WorldWideScience

Sample records for surgical trainees symposium

  1. Quality of colonoscopy performance among gastroenterology and surgical trainees: a need for common training standards for all trainees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyden, J E; Doherty, G A; Hanley, A; McNamara, D A; Shields, C; Leader, M; Murray, F E; Patchett, S E; Harewood, G C

    2011-11-01

    Cecal intubation and polyp detection rates are objective measures of colonoscopy performance. Minimum cecal intubation rates greater than 90% have been endorsed by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) and the Joint Advisory Group (JAG) UK. Performance data for medical and surgical trainee endoscopists are limited, and we used endoscopy quality parameters to compare these two groups. Retrospective review of all single-endoscopist colonoscopies done by gastroenterology and surgical trainees ("registrars," equivalent to fellows, postgraduate year 5) with more than two years' endoscopy experience, in 2006 and 2007 at a single academic medical center. Completion rates and polyp detection rates for endoscopists performing more than 50 colonoscopies during the study period were audited. Colonoscopy withdrawal time was prospectively observed in a representative subset of 140 patients. Among 3079 audited single-endoscopist colonoscopies, seven gastroenterology trainees performed 1998 procedures and six surgery trainees performed 1081. The crude completion rate was 82%, 84% for gastroenterology trainees and 78% for surgery trainees (P gastroenterology trainees, and 84% for surgical trainees (P gastroenterology and surgical trainees, respectively (P gastroenterology trainees 14% and surgical trainees 9% (P = 0.0065). In the prospectively audited procedures, median withdrawal time was greater in the gastroenterology trainee group and polyp detection rates correlated closely with withdrawal time (r = 0.99). The observed disparity in endoscopic performance between surgical and gastroenterology trainees suggests the need for a combined or unitary approach to endoscopy training for specialist medical and surgical trainees. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. The 2nd Annual Clinical Scientist Trainee Symposium, August 22, 2017, London, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Charles; Blom, Jessica N; Lewis, James F

    2018-03-27

    Clinician scientists play a critical role in bridging research and clinical practice. Unfortunately, the neglect of research training in medical schools has created clinicians who are unable to translate evidence from literature to practice. Furthermore, the erosion of research training in medical education has resulted in clinicians who lack the skills required for successful scientific investigation. To counteract this, the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry has made an effort to engage trainees, at all levels, in the research process. The 2nd Annual Clinician Scientist Trainee Symposium was held in London, Ontario, Canada on August 22, 2017. Organized each year since 2016 by the Schulich Research Office, the symposium features research being conducted by trainees in Schulich's Clinical Research Training Program. The focus this year was on the current state of clinician-scientist training in Canada and visions for the path ahead.

  3. Strengthening Your Surgical Hand: Strengths-Based Profiling and Coaching of Surgical Trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A.L. Macafee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction As scientific and professional disciplines, medicine and surgery have a tendency to focus on deficiencies, namely what trainees do not know or are not good at doing. The philosophy of Positive Psychology and the notion of “Strengths” takes a different stance. It is an inherently positive process, seeing each trainee as an individual bringing a unique set of strengths to every situation. There is clear evidence from the commercial sector regarding improved performance and well-being when focusing on one's strengths. We were therefore keen to investigate its potential role in the global development of trainee surgeons. Methods Surgical trainees from Core Training 1 to Specialty Training 8 in one training region of the United Kingdom were invited to voluntarily undertake the online Strengthscope™ assessment tool. The computer-generated report was reviewed by an Occupational Psychologist and trainees were then invited to have a strengths-focused feedback discussion on that report, either face-to-face or via telephone. Results Thirty four surgical trainees ranging from CT1 to ST6 completed the tool and 28 undertook the voluntary feedback sessions. Decisiveness, self-improvement, efficiency, emotional control and critical thinking were common strengths identified. Less commonly represented were leading, creativity and developing others. Trainees found that the tool and feedback helped them identify their strengths and embrace them, rather than fitting the surgical mould. It further aided the recognition of strengths in-overdrive and for some trainees it helped explain difficulties they had experienced in previous jobs. It provided insight into individual motivations and character whilst also highlighting how others in the workplace might perceive them. Trainees liked the emphasis on the building up of positive attributes and utilizing innate skills and strengths. The feedback consultation from an accredited coach trained in the

  4. Unsupervised laparoscopic appendicectomy by surgical trainees is safe and time-effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kenneth; Duncan, Tristram; Pearson, Andrew

    2007-07-01

    Open appendicectomy is the traditional standard treatment for appendicitis. Laparoscopic appendicectomy is perceived as a procedure with greater potential for complications and longer operative times. This paper examines the hypothesis that unsupervised laparoscopic appendicectomy by surgical trainees is a safe and time-effective valid alternative. Medical records, operating theatre records and histopathology reports of all patients undergoing laparoscopic and open appendicectomy over a 15-month period in two hospitals within an area health service were retrospectively reviewed. Data were analysed to compare patient features, pathology findings, operative times, complications, readmissions and mortality between laparoscopic and open groups and between unsupervised surgical trainee operators versus consultant surgeon operators. A total of 143 laparoscopic and 222 open appendicectomies were reviewed. Unsupervised trainees performed 64% of the laparoscopic appendicectomies and 55% of the open appendicectomies. There were no significant differences in complication rates, readmissions, mortality and length of stay between laparoscopic and open appendicectomy groups or between trainee and consultant surgeon operators. Conversion rates (laparoscopic to open approach) were similar for trainees and consultants. Unsupervised senior surgical trainees did not take significantly longer to perform laparoscopic appendicectomy when compared to unsupervised trainee-performed open appendicectomy. Unsupervised laparoscopic appendicectomy by surgical trainees is safe and time-effective.

  5. Communication Skills among Surgical Trainees: Perceptions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective Communication between the surgeon and the patient is a core clinical skill. The ability to communicate with patients and their family members is very important in the optimum care of the surgical patient. Few studies have assessed communication between surgical trainees and their patients in sub-Saharan Africa.

  6. Surgical education and training in an outer metropolitan hospital: a qualitative study of surgical trainers and trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestel, Debra; Harlim, Jennifer; Bryant, Melanie; Rampersad, Rajay; Hunter-Smith, David; Spychal, Bob

    2017-08-01

    The landscape of surgical training is changing. The anticipated increase in the numbers of surgical trainees and the shift to competency-based surgical training places pressures on an already stretched health service. With these pressures in mind, we explored trainers' and trainees' experiences of surgical training in a less traditional rotation, an outer metropolitan hospital. We considered practice-based learning theories to make meaning of surgical training in this setting, in particular Actor-network theory. We adopted a qualitative approach and purposively sampled surgical trainers and trainees to participate in individual interviews and focus groups respectively. Transcripts were made and thematically analysed. Institutional human research ethics approval was obtained. Four surgical trainers and fourteen trainees participated. Almost without exception, participants' report training needs to be well met. Emergent inter-related themes were: learning as social activity; learning and programmatic factors; learning and physical infrastructure; and, learning and organizational structure. This outer metropolitan hospital is suited to the provision of surgical training with the current rotational system for trainees. The setting offers experiences that enable consolidation of learning providing a rich and varied overall surgical training program. Although relational elements of learning were paramount they occurred within a complex environment. Actor-network theory was used to give meaning to emergent themes acknowledging that actors (both people and objects) and their interactions combine to influence training quality, shifting the focus of responsibility for learning away from individuals to the complex interactions in which they work and learn.

  7. Core trainee boot camp-A method for improving technical and non-technical skills of novice surgical trainees. A before and after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, R; Langdon, L; Rodd, C A; Eastaugh-Waring, S; Coulston, J E

    2018-04-10

    The transition to surgical training can be a stressful time for trainees and is most evident during national handover periods where new graduates start and senior trainees rotate to new programmes. During this time, patient mortality can increase and Hospital efficiency reduces. This influence is compounded by the impact of working time directives. Intensive, simulation rich training programmes or "Boot Camps" have been postulated as a solution. This article highlights the development of a surgical boot camp for novice surgical trainees and the impact this can have on training. A novel surgical boot camp was developed for all trainees within a surgical training region including nine acute NHS trusts. Participating cohort of trainees completed pre and post course questionnaires to assess technical and non-technical skills. 25 trainees attended and completed the pre and post boot camp questionnaire. Significant improvements were seen with technical skills (p = 0.0429), overall non-technical skills (p skills (p = 0.005) and outpatient skill (p = 0.002). Trainees reported significantly increased ability to assess and manage a critically unwell patient (p = 0.001) and a trauma patient (p = 0.001). 96% of trainees have utilised the skills they learnt on Boot Camp and all trainees would recommend it as an induction programme. Surgical Boot Camps offer a timely chance to develop technical and non-technical skills whilst enhancing a trainee's confidence and knowledge and reduce the patient safety impact of the handover period. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Peer-mentoring junior surgical trainees in the United Kingdom: a pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulliamy, Paul; Junaid, Islam

    2012-04-16

    Peer-mentoring has attracted substantial interest in various healthcare professions, but has not been formally integrated into postgraduate surgical training. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a peer-mentor scheme among junior surgical trainees in the United Kingdom. Trainees entering the first year of core surgical training (CST) in a single postgraduate school of surgery were allocated a mentor in the second year of CST. Allocation was based on location of the initial clinical placement. An anonymised questionnaire regarding the mentorship scheme was sent to all participants in the third month following its introduction. 18 trainees participated in the scheme, of whom 12 (67%) responded to the questionnaire. All respondents had made contact with their allocated mentor or mentee, and no trainees had opted out of the scheme. Areas in which the mentees received guidance included examinations (83%), CV development (67%), and workplace-based assessments (67%). All respondents felt that the mentor scheme was a good addition to CST. Suggestions for improvement of the scheme included introduction of structured meetings and greater engagement with allocated mentors. A pilot peer-mentoring scheme was well received by junior surgical trainees. Consideration should be given to expansion of this scheme and more rigorous assessment of its value.

  9. Open cholecystectomy: Exposure and confidence of surgical trainees and new fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Beth M; Lambrianides, Andreas L; Dulhunty, Joel M

    2018-03-01

    The laparoscopic approach to cholecystectomy has overtaken open procedures in terms of frequency, despite open procedures playing an important role in certain clinical situations. This study explored exposure and confidence of Australasian surgical trainees and new fellows in performing an open versus laparoscopic cholecystectomy. An online survey was disseminated via the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons to senior general surgery trainees (years 3-5 of surgical training) and new fellows (fellowship within the previous 5 years). The survey included questions regarding level of experience and confidence in performing an open cholecystectomy and converting from a laparoscopic to an open approach. A total of 135 participants responded; 58 (43%) were surgical trainees, 58 (43%) were fellows and 19 (14%) did not specify their level of training. Respondents who were involved in more than 20 open cholecystectomy procedures as an assistant or independent operator compared with those less exposed were more likely to feel confident to independently perform an elective open cholecystectomy (87.8% vs. 57.3%, P = 0.001), independently convert from a laparoscopic to open cholecystectomy (87.8% vs. 58.7%, P = 0.001) and independently perform an open cholecystectomy as a surgical consultant based on their level of exposure as a trainee (73.2% vs. 45.3%, P = 0.004). This study suggests the need to ensure surgical trainees are exposed to sufficient open cholecystectomies to enable confidence and skill with performing these procedures when indicated. Greater recognition of the need for exposure during training, including meaningful simulation, may assist. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Appropriate working hours for surgical training according to Australasian trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Gregory; Harper, Simon; Loveday, Benjamin; Adams, Brandon; Civil, Ian D; Peters, Matthew

    2012-04-01

    The demands of surgical training, learning and service delivery compete with the need to minimize fatigue and maintain an acceptable lifestyle. The optimal balance of working hours is uncertain. This study aimed to define the appropriate hours to meet these requirements according to trainees. All Australian and New Zealand surgical trainees were surveyed. Roster structures, weekly working hours and weekly 'sleep loss hours' (work practices were then correlated with sufficiency of training time, time for study, fatigue and its impacts, and work-life balance preferences. Multivariate and univariate analyses were performed. The response rate was 55.3% with responders representative of the total trainee body. Trainees who worked median 60 h/week (interquartile range: 55-65) considered their work hours to be appropriate for 'technical' and 'non-technical' training needs compared with 55 h/week (interquartile range: 50-60) regarded as appropriate for study/research needs. Working ≥65 h/week, or accruing ≥5.5 weekly 'sleep loss hours', was associated with increased fatigue, reduced ability to study, more frequent dozing while driving and impaired concentration at work. Trainees who considered they had an appropriate work-life balance worked median 55 h/week. Approximately, 60 h/week proved an appropriate balance of working hours for surgical training, although study and lifestyle demands are better met at around 55 h/week. Sleep loss is an important determinant of fatigue and its impacts, and work hours should not be considered in isolation. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  11. Evidence-based surgery: knowledge, attitudes, and perceived barriers among surgical trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rohin; Perakath, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the knowledge and attitude of surgical trainees toward evidence-based medicine (EBM) and their perceived barriers to its practice. The McColl questionnaire and the BARRIERS scale were modified and incorporated into a single questionnaire, which was administered to all surgical trainees attending a Continuing Surgical Education meeting. Department of Surgery, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India. One hundred ten surgical trainees from 22 medical colleges. In all, 84.5% (93/110) trainees returned the questionnaire. The attitudes toward EBM were welcoming, although individual participants reported they welcomed EBM more than their colleagues did. Participants agreed that EBM was useful in everyday practice and that it improved patient care. About 50% of actual practice was considered evidence based. In all, 12.6% (10/89) of participants had received formal training in EBM, and 64.3% (54/84) of participants were aware of the Cochrane database of systemic reviews, but only 35.7% (30/84) read it regularly. Also, 67.8% (61/90) of respondents used protocols and guidelines developed by colleagues. However, 61.5% (56/91) of participants were interested in learning the skills of EBM. The terms absolute risk, relative risk, and clinical effectiveness were understood by >80% of respondents, whereas publication bias, confidence interval, and heterogeneity were poorly understood. The major barriers to practice of EBM were the inability to understand statistical analysis, inadequate facilities for implementation, lack of a single compiled source of literature, relevant literature not being readily available, and insufficient time on the job. Surgical trainees have a positive attitude towards EBM and have some familiarity with the common terms used in EBM. There is a need to increase awareness of, and provide access to, available sources of medical literature. Formal training in EBM, as well as basic statistical analysis, should form a part

  12. Support for Students, Postdoctoral Fellows and Trainees who have been accepted to present at the Terachem 2014 Symposium

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    Cutler, Cathy S. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2016-09-29

    This award under the Office of nuclear Physics, isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program ($20,000) was to provide bursaries for U.S. students/trainees to enable them to participate in the Terachem 2014 Symposium.

  13. What proportion of basic surgical trainees continue in a surgical career? A survey of the factors which are important in influencing career decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, J M J; Drummond, R; Murray, J; Fraser, S; MacDonald, A; Parks, R W

    2009-10-01

    Since the launch of Modernising Medical Careers, trainees are selected for a run-through training programme in a single surgical specialty. The surgical training bodies are currently considering the recommendations of the Tooke report as they review the policy for selection into surgical training in the UK. There is little information available on the factors involved in career choices amongst surgical trainees and this study aimed to address this issue. Trainees appointed to the Basic Surgical Training Programmes in the west and south-east of Scotland (1996-2006) were contacted by email and invited to participate in an online survey. Of 467 trainees identified, valid email addresses were available for 299 of which 191 (64%) responded to the survey. One hundred and forty-nine (78%) trainees were still working in surgery but 38 (20%) had moved to a non-surgical specialty and 4 (2%) had left the medical profession. Of those who had obtained a NTN at the time of the survey (n = 138), 62 (45%) had a NTN in the specialty they chose at the start of the BST but 34 (25%) had changed to a different surgical specialty and 42 (30%) had left surgery altogether. For those still working in surgery, enjoyment of the specialty was the most important factor affecting career choice. Achieving an acceptable work/life balance was the most significant factor influencing trainees who left surgery. The majority of trainees recruited to surgery at an early stage change specialty or leave surgery altogether. Both social and professional factors are important in career choices. The findings of this study support a period of core surgical training to provide flexibility prior to further training in a surgical specialty.

  14. Are Surgeons Born or Made? A Comparison of Personality Traits and Learning Styles Between Surgical Trainees and Medical Students.

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    Preece, Ryan A; Cope, Alexandra C

    2016-01-01

    Medical students and surgical trainees differ considerably in both their preferential learning styles and personality traits. This study compares the personality profiles and learning styles of surgical trainees with a cohort of medical students specifically intent on pursuing a surgical career. A cross-sectional study was conducted contrasting surgical trainees with medical students specifying surgical career intent. The 50-item International Personality Item Pool Big-Five Factor Marker (FFM) questionnaire was used to score 5 personality domains (extraversion, conscientiousness, agreeableness, openness to experience, and neuroticism). The 24-item Learning Style Inventory (LSI) Questionnaire was used to determine the preferential learning styles (visual, auditory, or tactile). χ(2) Analysis and independent samples t-test were used to compare LSI and FFM scores, respectively. Surgical trainees from several UK surgical centers were contrasted to undergraduate medical students. A total of 53 medical students who had specifically declared desire to pursue a surgical career and were currently undertaking an undergraduate intercalated degree in surgical sciences were included and contrasted to 37 UK core surgical trainees (postgraduate years 3-4). The LSI questionnaire was completed by 53 students and 37 trainees. FFM questionnaire was completed by 29 medical students and 34 trainees. No significant difference for learning styles preference was detected between the 2 groups (p = 0.139), with the visual modality being the preferred learning style for both students and trainees (69.8% and 54.1%, respectively). Neuroticism was the only personality trait to differ significantly between the 2 groups, with medical students scoring significantly higher than trainees (2.9 vs. 2.6, p = 0.03). Medical students intent on pursuing a surgical career exhibit similar personality traits and learning styles to surgical trainees, with both groups preferring the visual learning modality

  15. The impact of a surgical boot camp on early acquisition of technical and nontechnical skills by novice surgical trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heskin, Leonie; Mansour, Ehab; Lane, Brian; Kavanagh, Dara; Dicker, Pat; Ryan, Donncha; Gildea-Byrne, Kate; Pawlikowska, Teresa; Tierney, Sean; Traynor, Oscar

    2015-09-01

    Acquisition of skills early in surgical training represents a significant challenge at present because of training time constraints. The aim of this study was to investigate if an intensive surgical boot camp was effective in transferring skills at the beginning of a surgical training program. New core surgical trainees (n = 58) took part in a 5-day boot camp. There were pretest and posttest assessments of knowledge, technical skills, and confidence levels. The boot camp used simulation and senior surgical faculty to teach a defined range of technical and nontechnical skills. The scores for knowledge (53.8% vs 68.4%, P technical skills (35.9% to 60.6% vs 50.6% to 78.2%, P Skills improvements were still present a year later. The 5-day surgical boot camp proved to be an effective way to rapidly acquire surgical knowledge and skills while increasing the confidence levels of trainees. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Virtual reality training for surgical trainees in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagendran, Myura; Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Loizidou, Marilena; Davidson, Brian R

    2013-08-27

    Standard surgical training has traditionally been one of apprenticeship, where the surgical trainee learns to perform surgery under the supervision of a trained surgeon. This is time-consuming, costly, and of variable effectiveness. Training using a virtual reality simulator is an option to supplement standard training. Virtual reality training improves the technical skills of surgical trainees such as decreased time for suturing and improved accuracy. The clinical impact of virtual reality training is not known. To assess the benefits (increased surgical proficiency and improved patient outcomes) and harms (potentially worse patient outcomes) of supplementary virtual reality training of surgical trainees with limited laparoscopic experience. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Science Citation Index Expanded until July 2012. We included all randomised clinical trials comparing virtual reality training versus other forms of training including box-trainer training, no training, or standard laparoscopic training in surgical trainees with little laparoscopic experience. We also planned to include trials comparing different methods of virtual reality training. We included only trials that assessed the outcomes in people undergoing laparoscopic surgery. Two authors independently identified trials and collected data. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using Review Manager 5 analysis. For each outcome we calculated the mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals based on intention-to-treat analysis. We included eight trials covering 109 surgical trainees with limited laparoscopic experience. Of the eight trials, six compared virtual reality versus no supplementary training. One trial compared virtual reality training versus box-trainer training and versus no supplementary training, and one trial compared

  17. Working hours and roster structures of surgical trainees in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Gregory; Loveday, Benjamin; Harper, Simon; Adams, Brandon; Civil, Ian D; Peters, Matthew

    2010-12-01

    The working hours of surgical trainees are a subject of international debate. Excessive working hours are fatiguing, and compromise performance, learning and work-life balance. However, reducing hours can impact on continuity of care, training experience and service provision. This study defines the current working hours of Australasian trainees, to inform the working hours debate in our regions. An online survey was conducted of all current Australasian trainees. Questions determined hours spent at work (AW) and off-site on-call (OC) per week, and roster structures were evaluated by training year, specialty and location. The response rate was 55.3%. Trainees averaged 61.4 ± 11.7 h/week AW, with 5% working ≥80 h. OC shifts were worked by 73.5%, for an average of 27.8 ± 14.3 h/week. Trainees of all levels worked similar hours (P= 0.10); however, neurosurgical trainees worked longer hours than most other specialties (P hours (P= 0.01) and rural rotations more OC (P Long days (>12 h) were worked by 86%; median frequency 1:4.4 days; median duration 15 h. OC shifts of 24-h duration were worked by 75%; median frequency 1:4.2 days; median sleep: 5-7 h/shift; median uninterrupted sleep: 3-5 h/shift. This study has quantified the working hours and roster structures of Australasian surgical trainees. By international standards, Australasian trainee working hours are around average. However, some rosters demand long hours and/or induce chronic sleep loss, placing some trainees at risk of fatigue. Ongoing efforts are needed to promote safe rostering practices. © 2010 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2010 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  18. Analysing the operative experience of basic surgical trainees in Ireland using a web-based logbook

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lonergan, Peter E

    2011-09-25

    Abstract Background There is concern about the adequacy of operative exposure in surgical training programmes, in the context of changing work practices. We aimed to quantify the operative exposure of all trainees on the National Basic Surgical Training (BST) programme in Ireland and compare the results with arbitrary training targets. Methods Retrospective analysis of data obtained from a web-based logbook (http:\\/\\/www.elogbook.org) for all general surgery and orthopaedic training posts between July 2007 and June 2009. Results 104 trainees recorded 23,918 operations between two 6-month general surgery posts. The most common general surgery operation performed was simple skin excision with trainees performing an average of 19.7 (± 9.9) over the 2-year training programme. Trainees most frequently assisted with cholecystectomy with an average of 16.0 (± 11.0) per trainee. Comparison of trainee operative experience to arbitrary training targets found that 2-38% of trainees achieved the targets for 9 emergency index operations and 24-90% of trainees achieved the targets for 8 index elective operations. 72 trainees also completed a 6-month post in orthopaedics and recorded 7,551 operations. The most common orthopaedic operation that trainees performed was removal of metal, with an average of 2.90 (± 3.27) per trainee. The most common orthopaedic operation that trainees assisted with was total hip replacement, with an average of 10.46 (± 6.21) per trainee. Conclusions A centralised web-based logbook provides valuable data to analyse training programme performance. Analysis of logbooks raises concerns about operative experience at junior trainee level. The provision of adequate operative exposure for trainees should be a key performance indicator for training programmes.

  19. Assessing the Nontechnical Skills of Surgical Trainees: Views of the Theater Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jundi, Wissam; Wild, Jonathan; Ritchie, Judith; Daniels, Sarah; Robertson, Eleanor; Beard, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the views of members of theater teams regarding the proposed introduction of a workplace-based assessment of nontechnical skills of surgeons (NOTSS) into the Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme in the United Kingdom. In addition, the previous training and familiarity of the members of the surgical theater team with the concept and assessment of NOTSS would be evaluated. A regional survey of members of theater teams (consultant surgeons, anesthetists, scrub nurses, and trainees) was performed at 1 teaching and 2 district general hospitals in South Yorkshire. There were 160 respondents corresponding to a response rate of 81%. The majority (77%) were not aware of the NOTSS assessment tool with only 9% of respondents reporting to have previously used the NOTSS tool and just 3% having received training in NOTSS assessment. Overall, 81% stated that assessing NOTSS was as important as assessing technical skills. Trainees attributed less importance to nontechnical skills than the other groups (p ≤ 0.016). Although opinion appears divided as to whether the presence of a consultant surgeon in theater could potentially make it difficult to assess a trainee's leadership skills and decision-making capabilities, overall 60% agree that the routine use of NOTSS assessment would enhance safety in the operating theater and 80% agree that the NOTSS tool should be introduced to assess the nontechnical skills of trainees in theater. However, a significantly lower proportion of trainees (45%) agreed on the latter compared with the other groups (p = 0.001). Our survey demonstrates acceptability among the theater team for the introduction of the NOTSS tool into the surgical curriculum. However, lack of familiarity highlights the importance of faculty training for assessors before such an introduction. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The delivery of general paediatric surgery in Ireland: a survey of higher surgical trainees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, E

    2012-12-01

    The delivery of general paediatric surgery is changing in Ireland. Fewer paediatric surgical procedures are being performed by newly appointed consultant general surgeons, resulting in increased referrals to the specialist paediatric surgeons of uncomplicated general paediatric surgical problems. We surveyed current higher surgical trainees about their views on provision of paediatric surgical services.

  1. Surgical Trainee Feedback-Seeking Behavior in the Context of Workplace-Based Assessment in Clinical Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Anne; Patel, Abhilasha; Fallis, Simon; Rusius, Victoria; Mylvaganam, Seni; Royle, T James; Almond, Max; Markham, Deborah H; Pawlikowska, Teresa R B

    2017-06-01

    To investigate surgical trainee feedback-seeking behaviors-directly asking for feedback (inquiry) and observing and responding to situational clues (monitoring)-in the context of workplace-based assessment (WBA). A hypothetical model of trainee feedback-seeking behavior was developed using existing literature. A questionnaire, incorporating previously validated instruments from organizational psychology, was distributed to general surgical trainees at 23 U.K. hospitals in 2012-2013. Statistical modeling techniques compared the data with 12 predetermined hypothetical relationships between feedback-seeking behaviors and predictive variables (goal orientation, supervisory style) through mediating variables (perceptions of personal benefits and costs of feedback) to develop a final model. Of 235 trainees invited, 178 (76%) responded. Trainees completed 48 WBAs/year on average, and 73% reported receiving feedback via WBA. The final model was of good fit (chi-square/degree of freedom ratio = 1.620, comparative fit index = 0.953, root mean square error of approximation = 0.059). Modeled data showed trainees who perceive personal benefits to feedback use both feedback inquiry and monitoring to engage in feedback interactions. Trainees who seek feedback engage in using WBA. Trainees' goal orientations and perceptions of trainers' supervisory styles as supportive and instrumental are associated with perceived benefits and costs to feedback. Trainees actively engage in seeking feedback and using WBA. Their perceptions of feedback benefits and costs and supervisory style play a role in their feedback-seeking behavior. Encouraging trainees to actively seek feedback by providing specific training and creating a supportive environment for feedback interactions could positively affect their ability to seek feedback.

  2. Engagement and role of surgical trainees in global surgery: Consensus statement and recommendations from the Association of Surgeons in Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Helen M; Fitzgerald, Edward; Gokani, Vimal; Sutton, Paul; Harries, Rhiannon; Bethune, Robert; McDermott, Frank D

    2018-04-01

    There is a wide chasm in access to essential and emergency surgery between high and low/middle income countries (LMICs). Surgeons worldwide are integral to solutions needed to address this imbalance. Involving surgical trainees, who represent the future of surgery, is vital to this endeavour. The Association of Surgeons in Training (ASiT) is an independent charity that support surgical trainees of all ten surgical specialties in the UK and Ireland. ASiT convened a consensus meeting at the ASiT conference in Liverpool 2016 to discuss trainee engagement with global surgery, including potential barriers and solutions. A face-to-face consensus meeting reviewed the engagement of, and roles for, surgical trainees in global surgery at the ASiT Conference (Liverpool, England), March 2016. Participants self-identified based on experience and interest in the field, and included trainees (residents and students) and consultants (attending grade). Following expert review, seven pre-determined core areas were presented for review and debate. Extensive discussion was facilitated by a consultant and a senior surgical trainee, with expertise in global surgery. The draft derived from these initial discussions was circulated to all those who had participated, and an iterative process of revision was undertaken until a final consensus and recommendations were reached. There is increasing interest from trainee surgeons to work in LMICs. There are however, ethical considerations, and it is important that trainees working in LMICs undertake work appropriate to their training stage and competencies. Visiting surgeons must consider the requirements of the hosting centres rather than just their own objectives. If appropriately organised, both short and long-term visits, can enable development of transferable clinical, organisational, research and education skills. A central repository of information on global surgery would be useful to trainees, to complement existing resources. Challenges

  3. Poor Employment Conditions Adversely Affect Mental Health Outcomes Among Surgical Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevric, Jasmina; Papa, Nathan; Perera, Marlon; Rashid, Prem; Toshniwal, Sumeet

    Poor mental health in junior clinicians is prevalent and may lead to poor productivity and significant medical errors. We aimed to provide contemporary data on the mental health of surgical trainees and identify risk factors relating to poorer mental health outcomes. A detailed questionnaire was developed comprising questions based on the 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36) and Physical Activity Questionnaire. Each of the questionnaires has proven validity and reliability in the clinical context. Ethics approval was obtained from the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. The questionnaire was aimed at surgical registrars. We used Physical Activity Questionnaire, SF-36 scores and linear regression to evaluate the effect of putative predictors on mental health. A total of 83 responses were collected during the study period, of which 49 (59%) were from men and 34 (41%) were from women. The mean Mental Component Summary (MCS) score for both sexes was significantly lower than the population mean at ages 25-34 (p work culture and a feeling of a lack of support at work were extremely strong predictors of a lower MCS score (p Hours of overtime worked, particularly unpaid overtime, were also strong predictors of a poorer score. Australian surgical trainees reported lower MCS scores from the SF-36 questionnaire compared to the general population. Increasing working hours, unpaid overtime, poor job security, and job satisfaction were associated with poorer scores among trainees. Interventions providing improved working conditions need to be considered by professional training bodies and employers. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. All rights reserved.

  4. The need for more workshops in laparoscopic surgery and surgical anatomy for European gynaecological oncology trainees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manchanda, Ranjit; Halaska, Michael J; Piek, Jurgen M

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to highlight the relative preference of European gynecologic oncology trainees for workshops that could support and supplement their training needs. METHODS: A Web-based survey was sent to 900 trainees on the European Network of Young Gynaecological...... to the survey, giving a 21% response rate. The 3 most important topics reported were laparoscopic surgery; surgical anatomy, and imaging techniques in gynecologic oncology. The Dendron plot indicated 4 different clusters of workshops (research related skills, supportive ancillary skills, related nonsurgical...... questionnaire was 0.78, which suggests good internal consistency/reliability. CONCLUSIONS: This report for the first time highlights the relative importance and significance European trainees attach to some of their training needs in gynecologic oncology. Laparoscopic surgery, surgical anatomy, and imaging...

  5. Systematic Review of Voluntary Participation in Simulation-Based Laparoscopic Skills Training: Motivators and Barriers for Surgical Trainee Attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostlow, Hannah; Marlow, Nicholas; Babidge, Wendy; Maddern, Guy

    To examine and report on evidence relating to surgical trainees' voluntary participation in simulation-based laparoscopic skills training. Specifically, the underlying motivators, enablers, and barriers faced by surgical trainees with regard to attending training sessions on a regular basis. A systematic search of the literature (PubMed; CINAHL; EMBASE; Cochrane Collaboration) was conducted between May and July 2015. Studies were included on whether they reported on surgical trainee attendance at voluntary, simulation-based laparoscopic skills training sessions, in addition to qualitative data regarding participant's perceived barriers and motivators influencing their decision to attend such training. Factors affecting a trainee's motivation were categorized as either intrinsic (internal) or extrinsic (external). Two randomised control trials and 7 case series' met our inclusion criteria. Included studies were small and generally poor quality. Overall, voluntary simulation-based laparoscopic skills training was not well attended. Intrinsic motivators included clearly defined personal performance goals and relevance to clinical practice. Extrinsic motivators included clinical responsibilities and available free time, simulator location close to clinical training, and setting obligatory assessments or mandated training sessions. The effect of each of these factors was variable, and largely dependent on the individual trainee. The greatest reported barrier to attending voluntary training was the lack of available free time. Although data quality is limited, it can be seen that providing unrestricted access to simulator equipment is not effective in motivating surgical trainees to voluntarily participate in simulation-based laparoscopic skills training. To successfully encourage participation, consideration needs to be given to the factors influencing motivation to attend training. Further research, including better designed randomised control trials and large

  6. Quality of colonoscopy performance among gastroenterology and surgical trainees: a need for common training standards for all trainees?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leyden, J E

    2011-11-01

    Cecal intubation and polyp detection rates are objective measures of colonoscopy performance. Minimum cecal intubation rates greater than 90% have been endorsed by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) and the Joint Advisory Group (JAG) UK. Performance data for medical and surgical trainee endoscopists are limited, and we used endoscopy quality parameters to compare these two groups.

  7. Non-technical skills of surgical trainees and experienced surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostlow, H; Marlow, N; Thomas, M J W; Hewett, P J; Kiermeier, A; Babidge, W; Altree, M; Pena, G; Maddern, G

    2017-05-01

    In addition to technical expertise, surgical competence requires effective non-technical skills to ensure patient safety and maintenance of standards. Recently the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons implemented a new Surgical Education and Training (SET) curriculum that incorporated non-technical skills considered essential for a competent surgeon. This study sought to compare the non-technical skills of experienced surgeons who completed their training before the introduction of SET with the non-technical skills of more recent trainees. Surgical trainees and experienced surgeons undertook a simulated scenario designed to challenge their non-technical skills. Scenarios were video recorded and participants were assessed using the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) scoring system. Participants were divided into subgroups according to years of experience and their NOTSS scores were compared. For most NOTSS elements, mean scores increased initially, peaking around the time of Fellowship, before decreasing roughly linearly over time. There was a significant downward trend in score with increasing years since being awarded Fellowship for six of the 12 NOTSS elements: considering options (score -0·015 units per year), implementing and reviewing decisions (-0·020 per year), establishing a shared understanding (-0·014 per year), setting and maintaining standards (-0·024 per year), supporting others (-0·031 per year) and coping with pressure (-0·015 per year). The drop in NOTSS score was unexpected and highlights that even experienced surgeons are not immune to deficiencies in non-technical skills. Consideration should be given to continuing professional development programmes focusing on non-technical skills, regardless of the level of professional experience. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Surgical Education and Health Care Reform: Defining the Role and Value of Trainees in an Evolving Medical Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayanju, Oluwadamilola M; Aggarwal, Reena; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Ferrone, Cristina R; Massaro, David; Terhune, Kyla P

    2017-03-01

    Health care reform and surgical education are often separated functionally. However, especially in surgery, where resident trainees often spend twice as much time in residency and fellowship than in undergraduate medical education, one must consider their contributions to health care. In this short commentary, we briefly review the status of health care in the United States as well as some of the recent and current changes in graduate medical education that pertain to surgical trainees. This is a perspective piece that draws on the interests and varied background of the multiinstitutional and international group of authors. The authors propose 3 main areas of focus for research and practice- (1) accurately quantifying the care provided currently by trainees, (2) determining impact to trainees and hospital systems of training parameters, focusing on long-term outcomes rather than short-term outcomes, and (3) determining practice models of education that work best for both health care delivery and trainees. The authors propose that surgical education must align itself with rather than separate itself from overall health care reform measures and even individual hospital financial pressures. This should not be seen as additional burden of service, but rather practical education in training as to the pressures trainees will face as future employees. Rethinking the contributions and training of residents and fellows may also synergistically work to impress to hospital administrators that providing better, more focused and applicable education to residents and fellows may have long-term, strategic, positive impacts on institutions.

  9. The laparoscopic performance of novice surgical trainees: testing for acquisition, loss, and reacquisition of psychomotor skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, J A; Zoha, F

    2005-08-01

    It has been suggested that virtual reality (VR) might be useful for the selection of surgical trainees and the measurement of technical performance during preoperative training and retraining. This study was designed to determine whether it is possible to define and measure the acquisition, loss, and reacquisition of psychomotor skills in novice surgical trainees. Novice surgical trainees (NSTs n = 10, junior surgical registrars with little or no prior experience with laparoscopic surgery) were tested and retested after 1 month using the Minimally Invasive Surgical Trainer-Virtual Reality. Two tasks were used: the simple task [stretch diathermy (SD)] and the more complex task [manipulation diathermy (MD)]. The score was derived from the time taken to complete the task and the number of errors that occurred. Acquisition is the difference between the first and last score of the first training session, loss is the difference in score that occurs between the last score of the first training session and the first score of the second training session, and reacquisition is the difference in the first and last scores of the second training session. A performance criterion level was defined for each task by testing a group of experienced laparoscopic surgeons (n = 10). Groups were compared using the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed rank test, with p psychomotor skills in individual NSTs and to compare them with a predefined performance criterion level. This study defines parameters that will be useful in repeated training sessions of NSTs in the preoperative phase of training and during retraining.

  10. Beliefs and Values about Intra-Operative Teaching and Learning: A Case Study of Surgical Teachers and Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Caroline C.; Dodds, Agnes; Nestel, Debra

    2016-01-01

    Surgeons require advanced psychomotor skills, critical decision-making and teamwork skills. Much of surgical skills training involve progressive trainee participation in supervised operations where case variability, operating team interaction and environment affect learning, while surgical teachers face the key challenge of ensuring patient…

  11. Mersey deanery ophthalmology trainees' views of the objective assessment of surgical and technical skills (OSATS) workplace-based assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagkataki, Myrto; Choudhary, Anshoo

    2013-02-01

    Objective assessment of surgical and technical skills (OSATS) workplace-based assessment tool is now mandatory during ophthalmology speciality training in the United Kingdom. The opinions of those undergoing this assessment have not been formally sought. This study evaluated the views of ophthalmology trainees on OSATS assessment as applied to cataract surgery. A questionnaire was circulated to 34 ophthalmology speciality trainees of the Mersey deanery. A total of 28 responses were received. The most positive aspects of the process identified were feedback, learning and opportunity for reflective practice. The most negative aspects were time constraints, assessor's availability and case selection. Of the trainees, 93 % mentioned that no previous agreed action was taken into consideration when filling in subsequent forms and their performance was not discussed in their annual summative assessment. This study highlights important aspects of trainees' perceptions of OSATS. Trainees appreciate the formative aspects of OSATS assessment. Some problems came to light, which can be resolved by specification of standards, training of assessors, and commitment from both trainers and trainees. Changes are needed to allow demonstration of surgical progression with time. The issues identified here will be relevant to other specialities as well. A larger survey would be beneficial.

  12. How to select aspirant laparoscopic surgical trainees: establishing concurrent validity comparing Xitact LS500 index performance scores with standardized psychomotor aptitude test battery scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijven, Marlies P.; Jakimowicz, Jack J.; Carter, Fiona J.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although a controversial topic in medical education, the selection of aspirant surgical trainees is a subject that needs to be addressed. In the view of preventing surgical trainee drop-outs and of appropriate allocation of limited resources, it is an issue critical to the profession.

  13. Communication skills among surgical trainees: Perceptions of residents in a teaching hospital in Northern Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    A Ibrahim; Z I Delia; M E Asuku; T Dahiru

    2011-01-01

    Objective Communication between the surgeon and the patient is a core clinical skill. The ability to communicate with patients and their family members is very important in the optimum care of the surgical patient. Few studies have assessed communication between surgical trainees and their patients in sub-Saharan Africa. In response to this, the communication skills of residents in the department of surgery were evaluated to determine their perception of competency and perceived need for ...

  14. The future of patient safety: Surgical trainees accept virtual reality as a new training tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogelbach Peter

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of virtual reality (VR has gained increasing interest to acquire laparoscopic skills outside the operating theatre and thus increasing patients' safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate trainees' acceptance of VR for assessment and training during a skills course and at their institution. Methods All 735 surgical trainees of the International Gastrointestinal Surgery Workshop 2006–2008, held in Davos, Switzerland, were given a minimum of 45 minutes for VR training during the course. Participants' opinion on VR was analyzed with a standardized questionnaire. Results Fivehundred-twenty-seven participants (72% from 28 countries attended the VR sessions and answered the questionnaires. The possibility of using VR at the course was estimated as excellent or good in 68%, useful in 21%, reasonable in 9% and unsuitable or useless in 2%. If such VR simulators were available at their institution, most course participants would train at least one hour per week (46%, two or more hours (42% and only 12% wouldn't use VR. Similarly, 63% of the participants would accept to operate on patients only after VR training and 55% to have VR as part of their assessment. Conclusion Residents accept and appreciate VR simulation for surgical assessment and training. The majority of the trainees are motivated to regularly spend time for VR training if accessible.

  15. ENT audit and research in the era of trainee collaboratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew E; Hardman, John; Ellis, Matthew; Williams, Richard J

    2018-05-26

    Large surgical audits and research projects are complex and costly to deliver, but increasingly surgical trainees are delivering these projects within formal collaboratives and research networks. Surgical trainee collaboratives are now recognised as a valuable part of the research infrastructure, with many perceived benefits for both the trainees and the wider surgical speciality. In this article, we describe the activity of ENT trainee research collaboratives within the UK, and summarise how INTEGRATE, the UK National ENT Trainee Research Network, successfully delivered a national audit of epistaxis management. The prospective audit collected high-quality data from 1826 individuals, representing 94% of all cases that met the inclusion criteria at the 113 participating sites over the 30-day audit period. It is hoped that the audit has provided a template for subsequent high-quality and cost-effective national studies, and we discuss the future possibilities for ENT trainee research collaboratives.

  16. Communication skills among surgical trainees: Perceptions of residents in a teaching hospital in Northern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Communication between the surgeon and the patient is a core clinical skill. The ability to communicate with patients and their family members is very important in the optimum care of the surgical patient. Few studies have assessed communication between surgical trainees and their patients in sub-Saharan Africa. In response to this, the communication skills of residents in the department of surgery were evaluated to determine their perception of competency and perceived need for training in communication skills as a basis for developing an effective education programme. Method A survey of patient care - related communication skills among surgery residents and assessment of competence, rating the importance and perceived need for training in communication skills. Results Most residents rated their skills as either fairly or extremely competent in all areas except in providing bereavement counseling. They found all skills important and indicated a need for training in them. Senior registrars rated their competence and the importance higher in skills relating to breaking bad news, educating and preparing patients and families for surgery and encouraging them to express their anxieties. (p 0.05. Conclusion Residents face difficult communication challenges with patients and their families. There is a dire need for improved education in communication skills. Understanding the surgical trainees perceptions of patient care related communication skills is the first step in designing an effective education programme.

  17. Assessing the surgical skills of trainees in the operating theatre: a prospective observational study of the methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, J D; Marriott, J; Purdie, H; Crossley, J

    2011-01-01

    To compare user satisfaction and acceptability, reliability and validity of three different methods of assessing the surgical skills of trainees by direct observation in the operating theatre across a range of different surgical specialties and index procedures. A 2-year prospective, observational study in the operating theatres of three teaching hospitals in Sheffield. The assessment methods were procedure-based assessment (PBA), Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) and Non-technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS). The specialties were obstetrics and gynaecology (O&G) and upper gastrointestinal, colorectal, cardiac, vascular and orthopaedic surgery. Two to four typical index procedures were selected from each specialty. Surgical trainees were directly observed performing typical index procedures and assessed using a combination of two of the three methods (OSATS or PBA and NOTSS for O&G, PBA and NOTSS for the other specialties) by the consultant clinical supervisor for the case and the anaesthetist and/or scrub nurse, as well as one or more independent assessors from the research team. Information on user satisfaction and acceptability of each assessment method from both assessor and trainee perspectives was obtained from structured questionnaires. The reliability of each method was measured using generalisability theory. Aspects of validity included the internal structure of each tool and correlation between tools, construct validity, predictive validity, interprocedural differences, the effect of assessor designation and the effect of assessment on performance. Of the 558 patients who were consented, a total of 437 (78%) cases were included in the study: 51 consultant clinical supervisors, 56 anaesthetists, 39 nurses, 2 surgical care practitioners and 4 independent assessors provided 1635 assessments on 85 trainees undertaking the 437 cases. A total of 749 PBAs, 695 NOTSS and 191 OSATSs were performed. Non-O&G clinical supervisors and

  18. The da vinci robot system eliminates multispecialty surgical trainees' hand dominance in open and robotic surgical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalato, Gina M; Shapiro, Edan; Rothberg, Michael B; Bergman, Ari; RoyChoudhury, Arindam; Korets, Ruslan; Patel, Trushar; Badani, Ketan K

    2014-01-01

    Handedness, or the inherent dominance of one hand's dexterity over the other's, is a factor in open surgery but has an unknown importance in robot-assisted surgery. We sought to examine whether the robotic surgery platform could eliminate the effect of inherent hand preference. Residents from the Urology and Obstetrics/Gynecology departments were enrolled. Ambidextrous and left-handed subjects were excluded. After completing a questionnaire, subjects performed three tasks modified from the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery curriculum. Tasks were performed by hand and then with the da Vinci robotic surgical system (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, California). Participants were randomized to begin with using either the left or the right hand, and then switch. Left:right ratios were calculated from scores based on time to task completion. Linear regression analysis was used to determine the significance of the impact of surgical technique on hand dominance. Ten subjects were enrolled. The mean difference in raw score performance between the right and left hands was 12.5 seconds for open tasks and 8 seconds for robotic tasks (Probot tasks, respectively (Probotic and open approaches for raw time scores (Phand, prior robotic experience, and comfort level. These findings remain to be validated in larger cohorts. The robotic technique reduces hand dominance in surgical trainees across all task domains. This finding contributes to the known advantages of robotic surgery.

  19. The European Working Time Directive: a practical review for surgical trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J E F; Caesar, B C

    2012-01-01

    The European Working Time Directive (EWTD) 2003/88/EC is a Union Directive laying down minimum health and safety requirements for the organisation of working time. Originally primarily intended as labour law, its progressive introduction up to full implementation for doctors-in-training in August 2009 has substantially reduced duty-hours and caused widespread concern in surgery. Detrimental effects on the continuity of patient care, reduced availability of medical staff with associated rota difficulties, and the reduction in time for training junior doctors have been widely cited. Craft-specialities such as surgery and those providing an acute service have faced particular challenges. This review offers a practical guide for surgical trainees, explaining the European regulations in the context of current terms and conditions of doctor's employment in the UK. Information is provided on protecting training, opting-out, seeking remuneration for this, and ensuring doctors and patients are protected with appropriate medical indemnity cover in place. Copyright © 2012 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. "Is general surgery still relevant to the subspecialised trainee?" A 10 year comparison of general versus specialty surgical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, C A; Khan, Z; Andrews, E J; Fulton, G J; Redmond, H P; Corrigan, M A

    2015-02-01

    The splintering of general surgery into subspecialties in the past decade has brought into question the relevance of a continued emphasis on traditional general surgical training. With the majority of trainees now expressing a preference to subspecialise early, this study sought to identify if the requirement for proficiency in managing general surgical conditions has reduced over the past decade through comparison of general and specialty surgical admissions at a tertiary referral center. A cross-sectional review of all surgical admissions at Cork University Hospital was performed at three individual time points: 2002, 2007 & 2012. Basic demographic details of both elective & emergency admissions were tabulated & analysed. Categorisation of admissions into specialty relevant or general surgery was made using International guidelines. 11,288 surgical admissions were recorded (2002:2773, 2007:3498 & 2012:5017), showing an increase of 81 % over the 10-year period. While growth in overall service provision was seen, the practice of general versus specialty relevant emergency surgery showed no statistically significant change in practice from 2002 to 2012 (p = 0.87). General surgery was mostly practiced in the emergency setting (84 % of all emergency admissions in 2012) with only 28 % elective admissions for general surgery. A reduction in length of stay was seen in both elective (3.62-2.58 bed days, p = 0.342) & emergency admissions (7.36-5.65, p = 0.026). General surgical emergency work continues to constitute a major part of the specialists practice. These results emphasize the importance of general surgical training even for those trainees committed to sub-specialisation.

  1. Assessing Technical Competence in Surgical Trainees: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, Peter; Louridas, Marisa; Harris, Kenneth A; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2015-06-01

    To systematically examine the literature describing the methods by which technical competence is assessed in surgical trainees. The last decade has witnessed an evolution away from time-based surgical education. In response, governing bodies worldwide have implemented competency-based education paradigms. The definition of competence, however, remains elusive, and the impact of these education initiatives in terms of assessment methods remains unclear. A systematic review examining the methods by which technical competence is assessed was conducted by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, and the Cochrane database of systematic reviews. Abstracts of retrieved studies were reviewed and those meeting inclusion criteria were selected for full review. Data were retrieved in a systematic manner, the validity and reliability of the assessment methods was evaluated, and quality was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation classification. Of the 6814 studies identified, 85 studies involving 2369 surgical residents were included in this review. The methods used to assess technical competence were categorized into 5 groups; Likert scales (37), benchmarks (31), binary outcomes (11), novel tools (4), and surrogate outcomes (2). Their validity and reliability were mostly previously established. The overall Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation for randomized controlled trials was high and low for the observational studies. The definition of technical competence continues to be debated within the medical literature. The methods used to evaluate technical competence predominantly include instruments that were originally created to assess technical skill. Very few studies identify standard setting approaches that differentiate competent versus noncompetent performers; subsequently, this has been identified as an area with great research potential.

  2. Assessing Trainee Surgeons’ Nontechnical Skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanager, Lene; Konge, Lars; Dieckmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Trainee surgeons would benefit from regular, formative assessments to ensure they learn the nontechnical aspects of surgical performance. Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons in Denmark (NOTSSdk) is a tool to assess surgeons' nontechnical skills (NTS) during an operation. The aims...... of this study were to explore which parts of NOTSSdk supervisors use to assess trainee surgeons' NTS, to determine the internal consistency reliability of NOTSSdk, and to estimate how many operations were needed to obtain reliable ratings of a trainee surgeon's NTS. METHODS: A total of 12 supervisors from 2...

  3. Improving core surgical training in a major trauma centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Daniel L J; Bryson, David J; Ollivere, Ben J; Forward, Daren P

    2016-06-01

    English Major Trauma Centres (MTCs) were established in April 2012. Increased case volume and complexity has influenced trauma and orthopaedic (T&O) core surgical training in these centres. To determine if T&O core surgical training in MTCs meets Joint Committee on Surgical Training (JCST) quality indicators including performance of T&O operative procedures and consultant supervised session attendance. An audit cycle assessing the impact of a weekly departmental core surgical trainee rota. The rota included allocated timetabled sessions that optimised clinical and surgical learning opportunities. Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme (ISCP) records for T&O core surgical trainees at a single MTC were analysed for 8 months pre and post rota introduction. Outcome measures were electronic surgical logbook evidence of leading T&O operative procedures and consultant validated work-based assessments (WBAs). Nine core surgical trainees completed a 4 month MTC placement pre and post introduction of the core surgical trainee rota. Introduction of core surgical trainee rota significantly increased the mean number of T&O operative procedures led by a core surgical trainee during a 4 month MTC placement from 20.2 to 34.0 (pcore surgical trainee during a 4 month MTC placement was significantly increased (0.3 vs 2.4 [p=0.04]). Those of dynamic hip screw fixation (2.3 vs 3.6) and ankle fracture fixation (0.7 vs 1.6) were not. Introduction of a core surgical trainee rota significantly increased the mean number of consultant validated WBAs completed by a core surgical trainee during a 4 month MTC placement from 1.7 to 6.6 (pcore surgical trainee rota utilising a 'problem-based' model can significantly improve T&O core surgical training in MTCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of subsequent publication and impact of abstracts presented at the Sir Peter Freyer Surgical Symposium: Focus on the Plenary Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O' Connor, D J; Lowery, A J; Kearney, D; McAnena, O J; Sweeney, K J; Kerin, M J

    2015-09-01

    The quality of abstracts presented at a conference reflects the academic activity and research productivity of the surgical/scientific association concerned. The abstract to publication rate (44.5 % internationally), is an important indicator of the quality of presented research. To evaluate the publication rate and impact of abstracts presented at the plenary session of the Sir Peter Freyer Surgical Symposium over a 25-year period (1989-2014), and identify factors influencing publication. Plenary abstracts were identified from abstract books of the Symposium from 1989-2014. The authors, institution, subspecialty and research subject were recorded. A Medline search with name of the first and last author, key words and content of all abstracts was conducted to identify related publications. The impact factor (IF) of the journal and the time to publication was recorded. 298 presented abstracts resulted in 168 publications (publication rate: 56 %). Basic Science research accounted for 80 % (n = 237) of the total number of presentations with the remaining 20 % (n = 61) being categorised as clinical research. Overall, cancer research accounted for 48 % of presented work. The average time to publication was 2 ± 7 years, while 11 % of all published studies achieved publication in the year of the symposium. The median impact factor for published research was 3.558 (IF range 0-39). These results indicate that the quality of papers presented at the Sir Peter Freyer Surgical Symposium compares favourably with international equivalents, making this meeting an important forum for Irish Academic Surgery.

  5. Trainee ophthalmologists' opinions on ways to improve cataract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To know the opinions of trainee ophthalmologists on ways to improve cataract surgical rate (CSR) with a view to having insight into actions that should be of high priority for achieving this improvement. Methods: A survey of 27 trainee ophthalmologists using structured self-administered questionnaire. Results: ...

  6. Surgeons' and surgical trainees' acute stress in real operations or simulation: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Konstantinos; Larentzakis, Andreas; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G

    2017-12-01

    Acute stress in surgery is ubiquitous and has an immediate impact on surgical performance and patient safety. Surgeons react with several coping strategies; however, they recognise the necessity of formal stress management training. Thus, stress assessment is a direct need. Surgical simulation is a validated standardised training milieu designed to replicate real-life situations. It replicates stress, prevents biases, and provides objective metrics. The complexity of stress mechanisms makes stress measurement difficult to quantify and interpret. This systematic review aims to identify studies that have used acute stress estimation measurements in surgeons or surgical trainees during real operations or surgical simulation, and to collectively present the rationale of these tools, with special emphasis in salivary markers. A search strategy was implemented to retrieve relevant articles from MEDLINE and SCOPUS databases. The 738 articles retrieved were reviewed for further evaluation according to the predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Thirty-three studies were included in this systematic review. The methods for acute stress assessment varied greatly among studies with the non-invasive techniques being the most commonly used. Subjective and objective tests for surgeons' acute stress assessment are being presented. There is a broad spectrum of acute mental stress assessment tools in the surgical field and simulation and salivary biomarkers have recently gained popularity. There is a need to maintain a consistent methodology in future research, towards a deeper understanding of acute stress in the surgical field. Copyright © 2017 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gender and Specialty Influences on Personal and Professional Life Among Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Ailín C; Wren, Sherry M; McNamara, Deborah A

    2017-11-02

    This study aimed to determine the impact of surgical training on lifestyle and parenthood, and to assess for gender-based workplace issues. The effects of a surgical career on lifestyle are difficult to quantify and may vary between male and female doctors. A gender gap is present in the highest tiers of the profession, and reasons why women do not attain senior positions are complex but likely relate to factors beyond merit alone. An anonymous Web-based survey was distributed to Irish surgical and nonsurgical trainees. They were asked questions regarding family planning, pregnancy outcomes, parenthood, and gender issues in the workplace, with results analyzed by sex and specialty. Four hundred sixty trainees responded with a response rate of 53.0%; almost two thirds were female. Female trainee surgeons were less likely to have children than their male counterparts (22.5% vs 40.0%, P = 0.0215). Pregnant surgical trainees were more likely to have adverse pregnancy events than the partners of their male contemporaries (65.0% vs 11.5%, P = 0.0002), or than their female nonsurgical colleagues (P = 0.0329). Women were more likely to feel that they had missed out on a job opportunity (P gender (P genders.

  8. Open surgical simulation--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jennifer; Khatib, Manaf; Bello, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Surgical simulation has benefited from a surge in interest over the last decade as a result of the increasing need for a change in the traditional apprentice model of teaching surgery. However, despite the recent interest in surgical simulation as an adjunct to surgical training, most of the literature focuses on laparoscopic, endovascular, and endoscopic surgical simulation with very few studies scrutinizing open surgical simulation and its benefit to surgical trainees. The aim of this review is to summarize the current standard of available open surgical simulators and to review the literature on the benefits of open surgical simulation. Open surgical simulators currently used include live animals, cadavers, bench models, virtual reality, and software-based computer simulators. In the current literature, there are 18 different studies (including 6 randomized controlled trials and 12 cohort studies) investigating the efficacy of open surgical simulation using live animal, bench, and cadaveric models in many surgical specialties including general, cardiac, trauma, vascular, urologic, and gynecologic surgery. The current open surgical simulation studies show, in general, a significant benefit of open surgical simulation in developing the surgical skills of surgical trainees. However, these studies have their limitations including a low number of participants, variable assessment standards, and a focus on short-term results often with no follow-up assessment. The skills needed for open surgical procedures are the essential basis that a surgical trainee needs to grasp before attempting more technical procedures such as laparoscopic procedures. In this current climate of medical practice with reduced hours of surgical exposure for trainees and where the patient's safety and outcome is key, open surgical simulation is a promising adjunct to modern surgical training, filling the void between surgeons being trained in a technique and a surgeon achieving fluency in that

  9. Trainee underperformance: a guide to achieving resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Prem; Grills, Richard; Kuan, Melvyn; Klein, Deborah

    2015-05-01

    Underperformance and the disharmony it can cause are not commonly faced by trainees. However, when it occurs, a process to recognize and manage the issues compassionately must be put in place. A literature review was undertaken to outline processes and themes in addressing and resolving these types of issues. A PubMed search using 'surgical underperformance' and 'remedial teaching' was used as a broad template to find papers that illustrated key concepts. One thousand four hundred and fifteen papers were identified. In papers where the titles were in line with the stated topic, 294 abstracts were reviewed. Key papers were used to develop themes. Additional cross-referenced papers were also included where relevant. There can be a variety of reasons for trainee underperformance. The root cause is not always clear. Disharmony can result in a surgical unit during this time. The involved trainee as well as the members of the clinical unit may experience a variety of stressors. A systematic process of management can be used to evaluate the situation and bring some resolution to difficulties in working relationships. Early constructive intervention improves outcomes. There should be a process to systematically and compassionately resolve underlying issues. This paper outlines the disharmony that can result from trainee underperformance and offers guidance for resolution to those involved. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  10. A modern approach to teaching pancreatic surgery: stepwise pancreatoduodenectomy for trainees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marangoni, Gabriele

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) has always been regarded as one of the most technically demanding abdominal procedures, even when carried out in high-volume centers by experienced surgeons. The reduction in higher surgical trainees working hours has led to reduced exposure, and consequently less experience in operative procedures. Furthermore, trainees have also become victims as health care systems striving for operating room efficiency, have attempted to reduce procedure duration by encouraging consultant led procedures at the expense of training. A strategy therefore needs to be developed to match the ability of the trainee with the complexity of the surgical procedure. As a PD can be deconstructed into a number of different steps, it may indeed be an ideal training operation for varying levels of ability.

  11. Mobile surgical skills education unit: a new concept in surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Faisal M; Hseino, Hazem; Hill, Arnold D K; Kavanagh, Eamon; Traynor, Oscar

    2011-08-01

    Basic surgical skills are an integral part of surgical training. Simulation-based surgical training offers an opportunity both to trainees and trainers to learn and teach surgical skills outside the operating room in a nonpatient, nonstressed environment. However, widespread adoption of simulation technology especially in medical education is prohibited by its inherent higher cost, limited space, and interruptions to clinical duties. Mobile skills laboratory has been proposed as a means to address some of these limitations. A new program is designed by the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), in an approach to teach its postgraduate basic surgical trainees the necessary surgical skills, by making the use of mobile innovative simulation technology in their own hospital settings. In this article, authors describe the program and students response to the mobile surgical skills being delivered in the region of their training hospitals and by their own regional consultant trainers.

  12. Sixth BHD Symposium and First International Upstate Kidney Cancer Symposium: latest scientific and clinical discoveries

    OpenAIRE

    Bratslavsky, Gennady; Woodford, Mark R.; Daneshvar, Michael; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    The Sixth BHD Symposium and First International Upstate Kidney Cancer Symposium concluded in September 2015, in Syracuse, NY, USA. The program highlighted recent findings in a variety of areas, including drug development, therapeutics and surgical management of patients with BHD and multi-focal renal tumors, as well as multidisciplinary approaches for patients with localized, locally advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  13. Sixth BHD Symposium and First International Upstate Kidney Cancer Symposium: latest scientific and clinical discoveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratslavsky, Gennady; Woodford, Mark R; Daneshvar, Michael; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-03-29

    The Sixth BHD Symposium and First International Upstate Kidney Cancer Symposium concluded in September 2015, in Syracuse, NY, USA. The program highlighted recent findings in a variety of areas, including drug development, therapeutics and surgical management of patients with BHD and multi-focal renal tumors, as well as multidisciplinary approaches for patients with localized, locally advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  14. Sensitizing health-care workers and trainees to create a nondiscriminatory health-care environment for surgical care of HIV-Infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeptiman James

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV transmission creates barriers in the surgical health care of patients with HIV infection. Poor awareness, prevalent misconceptions, and associated stigma lead to discrimination against HIV-infected patients. This study was carried out to assess effectiveness of a “HIV awareness program” (HAP to educate and motivate health-care workers to provide equitable and ethical health care to HIV-infected patients. Methodology: An interventional study was conducted at a secondary level mission hospital in Central India from April 2014 to August 2015. Change in knowledge, awareness, and attitude following a multimedia “HAP” was analyzed with a “pre- and posttest design.” Seventy-four staffs and trainees participated in the program. Z-test and t-test were used to check the statistical significance of the data. Results: The mean pretest score was 19.31 (standard deviation [SD]: 6.0, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 17.923–20.697 and the mean posttest score was 30.84 (SD: 4.8, 95% CI: 29.714–31.966. This difference was statistically significant at the 5% level with P < 0.001. Conclusions: “HAP” was effective in changing the knowledge, awareness, and attitude of the staffs and trainees of the secondary hospital toward surgical care of HIV-infected patients.

  15. Surgical simulation in orthopaedic skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atesok, Kivanc; Mabrey, Jay D; Jazrawi, Laith M; Egol, Kenneth A

    2012-07-01

    Mastering rapidly evolving orthopaedic surgical techniques requires a lengthy period of training. Current work-hour restrictions and cost pressures force trainees to face the challenge of acquiring more complex surgical skills in a shorter amount of time. As a result, alternative methods to improve the surgical skills of orthopaedic trainees outside the operating room have been developed. These methods include hands-on training in a laboratory setting using synthetic bones or cadaver models as well as software tools and computerized simulators that enable trainees to plan and simulate orthopaedic operations in a three-dimensional virtual environment. Laboratory-based training offers potential benefits in the development of basic surgical skills, such as using surgical tools and implants appropriately, achieving competency in procedures that have a steep learning curve, and assessing already acquired skills while minimizing concerns for patient safety, operating room time, and financial constraints. Current evidence supporting the educational advantages of surgical simulation in orthopaedic skills training is limited. Despite this, positive effects on the overall education of orthopaedic residents, and on maintaining the proficiency of practicing orthopaedic surgeons, are anticipated.

  16. Surgical training in your hands: organising a skills course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnand, Henry; Mutimer, Jon

    2012-12-01

    The advent of simulated surgical skills courses has brought dynamic changes to the traditional approach to acquiring practical skills in surgery. Teaching is a core part of the surgical profession, and any trainee can be involved in the organisation of skills training courses. This paper outlines the importance of organising surgical skills courses for trainees, and provides a practical guide on how to do so within busy clinical environments. The paper examines how to plan a course, how to design the programme, and provides tips on faculty staff requirements, venue, finance and participants, with additional suggestions for assessment and evaluation. We recommend the organisation of skills courses to any trainee. By following key ground rules, the surgical trainee can enable the acquisition of advanced learning opportunities and the ability to demonstrate valuable organisational skills. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  17. Minimal Access Surgery Educational Needs of Trainees from Africa: Perspectives from an Asian Training Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, J I; Mishra, R K

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of minimal access surgery (MAS) in the last three decades brought new dimensions to surgical training. The sole role of traditional apprenticeship training model was challenged and adjunctive surgical simulation models were introduced. Knowledge of the trainees' educational needs is important in designing MAS training curriculum. To study the MAS educational needs of trainees from Africa, review MAS training models and offer recommendations for MAS training. Data was obtained from questionnaires filled by trainees from Africa who attended the monthly MAS training at the World Laparoscopy Hospital, India from October 2013 to May 2014 about their MAS educational needs. There were 38 trainees from different parts of Africa (Central, East, North, South and West Africa) with average age of 41.92 ± 8.67 years (minimum-28 years and maximum 63 years) and majority were males (92%). General surgeons constituted 57% while Gynaecologists were 41%. Only a quarter have MAS training integrated in their training curriculum. Box trainers, Animal models, live human surgeries and virtual reality simulation were the commonest models used in previous trainings and favoured in the educational needs for MAS training. Using cadaveric models and self sponsorship were deemphasised. Widespread application of MAS, globalisation and trainees educational needs call for establishing training programmes. Box trainers, animal models, live human surgeries and virtual reality simulators should be adopted and a synergy between Postgraduate surgical programmes, biomedical industry, universities and trainees will facilitate the setting of MAS skills laboratories and programmes.

  18. Duty hours restriction for our surgical trainees: An ethical obligation or a bad idea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adin, Christopher A; Fogle, Callie A; Marks, Steven L

    2018-04-01

    To ensure patient safety and protect the well-being of interns and residents, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) issued guidelines in 2003 limiting the working hours of physician trainees. Although many supported the goals of the ACGME, institutions struggled to restructure their programs and hire staff required by this unfunded mandate. Numerous studies have analyzed the effects of duty hours restrictions on patient outcomes and physician training over the past 15 years. Most agree that duty hours restrictions improved well-being of house officers, but these improvements came at the expense of continuity, and patient hand-offs led to medical errors. Effects on resident training are program specific, with duty hours restrictions having the most deleterious effects on surgical disciplines. Because veterinary specialists assume a similar role in providing 24-hour patient care, interns and residents face work-related stress as a result of extended working hours, on-call duty, and an increasingly complex caseload. The North Carolina State Veterinary Hospital is staffed by approximately 100 house officers representing almost every veterinary specialty group. We surveyed departing house officers regarding their quality of life and training experience. Sixty-six percent of interns and residents reported that they do not have time to take care of personal needs, and 57%-62% felt neutral or dissatisfied with their mental and physical well-being. Most trainees believed that decreased duty hours would improve learning, but 42% believed that decreased caseload would be detrimental to training. Veterinary educators must consider post-DVM veterinary training guidelines that maintain patient care with a good learning environment for interns and residents. © 2018 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  19. Does direct observation of procedural skills reflect trainee's progress in otolaryngology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Z; Hayden, L; Muthuswamy, K; Ziprin, P; Darzi, A; Tolley, N S

    2014-06-01

    UK surgical trainees are required to undertake work-based assessments each year in order to progress in their training. Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS) is one of these assessments. We aim to investigate the validity of DOPS in assessing otolaryngology trainees at all levels. A retrospective search of the portfolios of all otolaryngology trainees in North Thames was carried out to identify otolaryngology-specific DOPS. A score (Cs) was calculated for each DOPS based on the percentage of satisfactorily-rated items. The overall performance rating (Ps) was analysed as a separate variable and compared with Cs. The Ps and Cs results were then compared across trainee grades and levels within each grade: Core trainees (CT1-CT2) and specialty trainees (ST3-ST8). Seven hundred and sixty-seven otolaryngology DOPS were completed between August 2008 and September 2013. The tool was found to be reliable and internally consistent. Trainees in ST grade had higher Cs and Ps scores than CT grade (P Otolaryngology DOPS is a useful tool in assessing otolaryngology trainees especially from CT1-ST3 level. DOPS can also differentiate between junior and senior trainees. However, it was not able to demonstrate progress at levels above ST3, most likely due to the simplicity of the procedures which trainees tend to master in the first few years of training. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. E-learning teaches attendings "how to" objectively assess pediatric urology trainees' surgery skills for orchiopexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Nicolas; Maizels, Max; Farhat, Walid; Smith, Edwin; Liu, Dennis; Chua, Michael; Bhanji, Yasin

    2018-04-01

    Established methods to train pediatric urology surgery by residency training programs require updating in response to administrative changes such as new, reduced trainee duty hours. Therefore, new objective methods must be developed to teach trainees. We approached this need by creating e-learning to teach attendings objective assessment of trainee skills using the Zwisch scale, an established assessment tool. The aim of this study was to identify whether or not e-learning is an appropriate platform for effective teaching of this assessment tool, by assessing inter-rater correlation of assessments made by the attendings after participation in the e-learning. Pediatric orchiopexy was used as the index case. An e-learning tool was created to teach attending surgeons objective assessment of trainees' surgical skills. First, e-learning content was created which showed the assessment method videotape of resident surgery done in the operating room. Next, attendings were enrolled to e-learn this method. Finally, the ability of enrollees to assess resident surgery skill performance was tested. Namely, test video was made showing a trainee performing inguinal orchiopexy. All enrollees viewed the same online videos. Assessments of surgical skills (Zwisch scale) were entered into an online survey. Data were analyzed by intercorrelation coefficient kappa analysis (strong correlation was ICC ≥ 0.7). A total of 11 attendings were enrolled. All accessed the online learning and then made assessments of surgical skills trainees showed on videotapes. The e-learning comprised three modules: 1. "Core concepts," in which users learned the assessment tool methods; 2. "Learn to assess," in which users learned how to assess by watching video clips, explaining the assessment method; and 3. "Test," in which users tested their skill at making assessments by watching video clips and then actively inputting their ratings of surgical and global skills as viewed in the video clips (Figure

  1. Cost-effective framework for basic surgical skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Deng-Jin; Wen, Chan; Yang, Ai-Jun; Zhu, Zhi-Li; Lei, Yan; Lan, Yang-Jun; Huang, Qing-Yuan; Hou, Xiao-Yu

    2013-06-01

    The importance of basic surgical skills is entirely agreed among surgical educators. However, restricted by ethical issues, finance etc, the basic surgical skills training is increasingly challenged. Increasing cost gives an impetus to the development of cost-effective training models to meet the trainees' acquisition of basic surgical skills. In this situation, a cost-effective training framework was formed in our department and introduced here. Each five students were assigned to a 'training unit'. The training was implemented weekly for 18 weeks. The framework consisted of an early, a transitional, an integrative stage and a surgical skills competition. Corresponding training modules were selected and assembled scientifically at each stage. The modules comprised campus intranet databases, sponge benchtop, nonliving animal tissue, local dissection specimens and simulating reality operations. The training outcomes used direct observation of procedural skills as an assessment tool. The training data of 50 trainees who were randomly selected in each year from 2006 to 2011 year, were retrospectively analysed. An excellent and good rate of the surgical skills is from 82 to 88%, but there is no significant difference among 6 years (P > 0.05). The skills scores of the contestants are markedly higher than those of non-contestants (P < 0.05). The average training cost per trainee is about $21.85-34.08. The present training framework is reliable, feasible, repeatable and cost-effective. The skills competition can promote to improve the surgical skills level of trainees. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  2. Understanding Surgical Resident and Fellow Perspectives on Their Operative Performance Feedback Needs: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Ricardo J; Sarmiento, Samuel; Meyer, Meredith L; Rosson, Gedge D; Cooney, Damon S; Lifchez, Scott D; Cooney, Carisa M

    2018-04-20

    Operative performance feedback is essential for surgical training. We aimed to understand surgical trainees' views on their operative performance feedback needs and to characterize feedback to elucidate factors affecting its value from the resident perspective. Using a qualitative research approach, 2 research fellows conducted semistructured, one-on-one interviews with surgical trainees. We analyzed recurring themes generated during interviews related to feedback characteristics, as well as the extent to which performance rating tools can help meet trainees' operative feedback needs. Departments or divisions of general or plastic surgery at 9 US academic institutions. Surgical residents and clinical fellows in general or plastic surgery. We conducted 30 interviews with 9 junior residents, 14 senior residents, and 7 clinical fellows. Eighteen (60%) participants were in plastic and 12 (40%) were in general surgery. Twenty-four participants (80%) reported feedback as very or extremely important during surgical training. All trainees stated that verbal, face-to-face feedback is the most valuable, especially if occurring during (92%) or immediately after (65%) cases. Of those trainees using performance rating tools (74%), most (57%) expressed positive views about them but wanted the tools to complement and not replace verbal feedback in surgical education. Trainees value feedback more if received within 1 week or the case. Verbal, face-to-face feedback is very or extremely important to surgical trainees. Residents and fellows prefer to receive feedback during or immediately after a case and continue to value feedback if received within 1 week of the event. Performance rating tools can be useful for providing formative feedback and documentation but should not replace verbal, face-to-face feedback. Considering trainee views on feedback may help reduce perceived gaps in feedback demand-versus-supply in surgical training, which may be essential to overcoming current

  3. A Descriptive Analysis of the Use of Workplace-Based Assessments in UK Surgical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalhoub, Joseph; Santos, Cristel; Bussey, Maria; Eardley, Ian; Allum, William

    2015-01-01

    Workplace-based assessments (WBAs) were introduced formally in the UK in 2007. The aim of the study was to describe the use of WBAs by UK surgical trainees and examine variations by training region, specialty, and level of training. The database of the Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme was examined for WBAs between August 2007 and July 2013, with in-depth analysis of 2 periods: August 2011 to July 2012 and August 2012 to July 2013. The numbers of validated WBAs per trainee per year increased more than 7-fold, from median 6 per trainee in 2007 to 2008, to 39 in 2011 to 2012, and 44 in 2012 to 2013. In the period 2011 to 2012, 58.4% of core trainees completed the recommended 40 WBAs, with only 38.1% of specialty trainees achieving 40 validated WBAs. In the period 2012 to 2013, these proportions increased to 67.7% and 57.0% for core and specialty trainees, respectively. Core trainees completed more WBAs per year than specialty trainees in the same training region. London core trainees completed the highest numbers of WBAs in both the periods 2011 to 2012 (median 67) and 2012 to 2013 (median 74). There was a peak in WBAs completed by London specialty trainees in the period 2012 to 2013 (median 63). The most validated WBAs were completed by ST1/CT1 (specialty surgical training year, core surgical training year), with a gradual decrease in median WBAs to ST4, followed by a plateau; in the period 2012 to 2013, there was an increase in WBAs at ST8. Core surgical trainees complete ~50% "operative" (procedure-based assessment/direct observation of procedural skills) and ~50% "nonoperative" assessments (case-based discussion/clinical evaluation exercise). During specialty training, procedure-based assessments represented ~46% of WBAs, direct observation of procedural skills 11.2%, case-based discussion ~23%, and clinical evaluation exercise ~15%. UK surgical trainees are, on an average, undertaking 1 WBA per week. Variation exists in use of WBAs between training

  4. Educational system of laparoscopic gastrectomy for trainee-how to teach, how to learn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaito, Akio; Kinoshita, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    The feasibility of laparoscopic gastrectomy (LG) has been gradually proven by several scientific works, however, proper training method for this kind of surgery are still under investigation and debate. Here we report our educational system of LG to enhance the skill of young surgeons in our hospital. Our training program for trainee consists of 3 years of junior residency and 2 years of senior residency programs, requiring 5 years in total. In order to master LG, three following factors seem to be essential: learning, practice and experience. Learning means that trainee study techniques and concepts by educational materials, such as operative videos, lectures, or textbook. Practice means animal laboratory training or dry box training to acquire hand-eye coordination or bi-hand coordination, leading to precise movement of surgical devices. Experience means actual on-site training, participating in clinical LG as scopist, assistant or operator. In the actual surgery, we have some common principles for scopist, assistant and operator, respectively, and these principles are shared by entire surgical team. These principles are transmitted from trainer to trainee using simple keywords repeatedly. In conclusion, combination and balance of the three factors, learning, practice and experience are necessary to efficiently advance education of LG for trainee and may leads to benefits for gastric cancer patients.

  5. Is laparoscopic appendicectomy a safe procedure for trainees in the peripheral hospital setting?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Emmanuel, A

    2011-10-01

    Laparoscopic appendicectomy has become standard in the treatment of acute appendicitis in most hospitals in Ireland. Studies have shown that it is a safe procedure for trainees to perform. However, these studies were conducted in university teaching hospitals whereas a significant proportion of training in Ireland takes place in peripheral hospitals which provide a different training environment. The aim of this study was to determine whether laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for surgical trainees to perform in a peripheral hospital setting. A retrospective analysis was performed of appendicectomies carried out at a peripheral hospital over a 12 month period. Comparisons were made between consultant surgeons and trainees for a variety of outcomes. Of 155 appendicectomies, 129 (83.2%) were performed laparoscopically, of which 10 (7.75%) were converted to open. Consultants performed 99 (77%) laparoscopic appendicectomies. There were no statistically significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (19 (19.2%) vs. 4 (13.3%), p = 0.46), mean length of hospital stay (4.7 +\\/- 4.0 vs. 3.4 +\\/- 3.3 days, p = 0.13), or rate of conversion to open operation (9 (9.1%) vs. 1 (3.3%), p = 0.45). For cases of complicated appendicitis there were no significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (12 vs. 2, p = 0.40) or length of hospital stay (6.4 +\\/- 3.9 vs. 4.7 +\\/- 5.6 days, p = 0.27). We conclude that laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for trainees to perform in the peripheral hospital setting and should be incorporated into surgical training programs at an early stage of training.

  6. Integrated surgical academic training in the UK: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blencowe, Natalie S; Glasbey, James C; McElnay, Philip J; Bhangu, Aneel; Gokani, Vimal J; Harries, Rhiannon L

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to explore variations in the provision of integrated academic surgical training across the UK. This is an online cross-sectional survey (consisting of 44 items with a range of free-text, binomial and 5-point Likert scale responses) developed by the Association of Surgeons in Training. A self-reported survey instrument was distributed to academic surgical trainees across the UK (n=276). 143 (51.9%) responses were received (81% male, median age: 34 years), spanning all UK regions and surgical specialties. Of the 143 trainees, 29 were core trainees (20.3%), 99 were specialty trainees (69.2%) and 15 (10.5%) described themselves as research fellows. The structure of academic training varied considerably, with under a third of trainees receiving guaranteed protected time for research. Despite this, however, 53.1% of the respondents reported to be satisfied with how their academic training was organised. Covering clinical duties during academic time occurred commonly (72.7%). Although most trainees (n=88, 61.5%) met with their academic supervisor at least once a month, six (4.2%) never had an academic supervisory meeting. Most trainees (n=90, 62.9%) occupied a full-time rota slot and only 9.1% (n=13) described their role as 'supernumerary'. Although 58.7% (n=84) of the trainees were satisfied with their clinical competence, 37.8% (n=54) felt that clinical time focused more on service provision than the acquisition of technical skills. 58 (40.6%) had experienced some form of negative sentiment relating to their status as an academic trainee. Integrated academic training presents unique challenges and opportunities within surgery. This survey has identified variation in the quality of current programmes, meaning that the future provision of integrated surgical academic training should be carefully considered. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is

  7. The impact of the European Working Time Regulations on Ophthalmic Specialist Training--a national trainee survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gallagher, M K; Lewis, G; Mercieca, K; Moutray, T

    2013-01-01

    To assess ophthalmic trainees' perspective of the impact of the European Working Time Regulations (EWTR) on their training. All trainees in ophthalmology in the UK were emailed a link to an electronic survey asking about their experiences of the EWTR. 324 trainees (46% of those invited) responded to the survey. 44.4% of trainees reported that their posts were compliant with the EWTR. 40.7% felt that training had been adversely affected. 49.1% thought that ophthalmic trainees should opt out of the EWTR to work more than 48 h per week, with 57 the mean number of hours suggested appropriate. Many ophthalmic trainees in the United Kingdom are working in rotas which are not compliant with the European Working Time Directive. Many trainees feel that implementation of the EWTD has had a negative effect on training and feel it would be acceptable to work a higher number of hours per week. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Defining decision making: a qualitative study of international experts' views on surgical trainee decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennie, Sarah C; van Rij, Andre M; Jaye, Chrystal; Hall, Katherine H

    2011-06-01

    Decision making is a key competency of surgeons; however, how best to assess decisions and decision makers is not clearly established. The aim of the present study was to identify criteria that inform judgments about surgical trainees' decision-making skills. A qualitative free text web-based survey was distributed to recognized international experts in Surgery, Medical Education, and Cognitive Research. Half the participants were asked to identify features of good decisions, characteristics of good decision makers, and essential factors for developing good decision-making skills. The other half were asked to consider these areas in relation to poor decision making. Template analysis of free text responses was performed. Twenty-nine (52%) experts responded to the survey, identifying 13 categories for judging a decision and 14 for judging a decision maker. Twelve features/characteristics overlapped (considered, informed, well timed, aware of limitations, communicated, knowledgeable, collaborative, patient-focused, flexible, able to act on the decision, evidence-based, and coherent). Fifteen categories were generated for essential factors leading to development of decision-making skills that fall into three major themes (personal qualities, training, and culture). The categories compiled from the perspectives of good/poor were predominantly the inverse of each other; however, the weighting given to some categories varied. This study provides criteria described by experts when considering surgical decisions, decision makers, and development of decision-making skills. It proposes a working definition of a good decision maker. Understanding these criteria will enable clinical teachers to better recognize and encourage good decision-making skills and identify poor decision-making skills for remediation.

  9. Identifying Opportunities for Virtual Reality Simulation in Surgical Education: A Review of the Proceedings from the Innovation, Design, and Emerging Alliances in Surgery (IDEAS) Conference: VR Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasky, Jaisa; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Seymour, Neal E.; Magee, J. Harvey; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Lin, Ming C.; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Brunt, L. Michael; Schwaitzberg, Steven D.; Cao, Caroline G. L.; De, Suvranu; Jones, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a review of the state of virtual reality (VR) simulation technology, to identify areas of surgical education that have the greatest potential to benefit from it, and to identify challenges to implementation. Background Data Simulation is an increasingly important part of surgical training. VR is a developing platform for using simulation to teach technical skills, behavioral skills, and entire procedures to trainees and practicing surgeons worldwide. Questions exist regarding the science behind the technology and most effective usage of VR simulation. A symposium was held to address these issues. Methods Engineers, educators, and surgeons held a conference in November 2013 both to review the background science behind simulation technology and to create guidelines for its use in teaching and credentialing trainees and surgeons in practice. Results Several technologic challenges were identified that must be overcome in order for VR simulation to be useful in surgery. Specific areas of student, resident, and practicing surgeon training and testing that would likely benefit from VR were identified: technical skills, team training and decision-making skills, and patient safety, such as in use of electrosurgical equipment. Conclusions VR simulation has the potential to become an essential piece of surgical education curriculum but depends heavily on the establishment of an agreed upon set of goals. Researchers and clinicians must collaborate to allocate funding toward projects that help achieve these goals. The recommendations outlined here should guide further study and implementation of VR simulation. PMID:25925424

  10. Identifying Opportunities for Virtual Reality Simulation in Surgical Education: A Review of the Proceedings from the Innovation, Design, and Emerging Alliances in Surgery (IDEAS) Conference: VR Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasky, Jaisa; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Seymour, Neal E; Magee, J Harvey; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Lin, Ming C; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Brunt, L Michael; Schwaitzberg, Steven D; Cao, Caroline G L; De, Suvranu; Jones, Daniel B

    2015-10-01

    To conduct a review of the state of virtual reality (VR) simulation technology, to identify areas of surgical education that have the greatest potential to benefit from it, and to identify challenges to implementation. Simulation is an increasingly important part of surgical training. VR is a developing platform for using simulation to teach technical skills, behavioral skills, and entire procedures to trainees and practicing surgeons worldwide. Questions exist regarding the science behind the technology and most effective usage of VR simulation. A symposium was held to address these issues. Engineers, educators, and surgeons held a conference in November 2013 both to review the background science behind simulation technology and to create guidelines for its use in teaching and credentialing trainees and surgeons in practice. Several technologic challenges were identified that must be overcome in order for VR simulation to be useful in surgery. Specific areas of student, resident, and practicing surgeon training and testing that would likely benefit from VR were identified: technical skills, team training and decision-making skills, and patient safety, such as in use of electrosurgical equipment. VR simulation has the potential to become an essential piece of surgical education curriculum but depends heavily on the establishment of an agreed upon set of goals. Researchers and clinicians must collaborate to allocate funding toward projects that help achieve these goals. The recommendations outlined here should guide further study and implementation of VR simulation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Higher surgical training opportunities in the general hospital setting; getting the balance right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, I; Traynor, O; Khan, W; Waldron, R; Barry, K

    2013-12-01

    The general hospital can play an important role in training of higher surgical trainees (HSTs) in Ireland and abroad. Training opportunities in such a setting have not been closely analysed to date. The aim of this study was to quantify operative exposure for HSTs over a 5-year period in a single institution. Analysis of electronic training logbooks (over a 5-year period, 2007-2012) was performed for general surgery trainees on the higher surgical training programme in Ireland. The most commonly performed adult and paediatric procedures per trainee, per year were analysed. Standard general surgery operations such as herniae (average 58, range 32-86) and cholecystectomy (average 60, range 49-72) ranked highly in each logbook. The most frequently performed emergency operations were appendicectomy (average 45, range 33-53) and laparotomy for acute abdomen (average 48, range 10-79). Paediatric surgical experience included appendicectomy, circumcision, orchidopexy and hernia/hydrocoele repair. Overall, the procedure most commonly performed in the adult setting was endoscopy, with each trainee recording an average of 116 (range 98-132) oesophagogastroduodenoscopies and 284 (range 227-354) colonoscopies. General hospitals continue to play a major role in the training of higher surgical trainees. Analysis of the electronic logbooks over a 5-year period reveals the high volume of procedures available to trainees in a non-specialist centre. Such training opportunities are invaluable in the context of changing work practices and limited resources.

  12. Effective e-learning in surgical education: the core values underpinning effective e-learning environments and how these may be enhanced for future surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, R; Coulston, J

    2016-01-01

    e-learning is a valuable tool that has a number of advantages for Surgical Oncology training and education. The rapidly evolving nature of, and limited clinical exposure to oncological practice creates challenges for surgical trainees to stay up to date and engaged. Online learning can be accessed anywhere at any time and allows trainees to develop, apply and be assessed on their learning. To be effective, it must be educationally sound and embrace technology to enhance learners' experience.

  13. National survey of surgeons\\' attitudes to laparoscopic surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim. Laparoscopic surgery forms an integral component of modern surgical practice. The perception exists that laparoscopic training in South Africa has been unplanned and under-resourced. This study set out to assess the opinions of surgeons and surgical trainees with regard to the various facets of laparoscopic surgical ...

  14. In the time of significant generational diversity - surgical leadership must step up!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, Samuel R; O'Donnell, Mark E; Gray, Richard J

    2014-02-01

    The diverse attitudes and motivations of surgeons and surgical trainees within different age groups present an important challenge for surgical leaders and educators. These challenges to surgical leadership are not unique, and other industries have likewise needed to grapple with how best to manage these various age groups. The authors will herein explore management and leadership for surgeons in a time of age diversity, define generational variations within "Baby-Boomer", "Generation X" and "Generation Y" populations, and identify work ethos concepts amongst these three groups. The surgical community must understand and embrace these concepts in order to continue to attract a stellar pool of applicants from medical school. By not accepting the changing attitudes and motivations of young trainees and medical students, we may disenfranchise a high percentage of potential future surgeons. Surgical training programs will fill, but will they contain the highest quality trainees? Copyright © 2013 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Financial impact of surgical training on hospital economics: an income analysis of 1184 out-patient clinic consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J E F; Ravindra, P; Lepore, M; Armstrong, A; Bhangu, A; Maxwell-Armstrong, C A

    2013-01-01

    In many countries healthcare commissioning bodies (state or insurance-based) reimburse hospitals for their activity. The costs associated with post-graduate clinical training as part of this are poorly understood. This study quantified the financial revenue generated by surgical trainees in the out-patient clinic setting. A retrospective analysis of surgical out-patient ambulatory care appointments under 6 full-time equivalent Consultants (Attendings) in one hospital over 2 months. Clinic attendance lists were generated from the Patient Access System. Appointments were categorised as: 'new', 'review' or 'procedure' as per the Department of Health Payment by Results (PbR) Outpatient Tariff (Outpatient Treatment Function Code 104; Outpatient Procedure Code OPRSI1). During the study period 78 clinics offered 1184 appointments; 133 of these were not attended (11.2%). Of those attended 1029 had sufficient detail for analysis (98%). 261 (25.4%) patients were seen by a trainee. Applying PbR reimbursement criteria to these gave a projected annual income of £GBP 218,712 (€EU 266,527; $USD 353,657) generated by 6 surgical trainees (Residents). This is equivalent to approximately £GBP 36,452 (€EU 44,415; $USD 58,943) per trainee annually compared to £GBP 48,732 (€EU 59,378; $USD 78,800) per Consultant. This projected yearly income off-set 95% of the trainee's basic salary. Surgical trainees generated a quarter of the out-patient clinic activity related income in this study, with each trainee producing three-quarters of that generated by a Consultant. This offers considerable commercial value to hospitals. Although this must offset productivity differences and overall running costs, training bodies should ensure hospitals offer an appropriate return. In a competitive market hospitals could be invited to compete for trainees, with preference given to those providing excellence in training. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  16. Use and Underlying Reasons for Duty Hour Flexibility in the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilimoria, Karl Y; Quinn, Christopher M; Dahlke, Allison R; Kelz, Rachel R; Shea, Judy A; Rajaram, Ravi; Love, Remi; Kreutzer, Lindsey; Biester, Thomas; Yang, Anthony D; Hoyt, David B; Lewis, Frank R

    2017-02-01

    The Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial randomly assigned surgical residency programs to either standard duty hour policies or flexible policies that eliminated caps on shift lengths and time off between shifts. Our objectives were to assess adherence to duty hour requirements in the Standard Policy arm and examine how often and why duty hour flexibility was used in the Flexible Policy arm. A total of 3,795 residents in the FIRST trial completed a survey in January 2016 (response rate >95%) that asked how often and why they exceeded current standard duty hour limits in both study arms. Flexible Policy interns worked more than 16 hours continuously at least once in a month more frequently than Standard Policy residents (86% vs 37.8%). Flexible Policy residents worked more than 28 hours once in a month more frequently than Standard Policy residents (PGY1: 64% vs 2.9%; PGY2 to 3: 62.4% vs 41.9%; PGY4 to 5: 52.2% vs 36.6%), but this occurred most frequently only 1 to 2 times per month. Although residents reported working more than 80 hours in a week 3 or more times in the most recent month more frequently under Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy (19.9% vs 16.2%), the difference was driven by interns (30.9% vs 19.6%), and there were no significant differences in exceeding 80 hours among PGY2 to 5 residents. The most common reasons reported for extending duty hours were facilitating care transitions (76.6%), stabilizing critically ill patients (70.7%), performing routine responsibilities (67.9%), and operating on patients known to the trainee (62.0%). There were differences in duty hours worked by residents in the Flexible vs Standard Policy arms of the FIRST trial, but it appeared that residents generally used the flexibility for patient care and educational opportunities selectively. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of surgeons and trainees in assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Diagnostic accuracy in the assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain in the emergency ward is not adequate. It has been argued that this is because the investigations are carried out predominantly by a trainee. Resource utilization could be lowered if surgeons had a higher initial diagnostic accuracy. Patients with acute abdominal pain were included in a prospective cohort study. A surgical trainee and a surgeon made independent assessments in the emergency department, recording the clinical diagnosis and proposed diagnostic investigations. A reference standard diagnosis was established by an expert panel, and the proportion of correct diagnoses was calculated. Diagnostic accuracy was expressed in terms of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. Interobserver agreement for the diagnosis and elements of history-taking and physical examination were expressed by means of Cohen's κ. Certainty of diagnosis was recorded using a visual analogue scale. A trainee and a surgeon independently assessed 126 patients. Trainees made a correct diagnosis in 44·4 per cent of patients and surgeons in 42·9 per cent (P = 0·839). Surgeons, however, recorded a higher level of diagnostic certainty. Diagnostic accuracy was comparable in distinguishing urgent from non-urgent diagnoses, and for the most common diseases. Interobserver agreement for the clinical diagnosis varied from fair to moderate (κ = 0·28-0·57). The diagnostic accuracy of the initial clinical assessment is not improved when a surgeon rather than a surgical trainee assesses a patient with abdominal pain in the emergency department. © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Development of a tool for evaluating multimedia for surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Jane; Morar, Sonali S

    2008-09-01

    Educational multimedia has been designed to provide surgical trainees with expert operative information outside of the operating theater. The effectiveness of multimedia (e.g., CD-ROMs) for learning has been a common research topic since the 1990s. To date, however, little discussion has taken place on the mechanisms to evaluate the quality of multimedia-driven teaching. This may be because of a lack of research into the development of appropriate tools for evaluating multimedia, especially for surgical education. This paper reports on a small-scale pilot and exploratory study (n = 12) that developed a tool for surgical multimedia evaluation. The validity of the developed tool was established through adaptation of an existing tool, which was reviewed using experts in surgery, usability, and education. The reliability of the developed tool was tested with surgical trainees who used it to assess a multimedia CD-ROM created for teaching basic surgical skills. The findings contribute to an understanding of surgical trainees' experience of using educational multimedia, in terms of characteristics of the learning material for interface design and content and the process of developing evaluation tools, in terms of inclusion of appropriate assessment criteria. The increasing use of multimedia in medical education necessitates the development of standardized tools for determining the quality of teaching and learning. Little research exists into the development of such tools and so the present work stimulates discussion on how to evaluate surgical training.

  19. Social Media in Surgical Training: Opportunities and Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovaere, Sander; Zimmerman, David D E; Brady, Richard R

    2018-05-02

    Surgeon engagement with social media is growing rapidly. Innovative applications in diverse fields of health care are increasingly available. The aim of this review is to explore the current and future applications of social media in surgical training. In addition, risks and barriers of social media engagement are analyzed, and recommendations for professional social media use amongst trainers and trainees are suggested. The published, peer-reviewed literature on social media in medicine, surgery and surgical training was reviewed. MESH terms including "social media", "education", "surgical training" and "web applications" were used. Different social media surgical applications are already widely available but limited in use in the trainee's curriculum. E-learning modalities, podcasts, live surgery platforms and microblogs are used for teaching purposes. Social media enables global research collaboratives and can play a role in patient recruitment for clinical trials. The growing importance of networking is emphasized by the increased use of LinkedIn, Facebook, Sermo and other networking platforms. Risks of social media use, such as lack of peer review and the lack of source confirmation, must be considered. Governing surgeon's and trainee's associations should consider adopting and sharing their guidelines for standards of social media use. Surgical training is changing rapidly and as such, social media presents tremendous opportunities for teaching, training, research and networking. Awareness must be raised on the risks of social media use. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. All rights reserved.

  20. International Symposium for Thyroid Eye Disease (June 2016, London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Y. Sviridenko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In June 2016, an International Symposium dedicated to the cutting edge research and achievements in Thyroid Eye Disease (TED diagnosis and treatment was held in London. The symposium was organized by the International Thyroid Eye Disease (ITEDs. It was attended EUGOGO, North American Neuro-Ophthalmological Society (NANOS and Orbit Society members. The symposium was attended by leading experts in the field of ophthalmology, orbital surgery and endocrinology: Rebecca S. Bahn, Maarten Mourits, Claudio Marcocci, George Kahaly, Mario Salvi, Antony Weetman, Anja Eckstein, Daniel Rootman, Geoffrey Rose, Robert Goldberg and Susanne Pitz, as well as doctors, specializing in the field of endocrinology, ophthalmology, radiology and other specialties. The symposium program was focused on the discussion of TED pathogenesis, classification and new therapeutic and surgical approaches. TED problems discussed by more than 300 professionals (65% ophthalmologists, 18% ophthalmic surgeons and 17% endocrinologists. North America was represented by 50 delegates. Representation of other continents was not less impressive.

  1. The Basic Surgical Skills Course in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Observational Study of Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergusson, Stuart J; Sedgwick, David M; Ntakiyiruta, Georges; Ntirenganya, Faustin

    2018-04-01

    The Basic Surgical Skills (BSS) course is a common component of postgraduate surgical training programmes in sub-Saharan Africa, but was originally designed in a UK context, and its efficacy and relevance have not been formally assessed in Africa. An observational study was carried out during a BSS course delivered to early-stage surgical trainees from Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Technical skill in a basic wound closure task was assessed in a formal Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSAT) before and after course completion. Participants completed a pre-course questionnaire documenting existing surgical experience and self-perceived confidence levels in surgical skills which were to be taught during the course. Participants repeated confidence ratings and completed course evaluation following course delivery. A cohort of 17 participants had completed a pre-course median of 150 Caesarean sections as primary operator. Performance on the OSAT improved from a mean of 10.5/17 pre-course to 14.2/17 post-course (mean of paired differences 3.7, p skills taught, and the course was assessed as highly relevant by trainees. The Basic Surgical Skills course is effective in improving the basic surgical technique of surgical trainees from sub-Saharan Africa and their confidence in key technical skills.

  2. The safe use of surgical energy devices by surgeons may be overestimated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ally; Richards, Carly; Criman, Erik; Piaggione, Jillian; Yheulon, Christopher; Lim, Robert

    2018-03-01

    Surgical energy injuries are an underappreciated phenomenon. Improper use of surgical energy or poor attention to patient safety can result in operating room fires, tissue injuries, and interferences with other electronic devices, while rare complications can be devastatingly severe. Despite this, there is no current standard requirement for educating surgeons on the safe use of energy-based devices or evaluation of electrosurgery (ES) education in residency training, credentialing, or practice. The study aimed to assess the current baseline knowledge of surgeons and surgical trainees with regards to ES across varying experiences at a tertiary level care center. Surgeons and surgical trainees from seven surgical specialties (General Surgery, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Vascular Surgery, Obstetrics/Gynecology, Orthopedic Surgery, Urology, and Otorhinolaryngology) at a tertiary level care hospital were tested. Testing included an evaluation regarding their background training and experiences with ES-related adverse events and a 15 multiple-choice-question exam testing critical knowledge of ES. A total of 134 surveys were sent out with 72 responses (53.7%). The mean quiz score was 51.5 ± 15.5% (passing score was 80%). Of staff surgeons, 33/65 (50.8%) completed the survey with mean and median scores of 54.9 and 53.3%, respectively (range 33.3-86.7%). Of surgical trainees, 39/69 (56.5%) completed the survey with mean and median scores of 48.6 and 46.7%, respectively (range 13.3-80.0%). There were no statistically significant differences based on training status (p = 0.08), previous training (p = 0.24), number of cases (p = 0.06), or specialty (p = 0.689). Surgeons and surgical trainees both have a significant knowledge gap in the safe and effective use of surgical energy devices, regardless of surgical specialty and despite what they feel was adequate training. The knowledge gap is not improved with experience. A formal surgical energy education program

  3. Cognitive learning and its future in urology: surgical skills teaching and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Somayeh B; Hussein, Ahmed A; Guru, Khurshid A

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the current status of novel cognitive training approaches in surgery and to investigate the potential role of cognitive training in surgical education. Kinematics of end-effector trajectories, as well as cognitive state features of surgeon trainees and mentors have recently been studied as modalities to objectively evaluate the expertise level of trainees and to shorten the learning process. Virtual reality and haptics also have shown promising in research results in improving the surgical learning process by providing feedback to the trainee. 'Cognitive training' is a novel approach to enhance training and surgical performance. The utility of cognitive training in improving motor skills in other fields, including sports and rehabilitation, is promising enough to justify its utilization to improve surgical performance. However, some surgical procedures, especially ones performed during human-robot interaction in robot-assisted surgery, are much more complicated than sport and rehabilitation. Cognitive training has shown promising results in surgical skills-acquisition in complicated environments such as surgery. However, these methods are mostly developed in research groups using limited individuals. Transferring this research into the clinical applications is a demanding challenge. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current status of these novel cognitive training approaches in surgery and to investigate the potential role of cognitive training in surgical education.

  4. Supply and demand mismatch for flexible (part-time) surgical training in Australasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Rachel E; Jeeves, Amy E; Vasey, Carolyn E; Wright, Deborah M; O'Grady, Gregory

    2013-05-06

    To define current patterns of flexible (part-time) surgical training in Australasia, determine supply and demand for part-time positions, and identify work-related factors motivating interest in flexible training. All Royal Australasian College of Surgeons trainees (n = 1191) were surveyed in 2010. Questions assessed demographic characteristics and working patterns, interest in flexible training, work-related fatigue and work-life balance preferences. Interest in part-time training, and work-related factors motivating this interest. Of the 1191 trainees, 659 responded (response rate, 55.3%). Respondents were representative of all trainees in terms of specialty and sex. The median age of respondents was 32 2013s, and 187 (28.4%) were female. Most of the 659 respondents (627, 95.1%) were in full-time clinical training; only two (0.3%) were in part-time clinical training, and 30 (4.6%) were not in active clinical training. An interest in part-time training was reported by 208 respondents (31.6%; 54.3% of women v 25.9% of men; P work and limited their social or family life, and that they had insufficient time in life for things outside surgical training, including study or research (P flexible surgical training and the number of trainees currently in part-time training positions in Australia and New Zealand. Efforts are needed to facilitate part-time surgical training.

  5. Surgical handover in an era of reduced working hours: an audit of current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq-ur-Rehman; Mehmood, Sajid; Ahmed, Jamil; Razzaq, Muhammad Haroon; Khan, Shakeeb; Perry, Eugene Phillip

    2012-06-01

    To examine the current practice of handover and to record trainees' assessment of handover process. An audit study. Department of General Surgery, Scarborough General Hospital, Scarborough, United Kingdom, from January to April 2010. A paper-based questionnaire containing instruments pertaining to handover guidelines was disseminated to trainees on surgical on-call rota at the hospital. Trainees' responses regarding handover process including information transferred, designated location, duration, structure, senior supervision, awareness of guidelines, formal training, and rating of current handover practice were analysed. A total of 42 questionnaires were returned (response rate = 100%). The trainees included were; registrars 21% (n=9), core surgical trainees 38 % (n=16), and foundation trainees 41% (n=17). Satisfactory compliance (> 80% handover sessions) to RCS guidelines was observed for only five out of nine components. Ninety-five percent of hand over sessions took place at a designated place and two-third lasted less than 20-minutes. Computer generated handover sheet 57% (n=24) was the most commonly practised method of handover. Specialist registrar 69 % (n=29) remained the supervising person in majority of handover sessions. None of the respondents received formal teaching or training in handover, whereas only half of them 48% (n=20) were aware of handover guidelines. Twenty-one percent of the trainees expressed dissatisfaction with the current practice of handover. Current practice of surgical handover lacks structure despite a fair degree of compliance to RCS handover guidelines. A computerised-sheet based structured handover process, subjected to regular audit, would ensure patient safety and continuity of care.

  6. Personal and Professional Well-Being of Surgical Residents in New England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Peter S; Tackett, John J; Maxfield, Mark W; Fisher, Rosemarie; Huot, Stephen J; Longo, Walter E

    2017-06-01

    Although there is increasing literature about burnout and attrition among surgeons, little is known about personal and professional well-being of surgical trainees. General surgery residents from the 6 New England states participated in a cross-sectional, qualitative, self-reported survey to assess the domains of personal health maintenance, personal finance, work environment, and fatigue management as they relate to surgical training. All surgical residency programs in the New England region were invited to participate. Of these 19 programs, 10 elected to participate in the study. Three hundred and sixty-three total trainees were contacted with requests to participate, and 166 completed responses to the survey, resulting in a response rate of 44.9%. Ninety percent of respondents identified their programs as "university or academic." Substantial cohorts reported that during training they lacked basic healthcare maintenance visits (54%) and had undesired weight gain (44%). Although most found their stipends adequate, three-quarters worried about their finances (75%) and reported substantial educational debt (45%). Most residents enjoyed coming to work; however, the vast majority reported that work-related stress is moderate to extreme (92%). Most also reported that work-related stress negatively affects their overall well-being (72%). The mean Epworth Sleepiness Scale score among respondents was 14, consistent with moderate excessive daytime sleepiness. Surgical trainee well-being is critical to optimal patient care, career development, and burnout reduction. Surgical residents attend to their own preventive health maintenance, finances, sleep, and stress reduction with variable success. Residency programs should make modest programmatic accommodations to allow trainees to tend to various aspects of their personal well-being. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The learning effect of intraoperative video-enhanced surgical procedure training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Det, M J; Meijerink, W J H J; Hoff, C; Middel, L J; Koopal, S A; Pierie, J P E N

    2011-07-01

    The transition from basic skills training in a skills lab to procedure training in the operating theater using the traditional master-apprentice model (MAM) lacks uniformity and efficiency. When the supervising surgeon performs parts of a procedure, training opportunities are lost. To minimize this intervention by the supervisor and maximize the actual operating time for the trainee, we created a new training method called INtraoperative Video-Enhanced Surgical Training (INVEST). Ten surgical residents were trained in laparoscopic cholecystectomy either by the MAM or with INVEST. Each trainee performed six cholecystectomies that were objectively evaluated on an Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) global rating scale. Absolute and relative improvements during the training curriculum were compared between the groups. A questionnaire evaluated the trainee's opinion on this new training method. Skill improvement on the OSATS global rating scale was significantly greater for the trainees in the INVEST curriculum compared to the MAM, with mean absolute improvement 32.6 versus 14.0 points and mean relative improvement 59.1 versus 34.6% (P=0.02). INVEST significantly enhances technical and procedural skill development during the early learning curve for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Trainees were positive about the content and the idea of the curriculum.

  8. Surgical simulators in urological training--views of UK Training Programme Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, James A; Browning, Anthony J; Paul, Alan B; Biyani, C Shekhar

    2012-09-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The role of surgical simulators is currently being debated in urological and other surgical specialties. Simulators are not presently implemented in the UK urology training curriculum. The availability of simulators and the opinions of Training Programme Directors' (TPD) on their role have not been described. In the present questionnaire-based survey, the trainees of most, but not all, UK TPDs had access to laparoscopic simulators, and that all responding TPDs thought that simulators improved laparoscopic training. We hope that the present study will be a positive step towards making an agreement to formally introduce simulators into the UK urology training curriculum. To discuss the current situation on the use of simulators in surgical training. To determine the views of UK Urology Training Programme Directors (TPDs) on the availability and use of simulators in Urology at present, and to discuss the role that simulators may have in future training. An online-questionnaire survey was distributed to all UK Urology TPDs. In all, 16 of 21 TPDs responded. All 16 thought that laparoscopic simulators improved the quality of laparoscopic training. The trainees of 13 TPDs had access to a laparoscopic simulator (either in their own hospital or another hospital in the deanery). Most TPDs thought that trainees should use simulators in their free time, in quiet time during work hours, or in teaching sessions (rather than incorporated into the weekly timetable). We feel that the current apprentice-style method of training in urological surgery is out-dated. We think that all TPDs and trainees should have access to a simulator, and that a formal competency based simulation training programme should be incorporated into the urology training curriculum, with trainees reaching a minimum proficiency on a simulator before undertaking surgical procedures. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2012 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  9. Surgical training in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borel-Rinkes, Inne H. M.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Hamming, Jaap F.

    2008-01-01

    Surgical training in the Netherlands has traditionally been characterized by learning on the job under the classic master-trainee doctrine. Over the past decades, it has become regionally organized with intensive structural training courses, and a peer-based quality control system. Recently, the

  10. Verification of Accurate Technical Insight: A Prerequisite for Self-Directed Surgical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yinin; Kim, Helen; Mahmutovic, Adela; Choi, Joanna; Le, Ivy; Rasmussen, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Simulation-based surgical skills training during preclinical education is a persistent challenge due to time constraints of trainees and instructors alike. Self-directed practice is resource-efficient and flexible; however, insight into technical proficiency among trainees is often lacking. The purpose of this study is to prospectively assess the…

  11. Teaching and learning in the operating theatre: a framework for trainers and advanced trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, S; China, S

    2010-04-01

    Surgical training of 'advanced trainees' in Obstetrics and Gynaecology currently occurs in a rather unstructured fashion. This is even more complicated by reduced training time of doctors necessitated by the European working time directive. Teaching and learning in theatre is a combination of art and science. This paper attempts to address the issues hampering effective theatre training and suggests ways to overcome them. The 'operating theatre' plan includes a needs assessment of trainees, goal setting and instructional methodologies. Various learning styles could potentially be adopted, although it might be difficult to choose a learning style suitable for a particular trainee. Additionally, team working skills and experiential learning need to be facilitated.

  12. Do trainees feel that they belong to a team?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sophie; Lusznat, Rosie

    2017-05-18

    Postgraduate medical education has undergone significant reorganisation in recent years, with changes to the traditional apprenticeship model and an increasing reliance on shift working. The importance of teamwork in clinical care is well established; however, there is little literature on the extent to which trainees actually feel part of a team in the context of current working patterns. This is a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews of medical and surgical trainees. Data were analysed thematically using an inductive qualitative approach. Fifteen trainees who had worked in a range of hospitals across the UK participated. Emerging themes fell into several categories: what constitutes the team; the effect of shift patterns on the team; the role of the team in education, support and well-being; and influences on team rapport. Whilst in general interviewees felt part of a team, this was not true for all posts. The nature of the team was also highly variable, and had evolved from the traditional 'Firm' structure to a more nebulous concept. Shift-working patterns could result in the fragmentation of the team, which had implications for patient care as well as for training. The team played an important role in both education and well-being for trainees, and several factors were identified that could engender a more supportive team. With an ageing population and with increasing demands on limited resources, the requirement for shift work is likely to increase, and there is a fundamental need to maintain support for the next generation of doctors. There is little literature on the extent to which trainees actually feel part of a team. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  13. Implementation of electronic logbook for trainees of general surgery in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aphinives, Potchavit

    2013-01-01

    All trainees are required to keep a record of their surgical skill and experiences throughout the trainingperiod in a logbook format. Paper-based logbook has several limitations. Therefore, an electronic logbook was introduced to replace the paper-based logbook. An electronic logbook program was developed in November 2005. This program was designed as web-based application based upon PHP scripts beneath Apache web server and MySQL database implementation. Only simpliJfied and essential data, such as hospital number diagnosis, surgical procedure, and pathological findings, etc. are recorded. The electronic logbook databases between Academic year 2006 and 2011 were analyzed. The annual recordedsurgical procedures gradually increasedfrom 41,214 procedures in 2006 to 66,643 procedures in 2011. Around one-third of all records were not verified by attending staffs, i.e. 27.59% (2006), 31.69% (2007), 18.06% (2008), 28.42% (2009), 30.18% (2010), and 31.41% (2011). On the Education year 2011, the three most common procedural groups included colon, rectum & anus group, appendix group, and vascular group, respectively. Advantages of the electronic logbook included more efficient data access, increased ability to monitor trainees and trainers, and analysis of procedural varieties among the training institutes.

  14. Part-time general surgical training in South Australia: its success and future implications (or: pinnacles, pitfalls and lessons for the future).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Susan; Igras, Emma; Fosh, Beverley; Benson, Sarah

    2012-12-01

    Flexible training options are sought by an increasing number of Australasian surgical trainees. Reasons include increased participation of women in the surgical workforce, postgraduate training and changing attitudes to family responsibilities. Despite endorsement of flexible training by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and Board in General Surgery, part-time (PT) training in General Surgery in Australia and New Zealand is not well established. A permanent 'stand-alone' PT training position was established at the Royal Adelaide Hospital in 2007 under the Surgical Education and Training Program. This position offered 12 months of General Surgical training on a 0.5 full-time (FT) equivalent basis with pro rata emergency and on-call commitments and was accredited for 6 months of General Surgical training. This paper reviews the PT training experience in South Australia. De-identified logbook data were obtained from the South Australian Regional Subcommittee of the Board in General Surgery with consent of each of the trainees. Totals of operative cases were compared against matched FT trainees working on the same unit. Overall, PT trainees achieved comparable operative caseloads compared with their FT colleagues. All trainees included in this review have subsequently passed the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Fellowship Examination in General Surgery and returned to FT workforce positions. This paper presents two validated models of PT training. Training, resource and regulatory requirements and individual and institutional barriers to flexible training are substantial. Successful PT models offer positive and beneficial training alternatives for General Surgical trainees and contribute to workforce flexibility. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  15. Simulation-based surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgeniou, Evgenios; Loizou, Peter

    2013-09-01

    The reduction in time for training at the workplace has created a challenge for the traditional apprenticeship model of training. Simulation offers the opportunity for repeated practice in a safe and controlled environment, focusing on trainees and tailored to their needs. Recent technological advances have led to the development of various simulators, which have already been introduced in surgical training. The complexity and fidelity of the available simulators vary, therefore depending on our recourses we should select the appropriate simulator for the task or skill we want to teach. Educational theory informs us about the importance of context in professional learning. Simulation should therefore recreate the clinical environment and its complexity. Contemporary approaches to simulation have introduced novel ideas for teaching teamwork, communication skills and professionalism. In order for simulation-based training to be successful, simulators have to be validated appropriately and integrated in a training curriculum. Within a surgical curriculum, trainees should have protected time for simulation-based training, under appropriate supervision. Simulation-based surgical education should allow the appropriate practice of technical skills without ignoring the clinical context and must strike an adequate balance between the simulation environment and simulators. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  16. Effect of Rehearsal Modality on Knowledge Retention in Surgical Trainees: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnesgard, Eric J; Aho, Johnathon M; Pandian, T K; Farley, David R

    2016-01-01

    The operating room is an exciting learning environment. With growing curriculum limitations and increasing complexity of care, existing education opportunities need to be optimized. Rehearsal has benefits for surgeon performance in the operating room, but its role for enhancing operative learning remains unclear. This pilot study aimed to differentiate the effects of physical rehearsal (PR) and cognitive rehearsal (CR) modalities on surgical trainee technical knowledge retention. Participants took part in a 2-day (sequential Fridays), instructed operative workshop performing midline laparotomy, splenectomy, left nephrectomy, and hand-sewn, side-to-side small bowel anastomosis (SBA). Participants were randomized to 10 minutes of either a (PR; n = 5) or (CR; n = 5) activity each day before operating. PR consisted of practicing SBA on a felt bowel model. CR entailed viewing narrated operative footage detailing the steps of SBA. Participants' technical knowledge of all procedures was assessed at 1 and 12 weeks postworkshop using a 31-question test. Animal operative suites at an academic medical center. A total of 10 general surgery postgraduate year 1 interns participated in the workshop; all completed the study. Participants had similar levels of operative exposure at the time of study participation. At 1-week postworkshop, mean assessment scores for CR were higher than PR (Mean ± Standard Deviation) (CR = 24.7 ± 1.6 vs. PR = 21.8 ± 1.7, p = 0.02). After 12 weeks, there was no difference in mean scores (CR = 23.3 ± 2 vs. PR = 21.7 ± 1.8, p = 0.22). Knowledge decay for the 12-week period was similar between groups (CR = -1.4 ± 1.6 vs. PR = -0.1 ± 2.4, p = 0.36). Study participants performed better on SBA-related questions than unrelated questions (laparotomy, splenectomy, and nephrectomy) at 1-week (related = 81.5% ± 11.3 vs. unrelated = 71.9% ± 6.6, p = 0.03) and 12 weeks (related = 81% ± 13.1 vs. unrelated = 68.6% ± 8.8, p = 0.02). This pilot data suggests

  17. Westinghouse European trainee program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, G.

    2010-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Company is proud of giving its employees the possibility to work and act globally. The company's European Trainee Program provides an opportunity to work within different fields of business within Westinghouse, participating in a wide range of projects and experiencing and learning from the different cultures of the company. In 2006 the first Trainee Program started with seven Swedish Trainees. During these eighteen months they worked 12 months in Sweden and then went off to six-month-assignments in France and in the US. In April 2008, the first European Trainee Program was launched with ten Trainees from four different countries: five from Sweden, two from Germany, two from Spain and one from Belgium. As with the previous program, its length was eighteen months. During the first year, the European Trainees had the opportunity to work in various areas within their country of hire, as well as to visit different Westinghouse headquarters in Europe and the US to learn more about the global business. Their kick-off session took place in Vaesteraas, Sweden in April 2008. During four days, the Trainees participated in group dynamic exercises as well as presentations of the business of Westinghouse abroad and in Sweden. Two of the most interesting parts of this session were the visits to the Fuel Factory and to the Field Services mock-ups. The second session took place in June 2008 in Monroeville, Pennsylvania (USA), where Westinghouse had its main headquarters, nowadays located in Cranberry, PA. During two weeks, the trainees got to know even more about Westinghouse through visits, lectures and forums for open discussions. The visits comprised for example the tubing factory at Blairsville, the Field Services main headquarters in Madison and the George Westinghouse Research and Technology Park near Pittsburgh. The meetings included presentations of each Westinghouse business unit, detailed information about future projects and round table discussions

  18. Multimedia educational tools for cognitive surgical skill acquisition in open and laparoscopic colorectal surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, U; Kullar, N; Haray, P N; Dorudi, S; Balasubramanian, S P

    2015-05-01

    Conventional teaching in surgical training programmes is constrained by time and cost, and has room for improvement. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of a multimedia educational tool developed for an index colorectal surgical procedure (anterior resection) in teaching and assessment of cognitive skills and to evaluate its acceptability amongst general surgical trainees. Multimedia educational tools in open and laparoscopic anterior resection were developed by filming multiple operations which were edited into procedural steps and substeps and then integrated onto interactive navigational platforms using Adobe® Flash® Professional CS5 10.1. A randomized controlled trial was conducted on general surgical trainees to evaluate the effectiveness of online multimedia in comparison with conventional 'study day' teaching for the acquisition of cognitive skills. All trainees were assessed before and after the study period. Trainees in the multimedia group evaluated the tools by completing a survey. Fifty-nine trainees were randomized but 27% dropped out, leaving 43 trainees randomized to the multimedia group (n = 25) and study day group (n = 18) who were available for analysis. Posttest scores improved significantly in both groups (P multimedia group was not significantly different from the study day group (6.02 ± 5.12 and 5.31 ± 3.42, respectively; P = 0.61). Twenty-five trainees completed the evaluation survey and experienced an improvement in their decision making (67%) and in factual and anatomical knowledge (88%); 96% agreed that the multimedia tool was a useful additional educational resource. Multimedia tools are effective for the acquisition of cognitive skills in colorectal surgery and are well accepted as an educational resource. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. See-What-I-Do: Increasing Mentor and Trainee Sense of Co-Presence in Trauma Surgeries with the STAR Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0042 TITLE: See-What-I-Do: Increasing Mentor and Trainee Sense of Co-Presence in Trauma Surgeries with the STAR ...AND SUBTITLE See-What-I-Do: Increasing mentor and trainee sense of co-presence in trauma surgeries with the STAR platform 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...next surgical steps, and they give the mentor an incomplete picture of the ongoing surgery. We are addressing these gaps by developing STAR – System

  20. How surgical mentors teach: a classification of in vivo teaching behaviors part 2: physical teaching guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutkin, Gary; Littleton, Eliza B; Kanter, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    To study surgical teaching captured on film and analyze it at a fine level of detail to categorize physical teaching behaviors. We describe live, filmed, intraoperative nonverbal exchanges between surgical attending physicians and their trainees (residents and fellows). From the films, we chose key teaching moments and transcribed participants' utterances, actions, and gestures. In follow-up interviews, attending physicians and trainees watched videos of their teaching case and answered open-ended questions about their teaching methods. Using a grounded theory approach, we examined the videos and interviews for what might be construed as a teaching behavior and refined the physical teaching categories through constant comparison. We filmed 5 cases in the operating suite of a university teaching hospital that provides gynecologic surgical care. We included 5 attending gynecologic surgeons, 3 fellows, and 5 residents for this study. More than 6 hours of film and 3 hours of interviews were transcribed, and more than 250 physical teaching motions were captured. Attending surgeons relied on actions and gestures, sometimes wordlessly, to achieve pedagogical and surgical goals simultaneously. Physical teaching included attending physician-initiated actions that required immediate corollary actions from the trainee, gestures to illustrate a step or indicate which instrument to be used next, supporting or retracting tissues, repositioning the trainee's instruments, and placement of the attending physicians' hands on the trainees' hands to guide them. Attending physicians often voiced surprise at the range of their own teaching behaviors captured on film. Interrater reliability was high using the Cohen κ, which was 0.76 for the physical categories. Physical guidance is essential in educating a surgical trainee, may be tacit, and is not always accompanied by speech. Awareness of teaching behaviors may encourage deliberate teaching and reflection on how to innovate pedagogy

  1. Conference Report: 6th Annual International Symposium on Regenerative Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loghmani, M Terry; Roche, Joseph A

    2018-04-03

    The 6th International Symposium on Regenerative Rehabilitation, hosted by the Alliance for Regenerative Rehabilitation Research and Training (AR 3 T), included a preconference meeting of institutional representatives of the International Consortium of Regenerative Rehabilitation, keynote talks from distinguished scientists, platform and poster presentations from experts and trainees, panel discussions and postconference workshops. The following priorities were identified: increasing rigor in basic, preclinical and clinical studies, especially the use of better controls; developing better outcome measures for preclinical and clinical trials; focusing on developing more tissue-based interventions versus cell-based interventions; including regenerative rehabilitation in curricula of professional programs like occupational and physical therapy; and developing better instruments to quantify rehabilitative interventions.

  2. Gender-Based Differences in Surgical Residents' Perceptions of Patient Safety, Continuity of Care, and Well-Being: An Analysis from the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Kristen A; Chung, Jeanette W; Matulewicz, Richard S; Kelz, Rachel R; Shea, Judy A; Dahlke, Allison R; Quinn, Christopher M; Yang, Anthony D; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about gender differences in residency training experiences and whether duty hour policies affect these differences. Using data from the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) trial, we examined gender differences in surgical resident perceptions of patient safety, education, health and well-being, and job satisfaction, and assessed whether duty hour policies affected gender differences. We compared proportions of male and female residents expressing dissatisfaction or perceiving a negative effect of duty hours on aspects of residency training (ie patient safety, resident education, well-being, job satisfaction) overall and by PGY. Logistic regression models with robust clustered SEs were used to test for significant gender differences and interaction effects of duty hour policies on gender differences. Female PGY2 to 3 residents were more likely than males to be dissatisfied with patient safety (odds ratio [OR] = 2.50; 95% CI, 1.29-4.84) and to perceive a negative effect of duty hours on most health and well-being outcomes (OR = 1.51-2.10; all p duty hours reduced gender differences in career dissatisfaction among interns (p = 0.028), but widened gender differences in negative perceptions of duty hours on patient safety (p duty hour policies. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Innovation in pediatric surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Matthew S; Wulkan, Mark L

    2015-06-01

    Pediatric surgical training in the United States remained basically unchanged from the model developed by Ladd and Gross in the 1930s until recently. Standardized curriculum and novel evaluation methods are now being implemented. Pediatric Surgical education is currently undergoing a transition to competency-based evaluation and promotion. Unfortunately, there is little data on the efficacy of these changes. This presents an opportunity for further study of how we conduct training, and how we evaluate and promote our trainees. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Progress in virtual reality simulators for surgical training and certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visser, Hans; Watson, Marcus O; Salvado, Olivier; Passenger, Joshua D

    2011-02-21

    There is increasing evidence that educating trainee surgeons by simulation is preferable to traditional operating-room training methods with actual patients. Apart from reducing costs and risks to patients, training by simulation can provide some unique benefits, such as greater control over the training procedure and more easily defined metrics for assessing proficiency. Virtual reality (VR) simulators are now playing an increasing role in surgical training. However, currently available VR simulators lack the fidelity to teach trainees past the novice-to-intermediate skills level. Recent technological developments in other industries using simulation, such as the games and entertainment and aviation industries, suggest that the next generation of VR simulators should be suitable for training, maintenance and certification of advanced surgical skills. To be effective as an advanced surgical training and assessment tool, VR simulation needs to provide adequate and relevant levels of physical realism, case complexity and performance assessment. Proper validation of VR simulators and an increased appreciation of their value by the medical profession are crucial for them to be accepted into surgical training curricula.

  5. Formative assessment of GP trainees' clinical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener-Ogilvie, Sharon; Begg, Drummond

    2012-03-01

    Clinical skill assessment (CSA) has been an integral part of the Royal College of General Practitioners' membership examination (MRCGP) since 2008. It is an expensive, high-stakes examination with first time pass rates ranging from 76.4 to 81.3. In this paper we describe the South East Scotland Deanery, NHS Education Scotland, pilot of a formative clinical skills assessment (fCSA) using the principles of formative assessment and OSCE. The purpose of the study was to assess the acceptability of the fCSA and to examine whether trainees, identified during the fCSA as 'at risk of failing the MRCGP CSA exam', are more likely to fail the MRCGP CSA exam later on in the year. Trainees were assessed in four clinical skills stations under exam conditions. After each station they were given verbal feedback and subsequently both trainee and their trainer received written feedback. We assessed the value of the exercise through written feedback from trainees and trainers. Each trainee's performance in fCSA was triangulated with trainer assessment to identify 'flagged trainees'. We compared flagged and non-flagged trainees' performance in MRCGP CSA. Both trainees and trainers highly rated the fCSA. Overall 97% of non-flagged trainees have passed the RCGP CSA exam by May of that year in comparison to 80% of flagged trainees who have passed the RCGP CSA (P = 0.005). Trainers and trainees rated the fCSA as excellent and useful. We were able to demonstrate that the fCSA can be used to identify those trainees likely to fail the RCGP CSA. Contrary to reservations about the potential to demoralise trainees, the fCSA was viewed as a useful and a positive experience by both trainees and trainers. In addition, we suggest that feedback from fCSA was useful in triggering appropriate educational interventions. Early intervention with trainees who are predicted to fail the CSA has the potential to reduce deaneries overall fail rate. Preventing one trainee failure could save over £30 000.

  6. The effects of the European Working Time Directive on surgical training: the basic surgical trainee's perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, B D

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: On the 1 August 2009, the implementation of European Working Time Directive became European law and was implemented in Galway University Hospital (GUH). AIMS: The aim of the study is to ascertain the opinion of the 25 surgical SHOs in GUH on the effect of the implementation of an EWTD compliant roster had on the quality of their training. METHODS: A questionnaire was circulated to all 25 surgical SHOs. RESULTS: Twenty-two (88%) SHOs report a reduction in the quality of their training. 18 (72%) report a reduction in the development of their operative skills. The SHOs believed the EWTD Rotas would encourage Irish graduates to train abroad. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical training faces a challenge with the implementation of EWTD Rotas. Major changes need to be made to the surgical training structure to train surgeons to the highest standard and to retain Irish-trained surgeons in the Irish healthcare system.

  7. Lost opportunity cost of surgical training in the Australian private sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, R James

    2012-03-01

    To meet Australia's future demands, surgical training in the private sector will be required. The aim of this study was to estimate the time and lost opportunity cost of training in the private sector. A literature search identified studies that compared the operation time required by a supervised trainee with a consultant. This time was costed using a business model. In 22 studies (34 operations), the median operation duration of a supervised trainee was 34% longer than the consultant. To complete a private training list in the same time as a consultant list, one major case would have to be dropped. A consultant's average lost opportunity cost was $1186 per list ($106,698 per year). Training in rooms and administration requirements increased this to $155,618 per year. To train 400 trainees in the private sector to college standards would require 54,000 training lists per year. The consultants' national lost opportunity cost would be $137 million per year. The average lost hospital case payment was $5894 per list, or $330 million per year nationally. The total lost opportunity cost of surgical training in the private sector would be about $467 million per year. When trainee salaries, other specialties and indirect expenses are included, the total cost will be substantially greater. It is unlikely that surgeons or hospitals will be prepared to absorb these costs. There needs to be a public debate about the funding implications of surgical training in the private sector. © 2012 The Author. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  8. Levels and Trends of Occupational Hazards among Surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    training at the Addis Ababa University revealed that work-related accidents among surgical trainees were enormous, and there was huge under reporting to the occupational health unit (OHU) of the hospital. The aim of this study was to evaluate ...

  9. Virtual Reality Training System for Anytime/Anywhere Acquisition of Surgical Skills: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahiri, Mohsen; Booton, Ryan; Nelson, Carl A; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Siu, Ka-Chun

    2018-03-01

    This article presents a hardware/software simulation environment suitable for anytime/anywhere surgical skills training. It blends the advantages of physical hardware and task analogs with the flexibility of virtual environments. This is further enhanced by a web-based implementation of training feedback accessible to both trainees and trainers. Our training system provides a self-paced and interactive means to attain proficiency in basic tasks that could potentially be applied across a spectrum of trainees from first responder field medical personnel to physicians. This results in a powerful training tool for surgical skills acquisition relevant to helping injured warfighters.

  10. "Run-through" training at specialist training year 1 and uncoupled core surgical training for oral and maxillofacial surgery in the United Kingdom: a snapshot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, M; Collyer, J; Dhariwal, D

    2018-05-01

    Training in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) in the UK has undergone considerable changes during the last 10years, and "core" surgical training has replaced "basic" surgical training. In 2014 a pilot "run-through" training programme from specialist training year one (ST1)-ST7 was introduced to facilitate early entry into the speciality. Run-through training guarantees that a trainee, after a single competitive selection process and satisfactory progress, will be given training that covers the entire curriculum of the speciality, whereas uncoupled training requires a second stage of competitive recruitment after the first one (for OMFS only) or two years of "core" training to progress to higher specialty training. The first two years of run-through training (ST1-ST2) are the same as for core surgical training. Dual-qualified maxillofacial aspirants and those in their second degree course are curious to know whether they should go for the uncoupled core surgical training or the run-through programme in OMFS. The General Medical Council (GMC) has now agreed that run-through training can be rolled out nationally in OMFS. To assess the two pathways we used an online questionnaire to gain feedback about the experience from all OMFS ST3 and run-through trainees (ST3/ST4) in 2016-2017. We identified and contacted 21 trainees, and 17 responded, including seven run-through trainees. Eleven, including five of the run-through trainees, recommended the run-through training programme in OMFS. Six of the seven run-through trainees had studied dentistry first. The overall mean quality of training was rated as 5.5 on a scale 0-10 by the 17 respondents. This survey gives valuable feedback from the current higher surgical trainees in OMFS, which will be useful to the GMC, Health Education England, OMFS Specialist Advisory Committee, and those seeking to enter higher surgical training in OMFS. Copyright © 2018 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published

  11. Do soft skills predict surgical performance?: a single-center randomized controlled trial evaluating predictors of skill acquisition in virtual reality laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschuw, K; Schlosser, K; Kupietz, E; Slater, E P; Weyers, P; Hassan, I

    2011-03-01

    Virtual reality (VR) training in minimal invasive surgery (MIS) is feasible in surgical residency and beneficial for the performance of MIS by surgical trainees. Research on stress-coping of surgical trainees indicates the additional impact of soft skills on VR performance in the surgical curriculum. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of structured VR training and soft skills on VR performance of trainees. The study was designed as a single-center randomized controlled trial. Fifty first-year surgical residents with limited experience in MIS ("camera navigation" in laparoscopic cholecystectomy only) were randomized for either 3 months of VR training or no training. Basic VR performance and defined soft skills (self-efficacy, stress-coping, and motivation) were assessed prior to randomization using basic modules of the VR simulator LapSim(®) and standardized psychological questionnaires. Three months after randomization VR performance was reassessed. Outcome measurement was based on the results derived from the most complex of the basic VR modules ("diathermy cutting") as the primary end point. A correlation analysis of the VR end-point performance and the psychological scores was done in both groups. Structured VR training enhanced VR performance of surgical trainees. An additional correlation to high motivational states (P 0.05). Low self-efficacy and negative stress-coping strategies seem to predict poor VR performance. However, structured training along with high motivational states is likely to balance out this impairment.

  12. Surgeons' and trainees' perceived self-efficacy in operating theatre non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, G; Altree, M; Field, J; Thomas, M J W; Hewett, P; Babidge, W; Maddern, G J

    2015-05-01

    An important factor that may influence an individual's performance is self-efficacy, a personal judgement of capability to perform a particular task successfully. This prospective study explored newly qualified surgeons' and surgical trainees' self-efficacy in non-technical skills compared with their non-technical skills performance in simulated scenarios. Participants undertook surgical scenarios challenging non-technical skills in two simulation sessions 6 weeks apart. Some participants attended a non-technical skills workshop between sessions. Participants completed pretraining and post-training surveys about their perceived self-efficacy in non-technical skills, which were analysed and compared with their performance in surgical scenarios in two simulation sessions. Change in performance between sessions was compared with any change in participants' perceived self-efficacy. There were 40 participants in all, 17 of whom attended the non-technical skills workshop. There was no significant difference in participants' self-efficacy regarding non-technical skills from the pretraining to the post-training survey. However, there was a tendency for participants with the highest reported self-efficacy to adjust their score downwards after training and for participants with the lowest self-efficacy to adjust their score upwards. Although there was significant improvement in non-technical skills performance from the first to second simulation sessions, a correlation between participants' self-efficacy and performance in scenarios in any of the comparisons was not found. The results suggest that new surgeons and surgical trainees have poor insight into their non-technical skills. Although it was not possible to correlate participants' self-belief in their abilities directly with their performance in a simulation, in general they became more critical in appraisal of their abilities as a result of the intervention. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A Targeted E-Learning Program for Surgical Trainees to Enhance Patient Safety in Preventing Surgical Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Seamus Mark; Corrigan, Mark; Dimitrov, Borislav; Cowman, Seamus; Tierney, Sean; Humphreys, Hilary; Hill, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infection accounts for 20% of all health care-associated infections (HCAIs); however, a program incorporating the education of surgeons has yet to be established across the specialty. Methods: An audit of surgical practice in infection prevention was carried out in Beaumont Hospital from July to November 2009. An…

  14. Getting lost in translation? Workplace based assessments in surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Jason M

    2013-10-01

    Workplace based assessments (WBA) are integral to the competence-based surgical training curriculum that currently exists in the UK. The GMC emphasise the value of WBA's as assessments for learning (formative), rather than as assessments of learning (summative). Current implementation of WBA's in the workplace though, is at odds with their intended use, with the formative functions often being overlooked in favour of the summative, as exemplified by the recent announcement that trainees are required to complete a minimum of 40 WBA's a year, an increase from 24. Even before this increase, trainees viewed WBA's as tick-box exercises that negatively impact upon training opportunities. As a result, the tools are commonly misused, often because both trainees and trainers lack understanding of the benefits of full engagement with the formative learning opportunities afforded by WBA's. To aid the transition in mind-set of trainees and trainers to the purpose of assessment in the workplace, the GMC propose the introduction of 'supervised learning events' and 'assessments of performance' to supersede 'WBA's'. The impact of this change and how these will be integrated into surgical training is yet to be seen, but is likely to be a step in the right direction. Copyright © 2013 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Surgical skills simulation in trauma and orthopaedic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, Euan R B; Lewis, Thomas L; Ferran, Nicholas A

    2014-12-19

    Changing patterns of health care delivery and the rapid evolution of orthopaedic surgical techniques have made it increasingly difficult for trainees to develop expertise in their craft. Working hour restrictions and a drive towards senior led care demands that proficiency be gained in a shorter period of time whilst requiring a greater skill set than that in the past. The resulting conflict between service provision and training has necessitated the development of alternative methods in order to compensate for the reduction in 'hands-on' experience. Simulation training provides the opportunity to develop surgical skills in a controlled environment whilst minimising risks to patient safety, operating theatre usage and financial expenditure. Many options for simulation exist within orthopaedics from cadaveric or prosthetic models, to arthroscopic simulators, to advanced virtual reality and three-dimensional software tools. There are limitations to this form of training, but it has significant potential for trainees to achieve competence in procedures prior to real-life practice. The evidence for its direct transferability to operating theatre performance is limited but there are clear benefits such as increasing trainee confidence and familiarity with equipment. With progressively improving methods of simulation available, it is likely to become more important in the ongoing and future training and assessment of orthopaedic surgeons.

  16. Surgical video recording with a modified GoPro Hero 4 camera

    OpenAIRE

    Lin LK

    2016-01-01

    Lily Koo Lin Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science, University of California, Davis Eye Center, Sacramento, CA, USA Background: Surgical videography can provide analytical self-examination for the surgeon, teaching opportunities for trainees, and allow for surgical case presentations. This study examined if a modified GoPro Hero 4 camera with a 25 mm lens could prove to be a cost-effective method of surgical videography with enough detail for oculoplastic and strabismus surgery. Me...

  17. Trainee satisfaction in surgery residency programs: modern management tools ensure trainee motivation and success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Websky, Martin W; Oberkofler, Christian E; Rufibach, Kaspar; Raptis, Dimitri A; Lehmann, Kuno; Hahnloser, Dieter; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2012-11-01

    To assess trainee satisfaction in their surgery residency with a validated instrument and identify the contributing factors. Currently, surgery is deemed unattractive by medical students and ignored by many candidates planning to enter an academic career. New insights on the rational for such lack of interest are needed. Job satisfaction is a central concept in organizational and behavioral research that is well understood by large companies such as Google, IBM, and Toyota. Similar assessment can likewise be used to improve trainee satisfaction in surgery residency. A survey among 2039 surgery residents was conducted in three European countries analyzing satisfaction at work using the Global Job Satisfaction Instrument (validated in Emergency Room physicians). Crucial factors covering different aspects of surgery residency where identified using the GJS instrument combined with multiple logistic regression analysis. With an overall response rate of 23%, we identified trainee dissatisfaction in one third of residents. Factors affecting satisfaction related almost exclusively to training issues, such as assignment of surgery procedures according to skills (OR 4.2), training courses (OR 2.7), availability of a structured training curriculum (OR 2.4), bedside teaching, and availability of morbidity-mortality conferences (OR 2.3). A good working climate among residents (OR 3.7) and the option for part time work (OR 2.1) were also significant factors for trainee satisfaction. Increased working hours had a modest (OR 0.98)-though cumulative- negative effect. The sex of the trainee was not related to trainee satisfaction. Validated measurement of job satisfaction as used in the industry appears to be an efficient tool to assess trainee satisfaction in surgery residency and thereby identify the key contributing factors. Improvement of conceptual training structures and working conditions might facilitate recruitment, decrease drop-out, and attract motivated candidates with

  18. Psychiatric trainees in Finland 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putkonen, Hanna; Holi, Matti; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Korkeila, Jyrki; Eronen, Markku

    2005-01-01

    This study examined Finnish psychiatric trainees' views on their education. This was a survey study of nationwide data on Finnish psychiatric trainees in 2001. The quality of training was considered at least moderate by 84% of the respondents. Training on epidemiology, on taking history and status, and on psychopharmacology was considered the best. Quality was rated bad for training in leadership and administration, and educating the community. Research was done by 20%, and a personal clinical supervisor was appointed to 52% of the respondents. Offensive treatment had been experienced by 49% of the trainees in this study. Generally, studies of training also reflect strengths and weaknesses of the profession. Based on our results, it seems especially that training in leadership and in educating the community need to be improved; both of these are quintessential skills to survive in the struggle for economic and human resources. Furthermore, treatment of the trainees could still be better; attention should be paid to supervision of all trainees. Moreover, research must become more attractive. Psychiatry can be developed by the development of psychiatric training.

  19. Abstracts of the Charite-symposium 'CT and MR in medicine'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    127 abstracts of papers read at the Charite-symposium are presented. They chiefly deal with the diagnostic application of computerized tomograhpy and NMR imaging in clinical and surgical medicine comprising the use of contrast media. CT and MR in relation to irradiation planning and possibilities in image processing such as the new picture archiving and communication system (PACS) are included as well

  20. Social media in the mentorship and networking of physicians: Important role for women in surgical specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luc, Jessica G Y; Stamp, Nikki L; Antonoff, Mara B

    2018-04-01

    Social media may be a useful supplement to physician and trainee interactions; however, its role in enhancing mentorship has not been described. A 35-item survey investigating trainee and physician social media use was distributed. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics. 282 respondents completed the survey, among whom 136 (48.2%) reported careers in surgical specialties. Women in surgical specialties were more likely to describe the specialty as being dominated by the opposite sex (p media to build a network of same-sex mentorship (p = 0.031). Social media serves as a valuable tool to enhance the networking and mentorship of surgeons, particularly for women in surgical specialties who may lack exposure to same-sex mentors at their own institution. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Trainee-Associated Factors and Proficiency at Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamir, Seyed Mohammad Kazem; Behtash, Negar; Hamidi, Morteza; Farahmand, Hasan; Salavati, Alborz; Mortaz Hejri, Sara

    2017-07-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) is a complicated procedure for urology trainees. This study was designed to investigate the effect of trainees' ages and previous experience, as well as the number of operated cases, on proficiency at PNL by using patient outcomes. A cross sectional observational study was designed during a five-year period. Trainees in PNL fellowship programs were included. At the end of the program, the trainees' performance in PNL was assessed regarding five competencies and scored 1-5. If the overall score was 4 or above, the trainee was considered as proficient. The trainees' age at the beginning of the program and the years passed from their residency graduation were asked and recorded. Also, the number of PNL cases operated by each trainee was obtained via their logbooks. The age, years passed from graduation, and number of operated cases were compared between two groups of proficient and non-proficient trainees. Univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate the effect of aforementioned variables on the occurrence of the proficiency. Forty-two trainees were included in the study. The mean and standard deviation for the overall score were 3.40 (out of 5) and 0.67, respectively. Eleven trainees (26.2%) recognized as proficient in performing PNL. Univariate regression analysis indicated that each of three variables (age, years passed from graduation and number of operated cases) had statistically significant effect on proficiency. However, the multivariate regression analysis revealed that just the number of cases had significant effect on achieving proficiency. Although it might be assumed that trainees' age negatively correlates with their scores, in fact, it is their amount of practice that makes a difference. A certain number of cases is required to be operated by a trainee in order to reach the desired competency in PNL.

  2. Gynaecological surgical training in the operating room : an exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Houwen, Clasien; Boor, Klarke; Essed, Gerard G. M.; Boendermaker, Peter M.; Scherpbier, Albert A. J. J. A.; Scheele, Fedde

    Objective: One of the challenging goals of gynaecological education is preparing trainees for independent practice of surgery. Research, however, on how to acquire surgical skills in the operating room safely, effectively and efficiently is scarce. We performed this study to explore trainers' and

  3. Information for New Trainees and Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellows and cancer research trainees will find information to support their onboarding at NCI, including stipend and tax information and NIH rules and regulations. Learn more about orientation for NCI trainees.

  4. Crowd-sourced assessment of technical skills: an adjunct to urology resident surgical simulation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Daniel; Kowalewski, Timothy M; White, Lee W; Brand, Timothy C; Harper, Jonathan D; Sorenson, Mathew D; Kirsch, Sarah; Lendvay, Thomas S

    2015-05-01

    Crowdsourcing is the practice of obtaining services from a large group of people, typically an online community. Validated methods of evaluating surgical video are time-intensive, expensive, and involve participation of multiple expert surgeons. We sought to obtain valid performance scores of urologic trainees and faculty on a dry-laboratory robotic surgery task module by using crowdsourcing through a web-based grading tool called Crowd Sourced Assessment of Technical Skill (CSATS). IRB approval was granted to test the technical skills grading accuracy of Amazon.com Mechanical Turk™ crowd-workers compared to three expert faculty surgeon graders. The two groups assessed dry-laboratory robotic surgical suturing performances of three urology residents (PGY-2, -4, -5) and two faculty using three performance domains from the validated Global Evaluative Assessment of Robotic Skills assessment tool. After an average of 2 hours 50 minutes, each of the five videos received 50 crowd-worker assessments. The inter-rater reliability (IRR) between the surgeons and crowd was 0.91 using Cronbach's alpha statistic (confidence intervals=0.20-0.92), indicating an agreement level between the two groups of "excellent." The crowds were able to discriminate the surgical level, and both the crowds and the expert faculty surgeon graders scored one senior trainee's performance above a faculty's performance. Surgery-naive crowd-workers can rapidly assess varying levels of surgical skill accurately relative to a panel of faculty raters. The crowds provided rapid feedback and were inexpensive. CSATS may be a valuable adjunct to surgical simulation training as requirements for more granular and iterative performance tracking of trainees become mandated and commonplace.

  5. Fuel wood symposium; Symposium Energieholz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, C.; Wauer, A. (comps.)

    2001-07-01

    The Bavarian State Institute of Forestry (LWF) organised a 'Fuel Wood Symposium' in Freising-Weihenstephan on 17.11.2000. The purpose of this specialist conference was to give an overview of the use of biomass, especially wood, as an source of energy. (orig.) [German] Die Bayerische Landesanstalt fuer Wald und Forstwirtschaft richtete am 17.11.2000 in Freising-Weihenstephan das 'Symposium Energieholz' aus. Ziel der Fachtagung war es, einen Ueberblick ueber die energetische Nutzung von Biomasse, insbesondere Holz, zu geben. (orig.)

  6. Piano instruction for nursery school trainees

    OpenAIRE

    新海, 節; Makoto, SHINKAI; 藤女子大学人間生活学部保育学科

    2012-01-01

    It is important piano instruction in childcare training schools be viewed primarily as "music for childcare". To this end,it is also important that the view of piano instruction for nursery school trainees be switched from one mainly focused on the technical aspects of performance using many etudes to a form of instruction based on developing the musicality of the trainees and their ability to display emotion through music. Further, through this instruction, the trainees need to develop the a...

  7. Effective and efficient learning in the operating theater with intraoperative video-enhanced surgical procedure training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Det, M J; Meijerink, W J H J; Hoff, C; Middel, B; Pierie, J P E N

    2013-08-01

    INtraoperative Video Enhanced Surgical procedure Training (INVEST) is a new training method designed to improve the transition from basic skills training in a skills lab to procedural training in the operating theater. Traditionally, the master-apprentice model (MAM) is used for procedural training in the operating theater, but this model lacks uniformity and efficiency at the beginning of the learning curve. This study was designed to investigate the effectiveness and efficiency of INVEST compared to MAM. Ten surgical residents with no laparoscopic experience were recruited for a laparoscopic cholecystectomy training curriculum either by the MAM or with INVEST. After a uniform course in basic laparoscopic skills, each trainee performed six cholecystectomies that were digitally recorded. For 14 steps of the procedure, an observer who was blinded for the type of training determined whether the step was performed entirely by the trainee (2 points), partially by the trainee (1 point), or by the supervisor (0 points). Time measurements revealed the total procedure time and the amount of effective procedure time during which the trainee acted as the operating surgeon. Results were compared between both groups. Trainees in the INVEST group were awarded statistically significant more points (115.8 vs. 70.2; p < 0.001) and performed more steps without the interference of the supervisor (46.6 vs. 18.8; p < 0.001). Total procedure time was not lengthened by INVEST, and the part performed by trainees was significantly larger (69.9 vs. 54.1 %; p = 0.004). INVEST enhances effectiveness and training efficiency for procedural training inside the operating theater without compromising operating theater time efficiency.

  8. Defining our destiny: trainee working group consensus statement on the future of emergency surgery training in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrock, A E; Gokani, V J; Harries, R L; Pearce, L; Smith, S R; Ali, O; Chu, H; Dubois, A; Ferguson, H; Humm, G; Marsden, M; Nepogodiev, D; Venn, M; Singh, S; Swain, C; Kirkby-Bott, J

    2015-01-01

    The United Kingdom National Health Service treats both elective and emergency patients and seeks to provide high quality care, free at the point of delivery. Equal numbers of emergency and elective general surgical procedures are performed, yet surgical training prioritisation and organisation of NHS institutions is predicated upon elective care. The increasing ratio of emergency general surgery consultant posts compared to traditional sub-specialities has yet to be addressed. How should the capability gap be bridged to equip motivated, skilled surgeons of the future to deliver a high standard of emergency surgical care? The aim was to address both training requirements for the acquisition of necessary emergency general surgery skills, and the formation of job plans for trainee and consultant posts to meet the current and future requirements of the NHS. Twenty nine trainees and a consultant emergency general surgeon convened as a Working Group at The Association of Surgeons in Training Conference, 2015, to generate a united consensus statement to the training requirement and delivery of emergency general surgery provision by future general surgeons. Unscheduled general surgical care provision, emergency general surgery, trauma competence, training to meet NHS requirements, consultant job planning and future training challenges arose as key themes. Recommendations have been made from these themes in light of published evidence. Careful workforce planning, education, training and fellowship opportunities will provide well-trained enthusiastic individuals to meet public and societal need.

  9. Influences of Radiology Trainees on Screening Mammography Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Jeffrey R; Taylor, Clayton R; Cubbison, Alyssa M; Erdal, B Selnur; Yildiz, Vedat O; Carkaci, Selin

    2016-05-01

    Participation of radiology trainees in screening mammographic interpretation is a critical component of radiology residency and fellowship training. The aim of this study was to investigate and quantify the effects of trainee involvement on screening mammographic interpretation and diagnostic outcomes. Screening mammograms interpreted at an academic medical center by six dedicated breast imagers over a three-year period were identified, with cases interpreted by an attending radiologist alone or in conjunction with a trainee. Trainees included radiology residents, breast imaging fellows, and fellows from other radiology subspecialties during breast imaging rotations. Trainee participation, patient variables, results of diagnostic evaluations, and pathology were recorded. A total of 47,914 mammograms from 34,867 patients were included, with an overall recall rate for attending radiologists reading alone of 14.7% compared with 18.0% when involving a trainee (P radiology trainees, with no change in cancer detection rate. Radiology faculty members should be aware of this potentiality and mitigate tendencies toward greater false positives. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. IUTAM Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    The International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (IUTAM) decided in 1992 to sponsor the fourth Symposium on Laminar-Turbulent Transition, Sendai/Japan, 1994. The objectives of the present Symposium were to deepen the fundamental knowledge of stability and laminar­ turbulent transition in three-dimensional and compressible flows and to contribute to recent developing technologies in the field. This Symposium followed the three previous IUTAM-Symposia (Stuttgart 1979, Novosibirsk 1984 and Toulouse 1989). The Scientific Committee selected two keynote lectures and 62 technical papers. The Symposium was held on the 5th to 9th of September, 1994, at the Sendai International Center in Sendai. The participants were 82 scientists from 10 countries. The keynote lectures have critically reviewed recent development of researches concerning the laminar-to-turbulent transition phenomena from the fundamental and the application aspects. Many papers presented were concerned about the detailed mechanism of the bo...

  11. Assessment methods in surgical training in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenios Evgeniou

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A career in surgery in the United Kingdom demands a commitment to a long journey of assessment. The assessment methods used must ensure that the appropriate candidates are selected into a programme of study or a job and must guarantee public safety by regulating the progression of surgical trainees and the certification of trained surgeons. This review attempts to analyse the psychometric properties of various assessment methods used in the selection of candidates to medical school, job selection, progression in training, and certification. Validity is an indicator of how well an assessment measures what it is designed to measure. Reliability informs us whether a test is consistent in its outcome by measuring the reproducibility and discriminating ability of the test. In the long journey of assessment in surgical training, the same assessment formats are frequently being used for selection into a programme of study, job selection, progression, and certification. Although similar assessment methods are being used for different purposes in surgical training, the psychometric properties of these assessment methods have not been examined separately for each purpose. Because of the significance of these assessments for trainees and patients, their reliability and validity should be examined thoroughly in every context where the assessment method is being used.

  12. Assessment of technical and nontechnical skills in surgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponton-Carss, Alicia; Kortbeek, John B; Ma, Irene W Y

    2016-11-01

    Surgical competence encompasses both technical and nontechnical skills. This study seeks to evaluate the validity evidence for a comprehensive surgical skills examination and to examine the relationship between technical and nontechnical skills. Six examination stations assessing both technical and nontechnical skills, conducted yearly for surgical trainees (n = 120) between 2010 and 2014 are included. The assessment tools demonstrated acceptable internal consistency. Interstation reliability for technical skills was low (alpha = .39). Interstation reliability for the nontechnical skills was lower (alpha range -.05 to .31). Nontechnical skills domains were strongly correlated, ranging from r = .65, P skills were inconsistent, ranging from poor (r = -.06; P = .54) to moderate (r = .45; P skills are necessary to assess overall surgical competency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Multidisciplinary crisis simulations: the way forward for training surgical teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undre, Shabnam; Koutantji, Maria; Sevdalis, Nick; Gautama, Sanjay; Selvapatt, Nowlan; Williams, Samantha; Sains, Parvinderpal; McCulloch, Peter; Darzi, Ara; Vincent, Charles

    2007-09-01

    High-reliability organizations have stressed the importance of non-technical skills for safety and of regularly providing such training to their teams. Recently safety skills training has been applied in the practice of medicine. In this study, we developed and piloted a module using multidisciplinary crisis scenarios in a simulated operating theatre to train entire surgical teams. Twenty teams participated (n = 80); each consisted of a trainee surgeon, anesthetist, operating department practitioner (ODP), and scrub nurse. Crisis scenarios such as difficult intubation, hemorrhage, or cardiac arrest were simulated. Technical and non-technical skills (leadership, communication, team skills, decision making, and vigilance), were assessed by clinical experts and by two psychologists using relevant technical and human factors rating scales. Participants received technical and non-technical feedback, and the whole team received feedback on teamwork. Trainees assessed the training favorably. For technical skills there were no differences between surgical trainees' assessment scores and the assessment scores of the trainers. However, nurses overrated their technical skill. Regarding non-technical skills, leadership and decision making were scored lower than the other three non-technical skills (communication, team skills, and vigilance). Surgeons scored lower than nurses on communication and teamwork skills. Surgeons and anesthetists scored lower than nurses on leadership. Multidisciplinary simulation-based team training is feasible and well received by surgical teams. Non-technical skills can be assessed alongside technical skills, and differences in performance indicate where there is a need for further training. Future work should focus on developing team performance measures for training and on the development and evaluation of systematic training for technical and non-technical skills to enhance team performance and safety in surgery.

  14. The Relationship of Endoscopic Proficiency to Educational Expense for Virtual Reality Simulator Training Amongst Surgical Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raque, Jessica; Goble, Adam; Jones, Veronica M; Waldman, Lindsey E; Sutton, Erica

    2015-07-01

    With the introduction of Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery, training methods in flexible endoscopy are being augmented with simulation-based curricula. The investment for virtual reality simulators warrants further research into its training advantage. Trainees were randomized into bedside or simulator training groups (BED vs SIM). SIM participated in a proficiency-based virtual reality curriculum. Trainees' endoscopic skills were rated using the Global Assessment of Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Skills (GAGES) in the patient care setting. The number of cases to reach 90 per cent of the maximum GAGES score and calculated costs of training were compared. Nineteen residents participated in the study. There was no difference in the average number of cases required to achieve 90 per cent of the maximum GAGES score for esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 13 (SIM) versus11 (BED) (P = 0.63), or colonoscopy 21 (SIM) versus 4 (BED) (P = 0.34). The average per case cost of training for esophagogastroduodenoscopy was $35.98 (SIM) versus $39.71 (BED) (P = 0.50), not including the depreciation costs associated with the simulator ($715.00 per resident over six years). Use of a simulator appeared to increase the cost of training without accelerating the learning curve or decreasing faculty time spent in instruction. The importance of simulation in endoscopy training will be predicated on more cost-effective simulators.

  15. Making robust assessments of specialist trainees' workplace performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, J M; Castanelli, D J; Chen, Y; Jolly, B

    2017-02-01

    Workplace-based assessments should provide a reliable measure of trainee performance, but have met with mixed success. We proposed that using an entrustability scale, where supervisors scored trainees on the level of supervision required for the case would improve the utility of compulsory mini-clinical evaluation exercise (CEX) assessments in a large anaesthesia training program. We analysed mini-CEX scores from all Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists trainees submitted to an online database over a 12-month period. Supervisors' scores were adjusted for the expected supervision requirement for the case for trainees at different stages of training. We used generalisability theory to determine score reliability. 7808 assessments were available for analysis. Supervision requirements decreased significantly (P  0.7) with a feasible number of assessments. Adjusting scores against the expected supervision requirement considerably improved reliability, with G > 0.8 achieved with only nine assessments. Three per cent of trainees generated average mini-CEX scores below the expected standard. Using an entrustment scoring system, where supervisors score trainees on the level of supervision required, mini-CEX scores demonstrated moderate reliability within a feasible number of assessments, and evidence of validity. When scores were adjusted against an expected standard, underperforming trainees could be identified, and reliability much improved. Taken together with other evidence on trainee ability, the mini-CEX is of sufficient reliability for inclusion in high stakes decisions on trainee progression towards independent specialist practice. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Auckland regional emergency medicine trainee mentoring uptake survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Gordon Michael Mike; Lawrey, Emma; Jones, Peter

    2017-10-01

    The primary objective of this study is to quantify how many Auckland region emergency medicine (EM) trainees would like a formal mentoring programme. The secondary objectives were to quantify how many Auckland region EM trainees would like to participate in a formal mentoring programme; to determine trainees' current understanding of mentoring; how trainees prefer mentors to be allocated; why trainees may want a mentor; what mentees perceive would be good qualities in a mentor; and trainees' prior experience with mentoring. Online survey of EM trainees in the Auckland region in June 2015. Of 61 potential respondents, 40 (65.6%) respondents replied to the survey. Of the 40, 38 (95%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 82.6-99.5) respondents indicated they would like some form of mentoring system, and of the 38, 25 (65.8%; 95% CI 49.8-78.9) preferred this to be formal. Of the 38, 19 (50%; 95% CI 34.9-65.2) currently wanted assistance obtaining a mentor. Of the 40, 30 (75%; 95% CI 59.6-86.0) are not currently in any form of mentoring relationship. Respondents believed that mentors would be most beneficial in critical incidents, career development and with work/life balance. The attributes participants considered most important in a mentor were respecting confidentiality, being honest and the ability to provide constructive feedback. Many EM trainees in Auckland want a formal mentoring system and would like a mentor. Appropriate mentor-mentee matching through a formalised voluntary system, with adequate mentor training, may enable the Auckland region to develop a suitable mentoring programme for EM trainees. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  17. A cross sectional study of surgical training among United Kingdom general practitioners with specialist interests in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, H J M; Fitzgerald, J E F; Reilly, J; Beamish, A J; Gokani, V J

    2015-04-08

    Increasing numbers of minor surgical procedures are being performed in the community. In the UK, general practitioners (family medicine physicians) with a specialist interest (GPwSI) in surgery frequently undertake them. This shift has caused decreases in available cases for junior surgeons to gain and consolidate operative skills. This study evaluated GPwSI's case-load, procedural training and perceptions of offering formalised operative training experience to surgical trainees. Prospective, questionnaire-based cross-sectional study. A novel, 13-item, self-administered questionnaire was distributed to members of the Association of Surgeons in Primary Care (ASPC). A total 113 of 120 ASPC members completed the questionnaire, representing a 94% response rate. Respondents were general practitioners practising or intending to practice surgery in the community. Respondents performed a mean of 38 (range 5-150) surgical procedures per month in primary care. 37% (42/113) of respondents had previously been awarded Membership or Fellowship of a Surgical Royal College; 22% (25/113) had completed a surgical certificate or diploma or undertaken a course of less than 1 year duration. 41% (46/113) had no formal British surgical qualifications. All respondents believed that surgical training in primary care could be valuable for surgical trainees, and the majority (71/113, 63%) felt that both general practice and surgical trainees could benefit equally from such training. There is a significant volume of surgical procedures being undertaken in the community by general practitioners, with the capacity and appetite for training of prospective surgeons in this setting, providing appropriate standards are achieved and maintained, commensurate with current standards in secondary care. Surgical experience and training of GPwSI's in surgery is highly varied, and does not yet benefit from the quality assurance secondary care surgical training in the UK undergoes. The Royal Colleges of

  18. Surgical trainees neuropraxia? An unusual case of compression of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Seoighe, D M

    2010-09-01

    Compression of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm is an uncommon diagnosis but has been associated with strenuous upper limb activity. We report the unique case of a 32-year-old male orthopaedic trainee who suffered this nerve palsy as a result of prolonged elbow extension and forearm pronation while the single assistant during a hip resurfacing procedure. Conservative measures were sufficient for sensory recovery to be clinically detectable after 12 weeks.

  19. Automatically rating trainee skill at a pediatric laparoscopic suturing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquendo, Yousi A; Riddle, Elijah W; Hiller, Dennis; Blinman, Thane A; Kuchenbecker, Katherine J

    2018-04-01

    Minimally invasive surgeons must acquire complex technical skills while minimizing patient risk, a challenge that is magnified in pediatric surgery. Trainees need realistic practice with frequent detailed feedback, but human grading is tedious and subjective. We aim to validate a novel motion-tracking system and algorithms that automatically evaluate trainee performance of a pediatric laparoscopic suturing task. Subjects (n = 32) ranging from medical students to fellows performed two trials of intracorporeal suturing in a custom pediatric laparoscopic box trainer after watching a video of ideal performance. The motions of the tools and endoscope were recorded over time using a magnetic sensing system, and both tool grip angles were recorded using handle-mounted flex sensors. An expert rated the 63 trial videos on five domains from the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (OSATS), yielding summed scores from 5 to 20. Motion data from each trial were processed to calculate 280 features. We used regularized least squares regression to identify the most predictive features from different subsets of the motion data and then built six regression tree models that predict summed OSATS score. Model accuracy was evaluated via leave-one-subject-out cross-validation. The model that used all sensor data streams performed best, achieving 71% accuracy at predicting summed scores within 2 points, 89% accuracy within 4, and a correlation of 0.85 with human ratings. 59% of the rounded average OSATS score predictions were perfect, and 100% were within 1 point. This model employed 87 features, including none based on completion time, 77 from tool tip motion, 3 from tool tip visibility, and 7 from grip angle. Our novel hardware and software automatically rated previously unseen trials with summed OSATS scores that closely match human expert ratings. Such a system facilitates more feedback-intensive surgical training and may yield insights into the fundamental

  20. Provision of general paediatric surgical services in a regional hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zgraj, O

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: In Ireland, specialist paediatric surgery is carried out in paediatric hospitals in Dublin. General surgeons\\/consultants in other surgical specialities provide paediatric surgical care in regional centres. There has been a failure to train general surgeons with paediatric skills to replace these surgeons upon retirement. AIM: To assess paediatric surgical workload in one regional centre to focus the debate regarding the future provision of general paediatric surgery in Ireland. METHODS: Hospital in-patient enquiry (HIPE) system was used to identify total number of paediatric surgical admissions and procedures. Cases assessed requiring hospital transfer. RESULTS: Of 17,478 surgical patients treated, 2,584 (14.8%) were under 14 years. A total of 2,154 procedures were performed. CONCLUSION: Regional centres without dedicated paediatric surgeons deliver care to large numbers of paediatric patients. The demand for care highlights the need for formal paediatric services\\/appropriate surgical training for general surgical trainees.

  1. The rationale for combining an online audiovisual curriculum with simulation to better educate general surgery trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJamal, Yazan N; Ali, Shahzad M; Ruparel, Raaj K; Brahmbhatt, Rushin D; Yadav, Siddhant; Farley, David R

    2014-09-01

    Surgery interns' training has historically been weighted toward patient care, operative observation, and sleeping when possible. With more protected free time and less clinical time, real educational hours for trainees in 2013 are precious. We created a 20-session (3 hours each) simulation curriculum (with pre- and post-tests) and a 24/7 online audiovisual (AV) curriculum for surgery interns. Friday morning simulation sessions emphasize operative skills and judgment. AV clips (using operating room, whiteboard, and simulation center videos) take learners through 20 different general surgery operations with follow-up quizzes. We report our early experience with this novel setup. Thirty-two surgical interns (2012-2013) attended simulation sessions on 20 separate subjects (hernia, breast, hepatobiliary, endocrine, etc). Post-test scores improved (P 4.5; Likert scale, 1-5). The AV curriculum feedback is similar (mean, >4.3) and usage is available 24/7 preparing learners for both operating room and simulation sessions. Most simulation sessions utilize low-fidelity models to keep costs <$50 per session. Scores on our semiannual Surgical Olympics (mean score of 49.6 in July vs 82.9 in January; P < .05) improved significantly, suggesting that interns are improving their surgical skills and knowledge. Residents enjoy and learn from the step-by-step, in-house, AV curriculum and both appreciate and thrive on the 'hands-on' simulation sessions mimicking operations they see in real operating rooms. The cost of these programs is not prohibitive and the programs offer simulated repetitions for duty-hour-regulated trainees. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Comparative Study of Surgical Training in South East Asia, Australia and The United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Kheong Lum

    2009-07-01

    Conclusion: Quality of training can be improved by changing to a curriculum and competency based model, utilization of continuous assessment methods, reducing service requirements and better compensation for trainers. Southeast Asia has the potential to provide centres of excellence for surgical training. Surgical educators in SEA will find useful information in this paper to improve their programs which will hopefully evolve into a common core curriculum and enable cross border exchange of surgical trainees in SEA for broader exposure.

  3. Description and evaluation of a bench porcine model for teaching surgical residents vascular anastomosis skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jauch Karl-Walter

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous models, of variable quality, exist to impart the complex skills required to perform vascular anastomosis. These models differ with regard to the kinds of materials used, as well as their sizes, the time needed for their preparation, their availability, and the associated costs. The present study describes a bench model that uses formalin-fixed porcine aorta, and its evaluation by young surgical residents during a recent skills course. Findings The aortic segments used were a by-product of slaughtering. They were fixed and stored after harvesting for eventual use. Ten young surgical residents participated, and each performed one end-to-side vascular anastomosis. The evaluation was a questionnaire maintaining anonymity of the participant containing questions addressing particular aspects of the model and the experiences of the trainee, along with their ratings concerning the need for a training course to learn vascular anastomosis techniques. The scoring on the survey was done using a global 6-point rating scale (Likert Scale. In addition, we ranked the present model by reviewing the current literature for models that address vascular anastomosis skills. The trainees who participated were within their first two years of training (1.25 ± 0.46. A strong agreement in terms of the necessity of training for vascular anastomosis techniques was evident among the participating trainees (5.90 ± 0.32, who had only few prior manual experiences (total number 1.50 ± 0.53. The query revealed a strong agreement that porcine aorta is a suitable model that fits the needs for training vascular anastomosis skills (5.70 ± 0.48. Only a few bench models designed to teach surgical residents vascular anastomosis techniques were available in the literature. Conclusions The preparatory and financial resources needed to perform anastomosis skills training using porcine aorta are few. The presented bench model appears to be appropriate for

  4. A Call for New Communication Channels for Gynecological Oncology Trainees: A Survey on Social Media Use and Educational Needs by the European Network of Young Gynecological Oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Kamil; Lindemann, Kristina; Halaska, Michael J; Zapardiel, Ignacio; Laky, Rene; Chereau, Elisabeth; Lindquist, David; Polterauer, Stephan; Sukhin, Vladislav; Dursun, Polat

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess patterns in the use of social media (SM) platforms and to identify the training needs among European gynecologic oncology trainees. In 2014, a web-based survey was sent to 633 trainees from the European Network of Young Gynaecological Oncologists (ENYGO) database. The 14-item questionnaire (partially using a 1- to 5-point Likert scale) assessed respondents' use of SM and preference for workshop content and organization. Descriptive analysis was used to describe the mean scores reported for different items, and the internal reliability of the questionnaire was assessed by Cronbach α. In total, 170 ENYGO members (27%) responded to the survey. Of those, 91% said that they use SM platforms, mostly for private purposes. Twenty-three percent used SM professionally and 43% indicated that they would consider SM to be a clinical discussion forum. The respondents said that they would like updates on conferences and professional activities to be shared on SM platforms. Complication management, surgical anatomy, and state of the art in gynecologic oncology were identified as preferred workshops topics. The most frequently indicated hands-on workshops were laparoscopic techniques and surgical anatomy. Consultants attached a higher level of importance to palliative care education and communication training than trainees. The mean duration of the workshop preferred was 2 days. This report highlights the significance of ENYGO trainees' attachment to SM platforms. Most respondents expect ENYGO to use these online channels for promoting educational activities and other updates. Using SM for clinical discussion will require specific guidelines to secure professional and also consumer integrity. This survey confirms surgical management and the state of the art as important knowledge gaps, and ENYGO has tailored its activities according to these results. Future activities will further direct attention and resources to education in palliative care and

  5. Understanding Trainees' Perception Concerning the Educational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Trainees' skills and the teaching process can be improved by consideration of candidates' views. Aim: To find out the trainees' perception and views about the features and teaching methods of the Family Practice Training Program (FPSTP) in Kuwait to upgrade its standard. Methods: The study design is cross ...

  6. Female Surgeons as Counter Stereotype: The Impact of Gender Perceptions on Trainee Evaluations of Physician Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassiotto, Magali; Li, Jie; Maldonado, Yvonne; Kothary, Nishita

    2018-02-02

    Similar to women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics disciplines, women in medicine are subject to negative stereotyping when they do not adhere to their sex-role expectations. These biases may vary by specialty, largely dependent on the gender's representation in that specialty. Thus, females in male-dominated surgical specialties are especially at risk of stereotype threat. Herein, we present the role of gender expectations using trainee evaluations of physician faculty at a single academic center, over a 5-year period (2010-2014). Using Graduate Medical Education evaluation data of physician faculty from MedHub, we examined the differences in evaluation scores for male and female physicians within specialties that have traditionally had low female representation (e.g., surgical fields) compared to those with average or high female representation (e.g., pediatrics). Stanford Medicine residents and fellows' MedHub ratings of their physician faculty from 2010 to 2014. A total of 3648 evaluations across 1066 physician faculty. Overall, female physicians received lower median scores than their male counterparts across all specialties. When using regression analyses controlling for race, age, rank, and specialty-specific characteristics, the negative effect persists only for female physicians in specialties with low female representation. This finding suggests that female physicians in traditionally male-dominated specialties may face different criteria based on sex-role expectations when being evaluated by trainees. As trainee evaluations play an important role in career advancement decisions, dictate perceptions of quality within academic medical centers and affect overall job satisfaction, we propose that these differences in evaluations based merely on gender stereotypes could account, in part, for the narrowing pipeline of women promoted to higher ranks in academic medicine. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published

  7. 4th Abel Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Friedlander, Eric; Jahren, Björn; Østvær, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The 2007 Abel Symposium took place at the University of Oslo in August 2007. The goal of the symposium was to bring together mathematicians whose research efforts have led to recent advances in algebraic geometry, algebraic K-theory, algebraic topology, and mathematical physics. A common theme of this symposium was the development of new perspectives and new constructions with a categorical flavor. As the lectures at the symposium and the papers of this volume demonstrate, these perspectives and constructions have enabled a broadening of vistas, a synergy between once-differentiated subjects, and solutions to mathematical problems both old and new.

  8. Avoiding Surgical Skill Decay: A Systematic Review on the Spacing of Training Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecilio-Fernandes, Dario; Cnossen, Fokie; Jaarsma, Debbie A D C; Tio, René A

    Spreading training sessions over time instead of training in just 1 session leads to an improvement of long-term retention for factual knowledge. However, it is not clear whether this would also apply to surgical skills. Thus, we performed a systematic review to find out whether spacing training sessions would also improve long-term retention of surgical skills. We searched the Medline, PsycINFO, Embase, Eric, and Web of Science online databases. We only included articles that were randomized trials with a sample of medical trainees acquiring surgical motor skills in which the spacing effect was reported. The quality and bias of the articles were assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias assessment tool. With respect to the spacing effect, 1955 articles were retrieved. After removing duplicates and articles that did not meet the inclusion criteria, 11 articles remained. The overall quality of the experiments was "moderate." Trainees in the spaced condition scored higher in a retention test than students in the massed condition. Our systematic review showed evidence that spacing training sessions improves long-term surgical skills retention when compared to massed practice. However, the optimal gap between the re-study sessions is unclear. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Preoperative Site Marking: Are We Adhering to Good Surgical Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathla, Sonia; Chadwick, Michael; Nevins, Edward J; Seward, Joanna

    2017-06-29

    Wrong-site surgery is a never event and a serious, preventable patient safety incident. Within the United Kingdom, national guidance has been issued to minimize the risk of such events. The mandate includes preoperative marking of all surgical patients. This study aimed to quantify regional variation in practice within general surgery and opinions of the surgeons, to help guide the formulation and implementation of a regional general surgery preoperative marking protocol. A SurveyMonkey questionnaire was designed and distributed to 120 surgeons within the Mersey region, United Kingdom. This included all surgical trainees in Mersey (47 registrars, 56 core trainees), 15 consultants, and 2 surgical care practitioners. This sought to ascertain their routine practice and how they would choose to mark for 12 index procedures in general surgery, if mandated to do so. A total of 72 responses (60%) were obtained to the SurveyMonkey questionnaire. Only 26 (36.1%) said that they routinely marked all of their patients preoperatively. The operating surgeon marked the patient in 69% of responses, with the remainder delegating this task. Markings were visible after draping in only 55.6% of marked cases. Based on our findings, surgeons may not be adhering to "Good Surgical Practice"; practice is widely variable and surgeons are largely opposed and resistant to marking patients unless laterality is involved. We suggest that all surgeons need to be actively engaged in the design of local marking protocols to gain support, change practice, and reduce errors.

  10. [New Approaches for Young Surgeons - Students' Symposium on Minimally Invasive Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roch, Paul Jonathan; Friedrich, Mirco; Kowalewski, Karl-Friedrich; Schmidt, Mona Wanda; Herrera, Javier De la Garza; Müller, Philip Christoph; Benner, Laura; Romero, Philipp; Müller-Stich, Beat Peter; Nickel, Felix

    2017-12-01

    Background Physician shortage is particularly striking in surgical specialities. Umbrella organisations are making an effort to recruit medical students. Students' symposia during congresses seem to provide a promising approach to developing motivation and promoting interest. An exemplary students' symposium took place at the three nations meeting for minimally invasive surgery (MIS). Our aim was to evaluate the students' symposium from the students' perspective, in order to give recommendations for the future. Methods Of a total of 60 participants, half (30/60) completed the survey. Using a 5-point Likert scale, students evaluated items on the agenda, increase in interests, personal benefit and likelihood of future participation. Results Sixty percent (18/30) of the participants in the student forum reported enhanced interest in MIC - the largest increase found. For surgery in general and for robotic surgery in particular, an increase was reported by 57% (17/30) of the students. Of all the items on the agenda, laparoscopic hands-on experience was rated best - with a positive rating from 90% (27/30) of the students. Students expressed the wish for improved personal exchange with experts and professionals. Two thirds (40/60) of the students stated that future participation was definite or very likely. Discussion The increase in interest in MIS and surgery in general demonstrated the success of the students' symposium. Hands-on experiences was very popular. Future events should focus on personal exchange between students and experts. This seems necessary to reduce prejudice in the debate on a well-adjusted work-life balance. With a view to physician shortage in surgical specialties, students' symposia are a valuable option that should be firmly established and consistently developed. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Evaluation of Augmented Reality Feedback in Surgical Training Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahiri, Mohsen; Nelson, Carl A; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Siu, Ka-Chun

    2018-02-01

    Providing computer-based laparoscopic surgical training has several advantages that enhance the training process. Self-evaluation and real-time performance feedback are 2 of these advantages, which avoid dependency of trainees on expert feedback. The goal of this study was to investigate the use of a visual time indicator as real-time feedback correlated with the laparoscopic surgical training. Twenty novices participated in this study working with (and without) different presentations of time indicators. They performed a standard peg transfer task, and their completion times and muscle activity were recorded and compared. Also of interest was whether the use of this type of feedback induced any side effect in terms of motivation or muscle fatigue. Of the 20 participants, 15 (75%) preferred using a time indicator in the training process rather than having no feedback. However, time to task completion showed no significant difference in performance with the time indicator; furthermore, no significant differences in muscle activity or muscle fatigue were detected with/without time feedback. The absence of significant difference between task performance with/without time feedback shows that using visual real-time feedback can be included in surgical training based on user preference. Trainees may benefit from this type of feedback in the form of increased motivation. The extent to which this can influence training frequency leading to performance improvement is a question for further study.

  12. Peer mentoring for core medical trainees: uptake and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jessica; Brightwell, Alexandra; Sarkar, Pamela; Rabbie, Roy; Chakravorty, Indranil

    2015-04-01

    To assess the uptake and impact of a peer mentoring scheme for core medical trainees on both mentors and mentees. All second year core medical trainees in the Southwest London Training programme in September 2012 were invited to mentor a first year core medical trainee. In parallel, all first year core medical trainees were invited to be mentored. Both potential mentors and mentees were asked to submit personal statements, to attend a three-session mentoring training programme and to be matched into mentoring pairs. The impact of the mentoring scheme on trainees' behaviour and outlook was assessed through questionnaires distributed at the start and at the end of the year. 31 of 72 (43%) core medical trainees submitted personal statements and 40 of 72 (56%) attended training sessions. 42 trainees (58%) participated in the scheme (21 mentor/mentee pairs were established). Of the trainees who participated, 23 of 42 (55%) completed the end of year questionnaire. Participating trainees viewed the scheme positively. Reported benefits included changes in their behaviour and acquiring transferable skills that might help them in later career roles, such as an educational supervisor. The end of year questionnaire was sent to all trainees and 10 responded who had not participated. They were asked why they had not participated and their reasons included lack of time, lack of inclination and a desire for more senior mentors. Their suggestions for improvement included more structured sessions to allow the mentor/mentee pairs to meet. This simple peer mentoring scheme was popular despite busy workloads and benefited all concerned. It is a simple effective way of supporting doctors. More work is needed to improve training for mentors and to improve access to mentoring. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Job burnout in 159 anesthesiology trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesim Cokay Abut

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anesthesiology may be stressful and most anesthesiologists develop mechanisms for coping. However, inexperienced trainee anesthesiologists seem to be vulnerable. We studied stress perception and job burnout in trainee anesthesiologists. Methods: Responses to perceived stress scale (PSS and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI were evaluated in 159 trainee anesthesiologists. Results: In our results, when perceived stress was increased, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization increased but personal accomplishment decreased, as expected. Perceived stress was very high in the early years of training. There was a negative correlation between age and emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, but positive correlation with personal accomplishment. Female anesthesiologists had higher personal accomplishment, but lower depersonalization points than male anesthesiologists in our study. There was no statistical association between marital status, PSS, and MBI; ≥2 children group had a significant high personal accomplishment but low depersonalization and emotional exhaustion scores. Line regression analysis showed a statistically significant relationship between PSS and emotional exhaustion and between age and depersonalization. Conclusions: Social factors such as gender and number of children affect the work life of our trainees.

  14. Comprehensive feedback on trainee surgeons’ non-technical skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, Peter; Beier-Holgersen, Randi; Rosenberg, Jacob; Oestergaard, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to explore the content of conversations, feedback style, and perceived usefulness of feedback to trainee surgeons when conversations were stimulated by a tool for assessing surgeons’ non-technical skills. Methods Trainee surgeons and their supervisors used the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons in Denmark tool to stimulate feedback conversations. Audio recordings of post-operation feedback conversations were collected. Trainees and supervisors provided questionnaire responses on the usefulness and comprehensiveness of the feedback. The feedback conversations were qualitatively analyzed for content and feedback style. Usefulness was investigated using a scale from 1 to 5 and written comments were qualitatively analyzed. Results Six trainees and six supervisors participated in eight feedback conversations. Eighty questionnaires (response rate 83 percent) were collected from 13 trainees and 12 supervisors. Conversations lasted median eight (2-15) minutes. Supervisors used the elements and categories in the tool to structure the content of the conversations. Supervisors tended to talk about the trainees’ actions and their own frames rather than attempting to understand the trainees’ perceptions. Supervisors and trainees welcomed the feedback opportunity and agreed that the conversations were useful and comprehensive. Conclusions The content of the feedback conversations reflected the contents of the tool and the feedback was considered useful and comprehensive. However, supervisors talked primarily about their own frames, so in order for the feedback to reach its full potential, supervisors may benefit from training techniques to stimulate a deeper reflection among trainees. PMID:25602262

  15. What do gastroenterology trainees want: recognition, remuneration or recreation?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, G C

    2010-07-27

    BACKGROUND: Occupational psychologists have identified three factors important in motivating physicians: financial reward, academic recognition, time off. AIM: To assess motivators among gastroenterology (GI) trainees. METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to GI trainees to assess their motivators: (1) work fewer hours for less lucrative rate, (2) reduction in salary\\/increase in hours for academic protected time, and (3) work longer hours for higher total salary, but less lucrative hourly rate. RESULTS: Overall, 61 trainees responded; 52% of trainees would work shorter hours for less lucrative rate; 60% would accept a disproportionate reduction in salary\\/increase in hours for academic protected time; 54% would work longer hours for more money but less lucrative rate. Most trainees (93%) accepted at least one scenario. CONCLUSIONS: Most GI trainees are willing to modify their job description to align with their personal values. Tailoring job descriptions according to these values can yield economic benefits to GI Divisions.

  16. What do gastroenterology trainees want: recognition, remuneration or recreation?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, G C

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Occupational psychologists have identified three factors important in motivating physicians: financial reward, academic recognition, time off. AIM: To assess motivators among gastroenterology (GI) trainees. METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to GI trainees to assess their motivators: (1) work fewer hours for less lucrative rate, (2) reduction in salary\\/increase in hours for academic protected time, and (3) work longer hours for higher total salary, but less lucrative hourly rate. RESULTS: Overall, 61 trainees responded; 52% of trainees would work shorter hours for less lucrative rate; 60% would accept a disproportionate reduction in salary\\/increase in hours for academic protected time; 54% would work longer hours for more money but less lucrative rate. Most trainees (93%) accepted at least one scenario. CONCLUSIONS: Most GI trainees are willing to modify their job description to align with their personal values. Tailoring job descriptions according to these values can yield economic benefits to GI Divisions.

  17. Trainee-Associated Factors and Proficiency at Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Kazem Aghamir

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL is a complicated procedure for urology trainees. This study was designed to investigate the effect of trainees’ ages and previous experience, as well as the number of operated cases, on proficiency at PNL by using patient outcomes. A cross sectional observational study was designed during a five-year period. Trainees in PNL fellowship programs were included. At the end of the program, the trainees’ performance in PNL was assessed regarding five competencies and scored 1-5. If the overall score was 4 or above, the trainee was considered as proficient. The trainees’ age at the beginning of the program and the years passed from their residency graduation were asked and recorded. Also, the number of PNL cases operated by each trainee was obtained via their logbooks. The age, years passed from graduation, and number of operated cases were compared between two groups of proficient and non-proficient trainees. Univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate the effect of aforementioned variables on the occurrence of the proficiency. Forty-two trainees were included in the study. The mean and standard deviation for the overall score were 3.40 (out of 5 and 0.67, respectively. Eleven trainees (26.2% recognized as proficient in performing PNL. Univariate regression analysis indicated that each of three variables (age, years passed from graduation and number of operated cases had statistically significant effect on proficiency. However, the multivariate regression analysis revealed that just the number of cases had significant effect on achieving proficiency. Although it might be assumed that trainees’ age negatively correlates with their scores, in fact, it is their amount of practice that makes a difference. A certain number of cases is required to be operated by a trainee in order to reach the desired competency in PNL.

  18. Paediatric trainee supervision: management changes and perceived education value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boom, Mirjam; Pinnock, Ralph; Weller, Jennifer; Reed, Peter; Shulruf, Boaz

    2012-07-01

    Supervision in postgraduate training is an under-researched area. We measured the amount, type and effect of supervision on patient care and perceived education value in a general paediatric service. We designed a structured observation form and questionnaire to document the type, duration and effect of supervision on patient management and perceived education value. Most supervision occurred without the paediatrician confirming the trainee's findings. Direct observation of the trainee was rare. Management was changed in 30% of patients seen on the inpatient ward round and in 42% of the patients discussed during the chart reviews but not seen by the paediatrician. Management was changed in 48% of the cases when the paediatrician saw the patient with the trainee in outpatients but in only 21% of patients when the patient was but not seen. Changes made to patient management, understanding and perceived education value, differed between inpatient and out patient settings. There was more impact when the paediatrician saw the patient with the trainee in outpatients; while for inpatients, the opposite was true. Trainees rated the value of the supervision more highly than their supervisors did. Trainees' comments on what they learnt from their supervisor related almost exclusively to clinical knowledge rather than professional behaviours. We observed little evidence of supervisors directly observing trainees and trainees learning professional behaviours. A review of supervisory practices to promote more effective learning is needed. Communicating to paediatricians the value their trainees place on their input could have a positive effect on their engagement in supervision. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2012 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  19. Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery (APDVS) survey of program selection, knowledge acquisition, and education provided as viewed by vascular trainees from two different training paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsing, Michael C; Makaroun, Michel S; Harris, Linda M; Mills, Joseph L; Eidt, John; Eckert, George J

    2012-02-01

    Methods of learning may differ between generations and even the level of training or the training paradigm, or both. To optimize education, it is important to optimize training designs, and the perspective of those being trained can aid in this quest. The Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery leadership sent a survey to all vascular surgical trainees (integrated [0/5], independent current and new graduates [5 + 2]) addressing various aspects of the educational experience. Of 412 surveys sent, 163 (∼40%) responded: 46 integrated, 96 fellows, and 21 graduates. The survey was completed by 52% of the integrated residents, 59% of the independent residents, and 20% of the graduates. When choosing a program for training, the integrated residents are most concerned with program atmosphere and the independent residents with total clinical volume. Concerns after training were thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysm procedures and business aspects: 40% to 50% integrated, and 60% fellows/graduates. Integrated trainees found periprocedural discussion the best feedback (79%), with 9% favoring written test review. Surgical training and vascular laboratory and venous training were judged "just right" by 87% and ∼71%, whereas business aspects needed more emphasis (65%-70%). Regarding the 80-hour workweek, 82% felt it prevented fatigue, and 24% thought it was detrimental to patient care. Independent program trainees also found periprocedural discussion the best feedback (71%), with 12% favoring written test review. Surgical training and vascular laboratory/venous training were "just right" by 87% and 60% to 70%, respectively, whereas business aspects needed more emphasis (∼65%-70%). Regarding the 80-hour workweek, 62% felt it was detrimental to patient care, and 42% felt it prevented fatigue. A supportive environment and adequate clinical volume will attract trainees to a program. For "an urgent need to know," the integrated trainees are especially turning to

  20. Creating an animation-enhanced video library of hepato-pancreato-biliary and transplantation surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Albert; Kelly, Paul; Tait, Gordon; Greig, Paul D; McGilvray, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    The potential for integrating real-time surgical video and state-of-the art animation techniques has not been widely applied to surgical education. This paper describes the use of new technology for creating videos of liver, pancreas and transplant surgery, annotating them with 3D animations, resulting in a freely-accessible online resource: The Toronto Video Atlas of Liver, Pancreas and Transplant Surgery ( http://tvasurg.ca ). The atlas complements the teaching provided to trainees in the operating room, and the techniques described in this study can be readily adapted by other surgical training programmes.

  1. Future career intentions of higher specialist trainees in general Paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Grainne; Breatnach, Colm; Harty, Sinead; Gavin, Patrick; O'Donnell, Colm; O'Grady, Michael J

    2018-03-27

    A survey of paediatric higher specialist trainees was carried out in 2002 assessing career intentions and perception of training. Fourteen years later, with increased numbers of trainees and a national model of care and a tertiary paediatric hospital on the horizon, we re-evaluated the career intentions of the current trainee workforce. To assess the career intentions of the current paediatric higher specialist trainees. A 28-item questionnaire was developed based on a previously validated instrument and distributed online using the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland trainee database. We distributed the questionnaire to 118 eligible trainees and received responses from 92 (78%). Seventy-nine (86%) respondents desire a consultant post in Ireland. Seventy-five (82%) indicated that their preferred consultant post location was in a tertiary paediatric centre. Sixty-two trainees (67%) intend to become subspecialists with 25 (27%) planning a career in general paediatrics. This contrasts with the 2002 survey when 76% wished to work in urban centres and 61% of trainees planned a career in general paediatrics. There appears to be a mismatch between the career goals of the future paediatric consultant workforce and the requirements for staffing paediatric units nationally. This has the potential to complicate the proposed expansion of general paediatricians in regional centres and result in a significant proportion of current trainees failing to secure a post in their desired location.

  2. Mentor Tutoring: An Efficient Method for Teaching Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgical Skills in a General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Nobuki; Homma, Shigenori; Yoshida, Tadashi; Ohno, Yosuke; Kawamura, Hideki; Wakizaka, Kazuki; Nakanishi, Kazuaki; Kazui, Keizo; Iijima, Hiroaki; Shomura, Hiroki; Funakoshi, Tohru; Nakano, Shiro; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2017-12-01

    We retrospectively assessed the efficacy of our mentor tutoring system for teaching laparoscopic colorectal surgical skills in a general hospital. A series of 55 laparoscopic colectomies performed by 1 trainee were evaluated. Next, the learning curves for high anterior resection performed by the trainee (n=20) were compared with those of a self-trained surgeon (n=19). Cumulative sum analysis and multivariate regression analyses showed that 38 completed cases were needed to reduce the operative time. In high anterior resection, the mean operative times were significantly shorter after the seventh average for the tutored surgeon compared with that for the self-trained surgeon. In cumulative sum charting, the curve reached a plateau by the seventh case for the tutored surgeon, but continued to increase for the self-trained surgeon. Mentor tutoring effectively teaches laparoscopic colorectal surgical skills in a general hospital setting.

  3. Fourth Tennessee water resources symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sale, M.J.; Presley, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    The annual Tennessee Water Resources Symposium was initiated in 1988 as a means to bring together people with common interests in the state's important water-related resources at a technical, professional level. Initially the symposium was sponsored by the American Institute of Hydrology and called the Hydrology Symposium, but the Tennessee Section of the American Water Resources Association (AWRA) has taken on the primary coordination role for the symposium over the last two years and the symposium name was changed in 1990 to water resources to emphasize a more inter-disciplinary theme. This year's symposium carries on the successful tradition of the last three years. Our goal is to promote communication and cooperation among Tennessee's water resources professionals: scientists, engineers, and researchers from federal, state, academic, and private institutions and organizations who have interests and responsibilities for the state's water resources. For these conference proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base

  4. Fresh frozen cadaver workshops for advanced vascular surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Shirley; Cowie, Margaret; Linehan, John; Hamdorf, Jeffery M

    2014-11-01

    Reduction in working hours, streamlined training schemes and increasing use of endovascular techniques has meant a reduction in operative experience for newer vascular surgical trainees, especially those exposures which are not routinely performed such as thoracoabdominal, thoracotomy and retroperitoneal aortic, for example. This paper describes an Advanced Anatomy of Exposure course which was designed and convened at the Clinical Training & Evaluation Centre in Western Australia and uses fresh frozen cadavers. Feedback was obtained from the participants who attended over three courses by questionnaire. Feedback was strongly positive for the course meeting both its learning outcomes and personal learning objectives, and in addition, making a significant contribution to specialty skills. Most participants thought the fresh frozen cadaveric model significantly improved the learning objectives for training. The fresh frozen cadaver is an excellent teaching model highly representative of the living open surgical scenario where advanced trainees and newly qualified consultants can improve their operative confidence and consequently patient safety in vascular surgery. An efficient fresh frozen cadaver teaching programme can benefit many health professionals simultaneously maximizing the use of donated human tissue. © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  5. Deafness among physicians and trainees: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, Christopher J; Latimore, Darin; Sen, Ananda; Arato, Nora; Zazove, Philip

    2013-02-01

    To describe the characteristics of and accommodations used by the deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHoH) physician and trainee population and examine whether these individuals are more likely to care for DHoH patients. Multipronged snowball sampling identified 86 potential DHoH physician and trainee participants. In July to September 2010, a Web-based survey investigated accommodations used by survey respondents. The authors analyzed participants' demographics, accommodation and career satisfaction, sense of institutional support, likelihood of recommending medicine as a career, and current/anticipated DHoH patient population size. The response rate was 65% (56 respondents; 31 trainees and 25 practicing physicians). Modified stethoscopes were the most frequently used accommodation (n = 50; 89%); other accommodations included auditory equipment, note-taking, computer-assisted real-time captioning, signed interpretation, and oral interpretation. Most respondents reported that their accommodations met their needs well, although 2 spent up to 10 hours weekly arranging accommodations. Of 25 physicians, 17 reported primary care specialties; 7 of 31 trainees planned to enter primary care specialties. Over 20% of trainees anticipated working with DHoH patients, whereas physicians on average spent 10% of their time with DHoH patients. Physicians' accommodation satisfaction was positively associated with career satisfaction and recommending medicine as a career. DHoH physicians and trainees seemed satisfied with frequent, multimodal accommodations from employers and educators. These results may assist organizations in planning accommodation provisions. Because DHoH physicians and trainees seem interested in primary care and serving DHoH patients, recruiting and training DHoH physicians has implications for the care of this underserved population.

  6. Adaptive leadership curriculum for Indian paramedic trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantha, Aditya; Coggins, Nathaniel L; Mahadevan, Aditya; Strehlow, Rebecca N; Strehlow, Matthew C; Mahadevan, S V

    2016-12-01

    Paramedic trainees in developing countries face complex and chaotic clinical environments that demand effective leadership, communication, and teamwork. Providers must rely on non-technical skills (NTS) to manage bystanders and attendees, collaborate with other emergency professionals, and safely and appropriately treat patients. The authors designed a NTS curriculum for paramedic trainees focused on adaptive leadership, teamwork, and communication skills critical to the Indian prehospital environment. Forty paramedic trainees in the first academic year of the 2-year Advanced Post-Graduate Degree in Emergency Care (EMT-paramedic equivalent) program at the GVK-Emergency Management and Research Institute campus in Hyderabad, India, participated in the 6-day leadership course. Trainees completed self-assessments and delivered two brief video-recorded presentations before and after completion of the curriculum. Independent blinded observers scored the pre- and post-intervention presentations delivered by 10 randomly selected paramedic trainees. The third-party judges reported significant improvement in both confidence (25 %, p leadership (2.6 vs. 4.6, p confidence (3.0 vs. 4.8, p leadership curriculum for prehospital providers demonstrated significant improvement in self-reported NTS commonly required of paramedics in the field. The authors recommend integrating focused NTS development curriculum into Indian paramedic education and further evaluation of the long term impacts of this adaptive leadership training.

  7. The Interventional Arm of the Flexibility In Duty-Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees Trial: First-Year Data Show Superior Quality In-Training Initiative Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmehdi, Issa; O'Neal, Cindy-Marie; Moon, Davis; MacNew, Heather; Senkowski, Christopher

    With the implementation of strict 80-hour work week in general surgery training, serious questions have been raised concerning the quality of surgical education and the ability of newly trained general surgeons to independently operate. Programs that were randomized to the interventional arm of the Flexibility In duty-hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial were able to decrease transitions and allow for better continuity by virtue of less constraints on duty-hour rules. Using National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Quality In-Training Initiative data along with duty-hour violations compared with old rules, it was hypothesized that quality of care would be improved and outcomes would be equivalent or better than the traditional duty-hour rules. It was also hypothesized that resident perception of compliance with duty hour would not change with implementation of new regulations based on FIRST trial. Flexible work hours were implemented on July 1, 2014. National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Quality In-Training Initiative information was reviewed from July 2014 to January 2015. Patient risk factors and outcomes were compared between institutional resident cases and the national cohort for comparison. Residents' duty-hour logs and violations during this period were compared to the 6-month period before the implementation of the FIRST trial. The annual Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education resident survey was used to assess the residents' perception of compliance with duty hours. With respect to the postoperative complications, the only statistically significant measures were higher prevalence of pneumonia (3.4% vs. 1.5%, p flexible duty hours. All other measures of postoperative surgical complications showed no difference. The total number of duty-hour violations decreased from 54 to 16. Had the institution not been part of the interventional arm of the FIRST trial, this number would have increased to 238. The residents

  8. COST 516 Tribology Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronkainen, H.; Holmberg, K. [eds.

    1998-11-01

    Cost 516 Tribology action is the first joint European research action focusing on tribology, which originates in the approval of its Memorandum of understanding in February 1994. The COST 516 Tribology Symposium took place in Espoo, Finland from 14th to 15th May 1998. This was the first Symposium of the COST 516 Tribology action. The large number of research contributions at the Symposium, altogether almost SO, and their scientific and technical level, is an indication of the importance and significance of tribology research. The symposium proceedings contain papers in a wide variety of subjects, covering the three categories of the COST 516 Tribology action, namely Grease lubrication (GRIT), Tribology of renewable environmentally adapted lubricants (REAL) and Coatings and surface treatments (CAST). (orig.)

  9. Attitudes towards attrition among UK trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology

    OpenAIRE

    Gafson, I.; Currie, J.; O Dwyer, S.; Woolf, K.; Griffin, A.

    2017-01-01

    Physician dissatisfaction in the workplace has consequences for patient safety. Currently in the UK, 1 in 5 doctors who enter specialist training in obstetrics and gynaecology leave the programme before completion. Trainee attrition has implications for workforce planning, organization of health-care services and patient care. The authors conducted a survey of current trainees' and former trainees' views concerning attrition and ‘peri-attrition’ – a term coined to describe the trainee who has...

  10. ACGME core competency training, mentorship, and research in surgical subspecialty fellowship programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesca Monn, M; Wang, Ming-Hsien; Gilson, Marta M; Chen, Belinda; Kern, David; Gearhart, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    To determine the perceived effectiveness of surgical subspecialty training programs in teaching and assessing the 6 ACGME core competencies including research. Cross-sectional survey. ACGME approved training programs in pediatric urology and colorectal surgery. Program Directors and recent trainees (2007-2009). A total of 39 program directors (60%) and 57 trainees (64%) responded. Both program directors and recent trainees reported a higher degree of training and mentorship (75%) in patient care and medical knowledge than the other core competencies (pinterpersonal and communication, and professionalism training were perceived effective to a lesser degree. Specifically, in the areas of teaching residents and medical students and team building, program directors, compared with recent trainees, perceived training to be more effective, (p = 0.004, p = 0.04). Responses to questions assessing training in systems based practice ubiquitously identified a lack of training, particularly in financial matters of running a practice. Although effective training in research was perceived as lacking by recent trainees, 81% reported mentorship in this area. According to program directors and recent trainees, the most effective method of teaching was faculty supervision and feedback. Only 50% or less of the recent trainees reported mentorship in career planning, work-life balance, and job satisfaction. Not all 6 core competencies and research are effectively being taught in surgery subspecialty training programs and mentorship in areas outside of patient care and research is lacking. Emphasis should be placed on faculty supervision and feedback when designing methods to better incorporate all 6 core competencies, research, and mentorship. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Seventh International Beaver Symposium

    OpenAIRE

    Yuri A. Gorshkov

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents data on the seventh international Beaver Symposium. Brief historical background about previous Beaver Symposia beaver is shown. Data on the sections of symposium, number of participants and reports are presented.

  12. Self-entrustment: how trainees' self-regulated learning supports participation in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagasser, Margaretha H; Kramer, Anneke W M; Fluit, Cornelia R M G; van Weel, Chris; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2017-10-01

    Clinical workplaces offer postgraduate trainees a wealth of opportunities to learn from experience. To promote deliberate and meaningful learning self-regulated learning skills are foundational. We explored trainees' learning activities related to patient encounters to better understand what aspects of self-regulated learning contribute to trainees' development, and to explore supervisor's role herein. We conducted a qualitative non-participant observational study in seven general practices. During two days we observed trainee's patient encounters, daily debriefing sessions and educational meetings between trainee and supervisor and interviewed them separately afterwards. Data collection and analysis were iterative and inspired by a phenomenological approach. To organise data we used networks, time-ordered matrices and codebooks. Self-regulated learning supported trainees to increasingly perform independently. They engaged in self-regulated learning before, during and after encounters. Trainees' activities depended on the type of medical problem presented and on patient, trainee and supervisor characteristics. Trainees used their sense of confidence to decide if they could manage the encounter alone or if they should consult their supervisor. They deliberately used feedback on their performance and engaged in reflection. Supervisors appeared vital in trainees' learning by reassuring trainees, discussing experience, knowledge and professional issues, identifying possible unawareness of incompetence, assessing performance and securing patient safety. Self-confidence, reflection and feedback, and support from the supervisor are important aspects of self-regulated learning in practice. The results reflect how self-regulated learning and self-entrustment promote trainees' increased participation in the workplace. Securing organized moments of interaction with supervisors is beneficial to trainees' self-regulated learning.

  13. Factors for Personal Counseling among Counseling Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. Stephen; Shufelt, Brett

    2014-01-01

    The present study explored the use of counseling among counselor trainees and the characteristics of consumers and nonconsumers. Approximately 61% of those surveyed (n = 85) reported that they had received counseling, with the majority being mental health counseling trainees. Nonconsumers (n = 54) indicated that they coped with problems in other…

  14. Symposium Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen-Whitred, K.

    2015-01-01

    Overview/Highlights: To begin, I'd like to take a moment to highlight some of the novel elements of this Symposium as compared to those that have been held in the past. For the first time ever, this Symposium was organized around five concurrent sessions, covering over 300 papers and presentations. These sessions were complemented by an active series of exhibits put on by vendors, universities, ESARDA, INMM, and Member State Support Programmes. We also had live demonstrations throughout the week on everything from software to destructive analysis to instrumentation, which provided the participants the opportunity to see recent developments that are ready for implementation. I'm sure you all had a chance to observe - and, more importantly, interact with - the electronic Poster, or ePoster format used this past week. This technology was used here for the first time ever by the IAEA, and I'm sure was a first for many of us as well. The ePoster format allowed participants to interact with the subject matter, and the subject matter experts, in a dynamic, engaging way. In addition to the novel technology used here, I have to say that having the posters strategically embedded in the sessions on the same topic, by having each poster author introduce his or her topic to the assembled group in order to lure us to the poster area during the breaks, was also a novel and highly effective technique. A final highlight I'd like to touch on in terms of the Symposium organization is the diversity of participation. This chart shows the breakdown by geographical distribution for the Symposium, in terms of participants. There are no labels, so don't try to read any, I simply wanted to demonstrate that we had great representation in terms of both the Symposium participants in general and the session chairs more specifically-and on that note, I would just mention here that 59 Member States participated in the Symposium. But what I find especially interesting and

  15. PENDELEGASIAN TUGAS KEPADA TRAINEE DI MAIN KITCHEN GRAND ROYAL PANGHEGAR HOTEL BANDUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Rijwan

    2016-03-01

      Abstrak - Masalah yang di teliti adalah bagaimana pendelegasian tugas kepadatraineedi main kitchen, bagaimana standar operasional prosedur pendelegasian tugas kepada trainee di main kitchen, serta bagaimana kesempatan dan peluang dari pendelegasian tugas kepada trainee di main kitchen.  Dalam hal pengolahan data, penulis menggunakan analisis deskriptif, yaitu metode yang berusaha mengumpulkan data dan sesuai dengan keadaan yang sebenarnya, menyajikan serta menganalisanya sehigga dapat memberikan gambaran yang cukup jelas atas objek yang diteliti dan kemudian di ambil kesimpulannya. Berdasarkan hasil observasi ini dapat disimpulkan bahwa pendelegasian tugas kepada trainee di Main Kitchen Grand Royal Panghegar Hotel sudah dilaksanakan dengan sangat baik, hal ini dapat dilihat dengan di selesaikannya delegasi tugas dengan baik pula oleh trainee. Standar operasional prosedur pendelegasian kepada trainee di Main Kitchen Grand Royal Panghegar Hotel sudah baik, hal ini dapat dilihat bahwa trainee dapat melaksanakan kegiatan- kegiatan yang ada di main kitchen dengan baik pula. Peluang dari pendelegasian tugas kepada trainee di Main Kitchen Grand Royal Panghegar Hotel menjadikan trainee lebih percaya diri, memiliki pengalaman baru dalam mengolah makanan, lebih meningkatnya skill trainee, dan memiliki pengetahuan yang lebih dari sebelumnya, dan staff pun tidak akan mendapat terlalu banyak beban pekerjaan, karena sebagian dapat dikerjakan oleh trainee dengan baik. Berdasarkan dari hasil observasi dan pembahasan tersebut, penulis menyimpulkan bahwa apabila standar operasional prosedur pendelegasian kepada Trainee dijalankan dengan baik, maka selain berdampak baik kepada trainee akan berdampak baik pula kepada staff atau hotel itu sendiri.

  16. Comprehensive feedback on trainee surgeons' non-technical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanager, Lene; Dieckmann, Peter; Beier-Holgersen, Randi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the content of conversations, feedback style, and perceived usefulness of feedback to trainee surgeons when conversations were stimulated by a tool for assessing surgeons' non-technical skills. METHODS: Trainee surgeons and their supervisors used the Non...... qualitatively analyzed for content and feedback style. Usefulness was investigated using a scale from 1 to 5 and written comments were qualitatively analyzed. RESULTS: Six trainees and six supervisors participated in eight feedback conversations. Eighty questionnaires (response rate 83 percent) were collected...

  17. Seventh International Beaver Symposium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri A. Gorshkov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents data on the seventh international Beaver Symposium. Brief historical background about previous Beaver Symposia beaver is shown. Data on the sections of symposium, number of participants and reports are presented.

  18. Providing care for critically ill surgical patients: challenges and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisherman, Samuel A; Kaplan, Lewis; Gracias, Vicente H; Beilman, Gregory J; Toevs, Christine; Byrnes, Matthew C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-07-01

    Providing optimal care for critically ill and injured surgical patients will become more challenging with staff shortages for surgeons and intensivists. This white paper addresses the historical issues behind the present situation, the need for all intensivists to engage in dedicated critical care per the intensivist model, and the recognition that intensivists from all specialties can provide optimal care for the critically ill surgical patient, particularly with continuing involvement by the surgeon of record. The new acute care surgery training paradigm (including trauma, surgical critical care, and emergency general surgery) has been developed to increase interest in trauma and surgical critical care, but the number of interested trainees remains too few. Recommendations are made for broadening the multidisciplinary training and practice opportunities in surgical critical care for intensivists from all base specialties and for maintaining the intensivist model within acute care surgery practice. Support from academic and administrative leadership, as well as national organizations, will be needed.

  19. Training family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcerelli, John H; Fowler, Shannon L; Murdoch, William; Markova, Tsveti; Kimbrough, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe a training curriculum for family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology (doctoral) trainees at the Wayne State University/Crittenton Family Medicine Residency program. The collaborative care curriculum involves a series of patient care and educational activities that require collaboration between family medicine residents and psychology trainees. Activities include: (1) clinic huddle, (2) shadowing, (3) pull-ins and warm handoffs, (4) co-counseling, (5) shared precepting, (6) feedback from psychology trainees to family medicine residents regarding consults, brief interventions, and psychological testing, (7) lectures, (8) video-observation and feedback, (9) home visits, and (10) research. The activities were designed to teach the participants to work together as a team and to provide a reciprocal learning experience. In a brief three-item survey of residents at the end of their academic year, 83% indicated that they had learned new information or techniques from working with the psychology trainees for assessment and intervention purposes; 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their patient care; and 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their ability to work as part of a team. Informal interviews with the psychology trainees indicated that reciprocal learning had taken place. Family medicine residents can learn to work collaboratively with psychology trainees through a series of shared patient care and educational activities within a primary care clinic where an integrated approach to care is valued.

  20. English Primary Trainee Teachers' Perceptions of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Emma

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarises the findings of research conducted with one cohort of English undergraduate primary teacher trainees on point of entry to a 4-year course. The research examines the perceptions held of geography as a subject discipline and the purposes of teaching the subject. Two hundred and eleven trainees were asked to define geography and…

  1. A pilot comparison of standardized online surgical curricula for use in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Seth D; Papandria, Dominic; Linden, Allison; Azzie, Georges; Borgstein, Eric; Calland, James Forrest; Finlayson, Samuel R G; Jani, Pankaj; Klingensmith, Mary; Labib, Mohamed; Lewis, Frank; Malangoni, Mark A; O'Flynn, Eric; Ogendo, Stephen; Riviello, Robert; Abdullah, Fizan

    2014-04-01

    Surgical conditions are an important component of global disease burden, due in part to critical shortages of adequately trained surgical providers in low- and middle-income countries. To assess the use of Internet-based educational platforms as a feasible approach to augmenting the education and training of surgical providers in these settings. Access to two online curricula was offered to 75 surgical faculty and trainees from 12 low- and middle-income countries for 60 days. The Surgical Council on Resident Education web portal was designed for general surgery trainees in the United States, and the School for Surgeons website was built by the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland specifically for the College of Surgeons of East, Central and Southern Africa. Participants completed an anonymous online survey detailing their experiences with both platforms. Voluntary respondents were daily Internet users and endorsed frequent use of both print and online textbooks as references. Likert scale survey questionnaire responses indicating overall and content-specific experiences with the Surgical Council on Resident Education and School for Surgeons curricula. Survey responses were received from 27 participants. Both online curricula were rated favorably, with no statistically significant differences in stated willingness to use and recommend either platform to colleagues. Despite regional variations in practice context, there were few perceived hurdles to future curriculum adoption. Both the Surgical Council on Resident Education and School for Surgeons educational curricula were well received by respondents in low- and middle-income countries. Although one was designed for US surgical postgraduates and the other for sub-Saharan African surgical providers, there were no significant differences detected in participant responses between the two platforms. Online educational resources have promise as an effective means to enhance the education of surgical providers in low

  2. IUTAM Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Whitelaw, James; Wung, T

    1992-01-01

    A Symposium on Aerothermodynamics of Combustors was held at the Institute of Applied Mechanics of the National Taiwan University from 3 to 5 June 1991 and was attended by 130 delegates from eight countries. The topics of the forty formal presentations included measurements and calculations of isothermal simulations and of combusting flows with one and two phases, and with consideration of configurations ranging from simple diffusion to gas-turbine flows. The discussions inside and outside of the Symposium Hall were lively and an open forum session demonstrated the range of opinions currently and strongly held. The International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics initiated the Symposium under the chairmanship of Professor R S L Lee and with the Scientific Committee listed below. It benefited from sponsorship, again as listed below, and from contributors who presented interesting and up-to-date descriptions of their research. Invited lectures were delivered by Professors R Bilger and F Weinberg and set ...

  3. IUTAM Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Shioiri, Jumpei

    1996-01-01

    The IUTAM Symposium on Constitutive Relation in High/Very High Strain Rates (CRHVHSR) was held October 16 - 19, 1995, at Seminar House, Science University of Tokyo, under the sponsorship of IUTAM, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, The Commemorative Association for the Japan World Exposition (1970), Inoue Foundation for Science, The Japan Society for Aeronautical and Space Sciences, and Science University of Tokyo. The proposal to hold the symposium was accepted by the General Assembly of IUT AM held in Haifa, Israel, in August 1992, and the scientists mentioned below were appointed by the Bureau of IUTAM to serve as members of the Scientific Committee. The main object of the symposium was to make a general survey of recent developments in the research of constitutive relations in high and very high strain rates and related problems in high velocity solid mechanics, and to explore further new ideas for dealing with unresolved problems of a fundamental nature as well as of practical importance. The su...

  4. Verbal Aggressiveness Among Physicians and Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Jenny Lynn; Hosseini, Motahar; Kamangar, Farin; Levien, David H; Rowland, Pamela A; Kowdley, Gopal C; Cunningham, Steven C

    2016-01-01

    To better understand verbal aggressiveness among physicians and trainees, including specialty-specific differences. The Infante Verbal Aggressiveness Scale (IVAS) was administered as part of a survey to 48 medical students, 24 residents, and 257 attending physicians. The 72 trainees received the IVAS and demographic questions, whereas the attending physicians received additional questions regarding type of practice, career satisfaction, litigation, and personality type. The IVAS scores showed high reliability (Cronbach α = 0.83). Among all trainees, 56% were female with mean age 28 years, whereas among attending physicians, 63% were male with mean age 50 years. Average scores of trainees were higher than attending physicians with corresponding averages of 1.88 and 1.68, respectively. Among trainees, higher IVAS scores were significantly associated with male sex, non-US birthplace, choice of surgery, and a history of bullying. Among attending physicians, higher IVAS scores were significantly associated with male sex, younger age, self-reported low-quality of patient-physician relationships, and low enjoyment talking to patients. General surgery and general internal medicine physicians were significantly associated with higher IVAS scores than other specialties. General practitioners (surgeons and medical physicians) had higher IVAS scores than the specialists in their corresponding fields. No significant correlation was found between IVAS scores and threats of legal action against attending physicians, or most personality traits. Additional findings regarding bullying in medical school, physician-patient interactions, and having a method to deal with inappropriate behavior at work were observed. Individuals choosing general specialties display more aggressive verbal communication styles, general surgeons displaying the highest. The IVAS scoring system may identify subgroups of physicians with overly aggressive (problematic) communication skills and may provide a

  5. Attitudes towards attrition among UK trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafson, Irene; Currie, Jane; O'Dwyer, Sabrina; Woolf, Katherine; Griffin, Ann

    2017-06-02

    Physician dissatisfaction in the workplace has consequences for patient safety. Currently in the UK, 1 in 5 doctors who enter specialist training in obstetrics and gynaecology leave the programme before completion. Trainee attrition has implications for workforce planning, organization of health-care services and patient care. The authors conducted a survey of current trainees' and former trainees' views concerning attrition and 'peri-attrition' - a term coined to describe the trainee who has seriously considered leaving the specialty. The authors identified six key themes which describe trainees' feelings about attrition in obstetrics and gynaecology: morale and undermining; training processes and paperwork; support and supervision; work-life balance and realities of life; NHS environment; and job satisfaction. This article discusses themes of an under-resourced health service, bullying, lack of work-life balance and poor personal support.

  6. Surgical skills simulation in trauma and orthopaedic training

    OpenAIRE

    Stirling, Euan RB; Lewis, Thomas L; Ferran, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    Changing patterns of health care delivery and the rapid evolution of orthopaedic surgical techniques have made it increasingly difficult for trainees to develop expertise in their craft. Working hour restrictions and a drive towards senior led care demands that proficiency be gained in a shorter period of time whilst requiring a greater skill set than that in the past. The resulting conflict between service provision and training has necessitated the development of alternative methods in orde...

  7. Proceedings of the TOUGH Symposium 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moridis, George J.; Doughty, Christine; Finsterle, Stefan; Sonnenthal, Eric

    2009-10-01

    Welcome to the TOUGH Symposium 2009. Within this volume are the Symposium Program for eighty-nine papers to be presented in both oral and poster formats. The full papers are available as pdfs linked from the Symposium Program posted on the TOUGH Symposium 2009 website http://esd.lbl.gov/newsandevents/events/toughsymposium09/program.html Additional updated information including any changes to the Program will also be available at the website. The papers cover a wide range of application areas and reflect the continuing trend toward increased sophistication of the TOUGH codes. A CD containing the proceedings papers will be published immediately following the Symposium and sent to all participants. As in the prior Symposium, selected papers will be invited for submission to a number of journals for inclusion in Special Issues focused on applications and developments of the TOUGH codes. These journals include, Transport in Porous Media, Geothermics, Energy Conversion and Management, Journal of Nuclear Science and Technology, and the Vadose Zone Journal.

  8. Symposium Promotes Technological Literacy through STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havice, Bill; Marshall, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a symposium which promotes technological literacy through science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The three-day symposium titled, "The Anderson, Oconee, Pickens Symposium on Teaching and Learning STEM Standards for the 21st Century," was held August 4-6, 2008 at the Tri-County Technical College…

  9. Documentation of in-training assessment for radiology trainees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Gillian

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To determine if the assessment of radiology trainees can be improved by modifying the in-training assessment form issued by the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A qualitative study comparing the RCR assessment form with other alternative forms in use in the U.K. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with trainees (21) and trainers (18) in Sheffield to collect their views on the RCR form and an alternative form introduced on the North Trent Training Scheme. A postal questionnaire was sent to Heads of Training (24) to find out what assessment forms were in use at other centres and collect their views on the different forms. RESULTS: Trainees and trainers in Sheffield were virtually unanimous in their support of the new North Trent assessment form. The main advantages perceived were the encouragement of appraisal, setting of objectives and feedback from the trainees. Six other radiology training centres were using alternative assessment forms and all believed their forms had advantages over the RCR in-training assessment form. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that the assessment process for radiology trainees can be improved by modifications to the RCR in-training assessment form and allows various recommendations to be made. Long, G. (2001)

  10. Surgical simulators in cataract surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, Shameema; Tuwairqi, Khaled; Al-Kahtani, Eman; Myers, William G; Banerjee, Pat

    2014-02-01

    Virtual simulators have been widely implemented in medical and surgical training, including ophthalmology. The increasing number of published articles in this field mandates a review of the available results to assess current technology and explore future opportunities. A PubMed search was conducted and a total of 10 articles were reviewed. Virtual simulators have shown construct validity in many modules, successfully differentiating user experience levels during simulated phacoemulsification surgery. Simulators have also shown improvements in wet-lab performance. The implementation of simulators in the residency training has been associated with a decrease in cataract surgery complication rates. Virtual reality simulators are an effective tool in measuring performance and differentiating trainee skill level. Additionally, they may be useful in improving surgical skill and patient outcomes in cataract surgery. Future opportunities rely on taking advantage of technical improvements in simulators for education and research.

  11. Get SET: aligning anatomy demonstrator programmes with Surgical Education and Training selection criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Danielle; Fogg, Quentin A; Lazarus, Michelle D

    2018-05-01

    Prevocational doctors aspiring to surgical careers are commonly recruited as anatomy demonstrators for undergraduate and graduate medical programmes. Entry into Surgical Education and Training (SET) is highly competitive and a unique opportunity exists to align anatomy demonstrator programmes with the selection criteria and core competencies of SET programmes. This study used a qualitative approach to (i) determine what criteria applicants for SET are assessed on and (ii) identify criteria that could be aligned with and enhanced by an anatomy demonstrator programme. The selection guidelines of all nine surgical specialties for the 2017 intake of SET trainees were analysed using qualitative content analysis methodology. The Royal Australasian College of Surgeons adopted a holistic approach to trainee selection that assessed both discipline-specific and discipline-independent skills. Qualitative content analysis identified eight categories of key selection criteria: medical expertise, scholarly activity, professional identity, interpersonal skills, integrity, self-management, insight and self-awareness and community involvement. The structured curriculum vitae was heavily weighted towards discipline-specific skills, such as medical expertise and scholarly activity. Insufficient information was available to determine the weighting of selection criteria assessed by the structured referee reports or interviews. Anatomy demonstrator programmes provide prevocational doctors with unique opportunities to develop surgical skills and competencies in a non-clinical setting. Constructively aligned anatomy demonstrator programmes may be particularly beneficial for prevocational doctors seeking to improve their anatomical knowledge, teaching skills or scholarly activity. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  12. Symposium report of Inter-COE international symposium on energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    The symposium of the title aims to discuss a comprehensive possibility of energy system technologies for future society utilizing both specialties of five COEs in energy technology field. The symposium topics include, 'Primary energy production', 'Energy conversion, storage and transportation', 'Energy materials', 'Energy system' by specialists from the COEs. Posters were presented by doctoral course students and others in the COEs, in addition special session 'Energy Research and Human Resources Development'. (J.P.N.)

  13. Comprehensive Surgical Coaching Enhances Surgical Skill in the Operating Room: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonrath, Esther M; Dedy, Nicolas J; Gordon, Lauren E; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether individualized coaching improved surgical technical skill in the operating room to a higher degree than current residency training. Clinical training in the operating room is a valuable opportunity for surgeons to acquire skill and knowledge; however, it often remains underutilized. Coaching has been successfully used in various industries to enhance performance, but its role in surgery has been insufficiently investigated. This randomized controlled trial was conducted at one surgical training program. Trainees undergoing a minimally invasive surgery rotation were randomized to either conventional training (CT) or comprehensive surgical coaching (CSC). CT included ward and operating room duties, and regular departmental teaching sessions. CSC comprised performance analysis, debriefing, feedback, and behavior modeling. Primary outcome measures were technical performance as measured on global and procedure-specific rating scales, and surgical safety parameters, measured by error count. Operative performance was assessed by blinded video analysis of the first and last cases recorded by the participants during their rotation. Twenty residents were randomized and 18 completed the study. At posttraining the CSC group (n = 9) scored significantly higher on a procedure-specific skill scale compared with the CT group (n = 9) [median, 3.90 (interquartile range, 3.68-4.30) vs 3.60 (2.98-3.70), P = 0.017], and made fewer technical errors [10 (7-13) vs 18 (13-21), P = 0.003]. Significant within-group improvements for all skill metrics were only noted in the CSC group. Comprehensive surgical coaching enhances surgical training and results in skill acquisition superior to conventional training.

  14. Clouds and silver linings: training experiences of psychodynamically oriented mental health trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouff, L C

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the experiences of today's psychodynamically oriented mental health trainees. Recent changes in the training environment, such as the increase in managed care, rise in use of psychotropic medication, the waning popularity of psychodynamic thinking, and reduced funding for psychotherapy training, in general, have all affected current trainees' professional development. In particular, trainees struggle with problems of demoralization, professional isolation, and reduced financial opportunities. Advantages that current trainees experience, as well as suggestions for training directors and trainees, will also be discussed.

  15. Impact of child death on paediatric trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Clare E; Wesley, Carla; Huckridge, Jaymie; Finn, Gabrielle M; Griksaitis, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of symptoms of acute stress reactions (ASR) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in paediatric trainees following their involvement in child death. A survey designed to identify trainees' previous experiences of child death combined with questions to identify features of PTSD. Quantitative interpretation was used alongside a χ 2 test. A p value of death of a child, although 190/284 (67%) had no training in child death. 118/248 (48%) of trainees were given a formal debrief session following their most recent experience. 203/251 (81%) of trainees reported one or more symptoms or behaviours that could contribute to a diagnosis of ASR/PTSD. 23/251 (9%) of trainees met the complete criteria for ASR and 13/251 (5%) for PTSD. Attending a formal debrief and reporting feelings of guilt were associated with an increase in diagnostic criteria for ASR/PTSD (p=0.036 and pdeath of a child. The feeling of guilt should be identified and acknowledged to allow prompt signposting to further support, including psychological assessment or intervention if required. Clear recommendations need to be made about the safety of debriefing sessions as, in keeping with existing evidence, our data suggest that debrief after the death of a child may be associated with the development of symptoms suggestive of ASR/PTSD. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Trainees' Perceptions of a Final Oral Competency Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert W.; Young, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The focus on competency attainment by professional psychology trainees obligates training programs to assess these competencies prior to completion of an internship. However, little is known about how trainees may perceive such testing. This study examines relationships between performance on an Oral Final Competency Examination of a…

  17. Crispy Cracks Symposium Explores Crispness and Water Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, R.J.; Vliet, van T.

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the first international symposium on crispness creation and retention. The symposium, entitled, ¿Crispy Cracks Symposium,¿ was organized by Cereals & Europe and TI Food and Nutrition. The symposium contained three sessions: 1) Crispiness¿The Fundamentals; 2)

  18. CONTEXT 2015 Doctorial Symposium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eklund, Peter; wegener, rebekah

    2015-01-01

    What is the CONTEXT 2015 Doctoral Symposium? The CONTEXT 2015 Doctoral Symposium is an opportunity for doctoral researchers to showcase their work and discuss problems, challenges, and ideas in an open and collegial environment with expert feedback. The Doctoral Symposium is a workshop for doctoral...... feedback and general advice in a constructive atmosphere. Doctoral researchers will present and discuss their research in a supportive atmosphere with other doctoral researchers and an international panel of established researchers that provide expert feedback. The workshop will take place on a single full...... day, Monday November 2, 2015, the day prior to the start of the main CONTEXT 2015 conference....

  19. Developing leadership as a trainee- opportunities, barriers and potential improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Rachel; Lawson, Sara; Mc Laughlin, Laura; Donaghy, Grainne; Courtney, Julia; Gardiner, Keith

    2018-05-01

    The General Medical Council explicitly state that doctors completing training should demonstrate capabilities in leadership and teamwork. 1 However, most trainees receive little formal training in leadership. In March 2017, at the Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management (FMLM) Northern Ireland Regional Conference, a workshop on developing leadership skills as a trainee was hosted and the views of doctors in training regarding current opportunities, potential barriers and improvements were sought. In Northern Ireland presently there are a number of opportunities available for trainees to gain experience in leadership - both by learning through observation and learning through experience. These range from informal activities which do not require significant time commitment to focused, immersive leadership experiences such as ADEPT (Achieve Develop Explore Programme for Trainees) 2 , and the Royal College of Physicians' Chief Registrar scheme. 3 Several barriers to developing leadership have been identified, including limited understanding of what constitutes leadership, a lack of senior support and little formal recognition for trainees leading teams. Time pressures, frequently rotating jobs, limited resources and difficulty upscaling can also undermine the sustainability of improvement and other leadership projects. Incorporating awareness of and training in leadership skills, as well as greater engagement with senior leaders and managers, at an early stage in training could promote understanding and encourage trainees. Formalising leadership roles within training posts may improve experience. Deaneries and Trusts can also enable leadership opportunities by facilitating study leave, raising awareness amongst supervisors, and providing career enhancing incentives for interested trainees.

  20. Ethical dilemmas experienced by clinical psychology trainee therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhola, Poornima; Sinha, Ananya; Sonkar, Suruchi; Raguram, Ahalya

    2015-01-01

    Ethical dilemmas are inevitable during psychotherapeutic interactions, and these complexities and challenges may be magnified during the training phase. The experience of ethical dilemmas in the arena of therapy and the methods of resolving these dilemmas were examined among 35 clinical psychologists in training, through an anonymous and confidential online survey. The trainees' responses to four open-ended questions on any one ethical dilemma encountered during therapy were analysed, using thematic content analysis. The results highlighted that the salient ethical dilemmas related to confidentiality and boundary issues. The trainees also raised ethical questions regarding therapist competence, the beneficence and non-maleficence of therapeutic actions, and client autonomy. Fifty-seven per cent of the trainees reported that the dilemmas were resolved adequately, the prominent methods of resolution being supervision or consultation and guidance from professional ethical guidelines. The trainees felt that the professional codes had certain limitations as far as the effective resolution of ethical dilemmas was concerned. The findings indicate the need to strengthen training and supervision methodologies and professional ethics codes for psychotherapists and counsellors in India.

  1. Emotional Creativity (EC) among Pre-Service and In-Service Trainee Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gaurav; Kumar, Girijesh

    2010-01-01

    In the personality of a teacher, his emotional creativity is an important counterpart. In current study, researchers have carried out an investigation of emotional creativity of trainee teachers of pre-service and in-service trainee teachers. The objectives were to compare the emotional creativity of Trainee teachers of Pre-service Courses and…

  2. Where did the acute medical trainees go? A review of the career pathways of acute care common stem acute medical trainees in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowland, Emily; Ball, Karen Le; Bryant, Catherine; Birns, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Acute care common stem acute medicine (ACCS AM) training was designed to develop competent multi-skilled acute physicians to manage patients with multimorbidity from 'door to discharge' in an era of increasing acute hospital admissions. Recent surveys by the Royal College of Physicians have suggested that acute medical specialties are proving less attractive to trainees. However, data on the career pathways taken by trainees completing core acute medical training has been lacking. Using London as a region with a 100% fill rate for its ACCS AM training programme, this study showed only 14% of trainees go on to higher specialty training in acute internal medicine and a further 10% to pursue higher medical specialty training with dual accreditation with internal medicine. 16% of trainees switched from ACCS AM to emergency medicine or anaesthetics during core ACCS training, and intensive care medicine proved to be the most popular career choice for ACCS AM trainees (21%). The ACCS AM training programme therefore does not appear to be providing what it was set out to do and this paper discusses the potential causes and effects. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  3. A Real-Time Systems Symposium Preprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    Real - Time Systems Symposium Preprint Interim Tech...estimate of the occurence of the error. Unclassii ledSECUqITY CLASSIF’ICA T" NO MI*IA If’ inDI /’rrd erter for~~ble. ’Corrputnqg A REAL - TIME SYSTEMS SYMPOSIUM...ABSTRACT This technical report contains a preprint of a paper accepted for presentation at the REAL - TIME SYSTEMS SYMPOSIUM, Arlington,

  4. International Symposium on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and the Embassy of Japan in the Slovak Republic, under the auspices of the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign and European Affairs Mr Lajcak organized International Symposium on Nuclear Safety on 14 and 15 March 2013. The symposium took place almost exactly two years after the occurrence of accidents at the Japanese nuclear power plant Fukushima Daichi. The main mission of the symposium was an attempt to contribute to the improvement of nuclear safety by sharing information and lessons presented by Japanese experts with experts from the region, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the European Commission. The aim of the symposium, unlike many other events organized in connection with the events in Fukushima Daichi NPP, was a summary of the results of stress tests and measures update adopted by the international community, especially within Europe. Panel discussion was included to the program of the symposium for this aim was, mainly focused on the current state of implementation of the National Action Plan of the Slovak Republic, the Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine and Switzerland and the IAEA Action Plan.

  5. Video-Based Surgical Learning: Improving Trainee Education and Preparation for Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Paulo; Carvalho, Nuno; Carvalho-Dias, Emanuel; João Costa, Manuel; Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Lima, Estevão

    2017-10-11

    Since the end of the XIX century, teaching of surgery has remained practically unaltered until now. With the dawn of video-assisted laparoscopy, surgery has faced new technical and learning challenges. Due to technological advances, from Internet access to portable electronic devices, the use of online resources is part of the educational armamentarium. In this respect, videos have already proven to be effective and useful, however the best way to benefit from these tools is still not clearly defined. To assess the importance of video-based learning, using an electronic questionnaire applied to residents and specialists of different surgical fields. Importance of video-based learning was assessed in a sample of 141 subjects, using a questionnaire distributed by a GoogleDoc online form. We found that 98.6% of the respondents have already used videos to prepare for surgery. When comparing video sources by formation status, residents were found to use Youtube significantly more often than specialists (p learning is currently a hallmark of surgical preparation among residents and specialists working in Portugal. Based on these findings we believe that the creation of quality and scientifically accurate videos, and subsequent compilation in available video-libraries appears to be the future landscape for video-based learning. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. XX international {mu}-symposium - Brake conference. Papers; XX Internationales {mu}-Symposium - Bremsen-Fachtagung. Betraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, B. [ed.] [Verein Deutscher Ingenieure (VDI), Darmstadt (Germany); Bauer, E. (comp.) [TMD Friction GmbH, Leverkusen (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    This year, more brake experts from the international automotive community than ever will take part in the XXth {mu}-Symposium upon the invitation of TMD Friction and learn about the latest developments in their professional fields, discuss with each other, and listen in the opening speech to the viewpoints of a behavioural scientist on braking as the main focus of {mu}-Symposium and {mu}-Club. The contents of this {mu}-Symposium will be the following: Braking from the behavioural scientist's viewpoint/research on tribological characteristics between Al-MMC brake disc and friction material/SBC - the electro-hydraulic brake system from Mercedes-Benz/total chassis management - heading for the intelligent chassis/TMD Friction - a company profile. (orig./AKF) [German] Bremsenexperten der internationalen Automobilwelt trafen sich im Herbst 2000 zum zwanzigsten Mal auf Einladung von TMD Friction in Bad Neuenahr. Dieser Bericht fasst - jeweils in deutsch und englisch - die Vortraege ueber neueste Entwicklungen aus Industrie und Hochschule zusammen. Im Einfuehrungsvortrag berichtet ein Verhaltenswissenschaftler ueber seine Gedanken zum Bremsen als dem Hauptgegenstand von {mu}-Symposium und {mu}-Club. Ferner gehoeren die Praesentation des elektrohydraulischen Bremssystems ebenso zum Programm des Symposiums wie die Vorstellung von Forschungsergebnissen neuer Reibpaarungen und der Blick auf die Zukunft des Fahrwerks im Verbund mit Fahrzeugregelsystemen. (orig./AKF)

  7. Survey of UK radiology trainees in the aftermath of ‘Modernising Medical Careers’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mair Grant

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following implementation of Modernising Medical Careers (MMC in the UK, potential radiology trainees must decide on their career and apply sooner than ever before. We aimed to determine whether current trainees were sufficiently informed to make an earlier career decision by comparing the early radiology experiences of Traditional and Foundation Trainees. Methods 344 radiology trainees were appointed through MMC in 2007/08. This cohort was surveyed online. Results Response rate was 174/344 (51%. Traditional Trainees made their career decision 2.6 years after graduation compared with 1.2 years for Foundation Trainees (57/167, 34%. Nearly half of responders (79/169, 47% experienced no formal radiology teaching as undergraduates. Most trainees regularly attended radiology meetings, spent time in a radiology department and/or performed radiology research. Many trainees received no career advice specific to radiology (69/163, 42% at any point prior to entering the specialty; this includes both formal and informal advice. Junior doctor experiences were more frequently cited as influencing career choice (98/164, 60%. An earlier career decision was associated with; undergraduate radiology projects (-0.72 years, p = 0.018, career advice (-0.63 years, p = 0.009 and regular attendance at radiology meetings (-0.65 years, p = 0.014. Conclusion Early experience of radiology enables trainees to make an earlier career decision, however current radiology trainees were not always afforded relevant experiences prior to entering training. Radiologists need to be more proactive in encouraging the next generation of trainees.

  8. Survey of UK radiology trainees in the aftermath of ‘Modernising Medical Careers’

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Following implementation of Modernising Medical Careers (MMC) in the UK, potential radiology trainees must decide on their career and apply sooner than ever before. We aimed to determine whether current trainees were sufficiently informed to make an earlier career decision by comparing the early radiology experiences of Traditional and Foundation Trainees. Methods 344 radiology trainees were appointed through MMC in 2007/08. This cohort was surveyed online. Results Response rate was 174/344 (51%). Traditional Trainees made their career decision 2.6 years after graduation compared with 1.2 years for Foundation Trainees (57/167, 34%). Nearly half of responders (79/169, 47%) experienced no formal radiology teaching as undergraduates. Most trainees regularly attended radiology meetings, spent time in a radiology department and/or performed radiology research. Many trainees received no career advice specific to radiology (69/163, 42%) at any point prior to entering the specialty; this includes both formal and informal advice. Junior doctor experiences were more frequently cited as influencing career choice (98/164, 60%). An earlier career decision was associated with; undergraduate radiology projects (-0.72 years, p = 0.018), career advice (-0.63 years, p = 0.009) and regular attendance at radiology meetings (-0.65 years, p = 0.014). Conclusion Early experience of radiology enables trainees to make an earlier career decision, however current radiology trainees were not always afforded relevant experiences prior to entering training. Radiologists need to be more proactive in encouraging the next generation of trainees. PMID:23031228

  9. Symposium on neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, M.S.; Saenger, W.; Hildebrandt, G.; Dachs, H.

    1984-01-01

    Extended abstracts of the named symposium are presented. The first part of this report contains the abstracts of the lectures, the second those of the posters. Topics discussed on the symposium include neutron diffraction and neutron scattering studies in magnetism, solid state chemistry and physics, materials research. Some papers discussing instruments and methods are included too. (GSCH)

  10. The use of smartphone applications by urology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, G J; Burke, M J; Aslam, A; Kelly, M E; Akram, C M; Giri, S K; Flood, H D

    2015-10-01

    Mobile phone technology is continuously advancing- the smartphone allows users instant access to information via the internet. Downloadable applications (apps) are becoming widespread across medical specialities. The aim of this study was to assess the use of smartphone apps among urology trainees in Ireland. An anonymous electronic survey was distributed via Survey Monkey(®) to all urology trainees in Ireland assessing their ownership and use of smartphones and downloadable apps. A search of urology apps was performed using the Apple App Store and the Android Market. 36 (81.8%) of trainees responded with 100% ownership of smartphones. 28 (77%) report downloading apps with 11 (30.6%) reporting paying for them. The mean number of apps downloaded was 4 (Range 1-12). 16 (44.4%) trainees think apps for smartphones are very useful in clinical practice, 14 (42.4%) think they are useful. A total of 126 urology apps were available. 76 (60.3%) were designed for physicians, 46 (36.5%) for patients, 2 (1.6%) for students and 2 (1.6%) for urological nurses. There are an ever increasing number of urology apps available. Urology trainees are using smartphones as an educational and reference tool and find them a useful aide in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Career planning and mentorship: a few key considerations for trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Sherif M

    2017-01-01

    Publishing and securing funding are considered our "academic currency", and therefore, both should be emphasized during training, both residency and fellowship. Trainees should make an effort to find funding opportunities at or outside of their institutions and try to identify their short- and long-term goals. Establishing a track record of publications can help trainees get hired, funded, and promoted as junior faculty, and effective networking and mentorship are critical determinants of academic success. Given the positive effects of mentorship, trainees should understand what comprises a good mentor-mentee relationship and how to optimize the mentoring process. The objective of this article is to discuss few key considerations for trainees in residency or fellowship regarding mentorship and career planning in academic medicine.

  12. Attitudes and intentions of current anaesthetic trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, S; Moriarty, J

    2013-03-01

    We report the results of a survey of Irish anaesthetic specialist trainees to establish their future training intentions, their interest in seeking a Consultant position in Ireland and identification of factors that may reduce the attractiveness of future employment in the HSE. 149 responses were received (71% of trainees). 137 (92%) are likely to complete further training abroad, but only 24 (16.1%) are definitely planning to return to work in Ireland. Factors, in order of importance that influence their return to Ireland include equivalence of all Consultants, salary level and availability of flexible work practices. Almost all (131 - 91%) would only consider working in Ireland at Consultant level. These results reveal that the current cohort of specialist trainees do not consider Ireland an attractive place to work, and any further diminution of the current Consultant grade will only serve to worsen this perception.

  13. Assessing Changes in Counselor Trainees' Multicultural Competence Related to Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Debbiesiu L.; Rosen, Adam D.; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2014-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined changes in self-reported multicultural competence and distress reactions of 32 counselor trainees engaged in service learning. Whereas 3 trainees significantly increased in self-reported multicultural competence, 5 significantly decreased. Trainees who significantly increased in multicultural competence reported…

  14. The Pareto Analysis for Establishing Content Criteria in Surgical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramp, Kelvin H; van Det, Marc J; Veeger, Nic J G M; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E N

    2016-01-01

    Current surgical training is still highly dependent on expensive operating room (OR) experience. Although there have been many attempts to transfer more training to the skills laboratory, little research is focused on which technical behaviors can lead to the highest profit when they are trained outside the OR. The Pareto principle states that in any population that contributes to a common effect, a few account for the bulk of the effect. This principle has been widely used in business management to increase company profits. This study uses the Pareto principle for establishing content criteria for more efficient surgical training. A retrospective study was conducted to assess verbal guidance provided by 9 supervising surgeons to 12 trainees performing 64 laparoscopic cholecystectomies in the OR. The verbal corrections were documented, tallied, and clustered according to the aimed change in novice behavior. The corrections were rank ordered, and a cumulative distribution curve was used to calculate which corrections accounted for 80% of the total number of verbal corrections. In total, 253 different verbal corrections were uttered 1587 times and were categorized into 40 different clusters of aimed changes in novice behaviors. The 35 highest-ranking verbal corrections (14%) and the 11 highest-ranking clusters (28%) accounted for 80% of the total number of given verbal corrections. Following the Pareto principle, we were able to identify the aspects of trainee behavior that account for most corrections given by supervisors during a laparoscopic cholecystectomy on humans. This strategy can be used for the development of new training programs to prepare the trainee in advance for the challenges encountered in the clinical setting in an OR. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Knowledge model of trainee for training support system of plant operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuhama, Yutaka; Furuta, Kazuo; Kondo, Shunsuke [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    We have already proposed a knowledge model of a trainee, which model consists of two layers: hierarchical function and qualitative structure. We developed a method to generate normative operator knowledge based on this knowledge model structure, and to identify trainee`s intention by means of truth maintenance. The methods were tested by cognitive experiment using a prototype of training support system. (author)

  16. Abel Symposium 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Nadia; Neshveyev, Sergey; Skau, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Like the first Abel Symposium, held in 2004, the Abel Symposium 2015 focused on operator algebras. It is interesting to see the remarkable advances that have been made in operator algebras over these years, which strikingly illustrate the vitality of the field. A total of 26 talks were given at the symposium on a variety of themes, all highlighting the richness of the subject. The field of operator algebras was created in the 1930s and was motivated by problems of quantum mechanics. It has subsequently developed well beyond its initial intended realm of applications and expanded into such diverse areas of mathematics as representation theory, dynamical systems, differential geometry, number theory and quantum algebra. One branch, known as “noncommutative geometry”, has become a powerful tool for studying phenomena that are beyond the reach of classical analysis. This volume includes research papers that present new results, surveys that discuss the development of a specific line of research, and articles ...

  17. A surgical career for New Zealand junior doctors? Factors influencing this choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jason; Sathanathan, Janarthanan; Naden, Gill; Child, Stephen

    2009-08-07

    To discover the level of interest in a surgical career amongst junior doctors and trainee interns in the Auckland region. Secondary aims are to identify the factors that influence career choice as well as the timing of career choice. An anonymous and structured questionnaire was distributed to all trainee interns and junior doctors in their first to fifth postgraduate years in the Auckland region. Questions were based on basic demographics, level of training, career preference and factors from previous experiences in surgery that may have influenced their career choice. Total of 87 replies with 36% expressed interest in surgery whereas 64% were interested in non-surgical specialties. Top three factors influencing career choice were similar in both groups: Lifestyle, career ambitions and family. Personal interest, practical hands-on and positive previous experiences were the top reasons why junior doctors chose surgery. Poor lifestyle, lacking of interest, limited future part-time work and previous negative experiences were the top reasons why junior doctors did not choose surgery. A significantly (pcareers earlier. Career aspirations of New Zealand junior doctors were similar to findings reported overseas. To promote surgery amongst junior doctors and medical students, attention should be paid to the key factors which may influence career choice. By improving working conditions and have better surgical education with good mentoring, team atmosphere and opportunities for early exposure will hopefully allow better recruitment and training of future surgeons.

  18. Burnout and the learning environment of anaesthetic trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanelli, D J; Wickramaarachchi, S A; Wallis, S

    2017-11-01

    Burnout has a high prevalence among healthcare workers and is increasingly recognised as an environmental problem rather than reflecting a personal inability to cope with work stress. We distributed an electronic survey, which included the Maslach Burnout Inventory Health Services Survey and a previously validated learning environment instrument, to 281 Victorian anaesthetic trainees. The response rate was 50%. We found significantly raised rates of burnout in two of three subscales. Ninety-one respondents (67%) displayed evidence of burnout in at least one domain, with 67 (49%) reporting high emotional exhaustion and 57 (42%) reporting high depersonalisation. The clinical learning environment tool demonstrated a significant negative correlation with burnout (r=-0.56, P Burnout was significantly more common than when previously measured in Victoria in 2008 (62% versus 38%). Trainees rated examination preparation the most stressful aspect of the training program. There is a high prevalence of burnout among Victorian anaesthetic trainees. We have shown a significant correlation exists between the clinical learning environment measure and the presence of burnout. This correlation supports the development of interventions to improve the clinical learning environment, as a means to improve trainee wellbeing and address the high prevalence of burnout.

  19. Face validation of the Simbionix LAP Mentor virtual reality training module and its applicability in the surgical curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayodeji, I. D.; Schijven, M.; Jakimowicz, J.; Greve, J. W.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The goal of our study was to determine expert and referent face validity of the LAP Mentor, the first procedural virtual reality (VR) laparoscopy trainer. METHODS: In The Netherlands 49 surgeons and surgical trainees were given a hands-on introduction to the Simbionix LAP Mentor training

  20. Surgical video recording with a modified GoPro Hero 4 camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lily Koo

    2016-01-01

    Surgical videography can provide analytical self-examination for the surgeon, teaching opportunities for trainees, and allow for surgical case presentations. This study examined if a modified GoPro Hero 4 camera with a 25 mm lens could prove to be a cost-effective method of surgical videography with enough detail for oculoplastic and strabismus surgery. The stock lens mount and lens were removed from a GoPro Hero 4 camera, and was refitted with a Peau Productions SuperMount and 25 mm lens. The modified GoPro Hero 4 camera was then fixed to an overhead surgical light. Camera settings were set to 1080p video resolution. The 25 mm lens allowed for nine times the magnification as the GoPro stock lens. There was no noticeable video distortion. The entire cost was less than 600 USD. The adapted GoPro Hero 4 with a 25 mm lens allows for high-definition, cost-effective, portable video capture of oculoplastic and strabismus surgery. The 25 mm lens allows for detailed videography that can enhance surgical teaching and self-examination.

  1. Does interpersonal behavior of psychotherapy trainees differ in private and professional relationships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincke, Janna I; Möller, Heidi; Taubner, Svenja

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trainees' interpersonal behavior on work involvement (WI) and compared their social behavior within professional and private relationships as well as between different psychotherapeutic orientations. The interpersonal scales of the Intrex short-form questionnaire and the Work Involvement Scale (WIS) were used to evaluate two samples of German psychotherapy trainees in psychoanalytic, psychodynamic, and cognitive behavioral therapy training. Trainees from Sample 1 (N = 184) were asked to describe their interpersonal behavior in relation to their patients when filling out the Intrex, whereas trainees from Sample 2 (N = 135) were asked to describe the private relationship with a significant other. Interpersonal affiliation in professional relationships significantly predicted the level of healing involvement, while stress involvement was predicted by interpersonal affiliation and interdependence in trainees' relationships with their patients. Social behavior within professional relationships provided higher correlations with WI than private interpersonal behavior. Significant differences were found between private and professional relation settings in trainees' interpersonal behavior with higher levels of affiliation and interdependence with significant others. Differences between therapeutic orientation and social behavior could only be found when comparing trainees' level of interdependence with the particular relationship setting. Trainees' interpersonal level of affiliation in professional relationships is a predictor for a successful psychotherapeutic development. Vice versa, controlling behavior in professional settings can be understood as a risk factor against psychotherapeutic growth. Both results strengthen an evidence-based approach for competence development during psychotherapy training.

  2. The trainee leadership blueprint: opportunities, benefits, and a call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Amanda; Block, Cady K; Brown, Daniel S; Sunderaraman, Preeti

    2018-02-01

    Leadership experiences are vital not only to individual long-term career success but also the development, direction, and operation of higher spheres including professional organizations and the field of clinical neuropsychology itself. The present paper presents a blueprint guide for neuropsychology trainees on available opportunities and resources for increasing their involvement in professional governance and developing leadership skills. First, we present a discussion of the benefits of leadership and professional service, including the acquisition of interpersonal skills and new professional competencies, the prospect of recognition and advancement, and the opportunity to participate in advocacy efforts. Then, we present an overview of existing opportunities for involvement, followed by the provision of specific, actionable items for trainees, mentors and leadership committees, and for neuropsychology organizations to ensure continued trainee engagement. These resources can serve as a guide for trainees and early career neuropsychologists seeking to acquire leadership proficiencies, and the recommendations aspire to promote advancement for trainees, professionals, and organizations alike.

  3. Providing Experiential Business and Management Training for Biomedical Research Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Kimberly A; Carnahan, Robert H; Brown, Abigail M; Gould, Kathleen L

    2017-01-01

    Many biomedical PhD trainees lack exposure to business principles, which limits their competitiveness and effectiveness in academic and industry careers. To fill this training gap, we developed Business and Management Principles for Scientists, a semester-long program that combined didactic exposure to business fundamentals with practical team-based projects aimed at solving real business problems encountered by institutional shared--resource core facilities. The program also included a retreat featuring presentations by and networking with local life science entrepreneurs and final team presentations to expert judges. Quantitative and qualitative metrics were used to evaluate the program's impact on trainees. A pretest-posttest approach was used to assess trainees' baseline knowledge and mastery of module concepts, and each individual's pretest and posttest responses were compared. The mean score improved by more than 17 percentage points. Trainees also took an online survey to provide feedback about the module. Nearly all participants agreed or strongly agreed that the module was a valuable use of their time and will help guide their career decisions and that project work helped drive home module concepts. More than 75% of trainees reported discussing the module with their research advisors, and all of these participants reported supportive or neutral responses. Collectively, the trainee feedback about the module, improvement in test scores, and trainee perception of advisor support suggest that this short module is an effective method of providing scientists with efficient and meaningful exposure to business concepts. © 2017 K. A. Petrie et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http

  4. Simulation-based education: understanding the socio-cultural complexity of a surgical training 'boot camp'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer; Walker, Kenneth G; Gale, Michael; Nicol, Laura G

    2016-08-01

    The focus of simulation-based education (SBE) research has been limited to outcome and effectiveness studies. The effect of social and cultural influences on SBE is unclear and empirical work is lacking. Our objective in this study was to explore and understand the complexity of context and social factors at a surgical boot camp (BC). A rapid ethnographic study, employing the theoretical lenses of complexity and activity theory and Bourdieu's concept of 'capital', to better understand the socio-cultural influences acting upon, and during, two surgical BCs, and their implications for SBE. Over two 4-day BCs held in Scotland, UK, an observer and two preceptors conducted 81 hours of observations, 14 field interviews and 11 formal interviews with faculty members (n = 10, including the lead faculty member, session leaders and junior faculty members) and participants (n = 19 core surgical trainees and early-stage residents). Data collection and inductive analysis for emergent themes proceeded iteratively. This paper focuses on three analytical themes. First, the complexity of the surgical training system and wider health care education context, and how this influenced the development of the BC. Second, participants' views of the BC as a vehicle not just for learning skills but for gaining 'insider information' on how best to progress in surgical training. Finally, the explicit aim of faculty members to use the Scottish Surgical Bootcamp to welcome trainees and residents into the world of surgery, and how this occurred. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first empirical study of a surgical BC that takes a socio-cultural approach to exploring and understanding context, complexities, uncertainties and learning associated with one example of SBE. Our findings suggest that a BC is as much about social and cultural processes as it is about individual, cognitive and acquisitive learning. Acknowledging this explicitly will help those planning similar enterprises and

  5. BEST-TEST2: assessment of hematology trainee knowledge of transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yulia; Tinmouth, Alan; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Haspel, Richard L

    2016-02-01

    As transfusion is a common therapy and key component in every hematologist's practice, hematology training programs should dedicate significant time and effort to delivering high-quality transfusion medicine education to their trainees. The current state of hematology trainee knowledge of transfusion medicine is not known. A validated assessment tool developed by the Biomedical Excellence for Safer Transfusion (BEST) Collaborative was used to assess prior transfusion medicine education, attitudes, perceived ability, and transfusion medicine knowledge of hematology trainees. A total of 149 hematology trainees at 17 international sites were assessed. The overall mean exam score was 61.6% (standard deviation, 13.4%; range, 30%-100%) with no correlation in exam scores with postgraduate year or previous transfusion medicine education in medical school or internal medicine residency. However, better scores correlated with 3 or more hours of transfusion medicine education (p = 0.0003) and perceived higher-quality education during hematology training (p = 0.03). Hematology trainees at US sites, where hematology is often combined with oncology training, had statistically lower scores than trainees at non-US sites (56.2% vs. 67.4%; p hematology training programs to reevaluate the quality and quantity of transfusion medicine training and can assist in the development of targeted curricula. © 2015 AABB.

  6. Experiences of Pharmacy Trainees from an Interprofessional Immersion Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daubney Boland

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Interprofessional education is essential in that it helps healthcare disciplines better utilize each other and provide team-based collaboration that improves patient care. Many pharmacy training programs struggle to implement interprofessional education. This purpose of the study was to examine the effect of a 30-h interprofessional training that included pharmacy students to determine if the training helped these students build valuable knowledge and skills while working alongside other health care professions. The interprofessional training included graduate-level trainees from pharmacy, behavioral health, nursing, and family medicine programs where the trainees worked within teams to build interprofessional education competencies based on the Interprofessional Education Collaborative core competencies. Sixteen pharmacy trainees participated in the training and completed pre- and post-test measures. Data were collected over a two-year period with participants completing the Team Skills Scale and the Interprofessional Attitudes Scale. Paired sample t-tests indicated that, after this training, pharmacy trainees showed significant increases in feeling better able to work in healthcare teams and valuing interprofessional practice.

  7. Experiences of Pharmacy Trainees from an Interprofessional Immersion Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Daubney; White, Traci; Adams, Eve

    2018-04-25

    Interprofessional education is essential in that it helps healthcare disciplines better utilize each other and provide team-based collaboration that improves patient care. Many pharmacy training programs struggle to implement interprofessional education. This purpose of the study was to examine the effect of a 30-h interprofessional training that included pharmacy students to determine if the training helped these students build valuable knowledge and skills while working alongside other health care professions. The interprofessional training included graduate-level trainees from pharmacy, behavioral health, nursing, and family medicine programs where the trainees worked within teams to build interprofessional education competencies based on the Interprofessional Education Collaborative core competencies. Sixteen pharmacy trainees participated in the training and completed pre- and post-test measures. Data were collected over a two-year period with participants completing the Team Skills Scale and the Interprofessional Attitudes Scale. Paired sample t -tests indicated that, after this training, pharmacy trainees showed significant increases in feeling better able to work in healthcare teams and valuing interprofessional practice.

  8. Face and content validation of a novel three-dimensional printed temporal bone for surgical skills development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Cruz, M J; Francis, H W

    2015-07-01

    To assess the face and content validity of a novel synthetic, three-dimensional printed temporal bone for surgical skills development and training. A synthetic temporal bone was printed using composite materials and three-dimensional printing technology. Surgical trainees were asked to complete three structured temporal bone dissection exercises. Attitudes and impressions were then assessed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Previous cadaver and real operating experiences were used as a reference. Trainees' experiences of the synthetic temporal bone were analysed in terms of four domains: anatomical realism, usefulness as a training tool, task-based usefulness and overall reactions. Responses across all domains indicated a high degree of acceptance, suggesting that the three-dimensional printed temporal bone was a useful tool in skills development. A sophisticated three-dimensional printed temporal bone that demonstrates face and content validity was developed. The efficiency in cost savings coupled with low associated biohazards make it likely that the printed temporal bone will be incorporated into traditional temporal bone skills development programmes in the near future.

  9. XV ESLAB Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    1981-01-01

    The 15th ESLAB symposium was held at the end of June 1981 in Amsterdam with the topic being X-ray astronomy. The aim of this symposium was to bring together the international astrophysical community in order to 1. review the present state of X-ray astronomy in the light of new observations gathered in recent missions and to review data on interesting objects in correlated wavelen8th regions; 2. discuss theoretical models describing the phenomena observed; 3. present ESA's European X-ray Observatory Satellite (EXOSAT) and to discuss future X-ray missions and their associated instrumenta­ tion. These topics seemed to be so interesting for the scientific community that more than 120 contributions were submitted. Of these, 94 were finally accepted and approximately 200 participants attended the 5-day meeting. The symposium was organised in nine sessions covering the whole field. Every main topic was introduced by a review lecture covering the state­ of-the-art. The aim of the meeting was to assess the impact of...

  10. Is Video-Based Education an Effective Method in Surgical Education? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmet, Akgul; Gamze, Kus; Rustem, Mustafaoglu; Sezen, Karaborklu Argut

    2018-02-12

    Visual signs draw more attention during the learning process. Video is one of the most effective tool including a lot of visual cues. This systematic review set out to explore the influence of video in surgical education. We reviewed the current evidence for the video-based surgical education methods, discuss the advantages and disadvantages on the teaching of technical and nontechnical surgical skills. This systematic review was conducted according to the guidelines defined in the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses statement. The electronic databases: the Cochrane Library, Medline (PubMED), and ProQuest were searched from their inception to the 30 January 2016. The Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms and keywords used were "video," "education," and "surgery." We analyzed all full-texts, randomised and nonrandomised clinical trials and observational studies including video-based education methods about any surgery. "Education" means a medical resident's or student's training and teaching process; not patients' education. We did not impose restrictions about language or publication date. A total of nine articles which met inclusion criteria were included. These trials enrolled 507 participants and the total number of participants per trial ranged from 10 to 172. Nearly all of the studies reviewed report significant knowledge gain from video-based education techniques. The findings of this systematic review provide fair to good quality studies to demonstrate significant gains in knowledge compared with traditional teaching. Additional video to simulator exercise or 3D animations has beneficial effects on training time, learning duration, acquisition of surgical skills, and trainee's satisfaction. Video-based education has potential for use in surgical education as trainees face significant barriers in their practice. This method is effective according to the recent literature. Video should be used in addition to standard techniques

  11. Sexual harassment of psychiatric trainees: experiences and attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, J.; Porter, S.

    1999-01-01

    A survey was carried out of psychiatric trainees' work-related experiences of unwanted sexual contact. A structured postal questionnaire was administered to 100 psychiatric trainees from senior house officer to specialist registrar level in a large psychiatric rotation. There was an 85% response rate; 86% (73) of the sample had experienced unwanted sexual contact, with 47% (40) experiencing deliberate touching, leaning over or cornering, and 18% (15) receiving letters, telephone calls or mate...

  12. A survey of British senior psychiatry trainees' ethnocultural personal values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelam, Kishen; Duddu, Venugopal; Chaudhry, Imran Bashir; Antonysamy, A S; Husain, Nusrat

    2009-01-01

    The authors explored the ethnocultural values of a group of senior psychiatry trainees in the northwest region of England. The authors surveyed senior psychiatry trainees using the Personal Values Questionnaire and analyzed responses under the headings of ethnic stereotypes, ethnocultural service issues, and perceptions of racism. They also explored training requirements on cultural issues in a subsample of trainees. The majority of the trainees disagreed with certain commonly held ethnic stereotypes and acknowledged the role of culture in mental health. However, they had contrasting views on the need for culture-specific services and on perceptions of racism. They expressed interest in training programs on cultural issues in psychiatric practice. In multicultural settings, personal beliefs, perceptions, and values are likely to influence psychiatric practice. A training program on cultural aspects of mental health could help improve awareness and sensitivity of these issues and the quality of care.

  13. What evidence is there for the use of workplace-based assessment in surgical training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalhoub, Joseph; Vesey, Alex Thomas; Fitzgerald, James Edward Frankland

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen broad changes in postgraduate training with a move toward structured formative and summative evaluation of trainees' competencies using workplace-based assessment (WBA) tools. The fitness for purpose of these instruments in surgery has been much debated. The aim of this study is to explore the evidence underlying the introduction and ongoing use of WBAs in surgical training. A critical literature review was conducted to identify studies evaluating the use of WBAs in postgraduate surgical training. The search was conducted using the electronic databases PubMed for full-text articles in English. Additional critical evaluations of the curriculum relating to WBAs were included. The articles were synthesized in a narrative review. The implementation of WBA requirements in surgical training has occurred despite a relative dearth of direct evidence of their efficacy and benefit. Studies and critical reviews are being regularly undertaken to ensure that supporting evidence is accrued and the drive for improvement and refinement is maintained. It is emerging that WBAs are (contrary to their current nomenclature) formative tools for feedback and hence learning. They can facilitate the progression toward expert practice at the center of the zone of proximal development and the higher levels of Miller's pyramid, but fall short--owing to their focus on competence--of guiding surgical trainees to the higher levels of Maslow's hierarchy. Limited evidence has potentially undermined the introduction of WBAs in surgical training to date. There are misunderstandings regarding their use as either summative or formative educational tools. These shortcomings are an opportunity for further work in examining WBAs in their current or modified form. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Spin symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1989-01-15

    The recent 8th International Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, Minnesota, opened with a bang when L. Pondrom (Wisconsin), donning a hard hat borrowed from construction workers, ventured that 'spin, the notorious inessential complication of hadronic physics, is finally telling us what real QCD (quantum chromodynamics, the field theory of quarks and gluons) looks like.' He was referring to an animated discussion on the meaning of the recent spin oriented (polarized) scattering results from the European Muon Collaboration (EMC) at CERN and reported at the Symposium by R. Garnet (Liverpool) and P. Schuler (Yale) which show that the proton spin is not simply a reflection of the spins of its constituent quarks.

  15. 43rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesiger, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Sponsored and organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, responsibility for hosting the AMS is shared by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC). Now in its 43rd symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 43rd AMS was held in Santa Clara, California on May 4, 5 and 6, 2016. During these three days, 42 papers were presented. Topics included payload and positioning mechanisms, components such as hinges and motors, CubeSats, tribology, and mechanism testing. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components. The high quality of this symposium is a result of the work of many people, and their efforts are gratefully acknowledged. This extends to the voluntary members of the symposium organizing committee representing the eight NASA field centers, LMSSC, and the European Space Agency. Appreciation is also extended to the session chairs, the authors, and particularly the personnel at ARC responsible for the symposium arrangements and the publication of these proceedings. A sincere thank you also goes to the symposium executive committee who is responsible for the year-to-year management of the AMS, including paper processing and preparation of the program. The use of trade names of manufacturers in this publication does not constitute an official endorsement of such products or manufacturers, either expressed or implied, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  16. Proceedings of the symposium on networking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karita, Yukio; Abe, Fumio

    1989-06-01

    The first symposium on networking was held on February 6-7, 1989. Due to the increase of the needs of computer networks, several networks which connect among universities and laboratories are going to be constructed in Japan. However, the techniques in networking are not familiar to most people, and the information about these techniques is sometimes difficult to get, especially in multivendor connection. In such situation, an opportunity to hold a symposium on networking at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK) was given. More than 200 people took part in this symposium, and the local area networks in institutions, the networks among institutions, the networks for high energy physics, the application of networks, the networks for academic research and so on are reported. The valuable discussion about networks was carried out, including the plans for near future. At the time of this symposium, the construction of the Gakujo-net and the Pacific network project of University of Hawaii were in progress, and many Japanese universities are going to construct their campus LANs, so the symposium seemed to be very timely. (K.I.)

  17. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  18. The knowledge and attitudes of orthodontic trainees towards orthodontic therapists: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sameer; Mack, Gavin

    2017-09-01

    To assess the knowledge and attitudes of orthodontic trainees towards orthodontic therapists (OTs) in the UK. Cross-sectional survey. UK-based orthodontic trainees. An electronic survey was sent to all members of the Training Grades Group of the British Orthodontic Society assessing exposure to OTs and their knowledge regarding current supervision guidelines and scope of practice. Attitudes towards OTs were also explored. Seventy-six responses (response rate 57%) were returned. Nearly 90% of trainees had no formal training regarding OTs. A total of 15.5% were aware of the correct current supervision guidelines and there was large variation in the knowledge of OTs' scope of practice. The majority of trainees were happy to supervise OTs, but only 22.4% felt prepared for this during training. In total, 63% of trainees felt that OTs could impact their own future job prospects. Currently, there is minimal formal training provided to trainees regarding the role of OTs. This is reflected in the lack of knowledge regarding supervision guidelines and scope of practice. Overall, trainees felt OTs were positive for the workforce but were concerned regarding the impact of their own future employment.

  19. FY 2000 Report on the survey results. Survey on international cooperation for development of a system for supporting low-invasion surgical operations; 2000 nendo teishinshu shujutsu shien system kaihatsu ni kakawaru kokusai kyoryoku ni kansuru chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The international Medical Treatment Symposium and Exhibition were held from July 20 to the end of August, 2000 in Hannover in Germany, in which the Japan's system for supporting low-invasion surgical operations was presented and information was exchanged for the system. A total of 50 to 100 neurosurgeons visited the exhibition, held as part of the symposium, every day from July 21 to 24. The system for supporting low-invasion surgical operations is rated as the most advanced one in the world. It attracted much attention, because a number of attendees applied for operating manipulator. The research trends seen in the symposium point to early diagnosis of diseases, finer surgical operations, low-invasion type operations, use of high-function diagnosis devices for improving operations, real-time imaging, and application of DNA diagnosis to pathological diagnosis, among others. Japan is leading the world in the technological areas of micromachines, robotics, high-vision and diagnosis. The bold researches, e.g., those on artificial visual and hearing systems to be embedded in the head, are pursued more extensively in the overseas countries. (NEDO)

  20. 6th interventional MRI symposium. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The ongoing progress in the field of interventional MRI and the great success of our last symposium 2004 in Boston have stimulated us to organize the 6th Interventional MRI Symposium to be held September 15-16, 2006 in Leipzig. This meeting will highlight ground-breaking research as well as cutting-edge reports from many groups. The symposium also provides a forum to network with leaders and innovators in the field. Session topics are: intraoperative MRI, vascular applications, targeted drug delivery, cryotherapy, thermometry, pulse sequences, LITT, percutaneous procedures, navigation, robotics, focused ultrasound. (uke)

  1. Toward human organ printing: Charleston Bioprinting Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    The First Annual Charleston Bioprinting Symposium was organized by the Bioprinting Research Center of the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and convened July 21, 2006, in Charleston, South Carolina. In broad terms, bioprinting is the application of rapid prototyping technology to the biomedical field. More specifically, it is defined as the layer by layer deposition of biologically relevant material. The 2006 Symposium included four sessions: Computer-aided design and Bioprinting, Bioprinting Technologies; Hydrogel for Bioprinting and, finally, a special session devoted to ongoing research projects at the MUSC Bioprinting Research Center. The Symposium highlight was the presentation of the multidisciplinary Charleston Bioengineered Kidney Project. This symposium demonstrated that bioprinting or robotic biofabrication is one of the most exciting and fast-emerging branches in the tissue engineering field. Robotic biofabrication will eventually lead to industrial production of living human organs suitable for clinical transplantation. The symposium demonstrated that although there are still many technological challenges, organ printing is a rapidly evolving feasible technology.

  2. Job-sharing in paediatric training in Australia: availability and trainee perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelaw, C M; Nash, M C

    2001-04-16

    To examine the current availability of job-sharing in paediatric training hospitals in Australia and to evaluate job-sharing from the trainees' perspective. National survey with structured telephone interviews and postal questionnai res. The eight major paediatric training hospitals in Australia. Directors of Paediatric Physician Training (DPPTs) at each hospital (or a staff member nominated by them) provided information by phone interview regarding job-sharing. All paediatric trainees who job-shared in 1998 (n=34) were sent written questionnaires, of which 25 were returned. Hospitals differed in terms of whether a trainee was required to give a reason for wishing to job-share, and what reasons were acceptable. One hospital stated that two specialty units (Intensive Care and Neonatal Intensive Care) were excluded from job-sharing, and another stated that certain units were unlikely to be allocated job-sharers. The remaining six hospitals said that all units were available for job-sharing, but the majority of their trainees disagreed. Only one hospital had a cap on the number of job-share positions available yearly. Trainees perceived benefits of job-sharing to include decreased tiredness, increased enthusiasm for work, and the ability to strike a balance between training and other aspects of life. Trainees believed job-sharing did not adversely affect the quality of service provided to patients, and that part-time training was not of lower quality than full-time training. Job-sharing in Australian paediatric training hospitals varies in terms of the number of positions available, eligibility criteria, and which units are available for job-sharing. In our survey, trainees' experience of job-sharing was overwhelmingly positive.

  3. Burnout among Slovenian family medicine trainees: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Selič

    2012-03-01

    Conclusions: The prevalence of burnout syndrome among family medicine trainees is high and consistent with data from other studies among the physicians worldwide using the same instrument. Family medicine trainees are at risk of burnout regardless of their demographic characteristics. Increased workload affects EE and D.

  4. Competent Counseling for Middle Eastern American Clients: Implications for Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheilian, Sepideh S.; Inman, Arpana G.

    2015-01-01

    The authors used a factorial multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) to determine whether counselor trainees' group differences on measures of multicultural competence, empathy, and multicultural counseling self-efficacy (CSE) when working with Middle Eastern American (MEA) clients were moderated by trainee race. Two hundred and fifty-six…

  5. Technological pedagogical content knowledge and teaching practice of mathematics trainee teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajudin, Nor'ain Mohd.; Kadir, Noor Zarinawaty Abd.

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to identify the level of technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK) of mathematics trainee teachers at Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI) and explore their teaching practices during practical training at school. The study was conducted in two phases using a mix-method research. In the first phase, a survey method using a questionnaire was carried out on 156 trainee teachers of Bachelor of Mathematics Education (AT14) and Bachelor of Science (Mathematics) with Education (AT48). The instrument used was a questionnaire that measures the level of content knowledge, pedagogy, technology and TPCK of mathematics. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, namely the mean. While in the second phase, the interview method involved four trainee teachers were performed. The instrument used was the semi-structured interview protocol to assess the trainee teacher's TPCK integration in their teaching practice. Data were analyzed using the content analysis. The findings showed that the level of knowledge of TPCK among trainee teachers was moderate with overall mean score of 3.60. This level did not show significant differences between the two programs with mean scores of 3.601 for the AT14 group and 3.603 for the AT48 group. However, there was a difference for gender classification such that the female trainees had mean score of 3.58 and male trainees with mean score of 3.72. Although students' TPCK level was moderate, the level of content knowledge (CK), technological knowledge (TK) and pedagogical knowledge (PK), showed a higher level with overall mean scores of 3.75, 3.87 and 3.84 respectively. The findings also showed that in terms of content knowledge, trainee teacher's learning mathematics background was good, but the knowledge of mathematics was limited in the curriculum, philosophy and application aspect. In terms of pedagogical content knowledge, all respondents tend to use lecture and discussion methods in teaching Trigonometry topic

  6. Psychotherapy trainees' multicultural case conceptualization content: thematic differences across three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Debbiesiu L; Sheridan, Daniel J; Rosen, Adam D; Jones, Isaiah

    2013-06-01

    This study examined thematic differences in the multicultural case conceptualization content of 61 psychotherapy trainees across three different cases and trainee demographics (number of multicultural courses completed, years of supervised clinical practicum completed, and White trainee vs. trainee of color). Themes across cases included general counseling skills (attend to affect, build rapport, focus on specific client concerns, use of specific clinical interventions, and use of external resources not related to culture), as well as multicultural specific counseling skills (focus on culture, focus on discrimination, use of culturally competent interventions, and use of external resources related to culture). Thematic differences across case were found in three of the nine themes (affect, culture, discrimination). No systematic differences were found across multicultural training, clinical training, or race. Implications of these results are discussed.

  7. 4th International Language Management Symposium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prošek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 3 (2016), s. 233-240 ISSN 0037-7031. [international language management symposium] Institutional support: RVO:68378092 Keywords : language management theory * international language symposium * language management Subject RIV: AI - Linguistics OBOR OECD: Linguistics Impact factor: 0.625, year: 2016

  8. Virtual Reality Simulator Systems in Robotic Surgical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Alberto; Gheza, Federico; Giulianotti, Pier Cristoforo

    2018-06-01

    The number of robotic surgical procedures has been increasing worldwide. It is important to maximize the cost-effectiveness of robotic surgical training and safely reduce the time needed for trainees to reach proficiency. The use of preliminary lab training in robotic skills is a good strategy for the rapid acquisition of further, standardized robotic skills. Such training can be done either by using a simulator or by exercises in a dry or wet lab. While the use of an actual robotic surgical system for training may be problematic (high cost, lack of availability), virtual reality (VR) simulators can overcome many of these obstacles. However, there is still a lack of standardization. Although VR training systems have improved, they cannot yet replace experience in a wet lab. In particular, simulated scenarios are not yet close enough to a real operative experience. Indeed, there is a difference between technical skills (i.e., mechanical ability to perform a simulated task) and surgical competence (i.e., ability to perform a real surgical operation). Thus, while a VR simulator can replace a dry lab, it cannot yet replace training in a wet lab or operative training in actual patients. However, in the near future, it is expected that VR surgical simulators will be able to provide total reality simulation and replace training in a wet lab. More research is needed to produce more wide-ranging, trans-specialty robotic curricula.

  9. CONFERENCE NOTE: Sixth Symposium on Temperature Scheduled for March 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    The call for papers for the 6th Symposium on Temperature, Its Measurement and Control in Science and Industry has been issued. The Symposium is scheduled to take place in Washington, DC, USA during the week of March 14 18, 1982. Like its predecessors held in the years 1919, 1939, 1954, 1961, and 1971, the 6th Symposium will stress advances in the measurement of thermodynamic values of temperature, in temperature reference points, in temperature sensors and instruments for the control of temperature, and in the development and use of temperature scales. For the first time, an exhibit of thermometry will be a part of the Symposium. Manuscripts to be submitted for inclusion in the Symposium should be sent to the 6th Temperature Symposium Program Chairman, National Bureau of Standards, by September 15, 1981. Those papers accepted for the Symposium will be due in camera-ready form by February 15, 1982. Original papers on all of the topics listed above, as well as reviews of the past decade's progress in thermometry and temperature control, are solicited by the Symposium organizers. The Symposium arrangements and registration are in the care of the Instrument Society of America (represented on the Symposium General Committee by Mr C T Glazer, 67 Alexander Drive, PO Box 12277, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27709, USA). Questions regarding the instrument exhibits should also be addressed to the ISA. The technical program for the Symposium is the responsibility of a committee headed by Dr J F Schooley, Room B-128 Physics Building, National Bureau of Standards, Washington, DC, 20234, USA. The Symposium proceedings will be published by the American Institute of Physics.

  10. How Supervisor Experience Influences Trust, Supervision, and Trainee Learning: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Leslie; Kogan, Jennifer R; Hauer, Karen E

    2017-09-01

    Appropriate trust and supervision facilitate trainees' growth toward unsupervised practice. The authors investigated how supervisor experience influences trust, supervision, and subsequently trainee learning. In a two-phase qualitative inductive content analysis, phase one entailed reviewing 44 internal medicine resident and attending supervisor interviews from two institutions (July 2013 to September 2014) for themes on how supervisor experience influences trust and supervision. Three supervisor exemplars (early, developing, experienced) were developed and shared in phase two focus groups at a single institution, wherein 23 trainees validated the exemplars and discussed how each impacted learning (November 2015). Phase one: Four domains of trust and supervision varying with experience emerged: data, approach, perspective, clinical. Early supervisors were detail oriented and determined trust depending on task completion (data), were rule based (approach), drew on their experiences as trainees to guide supervision (perspective), and felt less confident clinically compared with more experienced supervisors (clinical). Experienced supervisors determined trust holistically (data), checked key aspects of patient care selectively and covertly (approach), reflected on individual experiences supervising (perspective), and felt comfortable managing clinical problems and gauging trainee abilities (clinical). Phase two: Trainees felt the exemplars reflected their experiences, described their preferences and learning needs shifting over time, and emphasized the importance of supervisor flexibility to match their learning needs. With experience, supervisors differ in their approach to trust and supervision. Supervisors need to trust themselves before being able to trust others. Trainees perceive these differences and seek supervision approaches that align with their learning needs.

  11. Evaluation of feedback given to trainees in medical specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Tony Ck; Burr, Bill; Boohan, Mairead

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of feedback provided to specialty trainees (ST3 or higher) in medical specialties during their workplace-based assessments (WBAs). The feedback given in WBAs was examined in detail in a group of 50 ST3 or higher trainees randomly selected from those taking part in a pilot study of changes to the WBA system conducted by the Joint Royal Colleges of Physicians Training Board. They were based in Health Education Northeast (Northern Deanery) and Health Education East of England (Eastern Deanery). Thematic analysis was used to identify commonly occurring themes. Feedback was mainly positive but there were differences in quality between specialties. Problems with feedback included insufficient detail, such that it was not possible to map the progression of the trainee, insufficient action plans made and the timing of feedback not being contemporaneous (feedback not being given at the time of assessment). Recommendations included feedback should be more specific; there need to be more options in the feedback forms for the supervisor to compare the trainee's performance to what is expected and action plans need to be made. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  12. Utility of 3D Reconstruction of 2D Liver Computed Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Images as a Surgical Planning Tool for Residents in Liver Resection Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Caitlin T; MacDonald, Andrew; Ungi, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Jalink, Diederick; Zevin, Boris; Fichtinger, Gabor; Nanji, Sulaiman

    A fundamental aspect of surgical planning in liver resections is the identification of key vessel tributaries to preserve healthy liver tissue while fully resecting the tumor(s). Current surgical planning relies primarily on the surgeon's ability to mentally reconstruct 2D computed tomography/magnetic resonance (CT/MR) images into 3D and plan resection margins. This creates significant cognitive load, especially for trainees, as it relies on image interpretation, anatomical and surgical knowledge, experience, and spatial sense. The purpose of this study is to determine if 3D reconstruction of preoperative CT/MR images will assist resident-level trainees in making appropriate operative plans for liver resection surgery. Ten preoperative patient CT/MR images were selected. Images were case-matched, 5 to 2D planning and 5 to 3D planning. Images from the 3D group were segmented to create interactive digital models that the resident can manipulate to view the tumor(s) in relation to landmark hepatic structures. Residents were asked to evaluate the images and devise a surgical resection plan for each image. The resident alternated between 2D and 3D planning, in a randomly generated order. The primary outcome was the accuracy of resident's plan compared to expert opinion. Time to devise each surgical plan was the secondary outcome. Residents completed a prestudy and poststudy questionnaire regarding their experience with liver surgery and the 3D planning software. Senior level surgical residents from the Queen's University General Surgery residency program were recruited to participate. A total of 14 residents participated in the study. The median correct response rate was 2 of 5 (40%; range: 0-4) for the 2D group, and 3 of 5 (60%; range: 1-5) for the 3D group (p surgery planning increases accuracy of resident surgical planning and decreases amount of time required. 3D reconstruction would be a useful model for improving trainee understanding of liver anatomy and surgical

  13. Welcome and introduction to symposium

    OpenAIRE

    humanities, Symposium on Information and technology in the arts and; McLaughlin, Jeremy Lee; Matusiak, Krystyna; Hirsh, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Welcome and introduction slides used for presentation at the Virtual Symposium on Information and Technology in the Arts and Humanities, held April 22 and 23, 2015. The Symposium was co-sponsored by the ASIS&T (Association for Information Science and Technology) Special Interest Group for Arts and Humanities (SIG AH) and the Special Interest Group for Visualization, Images, and Sound (SIG VIS).

  14. The Influence of Gender on ProfessionalismFemale in Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae Hee

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to analyze the experience of female trainees who were trained in hospitals after graduating from medical school, focusing on methods of representing their gender in training courses. We interviewed 8 trainees who had been trained in a hospital in Seoul and 4 faculties from June 2010 to October 2010. We analyzed their similarities and differences and developed a vocational identity formation process to represent gender. Gender was represented contradictorily in their training course, affecting their choice of specialties and interactions with patients. But, female trainees did not want to their being distinguished from their male counterparts with regard to being a good doctor to be influenced by meritocracy. It was difficult for them to bear children and balance work and family life due to aspects of the training system, including long work hours and the lack of replacement workers. Consequently, they asked their parents to help with child care, because hospitals are not interested in the maternity system. Female trainees did not consider being a doctor to be a male profession. Likely, they believed that their femininity influenced their professionalism positively. The methods of representing gender are influenced by the training system, based a male-dominated apprenticeship. Thus, we will research the mechanisms that influence gender-discriminated choices in specialties, hospitals, and medical schools and prepare a maternity care system for female trainees. Strategies that maximize recruitment and retention of women in medicine should include a consideration of alternative work schedules and optimization of maternity leave and child care opportunities.

  15. What IAPT CBT High-Intensity Trainees Do After Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liness, Sheena; Lea, Susan; Nestler, Steffen; Parker, Hannah; Clark, David M

    2017-01-01

    The UK Department of Health Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) initiative set out to train a large number of therapists in cognitive behaviour therapies (CBT) for depression and anxiety disorders. Little is currently known about the retention of IAPT CBT trainees, or the use of CBT skills acquired on the course in the workplace after training has finished. This study set out to conduct a follow-up survey of past CBT trainees on the IAPT High Intensity CBT Course at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), King's College London (KCL), one of the largest IAPT High Intensity courses in the UK. Past trainees (n = 212) across 6 cohorts (2008-2014 intakes) were contacted and invited to participate in a follow-up survey. A response rate of 92.5% (n = 196) was achieved. The vast majority of IAPT trainees continue to work in IAPT services posttraining (79%) and to practise CBT as their main therapy modality (94%); 61% have become CBT supervisors. A minority (23%) have progressed to other senior roles in the services. Shortcomings are reported in the use of out-of-office CBT interventions, the use of disorder-specific outcome measures and therapy recordings to inform therapy and supervision. Past trainees stay working in IAPT services and continue to use CBT methods taught on the course. Some NICE recommended treatment procedures that are likely to facilitate patients' recovery are not being routinely implemented across IAPT services. The results have implications for the continued roll out of the IAPT programme, and other future large scale training initiatives.

  16. International perspectives on plagiarism and considerations for teaching international trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitman, Elizabeth; Litewka, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    In the increasingly global community of biomedical science and graduate science education, many US academic researchers work with international trainees whose views on scientific writing and plagiarism can be strikingly different from US norms. Although a growing number of countries and international professional organizations identify plagiarism as research misconduct, many international trainees come from research environments where plagiarism is ill-defined and even commonly practiced. Two research-ethics educators consider current perspectives on plagiarism around the world and contend that US research-training programs should focus on trainees' scientific writing skills and acculturation, not simply on preventing plagiarism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mental training in surgical education: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Sara; Raison, Nicholas; Khan, Muhammad S; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2017-11-01

    Pressures on surgical education from restricted working hours and increasing scrutiny of outcomes have been compounded by the development of highly technical surgical procedures requiring additional specialist training. Mental training (MT), the act of performing motor tasks in the 'mind's eye', offers the potential for training outside the operating room. However, the technique is yet to be formally incorporated in surgical curricula. This study aims to review the available literature to determine the role of MT in surgical education. EMBASE and Medline databases were searched. The primary outcome measure was surgical proficiency following training. Secondary analyses examined training duration, forms of MT and trainees level of experience. Study quality was assessed using Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials scores or Quality Assessment Tool for Before-After (Pre-Post) Studies with No Control Group. Fourteen trials with 618 participants met the inclusion criteria, of which 11 were randomized and three longitudinal. Ten studies found MT to be beneficial. Mental rehearsal was the most commonly used form of training. No significant correlation was found between the length of MT and outcomes. MT benefitted expert surgeons more than medical students or novice surgeons. The majority studies demonstrate MT to be beneficial in surgical education especially amongst more experienced surgeons within a well-structured MT programme. However, overall studies were low quality, lacked sufficient methodology and suffered from small sample sizes. For these reasons, further research is required to determine optimal role of MT as a supplementary educational tool within the surgical curriculum. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  18. 10th German nuclear law symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, H.J.; Rossnagel, A.

    2000-01-01

    This 10th symposium on nuclear law in Germany was held eight years after the 9th symposium. Due to the change of government after the last general elections, there had been a turnaround in Germany's energy policy. 'Phasing out nuclear energy' was the major strategy of the new Federal Government. The topics of the papers presented at the symposium therefore focus on: a new time frame for NPP shutdown and termination of operating licences; ensuring the safe operation of nuclear power plants for the remaining operating periods; new concepts for radwaste management and ultimate disposal. (orig./CB) [de

  19. The British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative: Five years on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Aswin; Jamjoom, Aimun A; Edlmann, Ellie; Ahmed, Aminul I; Coulter, Ian C; Ma, Ruichong; May, Paul; Brennan, Paul M; Hutchinson, Peter J A; Kolias, Angelos G

    2018-01-01

    Since its inception in 2012, the British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative (BNTRC) has established itself as a robust example of a trainee-led research collaborative. This article summarises the work of the collaborative over its first 5 years of existence, outlining the structure, its research projects, impact and future directions.

  20. Dimensions, discourses and differences: trainees conceptualising health care leadership and followership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lisi J; Rees, Charlotte E; Ker, Jean S; Cleland, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    As doctors in all specialties are expected to undertake leadership within health care organisations, leadership development has become an inherent part of medical education. Whereas the leadership literature within medical education remains mostly focused on individual, hierarchical leadership, contemporary theory posits leadership as a group process, which should be distributed across all levels of health care organisation. This gap between theory and practice indicates that there is a need to understand what leadership and followership mean to medical trainees working in today's interprofessional health care workplace. Epistemologically grounded in social constructionism, this research involved 19 individual and 11 group interviews with 65 UK medical trainees across all stages of training and a range of specialties. Semi-structured interviewing techniques were employed to capture medical trainees' conceptualisations of leadership and followership. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic framework analysis to identify leadership and followership dimensions which were subsequently mapped onto leadership discourses found in the literature. Although diversity existed in terms of medical trainees' understandings of leadership and followership, unsophisticated conceptualisations focusing on individual behaviours, hierarchy and personality were commonplace in trainees' understandings. This indicated the dominance of an individualist discourse. Patterns in understandings across all stages of training and specialties, and whether definitions were solicited or unsolicited, illustrated that context heavily influenced trainees' conceptualisations of leadership and followership. Our findings suggest that UK trainees typically hold traditional understandings of leadership and followership, which are clearly influenced by the organisational structures in which they work. Although education may change these understandings to some extent

  1. EXPLORING MALAYSIAN TRAINEE TEACHERS’ ADOPTION OF THE INTERNET AS INFORMATION TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Teck-Chai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the usage of three commercial Internet search engines in information seeking among trainee teachers at a teacher training institute in Malaysia. It attempts to investigate the information seeking behavior of the trainees via three Internet search engines (Google, Yahoo and MSN as gateways to information for research in academic learning using two cohorts of trainee teachers. The study surveyed 166 trainee teachers undergoing a 5-year Bachelor’s Degree program and compares the statistical differences on gender, programs and years of computer technology experiences. The results revealed that there were significant differences between gender for all the three search engines. Furthermore it also indicated that there was a significant difference between TESL and PISMP group for Yahoo and MSN but not for Google. A significant difference was also observed between years of computer technology experiences and the frequency of usage in the case of MSN. Post hoc test revealed a significant difference in the Internet search between those with more than 7 years of experience with those with less than 2 years experience and those between 2-4 years computing experience. The results provide insight into TESL and PPISMP trainee teachers’ use of the Internet search engines as a tool in information seeking when approaching research for their academic learning activities. Implications on the impact of the Internet to the trainee teachers’ academic learning in approaching research needs were discussed.

  2. Junior Radiologists' Forum (JRF): National trainee survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyas, S.; Beatie, A.; Pettet, G.; Kharay, A.; Hedayati, V.; Hameed, S.; McCleery, M.A.; Papadakos, N.; Chari, B.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To gather information in order to highlight areas within training that could be improved and share ideas of good practice and, in addition, to compare national results with those of local training schemes. Materials and methods: A request to participate in the survey was emailed to 1158 radiology trainees across 36 UK training schemes in October 2012. The electronic replies were anonymous. The survey remained active for 6 weeks. The data were collated and analysed by members of the JRF. The survey itself was divided into seven sections, covering a diverse range of topics. Results: Six hundred and four trainees from 36 UK training schemes completed the survey, resulting in a response rate of 52%. - Highlights: • First Radiology specific national survey, written by trainees. • Training schemes can benchmark their performance against a national average. • Also can share areas of good practice; and highlight those that need improvement. • Summary of the results, highlighting the most pertinent findings from each section

  3. Proceedings of the seventh symposium on laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This proceedings contains articles of the 7th symposium on laser spectroscopy and this symposium is held on Nov. 5-6, 1999 by KAERI. Both the laser and laser beams are critically used in many most precise measurements in science and technology. We discussed about the recently developed subjects in detail during the this symposium. This proceedings is composed of two major parts. One is the invitational lectures and the other is the research papers. And we have a number of invited speakers from several advanced countries. Their talks are the highlights of this symposium. (Cho, G. S.)

  4. Proceedings of the eighth symposium on laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This proceedings contains articles of the 8th symposium on laser spectroscopy and this symposium is held on Nov. 3-4, 2000 by KAERI. Both the laser and laser beams are critically used in many most precise measurements in science and technology. We discussed about the recently developed subjects in detail during the this symposium. This proceedings is composed of two major parts. One is the invitational lectures and the other is the research papers. And we have a number of invited speakers from several advanced countries. Their talks are the highlights of this symposium. (Yi, J. H.)

  5. International symposium 'Energetics 2004'. Symposium proceedings. Book 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The holding of this Symposium was initiated by ZEMAK - Macedonian Energy Association that for the last tens of years established itself in the national and international scientific and professional circles as a competent association of professionals with the main goal to follow, promote and improve the energy sector in the country. Having in mind the fact that the power energy sector as a fundamental sector plays a main role in the development and the improvement of the rest of the industry, and in the same time has a tremendous impact on the sustainable development of the entire economy of a country, power energy sector in fact has the paramount importance in the business environment of our country. Thus, ZEMAK has historically important role as a responsible and permanent driver, promoter and initiator for resolving of all-important questions directly or indirectly interconnected with the power energy sector in the country, and therefore the entire economy in the country as well. Following the past, ZEMAK had and would always have needs of organizing national and international symposiums and workshops as a panel where directly at one place national and international power energy experts could initiate, debate and resolve all up-to-date questions in the present energy sector in Macedonia, could analyze the modern world trends in the energy sector and try to find appropriate models for their application for further development and improvement of the energy sector in our country. This international symposium has the main goal to concentrate on a single place everybody who has power energy as a permanent preoccupation and/or vocation and professional interest. To aggregate on one place various experts, from the Academy and Universities, from the business circles and companies who are preoccupied with power energy directly or indirectly in their everyday life and work. During the Symposium more than 90 scientific and/or professional papers were presented and discussed

  6. International symposium 'Energetics 2004'. Symposium proceedings. Book 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The holding of this Symposium was initiated by ZEMAK - Macedonian Energy Association that for the last tens of years established itself in the national and international scientific and professional circles as a competent association of professionals with the main goal to follow, promote and improve the energy sector in the country. Having in mind the fact that the power energy sector as a fundamental sector plays a main role in the development and the improvement of the rest of the industry, and in the same time has a tremendous impact on the sustainable development of the entire economy of a country, power energy sector in fact has the paramount importance in the business environment of our country. Thus, ZEMAK has historically important role as a responsible and permanent driver, promoter and initiator for resolving of all-important questions directly or indirectly interconnected with the power energy sector in the country, and therefore the entire economy in the country as well. Following the past, ZEMAK had and would always have needs of organizing national and international symposiums and workshops as a panel where directly at one place national and international power energy experts could initiate, debate and resolve all up-to-date questions in the present energy sector in Macedonia, could analyze the modern world trends in the energy sector and try to find appropriate models for their application for further development and improvement of the energy sector in our country. This international symposium has the main goal to concentrate on a single place everybody who has power energy as a permanent preoccupation and/or vocation and professional interest. To aggregate on one place various experts, from the Academy and Universities, from the business circles and companies who are preoccupied with power energy directly or indirectly in their everyday life and work. During the Symposium more than 90 scientific and/or professional papers were presented and discussed

  7. The 12th International Symposium on Spermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, R John; Cummins, Jim M; Nixon, Brett

    2015-01-01

    The 12th International Symposium of Spermatology continued the excellent tradition of this meeting since its inception in 1969 when the first Symposium was held in Italy under the Chairmanship of Professor Baccio Baccetti. This unique Symposium is held every 4 years and serves as a beacon for sperm cell biologists from all over the world, regardless of which species, animal or plant, they are working on. This willingness to embrace the fundamental biology of this distinctive cell type without species limitations is one of the hallmarks of this Symposium. For sperm biologists – it is our Olympics. The meeting in Newcastle, NSW brought together around 300 biologists from more than 22 different countries covering North and South America, Africa, Europe, Asia and Australia. Given the considerable distances and high cost involved in travelling to the East Coast of NSW, this was an outstanding outcome. The Symposium featured a series of 31 plenary lectures culminating in the prestigious Thaddeus Mann Memorial Lecture, which was delivered with typical grace and brilliance by Professor Masaru Okabe. PMID:25994646

  8. Life and Work Values of Counselor Trainees: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busacca, Louis A.; Beebe, Ronald S.; Toman, Sarah M.

    2010-01-01

    This national web-based study used the Schwartz Value Survey (Schwartz, 1994) and Super's Work Values Inventory-Revised (Zytowski, n.d.) to identify general life and work value orientations of 674 female and male entry-level counselor trainees residing in 27 states. In general, trainees emphasized benevolence, self-direction, and achievement and…

  9. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  10. To which countries do European psychiatric trainees want to move to and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto da Costa, M; Giurgiuca, A; Holmes, K; Biskup, E; Mogren, T; Tomori, S; Kilic, O; Banjac, V; Molina-Ruiz, R; Palumbo, C; Frydecka, D; Kaaja, J; El-Higaya, E; Kanellopoulos, A; Amit, B H; Madissoon, D; Andreou, E; Uleviciute-Belena, I; Rakos, I; Dragasek, J; Feffer, K; Farrugia, M; Mitkovic-Voncina, M; Gargot, T; Baessler, F; Pantovic-Stefanovic, M; De Picker, L

    2017-09-01

    There is a shortage of psychiatrists worldwide. Within Europe, psychiatric trainees can move between countries, which increases the problem in some countries and alleviates it in others. However, little is known about the reasons psychiatric trainees move to another country. Survey of psychiatric trainees in 33 European countries, exploring how frequently psychiatric trainees have migrated or want to migrate, their reasons to stay and leave the country, and the countries where they come from and where they move to. A 61-item self-report questionnaire was developed, covering questions about their demographics, experiences of short-term mobility (from 3 months up to 1 year), experiences of long-term migration (of more than 1 year) and their attitudes towards migration. A total of 2281 psychiatric trainees in Europe participated in the survey, of which 72.0% have 'ever' considered to move to a different country in their future, 53.5% were considering it 'now', at the time of the survey, and 13.3% had already moved country. For these immigrant trainees, academic was the main reason they gave to move from their country of origin. For all trainees, the overall main reason for which they would leave was financial (34.4%), especially in those with lower (2500€) incomes, personal reasons were paramount (44.5%). A high number of psychiatric trainees considered moving to another country, and their motivation largely reflects the substantial salary differences. These findings suggest tackling financial conditions and academic opportunities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Does interpersonal behaviour of psychotherapy trainees differ in private and professional relationships?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna Ida Fincke

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trainees' interpersonal behaviour on Work Involvement (WI and compared their social behaviour within professional and private relationships as well as between different psychotherapeutic orientations. Methods: The interpersonal scales of the Intrex short-form questionnaire and the Work Involvement Scale (WIS were used to evaluate two samples of German psychotherapy trainees in psychoanalytic (PA, psychodynamic (PD and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT training. Trainees from sample 1 (N = 184 were asked to describe their interpersonal behaviour in relation to their patients when filling out the Intrex, whereas trainees from sample 2 (N = 135 were asked to describe the private relationship with a significant other. Results: Interpersonal affiliation in professional relationships significantly predicted the level of Healing Involvement (HI, while Stress Involvement (SI was predicted by interpersonal affiliation and interdependence in trainees' relationships with their patients. Social behaviour within professional relationships provided higher correlations with WI than private interpersonal behaviour. Significant differences were found between private and professional relation settings in trainees’ interpersonal behaviour with higher levels of affiliation and interdependence with significant others. Differences between therapeutic orientation and social behaviour could only be found when comparing trainees' level of interdependence with the particular relationship setting. Conclusion: Trainees' interpersonal level of affiliation in professional relationships is a predictor for a successful psychotherapeutic development. Vice versa, controlling behaviour in professional settings can be understood as a risk factor against psychotherapeutic growth. Both results strengthen an evidence-based approach for competence development during psychotherapy training.

  12. In search of work/life balance: trainee perspectives on part-time obstetrics and gynaecology specialist training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Part-time training (PTT is accessed by approximately 10% of Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees, a small but increasing minority which reflects the growing demand for improved work/life balance amongst the Australian medical workforce. This survey reports the attitudes and experiences of both full-time and part-time trainees to PTT. Methods An email-based anonymous survey was sent to all Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in April 2009, collecting demographic and training status data, data on personal experiences of PTT and/or trainees, and attitudes towards PTT. Results 105 responses were received (20% response rate. These indicated strong support (90% from both full-time (FT and part-time (PT trainees for the availability of PTT. PT trainees were significantly more likely than FT trainees to be female with children. Improved morale was seen as a particular advantage of PTT; decreased continuity of care as a disadvantage. Conclusions Although limited by poor response rate, both PT and FT Australian obstetric trainees were supportive of part-time training. Both groups recognised important advantages and disadvantages of this mode of training. Currently, part-time training is accessed primarily by female trainees with family responsibilities, with many more trainees considering part-time training than the number that access it.

  13. In search of work/life balance: trainee perspectives on part-time obstetrics and gynaecology specialist training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Amanda; Clements, Sarah; Kingston, Ashley; Abbott, Jason

    2012-01-10

    Part-time training (PTT) is accessed by approximately 10% of Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees, a small but increasing minority which reflects the growing demand for improved work/life balance amongst the Australian medical workforce. This survey reports the attitudes and experiences of both full-time and part-time trainees to PTT. An email-based anonymous survey was sent to all Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in April 2009, collecting demographic and training status data, data on personal experiences of PTT and/or trainees, and attitudes towards PTT. 105 responses were received (20% response rate). These indicated strong support (90%) from both full-time (FT) and part-time (PT) trainees for the availability of PTT. PT trainees were significantly more likely than FT trainees to be female with children. Improved morale was seen as a particular advantage of PTT; decreased continuity of care as a disadvantage. Although limited by poor response rate, both PT and FT Australian obstetric trainees were supportive of part-time training. Both groups recognised important advantages and disadvantages of this mode of training. Currently, part-time training is accessed primarily by female trainees with family responsibilities, with many more trainees considering part-time training than the number that access it.

  14. The Abel Symposium 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Irgens, Marius; Wold, Erlend

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on complex geometry and covers highly active topics centered around geometric problems in several complex variables and complex dynamics, written by some of the world’s leading experts in their respective fields. This book features research and expository contributions from the 2013 Abel Symposium, held at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology Trondheim on July 2-5, 2013. The purpose of the symposium was to present the state of the art on the topics, and to discuss future research directions.

  15. 2016 AMS Mario J. Molina Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Renyi [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-11-29

    A named symposium to honor Dr. Mario J. Molina was held 10–14 January 2016, as part of the 96th American Meteorological Society (AMS) Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana. Dr. Molina first demonstrated that industrially produced chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) decompose in the stratosphere and release chlorine atoms, leading to catalytic ozone destruction. His research in stratospheric chemistry was instrumental to the establishment of the 1987 United Nations Montreal Protocol to ban ozone-depleting substances worldwide. Dr. Molina’s contributions to preserving the planet Earth not only save the atmospheric ozone layer, but also protect the climate by reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases. He was awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his pioneering research in understanding the stratospheric ozone loss mechanism. In 2013, President Barack Obama announced Dr. Molina as a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The 2016 AMS Molina Symposium honored Dr. Molina’s distinguished contributions to research related to atmospheric chemistry. The symposium contained an integrated theme related to atmospheric chemistry, climate, and policy. Dr. Molina delivered a keynote speech at the Symposium. The conference included invited keynote speeches and invited and contributed oral and poster sessions, and a banquet was held on Tuesday January 12, 2016. The symposium covered all aspects of atmospheric chemistry, with topics including (1) Stratospheric chemistry, (2) Tropospheric chemistry, (3) Aerosol nucleation, growth, and transformation, (4) Aerosol properties, (5) Megacity air pollution, and (6) Atmospheric chemistry laboratory, field, and modeling studies. This DOE project supported 14 scientists, including graduate students, post docs, junior research scientists, and non-tenured assistant professors to attend this symposium.

  16. Memorial Symposium for Willibald Jentschke

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Willibald 'Willi' Jentschke, Director General of CERN from 1971 to 1975 and founder of the DESY Laboratory in Hamburg, died last March, just a few months after celebrating his 90th birthday. At that time, the Bulletin dedicated an article to him (Bulletin n°19-20/2002). Now, CERN has organised a Memorial Symposium for next Thursday 31 October, where you are cordially invited. This tribute will include the following speechs: L. Maiani : Welcome E. Lohrmann : Message from DESY H. Schopper : Willi Jentschke M. Veltman and D. Perkins : The Neutral Currents K. Johnsen : The ISR in Jentschke's time K. Winter : Some recollections of Jentschke The Memorial Symposium will take place in the Council Chamber, Thursday 31 October at 15 hrs. Drinks will be served at 17:30 hrs following the symposium.

  17. A Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachal, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Uses the framework of a symposium to present an imagined discussion by historical figures about whether and how knowledge might be acquired. Discussants include Democritus, Protagoras, Heraclitus, Socrates, Jesus, Gorgias, Nietzsche, Buddha, and Kierkegaard. (Contains 40 endnotes.) (SK)

  18. India Symposium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JNCASR

    Impact of Women's research in Science and Technology in the new millennium'. The. Symposium will showcase the work done by young Indian Women Scientists in different branches of Science and Engineering, at a wide spectrum of Research ...

  19. 1984 Statistical symposium on national energy issues: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnison, R.; Doctor, P.

    1985-07-01

    The 1984 Statistical Symposium on National Energy Issues was the tenth in a series of annual symposia bringing together statisticians and other interested parties who are actively engaged in the pursuit of solving the nation's energy problems. Initially the symposium was sponsored by US Department of Energy (DOE) and named the DOE Statistical Symposium. The symposium is organized by a steering committee made up of representatives from the national laboratories. The 1984 symposium was hosted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and it was organized around four special topical sessions: (1) assessing and assuring high reliability, (2) spatial statistical, (3) quantification of informed opinion, and (4) health effects of energy technologies. These were chosen by the steering committee as topics currently of high importance in energy research and data analysis. Several contributed papers were also presented. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 17 papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  20. International symposium 'Energetics 2006'. Symposium proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    ZEMAK as a civil association, created in the term positive legitimate regulations of our country, presents non party, non political and non profitable association, which primary goal is animation of eperts and other scientific and non scientific workers in the function of permanent following, studying and giving directives for solve the energy problems for a long temporal period. Behind us are fourteen successful years of fertile and wealthy work, which is bringing maimal penetration in domestic as well as foreign scientific field. This successful work of ZEMAK deserves by all members which professional work is in the institutions like: MANU (Macedonian academy of science and art), Technical faculties from the Universities, state and private company from energy field and other civil persons. The main goal of this 9-th International Symposium traditionally is to collect all engineers and eperts from the field of energy, and those which professional life is energy. During this International Symposium will be present, analyze and discuss about 100 incoming papers, prepared by 100th or more authors and coauthors, divided in the following topics: Basic energy and ecology, Renewable energy sources, Energy efficiency and energy saving and Management in energy and regulations.

  1. Exploring the impact of workplace cyberbullying on trainee doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Samuel; Coyne, Iain; Sprigg, Christine; Axtell, Carolyn; Subramanian, Ganesh

    2015-04-01

    Workplace bullying is an occupational hazard for trainee doctors. However, little is known about their experiences of cyberbullying at work. This study examines the impact of cyberbullying among trainee doctors, and how attributions of blame for cyberbullying influence individual and work-related outcomes. Doctors at over 6 months into training were asked to complete an online survey that included measures of cyberbullying, blame attribution, negative emotion, job satisfaction, interactional justice and mental strain. A total of 158 trainee doctors (104 women, 54 men) completed the survey. Overall, 73 (46.2%) respondents had experienced at least one act of cyberbullying. Cyberbullying adversely impacted on job satisfaction (β = - 0.19; p cyberbullying influenced its impact and the path of mediation. Negative emotion mediated the relationship between self-blame for a cyber-bullying act and mental strain, whereas interactional injustice mediated the association between blaming the perpetrator and job dissatisfaction. Acts of cyberbullying had been experienced by nearly half of the sample during their training and were found to significantly relate to ill health and job dissatisfaction. The deleterious impact of cyberbullying can be addressed through both workplace policies, and training for trainee doctors and experienced medical professionals. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. 29 CFR 553.214 - Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trainees. 553.214 Section 553.214 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS APPLICATION OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT TO EMPLOYEES OF STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Fire Protection and Law...

  3. Psychiatry trainees' attitudes towards euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontaxaki, M-I; Paplos, K; Dasopoulou, M; Kontaxakis, V

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the attitudes towards Euthanasia (EUT) and Physician-Assisted Suicide (PAS) in a sample of Greek Psychiatry trainees (PT), (n=120, mean age 32.01±0.21, male 60.0%) and compared these to those of medical trainees of other specialties (OMT), i.e. internal medicine, surgery, intensive care (n=154, mean age 32.97±1.17, male 57.1%). Most of the responders were for the acceptance of EUT and PAS under some circumstances. More often PT answer "never" in the question regarding the permission to withdraw life-sustaining medical treatment to hasten death, if that requested by a terminally ill patient (pquality of life (plife decisions. Also, it is important for educators to have understanding the views of the trainees since soon in the future, the new generation of physicians will have to make end of life decisions.

  4. Space 2000 Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Space 2000 Symposium is to present the creativity and achievements of key figures of the 20th century. It offers a retrospective discussion on space exploration. It considers the future of the enterprise, and the legacy that will be left for future generations. The symposium includes panel discussions, smaller session meetings with some panelists, exhibits, and displays. The first session entitled "From Science Fiction to Science Facts" commences after a brief overview of the symposium. The panel discussions include talks on space exploration over many decades, and the missions of the millennium to search for life on Mars. The second session, "Risks and Rewards of Human Space Exploration," focuses on the training and health risks that astronauts face on their exploratory mission to space. Session three, "Messages and Messengers Informing and Inspire Space Exploration and the Public," focuses on the use of TV medium by educators and actors to inform and inspire a wide variety of audiences with adventures of space exploration. Session four, "The Legacy of Carl Sagan," discusses the influences made by Sagan to scientific research and the general public. In session five, "Space Exploration for a new Generation," two student speakers and the NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin address the group. Session six, "Destiny or Delusion? -- Humankind's Place in the Cosmos," ends the symposium with issues of space exploration and some thought provoking questions. Some of these issues and questions are: what will be the societal implications if we discover the origin of the universe, stars, or life; what will be the impact if scientists find clear evidence of life outside the domains of the Earth; should there be limits to what humans can or should learn; and what visionary steps should space-faring people take now for future generations.

  5. A national UK survey of radiology trainees special interest choices: what and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Nassim; Bhuva, Shaheel

    2017-11-01

    A national survey was designed to better understand factors influencing special interest choices, future aspirations of UK radiology trainees and perceptions of breast radiology. A SurveyMonkey questionnaire was developed and distributed to all radiology trainees in the UK through the British Institute of Radiology, RCR Junior Radiologists Forum and by directly contacting UK training schemes as well as by social media between December 2015 and January 2016. From 21 training schemes across the UK, 232 responses were received. Over half entered radiology after foundation training and 62% were ST1-3; one-fifth of trainees intended to leave the NHS. The most popular special interests were musculoskeletal (18%), abdominal imaging (16%) and neuroradiology (13%). Gynaecological and oncological imaging proved to be the least popular. Strong personal interest, a successful rotation during training, a mix of imaging modalities, direct impact on patient care and job prospects were the most popular factors influencing career choice. Research and potential for private income were the least influential factors. Respondents detailed their perceptions of breast radiology, selecting an awareness of career prospects (41%) and a better trainee experience (36%) as factors that would increase their interest in pursuing it as a career. Understanding the factors that influence special interest choice is essential to addressing the alarming staffing shortfalls that will befall certain radiology special interests. Addressing trainee's preconceptions and improving the trainee experience are key to attracting trainees to breast radiology. Advances in knowledge: This is the first survey of its kind in the UK literature designed to evaluate special interest career choices and the factors that influence those among radiology trainees.

  6. Irish (Republic) versus British (North West) orthopaedic trainees: what are the differences?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Banks, L N

    2012-02-01

    British Trainees have gradually had their working week curtained over the last 8 years. The Republic of Ireland Trainees have not been subjected to the European Working Time Directive prior to 2009 and have therefore worked on average, more hours than their British counterparts. We wanted to see if the differing schemes had an impact on recruiting and training orthopaedic surgeons. We surveyed Republic of Ireland orthopaedic specialist registrars (SpRs) and North West (NW) British SpRs\\/specialist trainees (ST3 and above) to see if there were any discernable differences in working patterns and subsequent training exposure. A standard proforma was given to Irish Trainees and to NW SpRs\\/STs at their National or regional teaching (January\\/February 2009). 62% of Irish and 47% of British NW Trainees responded. Irish trainees were more likely to have obtained a post-graduate degree (p = 0.03). The Irish worked more hours per week (p < 0.001) doing more trauma operative lists (p = 0.003) and more total cases per 6 months than the NW British (p = 0.003). This study suggests that more hours worked, equals more operative exposure, without detriment to the academic side of training. Obviously it is not possible to say whether fewer operations make for a poorer surgeon, but the evidence suggests that it may be true.

  7. COMPUTING: International symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Recent Developments in Computing, Processor, and Software Research for High Energy Physics, a four-day international symposium, was held in Guanajuato, Mexico, from 8-11 May, with 112 attendees from nine countries. The symposium was the third in a series of meetings exploring activities in leading-edge computing technology in both processor and software research and their effects on high energy physics. Topics covered included fixed-target on- and off-line reconstruction processors; lattice gauge and general theoretical processors and computing; multiprocessor projects; electron-positron collider on- and offline reconstruction processors; state-of-the-art in university computer science and industry; software research; accelerator processors; and proton-antiproton collider on and off-line reconstruction processors

  8. Working conditions survey and trainees situation: new approach to auditing the situation of European trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology ten years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, David; Christopoulos, Panagiotis; Martins, Nuno; Pärgmäe, Pille; Werner, Henrica M J

    2009-12-01

    (1) To review the training and working conditions for trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology (Ob/Gyn) in Europe. (2) To suggest further improvements in working conditions for trainees in Ob/Gyn. It is an observational, descriptive, and cross-sectional study. The sample is constituted of the answers from the representatives of 25 European Network of Trainees in Ob/Gyn (ENTOG) member countries to a survey designed by ENTOG's executive. The current survey is based on the former ENTOG working conditions survey published in 1997, but has been extended to include questions that have become important recently, and to include new countries that have entered the European Union (EU) since that time. The total number of trainees represented in this study is 6056. The male/female ratio is 35/65. The average number of official working hours is 51.6 h weekly, but varies widely. The average number of duties/month is five, but varies widely from two to nine. Fewer than 50% of countries have a hospital visitation system implemented. Training abroad is possible in most training systems. Compared with the 1997 survey further harmonisation is taking place. Steps towards harmonisation are being made. Hospital visitation systems should be further introduced. Not all countries have remunerated training posts. Assessment should become more homogeneous. Compliance with the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) is a big challenge.

  9. Virtual reality in surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, D; Loftin, B; Saito, T; Lea, R; Keller, J

    1995-03-01

    Virtual reality (VR) is an emerging technology that can teach surgeons new procedures and can determine their level of competence before they operate on patients. Also VR allows the trainee to return to the same procedure or task several times later as a refresher course. Laparoscopic surgery is a new operative technique which requires the surgeon to observe the operation on a video-monitor and requires the acquisition of new skills. VR simulation could duplicate the operative field and thereby enhance training and reduce the need for expensive animal training models. Our preliminary experience has shown that we have the technology to model tissues and laparoscopic instruments and to develop in real time a VR learning environment for surgeons. Another basic need is to measure competence. Surgical training is an apprenticeship requiring close supervision and 5-7 years of training. Technical competence is judged by the mentor and has always been subjective. If VR surgical simulators are to play an important role in the future, quantitative measurement of competence would have to be part of the system. Because surgical competence is "vague" and is characterized by such terms as "too long, too short" or "too close, too far," it is possible that the principles of fuzzy logic could be used to measure competence in a VR surgical simulator. Because a surgical procedure consists of a series of tasks and each task is a series of steps, we will plan to create two important tasks in a VR simulator and validate their use. These tasks consist of laparoscopic knot tying and laparoscopic suturing. Our hypothesis is that VR in combination with fuzzy logic can educate surgeons and determine when they are competent to perform these procedures on patients.

  10. Intraoperative technique as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2012-02-01

    Approximately five percent of patients who undergo surgery develop surgical site infections (SSIs) which are associated with an extra seven days as an inpatient and with increased postoperative mortality. The competence and technique of the surgeon is considered important in preventing SSI. We have reviewed the evidence on different aspects of surgical technique and its role in preventing SSI. The most recent guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK recommend avoiding diathermy for skin incision even though this reduces incision time and blood loss, both associated with lower infection rates. Studies comparing different closure techniques, i.e. continuous versus interrupted sutures, have not found a statistically significant difference in the SSI rate, but using continuous sutures is quicker. For contaminated wounds, the surgical site should be left open for four days to allow for treatment of local infection before subsequent healing by primary intention. Surgical drains should be placed through separate incisions, closed suction drains are preferable to open drains, and all drains should be removed as soon as possible. There are relatively few large studies on the impact of surgical techniques on SSI rates. Larger multicentre prospective studies are required to define what aspects of surgical technique impact on SSI, to better inform surgical practice and support education programmes for surgical trainees.

  11. Intraoperative technique as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-02-28

    Approximately five percent of patients who undergo surgery develop surgical site infections (SSIs) which are associated with an extra seven days as an inpatient and with increased postoperative mortality. The competence and technique of the surgeon is considered important in preventing SSI. We have reviewed the evidence on different aspects of surgical technique and its role in preventing SSI. The most recent guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK recommend avoiding diathermy for skin incision even though this reduces incision time and blood loss, both associated with lower infection rates. Studies comparing different closure techniques, i.e. continuous versus interrupted sutures, have not found a statistically significant difference in the SSI rate, but using continuous sutures is quicker. For contaminated wounds, the surgical site should be left open for four days to allow for treatment of local infection before subsequent healing by primary intention. Surgical drains should be placed through separate incisions, closed suction drains are preferable to open drains, and all drains should be removed as soon as possible. There are relatively few large studies on the impact of surgical techniques on SSI rates. Larger multicentre prospective studies are required to define what aspects of surgical technique impact on SSI, to better inform surgical practice and support education programmes for surgical trainees.

  12. 'That blasted Facebook page': supporting trainee-teachers' professional learning through social media

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Martyn; Darwent, Dave; Irons, Charly

    2015-01-01

    The creation and use of a Facebook group amongst trainee-teachers in post-16 and further education on a PGCE course at a large university in the North of England was studied. The Facebook group was self-initiated and self-managed by the trainee-teachers as a means of socialisation and peer-support amongst themselves. Data was gathered through parallel interviews with a PGCE trainee and a course tutor. Interviews were semi-structured using Tuckman's stages of group development (forming, stormi...

  13. Coping With Stress of Teacher Trainees With Different Levels of Computer Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Ceyhan, Esra

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine whether levels and styles of coping with the stress of teacher trainees having low and high levels of computer anxiety across a number of variables. This research was carried out with 800 teacher trainees. Data were collected using the Computer Anxiety Scale, Coping With Stress Scale, and an Information Form. The results of the study indicate that the computer anxiety levels of teacher trainees differentiate levels and styles of coping with stress. It was f...

  14. 6{sup th} interventional MRI symposium. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The ongoing progress in the field of interventional MRI and the great success of our last symposium 2004 in Boston have stimulated us to organize the 6th Interventional MRI Symposium to be held September 15-16, 2006 in Leipzig. This meeting will highlight ground-breaking research as well as cutting-edge reports from many groups. The symposium also provides a forum to network with leaders and innovators in the field. Session topics are: intraoperative MRI, vascular applications, targeted drug delivery, cryotherapy, thermometry, pulse sequences, LITT, percutaneous procedures, navigation, robotics, focused ultrasound. (uke)

  15. How can educators support general practice (GP) trainees to develop resilience to prevent burnout?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Bryony; Macdonald, Alexandra; Scallan, Samantha; Crane, Sue

    2016-11-01

    Burnout impacts adversely on professional and personal life, and holds implications for patient care. Current research on burnout mainly focuses on established general practitioners but it is unclear how early the signs of burnout really start. This work seeks to identify whether specific GP trainee groups are particularly at risk of burnout and the aspects of training they find stressful. A longitudinal cohort study, collecting qualitative and quantitative data through a single mode of data collection (questionnaire) took place with trainees from all GP training years (ST1-3), across a vocational training scheme (n = 48). Data gathered included the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI). Higher than anticipated levels of burnout were displayed by all trainees. A sub-group self reporting higher levels of burnout comprised all-female, UK-trained-at-undergraduate GP trainees, with a partner but no children. Top reported stressors included knowledge/uncertainty, workload/time pressures and ePortfolio. Less than 50% of trainees perceived their burnout levels to be as high as their OLBI showing potential lack of insight. This research demonstrates that high levels of burnout are experienced in GP trainees as early as the first year of training. Early identification of burnout amongst trainees is essential by GP educators to help protect the future GP workforce.

  16. 2015 American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology (AACN) student affairs committee survey of neuropsychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Douglas M; Guidotti Breting, Leslie M; Butts, Alissa M; Hahn-Ketter, Amanda E; Osborn, Katie; Towns, Stephanie J; Barisa, Mark; Santos, Octavio A; Smith, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Surveys of practicing neuropsychologists have been conducted for years; however, there have been no comprehensive surveys of neuropsychology trainees, which may result in important issues being overlooked by the profession. This survey assessed trainees' experiences in areas such as student debt, professional development, and training satisfaction. Survey items were written by a task force of the AACN Student Affairs Committee (SAC), and neuropsychology trainees were recruited via neuropsychology-focused listservs. In total, 344 trainees completed the survey (75% female) and included participants from every region of the US and Canada. Based on the survey questions, nearly half of all trainees (47%) indicated financial factors were the greatest limitation in their training. Student debt had a bimodal distribution; 32.7% had minimal debt, but 45% had debt >$100,000. In contrast, expected starting salaries were modest, but consistent with findings ($80-100,000). While almost all trainees intended to pursue board certification (97% through ABPP), many were 'not at all' or only 'somewhat' familiar with the process. Results indicated additional critical concerns beyond those related to debt and lack of familiarity with board certification procedures. The results will inform SAC conference programming and the profession on the current 'state of the trainees' in neuropsychology.

  17. The fifth Finnish national aerosol symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkanen, P.; Haemeri, K.; Kauppinen, E.

    1993-01-01

    The Fifth Finnish Aerosol Symposium was held June 1-3, 1993. Symposium is jointly organized by FAAR, Aerosol Technology Group of Technical Research Centre of Finland and Helsinki University, Department of Physics. Aerosols, the suspensions of solid and liquid particles and gases, are receiving increasing importance in many areas of science and technology. These include industrial hygiene, ambient and indoor air pollution, pollution control technologies, cloud physics, nuclear safety engineering, combustion science and engineering, clean manufacturing technologies and material processing. The importance of aerosol issues during the development of advanced fuel conversion and material processing technologies can be realized when looking at the numerous papers presented on these topics at the Symposium

  18. IUTAM Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanou, George

    2014-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the IUTAM Symposium on Multiscale Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification of Materials and Structures that was held at Santorini, Greece, September 9 – 11, 2013. It consists of 20 chapters which are divided in five thematic topics: Damage and fracture, homogenization, inverse problems–identification, multiscale stochastic mechanics and stochastic dynamics. Over the last few years, the intense research activity at microscale and nanoscale reflected the need to account for disparate levels of uncertainty from various sources and across scales. As even over-refined deterministic approaches are not able to account for this issue, an efficient blending of stochastic and multiscale methodologies is required to provide a rational framework for the analysis and design of materials and structures. The purpose of this IUTAM Symposium was to promote achievements in uncertainty quantification combined with multiscale modeling and to encourage research and development in this grow...

  19. Library Anxiety of Teacher Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Savita; Attri, Poonam

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the library anxiety in Teacher Trainees and found it to be a prevalent phenomenon in students. The five dimensions of library anxiety, namely, barriers with staff, affective barriers, comfort with the library, knowledge of the library, and mechanical barriers have been identified. The sample of the study constituted 58…

  20. The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium in Evian

    CERN Multimedia

    Ludwik Dobrzynski and Emmanuel Tsesmelis

    The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian from 16 to 20 November 2009. The Hadron Collider Physics Symposium series has been a major forum for presentations of physics at the Tevatron over the past two decades. The merger of the former Topical Conference on Hadron Collider Physics with the LHC Symposium in 2005 brought together the Tevatron and LHC communities in a single forum. The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian, on the shores of Lake Geneva, from 16-20 November 2009, some 17 years after the historic ECFA-CERN Evian meeting in March 1992 when Expressions of Interest for LHC detectors were presented for the first time. The 2009 event was organized jointly by CERN and the French high-energy physics community (CNRS-IN2P3 and CEA-IRFU). More than 170 people registered for this symposium. This year’s symposium was held at an important time for both the Tevatron and the LHC. It stimulated the completion of analyses for a significant Tevatron data sam...

  1. Coal economics and taxation discussed at symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-01

    Some of the highlights from the Symposium on Coal Economics and Taxation Symposium, Regina Saskatchewan May 7-9, 1978, sponsored by the Coal Association of Canada are presented. Investment, provincial policy, sources of funds, uncertainty, tax policies, and operating costs are discussed.

  2. Surgical resident technical skill self-evaluation: increased precision with training progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Jacob A; Kudav, Vishal; Doty, Jennifer; Crane, Megan; Bukoski, Alex D; Bennett, Bethany J; Barnes, Stephen L

    2017-10-01

    Surgical resident ability to accurately evaluate one's own skill level is an important part of educational growth. We aimed to determine if differences exist between self and observer technical skill evaluation of surgical residents performing a single procedure. We prospectively enrolled 14 categorical general surgery residents (six post-graduate year [PGY] 1-2, three PGY 3, and five PGY 4-5). Over a 6-month period, following each laparoscopic cholecystectomy, residents and seven faculty each completed the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS). Spearman's coefficient was calculated for three groups: senior (PGY 4-5), PGY3, and junior (PGY 1-2). Rho (ρ) values greater than 0.8 were considered well correlated. Of the 125 paired assessments (resident-faculty each evaluating the same case), 58 were completed for senior residents, 54 for PGY3 residents, and 13 for junior residents. Using the mean from all OSATS categories, trainee self-evaluations correlated well to faculty (senior ρ 0.97, PGY3 ρ 0.9, junior ρ 0.9). When specific OSATS categories were analyzed, junior residents exhibited poor correlation in categories of respect for tissue (ρ -0.5), instrument handling (ρ 0.71), operative flow (ρ 0.41), use of assistants (ρ 0.05), procedural knowledge (ρ 0.32), and overall comfort with the procedure (ρ 0.73). PGY3 residents lacked correlation in two OSATS categories, operative flow (ρ 0.7) and procedural knowledge (ρ 0.2). Senior resident self-evaluations exhibited strong correlations to observers in all areas. Surgical residents improve technical skill self-awareness with progressive training. Less-experienced trainees have a tendency to over-or-underestimate technical skill. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, E.M.; Gee, G.W.; Nelson, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    This document records the proceedings of a symposium on flow and transport processes in partially saturated groundwater systems, conducted at the Battelle Seattle Research Center on March 22-24, 1982. The symposium was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of assessing the state-of-the-art of flow and transport modeling for use in licensing low-level nuclear waste repositories in partially saturated zones. The first day of the symposium centered around research in flow through partially saturated systems. Papers were presented with the opportunity for questions following each presentation. In addition, after all the talks, a formal panel discussion was held during which written questions were addressed to the panel of the days speakers. The second day of the Symposium was devoted to solute and contaminant transport in partially saturated media in an identical format. Individual papers are abstracted

  4. Symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, E.M.; Gee, G.W.; Nelson, R.W. (eds.)

    1982-09-01

    This document records the proceedings of a symposium on flow and transport processes in partially saturated groundwater systems, conducted at the Battelle Seattle Research Center on March 22-24, 1982. The symposium was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of assessing the state-of-the-art of flow and transport modeling for use in licensing low-level nuclear waste repositories in partially saturated zones. The first day of the symposium centered around research in flow through partially saturated systems. Papers were presented with the opportunity for questions following each presentation. In addition, after all the talks, a formal panel discussion was held during which written questions were addressed to the panel of the days speakers. The second day of the Symposium was devoted to solute and contaminant transport in partially saturated media in an identical format. Individual papers are abstracted.

  5. Essential competencies in global health research for medical trainees: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary T; Satterfield, Caley A; Blackard, Jason T

    2017-09-01

    Participation in short-term educational experiences in global health (STEGHs) among medical trainees is increasingly accompanied by interest in conducting research while abroad. Because formal training in both global health and research methods is currently under-represented in most medical curricula, trainees are often unfamiliar with the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary to design and conduct research successfully. This narrative review identifies essential global health research competencies for medical trainees engaged in STEGHs. The authors searched the literature using the terms global health, competency, research, research methods/process/training, scholarly project, medical student, and medical education/education. Because articles directly addressing global health research competencies for medical trainees were limited, the authors additionally drew on the broader literature addressing general research competencies and global health competencies. Articles yielded by the literature search, combined with established guidelines in research ethics and global health ethics, were used to identify six core domains and twenty discrete competencies fundamental to global health research at a level appropriate for medical trainees enrolled in STEGHs. Consideration was given to diverse research modalities, varying levels of training, and the availability of mentoring and on-site support. Research may provide important benefits to medical trainees and host partners. These competencies provide a starting point; however, circumstances at any host site may necessitate additional competencies specific to that setting. These competencies are also limited by the methodology employed in their development and the need for additional perspectives from host partners. The competencies identified outline basic knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary for medical trainees to conduct limited global health research while participating in STEGHS. They may also be used as a

  6. Travel Medicine Encounters of Australian General Practice Trainees-A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Simon; Henderson, Kim M; Tapley, Amanda; Scott, John; van Driel, Mieke L; Spike, Neil A; McArthur, Lawrie A; Davey, Andrew R; Catzikiris, Nigel F; Magin, Parker J

    2015-01-01

    Travel medicine is a common and challenging area of clinical practice and practitioners need up-to-date knowledge and experience in a range of areas. Australian general practitioners (GPs) play a significant role in the delivery of travel medicine advice. We aimed to describe the rate and nature of travel medicine consultations, including both the clinical and educational aspects of the consultations. A cross-sectional analysis from an ongoing cohort study of GP trainees' clinical consultations was performed. Trainees contemporaneously recorded demographic, clinical, and educational details of consecutive patient consultations. Proportions of all problems/diagnoses managed in these consultations that were coded "travel-related" and "travel advice" were both calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Associations of a problem/diagnosis being "travel-related" or "travel advice" were tested using simple logistic regression within the generalized estimating equations (GEE) framework. A total of 856 trainees contributed data on 169,307 problems from 108,759 consultations (2010-2014). Travel-related and travel advice problems were managed at a rate of 1.1 and 0.5 problems per 100 encounters, respectively. Significant positive associations of travel-related problems were younger trainee and patient age; new patient to the trainee and practice; privately billing, larger, urban, and higher socioeconomic status practices; and involvement of the practice nurse. Trainees sought in-consultation information and generated learning goals in 34.7 and 20.8% of travel advice problems, respectively, significantly more than in non-travel advice problems. Significant positive associations of travel advice problems were seeking in-consultation information, generation of learning goals, longer consultation duration, and more problems managed. Our findings reinforce the importance of focused training in travel medicine for GP trainees and adequate exposure to patients in the practice

  7. Working hours of obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, Jade; Tucker, Paige E; Bulsara, Max K; Cohen, Paul A

    2017-10-01

    The importance of doctors' working hours has gained significant attention with evidence suggesting long hours and fatigue may compromise the safety and wellbeing of both patients and doctors. This study aims to quantify the working hours of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG) specialist trainees in order to better inform discussions of working hours and safety within our region. An anonymous, online survey of RANZCOG trainees was conducted. Demographic data were collected. The primary outcomes were: hours per week at work and hours per week on-call. Secondary outcomes included the frequency of long days (>12 h) and 24-h shifts, time spent studying, staff shortages and opinions regarding current rostering. Response rate was 49.5% (n = 259). Full-time trainees worked an average of 53.1 ± 10.0 h/week, with 11.6% working on-call. Long-day shifts were reported by 85.8% of respondents, with an average length of 14.2 h. Fifteen percent reported working 24-h shifts, with a median duration of uninterrupted sleep during this shift being 1-2 h. Trainees in New Zealand worked 7.0 h/week more than Australian trainees (P ≤0.001), but reported less on-call (P = 0.021). Trainees in Western Australia were more likely to work on-call (P ≤0.001) and 24-h shifts (P ≤0.001). While 53.1 h/week at work is similar to the average Australian hospital doctor, high rates of long days and 24-h shifts with minimal sleep were reported by RANZCOG trainees in this survey. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  8. Night shift fatigue among anaesthesia trainees at a major metropolitan teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancman, B M

    2016-05-01

    Night shifts expose anaesthesia trainees to the risk of fatigue and, potentially, fatigue-related performance impairment. This study examined the workload, fatigue and coping strategies of anaesthesia trainees during night shifts. A blinded survey-based study was undertaken at a major single centre metropolitan teaching hospital in Australia. All ten anaesthesia trainees who worked night shifts participated. The survey collected data on duration of night shifts, workload, and sleep patterns. Fatigue was assessed using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS). There were 93 night shifts generating data out of a potential 165. Trainees tended to sleep an increasing amount before their shift as the nights progressed from 1 to 5. Night 1 was identified as an 'at risk' night due to the amount of time spent awake before arriving at work (32% awake for U+003E8 hours); on all other nights trainees were most likely to have slept 6-8 hours. The KSS demonstrated an increase in sleepiness of 3 to 4 points on the scale from commencement to conclusion of a night shift. The Night 1 conclusion sleepiness was markedly worse than any other night with 42% falling into an 'at-risk' category. The findings demonstrate fatigue and inadequate sleep in anaesthesia trainees during night shifts in a major metropolitan teaching hospital. The data obtained may help administrators prepare safer rosters, and junior staff develop improved strategies to reduce the likelihood of fatigue.

  9. Supervising Family Therapy Trainees in Primary Care Medical Settings: Context Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Todd M.; Patterson, Jo Ellen

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify and describe four essential skills for effective supervision of family therapy trainees in primary care medical settings. The supervision skills described include: (1) Understand medical culture; (2) Locate the trainee in the treatment system; (3) Investigate the biological/health issues; and (4) Be…

  10. Information Activities and Appropriation in Teacher Trainees' Digital, Group-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanell, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports results from an ethnographic study of teacher trainees' information activities in digital, group-based learning and their relation to the interplay between use and appropriation of digital tools and the learning environment. Method: The participants in the present study are 249 pre-school teacher trainees in…

  11. Effect of Engaging Trainees by Assessing Peer Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loumann Krogh, Charlotte; Ringsted, Charlotte; Kromann, Charles B

    2014-01-01

    during training. Outcome measures were in-training performance and performance, both of which were measured two weeks after the course. Trainees' performances were videotaped and assessed by two expert raters using a checklist that included a global rating. Trainees' satisfaction with the training...... was also evaluated. RESULTS: The intervention group obtained a significantly higher overall in-training performance score than the control group: mean checklist score 20.87 (SD 2.51) versus 19.14 (SD 2.65) P = 0.003 and mean global rating 3.25 SD (0.99) versus 2.95 (SD 1.09) P = 0.014. Postcourse...

  12. Self-Esteem and Emotional Intelligence among B.Ed Trainees of Tsunami Affected Coastal Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu M, Sameer

    2008-01-01

    Through this study the author investigates the relationship between self-esteem and emotional intelligence among B.Ed trainees of Tsunami affected coastal belt of Alappey district of Kerala, India. Stream of study, marital status and age based comparisons were made among the B.Ed trainees. 92 B.Ed trainees were the participants in the study. It…

  13. [Professional Development Processes of Trainee and Experienced Psychotherapists in Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilican, F Işıl; Soygüt, Gonca

    2015-01-01

    This study explored professional characteristics of psychotherapists in Turkey, examined the changes in their professional developmental processes, and compared the professional characteristics of the trainees and experienced therapists. The participants were 88 psychotherapists, including trainee (N=37) and experienced (N=51) psychotherapists in Turkey. They completed the Development of Psychotherapists International Study-Common Core Questionnaire (DPCCQ), developed by the Collaborative Research Network. The participants identified with the cognitive theoretical orientation most often. 30% of the participants had more than two salient orientations. The most prevalent therapy modality was individual, followed by couples, family, and group psychotherapy. Ongoing supervision rate was 44%. Trainees scored lower on effectiveness in engaging patients in a working alliance, feeling natural while working with patients, effectiveness in communicating their understanding and concern to their patients, and feeling confident in their role as a therapist. Experienced therapists made changes in the therapeutic contract and invited collaboration from families more compared to the trainees. 63% of the variance in Healing Involvement was explained by Overall Career Development, Currently Experienced Growth, being influenced by the humanistic approach, and the impact of the main therapeutic environment; 26% of the variance in Stressful Involvement was explained by the length of official supervision received and having control over the length of therapy sessions. Therapists were more cognitively oriented, less eclectic, and had less supervision compared to their international counterparts. Experienced therapists were more flexible, natural, and confident than the trainees. Supervision, a supportive work environment, the humanistic approach, and investing in career development were essential to providing a healing experience.

  14. Evolving a common surgical curriculum for ASEAN nations with a public health approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Siew Kheong

    2013-03-01

    The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA) on medical practitioners' agreement will become a reality in the year 2015. Doctors registered in one ASEAN country will be given reciprocal recognition in another country under this agreement. Rapid and excessive movement of human resources between countries in a short span of time is undesirable and can be destabilizing. The surgical fraternity in the ASEAN countries should plan for a common surgical curriculum, a common examination and an ASEAN Board of Surgery so that standards of future trainees in different countries are comparable. The curriculum should take into consideration the diversity of the countries in socio-economic development. Ideally, it should be based on a public health approach to bring affordable quality surgical care to the masses in an efficient and effective manner. © 2013 The Author. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  15. Use of spaced education to deliver a curriculum in quality, safety and value for postgraduate medical trainees: trainee satisfaction and knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckel, Jeffrey; Carballo, Victoria; Kalibatas, Orinta; Soule, Michael; Wynne, Kathryn E; Ryan, Megan P; Shaw, Tim; Co, John Patrick T

    2016-03-01

    Quality, patient safety and value are important topics for graduate medical education (GME). Spaced education delivers case-based content in a structured longitudinal experience. Use of spaced education to deliver quality and safety education in GME at an institutional level has not been previously evaluated. To implement a spaced education course in quality, safety and value; to assess learner satisfaction; and to describe trainee knowledge in these areas. We developed a case-based spaced education course addressing learning objectives related to quality, safety and value. This course was offered to residents and fellows about two-thirds into the academic year (March 2014) and new trainees during orientation (June 2014). We assessed learner satisfaction by reviewing the course completion rate and a postcourse survey, and trainee knowledge by the per cent of correct responses. The course was offered to 1950 trainees. A total of 305 (15.6%) enrolled in the course; 265/305 (86.9%) answered at least one question, and 106/305 (34.8%) completed the course. Fewer participants completed the March programme compared with the orientation programme (42/177 (23.7%) vs 64/128 (50.0%), peducation can help deliver and assess learners' understanding of quality, safety and value principles. Offering a voluntary course may result in low completion. Learners were satisfied with their experience and were introduced to new concepts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Taekwondo trainees' satisfaction towards using the virtual taekwondo training environment prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelani, Nur Ain Mohd; Zulkifli, Abdul Nasir; Ismail, Salina; Yusoff, Mohd Fitri

    2017-10-01

    Taekwondo is among the most popular martial arts which have existed more than 3000 years ago and have millions of followers all around the world. The typical taekwondo training session takes place in a hall or large open spaces in the presence of a trainer. Even though this is the most widely used approach of Taekwondo training, this approach has some limitations in supporting self-directed training. Self-directed taekwondo training is required for the trainees to improve their skills and performance. There are varieties of supplementary taekwondo training materials available, however, most of them are still lacking in terms of three-dimensional visualization. This paper introduces the Virtual Taekwondo Training Environment (VT2E) prototype for self-directed training. The aim of this paper is to determine whether the intervention of the new taekwondo training approach using virtual reality contributes to the trainees' satisfaction in self-directed training. Pearson Correlation and Regression analyses were used to determine the effects of Engaging, Presence, Usefulness and Ease of Use on trainees' satisfaction in using the prototype. The results provide empirical support for the positive and statistically significant relationship between Usefulness and Ease of Use and trainees' satisfaction for taekwondo training. However, Engaging and Presence do not have a positive and significant relationship with trainees' satisfaction for self-directed training.

  17. IAEA symposium on international safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The eighth IAEA Symposium on International Safeguards was organized by the IAEA in cooperation with the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management and the European Safeguards Research and Development Association. It was attended by over 350 specialists and policy makers in the field of nuclear safeguards and verification from more than 50 countries and organizations. The purpose of the Symposium was to foster a broad exchange of information on concepts and technologies related to important developments in the areas of international safeguards and security. For the first time in the history of the symposia, the IAEA is issuing proceedings free of charge to participants on CD-ROM. The twenty-two plenary, technical, and poster sessions featured topics related to technological and policy aspects from national, regional and global perspectives. The theme of the Symposium: Four Decades of Development - Safeguarding into the New Millennium set the stage for the commemoration of a number of significant events in the annals of safeguards. 1997 marked the Fortieth Anniversary of the IAEA, the Thirtieth Anniversary of the Tlatelolco Treaty, and the Twentieth Anniversary of the Department of Safeguards Member State Support Programmes. There were special events and noted presentations featuring these anniversaries and giving the participants an informative retrospective view of safeguards development over the past four decades. The proceedings of this symposium provide the international community with a comprehensive view of where nuclear safeguards and verification stood in 1997 in terms of the growing demands and expectations. The Symposium offered thoughtful perspectives on where safeguards are headed within the broader context of verification issues. As the world of international nuclear verification looks towards the next millennium, the implementation of the expanding and strengthened safeguards system presents formidable challenges

  18. Proceedings of the sixth symposium on laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    This proceedings contains articles of the 6th symposium on laser spectroscopy and this symposium is held on Nov. 3-4, 1998 by KAERI. Laser spectroscopy is one of the most important areas in optical science and engineering and we discussed about the recently developed subjects in detail during the this symposium. This proceedings is composed of two major parts. One is the invitational lectures and the other is the research papers. This have a very important and very valuable lecture by Dr. William Phillips who is the 1997 Nobel Laureate in Physics. His special lecture was very wonderful and fruitful. And we have a number of invited speakers from several advanced countries. Their talks are the highlights of this symposium. (Cho, G. S.)

  19. Selection for Surgical Training: An Evidence-Based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaverien, Mark V

    2016-01-01

    The predictive relationship between candidate selection criteria for surgical training programs and future performance during and at the completion of training has been investigated for several surgical specialties, however there is no interspecialty agreement regarding which selection criteria should be used. Better understanding the predictive reliability between factors at selection and future performance may help to optimize the process and lead to greater standardization of the surgical selection process. PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE databases were searched. Over 560 potentially relevant publications were identified using the search strategy and screened using the Cochrane Collaboration Data Extraction and Assessment Template. 57 studies met the inclusion criteria. Several selection criteria used in the traditional selection demonstrated inconsistent correlation with subsequent performance during and at the end of surgical training. The following selection criteria, however, demonstrated good predictive relationships with subsequent resident performance: USMLE examination scores, Letters of Recommendation (LOR) including the Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE), academic performance during clinical clerkships, the interview process, displaying excellence in extracurricular activities, and the use of unadjusted rank lists. This systematic review supports that the current selection process needs to be further evaluated and improved. Multicenter studies using standardized outcome measures of success are now required to improve the reliability of the selection process to select the best trainees. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Surgical video recording with a modified GoPro Hero 4 camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin LK

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lily Koo Lin Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science, University of California, Davis Eye Center, Sacramento, CA, USA Background: Surgical videography can provide analytical self-examination for the surgeon, teaching opportunities for trainees, and allow for surgical case presentations. This study examined if a modified GoPro Hero 4 camera with a 25 mm lens could prove to be a cost-effective method of surgical videography with enough detail for oculoplastic and strabismus surgery. Method: The stock lens mount and lens were removed from a GoPro Hero 4 camera, and was refitted with a Peau Productions SuperMount and 25 mm lens. The modified GoPro Hero 4 camera was then fixed to an overhead surgical light. Results: Camera settings were set to 1080p video resolution. The 25 mm lens allowed for nine times the magnification as the GoPro stock lens. There was no noticeable video distortion. The entire cost was less than 600 USD. Conclusion: The adapted GoPro Hero 4 with a 25 mm lens allows for high-definition, cost-effective, portable video capture of oculoplastic and strabismus surgery. The 25 mm lens allows for detailed videography that can enhance surgical teaching and self-examination. Keywords: teaching, oculoplastic, strabismus

  1. 6th European symposium on uroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujlov, V.M.

    1999-01-01

    Materials of the 6th European symposium on uroradiology held in Strasbourg (France) in September, 1998. Symposium topics included problems of radiological diagnosis of kidneys, renovascular hypertension, man and woman sterility, pelvis organs of men and women, functional studies of lower urinary tract, pediatric and interventional uroradiology. Great attention is paid to magnetic resonance tomography, ultrasonography and conventional biomedical radiography [ru

  2. Exploring Malaysian Trainee Teachers' Adoption of the Internet as Information Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teck-Chai, Lau; Kim-Hong, Yeoh; Ching-Ching, Choong

    2010-01-01

    This study reports the usage of three commercial Internet search engines in information seeking among trainee teachers at a teacher training institute in Malaysia. It attempts to investigate the information seeking behavior of the trainees via three Internet search engines (Google, Yahoo and MSN) as gateways to information for research in academic…

  3. Supervision in Language Teaching: A Supervisor's and Three Trainee Teachers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahyalar, Eda; Yazici, lkay Çelik

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the findings from a study which investigated supervision in language teaching from a supervisor's and her three trainee teachers' perspectives. The data in the study were from three sources: 1) audio recordings of the supervisor's feedback sessions with each trainee teacher, 2) audio recording of an interview between the…

  4. Occupational Blood Exposure among Health Care Personnel and Hospital Trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hajjaji Darouiche

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood and body fluid Exposure is a major occupational safety problems for health care workers. Therefore, we conducted a descriptive and retrospective study to identify the characteristics of blood exposure accidents in health care settings which lasted five years (2005-2009 at the two university hospitals of Sfax. We have 593 blood exposure accidents in health care settings 152 (25.6% health personnel and 441 (74.4% trainees' doctors, nurses and health technicians. The mechanism of blood and body fluid exposure was accidental needle-stick injury in 78.9% of health staff, and 81% of trainees, accidental cut in 14.7% of health workers and 10.2% of trainees. The increasing severity of blood exposure accidents is linked to the lack of safe behavior against this risk.

  5. North American Pediatric Gastroenterology Fellowship Needs Assessment in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Trainee and Program Director Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Jennifer L; Falaiye, Tolulope; Bricker, Josh B; Strople, Jennifer; Rosh, Joel

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) care is complex and rapidly evolving. The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America and North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition cosponsored a needs assessment survey of pediatric gastroenterology trainees and program directors (PDs) to inform on educational programming. A Web-based, self-completed survey was provided to North American trainees and PDs during the 2013-2014 academic year. Standard descriptive statistics summarized demographics and responses. One hundred sixty-six of 326 (51%) trainees (62% female) and 37 of 74 (50%) PDs responded. Median trainees per program = 5 and median total faculty = 10 (3 IBD experts); 15% of programs did not have a self-identified "IBD expert" faculty member. Sixty-nine percent of trainees were confident/somewhat confident in their IBD inpatient training, whereas 54% were confident/somewhat confident in their outpatient training. Trainees identified activities that would most improve their education, including didactics (55%), interaction with national experts (50%), trainee-centered IBD Web resources (42%), and increased patient exposure (42%). Trainees were most confident in managing inpatient active Crohn's disease/ulcerative colitis, phenotype classification, managing biological therapies, and using clinical disease activity indices. They were least confident in managing J-pouch complications, performing pouchoscopy, managing extraintestinal manifestations, and ostomy-related complications. Eighty-five percent would like an IBD-focused training elective. Most directors (86%) would allow trainees to do electives at other institutions. This IBD needs assessment survey of pediatric gastroenterology trainees and PDs demonstrated a strong resource commitment to IBD training and clinical care. Areas for educational enrichment emerged, including pouch and ostomy complications.

  6. Understanding Faculty and Trainee Needs Related to Scholarly Activity in a Large, Nonuniversity Graduate Medical Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Davida; Garth, Hanna; Hollander, Rachel; Klein, Felice; Klau, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Graduate medical education (GME) programs must develop curriculum to ensure scholarly activity among trainees and faculty to meet accreditation requirements and to support evidence-based medicine. Test whether research-related needs and interests varied across four groups: primary care trainees, specialty trainees, primary care faculty, and specialty faculty. We surveyed a random sample of trainees and faculty in Kaiser Permanente Southern California's GME programs. We investigated group differences in outcomes using Fisher exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Research experiences, skills, barriers, motivators, and interests in specific research skills development. Participants included 47 trainees and 26 faculty (response rate = 30%). Among primary care faculty, 12 (71%) reported little or no research experience vs 1 (11%) for specialty faculty, 14 (41%) for primary care trainees, and 1 (8%) for specialty trainees (p work roles taking priority; desire for work-life balance; and lack of managerial support, research equipment, administrative support, and funding. Faculty and trainees in primary care and specialties have differing research-related needs that GME programs should consider when designing curricula to support scholarly activity. Developing research skills of primary care faculty is a priority to support trainees' scholarly activity.

  7. Radiographers and trainee radiologists reporting accident radiographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buskov, L; Abild, A; Christensen, A

    2013-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy and clinical validity of reporting radiographers with that of trainee radiologists whom they have recently joined in reporting emergency room radiographs at Bispebjerg University Hospital....

  8. The positive impact of structured teaching in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Yee; Salfinger, Stuart; Mercer, Annette

    2015-12-01

    A survey of obstetric and gynaecology trainees in Australia found the trainee's opinion of the consultants' teaching ability for laparoscopic procedures and procedures dealing with complications as 'poor' in 21.2% and 23.4% of responses, respectively (Aust NZ J Obstet Gynaecol 2009; 49: 84). Surgical caseload per trainee is falling for a variety of reasons. Strategies need to be adopted to enhance the surgical learning experience of trainees in the operating room. We describe the use of a structured encounter template to facilitate the teaching of surgery in the operating room and report the response of the trainees to this intervention. Trainees attached to a gynaecologic surgery unit all underwent surgical training using a set format based on the surgical encounter template, including briefing, goal setting and intra-operative teaching aims as well as debriefing. Data on the trainees' experience and perception of their learning experience were then collected and analysed as quantitative and qualitative data sets. The trainees reported satisfaction with the use of a structured encounter template to facilitate the surgical teaching in the operating room. Some trainees had not received such clarity of feedback or the opportunity to complete a procedure independently prior to using the structured encounter template. A structured surgical encounter template based on andragogy principles to focus consultant teaching in the operating room is highly acceptable to obstetric and gynaecology trainees in Australia. Allowing the trainee the opportunity to set objectives and receive feedback empowers the trainee and enhances their educational experience. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  9. 7th International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics

    CERN Document Server

    James, David

    1994-01-01

    The Seventh International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, U. S. A. , on April 24-28, 1994. The symposium continued the interdisciplinary character and comprehensive approach of the preceding six symposia. Gaseous DielecIries VII is a detailed record of the symposium proceedings. It covers recent advances and developments in a wide range of basic, applied and industrial areas of gaseous dielectrics. It is hoped that Gaseous DielecIries VII will aid future research and development in, and encourage wider industrial use of, gaseous dielectrics. The Organizing Committee of the Seventh International Symposium on Gaseous Dielectrics consisted of G. Addis (U. S. A. ), L. G. Christophorou (U. S. A. ), F. Y. Chu (Canada), A. H. Cookson (U. S. A. ), O. Farish (U. K. ), I. Gallimberti (Italy) , A. Garscadden (U. S. A. ), D. R. James (U. S. A. ), E. Marode (France), T. Nitta (Japan), W. Pfeiffer (Germany), Y. Qiu (China), I. Sauers (U. S. A. ), R. J. Van Brunt (U. S. A. ), and W. Zaengl...

  10. Education in medical billing benefits both neurology trainees and academic departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Jeff L

    2014-11-11

    The objective of residency training is to produce physicians who can function independently within their chosen subspecialty and practice environment. Skills in the business of medicine, such as clinical billing, are widely applicable in academic and private practices but are not commonly addressed during formal medical education. Residency and fellowship training include limited exposure to medical billing, but our academic department's performance of these skills was inadequate: in 56% of trainee-generated outpatient notes, documentation was insufficient to sustain the chosen billing level. We developed a curriculum to improve the accuracy of documentation and coding and introduced practice changes to address our largest sources of error. In parallel, we developed tools that increased the speed and efficiency of documentation. Over 15 months, we progressively eliminated note devaluation, increased the mean level billed by trainees to nearly match that of attending physicians, and increased outpatient revenue by $34,313/trainee/year. Our experience suggests that inclusion of billing education topics into the formal medical curriculum benefits both academic medical centers and trainees. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. NATO Symposium on Human Detection and Diagnosis of System Failures

    CERN Document Server

    Rouse, William

    1981-01-01

    This book includes all of the papers presented at the NATO Symposium on Human Detection and Diagnosis of System Failures held at Roskilde, Denmark on August 4-8, 1980. The Symposium was sponsored by the Scientific Affairs Division of NATO and the Rise National Laboratory of Denmark. The goal of the Symposium was to continue the tradition initiated by the NATO Symposium on Monitoring Behavior and Supervisory Control held in Berchtesgaden, F .R. Germany in 1976 and the NATO Symposium on Theory and Measurement of Mental Workload held in Mati, Greece in 1977. To this end, a group of 85 psychologists and engineers coming from industry, government, and academia convened to discuss, and to generate a "state-of-the-art" consensus of the problems and solutions associated with the human IS ability to cope with the increasing scale of consequences of failures within complex technical systems. The Introduction of this volume reviews their findings. The Symposium was organized to include brief formal presentations of pape...

  12. Video gaming enhances psychomotor skills but not visuospatial and perceptual abilities in surgical trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, A M; Boyle, E M; Traynor, O; Walsh, T; Hill, A D K

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the identification and assessment of underlying aptitudes or innate abilities that could potentially predict excellence in the technical aspects of operating. However, before the assessment of innate abilities is introduced for high-stakes assessment (such as competitive selection into surgical training programs), it is essential to determine that these abilities are stable and unchanging and are not influenced by other factors, such as the use of video games. The aim of this study was to investigate whether experience playing video games will predict psychomotor performance on a laparoscopic simulator or scores on tests of visuospatial and perceptual abilities, and to examine the correlation, if any, between these innate abilities. Institutional ethical approval was obtained. Thirty-eight undergraduate medical students with no previous surgical experience were recruited. All participants completed a self-reported questionnaire that asked them to detail their video game experience. They then underwent assessment of their psychomotor, visuospatial, and perceptual abilities using previously validated tests. The results were analyzed using independent samples t tests to compare means and linear regression curves for subsequent analysis. Students who played video games for at least 7 hours per week demonstrated significantly better psychomotor skills than students who did not play video games regularly. However, there was no difference on measures of visuospatial and perceptual abilities. There was no correlation between psychomotor tests and visuospatial or perceptual tests. Regular video gaming correlates positively with psychomotor ability, but it does not seem to influence visuospatial or perceptual ability. This study suggests that video game experience might be beneficial to a future career in surgery. It also suggests that relevant surgical skills may be gained usefully outside the operating room in activities that are not

  13. Persuasive Writing and the Student-Run Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, James C.

    2007-01-01

    High school teacher James C. Mayer explains how a student-run symposium can promote "risk-taking and participation" and help students practice effective persuasion skills before demonstrating them in writing. The symposium places students in roles that encourage responsibility and ownership for discussion and learning, shifting the classroom…

  14. Improving Novice Radiology Trainees' Perception Using Fine Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Thomas Rob; Kelleher, Michael

    2017-10-01

    To determine if fine art perception training improved performance in novice radiology trainees. On the first day of their residency, 15 radiology residents underwent a basic radiology perception test in which they were shown 15 different radiographs that each had a significant abnormality. This was followed by a focused session of interpretation training at a local art gallery where art experts taught the trainees how to thoroughly analyze a painting. After this fine art session, the residents were once again shown 15 different radiographs and asked, in the same manner as before, to identify the location of the abnormality. The results of both radiograph assessments were then compared. The 15 residents correctly identified the areas of abnormality on 35 of 225 cases pre-art training with a mean score of 2.33 and a SD of 1.4. After art training, the figure for correctly identifying the area of abnormality rose to 94 of 225 cases with a mean score of 6.27 and a SD of 1.79 (P art gallery may be a novel, effective transitional starting point for novice radiology trainees. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Vocational trainees' views and experiences regarding the learning and teaching of communication skills in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nuland, Marc; Thijs, Gabie; Van Royen, Paul; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Goedhuys, Jo

    2010-01-01

    To explore the views and experiences of general practice (GP) vocational trainees regarding communication skills (CS) and the teaching and learning of these skills. A purposive sample of second and third (final) year GP trainees took part in six focus group (FG) discussions. Transcripts were coded and analysed in accordance with a grounded theory approach by two investigators using Alas-ti software. Finally results were triangulated by means of semi-structured telephone interviews. The analysis led to three thematic clusters: (1) trainees acknowledge the essential importance of communication skills and identified contextual factors influencing the learning and application of these skills; (2) trainees identified preferences for learning and receiving feedback on their communication skills; and (3) trainees perceived that the assessment of communication skills is subjective. These themes are organised into a framework for a better understanding of trainees' communication skills as part of their vocational training. The framework helps in leading to a better understanding of the way in which trainees learn and apply communication skills. The unique context of vocational training should be taken into account when trainees' communication skills are assessed. The teaching and learning should be guided by a learner-centred approach. The framework is valuable for informing curricular reform and future research.

  16. Parental Leave Policies and Pediatric Trainees in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Avika; Feldman-Winter, Lori; Szucs, Kinga A

    2015-08-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) states that each residency program should have a clearly delineated, written policy for parental leave. Parental leave has important implications for trainees' ability to achieve their breastfeeding goals. This study aimed to measure the knowledge and awareness among members of the AAP Section on Medical Students, Residents, and Fellowship Trainees (SOMSRFT) regarding parental leave. An online survey was emailed to SOMSRFT members in June 2013. Quantitative data are presented as percentage of respondents. Awareness of leave policies was analyzed based on having children and the sex of respondents. Nine hundred twenty-seven members responded to the survey. Among those with children, 40% needed to extend the duration of their training in order to have longer maternity leave, 44% of whom did so in order to breastfeed longer. Thirty percent of respondents did not know if their program had a written, accessible policy for parental leave. Trainees without children and men were more unaware of specific aspects of parental leave such as eligibility for the Family Medical Leave Act as compared to women and those with children. Despite the fact that United States national policies support parental leave during pediatrics training, and a majority of programs comply, trainees' awareness regarding these policies needs improvement. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Implementation of a novel population panel management curriculum among interprofessional health care trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminetzky, Catherine P; Beste, Lauren A; Poppe, Anne P; Doan, Daniel B; Mun, Howard K; Woods, Nancy Fugate; Wipf, Joyce E

    2017-12-22

    Gaps in chronic disease management have led to calls for novel methods of interprofessional, team-based care. Population panel management (PPM), the process of continuous quality improvement across groups of patients, is rarely included in health professions training for physicians, nurses, or pharmacists. The feasibility and acceptance of such training across different healthcare professions is unknown. We developed and implemented a novel, interprofessional PPM curriculum targeted to diverse health professions trainees. The curriculum was implemented annually among internal medicine residents, nurse practitioner students and residents, and pharmacy residents co-located in a large, academic primary care site. Small groups of interprofessional trainees participated in supervised quarterly seminars focusing on chronic disease management (e.g., diabetes mellitus, hypertension, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) or processes of care (e.g., emergency department utilization for nonacute conditions or chronic opioid management). Following brief didactic presentations, trainees self-assessed their clinic performance using patient-level chart review, presented individual cases to interprofessional staff and faculty, and implemented subsequent feedback with their clinic team. We report data from 2011 to 2015. Program evaluation included post-session participant surveys regarding attitudes, knowledge and confidence towards PPM, ability to identify patients for referral to interprofessional team members, and major learning points from the session. Directed content analysis was performed on an open-ended survey question. Trainees (n = 168) completed 122 evaluation assessments. Trainees overwhelmingly reported increased confidence in using PPM and increased knowledge about managing their patient panel. Trainees reported improved ability to identify patients who would benefit from multidisciplinary care or referral to another team member. Directed content analysis

  18. Use of Google Glass to Enhance Surgical Education of Neurosurgery Residents: "Proof-of-Concept" Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhla, Jonathan; Kobets, Andrew; De la Garza Ramos, Rafeal; Haranhalli, Neil; Gelfand, Yaroslav; Ammar, Adam; Echt, Murray; Scoco, Aleka; Kinon, Merritt; Yassari, Reza

    2017-02-01

    The relatively decreased time spent in the operating room and overall reduction in cases performed by neurosurgical trainees as a result of duty-hour restrictions demands that the pedagogical content within each surgical encounter be maximized and crafted toward the specific talents and shortcomings of the individual. It is imperative to future generations that the quality of training adapts to the changing administrative infrastructures and compensates for anything that may compromise the technical abilities of trainees. Neurosurgeons in teaching hospitals continue to experiment with various emerging technologies-such as simulators and virtual presence-to supplement and improve surgical training. The authors participated in the Google Glass Explorer Program in order to assess the applicability of Google Glass as a tool to enhance the operative education of neurosurgical residents. Google Glass is a type of wearable technology in the form of eyeglasses that employs a high-definition camera and allows the user to interact using voice commands. Google Glass was able to effectively capture video segments of various lengths for residents to review in a variety of clinical settings within a large, tertiary care university hospital, as well as during a surgical mission to a developing country. The resolution and quality of the video were adequate to review and use as a teaching tool. While Google Glass harbors the potential to dramatically improve both neurosurgical education and practice in a variety of ways, certain technical drawbacks of the current model limit its effectiveness as a teaching tool. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The development of scientific communication skills: a qualitative study of the perceptions of trainees and their mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Carrie; Collie, Candice L; Baldwin, Constance D; Bartholomew, L Kay; Palmer, J Lynn; Greer, Marilyn; Chang, Shine

    2013-10-01

    Scientific communication, both written and oral, is the cornerstone of success in biomedical research, yet formal instruction is rarely provided. Trainees with little exposure to standard academic English may find developing scientific communication skills challenging. In this exploratory, hypothesis-generating qualitative study, the authors examined the process by which mentored junior researchers learn scientific communication skills, their feelings about the challenges, and their mentor's role in the process. In 2010, the authors conducted semistructured focus groups and interviews to explore research trainees' and faculty mentors' perceptions and practices regarding scientific communication skills development, as part of the development phase of a larger quantitative study. The facilitator took detailed notes and verified their accuracy with participants during the sessions; a second member of the research team observed and verified the recorded notes. Three coders performed a thematic analysis, and the other authors reviewed it. Forty-three trainees and 50 mentors participated. Trainees and mentors had diverging views on the role of mentoring in fostering communication skills development. Trainees expressed varying levels of self-confidence but considerable angst. Mentors felt that most trainees have low self-confidence. Trainees expressed interest in learning scientific communication skills, but mentors reported that some trainees were insufficiently motivated and seemed resistant to guidance. Both groups agreed that trainees found mentors' feedback difficult to accept. The degree of distress, dissatisfaction, and lack of mutual understanding between mentors and trainees was striking. These themes have important implications for best practices and resource development.

  20. Retention of fundamental surgical skills learned in robot-assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Irene H; Mukherjee, Mukul; Shah, Bhavin C; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Siu, Ka-Chun

    2012-12-01

    Evaluation of the learning curve for robotic surgery has shown reduced errors and decreased task completion and training times compared with regular laparoscopic surgery. However, most training evaluations of robotic surgery have only addressed short-term retention after the completion of training. Our goal was to investigate the amount of surgical skills retained after 3 months of training with the da Vinci™ Surgical System. Seven medical students without any surgical experience were recruited. Participants were trained with a 4-day training program of robotic surgical skills and underwent a series of retention tests at 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months post-training. Data analysis included time to task completion, speed, distance traveled, and movement curvature by the instrument tip. Performance of the participants was graded using the modified Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) for robotic surgery. Participants filled out a survey after each training session by answering a set of questions. Time to task completion and the movement curvature was decreased from pre- to post-training and the performance was retained at all the corresponding retention periods: 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months. The modified OSATS showed improvement from pre-test to post-test and this improvement was maintained during all the retention periods. Participants increased in self-confidence and mastery in performing robotic surgical tasks after training. Our novel comprehensive training program improved robot-assisted surgical performance and learning. All trainees retained their fundamental surgical skills for 3 months after receiving the training program.

  1. Preoperative learning goals set by surgical residents and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernar, Luise I M; Breen, Elizabeth; Ashley, Stanley W; Peyre, Sarah E

    2011-09-01

    The operating room (OR) remains the main teaching venue for surgical trainees. The OR is considered a pure-discovery learning environment; the downsides of this can be putatively overcome when faculty and trainee arrive at a shared understanding of learning. This study aimed to better understand preoperative learning goals to identify areas of commonalities and potential barrier to intraoperative teaching. Brief, structured preoperative interviews were conducted outside the OR with the resident and faculty member who were scheduled to operate together. Answers were analyzed and grouped using grounded theory. Twenty-seven resident-faculty pairs were interviewed. Nine residents (33.3%) were junior (PGY 1 and 2) and 18 (66.7%) were senior (PGY 3 through 5). Learning goal categories that emerged from the response analysis were anatomy, basic and advanced surgical skills, general and specific procedural tasks, technical autonomy, and pre-, intra-, and postoperative considerations. Residents articulated fewer learning goals than faculty (1.5 versus 2.4; P = 0.024). The most frequently identified learning goal by both groups was one classifiable under general procedural tasks; the greatest divergence was seen regarding perioperative considerations, which were identified frequently by faculty members but rarely by residents. Faculty articulate significantly more learning goals for the residents they will operate with than residents articulate for themselves. Our data suggest that residents and faculty align on some learning goals for the OR but residents tend to be more limited, focusing predominantly on technical aspects of the operation. Faculty members tend to hold a broader view of the learning potential of the OR. These discrepancies may present barriers to effective intraoperative teaching. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation matters: lessons learned on the evaluation of surgical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Nicole N

    2011-01-01

    The traditional system of academic promotion and tenure can make it difficult to reward those who excel at surgical teaching. A successful faculty evaluation process can provide the objective measures of teaching performance needed for performance appraisals and promotion decisions. Over the course of two decades, an extensive faculty evaluation process has been developed in the Department of Surgery at the University of Toronto. This paper presents some of the non-psychometric characteristics of that system. Faculty awareness of the evaluation process, the consistency of its application, trainee anonymity and the materiality of the results are described key factors of a faculty evaluation system that meets the assessment needs of individual teachers and raises the profile of teaching in surgical departments. Copyright © 2010 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Leaving surgical training: some of the reasons are in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forel, Deanne; Vandepeer, Meegan; Duncan, Joanna; Tivey, David R; Tobin, Stephen A

    2018-05-01

    In 2014, the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons identified, through internal analysis, a considerable attrition rate within its Surgical Education and Training programme. Within the attrition cohort, choosing to leave accounted for the majority. Women were significantly over-represented. It was considered important to study these 'leavers' if possible. An external group with medical education expertise were engaged to do this, a report that is now published and titled 'A study exploring the reasons for and experiences of leaving surgical training'. During this time, the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons came under serious external review, leading to the development of the Action Plan on Discrimination, Bullying and Sexual Harassment in the Practice of Surgery, known as the Building Respect, Improving Patient Safety (BRIPS) action plan. The 'Leaving Training Report', which involved nearly one-half of all voluntary 'leavers', identified three major themes that were pertinent to leaving surgical training. Of these, one was about surgery itself: the complexity, the technical, decision-making and lifestyle demands, the emotional aspects of dealing with seriously sick patients and the personal toll of all of this. This narrative literature review investigates these aspects of surgical education from the trainees' perspective. © 2018 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  4. A Survey of Clinical Uncertainty from the Paediatric Basic Specialist Trainee Perspective

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Neill, MB

    2017-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate uncertainty from the Basic Specialist Trainee perspective. The survey of trainees explored 1) factors in decision making, 2) the personal impact of uncertainty, 3) the responses to both clinical errors and challenges to their decision making and 4) the potential strategies to address uncertainty. Forty-one (93%) of trainees surveyed responded. Important factors in decision making were clinical knowledge and senior colleague’s opinion. Sixty percent experienced significant anxiety post call as a consequence of their uncertainty. When errors are made by colleagues, the trainee’s response is acceptance (52.5%), and sympathy (32%).Trainees are strongly influenced by the opinions of senior colleagues often changing their opinions having made confident decisions. Solutions to address uncertainty include enhanced knowledge translation, and to a lesser extent, enhanced personal awareness and resilience awareness. To enhance the training experience for BST and lessen the uncertainty experienced these strategies need to be enacted within the training milieu.

  5. Psychosocial Resolution and Counsellor Trainee Empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Joshua M.

    1992-01-01

    Entry-level counseling students (n=74) were surveyed to investigate the relationship between resolution of Erikson's psychosocial stage of intimacy/isolation and counselor trainee empathy. Results revealed a significant positive relationship between measures of psychosocial stage resolution and counselor empathy and a significant main effect for…

  6. Allergen immunotherapy: clinical and practical education of Italian trainees in allergy and clinical immunology schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolo, E; Incorvaia, C; Senna, G E; Montagni, M; Olivieri, E; Canonica, G W

    2013-10-01

    We performed a survey, based on a questionnaire including 20 items, submitted anonymously to Italian trainees in Allergology and Clinical Immunology, in order to obtain information about their specific allergen immunotherapy (AIT) practices. The questionnaire was sent to 40 trainees, who had attended the last two years of the training course. Thirty-four subjects (mean age: 27 years, 65% females) adequately completed the survey. The answers to the questionnaire showed that only 60% of the training programs included lectures on AIT. Among the trainees using AIT, only 40% declared being able to prescribe it independently, while 60% were guided by a tutor. Of the trainees who were able to prescribe AIT autonomously, 60% were familiar with both routes of administration, i.e. subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), while 25% of these used only SLIT. In 80% of the training institutions involved, the trainees could attend a dedicated AIT outpatient ward for SCIT administration; only 40% administered AIT personally, and in half of these cases, they were guided by a tutor. Only 70% of trainees had experience in the follow-up of patients still under treatment and of patients who had completed treatment. Analysis of the answers obtained for questions on venom immunotherapy (VIT) showed that, in 90% of cases, the trainees attended a dedicated outpatients ward where VIT is administered, but with a role limited to observation/cooperation. Only 30% were involved in the follow-up of patients who were under treatment or who had completed VIT. Only 20% of the trainees felt confident enough about VIT to prescribe this treatment independently, 80% knew there were several administration protocols, and the majority prescribed products from three different manufacturers. These findings suggest that there is significant room for improving the instructions provided regarding allergology and clinical immunology to trainees in Italy with respect to AIT.

  7. Symposium on Differential Geometry and Differential Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Marcel; Bryant, Robert

    1987-01-01

    The DD6 Symposium was, like its predecessors DD1 to DD5 both a research symposium and a summer seminar and concentrated on differential geometry. This volume contains a selection of the invited papers and some additional contributions. They cover recent advances and principal trends in current research in differential geometry.

  8. Harnessing technology to provide the support that trainees require to write high quality reflective statements\\ud

    OpenAIRE

    Mawson, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Trainees work within schools spending 80% of their time away from University. The one day a week during which they are based at Warwick is full of content delivery, subject knowledge improvement and pedagogy training. The course uses ICT to support trainees, through Moodle as the VLE for online course delivery and Mahara as the e-portfolio for assessment, where trainees display their evidence against the eight teaching standards. Trainees produce an e-portfolio where they write reflective sta...

  9. Technical tips and advancements in pediatric minimally invasive surgical training on porcine based simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sarath Kumar; Cohen, Ralph Clinton; Shun, Albert

    2014-06-01

    Minimal access techniques have transformed the way pediatric surgery is practiced. Due to various constraints, surgical residency programs have not been able to tutor adequate training skills in the routine setting. The advent of new technology and methods in minimally invasive surgery (MIS), has similarly contributed to the need for systematic skills' training in a safe, simulated environment. To enable the training of the proper technique among pediatric surgery trainees, we have advanced a porcine non-survival model for endoscopic surgery. The technical advancements over the past 3 years and a subjective validation of the porcine model from 114 participating trainees using a standard questionnaire and a 5-point Likert scale have been described here. Mean attitude scores and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used for statistical analysis of the data. Almost all trainees agreed or strongly agreed that the animal-based model was appropriate (98.35%) and also acknowledged that such workshops provided adequate practical experience before attempting on human subjects (96.6%). Mean attitude score for respondents was 19.08 (SD 3.4, range 4-20). Attitude scores showed no statistical association with years of experience or the level of seniority, indicating a positive attitude among all groups of respondents. Structured porcine-based MIS training should be an integral part of skill acquisition for pediatric surgery trainees and the experience gained can be transferred into clinical practice. We advocate that laparoscopic training should begin in a controlled workshop setting before procedures are attempted on human patients.

  10. 8th International symposium on transport phenomena in combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The 8th International Symposium on Transport Phenomena in Combustion will be held in San Francisco, California, U.S.A., July 16-20, 1995, under the auspices of the Pacific Center of Thermal-Fluids Engineering. The purpose of the Symposium is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners from around the world to present new developments and discuss the state of the art and future directions and priorities in the areas of transport phenomena in combustion. The Symposium is the eighth in a series; previous venues were Honolulu 1985, Tokyo 1987, Taipei 1988, Sydney 1991, Beijing 1992, Seoul 1993 and Acapulco 1994, with emphasis on various aspects of transport phenomena. The current Symposium theme is combustion. The Symposium has assembled a balanced program with topics ranging from fundamental research to contemporary applications of combustion theory. Invited keynote lecturers will provide extensive reviews of topics of great interest in combustion. Colloquia will stress recent advances and innovations in fire spread and suppression, and in low NO{sub x} burners, furnaces, boilers, internal combustion engines, and other practical combustion systems. Finally, numerous papers will contribute to the fundamental understanding of complex processes in combustion. This document contains abstracts of papers to be presented at the Symposium.

  11. Supervisor-trainee continuity and the quality of work-based assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Warren J; Dudek, Nancy L; Wood, Timothy J; Frank, Jason R

    2017-12-01

    Work-based assessments (WBAs) represent an increasingly important means of reporting expert judgements of trainee competence in clinical practice. However, the quality of WBAs completed by clinical supervisors is of concern. The episodic and fragmented interaction that often occurs between supervisors and trainees has been proposed as a barrier to the completion of high-quality WBAs. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the effect of supervisor-trainee continuity on the quality of assessments documented on daily encounter cards (DECs), a common form of WBA. The relationship between trainee performance and DEC quality was also examined. Daily encounter cards representing three differing degrees of supervisor-trainee continuity (low, intermediate, high) were scored by two raters using the Completed Clinical Evaluation Report Rating (CCERR), a previously published nine-item quantitative measure of DEC quality. An analysis of variance (anova) was performed to compare mean CCERR scores among the three groups. Linear regression analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between resident performance and DEC quality. Differences in mean CCERR scores were observed between the three continuity groups (p = 0.02); however, the magnitude of the absolute differences was small (partial eta-squared = 0.03) and not educationally meaningful. Linear regression analysis demonstrated a significant inverse relationship between resident performance and CCERR score (p < 0.001, r 2  = 0.18). This inverse relationship was observed in both groups representing on-service residents (p = 0.001, r 2  = 0.25; p = 0.04, r 2  = 0.19), but not in the Off-service group (p = 0.62, r 2  = 0.05). Supervisor-trainee continuity did not have an educationally meaningful influence on the quality of assessments documented on DECs. However, resident performance was found to affect assessor behaviours in the On-service group, whereas DEC quality remained poor regardless

  12. Verslag symposium : "M€€r welzijn zonder pijn"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driesse, M.; Kluivers-Poodt, M.

    2010-01-01

    Op 27 april 2010 hield men in Lelystad het symposium 'Meer welzijn zonder pijn' over het thema welzijn bij landbouwhuisdieren, georganiseerd door Wageningen UR Livestock Research in samenwerking met Boehringer Ingelheim. Hoewel het symposium primair bedoeld was voor rundvee- en varkensdierenartsen,

  13. Highlight: IDRC sponsors Caribbean symposium on impact of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    12 mai 2015 ... An IDRC-sponsored symposium exploring the impact of the Internet on economic ... Le symposium commandité par le CRDI, qui a eu lieu à Saint Andrew, ... Une nouvelle recherche fait état d'arguments convaincants pour ...

  14. Global surgery: current evidence for improving surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jennifer C; Shaye, David A

    2017-08-01

    The field of global surgery is undergoing rapid transformation, owing to several recent prominent reports positioning it as a cost-effective means of relieving global disease burden. The purpose of this article is to review the recent advances in the field of global surgery. Efforts to grow the global surgical workforce and procedural capacity have focused on innovative methods to increase surgeon training, enhance international collaboration, leverage technology, optimize existing health systems, and safely implement task-sharing. Computer modeling offers a novel means of informing policy to optimize timely access to care, equitably promote health and financial protection, and efficiently grow infrastructure. Tools and checklists have recently been developed to enhance data collection and ensure methodologically rigorous publications to inform planning, benchmark surgical systems, promote accurate modeling, track key health indicators, and promote safety. Creation of institutional partnerships and trainee exchanges can enrich training, stimulate commitment to humanitarian work, and promote the equal exchange of ideas and expertise. The recent body of work creates a strong foundation upon which work toward the goal of universal access to safe, affordable surgical care can be built; however, further collection and analysis of country-specific data is necessary for accurate modeling and outcomes research into the efficacy of policies such as task-sharing is greatly needed.

  15. 360-degree feedback for medical trainees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Ellen; Holm, Kirsten; Sørensen, Jette Led

    2015-01-01

    feedback and assessment. In order to secure reliability 8-15 respondents are needed. It is a matter of discussion whether the respondents should be chosen by the trainee or by a third part, and if respondents should be anonymous. The process includes a feedback session with a trained supervisor....

  16. Assessing Primary Care Trainee Comfort in the Diagnosis and Management of Thermal Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrouwe, Sebastian Q; Shahrokhi, Shahriar

    Thermal injuries are common and the majority will initially present to primary care physicians. Despite being a part of the objectives of training in family medicine (FM) and emergency medicine (EM), previous study has shown that in practice, gaps exist in the delivery of care. An electronic survey was sent to all FM/EM trainees at our university for the 2014 to 2015 academic year. Plastic Surgery trainees were included as a control group. Demographics and educational/clinical experience were assessed. Trainee comfort was measured on a five-point Likert scale across 15 domains related to thermal injuries. Preferences for educational interventions were also ranked. Descriptive statistics and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used (P comfort levels across all 15 domains when compared with plastic surgery trainees. Preferences for educational interventions were ranked, with clinical rotations and traditional lecture scoring the highest. Primary care trainees are not comfortable in the diagnosis and management of thermal injuries. This may be attributed to limited clinical exposure and teaching during their postgraduate training. There exists an opportunity for specialists in burn care to collaborate with primary care training programs and deliver an educational intervention with the aim of long-lasting quality improvement.

  17. Using patients' charts to assess medical trainees in the workplace: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wassia, Heidi; Al-Wassia, Rolina; Shihata, Shadi; Park, Yoon Soo; Tekian, Ara

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this review is to summarize and critically appraise existing evidence on the use of chart stimulated recall (CSR) and case-based discussion (CBD) as an assessment tool for medical trainees. Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Educational Resources Information Centre (ERIC), Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for original articles on the use of CSR or CBD as an assessment method for trainees in all medical specialties. Four qualitative and three observational non-comparative studies were eligible for this review. The number of patient-chart encounters needed to achieve sufficient reliability varied across studies. None of the included studies evaluated the content validity of the tool. Both trainees and assessors expressed high level of satisfaction with the tool; however, inadequate training, different interpretation of the scoring scales and skills needed to give feedback were addressed as limitations for conducting the assessment. There is still no compelling evidence for the use of patient's chart to evaluate medical trainees in the workplace. A body of evidence that is valid, reliable, and documents the educational effect in support of the use of patients' charts to assess medical trainees is needed.

  18. Proceedings of the international nuclear power plant aging symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beranek, A.

    1989-03-01

    This report presents the proceedings of the International Nuclear Power Plant Aging Symposium that was held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland, on August 30-31 and September 1, 1988. The Symposium was presented in cooperation with the American Nuclear Society, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. There were approximately 550 participants from 16 countries at the Symposium

  19. Counseling psychology trainees' perceptions of training and commitments to social justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Amanda M; Spanierman, Lisa B; Greene, Jennifer C; Todd, Nathan R

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined social justice commitments of counseling psychology graduate trainees. In the quantitative portion of the study, a national sample of trainees (n = 260) completed a web-based survey assessing their commitments to social justice and related personal and training variables. Results suggested that students desired greater social justice training than what they experienced in their programs. In the qualitative portion, we used a phenomenological approach to expand and elaborate upon quantitative results. A subsample (n = 7) of trainees who identified as strong social justice activists were interviewed regarding their personal, professional, and training experiences. Eleven themes related to participants' meanings of and experiences with social justice emerged within 4 broad categories: nature of social justice, motivation for activism, role of training, and personal and professional integration. Thematic findings as well as descriptive statistics informed the selection and ordering of variables in a hierarchical regression analysis that examined predictors of social justice commitment. Results indicated that trainees' perceptions of training environment significantly predicted their social justice commitment over and above their general activist orientation and spirituality. Findings are discussed collectively, and implications for training and future research are provided. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Design, development, and validation of a take-home simulator for fundamental laparoscopic skills: using Nintendo Wii for surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhari, Ravia; Bollman-McGregor, Jyoti; Kahoi, Kanav; Smith, Marshall; Feinstein, Ara; Ferrara, John

    2010-06-01

    Assuring quality surgical trainees within the confines of reduced work hours mandates reassessment of educational paradigms. Surgical simulators have been shown to be effective in teaching surgical residents, but their use is limited by cost and time constraints. The Nintendo Wii gaming console is inexpensive and allows natural hand movements similar to those performed in laparoscopy to guide game play. We hypothesize that surgical skills can be improved through take-home simulators adapted from affordable off-the-shelf gaming consoles. A total of 21 surgical residents participated in a prospective, controlled study. An experimental group of 14 surgical residents was assigned to play Marble Mania on the Nintendo Wii using a unique physical controller that interfaces with the WiiMote controller followed by a simulated electrocautery task. Seven residents assigned to the control group performed the electrocautery task without playing the game first. When compared with the control group, the experimental group performed the task with fewer errors and superior movement proficiency (P Nintendo Wii gaming device along with Marble Mania serves as an effective take-home surgical simulator.

  1. Improving Workplace Learning of Lifelong Learning Sector Trainee Teachers in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Bronwen

    2014-01-01

    Learning in the teaching workplace is crucial for the development of all trainee teachers. Workplace learning is particularly important for trainee teachers in the lifelong learning sector (LLS) in the UK, the majority of whom are already working as teachers, tutors, trainers or lecturers while undertaking initial teacher education. However,…

  2. What impact has tendering had on trainees? Results of a national survey by British Association for Sexual Health and HIV Trainees' Collaborative for audit, research and quality improvement projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Helen; Hartley, Anna; Clarke, Emily; Foley, Elizabeth; Nandwani, Rak; Carlin, Elizabeth; Waters, Laura; Ahmed, Nadia

    2018-01-01

    In April 2013, local authorities gained responsibility for commissioning sexual health services in England. With many services going out to tender and resultant change in services or service provider, there is anecdotal evidence that this has impacted on the education, training and morale of genitourinary medicine (GUM) trainees. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of tendering on GUM trainees. An electronic survey designed by the British Association for Sexual Health and HIV Trainees' Collaborative for Audit, Research and Quality Improvement Projects (T-CARQ) was distributed to GUM trainees and newly appointed consultants. Eighty-two individuals responded (74% GUM trainees, 25% newly appointed consultants, 1% locum appointed for service). Sixty-three per cent (45/72) had experience of training within a service which was being tendered. Of these, 59% (24/41) felt their training was not considered during the tendering process and 20% (8/41) felt that it was. Forty-four per cent (18/41) felt adequately supported. Thirty per cent (12/40) reported active participation in the tendering process. On a scale of 0 (no impact) to 5 (major impact), the median score for impact of tendering on training was 2. The positive/negative impact of tendering on different training elements was rated: other than management experience the overall impact on all parameters was negative, namely morale, senior support and education. In conclusion, this survey describes the variable impact of service tendering on GUM training. Our recommendations for maintaining training standards despite tendering include actively involving trainees and education partners, inclusion of specialist GUM training in service specifications, development of guidance for commissioners and services for the management of GUM training within tendering.

  3. Introduction and Overview of the Symposium Anil Kumar (Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Introduction and Overview of the Symposium Anil Kumar (Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore). Symposium on Quantum Computing and Quantum Information. Notes:

  4. Test ordering by GP trainees: Effects of an educational intervention on attitudes and intended practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Simon; Morgan, Andy; Kerr, Rohan; Tapley, Amanda; Magin, Parker

    2016-09-01

    To assess the effectiveness of an educational intervention on test-ordering attitudes and intended practice of GP trainees, and any associations between changes in test ordering and trainee characteristics. Preworkshop and postworkshop survey of attitudes to test ordering, intended test-ordering practices for 3 clinical scenarios (fatigue, screening, and shoulder pain), and tolerance for uncertainty. Three Australian regional general practice training providers. General practice trainees (N = 167). A 2-hour workshop session and an online module. Proportion of trainees who agreed with attitudinal statements before and after the workshop; proportion of trainees who would order tests, mean number of tests ordered, and number of appropriate and inappropriate tests ordered for each scenario before and after the workshop. Of 167 trainees, 132 (79.0%) completed both the preworkshop and postworkshop questionnaires. A total of 122 trainees attended the workshop. At baseline, 88.6% thought that tests can harm patients, 84.8% believed overtesting was a problem, 72.0% felt pressured by patients, 52.3% believed that tests would reassure patients, and 50.8% thought that they were less likely to be sued if they ordered tests. There were desirable changes in all attitudes after the workshop. Before the workshop, the mean number of tests that trainees would have ordered was 4.4, 4.8, and 1.5 for the fatigue, screening, and shoulder pain scenarios, respectively. After the workshop there were decreases in the mean number of both appropriate tests (decrease of 0.94) and inappropriate tests (decrease of 0.24) in the fatigue scenario; there was no change in the mean number of appropriate tests and a decrease in inappropriate tests (decrease of 0.76) in the screening scenario; and there was an increase in the proportion of trainees who would appropriately not order tests in the shoulder pain scenario. There were no significant associations between changes in test ordering and trainee

  5. Conserving biodiversity on native rangelands: Symposium proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel W. Uresk; Greg L. Schenbeck; James T. O' Rourke

    1997-01-01

    These proceedings are the result of a symposium, "Conserving biodiversity on native rangelands" held on August 17, 1995 in Fort Robinson State Park, NE. The purpose of this symposium was to provide a forum to discuss how elements of rangeland biodiversity are being conserved today. We asked, "How resilient and sustainable are rangeland systems to the...

  6. IUTAM Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Pedley, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    The IUTAM Symposium on Flow in Collapsible Tubes and Past Other Highly Compliant Boundaries was held on 26-30 March, 2001, at the University of Warwick. As this was the first scientific meeting of its kind we considered it important to mark the occasion by producing a book. Accordingly, at the end of the Symposium the Scientific Committee met to discuss the most appropriate format for the book. We wished to avoid the format of the conventional conference book consisting of a large number of short articles of varying quality. It was agreed that instead we should produce a limited number of rigorously refereed and edited articles by selected participants who would aim to sum up the state of the art in their particular research area. The outcome is the present book. Peter W. Ca rpenter, Warwick Timothy J. Pedley, Cambridge May, 2002. VB SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE Co-Chair: P.W. Carpenter, Engineering, Warwiek, UK Co-Chair: TJ. Pedley, DAMTP, Cambridge, UK V.V. Babenko, Hydromechanics, Kiev, Ukraine R. Bannasch, Bionik...

  7. In-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Trainees' worst and most memorable experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, P K; Rivas, C A; Bowker, L K

    2010-11-01

    To examine the personal experiences of higher specialist trainees in Geriatric Medicine (GM) with regard to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and do not attempt resuscitation (DNAR) decision making. UK. Two hundred and thirty-five higher trainee members of the British Geriatrics Society (BGS) at the Specialist Registrar (SpR) level. Postal questionnaire survey. We distributed a questionnaire examining the various issues around DNAR decision making among the trainee members of the BGS in November 2003. In one of the questions, we asked the participants, 'Briefly describe your worst or most memorable experience of DNAR'. Responses to this question were analysed by thematic schema and are presented. Overall the response rate was 62% (251/408) after second mailing and 235 of these were at SpR grade. One hundred and ninety-eight participants provided an answer to the above question, providing diverse and often detailed accounts, most of which were negative experiences and which appeared to have had a powerful influence on their ongoing clinical practice. The emerging themes demonstrated areas of conflict between trainees and other doctors as well as patients and relatives. SpR grade geriatricians are exposed to extreme and varied experiences of DNAR decision making in the UK. Efforts to improve support and training in this area should embrace the complexity of the subject.

  8. The laparoscopic surgical skills programme : Preliminary evaluation of grade I Level 1 courses by trainees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buzink, S.N.; Soltes, M.; Radonak, J.; Fingerhutt, A.; Hanna, G.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: New training models are needed to maintain safety and quality of surgical performance. A simulated setting using virtual reality, synthetic, and/or organic models should precede traditional supervised training in the operating room. Aim: The aim of the paper is to describe the

  9. 78 FR 10180 - Annual Computational Science Symposium; Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ...] Annual Computational Science Symposium; Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... Pharmaceutical Users Software Exchange (PhUSE), is announcing a public conference entitled ``The FDA/PhUSE Annual Computational Science Symposium.'' The purpose of the conference is to help the broader community align and...

  10. Choosing a career in paediatrics: do trainees' views change over the first year of specialty training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Helen M; Lakshminarayana, Indumathy; Wall, David; Bindal, Taruna

    2014-09-01

    To look at why a regional cohort of UK doctors chose a paediatric career and to ascertain views on their career near the end of training year one. A 20-item questionnaire was sent to all new regional paediatric specialty trainees. Three focus groups were held with trainees near the end of year one to elicit key themes. West Midlands Deanery, UK. Twenty-nine new regional paediatric specialty trainees in year one completed the questionnaire. A total of 15 trainees participated in the focus groups near the end of year one training. Reasons for choosing a paediatric career and factors which further influence career choice for trainees during their first specialty training year. Key influencing factors for choosing paediatrics were enjoying working with children and positive undergraduate experience of the specialty. All trainees had paediatrics as their first choice specialty and undertook a paediatric Foundation post. Near the end of year one, doubts were cast on career aspirations due to seeing middle grade colleagues struggling with work-life balance and a growing feeling that family came first. Senior trainees need to be aware that they act as powerful role models for their more junior colleagues and therefore have an influential role on how juniors perceive a paediatric career. Family friendly flexible working patterns in paediatrics are vital to retain junior trainees. All paediatric staff are role models and need to be enthusiastic, keen to teach and to promote a positive working environment.

  11. Perioperative feedback in surgical training: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKendy, Katherine M; Watanabe, Yusuke; Lee, Lawrence; Bilgic, Elif; Enani, Ghada; Feldman, Liane S; Fried, Gerald M; Vassiliou, Melina C

    2017-07-01

    Changes in surgical training have raised concerns about residents' operative exposure and preparedness for independent practice. One way of addressing this concern is by optimizing teaching and feedback in the operating room (OR). The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review on perioperative teaching and feedback. A systematic literature search identified articles from 1994 to 2014 that addressed teaching, feedback, guidance, or debriefing in the perioperative period. Data was extracted according to ENTREQ guidelines, and a qualitative analysis was performed. Thematic analysis of the 26 included studies identified four major topics. Observation of teaching behaviors in the OR described current teaching practices. Identification of effective teaching strategies analyzed teaching behaviors, differentiating positive and negative teaching strategies. Perceptions of teaching behaviors described resident and attending satisfaction with teaching in the OR. Finally models for delivering structured feedback cited examples of feedback strategies and measured their effectiveness. This study provides an overview of perioperative teaching and feedback for surgical trainees and identifies a need for improved quality and quantity of structured feedback. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ethics Education Adherence by Teacher Trainees during Teaching Practice: A Botswana Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moswela, Bernard; Gobagoba, Marina

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey conducted to find out the extent to which teacher trainees understand and observe professional ethics. It also sought the contribution of the Faculty of Education and secondary schools make in promoting teacher ethics among trainees on teaching practice. Data were gathered from randomly chosen 90…

  13. Comparison of stress in anaesthetic trainees between Hong Kong and Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, A C L; Irwin, M G; Lee, P W H; Lee, T H W; Man, S E

    2008-11-01

    A postal survey was sent to anaesthetic trainees in Hong Kong and Victoria, Australia to compare work-related stress levels. Demographic data were collected. Anaesthetist-specific stressors, Maslach Burnout Inventory and Global Job Satisfaction scores were used for psychological testing. The response rates from Hong Kong and Melbourne were 64 of 133 (48.1%) and 108 of 196 (55.1%), respectively. Victorian respondents were older with greater family commitments, but more advanced in fulfilling training requirements. Hong Kong respondents, being faced with both the challenge of dual College requirements, exhibited consistently higher indices of stress (P stress scores observed in Hong Kong trainees related to service provision and a perceived lack of resources. Despite the complex nature of stress, its antecedents and manifestations, an inverse relationship between emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction was evident in correlation analysis (P stress was present in some trainees in both areas. Hong Kong trainees may benefit from local development to address mental wellbeing as being important to fulfil this highly competitive training program.

  14. Peer teaching as a means of enhancing communication skills in anaesthesia training: trainee perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, S M

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to introduce peer teaching of communication skills to first-year anaesthesia trainees in Ireland and to evaluate their perception of this teaching modality. Seventy-nine first-year anaesthesia trainees participated in a novel peer-led communication skills programme over a 2-year period (Y1, Y2). A Likert scaling questionnaire was developed to explore trainee perception of the peer teaching programme. Of the 79 respondents (36 in Y1 and 43 in Y2), 99% either agreed or strongly agreed that the peer teachers were successful in their role. Ninety-two percent requested formal peer teaching in other areas of training. The trainees regarded a peer teacher as an appropriate information provider (92%), role model (88%), planner (88%) and facilitator (94%), but less so as an assessor (70%). The most consistently stated strength of peer teaching was the relatability of peer teachers with their lack of experience cited as the main weakness. Eighty percent of participants preferred peer teaching to regular expert teaching. This study highlights the positive attitudes of first-year anaesthesia trainees towards a novel peer teaching programme in communication skills. This author recommends that peer teaching is further developed within postgraduate medical programmes to maximise learning for trainees in the student and teacher roles and to redistribute the teaching burden within clinical departments.

  15. 30th International Acoustical Imaging Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Joie; Lee, Hua

    2011-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2009 the 30th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Monterey, CA, USA, March 1-4. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 30 in the Series contains an excellent collection of forty three papers presented in five major categories: Biomedical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation Systems Analysis Signal Analysis and Image Processing Audience Researchers in medical imaging and biomedical instrumentation experts.

  16. Proceedings of the second ERDA statistical symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietjen, G.; Campbell, K. (comps.)

    1977-04-01

    The Second ERDA Statistical Symposium, sponsored by the Energy Research and Development Administration, was held at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 25-27, 1976. This was the second annual symposium designed to promote interlaboratory communications among ERDA statisticians as well as contacts with statisticians from other institutions. The proceedings of the first symposium, held at Los Alamos in November, 1975, have been published by Batelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BNWL-1986). Separate abstracts were prepared for seven of the papers in this proceeding, all going in ERDA Energy Research Abstracts (ERA) and two in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). The remaining four have already been cited in ERA and can be found by referring to CONF-761023-- in the report number index. (RWR)

  17. Workplace-based assessments in Foundation Programme training: do trainees in difficulty use them differently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Colin; Bhat, Sarita; Herbert, Anne; Baker, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Trainee-led workplace-based assessment (WPBA) is increasingly used in postgraduate medical training. Trainees in difficulty are known to behave differently from their peers; these differences may be reflected in their use of WPBAs and may give new insights into the behaviour and assessment of struggling trainees. Data were extracted for 76 115 assessments, completed by 1900 UK Foundation Programme (FP) trainees. Of these 1900 trainees, 95 (5%) were FP trainees in difficulty (FTiDs). We analysed aspects of the use of WPBAs, using multiple logistic regressions, to compare the behaviours of FTiDs with those of their peers. Of 48 possible comparisons, only two (i.e. the rate expected to occur by chance) showed statistically significant differences: relative to their peers, FTiDs were more likely to choose nurse assessors in direct observations of procedural skills (odds ratio [OR] 7.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23-40.43) and more likely to choose non-clinical assessors for assessments using the mini-peer assessment tool (OR 30.44, 95% CI 1.34-689.29). Key features of assessor choice for FTiDs are familiarity and likelihood of receiving a positive assessment. This analysis has not demonstrated that FTiDs use WPBAs any differently from their peers who are not in difficulty, although it does suggest associations and trends that require further exploration. These null results are interesting and raise hypotheses for prospective confirmation or disproof, and for further qualitative work investigating how struggling trainees use WPBAs in order to guide the future implementation of WPBAs in postgraduate training. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2013.

  18. NIFS symposium: toward the research of fusion burning plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Sanae

    1993-07-01

    NIFS symposium, entitled 'Toward the research of Fusion Burning Plasmas - Present status and Future Strategy' was held at NIFS on July 15th 1992. This NIFS symposium covers various topics related to burning plasma, e.g., JET DT experiment, Plan for DT experiment on TFTR as well as the future trends among researchers. To study the critical issues and trends of future research, a questionnaire was sent to about 100 researchers. This report presents such activities in the NIFS symposium. (author)

  19. Proceedings of the 2012 symposium on nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Ken; Hori, Jun-ichi

    2013-10-01

    The 2012 symposium on nuclear data organized by the Nuclear Data Division of Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) and Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University (KURRI) was held at Kumatori, KURRI on Nov. 15th and 16th, 2012 in cooperation with Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate of Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The symposium was devoted for presentations and discussions on the four topics: 'Nuclear Power after Fukushima Nuclear Plant Accident', 'Application of Nuclear Data', 'How Should We Deal with Covariances of Nuclear Data?' and 'Validation of JENDL-4.0 and Future', as well as poster sessions on various research fields. Tutorials on neutron resonance capture and transmission analysis, international trend of nuclear data research were also given in the symposium. Talks as well as posters presented at the symposium aroused lively discussions among approximately 83 participants. This report consists of total 35 papers including 13 oral presentations and 22 poster presentations. (author)

  20. Self-Entrustment: How Trainees' Self-Regulated Learning Supports Participation in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagasser, Margaretha H.; Kramer, Anneke W. M.; Fluit, Cornelia R. M. G.; van Weel, Chris; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Clinical workplaces offer postgraduate trainees a wealth of opportunities to learn from experience. To promote deliberate and meaningful learning self-regulated learning skills are foundational. We explored trainees' learning activities related to patient encounters to better understand what aspects of self-regulated learning contribute to…

  1. Pre-Enlistment Maltreatment Histories of U.S. Navy Basic Trainees: Prevalence of Abusive Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-11-13

    screen groups similar in age to Navy trainees. Table 13 summarizes the MAST results for trainees and for the two studies of college students ( Favazza ... Favazza & Cannell: 245 20.0 32 Silber et al.: 200 22.0 17 Total: 445 21.0 25 Trainees 3,152 20.2 69 Note. * A score of 4 is categorized as "suggestive...Journal of Studies of Alcohol, 54(3), 334-344. Favazza , A. R., & Cannell, B. (1977). Screening for alcoholism among college students. American Journal of

  2. Tools for the direct observation and assessment of psychomotor skills in medical trainees: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelovsek, J Eric; Kow, Nathan; Diwadkar, Gouri B

    2013-07-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Milestone Project mandates programmes to assess the attainment of training outcomes, including the psychomotor (surgical or procedural) skills of medical trainees. The objectives of this study were to determine which tools exist to directly assess psychomotor skills in medical trainees on live patients and to identify the data indicating their psychometric and edumetric properties. An electronic search was conducted for papers published from January 1948 to May 2011 using the PubMed, Education Resource Information Center (ERIC), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and Web of Science electronic databases and the review of references in article bibliographies. A study was included if it described a tool or instrument designed for the direct observation of psychomotor skills in patient care settings by supervisors. Studies were excluded if they referred to tools that assessed only clinical or non-technical skills, involved non-medical health professionals, or assessed skills performed on a simulator. Overall, 4114 citations were screened, 168 (4.1%) articles were reviewed for eligibility and 51 (1.2%) manuscripts were identified as meeting the study inclusion criteria. Three authors abstracted and reviewed studies using a standardised form for the presence of key psychometric and edumetric elements as per ACGME and American Psychological Association (APA) recommendations, and also assigned an overall grade based on the ACGME Committee on Educational Outcome Assessment grading system. A total of 30 tools were identified. Construct validity based on associations between scores and training level was identified in 24 tools, internal consistency in 14, test-retest reliability in five and inter-rater reliability in 20. The modification of attitudes, knowledge or skills was reported using five tools. The seven-item Global Rating Scale and the Procedure-Based Assessment received an

  3. 3rd International Symposium on Innovative Management, Information and Production

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Bing; Wu, Berlin

    2014-01-01

    Innovative Management in Information and Production is based on the proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Innovative Managemet, Information and Production. This symposium is held by International Society of Management Engineers. The symposium took place on October 8-10, in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. This book examines recent innovative management of information and productions such as digital collection management and operations planning, scheduling and control.

  4. Teacher Trainees' Strategies for Managing the Behaviours of Students with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Manisah Mohd.; Abdullah, Rozila; Majid, Rosadah Abdul

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine how a group of teacher trainees handled challenging behaviour by students during teaching practice. A total of 35 teacher trainees from the special education programme of a local university were chosen as respondents. A questionnaire based on a 5-point Likert-type scale was administered in this study. The data were…

  5. Decreasing radiation doses in digital subtraction angiographies consecutively performed by trainees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, G.; Zhao, W.; Zheng, L.; Fan, X.; Yin, Q.; Liu, X.

    2012-01-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) performed by trainees may be related to increased radiation exposure. This study was aimed to investigate and quantify this learning effect, with fluoroscopy time and dose-area product (DAP) as parameters. We collected procedure data of the first to the fortieth cerebral DSA consecutively performed by 13 trainees in a training centre. DAP, procedure time, fluoroscopy time, number of cine-frames of the first 20 DSA procedures performed by these trainees were compared with that of the second 20 procedures. There was no significant difference concerning the procedure time between the first and the second 20 procedures (56.3 ±29.5 vs 51.5±20.2 min, p = 0.113). Numbers of cine-frames were very similar between the first and the second 20 procedures (750.7 ±290.3 vs 744.5 ±188.7, p = 0.830). Fluoroscopy time of the first 20 procedures was significantly longer than that of the second 20 procedures (17.8 ±15.4 vs 12.6 ±9.0, p = 0.001). DAP of the first 20 procedures was significantly higher than that of the second 20 procedures (6.4 ±4.9 vs 3.8 ±1.8, p < 0.001). DAP was correlated significantly with the performer's experience (R = -0.288, p < 0.001). There exists a learning effect of radiation exposure during cerebral DSA procedures performed by trainees. The learning effect is significant during the first 20 procedures, and becomes insignificant after 20 procedures. Insufficient catheter skills in novice trainees may be one reason for this effect. (authors)

  6. Empathy and Emotional Intelligence among Eastern and Western Counsellor Trainees: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Kaelber, Kara A.; Schwartz, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored degree of empathy and emotional intelligence among Thai (n?=?48) and American (n?=?53) counsellor trainees to determine if differences in Eastern and Western cultural orientations (e.g., interdependent versus independent self-construals) affect foundational counselling skills. Results indicated that Western trainees showed…

  7. Predicting error in detecting mammographic masses among radiology trainees using statistical models based on BI-RADS features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, Lars J., E-mail: Lars.grimm@duke.edu; Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Kim, Connie [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Kuzmiak, Cherie M. [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 2006 Old Clinic, CB No. 7510, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Mazurowski, Maciej A. [Duke University Medical Center, Box 2731 Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) features as predictors of individual errors made by trainees when detecting masses in mammograms. Methods: Ten radiology trainees and three expert breast imagers reviewed 100 mammograms comprised of bilateral medial lateral oblique and craniocaudal views on a research workstation. The cases consisted of normal and biopsy proven benign and malignant masses. For cases with actionable abnormalities, the experts recorded breast (density and axillary lymph nodes) and mass (shape, margin, and density) features according to the BI-RADS lexicon, as well as the abnormality location (depth and clock face). For each trainee, a user-specific multivariate model was constructed to predict the trainee's likelihood of error based on BI-RADS features. The performance of the models was assessed using area under the receive operating characteristic curves (AUC). Results: Despite the variability in errors between different trainees, the individual models were able to predict the likelihood of error for the trainees with a mean AUC of 0.611 (range: 0.502–0.739, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.543–0.680,p < 0.002). Conclusions: Patterns in detection errors for mammographic masses made by radiology trainees can be modeled using BI-RADS features. These findings may have potential implications for the development of future educational materials that are personalized to individual trainees.

  8. Predicting error in detecting mammographic masses among radiology trainees using statistical models based on BI-RADS features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Lars J; Ghate, Sujata V; Yoon, Sora C; Kuzmiak, Cherie M; Kim, Connie; Mazurowski, Maciej A

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) features as predictors of individual errors made by trainees when detecting masses in mammograms. Ten radiology trainees and three expert breast imagers reviewed 100 mammograms comprised of bilateral medial lateral oblique and craniocaudal views on a research workstation. The cases consisted of normal and biopsy proven benign and malignant masses. For cases with actionable abnormalities, the experts recorded breast (density and axillary lymph nodes) and mass (shape, margin, and density) features according to the BI-RADS lexicon, as well as the abnormality location (depth and clock face). For each trainee, a user-specific multivariate model was constructed to predict the trainee's likelihood of error based on BI-RADS features. The performance of the models was assessed using area under the receive operating characteristic curves (AUC). Despite the variability in errors between different trainees, the individual models were able to predict the likelihood of error for the trainees with a mean AUC of 0.611 (range: 0.502-0.739, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.543-0.680,p errors for mammographic masses made by radiology trainees can be modeled using BI-RADS features. These findings may have potential implications for the development of future educational materials that are personalized to individual trainees.

  9. Predicting error in detecting mammographic masses among radiology trainees using statistical models based on BI-RADS features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, Lars J.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Kim, Connie; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) features as predictors of individual errors made by trainees when detecting masses in mammograms. Methods: Ten radiology trainees and three expert breast imagers reviewed 100 mammograms comprised of bilateral medial lateral oblique and craniocaudal views on a research workstation. The cases consisted of normal and biopsy proven benign and malignant masses. For cases with actionable abnormalities, the experts recorded breast (density and axillary lymph nodes) and mass (shape, margin, and density) features according to the BI-RADS lexicon, as well as the abnormality location (depth and clock face). For each trainee, a user-specific multivariate model was constructed to predict the trainee's likelihood of error based on BI-RADS features. The performance of the models was assessed using area under the receive operating characteristic curves (AUC). Results: Despite the variability in errors between different trainees, the individual models were able to predict the likelihood of error for the trainees with a mean AUC of 0.611 (range: 0.502–0.739, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.543–0.680,p < 0.002). Conclusions: Patterns in detection errors for mammographic masses made by radiology trainees can be modeled using BI-RADS features. These findings may have potential implications for the development of future educational materials that are personalized to individual trainees

  10. Learning styles of medical students, general surgery residents, and general surgeons: implications for surgical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Gara Chris

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical education is evolving under the dual pressures of an enlarging body of knowledge required during residency and mounting work-hour restrictions. Changes in surgical residency training need to be based on available educational models and research to ensure successful training of surgeons. Experiential learning theory, developed by David Kolb, demonstrates the importance of individual learning styles in improving learning. This study helps elucidate the way in which medical students, surgical residents, and surgical faculty learn. Methods The Kolb Learning Style Inventory, which divides individual learning styles into Accommodating, Diverging, Converging, and Assimilating categories, was administered to the second year undergraduate medical students, general surgery resident body, and general surgery faculty at the University of Alberta. Results A total of 241 faculty, residents, and students were surveyed with an overall response rate of 73%. The predominant learning style of the medical students was assimilating and this was statistically significant (p Conclusions We conclude that medical students have a significantly different learning style from general surgical trainees and general surgeons. This has important implications in the education of general surgery residents.

  11. Specialist training in obstetrics and gynaecology: a survey on work-life balance and stress among trainees in UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaratinam, S; Yanamandra, S R; Deb, S; Coomarasamy, A

    2006-05-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate perceptions about work-life balance and levels of stress in obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in the UK. This was a questionnaire survey conducted at the National Obstetric and Gynaecology Specialist Registrar Meeting (SpROGs 2004, Birmingham, UK). A total of 190 trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology attended the meeting. Trainees at the meeting were given a questionnaire to fill in regarding their perception of work-life balance, stress at work and their attitude to training in obstetrics and gynaecology. The response rate was 128/190 (67%). Half of the trainees (64/128, 50%) felt that they had achieved satisfactory work-life balance. There was a trend towards more men achieving this balance compared with women (25/42 (60%) vs 38/83 (46%), p = 0.19). Unsatisfactory social life (82%) and scarce time with the family (74%) were cited as the most common reasons for not achieving a satisfactory work-life balance. More than two-thirds of the trainees (83/128, 65%) found their work moderately or very stressful. Senior trainees (years 4 or more of specialist training) found work more stressful than junior trainees (years 1 - 3 of specialist training) (29/35 (83%) vs 54/93 (58%), p = 0.01). However, 77/128 (60%) of trainees would still recommend a career in obstetrics and gynaecology to medical students. A majority (85/128, 66%) claimed that they would choose obstetrics and gynaecology again if given a second chance. A large number of trainees (110/128, 86%) were looking forward to their future in this field. In spite of the high levels of perceived work-life imbalance and stress at work, most trainees would choose the same specialty given another chance and would recommend the same to others, indicating a certain level of satisfaction with the specialty. However, our study shows that improvements in the working lives of obstetrics and gynaecology trainees are still needed, especially given the current context of difficulty with

  12. Responses to clinical uncertainty in Australian general practice trainees: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Georga; Tapley, Amanda; Holliday, Elizabeth; Morgan, Simon; Henderson, Kim; Ball, Jean; van Driel, Mieke; Spike, Neil; Kerr, Rohan; Magin, Parker

    2017-12-01

    Tolerance for ambiguity is essential for optimal learning and professional competence. General practice trainees must be, or must learn to be, adept at managing clinical uncertainty. However, few studies have examined associations of intolerance of uncertainty in this group. The aim of this study was to establish levels of tolerance of uncertainty in Australian general practice trainees and associations of uncertainty with demographic, educational and training practice factors. A cross-sectional analysis was performed on the Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT) project, an ongoing multi-site cohort study. Scores on three of the four independent subscales of the Physicians' Reaction to Uncertainty (PRU) instrument were analysed as outcome variables in linear regression models with trainee and practice factors as independent variables. A total of 594 trainees contributed data on a total of 1209 occasions. Trainees in earlier training terms had higher scores for 'Anxiety due to uncertainty', 'Concern about bad outcomes' and 'Reluctance to disclose diagnosis/treatment uncertainty to patients'. Beyond this, findings suggest two distinct sets of associations regarding reaction to uncertainty. Firstly, affective aspects of uncertainty (the 'Anxiety' and 'Concern' subscales) were associated with female gender, less experience in hospital prior to commencing general practice training, and graduation overseas. Secondly, a maladaptive response to uncertainty (the 'Reluctance to disclose' subscale) was associated with urban practice, health qualifications prior to studying medicine, practice in an area of higher socio-economic status, and being Australian-trained. This study has established levels of three measures of trainees' responses to uncertainty and associations with these responses. The current findings suggest differing 'phenotypes' of trainees with high 'affective' responses to uncertainty and those reluctant to disclose uncertainty to patients. More

  13. The 2002 Starting Artificial Intelligence Researchers Symposium

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    During the 2002 European Conference on Artificial Intelligence (ECAI-02) was introduced the Starting Artificial Intelligence Researchers Symposium STAIRS), the first-ever international symposium specifically aimed at Ph.D. students in AI. The outcome was a thorough, high-quality, and successful event, with all the features one usually finds in the best international conferences: large international committees, comprehensive coverage, published proceedings, renowned speakers and panelists, sub...

  14. Welcome and introduction to symposium - Day 2

    OpenAIRE

    humanities, Symposium on Information and technology in the arts and; McLaughlin, Jeremy Lee; Matusiak, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Welcome and introduction slides used for presentation at Day 2 of the Virtual Symposium on Information and Technology in the Arts and Humanities, held April 22 and 23, 2015. The Symposium was co-sponsored by the ASIS&T (Association for Information Science and Technology) Special Interest Group for Arts and Humanities (SIG AH) and the Special Interest Group for Visualization, Images, and Sound (SIG VIS).

  15. Nagasaki symposium on Chernobyl: Update and future. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagataki, Shigenobu

    1994-01-01

    This publication contains valuable, up-to-date scientific information on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident, obtained from almost all the leading international and national organizations. The purpose of the Nagasaki symposium on Chernobyl was to present and discuss the available data from all over the world independent of psychological, social, economic, and political bias, and thus to make conclusions that would further medical science. To this end, the symposium consisted of two sessions, 'Chernobyl update' and 'Chernobyl in the future'. Along with the proceedings of these two sessions, the proceedings of the Japan-NIS Chernobyl thyroid symposium, held in December 1993 are included in this book. (orig.)

  16. The ILL millennium symposium and European user meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlile, C.J.; Frick, B.; Radaelli, P.G.; Alba-Simionesco, C.; Chauty, A.; Niss, K.; Casas, F.; Sokolov, A.; Lequeux, F.; Montes, H.; Harrison, A.; Schurtenberger, P.; Dubbers, D.; Frank, A.; Gudel, H.U.; Wagner, R.; Vettier, C.; Gahler, R.; Protassov, K.; Geltenbort, P.; Plonka, C.; Simpson, G.; Pinston, J.A.; Genevey, J.; Urban, W.; Scherillo, A.; Orlandi, R.; Smith, A.G.; Mana, G.; Abele, H.; Van der Grinten, M.; Steuwer, A.; Klotz, S.; Hamel, G.; Strassle, C.Th.; Kervananois, N.; Koza, M.M.; Nishiyama, Y.; Langan, P.; Wada, M.; Sugiyama, J.; Chanzy, H.; Gunter, M.M.; Lerch, M.; Boysen, H.; Korte, C.; Suard, E.; Blanco, J.A.; Fernandez-Rodriguez, J.; Brown, P.J.; Stunault, A.; Katsumata, K.; Lovesey, S.W.; Iga, F.; Michimura, S.; Kremer, R.K.; Banks, M.; Capogna, L.; Enderle, M.; Gibson, B.J.; McIntyre, G.J.; Ouladdiaf, B.; Pujol, S.; Raggazzoni, J.L.; Rheinstadter, M.; Schefer, J.; Boehm, M.; Roessli, B.; Wills, A.S.; Ouladdiaf, B.; Lelievre-Berna, E.; Goff, J.P.; Toader, A.M.; Skoulatos, M.; Enderle, M.; Stewart, J.R.; Murani, A.; Roger, M.; Shannon, N.; Kaul, E.E.; Geibel, C.; Simonet, V.; Lhotel, E.; Paulsen, C.; Ressouche, E.; Staub, U.; Amato, A.; Baines, C.; Petrakovskii, G.A.; Bramwell, S.; Fukuhara, N.; Ebert, J.; Lindner, D.; Dauvergne, M.T.; Hartlein, M.; Timmins, P.; Conti, E.; Svergun, D.; Budayova-Spano, M.; Bonnete, F.; El Hajji, M.; Blakeley, M.P.; Meilleur, F.; Castro, B.; Gabel, F.; Ferrand, M.; Chenal, A.; Forge, V.; Fragneto, G.; Haertlein, M.; Gillet, D.; Haertlein, M.

    2006-01-01

    Five years ago the ILL (Institute Laue-Langevin) convened the first Millennium symposium in order to launch an ambitious modernization program of instruments and infrastructure known as the ILL Millennium Program. After 5 years of activity we have decided to run a second such symposium. The scientific program of this Millennium Symposium will address the following points: -) instrumental and scientific achievements made possible by the Millennium Program, -) trends in science and engineering and the implications for the ILL, -) scenarios for future instrumentation and user support facilities, and -) the scientific priorities of the user community. This document gathers the abstracts of 63 contributions and 73 posters

  17. The ILL millennium symposium and European user meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlile, C.J.; Frick, B.; Radaelli, P.G.; Alba-Simionesco, C.; Chauty, A.; Niss, K.; Casas, F.; Sokolov, A.; Lequeux, F.; Montes, H.; Harrison, A.; Schurtenberger, P.; Dubbers, D.; Frank, A.; Gudel, H.U.; Wagner, R.; Vettier, C.; Gahler, R.; Protassov, K.; Geltenbort, P.; Plonka, C.; Simpson, G.; Pinston, J.A.; Genevey, J.; Urban, W.; Scherillo, A.; Orlandi, R.; Smith, A.G.; Mana, G.; Abele, H.; Van der Grinten, M.; Steuwer, A.; Klotz, S.; Hamel, G.; Strassle, C.Th.; Kervananois, N.; Koza, M.M.; Nishiyama, Y.; Langan, P.; Wada, M.; Sugiyama, J.; Chanzy, H.; Gunter, M.M.; Lerch, M.; Boysen, H.; Korte, C.; Suard, E.; Blanco, J.A.; Fernandez-Rodriguez, J.; Brown, P.J.; Stunault, A.; Katsumata, K.; Lovesey, S.W.; Iga, F.; Michimura, S.; Kremer, R.K.; Banks, M.; Capogna, L.; Enderle, M.; Gibson, B.J.; McIntyre, G.J.; Ouladdiaf, B.; Pujol, S.; Raggazzoni, J.L.; Rheinstadter, M.; Schefer, J.; Boehm, M.; Roessli, B.; Wills, A.S.; Ouladdiaf, B.; Lelievre-Berna, E.; Goff, J.P.; Toader, A.M.; Skoulatos, M.; Enderle, M.; Stewart, J.R.; Murani, A.; Roger, M.; Shannon, N.; Kaul, E.E.; Geibel, C.; Simonet, V.; Lhotel, E.; Paulsen, C.; Ressouche, E.; Staub, U.; Amato, A.; Baines, C.; Petrakovskii, G.A.; Bramwell, S.; Fukuhara, N.; Ebert, J.; Lindner, D.; Dauvergne, M.T.; Hartlein, M.; Timmins, P.; Conti, E.; Svergun, D.; Budayova-Spano, M.; Bonnete, F.; El Hajji, M.; Blakeley, M.P.; Meilleur, F.; Castro, B.; Gabel, F.; Ferrand, M.; Chenal, A.; Forge, V.; Fragneto, G.; Haertlein, M.; Gillet, D.; Haertlein, M

    2006-07-01

    Five years ago the ILL (Institute Laue-Langevin) convened the first Millennium symposium in order to launch an ambitious modernization program of instruments and infrastructure known as the ILL Millennium Program. After 5 years of activity we have decided to run a second such symposium. The scientific program of this Millennium Symposium will address the following points: -) instrumental and scientific achievements made possible by the Millennium Program, -) trends in science and engineering and the implications for the ILL, -) scenarios for future instrumentation and user support facilities, and -) the scientific priorities of the user community. This document gathers the abstracts of 63 contributions and 73 posters.

  18. Assessment and modelling of general practice and community setting capacity for medical trainees in northern New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Al-Murrani, Abbas

    2017-09-22

    To estimate the capacity of general practice to accommodate undergraduate and postgraduate medical trainees, and model efficient ways to utilise identified capacity and increase capacity. We conducted an online survey, with phone follow-up to non-responders, of all general practices in the northern half of New Zealand. The main outcome measures were current placements and future intentions for taking medical trainees; factors influencing decisions and possible incentives to take trainees. Sixty percent of existing practices take no medical trainees. On average, practices take trainees for 50% of available cycles per year. Postgraduate trainees displace undergraduate student placements due to space limitations. Only 1.9% practices demonstrate current capacity for full vertical training by taking all three types of trainee (undergraduate, PGY, registrar). Modelling on current use means 69 additional practices will be needed to be recruited by 2020. A number of strategies are presented aimed at increasing short-term undergraduate teaching practice capacity in New Zealand, but also relevant to Australia and elsewhere. In the long-term, establishment of the proposed School of Rural Health would enable integrated vertical teaching and address the GP training capacity issues.

  19. 9th International Symposium on Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Oscar P.; Poolman, Berend; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    What’s new in the field of lactic acid bacteria? The 9th International Symposium on Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB9) will take place 31 August to 4 September 2008 in Egmond aan Zee, The Netherlands. Traditionally, the triannual LAB symposium focuses on the themes of genetics, physiology, and applications

  20. 28th International Acoustical Imaging Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    André, Michael P; Andre, Michael; Arnold, Walter; Bamber, Jeff; Burov, Valentin; Chubachi, Noriyoshi; Erikson, Kenneth; Ermert, Helmut; Fink, Mathias; Gan, Woon S; Granz, Bernd; Greenleaf, James; Hu, Jiankai; Jones, Joie P; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre; Laugier, Pascal; Lee, Hua; Lees, Sidney; Levin, Vadim M; Maev, Roman; Masotti, Leonardo; Nowicki, Andrzej; O’Brien, William; Prasad, Manika; Rafter, Patrick; Rouseff, Daniel; Thijssen, Johan; Tittmann, Bernard; Tortoli, Piero; Steen, Anton; Waag, Robert; Wells, Peter; Acoustical Imaging

    2007-01-01

    The International Acoustical Imaging Symposium has been held continuously since 1968 as a unique forum for advanced research, promoting the sharing of technology, developments, methods and theory among all areas of acoustics. The interdisciplinary nature of the Symposium and the wide international participation are two of its main strengths. Scientists from around the world present their papers in an informal environment conducive to lively discussion and cross-fertilization. The fact that a loyal community of scientists has supported this Series since 1968 is evidence of its impact on the field. The Symposium Series continues to thrive in a busy calendar of scientific meetings without the infrastructure of a professional society. It does so because those who attend and those who rely on the Proceedings as a well-known reference work acknowledge its value. This Volume 28 of the Proceedings likewise contains an excellent collection of papers presented in six major categories, offering both a broad perspective ...

  1. Analysis of qualitative interviews with Action Research Trainees, February 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Bente; Levinsen, Karin

    Interviews with trainees were conducted after the Action Research period (November-December 2006), when LBs 1-4 were tested on trainees. The aim of the interviews was to understand how teachers learn to teach and to relate to the online environment through the specific context of the Lancelot live...... online course.  The focus of the interviews was on the one hand the ability of the course to support this learning process and on the other hand the correction and adjustment of the syllabus for the spring pilot testing phase (beginning March 2007)....

  2. Measuring the surgical 'learning curve': methods, variables and competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nuzhath; Abboudi, Hamid; Khan, Mohammed Shamim; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2014-03-01

    To describe how learning curves are measured and what procedural variables are used to establish a 'learning curve' (LC). To assess whether LCs are a valuable measure of competency. A review of the surgical literature pertaining to LCs was conducted using the Medline and OVID databases. Variables should be fully defined and when possible, patient-specific variables should be used. Trainee's prior experience and level of supervision should be quantified; the case mix and complexity should ideally be constant. Logistic regression may be used to control for confounding variables. Ideally, a learning plateau should reach a predefined/expert-derived competency level, which should be fully defined. When the group splitting method is used, smaller cohorts should be used in order to narrow the range of the LC. Simulation technology and competence-based objective assessments may be used in training and assessment in LC studies. Measuring the surgical LC has potential benefits for patient safety and surgical education. However, standardisation in the methods and variables used to measure LCs is required. Confounding variables, such as participant's prior experience, case mix, difficulty of procedures and level of supervision, should be controlled. Competency and expert performance should be fully defined. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  3. Radiographers and trainee radiologists reporting accident radiographs: A comparative plain film-reading performance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buskov, L.; Abild, A.; Christensen, A.; Holm, O.; Hansen, C.; Christensen, H.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracy and clinical validity of reporting radiographers with that of trainee radiologists whom they have recently joined in reporting emergency room radiographs at Bispebjerg University Hospital. Materials and methods: Plain radiographs of the appendicular skeleton from 1000 consecutive emergency room patients were included in the study: 500 primarily reported by radiographers and 500 by trainee radiologists. The final reporting was subsequently undertaken by a consultant radiologist in consensus with an orthopaedic surgeon. Two observers classified reports as either true positive/negative or false positive/negative based on the final report, which was considered the reference standard. To evaluate the severity of incorrect primary reports, errors were graded into three categories concerning clinical impact and erroneous reports graded as the most severe category were subsequently analysed. Mann–Whitney and Chi-squared tests were used to compare differences and associations between radiographers versus trainee radiologists regarding film reporting. Results: The sensitivity for correct diagnosis was 99% for reporting radiographers and 94% for trainee radiologists. The specificity was found to be 97% for reporting radiographers and 99% for trainee radiologists. Radiographers missed significantly fewer fractures (n = 2) than trainee radiologists (n = 14; p = 0.006) but had a higher, but not significant, degree of overcalling. No significant difference was found between groups regarding clinical impact of incorrect reporting. Conclusion: Trained radiographers report accident radiographs of the extremities with high accuracy and constitute a qualified resource to help meet increasing workload and demands in quality standards.

  4. How we treat our own: the experiences and characteristics of psychology trainees with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Emily M; Andrews, Erin E; Holt, Judith M

    2014-11-01

    To better understand the characteristics and experiences of psychologists and trainees with disabilities. An invitation to participate in a survey of psychologists and psychology trainees with disabilities was sent to professional listservs related to psychology and/or disability. Fifty-six trainees and psychologists with doctoral training in clinical, counseling, school, or rehabilitation psychology completed the survey. Over half (57.1%) were practicing psychologists and 42.9% were current trainees. The most commonly reported disabilities were physical, sensory, and chronic health. The majority of the participants reported experiencing disability-related discrimination during their training, and less than one third had received mentorship from psychologists with disabilities. Less than half of respondents disclosed their disability to a university disability services office, and many relied on informal accommodations alone. Most participants did not disclose their disability during the graduate school, internship, or postdoctoral application processes. Professional psychology programs and training sites should work to remove barriers and provide support for trainees with disabilities, especially during preinternship doctoral training. Programs should not expect disability services offices to provide all support for students with disabilities, especially support related to clinical training. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. The use of virtual reality tools in surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew

    2010-03-01

    Advances in computing, specifically those used for simulation and games technology has allowed for exciting developments in dental and surgical education. At the same time concerns are being raised that students with relatively little training, practise to improve their skill on patients with all of the inherent risks that may occur. Simulation in dentistry has been practised for many years and so the concept is not new to the profession. New tools have been developed that both enhance teaching and learning and are also useful for assessment of students and trainees. The challenge of virtual and simulated reality tools is to have the required fidelity to improve teaching and learning outcomes over the currently utilized methodology.

  6. Knowledge, Skills and Experience Managing Tracheostomy Emergencies: A Survey of Critical Care Medicine trainees

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nizam, AA

    2016-10-01

    Since the development of percutaneous tracheostomy, the number of tracheostomy patients on hospital wards has increased. Problems associated with adequate tracheostomy care on the wards are well documented, particularly the management of tracheostomy-related emergencies. A survey was conducted among non-consultant hospital doctors (NCHDs) starting their Critical Care Medicine training rotation in a university affiliated teaching hospital to determine their basic knowledge and skills in dealing with tracheostomy emergencies. Trainees who had received specific tracheostomy training or who had previous experience of dealing with tracheostomy emergencies were more confident in dealing with such emergencies compared to trainees without such training or experience. Only a minority of trainees were aware of local hospital guidelines regarding tracheostomy care. Our results highlight the importance of increased awareness of tracheostomy emergencies and the importance of specific training for Anaesthesia and Critical Care Medicine trainees.

  7. Rapporteurs report of the symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myerscough, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the symposium was to share current practice, experiences and innovations within the management of contaminated metallic radioactive material. The symposium was a forum for: Learning about current practices, Highlight strategic issues related to metals recycling, Exchange of experiences, Discussion of innovative and new techniques and needs for improvements, Developing and maintenance of networks in the area of metals recycling. The aim was to bring together operators, regulators, decision makers, scientists, consultants, contractors and other stakeholders. A short introduction by representatives from Studsvik, IAEA and OECD/NEA started the symposium followed by presentations by invited speakers from international organisations. Seven topical sessions covered issues relating to: 1 - Regulations and recommendations: - International recommendations and national legislation, - Application of regulations, - Regulator views; 2 - Minimising waste amounts: - Experience in minimising the generation of waste in the form of radioactive or potentially radioactive metals, - Activities to minimise the waste volumes for disposal; 3 - Characterisation and categorisation of metals to be recycled; 4 - Decontamination of metals for clearance; 5 - Melting of metals for clearance, reuse or volume reduction; 6 - Best practice in management of metals for clearance and recycling; 7 - Sustainability and public acceptance. Each session contained three to five presentations and group discussions. Each session was concluded with a short analysis of the presentations and the outcome of the group discussions. Conclusions of each session and outcome of the group discussions were presented on a Summing up the third day. The symposium also held a poster session with topics as above. This report provides a short summary of the various presentations and discussions concentrating on the key messages and outcomes of the sessions

  8. Proceedings of DAE-BRNS national symposium on Limnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataramani, B.; Puranik, V.D.; Apte, S.K.; Gour, H.N.; Sharma, S.K.; Sharma, L.L.; Sharma, B.K.; Gupta, H.C.L.; Verma, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    The present symposium NSL addresses both the basic and applied aspects of limnology. The outcome of the symposium will help in the formulation of water policy that will result in the sustained availability of healthy fresh water resources and also benefit the industrial end user. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  9. Safe laparoscopic colorectal surgery performed by trainees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhoff, Peter Koch; Schultz, Martin; Harvald, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer is safe, but there have been hesitations to implement the technique in all departments. One of the reasons for this may be suboptimal learning possibilities since supervised trainees have not been allowed to do the operations to an adequate extent...

  10. International RILEM Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Birgisson, Björn; Frost, David; Wang, Linbing

    2013-01-01

    The micro- and nano-modification of infrastructure materials and the associated multi-scale characterization and simulation has the potential to open up whole new uses and classes of materials, with wide-ranging implications for society. The use of multi-scale characterization and simulation brings the ability to target changes at the very small scale that predictably effect the bulk behavior of the material and thus allowing for the optimization of material behavior and performance.   The International RILEM Symposium on Multi-Scale Modeling and Characterization of Infrastructure Materials (Stockholm, June 10-12, 2013) brought together key researchers from around the world to present their findings and ongoing research in this field in a focused environment with extended discussion times. From asphalt to concrete, from chemistry to mechanics, from nano- to macro-scale: the collection of topics covered by the Symposium represents the width and depth of the currently ongoing efforts of developing more sustain...

  11. International symposium on the history of mining and metallurgy. Internationales Symposium zur Geschichte des Bergbaus und Huettenwesens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waechtler, E; Engewald, G R [eds.

    1980-01-01

    The VII. International Symposium took place in Freiberg and Reinsberg, in the German Democratic Republic, from September 4-8, 1978. The Symposium was organized by the Executive Committee of the International Committee on the History of Technology (ICOHTEC) and was attended by 77 participants from 14 countries in Eastern and Western Europe as well as USA and Canada. A total of 51 papers were published and 30 talks were held and analyzed in discussions. The papers dealt with selected topics on the history of the mining and metallurgical industries, primarily from the fifteenth century to the twentieth century. The topics concern the development of science, of new mining and metallurgical equipment and processes, innovation in mines, increase in productivity, improvement in working conditions, economic progress and economic crisis, social aspects of the labor force and trade union movements in major mining countries. An excursion to a brown coal surface mine was organized in conjunction with the Symposium. (In German)

  12. Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None Available

    1999-06-24

    The Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium was commissioned by the Mountaintop Removal Mining/Valley Fill Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Interagency Steering Committee as an educational forum for the members of the regulatory community who will participate in the development of the EIS. The Steering Committee sought a balanced audience to ensure the input to the regulatory community reflected the range of perspectives on this complicated and emotional issue. The focus of this symposium is on mining and reclamation technology alternatives, which is one of eleven topics scheduled for review to support development of the EIS. Others include hydrologic, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic issues.

  13. Proceedings of the 3rd NINS symposium on engineering and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    The 3rd NINS Symposium on Engineering and Technology was held on 24-25, July 2008 at National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), organized by Department of Engineering and Technical Services, NIFS. This Symposium is continuation of an annual series. The 1st one was held on 25-26 July, 2006 organized by National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. The 2nd one was held on 25-26 June, 2007 organized by Institute for Molecular Science. This proceedings is a compilation of papers presented at the symposium. 49 participants from 5 institutes of NINS attended this symposium and 23 papers were presented. (author)

  14. Innovative model of delivering quality improvement education for trainees – a pilot project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Ramar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: After incorporating quality improvement (QI education as a required curriculum for our trainees in 2010, a need arose to readdress our didactic sessions as they were too long, difficult to schedule, and resulting in a drop in attendance. A ‘flipped classroom’ (FC model to deliver QI education was touted to be an effective delivery method as it allows the trainees to view didactic materials on videos, on their own time, and uses the classroom to clarify concepts and employ learned tools on case-based scenarios including workshops. Methods: The Mayo Quality Academy prepared 29 videos that incorporated the previously delivered 17 weekly didactic sessions, for a total duration of 135 min. The half-day session clarified questions related to the videos, followed by case examples and a hands-on workshop on how to perform and utilize a few commonly used QI tools and methods. Results: Seven trainees participated. There was a significant improvement in knowledge as measured by pre- and post-FC model test results [improvement by 40.34% (SD 16.34, p<0.001]. The survey results were overall positive about the FC model with all trainees strongly agreeing that we should continue with this model to deliver QI education. Conclusions: The pilot project of using the FC model to deliver QI education was successful in a small sample of trainees.

  15. International Symposium for the Promotion of APEC Environmental Technology Exchange; APEC kankyo gijutsu koryu sokushin symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-11

    The International Symposium for the Promotion of APEC Environmental Technology Exchange was held under the theme `The function and role expected of the APEC Virtual Center,` with the objectives of clarifying the need for future intra-regional environmental technological exchange, defining the types of information and personnel exchange, and promoting the use of interactive character of the APEC Virtual Center for Environmental Technology Exchange by encouraging access to and participation in the Virtual Center project. It was held in the period of 11th and 12th, November in 1996, at the venue of Rinku International Convention Center in Osaka. The symposium was attended by 477 persons from nine countries, i.e., Australia, Canada, China, Indonesia, Korea, Philippines, Thailand, the US, and Japan, comprising staff members of intra-regional environment-related organizations. After the keynote speech, `Current status and tasks of environmental technology exchange`, and `Expected roles of the Virtual Center for Environmental Technology Exchange` were discussed. During the plenary session, the chairman summarized the symposium. This summary was carried on the Virtual Center homepage of the Internet

  16. What causes trainees to leave oral and maxillofacial surgery? A questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, C; Kent, S; Magennis, P; Cleland, J

    2017-01-01

    Understanding what causes trainees to leave OMFS is essential if we are to retain them within the specialty. Although these factors have been defined for medicine, we know of no previous study for OMFS. An online survey was distributed to roughly 1500 people who had registered an interest in OMFS during the past seven years. Personal information and details of education and employment were gathered along with personal factors that attracted them to OMFS. Of 251 trainees who responded, 50 (30%) were no longer interested. Factors that significantly correlated with an interest in OMFS included male sex (p=0.020), dual qualification (p=0.024), and (only for women) being single (p=0.024) and having no dependants (p=0.005). We used qualitative analysis to identify work-life balance, duration of training, and financial implications, as significant factors. Identification of key factors that affect OMFS trainees allows us to develop ways to keep them in the specialty. The predominant factor is work-life balance, and for women this included having children and being married. Financial issues related to the junior doctors' contract and competition ratios to second degrees, are also factors for both sexes. Also important are the "sunk costs" fallacy that causes some trainees to stay in training. This information can be used to help develop higher training, in negotiations of contracts, and to attract and retain future OMFS trainees. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Army symposium: Electrical energy engineering today; Wehrtechnisches Symposium: Moderne elektrische Energietechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busse, H. (ed.) [Bundesakademie fuer Wehrverwaltung und Wehrtechnik, Mannheim (Germany). Fachgebiet Elektrotechnik und Elektroenergiewesen

    2000-05-01

    This symposium was held in Mannheim on May 20/21, 2000. All aspects of energy engineering were discussed, including electrochemical energy sources like accumulator batteries and fuel cells. The proceedings volume contains 26 papers which reflect the state of the art and current trends in electrical energy engineering in the German army. [German] Das Wehrtechnische Symposium 'Moderne elektrische Energietechnik' wurde von der Lehrabteilung Wehrtechnik der Bundesakademie fuer Wehrverwaltung und Wehrtechnik in Mannheim in der Zeit vom 20.05.-21.05.2000 durchgefuehrt. Das Programm enthaelt die aktuellen Themen der elektrischen Energietechnik. Die elektroschemischen Energiequellen (Batterien und Brennstoffzellen) wurden in das Programm integriert. Dadurch konnte das gesamte Spektrum der Energietechnik vielschichtig dargestellt und in der Diskussion unter z.T. sehr verschiedenen Gesichtspunkten beleuchtet werden. Die im vorliegenden Tagungsband abgedruckten 26 Skripte wurden weder gekuerzt noch ergaenzt. Sie zeigen insgesamt den aktuellen Stand und die erfolgversprechenden Entwicklungstendenzen der elektrischen Energietechnik in der Bundeswehr auf. (orig.)

  18. 77 FR 4568 - Annual Computational Science Symposium; Public Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ...] Annual Computational Science Symposium; Public Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... with the Pharmaceutical Users Software Exchange (PhUSE), is announcing a public conference entitled ``The FDA/PhUSE Annual Computational Science Symposium.'' The purpose of the conference is to help the...

  19. Credentialing and retention of visa trainees in post-graduate medical education programs in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Maria; Kandar, Rima; Slade, Steve; Yi, Yanqing; Beardall, Sue; Bourgeault, Ivy; Buske, Lynda

    2017-06-12

    Visa trainees are international medical graduates (IMG) who come to Canada to train in a post-graduate medical education (PGME) program under a student or employment visa and are expected to return to their country of origin after training. We examined the credentialing and retention of visa trainees who entered PGME programs between 2005 and 2011. Using the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry's National IMG Database linked to Scott's Medical Database, we examined four outcomes: (1) passing the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part 2 (MCCQE2), (2) obtaining a specialty designation (CCFP, FRCPC/SC), and (3) working in Canada after training and (4) in 2015. The National IMG Database is the most comprehensive source of information on IMG in Canada; data were provided by physician training and credentialing organizations. Scott's Medical Database provides data on physician locations in Canada. There were 233 visa trainees in the study; 39.5% passed the MCCQE2, 45.9% obtained a specialty designation, 24.0% worked in Canada after their training, and 53.6% worked in Canada in 2015. Family medicine trainees (OR = 8.33; 95% CI = 1.69-33.33) and residents (OR = 3.45; 95% CI = 1.96-6.25) were more likely than other specialist and fellow trainees, respectively, to pass the MCCQE2. Residents (OR = 7.69; 95% CI = 4.35-14.29) were more likely to obtain a specialty credential than fellows. Visa trainees eligible for a full license were more likely than those not eligible for a full license to work in Canada following training (OR = 3.41; 95% CI = 1.80-6.43) and in 2015 (OR = 3.34; 95% CI = 1.78-6.27). Visa training programs represent another route for IMG to qualify for and enter the physician workforce in Canada. The growth in the number of visa trainees and the high retention of these physicians warrant further consideration of the oversight and coordination of visa trainee programs in provincial and in pan

  20. LGBT Trainee and Health Professional Perspectives on Academic Careers--Facilitators and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Nelson F; Rankin, Susan; Callahan, Edward; Ng, Henry; Holaday, Louisa; McIntosh, Kadian; Poll-Hunter, Norma; Sánchez, John Paul

    2015-12-01

    Diversity efforts in the academic medicine workforce have often neglected the identification and inclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health professionals. Many of these professionals have served as educators, researchers, administrators, and leaders at their academic institutions, but their perspectives on the barriers to and facilitators of pursuing academic careers, as well as the perspectives of trainees, have not been explored. We applied a purposeful convenience sampling strategy to collect quantitative and qualitative data among LGBT health care professionals (HCP) and trainees. The authors identified trends in data using bivariate analyses and consensual qualitative research methods. We analyzed data from 252 surveys completed by HCPs and trainees and a subset of 41 individuals participated in 8 focus groups. Among survey participants, 100% identified as lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) or queer; 4.5% identified along the trans-spectrum; 31.2% identified as a racial or ethnic minority; 34.1% identified as faculty; and 27.4% as trainees. Eighty-one percent of trainees were interested in academia and 47% of HCPs held faculty appointments. Overall, 79.4% were involved in LGBT-related educational, research, service, or clinical activities. Facilitators of academic careers included engagement in scholarly activities, mentorship, LGBT-specific networking opportunities, personal desire to be visible, campus opportunities for involvement in LGBT activities, and campus climate inclusive of LGBT people. Barriers included poor recognition of LGBT scholarship, a paucity of concordant mentors or LGBT networking opportunities, and hostile or non-inclusive institutional climates. LGBT trainees and HCPs contribute significantly to services, programs, and scholarship focused on LGBT communities. LGBT individuals report a desire for a workplace environment that encourages and supports diversity across sexual orientation and gender identities

  1. International Ocean Symposium (IOS) 1996; Kokusai kaiyo symposium 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-18

    This is a proceedings of the International Ocean Symposium 1996. On the first day of the symposium, the following were given with a theme `The Ocean, Can She Save Us`: Underwater research and future of mankind as a commemorative speech; The ocean, can she save us -- trying to discover the true figure of the ocean as a keynote speech. Panel discussion was held on The global environment and the infinite potential of the ocean. On the second day, an approach was made mostly from a cultural aspect with a theme `The Ocean and the Japanese.` The following were given: Human links between east and west as a commemorative speech; The ocean and Japanese culture as a keynote speech; Civilization spanning across oceans as a panel discussion. The Japanese have been developing their individual technologies in shipbuilding, shipping, and ocean development, have been raised by Mother Ocean, and have lived together. Ocean has been supplying humans food, water, oxygen, marine routes, and even dream and hope. The environmental pollution is the result of the human greediness. It is fear and friendship between humans and ocean that can save humans and ocean.

  2. Reliability and validity of a tool to assess airway management skills in anesthesia trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliya Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The tool designed to assess bag-mask ventilation and tracheal intubation skills in anesthesia trainees demonstrated excellent inter-rater reliability, fair test-retest reliability, and good construct validity. The authors recommend its use for formative and summative assessment of junior anesthesia trainees.

  3. 28th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The University of Manchester hosted the 28th International Symposium on Shock Waves between 17 and 22 July 2011. The International Symposium on Shock Waves first took place in 1957 in Boston and has since become an internationally acclaimed series of meetings for the wider Shock Wave Community. The ISSW28 focused on the following areas: Blast Waves, Chemically Reacting Flows, Dense Gases and Rarefied Flows, Detonation and Combustion, Diagnostics, Facilities, Flow Visualisation, Hypersonic Flow, Ignition, Impact and Compaction, Multiphase Flow, Nozzle Flow, Numerical Methods, Propulsion, Richtmyer-Meshkov, Shockwave Boundary Layer Interaction, Shock Propagation and Reflection, Shock Vortex Interaction, Shockwave Phenomena and Applications, as well as Medical and Biological Applications. The two Volumes contain the papers presented at the symposium and serve as a reference for the participants of the ISSW 28 and individuals interested in these fields.

  4. Mental practice with interactive 3D visual aids enhances surgical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiasemidou, Marina; Glassman, Daniel; Mushtaq, Faisal; Athanasiou, Christos; Williams, Mark-Mon; Jayne, David; Miskovic, Danilo

    2017-10-01

    Evidence suggests that Mental Practice (MP) could be used to finesse surgical skills. However, MP is cognitively demanding and may be dependent on the ability of individuals to produce mental images. In this study, we hypothesised that the provision of interactive 3D visual aids during MP could facilitate surgical skill performance. 20 surgical trainees were case-matched to one of three different preparation methods prior to performing a simulated Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy (LC). Two intervention groups underwent a 25-minute MP session; one with interactive 3D visual aids depicting the relevant surgical anatomy (3D-MP group, n = 5) and one without (MP-Only, n = 5). A control group (n = 10) watched a didactic video of a real LC. Scores relating to technical performance and safety were recorded by a surgical simulator. The Control group took longer to complete the procedure relative to the 3D&MP condition (p = .002). The number of movements was also statistically different across groups (p = .001), with the 3D&MP group making fewer movements relative to controls (p = .001). Likewise, the control group moved further in comparison to the 3D&MP condition and the MP-Only condition (p = .004). No reliable differences were observed for safety metrics. These data provide evidence for the potential value of MP in improving performance. Furthermore, they suggest that 3D interactive visual aids during MP could potentially enhance performance, beyond the benefits of MP alone. These findings pave the way for future RCTs on surgical preparation and performance.

  5. Providing Transthoracic Echocardiography Training for Intensive Care Unit Trainees: An Educational Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuza, Catherine M; Hanifi, M Tariq; Koç, Melissa; Stopfkuchen-Evans, Matthias

    2018-04-09

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is important in the management of critically ill patients, yet it has not been incorporated into many residency programs' curricula. Our objective is to determine if trainees undergoing a 60-minute training session on TTE have improved knowledge, ultrasound skills, and increases the utilization of TTE during their rotation in the intensive care unit (ICU). We will also compare the results of participants with prior TTE exposure to TTE-naïve trainees. Our hypothesis is that after the training, participants' will have improved knowledge and ultrasound skills compared to before training. Our secondary hypotheses are that TTE-naïve trainees will have greater improvements in knowledge scores compared to those who have had prior TTE experience and trainees will increase their use of TTE in the ICU. Single-center, prospective trial. Brigham and Women's Hospital (academic hospital). Residents and fellows rotating through the ICU, at any level of postgraduate training. Forty-two trainees participated in the study. Statistically significant improvement after training was observed for all multiple choice questions (MCQ) and practical assessments (p < 0.001). When assessing the differences in score improvement between TTE-experienced versus TTE-naïve users, mean score improvements were notably higher for TTE-naïve participants (MCQ: 28.2 ± 11.6; echo clinical: 48.6 ± 23.4) compared to TTE-experienced users (MCQ: 18.6 ± 13.5, p = 0.01; echo clinical: 38.3 ± 30.2, p = 0.04). A short didactic presentation on TTE use may be useful in teaching ICU trainees basic TTE skills and encouraging the use of bedside TTE in the ICU. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. XXth symposium neuroradiologicum 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-09-15

    The volume includes abstracts from lectures and poster presentations during the XXth symposium neuroradiologicum 2014 covering the following issues: Stroke, head and neck, pediatric diagnostic neuroradiology, spine and interventional neuroradiology, adult diagnostic neuroradiology, intravascular interventional neuroradiology.

  7. A multisource feedback tool to assess ward round leadership skills of senior paediatric trainees: (2) Testing reliability and practicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Helen M; Lakshminarayana, Indumathy; Wall, David; Bindal, Taruna

    2015-05-01

    A five-domain multisource feedback (MSF) tool was previously developed in 2009-2010 by the authors to assess senior paediatric trainees' ward round leadership skills. To determine whether this MSF tool is practicable and reliable, whether individuals' feedback varies over time and trainees' views of the tool. The MSF tool was piloted (April-July 2011) and field tested (September 2011-February 2013) with senior paediatric trainees. A focus group held at the end of field testing obtained trainees' views of the tool. In field testing, 96/115 (84%) trainees returned 633 individual assessments from three different ward rounds over 18 months. The MSF tool had high reliability (Cronbach's α 0.84, G coefficient 0.8 for three raters). In all five domains, data were shifted to the right with scores of 3 (good) and 4 (excellent). Consultants gave significantly lower scores (p<0.001), as did trainees for self-assessment (p<0.001). There was no significant change in MSF scores over 18 months but comments showed that trainees' performance improved. Trainees valued these comments and the MSF tool but had concerns about time taken for feedback and confusion about tool use and the paediatric assessment strategy. A five-domain MSF tool was found to be reliable on pilot and field testing, practicable to use and liked by trainees. Comments on performance were more helpful than scores in giving trainees feedback. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Proceedings of the sixteenth biennial low-rank fuels symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Low-rank coals represent a major energy resource for the world. The Low-Rank Fuels Symposium, building on the traditions established by the Lignite Symposium, focuses on the key opportunities for this resource. This conference offers a forum for leaders from industry, government, and academia to gather to share current information on the opportunities represented by low-rank coals. In the United States and throughout the world, the utility industry is the primary user of low-rank coals. As such, current experiences and future opportunities for new technologies in this industry were the primary focuses of the symposium

  9. Proceedings of the first internet symposium on nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukahori, Tokio; Iwamoto, Osamu; Nakagawa, Tsuneo

    1997-03-01

    The First Internet Symposium on Nuclear Data (ISND-1) was held on the WWW home page of Nuclear Data Center at Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), from April 8 to June 15, 1996. This symposium was organized by Japanese Nuclear Data Committee and Nuclear Data Center, JAERI and was the first trial to use 'Internet' for the symposium in a nuclear data field. In ISND-1, presented were 25 papers on various topics of nuclear data. Those presented papers are compiled in this proceedings as well as brief description about management of ISND-1. (author)

  10. Proceedings of the first internet symposium on nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukahori, Tokio; Iwamoto, Osamu; Nakagawa, Tsuneo [eds.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    The First Internet Symposium on Nuclear Data (ISND-1) was held on the WWW home page of Nuclear Data Center at Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), from April 8 to June 15, 1996. This symposium was organized by Japanese Nuclear Data Committee and Nuclear Data Center, JAERI and was the first trial to use `Internet` for the symposium in a nuclear data field. In ISND-1, presented were 25 papers on various topics of nuclear data. Those presented papers are compiled in this proceedings as well as brief description about management of ISND-1. (author)

  11. Proceedings of the 3rd Symposium on Engineering Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, J.; Rizvi, S.Z.H.; Ahmad, R.; Saleem, M.

    2010-01-01

    The 3rd symposium on engineering sciences was held from March 10-12, 2010 in Lahore, Pakistan. More than twenty academic institutions and six industries participated in this conference. The foreign and Pakistani experts delivered their keynotes talk, contributor lectures and poster presentation on the conference topics. In three days of the symposium, Fifty four papers presented on different topics of Engineering Sciences including chemical engineering, energy engineering, metallurgy engineering, material engineering and electrical engineering. This symposium provided an ideal opportunity for exchange of information amongst scientists, engineers and researchers from all over Pakistan and other countries of the world. (A.B)

  12. Proceedings of the sixteenth biennial low-rank fuels symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    Low-rank coals represent a major energy resource for the world. The Low-Rank Fuels Symposium, building on the traditions established by the Lignite Symposium, focuses on the key opportunities for this resource. This conference offers a forum for leaders from industry, government, and academia to gather to share current information on the opportunities represented by low-rank coals. In the United States and throughout the world, the utility industry is the primary user of low-rank coals. As such, current experiences and future opportunities for new technologies in this industry were the primary focuses of the symposium.

  13. A qualitative study on perceptions of surgical careers in Rwanda: A gender-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sojung; Lin, Yihan; Kansayisa, Grace; Costas-Chavarri, Ainhoa

    2018-01-01

    Access to surgical care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) remains deficient without an adequate workforce. There is limited understanding of the gender gap in surgical trainees in LMICs. In Rwanda, females fill only one of 20 positions available. Understanding surgeons' experiences and perceptions of surgical careers may help facilitate support for females to contribute to the global surgical workforce. We performed qualitative analysis on perceptions of surgical careers through semi-structured interviews of all female surgeons (n = 6) and corresponding male surgeons (n = 6) who are training or have trained at University of Rwanda. Transcripts were analyzed with code structure formed through an integrated approach. Question categories formed the deductive framework, while theoretical saturation was reached through inductive grounded theory. Themes were organized within two key points of the career timeline. First, for developing interest in surgery, three main themes were identified: role models, patient case encounters, and exposure to surgery. Second, for selecting and sustaining surgical careers, four main themes emerged: social expectations about roles within the family, physical and mental challenges, professional and personal support, and finances. All female surgeons emphasized gender assumptions and surgical working culture as obstacles, with a corresponding strong sense of self-confidence and internal motivation that drew them to select and maintain careers in surgery. Family, time, and physical endurance were cited as persistent challenges for female participants. Our study reveals concepts for further exploration about gendered perceptions of surgical careers. Efforts to improve support for female surgical careers as a strategy for shaping surgical work culture and professional development in Rwanda should be considered. Such strategies may be beneficial for improving the global surgical workforce.

  14. PREFACE: XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Rodal, E.; Bijker, R.

    2012-09-01

    Conference logo The XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics was held at Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico from January 3-6 2012. Conceived in 1978 as a small meeting, over the years and thanks to the efforts of various organizing committees, the symposium has become a well known international conference on nuclear physics. To the best of our knowledge, the Mexican Symposium on Nuclear Physics represents the conference series with longest tradition in Latin America and one of the longest-running annual nuclear physics conferences in the world. The Symposium brings together leading scientists from all around the world, working in the fields of nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, physics with radioactive ion beams, hadronic physics, nuclear astrophysics, neutron physics and relativistic heavy-ion physics. Its main goal is to provide a relaxed environment where the exchange of ideas, discussion of new results and consolidation of scientific collaboration are encouraged. To celebrate the 35th edition of the symposium 53 colleagues attended from diverse countries including: Argentina, Australia, Canada, Japan, Saudi Arabia and USA. We were happy to have the active participation of Eli F Aguilera, Eduardo Andrade, Octavio Castaños, Alfonso Mondragón, Stuart Pittel and Andrés Sandoval who also participated in the first edition of the Symposium back in 1978. We were joined by old friends of Cocoyoc (Stuart Pittel, Osvaldo Civitarese, Piet Van Isacker, Jerry Draayer and Alfredo Galindo-Uribarri) as well as several first time visitors that we hope will come back to this scientific meeting in the forthcoming years. The scientific program consisted of 33 invited talks, proposed by the international advisory committee, which nicely covered the topics of the Symposium giving a balanced perspective between the experimental and the theoretical work that is currently underway in each line of research. Fifteen posters complemented the scientific sessions giving the opportunity

  15. Proceedings of the international symposium on materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masahiro; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    This report is the Proceedings of the International Symposium on Materials Testing Reactors hosted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The symposium was held on July 16 to 17, 2008, at the Oarai Research and Development Center of JAEA. This symposium was also held for the 40th anniversary ceremony of Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) from achieving its first criticality. The objective of the symposium is to exchange the information on current status, future plan and so on among each testing reactors for the purpose of mutual understanding. There were 138 participants from Argentina, Belgium, France, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Korea, the Russian Federation, Sweden, the United State, Vietnam and Japan. The symposium was divided into four technical sessions and three topical sessions. Technical sessions addressed the general topics of 'status and future plan of materials testing reactors', 'material development for research and testing reactors', irradiation technology (including PIE technology)' and 'utilization with materials testing reactors', and 21 presentations were made. Also the topical sessions addressed 'establishment of strategic partnership', 'management on re-operation work at reactor trouble' and 'basic technology for neutron irradiation tests in MTRs', and panel discussion was made. The 21 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  16. Reaching the hip-hop generation: Final (symposium proceedings) report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The goal of this final (closing) report is to capture the flavor of the symposium held March 1 and 2, 1993 in New York City convened by Motivational Educational Entertainment, Inc. (MEE), a black-owned communications research, consulting, and video production company based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The mission of MEE is to understand, reach, and positively affect inner-city youth. Traditional communication approaches from mainstream sources to at-risk youth often don`t account for the unique way youth communicate among themselves and how they relate to the media. This understanding, however, is crucial. To understand youth communication, the people who create and send both entertaining and educational messages to urban youth must be brought into the dialogue. The meeting in New York was intended to provide an important opportunity for senders to meet and evaluate the appropriateness and effectiveness of their messages. In addition, the MEE symposium provided a forum for the continuing public debate about what needs to be done to reach today`s urban teens. Included in this document is a description of symposium goals/objectives, symposium activities, the reaction to and analysis of the symposium, recommendations for future MEE courses of action, and an appendix containing copies of press articles.

  17. Is training effective? A study of counseling psychology doctoral trainees in a psychodynamic/interpersonal training clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Clara E; Baumann, Ellen; Shafran, Naama; Gupta, Shudarshana; Morrison, Ashley; Rojas, Andrés E Pérez; Spangler, Patricia T; Griffin, Shauna; Pappa, Laura; Gelso, Charles J

    2015-04-01

    We investigated changes over 12 to 42 months in 23 predoctoral trainees during their externship training in a psychodynamic/interpersonal psychotherapy clinic. Over time, trainees increased in client-rated working alliance and real relationship, therapist-rated working alliance, client-rated interpersonal functioning, ability to use helping skills (e.g., challenges, immediacy), higher-order functioning (e.g., conceptualization ability, countertransference management), feelings about themselves as therapists (e.g., more authentic, more self-aware), and understanding about being a therapist (e.g., theoretical orientation, curiosity about client dynamics). In contrast, trainees did not change in engaging clients (return after intake or for at least 8 sessions), judge-rated psychodynamic techniques in third and ninth sessions across clients (although trainees used more cognitive-behavioral techniques over time in third but not ninth sessions), or changes in client-rated symptomatology. Trainees primarily attributed changes to graduate training, individual and group supervision, research participation, and working with clients. Implications for training and research are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Career Preferences and Perceptions of Cardiology Among US Internal Medicine Trainees: Factors Influencing Cardiology Career Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pamela S; Rzeszut, Anne K; Bairey Merz, C Noel; Duvernoy, Claire S; Lewis, Sandra J; Walsh, Mary Norine; Gillam, Linda

    2018-05-30

    Few data exist on internal medicine trainees' selection of cardiology training, although this is important for meeting future cardiology workforce needs. To discover trainees' professional development preferences and perceptions of cardiology, and their relationship to trainees' career choice. We surveyed trainees to discover their professional development preferences and perceptions of cardiology and the influence of those perceptions and preferences on the trainees' career choices. Participants rated 38 professional development needs and 19 perceptions of cardiology. Data collection took place from February 2009, through January 2010. Data analysis was conducted from May 2017 to December 2017. Multivariable models were used to determine the association of demographics and survey responses with prospective career choice. A total of 4850 trainees were contacted, and 1123 trainees (of whom 625 [55.7%] were men) in 198 residency programs completed surveys (23.1% response; mean [SD] age, 29.4 [3.5] years). Principal component analysis of survey responses resulted in 8-factor and 6-factor models. Professional development preferences in descending order of significance were stable hours, family friendliness, female friendliness, the availability of positive role models, financial benefits, professional challenges, patient focus, and the opportunity to have a stimulating career. The top perceptions of cardiology in descending order of significance were adverse job conditions, interference with family life, and a lack of diversity. Women and future noncardiologists valued work-life balance more highly and had more negative perceptions of cardiology than men or future cardiologists, who emphasized the professional advantages available in cardiology. Professional development factors and cardiology perceptions were strongly associated with a decision to pursue or avoid a career in cardiology in both men and women. Alignment of cardiology culture with trainees' preferences

  19. The "new normal": Adapting doctoral trainee career preparation for broad career paths in science.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah St Clair

    Full Text Available Doctoral recipients in the biomedical sciences and STEM fields are showing increased interest in career opportunities beyond academic positions. While recent research has addressed the interests and preferences of doctoral trainees for non-academic careers, the strategies and resources that trainees use to prepare for a broad job market (non-academic are poorly understood. The recent adaptation of the Social Cognitive Career Theory to explicitly highlight the interplay of contextual support mechanisms, individual career search efficacy, and self-adaptation of job search processes underscores the value of attention to this explicit career phase. Our research addresses the factors that affect the career search confidence and job search strategies of doctoral trainees with non-academic career interests and is based on nearly 900 respondents from an NIH-funded survey of doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows in the biomedical sciences at two U.S. universities. Using structural equation modeling, we find that trainees pursuing non-academic careers, and/or with low perceived program support for career goals, have lower career development and search process efficacy (CDSE, and receive different levels of support from their advisors/supervisors. We also find evidence of trainee adaptation driven by their career search efficacy, and not by career interests.

  20. EWTD compliance amongst Anaesthesia trainees in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brohan, J; Moore, D

    2017-02-01

    The implications of the EWTD include a limit of 48 h working week and 11 consecutive hours rest every 24 h. This survey was designed to assess EWTD compliance over designated 1-week and 1-month periods amongst College of Anaesthesetists of Ireland (CAI) trainees and non-training Anaesthesia NCHDs. The two key elements of EWTD compliance were assessed; the compliance to a 48 h working week, and a minimizing of shift duration to 24 h. Existence of protected training time and teaching time were also assessed. This survey was completed by 191 Anaesthesia NCHDs, including 151 responses from CAI trainees; 75 % response rate from CAI trainees. 71 % of respondents worked in excess of 48 h. 37 % of respondents reported to have worked a shift >24 h duration. The average hours worked was 66 h (range 48.5-103 h). Our figures are a contrast to the reported figures in the HSE "Performance Assurance Report". 49 % of respondents reported a change in their working patterns to facilitate EWTD compliance. There appears to be a negative impact on training however, with 68 % respondents missing departmental teaching sessions and 30 % not receiving protected training time. 33 % of respondents were not in favour of full EWTD compliance. As work patterns change, it is vital to ensure that training is not compromised. Previous reports have recommended an increase in consultant numbers, which has yet to be achieved. This may provide a solution to allow service provision, NCHD training and EWTD compliance amongst NCHDs.

  1. 1st Jagiellonian Symposium on Fundamental and Applied Subatomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Following the success of two meetings "II Symposium on applied nuclear physics and innovative technologies" and "II Symposium on Positron Emission Tomography" organized in 2014, this event will start a new series of conferences which will bring together scientists from the physics, nuclear medicine and healthcare. One of the main purposes of the symposium is to exchange experience and and expertise gained by various institutions in the field of applied and fundamental nuclear as well as particle physics, medical imaging, radiotherapy and healthcare.

  2. Does interpersonal behavior of psychotherapy trainees differ in private and professional relationships?

    OpenAIRE

    Fincke, Janna I.; Möller, Heidi; Taubner, Svenja

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trainees' interpersonal behaviour on Work Involvement (WI) and compared their social behaviour within professional and private relationships as well as between different psychotherapeutic orientations. Methods: The interpersonal scales of the Intrex short-form questionnaire and the Work Involvement Scale (WIS) were used to evaluate two samples of German psychotherapy trainees in psychoanalytic (PA), psychodynamic (PD) and cognitive behavi...

  3. INTRODUCTION: Physics of Low-dimensional Systems: Nobel Symposium 73

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Stig

    1989-01-01

    The physics of low-dimensional systems has developed in a remarkable way over the last decade and has accelerated over the last few years, in particular because of the discovery of the new high temperature superconductors. The new developments started more than fifteen years ago with the discovery of the unexpected quasi-one-dimensional character of the TTF-TCNQ. Since then the field of conducting quasi-one-dimensional organic systems have been rapidly growing. Parallel to the experimental work there has been an important theoretical development of great conceptual importance, such as charge density waves, soliton-like excitations, fractional charges, new symmetry properties etc. A new field of fundamental importance was the discovery of the Quantum Hall Effect in 1980. This field is still expanding with new experimental and theoretical discoveries. In 1986, then, came the totally unexpected discovery of high temperature superconductivity which started an explosive development. The three areas just mentioned formed the main themes of the Symposium. They do not in any way exhaust the progress in low-dimensional physics. We should mention the recent important development with both two-dimensional and one-dimensional and even zero-dimensional structures (quantum dots). The physics of mesoscopic systems is another important area where the low dimensionality is a key feature. Because of the small format of this Symposium we could unfortunately not cover these areas. A Nobel Symposium provides an excellent opportunity to bring together a group of prominent scientists for a stimulating exchange of new ideas and results. The Nobel Symposia are very small meetings by invitation only and the number of key international participants is typically in the range 25-40. These Symposia are arranged through a special Nobel Symposium Committee after proposal from individuals. This Symposium was sponsored by the Nobel Foundation through its Nobel Symposium Fund with grants from The

  4. American Diabetes Association and JDRF Research Symposium: Diabetes and the Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenkovich, Clay F; Danska, Jayne; Darsow, Tamara; Dunne, Jessica L; Huttenhower, Curtis; Insel, Richard A; McElvaine, Allison T; Ratner, Robert E; Shuldiner, Alan R; Blaser, Martin J

    2015-12-01

    From 27-29 October 2014, more than 100 people gathered in Chicago, IL, to participate in a research symposium titled "Diabetes and the Microbiome," jointly sponsored by the American Diabetes Association and JDRF. The conference brought together international scholars and trainees from multiple disciplines, including microbiology, bioinformatics, endocrinology, metabolism, and immunology, to share the current understanding of host-microbe interactions and their influences on diabetes and metabolism. Notably, this gathering was the first to assemble specialists with distinct expertise in type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, immunology, and microbiology with the goal of discussing and defining potential pathophysiologies linking the microbiome and diabetes. In addition to reviewing existing evidence in the field, speakers presented their own original research to provide a comprehensive view of the current understanding of the topics under discussion.Presentations and discussions throughout the conference reflected a number of important concepts. The microbiota in any host represent a complex ecosystem with a high degree of interindividual variability. Different microbial communities, comprising bacteria, archaea, viruses, and fungi, occupy separate niches in and on the human body. Individually and collectively, these microbes provide benefits to the host-including nutrient harvest from food and protection against pathogens. They are dynamically regulated by both host genes and the environment, and they critically influence both physiology and lifelong health. The objective of the symposium was to discuss the relationship between the host and the microbiome-the combination of microbiota and their biomolecular environment and ecology-specifically with regard to metabolic and immunological systems and to define the critical research needed to understand and potentially target the microbiome in the prevention and treatment of diabetes. In this report, we present meeting

  5. Nuclear science symposium, 26th and symposium on nuclear power systems, 11th, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    Proceedings include 163 of the papers presented at the combined meetings, as well as two papers delivered at the plenary session on plant control beyond the 1980's and ionizing radiation dose hazards. One-hundred-and-sixty-two papers are indexed separately. Nuclear Science symposium included calorimeters and specific ionization (17 papers); PWC and Drift Chambers (7 papers); photo/optical detectors (10 papers); semiconductor detectors (11 papers); nuclear circuits and systems (11 papers); space instrumentation (9 papers); medical instrumentation (30 papers); data preprocessing (6 papers); data acquisition (11 papers); environmental instrumentation (15 papers); reactor instrumentation (16 papers). Fifteen Nuclear Systems Symposium papers covered: safety, RFI effects, detectors, monitoring systems, reactor protection, multiplexing of circuits, standard application, emergency planning and preparedness and operator/instrumentation interactions

  6. 9th International Frumkin symposium: Electrochemical technologies and materials for 21st century. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Abstracts of the 9th International Frumkin symposium: Electrochemical technologies and materials for 21st century are presented. The symposium was held 24-29 October 2010 in Moscow. The symposium included the following microsymposiums: Electrical double layer and electrochemical kinetics (from phenomenological to molecular level); New processes, materials and devices for successful electrochemical transformation of energy; Corrosion and protection of materials; General and local corrosion; Electroactive composition materials; Bioelectrochemistry. The Frumkin symposium includes plenary lectures, oral and poster presentations. Official language of the symposium is English

  7. 9th International Frumkin symposium: Electrochemical technologies and materials for 21st century. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Abstracts of the 9th International Frumkin symposium: Electrochemical technologies and materials for 21st century are presented. The symposium was held 24-29 October 2010 in Moscow. The symposium included the following microsymposiums: Electrical double layer and electrochemical kinetics (from phenomenological to molecular level); New processes, materials and devices for successful electrochemical transformation of energy; Corrosion and protection of materials; General and local corrosion; Electroactive composition materials; Bioelectrochemistry. The Frumkin symposium includes plenary lectures, oral and poster presentations. Official language of the symposium is English [ru

  8. Memorial Symposium for Victor Weisskopf

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Victor 'Viki' Weisskopf, former Director General of CERN from 1961 to 1965, passed away five months ago. At that time, the Bulletin dedicated its coverpage to this brilliant physicist (19-20/2002). Now, CERN has organised a Memorial Symposium for next Tuesday 17 September, where you are cordially invited. This tribute will include the following speechs: L. Maiani: Welcome J. D. Jackson: Highlights from the career and scientific works of Victor F. Weisskopf M. Hine and K. Johnsen: Working with Viki at CERN M. Jacob: Knowledge and Wonder A member of Viki's family: Reminiscences. The Memorial Symposium will take place in the Main Auditorium at 15h. Drinks will be served in Pas Perdus at 17h 30.

  9. Proceedings of the 2011 symposium on nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Hideo; Yokoyama, Kenji; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Nakamura, Shoji

    2012-12-01

    The 2011 data symposium on nuclear data, organized by the Nuclear Data Division of Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) was held at Ricotti, Tokai, on Nov. 16 and 17, 2011 in cooperation with Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate of JAEA and North-Kanto Branch of AESJ. The symposium was devoted for discussions and presentations of current topics in the field of nuclear data such as nuclear accident and accident analysis code, innovative methods on nuclear data theory and measurements, and nuclear data applications, including 2 tutorial talks, NJOY99 and PHITS. Talks as well as posters presented at the symposium aroused lively discussions among 97 participants. This report contains 34 papers submitted from the oral and poster presenters. (author)

  10. Symposium overview: alterations in cytokine receptors by xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M D; Schook, L B; Oppenheim, J J; Freed, B M; Rodgers, K E

    1999-04-01

    A symposium entitled Alterations in Cytokine Receptors by Xenobiotics was held at the 37th Annual Meeting of the Society of Toxicology (SOT) in Seattle, Washington. The symposium was sponsored by the Immunotoxicology Specialty Section of SOT and was designed to present information on the effect of several different classes of xenobiotics on various aspects of receptor function (i.e., post-receptor signal transduction of receptor expression), or the involvement of cytokine receptors in the action of the toxicant under consideration. This symposium brought together scientists in the area of receptor immunobiology whose expertise in receptor modulation encompassed those major signaling agents involved in the normal immune response, i.e., proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, interleukins, and interferons. The following is a summary of each of the individual presentations.

  11. Symposium 2 of JENAM

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquali, Anna; Environment and the Formation of Galaxies : 30 years later

    2011-01-01

    The publication of the morphology - density relation by Alan Dressler in 1980 brought into the limelight the role played by environment in the formation and evolution of galaxies. The symposium Environment and the Formation of Galaxies: 30 years later, was organised with the purpose of establishing the environmental impact on the evolution of galaxies and its dependence on look-back time. Special emphasis was placed on the physical mechanisms that are responsible for transforming galaxies once they are accreted by a group or a cluster, including the observable imprint left in the galaxy HI distribution. Other major topics of the symposium were the environmental dependence of galaxy properties at z ≥ 1 and the implementation of environmental effects in cosmological models of galaxy formation and evolution. This book presents the edited proceedings of this stimulating meeting.

  12. General Practitioner (GP) trainees' experience of a '1-h protected supervision model' given during psychiatry placements in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gareth; McNeill, Helen

    2018-01-05

    Background A '1-hour protected supervision model' is well established for Psychiatry trainees. This model is also extended to GP trainees who are on placement in psychiatry. To explore the experiences of the '1-hour protected supervision model' for GP trainees in psychiatry placements in the UK. Methods Using a mixed methods approach, an anonymous online questionnaire was sent to GP trainees in the North West of England who had completed a placement in Psychiatry between February and August 2015. Results Discussing clinical cases whilst using the e-portfolio was the most useful learning event in this model. Patient care can potentially improve if a positive relationship develops between trainee/supervisor, which is impacted by the knowledge of this model at the start of the placement. Trainees found that clinical pressures were impacting on the occurrence of supervision. Conclusion The model works best when both GP trainees and their supervisors understand the model. The most frequently used and educationally beneficial aspect for GP trainees in psychiatry is the exploration of clinical cases using the learning portfolio as an educational tool. For effective delivery of this model of supervision, organisations must reflect on the balance between service delivery and allowing the supervisor and trainee adequate time for it to occur.

  13. Educational Supervision Appropriate for Psychiatry Trainee's Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rele, Kiran; Tarrant, C. Jane

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors studied the regularity and content of supervision sessions in one of the U.K. postgraduate psychiatric training schemes (Mid-Trent). Methods: A questionnaire sent to psychiatry trainees assessed the timing and duration of supervision, content and protection of supervision time, and overall quality of supervision. The authors…

  14. Proceedings of the 13th international symposium on laser-aided plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahata, Kazuo

    2007-09-01

    The 9th international symposium on LASER-AIDED PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS was held from 18th November to 21st September, 2007 at Takayama, Japan. This symposium was organized by the National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan. The topics of the symposium include laser diagnostics and diagnostics aided by lasers for fusion plasmas, industrial process plasmas, environmental plasmas as well as for other plasma applications and processes related to plasmas. Hardware development related to laser-aided plasma diagnostics is another topic. Over 80 participants attended this international symposium. 1 Akazaki lecture, 10 general talks, 10 topical talks, 12 short oral talks and 45 posters were presented. This issue is the collection of the papers presented at the title symposium. The 41 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  15. 22nd DAE High Energy Physics Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    These proceedings gather invited and contributed talks presented at the XXII DAE-BRNS High Energy Physics (HEP) Symposium, which was held at the University of Delhi, India, on 12–16 December 2016. The contributions cover a variety of topics in particle physics, astroparticle physics, cosmology and related areas from both experimental and theoretical perspectives, namely (1) Neutrino Physics, (2) Standard Model Physics (including Electroweak, Flavour Physics), (3) Beyond Standard Model Physics, (4) Heavy Ion Physics & QCD (Quantum Chromodynamics), (5) Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology, (6) Future Experiments and Detector Development, (7) Formal Theory, and (8) Societal Applications: Medical Physics, Imaging, etc. The DAE-BRNS High Energy Physics Symposium, widely considered to be one of the leading symposiums in the field of Elementary Particle Physics, is held every other year in India and supported by the Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences (BRNS), Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), India. As man...

  16. In search of work/life balance: trainee perspectives on part-time obstetrics and gynaecology specialist training

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Amanda; Clements Sarah; Kingston Ashley; Abbott Jason

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Part-time training (PTT) is accessed by approximately 10% of Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees, a small but increasing minority which reflects the growing demand for improved work/life balance amongst the Australian medical workforce. This survey reports the attitudes and experiences of both full-time and part-time trainees to PTT. Methods An email-based anonymous survey was sent to all Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in April 2009, collecting d...

  17. Virtual study groups and online Observed Structured Clinical Examinations practices - enabling trainees to enable themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Dennisa; Evans, Lois

    2018-03-01

    To explore online study groups as augmentation tools in preparing for the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists Observed Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) for fellowship. An online survey of New Zealand trainees was carried out to assess exam preparedness and openness to virtual study groups and results analysed. Relevant material around virtual study groups for fellowship examinations was reviewed and used to inform a pilot virtual study group. Four New Zealand trainees took part in the pilot project, looking at using a virtual platform to augment OSCE preparation. Of the 50 respondents 36% felt adequately prepared for the OSCE. Sixty-four per cent were interested in using a virtual platform to augment their study. Virtual study groups were noted to be especially important for rural trainees, none of whom felt able to form study groups for themselves. The pilot virtual study group was trialled successfully. All four trainees reported the experience as subjectively beneficial to their examination preparation. Virtual platforms hold promise as an augmentation strategy for exam preparation, especially for rural trainees who are more geographically isolated and less likely to have peers preparing for the same examinations.

  18. Objective assessment of surgical performance and its impact on a national selection programme of candidates for higher surgical training in plastic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Sean M

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to develop and validate a transparent, fair and objective assessment programme for the selection of surgical trainees into higher surgical training (HST) in plastic surgery in the Republic of Ireland. METHODS: Thirty-four individuals applied for HST in plastic surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) in the academic years 2005-2006 and 2006-2007. Eighteen were short-listed for interview and further assessment. All applicants were required to report on their undergraduate educational performance and their postgraduate professional development. Short-listed applicants completed validated objective assessment simulations of surgical skills, an interview and assessment of their suitability for a career in surgery. RESULTS: When applicants\\' short-listing scores were combined with their interview scores and assessment of their suitability for a career in surgery, individuals who were selected for HST in plastic surgery performed significantly better than those who were not (P<0.002). However, when the assessment of technical skills scores were added the significance level of this difference increased further (P<0.0001) as did the statistical power of the difference to 99.9%, thus increasing the robustness of the selection package. CONCLUSION: The results from this study suggest that the assessment protocol we used to select individuals for HST in plastic surgery reliably and statistically significantly discriminated between the performances of candidates.

  19. Is Western Australia's rural surgical workforce going to sustain the future? A quantitative and qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugakumar, Sharanyaa; Playford, Denese; Burkitt, Tessa; Tennant, Marc; Bowles, Tom

    2017-03-01

    Objective Despite public interest in the rural workforce, there are few published data on the geographical distribution of Australia's rural surgeons, their practice skill set, career stage or work-life balance (on-call burden). Similarly, there has not been a peer-reviewed skills audit of rural training opportunities for surgical trainees. The present study undertook this baseline assessment for Western Australia (WA), which has some of the most remote practice areas in Australia. Methods Hospital staff from all WA Country Health Service hospitals with surgical service (20 of 89 rural health services) were contacted by telephone. A total of 18 of 20 provided complete data. The study questionnaire explored hospital and practice locations of practicing rural surgeons, on-call rosters, career stage, practice skill set and the availability of surgical training positions. Data were tabulated in excel and geographic information system geocoded. Descriptive statistics were calculated in Excel. Results Of the seven health regions for rural Western Australia, two (28.6%) were served by resident surgeons at a ratio consistent with Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) guidelines. General surgery was offered in 16 (89%) hospitals. In total, 16 (89%) hospitals were served by fly-in, fly-out (FIFO) surgical services. Two hospitals with resident surgeons did not use FIFO services, but all hospitals without resident surgeons were served by FIFO surgical specialists. The majority of resident surgeons (62.5%) and FIFO surgeons (43.2%) were perceived to be mid-career by hospital staff members. Three hospitals (16.7%) offered all eight of the identified surgical skill sets, but 16 (89%) offered general surgery. Conclusions Relatively few resident rural surgeons are servicing large areas of WA, assisted by the widespread provision of FIFO surgical services. The present audit demonstrates strength in general surgical skills throughout regional WA, and augers well for the

  20. Learning, technology and intellectual property: a survey of the philosophies and preferences of our trainees and peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Maria A; Back, Susan J; Scanlon, Mary H; Delgado, Jorge; Darge, Kassa; Reid, Janet R

    2016-12-01

    Increasing workloads threaten the quality of teaching in academic radiology practices. There is a wealth of unfiltered educational resources for radiology on the internet. As a digital native, today's radiology trainee may have differing opinions from teachers about learning and intellectual property. To identify the preferences and philosophies regarding learning, technology and intellectual property toward the future development of an innovative radiology curriculum. An electronic survey with 22 questions was sent to 2,010 members of the Society for Pediatric Radiology and 100 radiology trainees. Three hundred sixty-one of the 2,110 surveys were returned. All questions were completed in 342 surveys. Fifty-three respondents were trainees (residents and fellows) and 289 respondents were radiologists (teachers). Time needed for a single learning activity in both groups is learning environments were point-of-care and outside work hours for both groups. Ideal lecture durations were 31-45 min for trainees and 21-30 min for teachers (P=0.001). Adoption of new technology showed late majority and laggard trends for both groups (P=0.296). Interest in gadgets was greater in trainees (17%) than teachers (2%) (Peducational materials (P=0.028); 27% versus 13%, respectively, disagreed with dissemination of those materials beyond the institution (P=0.013). While millennial trainees are adult learners with a stronger comfort with technology, learning styles of trainees and teachers are more similar than was previously believed. Trainees and teachers hold conflicting philosophies about intellectual property. Results herein speak favorably for revising our teaching portfolio to include practical learning materials of short duration available at point-of-care.

  1. The Third International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology: Symposium proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Papers from the symposium are presented that are relevant to the generation, detection, and use of the terahertz spectral region for space astronomy and remote sensing of the Earth's upper atmosphere. The program included thirteen sessions covering a wide variety of topics including solid-state oscillators, power-combining techniques, mixers, harmonic multipliers, antennas and antenna arrays, submillimeter receivers, and measurement techniques.

  2. Quality assurance and demolition: 2006 symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierfeldt, S.

    2006-01-01

    The '2006 Symposium: Quality Assurance and Demolition' jointly organized by compra GmbH and Brenk Systemplanung GmbH this year again focused on quality assurance and the demolition of nuclear facilities as its main topics. The papers presented ranged from issues of clearance and disposal to demolition technologies and status reports about specific demolition projects. The sixteen presentations at the '2006 Symposium: Quality Assurance and Demolition' offered an interesting and very topical cross section of decommissioning and demolition of nuclear facilities in Germany. In 2007, the conference about similar main topics will again be held at the Schloss Bensberg Grand Hotel. (orig.)

  3. The effect of medical trainees on pediatric emergency department flow: a discrete event simulation modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genuis, Emerson D; Doan, Quynh

    2013-11-01

    Providing patient care and medical education are both important missions of teaching hospital emergency departments (EDs). With medical school enrollment rising, and ED crowding becoming an increasing prevalent issue, it is important for both pediatric EDs (PEDs) and general EDs to find a balance between these two potentially competing goals. The objective was to determine how the number of trainees in a PED affects patient wait time, total ED length of stay (LOS), and rates of patients leaving without being seen (LWBS) for PED patients overall and stratified by acuity level as defined by the Pediatric Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale (CTAS) using discrete event simulation (DES) modeling. A DES model of an urban tertiary care PED, which receives approximately 40,000 visits annually, was created and validated. Thirteen different trainee schedules, which ranged from averaging zero to six trainees per shift, were input into the DES model and the outcome measures were determined using the combined output of five model iterations. An increase in LOS of approximately 7 minutes was noted to be associated with each additional trainee per attending emergency physician working in the PED. The relationship between the number of trainees and wait time varied with patients' level of acuity and with the degree of PED utilization. Patient wait time decreased as the number of trainees increased for low-acuity visits and when the PED was not operating at full capacity. With rising numbers of trainees, the PED LWBS rate decreased in the whole department and in the CTAS 4 and 5 patient groups, but it rose in patients triaged CTAS 3 or higher. A rising numbers of trainees was not associated with any change to flow outcomes for CTAS 1 patients. The results of this study demonstrate that trainees in PEDs have an impact mainly on patient LOS and that the effect on wait time differs between patients presenting with varying degrees of acuity. These findings will assist PEDs in finding a

  4. Fourth symposium on macrocyclic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, J.J.; Izatt, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    Both theoretical and experimental aspects of the properties and behavior of synthetic and naturally occurring macrocyclic compounds are covered in this symposium. This document contains abstracts of the papers

  5. Learning styles of medical students, general surgery residents, and general surgeons: implications for surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Paul T; de Gara, Chris

    2010-06-30

    Surgical education is evolving under the dual pressures of an enlarging body of knowledge required during residency and mounting work-hour restrictions. Changes in surgical residency training need to be based on available educational models and research to ensure successful training of surgeons. Experiential learning theory, developed by David Kolb, demonstrates the importance of individual learning styles in improving learning. This study helps elucidate the way in which medical students, surgical residents, and surgical faculty learn. The Kolb Learning Style Inventory, which divides individual learning styles into Accommodating, Diverging, Converging, and Assimilating categories, was administered to the second year undergraduate medical students, general surgery resident body, and general surgery faculty at the University of Alberta. A total of 241 faculty, residents, and students were surveyed with an overall response rate of 73%. The predominant learning style of the medical students was assimilating and this was statistically significant (p learning style found in the residents and faculty. The predominant learning styles of the residents and faculty were convergent and accommodative, with no statistically significant differences between the residents and the faculty. We conclude that medical students have a significantly different learning style from general surgical trainees and general surgeons. This has important implications in the education of general surgery residents.

  6. The cutting-edge training modalities and educational platforms for accredited surgical training: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgione, Antonello; Guraya, Salman Y

    2017-01-01

    Historically, operating room (OR) has always been considered as a stand-alone trusted platform for surgical education and training. However, concerns about financial constraints, quality control, and patient safety have urged the surgical educators to develop more cost-effective, surgical educational platforms that can be employed outside the OR. Furthermore, trained surgeons need to regularly update their surgical skills to keep abreast with the emerging surgical technologies. This research aimed to explore the value of currently available modern surgical tools that can be used outside the OR and also elaborates the existing laparoscopic surgical training programs in world-class centers across the globe with a view to formulate a blended and unified structured surgical training program. Several data sources were searched using MeSH terms "Laparoscopic surgery" and "Surgical training" and "Surgical curriculum" and "fundamentals of endoscopic surgery" and "fundamentals of laparoscopic surgery" and "Telementoring" and "Box trainer." The eligibility criteria used in data extraction searched for original and review articles and by excluding the editorial articles, short communications, conference proceedings, personal view, and commentaries. Data synthesis and data analysis were done by reviewing the initially retrieved 211 articles. Irrelevant and duplicate and redundant articles were excluded from the study. Finally, 12 articles were selected for this systematic review. Data results showed that a myriad of cutting-edge technical innovations have provided modern surgical training tools such as the simulation-based mechanical and virtual reality simulators, animal and cadaveric labs, telementoring, telerobotic-assisted surgery, and video games. Surgical simulators allow the trainees to acquire surgical skills in a tension-free environment without supervision or time constraints. The existing world-renowned surgical training centers employ various clusters of training

  7. Family medicine training in Africa: Views of clinical trainers and trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis S. Jenkins

    2018-04-01

    Conclusion: The training of family physicians across Africa shares many common themes. However, there are also big differences among the various countries and even programmes within countries. The way forward would include exploring the local contextual enablers that influence the learning conversations between trainees and their supervisors. Family medicine training institutions and organisations (such as WONCA Africa and the South African Academy of Family Physicians have a critical role to play in supporting trainees and trainers towards developing local competencies which facilitate learning in the clinical workplace dominated by service delivery pressures.

  8. The Internet School of Medicine: use of electronic resources by medical trainees and the reliability of those resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egle, Jonathan P; Smeenge, David M; Kassem, Kamal M; Mittal, Vijay K

    2015-01-01

    Electronic sources of medical information are plentiful, and numerous studies have demonstrated the use of the Internet by patients and the variable reliability of these sources. Studies have investigated neither the use of web-based resources by residents, nor the reliability of the information available on these websites. A web-based survey was distributed to surgical residents in Michigan and third- and fourth-year medical students at an American allopathic and osteopathic medical school and a Caribbean allopathic school regarding their preferred sources of medical information in various situations. A set of 254 queries simulating those faced by medical trainees on rounds, on a written examination, or during patient care was developed. The top 5 electronic resources cited by the trainees were evaluated for their ability to answer these questions accurately, using standard textbooks as the point of reference. The respondents reported a wide variety of overall preferred resources. Most of the 73 responding medical trainees favored textbooks or board review books for prolonged studying, but electronic resources are frequently used for quick studying, clinical decision-making questions, and medication queries. The most commonly used electronic resources were UpToDate, Google, Medscape, Wikipedia, and Epocrates. UpToDate and Epocrates had the highest percentage of correct answers (47%) and Wikipedia had the lowest (26%). Epocrates also had the highest percentage of wrong answers (30%), whereas Google had the lowest percentage (18%). All resources had a significant number of questions that they were unable to answer. Though hardcopy books have not been completely replaced by electronic resources, more than half of medical students and nearly half of residents prefer web-based sources of information. For quick questions and studying, both groups prefer Internet sources. However, the most commonly used electronic resources fail to answer clinical queries more than half

  9. Comparative gut physiology symposium: The microbe-gut-brain axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Comparative Gut Physiology Symposium titled “The Microbe-Gut-Brain Axis” was held at the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Society of Animal Science and the American Dairy Science Association on Thursday, July 21, 2016, in Salt Lake City Utah. The goal of the symposium was to present basic r...

  10. Proceedings of the 2010 symposium on nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yukinobu; Koura, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Satoshi

    2011-09-01

    The 2010 symposium on nuclear data organized by the Nuclear Data Division of Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) was held at C-CUBE, Chikushi Campus, Kyushu University, on November 25 and 26, 2010, with approximately 60 domestic and foreign participants, in cooperation with Advanced Science Research Center of JAEA and under financial support from the Kyushu Branch of AESJ. The symposium was devoted to presentations and discussions about recent research results in a wide variety of fields associated with nuclear data, such as JENDL-4 related evaluation and benchmark tests, nuclear data measurements and facilities, theoretical model calculations, applications, and so on. A tutorial on nuclear data evaluation for actinide nuclides was given in the symposium. This report consists of total 40 papers including 15 oral presentations and 25 poster presentations. (author)

  11. A current assessment of diversity characteristics and perceptions of their importance in the surgical workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Judith C; O'Rourke, Colin; Walsh, R Matthew

    2014-11-01

    Diversity in the workforce is vital to successful businesses. Healthcare in general has suffered from a lack of cultural competence, which is the ability to successfully interact with individuals from diverse backgrounds. In order to eliminate discrimination and build a diverse workforce, physicians' perceptions and importance of diversity need to be measured. A 25-item, anonymous, online questionnaire was created, and a cross-sectional survey was performed. The instrument consisted of demographic and Likert-style questions which attempted to determine the participants' perceptions of the current level of diversity in their specialty and their perceived importance of particular diversity categories. Over 1,000 responses were received from US-based physicians across all specialties and levels of training. Statistically significant differences existed between surgical and nonsurgical specialties with regard to gender, prior work experience, and political identity. In the surgical workforce, there is significant perceived homogeneity regarding gender/sexual identity. Surgical respondents also deemed gender/sexual identity diversity to be less important than respondents from medical specialties. Surgeons and surgical trainees are less diverse than their medical colleagues, both by demographics and self-acknowledgement. The long-term impact and potential barriers to resolve these differences in diversity require further investigation.

  12. ACS Symposium on Molecular Tribology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gellman, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    .... The aspects of tribology covered by the symposium were quite broad but included a number of areas of importance to Air Force technologies including vapor phase lubrication, lubrication of MEMS...

  13. 6th International Symposium on Thermal Expansion

    CERN Document Server

    1978-01-01

    This 6th International Symposium on Thermal Expansion, the first outside the USA, was held on August 29-31, 1977 at the Gull Harbour Resort on Hecla Island, Manitoba, Canada. Symposium Chairman was Ian D. Peggs, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, and our continuing sponsor was CINDAS/Purdue University. We made considerable efforts to broaden the base this year to include more users of expansion data but with little success. We were successful, however, in establishing a session on liquids, an area which is receiving more attention as a logical extension to the high-speed thermophysical property measurements on materials at temperatures close to their melting points. The Symposium had good international representation but the overall attendance was, disappointingly, relatively low. Neverthe­ less, this enhanced the informal atmosphere throughout the meeting with a resultant frank exchange of information and ideas which all attendees appreciated. A totally new item this year was the presentation of a bursary to ...

  14. Non-Music Specialist Trainee Primary School Teachers' Confidence in Teaching Music in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Frederick; Biasutti, Michele

    2008-01-01

    Prior research has revealed that non-music specialist trainee primary school teachers lack confidence in teaching music in spite of changes to teacher training and the introduction of music in the National Curriculum in England. The current study investigated the effects on non-music specialist trainee primary teachers' confidence to teach music…

  15. MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN TRAINEES IN PHYSICAL THERAPY OF UESB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Rodrigues Barreto Neta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine musculoskeletal disorders presented in algic way of undergraduates supervised I and II of the physiotherapy course at the State University of Southwest Bahia, Jequié campus. The study of descriptive, transversal and quantitative character, with a sample of 35 trainees of the physiotherapy course at the State University of Southwest Bahia. Data were obtained through questionnaires demographic social, Nordic and Mc Gill. Of the participants 20% were male and 80% female, aged between 20-29 years (23 ± 2. The regions most affected by musculoskeletal disorders in the current period, 7 days and 12 months were the lower back (40%, shoulder (28,6%, neck and upper back (25.7%. Regarding the classification of pain, trainees described as tiring (60%; thin (40%; sharp and stabbing (34%. This study concluded that physiotherapy graduates have high musculoskeletal pain complaints, before entering the labor market.

  16. MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN TRAINEES IN PHYSICAL THERAPY OF UESB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Rodrigues Barreto Neta

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To determine musculoskeletal disorders presented in algic way of undergraduates supervised I and II of the physiotherapy course at the State University of Southwest Bahia, Jequié campus. The study of descriptive, transversal and quantitative character, with a sample of 35 trainees of the physiotherapy course at the State University of Southwest Bahia. Data were obtained through questionnaires demographic social, Nordic and Mc Gill. Of the participants 20% were male and 80% female, aged between 20-29 years (23 ± 2. The regions most affected by musculoskeletal disorders in the current period, 7 days and 12 months were the lower back (40%, shoulder (28,6%, neck and upper back (25.7%. Regarding the classification of pain, trainees described as tiring (60%; thin (40%; sharp and stabbing (34%. This study concluded that physiotherapy graduates have high musculoskeletal pain complaints, before entering the labor market.

  17. Preserving professional credibility: grounded theory study of medical trainees' requests for clinical support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Tara J T; Regehr, Glenn; Baker, G Ross; Lingard, Lorelei

    2009-02-09

    To develop a conceptual framework of the influences on medical trainees' decisions regarding requests for clinical support from a supervisor. Phase 1: members of teaching teams in internal and emergency medicine were observed during regular clinical activities (216 hours) and subsequently completed brief interviews. Phase 2: 36 in depth interviews were conducted using videotaped vignettes to probe tacit influences on decisions to request support. Data collection and analysis used grounded theory methods. Three teaching hospitals in an urban setting in Canada. 124 members of teaching teams on general internal medicine wards and in the emergency department, comprising 31 attending physicians, 57 junior and senior residents, 28 medical students, and eight nurses. Purposeful sampling to saturation was conducted. Trainees' decisions about whether or not to seek clinical support were influenced by three issues: the clinical question (clinical importance, scope of practice), supervisor factors (availability, approachability), and trainee factors (skill, desire for independence, evaluation). Trainees perceived that requesting frequent/inappropriate support threatened their credibility and used rhetorical strategies to preserve credibility. These strategies included building a case for the importance of requests, saving requests for opportune moments, making a plan before requesting support, and targeting requests to specific team members. Trainees consider not only clinical implications but also professional credibility when requesting support from clinical supervisors. Exposing the complexity of this process provides the opportunity to make changes to training programmes to promote timely supervision and provides a framework for further exploration of the impact of clinical training on quality of care of patients.

  18. Choice of antipsychotic treatment by European psychiatry trainees: are decisions based on evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jauhar Sameer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the factors influencing treatment choice in psychosis, the majority of this work being conducted with specialists (consultant in psychiatry. We sought to examine trainees' choices of treatment for psychosis if they had to prescribe it for themselves, their patients, and factors influencing decision-making. Methods Cross-sectional, semi-structured questionnaire-based study. Results Of the 726 respondents (response rate = 66%, the majority chose second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs if they had to prescribe it for themselves (n = 530, 93% or for their patients (n = 546, 94%. The main factor influencing choice was perceived efficacy, 84.8% (n = 475 of trainees stating this was the most important factor for the patient, and 77.8% (n = 404 stating this was the most important factor for their own treatment. Trainees with knowledge of trials questioning use of SGAs (CATIE, CUtLASS, TEOSS were more likely to choose second-generation antipsychotics than those without knowledge of these trials (χ2 = 3.943; p = 0.047; O.R. = 2.11; 95% C.I. = 1.0-4.48. Regarding psychotherapy, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT was the most popular choice for self (33.1%; n = 240 and patient (30.9%; n = 224. Trainees were significantly more likely to prefer some form of psychotherapy for themselves rather than patients (χ2 = 9.98; p Conclusions Trainees are more likely to choose second-generation antipsychotic medication for patients and themselves. Despite being aware of evidence that suggests otherwise, they predominantly base these choices on perceived efficacy.

  19. A Women in Radiology Group Fosters Career Development for Faculty and Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetke-Udager, Kara; Knoepp, Ursula S; Maturen, Katherine E; Leschied, Jessica R; Chong, Suzanne; Klein, Katherine A; Kazerooni, Ella

    2018-07-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the outcomes of a women in radiology (WIR) group during the first 6 years of its existence, including members' satisfaction, activities, and differences based on seniority. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to group members. Survey questions were related to the usefulness of sessions, mentoring, professional opportunities, and camaraderie. Comparisons were made on the basis of training status and seniority. Continuous variables were compared using means, t tests, and correlations, and categoric variables were compared using counts, percentages, and chi-square tests or Mantel-Haenszel tests. Surveys were sent to 61 women, including trainees and faculty; the response rate was 49% (38% of trainees and 53% of faculty). Overall satisfaction score for WIR sessions was high (mean summary score, 1.42 ± 0.37 [SD], with 1 meaning very satisfied and 4 meaning very unsatisfied). Trainees and junior faculty were more likely than senior faculty to report expanded internal networking opportunities (94% vs 69%; p = 0.07), to have gained a mentor (67% vs 8%; p = 0.001), and to have increased research involvement (33% vs 0%; p = 0.02). Both groups were equally likely to have become mentors. Almost all respondents (93%) reported increased camaraderie among women in the department. A WIR group can provide career development tools for its members. In this study, trainees and junior faculty reported increased networking and research involvement and gaining a mentor but were equally likely as senior faculty to have become mentors. Most members reported increased camaraderie among women in the department. A WIR group may help to accelerate professional development among trainees and junior faculty, thereby contributing to a more diverse and enabled workforce.

  20. Mobile technology supporting trainee doctors' workplace learning and patient care: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardyman, Wendy; Bullock, Alison; Brown, Alice; Carter-Ingram, Sophie; Stacey, Mark

    2013-01-21

    The amount of information needed by doctors has exploded. The nature of knowledge (explicit and tacit) and processes of knowledge acquisition and participation are complex. Aiming to assist workplace learning, Wales Deanery funded "iDoc", a project offering trainee doctors a Smartphone library of medical textbooks. Data on trainee doctors' (Foundation Year 2) workplace information seeking practice was collected by questionnaire in 2011 (n = 260). iDoc baseline questionnaires (n = 193) collected data on Smartphone usage alongside other workplace information sources. Case reports (n = 117) detail specific instances of Smartphone use. Most frequently (daily) used information sources in the workplace: senior medical staff (80% F2 survey; 79% iDoc baseline); peers (70%; 58%); and other medical/nursing team staff (53% both datasets). Smartphones were used more frequently by males (p mobile technology used for simple (information-based), complex (problem-based) clinical questions and clinical procedures (skills-based scenarios). From thematic analysis, the Smartphone library assisted: teaching and learning from observation; transition from medical student to new doctor; trainee doctors' discussions with seniors; independent practice; patient care; and this 'just-in-time' access to reliable information supported confident and efficient decision-making. A variety of information sources are used regularly in the workplace. Colleagues are used daily but seniors are not always available. During transitions, constant access to the electronic library was valued. It helped prepare trainee doctors for discussions with their seniors, assisting the interchange between explicit and tacit knowledge.By supporting accurate prescribing and treatment planning, the electronic library contributed to enhanced patient care. Trainees were more rapidly able to medicate patients to reduce pain and more quickly call for specific assessments. However, clinical decision-making often requires

  1. Organizational Change. Symposium 11. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This packet contains three papers from a symposium on organizational change. The first paper, "Kaizen Blitz: Rapid Learning to Facilitate Immediate Organizational Improvements" (Robert B. Gudgel, Fred C. Feitler), describes rapid and dramatic improvement in the organizational performance of a manufacturing firm after use of a series of…

  2. Survey of the incidence and effect of major life events on graduate medical education trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars J. Grimm

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to assess the incidence of major life events during graduate medical education (GME training and to establish any associations with modifiable activities and career planning. Methods: The authors surveyed graduating GME trainees from their parent institution in June 2013. Demographic information (clinical department, gender, training duration and major life events (marriage, children, death/illness, home purchase, legal troubles, property loss were surveyed. Respondents were queried about the relationship between life events and career planning. A multivariable logistic regression model tested for associations. Results: A total of 53.2% (166/312 of graduates responded to the survey. 50% (83/166 of respondents were female. Major life events occurred in 96.4% (160/166 of respondents. Male trainees were more likely (56.1% [46/82] vs. 30.1% [25/83] to have a child during training (p=0.01. A total of 41.6% (69/166 of responders consciously engaged or avoided activities during GME training, while 31.9% (53/166 of responders reported that life events influenced their career plans. Trainees in lifestyle residencies (p=0.02, those who experienced the death or illness of a close associate (p=0.01, and those with legal troubles (p=0.04 were significantly more likely to consciously control life events. Conclusion: Major life events are very common and changed career plans in nearly a third of GME trainees. Furthermore, many trainees consciously avoided activities due to their responsibilities during training. GME training programs should closely assess the institutional support systems available to trainees during this difficult time.

  3. Combining of ETHOS Operating Ergonomic Platform, Three-dimensional Laparoscopic Camera, and Radius Surgical System Manipulators Improves Ergonomy in Urologic Laparoscopy: Comparison with Conventional Laparoscopy and da Vinci in a Pelvi Trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokas, Theodoros; Gözen, Ali Serdar; Avgeris, Margaritis; Tschada, Alexandra; Fiedler, Marcel; Klein, Jan; Rassweiler, Jens

    2017-10-01

    Posture, vision, and instrumentation limitations are the main predicaments of conventional laparoscopy. To combine the ETHOS surgical chair, the three-dimensional laparoscope, and the Radius Surgical System manipulators, and compare the system with conventional laparoscopy and da Vinci in terms of task completion times and discomfort. Fifteen trainees performed the three main laparoscopic suturing tasks of the Heilbronn training program (IV: simulation of dorsal venous complex suturing; V: circular suturing of tubular structure; and VI: urethrovesical anastomosis) in a pelvi trainer. The tasks were performed conventionally, utilizing the three devices, and robotically. Task completion times were recorded and the surgeon discomfort was evaluated using questionnaires. Task completion times were compared using nonparametric Wilcoxon signed rank test and ergonomic scores were compared using Pearson chi-square test. The use of the full laparoscopic set (ETHOS chair, three-dimensional laparoscopic camera, Radius Surgical System needle holders), resulted in a significant improvement of the completion time of the three tested tasks compared with conventional laparoscopy (psystem nullified heavy discomfort for Tasks IV and V and minimized it (6.7%) for the most demanding Task VI. Especially for Task VI, all trainees gained benefit, by using the system, in terms of task completion times and discomfort. The limited trainee robotic experience and the questionnaire subjectivity could be a potential limitation. The ergonomic laparoscopic system offers significantly improved task completion times and ergonomy than conventional laparoscopy. Furthermore, it demonstrates comparable results to robotic surgery. The study was conducted in a pelvi trainer and no patients were recruited. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Proceedings of the 1st JAERI symposium on HTGR technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    This report was edited as the Proceedings of the 1st JAERI Symposium on HTGR Technologies, - Design, Licensing Requirements and Supporting Technologies -, collecting the 21 papers presented in the Symposium. The 19 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  5. SYMPOSIUM ON REMOTE SENSING IN THE POLAR REGIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Arctic Institute of North America long has been interested in encouraging full and specific attention to applications of remote sensing to polar...research problems. The major purpose of the symposium was to acquaint scientists and technicians concerned with remote sensing with some of the...special problems of the polar areas and, in turn, to acquaint polar scientists with the potential of the use of remote sensing . The Symposium therefore was

  6. Proceedings of the symposium on technology in laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    The Symposium on Technology in Laboratories was held on March 29 and 30, 1988 at Toyota Auditorium in Nagoya University. This symposium was hosted by Institute of Plasma Physics. Participants were about 210 and 54 papers were presented from many of Japanese universities and laboratories. Technical experience and new technics were reported and discussed divided into five sessions; technologies of manufacture, cryogenic, diagonostic and control system, computer and experimental apparatus. (author)

  7. Evaluation of trainees' ability to perform obstetrical ultrasound using simulation: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalouhi, Gihad E; Bernardi, Valeria; Gueneuc, Alexandra; Houssin, Isabelle; Stirnemann, Julien J; Ville, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Evaluation of trainee's ability in obstetrical ultrasound is a time-consuming process, which requires involving patients as volunteers. With the use of obstetrical ultrasound simulators, virtual reality could help in assessing competency and evaluating trainees in this field. The objective of the study was to test the validity of an obstetrical ultrasound simulator as a tool for evaluating trainees following structured training by comparing scores obtained on obstetrical ultrasound simulator with those obtained on volunteers and by assessing correlations between scores of images and of dexterity given by 2 blinded examiners. Trainees, taking the 2013 French national examination for the practice of obstetrical ultrasound were asked to obtain standardized ultrasound planes both on volunteer pregnant women and on an obstetrical ultrasound simulator. These planes included measurements of biparietal diameter, abdominal circumference, and femur length as well as reference planes for cardiac 4-chamber and outflow tracts, kidneys, stomach/diaphragm, spine, and face. Images were stored and evaluated subsequently by 2 national examiners who scored each picture according to previously established quality criteria. Dexterity was also evaluated and subjectively scored between 0 and 10. The Raghunathan's modification of Pearson, Filon's z, Spearman's rank correlation, and analysis of variance tests were used to assess correlations between the scores by the 2 examiners and scores of dexterity and also to compare the final scores between the 2 different methods. We evaluated 29 trainees. The mean dexterity scores in simulation (6.5 ± 2.0) and real examination (5.9 ± 2.3) were comparable (P = .31). Scores with an obstetrical ultrasound simulator were significantly higher than those obtained on volunteers (P = .027). Nevertheless, there was a good correlation between the scores of the 2 examiners judging on simulation (R = 0.888) and on volunteers (R = 0.873) (P = .81). An

  8. 'Oh my God, I can't handle this!': trainees' emotional responses to complex situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Esther; Diachun, Laura; Joseph, Radha; LaDonna, Kori; Noeverman-Poel, Nelleke; Lingard, Lorelei; Cristancho, Sayra

    2018-02-01

    Dealing with emotions is critical for medical trainees' professional development. Taking a sociocultural and narrative approach to understanding emotions, we studied complex clinical situations as a specific context in which emotions are evoked and influenced by the social environment. We sought to understand how medical trainees respond to emotions that arise in those situations. In an international constructivist grounded theory study, 29 trainees drew two rich pictures of complex clinical situations, one exciting and one frustrating. Rich pictures are visual representations that capture participants' perceptions about the people, situations and factors that create clinical complexity. These pictures were used to guide semi-structured, individual interviews. We analysed visual materials and interviews in an integrated way, starting with looking at the drawings, doing a 'gallery walk', and using the interviews to inform the aesthetic analysis. Participants' drawings depicted a range of personal emotions in response to complexity, and disclosed unsettling feelings and behaviours that might be considered unprofessional. When trainees felt confident, they were actively participating, engaged in creative problem-solving strategies, and emphasised their personal involvement. When trainees felt the situation was beyond their control, they described how they were running away from the situation, hiding themselves behind others or distancing themselves from patients or families. A sense of control seems to be a key factor influencing trainees' emotional and behavioural responses to complexity. This is problematic, as complex situations are by their nature emergent and dynamic, which limits possibilities for control. Following a social performative approach to emotions, we should help students understand that feeling out of control is an inherent property of participating in complex clinical situations, and, by extension, that it is not something they will 'grow out of

  9. Developing Skilled Doctor-Patient Communication in the Workplace: A Qualitative Study of the Experiences of Trainees and Clinical Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroldi, Esther; Veldhuijzen, Wemke; Geelen, Kristel; Muris, Jean; Bareman, Frits; Bueving, Herman; van der Weijden, Trudy; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2017-01-01

    To inform the development of recommendations to facilitate learning of skilled doctor-patient communication in the workplace, this qualitative study explores experiences of trainees and supervisors regarding how trainees learn communication and how supervisors support trainees' learning in the workplace. We conducted a qualitative study in a…

  10. Report on the First International Symposium Science in Judo (ISSJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Mateo-Cubo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This report resumes the First International Symposium Science in Judo (ISSJ, organized by the Department of Health Psychology, Miguel Hernández University, Elche (Spain, and held from October 12 to 14h, 2017. During this symposium some of the most relevant research projects related to judo as a sport were presented. There were a wide variety of topics, including biomechanics of technique, health, psychology, nutrition, sport training, education and future prospects. Five plenary sessions, six mini-sessions, one panel discussion and two workshops on tatami were developed. The symposium was an event where important national and international researchers participated. It was intended for groups related to judo, such as Sports Sciences students, judo coaches and high level judo athletes. More than 70 people participated in the symposium whose main aim was to provide scientific evidence on judo to judo professionals.

  11. Survey of Academic Field Experiences (SAFE): Trainees Report Harassment and Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Kathryn B. H.; Nelson, Robin G.; Rutherford, Julienne N.; Hinde, Katie

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the climate of the scientific fieldwork setting as it relates to gendered experiences, sexual harassment, and sexual assault. We conducted an internet-based survey of field scientists (N = 666) to characterize these experiences. Codes of conduct and sexual harassment policies were not regularly encountered by respondents, while harassment and assault were commonly experienced by respondents during trainee career stages. Women trainees were the primary targets; their perpetrators were predominantly senior to them professionally within the research team. Male trainees were more often targeted by their peers at the research site. Few respondents were aware of mechanisms to report incidents; most who did report were unsatisfied with the outcome. These findings suggest that policies emphasizing safety, inclusivity, and collegiality have the potential to improve field experiences of a diversity of researchers, especially during early career stages. These include better awareness of mechanisms for direct and oblique reporting of harassment and assault and, the implementation of productive response mechanisms when such behaviors are reported. Principal investigators are particularly well positioned to influence workplace culture at their field sites. PMID:25028932

  12. Survey of academic field experiences (SAFE: trainees report harassment and assault.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn B H Clancy

    Full Text Available Little is known about the climate of the scientific fieldwork setting as it relates to gendered experiences, sexual harassment, and sexual assault. We conducted an internet-based survey of field scientists (N = 666 to characterize these experiences. Codes of conduct and sexual harassment policies were not regularly encountered by respondents, while harassment and assault were commonly experienced by respondents during trainee career stages. Women trainees were the primary targets; their perpetrators were predominantly senior to them professionally within the research team. Male trainees were more often targeted by their peers at the research site. Few respondents were aware of mechanisms to report incidents; most who did report were unsatisfied with the outcome. These findings suggest that policies emphasizing safety, inclusivity, and collegiality have the potential to improve field experiences of a diversity of researchers, especially during early career stages. These include better awareness of mechanisms for direct and oblique reporting of harassment and assault and, the implementation of productive response mechanisms when such behaviors are reported. Principal investigators are particularly well positioned to influence workplace culture at their field sites.

  13. Survey of academic field experiences (SAFE): trainees report harassment and assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Kathryn B H; Nelson, Robin G; Rutherford, Julienne N; Hinde, Katie

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the climate of the scientific fieldwork setting as it relates to gendered experiences, sexual harassment, and sexual assault. We conducted an internet-based survey of field scientists (N = 666) to characterize these experiences. Codes of conduct and sexual harassment policies were not regularly encountered by respondents, while harassment and assault were commonly experienced by respondents during trainee career stages. Women trainees were the primary targets; their perpetrators were predominantly senior to them professionally within the research team. Male trainees were more often targeted by their peers at the research site. Few respondents were aware of mechanisms to report incidents; most who did report were unsatisfied with the outcome. These findings suggest that policies emphasizing safety, inclusivity, and collegiality have the potential to improve field experiences of a diversity of researchers, especially during early career stages. These include better awareness of mechanisms for direct and oblique reporting of harassment and assault and, the implementation of productive response mechanisms when such behaviors are reported. Principal investigators are particularly well positioned to influence workplace culture at their field sites.

  14. Proceedings of the symposium on nitride fuel cycle technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-12-01

    This report is the Proceedings of the Symposium of Nitride Fuel Cycle Technology, which was held on July 28, 2004, at the Tokai Research Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The purpose of this symposium is to exchange information and views on nitride fuel cycle technology among researchers from foreign and domestic organizations, and to discuss the recent and future research activities. The topics in the symposium are Present State of the Technology Development in the World and Japan, Fabrication Technology, Property Measurement and Pyrochemical Process. The intensive discussion was made among 53 participants. This report consists of 2 papers as invited presentations and 12 papers as contributed papers. (author)

  15. Basic Geriatrics Knowledge Among Internal Medicine Trainees in a Teaching Hospital in Saudi Arabia.</