. It is also found that na...

  2. The medical exploration toolkit: an efficient support for visual computing in surgical planning and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühler, Konrad; Tietjen, Christian; Ritter, Felix; Preim, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Application development is often guided by the usage of software libraries and toolkits. For medical applications, the toolkits currently available focus on image analysis and volume rendering. Advance interactive visualizations and user interface issues are not adequately supported. Hence, we present a toolkit for application development in the field of medical intervention planning, training, and presentation--the MEDICALEXPLORATIONTOOLKIT (METK). The METK is based on the rapid prototyping platform MeVisLab and offers a large variety of facilities for an easy and efficient application development process. We present dedicated techniques for advanced medical visualizations, exploration, standardized documentation, adn interface widgets for common tasks. These include, e.g., advanced animation facilities, viewpoint selection, several illustrative rendering techniques, and new techniques for object selection in 3D surface models. No extended programming skills are needed for application building, since a graphical programming approach can be used. the toolkit is freely available and well documented to facilitate the use and extension of the toolkit.

  3. Sustainability curricula in design education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casais, M.; Christiaans, H.H.C.M.; Almendra, R.

    2012-01-01

    While sustainability in Design finds much attention in the literature, the education of sustainability in Design courses lacks discussion regarding curricula and importance. In an attempt to map the way sustainability is taught in Design Bachelor and Master Courses in the European Union, we began

  4. Developmentally Appropriate Peace Education Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewsader, Joellen; Myers-Walls, Judith A.

    2017-01-01

    Peace education has been offered to children for decades, but those curricula have been only minimally guided by children's developmental stages and needs. In this article, the authors apply their research on children's developmental understanding of peace along with peace education principles and Vygotsky's sociocultural theory to present…

  5. The unmet need for a national surgical quality improvement curriculum: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medbery, Rachel L; Sellers, Morgan M; Ko, Clifford Y; Kelz, Rachel R

    2014-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Next Accreditation System will require general surgery training programs to demonstrate outstanding clinical outcomes and education in quality improvement (QI). The American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Project Quality In-Training Initiative reports the results of a systematic review of the literature investigating the availability of a QI curriculum. Using defined search terms, a systematic review was conducted in Embase, PubMed, and Google Scholar (January 2000-March 2013) to identify a surgical QI curriculum. Bibliographies from selected articles and other relevant materials were also hand searched. Curriculum was defined as an organized program of learning complete with content, instruction, and assessment for use in general surgical residency programs. Two independent observers graded surgical articles on quality of curriculum presented. Overall, 50 of 1155 references had information regarding QI in graduate medical education. Most (n = 24, 48%) described QI education efforts in nonsurgical fields. A total of 31 curricular blueprints were identified; 6 (19.4%) were specific to surgery. Targeted learners were most often post graduate year-2 residents (29.0%); only 6 curricula (19.4%) outlined a course for all residents within their respective programs. Plan, Do, Study, Act (n = 10, 32.3%), and Root Cause Analysis (n = 5, 16.1%) were the most common QI content presented, the majority of instruction was via lecture/didactics (n = 26, 83.9%), and only 7 (22.6%) curricula used validated tool kits for assessment. Elements of QI curriculum for surgical education exist; however, comprehensive content is lacking. The American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Project Quality In-Training Initiative will build on the high-quality components identified in our review and develop data-centered QI content to generate a comprehensive national QI curriculum for use in

  6. Development and validation of a surgical training simulator with haptic feedback for learning bone-sawing skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yanping; Wang, Xudong; Wu, Fule; Chen, Xiaojun; Wang, Chengtao; Shen, Guofang

    2014-04-01

    Bone sawing or cutting is widely used for bone removal processes in bone surgery. It is an essential skill that surgeons should execute with a high level of experience and sensitive force perception. Surgical training simulators, with virtual and haptic feedback functions, can offer a safe, repeatable and cost-effective alternative to traditional surgeries. In this research, we developed a surgical training simulator with virtual and haptic force feedback for maxillofacial surgery, and we validated the effects on the learning of bone-sawing skills through empirical evaluation. Omega.6 from Force Dimension was employed as the haptic device, and Display300 from SenseGraphices was used as the 3D stereo display. The voxel-based model was constructed using computed tomography (CT) images, and the virtual tools were built through reverse engineering. The multi-point collision detection method was applied for haptic rendering to test the 3D relationship between the virtual tool and the bone voxels. Bone-sawing procedures in maxillofacial surgery were simulated with a virtual environment and real-time haptic feedback. A total of 25 participants (16 novices and 9 experienced surgeons) were included in 2 groups to perform the bone-sawing simulation for assessing the construct validity. Each of the participants completed the same bone-sawing procedure at the predefined maxillary region six times. For each trial, the sawing operative time, the maximal acceleration, and the percentage of the haptic force exceeding the threshold were recorded and analysed to evaluate the validity. After six trials, all of the participants scored the simulator in terms of safe force learning, stable hand control and overall performance to confirm the face validity. Moreover, 10 novices in 2 groups indentified the transfer validity on rapid prototype skull models by comparing the operative time and the maximal acceleration. The analysed results of construct validity showed that the two groups

  7. American Sign Language Curricula: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Russell S.

    2010-01-01

    There is an exponential growth in the number of schools that offer American Sign Language (ASL) for foreign language credit and the different ASL curricula that were published. This study analyzes different curricula in its assumptions regarding language, learning, and teaching of second languages. It is found that curricula vary in their…

  8. Advances in Pediatric Surgical Education: A Critical Appraisal of Two Consecutive Minimally Invasive Pediatric Surgery Training Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gause, Colin D; Hsiung, Grace; Schwab, Ben; Clifton, Matthew; Harmon, Carroll M; Barsness, Katherine A

    2016-08-01

    Mandates for improved patient safety and increasing work hour restrictions have resulted in changes in surgical education. Educational courses increasingly must meet those needs. We sought to determine the experience, skill level, and the impact of simulation-based education (SBE) on two cohorts of pediatric surgery trainees. After Institutional Review Board (IRB) exempt determination, a retrospective review was performed of evaluations for an annual advanced minimally invasive surgery (MIS) course over 2 consecutive years. The courses included didactic content and hands-on skills training. Simulation included neonatal/infant models for rigid bronchoscopy-airway foreign body retrieval, laparoscopic common bile duct exploration, and real tissue diaphragmatic hernia (DH), duodenal atresia (DA), pulmonary lobectomy, and tracheoesophageal fistula models. Categorical data were analyzed with chi-squared analyses with t-tests for continuous data. Participants had limited prior advanced neonatal MIS experience, with 1.95 ± 2.84 and 1.16 ± 1.54 prior cases in the 2014 and 2015 cohorts, respectively. The 2015 cohort had significantly less previous experience in lobectomy (P = .04) and overall advanced MIS (P = .007). Before both courses, a significant percentage of participants were not comfortable with DH repair (39%-42%), DA repair (50%-74%), lobectomy (34%-43%), and tracheoesophageal fistula repair (54%-81%). After course completion, > 60% of participants reported improvement in comfort with procedures and over 90% reported that the course significantly improved their perceived ability to perform each operation safely. Pediatric surgery trainees continue to have limited exposure to advanced MIS during clinical training. SBE results in significant improvement in both cognitive knowledge and trainee comfort with safe operative techniques for advanced MIS.

  9. Impact of pharmacotherapy on the incidence of transurethral prostatectomy for benign prostatic hyperplasia and the implications for surgical training.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Long, R

    2010-10-01

    Medical therapy has become first line treatment for Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy (BPH) and in many cases TURP may no longer be required. Proof and quantification of this evolution in practice has been somewhat elusive and provided the principle impetus for this study. This is a retrospective study of BPH management in Republic of Ireland from 1995 to 2008. National treatment databases were sourced for numbers undergoing TURP and pharmacotherapy prescribing data was obtained from individual pharmaceutical companies. A total of 28,240 TURP\\'s were performed nationally between 1995 and 2008. TURP\\'s performed annually, decreased by 1,494 (51%), alpha-blocker prescriptions increased from 8,710 to 302,159 units and the number of urology trainees increased by 10 (60%). Clear association between decreases in TURP\\'s and increases in pharmacotherapy for BPH is demonstrated. Implications on training likely exist and will require proper evaluation in order to maintain future standards in this surgical practice.

  10. Impact of pharmacotherapy on the incidence of transurethral prostatectomy for benign prostatic hyperplasia and the implications for surgical training.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Long, R

    2012-01-31

    Medical therapy has become first line treatment for Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy (BPH) and in many cases TURP may no longer be required. Proof and quantification of this evolution in practice has been somewhat elusive and provided the principle impetus for this study. This is a retrospective study of BPH management in Republic of Ireland from 1995 to 2008. National treatment databases were sourced for numbers undergoing TURP and pharmacotherapy prescribing data was obtained from individual pharmaceutical companies. A total of 28,240 TURP\\'s were performed nationally between 1995 and 2008. TURP\\'s performed annually, decreased by 1,494 (51%), alpha-blocker prescriptions increased from 8,710 to 302,159 units and the number of urology trainees increased by 10 (60%). Clear association between decreases in TURP\\'s and increases in pharmacotherapy for BPH is demonstrated. Implications on training likely exist and will require proper evaluation in order to maintain future standards in this surgical practice.

  11. Research Ethics Education in Post-Graduate Medical Curricula in I.R. Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikravanfard, Nazila; Khorasanizadeh, Faezeh; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2016-08-16

    Research ethics training during post-graduate education is necessary to improve ethical standards in the design and conduct of biomedical research. We studied quality and quantity of research ethics training in the curricula of post-graduate programs in the medical science in I.R. Iran. We evaluated curricula of 125 post-graduate programs in medical sciences in I.R. Iran. We qualitatively studied the curricula by education level, including the Master and PhD degrees and analyzed the contents and the amount of teaching allocated for ethics training in each curriculum. We found no research ethics training in 72 (58%) of the programs. Among the 53 (42%) programs that considered research ethics training, only 17 programs had specific courses for research ethics and eight of them had detailed topics on their courses. The research ethics training was optional in 25% and mandatory in 76% of the programs. Post-graduate studies that were approved in the more recent years had more attention to the research ethics training. Research ethics training was neglected in most of the medical post-graduate programs. We suggest including sufficient amount of mandatory research ethics training in Master and PhD programs in I.R. Iran. Further research about quality of research ethics training and implementation of curricula in the biomedical institutions is warranted.

  12. ASSURING QUALITY IN FARM ANIMAL WELFARE CURRICULA: THE CASE OF WELFOOD CURRICULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EVANGELIA N. SOSSIDOU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to analyze virtual learning environments and to provide a framework for assuring quality in farm animal welfare curricula. The framework is constructed according to the experimental learning for a case study developed in the context of the Leonardo da Vinci Community Vocational Training Action Pilot Project entitled “WELFOOD-Promoting quality assurance in animal welfare-environment-food quality interaction studies through upgraded e-Learning”. WELFOOD addressed objectives such as improvement and competencies of the skills in vocational training to promote employability and facilitate integration and reintegration in terms of capabilities and knowledge, needed for improved technologies in animal husbandry and food industry.

  13. A Study of the FEPAC Accredited Graduate Forensic Science Programs' Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Catherine Genice

    2016-01-01

    The National Institute of Justice (1999) and the National Academy of Sciences (2009) recommended that forensic science training shift from on-the-job training to formal education; however, the reports cited inconsistencies in the curricula of the forensic science degree programs as an impediment to this. The Forensic Science Education Programs…

  14. Logic in the curricula of Computer Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareth Quindeless

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the programs in Computer Science is to educate and train students to understand the problems and build systems that solve them. This process involves applying a special reasoning to model interactions, capabilities, and limitations of the components involved. A good curriculum must involve the use of tools to assist in these tasks, and one that could be considered as a fundamental is the logic, because with it students develop the necessary reasoning. Besides, software developers analyze the behavior of the program during the designed, the depuration, and testing; hardware designers perform minimization and equivalence verification of circuits; designers of operating systems validate routing protocols, programing, and synchronization; and formal logic underlying all these activities. Therefore, a strong background in applied logic would help students to develop or potentiate their ability to reason about complex systems. Unfortunately, few curricula formed and properly trained in logic. Most includes only one or two courses of Discrete Mathematics, which in a few weeks covered truth tables and the propositional calculus, and nothing more. This is not enough, and higher level courses in which they are applied and many other logical concepts are needed. In addition, students will not see the importance of logic in their careers and need to modify the curriculum committees or adapt the curriculum to reverse this situation.

  15. Peer-assisted teaching of basic surgical skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Preece

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Basic surgical skills training is rarely emphasised in undergraduate medical curricula. However, the provision of skills tutorials requires significant commitment from time-constrained surgical faculty. Purpose: We aimed to determine how a peer-assisted suturing workshop could enhance surgical skills competency among medical students and enthuse them towards a career in surgery. Methods: Senior student tutors delivered two suturing workshops to second- and third- year medical students. Suturing performance was assessed before and after teaching in a 10-min suturing exercise (variables measured included number of sutures completed, suture tension, and inter-suture distance. Following the workshop, students completed a questionnaire assessing the effect of the workshop on their suturing technique and their intention to pursue a surgical career. Results: Thirty-five students attended. Eighty-one percent believed their medical school course provided insufficient basic surgical skills training. The mean number of sutures completed post-teaching increased significantly (p<0.001, and the standard deviation of mean inter-suture distance halved from ±4.7 mm pre-teaching, to ±2.6 mm post-teaching. All students found the teaching environment to be relaxed, and all felt the workshop helped to improve their suturing technique and confidence; 87% found the peer-taught workshop had increased their desire to undertake a career in surgery. Discussion: Peer-assisted learning suturing workshops can enhance medical students’ competence with surgical skills and inspire them towards a career in surgery. With very little staff faculty contribution, it is a cheap and sustainable way to ensure ongoing undergraduate surgical skills exposure.

  16. Peer-assisted teaching of basic surgical skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Ryan; Dickinson, Emily Clare; Sherif, Mohamed; Ibrahim, Yousef; Ninan, Ann Susan; Aildasani, Laxmi; Ahmed, Sartaj; Smith, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Background Basic surgical skills training is rarely emphasised in undergraduate medical curricula. However, the provision of skills tutorials requires significant commitment from time-constrained surgical faculty. Purpose We aimed to determine how a peer-assisted suturing workshop could enhance surgical skills competency among medical students and enthuse them towards a career in surgery. Methods Senior student tutors delivered two suturing workshops to second- and third- year medical students. Suturing performance was assessed before and after teaching in a 10-min suturing exercise (variables measured included number of sutures completed, suture tension, and inter-suture distance). Following the workshop, students completed a questionnaire assessing the effect of the workshop on their suturing technique and their intention to pursue a surgical career. Results Thirty-five students attended. Eighty-one percent believed their medical school course provided insufficient basic surgical skills training. The mean number of sutures completed post-teaching increased significantly (p<0.001), and the standard deviation of mean inter-suture distance halved from ±4.7 mm pre-teaching, to ±2.6 mm post-teaching. All students found the teaching environment to be relaxed, and all felt the workshop helped to improve their suturing technique and confidence; 87% found the peer-taught workshop had increased their desire to undertake a career in surgery. Discussion Peer-assisted learning suturing workshops can enhance medical students’ competence with surgical skills and inspire them towards a career in surgery. With very little staff faculty contribution, it is a cheap and sustainable way to ensure ongoing undergraduate surgical skills exposure. PMID:26044400

  17. The need to integrate values into environmental curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, John

    1989-03-01

    Many environmental problems are controversial because of conflicting values people hold and because there is not a consensus as to which values should have precedence over others. If environmental managers are to make ethical decisions that reflect environmental values, they must have full understanding of such values and types of ethics and principles of moral reasoning to use in the decision-making process. Unfortunately, integration of values into environmental curricula has often not been explicit or comprehensive. One result is that university-trained environmental managers do not possess the knowledge, skills, and methods necessary for more ethically based decisions. An analysis of attitudes about integrating values and/or ethics into environmental curricula and approaches to do so yields the conclusion that environmental programs should more fully include teaching about values and ethics so that environmental managers can make more ethically sound decisions.

  18. The Interventional Arm of the Flexibility In Duty-Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees Trial: First-Year Data Show Superior Quality In-Training Initiative Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmehdi, Issa; O'Neal, Cindy-Marie; Moon, Davis; MacNew, Heather; Senkowski, Christopher

    With the implementation of strict 80-hour work week in general surgery training, serious questions have been raised concerning the quality of surgical education and the ability of newly trained general surgeons to independently operate. Programs that were randomized to the interventional arm of the Flexibility In duty-hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial were able to decrease transitions and allow for better continuity by virtue of less constraints on duty-hour rules. Using National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Quality In-Training Initiative data along with duty-hour violations compared with old rules, it was hypothesized that quality of care would be improved and outcomes would be equivalent or better than the traditional duty-hour rules. It was also hypothesized that resident perception of compliance with duty hour would not change with implementation of new regulations based on FIRST trial. Flexible work hours were implemented on July 1, 2014. National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Quality In-Training Initiative information was reviewed from July 2014 to January 2015. Patient risk factors and outcomes were compared between institutional resident cases and the national cohort for comparison. Residents' duty-hour logs and violations during this period were compared to the 6-month period before the implementation of the FIRST trial. The annual Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education resident survey was used to assess the residents' perception of compliance with duty hours. With respect to the postoperative complications, the only statistically significant measures were higher prevalence of pneumonia (3.4% vs. 1.5%, p < 0.05) and lower prevalence of sepsis (0% vs. 1.5%, p < 0.05) among cases covered by residents with flexible duty hours. All other measures of postoperative surgical complications showed no difference. The total number of duty-hour violations decreased from 54 to 16. Had the institution not been part of the

  19. Perceptions of Intimate Partner Violence: a cross sectional survey of surgical residents and medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Mathews

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV is an important health issue. Many medical students and residents have received training relating to IPV, but previous studies show that many students feel that their training has been inadequate. Our objective was to assess the knowledge, attitudes and perceptions about IPV among university medical students and surgical residents. METHODS: We administered an online survey to a sample of Ontario medical students and surgical residents. The survey instrument was a modified version of the Provider Survey. RESULTS: Two hundred medical students and surgical residents participated in the survey (response rate: 29%. Misperceptions about IPV among respondents included the following: 1 victims must get something from the abusive relationships (18.2%, 2 physicians should not interfere with a couple’s conflicts (21%, 3 asking about IPV risks offending patients (45%, 4 Victims choose to be victims (11.1%, 5 it usually takes ‘two to tango’ (18.3%, and 6 some patients’ personalities cause them to be abused (41.1%. The majority of respondents (75.0% believed identifying IPV was very relevant to clinical practice. The majority of medical students (91.2% and surgical residents (96.9% estimated the IPV prevalence in their intended practice to be 10% or less. Most of the medical students (84% and surgical residents (60% felt that their level of training on IPV was inadequate and over three quarters of respondents (77.2% expressed a desire to receive additional education and training on IPV. CONCLUSIONS: There are misconceptions among Canadian medical students and surgical residents about intimate partner violence. These misconceptions may stem from lack of education and personal discomfort with the issue or from other factors such as gender. Curricula in medical schools and surgical training programs should appropriately emphasize educational opportunities in the area of IPV.

  20. Information Systems Curricula: A Fifty Year Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenecker, Herbert E., Jr.; Feinstein, David; Clark, Jon D.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of research to explore the nature of changes in skills over a fifty year period spanning the life of Information Systems model curricula. Work begun in 1999 was expanded both backwards in time, as well as forwards to 2012 to define skills relevant to Information Systems curricula. The work in 1999 was based on job…

  1. Integrating Sustainability Education into International Marketing Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Chamila Roshani; Hewege, Chandana Rathnasiri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to extend the current knowledge of curriculum developments in international business and marketing curricula. Integrating sustainability into business and marketing curricula of the universities are widely debated in previous literature. Sustainability is a global phenomenon; however, curriculum development…

  2. Integrating Sustainability Education into International Marketing Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Chamila Roshani; Hewege, Chandana Rathnasiri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to extend the current knowledge of curriculum developments in international business and marketing curricula. Integrating sustainability into business and marketing curricula of the universities are widely debated in previous literature. Sustainability is a global phenomenon; however, curriculum development…

  3. Can Law Become Curricula's Guidance Counselor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goslin, Kimberly G.

    2008-01-01

    This article asserts that curricula, a living text, ought to take into consideration the virtues of fairness, justice, and integrity as found in law, in order to judge controversial issues of curriculum. This assertion is argued through a comparison of jurisprudence and pedagogy, as well as law and curricula. Dworkin's (1986) contention of "law as…

  4. Curricula for sustainability in higher education

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This books presents the curricula necessary for sustainability in higher education. It shows how the learning process is transforming in order to promote sustainability. It prepares administrators, teachers and students to diffuse the development in the field, showing a curricula based on three interconnected pillars: the environment, the economic and the social aspects. It contains 8 chapters introducing research advances in the field.

  5. Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism: a comparative assessment of virtue-based leadership development in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kristine; Puscas, Liana; Tucci, Debara; Woodard, Charles; Witsell, David; Esclamado, Ramon M; Lee, Walter T

    2013-10-29

    Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism (STEPP) was developed in 2011 to train tomorrow's leaders during residency. It is based on virtue ethics and takes an approach similar to West Point military academy. The purpose of this research was: (i) to compare the virtue profiles of our residents with that of the military cohort using a standardized virtue assessment tool; and (ii) to assess the value of virtue education on residents. As part of STEPP, otolaryngology residents participated in a virtue-based validated assessment tool called Virtue in Action (VIA) Inventory. This was completed at the initiation of STEPP in July 2011 as well as 1 year later in June 2012. Comparison of the VIA to a military cohort was performed. Leadership 'Basic Training' is a series of forums focused on virtues of initiative, integrity, responsibility, self-discipline, and accountability. A pre- and post-test was administered assessing resident perceptions of the value of this 'Basic Training'. Virtues are shared between otolaryngology residents (n=9) and military personnel (n=2,433) as there were no significant differences in strength scores between two military comparison groups and otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) residents. There was a significant improvement (pvirtue-based approach is valued by residents as a part of leadership training during residency.

  6. Capacity building of skilled birth attendants: a review of pre-service education curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, Adetoro A; Mani, Safiyanu; Abubakar, Aisha; van den Broek, Nynke

    2013-07-01

    to assess the level, type and content of pre-service education curricula of health workers providing maternity services against the ICM global standards for Midwifery Education and Essential competencies for midwifery practice. We reviewed the quality and relevance of pre-service education curricula of four cadres of health-care providers of maternity care in Northern Nigeria. we adapted and used the ICM global standards for Midwifery Education and Essential competencies for midwifery practice to design a framework of criteria against which we assessed curricula for pre-service training. We reviewed the pre-service curricula for Nurses, Midwives, Community Health Extension Workers (CHEW) and Junior Community Health Extension Workers (JCHEW) in three states. Criteria against which the curricula were evaluated include: minimum entry requirement, the length of the programme, theory: practice ratio, curriculum model, minimum number of births conducted during training, clinical experience, competencies, maximum number of students allowable and proportion of Maternal, Newborn and Child Health components (MNCH) as part of the total curriculum. four pre-service education programmes were reviewed; the 3 year basic midwifery, 3 year basic nursing, 3 year Community Health Extension Worker (CHEW) and 2 year Junior Community Health Extension Worker (JCHEW) programme. Findings showed that, none of these four training curricula met all the standards. The basic midwifery curriculum most closely met the standards and competencies set out. The nursing curriculum showed a strong focus on foundations of nursing practice, theories of nursing, public health and maternal newborn and child health. This includes well-defined modules on family health which are undertaken from the first year to the third year of the programme. The CHEW and JCHEW curricula are currently inadequate with regard to training health-care workers to be skilled birth attendants. although the midwifery curriculum

  7. Teamwork Assessment Tools in Modern Surgical Practice: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, George; Abboudi, Hamid; Khan, Muhammed Shamim; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Deficiencies in teamwork skills have been shown to contribute to the occurrence of adverse events during surgery. Consequently, several teamwork assessment tools have been developed to evaluate trainee nontechnical performance. This paper aims to provide an overview of these instruments and review the validity of each tool. Furthermore, the present paper aims to review the deficiencies surrounding training and propose several recommendations to address these issues. Methods. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify teamwork assessment tools using MEDLINE (1946 to August 2015), EMBASE (1974 to August 2015), and PsycINFO (1806 to August 2015) databases. Results. Eight assessment tools which encompass aspects of teamwork were identified. The Nontechnical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) assessment was found to possess the highest level of validity from a variety of sources; reliability and acceptability have also been established for this tool. Conclusions. Deficits in current surgical training pathways have prompted several recommendations to meet the evolving requirements of surgeons. Recommendations from the current paper include integration of teamwork training and assessment into medical school curricula, standardised formal training of assessors to ensure accurate evaluation of nontechnical skill acquisition, and integration of concurrent technical and nontechnical skills training throughout training. PMID:26425732

  8. Teamwork Assessment Tools in Modern Surgical Practice: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, George; Abboudi, Hamid; Khan, Muhammed Shamim; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Deficiencies in teamwork skills have been shown to contribute to the occurrence of adverse events during surgery. Consequently, several teamwork assessment tools have been developed to evaluate trainee nontechnical performance. This paper aims to provide an overview of these instruments and review the validity of each tool. Furthermore, the present paper aims to review the deficiencies surrounding training and propose several recommendations to address these issues. Methods. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify teamwork assessment tools using MEDLINE (1946 to August 2015), EMBASE (1974 to August 2015), and PsycINFO (1806 to August 2015) databases. Results. Eight assessment tools which encompass aspects of teamwork were identified. The Nontechnical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) assessment was found to possess the highest level of validity from a variety of sources; reliability and acceptability have also been established for this tool. Conclusions. Deficits in current surgical training pathways have prompted several recommendations to meet the evolving requirements of surgeons. Recommendations from the current paper include integration of teamwork training and assessment into medical school curricula, standardised formal training of assessors to ensure accurate evaluation of nontechnical skill acquisition, and integration of concurrent technical and nontechnical skills training throughout training.

  9. Teamwork Assessment Tools in Modern Surgical Practice: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Whittaker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Deficiencies in teamwork skills have been shown to contribute to the occurrence of adverse events during surgery. Consequently, several teamwork assessment tools have been developed to evaluate trainee nontechnical performance. This paper aims to provide an overview of these instruments and review the validity of each tool. Furthermore, the present paper aims to review the deficiencies surrounding training and propose several recommendations to address these issues. Methods. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify teamwork assessment tools using MEDLINE (1946 to August 2015, EMBASE (1974 to August 2015, and PsycINFO (1806 to August 2015 databases. Results. Eight assessment tools which encompass aspects of teamwork were identified. The Nontechnical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS assessment was found to possess the highest level of validity from a variety of sources; reliability and acceptability have also been established for this tool. Conclusions. Deficits in current surgical training pathways have prompted several recommendations to meet the evolving requirements of surgeons. Recommendations from the current paper include integration of teamwork training and assessment into medical school curricula, standardised formal training of assessors to ensure accurate evaluation of nontechnical skill acquisition, and integration of concurrent technical and nontechnical skills training throughout training.

  10. Quality of colonoscopy performance among gastroenterology and surgical trainees: a need for common training standards for all trainees?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leyden, J E

    2011-11-01

    Cecal intubation and polyp detection rates are objective measures of colonoscopy performance. Minimum cecal intubation rates greater than 90% have been endorsed by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) and the Joint Advisory Group (JAG) UK. Performance data for medical and surgical trainee endoscopists are limited, and we used endoscopy quality parameters to compare these two groups.

  11. Mental distress and effort to engage an image-guided navigation system in the surgical training of endoscopic sinus surgery: a prospective, randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoraki, M N; Ledderose, G J; Becker, S; Leunig, A; Arpe, S; Luz, M; Stelter, K

    2015-04-01

    The use of image-guided navigation systems in the training of FESS is discussed controversy. Many experienced sinus surgeons report a better spatial orientation and an improved situational awareness intraoperatively. But many fear that the navigation system could be a disadvantage in the surgical training because of a higher mental demand and a possible loss of surgical skills. This clinical field study investigates mental and physical demands during transnasal surgery with and without the aid of a navigation system at an early stage in FESS training. Thirty-two endonasal sinus surgeries done by eight different trainee surgeons were included. After randomization, one side of each patient was operated by use of a navigation system, the other side without. During the whole surgery, the surgeons were connected to a biofeedback device measuring the heart rate, the heart rate variability, the respiratory frequency and the masticator EMG. Stress situations could be identified by an increase of the heart rate frequency and a decrease of the heart rate variability. The mental workload during a FESS procedure is high compared to the baseline before and after surgery. The mental workload level when using the navigation did not significantly differ from the side without using the navigation. Residents with more than 30 FESS procedures already done, showed a slightly decreased mental workload when using the navigation. An additional workload shift toward the navigation system could not be observed in any surgeon. Remarkable other stressors could be identified during this study: the behavior of the supervisor or the use of the 45° endoscope, other colleagues or students entering the theatre, poor vision due to bleeding and the preoperative waiting when measuring the baseline. The mental load of young surgeons in FESS surgery is tremendous. The application of a navigation system did not cause a higher mental workload or distress. The device showed a positive effort to engage

  12. “Too busy to think, too tired to learn” - the attrition of the apprenticeship model of surgical training in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Kelly

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article examines the notion of apprenticeship as experienced by trainee surgeons within the modern NHS, and attempts to demonstrate some unintended consequences of managerial target setting upon the training process. It argues that this situation is made more critical by the lack of explicit standards and curriculum by which trainees may assess their progress, and also that the potential grafting of behaviourist competence-based training models onto older notions of apprenticeship will be inadequate to meet the need for an holistic account of the development of professional practice. Alternative theoretical perspectives are examined, in particular social accounts of shared and collaborative expertise such as Lave and Wenger’s “community of practice” and Vygotsky’s thinking on the “zone of proximal development” with its emphasis on a highly active pedagogic role for both mentor and peers. A parallel is also suggested with Leder’s work on therapeutic discourse, in the sense that both patient and trainee actively construct shared interpretative modes with the doctor-mentor. These accounts challenge the traditional model of medical education which assumes a linear hierarchy of learning, effectively ignoring the cyclic nature of surgical development, and the mutual learning needs of “new comers” and “old-timers”. In order to initiate the modelling of surgical development, it is suggested that: • a dynamic and non-linear view of progress is required; • the link between formal structured training and opportunistic learning “on the job” is crucial; • assessment strategies are needed that promote, rather than hinder, the learning that derives from reflective practice.

  13. National Kitchen Research Survey. A Report to the Curricula Advisory Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Craft Curricula and Certification Board for the Hotel, Catering and Tourism Industry, Dublin (Ireland).

    In 1983, as part of its overall review of craft catering education and training in Ireland, the National Craft Curricula and Certification Board commissioned a nationwide research study of the trends and developments in professional kitchen practice in all sectors of the hotel and catering industry. The study was conducted through interviews with…

  14. National Kitchen Research Survey. A Report to the Curricula Advisory Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Craft Curricula and Certification Board for the Hotel, Catering and Tourism Industry, Dublin (Ireland).

    In 1983, as part of its overall review of craft catering education and training in Ireland, the National Craft Curricula and Certification Board commissioned a nationwide research study of the trends and developments in professional kitchen practice in all sectors of the hotel and catering industry. The study was conducted through interviews with…

  15. Abortion - surgical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion involves dilating the opening to the uterus (cervix) and placing a small suction tube into the uterus. ...

  16. Comparing Single and Dual Console Systems in the Robotic Surgical Training of Graduating OB/GYN Residents in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the impact of a single versus dual console robotic system on the perceptions of program directors (PD and residents (RES towards robotic surgical training among graduating obstetrics and gynecology residents. Design. An anonymous survey was developed using Qualtrics, a web-based survey development and administration system, and sent to obstetrics and gynecology program directors and graduating residents. Participants. 39 program directors and 32 graduating residents (PGY4. Results. According to residents perception, dual console is utilized in about 70% of the respondents’ programs. Dual console system programs were more likely to provide a robotics training certificate compared to single console programs (43.5% versus 0%, p=0.03. A greater proportion of residents graduating from a dual console program perform more than 20 robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomies, 30% versus 0% (p=0.15. Conclusions. Utilization of dual console system increased the likelihood of obtaining robotic training certification without significantly increasing the case volume of robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy.

  17. Comparing Single and Dual Console Systems in the Robotic Surgical Training of Graduating OB/GYN Residents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, Emad; Salemi, Jason L; Hart, Stuart; Imudia, Anthony N

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess the impact of a single versus dual console robotic system on the perceptions of program directors (PD) and residents (RES) towards robotic surgical training among graduating obstetrics and gynecology residents. Design. An anonymous survey was developed using Qualtrics, a web-based survey development and administration system, and sent to obstetrics and gynecology program directors and graduating residents. Participants. 39 program directors and 32 graduating residents (PGY4). Results. According to residents perception, dual console is utilized in about 70% of the respondents' programs. Dual console system programs were more likely to provide a robotics training certificate compared to single console programs (43.5% versus 0%, p = 0.03). A greater proportion of residents graduating from a dual console program perform more than 20 robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomies, 30% versus 0% (p = 0.15). Conclusions. Utilization of dual console system increased the likelihood of obtaining robotic training certification without significantly increasing the case volume of robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy.

  18. Does box model training improve surgical dexterity and economy of movement during virtual reality laparoscopy? A randomised trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clevin, L.; Grantcharov, T.P.

    2008-01-01

    . Performance before and after the training was assessed in a virtual reality laparoscopic trainer (LapSim and was based on objective parameters, registered by the computer system (time, error, and economy of motion scores). Group A showed significantly greater improvement in all performance parameters compared...... with the control group: economy of movement (p=0.001), time (p=0.001) and tissue damage (p=0.036), confirming the positive impact of box-trainer curriculum on laparoscopic skills acquisition. CONCLUSIONS: Structured laparoscopic skill training on a low cost box model trainer improves performance as assessed using...

  19. Evaluating Mind Fitness Training and Its Potential Effects on Surgical Residents' Well-Being : A Mixed Methods Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lases, S. S.; Lombarts, M. J. M. H.; Slootweg, Irene A.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Pierik, E. G. J. M.; Heineman, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background Residents' well-being is essential for both the individual physician and the quality of patient care they deliver. Therefore, it is important to maintain or possibly enhance residents' well-being. We investigated (i) the influence of mind fitness training (MFT) on quality of care-related

  20. Surgical Procedures in Predoctoral Periodontics Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radentz, William H.; Caffesse, Raul G.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 58 dental school periodontics departments revealed the frequency of predoctoral dental students performing surgery, the frequency of specific procedures, the degree of participation or performance of students, incidence of preclinical surgical laboratories in the curricula, and materials and anesthesia used. A wide range in…

  1. Between two roles - Experiences of newly trained nurse practitioners in surgical care in Sweden: A qualitative study using repeated interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangland, Eva; Yngman Uhlin, Pia; Arakelian, Erebouni

    2016-11-01

    The position of Nurse Practitioner is a new role in Nordic countries. The transition from a registered nurse to the Nurse Practitioner role has been reported to be a personal challenge. This study, guided by the Nordic theoretical model for use in the education of advanced practice nurses, represents a unique opportunity to describe this transition for newly graduated Nurse Practitioners in an interprofessional surgical care team in Sweden. The aim was to explore how the first Nurse Practitioners in surgical care experienced the transition into a new role and what competences they used in the team. Eight new Nurse Practitioners with parallel work in clinical practice were interviewed twice around the time of their graduation. The qualitative analyses show that the participants integrated several central competences, but the focus in this early stage in their new role was on direct clinical praxis, consultation, cooperation, case management, and coaching. Transition from the role of clinical nurse specialist to nurse practitioner was a challenging process in which the positive response from patients was a driving force for the new Nurse Practitioners. The participants felt prepared for and determined to solve the challenging situations they approached working in the interprofessional team.

  2. Identifying content for simulation-based curricula in urology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayahangan, Leizl Joy; Bølling Hansen, Rikke; Lindorff-Larsen, Karen

    2017-01-01

    to identify technical procedures in urology that should be included in a simulation-based curriculum for residency training. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A national needs assessment was performed using the Delphi method involving 56 experts with significant roles in the education of urologists. Round 1 identified......OBJECTIVE: Simulation-based training is well recognized in the transforming field of urological surgery; however, integration into the curriculum is often unstructured. Development of simulation-based curricula should follow a stepwise approach starting with a needs assessment. This study aimed...... technical procedures that newly qualified urologists should perform. Round 2 included a survey using an established needs assessment formula to explore: the frequency of procedures; the number of physicians who should be able to perform the procedure; the risk and/or discomfort to patients when a procedure...

  3. Acquiring minimally invasive surgical skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Many topics in surgical skills education have been implemented without a solid scientific basis. For that reason we have tried to find this scientific basis. We have focused on training and evaluation of minimally invasive surgical skills in a training setting and in practice in the operating room.

  4. Women's health topics in dental hygiene curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson-Howell, Joan C

    2010-01-01

    Minimal inclusion of women's health topics in dental and dental hygiene curricula may not prepare dental health care workers to provide comprehensive health care to females. The purposes of these surveys in 2001 and 2007 were to investigate United States dental hygiene school curricula regarding inclusion of women's health topics in differing degree programs (associate/certificate, baccalaureate, associate/baccalaureate) and course status (required or elective). The surveys also identified sources used to obtain women's health topics, assessed faculty continuing education participation in women's health, determined satisfaction with current curricula, questioned if change was anticipated and if so in what topics, identified where students apply their knowledge about women's health and in what ways and reported progress of dental hygiene curricula over the 6 year time period. Surveys were sent to dental hygiene program directors in 2001 (N=256) and in 2007 (N=288) asking them to complete the questionnaire. There was no statistically significant association between 2001 and 2007 survey results by degree or program setting. The educational issue, women's general health continuing education courses/topics completed by dental hygiene faculty in the past 2 years, showed a statistically significant difference during that time interval. No statistically significant difference existed between the survey years regarding topics on women's general health and oral health. Regardless of statistical significance, further details investigated percentage differences that may reveal relevant issues. These surveys establish a baseline of women's health topics included in dental hygiene curricula in order to assess knowledge of dental hygienists in practice.

  5. Anxiety in veterinary surgical students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langebæk, Rikke; Eika, Berit; Jensen, Asger Lundorff

    2012-01-01

    The surgical educational environment is potentially stressful and this can negatively affect students' learning. The aim of this study was to investigate whether veterinary students' level of anxiety is higher in a surgical course than in a non-surgical course and if pre-surgical training...... in a Surgical Skills Lab (SSL) has an anxiety reducing effect. Investigations were carried out as a comparative study and a parallel group study. Potential participants were fourth-year veterinary students who attended a surgical course (Basic Surgical Skills) and a non-surgical course (Clinical Examination...... and 28 students from 2010). Our results show that anxiety levels in veterinary students are significantly higher in a surgical course than in a non-surgical course (p...

  6. Leadership and management in UK medical school curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Richard; Sheriff, Ibrahim H N; Matthews, Jacob H; Jagger, Olivia; Curtis, Sarah; Lees, Peter; Spurgeon, Peter C; Fountain, Daniel Mark; Oldman, Alex; Habib, Ali; Saied, Azam; Court, Jessica; Giannoudi, Marilena; Sayma, Meelad; Ward, Nicholas; Cork, Nick; Olatokun, Olamide; Devine, Oliver; O'Connell, Paul; Carr, Phoebe; Kotronias, Rafail Angelos; Gardiner, Rebecca; Buckle, Rory T; Thomson, Ross J; Williams, Sarah; Nicholson, Simon J; Goga, Usman

    2016-10-10

    Purpose Although medical leadership and management (MLM) is increasingly being recognised as important to improving healthcare outcomes, little is understood about current training of medical students in MLM skills and behaviours in the UK. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach This qualitative study used validated structured interviews with expert faculty members from medical schools across the UK to ascertain MLM framework integration, teaching methods employed, evaluation methods and barriers to improvement. Findings Data were collected from 25 of the 33 UK medical schools (76 per cent response rate), with 23/25 reporting that MLM content is included in their curriculum. More medical schools assessed MLM competencies on admission than at any other time of the curriculum. Only 12 schools had evaluated MLM teaching at the time of data collection. The majority of medical schools reported barriers, including overfilled curricula and reluctance of staff to teach. Whilst 88 per cent of schools planned to increase MLM content over the next two years, there was a lack of consensus on proposed teaching content and methods. Research limitations/implications There is widespread inclusion of MLM in UK medical schools' curricula, despite the existence of barriers. This study identified substantial heterogeneity in MLM teaching and assessment methods which does not meet students' desired modes of delivery. Examples of national undergraduate MLM teaching exist worldwide, and lessons can be taken from these. Originality/value This is the first national evaluation of MLM in undergraduate medical school curricula in the UK, highlighting continuing challenges with executing MLM content despite numerous frameworks and international examples of successful execution.

  7. Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism: a comparative assessment of virtue-based leadership development in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Schulz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism (STEPP was developed in 2011 to train tomorrow's leaders during residency. It is based on virtue ethics and takes an approach similar to West Point military academy. The purpose of this research was: (i to compare the virtue profiles of our residents with that of the military cohort using a standardized virtue assessment tool; and (ii to assess the value of virtue education on residents. Methods: As part of STEPP, otolaryngology residents participated in a virtue-based validated assessment tool called Virtue in Action (VIA Inventory. This was completed at the initiation of STEPP in July 2011 as well as 1 year later in June 2012. Comparison of the VIA to a military cohort was performed. Leadership ‘Basic Training’ is a series of forums focused on virtues of initiative, integrity, responsibility, self-discipline, and accountability. A pre- and post-test was administered assessing resident perceptions of the value of this ‘Basic Training’. Results: Virtues are shared between otolaryngology residents (n=9 and military personnel (n=2,433 as there were no significant differences in strength scores between two military comparison groups and otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS residents. There was a significant improvement (p<0.001 in the understanding of components of the leadership vision and a significant improvement in the understanding of key leadership concepts based on ‘Basic Training’. All residents responded in the post-test that the STEPP program was valuable, up from 56%. Conclusions: A virtue-based approach is valued by residents as a part of leadership training during residency.

  8. Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism: a comparative assessment of virtue-based leadership development in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kristine; Puscas, Liana; Tucci, Debara; Woodard, Charles; Witsell, David; Esclamado, Ramon M.; Lee, Walter T.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism (STEPP) was developed in 2011 to train tomorrow's leaders during residency. It is based on virtue ethics and takes an approach similar to West Point military academy. The purpose of this research was: (i) to compare the virtue profiles of our residents with that of the military cohort using a standardized virtue assessment tool; and (ii) to assess the value of virtue education on residents. Methods As part of STEPP, otolaryngology residents participated in a virtue-based validated assessment tool called Virtue in Action (VIA) Inventory. This was completed at the initiation of STEPP in July 2011 as well as 1 year later in June 2012. Comparison of the VIA to a military cohort was performed. Leadership ‘Basic Training’ is a series of forums focused on virtues of initiative, integrity, responsibility, self-discipline, and accountability. A pre- and post-test was administered assessing resident perceptions of the value of this ‘Basic Training’. Results Virtues are shared between otolaryngology residents (n=9) and military personnel (n=2,433) as there were no significant differences in strength scores between two military comparison groups and otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) residents. There was a significant improvement (p<0.001) in the understanding of components of the leadership vision and a significant improvement in the understanding of key leadership concepts based on ‘Basic Training’. All residents responded in the post-test that the STEPP program was valuable, up from 56%. Conclusions A virtue-based approach is valued by residents as a part of leadership training during residency. PMID:24172053

  9. Incorporating sustainability into accounting curricula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazelton, James; Haigh, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    This paper chronicles the journey of two projects that sought to incorporate principles of sustainable development into predominantly technical postgraduate accounting curricula. The design and delivery of the projects were informed by Freirian principles of praxis and critical empowerment....... The first author introduced sustainability-related material into a core technical accounting unit and created an elective unit. The second author participated with students to evaluate critically social reports of employers, current and potential. In terms of an objective of bringing reflexivity...... as vocational skills) add to the difficulties for sustainability in penetrating already overcrowded curricula....

  10. Incorporating sustainability into accounting curricula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazelton, James; Haigh, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    This paper chronicles the journey of two projects that sought to incorporate principles of sustainable development into predominantly technical postgraduate accounting curricula. The design and delivery of the projects were informed by Freirian principles of praxis and critical empowerment....... The first author introduced sustainability-related material into a core technical accounting unit and created an elective unit. The second author participated with students to evaluate critically social reports of employers, current and potential. In terms of an objective of bringing reflexivity...... as vocational skills) add to the difficulties for sustainability in penetrating already overcrowded curricula....

  11. Surgical Assisting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Insert and remove Foley urinary bladder catheter Place pneumatic tourniquet Confirm procedure with surgeon Drape patient within ... Technology and Surgical Assisting (NBSTSA) offers the CertifiedSurgical First Assistant (CSFA) credential, and the National Surgical Assistant ...

  12. Novas Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais para a formação de professores e algumas novas ficções na leitura da escola Nuevas Directrices Curriculares Nacionales para la formación de profesores y algunas nuevas ficciones en la lectura de la escuela New National Curricula Guidelines to Teacher's Training and some new fictions on the reading of the school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosso Ademir José

    2010-12-01

    cursos hayan podido generar, en términos generales, profesores comprometidos e identificados con la Educación Básica o Primaria, o lectores competentes y capaces de dialogar con la realidad escolar.This paper presents an investigation on the profile of the graduated students of teachers training courses of the State University at Ponta Grossa (UEPG. These graduated students had their curricula based on the new statements from the Guidelines National Curriculum for Teachers' Training for the Basic Education. This text is based on references to the critical theory and Freire's theory to compose the literacy, understood as acquisition of knowledge to teach and the ability of applying it in school situations, in the context of world's reading. It uses qualitative and quantitative methodological procedures driven to teachers graduated in 2008. The analysis indicates an adaptive and conservative tendency of the respondents about the school context. It isn't possible to affirm that the changes on teachers' training curricula allowed making committed teachers, identified with the Basic Education, not even competent readers and dialoguers according with the school's reality.

  13. Found in transition: applying milestones to three unique discharge curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren B. Meade

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A safe and effective transition from hospital to post-acute care is a complex and important physician competency. Milestones and Entrustable Professional Activities (EPA form the new educational rubric in Graduate Medical Education Training. “A safe and effective discharge from the hospital” is an EPA ripe for educational innovation.Methods. The authors collaborated in a qualitative process called mapping to define 22 of 142 Internal Medicine (IM curricular milestones related to the transition of care. Fifty-five participant units at an Association for Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM workshop prioritized the milestones, using a validated ranking process called Q-sort. We analyzed the Q-sort results, which rank the milestones in order of priority. We then applied this ranking to three innovative models of training IM residents in the transitions of care: Simulation (S, Discharge Clinic Feedback (DCF and TRACER (T.Results. We collected 55 Q-sort rankings from particpants at the APDIM workshop. We then identified which milestones are a focus of the three innovative models of training in the transition of care: Simulation = 5 of 22 milestones, Discharge Clinic Feedback = 9 of 22 milestones, and TRACER = 7 of 22 milestones. Milestones identified in each innovation related to one of the top 8 prioritized milestones 75% of the time; thus, more frequently than the milestones with lower priority. Two milestones are shared by all three curricula: Utilize patient-centered education and Ensure succinct written communication. Two other milestones are shared by two curricula: Manage and coordinate care transitions across multiple delivery systems and Customize care in the context of the patient’s preferences. If you combine the three innovations, all of the top 8 milestones are included.Discussion. The milestones give us a context to share individual innovations and to compare and contrast using a standardized frame. We

  14. Communication skills training in surgical residency: a needs assessment and metacognition analysis of a difficult conversation objective structured clinical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, John L; Claxton, René N; Marshall, Gary T

    2014-01-01

    The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) can be used to evaluate the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Core Competencies of Professionalism and Interpersonal and Communication Skills. The aim of this study was to describe general surgery resident performance on a "difficult conversation" OSCE. In this prospective study, junior and senior residents participated in a 2-station OSCE. Junior stations involved discussing operative risks and benefits and breaking bad news. Senior stations involved discussing goals of care and discussing transition to comfort measures only status. Residents completed post-OSCE checklist and Likert-based self-evaluations of experience, comfort, and confidence. Trained standardized patients (SPs) evaluated residents using communication skill-based checklists and Likert-based assessments. Pearson correlation coefficients were determined between self-assessment and SP assessment. Mann-Whitney U tests were conducted between junior and senior resident variables, using α = 0.05. There were 27 junior residents (age 28.1 ± 1.9 years [29.6% female]) and 27 senior residents (age 32.1 ± 2.5 years [26.9% female]). The correlation of self-assessment and SP assessment of overall communication skills by junior residents was -0.32 on the risks and benefits case and 0.07 on the breaking bad news case. The correlation of self-assessment and SP assessment of overall communication skills by senior residents was 0.30 on the goals of care case and 0.26 on the comfort measures only case. SP assessments showed that junior residents had higher overall communication skills than senior residents (p = 0.03). Senior residents perceived that having difficult conversations was more level appropriate (p skills are correlated, and that skills-based training is needed across all residency levels. This well-received method may be used to observe, document, and provide resident feedback for these important skills. © 2014 Published by

  15. Diffusion of innovations in schools: a study of adoption and implementation of school-based tobacco prevention curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, L K; Steckler, A B; McLeroy, K R

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of implementation of school health education curricula, to identify factors which enhanced or impeded implementation, and to examine the link between the adoption and implementation phases of the diffusion process. The study used an experimental design; 22 school districts were randomly assigned to intervention and control conditions. The study was conducted in North Carolina. All teachers in the study districts identified by their schools as "eligible to teach health" were included in the sample. An in-depth training was conducted on the use of the middle school tobacco prevention curriculum that had been adopted. Three measures were used to assess implementation of the curricula. Independent variables of interest included organizational size and climate, teacher training, how long it took to make the adoption decision, and attitudes toward tobacco use prevention curricula. Response rates for these measures ranged from 44% to 78%. Nonparametric correlations and regression modeling indicated that larger organizational size and teacher training were the strongest predictors of curricula implementation. A favorable organizational climate within school districts also improved implementation. While interventions to increase adoption of school health education curricula should focus on larger school districts, the majority of efforts to improve implementation should focus on smaller districts.

  16. Embedding Multiple Literacies into STEM Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soules, Aline; Nielsen, Sarah; LeDuc, Danika; Inouye, Caron; Singley, Jason; Wildy, Erica; Seitz, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    In fall 2012, an interdisciplinary team of science, English, and library faculty embedded reading, writing, and information literacy strategies in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) curricula as a first step in improving student learning and retention in science courses and aligning them with the Next Generation Science and…

  17. National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The "National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula" attempts to represent current knowledge in the field of psychology in developmentally appropriate ways. Psychology is a popular high school course, one that can introduce students to scientific ideas and engage students in the learning process. However, it is difficult for even the best…

  18. Introducing Cloud Computing Topics in Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Liu, Yang; Gallagher, Marcus; Pailthorpe, Bernard; Sadiq, Shazia; Shen, Heng Tao; Li, Xue

    2012-01-01

    The demand for graduates with exposure in Cloud Computing is on the rise. For many educational institutions, the challenge is to decide on how to incorporate appropriate cloud-based technologies into their curricula. In this paper, we describe our design and experiences of integrating Cloud Computing components into seven third/fourth-year…

  19. Initiating Tobacco Curricula in Dental Hygiene Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Linda D.; Fun, Kay; Madden, Theresa E.

    2006-01-01

    Two hours of tobacco instructions were incorporated into the baccalaureate dental hygiene curricula in a university in the Northwestern United States. Prior to graduation, all senior students were invited to complete anonymously a questionnaire surveying attitudes and clinical skills in providing tobacco services to their clinic patients. Twenty…

  20. National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The "National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula" attempts to represent current knowledge in the field of psychology in developmentally appropriate ways. Psychology is a popular high school course, one that can introduce students to scientific ideas and engage students in the learning process. However, it is difficult for even the best…

  1. IFRS READINESS IN LATIN AMERICAN BUSINESS CURRICULA

    OpenAIRE

    Myrna R. Berríos

    2012-01-01

    Multinational companies doing business in Latin America, and elsewhere in the world, must comply with individual countries’ financial reporting and financial market rules and local legislation when disclosing financial information. This research assesses international financial reporting standards (IFRS) readiness in the finance, accounting, and taxation curricula in Latin American universities.

  2. Introducing Cloud Computing Topics in Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Liu, Yang; Gallagher, Marcus; Pailthorpe, Bernard; Sadiq, Shazia; Shen, Heng Tao; Li, Xue

    2012-01-01

    The demand for graduates with exposure in Cloud Computing is on the rise. For many educational institutions, the challenge is to decide on how to incorporate appropriate cloud-based technologies into their curricula. In this paper, we describe our design and experiences of integrating Cloud Computing components into seven third/fourth-year…

  3. Occupational Curricula: The School/Job Match

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lee; West, Leonard J.

    1978-01-01

    Substantial gaps often exist between occupational education and actual job duties, dominantly because of technological developments. The schools' response to needed change in curricula has been sluggish, piecemeal, and tardy. Authors suggest a strategy for accomplishing a closer match between school and work, and they illustrate its use in…

  4. Web Modules: Integrating Curricula and Technology Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Carol

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of this article are to provide the sequence of learning events about the integration of curricula and technology using modules prepared by the Southeast Teachers Are Revitalizing Teaching Through Technology (START) Technology Team and to describe the impact these technology modules had on university faculty and candidates at Alabama…

  5. Rich Literacy Curricula: Undocumented and Unstandardized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Ileana

    A study was conducted concerning the reduced and limited curricula which tests may represent. Observations were made at 18 different elementary and middle school classrooms in four school districts in central Pennsylvania during the language arts instructional period. All of the teachers were involved in promoting a holistic approach to literacy.…

  6. Cultural Intelligence (CQ) in MBA Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Mark J.; Ettner, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of cultural intelligence in MBA curricula. Shaping global corporate culture that manifests itself in powerful-shared values, group behavior, and persists despite changes in-group membership is decisive to organizational performance. In turn, cultural intelligence (CQ), defined, as an…

  7. Research priorities in light of current trends in microsurgical training: revalidation, simulation, cross-training, and standardisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Rebecca Spenser; Madada-Nyakauru, Rudo N; Irri, Renu Anita; Myers, Simon Richard; Ghanem, Ali Mahmoud

    2014-05-01

    Plastic surgery training worldwide has seen a thorough restructuring over the past decade, with the introduction of formal training curricula and work-based assessment tools. Part of this process has been the introduction of revalidation and a greater use of simulation in training delivery. Simulation is an increasingly important tool for educators because it provides a way to reduce risks to both trainees and patients, whilst facilitating improved technical proficiency. Current microsurgery training interventions are often predicated on theories of skill acquisition and development that follow a 'practice makes perfect' model. Given the changing landscape of surgical training and advances in educational theories related to skill development, research is needed to assess the potential benefits of alternative models, particularly cross-training, a model now widely used in non-medical areas with significant benefits. Furthermore, with the proliferation of microsurgery training interventions and therefore diversity in length, cost, content and models used, appropriate standardisation will be an important factor to ensure that courses deliver consistent and effective training that achieves appropriate levels of competency. Key research requirements should be gathered and used in directing further research in these areas to achieve on-going improvement of microsurgery training.

  8. EuroTraining - Supporting University Programmes in Nanoelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ivan Ring; Bruun, Erik

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes how the EuroTraining project supports a timely introduction of new nanoelectronics university programmes in Europe. The provisions include training courses, training material and training roadmaps describing the structure and content of nanoelectronics curricula. In order...... to facilitate the European integration of the new curricula courses based on the ECTS system are offered and training material free of copyright and IPR is emphasized....

  9. Science Process Skills in Science Curricula Applied in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumusak, Güngör Keskinkiliç

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important objectives of the science curricula is to bring in science process skills. The science process skills are skills that lie under scientific thinking and decision-making. Thus it is important for a science curricula to be rationalized in such a way that it brings in science process skills. New science curricula were…

  10. Problem Based Internship in Surveying and Planning Curricula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Esben Munk; Enemark, Stig

    2006-01-01

    another consulting agency ore company with a surveying ore land management profile. The internship is not focusing on practice training alone. The student has to prepare the internship by formulating a problem reflecting what they want to learn and how the can contribute to develop products, procedures...... by the society to serve the community with still more new knowledge and technology transfer from the international research community. The internship and still more real world influenced problem based learning by writing thesis will be and important bridge builder in the following years.......The University Programme for the education of Masters in Surveying and Planning has been reorganized. First of all the basic concept of Problem Based Learning at Aalborg University is still dominating the full curricula of the Danish Master Programme in Surveying and Planning. The five year...

  11. Integration of social responsability in the curricula: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Angela Prialé

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The document presented below combines the review of existing literature in the field of teaching ethics and social responsibility with a case study through which the integration of social responsibility is analyzed transversely in the curricula of undergraduate programs offered by a Peruvian university specializing in economics and business. An analysis method that exploits the concept of social responsibility defined in ISO 26000, to generate items that allow to evaluate the approach to social responsibility for the contents of 215 compulsory courses offered by the different academic departments of the university was created. The review of the courses was conducted using the discernment of five experts. The first contribution of this research is to design a transferable and replicable method for mapping if a generic competence, as is the social responsibility develops gradually throughout the whole training process. On the other hand, the case study shows that 21% of the courses offered address some of the subjects of social responsibility

  12. Decolonising medical curricula through diversity education: lessons from students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazar, Mahdi; Kendall, Kathleen; Day, Lawrence; Nazar, Hamde

    2015-04-01

    The General Medical Council (GMC) expects that medical students graduate with an awareness of how the diversity of the patient population may affect health outcomes and behaviours. However, little guidance has been provided on how to incorporate diversity teaching into medical school curricula. Research highlights the existence of two different models within medical education: cultural competency and cultural humility. The Southampton medical curriculum includes both models in its diversity teaching, but little was known about which model was dominant or about the students' experience. Fifteen semi-structured, in-depth interviews were carried out with medical students at the University of Southampton. Data were analysed thematically using elements of grounded theory and constant comparison. Students identified early examples of diversity teaching consistent with a cultural humility approach. In later years, the limited diversity teaching recognised by students generally adopted a cultural competency approach. Students tended to perceive diversity as something that creates problems for healthcare professionals due to patients' perceived differences. They also reported witnessing a number of questionable practices related to diversity issues that they felt unable to challenge. The dissonance created by differences in the largely lecture based and the clinical environments left students confused and doubting the value of cultural humility in a clinical context. Staff training on diversity issues is required to encourage institutional buy-in and establish consistent educational and clinical environments. By tackling cultural diversity within the context of patient-centred care, cultural humility, the approach students valued most, would become the default model. Reflective practice and the development of a critical consciousness are crucial in the improvement of cultural diversity training and thus should be facilitated and encouraged. Educators can adopt a

  13. Laparoscopic simulation training in gynaecology: Current provision and staff attitudes - a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Christy; Fox, Robert; Hinshaw, Kim; Draycott, Timothy J; James, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore current provision of laparoscopic simulation training, and to determine attitudes of trainers and trainees to the role of simulators in surgical training across the UK. An anonymous cross-sectional survey with cluster sampling was developed and circulated. All Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) Training Programme Directors (TPD), College Tutors (RCT) and Trainee representatives (TR) across the UK were invited to participate. One hundred and ninety-six obstetricians and gynaecologists participated. Sixty-three percent of hospitals had at least one box trainer, and 14.6% had least one virtual-reality simulator. Only 9.3% and 3.6% stated that trainees used a structured curriculum on box and virtual-reality simulators, respectively. Respondents working in a Large/Teaching hospital (p = 0.008) were more likely to agree that simulators enhance surgical training. Eighty-nine percent agreed that simulators improve the quality of training, and should be mandatory or desirable for junior trainees. Consultants (p = 0.003) and respondents over 40 years (p = 0.011) were more likely to hold that a simulation test should be undertaken before live operation. Our data demonstrated, therefore, that availability of laparoscopic simulators is inconsistent, with limited use of mandatory structured curricula. In contrast, both trainers and trainees recognise a need for greater use of laparoscopic simulation for surgical training.

  14. A novel method of teaching surgical techniques to residents--computerized enhanced visual learning (CEVL) with simulation to certify mastery of training: a model using newborn clamp circumcision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Angela; Maizels, Max; Korets, Ruslan; Wiener, John S; Stiener, Michael; Liu, Dennis B; Sutherland, Richard W

    2013-12-01

    To assess the learning process of combining a web-based video of a simulated surgical procedure with a step-by-step checklist of the same procedure in achieving competency of the simulated technique, in this case a newborn clamp circumcision. Fundamental to this particular learning process is immediate mentor step-by-step feedback which specifically follows the procedure's step-by-step checklist. Pediatric residents naïve to newborn circumcision were enrolled (n = 7). A circumcision simulator, instruments, and web access to the learning module were provided. Residents trained independently and then performed two simulations with the mentor. The first simulation was completed with formative scored feedback. The learner then performed a second scored simulation. All learners showed improvement between the first and second simulation (mean 85.3-97.4). All residents achieved competency (96/100 or greater) by the second simulation. On post-procedure surveys, learners demonstrated increased comfort and reduced apprehension in performing the procedure. Combining a web-accessible video of a procedure, a checklist, and a simulator followed by a single mentor session with immediate formative feedback which follows the steps of the checklist is a useful method to teach the simulation technique of circumcision. We plan to study if this paradigm is transferable to clinical circumcision. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Surgical education through video broadcasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagengast, Eric S; Ramos, Margarita S; Sarma, Hiteswar; Deshpande, Gaurav; Hatcher, Kristin; Magee, William P; Campbell, Alex

    2014-09-01

    Surgical training is facing new obstacles. As advancements in medicine are made, surgeons are expected to know more and to be able to perform more procedures. In the western world, increasing restrictions on residency work hours are adding a new hurdle to surgical training. In low-resource settings, a low attending-to-resident ratio results in limited operative experience for residents. Advances in telemedicine may offer new methods for surgical training. In this article, the authors share their unique experience using live video broadcasting of surgery for educational purposes at a comprehensive cleft care center in Guwahati, India.

  16. Wind for Schools: A National Data and Curricula Development Activity for Schools (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2011-05-01

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America?s Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by: 1) Developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses. 2) Installing small wind turbines at community 'host' schools. 3) Implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school.

  17. INFORMATION SYSTEMS AUDIT CURRICULA CONTENT MATCHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile-Daniel CARDOȘ

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Financial and internal auditors must cope with the challenge of performing their mission in technology enhanced environment. In this article we match the information technology description found in the International Federation of Accountants (IFAC and the Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA curricula against the Model Curriculum issued by the Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA. By reviewing these three curricula, we matched the content in the ISACA Model Curriculum with the IFAC International Education Practice Statement 2 and the IIAs’ Global Model Internal Audit Curriculum. In the IFAC and IIA Curriculum there are 16 content elements, out of 19 possible, which match, in their description, the ISACA Model Curriculum’s content. We noticed that a candidate who graduates an IFAC or IIA compliant program acquire IS auditing competences similar to the specific content of the ISACA model curriculum but less than the requirements for a professional information systems auditor.

  18. The importance of expert feedback during endovascular simulator training.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, Emily

    2011-07-01

    Complex endovascular skills are difficult to obtain in the clinical environment. Virtual reality (VR) simulator training is a valuable addition to current training curricula, but is there a benefit in the absence of expert trainers?

  19. EFNS Task Force on Teaching of Neuroimaging in Neurology Curricula in Europe : present status and recommendations for the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantano, P; Chollet, F; Paulson, O; von Kummer, R; Laihinen, A; Leenders, K; Yancheva, S

    2001-01-01

    A Task Force on 'Teaching of Neuroimaging in Neurology Curricula in Europe' was appointed in September 1998 by the education committee of the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) in order to: (1) examine the present status of teaching of neuroimaging in the training of neurology in E

  20. Surgical ethics: surgical virtue and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercler, Christian J

    2015-01-01

    The encounter between a patient and her surgeon is unique for several reasons. The surgeon inflicts pain upon a patient for the patient's own good. An operative intervention is irreducibly personal, such that the decisions about and performance of operations are inseparable from the idiosyncrasies of the individual surgeon. Furthermore, there is a chasm of knowledge between the patient and surgeon that is difficult to cross. Hence, training in the discipline of surgery includes the inculcation of certain virtues and practices to safeguard against abuses of this relationship and to make sure that the best interests of the patient are prioritized. The stories in this issue are evidence that in contemporary practice this is not quite enough, as surgeons reflect on instances they felt were ethically challenging. Common themes include the difficulty in communicating surgical uncertainty, patient-surgeon relationships, ethical issues in surgical training, and the impact of the technological imperative on caring for dying patients.

  1. Innovation in pediatric surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Matthew S; Wulkan, Mark L

    2015-06-01

    Pediatric surgical training in the United States remained basically unchanged from the model developed by Ladd and Gross in the 1930s until recently. Standardized curriculum and novel evaluation methods are now being implemented. Pediatric Surgical education is currently undergoing a transition to competency-based evaluation and promotion. Unfortunately, there is little data on the efficacy of these changes. This presents an opportunity for further study of how we conduct training, and how we evaluate and promote our trainees.

  2. Revitalizing Technical and Vocational Education Training for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Revitalizing Technical and Vocational Education Training for Poverty ... with a population of 140 million people is battling with food insecurity, poverty and youth ... in education curricula, agricultural education and the rural poor was discussed.

  3. Virtual reality training in neurosurgery: Review of current status and future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaraj, Ali; Lemole, Michael G.; Finkle, Joshua H.; Yudkowsky, Rachel; Wallace, Adam; Luciano, Cristian; Banerjee, P. Pat; Rizzi, Silvio H.; Charbel, Fady T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Over years, surgical training is changing and years of tradition are being challenged by legal and ethical concerns for patient safety, work hour restrictions, and the cost of operating room time. Surgical simulation and skill training offer an opportunity to teach and practice advanced techniques before attempting them on patients. Simulation training can be as straightforward as using real instruments and video equipment to manipulate simulated “tissue” in a box trainer. More advanced virtual reality (VR) simulators are now available and ready for widespread use. Early systems have demonstrated their effectiveness and discriminative ability. Newer systems enable the development of comprehensive curricula and full procedural simulations. Methods: A PubMed review of the literature was performed for the MESH words “Virtual reality, “Augmented Reality”, “Simulation”, “Training”, and “Neurosurgery”. Relevant articles were retrieved and reviewed. A review of the literature was performed for the history, current status of VR simulation in neurosurgery. Results: Surgical organizations are calling for methods to ensure the maintenance of skills, advance surgical training, and credential surgeons as technically competent. The number of published literature discussing the application of VR simulation in neurosurgery training has evolved over the last decade from data visualization, including stereoscopic evaluation to more complex augmented reality models. With the revolution of computational analysis abilities, fully immersive VR models are currently available in neurosurgery training. Ventriculostomy catheters insertion, endoscopic and endovascular simulations are used in neurosurgical residency training centers across the world. Recent studies have shown the coloration of proficiency with those simulators and levels of experience in the real world. Conclusion: Fully immersive technology is starting to be applied to the practice of

  4. Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity: a resident education tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croley, Julie A; Malone, C Helen; Goodwin, Brandon P; Phillips, Linda G; Cole, Eric L; Wagner, Richard F

    2017-01-01

    Background Surgical reconstructive planning following Mohs surgery can be a difficult subject for dermatology residents to master. Prior research demonstrates that active learning is preferred and more effective compared to passive learning models and that dermatology residents desire greater complexity and volume in surgical training. We present a novel, active, problem-based learning tool for the education of Mohs reconstruction with the goal of improving residents’ ability to plan surgical reconstructions. Materials and methods The Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity is an active, problem-based learning activity in which residents designed repairs for planned Mohs defects prior to surgery on an iPad application or on a printed photograph. The attending Mohs surgeon reviewed the reconstructive designs, provided feedback, guided discussion, and facilitated insight into additional issues requiring further review. Residents performed or observed the Mohs and reconstructive surgical procedures for respective repairs. Surveys were administered to participants before and after participating in the Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity to assess the educational value of the activity. Survey responses were recorded on a 5-point Likert scale. Results Mean participant-reported confidence in flap and graft knowledge, flap and graft planning, and flap and graft performance increased 1.50–2.50 Likert scale points upon completion of the Mohs surgery rotation by residents participating in the educational activity. The observed trend was larger in the dermatology resident subset, with increases of 2.00–3.50 Likert scale points reported for these questions. Mean participant-reported likelihoods of performing flaps and grafts in the future increased 0.25–0.50 Likert scale points among all residents participating in the educational activity and 0.50–1.00 Likert scale points in the dermatology resident subset. All residents participating in the

  5. Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity: a resident education tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croley, Julie A; Malone, C Helen; Goodwin, Brandon P; Phillips, Linda G; Cole, Eric L; Wagner, Richard F

    2017-01-01

    Surgical reconstructive planning following Mohs surgery can be a difficult subject for dermatology residents to master. Prior research demonstrates that active learning is preferred and more effective compared to passive learning models and that dermatology residents desire greater complexity and volume in surgical training. We present a novel, active, problem-based learning tool for the education of Mohs reconstruction with the goal of improving residents' ability to plan surgical reconstructions. The Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity is an active, problem-based learning activity in which residents designed repairs for planned Mohs defects prior to surgery on an iPad application or on a printed photograph. The attending Mohs surgeon reviewed the reconstructive designs, provided feedback, guided discussion, and facilitated insight into additional issues requiring further review. Residents performed or observed the Mohs and reconstructive surgical procedures for respective repairs. Surveys were administered to participants before and after participating in the Mohs Surgical Reconstruction Educational Activity to assess the educational value of the activity. Survey responses were recorded on a 5-point Likert scale. Mean participant-reported confidence in flap and graft knowledge, flap and graft planning, and flap and graft performance increased 1.50-2.50 Likert scale points upon completion of the Mohs surgery rotation by residents participating in the educational activity. The observed trend was larger in the dermatology resident subset, with increases of 2.00-3.50 Likert scale points reported for these questions. Mean participant-reported likelihoods of performing flaps and grafts in the future increased 0.25-0.50 Likert scale points among all residents participating in the educational activity and 0.50-1.00 Likert scale points in the dermatology resident subset. All residents participating in the educational activity somewhat or completely agreed

  6. Integrating ultrasound into modern medical curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shilpan G; Benninger, Brion; Mirjalili, S Ali

    2017-05-01

    Ultrasonography is widely practiced in many disciplines. It is becoming increasingly important to design well-structured curricula to introduce imaging to students during medical school. This review aims to analyze the literature for evidence of how ultrasonography has been incorporated into anatomy education in medical school curricula worldwide. A literature search was conducted using multiple databases with the keywords: "Ultrasound OR Ultrasonographic examination*" and "Medical student* OR Undergraduate teaching* OR Medical education*" and "Anatomy* OR Living anatomy* OR Real-time anatomy.*" This review found that ultrasound curricula vary in stage of implementation, course length, number of sessions offered to students as well as staffing and additional course components. Most courses consisted of didactic lectures supplemented with demonstration sessions and/or hands-on ultrasound scanning sessions. The stage of course implementation tended to depend on the aim of the course; introductory courses were offered earlier in a student's career. Most courses improved student confidence and exam performance, and more junior students tended to benefit more from learning anatomy with ultrasound guidance rather than learning clinical examination skills. Students tended to prefer smaller groups when learning ultrasound to get more access to using the machines themselves. Ultrasonography is an important skill, which should be taught to medical students early in their careers as it facilitates anatomical education and is clinically relevant, though further objective research required to support the use of ultrasound education as a tool to improve clinical examination skills in medical students. Clin. Anat. 30:452-460, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Constructivism theory analysis and application to curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Amy F; All, Anita C

    2010-01-01

    Today's nursing programs are struggling to accommodate the changing needs of the health care environment and need to make changes in how students are taught. Using constructivism theory, whereby learning is an active process in which learners construct new ideas or concepts based upon their current or past knowledge, leaders in nursing education can make a paradigm shift toward concept-based curricula. This article presents a summary and analysis of constructivism and an innovative application of its active-learning principles to curriculum development, specifically for the education of nursing students.

  8. Training needs for general dentistry residents to place and restore two-implant-retained mandibular overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmstrom, Hans; Xiao, Jin; Romanos, Georgios E; Ren, Yan-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Implant therapy is rapidly becoming a standard of care for replacing missing dentition. Predoctoral dental curricula include some training in the implant restorative phase but offer limited exposure to the surgical phase, so it is important for postdoctoral general dentistry residency programs to provide competency training in all phases of implant therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the training needed for general dentistry residents to achieve competence in this area, specifically by defining the number of clinical experiences necessary in both the surgical and prosthetic phases of implant-retained mandibular overdenture construction (IRMOD). Fifteen Advanced Education in General Dentistry (AEGD) residents at one academic dental institution placed two implants in a total of 50 patients with edentulous mandibles and subsequently restored them with IRMOD. The supervising faculty member and the residents evaluated the competency level on a five-point scale after each implant placement and prosthetic case completion. According to the faculty evaluations, the residents achieved surgical competence after placing two implants in four to six cases and prosthetic management competence after restoring two to four cases of IRMOD. All 50 patients were satisfied with the treatment outcomes of IRMOD. This study concluded that general dentistry residents could potentially achieve competence in both the surgical and prosthetic phases of implant therapy while enrolled in an AEGD program.

  9. The Use and Misuse of Pleasure in Sex Education Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Sharon; Lustig, Kara; Graling, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Since Michelle Fine's writing on the missing discourse of desire in sex education, there has been considerable prompting among sexuality educators and feminist scholars to incorporate talk of pleasure into sex education curricula. While the calls for inclusion continue, few have actually examined the curricula for a pleasure discourse or…

  10. An Experimental Evaluation of Four Elementary School Math Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agodini, Roberto; Harris, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of four elementary school math curricula: (a) "Investigations in Number, Data, and Space"; (b) "Math Expressions"; (c) "Saxon Math"; and (d) "Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley Mathematics" ("SFAW"). These curricula are distinct from one another and represent many…

  11. Teachers' Reactions to Pre-Differentiated and Enriched Mathematics Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Lisa DaVia; Gilson, Cindy M.; Bruce-Davis, Micah N.; Gubbins, E. Jean

    2015-01-01

    Modern classrooms are often comprised of a heterogeneous student population with varying abilities. To address this variance, third-grade teachers implemented researcher-designed, pre-differentiated, and enriched math curricula in algebra, geometry and measurement, and graphing and data analysis. The goal of the curricula was to provide academic…

  12. Learning Affordances of Language and Communication National Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the learning affordances of different language and communication curricula in the world. For reasons of space, only two national education systems (Finland and Singapore) and their language and communication curricula are referred to. The accounts of national education systems consist of the identification of mechanisms…

  13. Defining and Developing Curricula in the Context of Cooperative Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.; Worker, Steven M.; Meehan, Cheryl L.; Schmitt-McQuitty, Lynn; Ambrose, Andrea; Brian, Kelley; Schoenfelder, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Effective curricula are considered to be the cornerstone of successful programming in Extension. However, there is no universal operationalized definition of the term "curriculum" as it applies to Extension. Additionally, the development of curricula requires a systematic process that takes into account numerous factors. We provide an…

  14. Indigenous knowledge in Canadian science curricula: cases from Western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijung

    2016-09-01

    To enhance Aboriginal students' educational opportunities in sciences, culturally relevant science curriculum has been examined and practiced in Western Canadian science classrooms. This article shares some examples of inclusion of indigenous knowledge in science curricula and discusses the improvement and challenges of culturally relevant science curricula in Canadian contexts.

  15. Welcome to cultural competency: surgery's efforts to acknowledge diversity in residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Catherine L; Chun, Maria B J

    2013-01-01

    Although cultural competency is not a new concept in healthcare, it has only recently been formally embraced as important in the field of surgery. All physicians, including and especially surgeons, must acknowledge the potential influence of culture in order to provide effective and equitable care for patients of all backgrounds. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) recognizes cultural competency as a component of "patient care," "professionalism," and "interpersonal and communication skills." A systematic literature search was conducted using the MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases. All publications focusing on surgical residents and the assessment of patient care, professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, or specifically cultural competency and/or were considered. This initial search resulted in 12 articles. To further refine the review, publications discussing curricula in residencies other than surgery, the assessment of technical, or clinical skills and/or without any explicit focus on cultural competency were excluded. Based on the specified inclusion and exclusion criteria, 5 articles were selected. These studies utilized various methods to improve surgical residents' cultural competency, including lectures, Objective Structural Clinical Examinations (OSCE), and written exercises and evaluations. A number of surgical residency programs have made promising strides in training culturally competent surgeons. Ultimately, in order to maximize our collective efforts to improve the quality of health care, the development of cultural competency curricula must be made a priority and such training should be a requirement for all trainees in surgical residency programs. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Gerontology course in the nursing undergraduate curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSenany, Samira; AlSaif, Amer A

    2014-12-01

    To explores nursing faculty members' attitudes towards older people, their thoughts about gerontological nursing education. Five focus groups and a survey were used with nursing faculty members 132 at the three nursing schools to explore their attitudes towards the care of older people and the perceived status of gerontological nursing education. The survey was given to 132 faculty members, including 76 clinical instructors, 40 associate professors and 16 professors. The nursing faculty in general had a positive attitude toward older people (M=3.36, SD 0.25), and teachers' attitudes were higher than those of their nursing students (M=3.18, SD0.29). This study results suggests that Saudi nursing curricula should include more extensive gerontology content and clinical experience with older people. This is the first time in Saudi Arabia that research has listened to their voices and examined their commitments toward gerontology education.

  17. Gerontology course in the nursing undergraduate curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira AlSenany

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explores nursing faculty members’ attitudes towards older people, their thoughts about gerontological nursing education. Method Five focus groups and a survey were used with nursing faculty members 132 at the three nursing schools to explore their attitudes towards the care of older people and the perceived status of gerontological nursing education. The survey was given to 132 faculty members, including 76 clinical instructors, 40 associate professors and 16 professors. The nursing faculty in general had a positive attitude toward older people (M=3.36, SD 0.25, and teachers’ attitudes were higher than those of their nursing students (M=3.18, SD0.29. Results This study results suggests that Saudi nursing curricula should include more extensive gerontology content and clinical experience with older people. Conclusion This is the first time in Saudi Arabia that research has listened to their voices and examined their commitments toward gerontology education.

  18. Clinical Pharmacy Education and Training Program: A Special Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Bethesda, MD.

    The purpose of the report is to give a state-of-the-art picture of clinical pharmacy education and training in the United States as represented by 4 prototype pharmacy school curricula chosen for documentation by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Criteria for selection relate to the environment in which the various curricula are…

  19. Effectiveness and Organization of Addiction Medicine Training Across the Globe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayu, A.P.; Schellekens, A.F.A.; Iskandar, S.; Pinxten, L.; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over the past decade, addiction medicine training curricula have been developed to prepare physicians to work with substance use disorder patients. This review paper aimed at (1) summarizing scientific publications that outline the content of addiction medicine curricula and (2) evaluati

  20. Effectiveness and organization of addiction medicine training across the globe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayu, A.P.; Schellekens, A.F.A.; Iskandar, S.; Pinxten, W.J.L.; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2015-01-01

    Background: Over the past decade, addiction medicine training curricula have been developed to prepare physicians to work with substance use disorder patients. This review paper aimed at ( 1) summarizing scientific publications that outline the content of addiction medicine curricula and ( 2) evalua

  1. Effectiveness and organization of addiction medicine training across the globe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayu, A.P.; Schellekens, A.F.A.; Iskandar, S.; Pinxten, W.J.L.; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2015-01-01

    Background: Over the past decade, addiction medicine training curricula have been developed to prepare physicians to work with substance use disorder patients. This review paper aimed at ( 1) summarizing scientific publications that outline the content of addiction medicine curricula and ( 2)

  2. Effectiveness and Organization of Addiction Medicine Training Across the Globe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayu, A.P.; Schellekens, A.F.A.; Iskandar, S.; Pinxten, L.; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over the past decade, addiction medicine training curricula have been developed to prepare physicians to work with substance use disorder patients. This review paper aimed at (1) summarizing scientific publications that outline the content of addiction medicine curricula and (2)

  3. Das interaktive Chirurgische Logbuch im Praktischen Jahr: Eine mehrjährige Retrospektive [Interactive Logbook in the Surgical Training of Final Year Medical Students: A Four-Year Retrospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadmon, Guni

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] Aims: An interactive surgical logbook was introduced in 2004 as part of a reform of the 16-week surgical training period of the final medical year at Heidelberg University. The present work describes its aims and development and examines its utilization by students and supervising doctors over a period of four years. Methods: The surgical training period of the final medical year was evaluated in 2003 by means of questionnaires and interviews with doctors, nurses, orderlies, and final-year medical students. Subsequently, a catalog of training objectives was compiled, which formed the basis for a logbook that states the training objectives, outlines the curriculum of the surgical training period, and includes separate pages for documenting 31 different medical procedures including the treatment of three patients under one’s care. It further includes tables for recording one’s attendance at training activities and detachable forms for self-assessment, evaluation of the surgical training period, and assessment of the student by the training doctors. The logbook was given to all students in their final-year surgical training period, but its use was optional. The entries in all returned logbooks were retrieved, recorded, and analyzed. Results: The return rate of the logbooks was initially low but rose within two years to 80%–100%. The extent of the entries was, however, continuously poor. Nineteen percent of the logbooks were devoid of entries, approximately 40% had no entries of clinical procedures, and the majority of the rest contained very incomplete records. The extent of feedback and comments by the supervising doctors was very limited, and their assessment forms often were filled in by the students themselves. By contrast, students returned numerous self-assessment and evaluation questionnaires that were complete and contained differentiated entries. Informal interviews with students revealed that cooperation was lacking on the

  4. Needs assessment for simulation training in neuroendoscopy: a Canadian national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji, Faizal A; Dubrowski, Adam; Drake, James; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, dramatic changes in surgical education have increased interest in simulation-based training for complex surgical skills. This is particularly true for endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV), given the potential for serious intraoperative errors arising from surgical inexperience. However, prior to simulator development, a thorough assessment of training needs is essential to ensure development of educationally relevant platforms. The purpose of this study was to conduct a national needs assessment addressing specific goals of instruction, to guide development of simulation platforms, training curricula, and assessment metrics for ETV. Canadian neurosurgeons performing ETV were invited to participate in a structured online questionnaire regarding the procedural steps for ETV, the frequency and significance of intraoperative errors committed while learning the technique, and simulation training modules of greatest potential educational benefit. Descriptive data analysis was completed for both quantitative and qualitative responses. Thirty-two (55.2%) of 58 surgeons completed the survey. All believed that virtual reality simulation training for ETV would be a valuable addition to clinical training. Selection of ventriculostomy site, navigation within the ventricles, and performance of the ventriculostomy ranked as the most important steps to simulate. Technically inadequate ventriculostomy and inappropriate fenestration site selection were ranked as the most frequent/significant errors. A standard ETV module was thought to be most beneficial for resident training. To inform the development of a simulation-based training program for ETV, the authors have conducted a national needs assessment. The results provide valuable insight to inform key design elements necessary to construct an educationally relevant device and educational program.

  5. Integrating Family as a Discipline by Providing Parent Led Curricula: Impact on LEND Trainees' Leadership Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keisling, Bruce L; Bishop, Elizabeth A; Roth, Jenness M

    2017-01-20

    Background While the MCH Leadership Competencies and family as a discipline have been required elements of Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and related Disabilities (LEND) programs for over a decade, little research has been published on the efficacy of either programmatic component in the development of the next generation of leaders who can advocate and care for Maternal and Child Health (MCH) populations. Objective To test the effectiveness of integrating the family discipline through implementation of parent led curricula on trainees' content knowledge, skills, and leadership development in family-centered care, according to the MCH Leadership Competencies. Methods One hundred and two long-term (≥ 300 h) LEND trainees completed a clinical and leadership training program which featured intensive parent led curricula supported by a full-time family faculty member. Trainees rated themselves on the five Basic and Advanced skill items that comprise MCH Leadership Competency 8: Family-centered Care at the beginning and conclusion of their LEND traineeship. Results When compared to their initial scores, trainees rated themselves significantly higher across all family-centered leadership competency items at the completion of their LEND traineeship. Conclusions The intentional engagement of a full-time family faculty member and parent led curricula that include didactic and experiential components are associated with greater identification and adoption by trainees of family-centered attitudes, skills, and practices. However, the use of the MCH Leadership Competencies as a quantifiable measure of program evaluation, particularly leadership development, is limited.

  6. Comparison of student success using "atoms first" versus "traditional" curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillesheim, Christina S.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between the "atoms first" and the "traditional" curricula. Specifically focusing on which curriculum better aligns to curricular expectations, leads to higher student success when students are grouped together, and when students are differentiated based on several factors. The main difference between the two approaches being the sequence of topics presented in the first semester general chemistry course. This study involves more than 9,500 general chemistry I and II students over 7 semesters with about half of them being taught using the "atoms first" approach. Student success was measured using the American Chemical Society's (ACS) final examination scores and the final letter grades. Alignment to curricular expectations was determined via a qualitative review of textbooks written for each of the approaches. This showed that the "atoms first" approach better aligns to research supported best practices. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed to determine if there is a significant difference between the "atoms first" and the "traditional" curricula. The "traditional" approach was found to lead to higher student achievement for both measures of student success in both chemistry I and II courses. Lastly, multiple linear, multinomial logistic, and binary logistic regressions were run using all of the subgroups---gender, race/ethnicity, major, ACT composite, math ACT, overall GPA, and classroom size---as predictor variables to determine if any significant interactions between the curricular methods and the different subgroups existed. Results found that the relationship between gender, GPA, and classroom size groupings significantly impact student achievement in general chemistry. Specifically, the "traditional" approach lead to higher student success compared to the "atoms first" approach for males, females, below average GPA students, above average GPA students, and students in large classroom

  7. Surgical Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azarmehr, Iman; Stokbro, Kasper; Bell, R. Bryan

    2017-01-01

    were identified in the field of traumatology. Treatment of complex orbital fractures was considerably improved by the use of SN compared with traditionally treated control groups. Conclusions: SN seems to be a very promising addition to the surgical toolkit. Planning details of the surgical procedure...... in a 3-dimensional virtual environment and execution with real-time guidance can significantly improve precision. Among factors to be considered are the financial investments necessary and the learning curve....

  8. 3D Surgical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  9. 数字化三维手术模拟在正颌外科专科医师培训中的应用%Application of digital three-dimensional surgical simulation system in specialist training of orthognathic surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈末伦; 王旭东

    2016-01-01

    牙颌面畸形患者面部形态异常和咬合功能障碍常较严重,需要采用正颌—正畸联合治疗的方法进行矫正。治疗牙颌面畸形的正颌手术术野狭小、操作复杂、风险较大,其手术教学和操作培训手段有限,限制了此类技术的推广应用。文章介绍了将数字化三维手术设计与模拟系统应用于正颌外科专科医师培训,可取得良好的手术教学效果。实践表明,通过手术虚拟操作,可使受训医师加深对牙颌面畸形和正颌外科手术的理解。%Patients with dento-maxillofacial deformities often suffer relatively severe facial anomalies and occlusal dysfunction, which need to be corrected with combined orthodontic and orthognathic treatment.Orthognathic surgery is very complicated with narrow operative field and relatively high risk.The means of orthognathic surgery teaching and operation training are limited,which restricts the promotion of orthognathic surgical technology.In this study,a digital three-dimensional surgical design and simulation system was applied to specialist training of orthognathic surgery with satisfactory results.Practice proves that through virtual operation training,the trained surgeons obtained a deeper understanding of dento-maxillofacial deformities and orthognathic surgery.

  10. Nachhaltigkeit einer verbesserten studentischen Evaluation im operativen Fachgebiet des Reformstudiengangs HeiCuMed [Sustainability of an improved student evaluation of the undergraduate surgical training in the reform curriculum HeiCuMed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadmon, Martina

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] Aims: HeiCuMed (Heidelberger Curriculum Medicinale represents a reform curriculum which had the aim to resolve known problems of the traditional curriculum. The new clinical curriculum was implemented in October 2001. The comparative student evaluation of the undergraduate surgical training before and after the implementation of HeiCuMed shows a significantly higher rating of the surgical training in the reform curriculum. The present study aims at complementing the evaluation data collected during the surgical training by interviewing students from the traditional program and students from HeiCuMed in their final year of undergraduate training. Results: The interview data show that the introduction of new didactic strategies, the aligned contents in the different surgical fields, which were also matched with contents from internal medicine, as well as the case-based interactive teaching were responsible for the improved evaluation of students in HeiCuMed. The tutor continuity which is achieved by releasing the responsible tutor from clinical and operative duties for a period of 1-2 weeks, seems an important factor for the success. HeiCuMed students experienced the relation of the training to their future profession significantly stronger than students from the traditional curriculum and thus felt a stronger subjective learning success. Conclusion: In summary, the surgical training in HeiCuMed is highly effective from the point of view of the students, both in their realtime as well as in their retrospective judgement. [german] Zielsetzung: HeiCuMed (Heidelberger Curriculum Medicinale steht für ein Reformcurriculum, das sich zum Ziel gesetzt hat, Lösungsansätze für apparente Probleme des traditionellen Curriculums in die Curriculumsplanung zu integrieren. Im Oktober 2001 wurde das neue klinische Curriculum implementiert. Eine wesentliche Qualitätssicherungsmaßnahme im Block Operative Medizin war die Weiterführung der zuvor

  11. The future of postgraduate training

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    Improvements to postgraduate training have included newly designed postgraduate curricula, new forms of delivery of learning, more valid and reliable assessments, and more rigorous evaluation of training programmes. All these changes have been necessary and have now started to settle in. Now therefore is an appropriate time to look to the future of postgraduate training. Predicting the future is difficult in any course of life-however an examination of recent trends is often a good place to s...

  12. [Surgical education has its price].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, W; Krones, C J

    2012-04-01

    The radical economisation of the German health-care system has caused an increasing cost awareness. Following this trend, medical education has been identified as a possible expense factor. The theoretical and practical training of young doctors needs time and costs money. However, a detailed cost analysis is still not available, since the complex daily work schedule of young professionals only allows the calculation of single cost factors. Investigations in the USA estimate the costs of surgical training at US$ 80 000 per year and per resident. At present in Germany, surgical training is indirectly financed by the DRG flat rates of the health insurance companies. Possible alternatives include the implementation of a "training fond" which is financed by a percentage fee of the DRG's as well as an on-top funding by the federal government. This "training fond" would support only those surgical units that offer a structured and certified training to surgical residents. However, a systematic cost analysis of such a structured curriculum is necessary for any further discussion.

  13. Surgical trainees and trauma emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybaillie, E; Broos, P L O

    2010-01-01

    An accident and emergency (A&E) training has been suggested as an essential part of the basic surgical training. The A&E curriculum should be divided into three sections: a critical curriculum, a core curriculum and a comprehensive curriculum. For instance, the critical curriculum contains topics that provide the opportunity to translate the ABCDE principles of trauma management into practice. Furthermore, a post in the A&E department provides the surgical trainee with significant exposure to the management of the polytrauma patient and to the management of other acute general surgical, urological and orthopaedic conditions. By presenting better educational programs and by reducing the non-medical tasks a trainee has to deal with, the education of surgical trainees during A&E attachment can be improved.

  14. Improving the Teaching Skills of Residents in a Surgical Training Program: Results of the Pilot Year of a Curricular Initiative in an Ophthalmology Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Yewlin E; Newman, Lori R; Loewenstein, John I; Kloek, Carolyn E

    2015-01-01

    To design and implement a teaching skills curriculum that addressed the needs of an ophthalmology residency training program, to assess the effect of the curriculum, and to present important lessons learned. A teaching skills curriculum was designed for the Harvard Medical School (HMS) Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology. Results of a needs assessment survey were used to guide curriculum objectives. Overall, 3 teaching workshops were conducted between October 2012 and March 2013 that addressed areas of need, including procedural teaching. A postcurriculum survey was used to assess the effect of the curriculum. Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, a tertiary care institution in Boston, MA. Overall, 24 residents in the HMS Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology were included. The needs assessment survey demonstrated that although most residents anticipated that teaching would be important in their future career, only one-third had prior formal training in teaching. All residents reported they found the teaching workshops to be either very or extremely useful. All residents reported they would like further training in teaching, with most residents requesting additional training in best procedural teaching practices for future sessions. The pilot year of the resident-as-teacher curriculum for the HMS Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology demonstrated a need for this curriculum and was perceived as beneficial by the residents, who reported increased comfort in their teaching skills after attending the workshops. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Redesigning Curricula in Geology and Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, D. W.; Ewing, R. C.; Fowler, D.; Macik, M.; Marcantonio, F.; Miller, B.; Newman, J.; Olszewski, T.; Reece, R.; Rosser, S.

    2015-12-01

    In the summer of 2014, the Texas A&M Department of Geology and Geophysics partnered with the Texas A&M Center for Teaching Excellence to implement TAMU's curriculum revision process: a data-informed, faculty-driven, educational-developer-supported rebuilding of our degree programs and course offerings. The current curricula (B.S. and B.A. in Geology, B.S. in Geophysics) were put into place in 1997, following the merger of two separate departments. The needs and capabilities of the Department and the student body have changed significantly since that time: more than 50% turnover of the faculty, a rapidly-changing job climate for geologists and geophysicists, and a nearly five-fold increase in the undergraduate population to over 500 majors in Fall 2015. Surveys of former students, employers and faculty at other universities revealed more reasons to address the curriculum. Some of the most desired skills are also those at which our graduates feel and are perceived to be least prepared: oral communication and the ability to learn software packages (skills that are most challenging to teach with growing class sizes). The challenge facing the Department is to accommodate growing student numbers while maintaining strength in traditional instructor-intensive activities such as microscopy and field mapping, and also improving our graduates' non-geological skills (e.g., communication, software use, teamwork, problem-solving) to insulate them from volatility in the current job market. We formed the Curriculum Study Group, consisting of faculty, graduate students, advisors and curriculum experts, to gather and analyze data and define the knowledge and skill base a graduate of our department must have. In addition to conducting external surveys, this group interviewed current students and faculty to determine the strengths and weaknesses of our program. We developed program learning goals that were further specified into over fifty criteria. For each criteria we defined

  16. The effect of implementing cognitive load theory-based design principles in virtual reality simulation training of surgical skills: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts; Mikkelsen, Peter Trier; Konge, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Background Cognitive overload can inhibit learning, and cognitive load theory-based instructional design principles can be used to optimize learning situations. This study aims to investigate the effect of implementing cognitive load theory-based design principles in virtual reality simulation...... training of mastoidectomy. Methods Eighteen novice medical students received 1 h of self-directed virtual reality simulation training of the mastoidectomy procedure randomized for standard instructions (control) or cognitive load theory-based instructions with a worked example followed by a problem...... completion exercise (intervention). Participants then completed two post-training virtual procedures for assessment and comparison. Cognitive load during the post-training procedures was estimated by reaction time testing on an integrated secondary task. Final-product analysis by two blinded expert raters...

  17. Internationalizing curricula : Needs and wishes of alumni and employers with

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Funk, Andreas; Heijer, Joyce den; Schuurmans-Brouwer, Anneke; Walenkamp, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Internationalizing curricula. Needs and wishes of alumni and employers with regard to international competencies. Internationalization has become of great importance for universities acrossthe globe. The labour market is becoming international, with internationalopportunities and international comp

  18. The state of cancer epidemiology curricula in postgraduate schools worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavi-Jarrahi, Alireza; Azargashb, Ezanollah; Mousavi-Jarrahi, Yasaman; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali

    2011-09-01

    The study aimed to describe the cancer epidemiology curricula in postgraduate schools worldwide. Using a stepwise approach, information on the cancer epidemiology curricula were abstracted through an internet search of medical or public heath schools worldwide. The common scientific outline (a scholarly developed classification of cancer-related topics) was used to describe the extents that cancer epidemiology and its scientific domains are incorporated into postgraduate degrees in the epidemiology. Among the 120 studied schools, no school offered an explicitly doctoral degree in cancer epidemiology. Just eight schools offered cancer epidemiology as an area of concentration in their epidemiology curricula. The contents of the cancer epidemiology courses offered in different schools were related in 44% of times to topics of cancer control, 19% times to risk factors, and just 11% of times to biology of cancer. The need for comprehensive re-evaluation of the cancer epidemiology curricula in postgraduate teaching was concluded.

  19. Towards an Online Bachelor of Information Science Degree Programme in a Nigerian University: Part 1--Lessons from the Literature and Existing Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiferuke, Isola; Tiamiyu, Mutawakilu; Longe, Folake; Nwagwu, Williams; Ogunsola, Kemi; Opesade, Adeola; Olatokun, Wole

    2012-01-01

    Training programmes for the information professions worldwide have been shifting and diversifying the scope of their claimed domains and curricula in order to empower their graduates with diverse knowledge and versatile technical skills required to compete successfully in the highly competitive job markets in the information industries. In line…

  20. Marine Science Teaching at the University Level. Report of the Unesco Workshop on University Curricula. Unesco Technical Papers in Marine Science No. 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    A group of marine science education educators from several countries were requested to provide guidelines for the education and training of marine scientists and formulate recommended curricula in the following disciplines: marine biology (including fisheries biology), physical oceanography, and marine geology. Included in the report are: (1)…

  1. A Content Analysis of Phonological Awareness and Phonics in Commonly Used Head Start Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibbe, Lori E.; Gerde, Hope K.; Wright, Tanya S.; Samples-Steele, Chelsea R.

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used early childhood curricula were examined to consider the degree to which they support research-based instruction for phonological awareness (PA) and phonics. A content analysis was completed for two types of curricula widely used in Head Start: overarching general curricula and lesson-based curricula, which usually provide more…

  2. A Content Analysis of Phonological Awareness and Phonics in Commonly Used Head Start Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibbe, Lori E.; Gerde, Hope K.; Wright, Tanya S.; Samples-Steele, Chelsea R.

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used early childhood curricula were examined to consider the degree to which they support research-based instruction for phonological awareness (PA) and phonics. A content analysis was completed for two types of curricula widely used in Head Start: overarching general curricula and lesson-based curricula, which usually provide more…

  3. Surgical electronic logbook: A step forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Díaz, Carlos Javier; Luna Aufroy, Alexis; Rebasa Cladera, Pere; Serra Pla, Sheila; Jurado Ruiz, Cristina; Mora López, Laura; Serra Aracil, Xavier; Navarro Soto, Salvador

    2015-12-01

    The surgical electronic logbook (surgical e-logbook) aims to: simplify registration of the training activities of surgical residents, and to obtain reliable and detailed reports about these activities for resident evaluation. The surgical e-logbook is a unique and shared database. Residents prospectively record their activities in 3 areas: surgical, scientific and teaching. We can access activity reports that are constantly updated. Study period using the surgical e-logbook: Between June 2011 and May 2013. Number of surgeries reported: 4,255. Number of surgical procedures reported: 11,907. Number of surgeries per resident per year reported: 250. Number of surgical procedures per resident per year reported: 700. Surgical activity as a primary surgeon during the first year of residency is primarily in emergency surgery (68,01%) and by laparotomy (97,73%), while during the fifth year of residency 51,27% is performed in elective surgery and laparoscopy is used in 23,10% of cases. During this period, residents participated in a total of 11 scientific publications, 75 conference presentations and 69 continuing education activities. The surgical e-logbook is a useful tool that simplifies the recording and analysis of data about surgical and scientific activities of the residents. It is a step forward in the evaluation of the training of surgical residents, however, is only an intermediate step towards the development of a larger Spanish registry. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Tool-Based Curricula and Visual Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragica Vasileska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last twenty years nanotechnology hasrevolutionized the world of information theory, computers andother important disciplines, such as medicine, where it hascontributed significantly in the creation of more sophisticateddiagnostic tools. Therefore, it is important for people working innanotechnology to better understand basic concepts to be morecreative and productive. To further foster the progress onNanotechnology in the USA, the National Science Foundation hascreated the Network for Computational Nanotechnology (NCNand the dissemination of all the information from member andnon-member participants of the NCN is enabled by thecommunity website www.nanoHUB.org. nanoHUB’s signatureservices online simulation that enables the operation ofsophisticated research and educational simulation engines with acommon browser. No software installation or local computingpower is needed. The simulation tools as well as nano-conceptsare augmented by educational materials, assignments, and toolbasedcurricula, which are assemblies of tools that help studentsexcel in a particular area.As elaborated later in the text, it is the visual mode of learningthat we are exploiting in achieving faster and better results withstudents that go through simulation tool-based curricula. Thereare several tool based curricula already developed on thenanoHUB and undergoing further development, out of which fiveare directly related to nanoelectronics. They are: ABACUS –device simulation module; ACUTE – Computational Electronicsmodule; ANTSY – bending toolkit; and AQME – quantummechanics module. The methodology behind tool-based curriculais discussed in details. Then, the current status of each module ispresented, including user statistics and student learningindicatives. Particular simulation tool is explored further todemonstrate the ease by which students can grasp information.Representative of Abacus is PN-Junction Lab; representative ofAQME is PCPBT tool; and

  5. Training future surgeons for management roles: the resident-surgeon-manager conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Waël C; Mulder, David S; Fried, Gerald M; Elhilali, Mostafa; Khwaja, Kosar A

    2012-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To demonstrate that senior surgical residents would benefit from focused training by professionals with management expertise. Although managerial skills are recognized as necessary for the successful establishment of a surgical practice, they are not often emphasized in traditional surgical residency curricula. DESIGN Senior residents from all surgical subspecialties at McGill University were invited to participate in a 1-day management seminar. Precourse questionnaires aimed at evaluating the residents' perceptions of their own managerial knowledge and preparedness were circulated. The seminar was then given in the form of interactive lectures and case-based discussions. The questionnaires were readministered at the end of the course, along with an evaluation form. Precourse and postcourse data were compared using the Freeman-Halton extension of the Fisher exact test to determine statistical significance (P < .05). SETTING McGill University Health Centre in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. PARTICIPANTS A total of 43 senior residents. RESULTS Before the course, the majority of residents (27 of 43 [63%]) thought that management instruction only happened "from time to time" in their respective programs. After the course, 15 residents (35%) felt that management topics were "well addressed," and 19 (44%) felt that management topics have been "very well addressed" (P < .01). Residents noted a significant improvement in their ability to perform the following skills after the course: giving feedback, delegating duties, coping with stress, effective learning, and effective teaching. On the ensemble of all managerial skills combined, 26 residents (60%) rated their performance as "good" or "excellent" after the course vs only 21 (49%) before the course (P = .02). Residents also noted a statistically significant improvement in their ability to perform the managerial duties necessary for the establishment of a surgical practice. CONCLUSIONS Surgical residency programs

  6. Embedding concepts of sex and gender health differences into medical curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Virginia M; Rice, Morrisa; Schiebinger, Londa; Jenkins, Marjorie R; Werbinski, Janice; Núñez, Ana; Wood, Susan; Viggiano, Thomas R; Shuster, Lynne T

    2013-03-01

    Sex, a biological variable, and gender, a cultural variable, define the individual and affect all aspects of disease prevention, development, diagnosis, progression, and treatment. Sex and gender are essential elements of individualized medicine. However, medical education rarely considers such topics beyond the physiology of reproduction. To reduce health care disparities and to provide optimal, cost-effective medical care for individuals, concepts of sex and gender health need to become embedded into education and training of health professionals. In September 2012, Mayo Clinic hosted a 2-day workshop bringing together leading experts from 13 U.S. schools of medicine and schools of public health, Health Resources and Services Administration Office of Women's Health (HRSA OWH), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH), and the Canadian Institute of Health and Gender. The purpose of this workshop was to articulate the need to integrate sex- and gender-based content into medical education and training, to identify gaps in current medical curricula, to consider strategies to embed concepts of sex and gender health into health professional curricula, and to identify existing resources to facilitate and implement change. This report summarizes these proceedings, recommendations, and action items from the workshop.

  7. Can teenage novel users perform as well as General Surgery residents upon initial exposure to a robotic surgical system simulator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, A; Patel, S; Robison, W; Senkowski, T; Allen, J; Shaw, E; Senkowski, C

    2017-06-05

    New techniques in minimally invasive and robotic surgical platforms require staged curricula to insure proficiency. Scant literature exists as to how much simulation should play a role in training those who have skills in advanced surgical technology. The abilities of novel users may help discriminate if surgically experienced users should start at a higher simulation level or if the tasks are too rudimentary. The study's purpose is to explore the ability of General Surgery residents to gain proficiency on the dVSS as compared to novel users. The hypothesis is that Surgery residents will have increased proficiency in skills acquisition as compared to naive users. Six General Surgery residents at a single institution were compared with six teenagers using metrics measured by the dVSS. Participants were given two 1-h sessions to achieve an MScoreTM in the 90th percentile on each of the five simulations. MScoreTM software compiles a variety of metrics including total time, number of attempts, and high score. Statistical analysis was run using Student's t test. Significance was set at p value technology.

  8. Solar energy technical training directory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corcoleotes, G; Kramer, K; O& #x27; Connor, K

    1979-06-01

    Available solar energy offerings in the technical training area are presented. Institutions are listed alphabetically by state. Each listing includes an institution address and phone number, solar programs or curricula offered, and detailed solar couse information. An alphabetical index of institutions in included. (MHR)

  9. The effect of implementing cognitive load theory-based design principles in virtual reality simulation training of surgical skills: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts; Mikkelsen, Peter Trier; Konge, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive overload can inhibit learning, and cognitive load theory-based instructional design principles can be used to optimize learning situations. This study aims to investigate the effect of implementing cognitive load theory-based design principles in virtual reality simulation training...

  10. Simulation-based surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgeniou, Evgenios; Loizou, Peter

    2013-09-01

    The reduction in time for training at the workplace has created a challenge for the traditional apprenticeship model of training. Simulation offers the opportunity for repeated practice in a safe and controlled environment, focusing on trainees and tailored to their needs. Recent technological advances have led to the development of various simulators, which have already been introduced in surgical training. The complexity and fidelity of the available simulators vary, therefore depending on our recourses we should select the appropriate simulator for the task or skill we want to teach. Educational theory informs us about the importance of context in professional learning. Simulation should therefore recreate the clinical environment and its complexity. Contemporary approaches to simulation have introduced novel ideas for teaching teamwork, communication skills and professionalism. In order for simulation-based training to be successful, simulators have to be validated appropriately and integrated in a training curriculum. Within a surgical curriculum, trainees should have protected time for simulation-based training, under appropriate supervision. Simulation-based surgical education should allow the appropriate practice of technical skills without ignoring the clinical context and must strike an adequate balance between the simulation environment and simulators.

  11. Randomized trial of the effect of video feedback on the acquisition of surgical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, A L; Cresswell, A C; Beard, J D; Chan, P

    2013-10-01

    Constructive feedback provides a mechanism for reinforcing learning during the acquisition of surgical skills. Feedback is usually given verbally, and sometimes documented, after direct observation by a trained assessor. The aim was to evaluate video recording as an effective modality for enhancing feedback, in comparison with standard verbal feedback alone. This was a prospective, blinded, randomized clinical trial comparing standard verbal feedback plus video with standard verbal feedback alone. Validated pro formas for assessment were used and quality control was performed by independent expert assessors. Trial participants were recorded on video performing the surgical skill, and returned the next day to perform the skill again following video and standard verbal feedback (group 1) or standard verbal feedback alone (group 2). Forty-eight participants were divided equally between the two groups. There was a significant improvement in the mean overall procedure score for group 1 of 2·875 from a maximum achievable score of 20 (P = 0·003), but not for group 2. There were significant improvements in the specific domains of instrument familiarity, needle handling, skin handling and accurate apposition, again all in group 1. The only significant improvement in group 2 was in an organized approach to the task, also observed in group 1. Knot-tying security deteriorated after feedback in group 2 but not in group 1. The addition of video feedback can improve the acquisition of surgical skills, and could be incorporated into formal surgical curricula. © 2013 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Exploring Surgeons' Perceptions of the Role of Simulation in Surgical Education: A Needs Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Clark

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The last two decades have seen the adoption of simulation-based surgical education in various disciplines. The current study’s goal was to perform a needs assessment using the results to inform future curricular planning and needs of surgeons and learners. Methods: A survey was distributed to 26 surgeon educators and interviews were conducted with 8 of these surgeons.  Analysis of survey results included reliability and descriptive statistics. Interviews were analyzed for thematic content with a constant comparison technique, developing coding and categorization of themes. Results: The survey response rate was 81%. The inter-item reliability, according to Cronbach’s alpha was 0.81 with strongest agreement for statements related to learning new skills, training new residents and the positive impact on patient safety and learning.   There was less strong agreement for maintenance of skills, improving team functioning and reducing teaching in the operating room. Interview results confirmed those themes from the survey and highlighted inconsistencies for identified perceived barriers and a focus on acquisition of skills only.  Interview responses specified concerns with integrating simulation into existing curricula and the need for more evaluation as a robust educational strategy. Conclusion: The findings were summarized in four themes: 1 use of simulation, 2 integration into curriculum, 3 leadership, and 4 understanding gaps in simulation use. This study exemplifies a mixed-methods approach to planning a surgical simulation program through a general needs assessment.

  13. Communication Skills among Surgical Trainees: Perceptions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Communication Skills among Surgical Trainees: Perceptions of Residents in a ... ability to communicate with patients and their family members is very important in the ... for training in communication skills as a basis for developing an effective ...

  14. A porcine model for teaching surgical cricothyridootomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Antonio Campelo Spencer Netto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the acceptability of an educational project using A porcine model of airway for teaching surgical cricothyroidotomy to medical students and medical residents at a university hospital in southern Brazil.METHODS: we developed a teaching project using a porcine model for training in surgical cricothyroidotomy. Medical students and residents received lectures about this surgical technique and then held practical training with the model. After the procedure, all participants filled out a form about the importance of training in airway handling and the model used.RESULTS: There were 63 participants. The overall quality of the porcine model was estimated at 8.8, while the anatomical correlation between the model and the human anatomy received a mean score of 8.5. The model was unanimously approved and considered useful in teaching the procedure.CONCLUSION: the training of surgical cricothyroidotomy with a porcine model showed good acceptance among medical students and residents of this institution.

  15. The common problems and strategies in the training of surgical medical records writting%医学生外科病历书写教学的特点及对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱琳; 邱贵兴; 于健春

    2011-01-01

    目的 分析外科病历的特点及医学生书写的常见问题,以提高医学生临床技能,促进外科临床教学.方法 总结912份北京协和医院外科医学生书写的住院病例,分析其常见问题,结合外科病历的特点,提出外科病例书写教学的方法与对策.结果 病历集中体现出一些共性问题,例如现病史与病历特点书写冗长重复,专科查体不完善,拟诊讨论简单、欠缺条理性等.结论 外科病历书写有其独特特点,应详细分析并结合这一特点,以规范性、条理性和完整性的原则指导外科病历书写.%Objective Evaluate the features of the surgery medical record and the common problems the medical students had in writing it, so as to improve clinical teaching of the surgery department and streng then the clinical skills of the students. Methods 912 cases of medical records written by the interns of PUMC hospital were summarized. The common problems and weakness were evaluated. Combined with the features of surgical medical records, the methods and strategies in surgical medical records teaching are proposed. Results There were some common problems in the 912 cases of medical records. The medical history and case characteristic were too long with over laping contents. The physical examination is incomplete. The diagnosis discussion is too simple with poor logistic thinking. Conclusion The writing of surgical medical records has its special reguirements, which should be evaluated in detail during the teaching and training of medical students. Combined with these requirements, the surgical medical records should be prepared in a standardized procedures.

  16. Knowledge, transfer, and innovation in physical literacy curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine D. Ennis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Literate individuals possess knowledge and skill and can apply these to perform tasks in novel settings. Knowledge is at the heart of physical literacy and provides the foundation for knowing what to do and how and when to perform. In this paper I argue that physical literacy includes not only knowledge for performance but also the ability to apply knowledge and use knowledge for innovation. Scholars since the 1930s have addressed the role of knowledge in physical literacy designing curricula centered on transmitting knowledge through a range of interdisciplinary approaches to physical education. This emphasis on physical literacy curricula continues today in the Science, PE, & Me! and The Science of Healthful Living interdisciplinary curricula.

  17. [Traditional and non-traditional curricula. Definitions and terminology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, N

    1995-03-30

    Differences between traditional (conventional) and innovative curricula are described. Technical terms are defined or explained. In traditional tracks, basic and clinical sciences are studied separately. The students meet the first patient after several years. The education is mainly discipline-, teacher-, lecture- and hospital-based. In innovative programmes, basic sciences are taught throughout the study parallel with clinical subjects (vertical integration), and subjects from related disciplines are often taught concurrently (horizontal integration). The students meet patients from the first day at the university, participate from the first week in courses in clinical skills, and, after some months, attend continuity clinics in the community. Teaching is student-directed, problem-based and/or community-oriented, with several electives. Many of the strategies above are also used in traditional curricula. The main difference between traditional and innovative curricula is whether basic and clinical sciences are vertically integrated or not.

  18. The SimSpay-Student Perceptions of a Low-Cost Build-It-Yourself Model for Novice Training of Surgical Skills in Canine Ovariohysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langebæk, Rikke; Toft, Nils; Eriksen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    staff or costly, hard-to-source supplies. The SimSpay was developed and implemented in the clinical veterinary curriculum in 2013. In 2014, 54 students participated in a questionnaire study to investigate their perception of the usefulness of the SimSpay as a learning tool. On a five-point Likert......-type scale, students were asked to rate their perceived levels of competence, confidence, and anatomic knowledge before and after SimSpay training. Results demonstrate a strongly significant (p

  19. Industrial Training of Construction Students: Perceptions of Training Organizations in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayarkwa, Joshua; Adinyira, Emmanuel; Osei-Asibey, Dickson

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The industrial training component in a university's curricula adds tremendous value to a degree programme by enhancing the employable skills of graduates. The purpose of this paper is to assess the perception of organisations that have trained construction students from the Department of Building Technology of the Kwame Nkrumah University…

  20. Industrial Training of Construction Students: Perceptions of Training Organizations in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayarkwa, Joshua; Adinyira, Emmanuel; Osei-Asibey, Dickson

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The industrial training component in a university's curricula adds tremendous value to a degree programme by enhancing the employable skills of graduates. The purpose of this paper is to assess the perception of organisations that have trained construction students from the Department of Building Technology of the Kwame Nkrumah University…

  1. Building National Capacity for Research Mentor Training: An Evidence-Based Approach to Training the Trainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfund, Christine; Spencer, Kimberly C.; Asquith, Pamela; House, Stephanie C.; Miller, Sarah; Sorkness, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Research mentor training (RMT), based on the published "Entering Mentoring" curricula series, has been shown to improve the knowledge and skills of research mentors across career stages, as self-reported by both the mentors engaged in training and their mentees. To promote widespread dissemination and empower others to implement this…

  2. MIS training in Canada: a national survey of general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Alia; Vergis, Ashley; Jimenez, Carolina; Green, Jessica; Pryor, Aurora; Schlachta, Christopher M; Okrainec, Allan

    2011-09-01

    General surgery trainees' perceptions regarding their own laparoscopic training remain poorly defined. The objective of this survey was to identify and evaluate learner experiences with laparoscopic procedures in general surgery programs on a national level. Two hundred eighty-four residents were identified and contacted at English-speaking general surgery programs across Canada. Each was asked to complete a web- or paper-based survey regarding their demographics, experiences with basic and advanced minimally invasive surgery (MIS) procedures, and perceived barriers to training. Two hundred fifty-two of 284 (89%) surveyed residents responded. Eighty-seven percent of the residents had access to a skills lab that taught MIS techniques; however, standardized MIS curricula were implemented 53% of the time. Eighty percent of residents felt that skills lab training translated to improved performance in the OR. Although 90% of residents felt that they would be comfortable performing basic laparoscopic procedures, only 8% stated they would be comfortable performing advanced procedures at the end of their training. Moreover, 90% of general surgery residents felt that it was the academic surgical department's responsibility to teach both basic and advanced procedures, and 35% of respondents felt their surgical program was meeting this requirement. Half of the residents felt they had limited opportunity to be a primary surgeon because an MIS fellow was present. There exists a wide disparity between the expectations of residents and their actual experience. The majority of residents are concerned that they will not acquire sufficient laparoscopic skills during their training to perform advanced cases in practice. Additionally, the balance between resident and fellow-level cases needs to be more clearly defined as the majority of respondents identified the presence of a MIS fellow as a negative learning influence. Finally, although most centers had a surgical skills lab, 47% of

  3. A model for the development of university curricula in nanoelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik; Nielsen, I

    2010-01-01

    into account that nanotechnology affects not only physics but also electrical engineering and computer engineering because of the advent of new nanoelectronics devices. The model suggests that curriculum development tends to follow one of three major tracks: physics; electrical engineering; computer......Nanotechnology is having an increasing impact on university curricula in electrical engineering and in physics. Major influencers affecting developments in university programmes related to nanoelectronics are discussed and a model for university programme development is described. The model takes...... engineering. Examples of European curricula following this framework are identified and described. These examples may serve as sources of inspiration for future developments and the model...

  4. The climb to break the glass ceiling in surgery: trends in women progressing from medical school to surgical training and academic leadership from 1994 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Jonathan S; Chartrand, Genevieve; Moo, Tracy-Ann; Moore, Maureen; Yeo, Heather

    2016-10-01

    There have been many efforts to increase the number of women surgeons. We provide an update of women surgeon representation along the pathway to surgical academia. Data was extracted from Association of American Medical Colleges FACTS and Faculty Administrative Management Online User System as well as GME annual reports starting in 1994 until the last year available for each. The proportion of graduating women medical students has increased on average .5% per year from 1994 to 2014. Women general surgery trainees have more than doubled in number over the same period but represented 38.3% of all general surgery trainees in 2014. Women Full Professors increased on average .3% from 1994 to 2015 but still make up less than 10% of all Full Professors. Despite improvements over the past 20 years, there are still large gender gaps in surgery for trainees and academic leadership. At the current rate of increase, women Full Professors will not achieve gender parity until in 2136. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Posterior Approach to Kidney Dissection: An Old Surgical Approach for Integrated Medical Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Frank J.; Bolender, David L.; Jain, Deepali; Uyeda, Sheryl; Hoagland, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated medical curricular changes are altering the historical regional anatomy approach to abdominal dissection. The renal system is linked physiologically and biochemically to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems; yet, anatomists often approach the urinary system as part of the abdomen and pelvic regions. As part of an integrated…

  6. Posterior Approach to Kidney Dissection: An Old Surgical Approach for Integrated Medical Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Frank J.; Bolender, David L.; Jain, Deepali; Uyeda, Sheryl; Hoagland, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated medical curricular changes are altering the historical regional anatomy approach to abdominal dissection. The renal system is linked physiologically and biochemically to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems; yet, anatomists often approach the urinary system as part of the abdomen and pelvic regions. As part of an integrated…

  7. Evidence-based practice in speech-language pathology curricula: a scoping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togher, Leanne; Yiannoukas, Corina; Lincoln, Michelle; Power, Emma; Munro, Natalie; Mccabe, Patricia; Ghosh, Pratiti; Worrall, Linda; Ward, Elizabeth; Ferguson, Alison; Harrison, Elisabeth; Douglas, Jacinta

    2011-12-01

    This scoping study investigated how evidence-based practice (EBP) principles are taught in Australian speech-language pathology (SLP) teaching and learning contexts. It explored how Australian SLP university programs: (1) facilitate student learning about the principles of EBP in academic and clinical settings, and (2) self-evaluate their curricula in relation to EBP. The research involved two surveys. Survey 1 respondents were 131 academic staff, program coordinators, and on-campus and off-campus clinical educators. This survey gathered information about EBP teaching and learning in SLP programs as well as future EBP curriculum plans. Survey 2 investigated how clinical educators incorporated EBP into the way they taught clinical decision-making to students. Surveys responses from 85 clinical educators were analysed using descriptive and non-parametric statistics and thematic grouping of open-ended qualitative responses. Both surveys revealed strengths and gaps in integrating EBP into Australian SLP curricula. Perceived strengths were that respondents were positive about EBP, most had EBP training and access to EBP resources. The perceived gaps included the academic staff's perceptions of students' understanding and application of EBP, respondents' understanding of research methodologies, communication and collaboration between academic staff and clinical educators, and a lack of explicit discussion by clinical educators and students of EBP in relation to clients.

  8. A Call for Innovation: Reflective Practices and Clinical Curricula of US Army Special Operations Forces Medics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocklein, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Special Operations Forces (SOF) medics have written and published numerous practice reflections that intricately describe their practice environments, clinical dilemmas, and suggestions for teaching and practice. The lack of translation of SOF medics experiential evidence to their curriculum has created a gap in evidence-based curriculum development. This study analyzed SOF medics learning and practice patterns and compared it to the evidence in the interdisciplinary clinical literature. After framing the problem, the literature was reviewed to determine appropriate tools by which perceptions and attitudes toward reflection-centered curricula could be measured. A recognizable practice reflection was extracted from the published SOF clinical literature and presented in writing to self-identified SOF medics and medic instructors via a descriptive crossover design, to ensure possible biases were mitigated. To measure SOF medics perceptions of reflection-based curricula, the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure survey instrument was used, as it has validated psychometric properties and is used worldwide. SOF medics averaged scores of perceptions of their medic education indicated positive but not completely statistically significant preferences toward reflection-based curricula over traditional curriculum. Special Operations, medics, reflective practice, curricula BACKGROUND Special Operations Forces (SOF) medics practice in environments that are violent, austere, clandestine, and far removed from definitive hospital facilities. What was true almost 20 years ago?". . . academic demands of [Special Forces medic training] are roughly equivalent to those of an upper-level undergraduate curriculum in science or perhaps to those of first year medical school"?is even more challenging today. During this study, medics, physicians, and educators within the SOF medical community publicly and privately (ergo, names were redacted) expressed the need for curricular changes to

  9. A comparative study of the effects of asan, pranayama and asan-pranayama training on neurological and neuromuscular functions of Pondicherry police trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madanmohan Trakroo

    2013-01-01

    Summary and Conclusion: The present study has shown that 6 months training in asan, pranayama as well as their combination is effective in improving physiological functions of police trainees. They showed beneficial effects of yoga training, although they were undergoing intensive police training and the yoga training was relatively less intense. Hence, we recommend that yoga training be introduced in police training curricula.

  10. Proposal of a synthetic ethylene-vinyl acetate bench model for surgical foundations learning: suture training Modelo de bancada sintético de etileno vinil acetato para a aprendizagem das bases da cirurgia: treinamento de suturas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika Malheiros Bastos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to ethical and legal aspects involved in the handling of cadavers and animals the synthetic simulators are an alternative for learning how to suture technique plus the practice of various procedures such as incision and surgical flap. In this context, this paper describes and propose the use of a synthetic model manufactured from plates of ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA to teach primary surgical skills in medical students with no previous exposure to surgery. The model that provides the convenience of being easily reproducible, allowing the students in training can thus improve their skills before applying the technique in clinical practice.Devido aos aspectos éticos e legais envolvidos no manuseio de cadáveres e animais, os simuladores sintéticos surgem como alternativa para o ensino-aprendizagem de técnicas de sutura e simulação de procedimentos, como a confecção de incisões e retalhos cirúrgicos. Neste âmbito é proposto e descrito um modelo de bancada sintético confeccionado a partir de etileno vinil acetato (EVA para o ensino de habilidades cirúrgicas básicas, em estudantes de medicina sem exposição prévia a cirurgia. O modelo fornece a praticidade de ser reprodutível, barato e de fácil aquisição, possibilitando que o acadêmico em formação possa, portanto, aperfeiçoar suas habilidades antes de aplicar a técnica na prática clínica.

  11. Assessment of a Bioinformatics across Life Science Curricula Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David R.; Miskowski, Jennifer A.; Grunwald, Sandra K.; Abler, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    At the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, we have undertaken a program to integrate the study of bioinformatics across the undergraduate life science curricula. Our efforts have included incorporating bioinformatics exercises into courses in the biology, microbiology, and chemistry departments, as well as coordinating the efforts of faculty within…

  12. Sustainability Champions? Academic Identities and Sustainability Curricula in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bronwyn E.; Cornforth, Sue; Beals, Fiona; Taylor, Mike; Tallon, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of academic staff who are committed to embedding sustainability within tertiary curricula and pedagogy. Design/Methodology/Approach: The focus of this paper is on a New Zealand university. A survey of staff was undertaken and in-depth interviews conducted with 11 sustainability…

  13. Homeschooling Education: Longitudinal Study of Methods, Materials, and Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Linda G.

    2012-01-01

    In a comprehensive study of two-hundred fifty homeschooling families in urban, rural and suburban areas of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the researcher examined all aspects of the instruction, materials and curricula employed by the families in a ten-year longitudinal study from 1998 through 2008. The researcher conducted interviews and…

  14. Final Report of the Careers and Curricula Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, John L.; And Others

    The Center's Career and Curricula program bases its work upon a theory of career development. The report presents summaries of the theory upon which the program was based, of the work accomplished by the program, and of the research conducted. It also provides abstracts and ordering sources for the various reports completed. The theory assumes…

  15. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, or intersexed content for nursing curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Ann Marie Walsh; Barnsteiner, Jane; Siantz, Mary Lou de Leon; Cotter, Valeri T; Everett, Janine

    2012-01-01

    There has been limited identification of core lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, or intersexed (LGBTI) experience concepts that should be included in the nursing curricula. This article addresses the gap in the literature. To move nursing toward the goals of health equity and cultural humility in practice, education, and research, nursing curricula must integrate core LGBTI concepts, experiences, and needs related to health and illness. This article reviews LGBTI health care literature to address the attitudes, knowledge, and skills needed to address curricular gaps and provide content suggestions for inclusion in nursing curricula. Also considered is the need to expand nursing students' definition of diversity before discussing the interplay between nurses' attitudes and culturally competent care provided to persons who are LGBTI. Knowledge needed includes a life span perspective that addresses developmental needs and their impact on health concerns throughout the life course; health promotion and disease prevention with an articulation of unique health issues for this population; mental health concerns; specific health needs of transgender and intersex individuals; barriers to health care; interventions and resources including Internet sites; and legal and policy issues. Particular assessment and communication skills for LGBTI patients are identified. Finally, there is a discussion of didactic, simulation, and clinical strategies for incorporating this content into nursing curricula at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

  16. Curricula and Organization of Primary Care Residencies in Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, John M.

    1980-01-01

    The organization and curricula of internal medicine residencies programs that emphasize primary care are described and compared with traditional residencies in internal medicine. It is noted that primary care residents spend more time in ambulatory care and are allowed more electives in specialties outside of internal medicine. Out-of-hospital…

  17. Survival Mode: The Stresses and Strains of Computing Curricula Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Grace; Venables, Anne

    2008-01-01

    In an ideal world, review and changes to computing curricula should be driven solely by academic concerns for the needs of students. The process should be informed by industry accreditation processes and international best practice (Hurst et al., 2001). However, Australian computing curricular review is often driven by the need for financial…

  18. The Status of Fluid Mechanics in Bioengineering Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gerald E.; Hyman, William A.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the status of fluid mechanics courses in bioengineering curricula. A survey of institutions offering bioengineering degrees indicates that over half do not require fluid mechanics courses. Suggests increasing number of mechanics courses to increase the quality of bioengineering students and to prepare students for graduate work and more…

  19. Honors Thesis Preparation: Evidence of the Benefits of Structured Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Steven

    2016-01-01

    A recent study of honors curricula across the nation indicates that 75.6% of honors programs and colleges at four-year institutions have thesis or capstone requirements (Savage and Cognard-Black). In addition to institutions with thesis requirements, many more also have the option for students to complete theses. For example, an earlier study…

  20. State Minimum Core Curricula: Arkansas Institutions of Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Dept. of Higher Education, Little Rock.

    State minimum core curricula for two-year and four-year colleges and universities have been approved by the Arkansas Board of Higher Education. Within the framework of the State Minimum Core, each state institution is required to propose 35 semester/credit hours from its institutional general education core to be recognized for purposes of the…

  1. State Minimum Core Curricula: Arkansas Institutions of Higher Education, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Dept. of Higher Education, Little Rock.

    This document provides state minimum core curricula for each two- and four-year institution of higher education in Arkansas, determined by the Department of Higher Education. Courses within this core are to apply toward the general education core curriculum requirements for baccalaureate degrees at state-supported institutions and should be fully…

  2. Success factors of master of science curricula in business administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijker, Monique; Van der Klink, Marcel; Boshuizen, Els

    2010-01-01

    Bijker, M. M., Van der Klink, M. R., & Boshuizen, H. P. A. (2010, 25-27 August). Success factors of master of science curricula in business administration. Paper presented at the 5th EARLI-SIG14, Learning and Professional Development, Munich, Germany.

  3. The Internationalization of the Business Administration Curricula in Arab Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ahmed Abdel-Rahman

    2006-01-01

    This is a study of the extent of the internationalization of the business administration curricula in Arab universities. It is based on a survey of 110 Arab colleges of business that comprise more than half of the overall population, 35% of whom responded. The study found that Arab colleges of business appear to be only moderately…

  4. Assessment of a Bioinformatics across Life Science Curricula Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David R.; Miskowski, Jennifer A.; Grunwald, Sandra K.; Abler, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    At the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, we have undertaken a program to integrate the study of bioinformatics across the undergraduate life science curricula. Our efforts have included incorporating bioinformatics exercises into courses in the biology, microbiology, and chemistry departments, as well as coordinating the efforts of faculty within…

  5. Sustainability Champions? Academic Identities and Sustainability Curricula in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bronwyn E.; Cornforth, Sue; Beals, Fiona; Taylor, Mike; Tallon, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of academic staff who are committed to embedding sustainability within tertiary curricula and pedagogy. Design/Methodology/Approach: The focus of this paper is on a New Zealand university. A survey of staff was undertaken and in-depth interviews conducted with 11 sustainability…

  6. Campus Sustainability: Emerging Curricula Models in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyeva, Tamara; McKenna, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to build a detailed description of the Global Seminar (GS) curricula model by exploring its on-the-ground participatory practices in America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia. Design/methodology/approach: Within a qualitative research design framework, the authors interviewed 20 faculty members from the…

  7. The Current Landscape of the School Librarianship Curricula in USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Kwan; Turner, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    The current landscape of the School Librarianship educational programs and curricula of master's degrees in the USA has been explored. The master's programs are currently offered in the following four venues: (1) programs that are American Library Association (ALA) accredited but not American Association of School Librarians (AASL) recognized,…

  8. Matrices to Revise Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Mary C.; Longer, David; Miller, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Undergraduate curricula for natural resource and agronomic programs have been introduced and revised during the past several decades with a desire to stay current with emerging issues and technologies relevant to constituents. For the past decade, the Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences (CSES) faculty at the University of Arkansas…

  9. Engineering Faculty Attitudes to General Chemistry Courses in Engineering Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garip, Mehmet; Erdil, Erzat; Bilsel, Ayhan

    2006-01-01

    A survey on the attitudes of engineering faculty to chemistry, physics, and mathematics was conducted with the aim of clarifying the attitudes of engineering faculty to chemistry courses in relation to engineering education or curricula and assessing their expectations. The results confirm that on the whole chemistry is perceived as having a…

  10. Visual and Plastic Arts in Teaching Literacy: Null Curricula?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeland, Robin Gay

    2010-01-01

    Visual and plastic arts in contemporary literacy instruction equal null curricula. Studies show that painting and sculpture facilitate teaching reading and writing (literacy), yet such pedagogy has not been formally adopted into USA curriculum. An example of null curriculum can be found in late 19th - early 20th century education the USA…

  11. A Model for the Development of University Curricula in Nanoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun, E.; Nielsen, I.

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is having an increasing impact on university curricula in electrical engineering and in physics. Major influencers affecting developments in university programmes related to nanoelectronics are discussed and a model for university programme development is described. The model takes into account that nanotechnology affects not only…

  12. Vocabulary Instruction in Commonly Used Kindergarten Core Reading Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tanya S.; Neuman, Susan B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which commonly used core reading curricular materials supported research-based pedagogical features for oral vocabulary instruction in kindergarten. A document analysis was completed for 12 weeks of instructional materials from the teacher's editions of the 4 most widely used curricula.…

  13. Nature's Nature: Ideas of Nature in Curricula for Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Maurice, Henry

    2006-01-01

    Two contrasting sets of ideas about nature in environmental education are described. An analytical framework is developed from inter-disciplinary histories of ideas and used in evaluating a specific curriculum. In conclusion, some general implications are suggested for curricula in environmental education. [This article was reprinted from…

  14. A Toolkit to Implement Graduate Attributes in Geography Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronken-Smith, Rachel; McLean, Angela; Smith, Nell; Bond, Carol; Jenkins, Martin; Marshall, Stephen; Frielick, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    This article uses findings from a project on engagement with graduate outcomes across higher education institutions in New Zealand to produce a toolkit for implementing graduate attributes in geography curricula. Key facets include strong leadership; academic developers to facilitate conversations about graduate attributes and teaching towards…

  15. The Status of Fluid Mechanics in Bioengineering Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gerald E.; Hyman, William A.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the status of fluid mechanics courses in bioengineering curricula. A survey of institutions offering bioengineering degrees indicates that over half do not require fluid mechanics courses. Suggests increasing number of mechanics courses to increase the quality of bioengineering students and to prepare students for graduate work and more…

  16. Financial Capability and Asset Building in the Curricula: Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Vernon; Birkenmaier, Julie; Hageman, Sally A.

    2017-01-01

    Although social work education competencies include economic justice, and practice includes addressing client finances and assets, social work curricula lack an emphasis on these topics. Little is known about students' perceptions of the relevancy of this information or how well their program is preparing them for contemporary practice. This study…

  17. Graduate Museum Studies Curricula: Meeting the Needs of the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomar, William Frank

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess how graduate museum studies programs are meeting the current and anticipated future needs of the museum profession. A comprehensive assessment was conducted to determine the knowledge and skills most emphasized in graduate museum studies curricula and those most valued by leading museum practitioners. A total…

  18. The Traditional in Contemporary Curricula of Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopas-Vukašinovic, Emina; Savovic, Margit

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary curricula of preschool education are the result of the improvement of pedagogical and didactic theories. They imply a technical plan with which it is possible to achieve measurable objectives of preschool education. The curriculum is also defined as a tool for quality and equal education for all. It represents a reflection of the…

  19. Introducing information literacy into anesthesia curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demczuk, Lisa; Gottschalk, Tania; Littleford, Judith

    2009-04-01

    This review examines the topic of information literacy (IL) and its importance as a component of competency-based education in the health professions, and shares the process and outcome of a collaborative effort between The University of Manitoba Department of Anesthesia and Health Sciences Libraries to create, to introduce and integrate IL training into a new anesthesia curriculum. Nine IL modules were developed according to standards set by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) and aligned with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons CanMEDS competencies. Taken collectively, they explore modern tools used to approach the medical literature in an organized, efficient manner, and to locate, evaluate and use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose. Each module forms the basis of one IL session that combines self-study and group projects with librarian-led, computer-based training, designed to build competency in information need awareness, retrieval skills and resource appraisal. Facility with the concepts taught was evaluated though examples relevant to the anesthesia practice environment. The entire collection is available at http://wiki.lib.umanitoba.ca/tiki-index.php?page=Anesthesia+Clinical+Assistants+Programme. While the original impetus for this project was to prepare Anesthesia Clinical Assistants for self-directed, life-long, active learning, what emerged was a curriculum in IL germane to medical specialties and flexible enough to be used by healthcare professions generally. An IL program, directly relevant to current expectations of competent practice, education and lifelong learning, has been created and is discussed within the larger context of curriculum-integrated IL for the health professions.

  20. Historical review of surgical simulation--a personal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satava, Richard M

    2008-02-01

    Although simulation is relatively new to surgical education, there is a long history in many other disciplines, such as military, aviation, and nuclear power plant operations, among others. In the late 1980s these technologies began to be adapted to the surgical world, along with the new technology of virtual reality. This is a review of the introduction of manikins, computers, and virtual reality into education and training for surgical skills. Two concomitant revolutions occurred: objective assessment of surgical skills and converting training from the apprenticeship model to one of criterion-based training. A personal perspective on these developments adds information not previously published.

  1. Internationalization of University Curricula in Japan: Major Policies and Practice since the 1980s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Futao

    2006-01-01

    This article begins by discussing the context and major policies as well as the rationales related to internationalization of the university curricula in Japan. It then touches on internationalization of the curricula in Japanese higher education institutions at home and on development of cross-border curricula that are both imported into Japan…

  2. Tratamento cirúrgico da otosclerose na residência médica Surgical treatment of otosclerosis in medical residency training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Antunes Freitas

    2006-12-01

    AND METHODS: fifty charts of patients that were submitted to a total of 51 primary stapedotomies were reviewed mainly for complications and audiological results. RESULTS: there was closure of the air-bone gap within 10 dB HL in 70.5% of ears and closure to within 20 dB HL in 86.3% of ears. There was one ear with total hearing loss (2%. CONCLUSION: From the results and complications seen in the present study, and analyzing papers from the literature, it is possible to conclude that stapedotomy is a procedure that can be included in residency programs, if there are surgical cases for the residents.

  3. Surgical education in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    Surgical education in Mexico basically follows the same model as in the United States, with a selection process resembling the matching program. There is a 4-year training period during which residents in their third year spend 4 months as the sole surgeon in a rural community. During the senior year they are entitled to an elective period in a place of their choosing. After completion of the 4 years, residents have to present a thesis and undergo an oral examination before getting a university diploma. They are then encouraged to pass the written and oral examination of the Mexican Board of Surgery before they are fully certified to enter practice in a public or private hospital.

  4. Representing Swiss Vocational Education and Training Teachers' Domain-Specific Conceptions of Financial Literacy Using Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leumann, Seraina

    2017-01-01

    Issues related to financial matters are an integral component of the curricula in vocational education and training in Switzerland. However, the differences between students' competences are caused not only by the curricula but by multiple factors. One key factor is teachers' characteristics that support successful learning processes. Teachers'…

  5. [Modern didactics in surgical education--between demand and reality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape-Köhler, C; Chmelik, C; Rose, M; Heiss, M M

    2010-12-01

    Surgical residency contains an inadequate amount of hands-on training in the operating room and time constraints further make this type of education on the floor unlikely. Due to these deficits in residency training, private surgical courses outside of the established residency programmes are in high demand. Therefore, surgical residents must spend their own resources and time in addition to their residency training in order to receive adequate clinical exposure. Didactic approaches like problem-based learning have begun to influence our modern education. These novel education approaches along with visualisation training, video-based presentations, and multimedia-based training can be useful adjuncts to traditional surgical training. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart ˙ New York.

  6. Educating skilled birth attendants in Mexico: do the curricula meet international confederation of midwives standards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragin, Leslie; DeMaria, Lisa M; Campero, Lourdes; Walker, Dilys M

    2007-11-01

    Although the majority of births in Mexico are attended by skilled birth attendants, maternal mortality remains moderately high, raising questions about the quality of training and delivery care. We conducted an exhaustive review of the curricula of three representative schools for the education and clinical preparation of three types of birth attendant - obstetric nurses, professional midwives and general physicians - National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) School of Obstetric Nursing; CASA Professional Midwifery School; and UNAM School of Medicine, Iztacala Campus. All curricular materials were measured against the 214 indicators of knowledge and ability in the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) skilled attendant training guidelines. The CASA curriculum covered 83% of the competencies, 93% of basic knowledge and 86% of basic abilities, compared with 54%, 59% and 64% for UNAM Obstetric Nursing School and 43%, 60% and 36% for UNAM School of Medicine, respectively. Neither the Obstetric Nursing School nor the School of Medicine documented the quantity or types of clinical experience required for graduation. General physicians attend the most births in Mexico, yet based on our analysis, professional midwives had the most complete education and training as measured against the ICM competencies. We recommend that professional midwives and obstetric nurses should be formally integrated into the public health system to attend deliveries.

  7. Personal Knowledge Management in the Training of Non-Literary Translators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastberg, Peter

    2009-01-01

    the understanding of subject matter needed in order for them to translate non-literary texts in and for professional settings. The discussion ends with an introduction to a novel - and very pragmatic - way of integrating subject matter into translation curricula. It is my hope that I may contribute to laying...... the ground for rethinking how we deal with subject matter in the training of non-literary translators   KEYWORDS   Translator training, translation curricula, subject matter competence, Personal Knowledge Management...

  8. Development of mechanical engineering curricula at the University of Minho

    OpenAIRE

    J. C. F. Teixeira; Silva, Jaime F. da; Flores, Paulo

    2007-01-01

    The implementation of the Bologna protocol in the European Union has set new goals for the whole higher education system as: (a) a quality assessment for university courses; (b) a framework for the exchange of students and academics; and (c) an opportunity for changing the teaching/learning procedures and methodologies. Within the context, the mechanical engineering curricula at the University of Minho have been comprehensively formulated in order to meet these and future challenges and expec...

  9. Preservation of the discipline "Safety" by means of changing curricula

    OpenAIRE

    Kaslin, N. D.; Bogatov, О. І.

    2015-01-01

    During the past five years the regulatory and legal framework of education in Ukraine has been changing significantly. Especially important changes in the content and organization of education were stipulated by the law on “Higher Education” and the Resolution of the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine “List of Specialties” (correspondingly of 2014 and 2015 years of enactment). The introduction of the European credit transfer system in education has changed the structure of curricula and the list...

  10. Networked curricula: fostering transnational partnership in open and distance learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luz Cacheiro-González

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Transnational Networked Curricula (TNC provides many benefits to the institutions that offer them as well as to the different stakeholders involved, not only the students but also the academics, the institutions as a whole, and the wider society. Supporting Higher Education Institutions in enhancing and implementing international networked practices in virtual campus building is the main aim of the NetCU project, which has been developed by the EADTU, in partnership with 14 member organizations, from 2009 to 2012. The project outcomes intend to facilitate the future set-up of networked curricula in Higher Education institutions and potentially lead to more transnational partnerships in Open and Distance Education (ODE and blended learning, showing challenges, obstacles and ways to overcome them. This paper presents the main products developed in the project, assesses its completeness and usage, and discusses on the challenges of curricula networking starting from the ideas and opinions shared in different stakeholders workshops organized under the NetCU project.

  11. 情景教学法在中职外科护理学实训课中的应用%Application of scene teaching method in the secondary surgical nursing training class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李陟; 凌志杰

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨情景教学法在外科护理学实训课教学中的应用效果。方法:从2013级3年制护理专业中随机抽取10个班,每班50人,共500名中职生。分为两组,对照组250名采用传统教学法,实验组250名采用情景教学法,建立以中职生为主体的实训课情景教学格局,即通过语言、实物及多媒体来设置教学情景。结果:实验组学生的理论考核成绩与实践技能考核成绩均高于对照组,差异具有统计学意义(P <0.05)。教学满意度调查结果显示:实验组明显好于对照组。(P <0.05)。结论:运用情景教学法进行外科护理学实训课教学有利于提高中职生的学习兴趣、学习效率、知识应用及技能操作等综合能力。%Objective:To investigate the effects of the scene teaching method in nursing practical teach-ing for Surgical Nursing .Methods:A total of 500 secondary vocational students of 10 classes were randomly selected for the study,and divided into two groups.The control group of 250 students were trained with the traditional teaching method,the experimental group of 250 students received the scene teaching method.The teaching situation of practical teaching pattern was established through language,physical and multimedia in-cluding.Results:The performance of the students in the experimental group was significantly higher than that in the control group,and the difference was statistically significant (P <0.05).The results of teaching satis-faction survey of the experimental group was significantly better than the control group.(P <0.05).Con-clusion:Application of scene teaching method in nursing practical teaching for Surgical Nursing can improve the learning interest,learning efficiency,knowledge and skills of the students.

  12. Microskills Training: Evolution, Reexamination, and Call for Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Charles R.; Kelly, Shannon M.; Mollen, Debra

    2011-01-01

    For more than four decades, the microskills approach has been the dominant paradigm for training entry-level counseling students. At its inception, the model met a critical need: instruction in discrete counseling behaviors, which at the time was conspicuously missing from training curricula. Although these behaviors have become essential…

  13. Encuesta de opinión sobre la cirugía mayor ambulatoria en la formación del residente de especialidades quirúrgicas Opinion survey of the effect of major ambulatory surgery on the training of surgical residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Martínez Ramos

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La progresiva implantación en nuestro pais de la Cirugía Mayor Ambulatoria (CMA puede afectar a la enseñanza de la cirugía, si consideramos el desplazamiento presente y futuro hacia las Unidades de CMA de intervenciones quirúrgicas muy frecuentes, de riesgo medio y bajo, que constituyen la base del aprendizaje quirúrgico. El objetivo del presente trabajo es 1º conocer la opinión de los residentes de especialidades quirúrgicas sobre la repercusión que la CMA puede tener en su formación quirúrgica y 2º conocer las posibles soluciones que aportan en este sentido. Material y Métodos: Se ha realizado una encuesta de 17 preguntas (13 cerradas, 2 abiertas y 1 mixta a 72 residentes pertenecientes a 7 de las especialidades quirúrgicas que participan en la Unidad de CMA del Hospital Clínico San Carlos de Madrid. Resultados: La encuesta ha sido cumplimentada por el 36,1% de los residentes. De ellos, el 100% considera que: 1 es importante conocer y formarse en este tipo de cirugía. 2 las técnicas quirúrgicas que se realizan en la UCMA del Hospital son fundamentales para la formación del residente. 3 la Cirugía Mayor Ambulatoria debe incluirse en la formación de su especialidad durante el periodo de residencia. El 80,8% considera que tener formación en CMA contribuye a mejorar las expectativas laborales una vez finalizada la residencia. Conclusiones: Los residentes consideran que es necesaria su participación en la actividad de las Unidades de CMA, necesitándose, en este sentido, la creación de programas bien estructurados, elaborados y coordinados. Estos han de estar consensuados por todas las partes afectadas y se han de adaptar a las características de cada especialidad.Introduction: The progressive introduction in our country of Major Ambulatory Surgery (MAS may affect the training of surgical residents. The type of operations that may now be performed at MAS Units (frequent medium and low risk operations

  14. Retention of Mastoidectomy Skills After Virtual Reality Simulation Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts; Konge, Lars; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Sørensen, Mads Sølvsten

    2016-07-01

    The ultimate goal of surgical training is consolidated skills with a consistently high performance. However, surgical skills are heterogeneously retained and depend on a variety of factors, including the task, cognitive demands, and organization of practice. Virtual reality (VR) simulation is increasingly being used in surgical skills training, including temporal bone surgery, but there is a gap in knowledge on the retention of mastoidectomy skills after VR simulation training. To determine the retention of mastoidectomy skills after VR simulation training with distributed and massed practice and to investigate participants' cognitive load during retention procedures. A prospective 3-month follow-up study of a VR simulation trial was conducted from February 6 to September 19, 2014, at an academic teaching hospital among 36 medical students: 19 from a cohort trained with distributed practice and 17 from a cohort trained with massed practice. Participants performed 2 virtual mastoidectomies in a VR simulator a mean of 3.2 months (range, 2.4-5.0 months) after completing initial training with 12 repeated procedures. Practice blocks were spaced apart in time (distributed), or all procedures were performed in 1 day (massed). Performance of the virtual mastoidectomy as assessed by 2 masked senior otologists using a modified Welling scale, as well as cognitive load as estimated by reaction time to perform a secondary task. Among 36 participants, mastoidectomy final-product skills were largely retained at 3 months (mean change in score, 0.1 points; P = .89) regardless of practice schedule, but the group trained with massed practice took more time to complete the task. The performance of the massed practice group increased significantly from the first to the second retention procedure (mean change, 1.8 points; P = .001), reflecting that skills were less consolidated. For both groups, increases in reaction times in the secondary task (distributed practice group: mean

  15. Provision of general paediatric surgical services in a regional hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zgraj, O

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: In Ireland, specialist paediatric surgery is carried out in paediatric hospitals in Dublin. General surgeons\\/consultants in other surgical specialities provide paediatric surgical care in regional centres. There has been a failure to train general surgeons with paediatric skills to replace these surgeons upon retirement. AIM: To assess paediatric surgical workload in one regional centre to focus the debate regarding the future provision of general paediatric surgery in Ireland. METHODS: Hospital in-patient enquiry (HIPE) system was used to identify total number of paediatric surgical admissions and procedures. Cases assessed requiring hospital transfer. RESULTS: Of 17,478 surgical patients treated, 2,584 (14.8%) were under 14 years. A total of 2,154 procedures were performed. CONCLUSION: Regional centres without dedicated paediatric surgeons deliver care to large numbers of paediatric patients. The demand for care highlights the need for formal paediatric services\\/appropriate surgical training for general surgical trainees.

  16. Einmaliges studentisches standardisiertes Training der chirurgischen Händedesinfektion nach EN1500: Quantifizierung des Trainingseffektes, Nutzen der Methode und Vergleich mit klinischen Referenzgruppen [A single standardized practical training for surgical scrubbing according to EN1500: Effect Quantification, value of the standardized method and comparison with clinical reference groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wullenk, Katharina

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] The standardized training of practical competences in skills labs is relatively new among German Medical Faculties. The broad acceptance and outstanding evaluation results do not provide objective data on the efficiency and cost-efficiency of these trainings. This study aims on the quantification of the teaching effect of the surgical scrubbing technique EN1500 and its comparison with clinical references of OR personnel.Methods: 161 4 year medical students were randomized into intervention and control group. The intervention group received a 45 minute standardized peer-teaching training of practical competences necessary in the OR including the scrubbing according to EN1500. Fluorescence dye was mixed in the disinfectant solution. After hand disinfection, standardized fotographs and semi-automated digital processing resulted in quantification of the insufficiently covered hand area. These results were compared with the control group that received the training after the test. In order to provide information on the achieved clinical competence level, the results were compared with the two clinical reference groups.Results: The intervention group remained with 4,99% (SD 2,34 insufficiently covered hand area after the training compared to the control group 7,33% (SD 3,91, p[german] Die standardisierte Schulung klinisch-praktischer Fertigkeiten in sog. Skills Labs ist erst seit wenigen Jahren an deutschen Universitäten verbreitet. Den zumeist umfangreichen und sehr guten Evaluationsergebnissen stehen kaum Untersuchungen zur Effektquantifizierung und Kosten-Nutzen-Analyse gegenüber. In der vorliegenden Studie soll eine Methode zur digitalen Quantifizierung der Güte der chirurgischen Händedesinfektion vorgestellt werden sowie das Skills-Lab-Training der standardisierten Einreibemethode nach EN1500 auf seinen Effekt hin untersucht und mit OP-Pflegepersonal und Operateuren als klinische Referenzgruppen verglichen werden.Methode: 161

  17. Body Parts Removed during Surgery: A Useful Training Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Stecco, Carla; Tiengo, Cesare; Parenti, Anna; Cestrone, Adriano; De Caro, Raffaele

    2011-01-01

    Current undergraduate medical curricula provides relatively little time for cadaver dissection. The Department of Human Anatomy and Physiology at the University of Padova has organized a pilot project with the University Hospital for the donation of body parts that are surgically removed for therapeutic purposes and destined under Italian law for…

  18. Body Parts Removed during Surgery: A Useful Training Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Stecco, Carla; Tiengo, Cesare; Parenti, Anna; Cestrone, Adriano; De Caro, Raffaele

    2011-01-01

    Current undergraduate medical curricula provides relatively little time for cadaver dissection. The Department of Human Anatomy and Physiology at the University of Padova has organized a pilot project with the University Hospital for the donation of body parts that are surgically removed for therapeutic purposes and destined under Italian law for…

  19. Micro-surgical endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyas, S; Vere, J; Ali, Z; Harris, I

    2014-02-01

    Non-surgical endodontic retreatment is the treatment of choice for endodontically treated teeth with recurrent or residual disease in the majority of cases. In some cases, surgical endodontic treatment is indicated. Successful micro-surgical endodontic treatment depends on the accuracy of diagnosis, appropriate case selection, the quality of the surgical skills, and the application of the most appropriate haemostatic agents and biomaterials. This article describes the armamentarium and technical procedures involved in performing micro-surgical endodontics to a high standard.

  20. Surgical innovation as sui generis surgical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, Mianna

    2013-12-01

    Successful innovative 'leaps' in surgical technique have the potential to contribute exponentially to surgical advancement, and thereby to improved health outcomes for patients. Such innovative leaps often occur relatively spontaneously, without substantial forethought, planning, or preparation. This feature of surgical innovation raises special challenges for ensuring sufficient evaluation and regulatory oversight of new interventions that have not been the subject of controlled investigatory exploration and review. It is this feature in particular that makes early-stage surgical innovation especially resistant to classification as 'research', with all of the attendant methodological and ethical obligations--of planning, regulation, monitoring, reporting, and publication--associated with such a classification. This paper proposes conceptual and ethical grounds for a restricted definition according to which innovation in surgical technique is classified as a form of sui generis surgical 'research', where the explicit goal of adopting such a definition is to bring about needed improvements in knowledge transfer and thereby benefit current and future patients.

  1. [Evaluation of technical skills in surgical training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparian, Andres C; Martinez, A C; JoverClos, R J; Chércoles, R A

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: La adquisición de habilidades quirúrgicas constituye un factor central en la formación de todo cirujano. Sin embargo, la evaluación de las habilidades técnicas es uno de los factores más débiles y menos desarrollados. En la actualidad los recursos para evaluar las competencias técnicas adolecen de subjetividad, falta de confiabilidad y validez. La observación directa, método de evaluación más frecuentemente utilizado en nuestro medio, presenta inconvenientes instrumentales y está fuertemente influenciada por las relaciones intersubjetivas y los rasgos de personalidad. El objetivo de esta investigación es proponer creación y el uso de un instrumento objetivo para evaluar el desempeño técnico y determinar su confiabilidad y validez.Material y método: se seleccionaron dos procedimientos: colecistectomía laparoscópica y hernioplastia inguinal (técnica de Lichtenstein). Se constituyeron tres grupos de comparación según la experiencia quirúrgica: inicial, intermedio, y expertos. Se filmaron las cirugías en tiempo real, sin identificación del paciente ni del cirujano. Las filmaciones sin edición fueron asignadas a dos cirujanos expertos en forma aleatoria por sorteo y con sobres sin identificación. Para la evaluación se propuso el uso de un instrumento objetivo (explicitación de pasos a evaluar y cuantificación mediante escala de Likert) y específico para cada procedimiento. Así mismo se utilizó la escala global OSATS (R. Reznick). Se aplicó análisis de varianza no paramétrico para determinar validez. Valores de p menores a 0.05 fueron considerados estadísticamente significativos. Valores superiores a 0,80 del Coeficiente alfa de Cronbach aseguraron confiabilidad. Resultados: Desde Abril del 2010 hasta Diciembre del 2012 se filmaron 36 colecistectomías videolaparoscópicas y 31 hernioplastias inguinales. Se encontraron diferencias significativas entre los grupos en todos los ítems evaluados p<0.05. El coeficiente ? de Crohnbach fue mayor a 0,80 para ambas técnicas. No hubo diferencias significativas entre las calificaciones de ambos evaluadores. No hubo diferencias entre nuestro instrumento específico y la escala global OSATS. Discusión: Es posible y útil aplicar un instrumento objetivo de evaluación del desempeño técnico en cirugía. La herramienta presentó validez de constructo y confiabilidad aceptables. La filmación confiere perdurabilidad a un evento efímero: la cirugía. La objetividad se basa en la enunciación y cuantificación explícita de cada paso, y en la aleatorización y anonimato de la muestra. La uniformidad de criterios entre los evaluadores es fundamental para obtener resultados satisfactorios. Evaluarsiempreimplicaráunrecorte de la realidad.

  2. Telemedical Education: Training Digital Natives in Telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathipati, Akhilesh S; Azad, Tej D; Jethwani, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Telemedicine plays an important role in the delivery of medical care, and will become increasingly prominent going forward. Current medical students are among the first generation of "digital natives" who are well versed in the incorporation of technology into social interaction. These students are well positioned to apply advances in communications to patient care. Even so, providers require training to effectively leverage these opportunities. Therefore, we recommend introducing telemedicine training into medical school curricula and propose a model for incorporation.

  3. Training of Leadership Skills in Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Kiesewetter, Jan; Schmidt-Huber, Marion; Netzel, Janine; Krohn, Alexandra C.; Angstwurm, Matthias; Fischer, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Effective team performance is essential in the delivery of high-quality health-care. Leadership skills therefore are an important part of physicians’ everyday clinical life. To date, the development of leadership skills are underrepresented in medical curricula. Appropriate training methods for equipping doctors with these leadership skills are highly desirable. Objective: The review aims to summarize the findings in the current literature regarding training in leadership skills i...

  4. Learning, Behaviour and Reaction Framework: A Model for Training Raters to Improve Assessment Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chung-Yang; Chang, Huiju; Hsu, Wen-Chin; Sheen, Gwo-Ji

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a training model for raters, with the goal to improve the intra- and inter-consistency of evaluation quality for higher education curricula. The model, termed the learning, behaviour and reaction (LBR) circular training model, is an interdisciplinary application from the business and organisational training domain. The…

  5. An assessment of oral cancer curricula in dental hygiene programmes: implications for cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, K K; Kaste, L M; Homsi, K D; LeHew, C W

    2016-11-01

    To assess oral cancer prevention and early detection curricula in Illinois associate-degree dental hygiene programmes and highlight global health applications. An email invitation was sent to each Illinois associate-degree granting dental hygiene programme's oral cancer contact to participate in a survey via a SurveyMonkey™ link to a 21-item questionnaire. Questions elicited background information on each programme and inquired about curriculum and methods used for teaching oral cancer prevention and early detection. Eight of the 12 (67%) programmes responded. Three (37.5%) reported having a specific oral cancer curriculum. Five (62.5%) require students to perform examinations for signs and symptoms of oral cancer at each clinic visit. Variations exist across the programmes in the number of patients each student sees annually and the number of oral cancer examinations each student performs before graduation. Seven programmes (87.5%) conduct early detection screening in community settings. All programmes included risk assessment associated with tobacco. All other risk factors measured were treated inconsistently. Significant differences in training and experience were reported across Illinois dental hygiene programmes. Training is neither standardized nor uniformly comprehensive. Students' preparation for delivering prevention and early detection services to their patients could be strengthened to ensure competence including reflection of risk factors and behaviours in a global context. Regular review of curricular guidelines and programme content would help dental hygienists meet the expectations of the Crete Declaration on Oral Cancer Prevention. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Radiology Undergraduate and Resident Curricula: A Narrative Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linaker, Kathleen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the literature regarding radiology curricula for both undergraduates and residents. Methods A review of the literature was performed using relevant key words. Articles were retrieved through December 2012 using PubMed, ScienceDirect, ERIC, Proquest, and ICL databases along with a manual review of references. Results Of the 4716 unique abstracts reviewed by the author, 142 were found to be relevant to the purpose of this study. Undergraduate radiology education, radiology curriculum, and radiology pedagogy vary widely between disciplines and between colleges within disciplines. Formal radiology education is not taught at all medical programs and little radiology training is incorporated into non-radiology residencies. This results in some medical graduates not being taught how to interpret basic radiology images and not learning contraindications and indications for ordering diagnostic imaging tests. There are no definitive studies examining how to incorporate radiology into the curriculum, how to teach radiology to either undergraduates or residents, or how to assess this clinical competency. Conclusions This review shows that radiology education is perceived to be important in undergraduate and residency programs. However, some programs do not include radiology training, thus graduates from those programs do not learn radiology essentials. PMID:26770172

  7. Training effect of using Touch Surgery for intramedullary femoral nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugand, Kapil; Mawkin, Mala; Gupte, Chinmay

    2016-02-01

    Simulation in orthopaedic training is becoming increasingly popular and has been widely used in formal curricula. However, these resources are expensive and not easily accessible to every trainee. Other means of disseminating surgical education through virtual reality (VR) multimedia can act as useful adjunct to traditional methods of teaching. One validated VR platform is Touch Surgery, a cognitive task simulation and rehearsal app. The primary objective of this study was to identify the training effect of Touch Surgery intramedullary femoral nailing (IFN) modules using objective performance metrics over six consecutive attempts. Secondary objectives consisted of validated multiple choice questions (MCQ) testing before the first (pre) and after the sixth (post) attempts. 27 medical undergraduates were recruited to complete the decision-making process six consecutive times for four modules on the procedural steps of IFN. The modules consisted of (i) preparing the patient and equipment, (ii) femoral canal preparation, (iii) nail insertion and proximal locking, and (iv) distal locking and closure. Real-time objective performance metrics were obtained, stored electronically and analysed using the median and Bonett-Price 95% confidence intervals from the participants' attempts to assess training effect. Significance was calculated using the Mann-Whitney U test for independent data whilst the Wilcoxon signed ranked test was used for paired data. Significance was set as 2-tailed p-value training effect with practice. Novices demonstrated cognitive competencies to ensure patient safety prior to operating. The app is an effective adjunct to traditional learning methods and has the potential for curricular implementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dysfunctional problem-based learning curricula: resolving the problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim William K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Problem-based learning (PBL has become the most significant innovation in medical education of the past 40 years. In contrast to exam-centered, lecture-based conventional curricula, PBL is a comprehensive curricular strategy that fosters student-centred learning and the skills desired in physicians. The rapid spread of PBL has produced many variants. One of the most common is 'hybrid PBL' where conventional teaching methods are implemented alongside PBL. This paper contends that the mixing of these two opposing educational philosophies can undermine PBL and nullify its positive benefits. Schools using hybrid PBL and lacking medical education expertise may end up with a dysfunctional curriculum worse off than the traditional approach. Discussion For hybrid PBL schools with a dysfunctional curriculum, standard PBL is a cost-feasible option that confers the benefits of the PBL approach. This paper describes the signs of a dysfunctional PBL curriculum to aid hybrid PBL schools in recognising curricular breakdown. Next it discusses alternative curricular strategies and costs associated with PBL. It then details the four critical factors for successful conversion to standard PBL: dealing with staff resistance, understanding the role of lectures, adequate time for preparation and support from the administrative leadership. Summary Hybrid PBL curricula without oversight by staff with medical education expertise can degenerate into dysfunctional curricula inferior even to the traditional approach from which PBL emerged. Such schools should inspect their curriculum periodically for signs of dysfunction to enable timely corrective action. A decision to convert fully to standard PBL is cost feasible but will require time, expertise and commitment which is only sustainable with supportive leadership.

  9. Teacher training for sex education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, C; Smith, P B

    1981-04-01

    The Population Program at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston conducted a 3-year sex education teacher training program in cooperation with the Houston Independent School District. Existing sex education curricula and teacher training programs were reviewed during the project's last year, and working relationships with school personnel and community representatives were established. During the 2nd year contacts with school district personnel were increased. The project director trained 14 teacher trainers from the school district; 8 of the 14 trained a total of 40 teachers from a total of 10 schools. The 72-hour training program (nine 8-hour sessions, 1 day a week) for the teacher trainers was conducted from mid-January through mid-March 1980. Pre- and posttest knowledge and attitude assessments were conducted with trainers and teachers. 3rd year tasks included selecting student curricula, teaching students, evaluating the effectiveness of the teacher training based on classroom performance, and revising the training manual. Project and school personnel carefully discussed the criteria for teacher trainers and teachers. There are 4 learner-directed goals of the training project. They are for the trainees to be comfortable communicating about sexuality; understand factual information about human sexuality and social systems; recognize the influence of their sexual beliefs; values; and attitudes on their behavior; and comprehend the decision making, systems framework of the training. A 200-page training manual was developed. The training focus was to teach participants a comprehensive sex education program, to develop further their skills as trainers, and to provide information and experiences to answer questions about sex education for 8th and 10th grade students.

  10. Creating Educational Technology Curricula for Advanced Studies in Learning Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Nakayama

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Curriculum design and content are key factors in the area of human resource development. To examine the possibility of using a collaboration of Human Computer Interaction (HCI and Educational Technology (ET to develop innovative improvements to the education system, the curricula of these two areas of study were lexically analyzed and compared. As a further example, the curriculum of a joint course in HCI and ET was also lexically analyzed and the contents were examined. These analyses can be used as references in the development of human resources for use in advanced learning environments.

  11. Searching for scientific literacy and critical pedagogy in socioscientific curricula: A critical discourse analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Kristina M.

    The omnipresence of science and technology in our society require the development of a critical and scientifically literate citizenry. However, the inclusion of socioscientific issues, which are open-ended controversial issues informed by both science and societal factors such as politics, economics, and ethics, do not guarantee the development of these skills. The purpose of this critical discourse analysis is to identify and analyze the discursive strategies used in intermediate science texts and curricula that address socioscientific topics and the extent to which the discourses are designed to promote or suppress the development of scientific literacy and a critical pedagogy. Three curricula that address the issue of energy and climate change were analyzed using Gee's (2011) building tasks and inquiry tools. The curricula were written by an education organization entitled PreSEES, a corporate-sponsored group called NEED, and a non-profit organization named Oxfam. The analysis found that the PreSEES and Oxfam curricula elevated the significance of climate change and the NEED curriculum deemphasized the issue. The PreSEES and Oxfam curricula promoted the development of scientific literacy while the NEED curricula suppressed its development. The PreSEES and Oxfam curricula both promoted the development of the critical pedagogy; however, only the Oxfam curricula provided authentic opportunities to enact sociopolitical change. The NEED curricula suppressed the development of critical pedagogy. From these findings, the following conclusions were drawn. When socioscientific issues are presented with the development of scientific literacy and critical pedagogy, the curricula allow students to develop fact-based opinions about the issue. However, curricula that address socioscientific issues without the inclusion of these skills minimize the significance of the issue and normalize the hegemonic worldview promoted by the curricula's authors. Based on these findings

  12. Can a one-day practical lesson in surgical skills encourage medical students to consider a surgical career?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Florian; Rommel, Niklas; Koerdt, Steffen; Fichter, Andreas; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Kesting, Marco R

    2016-05-01

    Interest in a surgical career is declining among medical students, and many more need to commit themselves to becoming surgeons to cope with this. We have therefore developed a one-day practical lesson in surgical skills to find out whether a short course such as this can make students more enthusiastic about surgery, and about subsequently pursuing a career in one of its subspecialties. Fifty-four randomly-selected medical students did a one-day practical course in the skills required for maxillofacial surgical specialties. The 4 subdivisions involved - traumatology, resection of a tumour (cancer surgery), plastic surgery (microsurgery), and cleft lip and palate surgery. All students took written tests and completed an evaluation form about their interest in a surgical career before and after training. There was a significant increase in test scores in almost all categories at the end of the course, and significantly more students were prepared to consider a surgical career or a career in maxillofacial surgery after the training. This study shows that a one-day training course in surgical skills can significantly improve medical students' surgical knowledge, and might encourage them to enter a surgical career. We recommend the integration of a short training course such as this into the medical school curriculum. Only time and further evaluation will tell whether this increased exposure to surgical techniques can be transformed into additional surgeons.

  13. "You teach us to listen,… but you don't teach us about suffering": self-care and resilience strategies in medical school curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outram, Sue; Kelly, Brian

    2014-11-01

    This article examines the pre-vocational preparation of doctors to cope with the demands of clinical practice, drawing on literature from across a number of domains: mental health, psychological stress among medical students and medical practitioners; and self-care strategies in medicine curricula. High rates of psychological distress in medical students and medical practitioners were consistently reported. A number of questions remain pertinent to medical education: how does the experience of medical education impact on this level of distress, and possibly exacerbate pre-existing student vulnerabilities? What will help future doctors respond to, and cope with, suffering in their patients? Can the formal curriculum build resilience? Medical schools and educators have a responsibility to address these questions and to provide effective self-care curricula. In this review promising interventions such as mindfulness training are reported, frameworks to guide self-awareness in medical students are suggested, and recommendations for a self-care curriculum are made.

  14. Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prosthetics Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... majority of tissue used to produce these mesh implants are from a pig (porcine) or cow (bovine) ...

  15. Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prosthetics Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... majority of tissue used to produce these mesh implants are from a pig (porcine) or cow (bovine). ...

  16. Optimizing surgical f

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Mohamed Amin

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: In our study both dexmedetomidine and esmolol were effective in reducing MABP, and lowering the heart rate providing dry surgical field and ensured good surgical condition during cochlear implant surgery in pediatric patients.

  17. Abortion - surgical - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000658.htm Abortion - surgical - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. You have had a surgical abortion. This is a procedure that ends pregnancy by ...

  18. Surgical care in the Solomon Islands: a road map for universal surgical care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natuzzi, Eileen S; Kushner, Adam; Jagilly, Rooney; Pickacha, Douglas; Agiomea, Kaeni; Hou, Levi; Houasia, Patrick; Hendricks, Phillip L; Ba'erodo, Dudley

    2011-06-01

    Access to surgical care and emergency obstetrical care is limited in low-income countries. The Solomon Islands is one of the poorest countries in the Pacific region. Access to surgical care in Solomon Islands is limited and severely affected by a country made up of islands. Surgical care is centralized to the National Referral Hospital (NRH) on Guadalcanal, leaving a void of care in the provinces where more than 80% of the people live. To assess the ability to provide surgical care to the people living on outer islands in the Solomon Islands, the provincial hospitals were evaluated using the World Health Organization's Global Initiative for Emergency and Essential Surgical Care Needs Assessment Tool questionnaire. Data on infrastructure, workforce, and equipment available for treating surgical disease was collected at each provincial hospital visited. Surgical services are centralized to the NRH on Guadalcanal in Solomon Islands. Two provincial hospitals provide surgical care when a surgeon is available. Six of the hospitals evaluated provide only very basic surgical procedures. Infrastructure problems exist at every hospital including lack of running water, electricity, adequate diagnostic equipment, and surgical supplies. The number of surgeons and obstetricians employed by the Ministry of Health is currently inadequate for delivering care at the outer island hospitals. Shortages in the surgical workforce can be resolved in Solomon Islands with focused training of new graduates. Training surgeons locally, in the Pacific region, can minimize the "brain drain." Redistribution of surgeons and obstetricians to the provincial hospitals can be accomplished by creating supportive connections between these hospitals, the NRH, and international medical institutions.

  19. The emerging role of screen based simulators in the training and assessment of colonoscopists

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Morven; Fernando, Bimbi; Berlingieri, Pasquale

    2010-01-01

    Incorporation of screen based simulators into medical training has recently gained momentum, as advances in technology have coincided with a government led drive to increase the use of medical simulation training to improve patient safety with progressive reductions in working hours available for junior doctors to train. High fidelity screen based simulators hold great appeal for endoscopy training. Potentially, their incorporation into endoscopy training curricula could enhance speed of acqu...

  20. The introduction of digital dental technology into BDS curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatham, C; Spencer, M H; Wood, D J; Johnson, A

    2014-12-05

    The aim of this study was to determine the degree to which digital dental technologies have been introduced into the curricula of UK dental schools. A survey was carried out of all the UK dental schools that teach undergraduate dental students. The survey contained six questions and was designed to determine if digital dental technology techniques or systems were being taught in the curricula, what these techniques were, and whether the school dental laboratories supported these techniques. Sixteen schools were surveyed and 11 replied: a response rate of 69%. Forty-five percent of the schools that replied did not teach digital dental technology in their curriculum. Of the 55% of schools who did teach digital dental technology, 50% gave lectures or demonstrations while the other 50% allowed practical involvement by the student. Two thirds of these stated that not all the students participated in practical usage. Seventy-three percent of the schools that replied had dental laboratories using some, but not all the digital dental technology techniques listed. Eighty percent of the schools that were not teaching digital dental technology said it was because it was not included in the curriculum, and 20% stated it was due to a lack of technical expertise or support.

  1. Capacity Building through Geospatial Education in Planning and School Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Siddiqui, A.; Gupta, K.; Jain, S.; Krishna Murthy, Y. V. N.

    2014-11-01

    Geospatial technology has widespread usage in development planning and resource management. It offers pragmatic tools to help urban and regional planners to realize their goals. On the request of Ministry of Urban Development, Govt. of India, the Indian Institute of Remote Sensing (IIRS), Dehradun has taken an initiative to study the model syllabi of All India Council for Technical Education for planning curricula of Bachelor and Master (five disciplines) programmes. It is inferred that geospatial content across the semesters in various planning fields needs revision. It is also realized that students pursuing planning curricula are invariably exposed to spatial mapping tools but the popular digital drafting software have limitations on geospatial analysis of planning phenomena. Therefore, students need exposure on geospatial technologies to understand various real world phenomena. Inputs were given to seamlessly merge and incorporate geospatial components throughout the semesters wherever seems relevant. Another initiative by IIRS was taken to enhance the understanding and essence of space and geospatial technologies amongst the young minds at 10+2 level. The content was proposed in a manner such that youngsters start realizing the innumerable contributions made by space and geospatial technologies in their day-to-day life. This effort both at school and college level would help in not only enhancing job opportunities for young generation but also utilizing the untapped human resource potential. In the era of smart cities, higher economic growth and aspirations for a better tomorrow, integration of Geospatial technologies with conventional wisdom can no longer be ignored.

  2. Unexpected attitudinal growth in a course combining reformed curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M. Hull

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we show data from the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey that suggests that Georgetown physics majors become increasingly expert in their attitudes towards physics learning and knowing after taking a course that combines two reformed curricula, Matter and Interactions (M&I and Tutorials in Introductory Physics (TIPs. This occurs even though the two curricula do not send a consistent epistemological message to students. We analyze interview video data of two of these students to illustrate examples of this growth. We examine video data of one of these students in a tutorial session to describe a possible mechanism that may have contributed to the growth. Finally, we compare this qualitative video data with quantitative data from the newly developed Perceptions of Physics Classes survey and discuss aggregate responses to this survey in considering the ways in which other students developed more expertlike attitudes in this course. We conclude that the attitudinal growth observed cannot be explained simply “as the result of” either M&I or of TIPs but rather find the most plausible explanation to be that the growth is an emergent phenomena produced by M&I and TIPs working together in concert with other factors.

  3. Transcultural Nursing in Turkey's Bachelor's of Science Nursing Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülbu Tanrıverdi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aims of this manuscript are to examine the presence of transcultural Nursing concept and foundations in Turkey's Bachelor's Of Science In Nursing curricula.Methods: Tis study was planned as a descriptive study during the 2004-2005 academic year in Turkey's Bachelor's of Science in Nursing Curricula. The manuscript data were collected by internet, mail, fax and telephone calls. Percentage was used in the statistical evaluation.Results: According to findings none of the 66 Bachelor's of Science in Nursing curriculum programs had "transcultural Nursing" as a required course. There was only one nursing school that did have the course as an elective. However, There was courses like Socio-Anthropology, Medical Anthropology, Health Sociology and Anthropology which has the elements of transcultural nursing concept are included in BSN programs.Conclusions: Based on the findings it is recommended that Turkey's university curriculum programs in Nursing College and Health Colleges to be reevaluated for the inclusion of a transcultural Nursing Course.

  4. Unexpected attitudinal growth in a course combining reformed curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Michael M.; Lindsey, Beth A.; Archambault, Matthew; Davey, Kathleen; Liu, Amy Y.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we show data from the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey that suggests that Georgetown physics majors become increasingly expert in their attitudes towards physics learning and knowing after taking a course that combines two reformed curricula, Matter and Interactions (M&I) and Tutorials in Introductory Physics (TIPs). This occurs even though the two curricula do not send a consistent epistemological message to students. We analyze interview video data of two of these students to illustrate examples of this growth. We examine video data of one of these students in a tutorial session to describe a possible mechanism that may have contributed to the growth. Finally, we compare this qualitative video data with quantitative data from the newly developed Perceptions of Physics Classes survey and discuss aggregate responses to this survey in considering the ways in which other students developed more expertlike attitudes in this course. We conclude that the attitudinal growth observed cannot be explained simply "as the result of" either M&I or of TIPs but rather find the most plausible explanation to be that the growth is an emergent phenomena produced by M&I and TIPs working together in concert with other factors.

  5. Influence of national culture on the adoption of integrated medical curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jippes, Mariëlle; Majoor, Gerard D

    2011-03-01

    Integrated curricula have been implemented in medical schools all over the world. However, among countries different relative numbers of schools with integrated curricula are found. This study aims to explore the possible correlation between the percentage of medical schools with integrated curricula in a country and that country's cultural characteristics. Curricula were defined as not integrated if in the first 2 years of the program at least two out of the three monodisciplinary courses Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry were identified. Culture was defined using Hofstede's dimensions Power distance, Uncertainty avoidance, Masculinity/Femininity, and Individualism/Collectivism. Consequently, this study had to be restricted to the 63 countries included in Hofstede's studies which harbored 1,195 medical schools. From each country we randomly sampled a maximum of 15 schools yielding 484 schools to be investigated. In total 91% (446) of the curricula were found. Correlation of percent integrated curricula and each dimension of culture was determined by calculating Spearman's Rho. A high score on the Power distance index and a high score on the Uncertainty avoidance index correlated with a low percent integrated curricula; a high score on the Individualism index correlated with a high percent integrated curricula. The percentage integrated curricula in a country did not correlate with its score on the Masculinity index. National culture is associated with the propensity of medical schools to adopt integrated medical curricula. Consequently, medical schools considering introduction of integrated and problem-based medical curricula should take into account dimensions of national culture which may hinder the innovation process.

  6. Development of an Educational Game to Set Up Surgical Instruments on the Mayo Stand or Back Table: Applied Research in Production Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paim, Crislaine Pires Padilha; Goldmeier, Silvia

    2017-01-10

    Existing research suggests that digital games can be used effectively for educational purposes at any level of training. Perioperative nursing educators can use games to complement curricula, in guidance and staff development programs, to foster team collaboration, and to give support to critical thinking in nursing practice because it is a complex environment. To describe the process of developing an educational game to set up surgical instruments on the Mayo stand or back table as a resource to assist the instructor in surgical instrumentation training for students and nursing health professionals in continued education. The study was characterized by applied research in production technology. It included the phases of analysis and design, development, and evaluation. The objectives of the educational game were developed through Bloom's taxonomy. Parallel to the physical development of the educational game, a proposed model for the use of digital elements in educational game activities was applied to develop the game content. The development of the game called "Playing with Tweezers" was carried out in 3 phases and was evaluated by 15 participants, comprising students and professional experts in various areas of knowledge such as nursing, information technology, and education. An environment was created with an initial screen, menu buttons containing the rules of the game, and virtual tour modes for learning and assessment. The "digital" nursing student needs engagement, stimulation, reality, and entertainment, not just readings. "Playing with Tweezers" is an example of educational gaming as an innovative teaching strategy in nursing that encourages the strategy of involving the use of educational games to support theoretical or practical classroom teaching. Thus, the teacher does not work with only 1 type of teaching methodology, but with a combination of different methodologies. In addition, we cannot forget that skill training in an educational game does not

  7. Development of an Educational Game to Set Up Surgical Instruments on the Mayo Stand or Back Table: Applied Research in Production Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Existing research suggests that digital games can be used effectively for educational purposes at any level of training. Perioperative nursing educators can use games to complement curricula, in guidance and staff development programs, to foster team collaboration, and to give support to critical thinking in nursing practice because it is a complex environment. Objective To describe the process of developing an educational game to set up surgical instruments on the Mayo stand or back table as a resource to assist the instructor in surgical instrumentation training for students and nursing health professionals in continued education. Methods The study was characterized by applied research in production technology. It included the phases of analysis and design, development, and evaluation. The objectives of the educational game were developed through Bloom’s taxonomy. Parallel to the physical development of the educational game, a proposed model for the use of digital elements in educational game activities was applied to develop the game content. Results The development of the game called “Playing with Tweezers” was carried out in 3 phases and was evaluated by 15 participants, comprising students and professional experts in various areas of knowledge such as nursing, information technology, and education. An environment was created with an initial screen, menu buttons containing the rules of the game, and virtual tour modes for learning and assessment. Conclusions The “digital” nursing student needs engagement, stimulation, reality, and entertainment, not just readings. “Playing with Tweezers” is an example of educational gaming as an innovative teaching strategy in nursing that encourages the strategy of involving the use of educational games to support theoretical or practical classroom teaching. Thus, the teacher does not work with only 1 type of teaching methodology, but with a combination of different methodologies. In addition, we

  8. Computer-Based Training Methods for Surgical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-07

    anteroposteffor posi tJOil .ue .Chi < Wed . S~cure U~ finishing guldr to the dl~t.-t l(’n..-. use the- Screw lnserter/EXIr acto• 10 fns.erl i l.2mm...American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, 71" Annual Meeting San Francisco, California March 2004 Hawaiian Orthopedic Association "Advances in

  9. Assessment of the role of a student-led surgical interest group in surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ran; Buxey, Kenneth; Ashrafi, Akbar; Drummond, Katharine J

    2013-01-01

    We describe the development of a medical student surgical interest group, its initial evaluation, and future plans. The Surgical Students Society of Melbourne was formed in August 2008 by a group of senior medical students from the University of Melbourne. The Surgical Students Society of Melbourne seeks to provide additional surgical teaching and professional development for students interested in a career in surgery. It also aims to provide junior doctors with leadership and teaching opportunities to meet the requirements of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons for application to the Surgical Education and Training program. Its program also addresses contemporary workforce issues, such as women in surgery and rural surgery. The society runs a weekly teaching program during the semester and procedural and careers workshops throughout the year. A survey of students attending the teaching program was conducted by means of written and online questionnaires. The results suggest that the society has been successful in augmenting surgical education and providing opportunities to improve procedural skills, but also highlighted areas of the program that may be improved, including aspects of surgical professional development and role modeling. The Surgical Students Society initiative was generally very well received by students and shows great potential as a means for augmenting surgical education at the medical student level. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Integration of Hands-On Team Training into Existing Curriculum Improves Both Technical and Nontechnical Skills in Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskey, Robert C; Owei, Lily; Rao, Raghavendra; Riddle, Elijah W; Brooks, Ari D; Dempsey, Daniel T; Morris, Jon B; Neylan, Christopher J; Williams, Noel N; Dumon, Kristoffel R

    2017-05-26

    Nontechnical skills are an essential component of surgical education and a major competency assessed by the ACGME milestones project. However, the optimal way to integrate nontechnical skills training into existing curricula and then objectively evaluate the outcome is still unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect laparoscopic team-based task training would have on the nontechnical skills needed for laparoscopic surgery. 9 PGY-1 residents underwent an established training curriculum for teaching the knowledge and technical skills involved in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Initial training involved a didactic session, expert-led practice on a porcine model in a simulated operating room and laparoscopic skills practice on a virtual reality trainer. Residents then performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy on the same porcine model as a preintervention test. Three to four months following this, residents were subjected to specific nontechnical skills training involving 2 simple team-based laparoscopic tasks. They then practiced a further 4 to 6 hours on the virtual reality trainer. A repeat postintervention laparoscopic cholecystectomy was then performed 3 to 4 months after nontechnical skills training. Both the preintervention and postintervention laparoscopic cholecystectomies were audiovisually recorded and then evaluated by 2 independent surgeons in a blinded fashion. Technical skills were assessed using objective structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS) and a technique specific rating scale (TRS) that we developed for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Nontechnical skills were assessed using nontechnical skills for surgeons (NOTSS). Residents also completed a survey at the beginning and end of the training. Tertiary care, university based teaching institution. A total of 9 general surgery residents at the intern level. The mean OSATS score improved from 13.7 ± 1.24 to 26.7 ± 0.31 (p skills training for laparoscopic cholecystectomy that was

  11. Nutritional risk and status of surgical patients: the relevance of nutrition training of medical students Riesgo y estado nutricionales en pacientes quirúrgicos: la relevancia del entrenamiento nutricional en estudiantes de medicina

    OpenAIRE

    C. Ferreira; C. Lavinhas; Fernandes, L; M.ª Camilo; Ravasco, P

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of undernutrition among surgical patients is thought to be high, and negatively influencing outcomes. However, recent evidence shows the increase of overweight/obesity in hospitalised patients. Aims: A pilot cross-sectional study was conducted in 50 patients of a Surgical Department of the University Hospital of Santa Maria (CHLN) that aimed: 1) to assess nutritional risk and status through validated methods; 2) to explore the presence of overweight/obesity; 3) to e...

  12. Evolution of gastroenterology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telleman, Hanna; Burger, Trevlyn Felicity; Mulder, Chris Jacob Johan

    2009-04-21

    There have been rapid developments in gastroenterology (GE) over the last decade. Up until the late 1980s, GE-training was incorporated in Internal Medicine training. The introduction of endoscopy has necessitated the need for additional training. Around the world different national boards have developed their own curricula which will be discussed in this paper. Emphasis will be placed on the curriculum recently introduced in The Netherlands. The internal medicine component has become a two-year requirement (Common Trunk) and the duration of training in GE has been extended to four years. Because of the growing complexity of GE, there are now four subspecialties: Interventional Endoscopy, Neuromotility, Oncology and Hepatology that trainees can choose from. These subspecialties each have predefined specific requirements. The World Gastroenterology Organization has drawn up a standard curriculum which can be of help to the boards in different countries. The curriculum emphasizes the knowledge and skill components. The curriculum also defines the training recommendations, the requirements of training facilities and competence evaluation of fellows and facilities, while less is said about research, finance and the number of gastroenterologists required. In the coming decades the curriculum will need to be revised continuously. Personalization of the curriculum will be the next challenge for the years to come.

  13. Evolution of gastroenterology training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hanna Telleman; Trevlyn Felicity Burger; Chris Jacob Johan Mulder

    2009-01-01

    There have been rapid developments in gastroenterology (GE) over the last decade. Up until the late 1980s, GE-training was incorporated in Internal Medicine training. The introduction of endoscopy has necessitated the need for additional training. Around the world different national boards have developed their own curricula which will be discussed in this paper. Emphasis will be placed on the curriculum recently introduced in The Netherlands. The internal medicine component has become a two-year requirement (Common Trunk) and the duration of training in GE has been extended to four years. Because of the growing complexity of GE, there are now four subspecialties: Interventional Endoscopy, Neuromotility, Oncology and Hepatology that trainees can choose from. These subspecialties each have predefined specific requirements. The World Gastroenterology Organization has drawn up a standard curriculum which can be of help to the boards in different countries. The curriculum emphasizes the knowledge and skill components. The curriculum also defines the training recommendations, the requirements of training facilities and competence evaluation of fellows and facilities, while less is said about research, finance and the number of gastroenterologists required. In the coming decades the curriculum will need to be revised continuously. Personalization of the curriculum will be the next challenge for the years to come.

  14. Person-Oriented Organization of Academic Process – the Way of Genuine Flexibility and Individualization of Educational Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Sazonov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the necessity for Russian universities to switch over from the conservative stream-group scheduling to progressive individual scheduling of educational process where each particular student becomes an object of planning and implementing the higher educational curricula. The new liberal student- centered form called the «credit system» or in Russian variant the «credit units system» brings forward the students interests and rights. Gradually, such system tends to prevail in the world environment of vocational education, though in Russian higher school it still exist as an experiment and is not fast adopted. The prevailing stream-group model of educational process with steady group division throughout the whole academic period indicates our serious technological lagging behind the leaders of the world educational market. Rejection of traditional stream-group educational model and steady group formation brings about new opportunities for Russian universities providing real flexibility and individualization of educational curricula, giving students the option for individual term planning and scheduling, as well as the right for choosing teachers. Combining the modern approach to students’ assessment and person-oriented organization of academic process, the complete mass adoption of the model in question in bachelor and specialists training can guarantee a qualitative leap in developing Russian higher educational system. 

  15. Assessing Cardiff University's Curricula Contribution to Sustainable Development Using the STAUNCH[superscript (RTM)] System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Rodrigo; Peattie, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the results of the sustainable development curricula assessment undertaken at 19 of the 28 schools of Cardiff University using the Sustainability Tool for Assessing UNiversity's Curricula Holistically (STAUNCH[superscript (RTM)]. STAUNCH[superscript (RTM)] was developed with two objectives: (1) to systematically assess how…

  16. Curricula and Instruction for Young Handicapped Children: A Guideline for Selection and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBose, Rebecca; Kelley, Jean

    The paper examines the theoretical constructs that underlie currently used curricula for young handicapped children and suggests guidelines for selecting and evaluating curricula. Three developmental perspectives are reviewed: the age related developmental milestones identified by A. Gesell and adhered to by diagnostic prescriptive advocates, the…

  17. Comparison of Elementary Social Studies Curricula of Turkey and the United States on Values Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merey, Zihni; Kus, Zafer; Karatekin, Kadir

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the social studies teaching curricula of Turkey and the United States in terms of values education. The study is a model case study that relies upon one of the qualitative research methods. The data come from the elementary social studies curricula of both countries through the documents analysis method. The…

  18. Sustainbility and Undergraduate Management Curricula: Changes over a 5-Year Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Josie; Bonn, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    Global initiatives and a rapidly expanding academic literature identify the responsibility that universities have to incorporate sustainability education into their curricula. This study had two aims: first, to investigate the extent to which Australian undergraduate management curricula explicitly identified a focus on sustainability and, second,…

  19. On the Making and Faking of Knowledge Value in Higher Education Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordern, Jim

    2016-01-01

    This paper uses Bernstein's sociology of knowledge and studies of professional knowledge and expertise to identify how knowledge value is constituted in higher education curricula. It is argued that different knowledge structures and forms of disciplinary community influence how curricula are determined, and lead to distinctive types of knowledge…

  20. Ideas, Institutions, and School Curricula: Explaining Variation between England and France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haus, Leah

    2015-01-01

    This study raises the question of why the French secondary school history curricula introduced in the late 2000s prescribed more extensive coverage of plural histories than did secondary school history curricula for English schools introduced in the same time period. Both countries share similar societal diversity. To explain the variation in…

  1. Algebra for All: California's Eighth-Grade Algebra Initiative as Constrained Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domina, Thurston; Penner, Andrew M.; Penner, Emily K.; Conley, AnneMarie

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Across the United States, secondary school curricula are intensifying as a growing proportion of students enroll in high-level academic math courses. In many districts, this intensification process occurs as early as eighth grade, where schools are effectively constraining their mathematics curricula by restricting course…

  2. A Historical Analysis of Primary Mathematics Curricula in Terms of Teaching Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmantar, Mehmet Fatih

    2017-01-01

    This study carries out a comparative analysis of primary mathematics curricula put into practice during Turkish Republican period. The data for this study are composed of official curricula documents which are examined in terms of teaching principles. The study adopts a qualitative approach and employs document analysis method. The official…

  3. Engineering Education: Environmental and Chemical Engineering or Technology Curricula--A European Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavic, Peter; Lukman, Rebeka; Lozano, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Over recent years, universities have been incorporating sustainable development (SD) into their systems, including their curricula. This article analyses the incorporation of SD into the curricula of chemical and environmental engineering or technology bachelor degrees at universities in the European Union (EU) and European Free Trade Association…

  4. Using Variables in School Mathematics: Do School Mathematics Curricula Provide Support for Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogbey, James

    2016-01-01

    This study employed content analysis to examine 3 popular middle-grades mathematics curricula in the USA on the support they provide for teachers to implement concepts associated with variables in school mathematics. The results indicate that each of the 3 curricula provides some type of support for teachers, but in a varied amount and quality.…

  5. A Cross-National Comparison of Art Curricula for Kindergarten-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heejin; Kim, Hajin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to make a cross-national comparison of art curricula for kindergarten-aged children across five countries--Korea, Norway, New Zealand, Slovakia and Singapore. A document analysis was conducted on the five curricula using a constant comparative approach for selected qualitative statements to analyse two major constructs:…

  6. Surgical education and adult learning: Integrating theory into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Prem

    2017-01-01

    Surgical education continues to evolve from the master-apprentice model. Newer methods of the process need to be used to manage the dual challenges of educating while providing safe surgical care. This requires integrating adult learning concepts into delivery of practical training and education in busy clinical environments. A narrative review aimed at outlining and integrating adult learning and surgical education theory was undertaken. Additionally, this information was used to relate the practical delivery of surgical training and education in day-to-day surgical practice. Concepts were sourced from reference material. Additional material was found using a PubMed search of the words: 'surgical education theory' and 'adult learning theory medical'. This yielded 1351 abstracts, of which 43 articles with a focus on key concepts in adult education theory were used. Key papers were used to formulate structure and additional cross-referenced papers were included where appropriate. Current concepts within adult learning have a lot to offer when considering how to better deliver surgical education and training. Better integration of adult learning theory can be fruitful. Individual teaching surgical units need to rethink their paradigms and consider how each individual can contribute to the education experience. Up skilling courses for trainers can do much to improve the delivery of surgical education. Understanding adult learning concepts and integrating these into day-to-day teaching can be valuable.

  7. Surgical education and adult learning: Integrating theory into practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Prem

    2017-01-01

    Surgical education continues to evolve from the master-apprentice model. Newer methods of the process need to be used to manage the dual challenges of educating while providing safe surgical care. This requires integrating adult learning concepts into delivery of practical training and education in busy clinical environments. A narrative review aimed at outlining and integrating adult learning and surgical education theory was undertaken. Additionally, this information was used to relate the practical delivery of surgical training and education in day-to-day surgical practice. Concepts were sourced from reference material. Additional material was found using a PubMed search of the words: ‘surgical education theory’ and ‘adult learning theory medical’. This yielded 1351 abstracts, of which 43 articles with a focus on key concepts in adult education theory were used. Key papers were used to formulate structure and additional cross-referenced papers were included where appropriate. Current concepts within adult learning have a lot to offer when considering how to better deliver surgical education and training. Better integration of adult learning theory can be fruitful. Individual teaching surgical units need to rethink their paradigms and consider how each individual can contribute to the education experience. Up skilling courses for trainers can do much to improve the delivery of surgical education. Understanding adult learning concepts and integrating these into day-to-day teaching can be valuable.

  8. Experiencing the Implementation of New Inquiry Science Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ower, Peter S.

    Using a phenomenological methodology, a cohort of four experienced science teachers was interviewed about their experience transitioning from traditional, teacher and fact-centered science curricula to inquiry-based curricula. Each teacher participated in two interviews that focused on their teaching backgrounds, their experience teaching the prior traditional curriculum, and their experience teaching the new inquiry-based curriculum. The findings are presented as a narrative of each teachers' experience with the new curriculum implementation. Analyzing the data revealed four key themes. 1) The teachers felt trapped by the old curriculum as it did not align with their positive views of teaching science through inquiry. 2) The teachers found a way to fit their beliefs and values into the old and new curriculum. This required changes to the curriculum. 3) The teachers attempted to make the science curriculum as meaningful as possible for their students. 4) The teachers experienced a balancing act between their beliefs and values and the various aspects of the curriculum. The revealed essence of the curriculum transition is one of freedom and reconciliation of their beliefs. The teachers experienced the implementation of the new curriculum as a way to ensure their values and beliefs of science education were embedded therein. They treated the new curriculum as a malleable structure to impart their grander ideas of science education (e.g. providing important skills for future careers, creating a sense of wonder, future problem solving) to the students. Their changes were aligned with the philosophy of the curriculum kits they were implementing. Thus, the fidelity of the curriculum's philosophy was not at risk even though the curriculum kits were not taught as written. This study showed that phenomenological methods are able to reveal the relationship between a teacher's prior experiences, values and beliefs and their current instructional philosophy in science

  9. Surgical Lasers In Gynecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellhas, Helmut F.; Barnes, Alfonso E.

    1982-12-01

    Multipurpose surgical CO2 lasers marketed in the USA have been developed to be applicable to a variety of surgical procedures in many surgical fields. They are all suited for endoscopic surgical procedures and can be fitted to all standard surgical microscopes. They all can adjust the focal length of the laser beam to the different standard focal lengths of the surgical microscope which for instance in laryngoscopy is 400 mm and in colposcopy 300 mm. One laser instrument can even change the spot size in a given focal distance which is very advantageous for some microsurgical procedures (Merrimack Laboratories 820). All multipurpose surgical CO2 laser systems provide a multi-articulated surgical arm for free-hand surgery. The surgical arms are cumbersome to use but they are adapted to the surgeons needs with ingenuity. The practicality of the multi-articulated surgical arms depends mostly on the distance of the handpiece from the surgical console which now is also overbridged by the laser tube in most surgical laser system. The spot size of the beam is variable in most handpieces by interchangeable lenses which modify the focal distance of the beam and the power density. Another common feature in all systems is a coaxial He-Ne pilot light which provides a red spot which unfortunately becomes invisible in a bleeding surgical field. Most surgical laser systems have a spacial mode of TEM 00 which is essential for incisional surgery. The continuous mode of beam delivery is used for incisional surgery and also for most endoscopic procedures.

  10. Nicaraguan and US nursing collaborative evaluation study: Identifying similarities and differences between US and Nicaraguan curricula and teaching modalities using the community engagement model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Donna; Engelke, Martha K; Kosko, Debra A; Roberson, Donna W; Jaime, Joba Fany; López, Feliciana Rojas; Rivas, Fidelia Mercedes Poveda; Salazar, Yolanda Matute; Salmeron, Juana Julia

    2017-04-01

    Curricula evaluation is an essential phase of curriculum development. Study describes the implementation of a formative evaluation used by faculty members between Universidad Nacional Autonóma de Nicaragua (UNAN-Leon) Escuela de Enfermeriá, Nicaragua and East Carolina University College of Nursing (ECU CON) in North Carolina, US. Program evaluation study to conduct an assessment, comparison of a medical-surgical adult curriculum and teaching modalities. Also, explore the Community Engagement (CE) Model to build a Central American-US faculty partnership. Methodological evaluation study utilizing a newly developed International Nursing Education Curriculum Evaluation Tool related to adult medical and surgical nursing standards. Also, the CE Model was tested as a facilitation tool in building partnerships between nurse educators. Nicaragua and US nursing faculty teams constructed the curriculum evaluation by utilizing the International Nursing Education Curriculum Evaluation Tool (INECET) by reviewing 57 elements covering 6 Domains related to adult medical and surgical nursing standards. Developed, explored the utilization of the INECET based on a standard of practice framework. The Community Engagement Model, a fivephase cycle, Inform, Consult, Involve, Collaborate, and Empower was utilized to facilitate the collaborative process. Similarities between the US and Nicaraguan curricula and teaching modalities were reflective based on the 57 elements covering 6 Domain assessment tool. Case studies, lecture, and clinical hospital rotations were utilized as teaching modalities. Both schools lacked sufficient time for clinical practicum time. The differences, included UNAN-Leon had a lack of simulation skill lab, equipment, and space, whereas ECU CON had sufficient resources. The ECU school lacked applied case studies from a rural health medical-surgical adult nursing perspective and less time in rural health clinics. The UNAN-Leon nursing standards generalized based on

  11. Challenges to the development of complex virtual reality surgical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, N E; Røtnes, J S

    2006-11-01

    Virtual reality simulation in surgical training has become more widely used and intensely investigated in an effort to develop safer, more efficient, measurable training processes. The development of virtual reality simulation of surgical procedures has begun, but well-described technical obstacles must be overcome to permit varied training in a clinically realistic computer-generated environment. These challenges include development of realistic surgical interfaces and physical objects within the computer-generated environment, modeling of realistic interactions between objects, rendering of the surgical field, and development of signal processing for complex events associated with surgery. Of these, the realistic modeling of tissue objects that are fully responsive to surgical manipulations is the most challenging. Threats to early success include relatively limited resources for development and procurement, as well as smaller potential for return on investment than in other simulation industries that face similar problems. Despite these difficulties, steady progress continues to be made in these areas. If executed properly, virtual reality offers inherent advantages over other training systems in creating a realistic surgical environment and facilitating measurement of surgeon performance. Once developed, complex new virtual reality training devices must be validated for their usefulness in formative training and assessment of skill to be established.

  12. Cutting for a Career; a Discussion of the Domains of Surgical Competence Using Expert Bespoke Tailoring as a Metaphor for Surgical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees-Lee, Jacqueline; Kneebone, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Competency based surgical training uses proficiency of technical skills to quantify surgical competency. We believe this is an over simplification of what is required to be a competent surgeon. This work aims to illuminate the attributes of a mature, competent, thinking surgeon. A bespoke (or custom) tailor is highly trained craftsman who produces…

  13. Robotic surgical skill acquisition: What one needs to know?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Sood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic surgery has been eagerly adopted by patients and surgeons alike in the field of urology, over the last decade. However, there is a lack of standardization in training curricula and accreditation guidelines to ensure surgeon competence and patient safety. Accordingly, in this review, we aim to highlight ′who′ needs to learn ′what′ and ′how′, to become competent in robotic surgery. We demonstrate that both novice and experienced open surgeons require supervision and mentoring during the initial phases of robotic surgery skill acquisition. The experienced open surgeons possess domain knowledge, however, need to acquire technical knowledge under supervision (either in simulated or clinical environment to successfully transition to robotic surgery, whereas, novice surgeons need to acquire both domain as well as technical knowledge to become competent in robotic surgery. With regard to training curricula, a variety of training programs such as academic fellowships, mini-fellowships, and mentored skill courses exist, and cater to the needs and expectations of postgraduate surgeons adequately. Fellowships provide the most comprehensive training, however, may not be suitable to all surgeon-learners secondary to the long-term time commitment. For these surgeon-learners short-term courses such as the mini-fellowships or mentored skill courses might be more apt. Lastly, with regards to credentialing uniformity in criteria regarding accreditation is lacking but earnest efforts are underway. Currently, accreditation for competence in robotic surgery is institutional specific.

  14. Visual force feedback in laparoscopic training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horeman, T.; Rodrigues, S.P.; Van den Dobbelsteen, J.J.; Jansen, F.W.; Dankelman, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background - To improve endoscopic surgical skills, an increasing number of surgical residents practice on box or virtual reality (VR) trainers. Current training is focused mainly on hand–eye coordination. Training methods that focus on applying the right amount of force are not yet available. Metho

  15. Baccalaureate nursing students' attitudes toward poverty: implications for nursing curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sword, Wendy; Reutter, Linda; Meagher-Stewart, Donna; Rideout, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Given the link between poverty and health, nurses, in their work in hospitals and in the community, often come into contact with people who are poor. To be effective care providers, nurses must have an adequate understanding of poverty and a positive attitude toward people who are poor. This study examined attitudes toward poverty among baccalaureate nursing students (N = 740) at three Canadian universities. Students' attitudes were neutral to slightly positive. Personal experiences appeared to have an important influence on the development of favorable attitudes. The findings point to several considerations for nursing curricula. Students should not only be provided with classroom opportunities for critical exploration of poverty and its negative effects on individuals and society, but also have clinical learning experiences that bring them face-to-face with people who are poor, their health concerns, and the realities of their circumstances. Thoughtful critique of poverty-related issues and interpersonal contact may be effective strategies to foster attitude change.

  16. Teaching strategies to incorporate genomics education into academic nursing curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo Garcia, Sylvia P; Greco, Karen E; Loescher, Lois J

    2011-11-01

    The translation of genomic science into health care has expanded our ability to understand the effects of genomics on human health and disease. As genomic advances continue, nurses are expected to have the knowledge and skills to translate genomic information into improved patient care. This integrative review describes strategies used to teach genomics in academic nursing programs and their facilitators and barriers to inclusion in nursing curricula. The Learning Engagement Model and the Diffusion of Innovations Theory guided the interpretation of findings. CINAHL, Medline, and Web of Science were resources for articles published during the past decade that included strategies for teaching genomics in academic nursing programs. Of 135 articles, 13 met criteria for review. Examples of effective genomics teaching strategies included clinical application through case studies, storytelling, online genomics resources, student self-assessment, guest lecturers, and a genetics focus group. Most strategies were not evaluated for effectiveness.

  17. An Evaluation of Relevance of Computing Curricula to Industry Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Chan Mow

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The research documented in this paper attempted to answer the question of how relevant the content of the Computing courses offered within programs of the Computing Department at the National University of Samoa (NUS were to meet the needs of industry and the workforce. The RINCCII study which was conducted in 2013 to 2014, surveyed 13 institutions and 19 graduates from the Computing programs. Findings from the survey indicated that the current course offerings within the Computing department are relevant to the needs of industry and the workplace. However there are aspects or topics which need inclusion or better coverage. The study also recommended regular surveys to gauge relevance of curricula to needs of industry.

  18. Multimedia and Communication Curricula: The Medium vs. the Message

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahmane Azzi

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Multimedia technology is restructuring the field of communication in various ways. The prevalent nature of this new media invites flexibility which can make communication curricula accommodate a wide range of competencies including technical competency. I have argued in this paper that multimedia, much like printing, radio, television and film, is mainly the means whereby content is delivered. Central to multimedia are content and effects. Content requires perspective which can then be reproduced in texts and images, while effects involves assessment of the influence of multimedia on society and culture. As such, multimedia needs to be approached from a mass communication perspective which preserves the identity of the field and provides a vital link between theory and practical application.

  19. Graduate Ethics Curricula for Future Geospatial Technology Professionals (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, D. J.; Dibiase, D.; Harvey, F.; Solem, M.

    2009-12-01

    Professionalism in today's rapidly-growing, multidisciplinary geographic information science field (e.g., geographic information systems or GIS, remote sensing, cartography, quantitative spatial analysis), now involves a commitment to ethical practice as informed by a more sophisticated understanding of the ethical implications of geographic technologies. The lack of privacy introduced by mobile mapping devices, the use of GIS for military and surveillance purposes, the appropriate use of data collected using these technologies for policy decisions (especially for conservation and sustainability) and general consequences of inequities that arise through biased access to geospatial tools and derived data all continue to be challenging issues and topics of deep concern for many. Students and professionals working with GIS and related technologies should develop a sound grasp of these issues and a thorough comprehension of the concerns impacting their use and development in today's world. However, while most people agree that ethics matters for GIS, we often have difficulty putting ethical issues into practice. An ongoing project supported by NSF seeks to bridge this gap by providing a sound basis for future ethical consideration of a variety of issues. A model seminar curriculum is under development by a team of geographic information science and technology (GIS&T) researchers and professional ethicists, along with protocols for course evaluations. In the curricula students first investigate the nature of professions in general and the characteristics of a GIS&T profession in particular. They hone moral reasoning skills through methodical analyses of case studies in relation to various GIS Code of Ethics and Rules of Conduct. They learn to unveil the "moral ecologies" of a profession through actual interviews with real practitioners in the field. Assignments thus far include readings, class discussions, practitioner interviews, and preparations of original case

  20. Similarities and differences in curricula of a bachelor’s degree in oceanology at the universities in St Petersburg, Klaipeda, and Kaliningrad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gritsenko Vladimir

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Conducting a multi-aspect comparative analysis of curricula of bachelor’s degree programmes in oceanology offered at universities in St Petersburg, Klaipeda and Kaliningrad, the authors trace similarities between the existing variants of oceanologist training in the context of competence modules, disciplines, the so-called academic practices, and the number of hours and credits stipulated in the existing curricula. A formal comparison of generalised quantitative indicators without analysing the content of curriculum components demonstrated certain similarities in all indicators in terms of workload, the number of disciplines (50, 56 and 45 and academic practices. The clustering of competence modules and disciplines at each university within generalised academic areas — physics and mathematics, philosophy, informatics and computers, geoecology, measurement disciplines, etc. — made a more detailed comparison possible. The results of research demonstrate considerable similarities in the curricula used at the given universities in terms of all variants of comparison. The strongest similarity is observed in the areas of basic and professional disciplines.

  1. The quest for One Health: Human Resource training aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angwara Kiwara

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Appropriately trained Human Resources for Health (HRH are key inputs into One Health. ‘… more than 50% of all infectious diseases of humans originate from animals and that, of the emerging diseases about 75% could be traced back to animal origin’ (Rweyemamu et al. 2006. A comprehensive understanding of the social determinants of health, through an appropriate training model for HRH, is a key input. This study aimed to explore if human and veterinary medical schools were using such a model or providing time for this model in their curricula. Specific objectives were to: determine the time that human and veterinary medical schools’ curricula provide for subjects or courses related to the social determinants of health; analyse the curricula contents to establish how they relate to the social determinants of health; and explore how a bio-medical model may influence the graduates’ understanding and practice of One Health. A review of human and veterinary graduate-level medical schools’ curricula in East Africa was performed in April 2013 and May 2013. The findings were: in the curricula, SDH contents for knowledge enhancement about One Health are minimal and that teaching is Germ Theory model-driven and partisan. Out of the total training time for physicians and veterinarians, less than 10% was provided for the social determinants of health-related courses. In conclusion, the curricula and training times provided are inadequate for graduates to fully understand the social determinants of health and their role in One Health. Furthermore, the Germ Theory model that has been adopted addresses secondary causes and is inappropriate. There is a need for more in-depth model. This article suggests that a vicious cycle of ill-health model must be taught.

  2. Can a virtual reality surgical simulation training provide a self-driven and mentor-free skills learning? Investigation of the practical influence of the performance metrics from the virtual reality robotic surgery simulator on the skill learning and associated cognitive workloads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyusung I; Lee, Mija R

    2017-06-20

    While it is often claimed that virtual reality (VR) training system can offer self-directed and mentor-free skill learning using the system's performance metrics (PM), no studies have yet provided evidence-based confirmation. This experimental study investigated what extent to which trainees achieved their self-learning with a current VR simulator and whether additional mentoring improved skill learning, skill transfer and cognitive workloads in robotic surgery simulation training. Thirty-two surgical trainees were randomly assigned to either the Control-Group (CG) or Experiment-Group (EG). While the CG participants reviewed the PM at their discretion, the EG participants had explanations about PM and instructions on how to improve scores. Each subject completed a 5-week training using four simulation tasks. Pre- and post-training data were collected using both a simulator and robot. Peri-training data were collected after each session. Skill learning, time spent on PM (TPM), and cognitive workloads were compared between groups. After the simulation training, CG showed substantially lower simulation task scores (82.9 ± 6.0) compared with EG (93.2 ± 4.8). Both groups demonstrated improved physical model tasks performance with the actual robot, but the EG had a greater improvement in two tasks. The EG exhibited lower global mental workload/distress, higher engagement, and a better understanding regarding using PM to improve performance. The EG's TPM was initially long but substantially shortened as the group became familiar with PM. Our study demonstrated that the current VR simulator offered limited self-skill learning and additional mentoring still played an important role in improving the robotic surgery simulation training.

  3. Surgical rehearsal platform: potential uses in microsurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambakidis, Nicholas C; Selman, Warren R; Sloan, Andrew E

    2013-10-01

    Surgical training has remained remarkably similar in many respects since the early days of halstedian training. Neurosurgery is a demanding field that requires extensive cognitive, perceptive, and technical training. Surgical simulation is a promising approach to facilitate acquiring proficiency in neurosurgical procedures. Simulation can permit mentoring trainees in a "safe" environment. By incorporating images that depict specific abnormalities in actual patients, simulation can provide realistic rehearsal for any given case for both novice and experienced surgeons in much the same way that data acquired from drones can be used to allow pilots to rehearse mission-critical maneuvers in a simulator before taking flight. Most neurosurgical simulators to date have focused on endovascular procedures, spinal procedures, temporal bone dissection, and stereotactic procedures. The use of simulator technology for microsurgery is in its infancy. This article describes a novel simulator technology developed by Surgical Theater LLC (http://www.surgicaltheater.net/home.html) called the Selman Surgical Rehearsal Platform. The platform shows promise for use in intracranial microvascular procedures, which require experience that is becoming increasingly limited for trainees who have to become proficient in more procedures in much less time than ever before.

  4. Surgical checklists: the human factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Connor, Paul

    2013-05-14

    BACKGROUND: Surgical checklists has been shown to improve patient safety and teamwork in the operating theatre. However, despite the known benefits of the use of checklists in surgery, in some cases the practical implementation has been found to be less than universal. A questionnaire methodology was used to quantitatively evaluate the attitudes of theatre staff towards a modified version of the World Health Organisation (WHO) surgical checklist with relation to: beliefs about levels of compliance and support, impact on patient safety and teamwork, and barriers to the use of the checklist. METHODS: Using the theory of planned behaviour as a framework, 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted with theatre personnel regarding their attitudes towards, and levels of compliance with, a checklist. Based upon the interviews, a 27-item questionnaire was developed and distribute to all theatre personnel in an Irish hospital. RESULTS: Responses were obtained from 107 theatre staff (42.6% response rate). Particularly for nurses, the overall attitudes towards the effect of the checklist on safety and teamworking were positive. However, there was a lack of rigour with which the checklist was being applied. Nurses were significantly more sensitive to the barriers to the use of the checklist than anaesthetists or surgeons. Moreover, anaesthetists were not as positively disposed to the surgical checklist as surgeons and nurse. This finding was attributed to the tendency for the checklist to be completed during a period of high workload for the anaesthetists, resulting in a lack of engagement with the process. CONCLUSION: In order to improve the rigour with which the surgical checklist is applied, there is a need for: the involvement of all members of the theatre team in the checklist process, demonstrated support for the checklist from senior personnel, on-going education and training, and barriers to the implementation of the checklist to be addressed.

  5. The role of the surgical care practitioner within the surgical team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Julie

    Changes to the surgical workforce and the continued development of health policy have perpetuated the requirement for innovative perioperative roles. The surgical care practitioner is a nurse or allied health professional who works within a surgical team and has advanced perioperative skills, including the ability to undertake surgical interventions.With only limited literature evaluating this role, any benefits of their inclusion to a surgical team are largely anecdotal. This article presents the findings of an autoethnographic inquiry that explored the experiences of surgical team members who worked with the nurse researcher in her role as surgical care practitioner. Surgeons identified the provision of a knowledgeable, competent assistant and operator who enhanced patient care, helped maintain surgical services and supported the training of junior doctors. The professional, ethical and legal obligations of advanced perioperative practice were upheld. Interprofessional collaboration was improved, as was service provision. This further enhanced the patient experience. The traditional viewpoint that nurses who undertake tasks previously associated with medicine should be working to the standard of a doctor is challenged but requires further examination.

  6. Teaching surgical exposures to undergraduate medical students: an integration concept for anatomical and surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Niels; Hepp, Pierre; Löffler, Sabine; Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Steinke, Hanno; Klima, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Decreasing numbers of students are interested in starting a surgical career, posing substantial challenges to patient care in the next years. The anatomy course is one of the key subjects in medical training, especially in surgical disciplines. Innovative teaching concepts that integrate surgically relevant anatomy and manual dexterity might help boost student interest in surgery. A preclinical workshop entitled "Surgical exposures" was developed. A team of anatomists and surgeons introduced the surgical exposures, demonstrating the procedures on Thiel-fixed body donors. Following this introduction, students practiced the exposures in an operating room-like manner. A six-point Likert scale was used to evaluate the workshop and to compare it to the first-year dissection course. The overall evaluation result for the surgical exposures was excellent, proving to be a significantly better result when compared to the first-year dissection course. The students were more satisfied with the teaching time invested by the peers and regarded the workshop as clinically highly relevant. Furthermore, they felt that questions were addressed better and that the overall atmosphere was better than in the gross anatomy course. Subject to criticism was the course size and practicing time in both cases. The surgical exposures workshop provides preclinical students with clinically relevant anatomy and manual dexterity. It may positively influence the decision to follow a surgical career. This course, however, requires extensive teaching resources. The given concept may help implement practical medical skills in the preclinical curriculum, strengthening the professional identity of surgeons and anatomists.

  7. The surgical experience of current non-surgeons gained at medical school: a survey analysis with implications for teaching today’s students

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unknown what aspects of undergraduate surgical curricula are useful for future non-surgeons. We aimed to define relevant, enduring learning achievements for this subgroup to enable student-centered teaching. Methods An online questionnaire using open ended questions was distributed to physicians of non-surgical specialties at the University Hospital of Tuebingen, Germany and its associated teaching hospitals. Participants were asked to describe knowledge and skills that endur...

  8. Ethics Training in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Guloksuz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Although ethics training is one of the core components of psychiatric education, it is not sufficiently addressed in the curricula of many educational institutions. It is shown that many of the psychiatry residents received no ethics training in both residency and medical school. Predictably, over half of the psychiatry residents had faced an ethical dilemma that they felt unprepared to meet, and nearly all of them indicated ethics education would have helped them to solve this dilemma. In addition to learning about the fundamental topics of ethics like confidentiality, boundary violations, justice, benefience and nonmaleficence, psychiatrists must also learn to deal with other hidden ethical dilemmas which are mostly due to the changing world order. It is obvious that residency training should include a well developed ethics curriculum. However, some still believe that ethical principles cannot be taught and are formed in one’s early moral development. Accepting the fact that teaching ethics is difficult, we believe that it is getting easier with the new methods for teaching in medicine. These methods are clinical supervisions, rol-models, case studies, role playing, small group discussions, team based learning and “let’s talking medicine” groups which is a useful methods for discussing ethics dilemmas on daily practice and C.A.R.E (Core Beliefs, Actions, Reasons, Experience which is a special training method for teaching ethics. In this review, the need of ethics training in residency curriculum will be discussed and new methods for teaching ethics will be proposed.

  9. The professional training of future specialists for Industry of hospitality in the United States of America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vindyk A.V.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the USA's scientists publications on the professional training of specialists of hospitality is presented. The couteuts of curricula of Conrad Hilton's college, University Johnson and Wales has been analyzed. It is found out that the feature of training future specialists for Industry of hospitality consists in close connection with a society, enterprises. The associations of hotels take part in the discussion, adjustments of curricula, quality determination of training of graduating students, giving grants to higher educational establishments of hospitality.

  10. Career decisions and the structure of training: an American Board Of Colon and Rectal Surgery survey of colorectal residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Constance C; Rothenberger, David A; Trudel, Judith L; Wolff, Bruce G

    2009-07-01

    To investigate potential impacts of restructuring general surgery training on colorectal (CR) surgery recruitment and expertise. In response to the American Surgical Association Blue Ribbon Committee report on surgical education (2004), the American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery, working with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and American Board of Surgery, established a committee (2006) to review residency training curricula and study new pathways to certification as a CR surgeon. To address concerns related to shortened general surgery residency, the American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery committee surveyed recent, current, and entering CR residents on the timing and factors associated with their career choice and opinions regarding restructuring. A 10-item, online survey of 189 CR surgeons enrolled in the class years of 2005, 2006, and 2007 was administered and analyzed May to July 2007. One hundred forty-five CR residents responded (77%); results were consistent across class years and types of general surgery training program. Seventy percent of respondents had rotated onto a CR service by the end of their PGY-2 year. Most identified CR as a career interest in their PGY-3 or PGY-4 year. Overall interest in CR surgery, the influence of CR mentors and teachers, and positive exposure to CR as PGY-3, PGY-4, or PGY-5 residents were the top cited factors influencing choice decisions. Respondents were opposed to restructuring by a 2:1 ratio, primarily because of concerns about inadequate training and lack of time to develop technical expertise. Shortening general surgery residency would not necessarily limit exposure to CR rotations and mentors unless such rotations are cut. The details of proposed restructuring are critical.

  11. Manual of Surgical Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Lidia Sánchez Sarría

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Surgical instruments are the group of tools used in surgical procedures. They are very expensive and sophisticated. Consequently, a standardized and meticulous care is essential; they should go through the decontamination, cleaning and sterilization process. These instruments are designed in order to provide surgeons with tools that help them to perform a basic surgical procedure; there are multiple variations and the design depends on their function. This paper aims at showing all surgical instruments that can be used in an operating room during surgery and are not generally included in the medical literature.

  12. Working with LGBT older adults: an assessment of employee training practices, needs, and preferences of senior service organizations in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moone, Rajean P; Cagle, John G; Croghan, Catherine F; Smith, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    As the population ages and LGBT older adults become more visible among senior service providers, the need for cultural competency training will grow. Although this training is a relatively new phenomenon, curricula exist. These are generally in person for 2- to 8-hr durations. Training to Serve embarked on a study to investigate preferences in cultural competency format and duration. One-hundred and eighty-four Minnesota service providers participated in the online survey. The majority (90%) were interested in participating in LGBT cultural competency training. Results suggest a preference for shorter duration and online formats. Implications for curricula development and future research are included.

  13. A clarity clinic for surgical writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derish, Pamela; Eastwood, Susan

    2008-06-01

    Although writing and publishing are key to career development and academic success for surgeons, learning the skills needed to write publishable research reports is an often neglected aspect of surgical training. This report distills several lessons from scientific writing courses for surgeons taught at the University of California, San Francisco, to give a wider audience of academic surgeons tools they can use to write scientific prose more clearly. Drawing extensively on real examples of surgical writing, we cover techniques that are indispensable for achieving clarity, including choosing words carefully, designing well-constructed sentences, building structured paragraphs, and displaying your thinking clearly by using topic sentences and transitions.

  14. Lessons that cross the surgical drapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ming-Li; Saunders, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Modern medicine has created a need for innovative methods of training that create safe, proficient specialists with adequate experience, and who are fit for purpose in this new system. Patient safety and patient-focused care are central to current practice and promoted by the use of simulation, human factors, team-based, multidisciplinary and interspecialty training. An acknowledgement that postgraduate training occurs within the work environment underlies the need to create systems that support learning within the workplace. Supervision, protected time for adequate induction and the opportunity to be involved in workplace learning are the key. It is also important that robust mechanisms to assure the quality of postgraduate education are in place. Available reports were researched, and the particularities of anaesthetic training were outlined and summarised. Then, in a translational approach, we examined how to apply the lessons learned from anaesthesiological training to surgical training. The trend towards reducing the working hours of junior doctors, whilst still providing excellent training, creates a need for innovative, efficient, concentrated training programmes, where trainers and trainees are engaged in a seamless, constant educational endeavour. Within this review we offer the system of anaesthetic training in the UK, and some of its recent changes, as a template to highlight themes in postgraduate education that exemplify this innovation and are transferable not only to surgery but across different specialties.

  15. Modeling the adoption process of the Flight Training Synthetic Environment Technology (FTSET) in the Turkish Army Aviation (TUAA)

    OpenAIRE

    Boztas, Omer

    2006-01-01

    MBA Professional Report The motivation for using Flight Training Synthetic Environment Technology (FTSET) in military aviation is to create a cost-efficient and a risk-managed training environment. However, deciding on the appropriate mix of synthetic versus actual flight training remains a great unresolved issue. Further, FTSET usage and its adoption level may vary across the aviation community and flight training curricula. TUAA has employed FTSET in helicopter flight training since 1990...

  16. Instituting a Surgical Skills Competition Increases Technical Performance of Surgical Clerkship Students Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leraas, Harold J; Cox, Morgan L; Bendersky, Victoria A; Sprinkle, Shanna S; Gilmore, Brian F; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka M; Tracy, Elisabeth T; Sudan, Ranjan

    2017-10-04

    Surgical skills training varies greatly between institutions and is often left to students to approach independently. Although many studies have examined single interventions of skills training, no data currently exists about the implementation of surgical skills assessment as a component of the medical student surgical curriculum. We created a technical skills competition and evaluated its effect on student surgical skill development. Second-year medical students enrolled in the surgery clerkship voluntarily participated in a surgical skills competition consisting of knot tying, laparoscopic peg transfer, and laparoscopic pattern cut. Winning students were awarded dinner with the chair of surgery and a resident of their choice. Individual event times and combined times were recorded and compared for students who completed without disqualification. Disqualification included compromising cutting pattern, dropping a peg out of the field of vision, and incorrect knot tying technique. Timed performance was compared for 2 subsequent academic years using Mann-Whitney U test. Overall, 175 students competed and 71 students met qualification criteria. When compared by academic year, 2015 to 2016 students (n = 34) performed better than 2014 to 2015 students (n = 37) in pattern cut (133s vs 167s, p = 0.040), peg transfer (66s vs 101s, p skills competition improves student technical performance. Further research is needed regarding long-term benefits of surgical competitions for medical students. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Vocational Education and Training in Denmark. Short Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedefop - European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Vocational education and training in Denmark has embarked on a process of modernisation aiming at, primarily, increasing flexibility, and individualisation, quality and efficiency. Assessment and recognition of informal and non-formal learning, competence-based curricula, innovative approaches to teaching, and increased possibilities for partial…

  18. Modeling of tool-tissue interactions for computer-based surgical simulation: a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Misra, Sarthak; Ramesh, K.T.; Okamura, Allison M.

    2008-01-01

    Surgical simulators present a safe and potentially effective method for surgical training, and can also be used in robot-assisted surgery for pre- and intra-operative planning. Accurate modeling of the interaction between surgical instruments and organs has been recognized as a key requirement in th

  19. Realistic tool-tissue interaction models for surgical simulation and planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Misra, Sarthak

    2009-01-01

    Surgical simulators present a safe and potentially effective method for surgical training, and can also be used in pre- and intra-operative surgical planning. Realistic modeling of medical interventions involving tool-tissue interactions has been considered to be a key requirement in the development

  20. An Overview of Undergraduate Training in Cultural Competency and Cross-Cultural Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Zaza; Laugharne, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Multiculturalism is a familiar concept in many developed countries. While cultural competency training is part of most medical curricula, training in cultural psychiatry at the undergraduate level is typically minimal. It is important that medical graduates are both culturally competent and able to respond to the mental health needs of patients…

  1. Format of Basic Instruction Program Resistance Training Classes: Effect on Fitness Change in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, J. P.; Channell, Brian; Pugh, Chip; Tuck, Matt; Pendel, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    New resistance training programs such as CrossFit are gaining favor among college-aged students. CrossFit and related commercial resistance training programs may provide a valuable elective option within basic instruction program (BIP) curricula, but the fitness benefits of this course have not been compared with those of existing BIP resistance…

  2. Professional Training of Language Teachers in the Context of British Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyanenko, Kateryna

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with revealing the peculiarities of language teachers' professional training in the context of British experience. The notions of philology, linguistics, philologist, linguist, language studies have been outlined and specified in the article. The titles of the curricula and their meanings in reference to language training have…

  3. Format of Basic Instruction Program Resistance Training Classes: Effect on Fitness Change in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, J. P.; Channell, Brian; Pugh, Chip; Tuck, Matt; Pendel, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    New resistance training programs such as CrossFit are gaining favor among college-aged students. CrossFit and related commercial resistance training programs may provide a valuable elective option within basic instruction program (BIP) curricula, but the fitness benefits of this course have not been compared with those of existing BIP resistance…

  4. Vertical orbital dystopia--surgical correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, M T; Jane, J A

    1981-02-01

    The surgical correction of vertical malpositions of the human eye has been made relatively safe and reliable by recent surgical techniques. The authors define this condition as vertical orbital dystopia and review the etiology of this deformity in 38 recent consecutive cases that were surgically treated at the Craniofacial Anomalies Center of The University of Virginia. Some new and useful tests are described that are of value to the plastic surgeon in analysis of the facial deformity and in planning the appropriate surgical procedure to correct the vertical dystopia of one or both eyes. Several cases are illustrated that describe the principal surgical methods of moving the eye up or down without loss of vision. The vertical eye shifts in this series have been in the range of 2 to 3 mm to over 22 mm. No loss of vision was produced by these corrections. The most common difficulties and complications of orbital dystopia corrections are described. The implications of this type of surgery in terms of visual physiology are suggested. The authors conclude that surgical correction of vertical orbital dystopias is possible, safe, and rewarding to the patients. However, they advise that the correction is best performed in young children and by a specially trained team of plastic surgeons, neurosurgeons, and ophthalmologists.

  5. Surgical ethics and the challenge of surgical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelos, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Surgical ethics as a specific discipline is relatively new to many. Surgical ethics focuses on the ethical issues that are particularly important to the care of surgical patients. Informed consent for surgical procedures, the level of responsibility that surgeons feel for their patients' outcomes, and the management of surgical innovation are specific issues that are important in surgical ethics and are different from other areas of medicine. The future of surgical progress is dependent on surgical innovation, yet the nature of surgical innovation raises specific concerns that challenge the professionalism of surgeons. These concerns will be considered in the following pages.

  6. Recognizing surgical patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouarfa, L.

    2012-01-01

    In the Netherlands, each year over 1700 patients die from preventable surgical errors. Numerous initiatives to improve surgical practice have had some impact, but problems persist. Despite the introduction of checklists and protocols, patient safety in surgery remains a continuing challenge. This is

  7. Surgical medical record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.

    2008-01-01

    A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15......A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15...

  8. What's the Right Referral Rate? Specialty Referral Patterns and Curricula Across I3 Collaborative Primary Care Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Mark; Page, Cristen; Reid, Alfred; Donahue, Katrina; Newton, Warren

    2017-02-01

    Specialty physician visits account for a significant portion of ambulatory visits nationally, contribute significantly to cost of care, and are increasing over the past decade. Marked variability in referral rates exists among primary care practices without obvious causality. We present data describing the referral process and specialty referral curriculum within the I3 collaborative. Residency directors were surveyed about residency characteristics related to referrals. Specialty physician referral rates were obtained from each program and then correlated to program characteristics referral rates in four domains: presence and type of referral curriculum, process of referral review, faculty preceptor characteristics, and use of referral data for administrative processes. The survey response rate was 87%; 10 programs submitted complete referral data. Three programs (23%) reported a formal curriculum addressing the process of making a referral, and four programs (31%) reported a curriculum on appropriateness of subspecialty referrals. Specialty referral rates varied from 7%-31% of active residency patients, with no relationship to age, payor status, or race. Marked variability in referral rates and patterns exist within primary care residency training programs. Specialty referral practices are a key driver of total cost of care yet few curricula exist that address appropriateness, quantity, or process of specialty referrals. Practice patterns often develop during residency training, therefore an opportunity exists to improve training and practice around referrals.

  9. Training requirements for agro-food industry in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro D. Gaspar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Agro-food companies are aware that the technical and soft skills of their employees directly influence business performance and, consequently, improving those skills will enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of their companies. This paper presents the main results of the AgriTraining project “Training requirements for the agro-food industry". Activities in pursuit of the objectives of this project involved: (1 analysis of the training needs in the agro-food industry in Portugal; (2 analysis of the training provision and the training organizations; (3 analysis of market trends; (4 definition of a training strategy; and (5 adjustment and development of training strategies for the agro-food sector. This last activity comprised the development of training curricula, suitable for the food sector as a whole and adjusted for the specific needs of some traditional industries, in order to promote the development and competitiveness of the agro-food industry in Portugal. Such training curricula aimed to promote the uptake of innovative technologies and methodologies, increase the ability of agro-food industries to invest and take risks, and enable adoption of European Community standards for production and marketing. Gaps in training supply were identified and the training provision was updated according to the needs of the agro-food companies. It was determined that companies need and demand knowledge and innovation to increase their competitive position for internationalization purposes. It was possible to define a training strategy based on market-orientation for agro-food differentiation.

  10. Training requirements for agro-food industry in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro D. Gaspar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Agro-food companies are aware that the technical and soft skills of their employees directly influence business performance and, consequently, improving those skills will enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of their companies. This paper presents the main results of the AgriTraining project “Training requirements for the agro-food industry". Activities in pursuit of the objectives of this project involved: (1 analysis of the training needs in the agro-food industry in Portugal; (2 analysis of the training provision and the training organizations; (3 analysis of market trends; (4 definition of a training strategy; and (5 adjustment and development of training strategies for the agro-food sector. This last activity comprised the development of training curricula, suitable for the food sector as a whole and adjusted for the specific needs of some traditional industries, in order to promote the development and competitiveness of the agro-food industry in Portugal. Such training curricula aimed to promote the uptake of innovative technologies and methodologies, increase the ability of agro-food industries to invest and take risks, and enable adoption of European Community standards for production and marketing. Gaps in training supply were identified and the training provision was updated according to the needs of the agro-food companies. It was determined that companies need and demand knowledge and innovation to increase their competitive position for internationalization purposes. It was possible to define a training strategy based on market-orientation for agro-food differentiation.

  11. Training Psychiatry Residents in Professionalism in the Digital World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Nadyah Janine; Shelton, P G; Lang, Michael C; Ingersoll, Jennifer

    2016-10-29

    Professionalism is an abstract concept which makes it difficult to define, assess and teach. An additional layer of complexity is added when discussing professionalism in the context of digital technology, the internet and social media - the digital world. Current physicians-in-training (residents and fellows) are digital natives having been raised in a digital, media saturated world. Consequently, their use of digital technology and social media has been unconstrained - a reflection of it being integral to their social construct and identity. Cultivating the professional identity and therefore professionalism is the charge of residency training programs. Residents have shown negative and hostile attitudes to formalized professionalism curricula in training. Approaches to these curricula need to consider the learning style of Millennials and incorporate more active learning techniques that utilize technology. Reviewing landmark position papers, guidelines and scholarly work can therefore be augmented with use of vignettes and technology that are available to residency training programs for use with their Millennial learners.

  12. Assessment of Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Education and Training Curricula, Revision Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-01

    include the following: Introduction to Psychology Adolescent Psychology Maslow’s Hierarchy Abnormal Psychology Defense Mechanisms Anxiety...basic mechanics of how the equipment detects drug usage from body fluids. (Note: Full lesson book is available with EMIT kit from SYVA Corporation...identification procedures, organization of assets for control of alchohol and drug abuse, supervisory role in alcohol and drug abuse programs, local

  13. Bioterrorism and Emergency Preparedness in Aging (BTEPA): HRSA-Funded GEC Collaboration for Curricula and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Arleen; Roush, Robert E., Jr.; Howe, Judith L.; Sanders, Margaret; McBride, Melen R.; Sherman, Andrea; Palmisano, Barbara; Tumosa, Nina; Perweiler, Elyse A.; Weiss, Joan

    2006-01-01

    Frail elders living alone or in long-term care settings are particularly vulnerable to bioterrorism and other emergencies due to their complex physical, social and psychological needs. This paper provides an overview of the recent literature on bioterrorism and emergency preparedness in aging (BTEPA); discusses federal initiatives by the health…

  14. Study of the Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps: Should the Services’ Four Curricula Be Merged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Identify the steps for performing the Heimlich Maneuver Controlling Bleeding Lesson Objectives Identify the three types of bleeding Identify the best way...heart and brain alive Identify the steps for performing the Heimlich Maneuver Describe how to control external bleeding Explain the treatment for

  15. Facing the Changing Demands of Europe: Integrating Entrepreneurship Education in Finnish Teacher Training Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seikkula-Leino, Jaana; Ruskovaara, Elena; Hannula, Heikki; Saarivirta, Tuija

    2012-01-01

    The European Union (EU) considers the learning of entrepreneurial skills to be an essential factor in creating welfare. Therefore, in the EU, one of the latest core aspects is to develop entrepreneurship education in teacher education. However, entrepreneurship education still seems to be, across the countries, a quite uncommon theme. This article…

  16. The Potential of Incorporating Computer Games in Foreign Language Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakaran Mukundan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence that technology-enhanced instruction could result in students’ learning. With the advancement and ever-increasing growth of technology, the use of educational electronic games or computer games in education has appealed to both educators and students. Because of their potential to enhance students’ interest, motivation and creativity, computer games can be used to teach various skills and strategies to different types of students, particularly schoolchildren. These games have also made inroads into language learning classrooms as they provide language learners with a rich learning context to engage in authentic and meaningful learning experiences. This paper reviews the potential of integrating computer games into second/foreign language syllabi and curricula by offering a synopsis of the assumptions, prior studies and theoretical background in support of these games in language education. At the end, the paper touches upon the role of teachers and the likely inhibiting factors affecting the integration of computer games into English language programs.

  17. Incorporating A Structured Writing Process into Existing CLS Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Karen; Latshaw, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Good communication and critical thinking are essential skills for all successful professionals, including Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Laboratory Science (CLS/MLS) practitioners. Professional programs can incorporate writing assignments into their curricula to improve student written communication and critical thinking skills. Clearly defined, scenario-focused writing assignments provide student practice in clearly articulating responses to proposed problems or situations, researching and utilizing informational resources, and applying and synthesizing relevant information. Assessment rubrics, structured feedback, and revision writing methodologies help guide students through the writing process. This article describes how a CLS Program in a public academic medical center, located in the central United States (US) serving five centrally-located US states has incorporated writing intensive assignments into an existing 11-month academic year using formal, informal and reflective writing to improve student written communication and critical thinking skills. Faculty members and employers of graduates assert that incorporating writing intensive requirements have better prepared students for their professional role to effectively communicate and think critically.

  18. Development of security engineering curricula at US universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M.L.

    1998-08-01

    The Southwest Surety Institute was formed in June 1996 by Arizona State University (ASU), New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NM Tech), New Mexico State University (NMSU), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to provide educational programs in Security Engineering, and to conduct research and development in security technologies. This is the first science-based program of its kind in the US, focused on educating Security Engineers to help government and industry address their security needs. Each member brings a unique educational capability to the Institute. NM Tech has a formidable explosives testing and evaluation facility. ASU is developing a Masters program in Security Engineering at their School of Technology located on a new campus in Mesa, Arizona. NMSU provides a Security Technology minor, merging programs in Criminal Justice and Engineering Technology. The Sandia National Laboratories security system design and evaluation process forms the basis for the Security Engineering curricula. In an effort to leverage the special capabilities of each university, distance education will be used to share courses among Institute members and eventually with other sites across the country.

  19. Moving Toward a Humanistic Social Studies and History Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Berg

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Current reflective practices in the social studies are examined in light of how these strategies can add value and meaning to social studies curriculums. Many of these reflective practices were introduced within teacher education programs’ social studies methods courses, to expose pre-service teachers to innovative teaching practices that could be used in the classroom. An ineffective textbook-centered curriculum has dominated education in the United States for over a century. The researchers in this article argue for a new, reflective approach to teaching history and social studies curricula. New pedagogical models are needed to revive an ailing social studies program in the public school system. This article includes a selective examination of some traditional and non-traditional methods for promoting student learning and growth through reflective practices. Those considered in this article include dialogue journals, textbooks, culturally responsive texts (CRT, the Persona Doll Project, mask-making, primary source documents, and co-teaching. Each reflective practice strategy has its merits and could be easily implemented to improve pedagogical practice.

  20. Surgical Vision: Google Glass and Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Johnny Yau Cheung; Tsui, Lok Yee; Yeung, Keith Siu Kay; Yip, Stefanie Wai Ying; Leung, Gilberto Ka Kit

    2016-08-01

    Google Glass is, in essence, a smartphone in the form of a pair of spectacles. It has a display system, a bone conduction "speaker," video camera, and connectivity via WiFi or Bluetooth technologies. It can also be controlled by voice command. Seizing Google Glass' capabilities as windows of opportunity, surgeons have been the first group of doctors trying to incorporate the technology into their daily practices. Experiences from different groups have demonstrated Google Glass' potential in improving perioperative care, intraoperative communication and documentation, surgical outcome as well as surgical training. On the other hand, the device has technical limitations, notably suboptimal image qualities and a short battery life. Its operational functions also bring forth concerns on the protection of patient privacy. Nonetheless, the technological advances that this device embodies hold promises in surgical innovations. Further studies are required, and surgeons should explore, investigate, and embrace similar technologies with keen and informed anticipation.