WorldWideScience

Sample records for surgical specialties neurosurgery

  1. NEUROSURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    our experience with management and outcomes of this condition in children treated in the Neurosurgery Unit at Inkosi. Albert Luthuli Central .... The mean duration ..... Jennet B, Bond M. Assessment of outcome after severe brain damage.

  2. Operative Duration and Risk of Surgical Site Infection in Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Coy, Shannon; Simmons, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    The association of surgical duration with the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has not been quantified in neurosurgery. We investigated the association of operative duration in neurosurgical procedures with the incidence of SSI. We performed a retrospective cohort study involving patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures from 2005 to 2012 and were registered in the American College of Surgeons National Quality Improvement Project registry. To control for confounding, we used multivariable regression models and propensity score conditioning. During the study period there were 94,744 patients who underwent a neurosurgical procedure and met the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 4.1% developed a postoperative SSI within 30 days. Multivariable logistic regression showed an association between longer operative duration with higher incidence of SSI (odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.20). Compared with procedures of moderate duration (third quintile, 40th-60th percentile), patients undergoing the longest procedures (>80th percentile) had higher odds (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.86-2.31) of developing SSI. The shortest procedures (operative duration was associated with increased incidence of SSI for neurosurgical procedures. These results can be used by neurosurgeons to inform operative management and to stratify patients with regard to SSI risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cranial nerve functional neurosurgery : Evaluation of surgical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Guerinel, C.; Sindou, M.; Auque, J.; Blondet, E.; Brassier, G.; Chazal, J.; Cuny, E.; Devaux, B.; Fontaine, D.; Finiels, P. -J.; Fuentes, J. -M.; D'Haens, J.; Massager, N.; Mercier, Ph.; Mooij, J.; Nuti, C.; Rousseaux, P.; Serrie, A.; Stecken, J.; de Waele, L.; Keravel, Y.

    We report the results of an investigation carried out on the activity of functional neurosurgery of the cranial nerves in the French-speaking countries, based on the analysis of a questionnaire addressed to all the members of the SNCLF Eighteen centers responded to this questionnaire., which showed

  4. Augmented reality in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagaytayan, Raniel; Kelemen, Arpad; Sik-Lanyi, Cecilia

    2018-04-01

    Neurosurgery is a medical specialty that relies heavily on imaging. The use of computed tomography and magnetic resonance images during preoperative planning and intraoperative surgical navigation is vital to the success of the surgery and positive patient outcome. Augmented reality application in neurosurgery has the potential to revolutionize and change the way neurosurgeons plan and perform surgical procedures in the future. Augmented reality technology is currently commercially available for neurosurgery for simulation and training. However, the use of augmented reality in the clinical setting is still in its infancy. Researchers are now testing augmented reality system prototypes to determine and address the barriers and limitations of the technology before it can be widely accepted and used in the clinical setting.

  5. Surgical resident perceptions of trauma surgery as a specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzikadic, Lejla; Burke, Peter A; Esposito, Thomas J; Agarwal, Suresh

    2010-05-01

    Presenting the opinions of surgical residents about the appeal of trauma surgery as a specialty may influence current reform. Survey study. Academic research. General surgery residents (postgraduate years 1-5 and recent graduates) registered with the American College of Surgeons. A 22-item survey. Career plans and perceptions about trauma surgery as a specialty. Of 6006 mailed surveys, we had a 20.1% response rate. Midlevel residents comprised most of the respondents, and most were undecided about their career choice or planned to enter general surgical private practice. The typical residency programs represented were academic (81.7%), urban (90.6%), and level I trauma centers (78.7%), and included more than 6 months of trauma experience (77.6%). Most respondents (70.6%) thought that trauma surgery was unappealing. The most important deterrents to entering the field were lifestyle, poor reimbursement, and limited operating room exposure, while increased surgical critical care was not seen as a restriction. When questioned about the future of trauma surgery, they believed that trauma surgeons should perform elective (86.8%) and nontrauma emergency (91.5%) cases and would benefit from active association with an outpatient clinic (76.0%). Intellectual challenge and exciting nature of the field were listed as the most appealing aspects, and ideal practice characteristics included guaranteed salary and time away from work. As demand for trauma surgeons increases, resident interest has dwindled. As a specialty, trauma surgery must undergo changes that reflect the needs of the incoming generation. We present a sampling of current surgical resident opinion and offer these data to assist the changing discipline and the evolving field of acute care surgery.

  6. Prevalence of dry eye syndrome in residents of surgical specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-González, José Alberto; Torres-Martínez, Verónica; Martínez-Ruiz, Adriana; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; Rendón-Félix, Jorge; Irusteta-Jiménez, Leire; Márquez-Valdez, Aída Rebeca; Cortés-Lares, José Antonio; González-Ojeda, Alejandro

    2016-07-16

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and severity of dry eye syndrome in a group of Mexican residents of different surgical specialties. A cross-sectional descriptive study where the residents were studied using the Ocular Surface Disease Index, together with diagnostic tests for dry eye syndrome, such as tear breakup time, Oxford Schema, Schirmer's test I, and meibomian gland dysfunction testing. Statistical analyses were performed by Pearson's chi-squared test for categorical variables and student's t-test for quantitative variables. Any P value eyes); 90 (73 %) were male and 33 (27 %) were female. The mean age was 27.8 ± 2.1 years. A higher number of residents with dry eye syndrome was found in the cardiothoracic surgery (75 %) and otorhinolaryngology (71 %) specialties; 70 % of them reported ocular symptoms, with teardrop quality involvement in >50 % of them. We found a prevalence of 56 % for mild-to-moderate/severe stages of the condition. Their presence in the operating room predisposes surgical residents to dry eye syndrome because of environmental conditions.

  7. Surgical site infections after elective neurosurgery: a survey of 1747 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Laura G; Casali, Cecilia; Chatenoud, Liliane; Chiaffarino, Francesca; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Broggi, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence and risk factors of postsurgical site infections (SSIs) in elective neurosurgical procedures in patients treated with an ultrashort antibiotic protocol. In this consecutive series of 1747 patients treated with elective neurosurgery and ultrashort prophylactic antibiotic therapy at the Fondazione Istituto Nazionale Neurologico "Carlo Besta" in Milan, the rate of SSIs was 0.7% (13 patients). When only clean neurosurgery was considered, there were 11 such SSIs (1.52%) in 726 craniotomies and one SSI (0.15) in 663 spinal operations. The antibiotic protocol was prolonged in every case of external communication as cerebrospinal fluid leaks or external drainages. The infection rate of the whole series was low (0.72%), and a risk factor identified for SSIs in clean neurosurgery was longer surgery duration. The relative risk estimate was 12.6 for surgeries lasting 2 hours and 24.3 for surgeries lasting 3 or more hours. Patients aged older than 50 years had a lower risk of developing SSI with a relative risk of 0.23 when compared with patients aged younger than 50 years. The present series reports a low incidence of SSIs for elective neurosurgery, even for high-risk complex craniotomies performed for tumor removal. Given that an antibiotic protocol prolongation was used to pretreat any early signs of infection and external communication, the protocol was appropriate for the case mix. The two identified risk factors (surgical duration > 2 hours and middle-aged patients [16-50 yr]) may be indicators of other factors, such as the level of surgical complexity and poor neurological outcome.

  8. Image-guided neurosurgery. Global concept of a surgical tele-assistance using obstacle detection robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desgeorges, M.; Bellegou, N.; Faillot, Th.; Cordoliani, Y.S.; Dutertre, G.; Blondet, E.; Soultrait, F. de; Boissy, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Surgical tele-assistance significantly increases accuracy of surgical gestures, especially in the case of brain tumor neurosurgery. The robotic device is tele-operated through a microscope and the surgeon's gestures are guided by real-time overlaying of the X-ray imagery in the microscope. During the device's progression inside the brain, the focus is ensured by the microscope auto-focus feature. The surgeon can thus constantly check his position on the field workstation. Obstacles to avoid or dangerous areas can be previewed in the operation field. This system is routinely used for 5 years in the neurosurgery division of the Val de Grace hospital. More than 400 brain surgery operations have been done using it. An adaptation is used for rachis surgery. Other military hospitals begin to be equipped with similar systems. It will be possible to link them for data transfer. When it will be operational, such a network it will show what could be, in the future, a medical/surgical remote-assistance system designed to take care of wounded/critical conditions people, including assistance to surgical gestures. (authors)

  9. Social media in the mentorship and networking of physicians: Important role for women in surgical specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luc, Jessica G Y; Stamp, Nikki L; Antonoff, Mara B

    2018-04-01

    Social media may be a useful supplement to physician and trainee interactions; however, its role in enhancing mentorship has not been described. A 35-item survey investigating trainee and physician social media use was distributed. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics. 282 respondents completed the survey, among whom 136 (48.2%) reported careers in surgical specialties. Women in surgical specialties were more likely to describe the specialty as being dominated by the opposite sex (p media to build a network of same-sex mentorship (p = 0.031). Social media serves as a valuable tool to enhance the networking and mentorship of surgeons, particularly for women in surgical specialties who may lack exposure to same-sex mentors at their own institution. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Morbidity associated with 30-day surgical site infection following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Brandon A.; Rocque, Brandon G.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Morbidity associated with surgical site infection (SSI) following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgical procedures is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to analyze acute morbidity and mortality associated with SSI after nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery using a nationwide cohort. Methods The authors reviewed data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pediatric (NSQIP-P) 2012–2014 database, including all neurosurgical procedures performed on pediatric patients. Procedures were categorized by Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes. CSF shunts were excluded. Deep and superficial SSIs occurring within 30 days of an index procedure were identified. Deep SSIs included deep wound infections, intracranial abscesses, meningitis, osteomyelitis, and ventriculitis. The following outcomes occurring within 30 days of an index procedure were analyzed, along with postoperative time to complication development: sepsis, wound disruption, length of postoperative stay, readmission, reoperation, and death. Results A total of 251 procedures associated with a 30-day SSI were identified (2.7% of 9296 procedures). Superficial SSIs were more common than deep SSIs (57.4% versus 42.6%). Deep SSIs occurred more frequently after epilepsy or intracranial tumor procedures. Superficial SSIs occurred more frequently after skin lesion, spine, Chiari decompression, craniofacial, and myelomeningocele closure procedures. The mean (± SD) postoperative length of stay for patients with any SSI was 9.6 ± 14.8 days (median 4 days). Post-SSI outcomes significantly associated with previous SSI included wound disruption (12.4%), sepsis (15.5%), readmission (36.7%), and reoperation (43.4%) (p neurosurgery. Rates of SSI-associated complications are significantly lower in patients with superficial infection than in those with deep infection. There were no cases of SSI-related mortality within 30 days of the index procedure. PMID:28186474

  11. Surgical specialty procedures in rural surgery practices: implications for rural surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticca, Robert P; Mullin, Brady C; Harris, Joel D; Hosford, Clint C

    2012-12-01

    Specialty procedures constitute one eighth of rural surgery practice. Currently, general surgeons intending to practice in rural hospitals may not get adequate training for specialty procedures, which they will be expected to perform. Better definition of these procedures will help guide rural surgery training. Current Procedural Terminology codes for all surgical procedures for 81% of North Dakota and South Dakota rural surgeons were entered into the Dakota Database for Rural Surgery. Specialty procedures were analyzed and compared with the Surgical Council on Resident Education curriculum to determine whether general surgery training is adequate preparation for rural surgery practice. The Dakota Database for Rural Surgery included 46,052 procedures, of which 5,666 (12.3%) were specialty procedures. Highest volume specialty categories included vascular, obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedics, cardiothoracic, urology, and otolaryngology. Common procedures in cardiothoracic and vascular surgery are taught in general surgical residency, while common procedures in obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedics, urology, and otolaryngology are usually not taught in general surgery training. Optimal training for rural surgery practice should include experience in specialty procedures in obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedics, urology, and otolaryngology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Full-text automated detection of surgical site infections secondary to neurosurgery in Rennes, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo-Gimenez, Boris; Garcelon, Nicolas; Jarno, Pascal; Chapplain, Jean Marc; Cuggia, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The surveillance of Surgical Site Infections (SSI) contributes to the management of risk in French hospitals. Manual identification of infections is costly, time-consuming and limits the promotion of preventive procedures by the dedicated teams. The introduction of alternative methods using automated detection strategies is promising to improve this surveillance. The present study describes an automated detection strategy for SSI in neurosurgery, based on textual analysis of medical reports stored in a clinical data warehouse. The method consists firstly, of enrichment and concept extraction from full-text reports using NOMINDEX, and secondly, text similarity measurement using a vector space model. The text detection was compared to the conventional strategy based on self-declaration and to the automated detection using the diagnosis-related group database. The text-mining approach showed the best detection accuracy, with recall and precision equal to 92% and 40% respectively, and confirmed the interest of reusing full-text medical reports to perform automated detection of SSI.

  13. A patient group based business planning model for a surgical specialty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adan, I.J.B.F.; Vissers, J.M.H.; van den Heuvel, M.N.; Wiersema, K.; Vissers, J.M.H.; Beech, R.

    2005-01-01

    In this contribution we present an approach for a business planning model for a surgical specialty, based on modelling of all patient processes as well as of the dynamics involved in planning and managing resources. An important basis of the model is the description of the processes of all patient

  14. Best practices across surgical specialties relating to simulation-based training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Aimee K; Scott, Daniel J; Pedowitz, Robert A; Sweet, Robert M; Feins, Richard H; Deutsch, Ellen S; Sachdeva, Ajit K

    2015-11-01

    Simulation-based training is playing an increasingly important role in surgery. However, there is insufficient discussion among the surgical specialties regarding how simulation may best be leveraged for training. There is much to be learned from one another as we all strive to meet new requirements within the context of Undergraduate Medical Education, Graduate Medical Education, and Continuing Medical Education. To address this need, a panel was convened at the 6th Annual Meeting of the Consortium of the American College of Surgeons-Accredited Education Institutes consisting of key leaders in the field of simulation from 4 surgical subspecialties, namely, general surgery, orthopedic surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, urology, and otolaryngology. An overview of how the 5 surgical specialties are using simulation-based training to meet a wide array of educational needs for all levels of learners is presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A comparison of two surgical approaches in functional neurosurgery: individualized versus conventional stereotactic frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzke, Cornelia; Lindner, Dirk; Schwarz, Johannes; Classen, Joseph; Hammer, Niels; Weise, David; Rumpf, Jost-Julian; Fritzsch, Dominik; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Winkler, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The individualized Starfix® miniframe belongs to a new generation of stereotactic systems enabling high-precision electrode placement with considerably better time-efficiency in deep brain stimulation (DBS). We evaluated the usability and reliability of this novel technique in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) and compared surgical and clinical results with those obtained in a historical group in which a conventional stereotactic frame was employed. Sixty patients underwent surgery for implantation of DBS electrodes in the subthalamic nucleus. In 31 of them (group I) a conventional Zamorano-Dujovny frame was used and in 29 of them (group II) a Starfix® miniframe was used. Image fusion of preoperatively acquired 3D T1w and T2w 1.5 T MR-image series was used for the targeting procedure. Placement of the test electrodes and permanent electrodes corresponded to standard functional neurosurgery and included microelectrode recording and macrostimulation. Clinical (L-Dopa equivalent dose, United Parkinson's disease rating scale part III) and time for surgical electrode implantation were evaluated postoperatively in a 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-up. Twelve months postoperatively, L-Dopa dose was significantly reduced from 685.19 to 205.88 mg/day and from 757.92 to 314.42 mg/day in groups I and II, respectively. A comparable reduction of the LED could be observed 1 year after surgery. Motor function has improved in a significant and identical manner with 59% (group I) and 61% (group II). Besides clinical effects by stimulation therapy there was a significantly reduced surgery time required for electrode implantation using the Starfix® miniframe (group I: 234.1 min, group II: 173.6 min; p miniframes such as the Starfix® miniframe allow implantation of DBS electrodes in IPD that is equally effective as conventional systems. The time efficiency achieved in surgery using of the Starfix® system helps to minimize patients' discomfort during DBS

  16. Emergency medicine journal impact factor and change compared to other medical and surgical specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Joshua C; Menegazzi, James J; Yealy, Donald M

    2012-11-01

    A journal impact factor represents the mean number of citations per article published. Designed as one tool to measure the relative importance of a journal, impact factors are often incorporated into academic evaluation of investigators. The authors sought to determine how impact factors of emergency medicine (EM) journals compare to journals from other medical and surgical specialties and if any change has taken place over time. The 2010 impact factors and 5-year impact factors for each journal indexed by the Thomson Reuters ISI Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports (JCR) were collected, and EM, medical, and surgical specialties were evaluated. The maximum, median, and interquartile range (IQR) of the current impact factor and 5-year impact factor in each journal category were determined, and specialties were ranked according to the summary statistics. The "top three" impact factor journals for each specialty were analyzed, and growth trends from 2001 through 2010 were examined with random effects linear regression. Data from 2,287 journals in 31 specialties were examined. There were 23 EM journals with a current maximum impact factor of 4.177, median of 1.269, and IQR of 0.400 to 2.176. Of 23 EM journals, 57% had a 5-year impact factor available, with a maximum of 4.531, median of 1.325, and IQR of 0.741 to 2.435. The top three EM journals had a mean standard deviation (±SD) impact factor of 3.801 (±0.621) and median of 4.142 and a mean (±SD) 5-year impact factor of 3.788 (±1.091) and median of 4.297, with a growth trend of 0.211 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.177 to 0.245; p journals ranked no higher than 24th among 31 specialties. Emergency medicine journals rank low in impact factor summary statistics and growth trends among 31 medical and surgical specialties. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  17. Attitudes and factors contributing to attrition in Canadian surgical specialty residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Simon; Ginther, David Nathan; Neuls, Evan; Hayes, Paul

    2017-08-01

    We recently studied attrition in Canadian general surgical programs; however, there are no data on whether residents enrolled in other surgical residencies harbour the same intents as their general surgical peers. We sought to determine how many residents in surgical disciplines in Canada consider leaving their programs and why. An anonymous survey was administered to all residents in 9 surgical disciplines in Canada. Significance of association was determined using the Pearson χ2 test. The Canadian Post-MD Education Registry (CAPER) website was used to calculate the response rate. We received 523 responses (27.6% response rate). Of these respondents, 140 (26.8%) were either "somewhat" or "seriously" considering leaving their program. Residents wanting to pursue additional fellowship training and those aspiring to an academic career were significantly less likely to be considering changing specialties ( p = 0.003 and p = 0.005, respectively). Poor work-life balance and fear of unemployment/underemployment were the top reasons why residents would change specialty (55.5% and 40.8%, respectively), although the reasons cited were not significantly different between those considering changing and those who were not ( p = 0.64). Residents who were considering changing programs were significantly less likely to enjoy their work and more likely to cite having already invested too much time to change as a reason for continuing ( p work-life balance and limited employment prospects. Efforts to educate prospective residents about the reality of the surgical lifestyle and to optimize employment prospects may improve completion rates.

  18. Incidence of Postoperative Hematomas Requiring Surgical Treatment in Neurosurgery: A Retrospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillemäe, Kadri; Järviö, Johanna Annika; Silvasti-Lundell, Marja Kaarina; Antinheimo, Jussi Juha-Pekka; Hernesniemi, Juha Antero; Niemi, Tomi Tapio

    2017-12-01

    We aimed to characterize the occurrence of postoperative hematoma (POH) after neurosurgery overall and according to procedure type and describe the prevalence of possible confounders. Patient data between 2010 and 2012 at the Department of Neurosurgery in Helsinki University Hospital were retrospectively analyzed. A data search was performed according to the type of surgery including craniotomies; shunt procedures, spine surgery, and spinal cord stimulator implantation. We analyzed basic preoperative characteristics, as well as data about the initial intervention, perioperative period, revision operation and neurologic recovery (after craniotomy only). The overall incidence of POH requiring reoperation was 0.6% (n = 56/8783) to 0.6% (n = 26/4726) after craniotomy, 0% (n = 0/928) after shunting procedure, 1.1% (n = 30/2870) after spine surgery, and 0% (n = 0/259) after implantation of a spinal cord stimulator. Craniotomy types with higher POH incidence were decompressive craniectomy (7.9%, n = 7/89), cranioplasty (3.6%, n = 4/112), bypass surgery (1.7%, n = 1/60), and epidural hematoma evacuation (1.6%, n = 1/64). After spinal surgery, POH was observed in 1.1% of cervical and 2.1% of thoracolumbar operations, whereas 46.7% were multilevel procedures. 64.3% of patients with POH and 84.6% of patients undergoing craniotomy had postoperative hypertension (systolic blood pressure >160 mm Hg or lower if indicated). Poor outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale score 1-3), whereas death at 6 months after craniotomy was detected in 40.9% and 21.7%. respectively, of patients with POH who underwent craniotomy. POH after neurosurgery was rare in this series but was associated with poor outcome. Identification of risk factors of bleeding, and avoiding them, if possible, might decrease the incidence of POH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Professional burnout syndrome in doctors of surgical specialties in Ukraine: causes, consequences, labor optimization ways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurupii, Dmytro A; Kholod, Dmytro A; Sonnik, Evgen G

    The professional burnout syndrome (PBS) affects quality of medical care provision for people, which is acquires the special actuality in terms of reforming the health care system. To study ways to improve the efficiency of doctors of surgical specialties based on analyzes of PBS and its consequences. A survey of psychological tests and 62 surgical doctors was carried out. It was found out that the PBS reaches a peak after 11 to 15 years of working experience. Anesthesiologists have high levels of PBS, emotional exhaustion, cynicism, low desire for career growth, frequent misunderstanding with the administration, they prefer 8-hour working day, and relieve stress by sleeping and consuming alcohol. Obstetrician-gynecologists show moderate level of PBS and emotional exhaustion, high degree of cynicism, strong desire for career growth, frequent misunderstandings with patients and their relatives, prefer 8-hour working day, relieve stress by smoking and socializing with family and friends. Traumatic surgeons have moderate level of PBS, emotional exhaustion, high degree of cynicism, strong desire for career growth, frequent misunderstandings with their colleagues of related specialties, prefer the 24-hour working day, and reli eve their stress with alcohol and sports. Surgeons have moderate level of PBS, emotional exhaustion, low degree of cynicism, moderate desire for career growth, frequent misunderstandings with their colleagues of related specialties, prefer the 8-hour working day, and relieve stress by smoking and sleeping. PBS is most expressed in doctors having working experience of 11 to 15 years and in anesthesiologists. They get professional deformations. These features should be considered in course of organization of working process of medical teams.

  20. Neurosurgery. Fourth edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, L.; Thomas, D.G.T.; Clark, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The Fourth Edition of this volume in the Operative Surgery Series has been considerably revised to accommodate the many changes which have changed the practice of neurosurgery in the past eight years. There have been advances in technology, such as the wider application of CT scanning, in surgical technique, and in the design of new implantable materials. All these developments have substantially affected both the practice of neurosurgery and the prognosis for the patient and are fully reflected in the new edition

  1. Adherence of randomized trials within children's surgical specialties published during 2000 to 2009 to standard reporting guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Martin L; Kao, Lillian S; Tsao, Kuojen; Huang, Eunice Y; Tsai, Anthony; Tanaka, Stacy; Younas, Shiraz; Lu, Zengqi; Lally, Kevin P

    2013-09-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are uncommon in pediatric surgical specialties and the quality of reporting is unknown. Our primary purpose was to analyze published surgical RCTs involving children to measure adherence to the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) guidelines. Published RCTs from January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2009 were reviewed. The trials were evaluated for the presence of 7 CONSORT guidelines and also graded according to the Jadad scale. Two hundred and twenty-eight trials were included. Five trials met all 7 CONSORT criteria (2%) and 53 had a Jadad score of ≥3 (23%). Slightly more than 50% of all trials specified primary outcomes and guidelines for allocation concealment, randomization description, and attrition details was even lower. There were significant differences between surgical specialties with regard to CONSORT adherence to the majority of the guidelines. Pediatric general surgery had the largest number of published RCTs. Pediatric orthopaedic surgery had the highest proportion of trials with a Jadad score ≥3 (40%). Adherence to CONSORT guidelines is low across the spectrum of children's surgical specialties, although significant differences do exist. Future RCTs in children's surgical specialties should specifically focus on areas of low adherence to reporting guidelines. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of operative times of multiple surgical specialties in a public university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Altair da Silva

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the indicators duration of anesthesia, operative time and time patients stay in the operating rooms of different surgical specialties at a public university hospital. It was done by a descriptive cross-sectional study based on the operating room database. The following stages were measured: duration of anesthesia, procedure time and patient length of stay in the room of the various specialties. We included surgeries carried out in sequence in the same room, between 7:00 a.m. and 5 p.m., either elective or emergency. We calculated the 80th percentile of the stages, where 80% of procedures were below this value. The study measured 8,337 operations of 12 surgical specialties performed within one year. The overall mean duration of anesthesia of all specialties was 178.12±110.46 minutes, and the 80th percentile was 252 minutes. The mean operative time was 130.45±97.23 minutes, and the 80th percentile was 195 minutes. The mean total time of the patient in the operating room was 197.30±113.71 minutes, and the 80th percentile was 285 minutes. Thus, the variation of the overall mean compared to the 80th percentile was 41% for anesthesia, 49% for surgeries and 44% for operating room time. In average, anesthesia took up 88% of the operating room period, and surgery, 61%. This study identified patterns in the duration of surgery stages. The mean values of the specialties can assist with operating room planning and reduce delays. Avaliar os indicadores de tempo da anestesia, da operação e da permanência do paciente em sala de diversas especialidades do centro cirúrgico de um hospital universitário. Foi realizado em estudo descritivo transversal a partir da base de dados do centro cirúrgico e mensuradas as seguintes etapas: duração de anestesia, tempo do procedimento e tempo de permanência do paciente em sala das diversas especialidades. Foram incluídas as operações realizadas em sequência na mesma sala, das 7h às 17h, eletivas ou de urg

  3. A survey to determine the potential impact of foundation year career aims on surgical specialty training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rikesh Kumar; Sayers, Adele Elizabeth; Akbar, Muhammad Jawaid; Hunter, Iain Andrew

    2014-03-01

    The competition for Core Surgical Training (CST) positions and subsequent Surgical Specialty Training (ST3) posts throughout the UK is fierce. Our aim was to conduct a pilot study to assess whether current foundation year doctors were considering pursuing a career in surgery and the reasons guiding their decisions. A ten-item questionnaire was voluntarily completed by foundation doctors at a large acute teaching trust. Factors evaluated included: experience working within a surgical rotation; previous consideration of a career in surgery; whether they found a career in surgery appealing; reasons guiding their decision and would they be applying to CST. All 67 foundation doctors approached agreed to participate: of which 56 (83.6%) had experience working within a surgical rotation. Males were significantly more likely to find a career in surgery appealing (p career, only 11 (16.4%) would be applying to CST. Reasons for finding a career in surgery appealing included: job satisfaction (84.2%), diversity of work (79.0%) and working environment/colleagues (47.4%). Of those that did not consider a career in surgery to be appealing, reasons included: working hours (75.0%), work/life balance (62.5%), working environment/colleagues (50%). Although only a small proportion of current foundation doctors were surveyed in our study, only 16.4% were considering applying for CST. These figures are lower than previously suggested and would indicate that there will be fewer applicants for CST in future years, which may potentially reduce the current bottleneck of applicants at ST3.

  4. Stereotactic neurosurgery for tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, Johannes D.; Schuurman, Richard; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Esselink, Rianne A. J.; Bosch, D. Andries

    2002-01-01

    The role of the motor thalamus as surgical target in stereotactic neurosurgery for different kinds of tremor is discussed. For tremor in Parkinson's disease. the subthalamic nucleus becomes more and more often the surgical target, because this target also gives relief of other and more

  5. H-index and academic rank in general surgery and surgical specialties in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashfaq, Awais; Kalagara, Roshini; Wasif, Nabil

    2018-09-01

    H-index serves as an alternative to measure academic achievement. Our objective is to study the h-index as a measure of academic attainment in general surgery and surgical specialties. A database of all surgical programs in the United States was created. Publish or Perish software was used to determine surgeons h-index. A total of 134 hospitals and 3712 surgeons (79% male) were included. Overall, mean h-index was 14.9 ± 14.8. H-index increased linearly with academic rank: 6.8 ± 6.4 for assistant professors (n = 1557, 41.9%), 12.9 ± 9.3 for associate professors (n = 891, 24%), and 27.9 ± 17.4 for professors (n = 1170, 31.5%); P h-indices (18.7 ± 16.7 and 18.4 ± 17.6, respectively). Surgeons with additional postgraduate degrees, university affiliations and male had higher mean h-indices; P h-index and the number of publications (R2 = 0.817) and citations (R2 = 0.768). The h-index of academic surgeons correlates with academic rank and serves a potential tool to measure academic productivity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical management issues vary by specialty in the Victorian Audit of Surgical Mortality: a retrospective observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Vinluan, Jessele; Retegan, Claudia; Chen, Andrew; Beiles, Charles Barry

    2014-01-01

    Objective Clinical management issues are contributory factors to mortality. The aim of this study was to use data from the Victorian Audit of Surgical Mortality (VASM), an educational peer-review process for surgeons, to discover differences in the incidence of these issues between surgical specialties in order to focus attention to areas of care that might be improved. Design This study used retrospectively analysed observational data from VASM. Clinical management issues between eight speci...

  7. [Usefulness of an online education platform for the medical and surgical emergencies specialty in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loria-Castellanos, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Determine the usefulness of a Moodle-type education platform for knowledge development with residents in the medical and surgical emergencies (MSE) specialty. This quasi-experimental study compared the departmental evaluations of MSE residents in two Mexican hospital units after they did their academic work using different educational strategies. The control group used a traditional format (classroom-style teaching with guided discussion), while the comparison group had access to a variety of resources (forums, chat, wikis, downloaded files) on a Moodle-type platform. Nonparametric statistics were used. The study was conducted during the 2010 - 2011 and 2011 - 2012 academic years. Three versions of the course were made available online, geared to the academic level of the residents (first, second, or third year). There were statistically significant differences in the mid-year evaluations, and improvements were even greater in the evaluations at the end of the academic year, especially for the third-year residents. In both academic years, the mid-year evaluations reported that only one resident in the control group performed within the average range, while the majority were in the lower range. The resources most used with the platform Moodle were downloaded files (77%) and the forum (63%). Still, 46.4% of the residents said that they encountered some type of limitation when they used the platform, the main one being lack of time (76.9%). The Moodle-type education platform appears to be useful and to offer greater opportunities for knowledge development compared with the traditional strategies. It is recommended that educational strategies based on Moodle-type platforms be implemented for MSE and other medical specialties.

  8. Use of Google Glass to Enhance Surgical Education of Neurosurgery Residents: "Proof-of-Concept" Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhla, Jonathan; Kobets, Andrew; De la Garza Ramos, Rafeal; Haranhalli, Neil; Gelfand, Yaroslav; Ammar, Adam; Echt, Murray; Scoco, Aleka; Kinon, Merritt; Yassari, Reza

    2017-02-01

    The relatively decreased time spent in the operating room and overall reduction in cases performed by neurosurgical trainees as a result of duty-hour restrictions demands that the pedagogical content within each surgical encounter be maximized and crafted toward the specific talents and shortcomings of the individual. It is imperative to future generations that the quality of training adapts to the changing administrative infrastructures and compensates for anything that may compromise the technical abilities of trainees. Neurosurgeons in teaching hospitals continue to experiment with various emerging technologies-such as simulators and virtual presence-to supplement and improve surgical training. The authors participated in the Google Glass Explorer Program in order to assess the applicability of Google Glass as a tool to enhance the operative education of neurosurgical residents. Google Glass is a type of wearable technology in the form of eyeglasses that employs a high-definition camera and allows the user to interact using voice commands. Google Glass was able to effectively capture video segments of various lengths for residents to review in a variety of clinical settings within a large, tertiary care university hospital, as well as during a surgical mission to a developing country. The resolution and quality of the video were adequate to review and use as a teaching tool. While Google Glass harbors the potential to dramatically improve both neurosurgical education and practice in a variety of ways, certain technical drawbacks of the current model limit its effectiveness as a teaching tool. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Compassion Fatigue is Similar in Emergency Medicine Residents Compared to other Medical and Surgical Specialties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fernanda Bellolio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Compassion fatigue (CF is the emotional and physical burden felt by those helping others in distress, leading to a reduced capacity and interest in being empathetic towards future suffering. Emergency care providers are at an increased risk of CF secondary to their first responder roles and exposure to traumatic events. We aimed to investigate the current state of compassion fatigue among emergency medicine (EM resident physicians, including an assessment of contributing factors. Methods: We distributed a validated electronic questionnaire consisting of the Professional Quality of Life Scale with subscales for the three components of CF (compassion satisfaction, burnout and secondary traumatic stress, with each category scored independently. We collected data pertaining to day- versus night-shift distribution, hourly workload and child dependents. We included residents in EM, neurology, orthopedics, family medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics, and general surgery. Results: We surveyed 255 residents, with a response rate of 75%. Of the 188 resident respondents, 18% worked a majority of their clinical shifts overnight, and 32% had child dependents. Burnout scores for residents who worked greater than 80 hours per week, or primarily worked overnight shifts, were higher than residents who worked less than 80 hours (mean score 25.0 vs 21.5; p=0.013, or did not work overnight (mean score 23.5 vs 21.3; p=0.022. EM residents had similar scores in all three components of CF when compared to other specialties. Secondary traumatic stress scores for residents who worked greater than 80 hours were higher than residents who worked less than 80 hours (mean score 22.2 vs 19.5; p=0.048, and those with child dependents had higher secondary traumatic stress than those without children (mean score 21.0 vs 19.1; p=0.012. Conclusion: CF scores in EM residents are similar to residents in other surgical and medical specialties. Residents working primarily

  10. Measuring surgical outcomes in neurosurgery: implementation, analysis, and auditing a prospective series of more than 5000 procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodosopoulos, Philip V; Ringer, Andrew J; McPherson, Christopher M; Warnick, Ronald E; Kuntz, Charles; Zuccarello, Mario; Tew, John M

    2012-11-01

    Health care reform debate includes discussions regarding outcomes of surgical interventions. Yet quality of medical care, when judged as a health outcome, is difficult to define because of impediments affecting accuracy in data collection, analysis, and reporting. In this prospective study, the authors report the outcomes for neurosurgical treatment based on point-of-care interactions recorded in the electronic medical record (EMR). The authors' neurosurgery practice collected outcome data for 19 physicians and ancillary personnel using the EMR. Data were analyzed for 5361 consecutive surgical cases, either elective or emergency procedures, performed during 2009 at multiple hospitals, offices, and an ambulatory spine surgery center. Main outcomes included complications, length of stay (LOS), and discharge disposition for all patients and for certain frequently performed procedures. Physicians, nurses, and other medical staff used validated scales to record the hospital LOS, complications, disposition at discharge, and return to work. Of the 5361 surgical procedures performed, two-thirds were spinal procedures and one-third were cranial procedures. Organization-wide compliance with reporting rates of major complications improved throughout the year, from 80.7% in the first quarter to 90.3% in the fourth quarter. Auditing showed that rates of unreported complications decreased from 11% in the first quarter to 4% in the fourth quarter. Complication data were available for 4593 procedures (85.7%); of these, no complications were reported in 4367 (95.1%). Discharge dispositions reported were home in 86.2%, rehabilitation center in 8.9%, and nursing home in 2.5%. Major complications included culture-proven infection in 0.61%, CSF leak in 0.89%, reoperation within the same hospitalization in 0.38%, and new neurological deficits in 0.77%. For the commonly performed procedures, the median hospital LOS was 3 days for craniotomy for aneurysm or intraaxial tumor and less than

  11. "Is general surgery still relevant to the subspecialised trainee?" A 10 year comparison of general versus specialty surgical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, C A; Khan, Z; Andrews, E J; Fulton, G J; Redmond, H P; Corrigan, M A

    2015-02-01

    The splintering of general surgery into subspecialties in the past decade has brought into question the relevance of a continued emphasis on traditional general surgical training. With the majority of trainees now expressing a preference to subspecialise early, this study sought to identify if the requirement for proficiency in managing general surgical conditions has reduced over the past decade through comparison of general and specialty surgical admissions at a tertiary referral center. A cross-sectional review of all surgical admissions at Cork University Hospital was performed at three individual time points: 2002, 2007 & 2012. Basic demographic details of both elective & emergency admissions were tabulated & analysed. Categorisation of admissions into specialty relevant or general surgery was made using International guidelines. 11,288 surgical admissions were recorded (2002:2773, 2007:3498 & 2012:5017), showing an increase of 81 % over the 10-year period. While growth in overall service provision was seen, the practice of general versus specialty relevant emergency surgery showed no statistically significant change in practice from 2002 to 2012 (p = 0.87). General surgery was mostly practiced in the emergency setting (84 % of all emergency admissions in 2012) with only 28 % elective admissions for general surgery. A reduction in length of stay was seen in both elective (3.62-2.58 bed days, p = 0.342) & emergency admissions (7.36-5.65, p = 0.026). General surgical emergency work continues to constitute a major part of the specialists practice. These results emphasize the importance of general surgical training even for those trainees committed to sub-specialisation.

  12. Advanced technology in neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluchino, F.; Broggi, G.

    1987-01-01

    Technological improvements in neurosurgery are discussed. The use of surgical lasers, ultrasound aspirators, bipolar coagulator and operative microscopes for surgery of deep-seated neoplasms and vascular malformations is discussed. Intraoperative monitoring, chronotherapy, chronic neurostimulation and stereotactic interstitial irradiation are covered and indications for interventional neuroradiology are reviewed

  13. Functional neurosurgery (part 2)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This month's CME includes the final two articles that review func- tional neurosurgical topics, i.e. surgery for movement disorders,[1] where deep brain stimulation plays a major role, and surgical man- agement of pain.[2] From these articles, which give an overview of the respective topics, it is clear that neurosurgery forms a ...

  14. Neurosurgery in Egypt: past, present, and future-from pyramids to radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gindi, Sayed

    2002-09-01

    THE CONTEMPORARY DEVELOPMENT of neurosurgery in Egypt is described, with reference to the ancient past and recent American and European influences. This article traces the steps taken by several leading Egyptian pioneers. Egypt, one of the key countries in the Middle East, has led the development of the specialty in the region and has maintained close ties with the international body of neurological surgeons and surgical societies.

  15. Demographics, Interests, and Quality of Life of Canadian Neurosurgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio-Morin, Christian; Ahmed, Syed Uzair; Bigder, Mark; Dakson, Ayoub; Elliott, Cameron; Guha, Daipayan; Kameda-Smith, Michelle; Lavergne, Pascal; Makarenko, Serge; Taccone, Michael S; Tso, Michael K; Wang, Bill; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Fortin, David

    2018-03-01

    Neurosurgical residents face a unique combination of challenges, including long duty hours, technically challenging cases, and uncertain employment prospects. We sought to assess the demographics, interests, career goals, self-rated happiness, and overall well-being of Canadian neurosurgery residents. A cross-sectional survey was developed and sent through the Canadian Neurosurgery Research Collaborative to every resident enrolled in a Canadian neurosurgery program as of April 1, 2016. We analyzed 76 completed surveys of 146 eligible residents (52% response rate). The median age was 29 years, with 76% of respondents being males. The most popular subspecialties of interest for fellowship were spine, oncology, and open vascular neurosurgery. The most frequent self-reported number of worked hours per week was the 80- to 89-hour range. The majority of respondents reported a high level of happiness as well as stress. Sense of accomplishment and fatigue were reported as average to high and overall quality of life was low for 19%, average for 49%, and high for 32%. Satisfaction with work-life balance was average for 44% of respondents and was the only tested domain in which significant dissatisfaction was identified (18%). Overall, respondents were highly satisfied with their choice of specialty, choice of program, surgical exposure, and work environment; however, intimidation was reported in 36% of respondents and depression by 17%. Despite a challenging residency and high workload, the majority of Canadian neurosurgery residents are happy and satisfied with their choice of specialty and program. However, work-life balance, employability, resident intimidation, and depression were identified as areas of active concern.

  16. History of Neurosurgery in Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwazeh, Rami; Darwazeh, Mazhar; Sun, Xiaochuan

    2017-08-01

    Palestinian neurosurgery started with Dr. Antone Tarazi as the first Palestinian neurosurgeon. Before that, there was no organized neurosurgery specialty, and general surgeons performed neurosurgical procedures. Here we review the history of neurosurgery and neurosurgical applications in Palestine, evaluate some limitations of the current system, and discuss major challenges to improving this system. We collected information from various sources in either English or Arabic. The development of neurosurgery and neurosurgical training in Palestine began in 1960 with the first center established in Jerusalem, which provided much-needed neurosurgical services and training in the fields of neurosurgery and neurology. Palestine has produced a number of its own neurosurgeons and has promoted further progress by establishing the Palestinian Neurosurgical Society in 2014. Today, there are 34 neurosurgeons (including 1 female neurosurgeon) and 17 residents providing expert care in 17 centers across Palestine, along with 1 neurosurgical residency program. Neurosurgery in Palestine has faced many challenges, some of which have been overcome. However, there remain many challenges, which will require much time and effort to surmount. Political stabilization is a significant factor in the progress of neurosurgery in Palestine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Current Applications and Future Perspectives of the Use of 3D Printing in Anatomical Training and Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Vivek; Štrkalj, Goran; Štrkalj, Mirjana; Di Ieva, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a form of rapid prototyping technology, which has led to innovative new applications in biomedicine. It facilitates the production of highly accurate three dimensional objects from substrate materials. The inherent accuracy and other properties of 3D printing have allowed it to have exciting applications in anatomy education and surgery, with the specialty of neurosurgery having benefited particularly well. This article presents the findings of a literature review of the Pubmed and Web of Science databases investigating the applications of 3D printing in anatomy and surgical education, and neurosurgery. A number of applications within these fields were found, with many significantly improving the quality of anatomy and surgical education, and the practice of neurosurgery. They also offered advantages over existing approaches and practices. It is envisaged that the number of useful applications will rise in the coming years, particularly as the costs of this technology decrease and its uptake rises.

  18. Current Applications and Future Perspectives of the Use of 3D Printing in Anatomical Training and Neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Vivek; Štrkalj, Goran; Štrkalj, Mirjana; Di Ieva, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a form of rapid prototyping technology, which has led to innovative new applications in biomedicine. It facilitates the production of highly accurate three dimensional objects from substrate materials. The inherent accuracy and other properties of 3D printing have allowed it to have exciting applications in anatomy education and surgery, with the specialty of neurosurgery having benefited particularly well. This article presents the findings of a literature review of the Pubmed and Web of Science databases investigating the applications of 3D printing in anatomy and surgical education, and neurosurgery. A number of applications within these fields were found, with many significantly improving the quality of anatomy and surgical education, and the practice of neurosurgery. They also offered advantages over existing approaches and practices. It is envisaged that the number of useful applications will rise in the coming years, particularly as the costs of this technology decrease and its uptake rises. PMID:27445707

  19. Improving the communication between teams managing boarded patients on a surgical specialty ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvaneswaralingam, Shobitha; Ross, Daniella

    2016-01-01

    Transferring patients from the ward of their specialty or consultant is described as boarding. 1 Boarding patients is becoming increasingly prevalent due to greater pressure on hospital capacity. This practice compromises patient safety through delayed investigations, prolonged hospital stays, and increased risk of hospital-acquired infections. 1 2 We evaluated how regularly boarded patients were reviewed, and how effectively information regarding their management was communicated from their primary specialty to ward staff. We aimed to improve the frequency of patient reviews by ensuring that each patient was reviewed every weekday and increase communication between primary specialty, and medical and nursing teams by 20% from baseline during the data collection period. The project was based in the Otolaryngology ward in Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, where there was a high prevalence of boarded patients. Baseline data showed a clear deficit in communication between the primary specialty and ward staff with only 31% of patient reviews being communicated to ward doctors. We designed and implemented a communication tool, in the form of a sticker, to be inserted into patients' medical notes for use by the primary specialty. Implementation of the sticker improved communication between teams as stickers were completed in 93% of instances. In 88% of patient reviews, the junior doctor was informed of the management plan, showing a large increase from baseline. Through PDSA cycles, we aimed to increase the sustainability and reliability of the sticker; however, we faced challenges with sustainability of sticker insertion. We aim to engage more stakeholders to raise awareness of the problem, brainstorm solutions together, and review the production and implementation of stickers with senior hospital management to discuss the potential use of this tool within practice. There is potentially a large scope for utilisation of this communication tool on a local level, which we hope

  20. NASA Robotic Neurosurgery Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The detection of tissue interface (e.g., normal tissue, cancer, tumor) has been limited clinically to tactile feedback, temperature monitoring, and the use of a miniature ultrasound probe for tissue differentiation during surgical operations, In neurosurgery, the needle used in the standard stereotactic CT or MRI guided brain biopsy provides no information about the tissue being sampled. The tissue sampled depends entirely upon the accuracy with which the localization provided by the preoperative CT or MRI scan is translated to the intracranial biopsy site. In addition, no information about the tissue being traversed by the needle (e.g., a blood vessel) is provided. Hemorrhage due to the biopsy needle tearing a blood vessel within the brain is the most devastating complication of stereotactic CT/MRI guided brain biopsy. A robotic neurosurgery testbed has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a spin-off of technologies from space, aeronautics and medical programs. The invention entitled "Robotic Neurosurgery Leading to Multimodality Devices for Tissue Identification" is nearing a state ready for commercialization. The devices will: 1) improve diagnostic accuracy and precision of general surgery, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, 2) automate tissue identification, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, to permit remote control of the procedure, and 3) reduce morbidity for stereotactic brain biopsy. The commercial impact from this work is the potential development of a whole new generation of smart surgical tools to increase the safety, accuracy and efficiency of surgical procedures. Other potential markets include smart surgical tools for tumor ablation in neurosurgery, general exploratory surgery, prostate cancer surgery, and breast cancer surgery.

  1. [History of world neurosurgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X

    2017-05-28

    In 5000 BC, South American tribes digged the bones in the living head to seek ways to communicate with the gods, which was primitive trephination and may be the first neurosurgical behavior. In 2600 BC, Imhotep in ancient Egypt took the brain out of the head from the nose, for a better preserve of the mummy, which was a prototype of modern transsphenoidal surgery. And the development of anatomy in ancient Greek laid a solid foundation for neurosurgery. From 500 to 1500 AD, the rise of religion and the occurrence of war, prompted a large number of craniocerebral trauma, which contributed greatly to the early development of neurosurgery as a distinct specialty. In 1861, Brocca astutely localized the language function to the third left frontal convolution in a series of studies, which was considered to be of landmark importance in the understanding of cerebral localization. In 1878, William Macewen performed a successful surgery to remove an en plaque meningioma with intrathecal anesthesia, representing the first modern neurosurgical operation. However, the contributions of the Americans, starting with Harvey Cushing, exerted a definitive force. Portuguese Moritz performed the first cerebral angiogram on a living schizophrenia patient in 1926. And he established the Moniz-Lima prefrontal leucotomy for the treatment of schizophrenia, for which he won the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 1949. In 1968, the Swiss scholar Yassagir firstly carried out neurosurgical surgeries under the microscope. China's neurosurgery was founded by Zhao Yicheng in 1952 in Tianjin, and the gap in neurosurgery between China and the world gradually narrowed after 60 years of development.

  2. Development and Evaluation of a Novel Pan-Specialty Virtual Reality Surgical Simulator for Smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehme, Jean; Bahsoun, Ali N; Chow, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Touch Surgery is a novel simulator that allows cognitive task simulation and rehearsal of surgical procedures. Touch Surgery is designed for Apple and Android smartphones and tablets. This allows a global community of surgical professionals to review the steps of a procedure and test their competence. Content on Touch Surgery is developed with expert surgeons in the field from world leading institutions. Here we describe the development of Touch Surgery, its adoption by the global training community.

  3. [African neurosurgery. 1: Historical outline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Khamlichi, A

    1996-01-01

    African countries, together with the development of the health system that the colonial forces initiated in general as soon as they had come to these countries. This neurosurgery practised in the departments of general surgery either by neurosurgeons or general surgeons took part in the birth and development of neurosurgery as an independent specialty, thanks to the combined efforts of some European and African pioneers. Modern neurosurgery was introduced and started to develop in African countries from 1960, and the teaching of this specialty in many African universities began between 1960 and 1970.

  4. Spine Instability Neoplastic Score: agreement across different medical and surgical specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Estanislao; Kovacs, Francisco M; Royuela, Ana; Asenjo, Beatriz; Pérez-Ramírez, Úrsula; Zamora, Javier

    2016-05-01

    Spinal instability is an acknowledged complication of spinal metastases; in spite of recent suggested criteria, it is not clearly defined in the literature. This study aimed to assess intra and interobserver agreement when using the Spine Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) by all physicians involved in its management. Independent multicenter reliability study for the recently created SINS, undertaken with a panel of medical oncologists, neurosurgeons, radiologists, orthopedic surgeons, and radiation oncologists, was carried out. Ninety patients with biopsy-proven spinal metastases and magnetic resonance imaging, reviewed at the multidisciplinary tumor board of our institution, were included. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used for SINS score agreement. Fleiss kappa statistic was used to assess agreement on the location of the most affected vertebral level; agreement on the SINS category ("stable," "potentially stable," or "unstable"); and overall agreement with the classification established by tumor board. Clinical data and imaging were provided to 83 specialists in 44 hospitals across 14 Spanish regions. No assessment criteria were pre-established. Each clinician assessed the SINS score twice, with a minimum 6-week interval. Clinicians were blinded to assessments made by other specialists and to their own previous assessment. Subgroup analyses were performed by clinicians' specialty, experience (≤7, 8-13, ≥14 years), and hospital category (four levels according to size and complexity). This study was supported by Kovacs Foundation. Intra and interobserver agreement on the location of the most affected levels was "almost perfect" (κ>0.94). Intra-observer agreement on the SINS score was "excellent" (ICC=0.77), whereas interobserver agreement was "moderate" (ICC=0.55). Intra-observer agreement in SINS category was "substantial" (k=0.61), whereas interobserver agreement was "moderate" (k=0.42). Overall agreement with the tumor board classification

  5. Promoting teamwork and surgical optimization: combining TeamSTEPPS with a specialty team protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbs, Sheila Marie; Moss, Jacqueline

    2014-11-01

    This quality improvement project was a 300-day descriptive preintervention and postintervention comparison consisting of a convenience sample of 18 gynecology surgical team members. We administered the Team Strategies & Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS®) Teamwork Perception Questionnaire to measure the perception of teamwork. In addition, we collected data regarding rates of compliance (ie, huddle, time out) and measurable surgical procedure times. Results showed a statistically significant increase in the number of team members present for each procedure, 2.34 μ before compared with 2.61 μ after (P = .038), and in the final time-out (FTO) compliance as a result of a clarification of the definition of FTO, 1.05 μ before compared with 1.18 μ after (P = .004). Additionally, there was improvement in staff members' perception of teamwork. The implementation of team training, protocols, and algorithms can enhance surgical optimization, communication, and work relationships. Copyright © 2014 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Establishing a clinical information system for surgical ophthalmology and orthopedics specialties with reference to GSG '93].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, B; Basad, E

    1996-04-01

    As a result of new health care guidelines (Gesundheitsstrukturgesetz) and the federal hospital and nursing ordinance, there has been a large increase in the documentation required for diagnoses (ICD-9) and service ("Operationenschlüssel nach section 301 SGB V" = ICPM), all of which is done in the form of a numeric code. The method of coding diagnoses is supposed to make possible data entry and statistical evaluation of plausibility controls, as well as conspicuous and random testing of economic feasibility. Our data processing system is designed to assist in the planning and organization of clinical activities, while at the same time making documentation in accordance with health care guidelines easier and providing scientific documentation and evaluation. The application MedAccess was developed by clinicians on the basis of a relational client-server database. The application has been in use since June 1992 and has been further developed during operation according to the requirements and wishes of clinic and administrative staff. In cooperation with the Institute for Medical Information Technology, a computer interface with the patient check-in system was created, making possible the importing of patient data. The application is continuously updated according to the current needs of the clinic and administration. The primary functions of MedAccess include managing patient data, planning of in-patient admissions, surgical planning, organization, documentation (surgery book, reports with follow-up treatment records), administration of the tissue bank, clinic communications, clinic work processing, and management of the staff duty roster. Clinical data are entered into a computer and processed on site, and the user is assisted by practical applications which do not require special knowledge of data processing or encoding systems. The data is entered only once, but can be further used for other purposes, such as evaluations or selective transfer, for example, to

  7. The contributions of W.D. Stevenson to the development of neurosurgery in Atlantic Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhida, K; Mendez, I

    1999-08-01

    The establishment of a neurosurgical department in Halifax in January 1948 marked the beginnings of the first dedicated neurosurgical service in Atlantic Canada. The development of neurosurgery in Halifax occurred in a receptive place and time. The Victoria General Hospital, the region's largest tertiary care centre, and the Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine were in a period of growth associated with medical specialization and departmentalization, changes inspired in part by the Flexner Report of 1910. Atlantic Canadians during this period were increasingly looking to specialists for their medical care. Although this social environment encouraged the establishment of surgical specialty services, the development of neurosurgery in Halifax, as in other parts of Canada, was closely associated with the efforts of individual neurosurgeons, such as William D. Stevenson. After training with Kenneth G. McKenzie in Toronto, Stevenson was recruited to Halifax and established the first neurosurgical department in Atlantic Canada. From the outset and over his twenty-six years as Department Head at the Victoria General Hospital and Dalhousie University, Stevenson worked to maintain the department's commitment to clinical practice, medical education, and research. Although Stevenson single-handedly ran the service for several years after its inception, by the time of his retirement in 1974 the neurosurgery department had grown to include five attending staff surgeons who performed over two thousand procedures each year. This paper highlights the importance of Stevenson's contributions to the development of neurosurgery in Atlantic Canada within the context of the social and medical environment of the region.

  8. Risk factors for surgical site infection following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery: a review of 9296 procedures from a national database and comparison with a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Brandon A; Arynchyna, Anastasia A; Johnston, James M; Rozzelle, Curtis J; Blount, Jeffrey P; Oakes, W Jerry; Rocque, Brandon G

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical site infection (SSI) following CSF shunt operations has been well studied, yet risk factors for nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery are less well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine SSI rates and risk factors following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery using a nationwide patient cohort and an institutional data set specifically for better understanding SSI. METHODS The authors reviewed the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric (ACS NSQIP-P) database for the years 2012-2014, including all neurosurgical procedures performed on pediatric patients except CSF shunts and hematoma evacuations. SSI included deep (intracranial abscesses, meningitis, osteomyelitis, and ventriculitis) and superficial wound infections. The authors performed univariate analyses of SSI association with procedure, demographic, comorbidity, operative, and hospital variables, with subsequent multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine independent risk factors for SSI within 30 days of the index procedure. A similar analysis was performed using a detailed institutional infection database from Children's of Alabama (COA). RESULTS A total of 9296 nonshunt procedures were identified in NSQIP-P with an overall 30-day SSI rate of 2.7%. The 30-day SSI rate in the COA institutional database was similar (3.3% of 1103 procedures, p = 0.325). Postoperative time to SSI in NSQIP-P and COA was 14.6 ± 6.8 days and 14.8 ± 7.3 days, respectively (mean ± SD). Myelomeningocele (4.3% in NSQIP-P, 6.3% in COA), spine (3.5%, 4.9%), and epilepsy (3.4%, 3.1%) procedure categories had the highest SSI rates by procedure category in both NSQIP-P and COA. Independent SSI risk factors in NSQIP-P included postoperative pneumonia (OR 4.761, 95% CI 1.269-17.857, p = 0.021), immune disease/immunosuppressant use (OR 3.671, 95% CI 1.371-9.827, p = 0.010), cerebral palsy (OR 2.835, 95% CI 1.463-5.494, p = 0.002), emergency operation (OR 1

  9. Risk factors for surgical site infection following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery: a review of 9296 procedures from a national database and comparison with a single-center experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Brandon A.; Arynchyna, Anastasia A.; Johnston, James M.; Rozzelle, Curtis J.; Blount, Jeffrey P.; Oakes, W. Jerry; Rocque, Brandon G.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Surgical site infection (SSI) following CSF shunt operations has been well studied, yet risk factors for nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery are less well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine SSI rates and risk factors following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery using a nationwide patient cohort and an institutional dataset specifically for better understanding SSI. Methods The authors reviewed the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pediatric (ACS NSQIP-P) database for the years 2012–2014, including all neurosurgical procedures performed on pediatric patients except CSF shunts and hematoma evacuations. SSI included deep (intracranial abscesses, meningitis, osteomyelitis, and ventriculitis) and superficial wound infections. The authors performed univariate analyses of SSI association with procedure, demographic, comorbidity, operative, and hospital variables, with subsequent multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine independent risk factors for SSI within 30 days of the index procedure. A similar analysis was performed using a detailed institutional infection database from Children’s Hospital of Alabama (COA). Results A total of 9296 nonshunt procedures were identified in NSQIP-P with an overall 30-day SSI rate of 2.7%. The 30-day SSI rate in the COA institutional database was similar (3.3% of 1103 procedures, p = 0.325). Postoperative time to SSI in NSQIP-P and COA was 14.6 ± 6.8 days and 14.8 ± 7.3 days, respectively (mean ± SD). Myelomeningocele (4.3% in NSQIP-P, 6.3% in COA), spine (3.5%, 4.9%), and epilepsy (3.4%, 3.1%) procedure categoriess had the highest SSI rates by procedure category in both NSQIP-P and COA. Independent SSI risk factors in NSQIP-P included postoperative pneumonia (OR 4.761, 95% CI 1.269–17.857, p = 0.021), immune disease/immunosuppressant use (OR 3.671, 95% CI 1.371–9.827, p = 0.010), cerebral palsy (OR 2.835, 95% CI 1.463–5.494, p = 0.002), emergency

  10. A novel virtual reality simulation for hemostasis in a brain surgical cavity: perceived utility for visuomotor skills in current and aspiring neurosurgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasco, Jaime; Patel, Achal; Luciano, Cristian; Holbrook, Thomas; Ortega-Barnett, Juan; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Rizzi, Silvio; Kania, Patrick; Banerjee, Pat; Roitberg, Ben Z

    2013-12-01

    To understand the perceived utility of a novel simulator to improve operative skill, eye-hand coordination, and depth perception. We used the ImmersiveTouch simulation platform (ImmersiveTouch, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA) in two U.S. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited neurosurgical training programs: the University of Chicago and the University of Texas Medical Branch. A total of 54 trainees participated in the study, which consisted of 14 residents (group A), 20 senior medical students who were neurosurgery candidates (group B), and 20 junior medical students (group C). The participants performed a simulation task that established bipolar hemostasis in a virtual brain cavity and provided qualitative feedback regarding perceived benefits in eye-hand coordination, depth perception, and potential to assist in improving operating skills. The perceived ability of the simulator to positively influence skills judged by the three groups: group A, residents; group B, senior medical students; and group C, junior medical students was, respectively, 86%, 100%, and 100% for eye-hand coordination; 86%, 100%, and 95% for depth perception; and 79%, 100%, and 100% for surgical skills in the operating room. From all groups, 96.2% found the simulation somewhat or very useful to improve eye-hand coordination, and 94% considered it beneficial to improve depth perception and operating room skills. This simulation module may be suitable for resident training, as well as for the development of career interest and skill acquisition; however, validation for this type of simulation needs to be further developed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk factors for unplanned readmission within 30 days after pediatric neurosurgery: a nationwide analysis of 9799 procedures from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Brandon A.; Johnston, James M.; Rocque, Brandon G.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Readmission rate is increasingly used as a quality outcome measure after surgery. The purpose of this study was to establish, using a national database, the baseline readmission rates and risk factors for readmission after pediatric neurosurgical procedures. Methods The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program–Pediatric database was queried for pediatric patients treated by a neurosurgeon from 2012 to 2013. Procedures were categorized by current procedural terminology code. Patient demographics, comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, operative variables, and postoperative complications were analyzed via univariate and multivariate techniques to find associations with unplanned readmission within 30 days of the primary procedure. Results A total of 9799 cases met the inclusion criteria, 1098 (11.2%) of which had an unplanned readmission within 30 days. Readmission occurred 14.0 ± 7.7 days postoperatively (mean ± standard deviation). The 4 procedures with the highest unplanned readmission rates were CSF shunt revision (17.3%), repair of myelomeningocele > 5 cm in diameter (15.4%), CSF shunt creation (14.1%), and craniectomy for infratentorial tumor excision (13.9%). Spine (6.5%), craniotomy for craniosynostosis (2.1%), and skin lesion (1.0%) procedures had the lowest unplanned readmission rates. On multivariate regression analysis, the odds of readmission were greatest in patients experiencing postoperative surgical site infection (SSI; deep, organ/space, superficial SSI and wound disruption: OR > 12 and p readmission risk. Independent patient risk factors for unplanned readmission included Native American race (OR 2.363, p = 0.019), steroid use > 10 days (OR 1.411, p = 0.010), oxygen supplementation (OR 1.645, p = 0.010), nutritional support (OR 1.403, p = 0.009), seizure disorder (OR 1.250, p = 0.021), and longer operative time (per hour increase, OR 1.059, p = 0.014). Conclusions This study may aid in

  12. Risk factors for unplanned readmission within 30 days after pediatric neurosurgery: a nationwide analysis of 9799 procedures from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Brandon A; Johnston, James M; Rocque, Brandon G

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Hospital readmission rate is increasingly used as a quality outcome measure after surgery. The purpose of this study was to establish, using a national database, the baseline readmission rates and risk factors for patient readmission after pediatric neurosurgical procedures. METHODS The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric database was queried for pediatric patients treated by a neurosurgeon between 2012 and 2013. Procedures were categorized by current procedural terminology (CPT) code. Patient demographics, comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, operative variables, and postoperative complications were analyzed via univariate and multivariate techniques to find associations with unplanned readmissions within 30 days of the primary procedure. RESULTS A total of 9799 cases met the inclusion criteria, 1098 (11.2%) of which had an unplanned readmission within 30 days. Readmission occurred 14.0 ± 7.7 days postoperatively (mean ± standard deviation). The 4 procedures with the highest unplanned readmission rates were CSF shunt revision (17.3%; CPT codes 62225 and 62230), repair of myelomeningocele > 5 cm in diameter (15.4%), CSF shunt creation (14.1%), and craniectomy for infratentorial tumor excision (13.9%). The lowest unplanned readmission rates were for spine (6.5%), craniotomy for craniosynostosis (2.1%), and skin lesion (1.0%) procedures. On multivariate regression analysis, the odds of readmission were greatest in patients experiencing postoperative surgical site infection (SSI; deep, organ/space, superficial SSI, and wound disruption: OR > 12 and p 10 days (OR 1.411, p = 0.010), oxygen supplementation (OR 1.645, p = 0.010), nutritional support (OR 1.403, p = 0.009), seizure disorder (OR 1.250, p = 0.021), and longer operative time (per hour increase, OR 1.059, p = 0.029). CONCLUSIONS This study may aid in identifying patients at risk for unplanned readmission following pediatric neurosurgery

  13. Laser applications in neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, Leonard J.

    1985-09-01

    The "false start" of the laser in neurosurgery should not be misconstrued as a denial of the inherent advantages of precision and gentleness in dealing with neural tissue. Rather, early investigators were frustrated by unrealistic expectations, cumbersome equipment, and a general ignorance of microtechnique. By the early 70s, microneurosurgery was well established, surgical laser equipment for free hand and microlinked application had been developed, and a more realistic view of the limitations of the laser had been established. Consequently, the late 70s really heralded the renaissance of the laser in neurosurgery. Since then, there has been an overwhelming acceptance of the tool in a variety of clinical situations, broadly categorized in five groups. 1)|Perhaps the most generally accepted area is in the removal of extra-axial tumors of the brain and spinal cord. These tumors, benign by histology but treacherous by location, do not present until a significant amount of neurological compensation has already occurred. The application of additional trauma to the neural tissue, whether by further tumor growth or surgical manipulation, frequently results in irreversible damage. Here, the ability of the laser to vaporize tissue, in a fairly hemostatic fashion, without mechanical or thermal damage to sensitive surrounding tissues, is essential. 2)|The ability to incise delicate neural tissue with minimal spread of thermal destruction to adjacent functioning tissue makes the laser the ideal instrument when tumors deep under the surface are encountered in the brain or spinal cord. Thus, the second group of applications is in the transgression of normal neural structures to arrive at deeper pathological tissue. 3)|The third area of benefit for the laser in neurosurgery has been in the performance of neuroablative procedures, calling for deliberate destruction of functioning neural tissue in a controlled fashion. Again, the precision and shape confinement of the destructive

  14. [Virtual reality in neurosurgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronnier, V M; Staubert, A; Bonsanto, M M; Wirtz, C R; Kunze, S

    2000-03-01

    Virtual reality enables users to immerse themselves in a virtual three-dimensional world and to interact in this world. The simulation is different from the kind in computer games, in which the viewer is active but acts in a nonrealistic world, or on the TV screen, where we are passively driven in an active world. In virtual reality elements look realistic, they change their characteristics and have almost real-world unpredictability. Virtual reality is not only implemented in gambling dens and the entertainment industry but also in manufacturing processes (cars, furniture etc.), military applications and medicine. Especially the last two areas are strongly correlated, because telemedicine or telesurgery was originated for military reasons to operate on war victims from a secure distance or to perform surgery on astronauts in an orbiting space station. In medicine and especially neurosurgery virtual-reality methods are used for education, surgical planning and simulation on a virtual patient.

  15. Frameless neuronavigation in modern neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetzger, U; Laborde, G; Gilsbach, J M

    1995-12-01

    A fundamental effort in neurosurgery is to reduce surgical trauma. Microneurosurgical technique combined with precise localization of lesions, can minimize the invasiveness of neurosurgical procedures. This report summarizes the utility of frameless neuronavigator systems and examines their value in reducing operative invasiveness. The basic principle of neuronavigation is the virtual linkage between digitized neuroradiological data and real anatomical structures, allowing an excellent three-dimensional orientation by real-time graphic-anatomic interaction. As frameless graphic interactive neuronavigation is developed further, these devices should become an important component of the modern microneurosurgical armamentarium and reduce surgical morbidity.

  16. The surgical experience of general surgery residents: an analysis of the applicability of the specialty program in General and Digestive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targarona Soler, Eduardo Ma; Jover Navalon, Jose Ma; Gutierrez Saiz, Javier; Turrado Rodríguez, Víctor; Parrilla Paricio, Pascual

    2015-03-01

    Residents in our country have achieved a homogenous surgical training by following a structured residency program. This is due to the existence of specific training programs for each specialty. The current program, approved in 2007, has a detailed list of procedures that a surgeon should have performed in order to complete training. The aim of this study is to analyze the applicability of the program with regard to the number of procedures performed during the residency period. A data collection form was designed that included the list of procedures from the program of the specialty; it was sent in April 2014 to all hospitals with accredited residency programs. In September 2014 the forms were analysed, and a general descriptive study was performed; a subanalysis according to the resident's sex and Autonomous region was also performed. The number of procedures performed according to the number of residents in the different centers was also analyzed. The survey was sent to 117 hospitals with accredited programs, which included 190 resident places. A total of 91 hospitals responded (53%). The training offered adapts in general to the specialty program. The total number of procedures performed in the different sub-areas, in laparoscopic and emergency surgery is correct or above the number recommended by the program, with the exception of esophageal-gastric and hepatobiliary surgery. The sub-analysis according to Autonomous region did not show any significant differences in the total number of procedures, however, there were significant differences in endocrine surgery (P=.001) and breast surgery (P=.042). A total of 55% of residents are female, with no significant differences in distribution in Autonomous regions. However, female surgeons operate more than their male counterparts during the residency period (512±226 vs. 625±244; P<.01). The number of residents in the hospital correlates with the number of procedures performed; the residents with more procedures

  17. [The woman in neurosurgery at the national institute of neurology and neurosurgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Pérez, Sonia Iliana; Cervera-Martínez, Claudia; Sánchez-Correa, Thalía Estefanía; Corona-Vázquezo, Teresa

    Women have always had a hard time in the history of medicine; Dr. Isabel Blackwell was the first woman in history to practice medicine. Dr. Diana Beck became the world´s first female neurosurgeon. The first Latin American female neurosurgeon was Dr. María Cristina García Sancho y Álvarez-Tostado. All of these women had to face a large number of social, cultural, and economic obstacles in their path; however, this situation has changed gradually. Dr. Ana Lilia Siordia Karam was the first neurosurgeon to graduate from INNN. Nineteen years later the second female neurosurgeon at this institute was Dr. María Petra Herrera Guerrero. During their time at this institute they endured a lot of difficulties, especially with most of their coworkers; however, some coworkers treated them with respect and no gender distinction. Nowadays, four of the 25 total neurosurgery residents at INNN are women, and even though some of them have had to endure acts of gender discrimination, the general situation has changed. With work and respect, women have managed to have a larger role in the surgical field. We hope that in the near future a gender discrimination-free environment will be achieved in medicine and its specialties.

  18. P12.01 Epidemiology in spinal tumors treated surgically at the South Central Hospital of High Specialty from PEMEX in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Resendiz, R.; Cordoba Mosqueda, M.; Guerra Mora, J.; Loya Aguilar, I.; Garcia Gonzalez, U.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The spinal tumors are rare neoplasms, they can be primary or metastatic; in the literature they are divided in extradural and intradural, extramedullary and intramedullary, from which extradural tumors are the most frequent and are usually metastatic, the intramedullary are generally gliomas. From the primary tumors up to 78% are benign and 22% malign, the histological stripe and the involvement to the spinal compartments are of great importance for the results and the treatment which is mainly surgical, individualized and meticulously planned with the support of technological resources such as the electrophysiological monitoring during the surgery. Methods and Materials: Observational study with a range of patients from March 1999- March 2016 to whom surgical resection of the spinal tumor was performed and reported on the Electronic Files of the South Central Hospital of High Specialty PEMEX. A Statistical analysis is made with the SPSS Statistic of disease of the Institution program. Results: 23 patients with spinal tumor surgical resection were found. The median age was 53 ± 10 years. The most common clinical manifestation was radiculopathy (65%). The Karnofsky scale was used for initial evaluation where a 43% of patients had a 90 score at the moment of the diagnosis, while 65% had an ECOG 1. The most frequent tumor was the Spinal Shwannoma (39%), followed in prevalence by the Condroid Cordoma (17%), where the intradural extramedullary location was the most prevalent (78%). The medium rate of survival after the surgical procedure was from 11 months. Conclusions: Our cases and the international statistics coincide. Radiculopathy as high prevalence initial manifestation conceals us to dismiss in the sixth decade of life any possibility for spinal tumor presentation. Most of spinal tumor patients do not have any clinical deterioration in their basal state, which indicates that performing a successful surgical procedure and the right

  19. The role of student surgical interest groups and surgical Olympiads in anatomical and surgical undergraduate training in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dydykin, Sergey; Kapitonova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Traditional department-based surgical interest groups in Russian medical schools are useful tools for student-based selection of specialty training. They also form a nucleus for initiating research activities among undergraduate students. In Russia, the Departments of Topographical Anatomy and Operative Surgery play an important role in initiating student-led research and providing learners with advanced, practical surgical skills. In tandem with department-led activities, student surgical interest groups prepare learners through surgical competitions, known as "Surgical Olympiads," which have been conducted in many Russian centers on a regular basis since 1988. Surgical Olympiads stimulate student interest in the development of surgical skills before graduation and encourage students to choose surgery as their postgraduate specialty. Many of the participants in these surgical Olympiads have become highly qualified specialists in general surgery, orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, urology, gynecology, and emergency medicine. The present article emphasizes the role of student interest groups and surgical Olympiads in clinical anatomical and surgical undergraduate training in Russia. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  20. Technological innovation in neurosurgery: a quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Hani J; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Kwasnicki, Richard M; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Nandi, Dipankar

    2015-07-01

    Technological innovation within health care may be defined as the introduction of a new technology that initiates a change in clinical practice. Neurosurgery is a particularly technology-intensive surgical discipline, and new technologies have preceded many of the major advances in operative neurosurgical techniques. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate technological innovation in neurosurgery using patents and peer-reviewed publications as metrics of technology development and clinical translation, respectively. The authors searched a patent database for articles published between 1960 and 2010 using the Boolean search term "neurosurgeon OR neurosurgical OR neurosurgery." The top 50 performing patent codes were then grouped into technology clusters. Patent and publication growth curves were then generated for these technology clusters. A top-performing technology cluster was then selected as an exemplar for a more detailed analysis of individual patents. In all, 11,672 patents and 208,203 publications related to neurosurgery were identified. The top-performing technology clusters during these 50 years were image-guidance devices, clinical neurophysiology devices, neuromodulation devices, operating microscopes, and endoscopes. In relation to image-guidance and neuromodulation devices, the authors found a highly correlated rapid rise in the numbers of patents and publications, which suggests that these are areas of technology expansion. An in-depth analysis of neuromodulation-device patents revealed that the majority of well-performing patents were related to deep brain stimulation. Patent and publication data may be used to quantitatively evaluate technological innovation in neurosurgery.

  1. Simulating tumour removal in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radetzky, A; Rudolph, M

    2001-12-01

    In this article the software system ROBO-SIM is described. ROBO-SIM is a planning and simulation tool for minimally invasive neurosurgery. Different to the most other simulation tools, ROBO-SIM is able to use actual patient's datasets for simulation. Same as in real neurosurgery a planning step, which provides more functionality as up-to-date planning systems on the market, is performed before undergoing the simulated operation. The planning steps include the definition of the trepanation point for entry into the skull and the target point within the depth of the brain, checking the surgical track and doing virtual trepanations (virtual craniotomy). For use with an intra-operative active manipulator, which is guided by the surgeon during real surgery (robotic surgery), go- and non-go-areas can be defined. During operation, the robot restricts the surgeon from leaving these go-areas. After planning, an additional simulation system, which is understood as an extension to the planning step, is used to simulate whole surgical interventions directly on the patient's anatomy basing on the planning data and by using the same instruments as for the real intervention. First tests with ROBO-SIM are performed on a phantom developed for this purpose and on actual patient's datasets with ventricular tumours.

  2. History of Korean Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sung-nam

    2015-08-01

    The year 2012 was the 50th anniversary of the Korean Neurosurgical Society, and in 2013, the 15th World Congress of Neurosurgery took place in Seoul, Korea. Thus, it is an appropriate occasion to introduce the world to the history of the Korean Neurosurgical Society and the foundation, development, and growth of Korean neurosurgery. Historical materials and pictures were collected and reviewed from the history book and photo albums of the Korean Neurosurgical Society. During the last 50 years, the Korean Neurosurgical Society and Korean neurosurgery have developed and grown enormously not only in quantity but also in quality. In every aspect, the turning point from the old to the new era of the Korean Neurosurgical Society and Korean neurosurgery was the year 1980. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Challenges in paediatric neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragati Ganjoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvements in technique, knowledge and expertise have brought about rapid advances in the fields of paediatric neurosurgery and anaesthesia, and many procedures limited earlier to adults are now being increasingly attempted in neonates and small children, with good outcomes. This article highlights the challenges faced by the operating team while handling some of the technically complex procedures like awake craniotomy, interventional neuroradiology, minimally invasive neurosurgery, procedures in intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging suites, and neonatal emergencies in the paediatric population.

  4. The Prevalence of Burnout Among US Neurosurgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Hakeem J; McPheeters, Matthew J; Shallwani, Hussain; Pittari, Joseph E; Reynolds, Renée M

    2017-10-27

    Burnout is a syndrome of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment. Its prevalence among US physicians exceeds 50% and is higher among residents/fellows. This is important to the practice of neurosurgery, as burnout is associated with adverse physical health, increased risk of substance abuse, and increased medical errors. To date, no study has specifically addressed the prevalence of burnout among neurosurgery residents. To determine and compare the prevalence of burnout among US neurosurgery residents with published rates for residents/fellows and practicing physicians from other specialties. We surveyed 106 US neurosurgery residency training programs to perform a descriptive analysis of the prevalence of burnout among residents. Data on burnout among control groups were used to perform a cross-sectional analysis. Nonparametric tests assessed differences in burnout scores among neurosurgery residents, and the 2-tailed Fisher's exact test assessed burnout between neurosurgery residents and control populations. Of approximately 1200 US neurosurgery residents, 255 (21.3%) responded. The prevalence of burnout was 36.5% (95% confidence interval: 30.6%-42.7%). There was no significant difference in median burnout scores between gender (P = .836), age (P = .183), or postgraduate year (P = .963) among neurosurgery residents. Neurosurgery residents had a significantly lower prevalence of burnout (36.5%) than other residents/fellows (60.0%; P burnout than other residents/fellows and practicing physicians. The underlying causes for these findings were not assessed and are likely multifactorial. Future studies should address possible causes of these findings. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  5. Trigeminal neuralgia--a coherent cross-specialty management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinskou, Tone; Maarbjerg, Stine; Rochat, Per; Wolfram, Frauke; Jensen, Rigmor Højland; Bendtsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Optimal management of patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN) requires specific treatment programs and close collaboration between medical, radiological and surgical specialties. Organization of such treatment programs has never been described before. With this paper we aim to describe the implementation and feasibility of an accelerated cross-speciality management program, to describe the collaboration between the involved specialties and to report the patient flow during the first 2 years after implementation. Finally, we aim to stimulate discussions about optimal management of TN. Based on collaboration between neurologists, neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons a standardized program for TN was implemented in May 2012 at the Danish Headache Center (DHC). First out-patient visit and subsequent 3.0 Tesla MRI scan was booked in an accelerated manner. The MRI scan was performed according to a special TN protocol developed for this program. Patients initially referred to neurosurgery were re-directed to DHC for pre-surgical evaluation of diagnosis and optimization of medical treatment. Follow-up was 2 years with fixed visits where medical treatment and indication for neurosurgery was continuously evaluated. Scientific data was collected in a structured and prospective manner. From May 2012 to April 2014, 130 patients entered the accelerated program. Waiting time for the first out-patient visit was 42 days. Ninety-four percent of the patients had a MRI performed according to the special protocol after a mean of 37 days. Within 2 years follow-up 35% of the patients were referred to neurosurgery after a median time of 65 days. Five scientific papers describing demographics, clinical characteristics and neuroanatomical abnormalities were published. The described cross-speciality management program proved to be feasible and to have acceptable waiting times for referral and highly specialized work-up of TN patients in a public tertiary referral centre for headache

  6. Samii's essentials in neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramina, Ricardo; Pontifical Catholic Univ. of Parana, Curitiba; Pires Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Sao Paulo Univ.; Hospital Santa Paula, Sao Paulo; Tatagiba, Marcos

    2008-01-01

    'Samii's Essentials in Neurosurgery' contains selected papers written by internationally recognized contributors who were trained by Professor Madjid Samii in Hannover, Germany. The main topics deal with cutting-edge technology in neurosurgery, skull-base surgery, and specific peripheral nerve, spine, and vascular surgeries. The texts and a wealth of illustrations review and reinforce guidelines on the diagnosis and management of situations that readers are likely to encounter in everyday practice. This book will be of great interest to neurosurgeons, neurologists, ENT surgeons, neuroradiologists, and neurophysiotherapists. (orig.)

  7. Chronic Pain in Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodofsky, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    This review includes a summary of contemporary theories of pain processing and advocates a multimodal analgesia approach for providing perioperative care. A summary of various medication classes and anesthetic techniques is provided that highlights evidence emerging from neurosurgical literature. This summary covers opioid management, acetaminophen, nonsteroidal antiinflammatories, ketamine, lidocaine, dexmedetomidine, corticosteroids, gabapentin, and regional anesthesia for neurosurgery. At present, there is not enough investigation into these areas to describe best practices for treating or preventing chronic pain in neurosurgery; but providers can identify a wider range of options available to personalize perioperative care strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Intraoperative ultrasound in neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasco, J.; Manzanares, R.; Fernandez, L.; Hernando, A.; Ramos, M. del Mar; Garcia, R.

    1996-01-01

    The present work is a review of the major indications for intraoperative ultrasound in the field of neurosurgery, stressing the exploratory method and describing what we consider to be the most illustrative cases. We attempt to provide a thorough view of this constantly developing technique which, despite its great practical usefulness, may be being underemployed. (Author) 47 refs

  9. Dr. Lenke Horvath (1917-1991): Creator of Pediatric Neurosurgery in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Dumitru; Moisa, Horatiu Alexandru; Nica, Dan Aurel; Ciurea, Alexandru Vlad

    2016-04-01

    The development of neurosurgery as an independent specialty took place with great difficulty in Romania. In this respect, the most revered personalities are those of Professor Alexandru Moruzzi (1900-1957) (in Iasi) and Professor Dimitrie Bagdasar (1893-1946) (in Bucharest), who are the fathers of modern neurosurgery in Romania. Professor Bagdasar was schooled in Professor Harvey Cushing's clinic in Boston and is credited with creating the first completely independent neurosurgical unit in Romania. His legacy was carried on with honor by Professor Constantin Arseni (1912-1994), who, in 1975, tasked Dr. Lenke Horvath (1917-1991) with creating the first autonomous pediatric neurosurgery unit in Bucharest. This article is a small tribute to the founder of pediatric neurosurgery in Romania and one of the female pioneer neurosurgeons, who, by personal example of dedication and hard work, radically changed medical thinking and neurosurgery in Romania. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The history of neurosurgery at the University of Sao Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Jacobsen Teixeira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The history of neurosurgery at University of São Paulo comes from 1918, since its origins under the Department of Neurology from Chair of Psychiatric Clinic and Nervous Diseases. Professor Enjolras Vampré was the great inspiration for such medical specialty in the State of Sao Paulo. In 1929, the first neurosurgical procedures were performed in the recently (at time organized Section of Neurosurgery. The official inauguration of the Division of Functional Neurosurgery occurred at June 1977, with the presence of worldwide well-known neuroscientists. The division suffered a deep streamlining under the leadership of Professor Raul Marino Jr., between the decades of 1990 and 2000. At this time, it was structured with the sections of neurological surgery, functional neurosurgery and neurosurgical emergency. Since 2008, Professor Manoel Jacobsen Teixeira is the Chairman of the Division and has provided the Division with the best available technological resources, performing more than 3,000 surgeries a year and training professionals who will, certainly, be some of the future leaders of brazilian neurosurgery.

  11. Knowledge silos: assessing knowledge sharing between specialties through the vestibular schwannoma literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnurman, Zane; Golfinos, John G; Roland, J Thomas; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE It is common for a medical disorder to be managed or researched by individuals who work within different specialties. It is known that both neurosurgeons and neurotologists manage vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients. While overlap in specialty focus has the potential to stimulate multidisciplinary collaboration and innovative thinking, there is a risk of specialties forming closed-communication loops, called knowledge silos, which may inhibit knowledge diffusion. This study quantitatively assessed knowledge sharing between neurosurgery and otolaryngology on the subject of VS. METHODS A broad Web of Science search was used to download details for 4439 articles related to VS through 2016. The publishing journal's specialty and the authors' specialties (based on author department) were determined for available articles. All 114,647 of the article references were categorized by journal specialty. The prevalence of several VS topics was assessed using keyword searches of titles. RESULTS For articles written by neurosurgeons, 44.0% of citations were from neurosurgery journal articles and 23.4% were from otolaryngology journals. The citations of otolaryngology authors included 11.6% neurosurgery journals and 56.5% otolaryngology journals. Both author specialty and journal specialty led to more citations of the same specialty, though author specialty had the largest effect. Comparing the specialties' literature, several VS topics had significantly different levels of coverage, including radiosurgery and hearing topics. Despite the availability of the Internet, there has been no change in the proportions of references for either specialty since 1997 (the year PubMed became publicly available). CONCLUSIONS Partial knowledge silos are observed between neurosurgery and otolaryngology on the topic of VS, based on the peer-reviewed literature. The increase in access provided by the Internet and searchable online databases has not decreased specialty reference bias

  12. Risk Factors and Predictive Model Development of Thirty-Day Post-Operative Surgical Site Infection in the Veterans Administration Surgical Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinli; Nylander, William; Smith, Tracy; Han, Soonhee; Gunnar, William

    2018-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) complicates approximately 2% of surgeries in the Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals. Surgical site infections are responsible for increased morbidity, length of hospital stay, cost, and mortality. Surgical site infection can be minimized by modifying risk factors. In this study, we identified risk factors and developed accurate predictive surgical specialty-specific SSI risk prediction models for the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) surgery population. In a retrospective observation study, surgical patients who underwent surgery from October 2013 to September 2016 from 136 VA hospitals were included. The Veteran Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP) database was used for the pre-operative demographic and clinical characteristics, intra-operative characteristics, and 30-day post-operative outcomes. The study population represents 11 surgical specialties: neurosurgery, urology, podiatry, otolaryngology, general, orthopedic, plastic, thoracic, vascular, cardiac coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), and cardiac valve/other surgery. Multivariable logistic regression models were developed for the 30-day post-operative SSIs. Among 354,528 surgical procedures, 6,538 (1.8%) had SSIs within 30 days. Surgical site infection rates varied among surgical specialty (0.7%-3.0%). Surgical site infection rates were higher in emergency procedures, procedures with long operative duration, greater complexity, and higher relative value units. Other factors associated with increased SSI risk were high level of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification (level 4 and 5), dyspnea, open wound/infection, wound classification, ascites, bleeding disorder, chemotherapy, smoking, history of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), radiotherapy, steroid use for chronic conditions, and weight loss. Each surgical specialty had a distinct combination of risk factors. Accurate SSI risk-predictive surgery specialty

  13. Image-guided neurosurgery. Global concept of a surgical tele-assistance using obstacle detection robotics; Neurochirurgie guidee par l'image. Concept global d'une tele-assistance chirurgicale a l'aide d'une robotique d'empechement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desgeorges, M.; Bellegou, N.; Faillot, Th.; Cordoliani, Y.S.; Dutertre, G.; Blondet, E.; Soultrait, F. de; Boissy, J.M. [Hopital d' Instruction des Armees du Val-de-Grace, 75 - Paris (France)

    2000-12-01

    Surgical tele-assistance significantly increases accuracy of surgical gestures, especially in the case of brain tumor neurosurgery. The robotic device is tele-operated through a microscope and the surgeon's gestures are guided by real-time overlaying of the X-ray imagery in the microscope. During the device's progression inside the brain, the focus is ensured by the microscope auto-focus feature. The surgeon can thus constantly check his position on the field workstation. Obstacles to avoid or dangerous areas can be previewed in the operation field. This system is routinely used for 5 years in the neurosurgery division of the Val de Grace hospital. More than 400 brain surgery operations have been done using it. An adaptation is used for rachis surgery. Other military hospitals begin to be equipped with similar systems. It will be possible to link them for data transfer. When it will be operational, such a network it will show what could be, in the future, a medical/surgical remote-assistance system designed to take care of wounded/critical conditions people, including assistance to surgical gestures. (authors)

  14. [Changing the teaching of neurosurgery with information technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Jean-Jacques; Caire, François; Kalamarides, Michel; Mireau, Etienne; Dauger, Frédéric; Coignac, Marie-Jo; Charlin, Bernard

    2009-10-01

    A digital campus is a distance learning site that uses the potential of information and communication technologies to disseminate and improve educational services. This website, with open and free access, is built from free software with Web 2.0 technology. It is hosted at the University of Limoges. It functions as a digital library, containing scanned books, slide shows, more than 200 hours of recorded courses and round tables accessible by streaming video. The site is indexed according to the users' needs, by level of knowledge, specialty, keywords, and supplementary MeSH terms. The campus is organized as the College of Neurosurgery (http://college.neurochirurgie.fr). The durability of this type of training (in existence for 9 years now) is made possible by a powerful and committed consortium: the French Society of Neurosurgery, which has created high-quality intellectual and scientific resources, the University of Limoges, the Dupuytren University Hospital Center in Limoges, the region of Limousin, and the French-language Virtual Medical University, which have provided logistic and financial support. To target appropriate levels at various users, we distinguished four groups: medical students, neurosurgery students, neurosurgeons (continuing medical education), and students in allied health fields. All areas of neurosurgery are concerned. All the courses, including tests for self-evaluation and scientific meetings (organized with information and communication technologies) are digitally recorded for the site. The principles that make it possible for a medical discipline to organize around an online project are: a pedagogical conception of projects built in the form of models reusable by other health specialties; a stronghold within professional societies of the relevant specialties able to create high-quality intellectual and scientific resources; an organization by educational levels that can be extended transversally to other health disciplines; and free

  15. Number of Published Randomized Controlled Multi Center Trials Testing Pharmacological Interventions or Devices Is Increasing in Both Medical and Surgical Specialties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Anne Kjaergaard; Okholm, Cecilie; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2014-01-01

    : The object of this study was to investigate the development in the organization of multicenter studies, the distribution of studies within different clinical specialties, across continents, and investigate the differences related to testing various interventions. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A literature search...... was done in MEDLINE for multicenter studies published in 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010, respectively. Data extraction identified data related to clinical specialties, interventions, participating patients, departments, countries, and continents. RESULTS: The number of multicenter studies increased from 112...... as the number of participating departments increased during the time span, though the increase in studies was most evident in Europe and North America compared with the rest of the world....

  16. Minimalism in Art, Medical Science and Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okten, Ali Ihsan

    2018-01-01

    The word "minimalism" is a word derived from French the word "minimum". Whereas the lexical meaning of minimum is "the least or the smallest quantity necessary for something", its expression in mathematics can be described as "the lowest step a variable number can descend, least, minimal". Minimalism, which advocates an extreme simplicity of the artistic form, is a current in modern art and music whose origins go to 1960s and which features simplicity and objectivity. Although art, science and philosophy are different disciplines, they support each other from time to time, sometimes they intertwine and sometimes they copy each other. A periodic schools or teaching in one of them can take the others into itself, so, they proceed on their ways empowering each other. It is also true for the minimalism in art and the minimal invasive surgical approaches in science. Concepts like doing with less, avoiding unnecessary materials and reducing the number of the elements in order to increase the effect in the expression which are the main elements of the minimalism in art found their equivalents in medicine and neurosurgery. Their equivalents in medicine or neurosurgery have been to protect the physical integrity of the patient with less iatrogenic injury, minimum damage and the same therapeutic effect in the most effective way and to enable the patient to regain his health in the shortest span of time. As an anticipation, we can consider that the minimal approaches started by Richard Wollheim and Barbara Rose in art and Lars Leksell, Gazi Yaşargil and other neurosurgeons in neurosurgery in the 1960s are the present day equivalents of the minimalist approaches perhaps unconsciously started by Kazimir Malevich in art and Victor Darwin L"Espinasse in neurosurgery in the early 1900s. We can also consider that they have developed interacting with each other, not by chance.

  17. Genealogy of training in vascular neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhry, Shakeel A; Spetzler, Robert F

    2014-02-01

    Remarkable advances and changes in the landscape of neurovascular disease have occurred recently. Concurrently, a paradigm shift in training and resident education is underway. This crossroad of unique opportunities and pressures necessitates creative change in the training of future vascular neurosurgeons to allow incorporation of surgical advances, new technology, and supplementary treatment modalities in a setting of reduced work hours and increased public scrutiny. This article discusses the changing landscape in neurovascular disease treatment, followed by the recent changes in resident training, and concludes with our view of the future of training in vascular neurosurgery.

  18. Innovations in Functional Neurosurgery and Anesthetic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Lauren K; Durieux, Marcel E; Elias, W Jeffrey; Nemergut, Edward C; Naik, Bhiken I

    2018-01-01

    Functional neurosurgery has undergone rapid growth over the last few years fueled by advances in imaging technology and novel treatment modalities. These advances have led to new surgical treatments using minimally invasive and precise techniques for conditions such as Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, epilepsy, and psychiatric disorders. Understanding the goals and technological issues of these procedures is imperative for the anesthesiologist to ensure safe management of patients presenting for functional neurosurgical procedures. In this review, we discuss the advances in neurosurgical techniques for deep brain stimulation, focused ultrasound and minimally invasive laser-based treatment of refractory epilepsy and provide a guideline for anesthesiologists caring for patients undergoing these procedures.

  19. Standards for reporting randomized controlled trials in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiehna, Erin N; Starke, Robert M; Pouratian, Nader; Dumont, Aaron S

    2011-02-01

    The Consolidated Standards for Reporting of Trials (CONSORT) criteria were published in 1996 to standardize the reporting and improve the quality of clinical trials. Despite having been endorsed by major medical journals and shown to improve the quality of reported trials, neurosurgical journals have yet to formally adopt these reporting criteria. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the quality and reporting of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in neurosurgery and the factors that may affect the quality of reported trials. The authors evaluated all neurosurgical RCTs published in 2006 and 2007 in the principal neurosurgical journals (Journal of Neurosurgery; Neurosurgery; Surgical Neurology; Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry; and Acta Neurochirurgica) and in 3 leading general medical journals (Journal of the American Medical Association, Lancet, and the New England Journal of Medicine). Randomized controlled trials that addressed operative decision making or the treatment of neurosurgical patients were included in this analysis. The RCT quality was evaluated using the Jadad score and the CONSORT checklist. In 2006 and 2007, 27 RCTs relevant to intracranial neurosurgery were reported. Of these trials, only 59% had a Jadad score ≥ 3. The 3 major medical journals all endorsed the CONSORT guidelines, while none of the neurosurgical journals have adopted these guidelines. Randomized controlled trials published in the 3 major medical journals had a significantly higher mean CONSORT score (mean 41, range 39-44) compared with those published in neurosurgical journals (mean 26.4, range 17-38; p journals (mean 3.42, range 2-5) than neurosurgical journals (mean 2.45, range 1-5; p = 0.05). Despite the growing volume of RCTs in neurosurgery, the quality of reporting of these trials remains suboptimal, especially in the neurosurgical journals. Improved awareness of the CONSORT guidelines by journal editors, reviewers, and authors of these papers could

  20. YouTube as a Source of Information on Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Nardin; Alotaibi, Naif M; Lozano, Andres M

    2017-09-01

    The importance of videos in social media communications in the context of health care and neurosurgery is becoming increasingly recognized. However, there has not yet been a systematic analysis of these neurosurgery-related communications. Accordingly, this study was aimed at characterizing the online video content pertaining to neurosurgery. Neurosurgery-related videos uploaded on YouTube were collected using a comprehensive search strategy. The following metrics were extracted for each video: number of views, likes, dislikes, comments, shares, date of upload, and geographic region of origin where specified. A quantitative and qualitative evaluation was performed on all videos included in the study. A total of 713 nonduplicate videos met the inclusion criteria. The overall number of views for all videos was 90,545,164. Videos were most frequently uploaded in 2016 (n = 348), with a 200% increase in uploads compared with the previous year. Of the videos that were directly relevant to clinical neurosurgery, the most frequent video categories were "educational videos" (25%), followed by "surgical and procedure overview" (20%), "promotional videos" (17%), and "patient experience" (16%). The remainder of the videos consisted primarily of unrealistic simulations of cranial surgery for entertainment purposes (20%). The findings from this study highlight the increasing use of video communications related to neurosurgery and show that institutions, neurosurgeons, and patients are using YouTube as an educational and promotional platform. As online communications continue to evolve, it will be important to harness this tool to advance patient-oriented communication and knowledge dissemination in neurosurgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Neurosurgery and Music; Effect of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasenzer, Elena Romana; Kanat, Ayhan; Neugebauer, Edmund

    2017-06-01

    The nervous system works like a great orchestra. Specifically, the music of Mozart with its "Mozart effect" is appropriate to use in neurosurgery. We investigated the relationship between Mozart's music and neurosurgery. We used digital catalogs like "PubMed" and the libraries of universities. Key words were "Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart" and "neurosurgery and music." In the first half of the 20th century, performing neurosurgery on some musicians, such as Maurice Ravel, Josef Hassid, and George Gershwin, resulted in a fatal outcome. The cause of this is probably that neurosurgery had not been developed yet in the first half of the 20th century. In the past 3 decades, the neurosurgical operations of musicians show that musicians have rich associations among auditory, somatic, and sensorial systems. It is clear that we have much to learn from studies about music and brain function that derive from our surgical experiences with patients. The neuronal plasticity of musicians' brains may be different from that of nonmusicians' brains. Musicians with enhanced motor skills have greater capacity for plasticity because of enriched interhemispheric connections. Listening to music and the effect of Mozart in neurosurgical practice, intensive care, or rehabilitation were documented in many studies. As authors, we mean something different: Its effectiveness should be studied. We concluded that in current neurosurgical practice, Mozart has an effect. More research and clinical studies are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurosurgery Elective for Preclinical Medical Students: Early Exposure and Changing Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Scott L; Mistry, Akshitkumar M; Hanif, Rimal; Chambless, Lola B; Neimat, Joseph S; Wellons, John C; Mocco, J; Sills, Allen K; McGirt, Matthew J; Thompson, Reid C

    2016-02-01

    Exposure to surgical subspecialties is limited during the preclinical years of medical school. To offset this limitation, the authors created a neurosurgery elective for first- and second-year medical students. The objective was to provide each student with early exposure to neurosurgery by combining clinical experience with faculty discussions about the academic and personal realities of a career in neurosurgery. From 2012 to 2013, the authors offered a neurosurgery elective course to first- and second-year medical students. Each class consisted of the following: 1) peer-reviewed article analysis; 2) student presentation; 3) faculty academic lecture; 4) faculty personal lecture with question and answer period. Thirty-five students were enrolled over a 2-year period. After completing the elective, students were more likely to: consider neurosurgery as a future career (P life to be higher (P life, and family-work balance, while not altering the students' views about the difficulty of training. Adopting a neurosurgery elective geared towards preclinical medical students can significantly change attitudes about the field of neurosurgery and has potential to increase interest in pursuing a career in neurosurgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Co-evolution of Neuroimaging and Psychiatric Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyster, Timothy G; Mikell, Charles B; Sheth, Sameer A

    2016-01-01

    The role of neuroimaging in psychiatric neurosurgery has evolved significantly throughout the field's history. Psychiatric neurosurgery initially developed without the benefit of information provided by modern imaging modalities, and thus lesion targets were selected based on contemporary theories of frontal lobe dysfunction in psychiatric disease. However, by the end of the 20th century, the availability of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allowed for the development of mechanistic theories attempting to explain the anatamofunctional basis of these disorders, as well as the efficacy of stereotactic neuromodulatory treatments. Neuroimaging now plays a central and ever-expanding role in the neurosurgical management of psychiatric disorders, by influencing the determination of surgical candidates, allowing individualized surgical targeting and planning, and identifying network-level changes in the brain following surgery. In this review, we aim to describe the coevolution of psychiatric neurosurgery and neuroimaging, including ways in which neuroimaging has proved useful in elucidating the therapeutic mechanisms of neuromodulatory procedures. We focus on ablative over stimulation-based procedures given their historical precedence and the greater opportunity they afford for post-operative re-imaging, but also discuss important contributions from the deep brain stimulation (DBS) literature. We conclude with a discussion of how neuroimaging will transition the field of psychiatric neurosurgery into the era of precision medicine.

  4. Mythology and Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ökten, Ali İhsan

    2016-06-01

    Myths are the keystone of mythology. They are interpretations of events that have been told as stories and legends for thousands of years, inherited from generation to generation, and have reached the present day. Although most myths are considered figments of the imagination or fictitious legends, all of them contain references to facts from the time they occurred. Mythology, which is a collection of figments of imagination concerning nature and human beings, is a product of human effort to perceive, explain, and interpret the universe and the world, much like science. The interaction between mythology and science dates back to the early days of civilization. Mythology, a reflection of human creativity, is extensively used in modern science, particularly in a terminological context. This article aims to reveal the texture of mythology in neurosurgery, by analyzing the birth of medicine in mythology; heroes such as Apollo and Asklepios, the gods of healing and medicine, as well as Hygieia, the goddess of health and hygiene; and mythological terms and phrases such as Achilles tendon, atlas vertebra, gigantism, priapism syndrome, hippocampus, lethargy, syrinx, and arachnoid. Through the use of symbols, mythology has attempted to explain several subjects, such as human nature, disease, birth, and death. In this respect, mythology and medicine dance arm in arm, and this dance has been going on for centuries. As a result, mythology has manifested itself in many fields within medicine, either anatomically or by giving names to various diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. History of functional neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandar, B J; Nashold, B S

    1995-01-01

    Whereas in the early days of evil spirits, electric catfish, and phrenology, functional neurosurgery was based on crude observations and dogma, the progress made in neurophysiology at the turn of the century gave the field a strong scientific foundation. Subsequently, the advent of stereotaxis allowed access to deep brain regions and contributed an element of precision. Future directions include the development of frameless stereotaxy; the use of MRI-generated anatomic data, which would circumvent the serious problem of individual variations seen with standard brain atlases; the introduction of various chemicals into brain structures, in an attempt to influence neurochemically mediated disease processes; and finally, the use of the promising techniques of neural transplantation. On hearing of Penfield's intraoperative brain stimulations, Sherrington commented: "It must be great fun to have the physiological preparation speak to you." The idea of therapeutic neurophysiologic interventions is appealing, especially because many disorders show no obvious treatable pathologic cause (e.g., tumor, vascular malformation). As stereotactic technology becomes less cumbersome and more precise, more sophisticated in vivo neurophysiologic preparations become possible. In turn, as our understanding of nervous system physiology grows, our ability to understand pathophysiology and treat disease processes increases.

  6. Virtual endoscopy in neurosurgery: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, André; Wolfsberger, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Virtual endoscopy is the computerized creation of images depicting the inside of patient anatomy reconstructed in a virtual reality environment. It permits interactive, noninvasive, 3-dimensional visual inspection of anatomical cavities or vessels. This can aid in diagnostics, potentially replacing an actual endoscopic procedure, and help in the preparation of a surgical intervention by bridging the gap between plain 2-dimensional radiologic images and the 3-dimensional depiction of anatomy during actual endoscopy. If not only the endoscopic vision but also endoscopic handling, including realistic haptic feedback, is simulated, virtual endoscopy can be an effective training tool for novice surgeons. In neurosurgery, the main fields of the application of virtual endoscopy are third ventriculostomy, endonasal surgery, and the evaluation of pathologies in cerebral blood vessels. Progress in this very active field of research is achieved through cooperation between the technical and the medical communities. While the technology advances and new methods for modeling, reconstruction, and simulation are being developed, clinicians evaluate existing simulators, steer the development of new ones, and explore new fields of application. This review introduces some of the most interesting virtual reality systems for endoscopic neurosurgery developed in recent years and presents clinical studies conducted either on areas of application or specific systems. In addition, benefits and limitations of single products and simulated neuroendoscopy in general are pointed out.

  7. Smartphone-assisted minimally invasive neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Mauricio; Petito, Carlo Emanuel; Tutihashi, Rafael; Paiva, Wellingson; Abramovicz Mandel, Suzana; Gomes Pinto, Fernando Campos; Ferreira de Andrade, Almir; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Figueiredo, Eberval Gadelha

    2018-03-13

    OBJECTIVE Advances in video and fiber optics since the 1990s have led to the development of several commercially available high-definition neuroendoscopes. This technological improvement, however, has been surpassed by the smartphone revolution. With the increasing integration of smartphone technology into medical care, the introduction of these high-quality computerized communication devices with built-in digital cameras offers new possibilities in neuroendoscopy. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of smartphone-endoscope integration in performing different types of minimally invasive neurosurgery. METHODS The authors present a new surgical tool that integrates a smartphone with an endoscope by use of a specially designed adapter, thus eliminating the need for the video system customarily used for endoscopy. The authors used this novel combined system to perform minimally invasive surgery on patients with various neuropathological disorders, including cavernomas, cerebral aneurysms, hydrocephalus, subdural hematomas, contusional hematomas, and spontaneous intracerebral hematomas. RESULTS The new endoscopic system featuring smartphone-endoscope integration was used by the authors in the minimally invasive surgical treatment of 42 patients. All procedures were successfully performed, and no complications related to the use of the new method were observed. The quality of the images obtained with the smartphone was high enough to provide adequate information to the neurosurgeons, as smartphone cameras can record images in high definition or 4K resolution. Moreover, because the smartphone screen moves along with the endoscope, surgical mobility was enhanced with the use of this method, facilitating more intuitive use. In fact, this increased mobility was identified as the greatest benefit of the use of the smartphone-endoscope system compared with the use of the neuroendoscope with the standard video set. CONCLUSIONS Minimally invasive approaches

  8. Estudo de vigilância epidemiológica da profilaxia do tromboembolismo venoso em especialidades cirúrgicas de um hospital universitário de nível terciário Study of epidemiological surveillance of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in surgical specialties of a school tertiary referral hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Diogo-Filho

    2009-03-01

    tromboembolismo venoso, verifica-se adesão incompleta por parte dos profissionais médicos da especialidade, expondo os pacientes a complicações graves.CONTEXT: Postoperative venous thromboembolism is a frequent and severe disease that can lead to pulmonary embolism and post thrombotic syndrome. Although the venous thromboembolism prophylaxis is a proven strategy, an unsuitable indication is observed. OBJECTIVE: To verify the indication of prophylaxis with heparin among patients of several surgical specialties of a School Tertiary Referral Hospital. METHODS: It was accomplished a prospective study during 10 consecutive days in each month, from September to December of 2005, with 360 patients surgically treated in the specialties: General Surgery, Gynecology, Neurosurgery, Ortopedy and Traumatology, Urology and Angiology and Vascular Surgery, identifying risk factors for the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE and the use of heparin prophylaxis according to the recommendations of the Brazilian Society of Angiology and Vascular Surgery. RESULTS: Three hundred and fifty seven patients were evaluated, 24 (6,7%, 128 (35,9% and 205 (57,4% were included in low risk, medium risk and high risk for venous thromboembolism, respectively. One hundred and eighty four patients (51,5% of the sample received prophylactic heparin. Heparin was used in 73,3% of the patients of General Surgery, 16,7% of Gynecology, 50,0% of Neurosurgery, 32,5% of Ortopedy and Traumatology, 37,3% of Urology and 97,7% of Angiology and Vascular Surgery. Only 38,3% of medium risk and 64,4% of high risk patients received prophylactic heparin. Heparin was suitably used in 77,6% of medium risk and in 63,6% of high risk patients. Thrombocytopenia, minor bleeding and major bleeding occurred in 3 (1,6%, 12 (6,5% and 2 (1,1% of the patients, respectively. Thromboembolic complications occurred in 6 (1,7% cases. CONCLUSION: Although the indications of prophylactic heparin to venous thromboembolism are well known, we

  9. History of Neurosurgery in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffiq, Azman; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Haspani, Saffari; Adnan, Johari Siregar

    2015-12-01

    The development of neurosurgical services and training in Malaysia began in 1963, with the first centre established in its capital city at Hospital Kuala Lumpur, aimed to provide much needed neurosurgical services and training in the field of neurology and neurosurgery. This center subsequently expanded in 1975 with the establishment of the Tunku Abdul Rahman Neuroscience Institute (IKTAR); which integrated the three allied interdependent disciplines of neurosurgery, neurology and psychiatry. The establishment of this institute catalysed the rapid expansion of neurosurgical services in Malaysia and paved the way for development of comprehensive training for doctors, nurses, and paramedics. This culminated in the establishments of a local comprehensive neurosurgery training program for doctors in 2001; followed by a training program for nurses and paramedics in 2006. To date, there are more than 60 neurosurgeons providing expert care in 11 centers across Malaysia, along with trained personnel in the field of neurosciences.

  10. Progress of women in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetzler, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in issues related to gender equity, barriers to recruiting and retaining women in neurosurgery continue to exist. At the same time, the overall projected shortage of neurosurgeons suggests that women will be vital to the long-term success of the field. Attracting women to neurosurgery can capitalize on strategies, such as mentoring, teaching leadership and negotiating skills, and job sharing or dual training tracks to name a few, that would benefit both men and women passionate about pursuing neurosurgery. Ultimately, personal and institutional accountability must be evaluated to ensure that the best and brightest candidates, regardless of gender, are recruited to neurosurgical programs to promote the health of our challenging but most satisfying profession.

  11. From idea to publication: Publication rates of theses in neurosurgery from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öğrenci, Ahmet; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Özcan-Ekşi, Emel Ece; Koban, Orkun

    2016-01-01

    Thesis at the end of residency is considered as the complementary component of postgraduate training. In this respect, thesis helps the residents learn how to ask structured questions, set up the most appropriate study design, conduct the study, retrieve study results and write conclusions with clinical implications. To the best of our knowledge, the publication rates of theses in the field of neurosurgery have not been reported before. Our aim was to find out publication rates of theses in neurosurgery specialty, in this descriptive study. The database of Higher Education Council of Turkey, which includes the theses of residents in only university hospitals, was screened between years 2004 and 2013. After retrieving the theses from the database; we used search engines to find out the theses published in any SCI/SCI-E-indexed journals. For this purpose, the title of the theses and the author names were used as keywords for searching. Data was presented in a descriptive form as absolute numbers and percentages. We retrieved 164 theses written by former residents in neurosurgery using the database. Among 164 theses, 18% (national journals: 9; international journals: 21) were published in SCI/SCI-E indexed journals. Publication rates of theses in neurosurgery are low as they are in the other specialties of medicine. Our study is a descriptive research, to give an idea about publication rates of theses in neurosurgery. Further studies are required to understand the underlying factors, which are responsible for the limited success in publication of theses in neurosurgery. Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. Crisis Management Simulation: Establishing a Dual Neurosurgery and Anesthesia Training Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciporen, Jeremy; Gillham, Haley; Noles, Michele; Dillman, Dawn; Baskerville, Mark; Haley, Caleb; Spight, Donn; Turner, Ryan C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P

    2018-01-01

    Simulation training has been shown to be an effective teaching tool. Learner management of an intraoperative crisis such as a major cerebrovascular bleed requires effective teamwork, communication, and implementation of key skill sets at appropriate time points. This study establishes a first of a kind simulation experience in a neurosurgery/anesthesia resident (learners) team working together to manage an intraoperative crisis. Using a cadaveric cavernous carotid injury perfusion model, 7 neurosurgery and 6 anesthesia learners, were trained on appropriate vascular injury management using an endonasal endoscopic technique. Learners were evaluated on communication skills, crisis management algorithms, and implementation of appropriate skill sets at the right time. A preanatomic and postanatomic examination and postsimulation survey was administered to neurosurgery learners. Anesthesia learners provided posttraining evaluation through a tailored realism and teaching survey. Neurosurgery learners' anatomic examination score improved from presimulation (33.89%) to postsimulation (86.11%). No significant difference between learner specialties was observed for situation awareness, decision making, communications and teamwork, or leadership evaluations. Learners reported the simulation realistic, beneficial, and highly instructive. Realistic, first of kind, clinical simulation scenarios were presented to a neurosurgery/anesthesia resident team who worked together to manage an intraoperative crisis. Learners were effectively trained on crisis management, the importance of communication, and how to develop algorithms for future implementation in difficult scenarios. Learners were highly satisfied with the simulation training experience and requested that it be integrated more consistently into their residency training programs.

  13. Increasing use of less-invasive hemodynamic monitoring in 3 specialty surgical intensive care units: a 5-year experience at a tertiary medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirton, Orlando C; Calabrese, Rebecca C; Staff, Ilene

    2015-01-01

    Less-invasive hemodynamic monitoring (eg, esophageal doppler monitoring [EDM] and arterial pressure contour analysis, FloTrac) is increasingly used as an alternative to pulmonary artery catheters (PACs) in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU). The decrease in use of PACs is not associated with increased mortality. Five-year retrospective review of 1894 hemodynamically monitored patients admitted to 3 surgical ICUs in a university-affiliate, tertiary care urban hospital. Data included the number of admissions, diagnosis-related group discharge case mix, length of stay, insertion of monitoring devices (PAC, EDM, and FloTrac probes), administered intravenous vasoactive agents (β-predominant agonists--dobutamine, epinephrine, and dopamine; vasopressors--norepinephrine and phenylephrine), and mortality. Data from hospital administrative databases were compiled to create patient characteristic and monitoring variables across a 5-year time period, 2005 to 2009 inclusive. Chi-square for independent proportions, 1-way analysis of variance, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used; tests for trend were conducted. An α level of .05 was considered significant. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences v14 was used for all statistical testing. There was a significant change in the type of hemodynamic monitors inserted in 2 of the 3 surgical ICUs (in the general surgery and neurointensive care but not in the cardiac ICU) from PACs to less-invasive devices (FloTrac or EDM) during the 5-year study period (P < .001). There was no change in mortality rate over the time period (P = .492). There was an overall increase in the proportion of monitored patients who received intravenous vasoactive agents (P < .001) with a progressive shift from β-agonists to vasopressors (P < .002). Multivariate analyses indicated that age, case mix, and use of vasoactive agents were all independent predictors of inhospital mortality (P = .001) but that type of monitoring was not (P = .638). In a 5

  14. Versatile intraoperative MRI in neurosurgery and radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yrjänä, S K; Katisko, J P; Ojala, R O; Tervonen, O; Schiffbauer, H; Koivukangas, J

    2002-03-01

    Several models for the application of intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging (IMRI) have recently been reported, most of them unique. Two fundamental issues need to be addressed: optimal use of the scanner to ensure a wide base for research, development and clinical application, and an organisational model that facilitates such use. While in our setting the IMRI project was initiated by the neurosurgeons, the need for wider use of the facilities was recognised since the beginning of the planning phase in 1996. An organisational model was developed that allowed for development of neurosurgical applications, radiological imaging, and radiological interventions and for the research and development work of the vendor. A resistive 0.23 T MR scanner was installed in a dedicated operating room environment. Unique to this scanner is the ability to turn off the magnet, allowing for normal OR activities and devices, and to turn on the magnet as needed with a relatively short six-minute ramp up time. A staged surgical technique was perfected, allowing for transfer of data to the neuronavigator outside the scanner during surgery. In neurosurgery, IMRI was used as one part of a neuronavigational system that included ultrasound imaging, intra-operative cortical stimulation during awake procedures, electrocorticography and two neuronavigators. 34 neurosurgical cases included 27 brain tumour resections, 5 brain tumour biopsies, 1 extirpation of an arterio-venous malformation, and 1 haematoma evacuation. The scanner could also be used for normal clinical imaging where obese patients, children, claustophobic patients and postoperative control examinations were the major groups. The radiologists performed 110 interventions, including bone and abdominal biopsies, nerve root infiltrations and local pain therapies, with the optical needle tracking system under continuous MRI guidance. The organisational model allowed frequent use of the facilities for both neurosurgery and radiology

  15. Preoperative anemia increases postoperative morbidity in elective cranial neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydon, Mohamad; Abt, Nicholas B.; Macki, Mohamed; Brem, Henry; Huang, Judy; Bydon, Ali; Tamargo, Rafael J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preoperative anemia may affect postoperative mortality and morbidity following elective cranial operations. Methods: The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database was used to identify elective cranial neurosurgical cases (2006-2012). Morbidity was defined as wound infection, systemic infection, cardiac, respiratory, renal, neurologic, and thromboembolic events, and unplanned returns to the operating room. For 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated with multivariable logistic regression. Results: Of 8015 patients who underwent elective cranial neurosurgery, 1710 patients (21.4%) were anemic. Anemic patients had an increased 30-day mortality of 4.1% versus 1.3% in non-anemic patients (P neurosurgery was independently associated with an increased risk of 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity when compared to non-anemic patients. A hematocrit level below 33% (Hgb 11 g/dl) was associated with a significant increase in postoperative morbidity. PMID:25422784

  16. Counting the cost of negligence in neurosurgery: Lessons to be learned from 10 years of claims in the NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Alhafidz; Strachan, Roger D; Nath, Fredrick; Coulter, Ian C

    2015-04-01

    Despite substantial progress in modernising neurosurgery, the specialty still tops the list of medico-legal claims. Understanding the factors associated with negligence claims is vital if we are to identify areas of underperformance and subsequently improve patient safety. Here we provide data on trends in neurosurgical negligence claims over a 10-year period in England. We used data provided by the National Health Service Litigation Authority to analyse negligence claims related to neurosurgery from the financial years 2002/2003 to 2011/2012. Using the abstracts provided, we extracted information pertaining to the underlying pathology, injury severity, nature of misadventure and claim value. Over the 10-year period, the annual number of claims increased significantly. In total, there were 794 negligence claims (range 50-117/year); of the 613 closed cases, 405 (66.1%) were successful. The total cost related to claims during the 10 years was £65.7 million, with a mean claim per successful case of £0.16 million (total damages, defence and claimant costs of £45.1, £6.36 and £14.3 million, respectively). Claims related to emergency cases were more costly compared to those of elective cases (£209,327 vs. £112,627; P=0.002). Spinal cases represented the most frequently litigated procedures (350; 44.1% of total), inadequate surgical performance the most common misadventure (231; 29.1%) and fatality the commonest injury implicated in claims (102; 12.8%). Negligence claims related to wrong-site surgery and cauda equina syndrome were frequently successful (26/26; 100% and 14/16; 87.5% of closed cases, respectively). In England, the number of neurosurgical negligence claims is increasing, the financial cost substantial, and the burden significant. Lessons to be learned from the study are of paramount importance to reduce future cases of negligence and improve patient care.

  17. Patterns in neurosurgical adverse events: endovascular neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Judith M; Ziewacz, John E; Panchmatia, Jaykar R; Bader, Angela M; Pandey, Aditya S; Thompson, B Gregory; Frerichs, Kai; Gawande, Atul A

    2012-11-01

    As part of a project to devise evidence-based safety interventions for specialty surgery, the authors sought to review current evidence in endovascular neurosurgery concerning the frequency of adverse events in practice, their patterns, and current methods of reducing the occurrence of these events. This review represents part of a series of papers written to consolidate information about these events and preventive measures as part of an ongoing effort to ascertain the utility of devising system-wide policies and safety tools to improve neurosurgical practice. Based on a review of the literature, thromboembolic events appeared to be the most common adverse events in endovascular neurosurgery, with a reported incidence ranging from 2% to 61% depending on aneurysm rupture status and mode of detection of the event. Intraprocedural and periprocedural prevention and rescue regimens are advocated to minimize this risk; however, evidence on the optimal use of anticoagulant and antithrombotic agents is limited. Furthermore, it is unknown what proportion of eligible patients receive any prophylactic treatment. Groin-site hematoma is the most common access-related complication. Data from the cardiac literature indicate an overall incidence of 9% to 32%, but data specific to neuroendovascular therapy are scant. Manual compression, compression adjuncts, and closure devices are used with varying rates of success, but no standardized protocols have been tested on a broad scale. Contrast-induced nephropathy is one of the more common causes of hospital-acquired renal insufficiency, with an incidence of 30% in high-risk patients after contrast administration. Evidence from medical fields supports the use of various preventive strategies. Intraprocedural vessel rupture is infrequent, with the reported incidence ranging from 1% to 9%, but it is potentially devastating. Improvements in device technology combined with proper endovascular technique play an important role in reducing

  18. Mobile pediatric neurosurgery: rapid response neurosurgery for remote or urgent pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owler, Brian K; Carmo, Kathryn A Browning; Bladwell, Wendy; Fa'asalele, T Arieta; Roxburgh, Jane; Kendrick, Tina; Berry, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Time-critical neurosurgical conditions require urgent operative treatment to prevent death or neurological deficits. In New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory patients' distance from neurosurgical care is often great, presenting a challenge in achieving timely care for patients with acute neurosurgical conditions. A protocol was developed to facilitate consultant neurosurgery locally. Children with acute, time-critical neurosurgical emergencies underwent operations in hospitals that do not normally offer neurosurgery. The authors describe the developed protocol, the outcome of its use, and the lessons learned in the 9 initial cases where the protocol has been used. Three cases are discussed in detail. Nine children were treated by a neurosurgeon at 5 rural hospitals, and 2 children were treated at a smaller metropolitan hospital. Road ambulance, fixed wing aircraft, and medical helicopters were used to transport the Newborn and Paediatric Emergency Transport Service (NETS) team, neurosurgeon, and patients. In each case, the time to definitive neurosurgical intervention was significantly reduced. The median interval from triage at the initial hospital to surgical start time was 3:55 hours, (interquartile range [IQR] 03:29-05:20 hours). The median distance traveled to reach a patient was 232 km (range 23-637 km). The median interval from the initial NETS call requesting patient retrieval to surgical start time was 3:15 hours (IQR 00:47-03:37 hours). The estimated median "time saved" was approximately 3:00 hours (IQR 1:44-3:15 hours) compared with the travel time to retrieve the child to the tertiary center: 8:31 hours (IQR 6:56-10:08 hours). Remote urgent neurosurgical interventions can be performed safely and effectively. This practice is relevant to countries where distance limits urgent access for patients to tertiary pediatric care. This practice is lifesaving for some children with head injuries and other acute neurosurgical conditions.

  19. Patient Satisfaction and Short-Term Outcome in Elective Cranial Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reponen, Elina; Tuominen, Hanna; Hernesniemi, Juha; Korja, Miikka

    2015-11-01

    Patient-reported experience is often used as a measure for quality of care, but no reports on patient satisfaction after cranial neurosurgery exist. To study the association of overall patient satisfaction and surgical outcome and to evaluate the applicability of overall patient satisfaction as a proxy for quality of care in elective cranial neurosurgery. We conducted an observational study on the relationship of overall patient satisfaction at 30 postoperative days with surgical and functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] score) in a prospective, consecutive, and unselected cohort of 418 adult elective craniotomy patients enrolled between December 2011 and December 2012 at Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. Postoperative overall (subjective and objective) morbidity was present in 194 (46.4%) patients; yet almost 94% of all study patients reported high overall satisfaction. Low overall patient satisfaction at 30 days was not associated with postoperative major morbidity in elective cranial neurosurgery. Dependent functional status (mRS score ≥3) at 30 days, minor infections, poor postoperative subjective overall health status, and patient-reported severe symptoms (double vision, poor balance) may contribute to unsatisfactory patient experience. Overall patient satisfaction with elective cranial neurosurgery is high. Even 9 of 10 patients with postoperative major morbidity rated high overall patient satisfaction at 30 days. Overall patient satisfaction may merely reflect patient experience and subjective postoperative health status, and therefore it is a poor proxy for quality of care in elective cranial neurosurgery.

  20. Robot-assisted procedures in pediatric neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Benedictis, Alessandro; Trezza, Andrea; Carai, Andrea; Genovese, Elisabetta; Procaccini, Emidio; Messina, Raffaella; Randi, Franco; Cossu, Silvia; Esposito, Giacomo; Palma, Paolo; Amante, Paolina; Rizzi, Michele; Marras, Carlo Efisio

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE During the last 3 decades, robotic technology has rapidly spread across several surgical fields due to the continuous evolution of its versatility, stability, dexterity, and haptic properties. Neurosurgery pioneered the development of robotics, with the aim of improving the quality of several procedures requiring a high degree of accuracy and safety. Moreover, robot-guided approaches are of special interest in pediatric patients, who often have altered anatomy and challenging relationships between the diseased and eloquent structures. Nevertheless, the use of robots has been rarely reported in children. In this work, the authors describe their experience using the ROSA device (Robotized Stereotactic Assistant) in the neurosurgical management of a pediatric population. METHODS Between 2011 and 2016, 116 children underwent ROSA-assisted procedures for a variety of diseases (epilepsy, brain tumors, intra- or extraventricular and tumor cysts, obstructive hydrocephalus, and movement and behavioral disorders). Each patient received accurate preoperative planning of optimal trajectories, intraoperative frameless registration, surgical treatment using specific instruments held by the robotic arm, and postoperative CT or MR imaging. RESULTS The authors performed 128 consecutive surgeries, including implantation of 386 electrodes for stereo-electroencephalography (36 procedures), neuroendoscopy (42 procedures), stereotactic biopsy (26 procedures), pallidotomy (12 procedures), shunt placement (6 procedures), deep brain stimulation procedures (3 procedures), and stereotactic cyst aspiration (3 procedures). For each procedure, the authors analyzed and discussed accuracy, timing, and complications. CONCLUSIONS To the best their knowledge, the authors present the largest reported series of pediatric neurosurgical cases assisted by robotic support. The ROSA system provided improved safety and feasibility of minimally invasive approaches, thus optimizing the surgical

  1. Operative Landscape at Canadian Neurosurgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Michael K; Dakson, Ayoub; Ahmed, Syed Uzair; Bigder, Mark; Elliott, Cameron; Guha, Daipayan; Iorio-Morin, Christian; Kameda-Smith, Michelle; Lavergne, Pascal; Makarenko, Serge; Taccone, Michael S; Wang, Bill; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Sankar, Tejas; Christie, Sean D

    2017-07-01

    Background Currently, the literature lacks reliable data regarding operative case volumes at Canadian neurosurgery residency programs. Our objective was to provide a snapshot of the operative landscape in Canadian neurosurgical training using the trainee-led Canadian Neurosurgery Research Collaborative. Anonymized administrative operative data were gathered from each neurosurgery residency program from January 1, 2014, to December 31, 2014. Procedures were broadly classified into cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and miscellaneous procedures. A number of prespecified subspecialty procedures were recorded. We defined the resident case index as the ratio of the total number of operations to the total number of neurosurgery residents in that program. Resident number included both Canadian medical and international medical graduates, and included residents on the neurosurgery service, off-service, or on leave for research or other personal reasons. Overall, there was an average of 1845 operative cases per neurosurgery residency program. The mean numbers of cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and miscellaneous procedures were 725, 466, 48, and 193, respectively. The nationwide mean resident case indices for cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and total procedures were 90, 58, 5, and 196, respectively. There was some variation in the resident case indices for specific subspecialty procedures, with some training programs not performing carotid endarterectomy or endoscopic transsphenoidal procedures. This study presents the breadth of neurosurgical training within Canadian neurosurgery residency programs. These results may help inform the implementation of neurosurgery training as the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons residency training transitions to a competence-by-design curriculum.

  2. Prophylactic antibiotics and anticonvulsants in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratilal, B; Sampaio, C

    2011-01-01

    The prophylactic administration of antibiotics to prevent infection and the prophylactic administration of anticonvulsants to prevent first seizure episodes are common practice in neurosurgery. If prophylactic medication therapy is not indicated, the patient not only incurs the discomfort and the inconvenience resulting from drug treatment but is also unnecessarily exposed to adverse drug reactions, and incurs extra costs. The main situations in which prophylactic anticonvulsants and antibiotics are used are described and those situations we found controversial in the literature and lack further investigation are identified: anticonvulsants for preventing seizures in patients with chronic subdural hematomas, antiepileptic drugs for preventing seizures in those suffering from brain tumors, antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing meningitis in patients with basilar skull fractures, and antibiotic prophylaxis for the surgical introduction of intracranial ventricular shunts.In the following we present systematic reviews of the literature in accordance with the standard protocol of The Cochrane Collaboration to evaluate the effectiveness of the use of these prophylactic medications in the situations mentioned. Our goal was to efficiently integrate valid information and provide a basis for rational decision-making.

  3. Challenges in contemporary academic neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Peter M

    2006-03-01

    Traditionally, the ideal academic neurosurgeon has been a "quadruple threat," with excellence in clinical work, teaching, research, and administration. This tradition was best exemplified in Harvey Cushing, who developed the field of neurosurgery 90 years ago. This paradigm will probably have to change as academic neurosurgeons face major challenges. In patient care, these include increasing regulatory control, increasing malpractice costs, consolidation of expensive care in academic centers, and decreasing reimbursement; in resident teaching, work hour limitations and a changing resident culture; in research, the increasing dominance of basic scientists in governmental funding decisions and decreased involvement of neurosurgeons in scientific review committees; and in administration, problems of relationships in the workplace, patient safety, and employment compliance in an increasingly bureaucratic system. To meet these challenges, the new academic neurosurgeon will probably not be a quadruple threat personally but will be part of a quadruple threat in a department and institution. Neurosurgeons in such a setting will have to work with hospital, medical school, and national and international groups to address malpractice, reimbursement, subspecialization, and training problems; find supplemental sources of income through grants, development funds, and hospital support; lead in the development of multidisciplinary centers for neuroscience, brain tumor, spine, and other initiatives; and focus on training leaders for hospital, regional, and national groups to reconfigure neurosurgery. Collaboration, flexibility, and leadership will be characteristic of the academic neurosurgeon in this new era.

  4. Does a single specialty intensive care unit make better business sense than a multi-specialty intensive care unit? A costing study in a trauma center in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Parmeshwar; Jithesh, Vishwanathan; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Though intensive care units (ICUs) only account for 10% of hospital beds, they consume nearly 22% of hospital resources. Few definitive costing studies have been conducted in Indian settings that would help determine appropriate resource allocation. To evaluate and compare the cost of intensive care delivery between multi-specialty and neurosurgery ICU in an apex trauma care facility in India. The study was conducted in a polytrauma and neurosurgery ICU at a 203 bedded level IV trauma care facility in New Delhi, India from May, 2012 to June 2012. The study was cross-sectional, retrospective, and record-based. Traditional costing was used to arrive at the cost for both direct and indirect cost estimates. The cost centers included in study were building cost, equipment cost, human resources, materials and supplies, clinical and nonclinical support services, engineering maintenance cost, and biomedical waste management. Fisher's two-tailed t-test. Total cost/bed/day for the multi-specialty ICU was Rs. 14,976.9/- and for the neurosurgery ICU was Rs. 14,306.7/-, manpower constituting nearly half of the expenditure in both ICUs. The cost center wise and overall difference in the cost among the ICUs were statistically significant. Quantification of expenditure in running an ICU in a trauma center would assist healthcare decision makers in better allocation of resources. Although multi-specialty ICUs are more expensive, other factors will also play a role in defining the kind of ICU that need to be designed.

  5. Department of Neurosurgery, Madurai Medical College and the development of neurosurgery in South Tamil Nadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruppathy, Subbiah; Manimaran, Ramiah; Niban, Gopalakrishnan M; Muthukumar, Natarajan

    2018-01-01

    The development of neurosurgery in South Tamil Nadu can be traced to the Department of Neurosurgery, Madurai Medical College and Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India. The hospital was established in the year 1940 and Madurai Medical College was started in 1954. Prof. M. Natarajan founded this department in September, 1963. This department has a Neurosurgery Residency Program that is 50 years old. The establishment of this department and its growth to its present stature is documented here.

  6. The history of neurosurgery in Bolivia and pediatric neurosurgery in Santa Cruz de la Sierra

    OpenAIRE

    Dabdoub, Carlos F.; Dabdoub, Carlos B.

    2013-01-01

    The practice of neurosurgery in Bolivia began thousands of years ago with skull trepanation. This procedure dates from the earliest period of the Tiwanaku culture, a preInca civilization. Neurosurgical development in Bolivia has its origins in the late 19th century and can be divided in two stages. At the beginning, before the advent of neurosurgery as a discipline, some general surgeons performed procedures on the skull and brain. Formal neurosurgery in Bolivia was developed with the arrival...

  7. Nursing specialty and burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Laura; Ryan, Carey S; Thomas, Scott; Greenberg, Martin; Rolniak, Susan

    2007-03-01

    We examined the relationship between perceived control and burnout among three nursing specialties: nurse practitioners, nurse managers, and emergency nurses. Survey data were collected from 228 nurses from 30 states. Findings indicated that emergency nurses had the least control and the highest burnout, whereas nurse practitioners had the most control and the least burnout. Mediational analyses showed that expected control, hostility, and stressor frequency explained differences between specialties in burnout. The implications of these findings for interventions that reduce burnout and promote nursing retention are discussed.

  8. Virtual reality training in neurosurgery: Review of current status and future applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaraj, Ali; Lemole, Michael G; Finkle, Joshua H; Yudkowsky, Rachel; Wallace, Adam; Luciano, Cristian; Banerjee, P Pat; Rizzi, Silvio H; Charbel, Fady T

    2011-01-01

    Over years, surgical training is changing and years of tradition are being challenged by legal and ethical concerns for patient safety, work hour restrictions, and the cost of operating room time. Surgical simulation and skill training offer an opportunity to teach and practice advanced techniques before attempting them on patients. Simulation training can be as straightforward as using real instruments and video equipment to manipulate simulated "tissue" in a box trainer. More advanced virtual reality (VR) simulators are now available and ready for widespread use. Early systems have demonstrated their effectiveness and discriminative ability. Newer systems enable the development of comprehensive curricula and full procedural simulations. A PubMed review of the literature was performed for the MESH words "Virtual reality, "Augmented Reality", "Simulation", "Training", and "Neurosurgery". Relevant articles were retrieved and reviewed. A review of the literature was performed for the history, current status of VR simulation in neurosurgery. Surgical organizations are calling for methods to ensure the maintenance of skills, advance surgical training, and credential surgeons as technically competent. The number of published literature discussing the application of VR simulation in neurosurgery training has evolved over the last decade from data visualization, including stereoscopic evaluation to more complex augmented reality models. With the revolution of computational analysis abilities, fully immersive VR models are currently available in neurosurgery training. Ventriculostomy catheters insertion, endoscopic and endovascular simulations are used in neurosurgical residency training centers across the world. Recent studies have shown the coloration of proficiency with those simulators and levels of experience in the real world. Fully immersive technology is starting to be applied to the practice of neurosurgery. In the near future, detailed VR neurosurgical modules

  9. Implementation of a Cross-specialty Training Program in Basic Laparoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Flemming; Sorensen, Jette Led; Thinggaard, Jette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Several surgical specialties use laparoscopy and share many of the same techniques and challenges, such as entry approaches, equipment, and complications. However, most basic training programs focus on a single specialty. The objective of this study was to describe the ...... laparoscopy is feasible. There are several logistic benefits of using a cross-specialty approach; however, it is important that local departments include specialty-specific components, together with clinical departmental follow-up....

  10. Strategic design for pediatric neurosurgery missions across the Western Hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambrecht, Amanda; Duenas, Matthew J; Hahn, Edward J; Aryan, Henry E; Hughes, Samuel A; Waters, Dawn; Levy, Michael L; Jandial, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    With growing interest in global health, surgeons have created outreach missions to improve health care disparities in less developed countries. These efforts are mainly episodic with visiting surgeons performing the operations and minimal investment in local surgeon education. To create real and durable advancement in surgical services in disciplines that require urgent patient care, such as pediatric neurosurgery, improving the surgical armamentarium of the local surgeons must be the priority. We propose a strategic design for extending surgical education missions throughout the Western Hemisphere in order to transfer modern surgical skills to local neurosurgeons. A selection criteria and structure for targeted missions is a derivative of logistical and pedagogical lessons ascertained from previous missions by our teams in Peru and Ukraine. Outreach programs should be applied to hospitals in capital cities to serve as a central referral center for maximal impact with fiscal efficiency. The host country should fulfill several criteria, including demonstration of geopolitical stability in combination with lack of modern neurosurgical care and equipment. The mission strategy is outlined as three to four 1-week visits with an initial site evaluation to establish a relationship with the hospital administration and host surgeons. Each visit should be characterized by collaboration between visiting and host surgeons on increasingly complex cases, with progressive transfer of skills over time. A strategic approach for surgical outreach missions should be built on collaboration and camaraderie between visiting and local neurosurgeons, with the mutual objective of cost-effective targeted renovation of their surgical equipment and skill repertoire.

  11. Surgical and Teaching Mission to Mongolia: Experience and Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haranhalli, Neil; Gelfand, Yaroslav; Abramowicz, Apolonia E; Siyez, Abai; Elahi, Ebby; Yassari, Reza

    2017-06-01

    For decades, the disparity in medical care across the world along with the fundamental essence of medicine as service has laid the foundation for the global medical mission. Mongolia, a country often overlooked as an area in need of medical aid, harbors a fertile environment for long-term change. In the last 15-20 years, after the fall of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, Mongolia has turned to a free-market healthcare model and has been struggling with the transition from the formally state-run system. These changes have slowed the original progress noted among surgical specialties, namely neurosurgery, in Mongolia. A lack of resources, a desire for international interaction, and a need for technical mentorship remain a real struggle for local neurosurgeons. Under the auspices of the Virtue Foundation (www.virtuefoundation.org), we report on our 3-year experiences during our surgical and teaching mission to Mongolia and look towards long-term improvements in Mongolian neurosurgery. A total of 15 operations were performed and more than 50 patients seen in clinic during the 3-year experience. Patients ranged from 1 to 77 years of age. No patients encountered any significant peri- or postoperative complications. In our experience with the surgical and teaching mission to Mongolia, when directed appropriately, medical missions can serve as the perfect medium in fostering that environment, providing local healthcare professionals with the knowledge, skills, and motivation to create self-sustaining improvement in their own country, hence promoting intellectual and technological advancement and raising the standard of care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neurosurgical Skills Assessment: Measuring Technical Proficiency in Neurosurgery Residents Through Intraoperative Video Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkiss, Christopher A; Philemond, Steven; Lee, James; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Holloway, Terrell D; Moore, Maximillian M; Costa, Anthony B; Gordon, Errol L; Bederson, Joshua B

    2016-05-01

    Although technical skills are fundamental in neurosurgery, there is little agreement on how to describe, measure, or compare skills among surgeons. The primary goal of this study was to develop a quantitative grading scale for technical surgical performance that distinguishes operator skill when graded by domain experts (residents, attendings, and nonsurgeons). Scores provided by raters should be highly reliable with respect to scores from other observers. Neurosurgery residents were fitted with a head-mounted video camera while performing craniotomies under attending supervision. Seven videos, 1 from each postgraduate year (PGY) level (1-7), were anonymized and scored by 16 attendings, 8 residents, and 7 nonsurgeons using a grading scale. Seven skills were graded: incision, efficiency of instrument use, cauterization, tissue handling, drilling/craniotomy, confidence, and training level. A strong correlation was found between skills score and PGY year (P Technical skills of neurosurgery residents recorded during craniotomy can be measured with high interrater reliability. Surgeons and nonsurgeons alike readily distinguish different skill levels. This type of assessment could be used to coach residents, to track performance over time, and potentially to compare skill levels. Developing an objective tool to evaluate surgical performance would be useful in several areas of neurosurgery education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Augmented reality in neurosurgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Antonio; Cutolo, Fabrizio; Carbone, Marina; Cagnazzo, Federico; Ferrari, Mauro; Ferrari, Vincenzo

    2017-10-01

    Neuronavigation has become an essential neurosurgical tool in pursuing minimal invasiveness and maximal safety, even though it has several technical limitations. Augmented reality (AR) neuronavigation is a significant advance, providing a real-time updated 3D virtual model of anatomical details, overlaid on the real surgical field. Currently, only a few AR systems have been tested in a clinical setting. The aim is to review such devices. We performed a PubMed search of reports restricted to human studies of in vivo applications of AR in any neurosurgical procedure using the search terms "Augmented reality" and "Neurosurgery." Eligibility assessment was performed independently by two reviewers in an unblinded standardized manner. The systems were qualitatively evaluated on the basis of the following: neurosurgical subspecialty of application, pathology of treated lesions and lesion locations, real data source, virtual data source, tracking modality, registration technique, visualization processing, display type, and perception location. Eighteen studies were included during the period 1996 to September 30, 2015. The AR systems were grouped by the real data source: microscope (8), hand- or head-held cameras (4), direct patient view (2), endoscope (1), and X-ray fluoroscopy (1) head-mounted display (1). A total of 195 lesions were treated: 75 (38.46 %) were neoplastic, 77 (39.48 %) neurovascular, and 1 (0.51 %) hydrocephalus, and 42 (21.53 %) were undetermined. Current literature confirms that AR is a reliable and versatile tool when performing minimally invasive approaches in a wide range of neurosurgical diseases, although prospective randomized studies are not yet available and technical improvements are needed.

  14. Microvascular Anastomosis Training in Neurosurgery: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim A. Byvaltsev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular diseases are among the most widespread diseases in the world, which largely determine the structure of morbidity and mortality rates. Microvascular anastomosis techniques are important for revascularization surgeries on brachiocephalic and carotid arteries and complex cerebral aneurysms and even during resection of brain tumors that obstruct major cerebral arteries. Training in microvascular surgery became even more difficult with less case exposure and growth of the use of endovascular techniques. In this text we will briefly discuss the history of microvascular surgery, review current literature on simulation models with the emphasis on their merits and shortcomings, and describe the views and opinions on the future of the microvascular training in neurosurgery. In “dry” microsurgical training, various models created from artificial materials that simulate biological tissues are used. The next stage in training more experienced surgeons is to work with nonliving tissue models. Microvascular training using live models is considered to be the most relevant due to presence of the blood flow. Training on laboratory animals has high indicators of face and constructive validity. One of the future directions in the development of microsurgical techniques is the use of robotic systems. Robotic systems may play a role in teaching future generations of microsurgeons. Modern technologies allow access to highly accurate learning environments that are extremely similar to real environment. Additionally, assessment of microsurgical skills should become a fundamental part of the current evaluation of competence within a microneurosurgical training program. Such an assessment tool could be utilized to ensure a constant level of surgical competence within the recertification process. It is important that this evaluation be based on validated models.

  15. A neurosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dedicated PACS for conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefkopoulos, D.; Bocquiault, P.; Levrier, M.; Merienne, L.; Schlienger, M.

    1995-01-01

    To realise conformal cerebral stereotactic irradiations we use a Neurosurgery/stereotactic dedicated PACS between two distant hospitals. It connects the stereotactic neurosurgery planification imaging system NEUROAXIS (Sopelem-Sofretec/Ste Anne Hospital) with the dosimetric TPS ARTEMIS-3D/Dosigray (Tenon Hospital). NEUROAXIS is a computer aided stereotactic biopsies and stereo-electroencephalographies, used by surgeons in operating room. The system determines the precise location data for Talairach radiological equipment (X ray source at 5 meters from film) and the geometry of scanner and MRI stereotactical referentials. It provides a full set of features for lesion localization, geometrical computations, surgical planifications, picture archiving, stereotactic angiography, CT and MRI image processing and networking. It sends images through the French public digital network ISDN (NUMERIS/France Telecom : 2x64 Kbits/s) from Ste Anne to Tenon Hospital. Stereotactic angiographic and CT images are reformatted into the DOSIGRAY image processing environment where 3-D dose distributions, displays and DVHs are computed to determine the optimal treatment. ARTEMIS-3D/Dosigray is a TPS for stereotactic radiotherapy devised by the Tenon Hospital for clinical methodology and 3D dose calculations, optimization software development and the Dosigray company for multimodality imaging, (2D(3D)) computer graphics for dose and anatomical representation and data networking. Communication within the radiation oncology department is provided by local area ETHERNET network, linking heterogeneous systems (Vaxstations-3200; Decstation (5000(240))) by means of different protocols. The works in progress are to send back via the same network the 3-D dose matrix to Neurosurgery department NEUROAXIS system. Our PACS is used since six months to treat patients. It has permitted to improve the treatment quality in comparison with our first version TPS ARTEMIS-3D

  16. Checklists in Neurosurgery to Decrease Preventable Medical Errors: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enchev, Yavor

    2015-01-01

    Neurosurgery represents a zero tolerance environment for medical errors, especially preventable ones like all types of wrong site surgery, complications due to the incorrect positioning of patients for neurosurgical interventions and complications due to failure of the devices required for the specific procedure. Following the excellent and encouraging results of the safety checklists in intensive care medicine and in other surgical areas, the checklist was naturally introduced in neurosurgery. To date, the reported world experience with neurosurgical checklists is limited to 15 series with fewer than 20,000 cases in various neurosurgical areas. The purpose of this review was to study the reported neurosurgical checklists according to the following parameters: year of publication; country of origin; area of neurosurgery; type of neurosurgical procedure-elective or emergency; person in charge of the checklist completion; participants involved in completion; whether they prevented incorrect site surgery; whether they prevented complications due to incorrect positioning of the patients for neurosurgical interventions; whether they prevented complications due to failure of the devices required for the specific procedure; their specific aims; educational preparation and training; the time needed for checklist completion; study duration and phases; number of cases included; barriers to implementation; efforts to implementation; team appreciation; and safety outcomes. Based on this analysis, it could be concluded that neurosurgical checklists represent an efficient, reliable, cost-effective and time-saving tool for increasing patient safety and elevating the neurosurgeons’ self-confidence. Every neurosurgical department must develop its own neurosurgical checklist or adopt and modify an existing one according to its specific features and needs in an attempt to establish or develop its safety culture. The world, continental, regional and national neurosurgical societies

  17. Systematic Review of Patient-Specific Surgical Simulation: Toward Advancing Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Won Hyung A; Dharampal, Navjit; Mostafa, Ahmed E; Sharlin, Ehud; Kopp, Gail; Jacobs, William Bradley; Hurlbert, Robin John; Chan, Sonny; Sutherland, Garnette R

    Simulation-based education has been shown to be an effective tool to teach foundational technical skills in various surgical specialties. However, most of the current simulations are limited to generic scenarios and do not allow continuation of the learning curve beyond basic technical skills to prepare for more advanced expertise, such as patient-specific surgical planning. The objective of this study was to evaluate the current medical literature with respect to the utilization and educational value of patient-specific simulations for surgical training. We performed a systematic review of the literature using Pubmed, Embase, and Scopus focusing on themes of simulation, patient-specific, surgical procedure, and education. The study included randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, and case-control studies published between 2005 and 2016. Two independent reviewers (W.H.R. and N.D) conducted the study appraisal, data abstraction, and quality assessment of the studies. The search identified 13 studies that met the inclusion criteria; 7 studies employed computer simulations and 6 studies used 3-dimensional (3D) synthetic models. A number of surgical specialties evaluated patient-specific simulation, including neurosurgery, vascular surgery, orthopedic surgery, and interventional radiology. However, most studies were small in size and primarily aimed at feasibility assessments and early validation. Early evidence has shown feasibility and utility of patient-specific simulation for surgical education. With further development of this technology, simulation-based education may be able to support training of higher-level competencies outside the clinical settingto aid learners in their development of surgical skills. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantum computing: a prime modality in neurosurgery's future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brian; Liu, Charles Y; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2012-11-01

    With each significant development in the field of neurosurgery, our dependence on computers, small and large, has continuously increased. From something as mundane as bipolar cautery to sophisticated intraoperative navigation with real-time magnetic resonance imaging-assisted surgical guidance, both technologies, however simple or complex, require computational processing power to function. The next frontier for neurosurgery involves developing a greater understanding of the brain and furthering our capabilities as surgeons to directly affect brain circuitry and function. This has come in the form of implantable devices that can electronically and nondestructively influence the cortex and nuclei with the purpose of restoring neuronal function and improving quality of life. We are now transitioning from devices that are turned on and left alone, such as vagus nerve stimulators and deep brain stimulators, to "smart" devices that can listen and react to the body as the situation may dictate. The development of quantum computers and their potential to be thousands, if not millions, of times faster than current "classical" computers, will significantly affect the neurosciences, especially the field of neurorehabilitation and neuromodulation. Quantum computers may advance our understanding of the neural code and, in turn, better develop and program implantable neural devices. When quantum computers reach the point where we can actually implant such devices in patients, the possibilities of what can be done to interface and restore neural function will be limitless. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Virtual reality training in neurosurgery: Review of current status and future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaraj, Ali; Lemole, Michael G.; Finkle, Joshua H.; Yudkowsky, Rachel; Wallace, Adam; Luciano, Cristian; Banerjee, P. Pat; Rizzi, Silvio H.; Charbel, Fady T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Over years, surgical training is changing and years of tradition are being challenged by legal and ethical concerns for patient safety, work hour restrictions, and the cost of operating room time. Surgical simulation and skill training offer an opportunity to teach and practice advanced techniques before attempting them on patients. Simulation training can be as straightforward as using real instruments and video equipment to manipulate simulated “tissue” in a box trainer. More advanced virtual reality (VR) simulators are now available and ready for widespread use. Early systems have demonstrated their effectiveness and discriminative ability. Newer systems enable the development of comprehensive curricula and full procedural simulations. Methods: A PubMed review of the literature was performed for the MESH words “Virtual reality, “Augmented Reality”, “Simulation”, “Training”, and “Neurosurgery”. Relevant articles were retrieved and reviewed. A review of the literature was performed for the history, current status of VR simulation in neurosurgery. Results: Surgical organizations are calling for methods to ensure the maintenance of skills, advance surgical training, and credential surgeons as technically competent. The number of published literature discussing the application of VR simulation in neurosurgery training has evolved over the last decade from data visualization, including stereoscopic evaluation to more complex augmented reality models. With the revolution of computational analysis abilities, fully immersive VR models are currently available in neurosurgery training. Ventriculostomy catheters insertion, endoscopic and endovascular simulations are used in neurosurgical residency training centers across the world. Recent studies have shown the coloration of proficiency with those simulators and levels of experience in the real world. Conclusion: Fully immersive technology is starting to be applied to the practice of

  20. New CT-aided stereotactic neurosurgery technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, H.M.; Truong, T.K.; Reed, I.S.; Slater, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    In this communication, a new technique for CT-aided stereotactic neurosurgery is presented. The combination of specially designed hardware and software provides a fast, simple, and versatile tool for the accurate insertion of a probe into the human brain. This system is portable and can be implemented on any CT computer system. The complete procedure to perform the CT-aided stereotactic neurosurgery technique is presented. Experimental results are given which demonstrate the power of the method. Finally, the key algorithms for realizing this technique are described in the Appendix

  1. Endovascular Neurosurgery: Personal Experience and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Jean

    2016-09-01

    From Luessenhop's early clinical experience until the present day, experimental methods have been introduced to make progress in endovascular neurosurgery. A personal historical narrative, spanning the 1980s to 2010s, with a review of past opportunities, current problems, and future perspectives. Although the technology has significantly improved, our clinical culture remains a barrier to methodologically sound and safe innovative care and progress. We must learn how to safely practice endovascular neurosurgery in the presence of uncertainty and verify patient outcomes in real time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Interactive computer graphics for stereotactic neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.H.; Davis, J.R.; Gahbauer, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    A microcomputer (IBM PC/AT) system has been developed to incorporate multiple image sources for stereotactic neurosurgery. Hard copy data is calibrated and captured with a video camera and frame grabber. Line contours are generated automatically on the basis of gray scale density or digitized manually. Interactive computer graphics provide a format with acceptable speed and accuracy for stereotactic neurosurgery. The ability to dimensionally integrate existing image data from multiple sources for target selection makes preoperative scans and scanner compatible head holders unnecessary. The system description and examples of use for brain tumor biopsy and brachytherapy ware presented

  3. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging for neurosurgery – An anaesthesiologist's challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajashree U Gandhe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-guided neurosurgery has gained popularity over the years globally. These surgeries require a dedicated operating room and MRI-compatible anaesthesia equipment. The anaesthesiologist providing care in this setup needs to be experienced and vigilant to ensure patient safety. Strict adherence to MRI safety checklists and regular personnel training would avoid potential accidents and life-threatening emergencies. Teamwork, good communication, preprocedure planning, and familiarity with the surroundings are very important for safe care and good outcomes. We performed a literature search in Google Scholar, PubMed and Cochrane databases for original and reviewed articles for the origins, development and applications of intraoperative MRI in neurosurgical procedures. Much of the research has emphasised on the surgical indications than the anaesthetic challenges faced during intraoperative MRI guided surgery. The purpose of this review is to discuss the anaesthetic concerns specific to this unique environment.

  4. Preoperative imaging as the basis for image-guided neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, D.; Strauss, G.; Hesse, S.; Sabri, O.; Goldammer, A.; Meixensberger, J.; Hund-Georgiadis, M.; Richter, A.; Kahn, T.

    2004-01-01

    With the progressive development of soft- and hardware, the acceptance of image-guided neurosurgery has increased dramatically. Additional image data are required to analyze the nature and the dimensions of pathological processes and the surrounding tissue. In this context, fMRI, SPECT, PET, as well as special modalities of CT and MR imaging, are routinely used. Secondary post-processing options are used to detect intracerebral lesions as well as adjacent functional eloquent regions in the parenchymatous organ pre- and intraoperatively. The integration of different image information guarantees the precise planning and realization of surgical maneuvers. The segmentation of interesting structures and risk structures, as well as their implementation in the neuronavigation systems, help to avoid additional intraoperative traumatization and offer a higher level of safety and precision. In this article the value and limitations of presurgical imaging will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  5. Review of 3-Dimensional Printing on Cranial Neurosurgery Simulation Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakharia, Vejay N; Vakharia, Nilesh N; Hill, Ciaran S

    2016-04-01

    Shorter working times, reduced operative exposure to complex procedures, and increased subspecialization have resulted in training constraints within most surgical fields. Simulation has been suggested as a possible means of acquiring new surgical skills without exposing patients to the surgeon's operative "learning curve." Here we review the potential impact of 3-dimensional printing on simulation and training within cranial neurosurgery and its implications for the future. In accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines, a comprehensive search of PubMed, OVID MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was performed. In total, 31 studies relating to the use of 3-dimensional (3D) printing within neurosurgery, of which 16 were specifically related to simulation and training, were identified. The main impact of 3D printing on neurosurgical simulation training was within vascular surgery, where patient-specific replication of vascular anatomy and pathologies can aid surgeons in operative planning and clip placement for reconstruction of vascular anatomy. Models containing replicas of brain tumors have also been reconstructed and used for training purposes, with some providing realistic representations of skin, subcutaneous tissue, bone, dura, normal brain, and tumor tissue. 3D printing provides a unique means of directly replicating patient-specific pathologies. It can identify anatomic variation and provide a medium in which training models can be generated rapidly, allowing the trainee and experienced neurosurgeon to practice parts of operations preoperatively. Future studies are required to validate this technology in comparison with current simulators and show improved patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The future of neurosurgery: a white paper on the recruitment and retention of women in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzil, Deborah L; Abosch, Aviva; Germano, Isabelle; Gilmer, Holly; Maraire, J Nozipo; Muraszko, Karin; Pannullo, Susan; Rosseau, Gail; Schwartz, Lauren; Todor, Roxanne; Ullman, Jamie; Zusman, Edie

    2008-09-01

    The leadership of Women in Neurosurgery (WINS) has been asked by the Board of Directors of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) to compose a white paper on the recruitment and retention of female neurosurgical residents and practitioners. Neurosurgery must attract the best and the brightest. Women now constitute a larger percentage of medical school classes than men, representing approximately 60% of each graduating medical school class. Neurosurgery is facing a potential crisis in the US workforce pipeline, with the number of neurosurgeons in the US (per capita) decreasing. The number of women entering neurosurgery training programs and the number of board-certified female neurosurgeons is not increasing. Personal anecdotes demonstrating gender inequity abound among female neurosurgeons at every level of training and career development. Gender inequity exists in neurosurgery training programs, in the neurosurgery workplace, and within organized neurosurgery. The consistently low numbers of women in neurosurgery training programs and in the workplace results in a dearth of female role models for the mentoring of residents and junior faculty/practitioners. This lack of guidance contributes to perpetuation of barriers to women considering careers in neurosurgery, and to the lack of professional advancement experienced by women already in the field. There is ample evidence that mentors and role models play a critical role in the training and retention of women faculty within academic medicine. The absence of a critical mass of female neurosurgeons in academic medicine may serve as a deterrent to female medical students deciding whether or not to pursue careers in neurosurgery. There is limited exposure to neurosurgery during medical school. Medical students have concerns regarding gender inequities (acceptance into residency, salaries, promotion, and achieving leadership positions). Gender inequity in academic medicine is not unique to neurosurgery

  7. Stereotactic imaging in functional neurosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirabayashi, Hidehiro

    2012-07-01

    Background: The birth of stereotactic functional neurosurgery in 1947 was to a great extent dependent on the development of ventriculography. The last decades have witnessed a renaissance of functional stereotactic neurosurgery in the treatment of patients with movement disorders. Initially, these procedures were largely based on the same imaging technique that had been used since the birth of this technique, and that is still used in some centers. The introduction of new imaging modalities such as Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provided new potentials, but also new challenges for accurate identification and visualisation of the targets in the basal ganglia and the thalamus with an urge to thoroughly evaluate and optimize the stereotactic targeting technique, as well as evaluate accurately in stereotactic space the location and extent of stereotactic Radiofrequency (RF) lesions and the position of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. Aims: To study the differences between CT and MRI regarding indirect atlas coordinates in thalamic and pallidal procedures and to evaluate and validate visualisation of the pallidum and the subthalamic nucleus in view of direct targeting irrespective of atlas-derived coordinates. Furthermore, to evaluate the contribution of RF parameters on the size of stereotactic lesions, as well as the impact of size and location on clinical outcome. Method: The coordinates in relation to the landmarks of the 3{sup rd} ventricle of the targets in the pallidum and ventrolateral thalamus were compared between CT and MRI in 34 patients. In another 48 patients direct visualization of the pallidum was evaluated and compared to indirect atlas based targeting. The possibility and versatility of visualizing the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) on short acquisition MRI were evaluated in a multicentre study, and the use of alternative landmarks in identification of the STN was demonstrated in another study. In 46 patients CT and

  8. Stereotactic imaging in functional neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    Background: The birth of stereotactic functional neurosurgery in 1947 was to a great extent dependent on the development of ventriculography. The last decades have witnessed a renaissance of functional stereotactic neurosurgery in the treatment of patients with movement disorders. Initially, these procedures were largely based on the same imaging technique that had been used since the birth of this technique, and that is still used in some centers. The introduction of new imaging modalities such as Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provided new potentials, but also new challenges for accurate identification and visualisation of the targets in the basal ganglia and the thalamus with an urge to thoroughly evaluate and optimize the stereotactic targeting technique, as well as evaluate accurately in stereotactic space the location and extent of stereotactic Radiofrequency (RF) lesions and the position of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. Aims: To study the differences between CT and MRI regarding indirect atlas coordinates in thalamic and pallidal procedures and to evaluate and validate visualisation of the pallidum and the subthalamic nucleus in view of direct targeting irrespective of atlas-derived coordinates. Furthermore, to evaluate the contribution of RF parameters on the size of stereotactic lesions, as well as the impact of size and location on clinical outcome. Method: The coordinates in relation to the landmarks of the 3 rd ventricle of the targets in the pallidum and ventrolateral thalamus were compared between CT and MRI in 34 patients. In another 48 patients direct visualization of the pallidum was evaluated and compared to indirect atlas based targeting. The possibility and versatility of visualizing the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) on short acquisition MRI were evaluated in a multicentre study, and the use of alternative landmarks in identification of the STN was demonstrated in another study. In 46 patients CT and MRI

  9. Guest Editorial: Functional neurosurgery | Enslin | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 106, No 8 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Functional neurosurgery. JMN Enslin. Abstract. No Abstract.

  10. Neurosurgery for management of severe head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, K.; Richter, H.P.

    1998-01-01

    Neurosurgery as a treatment of severe head injuries is not restricted to invasive surgery but also includes peri-operative intensive care medicine. Thanks to the technological progress and advanced diagnostic tools, especially drug treatments and their efficiency as well as risks can be far better monitored and analysed today. (orig./CB) [de

  11. Interstitial laser thermotherapy in neurosurgery: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menovsky, T.; Beek, J. F.; van Gemert, M. J.; Roux, F. X.; Bown, S. G.

    1996-01-01

    One of the most recent laser treatment modalities in neurosurgery is interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILTT). In this review, experimental and clinical studies concerning intracranial ILTT are discussed. Two methods for intra-operative control of the laser induced lesions are described; i.e.,

  12. The Establishment and Development of Neurosurgery Services in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptigau, W Matui; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Kevau, Ikau; Watters, David A

    2016-02-01

    Papua New Guinea (PNG) is a developing Pacific Nation of 7.3 million people. Although neurosurgery training was introduced to PNG in the year 2000, it was in 2003 that a neurosurgery service was established. Prior to this time, neurosurgery in PNG was performed by general surgeons, with some assistance from visiting Australian neurosurgeons. Neurosurgical training was introduced to PNG in 2000. The model involved a further 3 years of training for a surgeon who had already completed 4 years of general surgical training. We aim to review the output, outcomes and impact achieved by training the first national neurosurgeon. The data on activity (output) and outcomes were collected prospectively from 2003–2012. Ongoing mentoring and continuing professional development were provided through annual neurosurgical visits from Australia. There were serious limitations in the provision of equipment, with a lack of computerized tomographic or MR imaging, and adjuvant oncological services. There were 1618 neurosurgery admissions, 1020 neurosurgical procedures with a 5.74 % overall mortality. Seventy percent of cases presented as emergencies. There were improved outcomes, particularly for head injuries, whilst hydrocephalus was managed with an acceptable morbidity and revision rate. The training of a neurosurgeon resulted in PNG patients receiving a better range of surgical services, with a lower mortality. The outcomes able to be delivered were limited by late presentations of patients and lack of resources including imaging. These themes are familiar to all low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) and this may serve as a model for other LMIC neurosurgical services to adopt as they consider whether to establish and develop neurosurgical and other sub-specialist surgical services.

  13. Does a single specialty intensive care unit make better business sense than a multi-specialty intensive care unit? A costing study in a trauma center in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Parmeshwar; Jithesh, Vishwanathan; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Context: Though intensive care units (ICUs) only account for 10% of hospital beds, they consume nearly 22% of hospital resources. Few definitive costing studies have been conducted in Indian settings that would help determine appropriate resource allocation. Aim: To evaluate and compare the cost of intensive care delivery between multi-specialty and neurosurgery ICU in an apex trauma care facility in India. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a polytrauma and neurosurgery ICU at a 203 bedded level IV trauma care facility in New Delhi, India from May, 2012 to June 2012. The study was cross-sectional, retrospective, and record-based. Traditional costing was used to arrive at the cost for both direct and indirect cost estimates. The cost centers included in study were building cost, equipment cost, human resources, materials and supplies, clinical and nonclinical support services, engineering maintenance cost, and biomedical waste management. Statistical Analysis: Fisher's two-tailed t-test. Results: Total cost/bed/day for the multi-specialty ICU was Rs. 14,976.9/- and for the neurosurgery ICU was Rs. 14,306.7/-, manpower constituting nearly half of the expenditure in both ICUs. The cost center wise and overall difference in the cost among the ICUs were statistically significant. Conclusions: Quantification of expenditure in running an ICU in a trauma center would assist healthcare decision makers in better allocation of resources. Although multi-specialty ICUs are more expensive, other factors will also play a role in defining the kind of ICU that need to be designed. PMID:25829909

  14. Does a single specialty intensive care unit make better business sense than a multi-specialty intensive care unit? A costing study in a trauma center in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmeshwar Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Though intensive care units (ICUs only account for 10% of hospital beds, they consume nearly 22% of hospital resources. Few definitive costing studies have been conducted in Indian settings that would help determine appropriate resource allocation. Aim: To evaluate and compare the cost of intensive care delivery between multi-specialty and neurosurgery ICU in an apex trauma care facility in India. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a polytrauma and neurosurgery ICU at a 203 bedded level IV trauma care facility in New Delhi, India from May, 2012 to June 2012. The study was cross-sectional, retrospective, and record-based. Traditional costing was used to arrive at the cost for both direct and indirect cost estimates. The cost centers included in study were building cost, equipment cost, human resources, materials and supplies, clinical and nonclinical support services, engineering maintenance cost, and biomedical waste management. Statistical Analysis: Fisher′s two-tailed t-test. Results: Total cost/bed/day for the multi-specialty ICU was Rs. 14,976.9/- and for the neurosurgery ICU was Rs. 14,306.7/-, manpower constituting nearly half of the expenditure in both ICUs. The cost center wise and overall difference in the cost among the ICUs were statistically significant. Conclusions: Quantification of expenditure in running an ICU in a trauma center would assist healthcare decision makers in better allocation of resources. Although multi-specialty ICUs are more expensive, other factors will also play a role in defining the kind of ICU that need to be designed.

  15. Specialty and full-service hospitals: a comparative cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Kathleen; Burgess, James F; Young, Gary J

    2008-10-01

    To compare the costs of physician-owned cardiac, orthopedic, and surgical single specialty hospitals with those of full-service hospital competitors. The primary data sources are the Medicare Cost Reports for 1998-2004 and hospital inpatient discharge data for three of the states where single specialty hospitals are most prevalent, Texas, California, and Arizona. The latter were obtained from the Texas Department of State Health Services, the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Additional data comes from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database. We identified all physician-owned cardiac, orthopedic, and surgical specialty hospitals in these three states as well as all full-service acute care hospitals serving the same market areas, defined using Dartmouth Hospital Referral Regions. We estimated a hospital cost function using stochastic frontier regression analysis, and generated hospital specific inefficiency measures. Application of t-tests of significance compared the inefficiency measures of specialty hospitals with those of full-service hospitals to make general comparisons between these classes of hospitals. Results do not provide evidence that specialty hospitals are more efficient than the full-service hospitals with whom they compete. In particular, orthopedic and surgical specialty hospitals appear to have significantly higher levels of cost inefficiency. Cardiac hospitals, however, do not appear to be different from competitors in this respect. Policymakers should not embrace the assumption that physician-owned specialty hospitals produce patient care more efficiently than their full-service hospital competitors.

  16. The impact of endovascular repair on specialties performing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.H.J. Ultee (Klaas); R. Hurks (Rob); D.B. Buck (Dominique B.); G.S. Dasilva (George S.); P.A. Soden (Peter A.); J.A. van Herwaarden (Joost); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); M.L. Schermerhorn (Marc)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair has been performed by various surgical specialties for many years. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) may be a disruptive technology, having an impact on which specialties care for patients with AAA. Therefore, we examined the proportion

  17. The impact of endovascular repair on specialties performing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ultee, Klaas H J; Hurks, Rob; Buck, Dominique B.; Dasilva, George S.; Soden, Peter A.; Van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Verhagen, Hence J M; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair has been performed by various surgical specialties for many years. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) may be a disruptive technology, having an impact on which specialties care for patients with AAA. Therefore, we examined the proportion of AAA

  18. The European Working Time Directive and the effects on training of surgical specialists (doctors in training): a position paper of the surgical disciplines of the countries of the EU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benes, V

    2006-11-01

    Legislation launched with the EWTD was born as a "Protection of the clinical personnel against overwork for the benefit of Patients" (consumer protection and safety). It appeared that this legislation is in direct and severe conflict with former EU legislation to train competent surgical specialists. First experiences with the EWTD show far reaching and serious consequences on the training of surgical specialists as well as on medical care. There will be a reduction of about 30-35% of clinical and operative experience acquired during the usual 6 yrs of training, with many other negative aspects (see p. 7). All measures proposed so far to overcome the ensuing problems are unworkable. The training of competent surgical specialists as required by the Directive 93/16 EEC is no longer possible and serious problems with safe patient care will occur in the short term, if no political actions are taken. The surgical specialties, represented in the UEMS, provide a proposal for a working hour model consisting of 48 hrs working time (incl. service duties) plus additional 12 hrs reserved and protected for teaching and training. This model would adhere to the EWTD on the one hand, yet maintain the desired standard of training. This proposed exemption from the EWTD would be limited to the time of specialist training. We ask the responsible politicians to find a solution rapidly to prevent serious negative consequences. This motion is supported by the surgical specialties (neurosurgery, general surgery, orthopaedic surgery, paediatric surgery, cardio-thoracic surgery, vascular surgery, oto-rhino-laryngology, list not complete) of the member states of the EU, representing more than 80,000 surgical specialists.

  19. Augmented Reality in Neurosurgery: A Review of Current Concepts and Emerging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Daipayan; Alotaibi, Naif M; Nguyen, Nhu; Gupta, Shaurya; McFaul, Christopher; Yang, Victor X D

    2017-05-01

    Augmented reality (AR) superimposes computer-generated virtual objects onto the user's view of the real world. Among medical disciplines, neurosurgery has long been at the forefront of image-guided surgery, and it continues to push the frontiers of AR technology in the operating room. In this systematic review, we explore the history of AR in neurosurgery and examine the literature on current neurosurgical applications of AR. Significant challenges to surgical AR exist, including compounded sources of registration error, impaired depth perception, visual and tactile temporal asynchrony, and operator inattentional blindness. Nevertheless, the ability to accurately display multiple three-dimensional datasets congruently over the area where they are most useful, coupled with future advances in imaging, registration, display technology, and robotic actuation, portend a promising role for AR in the neurosurgical operating room.

  20. In vivo porcine training model for cranial neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regelsberger, Jan; Eicker, Sven; Siasios, Ioannis; Hänggi, Daniel; Kirsch, Matthias; Horn, Peter; Winkler, Peter; Signoretti, Stefano; Fountas, Kostas; Dufour, Henry; Barcia, Juan A; Sakowitz, Oliver; Westermaier, Thomas; Sabel, Michael; Heese, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Supplemental education is desirable for neurosurgical training, and the use of human cadaver specimen and virtual reality models is routine. An in vivo porcine training model for cranial neurosurgery was introduced in 2005, and our recent experience with this unique model is outlined here. For the first time, porcine anatomy is illustrated with particular respect to neurosurgical procedures. The pros and cons of this model are described. The aim of the course was to set up a laboratory scenery imitating an almost realistic operating room in which anatomy of the brain and neurosurgical techniques in a mentored environment free from time constraints could be trained. Learning objectives of the course were to learn about the microsurgical techniques in cranial neurosurgery and the management of complications. Participants were asked to evaluate the quality and utility of the programme via standardized questionnaires by a grading scale from A (best) to E (worst). In total, 154 residents have been trained on the porcine model to date. None of the participants regarded his own residency programme as structured. The bleeding and complication management (97%), the realistic laboratory set-up (89%) and the working environment (94%) were favoured by the vast majority of trainees and confirmed our previous findings. After finishing the course, the participants graded that their skills in bone drilling, dissecting the brain and preserving cerebral vessels under microscopic magnification had improved to level A and B. In vivo hands-on courses, fully equipped with microsurgical instruments, offer an outstanding training opportunity in which bleeding management on a pulsating, vital brain represents a unique training approach. Our results have shown that education programmes still lack practical training facilities in which in vivo models may act as a complementary approach in surgical training.

  1. The history of neurosurgery in Bolivia and pediatric neurosurgery in Santa Cruz de la Sierra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabdoub, Carlos F; Dabdoub, Carlos B

    2013-09-25

    The practice of neurosurgery in Bolivia began thousands of years ago with skull trepanation. This procedure dates from the earliest period of the Tiwanaku culture, a preInca civilization. Neurosurgical development in Bolivia has its origins in the late 19(th) century and can be divided in two stages. At the beginning, before the advent of neurosurgery as a discipline, some general surgeons performed procedures on the skull and brain. Formal neurosurgery in Bolivia was developed with the arrival of neurosurgeons trained in the United States and some countries of South America. The Bolivian Neurosurgical Society was created in 1975. Nowadays, our national society has 74 members. It is affiliated with the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies and the Latin American Federation of Neurosurgical Societies. Presently, neurosurgery in Bolivia is similar to that seen in developed countries. In this sense, government programs should dedicate more financial support to establish specialized healthcare centers where the management of complex central nervous system lesions could be offered. In contrast, we believe that encouraging the local training of young neurosurgeons is one of the most important factors in the development of neurosurgery in Bolivia or any other country.

  2. Free-access open-source e-learning in comprehensive neurosurgery skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jotwani, Payal; Srivastav, Vinkle; Tripathi, Manjul; Deo, Rama Chandra; Baby, Britty; Damodaran, Natesan; Singh, Ramandeep; Suri, Ashish; Bettag, Martin; Roy, Tara Sankar; Busert, Christoph; Mehlitz, Marcus; Lalwani, Sanjeev; Garg, Kanwaljeet; Paul, Kolin; Prasad, Sanjiva; Banerjee, Subhashis; Kalra, Prem; Kumar, Subodh; Sharma, Bhavani Shankar; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Since the end of last century, technology has taken a front seat in dispersion of medical education. Advancements of technology in neurosurgery and traditional training methods are now being challenged by legal and ethical concerns of patient safety, resident work-hour restriction and cost of operating-room time. To supplement the existing neurosurgery education pattern, various e-learning platforms are introduced as structured, interactive learning system. This study focuses on the concept, formulation, development and impact of web based learning platforms dedicated to neurosurgery discipline to disseminate education, supplement surgical knowledge and improve skills of neurosurgeons. 'Neurosurgery Education and Training School (NETS), e-learning platform' has integration of web-based technologies like 'Content Management System' for organizing the education material and 'Learning Management System' for updating neurosurgeons. NETS discussion forum networks neurosurgeons, neuroscientists and neuro-technologists across the globe facilitating collaborative translational research. Multi-authored neurosurgical e-learning material supplements the deficiencies of regular time-bound education. Interactive open-source, global, free-access e-learning platform of NETS has around 1) 425 visitors/month from 73 countries; ratio of new visitors to returning visitors 42.3; 57.7 (2); 64,380 views from 190 subscribers for surgical videos, 3-D animation, graphics based training modules (3); average 402 views per post. The e-Learning platforms provide updated educational content that make them "quick, surf, find and extract" resources. e-Learning tools like web-based education, social interactive platform and question-answer forum will save unnecessary expenditure of time and travel of neurosurgeons seeking knowledge. The need for free access platforms is more pronounced for the neurosurgeons and patients in developing nations.

  3. CT-guided stereotactic neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Takaaki; Sato, Shoju; Matsumoto, Akira; Sano, Akira; Takahashi, Kazunori; Murakami, Yuji; Ohta, Kosuke

    1985-01-01

    Brown-Roberts-Wells stereotactic instruments were used for CT guided stereotactic surgery in 54 cases (65 operations). Stereotactic biopsy was done in 9 cases and successive regional chemotherapy was done in 3 cases. Stereotactic drainage was done in 2 cases of bacterial abcess, 3 cases of cystic neoplasm and 33 cases (43 operations) of intracerebral hematoma. CT guided stereotactic procedure was valuable for the correct cannulation to the center of the cavity. We tried to utilize CT image for the selection of targets for stereotactic functional neurosurgical procedures in 6 cases. In the cases of thalamotomy, the information derived from CT made the operation safer than that by contrast ventriculography alone. In all cases of electrode implantation for deep brain stimulation, accurate and precise electrode placement was achieved from CT images alone. This rapid and easy surgical technique was useful also for poor risk patients. (author)

  4. Curriculum-based neurosurgery digital library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Jean-Philippe; Dang, Thai; Kon, David; Sapo, Monica; Batzdorf, Ulrich; Martin, Neil

    2010-11-01

    Recent work-hour restrictions and the constantly evolving body of knowledge are challenging the current ways of teaching neurosurgery residents. To develop a curriculum-based digital library of multimedia content to face the challenges in neurosurgery education. We used the residency program curriculum developed by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons to structure the library and Microsoft Sharepoint as the user interface. This project led to the creation of a user-friendly and searchable digital library that could be accessed remotely and throughout the hospital, including the operating rooms. The electronic format allows standardization of the content and transformation of the operating room into a classroom. This in turn facilitates the implementation of a curriculum within the training program and improves teaching efficiency. Future work will focus on evaluating the efficacy of the library as a teaching tool for residents.

  5. Perioperative complications in endovascular neurosurgery: Anesthesiologist's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Megha U.; Ganjoo, Pragati; Singh, Daljit; Tandon, Monica S.; Agarwal, Jyotsna; Sharma, Durga P.; Jagetia, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Background: Endovascular neurosurgery is known to be associated with potentially serious perioperative complications that can impact the course and outcome of anesthesia. We present here our institutional experience in the anesthetic management of various endovascular neurosurgical procedures and their related complications over a 10-year period. Methods: Data was obtained in 240 patients pertaining to their preoperative status, details of anesthesia and surgery, perioperative course and surgery-related complications. Information regarding hemodynamic alterations, temperature variability, fluid-electrolyte imbalance, coagulation abnormalities and alterations in the anesthesia course was specifically noted. Results: Among the important complications observed were aneurysm rupture (2.5%), vasospasm (6.67%), thromboembolism (4.16%), contrast reactions, hemodynamic alterations, electrolyte abnormalities, hypothermia, delayed emergence from anesthesia, groin hematomas and early postoperative mortality (5.14%). Conclusion: Awareness of the unique challenges of endovascular neurosurgery and prompt and appropriate management of the associated complications by an experienced neuroanesthesiologist is vital to the outcome of these procedures. PMID:28413524

  6. [The origins of the French neurosurgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunon, J

    2016-06-01

    Modern French neurosurgery starts at the beginning of the XXth century under the motivation of Joseph Babinski. He submitted his patients to Thierry de Martel who had learned this new specialized area of medicine with H. Cushing in the États-Unis and V. Horsey in Great Britain. His first successfully treated case of an intracranial tumor was published in 1909. But the true founding father was Clovis Vincent, initially a neurologist and collaborator of de Martel, who became the first chairman in 1933 of the neurosurgical department at the Pitié hospital of Paris and the first professor of neurosurgery in 1938. After the Second World War, many departments were created outside of Paris. Neurosurgery was definitively recognized as a specialized area in medicine in 1948. Currently, more than 400 neurosurgeons work in France. Because I had the very great privilege to be present at the birth of this society in 1970 and to still be in contact with some of the second and third generation of French neurosurgeons who led it to its high international recognition, the Chairman of the French Neurosurgical Society asked me to write this short historical vignette. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Application of fiber tractography for neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Naoya; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2007-01-01

    This review describes about the fiber tractography (FT) for its basic principle, method, and application to neurosurgery involving usefulness, pitfall, validation needed and future perspective. MR diffusion weighted image exhibits the diffusion (Brownian movement) of water molecules and its multiple images taken by different angles of magnetic field can also give information of their diffusion anisotropy, whereby diffusion tensor image is yielded as FT owing to their high anisotropy, with use of appropriate softwares assuming an ellipsoid of anisotropic water (single tensor model). FT thus presents an image of a specific and functional neurofiber bundle. Recently, FT in neurosurgery has been recognized to have pitfalls in tracing the bundle at its crossing and branch, e.g., suggested avoidance of surgery of eloquent area navigated with FT alone. For this, developed and considered are the multi-tensor models based on multiple ellipsoids and on probabilistic one on probability, and combination of electrophysiological mapping is thought necessary as well. Application of FT is also actively in progress to understand neurological diseases like cerebral vascular lesion, hemiplegia, epilepsy, injury and many others. FT navigation without other validation is thus limited in neurosurgery, but FT is surely one of means to improve patients' prognosis and quality of life (QOL). (R.T.)

  8. Advancing neurosurgery through translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Claire; Sutherland, Garnette

    2013-01-01

    Every year, the number of published research articles increases significantly. However, many potentially useful ideas are lost in this flood of data. Translational research provides a framework through which investigators or laboratories can maximize the likelihood that the product of their research will be adopted in medical practice. There are 2 recognizable models of translation appropriate for the majority of research: investigator driven and industry enabled. Investigator-driven research has more range because it does not have to consider the profit margin of research, but it is a slow process. The industry-enabled model accelerates the translational research process through the power of industry funding but is interested primarily in products with potential for profit. Two cases are examined to illustrate different methods of partnering with industry. IMRIS is a company founded by investigators to distribute intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging technology based on a movable high-field magnet. It took 7 years for IMRIS to make its first sale, but it is now a successful company. With neuroArm, a surgical robot, investigators decided to sell the intellectual property to an established company to ensure successful global commercialization. Translational research advances medicine by creating and distributing effective solutions to contemporary problems.

  9. Physician career satisfaction within specialties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravitz Richard L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specialty-specific data on career satisfaction may be useful for understanding physician workforce trends and for counseling medical students about career options. Methods We analyzed cross-sectional data from 6,590 physicians (response rate, 53% in Round 4 (2004-2005 of the Community Tracking Study Physician Survey. The dependent variable ranged from +1 to -1 and measured satisfaction and dissatisfaction with career. Forty-two specialties were analyzed with survey-adjusted linear regressions Results After adjusting for physician, practice, and community characteristics, the following specialties had significantly higher satisfaction levels than family medicine: pediatric emergency medicine (regression coefficient = 0.349; geriatric medicine (0.323; other pediatric subspecialties (0.270; neonatal/prenatal medicine (0.266; internal medicine and pediatrics (combined practice (0.250; pediatrics (0.250; dermatology (0.249;and child and adolescent psychiatry (0.203. The following specialties had significantly lower satisfaction levels than family medicine: neurological surgery (-0.707; pulmonary critical care medicine (-0.273; nephrology (-0.206; and obstetrics and gynecology (-0.188. We also found satisfaction was significantly and positively related to income and employment in a medical school but negatively associated with more than 50 work-hours per-week, being a full-owner of the practice, greater reliance on managed care revenue, and uncontrollable lifestyle. We observed no statistically significant gender differences and no differences between African-Americans and whites. Conclusion Career satisfaction varied across specialties. A number of stakeholders will likely be interested in these findings including physicians in specialties that rank high and low and students contemplating specialty. Our findings regarding "less satisfied" specialties should elicit concern from residency directors and policy makers since they

  10. Doctors who considered but did not pursue specific clinical specialties as careers: questionnaire surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldacre, Michael J; Goldacre, Raph; Lambert, Trevor W

    2012-04-01

    To report doctors' rejection of specialties as long-term careers and reasons for rejection. Postal questionnaires. United Kingdom. Graduates of 2002, 2005 and 2008 from all UK medical schools, surveyed one year after qualification. Current specialty choice; any choice that had been seriously considered but not pursued (termed 'rejected' choices) with reasons for rejection. 2573 of 9155 respondents (28%) had seriously considered but then not pursued a specialty choice. By comparison with positive choices, general practice was under-represented among rejected choices: it was the actual choice of 27% of respondents and the rejected choice of only 6% of those who had rejected a specialty. Consideration of 'job content' was important in not pursuing general practice (cited by 78% of those who considered but rejected a career in general practice), psychiatry (72%), radiology (69%) and pathology (68%). The surgical specialties were the current choice of 20% of respondents and had been considered but rejected by 32% of doctors who rejected a specialty. Issues of work-life balance were the single most common factor, particularly for women, in not pursuing the surgical specialties, emergency medicine, the medical hospital specialties, paediatrics, and obstetrics and gynaecology. Competition for posts, difficult examinations, stressful working conditions, and poor training were mentioned but were mainly minority concerns. There is considerable diversity between doctors in their reasons for finding specialties attractive or unattractive. This underlines the importance of recruitment strategies to medical school that recognize diversity of students' interests and aptitudes.

  11. Experience with the United Kingdom examinations in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, J D

    1997-01-01

    The UK Intercollegiate Specialty Board examination in Surgical Neurology was established in 1991 based on the experience of the original Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh Assessment in Surgical Neurology, an exit examination that was originally opposed both by surgery in general and by the younger neurosurgical community. Criteria for eligibility encompass both UK, EC and non-EC overseas graduates. Candidates must have completed satisfactorily their 4th year of a 6 year training programme, have personal experience with the more straightforward benign tumours, aneurysms and posterior fossa explorations, and be able to safely manage a conventional neurosurgical practice. The examination consists of a multiple choice question paper, clinical examination and three Vivas. A curriculum is under construction. Examinations are held twice per annum, and rotate between the four colleges. There are strict guidelines for the examiners. The pass rate is about 70%. All aspects of the examination continue to evolve and are carefully audited.

  12. Surgical smartphone applications across different platforms: their evolution, uses, and users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulendran, Myutan; Lim, Marcus; Laws, Georgia; Chow, Andre; Nehme, Jean; Darzi, Ara; Purkayastha, Sanjay

    2014-08-01

    There are a vast array of smartphone applications that could benefit both surgeons and their patients. To review and identify all relevant surgical smartphone applications available for the Apple iPhone iOS and Google Android platform based on their user group and subspecialty for which they were designed. Both the literature using PubMed and Google Scholar were searched using the following terms: application$, smartphone$, app$, app*, surgery, surgical, surg*, general surgery, general surg*, bariatric$, urology and plastic surgery, ortho*, orthop(a)edic, cardiac surgery, cardiothoracic, neurosurgery, and ophthalmology. The search yielded 38 articles of which 23 were eligible. Each of the key specialties was searched in the Apple iTunes App Store for iPhone iOS and the Google Play Android application store. In total, there were 621 surgical applications for Apple iPhone iOS and 97 identified on Android's Google Play. There has been a 9-fold increase in the number of surgical applications available for the Apple iPhone iOS from 2009 to 2012. Of these applications there were 126 dedicated to plastic surgery, 79 to orthopedics, 41 to neurosurgical, 180 to general surgery, 36 to cardiac surgery, 121 to ophthalmology, and 44 to urology. There was a wide range of applications ranging from simple flashcards to be used for revision to virtual surgery applications that provided surgical exposure and familiarization with common operative procedures. Despite the plethora of surgical applications available for smartphones, there is no taxonomy for medical applications. Only 12% were affiliated with an academic institution or association, which highlights the need for greater regulation of surgical applications. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Temperamental traits may be associated with medical students’ specialty preferences – pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Pawełczyk

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was aimed at checking a hypothesis about a possible correlation between medical students’ temperamental traits and specialty preferences. Material and methods: The study was carried out among 202 students of the 6th year at the Medical University of Łódź in academic year 2008/2009. The examined group consisted of 140 women (69% and 62 men (31%. The average age of the students included into the study was 24.7 years (range: 23-29. The subjects were asked to fill in a questionnaire on demographic variables and the Formal Characteristics of BehaviourTemperament Inventory (FCB-TI by Zawadzki and Strelau. Results: The students taking part in the study preferred specialties in internal diseases (22%, surgery (18% and paediatrics (11%. Two point five percent of the students were indecisive in the specialty choice, 26% preferred surgical specialty and 71% – non-surgical specialty. Differences in temperamental traits were indicated between the students preferring different specialties. Students preferring surgery scored higher than those preferring internal medicine in Endurance (p=0.0036, d=0.63 and Activity (p=0.0292, d=0.63. Significantly higher average values were observed within two temperamental traits: Briskness (p=0.0083, d=0.5 and Endurance (p=0.0070, d=0.49 in students preferring surgical specialties, as compared to those choosing non-surgical specialties. Conclusions: Students’ preferring different medical specialties differ in temperamental traits. They obtained different results on the scales of Briskness, Endurance and Activity. The obtained results may be useful in vocational guidance within the choice of medical specialty.

  14. Reoperations within 48 hours following 7942 pediatric neurosurgery procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anil K; Chu, Jason; Bozeman, Caroline; Sarda, Samir; Sawvel, Michael; Chern, Joshua J

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Various indicators are used to evaluate the quality of care delivered by surgical services, one of which is early reoperation rate. The indications and rate of reoperations within a 48-hour time period have not been previously reported for pediatric neurosurgery. METHODS Between May 1, 2009, and December 30, 2014, 7942 surgeries were performed by the pediatric neurosurgery service in the operating rooms at a single institution. Demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical characteristics associated with each of the operations were prospectively collected. The procedures were grouped into 31 categories based on the nature of the procedure and underlying diseases. Reoperations within 48 hours at the conclusion of the index surgery were reviewed to determine whether the reoperation was planned or unplanned. Multivariate logistic regression was employed to analyze risk factors associated with unplanned reoperations. RESULTS Cerebrospinal fluid shunt-and hydrocephalus-related surgeries accounted for 3245 (40.8%) of the 7942 procedures. Spinal procedures, craniotomy for tumor resections, craniotomy for traumatic injury, and craniofacial reconstructions accounted for an additional 8.7%, 6.8%, 4.5%, and 4.5% of surgical volume. There were 221 reoperations within 48 hours of the index surgery, yielding an overall incidence of 2.78%; 159 of the reoperation were unplanned. Of these 159 unplanned reoperations, 121 followed index operations involving shunt manipulations. Using unplanned reoperations as the dependent variable (n = 159), index operations with a starting time after 3 pm and admission through the emergency department (ED) were associated with a two- to threefold increase in the likelihood of reoperations (after-hour surgery, odds ratio [OR] 2.01 [95% CI 1.43-2.83, p < 0.001]; ED admission, OR 1.97 (95% CI 1.32-2.96, p < 0.05]). CONCLUSIONS Approximately 25% of the reoperations within 48 hours of a pediatric neurosurgical procedure were planned. When

  15. Evolution in Practice: How has British Neurosurgery Changed in the Last 10 Years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnaris, A; Arvin, B; Ashkan, K

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Neurosurgery is a fast-evolving surgical subspecialty driven by technological advances, socio-economic factors and patient expectations. In this study, we have compared the work-load volume in a single institution in the years of 1994 and 2004 and commented on the possible reasons for the changes and the impacts they may have for the future. PATIENTS AND METHODS A retrospective, log-book review of all operations performed in the years 1994 and 2004 in a single, tertiary, neurosurgical centre was performed. RESULTS Neurosurgical practice has evolved over this period. Current practice has moved away from clipping of aneurysms and towards coil embolisation performed by interventional radiologists. Electrode stimulation of deep brain regions for movement disorders is the current practice, whereas 10 years ago the same disorders were dealt with by lesioning of the relevant regions. In spinal neurosurgery, instrumentation is increasingly favoured currently. In the field of neuro-oncology, current practice favours minimal access to the target area by the use of stereotactic localisation. CONCLUSIONS Changes were most pronounced in the subspecialties of vascular, functional and spinal neurosurgery within this 10-year period. Knowledge of such dynamics is valuable in health resource management as well as planning for neurosurgical training programmes. PMID:18765031

  16. Smartphone use in neurosurgery? APP-solutely!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Michael; Drazin, Doniel

    2014-01-01

    A number of smartphone medical apps have recently emerged that may be helpful for the neurosurgical patient, practitioner, and trainee. This study aims to review the current neurosurgery-focused apps available for the iPhone, iPad, and Android platforms as of December 2013. Two of the most popular smartphone app stores (Apple Store and Android Google Play Store) were surveyed for neurosurgery-focused apps in December 2013. Search results were categorized based on their description page. Data were collected on price, rating, app release date, target audience, and medical professional involvement in app design. A review of the top apps in each category was performed. The search resulted in 111 unique apps, divided into these 7 categories: 16 (14%) clinical tools, 17 (15%) conference adjunct, 27 (24%) education, 18 (16%) literature, 15 (14%) marketing, 10 (9%) patient information, and 8 (7%) reference. The average cost of paid apps was $23.06 (range: $0.99-89.99). Out of the 111 apps, 71 (64%) were free, 48 (43%) had reviews, and 14 (13%) had more than 10 reviews. Seventy-three (66%) apps showed evidence of medical professional involvement. The number of apps being released every year has been increasing since 2009. There are a number of neurosurgery-themed apps available to all audiences. There was a lack of patient information apps for nonspinal procedures. Most apps did not have enough reviews to evaluate their quality. There was also a lack of oversight to validate the accuracy of medical information provided in these apps.

  17. Resurgence of functional neurosurgery for Parkinson's disease: a historical perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, J. D.; Bosch, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    The history of functional neurosurgery for the treatment of Parkinson's disease is reviewed. Two major stages may be distinguished: (1) open functional neurosurgery, which started in 1921 with bilateral cervical rhizotomy by Leriche. In 1937 Bucy performed the first motor cortectomy in a tremor

  18. Mythological and Prehistorical Origins of Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Anil; Filis, Andreas; Kalakoti, Piyush

    2016-05-01

    Mythology has a cultural appeal, and the description of some neurosurgical procedures in the Hindu, Greek, Egyptian, and Chinese mythology has a bearing to the origins of our professions. The traces to some of our modern-day practices also can be linked back to the ancient prehistoric eras of the Siberian, Persian, and the Andean region. In this historical perspective, we briefly dwell into individual accounts through the prism of different cultures to highlight the development of neurosurgery in mythology and prehistoric era. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Medical specialty preferences in early medical school training in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Anthony; McLean, Laurie; McInnes, Matthew D F

    2017-11-14

    To understand what medical students consider when choosing their specialty, prior to significant clinical exposure to develop strategies to provide adequate career counseling. A cross-sectional study was performed by distributing optional questionnaires to 165 first-year medical students at the University of Ottawa in their first month of training with a sample yield of 54.5% (n=90).  Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, Spearman's rank correlation, Cronbach's alpha coefficient, Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure, and exploratory factor analyses were used to analyze the anonymized results. "Job satisfaction", "lifestyle following training" and, "impact on the patient" were the three highest rated considerations when choosing a specialty.  Fifty-two and seventeen percent (n=24) and 57.89% (n=22) of males and females ranked non-surgical specialties as their top choice. Student confidence in their specialty preferences was moderate, meaning their preference could likely change (mean=2.40/5.00, SD=1.23). ANOVA showed no significant differences between confidence and population size (F(2,86)=0.290, p=0.75) or marital status (F(2,85)=0.354, p=0.70) in both genders combined. Five underlying factors that explained 44.32% of the total variance were identified. Five themes were identified to enhance career counseling. Medical students in their first month of training have already considered their specialty preferences, despite limited exposure. However, students are not fixed in their specialty preference. Our findings further support previous results but expand what students consider when choosing their specialty early in their training. Medical educators and administrators who recognize and understand the importance of these considerations may further enhance career counseling and medical education curricula.

  20. Pakistani medical students' specialty preference and the influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Anis; Rehman, Tariq; Shaikh, Muhammad Ateeb; Yasmin, Haleema; Asif, Ammara; Kafil, Hina

    2011-07-01

    To elucidate the specialty preferences of Pakistani medical students and the factors which influence medical students to make the decision regarding which specialty to pursue. Both basic sciences and clinical students from four medical colleges of Pakistan, i.e., Dow Medical College, Sindh Medical College, Liaquat National Medical College and Muhammad Medical College, were included in the cross-sectional survey during the period of July 2008 to Jan' 2009. After ethical acceptance, data was collected using convenient sampling technique. The questionnaire covered the following demographic details: 13 common specialties and 15 influencing factors. Questionnaires included in the analysis were 771. Most students gave preference to surgery and its associated sub-specialties (50.3%) followed by internal medicine (26.8%), paediatrics (23.2%), dermatology (16.7%), gynaecology and obstetrics (16.7%), psychiatry (13.1%), radiology (10.8%), ENT (8.8%), anaesthesiology (8.7%), administrative medicine (8.6%), orthopaedics (8.2%), ophthalmology (7.5%), and laboratory medicine (6.1%). The highly considered factors (regarding specialties) chosen by 70% of the medical students were: applicable to respective personalities of the individuals, prestige and respect, international opportunities, and time commitment. Surgical-skills, job availability, financial rating, academic performance, and a role model were moderately influencing factors. Hospital environment, parents, general practice, peer-pressure and personal health were the least influential. This trend suggests competition in surgery and its sub-specialties along with internal medicine, paediatrics, dermatology, gynaecology and obstetrics. Specialty suited to personality, time commitment, prestige/respect and international opportunity, influenced more than 70% of the students.

  1. Gender differences in specialty preference and mismatch with real needs in Japanese medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harada Tadanari

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shortage of doctors and maldistribution among specialties are of great concern in the Japanese health care system. This study investigated specialty preference in medical students of one university, and examined gender differences and compared their preference with real needs. Methods We conducted a self-administered questionnaire including specialty preference in all students of one medical university. Preference was assessed by the five-level probability of their future choice: 1 = very low, 2 = low, 3 = moderate, 4 = high, and 5 = very high. The proportion of 4 or 5 was calculated as the preference rate. The real needs (magnitude of doctor shortage in the prefecture were drawn from two different surveys. The relationship between the sex-specific preference rate by specialty and real needs was assessed by Spearman's correlation coefficient. Results Internal medicine showed the highest preference rate, followed by general surgery, pediatrics, and emergency medicine. There was no significant correlation between the preference rates of men and women (r = 0.27, p = 0.34. The preference rates for general surgery, orthopedics, neurosurgery, and emergency medicine were significantly higher in men than in women, while those of obstetrics & gynecology, pediatrics, and dermatology were significantly higher in women. The magnitude of doctor shortage by specialty from two surveys were significantly correlated with the total preference rate and men's preference rate (r = 0.54 to 0.74, but not with women's preference rate (r = 0.06 and 0.32. Conclusions This study elucidated not only gender differences in specialty preference but also the relationship to real needs. Critical gender differences and mismatch with real needs were found in women. In addition to traditional gender roles and insufficient support for women's participation in Japan, gender differences and mismatch influence the current and future maldistribution of

  2. Treatment of malignant brain tumor. Today and tomorrow. Image-guided neurosurgery for brain tumor. A current perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajita, Yasukazu; Fujii, Masazumi; Yoshida, Jun; Maesawa, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    Although usefulness of the image-guided neurosurgery is well documented, there are scarce facilities having the actually operating system in Japan. Since 2006, authors' Nagoya University Hospital has had an operating room named ''Brain THEATER'', where an open MRI system APERTO (Hitachi-Medical Co.) and a navigation system Vector Vision (BrainLAB) are connected to conduct the complete image-guided neurosurgery for brain tumor by using the intraoperative MRI for continuously updating the residual tumor tissue to be dissected out. The room is pre- and intra-operatively supported by Departments of image analysis and of radiation technology in the University, and as well, is connected by net-working with another image-guided surgical room ''Brain Suite'' (Siemens 1.5 T MRI system: BrainLAB) in the neighboring facility, Nagoya Central Hospital. This paper describes the circumstances of the introduction of these systems in the Hospital, details of the image-guided surgery in the operation rooms with illustration of actual photos of the rooms and of pre-, intra- and post-operative images, outcomes of image-guided neurosurgery for brain tumor reported hitherto, image-guided neurosurgery for brain tumor's future perspectives involving robotic surgery and operation on the virtual 3D image including the net-worked one. Efforts should be made to further spread the system for performing the more non-invasive and precise surgery, and for conducting the diagnosis united with treatment. (R.T.)

  3. Integrating multimodal information for intraoperative assistance in neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenmann U.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Computer-assisted planning of complex neurosurgical interventions benefits from a variety of specific functions and tools. However, commercial planning- and neuronavigation systems are rather restrictive concerning the availability of innovative methods such as novel imaging modalities, fiber tracking algorithms or electrical dipole mapping. In this respect there is a demand for modular neurosurgical planning systems offering flexible interfaces for easy enhancement. Furthermore all relevant planning information should be available within neuron-avigation. In this work we present a planning system providing these capabilities and its suitability and application in a clinical setting. Our Multimodal Planning System (MOPS 3D offers a variety of tools such as definition of trajectories for minimally invasive surgery, segmentation of ROIs, integration of functional information from atlas maps or magnetoencephalography. It also supplies plugin interfaces for future extensions. For intraoperative application MOPS is coupled with the neuronavigation system Brainlab Vector Vision Cranial/ENT (VVC. We evaluated MOPS in the Department of Neurosurgery at the University Hospital Heidelberg. Surgical planning and navigation was performed in 5 frequently occurring clinical cases. The time necessary for planning was between 5 and 15 minutes including data import, segmentation and planning tasks. The additional information intraoperatively provided by MOPS 3D was highly appreciated by the neurosurgeons and the performance was satisfactory.

  4. Case-control studies in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvick, Cody L; Thompson, Clinton J; Boop, Frederick A; Klimo, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Observational studies, such as cohort and case-control studies, are valuable instruments in evidence-based medicine. Case-control studies, in particular, are becoming increasingly popular in the neurosurgical literature due to their low cost and relative ease of execution; however, no one has yet systematically assessed these types of studies for quality in methodology and reporting. The authors performed a literature search using PubMed/MEDLINE to identify all studies that explicitly identified themselves as "case-control" and were published in the JNS Publishing Group journals (Journal of Neurosurgery, Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics, Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, and Neurosurgical Focus) or Neurosurgery. Each paper was evaluated for 22 descriptive variables and then categorized as having either met or missed the basic definition of a case-control study. All studies that evaluated risk factors for a well-defined outcome were considered true case-control studies. The authors sought to identify key features or phrases that were or were not predictive of a true case-control study. Those papers that satisfied the definition were further evaluated using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist. The search detected 67 papers that met the inclusion criteria, of which 32 (48%) represented true case-control studies. The frequency of true case-control studies has not changed with time. Use of odds ratios (ORs) and logistic regression (LR) analysis were strong positive predictors of true case-control studies (for odds ratios, OR 15.33 and 95% CI 4.52-51.97; for logistic regression analysis, OR 8.77 and 95% CI 2.69-28.56). Conversely, negative predictors included focus on a procedure/intervention (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.13-0.998) and use of the word "outcome" in the Results section (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.082-0.65). After exclusion of nested case-control studies, the negative correlation between focus on a procedure

  5. 21 CFR 882.4800 - Self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery. 882...-retaining retractor for neurosurgery. (a) Identification. A self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery is a self-locking device used to hold the edges of a wound open during neurosurgery. (b) Classification...

  6. Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In the past 50 years forensic psychological practice has expanded dramatically. Because the practice of forensic psychology differs in important ways from more traditional practice areas (Monahan, 1980) the "Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychologists" were developed and published in 1991 (Committee on Ethical Guidelines for Forensic…

  7. Health-related quality of life outcomes and level of evidence in pediatric neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Daniel; Vedantam, Aditya; Briceño, Valentina; Lam, Sandi K; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jea, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    . CONCLUSIONS The frequency of studies using HRQOL outcomes in pediatric neurosurgical research has not increased over the past 10 years. Within pediatric neurosurgery, high-quality studies and standardization are lacking, as compared with contemporary studies in Pediatrics. In general, although the HOQ, HUI, PedsQL, and SF-36 instruments are emerging as standards in pediatric neurosurgery, even greater standardization across the specialty is needed, along with the design and implementation of more rigorous studies.

  8. Unplanned readmission within 90 days after pediatric neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotai, Silky; Guidry, Bradley S; Chan, Emily W; Sborov, Katherine D; Gannon, Stephen; Shannon, Chevis; Bonfield, Christopher M; Wellons, John C; Naftel, Robert P

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Readmission and return to operating room after surgery are increasingly being used as a proxy for quality of care. Nearly 60% of these readmissions are unplanned, which translates into billions of dollars in health care costs. The authors set out to analyze the incidence of readmission at their center, to define causes of unplanned readmission, and to determine the preoperative and surgical variables associated with readmissions following pediatric neurosurgery. METHODS A total of 536 children who underwent operations for neurosurgical diagnoses between 2012 and 2015 and who were later readmitted were included in the final analysis. Unplanned readmissions were defined to have occurred as a result of complications within 90 days after index surgery. Patient records were retrospectively reviewed to determine the primary diagnosis, surgery indication, and cause of readmission and return to operating room. The cost for index hospitalization, readmission episode, and total cost were derived based on the charges obtained from administrative data. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted. RESULTS Of 536 patients readmitted in total, 17.9% (n = 96) were readmitted within 90 days. Of the overall readmissions, 11.9% (n = 64) were readmitted within 30 days, and 5.97% (n = 32) were readmitted between 31 and 90 days. The median duration between discharge and readmission was 20 days (first quartile [Q1]: 9 days, third quartile [Q3]: 36 days). The most common reason for readmission was shunt related (8.2%, n = 44), followed by wound infection (4.7%, n = 25). In the risk-adjusted multivariable logistic regression model for total 90-day readmission, patients with the following characteristics: younger age (p = 0.001, OR 0.886, 95% CI 0.824-0.952); "other" (nonwhite, nonblack) race (p = 0.024, OR 5.49, 95% CI 1.246-24.2); and those born preterm (p = 0.032, OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.12) had higher odds of being readmitted within 90 days after discharge. The total

  9. Optimization of care in orthopaedics and neurosurgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, S.N.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aimed to contribute to the optimal use of non-surgical treatment and timing of surgery among hip and knee OA and sciatica patients in two different ways. First, if guidelines are specific on non-surgical and (timing of) surgical treatment, the focus was on implementation strategies to

  10. Overview of intraoperative MRI in neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiino, Akihiko; Matsuda, Masayuki

    2002-01-01

    This review describes usefulness, prospect and present problems of intraoperative MRI in neurosurgery. MRI equipments for the surgery have to have a wide, open space and have those magnets of short cylindrical, biplanar (clam shell), dual air core superconducting solenoidal (double doughnut) and targeted FOV (field of view) type. Devices required for the surgery are specific and in author's facility, they are classified into 4 zones depending on the region of their use. Application of the surgery involves biopsy, drainage of cyst and abscess, hematoma evacuation, nerve block, thermotherapy (interstitial laser, RF ablation, focused untrasonic and cryosurgery), local drug therapy, chemoablation, vascular intervention and tumor extraction, of which actual procedures and pictures are presented together with, in particular, MR-guided thermotherapy, ablation therapy of brain tumors, endoscopic surgery and minimally invasive therapy of the spine. A navigation software, 3D SlicerTM system, is introduced for interventional imaging. Safety measures are emphasized for the operation. (K.H.)

  11. Overview of intraoperative MRI in neurosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiino, Akihiko; Matsuda, Masayuki [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Otsu (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    This review describes usefulness, prospect and present problems of intraoperative MRI in neurosurgery. MRI equipments for the surgery have to have a wide, open space and have those magnets of short cylindrical, biplanar (clam shell), dual air core superconducting solenoidal (double doughnut) and targeted FOV (field of view) type. Devices required for the surgery are specific and in author's facility, they are classified into 4 zones depending on the region of their use. Application of the surgery involves biopsy, drainage of cyst and abscess, hematoma evacuation, nerve block, thermotherapy (interstitial laser, RF ablation, focused untrasonic and cryosurgery), local drug therapy, chemoablation, vascular intervention and tumor extraction, of which actual procedures and pictures are presented together with, in particular, MR-guided thermotherapy, ablation therapy of brain tumors, endoscopic surgery and minimally invasive therapy of the spine. A navigation software, 3D SlicerTM system, is introduced for interventional imaging. Safety measures are emphasized for the operation. (K.H.)

  12. The internal medicine specialist and neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pizzini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The neurosurgical patient is often a real challenge for the physicians, because of a frequent multimorbidity and a higher risk for severe complications. Cooperation between internal medicine specialist and neurosurgeon is essential to prevent the fatal effects of cranial and spinal injuries. The topic issues of medical interest in neurosurgery are the disorders of sodium balance, the glycemic control, the thromboembolic risk, the intracerebral bleeding management and the infective problems. The neurosurgeons could be worried by treating these complications that are mostly of internal medicine interest and that could unfortunately rise the risk of death or irreversible insults. AIM OF THE REVIEW This review summarizes the modality of diagnosis and therapy of the foremost concerns in neurosurgical field.

  13. Evolving virtual reality simulation in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Clemens M; Mocco, J; Elder, J Bradley

    2013-10-01

    Virtual reality (VR) applications promise the safe, efficacious, and valid replication of scenarios encountered in modern neurosurgery, and a number of navigation- or dissection-related and endovascular simulators have been successfully deployed in the last 2 decades. Concurrently, neurosurgical training is changing, and VR simulations are expected to play a part in future training. To give an overview of currently available neurosurgical VR applications in the spectrum of desired applications and the outlook of the requirements to be met by future applications. The available literature was analyzed using structured Medline and PubMed searches. Relevant articles were retrieved and reviewed. When quantitative results were available, effect sizes were collated or estimated to check for publication bias. There has been a significant increase in publications concerning the use of VR in neurosurgery in the last 22 years (P < .001). Thirty-eight of 117 publications (32%) identified reported data regarding the use of a simulator by practitioners; 35 of these were reported as positive trials (92%). Twenty-two of 38 studies (58%) reported quantitative data with mostly small positive effect sizes (median, 1.41; interquartile range, 1.08-2). The use of VR simulators in endovascular surgery has the most robust basis, with 65% of studies reporting quantitative outcomes. Current neurosurgical VR applications focus on basic procedural skill acquisition and are valid and efficacious adjuncts to neurosurgical training. In the future, the development of complex procedural simulators, teamwork, and focus on validated measures will lead to robust framework of the use of VR over the entire career of a neurosurgeon.

  14. [Applicability of the da Vinci robotic system in the skull base surgical approach. Preclinical investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Nogueras Jimenez, Francisco J; Segura Fernandez-Nogueras, Miguel; Jouma Katati, Majed; Arraez Sanchez, Miguel Ángel; Roda Murillo, Olga; Sánchez Montesinos, Indalecio

    2015-01-01

    The role of robotic surgery is well established in various specialties such as urology and general surgery, but not in others such as neurosurgery and otolaryngology. In the case of surgery of the skull base, it has just emerged from an experimental phase. To investigate possible applications of the da Vinci surgical robot in transoral skull base surgery, comparing it with the authors' experience using conventional endoscopic transnasal surgery in the same region. A transoral transpalatal approach to the nasopharynx and medial skull base was performed on 4 cryopreserved cadaver heads. We used the da Vinci robot, a 30° standard endoscope 12mm thick, dual camera and dual illumination, Maryland forceps on the left terminal and curved scissors on the right, both 8mm thick. Bone drilling was performed manually. For the anatomical study of this region, we used 0.5cm axial slices from a plastinated cadaver head. Various skull base structures at different depths were reached with relative ease with the robot terminals Transoral robotic surgery with the da Vinci system provides potential advantages over conventional endoscopic transnasal surgery in the surgical approach to this region. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. The Incidence of Postoperative Pneumonia in Various Surgical Subspecialties: A Dual Database Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chughtai, Morad; Gwam, Chukwuweike U; Khlopas, Anton; Newman, Jared M; Curtis, Gannon L; Torres, Pedro A; Khan, Rafay; Mont, Michael A

    2017-07-25

    Pneumonia is the third most common postoperative complication. However, its epidemiology varies widely and is often difficult to assess. For a better understanding, we utilized two national databases to determine the incidence of postoperative pneumonia after various surgical procedures. Specifically, we used the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) to determine the incidence and yearly trends of postoperative pneumonia following orthopaedic, urologic, otorhinolaryngologic, cardiothoracic, neurosurgery, and general surgeries. The NIS and NSQIP databases from 2009-2013 were utilized. The Clinical Classification Software (CCS) for International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition (ICD-9) codes provided by the NIS database was used to identify all surgical subspecialty procedures. The incidence of postoperative pneumonia was identified as the total number of cases under each identifying CCS code that also had ICD-9 codes for postoperative pneumonia. In the NSQIP database, the surgical subspecialties were selected using the following identifying string variables provided by NSQIP: 1) "Orthopedics", 2) "Otolaryngology (ENT)", 3) "Urology", 4) "Neurosurgery", 5) "General Surgery", and 6) "Cardiac Surgery" and "Thoracic Surgery". Cardiac and thoracic surgery was merged to create the variable "Cardiothoracic Surgery". Postoperative pneumonia cases were extracted utilizing the available NSQIP nominal variables. All variables were used to isolate the incidences of postoperative pneumonia stratified by surgical specialty. A subsequent trend analysis was conducted to assess the associations between operative year and incidence of postoperative pneumonia. For all NIS surgeries, the incidence of postoperative pneumonia was 0.97% between 2009 and 2013. The incidence was highest among patients who underwent cardiothoracic surgery (3.3%) and urologic surgery (1.73%). Patients who

  16. Meta-Analysis of Surgeon Burnout Syndrome and Specialty Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, Alex J; Houk, Anna K; Pulcrano, Marisa; Shara, Nawar M; Kwagyan, John; Jackson, Patrick G; Sosin, Michael

    2018-02-27

    Surgeon burnout compromises the quality of life of physicians and the delivery of care to patients. Burnout rates and interpretation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) complicates the interpretation of surgeon burnout. The purpose of this study is to apply a standardized interpretation of severe surgeon burnout termed, "burnout syndrome" to analyze inherent variation within surgical specialties. A systematic literature search was performed using MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and EMBASE to identify studies reporting MBI data by surgical specialty. Data extraction was performed to isolate surgeon specific data. A meta-analysis was performed. A total of 16 cross-sectional studies were included in this meta-analysis, totaling 3581 subjects. A random effects model approximated burnout syndrome at 3.0% (95% CI: 2.0%-5.0%; I 2 = 78.1%). Subscale analysis of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment indicated subscale burnout in 30.0% (CI: 25.0%-36.0%; I 2 = 93.2%), 34.0% (CI: 25.0%-43.0%; I 2 = 96.9%), and 25.0% (CI: 18.0%-32.0%; I 2 = 96.5%) of surgeons, respectively. Significant differences (p burnout termed "burnout syndrome," although surgeon burnout may occur in up to 34% of surgeons, characterized by high burnout in 1 of 3 subscales. Surgical specialties have significantly different rates of burnout subscales. Future burnout studies should target the specialty-specific level to understand inherent differences in an effort to better understand methods of improving surgeon burnout. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. History of Medical Specialty Interest Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Stephanie T.

    2016-01-01

    Medical specialties require decidedly different abilities, skills, and talents; which results in divergent experiences, lifestyles, skill sets, and income levels. To help medical students select their preferred medical specialty and alleviate shortages in medical specialty staffing, US medical schools and associations invest time and money in…

  18. The 2015 AANS Presidential Address: Neurosurgery's founding principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbaugh, Robert E

    2015-12-01

    These are turbulent times for American neurosurgery. It is important to look ahead and prepare for the future but it is also important to look back-for it is memory and tradition that prevent the tyranny of the present. It is impossible to know where we are going if we don't remember where we were. In this paper I want to discuss the founding principles of neurosurgery-the principles that have allowed neurosurgery to prosper in its first century-and to stress the importance of adhering to these principles in times of change. I also want to talk to you about how the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) is helping neurosurgeons honor our founding principles, while preparing neurosurgery for its second century.

  19. Defensive Medicine in U.S. Spine Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Ryan S; Yan, Sandra C; Cote, David J; Acosta, Michael A; Smith, Timothy R

    2017-02-01

    Observational cross-sectional survey. To compare defensive practices of U.S. spine and nonspine neurosurgeons in the context of state medical liability risk. Defensive medicine is a commonly reported and costly phenomenon in neurosurgery. Although state liability risk is thought to contribute greatly to defensive practice, variation within neurosurgical specialties has not been well explored. A validated, online survey was sent via email to 3344 members of the American Board of Neurological Surgeons. The instrument contained eight question domains: surgeon characteristics, patient characteristics, practice type, insurance type, surgeon liability profile, basic surgeon reimbursement, surgeon perceptions of medical legal environment, and the practice of defensive medicine. The overall response rate was 30.6% (n = 1026), including 499 neurosurgeons performing mainly spine procedures (48.6%). Spine neurosurgeons had a similar average practice duration as nonspine neurosurgeons (16.6 vs 16.9 years, P = 0.64) and comparable lifetime case volume (4767 vs 4,703, P = 0.71). The average annual malpractice premium for spine neurosurgeons was similar to nonspine neurosurgeons ($104,480.52 vs $101,721.76, P = 0.60). On average, spine neurosurgeons had a significantly higher rate of ordering labs, medications, referrals, procedures, and imaging solely for liability concerns compared with nonspine neurosurgeons (89.2% vs 84.6%, P = 0.031). Multivariate analysis revealed that spine neurosurgeons were roughly 3 times more likely to practice defensively compared with nonspine neurosurgeons (odds ratio, OR = 2.9, P = 0.001) when controlling for high-risk procedures (OR = 7.8, P < 0.001), annual malpractice premium (OR = 3.3, P = 0.01), percentage of patients publicly insured (OR = 1.1, P = 0.80), malpractice claims in the last 3 years (OR = 1.13, P = 0.71), and state medical-legal environment (OR = 1.3, P = 0

  20. The Role of Neurosurgery in Countries with Limited Facilities: Facts and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servadei, Franco; Rossini, Zefferino; Nicolosi, Federico; Morselli, Carlotta; Park, Kee B

    2018-04-01

    The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery has recently focused its attention on the lack of surgical care worldwide. Like other surgical subspecialties, neurosurgical care needs to be better distributed around the world, with a major focus on low- to middle-income countries. Neurosurgical diseases like hydrocephalus, traumatic brain injury, and brain tumors have a high impact on families, individual quality of life, and cost for the society. Implementation of neurosurgical care in poor settings is not easy. More than other surgeries, neurosurgery requires great amounts of human resources, dedicated environments, and specialized postoperative care. It is responsibility of the neurosurgical community to identify major areas of current gaps and outline strategies for intervention. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sensors management in robotic neurosurgery: the ROBOCAST project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccarella, Alberto; Comparetti, Mirko Daniele; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; De Momi, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Robot and computer-aided surgery platforms bring a variety of sensors into the operating room. These sensors generate information to be synchronized and merged for improving the accuracy and the safety of the surgical procedure for both patients and operators. In this paper, we present our work on the development of a sensor management architecture that is used is to gather and fuse data from localization systems, such as optical and electromagnetic trackers and ultrasound imaging devices. The architecture follows a modular client-server approach and was implemented within the EU-funded project ROBOCAST (FP7 ICT 215190). Furthermore it is based on very well-maintained open-source libraries such as OpenCV and Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK), which are supported from a worldwide community of developers and allow a significant reduction of software costs. We conducted experiments to evaluate the performance of the sensor manager module. We computed the response time needed for a client to receive tracking data or video images, and the time lag between synchronous acquisition with an optical tracker and ultrasound machine. Results showed a median delay of 1.9 ms for a client request of tracking data and about 40 ms for US images; these values are compatible with the data generation rate (20-30 Hz for tracking system and 25 fps for PAL video). Simultaneous acquisitions have been performed with an optical tracking system and US imaging device: data was aligned according to the timestamp associated with each sample and the delay was estimated with a cross-correlation study. A median value of 230 ms delay was calculated showing that realtime 3D reconstruction is not feasible (an offline temporal calibration is needed), although a slow exploration is possible. In conclusion, as far as asleep patient neurosurgery is concerned, the proposed setup is indeed useful for registration error correction because the brain shift occurs with a time constant of few tens of minutes.

  2. Can the transition process from foundation doctor to neurosurgical specialty trainee be improved through “learner-centered induction programs”?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acharya V

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vikas Acharya,1 Sami Mansour,2 Samuel M Amis,3 Amir Reyahi3 1Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire, 2Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, 3Luton and Dunstable University Hospital, Luton, UK Abstract: The transition period from foundation program doctor to specialty trainee can be difficult for junior doctors. This difficult period often acts as a major obstacle for learning in the workplace. Existing induction programs are commonly seen as inadequate at easing this transition, and therefore, a pilot study intervention was undertaken to assess if the initiation of “learner-centered induction programs” could help improve the confidence, knowledge acquisition, and satisfaction of junior doctors as they begin specialty training in neurosurgery. Ethnographic and anecdotal evidences were collated from junior doctors, specialty trainees, and consultants in order to investigate if further work on this subject would be beneficial. All participants were working in the Department of Neurosurgery at University Hospital Coventry and Warwickshire, Coventry, UK, over a 4-week period in March/April 2015. A review of the relevant literature was also undertaken. This report found that despite the reservations around the increased organizational demands of induction programs of this nature, as well as concerns around a single junior doctor covering the ward alone during the induction period, feedback following the intervention was largely positive. Junior doctors appreciated being taught about their roles and responsibilities from their predecessors as well as deciding among themselves what topics they wanted covering. As a result, the induction sessions tended to focus on clinical skills rather than theoretical knowledge, which most of the junior doctors believed they could cover adequately in their own time. The junior doctors felt that they benefited from learning/refreshing their relevant practical

  3. Introduction: military neurosurgery, past and present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimo, Paul; Ragel, Brian T

    2010-05-01

    For a physician has the worth of many other warriors, both for the excision of arrows and for the administration of soothing drugs. Homer, Iliad XI.514-515 Ever since armed conflict has been used as a means to settle disputes among men, there have been those who have been tasked to mend the wounds that ravage a soldier's body from the weapons of war. The Iliad portrays the pivotal 10th year of the legendary Trojan War, during which a schism in the Greek leadership prolongs the extended siege of the city of Troy. In the midst of this martial epic come the lines quoted above, quietly attesting to the value of the military physician, even under the crude conditions of the Greek Dark Age. They are uttered by Idomeneus, one of the foremost Greeks, when he is enjoining one of his comrades, Nestor, to rescue the injured Greek physician Machaon and take him back from the line to treat his wounds. He is afraid that Machaon will be captured by the Trojans, a loss far greater than that of any other single warrior. Duty to country has helped shape the careers of many neurosurgeons, including iconic US figures such as Harvey Cushing and Donald Matson. This issue of Neurosurgical Focus celebrates the rich history of military neurosurgery from the wars of yesterday to the conflicts of today. We have been humbled by the tremendous response to this topic. The 25 articles within this issue will provide the reader with both a broad and an in-depth look at the many facets of military neurosurgery. We have attempted to group articles based on their predominant topic. We also encourage our audience to read other recently published articles. The first 8 articles relate to the current conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. The lead article, written by Randy Bell and colleagues from the National Naval Medical Center and Walter Reed Army Medical Center, discusses what is arguably one of the most important contributions by military neurosurgeons from these 2 conflicts: the rapid and aggressive

  4. Online examiner calibration across specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturman, Nancy; Wong, Wai Yee; Turner, Jane; Allan, Chris

    2017-09-26

    Integrating undergraduate medical curricula horizontally across clinical medical specialties may be a more patient-centred and learner-centred approach than rotating students through specialty-specific teaching and assessment, but requires some interspecialty calibration of examiner judgements. Our aim was to evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of an online pilot of interdisciplinary examiner calibration. Fair clinical assessment is important to both medical students and clinical teachers METHODS: Clinical teachers were invited to rate video-recorded student objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) performances and join subsequent online discussions using the university's learning management system. Post-project survey free-text and Likert-scale participant responses were analysed to evaluate the acceptability of the pilot and to identify recommendations for improvement. Although 68 clinicians were recruited to participate, and there were 1599 hits on recordings and discussion threads, only 25 clinical teachers rated at least one student performance, and 18 posted at least one comment. Participants, including rural doctors, appeared to value the opportunity for interdisciplinary rating calibration and discussion. Although the asynchronous online format had advantages, especially for rural doctors, participants reported considerable IT challenges. Our findings suggest that fair clinical assessment is important to both medical students and clinical teachers. Interspecialty discussions about assessment may have the potential to enrich intraspecialty perspectives, enhance interspecialty engagement and collaboration, and improve the quality of clinical teacher assessment. Better alignment of university and hospital systems, a face to face component and other modifications may have enhanced clinician engagement with this project. Findings suggest that specialty assessment cultures and content expertise may not be barriers to pursuing more integrated

  5. Fundamentals of neurosurgery: virtual reality tasks for training and evaluation of technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Nusrat; Gélinas-Phaneuf, Nicholas; Delorme, Sébastien; Del Maestro, Rolando

    2013-11-01

    Technical skills training in neurosurgery is mostly done in the operating room. New educational paradigms are encouraging the development of novel training methods for surgical skills. Simulation could answer some of these needs. This article presents the development of a conceptual training framework for use on a virtual reality neurosurgical simulator. Appropriate tasks were identified by reviewing neurosurgical oncology curricula requirements and performing cognitive task analyses of basic techniques and representative surgeries. The tasks were then elaborated into training modules by including learning objectives, instructions, levels of difficulty, and performance metrics. Surveys and interviews were iteratively conducted with subject matter experts to delimitate, review, discuss, and approve each of the development stages. Five tasks were selected as representative of basic and advanced neurosurgical skill. These tasks were: 1) ventriculostomy, 2) endoscopic nasal navigation, 3) tumor debulking, 4) hemostasis, and 5) microdissection. The complete training modules were structured into easy, intermediate, and advanced settings. Performance metrics were also integrated to provide feedback on outcome, efficiency, and errors. The subject matter experts deemed the proposed modules as pertinent and useful for neurosurgical skills training. The conceptual framework presented here, the Fundamentals of Neurosurgery, represents a first attempt to develop standardized training modules for technical skills acquisition in neurosurgical oncology. The National Research Council Canada is currently developing NeuroTouch, a virtual reality simulator for cranial microneurosurgery. The simulator presently includes the five Fundamentals of Neurosurgery modules at varying stages of completion. A first pilot study has shown that neurosurgical residents obtained higher performance scores on the simulator than medical students. Further work will validate its components and use in a

  6. State of Global Pediatric Neurosurgery Outreach: Survey by the International Education Subcommittee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew C.; Rocque, Brandon G.; Singhal, Ash; Ridder, Tom; Pattisapu, Jogi V.; Johnston, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Object Neurosurgical services are increasingly recognized as essential components of surgical care worldwide. Degree of interest among neurosurgeons regarding international work, and barriers to involvement in global neurosurgical outreach, are largely unexplored. We distributed a survey to members of the AANS/CNS Joint Section on Pediatric Neurosurgery to assess the state of global outreach among its members and identify barriers to involvement. Methods An internet-based questionnaire was developed by the International Education Subcommittee of the AANS/CNS Joint Section on Pediatric Neurosurgery, and distributed to pediatric neurosurgeons via the AANS/CNS Joint Section email contact list. Participants were surveyed on involvement in global neurosurgical outreach, geographic location, nature of participation, and barriers to further involvement. Results A 35.3% response rate was obtained, with 116 respondents completed the survey. 61% performed or taught neurosurgery in a developing country, 49% traveling at least annually. Africa was the most common region (54%), followed by South America (30%), through 29 separate organizing entities. Hydrocephalus was the most commonly treated condition (88%), followed by spinal dysraphism (74%) and tumor (68%). Most respondents obtained follow-up through communication from local surgeons (77%). 71% believed the international experience improved their practice, and 74% were very or extremely interested in working elsewhere. Interference with current practice (61%), cost (44%), and difficulty identifying international partners (43%) were the most commonly cited barriers to participation. Conclusion Any coordinated effort to expand global neurosurgical capacity begins with appreciation for the current state of outreach efforts. Increasing participation in global outreach will require addressing both real and perceived barriers to involvement. Creation and curation of a centralized online database of ongoing projects to facilitate

  7. Accurate multi-robot targeting for keyhole neurosurgery based on external sensor monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparetti, Mirko Daniele; Vaccarella, Alberto; Dyagilev, Ilya; Shoham, Moshe; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; De Momi, Elena

    2012-05-01

    Robotics has recently been introduced in surgery to improve intervention accuracy, to reduce invasiveness and to allow new surgical procedures. In this framework, the ROBOCAST system is an optically surveyed multi-robot chain aimed at enhancing the accuracy of surgical probe insertion during keyhole neurosurgery procedures. The system encompasses three robots, connected as a multiple kinematic chain (serial and parallel), totalling 13 degrees of freedom, and it is used to automatically align the probe onto a desired planned trajectory. The probe is then inserted in the brain, towards the planned target, by means of a haptic interface. This paper presents a new iterative targeting approach to be used in surgical robotic navigation, where the multi-robot chain is used to align the surgical probe to the planned pose, and an external sensor is used to decrease the alignment errors. The iterative targeting was tested in an operating room environment using a skull phantom, and the targets were selected on magnetic resonance images. The proposed targeting procedure allows about 0.3 mm to be obtained as the residual median Euclidean distance between the planned and the desired targets, thus satisfying the surgical accuracy requirements (1 mm), due to the resolution of the diffused medical images. The performances proved to be independent of the robot optical sensor calibration accuracy.

  8. INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR DEPARTMENT OF RECONSTRUCTIVE NEUROSURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Tsymbaliuk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is about creating information system for the rehabilitation Department of Neurosurgery. To develop the information system needs to explore the work of department, examine the medical documentation and statistical reporting forms which doctors using in their work. Determine the sequence of making records into documentation. And finally make list of requirements for application with help of medical staff. The software was developed by using C# language and the database server MySQL. It has five major systems and several ancillary subsystems. The major systems are: saving personal and clinical patient information, editing inputted data, showing data, ensuring the integrity and accuracy of database, the implementation of access to the same database from different computers. Auxiliary subsystems include: creating medical documentation, blocking form’s elements, searching for patient through database, making statistic over some period of time, creating folders for every patient and others. There was designed user interface that allows doctors to reduce time for learning functionality of application. Information system has positive effect. It saves time for medical staff and reduces the possibility of inputting wrong information. Application does not require high hardware characteristics of computer.

  9. Conservative vs. Surgical Management of Post-Traumatic Epidural Hematoma: A Case and Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugeri, Rosario; Anderson, David Greg; Graziano, Francesca; Meccio, Flavia; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 30 Final Diagnosis: Acute epidural hematoma Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Observation Specialty: Neurosurgery Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Trauma is the leading cause of death in people younger than 45 years and head injury is the main cause of trauma mortality. Although epidural hematomas are relatively uncommon (less than 1% of all patients with head injuries and fewer than 10% of those who are comatose), they should always be considered in evaluation of a serious head injury. Patients with epidural hematomas who meet surgical criteria and receive prompt surgical intervention can have an excellent prognosis, presumably owing to limited underlying primary brain damage from the traumatic event. The decision to perform a surgery in a patient with a traumatic extraaxial hematoma is dependent on several factors (neurological status, size of hematoma, age of patients, CT findings) but also may depend on the judgement of the treating neurosurgeon. Case Report: A 30-year old man arrived at our Emergency Department after a traumatic brain injury. General examination revealed severe headache, no motor or sensory disturbances, and no clinical signs of intracranial hypertension. A CT scan documented a significant left fronto-parietal epidural hematoma, which was considered suitable for surgical evacuation. The patient refused surgery. Following CT scan revealed a minimal increase in the size of the hematoma and of midline shift. The neurologic examination maintained stable and the patient continued to refuse the surgical treatment. Next follow up CT scans demonstrated a progressive resorption of hematoma. Conclusions: We report an unusual case of a remarkable epidural hematoma managed conservatively with a favorable clinical outcome. This case report is intended to rather add to the growing knowledge regarding the best management for this serious and acute pathology. PMID:26567227

  10. Thin-film electroencephalographic electrodes using multi-walled carbon nanotubes are effective for neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awara, Kousuke; Kitai, Ryuhei; Isozaki, Makoto; Neishi, Hiroyuki; Kikuta, Kenichiro; Fushisato, Naoki; Kawamoto, Akira

    2014-12-15

    Intraoperative morphological and functional monitoring is essential for safe neurosurgery. Functional monitoring is based on electroencephalography (EEG), which uses silver electrodes. However, these electrodes generate metal artifacts as silver blocks X-rays, creating white radial lines on computed tomography (CT) images during surgery. Thick electrodes interfere with surgical procedures. Thus, thinner and lighter electrodes are ideal for intraoperative use. The authors developed thin brain electrodes using carbon nanotubes that were formed into thin sheets and connected to electrical wires. The nanotube sheets were soft and fitted the curve of the head very well. When attached to the head using paste, the impedance of the newly developed electrodes was 5 kΩ or lower, which was similar to that of conventional metal electrodes. These electrodes can be used in combination with intraoperative CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or cerebral angiography. Somatosensory-evoked potentials, auditory brainstem responses, and visually evoked potentials were clearly identified in ten volunteers. The electrodes, without any artifacts that distort images, did not interfere with X-rays, CT, or MR images. They also did not cause skin damage. Carbon nanotube electrodes may be ideal for neurosurgery.

  11. [New approaches in neurosurgery and hyperbaric medicine--the importance of preventive and industrial medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohshi, K; Munaka, M; Abe, H; Tosaki, T

    1999-12-01

    Neurosurgical patients have been mainly treated by surgical procedures over the past decades. In addition, hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy in neurosurgery has been used in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases, head trauma, spinal damage, postoperative brain edema and others. However, the main therapeutic methods for neurosurgical diseases have changed dramatically due to developments in radiological techniques, such as radiosurgery and intravascular surgery. With changes in therapeutic methods, HBO therapy may become a very important treatment option for neurosurgical patients. For example, HBO therapy combined with radiotherapy (UOEH regimen) and anticoagulant therapy appear to be very effective in the treatments of malignant brain tumors and ischemic cerebrovascular diseases, respectively. On the other hand, medical examinations under hyper- and hypobaric environments have not yet been fully studied in the central nervous system compared to those in the cardiopulmonary systems. Moreover, the mechanisms of cerebral lesions in decompression sickness and acute mountain sickness remain unclear. Clinical neurologic approaches are very important in these fields. Hence, clinicians and researchers skilled in both neurosurgery and hyperbaric medicine will be required for advanced treatment and preventive and industrial medicine.

  12. Various irrigation fluids affect postoperative brain edema and cellular damage during experimental neurosurgery in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Kazuhisa; Kawano, Takeshi; Morioka, Yujiro; Fujita, Yasutaka; Nishimura, Masuhiro

    2006-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate how various irrigation fluids used during neurosurgical procedures affect the degree of postoperative brain edema and cellular damage during experimental neurosurgery in rats. The cerebral cortex was exposed and incised crosswise with a surgical knife under irrigation with an artificial CSF, lactated Ringer's solution, or normal saline. Four hours after injury, irrigation was stopped and brain tissue samples were obtained from injured and uninjured sites. Specific gravity, cerebrovascular permeability, and TTC staining of the samples were evaluated. Incision and irrigation of the brain were not performed on the control group. At the injured site, specific gravities of the samples in the normal saline group and the lactated Ringer's solution group were significantly lower than the specific gravity in the artificial CSF group. The EB concentration was significantly higher in the lactated Ringer's solution group and relatively high in the normal saline group as compared with the artificial CSF group. TTC staining did not differ significantly between the artificial CSF group and the control group. It was significantly lower in the lactated Ringer's solution group and the normal saline group than in the control group and the artificial CSF group. As compared with normal saline and lactated Ringer's solution, artificial CSF reduced postoperative brain edema, cerebrovascular permeability, and cellular damage in sites injured by experimental neurosurgery in rats.

  13. da Vinci robot-assisted keyhole neurosurgery: a cadaver study on feasibility and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Hani J; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Cundy, Thomas P; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Nandi, Dipankar

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this cadaver study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of da Vinci robot-assisted keyhole neurosurgery. Several keyhole craniotomies were fashioned including supraorbital subfrontal, retrosigmoid and supracerebellar infratentorial. In each case, a simple durotomy was performed, and the flap was retracted. The da Vinci surgical system was then used to perform arachnoid dissection towards the deep-seated intracranial cisterns. It was not possible to simultaneously pass the 12-mm endoscope and instruments through the keyhole craniotomy in any of the approaches performed, limiting visualization. The articulated instruments provided greater dexterity than existing tools, but the instrument arms could not be placed in parallel through the keyhole craniotomy and, therefore, could not be advanced to the deep cisterns without significant clashing. The da Vinci console offered considerable ergonomic advantages over the existing operating room arrangement, allowing the operating surgeon to remain non-sterile and seated comfortably throughout the procedure. However, the lack of haptic feedback was a notable limitation. In conclusion, while robotic platforms have the potential to greatly enhance the performance of transcranial approaches, there is strong justification for research into next-generation robots, better suited to keyhole neurosurgery.

  14. [An automatic system for anatomophysiological correlation in three planes simultaneously during functional neurosurgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teijeiro, E J; Macías, R J; Morales, J M; Guerra, E; López, G; Alvarez, L M; Fernández, F; Maragoto, C; Seijo, F; Alvarez, E

    The Neurosurgical Deep Recording System (NDRS) using a personal computer takes the place of complex electronic equipment for recording and processing deep cerebral electrical activity, as a guide in stereotaxic functional neurosurgery. It also permits increased possibilities of presenting information in direct graphic form with automatic management and sufficient flexibility to implement different analyses. This paper describes the possibilities of automatic simultaneous graphic representation in three almost orthogonal planes, available with the new 5.1 version of NDRS so as to facilitate the analysis of anatomophysiological correlation in the localization of deep structures of the brain during minimal access surgery. This new version can automatically show the spatial behaviour of signals registered throughout the path of the electrode inside the brain, superimposed simultaneously on sagittal, coronal and axial sections of an anatomical atlas of the brain, after adjusting the scale automatically according to the dimensions of the brain of each individual patient. This may also be shown in a tridimensional representation of the different planes themselves intercepting. The NDRS system has been successfully used in Spain and Cuba in over 300 functional neurosurgery operations. The new version further facilitates analysis of spatial anatomophysiological correlation for the localization of brain structures. This system has contributed to increase the precision and safety in selecting surgical targets in the control of Parkinson s disease and other disorders of movement.

  15. Synthetic Biology for Specialty Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Kelly A; Alper, Hal S

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we address recent advances in the field of synthetic biology and describe how those tools have been applied to produce a wide variety of chemicals in microorganisms. Here we classify the expansion of the synthetic biology toolbox into three different categories based on their primary function in strain engineering-for design, for construction, and for optimization. Next, focusing on recent years, we look at how chemicals have been produced using these new synthetic biology tools. Advances in producing fuels are briefly described, followed by a more thorough treatment of commodity chemicals, specialty chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals. Throughout this review, an emphasis is placed on how synthetic biology tools are applied to strain engineering. Finally, we discuss organism and host strain diversity and provide a future outlook in the field.

  16. The First Neurosurgery Boot Camp in Southeast Asia: Evaluating Impact on Knowledge and Regional Collaboration in Yangon, Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Jack; Glick, Roberta; Germano, Isabelle M; Dempsey, Robert; Zervos, John; Prentiss, Tyler; Davis, Matthew; Wright, Ernest; Hlaing, Kyi; Thu, Myat; Soe, Zaw Wai; Myaing, Win

    2018-05-01

    For the first time in Southeast Asia, a Fundamentals of Neurosurgery Boot Camp was held at the University of Medicine 1 in Yangon, Myanmar, February 24-26, 2017. The aim of this course was to teach and train fundamental skills to neurosurgery residents. The Myanmar Neurosurgical Society, Foundation for International Education in Neurosurgery, Society for Neurological Surgeons, The University of Medicine 1 in Yangon, Myanmar, and the Henry Ford Department of Neurosurgery developed a 2-day resident training course. Day 1 activities consisted of lectures by faculty, small group case discussions, and industry-supported demonstrations of surgical techniques. Day 2 activities consisted of hands-on skill stations for common neurosurgical procedures with each station supervised by attending faculty. Written evaluations were distributed before the meeting, immediately after the meeting, and 6 months after the meeting. Boot camp attendees included 40 residents and 24 neurosurgical faculty from Myanmar, Cambodia, Nepal, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam. There were 35 evaluations completed before the boot camp, 34 completed immediately after boot camp, and 20 completed 6 months after boot camp. Knowledge of participants improved from 62.75% before boot camp to 71.50% 6 months after boot camp (P = 0.046). Boot camps provide fundamental didactic and technical exposure to trainees in developed and developing countries and help standardize training in basic neurosurgical competencies, while exposing local faculty to important teaching methods. This model provides a sustainable solution to educational needs and demonstrates to local neurosurgeons how they can take ownership of the educational process. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Brain metastasis from breast cancer: who?, when? and special considerations about the role of technology in neurosurgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutertre, Guillaume; Pouit, Bruno

    2011-04-01

    Questions about both the place and the role of surgery on brain metastasis from breast cancer are arising more and more frequently in practice due to the increase of brain metastasis in patients suffering from a form of cancer recognized as one of the most recurrent cancers in adults but also one of the most sensitive to general treatments of the systemic disease. With improvements in anaesthesia, in surgical instruments, and in global care, neurosurgery has taken advantage of new techniques such as pre- and even per-operative imagery and also neuronavigation. These techniques enable radical and effective surgical intervention with a high level of safety for the patient, making neurosurgery perfectly competitive with other therapeutic modalities, particularly on functional grounds. As for symptomatic treatments or other anti-metastasis treatments, most situations allow a reflection on the global therapeutic strategy which can be adapted to individual cases depending on the patient's general prognosis. In developing this global therapeutic strategy, surgical treatment is still as relevant as ever.

  18. Teleradiology in neurosurgery, based on the experience of the Department of Neurosurgery, Polish Academy of Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glowacki, M.; Czernicki, Z.; Jurkiewicz, J.; Walasek, N.; Czernicki, Z.; Jurkiewicz, J.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze experience with the teleconsulting system applied at the Department of Neurosurgery, Polish Academy of Sciences (PAN) and to establish the best medical and economic conditions for teleradiological networks. The presented system is based on frame-grabbing technology and is operated by MultiView TM 2.0D (eMeD, Tech.) software. Computed tomography (CT) examinations performed in the hospitals in Ciechanow or Ostroleka are transmitted to the teleconsulting center in the Department of Neurosurgery, PAN. Regular telephone lines with a transmission speed of 56 kbps are utilized. One whole CT examination is transmitted in 5 to 7 minutes. All clinical information is reported during telephone conversation optimized by a specific questionnaire which helps improve arrangements for neurosurgical intervention and to document consultations. The usefulness of mobile phones and e mail in teleradiology was also evaluated.The period from December 1996 to April 2002 was studied. During this time, 931 transmission were performed. The most common were control examinations (26%), followed by neurotrauma (19%), spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (18%), neurooncology (13%), subarachnoidal hemorrhage (7%), hydrocephalus (5%), cerebral ischemia (3%), and those without any intracranial pathologies (4%). Disturbances were observed in 4% of transmissions. Seventy percent of the consulted patients were treated conservatively in remote hospitals. Thirty percent of the cases were admitted to our department, of whom 86% were operated. Mobile phones were found to be a useful tool in urgent neurosurgical consultations. Sending compressed CT images via e mail provided sufficient quality,but requires a particular technical background. The system allows for: 1) proper qualification for neurosurgical treatment, 2) fast and easy access to consultations with specialists, 3) patient follow-up (repeated consultations),4) avoidance of unnecessary transportation, and 5

  19. Psychiatric specialty training in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margariti, M; Kontaxakis, V; Ploumpidis, D

    2017-01-01

    The reform and development of psychiatric services require, in addition to financial resources, reserves in specialized human resources. The role of psychiatrists in this process, and at reducing the consequences of mental morbidity is evident. Psychiatrists are required to play a multifaceted role as clinicians, as experts in multidisciplinary team environments and as advisors in the recognition of public needs in mental health issues, as teachers and mentors for students and other health professionals, as researchers in order to enrich our knowledge in the scientific field of psychiatry, and as public health specialists in the development of the mental health services system. This multifaceted role requires the continuous education of modern psychiatrists, but above all a broad, substantial and comprehensive training regime in the initial stage of their professional career, that is to say during specialization. Training in Psychiatry, as indeed has happened in all other medical specialties, has evolved considerably in recent decades, both in the content of education due to scientific advances in the fields of neurobiology, cognitive neuroscience, genetics, psychopharmacology, epidemiology and psychiatric nosology, and also because of advances in the educational process itself. Simple apprenticeship next to an experienced clinician, despite its importance in the clinical training of young psychiatrists, is no longer sufficient to meet the increased demands of the modern role of psychiatrists, resulting in the creation of educational programs defined by setting and pursuing minimum, though comprehensive educational objectives. This development has created the global need to develop organizations intended to supervise training programs. These organizations have various forms worldwide. In the European Union, the competent supervising body for medical specialties is the UEMS (European Union of Medical Specialities) and particularly in the case of the psychiatric

  20. Factors Influencing Medical Students' Choice of Specialty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yeh Chang

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: This study found that personal intelligence/ability preference and career opportunities were more important factors to the current generation of students in choosing a specialty. Knowledge of these students' attitudes could form the basis for the development of strategies to enhance the attractiveness of specialties facing the problem of a shortage of manpower.

  1. Social Dominance Theory and Medical Specialty Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepièce, Brice; Reynaert, Christine; van Meerbeeck, Philippe; Dory, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how medical students select their specialty is a fundamental issue for public health and educational policy makers. One of the factors that students take into account is a specialty's prestige which hinges partly on its focus on technique rather than whole person. We examine the potential of a psychological framework, social…

  2. Industry Financial Relationships in Neurosurgery in 2015: Analysis of the Sunshine Act Open Payments Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lotbiniere-Bassett, Madeleine P; McDonald, Patrick J

    2018-03-23

    The 2013 Physician Payments Sunshine Act mandates that all U.S. drug and device manufacturers disclose payments to physicians. All payments are made available annually in the Open Payments Database (OPD). Our aim was to determine prevalence, magnitude, and nature of these payments to physicians performing neurologic surgery in 2015 and to discuss the role that financial conflicts of interest play in neurosurgery. All records of industry financial relationships with physicians identified by the neurological surgery taxonomy code in 2015 were accessed via the OPD. Data were analyzed in terms of type and amounts of payments, companies making payments, and comparison with previous studies. In 2015, 83,690 payments (totaling $99,048,607) were made to 7613 physicians by 330 companies. Of these, 0.01% were >$1 million, and 73.2% were <$100. The mean payment ($13,010) was substantially greater than the median ($114). Royalties and licensing accounted for the largest monetary value of payments (74.2%) but only 1.7% of the total number. Food and beverage payments were the most commonly reported transaction (75%) but accounted for only 2.5% of total reported monetary value. Neurologic surgery had the second highest average total payment per physician of any specialty. The neurological surgery specialty receives substantial annual payments from industry in the United States. The overall value is driven by a small number of payments of high monetary value. The OPD provides a unique opportunity for increased transparency in industry-physician relationships facilitating disclosure of financial conflicts of interest. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Perception of Surgical Faculty on the Utility of Modified Thiel Embalmed Cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini C Appaji

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical skills training on low and high fidelity simulators have been in practice for over a decade, but due to the high cost of virtual reality simulators it is beyond the reach of institutions and trainees. Among the simulators, high fidelity simulators such as a suitably prepared human anatomical specimen would give a real feel as if doing the procedure in the living. Hence, having soft, supple cadaver with organoleptic properties is an ideal situation for training by simulation and research. To facilitate the surgical skill training and research, chemical embalming was adopted with modifications of the Thiel method, for cadaver preservation. Aim: The aim of this study was to study the perception of the surgical faculty’s experience on the utility of modified Thiel embalmed cadavers for surgical procedures. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a feedback was taken from practicing surgeons of broad and sub specialties such as general surgery, orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, plastic surgery, pediatric surgery, ophthalmology, ENT, OBG, Transplant surgery (n=54. A 5 point Likert scale questionnaire was used with criteria of measurements like skin color, consistency, odour, differentiation of the layers, approach to the area, joint mobility and suitability for the procedure. Results: The scores ranged from 3.9 to 4.46/5. The participants expressed satisfaction on the cadaver quality on their utility for performance of surgical procedures. They expressed that, such embalmed cadavers would be excellent for learning purpose, surgical skills training in orthopedic procedures like arthroscopy. They felt the joint mobility was good, the consistency was soft and differentiation of layers was good. Some felt the tissues were fragile and would easily give away losing their strength. Conclusion: Thiel embalmed cadavers retain their organoleptic properties and hence facilitate surgical skills training. The thiel embalmed

  4. Evaluation of the impact of collaborative work by teams from the National Medical Residency Committee and the Brazilian Society of Neurosurgery. Retrospective and prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Renato Antunes Dos; Snell, Linda; Nunes, Maria do Patrocínio Tenório

    2016-04-01

    Training for specialist physicians in Brazil can take place in different ways. Closer liaison between institutions providing this training and assessment and health care services may improve qualifications. This article analyzes the impact of closer links and joint work by teams from the National Medical Residency Committee (Comissão Nacional de Residência Médica, CNRM) and the Brazilian Society of Neurosurgery (Sociedade Brasileira de Neurocirurgia, SBN) towards evaluating these programs. Retrospective and prospective study, conducted in a public university on a pilot project developed between CNRM and SBN for joint assessment of training programs across Brazil. The literature in the most relevant databases was reviewed. Documents and legislation produced by official government bodies were evaluated. Training locations were visited. Reports produced about residency programs were analyzed. Only 26% of the programs were immediately approved. The joint assessments found problems relating to teaching and to functioning of clinical service in 35% of the programs. The distribution of programs in this country has a strong relationship with the Human Development Index (HDI) of the regions and is very similar to the distribution of specialists. Closer collaboration between the SBN and CNRM had a positive impact on assessment of neurosurgery medical residency across the country. The low rates of direct approval have produced modifications and improvements to the quality of teaching and care (services). Closer links between the CNRM and other medical specialties have the capability to positively change the structure and function of specialty training in Brazil.

  5. Lifetime earnings for physicians across specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, J Paul; Tancredi, Daniel; Jerant, Anthony; Romano, Patrick S; Kravitz, Richard L

    2012-12-01

    Earlier studies estimated annual income differences across specialties, but lifetime income may be more relevant given physicians' long-term commitments to specialties. Annual income and work hours data were collected from 6381 physicians in the nationally representative 2004-2005 Community Tracking Study. Data regarding years of residency were collected from AMA FREIDA. Present value models were constructed assuming 3% discount rates. Estimates were adjusted for demographic and market covariates. Sensitivity analyses included 4 alternative models involving work hours, retirement, exogenous variables, and 1% discount rate. Estimates were generated for 4 broad specialty categories (Primary Care, Surgery, Internal Medicine and Pediatric Subspecialties, and Other), and for 41 specific specialties. The estimates of lifetime earnings for the broad categories of Surgery, Internal Medicine and Pediatric Subspecialties, and Other specialties were $1,587,722, $1,099,655, and $761,402 more than for Primary Care. For the 41 specific specialties, the top 3 (with family medicine as reference) were neurological surgery ($2,880,601), medical oncology ($2,772,665), and radiation oncology ($2,659,657). The estimates from models with varying rates of retirement and including only exogenous variables were similar to those in the preferred model. The 1% discount model generated estimates that were roughly 150% larger than the 3% model. There was considerable variation in the lifetime earnings across physician specialties. After accounting for varying residency years and discounting future earnings, primary care specialties earned roughly $1-3 million less than other specialties. Earnings' differences across specialties may undermine health reform efforts to control costs and ensure adequate numbers of primary care physicians.

  6. Virtual reality neurosurgery: a simulator blueprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Mark A; van Velsen, Martin; Caffrey, John P; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2004-04-01

    This article details preliminary studies undertaken to integrate the most relevant advancements across multiple disciplines in an effort to construct a highly realistic neurosurgical simulator based on a distributed computer architecture. Techniques based on modified computational modeling paradigms incorporating finite element analysis are presented, as are current and projected efforts directed toward the implementation of a novel bidirectional haptic device. Patient-specific data derived from noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging sequences are used to construct a computational model of the surgical region of interest. Magnetic resonance images of the brain may be coregistered with those obtained from magnetic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance venography, and diffusion tensor imaging to formulate models of varying anatomic complexity. The majority of the computational burden is encountered in the presimulation reduction of the computational model and allows realization of the required threshold rates for the accurate and realistic representation of real-time visual animations. Intracranial neurosurgical procedures offer an ideal testing site for the development of a totally immersive virtual reality surgical simulator when compared with the simulations required in other surgical subspecialties. The material properties of the brain as well as the typically small volumes of tissue exposed in the surgical field, coupled with techniques and strategies to minimize computational demands, provide unique opportunities for the development of such a simulator. Incorporation of real-time haptic and visual feedback is approached here and likely will be accomplished soon.

  7. Mixed reality for neurosurgery: a novel prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcañiz Raya, Mariano; Varvaro Marcinek, Hugo; Martinez Saez, José Miguel; Torres Sanchez, Roque; Juan Lizandra, M Carmen; Monserrat Aranda, Carlos; Gil Gomez, José Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Microscopes and neuronavigators are often used in neurosurgical procedures. Our Mixed Reality prototype proposes to show neuronavigator imaging overlayed onto the surgical field of view. The proposal is to replace the traditional optical microscope with a digital one. The system is presented in this article. Firsts trials have been performed at the laboratory with satisfactory results.

  8. Computer-guided laser for neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivukangas, J; Louhisalmi, Y

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of over 40 neurosurgical laser operations, including CO2, Nd-YAG and simultaneous CO2/Nd-YAG laser procedures, a computer-guided system for spatial control of the laser beam has been developed. The pilot laser has several modes: it can direct the neurosurgeon along the central axis of the surgical microscope to stereotactically determined point-like targets or outline selected layers of underlying volume targets onto superficial surfaces such as scalp and cortex and onto the tissue at the appropriate depth. The active treatment laser can be guided by preoperative CT/MRI or intraoperative ultrasound image data for layer-by-layer resection of tumor. The laser system can be connected to the surgical field by rigid stereotactic means or by neuronavigator. In the present system, a special brain surgery adapter coordinates the imaging system and laser to the surgical field. Thus, the laser system can be used for image-guided surgical orientation, for demarcation of lesions and for actual layer-by-layer removal of tumor.

  9. Neurosurgery for mental disorders: a review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    “A surgical procedure for the destruction of brain tissue for the purposes of alleviating specific ... left vagus nerve as the right vagus nerve is crucial for cardiac function. ..... D. Vagus nerve stimulation: 2-year outcomes for bipolar versus unipolar ...

  10. Water balance disorders after neurosurgery: The triphasic response revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Hoorn (Ewout); R. Zietse (Bob)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWater balance disorders after neurosurgery are well recognized, but detailed reports of the triphasic response are scarce. We describe a 55-year-old woman, who developed the triphasic response with severe hyper- and hyponatraemia after resection of a suprasellar meningioma. The case

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Neurosurgery in the Tropics: A practical approach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BOOK REVIEW: Neurosurgery in the Tropics: A practical approach to common problems By Jeffrey V. Rosenfeld MBBS, MS, FRACS, FRCS (Ed), FACS, FACTM and David A.K Watters ChM, FRACS, FRCS (Ed) Macmillan Education LTD 2000, Price $ 50 US ISBN 0-333-68412-5.

  12. Highly cited works in neurosurgery. Part II: the citation classics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Francisco A; Lozano, Andres M

    2010-02-01

    The term "citation classic" has been used in reference to an article that has been cited more than 400 times. The purpose of this study is to identify such articles that pertain to clinical neurosurgery. A list of search phrases relating to neurosurgery was compiled. A topic search was performed using the Institute for Scientific Information Web of Science for phrases. Articles with more than 400 citations were identified, and nonclinical articles were omitted. The journals, year of publication, topics, and study types were analyzed. There were 106 articles with more than 400 citations relating to clinical neurosurgery. These articles appeared in 28 different journals, with more than half appearing in the Journal of Neurosurgery or the New England Journal of Medicine. Fifty-three articles were published since 1990. There were 38 articles on cerebrovascular disease, 21 on stereotactic and functional neurosurgery, 21 on neurooncology, 19 on trauma, 4 on nontraumatic spine, 2 on CSF pathologies, and 1 on infection. There were 29 randomized trials, of which 86% appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, or the Journal of the American Medical Association, and half concerned the prevention or treatment of stroke. In addition, there were 16 prospective studies, 15 classification or grading systems, and 7 reviews. The remaining 39 articles were case series, case reports, or technical notes. More than half of the citation classics identified in this study have been published in the past 20 years. Case series, classifications, and reviews appeared more frequently in neurosurgical journals, while randomized controlled trials tended to be published in general medical journals.

  13. Past, Present, and Future of Neurosurgery in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Michael M; Warf, Benjamin; Fuller, Anthony; Freischlag, Kyle; Muhumuza, Michael; Ssenyonjo, Hussein; Mukasa, John; Mugamba, John; Kiryabwire, Joel

    2017-04-01

    Neurosurgery in Uganda was virtually non-existent up until late 1960s. This changed when Dr. Jovan Kiryabwire spearheaded development of a neurosurgical unit at Mulago Hospital in Kampala. His work ethic and vision set the stage for rapid expansion of neurosurgical care in Uganda.At the beginning of the 2000s, Uganda was a country of nearly 30 million people, but had only 4 neurosurgeons. Neurosurgery's progress was plagued by challenges faced by many developing countries, such as difficulty retaining specialists, lack of modern hospital resources, and scarce training facilities. To combat these challenges 2 distinct programs were launched: 1 by Dr. Benjamin Warf in collaboration with CURE International, and the other by Dr. Michael Haglund from Duke University. Dr. Warf's program focused on establishing a facility for pediatric neurosurgery. Dr. Haglund's program to increase neurosurgical capacity was founded on a "4 T's Paradigm": Technology, Twinning, Training, and Top-Down. Embedded within this paradigm was the notion that Uganda needed to train its own people to become neurosurgeons, and thus Duke helped establish the country's first neurosurgery residency training program.Efforts from overseas, including the tireless work of Dr. Benjamin Warf, have saved thousands of children's lives. The influx of the Duke Program caused a dynamic shift at Mulago Hospital with dramatic effects, as evidenced by the substantial increase in neurosurgical capacity. The future looks bright for neurosurgery in Uganda and it all traces back to a rural village where 1 man had a vision to help the people of his country. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  14. Neurosurgery simulation using non-linear finite element modeling and haptic interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Huai-Ping; Audette, Michel; Joldes, Grand R.; Enquobahrie, Andinet

    2012-02-01

    Real-time surgical simulation is becoming an important component of surgical training. To meet the realtime requirement, however, the accuracy of the biomechancial modeling of soft tissue is often compromised due to computing resource constraints. Furthermore, haptic integration presents an additional challenge with its requirement for a high update rate. As a result, most real-time surgical simulation systems employ a linear elasticity model, simplified numerical methods such as the boundary element method or spring-particle systems, and coarse volumetric meshes. However, these systems are not clinically realistic. We present here an ongoing work aimed at developing an efficient and physically realistic neurosurgery simulator using a non-linear finite element method (FEM) with haptic interaction. Real-time finite element analysis is achieved by utilizing the total Lagrangian explicit dynamic (TLED) formulation and GPU acceleration of per-node and per-element operations. We employ a virtual coupling method for separating deformable body simulation and collision detection from haptic rendering, which needs to be updated at a much higher rate than the visual simulation. The system provides accurate biomechancial modeling of soft tissue while retaining a real-time performance with haptic interaction. However, our experiments showed that the stability of the simulator depends heavily on the material property of the tissue and the speed of colliding objects. Hence, additional efforts including dynamic relaxation are required to improve the stability of the system.

  15. Recording stereoscopic 3D neurosurgery with a head-mounted 3D camera system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brian; Chen, Brian R; Chen, Beverly B; Lu, James Y; Giannotta, Steven L

    2015-06-01

    Stereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) imaging can present more information to the viewer and further enhance the learning experience over traditional two-dimensional (2D) video. Most 3D surgical videos are recorded from the operating microscope and only feature the crux, or the most important part of the surgery, leaving out other crucial parts of surgery including the opening, approach, and closing of the surgical site. In addition, many other surgeries including complex spine, trauma, and intensive care unit procedures are also rarely recorded. We describe and share our experience with a commercially available head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to obtain stereoscopic 3D recordings of these seldom recorded aspects of neurosurgery. The strengths and limitations of using the GoPro(®) 3D system as a head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system in the operating room are reviewed in detail. Over the past several years, we have recorded in stereoscopic 3D over 50 cranial and spinal surgeries and created a library for education purposes. We have found the head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to be a valuable asset to supplement 3D footage from a 3D microscope. We expect that these comprehensive 3D surgical videos will become an important facet of resident education and ultimately lead to improved patient care.

  16. Pre-operative planning and intra-operative guidance in modern neurosurgery: a review of 300 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadley, J.; Dorward, N.; Kitchen, N.; Thomas, D.

    1999-01-01

    Operative neurosurgery has recently entered an exciting era of image guided surgery or neuronavigation and application of this novel technology is beginning to have a significant impact in many ways in a variety of intracranial procedures. In order to fully assess the advantages of image guided techniques over conventional planning and surgery in selected cases, detailed prospective evaluation has been carried out during the advanced development of an optically tracked neuronavigation system. Over a 2-year period, 300 operative neurosurgical procedures have been performed with the assistance of interactive image guidance, as well as the development of new software applications and hardware tools. A broad range of intracranial neurosurgical procedures were seen to benefit from image guidance, including 163 craniotomies, 53 interactive stereotactic biopsies, 7 tracked neuroendoscopies and 37 complex skull base procedures. The most common pathological diagnoses were cerebral glioma in 98 cases, meningioma in 64 and metastasis in 23. Detailed analysis of a battery of postoperative questions revealed benefits in operative planning, appreciation of anatomy, lesion location, safety of surgery and greatly enhanced surgical confidence. The authors believe that image guided surgical technology, with new developments such as those described, has a significant role to play in contemporary neurosurgery and its widespread adoption in practice will be realised in the near future. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:10615186

  17. Pediatric neurosurgery outreach: sustainability appraisal of a targeted teaching model in Kiev, Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michael L; Duenas, Vincent J; Hambrecht, Amanda C; Hahn, Edward J; Aryan, Henry E; Jandial, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the efficacy of operative skill transfer in the context of targeted pediatric outreach missions completed in Kiev, Ukraine. In addition the ability to create sustainable surgical care improvement is investigated as an efficient method to improve global surgical care. Three 1-week targeted neurosurgical missions were performed (2005-2007) to teach neuroendoscopy, which included donation of the necessary surgical equipment, so the host team can deliver newly acquired surgical skills to their citizens after the visiting mission team departs. The neuroendoscopy data for the 4 years after the final mission in 2007 was obtained. After performing pediatric neurosurgery missions in 2005-2007, with a focus on teaching neuroendoscopy, the host team demonstrated the sustainability of our educational efforts in the subsequent 4 years by performing cases independently for their citizens. Since the last targeted mission of 2007, neuroendoscopic procedures have continued to be performed by the trained host surgeons. In 2008, 33 cases were performed. In 2009 and 2010, 29 and 22 cases were completed, respectively. In 2011, local neurosurgeons accomplished 27 cases. To date, a total of 111 operations have been performed over the past 4 years independent of any visiting team, illustrating the sustainability of educational efforts of the missions in 2005-2007. Effective operative skill transfer to host neurosurgeons can be accomplished with limited international team visits using a targeted approach that minimizes expenditures on personnel and capital. With the priority being teaching of an operative technique, as opposed to perennially performing operations by a visiting mission team, sustainable surgical care was achieved and perpetuated after missions officially concluded. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Inter-observer variability in diagnosing radiological features of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage; a preliminary single centre study comparing observers from different specialties and levels of training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Usman T; Khan, Anjum F; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad; Hamid, Rana Shoaib; Alam, Muhammad Mehboob; Emaduddin, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    A noncontrast computed tomography (CT) scan remains the initial radiological investigation of choice for a patient with suspected aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). This initial scan may be used to derive key information about the underlying aneurysm which may aid in further management. The interpretation, however, is subject to the skill and experience of the interpreting individual. The authors here evaluate the interpretation of such CT scans by different individuals at different levels of training, and in two different specialties (Radiology and Neurosurgery). Initial nonontrast CT scan of 35 patients with aSAH was evaluated independently by four different observers. The observers selected for the study included two from Radiology and two from Neurosurgery at different levels of training; a resident currently in mid training and a resident who had recently graduated from training of each specialty. Measured variables included interpreter's suspicion of presence of subarachnoid blood, side of the subarachnoid hemorrhage, location of the aneurysm, the aneurysm's proximity to vessel bifurcation, number of aneurysm(s), contour of aneurysm(s), presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), infarction, hydrocephalus and midline shift. To determine the inter-observer variability (IOV), weighted kappa values were calculated. There was moderate agreement on most of the CT scan findings among all observers. Substantial agreement was found amongst all observers for hydrocephalus, IVH, and ICH. Lowest agreement rates were seen in the location of aneurysm being supra or infra tentorial. There were, however, some noteworthy exceptions. There was substantial to almost perfect agreement between the radiology graduate and radiology resident on most CT findings. The lowest agreement was found between the neurosurgery graduate and the radiology graduate. Our study suggests that although agreements were seen in the interpretation of some of

  19. Factors Influencing Medical Students' Choice of Specialty

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Pei-Yeh; Hung, Chih-Young; Wang, Kuei-lng; Huang, Yuan-Huei; Chang, King-Jen

    2006-01-01

    Medical school graduates are the source of a country's physicians. Determining how the graduates of these schools select their areas of specialization is the key to achieving a balanced distribution of doctors among all specialties. The purposes of this study were to determine the factors that influence medical students' choice of medical specialty, and to derive the relative weight of each factor. Methods: We constructed a two-tiered analytic hierarchy process (AHP) model which was repres...

  20. The Value of Specialty Oncology Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Dana P; Jena, Anupam B; Lakdawalla, Darius N; Malin, Jennifer L; Malkin, Jesse D; Sun, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Objective To estimate patients' elasticity of demand, willingness to pay, and consumer surplus for five high-cost specialty medications treating metastatic disease or hematologic malignancies. Data Source/Study Setting Claims data from 71 private health plans from 1997 to 2005. Study Design This is a revealed preference analysis of the demand for specialty drugs among cancer patients. We exploit differences in plan generosity to examine how utilization of specialty oncology drugs varies with patient out-of-pocket costs. Data Collection/Extraction Methods We extracted key variables from administrative health insurance claims records. Principal Findings A 25 percent reduction in out-of-pocket costs leads to a 5 percent increase in the probability that a patient initiates specialty cancer drug therapy. Among patients who initiate, a 25 percent reduction in out-of-pocket costs reduces the number of treatments (claims) by 1–3 percent, depending on the drug. On average, the value of these drugs to patients who use them is about four times the total cost paid by the patient and his or her insurer, although this ratio may be lower for oral specialty therapies. Conclusions The decision to initiate therapy with specialty oncology drugs is responsive to price, but not highly so. Among patients who initiate therapy, the amount of treatment is equally responsive. The drugs we examine are highly valued by patients in excess of their total costs, although oral agents warrant further scrutiny as copayments increase. PMID:19878344

  1. Is surgical workforce diversity increasing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriole, Dorothy A; Jeffe, Donna B; Schechtman, Kenneth B

    2007-03-01

    We sought to determine the extent to which recent increases in levels of gender and racial diversity in the overall resident-physician workforce were evident among core-surgical specialty resident workforces. Chi-square tests for trend assessed the importance of changes from 1996 to 2004 in proportions of women and African Americans in the surgery-resident workforce. Surgery-resident trends were compared with overall resident workforce trends using two-tailed t-tests to compare regression slopes that quantified rates of change over time. Chi-square tests assessed differences between proportions of women and African Americans in the current overall board-certified workforce and their proportions in the surgery board-certified workforce. From 1996 to 2004, proportions of women increased in all seven surgical specialties studied. Compared with the overall trend toward increasing proportions of women in the resident workforce, the trend in one surgical specialty was larger (obstetrics/gynecology, p 0.05), and two were smaller (each p 0.05). Proportions of African Americans decreased in three specialties (each p workforce, except obstetrics/gynecology, remained lower than in the overall board-certified workforce (each p workforces have persisted since 1996 and will likely perpetuate ongoing surgery board-certified workforce disparities.

  2. Non-rigid registration of 3D ultrasound for neurosurgery using automatic feature detection and matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Inês; Toews, Matthew; Luo, Jie; Unadkat, Prashin; Essayed, Walid; George, Elizabeth; Teodoro, Pedro; Carvalho, Herculano; Martins, Jorge; Golland, Polina; Pieper, Steve; Frisken, Sarah; Golby, Alexandra; Wells, William

    2018-06-04

    The brain undergoes significant structural change over the course of neurosurgery, including highly nonlinear deformation and resection. It can be informative to recover the spatial mapping between structures identified in preoperative surgical planning and the intraoperative state of the brain. We present a novel feature-based method for achieving robust, fully automatic deformable registration of intraoperative neurosurgical ultrasound images. A sparse set of local image feature correspondences is first estimated between ultrasound image pairs, after which rigid, affine and thin-plate spline models are used to estimate dense mappings throughout the image. Correspondences are derived from 3D features, distinctive generic image patterns that are automatically extracted from 3D ultrasound images and characterized in terms of their geometry (i.e., location, scale, and orientation) and a descriptor of local image appearance. Feature correspondences between ultrasound images are achieved based on a nearest-neighbor descriptor matching and probabilistic voting model similar to the Hough transform. Experiments demonstrate our method on intraoperative ultrasound images acquired before and after opening of the dura mater, during resection and after resection in nine clinical cases. A total of 1620 automatically extracted 3D feature correspondences were manually validated by eleven experts and used to guide the registration. Then, using manually labeled corresponding landmarks in the pre- and post-resection ultrasound images, we show that our feature-based registration reduces the mean target registration error from an initial value of 3.3 to 1.5 mm. This result demonstrates that the 3D features promise to offer a robust and accurate solution for 3D ultrasound registration and to correct for brain shift in image-guided neurosurgery.

  3. A glance at live interventional neuroradiology and neurosurgery course 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qiang; Hong Bo; Liu Jianmin

    2010-01-01

    The annual Live Interventional Neuroradiology and Neurosurgery Course (LINNC) is one of the most important congresses in the neurosurgery and neuroradiology field. LINNC 2009 was held on May 25th this year and lasted for 3 days. In this article, the authors introduced the main points of the congress. The congress mainly discussed some hot topics at present time, including both the clinical and fundamental studies of cerebral arteriovenous malformation, ischemic cerebral disease and intracranial aneurysm, etc. Both neurological and neuroradiological case demonstrations related to the topics, and the main course of the congress were alternately performed. Recent advances in imaging technique and clinical application, such as Dyna-CT and Xper-CT, were also presented on the congress. (authors)

  4. Cerenkov and radioluminescence imaging of brain tumor specimens during neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello Enrico; Schiariti, Marco P.; Grana, Chiara M.; Ferrari, Mahila; Cremonesi, Marta; Boschi, Federico

    2016-05-01

    We presented the first example of Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) and radioluminescence imaging (RLI) of human tumor specimens. A patient with a brain meningioma localized in the left parietal region was injected with 166 MBq of Y90-DOTATOC the day before neurosurgery. The specimens of the tumor removed during surgery were imaged using both CLI and RLI using an optical imager prototype developed in our laboratory. The system is based on a cooled electron multiplied charge coupled device coupled with an f/0.95 17-mm C-mount lens. We showed for the first time the possibility of obtaining CLI and RLI images of fresh human brain tumor specimens removed during neurosurgery.

  5. Surgical Assisting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... instruction, including: Microbiology Pathophysiology Pharmacology Anatomy and physiology Medical terminology Curriculum . Course content includes: Advanced surgical anatomy Surgical microbiology Surgical pharmacology Anesthesia methods and agents Bioscience Ethical ...

  6. CT-MR image data fusion for computer assisted navigated neurosurgery of temporal bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, Stefan Franz; Donat, Markus Alexander; Mehrain, Sheida; Friedrich, Klaus; Krestan, Christian; Matula, Christian; Imhof, Herwig; Czerny, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the value of multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative work up of temporal bone tumors and to present, especially, CT and MR image fusion for surgical planning and performance in computer assisted navigated neurosurgery of temporal bone tumors. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with temporal bone tumors underwent MDCT and MRI. MDCT was performed in high-resolution bone window level setting in axial plane. The reconstructed MDCT slice thickness was 0.8 mm. MRI was performed in axial and coronal plane with T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences, un-enhanced and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) sequences, and coronal T1-weighted SE sequences with fat suppression and with 3D T1-weighted gradient-echo (GE) contrast-enhanced sequences in axial plane. The 3D T1-weighted GE sequence had a slice thickness of 1 mm. Image data sets of CT and 3D T1-weighted GE sequences were merged utilizing a workstation to create CT-MR fusion images. MDCT and MR images were separately used to depict and characterize lesions. The fusion images were utilized for interventional planning and intraoperative image guidance. The intraoperative accuracy of the navigation unit was measured, defined as the deviation between the same landmark in the navigation image and the patient. Results: Tumorous lesions of bone and soft tissue were well delineated and characterized by CT and MR images. The images played a crucial role in the differentiation of benign and malignant pathologies, which consisted of 13 benign and 2 malignant tumors. The CT-MR fusion images supported the surgeon in preoperative planning and improved surgical performance. The mean intraoperative accuracy of the navigation system was 1.25 mm. Conclusion: CT and MRI are essential in the preoperative work up of temporal bone tumors. CT-MR image data fusion presents an accurate tool for planning the correct surgical procedure and is a

  7. Three-dimensional, computer simulated navigation in endoscopic neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta K. Sefcik, BHA

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Three-dimensional, frameless neuronavigation systems are useful in endoscopic neurosurgery to assist in the pre-operative planning of potential trajectories and to help localize the pathology of interest. Neuronavigation appears to be accurate to <1–2 mm without issues related to brain shift. Further work is necessary in the investigation of the effect of neuronavigation on operative time, cost, and patient-centered outcomes.

  8. Investigating the Scope of Resident Patient Care Handoffs within Neurosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Babu, Maya A.; Nahed, Brian Vala; Heary, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Handoffs are defined as verbal and written communications during patient care transitions. With the passage of recent ACMGE work hour rules further limiting the hours interns can spend in the hospital, many fear that more handoffs will occur, putting patient safety at risk. The issue of handoffs has not been studied in the neurosurgical literature. Methods: A validated, 20-question online-survey was sent to neurosurgical residents in all 98 accredited U.S. neurosurgery programs....

  9. A systematic review of 30-day readmission after cranial neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusimano, Michael D; Pshonyak, Iryna; Lee, Michael Y; Ilie, Gabriela

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The 30-day readmission rate has emerged as an important marker of the quality of in-hospital care in several fields of medicine. This review aims to summarize available research reporting readmission rates after cranial procedures and to establish an association with demographic, clinical, and system-related factors and clinical outcomes. METHODS The authors conducted a systematic review of several databases; a manual search of the Journal of Neurosurgery, Neurosurgery, Acta Neurochirurgica, Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences; and the cited references of the selected articles. Quality review was performed using the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) criteria. Findings are reported according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. RESULTS A total of 1344 articles published between 1947 and 2015 were identified; 25 were considered potentially eligible, of which 12 met inclusion criteria. The 30-day readmission rates varied from 6.9% to 23.89%. Complications arising during or after neurosurgical procedures were a prime reason for readmission. Race, comorbidities, and longer hospital stay put patients at risk for readmission. CONCLUSIONS Although readmission may be an important indicator for good care for the subset of acutely declining patients, neurosurgery should aim to reduce 30-day readmission rates with improved quality of care through systemic changes in the care of neurosurgical patients that promote preventive measures.

  10. Simulation training in neurosurgery: advances in education and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konakondla S

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sanjay Konakondla, Reginald Fong, Clemens M Schirmer Department of Neurosurgery and Neuroscience Institute, Geisinger Medical Center, Geisinger Health System, Danville, PA, USA Abstract: The current simulation technology used for neurosurgical training leaves much to be desired. Significant efforts are thoroughly exhausted in hopes of developing simulations that translate to give learners the “real-life” feel. Though a respectable goal, this may not be necessary as the application for simulation in neurosurgical training may be most useful in early learners. The ultimate uniformly agreeable endpoint of improved outcome and patient safety drives these investments. We explore the development, availability, educational taskforces, cost burdens and the simulation advancements in neurosurgical training. The technologies can be directed at achieving early resident milestones placed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. We discuss various aspects of neurosurgery disciplines with specific technologic advances of simulation software. An overview of the scholarly landscape of the recent publications in the realm of medical simulation and virtual reality pertaining to neurologic surgery is provided. We analyze concurrent concept overlap between PubMed headings and provide a graphical overview of the associations between these terms. Keywords: residency education, simulation, neurosurgery training, virtual reality, haptic feedback, task analysis, ACGME 

  11. Trepanation to Treat a Head Wound: A Case of Neurosurgery from 13th-Century Tuscany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccomi, Giulia; Fornaciari, Gino; Vitiello, Angelica; Bini, Anna; Caramella, Davide; Giuffra, Valentina

    2017-08-01

    During the archaeological excavations conducted in the 13th century cemetery of the Church of Sant'Agostino in Poggibonsi (Tuscany, Italy), a skull with evidence of neurosurgical intervention was brought to light. The skull, belonging to an adult male, shows two traumatic lesions produced by bladed instruments. The first lesion, located on the anterior part of the parietal bones, involved only the outer cranial table; bone remodeling indicates that the individual survived the injury for a long time. The second lesion, located on the frontal bone, involved all the thickness of the bone; the absence of reparative processes allows a diagnosis of peri mortem lesion. To treat this wound, the patient underwent surgical intervention. In fact, in correspondence to the lesion, an oval bone loss, with clean and well-defined cutting edges, can be interpreted as the result of a trepanation, probably performed to clean the wound and to remove any bone splinters. Half of the bone "rondella" was found in situ; it can be hypothesized that the surgeon decided to replace the bony piece to protect the brain. However, the surgical intervention failed, and the patient died soon afterwards. Trepanation for the treatment of cranial traumas is described by several medical classical and medieval authors, whose texts were available in the 13th century. This case represents rare Middle Ages evidence of neurosurgery used to treat a bone injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor, E-mail: halva@ciencias.unam.mx [Unidad de Imagen Molecular PET/CT, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía Manuel Velasco Suárez, Insurgentes Sur 3877 Col. La Fama, 14269, México D.F. (Mexico); Reynoso-Mejía, Alberto [Unidad de Imagen Molecular PET/CT, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía Manuel Velasco Suárez, Insurgentes Sur 3877 Col. La Fama, 14269, México D.F., Mexico and Departamento de Neuroimagen, Instituto Nacional de (Mexico); Casares-Cruz, Katiuzka; Taboada-Barajas, Jesús [Departamento de Neuroimagen, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía Manuel Velasco Suárez, Insurgentes Sur 3877 Col. La Fama, 14269, México D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.

  13. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor; Reynoso-Mejía, Alberto; Casares-Cruz, Katiuzka; Taboada-Barajas, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens

  14. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor; Reynoso-Mejía, Alberto; Casares-Cruz, Katiuzka; Taboada-Barajas, Jesús

    2014-11-01

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.

  15. The history of neurosurgery at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Paul M; Markert, James M; Diethelm, Arnold G; Hadley, Mark N

    2014-10-01

    : The Division of Neurosurgery at the University of Alabama at Birmingham was formally founded in 1954 under the leadership of James Garber Galbraith. The following 60 years would see neurosurgery at the forefront of the development of a nationally recognized medical center in the heart of Birmingham, Alabama. The Department of Neurosurgery now employs 14 faculty members, performs more than 4500 neurosurgical procedures annually, is active in clinical and laboratory research, and boasts a contemporary, comprehensive residency training program.

  16. Dental students' perceptions of dental specialties and factors influencing specialty and career choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhima, Matilda; Petropoulos, Vicki C; Han, Rita K; Kinnunen, Taru; Wright, Robert F

    2012-05-01

    The goals of this study were to 1) evaluate dental students' perceptions of dental specialties, 2) identify factors that play an important role in students' decision to pursue specialty training or career choices, and 3) establish a baseline of students' perceptions of the dental fields with the best future in terms of salary, personal and patient quality of life, and overall impact on the dental profession. Surveys were distributed to 494 students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine. Data were collected from 380 traditional four-year students and thirty advanced standing students. Chi-square tests, multivariate analysis, and logistic regressions were used to determine associations and independent contributions of student demographics to their perceptions of dental specialties and factors influencing specialty training or career choices. Debt was a statistically significant factor (p<0.001) in choosing specialty training or career independent of gender, age, or class year. Enjoyment of providing care in a specialty or field was identified as the single most important factor in choosing a specialty career. Half of the respondents had decided not to specialize. Pursuing postdoctoral general dentistry training and private practice in general dentistry were the most commonly reported plans after completion of dental school. Suggestions are made for ways to inform students about specialty training.

  17. Factors affecting membership in specialty nursing organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary Joe; Olson, Rhonda S

    2004-01-01

    A discouraging trend in many specialty nursing organizations is the stagnant or declining membership. The research committee of the Southeast Texas Chapter of the Association of Rehabilitation Nurses (ARN) collected data and studied this trend to determine what changes would be necessary to increase membership. Using Herzberg's motivational theory as a framework, a review of the literature was initiated. There were few current studies on this issue, but relevant information was found about nursing's emerging workforce, as well as implications of the growth of magnet hospitals, which affect whether nurses join specialty nursing organizations. A multifaceted data-collection approach using convenience samples was designed. First, relevant literature was reviewed. Second, a survey was sent by e-mail to other ARN chapters. Third, a telephone survey on other specialty organizations in the geographic region was completed. Finally, members of the local ARN chapter and four other specialty organizations, as well staff nurses in the geographic area, were given questionnaires to complete. Descriptive statistics and cross tabulations were used to determine why nurses do and do not join specialty organizations (N = 81). The most frequent reasons for joining an organization were to increase knowledge, benefit professionally, network, and earn continuing education units. Reasons for choosing not to participate were family responsibilities, lack of information about these organizations, and lack of time. Ways to reverse the decline in membership are discussed.

  18. Physician attitudes toward industry: a view across the specialties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenstein, Deborah; Keyhani, Salomeh; Ross, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Physician relationships with industry are receiving attention as government and professional organizations move toward restrictive policies and financial transparency. Our objective was to explore attitudes of physicians from all specialties toward gifts from and interactions with the pharmaceutical and device industries. Design Anonymous cross sectional survey. Setting Hospitals in the Mount Sinai School of Medicine consortium, in the New York City metro area Participants Faculty and trainee physicians from all clinical departments Main Outcome Measures Attitudes toward industry interactions and gifts and their appropriateness, measured on 4-point Likert scales. Results Five hundred ninety physicians and medical students completed the survey (response rate=67%); 59% were male, 39% were attendings, and 24% were from surgical specialties. Attitudes toward industry and gifts were generally positive. More than 65% found educational materials and sponsored lunches appropriate, whereas fewer than 25% considered vacations or large gifts appropriate. Surgeons, trainees, and those unfamiliar with institutional policies on industry interactions held more positive attitudes than others and were more likely to deem some gifts appropriate, including industry funding of residency programs and, among surgeons, receiving meals, travel expenses, and payments for attending lectures. Non-attendings held more positive attitudes toward meals in clinical settings, textbooks and samples. Conclusions Physicians continue to hold positive attitudes toward marketing-oriented activities of the pharmaceutical and device industries. Changes in medical culture and physician education focused on surgeons and trainees may align physician attitudes with current policy trends. PMID:20566978

  19. Abortion - surgical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion involves dilating the opening to the uterus (cervix) and placing a small suction tube into the uterus. ...

  20. Specialty Choice Among Sexual and Gender Minorities in Medicine: The Role of Specialty Prestige, Perceived Inclusion, and Medical School Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitkin, Nicole A; Pachankis, John E

    2016-12-01

    Sexual and gender minorities (SGMs) in medicine experience unique stressors in training. However, little is known about SGM specialty choice. This study examined predictors of SGM specialty choice, associations between specialty prestige and perceived SGM inclusion, and self-reported influences on specialty choice. Medical trainees and practitioners (358 SGM, 1528 non-SGM) were surveyed online. We operationalized specialty choice at the individual level as respondents' specialty of practice; at the specialty level, as a percentage of SGM respondents in each specialty. We examined specialty prestige, perceived SGM inclusivity, and medical school climate as predictors of SGM specialty choice, and we compared additional influences on specialty choice between SGM and non-SGM. The percentage of SGM in each specialty was inversely related to specialty prestige (P = 0.001) and positively related to perceived SGM inclusivity (P = 0.01). Prestigious specialties were perceived as less SGM inclusive (P gender identity strongly influenced specialty choice (P role models, and work-life balance as strong influences on specialty choice. Exposure as a medical student to SGM faculty did not predict specialty prestige among SGM. Specialty prestige and perceived inclusivity predict SGM specialty choice. SGM diversity initiatives in prestigious specialties may be particularly effective by addressing SGM inclusion directly. Further research is needed to inform effective mentorship for SGM medical students. Exposure to SGM in medical training reduces anti-SGM bias among medical professionals, and SGM in medicine often assume leadership roles in clinical care, education, and research regarding SGM health. Supporting and promoting SGM diversity across the spectrum of medical specialties, therefore, represents a critical avenue to improve the care delivered to SGM populations and addresses the role of providers in the health disparities experienced by SGM.

  1. Specialty Choice Among Sexual and Gender Minorities in Medicine: The Role of Specialty Prestige, Perceived Inclusion, and Medical School Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachankis, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Sexual and gender minorities (SGMs) in medicine experience unique stressors in training. However, little is known about SGM specialty choice. This study examined predictors of SGM specialty choice, associations between specialty prestige and perceived SGM inclusion, and self-reported influences on specialty choice. Methods: Medical trainees and practitioners (358 SGM, 1528 non-SGM) were surveyed online. We operationalized specialty choice at the individual level as respondents' specialty of practice; at the specialty level, as a percentage of SGM respondents in each specialty. We examined specialty prestige, perceived SGM inclusivity, and medical school climate as predictors of SGM specialty choice, and we compared additional influences on specialty choice between SGM and non-SGM. Results: The percentage of SGM in each specialty was inversely related to specialty prestige (P = 0.001) and positively related to perceived SGM inclusivity (P = 0.01). Prestigious specialties were perceived as less SGM inclusive (P gender identity strongly influenced specialty choice (P work–life balance as strong influences on specialty choice. Exposure as a medical student to SGM faculty did not predict specialty prestige among SGM. Conclusion: Specialty prestige and perceived inclusivity predict SGM specialty choice. SGM diversity initiatives in prestigious specialties may be particularly effective by addressing SGM inclusion directly. Further research is needed to inform effective mentorship for SGM medical students. Exposure to SGM in medical training reduces anti-SGM bias among medical professionals, and SGM in medicine often assume leadership roles in clinical care, education, and research regarding SGM health. Supporting and promoting SGM diversity across the spectrum of medical specialties, therefore, represents a critical avenue to improve the care delivered to SGM populations and addresses the role of providers in the health disparities

  2. Bradford's law: identification of the core journals for neurosurgery and its subspecialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venable, Garrett T; Shepherd, Brandon A; Loftis, Christopher M; McClatchy, S Gray; Roberts, Mallory L; Fillinger, Meghan E; Tansey, James B; Klimo, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Bradford's law describes the scatter of citations for a given subject or field. It can be used to identify the most highly cited journals for a field or subject. The objective of this study was to use currently accepted formulations of Bradford's law to identify core journals of neurosurgery and neurosurgical subspecialties. All original research publications from 2009 to 2013 were analyzed for the top 25 North American academic neurosurgeons from each subspecialty. The top 25 were chosen from a ranked career h-index list identified from previous studies. Egghe's formulation and the verbal formulation of Bradford's law were applied to create specific citation density zones and identify the core journals for each subspecialty. The databases were then combined to identify the core journals for all of academic neurosurgery. Using Bradford's verbal law with 4 zone models, the authors were able to identify the core journals of neurosurgery and its subspecialties. The journals found in the most highly cited first zone are presented here as the core journals. For neurosurgery as a whole, the core included the following journals: Journal of Neurosurgery, Neurosurgery, Spine, Stroke, Neurology, American Journal of Neuroradiology, International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, and New England Journal of Medicine. The core journals for each subspecialty are presented in the manuscript. Bradford's law can be used to identify the core journals of neurosurgery and its subspecialties. The core journals vary for each neurosurgical subspecialty, but Journal of Neurosurgery and Neurosurgery are among the core journals for each neurosurgical subspecialty.

  3. A frameless stereotaxic operating microscope for neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friets, E.M.; Strohbehn, J.W.; Hatch, J.F.; Roberts, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    A new system, which we call the frameless stereotaxic operating microscope, is discussed. Its purpose is to display CT or other image data in the operating microscope in the correct scale, orientation, and position without the use of a stereotaxic frame. A nonimaging ultrasonic rangefinder allows the position of the operating microscope and the position of the patient to be determined. Discrete fiducial points on the patient's external anatomy are located in both image space and operating room space, linking the image data and the operating room. Physician-selected image information, e.g., tumor contours or guidance to predetermined targets, is projected through the optics of the operating microscope using a miniature cathode ray tube and a beam splitter. Projected images superpose the surgical field, reconstructed from image data to match the focal plane of the operating microscope. The algorithms on which the system is based are described, and the sources and effects of errors are discussed. The system's performance is simulated, providing an estimate of accuracy. Two phantoms are used to measure accuracy experimentally. Clinical results and observations are given

  4. A frameless stereotaxic operating microscope for neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friets, E M; Strohbehn, J W; Hatch, J F; Roberts, D W

    1989-06-01

    A new system, which we call the frameless stereotaxic operating microscope, is discussed. Its purpose is to display CT or other image data in the operating microscope in the correct scale, orientation, and position without the use of a stereotaxic frame. A nonimaging ultrasonic rangefinder allows the position of the operating microscope and the position of the patient to be determined. Discrete fiducial points on the patient's external anatomy are located in both image space and operating room space, linking the image data and the operating room. Physician-selected image information, e.g., tumor contours or guidance to predetermined targets, is projected through the optics of the operating microscope using a miniature cathode ray tube and a beam splitter. Projected images superpose the surgical field, reconstructed from image data to match the focal plane of the operating microscope. The algorithms on which the system is based are described, and the sources and effects of errors are discussed. The system's performance is simulated, providing an estimate of accuracy. Two phantoms are used to measure accuracy experimentally. Clinical results and observations are given.

  5. Gender awareness among physicians – the effect of specialty and gender. A study of teachers at a Swedish medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamberg Katarina

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important goal for medical education today is professional development including gender equality and awareness of gender issues. Are medical teachers prepared for this task? We investigated gender awareness among physician teachers, expressed as their attitudes towards the role of gender in professional relationships, and how it varied with physician gender and specialty. We discuss how this might be related to the gender climate and sex segregation in different specialties. Method Questionnaires were sent to all 468 specialists in the clinical departments and in family medicine, who were engaged in educating medical students at a Swedish university. They were asked to rate, on visual analogue scales, the importance of physician and patient gender in consultation, of preceptor and student gender in clinical tutoring and of physician gender in other professional encounters. Differences between family physicians, surgical, and non-surgical hospital doctors, and between women and men were estimated by chi-2 tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results The response rate was 65 %. There were differences between specialty groups in all investigated areas mainly due to disparities among men. The odds for a male family physician to assess gender important were three times higher, and for a male non-surgical doctor two times higher when compared to a male surgical doctor. Female teachers assessed gender important to a higher degree than men. Among women there were no significant differences between specialty groups. Conclusions There was an interaction between physician teachers' gender and specialty as to whether they identified gender as important in professional relationships. Male physicians, especially from the surgical group, assessed gender important to a significantly lower degree than female physicians. Physicians' degree of gender awareness may, as one of many factors, affect working climate and the

  6. [Infectious diseases - a specialty of internal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fätkenheuer, G; Jung, N; Kern, W V; Fölsch, U R; Salzberger, B

    2018-04-01

    Infectious diseases have recently gained wide public interest. Emerging infections and rising rates of antibiotic resistance are determining this trend. Both challenges will need to be addressed in international and local collaborations between different specialties in medicine and basic science. Infectious diseases as a clinical specialty in this scenario is directly responsible for the care of patients with infectious diseases. Its involvement in the care of patients with complicated infections has proved to be highly effective. Antibiotic stewardship programmes are effective measures in slowing the development of antibiotic resistance and have been widely implemented. But antibiotic stewardship specialists should not be confused with or taken as an alternative to infectious disease experts. Infectious diseases requires appropriate and specific training. It mainly uses the instrumentarium of internal medicine. With the current challenges in modern medicine, infectious diseases in Germany should thus be upgraded from a subspecialty to a clinical specialty, ideally within Internal Medicine.

  7. The long overdue medical specialty: bioethiatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkian, J

    1986-11-01

    Traditional bioethical codes have been unable to cope with the results of modern technology and the drastic changes in life patterns. The medical profession can reestablish bioethical order and reassert leadership through a new and urgently needed medical specialty, which the author tentatively calls bioethiatrics or bioethiatry. Bioethiatrics embodies a unique combination of ethical action and moral judgment.Training for the specialty would start with a residency program, consisting of thorough training in philosophy and religion coupled with continued experience in clinical medicine and indoctrination in contemporary research. Requirements would include the practice of general medicine for at least two years after internship, the passing of oral and written examinations after four years of residency, board certification, and subsequent periodic evaluations.Bioethiatricians would assume all the usual privileges, obligations, and risks associated with the practice of any medical specialty, thereby averting unnecessary ethical crises and ensuring a more rational response to present and future moral challenges.

  8. Red blood cell transfusion in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsler, Stefan; Ketter, Ralf; Eichler, Hermann; Schwerdtfeger, Karsten; Steudel, Wolf-Ingo; Oertel, Joachim

    2012-07-01

    The necessity of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in neurosurgical procedures is under debate. Although detailed recommendations exist for many other surgical disciplines, there are very limited data on the probability of transfusions during neurosurgical procedures. Three-thousand and twenty-six consecutive adult patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures at Saarland University Hospital from December 2006 to June 2008 were retrospectively analyzed for administration of RBCs. The patients were grouped into 11 main diagnostic categories for analysis. The transfusion probability and cross-match to transfusion ratio (C/T ratio) were calculated. Overall, the transfusion probability for neurosurgical procedures was 1.7 % (52/3,026). The probability was 6.5 % for acute subdural hematoma (7/108), 6.2 % for spinal tumors (5/80), 4.6 % for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH, 4/98), 2.8 % for abscess (3/108), 2.4 % for traumatic brain injury (4/162), 2.3 % for cerebral ischemia (1/44), 1.9 % for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) /aneurysms (4/206), 1.4 % for brain tumors (10/718), 0.8 % for hydrocephalus (2/196), 0.4 % for degenerative diseases of the spine (5/1290), including 3.6 % (3/82) for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and 0 % for epidural hematoma (0/15). The transfusion probabilities for clipping and coiling of SAH were 2.9 % (2/68) and 1.7 % (2/120) respectively. The probability of blood transfusion during neurosurgical procedures is well below the 10 % level which is generally defined as the limit for preoperative appropriation of RBCs. Patients with spinal tumors, acute subdural hematomas or ICH, i.e., patients undergoing large decompressive procedures of bone or soft tissue, had a higher probability of transfusion.

  9. Prototyping for surgical and prosthetic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Santos, Murillo Rezende; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves; Moreno, Amália; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Haddad, Marcela Filié

    2011-05-01

    Techniques of rapid prototyping were introduced in the 1980s in the field of engineering for the fabrication of a solid model based on a computed file. After its introduction in the biomedical field, several applications were raised for the fabrication of models to ease surgical planning and simulation in implantology, neurosurgery, and orthopedics, as well as for the fabrication of maxillofacial prostheses. Hence, the literature has described the evolution of rapid prototyping technique in health care, which allowed easier technique, improved surgical results, and fabrication of maxillofacial prostheses. Accordingly, a literature review on MEDLINE (PubMed) database was conducted using the keywords rapid prototyping, surgical planning, and maxillofacial prostheses and based on articles published from 1981 to 2010. After reading the titles and abstracts of the articles, 50 studies were selected owing to their correlations with the aim of the current study. Several studies show that the prototypes have been used in different dental-medical areas such as maxillofacial and craniofacial surgery; implantology; neurosurgery; orthopedics; scaffolds of ceramic, polymeric, and metallic materials; and fabrication of personalized maxillofacial prostheses. Therefore, prototyping has been an indispensable tool in several studies and helpful for surgical planning and fabrication of prostheses and implants.

  10. Target localization on standard axial images in computed tomography (CT) stereotaxis for functional neurosurgery - a technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, A.-A.

    1986-01-01

    A simple technique for marking functional neurosurgery target on computed tomography (CT) axial image is described. This permits the use of standard axial image for computed tomography (CT) stereotaxis in functional neurosurgery. (Author)

  11. Specialty Choices: Patterns and Determinants among Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-07-18

    Jul 18, 2017 ... Methods: This was a cross‑sectional questionnaire‑based survey carried out ... were preferentially influenced by family/societal expectations (P = 0.03) and ..... Table 5: Distribution of specialties of first choice by age, parent's ...

  12. Retractor-induced brain shift compensation in image-guided neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2013-03-01

    In image-guided neurosurgery, intraoperative brain shift significantly degrades the accuracy of neuronavigation that is solely based on preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR). To compensate for brain deformation and to maintain the accuracy in image guidance achieved at the start of surgery, biomechanical models have been developed to simulate brain deformation and to produce model-updated MR images (uMR) to compensate for brain shift. To-date, most studies have focused on shift compensation at early stages of surgery (i.e., updated images are only produced after craniotomy and durotomy). Simulating surgical events at later stages such as retraction and tissue resection are, perhaps, clinically more relevant because of the typically much larger magnitudes of brain deformation. However, these surgical events are substantially more complex in nature, thereby posing significant challenges in model-based brain shift compensation strategies. In this study, we present results from an initial investigation to simulate retractor-induced brain deformation through a biomechanical finite element (FE) model where whole-brain deformation assimilated from intraoperative data was used produce uMR for improved accuracy in image guidance. Specifically, intensity-encoded 3D surface profiles at the exposed cortical area were reconstructed from intraoperative stereovision (iSV) images before and after tissue retraction. Retractor-induced surface displacements were then derived by coregistering the surfaces and served as sparse displacement data to drive the FE model. With one patient case, we show that our technique is able to produce uMR that agrees well with the reconstructed iSV surface after retraction. The computational cost to simulate retractor-induced brain deformation was approximately 10 min. In addition, our approach introduces minimal interruption to the surgical workflow, suggesting the potential for its clinical application.

  13. Complications in Endovascular Neurosurgery: Critical Analysis and Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Mazur, Marcus D; Park, Min S; Kilburg, Craig; Moran, Christopher J; Hardman, Rulon L; Couldwell, William T; Taussky, Philipp

    2016-11-01

    Precisely defining complications, which are used to measure overall quality, is necessary for critical review of delivery of care and quality improvement in endovascular neurosurgery, which lacks common definitions for complications. Furthermore, in endovascular interventions, events that may be labeled complications may not always negatively affect outcome. Our objective is to provide precise definitions for quality evaluation within endovascular neurosurgery. Thus, we propose an endovascular-specific classification system of complications based on our own patient series. This single-center review included all patients who had endovascular interventions from September 2013 to August 2015. Complication types were analyzed, and a descriptive analysis was undertaken to calculate the incidence of complications overall and in each category. Two hundred and seventy-five endovascular interventions were performed in 245 patients (65% female; mean age, 55 years). Forty complications occurred in 39 patients (15%), most commonly during treatment of intracranial aneurysms (24/40). Mechanical complications (eg, device deployment, catheter, or closure device failure) occurred in 8/40, technical complications (eg, failure to deploy flow diverter, unintended embolization, air emboli, retroperitoneal hemorrhage, dissection) in 11/40, judgment errors (eg, patient or equipment selection) in 9/40, and critical events (eg, groin hematoma, hemorrhagic or thromboembolic complications) in 12/40 patients. Only 12/40 complications (30%) resulted in new neurologic deficits, vessel injury requiring surgery, or blood transfusion. We propose an endovascular-specific classification system of complications with 4 categories: mechanical, technical, judgment errors, and critical events. This system provides a framework for future studies and quality control in endovascular neurosurgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Planning and Executing the Neurosurgery Boot Camp: The Bolivia Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Jared D; Kim, Timothy; Gold-Markel, Judah; Germano, Isabelle M; Dempsey, Robert; Weaver, John P; DiPatri, Arthur J; Andrews, Russell J; Sanchez, Mary; Hinojosa, Juan; Moser, Richard P; Glick, Roberta

    2017-08-01

    The neurosurgical boot camp has been fully incorporated into U.S. postgraduate education. This is the first implementation of the neurosurgical boot in a developing country. To advance neurosurgical education, we developed a similar boot camp program, in collaboration with Bolivian neurosurgeons, to determine its feasibility and effectiveness in an international setting. In a collective effort, the Bolivian Society for Neurosurgery, Foundation for International Education in Neurological Surgery, Solidarity Bridge, and University of Massachusetts organized and executed the first South American neurosurgical boot camp in Bolivia in 2015. Both U.S. and Bolivian faculty led didactic lectures followed by a practicum day using mannequins and simulators. South American residents and faculty were surveyed after the course to determine levels of enthusiasm and their perceived improvement in fund of knowledge and course effectiveness. Twenty-four neurosurgery residents from 5 South American countries participated. Average survey scores ranged between 4.2 and 4.9 out of 5. Five Bolivian neurosurgeons completed the survey with average scores of 4.5-5. This event allowed for Bolivian leaders in the field to unify around education, resulting in the formation of an institute to continue similar initiatives. Total cost was estimated at $40 000 USD; however, significant faculty, industry, and donor support helped offset this amount. The first South American neurosurgical boot camp had significant value and was well received in Bolivia. This humanitarian model provides a sustainable solution to education needs and should be expanded to other regions as a means for standardizing the core competencies in neurosurgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. History, Current Situation, and Future Development of Endoscopic Neurosurgery in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuzhong; Zhu, Haibo; Zong, Xuyi; Wang, Xinsheng; Gui, Songbai; Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2018-02-01

    During the past few decades, Chinese endoscopic neurosurgery has rapidly developed in synchrony with the rest of the world. The aim of this article is to review the development of Chinese endoscopic neurosurgery, including its birth, growth, current situation, and prospects. The history of Chinese endoscopic neurosurgery development can be divided into 3 stages: cognition and initial stage (1964-1995), exploration and maturity stage (1995-2006), and rapid development and promotion stage (2006-present). In the first stage, we mainly began to become aware of endoscopic neurosurgery from the translation and review of literature. In the mid to late 1990s, Chinese neurosurgery pioneers began using neuroendoscopic techniques. In the following decade, many leading neurosurgeons made persistent efforts to push the development of Chinese endoscopic neurosurgery forward, focusing on advocating for and promoting and popularizing neuroendoscopic technology. In the rapid development and promotion stage, many representative national and regional neurosurgical centers became skilled and efficient in the application of neuroendoscopic technology and became new advocates of the technology. The number of cases, level of technology, and treatment effectiveness are gradually nearing international standards. However, future development requires promotion of balanced development to decrease regional disparities, further strengthen international exchanges, follow the latest developments, and constantly innovate for continuous improvement. Following the dramatic efforts of several pioneers, development of Chinese endoscopic neurosurgery has been considerable, and it has become an important component of neurosurgery worldwide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Third-generation cephalosporins as antibiotic prophylaxis in neurosurgery : What's the evidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Weiming; Neidert, Marian Christoph; Groen, Rob J. M.; Woernle, Christoph Michael; Grundmann, Hajo

    To analyze the role of third-generation cephalosporins as prophylactic antibiotics in neurosurgery. We reviewed the literature for data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on third-generation cephalosporins compared to other antibiotic regimen in neurosurgery. End point of the RCTs was the

  17. eLearning resources to supplement postgraduate neurosurgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stienen, Martin N; Schaller, Karl; Cock, Hannah; Lisnic, Vitalie; Regli, Luca; Thomson, Simon

    2017-02-01

    In an increasingly complex and competitive professional environment, improving methods to educate neurosurgical residents is key to ensure high-quality patient care. Electronic (e)Learning resources promise interactive knowledge acquisition. We set out to give a comprehensive overview on available eLearning resources that aim to improve postgraduate neurosurgical training and review the available literature. A MEDLINE query was performed, using the search term "electronic AND learning AND neurosurgery". Only peer-reviewed English-language articles on the use of any means of eLearning to improve theoretical knowledge in postgraduate neurosurgical training were included. Reference lists were crosschecked for further relevant articles. Captured parameters were the year, country of origin, method of eLearning reported, and type of article, as well as its conclusion. eLearning resources were additionally searched for using Google. Of n = 301 identified articles by the MEDLINE search, n = 43 articles were analysed in detail. Applying defined criteria, n = 28 articles were excluded and n = 15 included. Most articles were generated within this decade, with groups from the USA, the UK and India having a leadership role. The majority of articles reviewed existing eLearning resources, others reported on the concept, development and use of generated eLearning resources. There was no article that scientifically assessed the effectiveness of eLearning resources (against traditional learning methods) in terms of efficacy or costs. Only one article reported on satisfaction rates with an eLearning tool. All authors of articles dealing with eLearning and the use of new media in neurosurgery uniformly agreed on its great potential and increasing future use, but most also highlighted some weaknesses and possible dangers. This review found only a few articles dealing with the modern aspects of eLearning as an adjunct to postgraduate neurosurgery training. Comprehensive

  18. Publication misrepresentation among neurosurgery residency applicants: an increasing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistka, Heather M; Nayeri, Arash; Wang, Li; Dow, Jamie; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Chambless, Lola B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Misrepresentation of scholarly achievements is a recognized phenomenon, well documented in numerous fields, yet the accuracy of reporting remains dependent on the honor principle. Therefore, honest self-reporting is of paramount importance to maintain scientific integrity in neurosurgery. The authors had observed a trend toward increasing numbers of publications among applicants for neurosurgery residency at Vanderbilt University and undertook this study to determine whether this change was a result of increased academic productivity, inflated reporting, or both. They also aimed to identify application variables associated with inaccurate citations. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the residency applications submitted to their neurosurgery department in 2006 (n = 148) and 2012 (n = 194). The applications from 2006 were made via SF Match and those from 2012 were made using the Electronic Residency Application Service. Publications reported as "accepted" or "in press" were verified via online search of Google Scholar, PubMed, journal websites, and direct journal contact. Works were considered misrepresented if they did not exist, incorrectly listed the applicant as first author, or were incorrectly listed as peer reviewed or published in a printed journal rather than an online only or non-peer-reviewed publication. Demographic data were collected, including applicant sex, medical school ranking and country, advanced degrees, Alpha Omega Alpha membership, and USMLE Step 1 score. Zero-inflated negative binomial regression was used to identify predictors of misrepresentation. RESULTS Using univariate analysis, between 2006 and 2012 the percentage of applicants reporting published works increased significantly (47% vs 97%, p < 0.001). However, the percentage of applicants with misrepresentations (33% vs 45%) also increased. In 2012, applicants with a greater total of reported works (p < 0.001) and applicants from unranked US medical schools (those not

  19. The risk of acquiring bacterial meningitis following surgery in Denmark, 1996-2009: a nationwide retrospective cohort study with emphasis on ear, nose and throat (ENT) and neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howitz, M F; Homøe, P

    2014-06-01

    This paper estimates the risk of bacterial meningitis following surgery between 1996 and 2009 in Denmark. We conducted two retrospective nationwide cohort studies; first by linking notified bacterial meningitis cases to the National Patient Registry to see how many had undergone a surgical procedure; second, we scrutinized notified bacterial meningitis cases to see if the clinician suspected a surgical procedure to be the aetiology. We found that ear, nose and throat surgery had an 11-fold, and neurosurgery a sevenfold, increased risk compared to the reference group in the first 10 days following surgery. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the pathogen most often involved. Operation procedures involving penetration of dura mater was associated with increased risk for post-operative bacterial meningitis. In absolute numbers we found few bacterial meningitis cases after surgery; however, patients undergoing certain surgical procedures are at-risk and should be considered when national vaccination guidelines are revised.

  20. Recent trends in specialty pharma business model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannching Sherry Ku

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent rise of specialty pharma is attributed to its flexible, versatile, and open business model while the traditional big pharma is facing a challenging time with patent cliff, generic threat, and low research and development (R&D productivity. These multinational pharmaceutical companies, facing a difficult time, have been systematically externalizing R&D and some even establish their own corporate venture capital so as to diversify with more shots on goal, with the hope of achieving a higher success rate in their compound pipeline. Biologics and clinical Phase II proof-of-concept (POC compounds are the preferred licensing and collaboration targets. Biologics enjoys a high success rate with a low generic biosimilar threat, while the need is high for clinical Phase II POC compounds, due to its high attrition/low success rate. Repurposing of big pharma leftover compounds is a popular strategy but with limitations. Most old compounds come with baggage either in lackluster clinical performance or short in patent life. Orphan drugs is another area which has gained popularity in recent years. The shorter and less costly regulatory pathway provides incentives, especially for smaller specialty pharma. However, clinical studies on orphan drugs require a large network of clinical operations in many countries in order to recruit enough patients. Big pharma is also working on orphan drugs starting with a small indication, with the hope of expanding the indication into a blockbuster status. Specialty medicine, including orphan drugs, has become the growth engine in the pharmaceutical industry worldwide. Big pharma is also keen on in-licensing technology or projects from specialty pharma to extend product life cycles, in order to protect their blockbuster drug franchises. Ample opportunities exist for smaller players, even in the emerging countries, to collaborate with multinational pharmaceutical companies provided that the technology platforms or

  1. Recent trends in specialty pharma business model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Mannching Sherry

    2015-12-01

    The recent rise of specialty pharma is attributed to its flexible, versatile, and open business model while the traditional big pharma is facing a challenging time with patent cliff, generic threat, and low research and development (R&D) productivity. These multinational pharmaceutical companies, facing a difficult time, have been systematically externalizing R&D and some even establish their own corporate venture capital so as to diversify with more shots on goal, with the hope of achieving a higher success rate in their compound pipeline. Biologics and clinical Phase II proof-of-concept (POC) compounds are the preferred licensing and collaboration targets. Biologics enjoys a high success rate with a low generic biosimilar threat, while the need is high for clinical Phase II POC compounds, due to its high attrition/low success rate. Repurposing of big pharma leftover compounds is a popular strategy but with limitations. Most old compounds come with baggage either in lackluster clinical performance or short in patent life. Orphan drugs is another area which has gained popularity in recent years. The shorter and less costly regulatory pathway provides incentives, especially for smaller specialty pharma. However, clinical studies on orphan drugs require a large network of clinical operations in many countries in order to recruit enough patients. Big pharma is also working on orphan drugs starting with a small indication, with the hope of expanding the indication into a blockbuster status. Specialty medicine, including orphan drugs, has become the growth engine in the pharmaceutical industry worldwide. Big pharma is also keen on in-licensing technology or projects from specialty pharma to extend product life cycles, in order to protect their blockbuster drug franchises. Ample opportunities exist for smaller players, even in the emerging countries, to collaborate with multinational pharmaceutical companies provided that the technology platforms or specialty medicinal

  2. A qualitative study on physicians' perceptions of specialty characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwi Hwa; Jun, Soo-Koung; Park, Ie Byung

    2016-09-01

    There has been limited research on physicians' perceptions of the specialty characteristics that are needed to sustain a successful career in medical specialties in Korea. Medical Specialty Preference Inventory in the United States or SCI59 (specialty choice inventory) in the United Kingdom are implemented to help medical students plan their careers. The purpose of this study was to explore the characteristics of the major specialties in Korea. Twelve physicians from different specialties participated in an exploratory study consisting of qualitative interviews about the personal ability and emotional characteristics and job attributes of each specialty. The collected data were analysed with content analysis methods. Twelve codes were extracted for ability & skill attributes, 23 codes for emotion & attitude attributes, and 12 codes for job attributes. Each specialty shows a different profile in terms of its characteristic attributes. The findings have implications for the design of career planning programs for medical students.

  3. A qualitative study on physicians' perceptions of specialty characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwi Hwa Park

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: There has been limited research on physicians’ perceptions of the specialty characteristics that are needed to sustain a successful career in medical specialties in Korea. Medical Specialty Preference Inventory in the United States or SCI59 (specialty choice inventory in the United Kingdom are implemented to help medical students plan their careers. The purpose of this study was to explore the characteristics of the major specialties in Korea. Methods: Twelve physicians from different specialties participated in an exploratory study consisting of qualitative interviews about the personal ability and emotional characteristics and job attributes of each specialty. The collected data were analysed with content analysis methods. Results: Twelve codes were extracted for ability & skill attributes, 23 codes for emotion & attitude attributes, and 12 codes for job attributes. Each specialty shows a different profile in terms of its characteristic attributes. Conclusion: The findings have implications for the design of career planning programs for medical students.

  4. medical students' preference for choice of clinical specialties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zamzar

    This study seeks to determine the medical student preference for the clinical specialty and the factors that they consider in making ... undergraduates in selecting these specialties is important. .... effect of National Health Insurance on changes.

  5. Augmented-reality integrated robotics in neurosurgery: are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Karthik; Kolcun, John Paul G; Chieng, Lee Onn; Wang, Michael Y

    2017-05-01

    Surgical robots have captured the interest-if not the widespread acceptance-of spinal neurosurgeons. But successful innovation, scientific or commercial, requires the majority to adopt a new practice. "Faster, better, cheaper" products should in theory conquer the market, but often fail. The psychology of change is complex, and the "follow the leader" mentality, common in the field today, lends little trust to the process of disseminating new technology. Beyond product quality, timing has proven to be a key factor in the inception, design, and execution of new technologies. Although the first robotic surgery was performed in 1985, scant progress was seen until the era of minimally invasive surgery. This movement increased neurosurgeons' dependence on navigation and fluoroscopy, intensifying the drive for enhanced precision. Outside the field of medicine, various technology companies have made great progress in popularizing co-robots ("cobots"), augmented reality, and processor chips. This has helped to ease practicing surgeons into familiarity with and acceptance of these technologies. The adoption among neurosurgeons in training is a "follow the leader" phenomenon, wherein new surgeons tend to adopt the technology used during residency. In neurosurgery today, robots are limited to computers functioning between the surgeon and patient. Their functions are confined to establishing a trajectory for navigation, with task execution solely in the surgeon's hands. In this review, the authors discuss significant untapped technologies waiting to be used for more meaningful applications. They explore the history and current manifestations of various modern technologies, and project what innovations may lie ahead.

  6. Informed consent in neurosurgery--translating ethical theory into action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Dagmar; Reinacher, Peter C

    2006-09-01

    Although a main principle of medical ethics and law since the 1970s, standards of informed consent are regarded with great scepticism by many clinicans. By reviewing the reactions to and adoption of this principle of medical ethics in neurosurgery, the characteristic conflicts that emerge between theory and everyday clinical experience are emphasised and a modified conception of informed consent is proposed. The adoption and debate of informed consent in neurosurgery took place in two steps. Firstly, respect for patient autonomy was included into the ethical codes of the professional organisations. Secondly, the legal demands of the principle were questioned by clinicians. Informed consent is mainly interpreted in terms of freedom from interference and absolute autonomy. It lacks a constructive notion of physician-patient interaction in its effort to promote the best interest of the patient, which, however, potentially emerges from a reconsideration of the principle of beneficence. To avoid insufficient legal interpretations, informed consent should be understood in terms of autonomy and beneficence. A continuous interaction between the patient and the given physician is considered as an essential prerequisite for the realisation of the standards of informed consent.

  7. Interrupted time-series analysis: studying trends in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ricky H; Smieliauskas, Fabrice; Pan, I-Wen; Lam, Sandi K

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Neurosurgery studies traditionally have evaluated the effects of interventions on health care outcomes by studying overall changes in measured outcomes over time. Yet, this type of linear analysis is limited due to lack of consideration of the trend's effects both pre- and postintervention and the potential for confounding influences. The aim of this study was to illustrate interrupted time-series analysis (ITSA) as applied to an example in the neurosurgical literature and highlight ITSA's potential for future applications. METHODS The methods used in previous neurosurgical studies were analyzed and then compared with the methodology of ITSA. RESULTS The ITSA method was identified in the neurosurgical literature as an important technique for isolating the effect of an intervention (such as a policy change or a quality and safety initiative) on a health outcome independent of other factors driving trends in the outcome. The authors determined that ITSA allows for analysis of the intervention's immediate impact on outcome level and on subsequent trends and enables a more careful measure of the causal effects of interventions on health care outcomes. CONCLUSIONS ITSA represents a significant improvement over traditional observational study designs in quantifying the impact of an intervention. ITSA is a useful statistical procedure to understand, consider, and implement as the field of neurosurgery evolves in sophistication in big-data analytics, economics, and health services research.

  8. Defining Innovation in Neurosurgery: Results from an International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Mark M; Cote, David J; Muskens, Ivo S; Smith, Timothy R; Broekman, Marike L

    2018-06-01

    Innovation is a part of the daily practice of neurosurgery. However, a clear definition of what constitutes innovation is lacking and opinions vary from continent to continent, from hospital to hospital, and from surgeon to surgeon. In this study, we distributed an online survey to neurosurgeons from multiple countries to investigate what neurosurgeons consider innovative, by gathering opinions on several hypothetical cases. The anonymous survey consisted of 52 questions and took approximately 10 minutes to complete. A total of 355 neurosurgeons across all continents excluding Antarctica completed the survey. Neurosurgeons achieved consensus (>75%) in considering specific cases to be innovative, including laser resection of meningioma, focused ultrasonography for tumor, oncolytic virus, deep brain stimulation for addiction, and photodynamic therapy for tumor. Although the new dura substitute case was not considered innovative, there was consensus among neurosurgeons indicating that institutional review board approval was still necessary to maintain ethical standards. Furthermore, although 90% of neurosurgeons considered an oncolytic virus for glioblastoma multiforme to be innovative, only 78% believed that institutional review board approval was necessary before treatment. Our results indicate that innovation is a heterogeneous concept among neurosurgeons that necessitates standardization to ensure appropriate patient safety without stifling progress. We discuss both the ethical drawbacks of not having a clear definition of innovation and the challenges in achieving a unified understanding of innovation in neurosurgery and offer suggestions for uniting the field. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Current use of Social Media in Neurosurgery in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Gómez, Jacinto; Gilete-Tejero, Ignacio Javier; Rico-Cotelo, María; Royano-Sánchez, Manuel; Ortega-Martínez, Marta

    To analyze the current situation in Spain of the use of Social Media in Neurosurgery. We made an observational transversal study between February and March 2017, with a systematic search of the Facebook, Twitter and Youtube accounts from public and private neurosurgical units, scientific societies, peer-reviewed publications and patients groups in relation with Neurosurgical pathologies. We rank them according their popularity. According of our search only 5 public neurosurgical services have social media accounts, being their popularity inferior to the private units accounts. In relation with the scientific societies and neurosurgical publications their presence in social media is marginal, even more in comparison to the accounts of other medical specialities. The popularity of associations of patients and supporting groups is high, especially among patients, finding there more information about their disease. The use in Spain of Social Media about Neurosurgery is low in comparison to other medical specialities. There is a huge field to improve the popularity of the accounts, making in them promotion of health and extend the diffusion of the scientific society and the peer-reviewed publication Neurocirugía. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. The Current Use of Social Media in Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Naif M; Badhiwala, Jetan H; Nassiri, Farshad; Guha, Daipayan; Ibrahim, George M; Shamji, Mohammed F; Lozano, Andres M

    2016-04-01

    To measure the presence and popularity of neurosurgical departments, journals, and nonprofit organizations on 3 major social networks. A systematic 2-pronged search strategy was used in June 2015 to identify all accounts on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube that were relevant to neurosurgery. Online search was conducted by 2 independent authors. All accounts were ranked according to their popularity data. Our search yielded 158 social media accounts (86 Facebook, 59 Twitter, and 13 YouTube) of neurosurgical private and academic practice departments. Of the 158 accounts we retrieved, 117 were for private practice centers (74%). Accounts of academic and private departments had a similar median number of "likes" and "followers" on Facebook and Twitter, respectively. Seven neurosurgical journals only had active Facebook and Twitter accounts (of 20 screened journals). When compared with studies of social media in other medical subspecialties, the use of these networks in neurosurgery followed a similar pattern in their presence and popularity. The current study shows different uses of social media platforms and numbers of users of the online neurosurgical community. Content optimization, advanced metrics of user engagement, and their subsequent effects on academic impact remain unanswered queries and require further prospective study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of Sensory and Motor Skills in Neurosurgery Applicants Using a Virtual Reality Neurosurgical Simulator: The Sensory-Motor Quotient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roitberg, Ben Z; Kania, Patrick; Luciano, Cristian; Dharmavaram, Naga; Banerjee, Pat

    2015-01-01

    Manual skill is an important attribute for any surgeon. Current methods to evaluate sensory-motor skills in neurosurgical residency applicants are limited. We aim to develop an objective multifaceted measure of sensory-motor skills using a virtual reality surgical simulator. A set of 3 tests of sensory-motor function was performed using a 3-dimensional surgical simulator with head and arm tracking, collocalization, and haptic feedback. (1) Trajectory planning: virtual reality drilling of a pedicle. Entry point, target point, and trajectory were scored-evaluating spatial memory and orientation. (2) Motor planning: sequence, timing, and precision: hemostasis in a postresection cavity in the brain. (3) Haptic perception: touching virtual spheres to determine which is softest of the group, with progressive difficulty. Results were analyzed individually and for a combined score of all the tasks. The University of Chicago Hospital's tertiary care academic center. A total of 95 consecutive applicants interviewed at a neurosurgery residency program over 2 years were offered anonymous participation in the study; in 2 cohorts, 36 participants in year 1 and 27 participants in year 2 (validation cohort) agreed and completed all the tasks. We also tested 10 first-year medical students and 4 first- and second-year neurosurgery residents. A cumulative score was generated from the 3 tests. The mean score was 14.47 (standard deviation = 4.37), median score was 13.42, best score was 8.41, and worst score was 30.26. Separate analysis of applicants from each of 2 years yielded nearly identical results. Residents tended to cluster on the better performance side, and first-year students were not different from applicants. (1) Our cumulative score measures sensory-motor skills in an objective and reproducible way. (2) Better performance by residents hints at validity for neurosurgery. (3) We were able to demonstrate good psychometric qualities and generate a proposed sensory

  12. Specialty choice among dental students in Ibadan, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The majority of dental students at the University of Ibadan preferred the oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) specialty above all other dental specialties, while prosthetic dentistry was least preferred. Of all the factors to take into consideration when choosing a dental specialty, personal interest was the only factor considered ...

  13. Gender variations in specialties among medical doctors working in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gender variations exist in the choice of specialties among ... as it affects the distribution of doctors in public health institutions and patient care. ... For female doctors,pediatrics was the topmost specialty (25%) followed by ... Keywords: Gender variation,Specialties,Doctors,Public healthcare,Health workforce ...

  14. [A new specialty is born: Vascular medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroche, J-P

    2016-05-01

    On the 4th of December 2015, the French authorities officially recognized the birth of a specialty in vascular medicine entitled CO-DES cardiology-vascular/vascular Medicine. France is the 7th country to obtain this specialty after Switzerland, Germany, Austria, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Slovenia, six countries in the EEC. It has taken years to achieve a long but exciting experience: we went from hopes to disappointments, sometimes with the blues, but lobbying helping… with sustained confidence. This article tells the story of 30 years of struggle to achieve this vascular medicine specialty. Gaston Bachelard wrote: "Nothing is obvious, nothing is given, all is built." For the construction of vascular medicine, we had to overcome many obstacles, nothing was given to us, everything was conquered. Beware "The specialist is one who knows more and more things about an increasingly restricted field, up to 'knowing everything about nothing"' recalled Ralph Barton Ferry, philosopher; so there is room for modesty and humility but also convictions. The physical examination will remain the basis of our exercise. But let us recall the contributions of all those vascular physicians who practiced in the past, together with those currently active, who built day after day, year after year, a vascular medicine of quality. It is because of the trust of our colleagues and our patients that we can occupy the place that is ours today. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Health impact and economic analysis of NGO-supported neurosurgery in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Jared D; Greene, Kevin R; Flores, Ivan; Capobianco, Fernando; Salas, Gueider; Uriona, Maria Ines; Weaver, John P; Moser, Richard

    2014-04-01

    Bolivia, one of the poorest countries in the world, ranks 108th on the 2013 Human Development Index. With approximately 1 neurosurgeon per 200,000 people, access to neurosurgery in Bolivia is a growing health concern. Furthermore, neurosurgery in nonindustrialized countries has been considered both cost-prohibitive and lacking in outcomes evaluation. A non-governmental organization (NGO) supports spinal procedures in Bolivia (Solidarity Bridge), and the authors sought to determine its impact and cost-effectiveness. In a retrospective review of prospectively collected data, 19 patients were identified prior to spinal instrumentation and followed over 12 months. For inclusion, patients required interviewing prior to surgery and during at least 2 follow-up visits. All causes of spinal pathology were included. Sixteen patients met inclusion criteria and were therefore part of the analysis. Outcomes measured included assessment of activities of daily living, pain, ambulation, return to work/school, and satisfaction. Cost-effectiveness was determined by cost-utility analysis. Utilities were derived using the Health Utilities Index. Complications were incorporated into an expected value decision tree. Median (± SD) preoperative satisfaction was 2.0 ± 0.3 (on a scale of 0-10), while 6-month postoperative satisfaction was 7 ± 1.4 (p Bolivia appears to be cost-effective, especially when compared with the conventional $50,000/QALY benchmark and the WHO endorsed country-specific threshold of $16,026/QALY. However, with a gross domestic product per capita in Bolivia equaling $4800 per year and 30.3% of the population living on less than $2 per day, this cost continues to appear unrealistic. Additionally, the study has several significant limitations, namely its limited sample size, follow-up period, the assumption that patients not receiving surgical intervention would not make any clinical improvement, the reliance on the NGO for patient selection and sustainable practices

  16. Vitom-3D for Exoscopic Neurosurgery: Initial Experience in Cranial and Spinal Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertel, Joachim M; Burkhardt, Benedikt W

    2017-09-01

    The authors describe the application of a new exoscope that offers 3-dimensional (3D) visualization in cranial and spinal neurosurgery in detail. Five cranial and 11 spinal procedures were performed with a 3D exoscope. Instrument handling, repositioning of the exoscope, handling of the image control unit, the adjustment of magnification and focal length, the depth perception, the image quality, the illumination, and the comfort level of the posture during the procedure were assessed via a questionnaire. The following procedures were performed: Microvascular decompression (n = 1), craniotomy and tumor resection (n = 4), anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with cervical plating (n = 2), cervical laminectomy and lateral mass fixation (n = 1), shear cervical lateral mass osteosynthesis (n = 1), lumbar canal decompression (n = 1), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (n = 2), thoracic intraspinal extradural tumor resection (n = 1), and lumbar discectomy (n = 3). Instrument handling, the intraoperative repositioning and handling of the VITOM-3D, and the comfort level of the intraoperative posture was rated excellent in 100% of procedures. The image quality was rated equal to the operating microscope in 68.75% of procedures. None of the procedures had to be stopped because of technical problems. No surgical complications were noted that could be related to the use of the exoscope. The 3D-exoscopic system is safe and effective tool to perform spinal procedures and less demanding cranial procedures. The image quality and 3D visualization were comparable with the operating microscope. The technique harbors the unique advantage of excellent comfort for the involved surgical team during the procedure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Targeted E-Learning Program for Surgical Trainees to Enhance Patient Safety in Preventing Surgical Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Seamus Mark; Corrigan, Mark; Dimitrov, Borislav; Cowman, Seamus; Tierney, Sean; Humphreys, Hilary; Hill, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infection accounts for 20% of all health care-associated infections (HCAIs); however, a program incorporating the education of surgeons has yet to be established across the specialty. Methods: An audit of surgical practice in infection prevention was carried out in Beaumont Hospital from July to November 2009. An…

  18. Theoretical Model of Professional Competence Development in Dual-Specialty Students (On the Example of the "History, Religious Studies" Specialty)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimova, A. E.; Amanova, A. S.; Sadykova, A. M.; Kuzembaev, N. E.; Makisheva, A. T.; Kurmangazina, G. Zh.; Sakenov, Janat

    2016-01-01

    The article explores the significant problem of developing a theoretical model of professional competence development in dual-specialty students (on the example of the "History, Religious studies" specialty). In order to validate the specifics of the professional competence development in dual-specialty students (on the example of the…

  19. Surgical lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knulst, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    The surgical light is an important tool for surgeons to create and maintain good visibility on the surgical task. Chapter 1 gives background to the field of (surgical) lighting and related terminology. Although the surgical light has been developed strongly since its introduction a long time ago,

  20. Outcomes of Concurrent Operations: Results From the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jason B; Berian, Julia R; Ban, Kristen A; Liu, Yaoming; Cohen, Mark E; Angelos, Peter; Matthews, Jeffrey B; Hoyt, David B; Hall, Bruce L; Ko, Clifford Y

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether concurrently performed operations are associated with an increased risk for adverse events. Concurrent operations occur when a surgeon is simultaneously responsible for critical portions of 2 or more operations. How this practice affects patient outcomes is unknown. Using American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data from 2014 to 2015, operations were considered concurrent if they overlapped by ≥60 minutes or in their entirety. Propensity-score-matched cohorts were constructed to compare death or serious morbidity (DSM), unplanned reoperation, and unplanned readmission in concurrent versus non-concurrent operations. Multilevel hierarchical regression was used to account for the clustered nature of the data while controlling for procedure and case mix. There were 1430 (32.3%) surgeons from 390 (77.7%) hospitals who performed 12,010 (2.3%) concurrent operations. Plastic surgery (n = 393 [13.7%]), otolaryngology (n = 470 [11.2%]), and neurosurgery (n = 2067 [8.4%]) were specialties with the highest proportion of concurrent operations. Spine procedures were the most frequent concurrent procedures overall (n = 2059/12,010 [17.1%]). Unadjusted rates of DSM (9.0% vs 7.1%; P < 0.001), reoperation (3.6% vs 2.7%; P < 0.001), and readmission (6.9% vs 5.1%; P < 0.001) were greater in the concurrent operation cohort versus the non-concurrent. After propensity score matching and risk-adjustment, there was no significant association of concurrence with DSM (odds ratio [OR] 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96-1.21), reoperation (OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.96-1.40), or readmission (OR 1.14; 95% CI 0.99-1.29). In these analyses, concurrent operations were not detected to increase the risk for adverse outcomes. These results do not lessen the need for further studies, continuous self-regulation and proactive disclosure to patients.

  1. Creation of a novel simulator for minimally invasive neurosurgery: fusion of 3D printing and special effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Peter; Rehder, Roberta; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Forbes, Peter W; Roussin, Christopher J; Cohen, Alan R

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent advances in optics and miniaturization have enabled the development of a growing number of minimally invasive procedures, yet innovative training methods for the use of these techniques remain lacking. Conventional teaching models, including cadavers and physical trainers as well as virtual reality platforms, are often expensive and ineffective. Newly developed 3D printing technologies can recreate patient-specific anatomy, but the stiffness of the materials limits fidelity to real-life surgical situations. Hollywood special effects techniques can create ultrarealistic features, including lifelike tactile properties, to enhance accuracy and effectiveness of the surgical models. The authors created a highly realistic model of a pediatric patient with hydrocephalus via a unique combination of 3D printing and special effects techniques and validated the use of this model in training neurosurgery fellows and residents to perform endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV), an effective minimally invasive method increasingly used in treating hydrocephalus. METHODS A full-scale reproduction of the head of a 14-year-old adolescent patient with hydrocephalus, including external physical details and internal neuroanatomy, was developed via a unique collaboration of neurosurgeons, simulation engineers, and a group of special effects experts. The model contains "plug-and-play" replaceable components for repetitive practice. The appearance of the training model (face validity) and the reproducibility of the ETV training procedure (content validity) were assessed by neurosurgery fellows and residents of different experience levels based on a 14-item Likert-like questionnaire. The usefulness of the training model for evaluating the performance of the trainees at different levels of experience (construct validity) was measured by blinded observers using the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) scale for the performance of ETV. RESULTS A

  2. Medical Specialty Choice and Related Factors of Brazilian Medical Students and Recent Doctors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Correia Lima de Souza

    Full Text Available Choosing a medical specialty is an important, complex, and not fully understood process. The present study investigated the factors that are related to choosing and rejecting medical specialties in a group of students and recent medical doctors.A cross-sectional survey of 1,223 medical students and doctors was performed in Brazil in 2012. A standardized literature-based questionnaire was applied that gathered preferable or rejected specialties, and asked questions about extracurricular experiences and the influence of 14 factors on a Likert-type scale from 0 to 4. Specialties were grouped according to lifestyle categories: controllable and uncontrollable, which were subdivided into primary care, internal medicine, and surgical specialties. Notably, the time period of rejection was usually earlier than the time period of intended choice (p < 0.0001, χ(2 = 107.2. The choice mainly occurred during the internship period in medical school (n = 466; 38.7%. An overall large frequency of participation in extracurricular activities was observed (n = 1,184; 95.8%, which were highly associated with the respective medical area. Orthopedic surgery had the highest correlation with participation in specialty-specific organized groups (OR = 59.9, 95% CI = 21.6-166.3 and psychiatry was correlated with participation in research groups (OR = 18.0, 95% CI = 9.0-36.2. With regard to influential factors in controllable lifestyle specialties, "financial reason" (mean score ± standard deviation: 2.8 ± 1.0; median = 3 and "personal time" (3.1 ± 1.3; median = 4 were important factors. In primary care, these factors were less important (1.7 ± 1.3 and 1.7 ± 1.5, respectively; median = 2 for both, and higher scores were observed for "curricular internship" (3.2 ± 1.1, median = 4 and "social commitment" (2.6 ± 1.3, median = 3.The present findings provide important insights into developing strategies to stimulate interest in specialties based on the needs of the

  3. The prognostic value of histopathology on lingual nerve neurosensory recovery after micro-neurosurgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørberg, Mette; Reibel, Jesper; Kragelund, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Micro-neurosurgical repair is considered in permanent nerve damage but the outcome is unpredictable. We examined if histopathologic parameters of traumatic neuromas have a prognostic value for recovery in relation to lingual nerve micro-neurosurgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective...... case study on neurosensory recovery after micro-neurosurgery. Outcome variables were as follows: pain perception, two-point discrimination, and sum score of perception, before and 12 months after micro-neurosurgery. Predictive histopathology variables included size, nerve tissue, and inflammation...

  4. Perceived benefits and barriers to a career in pediatric neurosurgery: a survey of neurosurgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Mark S; Sussman, Jeffrey S; Durham, Susan; Iantosca, Mark R

    2013-11-01

    Research suggests that there may be a growing disparity between the supply of and demand for both pediatric specialists and neurosurgeons. Whether pediatric neurosurgeons are facing such a disparity is disputable, but interest in pediatric neurosurgery (PNS) has waxed and waned as evidenced by the number of applicants for PNS fellowships. The authors undertook a survey to analyze current neurosurgical residents' perceptions of both benefits and deterrents to a pediatric neurosurgical career. All residents and PNS fellows in the United States and Canada during the academic year 2008-2009 were invited to complete a Web-based survey that assessed 1) demographic and educational information about residents and their residency training, particularly as it related to training in PNS; 2) residents' exposure to mentoring opportunities from pediatric neurosurgical faculty and their plans for the future; and 3) residents' perceptions about how likely 40 various factors were to influence their decision about whether to pursue a PNS career. Four hundred ninety-six responses were obtained: 89% of the respondents were male, 63% were married, 75% were in at least their 3rd year of postgraduate training, 61% trained in a children's hospital and 29% in a children's "hospital within a hospital," and 72% were in programs having one or more dedicated PNS faculty members. The residencies of 56% of respondents offered 6-11 months of PNS training and nearly three-quarters of respondents had completed 2 months of PNS training. During medical school, 92% had been exposed to neurosurgery and 45% to PNS during a clinical rotation, but only 7% identified a PNS mentor. Nearly half (43%) are considering a PNS career, and of these, 61% are definitely or probably considering post-residency fellowship. On the other hand, 68% would prefer an enfolded fellowship during residency. Perceived strengths of PNS included working with children, developing lasting relationships, wider variety of operations

  5. Simulation and augmented reality in endovascular neurosurgery: lessons from aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitha, Alim P; Almekhlafi, Mohammed A; Janjua, Major Jameel J; Albuquerque, Felipe C; McDougall, Cameron G

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular neurosurgery is a discipline strongly dependent on imaging. Therefore, technology that improves how much useful information we can garner from a single image has the potential to dramatically assist decision making during endovascular procedures. Furthermore, education in an image-enhanced environment, especially with the incorporation of simulation, can improve the safety of the procedures and give interventionalists and trainees the opportunity to study or perform simulated procedures before the intervention, much like what is practiced in the field of aviation. Here, we examine the use of simulators in the training of fighter pilots and discuss how similar benefits can compensate for current deficiencies in endovascular training. We describe the types of simulation used for endovascular procedures, including virtual reality, and discuss the relevant data on its utility in training. Finally, the benefit of augmented reality during endovascular procedures is discussed, along with future computerized image enhancement techniques.

  6. The incidentaloma of the pituitary gland: Is neurosurgery required

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reincke, M.; Allolio, B.; Saeger, W.; Menzel, J.; Winkelmann, W. (Univ. of Cologne (West Germany))

    1990-05-23

    The authors describe a series of 18 patients with an intrasellar mass incidentally discovered by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The average size of the mass was 13 mm, with a range from 5 to 25 mm. Initial ophthalmologic examination revealed bitemporal hemianopia in 2 patients. Results of routine endocrine testing showed partial hypopituitarism in 5 patients and growth hormone hypersecretion without signs and symptoms of acromegaly in 1 patient. Four patients underwent neurosurgery. Histologically, one chondroid chordoma and three pituitary adenomas were found. In the remaining 14 patients treated conservatively, repeated computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed no significant change in tumor size at the time of follow-up. The results suggest that the incidentaloma of the pituitary gland is a benign condition that does not necessarily require neurosurgical intervention.

  7. The incidentaloma of the pituitary gland: Is neurosurgery required?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reincke, M.; Allolio, B.; Saeger, W.; Menzel, J.; Winkelmann, W.

    1990-01-01

    The authors describe a series of 18 patients with an intrasellar mass incidentally discovered by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The average size of the mass was 13 mm, with a range from 5 to 25 mm. Initial ophthalmologic examination revealed bitemporal hemianopia in 2 patients. Results of routine endocrine testing showed partial hypopituitarism in 5 patients and growth hormone hypersecretion without signs and symptoms of acromegaly in 1 patient. Four patients underwent neurosurgery. Histologically, one chondroid chordoma and three pituitary adenomas were found. In the remaining 14 patients treated conservatively, repeated computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed no significant change in tumor size at the time of follow-up. The results suggest that the incidentaloma of the pituitary gland is a benign condition that does not necessarily require neurosurgical intervention

  8. Veterans Affairs general surgery service: the last bastion of integrated specialty care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteet, Stephen; Tarpley, Margaret; Tarpley, John L; Pearson, A Scott

    2011-11-01

    In a time of increasing specialization, academic training institutions provide a compartmentalized learning environment that often does not reflect the broad clinical experience of general surgery practice. This study aimed to evaluate the contribution of the Veterans Affairs (VA) general surgery surgical experience to both index Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements and as a unique integrated model in which residents provide concurrent care of multiple specialty patients. Institutional review board approval was obtained for retrospective analysis of electronic medical records involving all surgical cases performed by the general surgery service from 2005 to 2009 at the Nashville VA. Over a 5-year span general surgery residents spent an average of 5 months on the VA general surgery service, which includes a postgraduate year (PGY)-5, PGY-3, and 2 PGY-1 residents. Surgeries involved the following specialties: surgical oncology, endocrine, colorectal, hepatobiliary, transplant, gastrointestinal laparoscopy, and elective and emergency general surgery. The surgeries were categorized according to ACGME index requirements. A total of 2,956 surgeries were performed during the 5-year period from 2005 through 2009. Residents participated in an average of 246 surgeries during their experience at the VA; approximately 50 cases are completed during the chief year. On the VA surgery service alone, 100% of the ACGME requirement was met for the following categories: endocrine (8 cases); skin, soft tissue, and breast (33 cases); alimentary tract (78 cases); and abdominal (88 cases). Approximately 50% of the ACGME requirement was met for liver, pancreas, and basic laparoscopic categories. The VA hospital provides an authentic, broad-based, general surgery training experience that integrates complex surgical patients simultaneously. Opportunities for this level of comprehensive care are decreasing or absent in many general surgery training

  9. Do we need to overcome barriers to learning in the workplace for foundation trainees rotating in neurosurgery in order to improve training satisfaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Pho Nh; Patel, Keyur; Bhavsar, Amar; Acharya, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Junior doctors go through a challenging transition upon qualification; this repeats every time they start a rotation in a new department. Foundation level doctors (first 2 years postqualification) in neurosurgery are often new to the specialty and face various challenges that may result in significant workplace dissatisfaction. The neurosurgical environment is a clinically demanding area with a high volume of unwell patients and frequent emergencies - this poses various barriers to learning in the workplace for junior doctors. We identify a number of key barriers and review ideas that can be trialed in the department to overcome them. Through an evaluation of current suggestions in the literature, we propose that learning opportunities need to be made explicit to junior doctors in order to encourage them to participate as a member of the team. We consider ideas for adjustments to the induction program and the postgraduate medical curriculum to shift the focus from medical knowledge to improving confidence and clinical skills in newly qualified doctors. Despite being a powerful window for opportunistic learning, the daily ward round is unfortunately not maximized and needs to be more learner focused while maintaining efficiency and time consumption. Finally, we put forward the idea of an open forum where trainees can talk about their learning experiences, identify subjective barriers, and suggest solutions to senior doctors. This would be achieved through departmental faculty development. These interventions are presented within the context of the neurosurgical ward; however, they are transferable and can be adapted in other specialties and departments.

  10. Patients' views on priority setting in neurosurgery: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaratnam, Caroline; Bernstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Accountability for Reasonableness is an ethical framework which has been implemented in various health care systems to improve and evaluate the fairness of priority setting. This framework is grounded on four mandatory conditions: relevance, publicity, appeals, and enforcement. There have been few studies which have evaluated the patient stakeholders' acceptance of this framework; certainly no studies have been done on patients' views on the prioritization system for allocating patients for operating time in a system with pressure on the resource of inpatient beds. The aim of this study is to examine neurosurgical patients' views on the prioritization of patients for operating theater (OT) time on a daily basis at a tertiary and quaternary referral neurosurgery center. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with thirty-seven patients, recruited from the neurosurgery clinic at Toronto Western Hospital. Family members and friends who accompanied the patient to their clinic visit were encouraged to contribute to the discussion. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and subjected to thematic analysis using open and axial coding. Overall, patients are supportive of the concept of a priority-setting system based on fairness, but felt that a few changes would help to improve the fairness of the current system. These changes include lowering the level of priority given to volume-funded cases and providing scheduled surgeries that were previously canceled a higher level of prioritization. Good communication, early notification, and rescheduling canceled surgeries as soon as possible were important factors that directly reflected the patients' confidence level in their doctor, the hospital, and the health care system. This study is the first clinical qualitative study of patients' perspective on a prioritization system used for allocating neurosurgical patients for OT time on a daily basis in a socialized not-for-profit health care system with

  11. Numerical simulations of clinical focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, Aki; Werner, Beat; Martin, Ernst; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-04-01

    A computational model utilizing grid and finite difference methods were developed to simulate focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery interventions. The model couples the propagation of ultrasound in fluids (soft tissues) and solids (skull) with acoustic and visco-elastic wave equations. The computational model was applied to simulate clinical focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery treatments performed in patients suffering from therapy resistant chronic neuropathic pain. Datasets of five patients were used to derive the treatment geometry. Eight sonications performed in the treatments were then simulated with the developed model. Computations were performed by driving the simulated phased array ultrasound transducer with the acoustic parameters used in the treatments. Resulting focal temperatures and size of the thermal foci were compared quantitatively, in addition to qualitative inspection of the simulated pressure and temperature fields. This study found that the computational model and the simulation parameters predicted an average of 24 ± 13% lower focal temperature elevations than observed in the treatments. The size of the simulated thermal focus was found to be 40 ± 13% smaller in the anterior-posterior direction and 22 ± 14% smaller in the inferior-superior direction than in the treatments. The location of the simulated thermal focus was off from the prescribed target by 0.3 ± 0.1 mm, while the peak focal temperature elevation observed in the measurements was off by 1.6 ± 0.6 mm. Although the results of the simulations suggest that there could be some inaccuracies in either the tissue parameters used, or in the simulation methods, the simulations were able to predict the focal spot locations and temperature elevations adequately for initial treatment planning performed to assess, for example, the feasibility of sonication. The accuracy of the simulations could be improved if more precise ultrasound tissue properties (especially of the

  12. Operative volume and outcomes of cerebrovascular neurosurgery in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Connolly, Ian D; Do, Huy M; Choudhri, Omar

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE The impact of procedural volume on the outcomes of cerebrovascular surgery in children has not been determined. In this study, the authors investigated the association of operative volume on the outcomes of cerebrovascular neurosurgery in pediatric patients. METHODS The authors performed a cohort study of all pediatric patients who underwent a cerebrovascular procedure between 2003 and 2012 and were registered in the Kids' Inpatient Database (KID). To control for confounding, the authors used multivariable regression models, propensity-score conditioning, and mixed-effects analysis to account for clustering at the hospital level. RESULTS During the study period, 1875 pediatric patients in the KID underwent cerebrovascular neurosurgery and met the inclusion criteria for the study; 204 patients (10.9%) underwent aneurysm clipping, 446 (23.8%) underwent coil insertion for an aneurysm, 827 (44.1%) underwent craniotomy for arteriovenous malformation resection, and 398 (21.2%) underwent bypass surgery for moyamoya disease. Mixed-effects multivariable regression analysis revealed that higher procedural volume was associated with fewer inpatient deaths (OR 0.58; 95% CI 0.40-0.85), a lower rate of discharges to a facility (OR 0.87; 95% CI 0.82-0.92), and shorter length of stay (adjusted difference -0.22; 95% CI -0.32 to -0.12). The results in propensity-adjusted multivariable models were robust. CONCLUSIONS In a national all-payer cohort of pediatric patients who underwent a cerebrovascular procedure, the authors found that higher procedural volume was associated with fewer deaths, a lower rate of discharges to a facility, and decreased lengths of stay. Regionalization initiatives should include directing children with such rare pathologies to a center of excellence.

  13. Organizational readiness in specialty mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Alison B; Cohen, Amy N; Young, Alexander S

    2010-01-01

    Implementing quality improvement efforts in clinics is challenging. Assessment of organizational "readiness" for change can set the stage for implementation by providing information regarding existing strengths and deficiencies, thereby increasing the chance of a successful improvement effort. This paper discusses organizational assessment in specialty mental health, in preparation for improving care for individuals with schizophrenia. To assess organizational readiness for change in specialty mental health in order to facilitate locally tailored implementation strategies. EQUIP-2 is a site-level controlled trial at nine VA medical centers (four intervention, five control). Providers at all sites completed an organizational readiness for change (ORC) measure, and key stakeholders at the intervention sites completed a semi-structured interview at baseline. At the four intervention sites, 16 administrators and 43 clinical staff completed the ORC, and 38 key stakeholders were interviewed. The readiness domains of training needs, communication, and change were the domains with lower mean scores (i.e., potential deficiencies) ranging from a low of 23.8 to a high of 36.2 on a scale of 10-50, while staff attributes of growth and adaptability had higher mean scores (i.e., potential strengths) ranging from a low of 35.4 to a high of 41.1. Semi-structured interviews revealed that staff perceptions and experiences of change and decision-making are affected by larger structural factors such as change mandates from VA headquarters. Motivation for change, organizational climate, staff perceptions and beliefs, and prior experience with change efforts contribute to readiness for change in specialty mental health. Sites with less readiness for change may require more flexibility in the implementation of a quality improvement intervention. We suggest that uptake of evidence-based practices can be enhanced by tailoring implementation efforts to the strengths and deficiencies of the

  14. MO-DE-202-02: Advances in Image Registration and Reconstruction for Image-Guided Neurosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siewerdsen, J. [Johns Hopkins University (United States)

    2016-06-15

    At least three major trends in surgical intervention have emerged over the last decade: a move toward more minimally invasive (or non-invasive) approach to the surgical target; the development of high-precision treatment delivery techniques; and the increasing role of multi-modality intraoperative imaging in support of such procedures. This symposium includes invited presentations on recent advances in each of these areas and the emerging role for medical physics research in the development and translation of high-precision interventional techniques. The four speakers are: Keyvan Farahani, “Image-guided focused ultrasound surgery and therapy” Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen, “Advances in image registration and reconstruction for image-guided neurosurgery” Tina Kapur, “Image-guided surgery and interventions in the advanced multimodality image-guided operating (AMIGO) suite” Raj Shekhar, “Multimodality image-guided interventions: Multimodality for the rest of us” Learning Objectives: Understand the principles and applications of HIFU in surgical ablation. Learn about recent advances in 3D–2D and 3D deformable image registration in support of surgical safety and precision. Learn about recent advances in model-based 3D image reconstruction in application to intraoperative 3D imaging. Understand the multi-modality imaging technologies and clinical applications investigated in the AMIGO suite. Understand the emerging need and techniques to implement multi-modality image guidance in surgical applications such as neurosurgery, orthopaedic surgery, vascular surgery, and interventional radiology. Research supported by the NIH and Siemens Healthcare.; J. Siewerdsen; Grant Support - National Institutes of Health; Grant Support - Siemens Healthcare; Grant Support - Carestream Health; Advisory Board - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Elekta Oncology.; T. Kapur, P41EB015898; R. Shekhar, Funding: R42CA137886 and R41CA192504

  15. MO-DE-202-02: Advances in Image Registration and Reconstruction for Image-Guided Neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siewerdsen, J.

    2016-01-01

    At least three major trends in surgical intervention have emerged over the last decade: a move toward more minimally invasive (or non-invasive) approach to the surgical target; the development of high-precision treatment delivery techniques; and the increasing role of multi-modality intraoperative imaging in support of such procedures. This symposium includes invited presentations on recent advances in each of these areas and the emerging role for medical physics research in the development and translation of high-precision interventional techniques. The four speakers are: Keyvan Farahani, “Image-guided focused ultrasound surgery and therapy” Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen, “Advances in image registration and reconstruction for image-guided neurosurgery” Tina Kapur, “Image-guided surgery and interventions in the advanced multimodality image-guided operating (AMIGO) suite” Raj Shekhar, “Multimodality image-guided interventions: Multimodality for the rest of us” Learning Objectives: Understand the principles and applications of HIFU in surgical ablation. Learn about recent advances in 3D–2D and 3D deformable image registration in support of surgical safety and precision. Learn about recent advances in model-based 3D image reconstruction in application to intraoperative 3D imaging. Understand the multi-modality imaging technologies and clinical applications investigated in the AMIGO suite. Understand the emerging need and techniques to implement multi-modality image guidance in surgical applications such as neurosurgery, orthopaedic surgery, vascular surgery, and interventional radiology. Research supported by the NIH and Siemens Healthcare.; J. Siewerdsen; Grant Support - National Institutes of Health; Grant Support - Siemens Healthcare; Grant Support - Carestream Health; Advisory Board - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Elekta Oncology.; T. Kapur, P41EB015898; R. Shekhar, Funding: R42CA137886 and R41CA192504

  16. Getting the right balance? A mixed logit analysis of the relationship between UK training doctors' characteristics and their specialties using the 2013 National Training Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Santana, Idaira; Chalkley, Martin

    2017-08-11

    To analyse how training doctors' demographic and socioeconomic characteristics vary according to the specialty that they are training for. Descriptive statistics and mixed logistic regression analysis of cross-sectional survey data to quantify evidence of systematic relationships between doctors' characteristics and their specialty. Doctors in training in the United Kingdom in 2013. 27 530 doctors in training but not in their foundation year who responded to the National Training Survey 2013. Mixed logit regression estimates and the corresponding odds ratios (calculated separately for all doctors in training and a subsample comprising those educated in the UK), relating gender, age, ethnicity, place of studies, socioeconomic background and parental education to the probability of training for a particular specialty. Being female and being white British increase the chances of being in general practice with respect to any other specialty, while coming from a better-off socioeconomic background and having parents with tertiary education have the opposite effect. Mixed results are found for age and place of studies. For example, the difference between men and women is greatest for surgical specialties for which a man is 12.121 times more likely to be training to a surgical specialty (relative to general practice) than a woman (p-valuevalue<0.01). There are systematic and substantial differences between specialties in respect of training doctors' gender, ethnicity, age and socioeconomic background. The persistent underrepresentation in some specialties of women, minority ethnic groups and of those coming from disadvantaged backgrounds will impact on the representativeness of the profession into the future. Further research is needed to understand how the processes of selection and the self-selection of applicants into specialties gives rise to these observed differences. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article

  17. Impact of a national specialty e-consultation implementation project on access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsh, Susan; Carey, Evan; Aron, Dacid C; Cardenas, Omar; Graham, Glenn; Jain, Rajiv; Au, David H; Tseng, Chin-Lin; Franklin, Heather; Ho, P Michael

    2015-12-01

    To assess the early impact of implementation of the electronic consults (e-consults) initiative by the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), designed to improve specialty care access. Observational cohort study exploiting a natural experiment begun in May 2011 at 12 VHA medical centers and expanded to 122 medical centers by December 2013. The following were assessed: 1) growth of e-consults by VHA regional networks, medical centers, and specialty; 2) location of patient's primary care provider (medical center vs community-based outpatient clinic [CBOC]); 3) potential patient miles needed to travel for a specialty care face-to-face consult in place of the observed e-consults using estimated geodesic distance; 4) use of specialty care subsequent to the e-consult. Of 11,270,638 consults completed in 13 clinics of interest, 217,014 were e-consults (adjusted rate, 1.93 e-consults per 100 consults). The e-consult rate was highest in endocrinology (5.0 per 100), hematology (3.0 per 100), and gastroenterology (3.0 per 100). The percentage of e-consult patients with CBOC-based primary care grew from 28.5% to 44.4% in the first year of implementation and to 45.6% at year 3. Of those e-consult patients from community clinics, the average potential miles needed to travel was 72.1 miles per patient (SD = 72.6; median = 54.6; interquartile range = 17.1-108), translating to a potential savings of 6,875,631 total miles and travel reimbursement costs of $2,853,387. E-consult volume increased significantly since inception within many medical and surgical specialties. For patients receiving primary care at one of more than 800 CBOCs, e-consults may decrease travel burden and direct travel costs for patients.

  18. Candida infection of the central nervous system following neurosurgery: a 12-year review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Deirdre

    2011-06-01

    Candida infection of the central nervous system (CNS) following neurosurgery is relatively unusual but is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present our experience with this infection in adults and discuss clinical characteristics, treatment options, and outcome.

  19. Unconscious race and social class bias among acute care surgical clinicians and clinical treatment decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Adil H; Schneider, Eric B; Sriram, N; Dossick, Deborah S; Scott, Valerie K; Swoboda, Sandra M; Losonczy, Lia; Haut, Elliott R; Efron, David T; Pronovost, Peter J; Lipsett, Pamela A; Cornwell, Edward E; MacKenzie, Ellen J; Cooper, Lisa A; Freischlag, Julie A

    2015-05-01

    Significant health inequities persist among minority and socially disadvantaged patients. Better understanding of how unconscious biases affect clinical decision making may help to illuminate clinicians' roles in propagating disparities. To determine whether clinicians' unconscious race and/or social class biases correlate with patient management decisions. We conducted a web-based survey among 230 physicians from surgery and related specialties at an academic, level I trauma center from December 1, 2011, through January 31, 2012. We administered clinical vignettes, each with 3 management questions. Eight vignettes assessed the relationship between unconscious bias and clinical decision making. We performed ordered logistic regression analysis on the Implicit Association Test (IAT) scores and used multivariable analysis to determine whether implicit bias was associated with the vignette responses. Differential response times (D scores) on the IAT as a surrogate for unconscious bias. Patient management vignettes varied by patient race or social class. Resulting D scores were calculated for each management decision. In total, 215 clinicians were included and consisted of 74 attending surgeons, 32 fellows, 86 residents, 19 interns, and 4 physicians with an undetermined level of education. Specialties included surgery (32.1%), anesthesia (18.1%), emergency medicine (18.1%), orthopedics (7.9%), otolaryngology (7.0%), neurosurgery (7.0%), critical care (6.0%), and urology (2.8%); 1.9% did not report a departmental affiliation. Implicit race and social class biases were present in most respondents. Among all clinicians, mean IAT D scores for race and social class were 0.42 (95% CI, 0.37-0.48) and 0.71 (95% CI, 0.65-0.78), respectively. Race and class scores were similar across departments (general surgery, orthopedics, urology, etc), race, or age. Women demonstrated less bias concerning race (mean IAT D score, 0.39 [95% CI, 0.29-0.49]) and social class (mean IAT D score

  20. Assessment of Surgical Skills and Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Nasir I

    2017-10-01

    Evaluation of surgical skills and competency are important aspects of the medical education process. Measurable and reproducible methods of assessment with objective feedback are essential components of surgical training. Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) is widely used across the medical specialties and otolaryngology-specific tools have been developed and validated for sinus and mastoid surgery. Although assessment of surgical skills can be time-consuming and requires human and financial resources, new evaluation methods and emerging technology may alleviate these barriers while also improving data collection practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Robotic surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Or, Sharon; Nifong, L Wiley; Chitwood, W Randolph

    2013-01-01

    In July 2000, the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Inc) received Food and Drug Administration approval for intracardiac applications, and the first mitral valve repair was done at the East Carolina Heart Institute in May 2000. The system is now approved and used in many surgical specialties. With this disruptive technology and accepted use, surgeons and hospitals are seeking the most efficacious training pathway leading to safe use and responsible credentialing.One of the most important issues related to safe use is assembling the appropriate team of professionals involved with patient care. Moreover, proper patient selection and setting obtainable goals are also important.Creation and maintenance of a successful program are discussed in the article focusing on realistic goals. This begins with a partnership between surgeon leaders, hospital administrators, and industry support. Through this partnership, an appropriate training pathway and clinical pathway for success can be outlined. A timeline can then be created with periods of data analysis and adjustments as necessary. A successful program is attainable by following this pathway and attending to every detail along the journey.

  2. Utilizing virtual and augmented reality for educational and clinical enhancements in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelargos, Panayiotis E; Nagasawa, Daniel T; Lagman, Carlito; Tenn, Stephen; Demos, Joanna V; Lee, Seung J; Bui, Timothy T; Barnette, Natalie E; Bhatt, Nikhilesh S; Ung, Nolan; Bari, Ausaf; Martin, Neil A; Yang, Isaac

    2017-01-01

    Neurosurgery has undergone a technological revolution over the past several decades, from trephination to image-guided navigation. Advancements in virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) represent some of the newest modalities being integrated into neurosurgical practice and resident education. In this review, we present a historical perspective of the development of VR and AR technologies, analyze its current uses, and discuss its emerging applications in the field of neurosurgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Free-access open-source e-learning in comprehensive neurosurgery skills training

    OpenAIRE

    Payal Jotwani; Vinkle Srivastav; Manjul Tripathi; Rama Chandra Deo; Britty Baby; Natesan Damodaran; Ramandeep Singh; Ashish Suri; Martin Bettag; Tara Sankar Roy; Christoph Busert; Marcus Mehlitz; Sanjeev Lalwani; Kanwaljeet Garg; Kolin Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since the end of last century, technology has taken a front seat in dispersion of medical education. Advancements of technology in neurosurgery and traditional training methods are now being challenged by legal and ethical concerns of patient safety, resident work-hour restriction and cost of operating-room time. To supplement the existing neurosurgery education pattern, various e-learning platforms are introduced as structured, interactive learning system. Materials and Methods: ...

  4. Emergency medicine as a specialty in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pek, Jen Heng; Lim, Swee Han; Ho, Hiu Fai; Ramakrishnan, T V; Jamaluddin, Sabariah Faizah; Mesa-Gaerlan, Faith Joan C; Tiru, Mohan; Hwang, Sung Oh; Choi, Wai-Mau; Kanchanasut, Somchai; Khruekarnchana, Pairoj; Avsarogullari, Levent; Shimazu, Takeshi; Hori, Shingo

    2016-04-01

    We aim to examine the similarities and differences in areas of EM development, workload, workforce, and capabilities and support in the Asia region. Emerging challenges faced by our EM community are also discussed. The National Societies for Emergency Medicine of Hong Kong, India, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Turkey participated in the joint Japanese Association of Acute Medicine (JAAM) and Asian Conference of Emergency Medicine (ACEM) Special Symposium held in October 2013 at Tokyo, Japan. The findings are reviewed in this paper. Emergency medicine (EM) has over the years evolved into a distinct and recognized medical discipline requiring a unique set of cognitive, administrative and technical skills for managing all types of patients with acute illness or injury. EM has contributed to healthcare by providing effective, safe, efficient and cost-effective patient care. Integrated systems have developed to allow continuity of emergency care from the community into emergency departments. Structured training curriculum for undergraduates, and specialty training programs for postgraduates are in place to equip trainees with the knowledge and skills required for the unique practice of EM. The practice of EM still varies among the Asian countries. However, as a region, we strive to continue in our efforts to develop the specialty and improve the delivery of EM.

  5. Surgical smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Joe King-Man; Chan, Fion Siu-Yin; Chu, Kent-Man

    2009-10-01

    Surgical smoke is the gaseous by-product formed during surgical procedures. Most surgeons, operating theatre staff and administrators are unaware of its potential health risks. Surgical smoke is produced by various surgical instruments including those used in electrocautery, lasers, ultrasonic scalpels, high speed drills, burrs and saws. The potential risks include carbon monoxide toxicity to the patient undergoing a laparoscopic operation, pulmonary fibrosis induced by non-viable particles, and transmission of infectious diseases like human papilloma virus. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity are other concerns. Minimisation of the production of surgical smoke and modification of any evacuation systems are possible solutions. In general, a surgical mask can provide more than 90% protection to exposure to surgical smoke; however, in most circumstances it cannot provide air-tight protection to the user. An at least N95 grade or equivalent respirator offers the best protection against surgical smoke, but whether such protection is necessary is currently unknown.

  6. What proportion of basic surgical trainees continue in a surgical career? A survey of the factors which are important in influencing career decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, J M J; Drummond, R; Murray, J; Fraser, S; MacDonald, A; Parks, R W

    2009-10-01

    Since the launch of Modernising Medical Careers, trainees are selected for a run-through training programme in a single surgical specialty. The surgical training bodies are currently considering the recommendations of the Tooke report as they review the policy for selection into surgical training in the UK. There is little information available on the factors involved in career choices amongst surgical trainees and this study aimed to address this issue. Trainees appointed to the Basic Surgical Training Programmes in the west and south-east of Scotland (1996-2006) were contacted by email and invited to participate in an online survey. Of 467 trainees identified, valid email addresses were available for 299 of which 191 (64%) responded to the survey. One hundred and forty-nine (78%) trainees were still working in surgery but 38 (20%) had moved to a non-surgical specialty and 4 (2%) had left the medical profession. Of those who had obtained a NTN at the time of the survey (n = 138), 62 (45%) had a NTN in the specialty they chose at the start of the BST but 34 (25%) had changed to a different surgical specialty and 42 (30%) had left surgery altogether. For those still working in surgery, enjoyment of the specialty was the most important factor affecting career choice. Achieving an acceptable work/life balance was the most significant factor influencing trainees who left surgery. The majority of trainees recruited to surgery at an early stage change specialty or leave surgery altogether. Both social and professional factors are important in career choices. The findings of this study support a period of core surgical training to provide flexibility prior to further training in a surgical specialty.

  7. Interventional radiology as clinical specialty and how this affects the radiology specialty as a whole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsetis, D.

    2015-01-01

    maintain high quality clinical standards, Radiology departments must carry out regular audit and where available submitting data to national or international registries. Furthermore, IRs have a duty of care to ensure that the IR procedures are safe and effective which can only be demonstrated by high quality research. For IR to survive as clinical specialty, IR training must be adapted in order to ensure that future IR’s will acquire both clinical knowledge and confidence in the disease processes as well as in dealing with patients. Core IR training must include communication skills, clinical assessment and knowledge of the various alternative treatments to IR both surgical and medical. In order to fulfill these expectations, IR training must move to a certified residency program; an attractive format would be one year of internship, three years of Diagnostic Radiology, and then two years of IR. this IR certification will hopefully have a huge impact on local organizational issues so that at a local institution the IR service will be listed next to surgery and medicine. towards this direction, appropriate curricula and formal assessment of the appropriate skills such as the european Board of Interventional Radiology (eBIR) examination are available to ensure the high standards of the future IR workforce. the CIRSe Clinical Practice in IR Manual provides a comprehensive approach to patient care, including numerous well-structured forms for gathering data on patient or social history and conducting examinations are part of its content (www.cirse.org/Clinical_Practice) In my opinion the continuous effort to upgrade IR practice, also points to the only direction for the entire Radiology specialty to survive: the radiologist should be part of clinical decision-making, a true active clinical partner, with up-to-date clinical knowledge about a medical subspecialty. the reality is that clinicians have started to learn about the images in their subspecialty territory, and through

  8. [Deep brain recording and length of surgery in stereotactic and functional neurosurgery for movement disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teijeiro, Juan; Macías, Raúl J; Maragoto, Carlos; García, Iván; Alvarez, Mario; Quintanal, Nelson E

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives were to study the length of multi-unit recordings (MURs) of brain activity in 20 years of movement disorder neurosurgeries and to determine the number of times in which it was necessary for the teams using single-unit recording (SUR) to explore all the electrode tracks in the simultaneously recorded sites (SRS). This was a retrospective descriptive statistical analysis of MUR length on 4,296 tracks in 952 surgeries. The exclusion criteria were: tracks with fewer than 5 recorded signals, tracks that had a signal length different from the habitual 2s, or there being unusual situations not related to the MUR, as well as the first 20 surgeries of each surgical target. This yielded a total of 3,448 tracks in 805 surgeries. We also determined the number of the total 952 surgeries in which all the tracks in the SURs of the SRS were explored. The mean and its confidence interval (P=.05) of time per MUR track were 5.49±0.16min in subthalamic nucleus surgery, 8.82±0.24min in the medial or internal globus pallidus) and 18.51±1.31min in the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus. For the total sum of tracks per surgery, in 75% of cases the total time was less than 39min in subthalamic nucleus, almost 42min in the medial or internal globus pallidus and less than 1h and 17min in ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus. All the tracks in the SUR SRS were explored in only 4.2% of the surgeries. The impact of MUR on surgical time is acceptable for this guide in objective localization for surgical targets, without having to use several simultaneous electrodes (not all indispensable in most of the cases). Consequently, there is less risk for the patient. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Dental student perceptions of oral and maxillofacial surgery as a specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, Krystian F; Ziccardi, Vincent B; Aziz, Shahid R; Sue-Jiang, Shuying

    2013-05-01

    The specialty of oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) encompasses the diagnosis and surgical management of a variety of pathologic, functional, and esthetic conditions of the oral and maxillofacial region. Despite the specialty's prominent role in the field of dentistry, a lack of complete understanding still remains among dental and medical health professionals as to the exact scope and expertise of the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. The present study aimed to analyze a population of dental students' perceptions of OMS as a specialty with respect to treatment rendered, referral patterns, and a general opinion of the specialty as a whole. A survey consisting of 10 multiple-choice questions was compiled and distributed to dental students through an on-line polling service (SurveyMonkey). A total of 5 dental student classes at a single dental school were polled using school-based electronic mail, including the graduating seniors. All answers were kept confidential, and no individual students were identified. The students were not able to retake the survey once completed. The final tallies of the survey results were compiled and submitted for statistical analysis. Statistically significant associations between the year of dental education and student perceptions of OMS were determined. As dental students progress through their undergraduate studies, their perceptions change with regard to the referral of dental implants. Periodontists were found to have statistically significantly greater rates of referral than oral and maxillofacial surgeons from dental students in the fourth year and recent graduates compared with younger dental students from the first, second, and third years for placement of dental implants. Statistically insignificant in terms of a changing dental student perception was the finding that third molar removal was within the domain of the oral and maxillofacial surgeon, as well as the management of cleft lip and palate deformities and mandibular

  10. Factors affecting future specialty choice among medical students in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fouzan, Rawan; Al-Ajlan, Sarah; Marwan, Yousef; Al-Saleh, Mervat

    2012-01-01

    Choosing a medical specialty can be either a daunting and confusing experience for some medical students and junior doctors or a foregone conclusion to others. The aim of this study is to evaluate factors affecting future specialty choice among medical students in Kuwait University. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from medical students registered in Kuwait University during the academic year 2011/2012. Chi-square test and logistic regression were used to test the association between deciding a future specialty and students' sociodemographic and academic factors. Of the 422 students approached, 387 (91.7%) decided to participate. A total of 144 (37.2%) students made a decision regarding their choice of future medical specialty. Pediatrics, general surgery, and cardiology were the most desired specialties - 18 (12.5%), 17 (11.8%), and 16 (11.1%) students requested these specialties, respectively. Only 61 (42.4%) of those who selected a future specialty received advice regarding their choice. Looking for a good treatment outcome for patients (66; 45.8%) and a challenging specialty (58; 40.3%) were the most influencing incentives when selecting a future specialty. Students in the clinical phase of their study were 3.014 (95% CI: 1.498-6.065) more likely to report on their decision regarding a future specialty compared to students in the basic medical sciences phase (p=0.002). A variety of factors appeared to inspire medical students in Kuwait to choose a future medical specialty. When identified, these factors can be used by mentors of medical students and directors of residency training programs to motivate students to choose specialties that are limited in Kuwait.

  11. Factors affecting future specialty choice among medical students in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawan Al-Fouzan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Choosing a medical specialty can be either a daunting and confusing experience for some medical students and junior doctors or a foregone conclusion to others. The aim of this study is to evaluate factors affecting future specialty choice among medical students in Kuwait University. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from medical students registered in Kuwait University during the academic year 2011/2012. Chi-square test and logistic regression were used to test the association between deciding a future specialty and students’ sociodemographic and academic factors. Results: Of the 422 students approached, 387 (91.7% decided to participate. A total of 144 (37.2% students made a decision regarding their choice of future medical specialty. Pediatrics, general surgery, and cardiology were the most desired specialties – 18 (12.5%, 17 (11.8%, and 16 (11.1% students requested these specialties, respectively. Only 61 (42.4% of those who selected a future specialty received advice regarding their choice. Looking for a good treatment outcome for patients (66; 45.8% and a challenging specialty (58; 40.3% were the most influencing incentives when selecting a future specialty. Students in the clinical phase of their study were 3.014 (95% CI: 1.498–6.065 more likely to report on their decision regarding a future specialty compared to students in the basic medical sciences phase (p=0.002. Conclusion : A variety of factors appeared to inspire medical students in Kuwait to choose a future medical specialty. When identified, these factors can be used by mentors of medical students and directors of residency training programs to motivate students to choose specialties that are limited in Kuwait.

  12. Sampling and farm stories prompt consumers to buy specialty cheeses

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Barbara A.; Bruhn, Christine M.

    2003-01-01

    California specialty cheese makers need information on what drives product sales so they can effectively market their products. Focus group and telephone research revealed that specialty cheese consumers have a strong preference for sampling cheese before making a purchase. Consumers also rely heavily on staff recommendations to select cheese. They appreciate unlimited sampling in an unhurried, low-pressure environment. Specialty cheese consumers consider themselves “food experimenters”; they...

  13. Factors influencing medical students' choice of emergency medicine as a career specialty-a descriptive study of Saudi medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhaneen, Hadeel; Alhusain, Faisal; Alshahri, Khalid; Al Jerian, Nawfal

    2018-03-07

    Choosing a medical specialty is a poorly understood process. Although studies conducted around the world have attempted to identify the factors that affect medical students' choice of specialty, data is scarce on the factors that influence the choice of specialty of Saudi Arabian medical students, in particular those planning a career in emergency medicine (EM). In this study, we investigated whether Saudi medical students choosing EM are influenced by different factors to those choosing other specialties. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences (KSAUHS), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The questionnaire distributed among all undergraduate and postgraduate medical students of both sexes in the second and third phases (57% were males and 43% were females). A total of 436 students answered the questionnaire, a response rate of 53.4%. EM group was most influenced by hospital orientation and lifestyle and least influenced by social orientation and prestige provided by their specialty. Unlike controllable lifestyle (CL) group and primary care (PC) group, EM reported lesser influence of social orientation on their career choice. When compared with students primarily interested in the surgical subspecialties (SS), EM group were less likely to report prestige as an important influence. Moreover, students interested in SS reported a leaser influence of medical lifestyle in comparison to EM group. When compared with CL group, EM group reported more interest in medical lifestyle. We found that students primarily interested in EM had different values and career expectations to other specialty groups. The trends in specialty choice should be appraised to meet future needs.

  14. BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY FOR SPECIALTY COFFEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vharessa Aknesia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Specialty coffee is a coffee of premium quality that has been made through various stages of post-harvest processing and strictly controlled to produce distinctive taste of origins. PT Sinar Mayang Lestari is one of the companies that currently produce and develop specialty coffee type, Arabica Java Preanger. The objectives of the study are to examine competitive advantages and develop an alternative strategy that need to be done by PT Sinar Mayang Lestari for their business development. The research methods used are value chain analysis and VRIO framework to explore competitive advantage owned by the company. The result shows the company currently has a temporary competitive advantage of the technological resources and reputation. By using SWOT-AHP technique, the alternative strategies that can be done by company are as follows: 1 increasing the production of natural and honey coffee  type; 2 building coffee center in plantation site for sharing knowledge and innovation media to the farmers; 3 improving the competency of human resource in plantation, post harvest, and promoting area; 4 building management system gradually 5 forwarding integration by building roast and ground coffee business; and 6 maximizing the ability of the land and human resources through research and development.Keywords: competitive advantage, specialty coffee, SWOT-AHP, value chain, VRIOABSTRAKKopi special merupakan kopi dengan kualitas premium yang sudah melalui berbagai tahapan pengolahan pascapanen yang diawasi dengan ketat sehingga menghasilkan cita rasa yang khas sesuai dengan daerah asalnya. PT Sinar Mayang Lestari adalah salah satu perusahaan yang saatini memproduksi dan mengembangkan kopi spesial jenis Arabika Java Preanger. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah menganalisis keunggulan bersaing yang dimiliki dan mengembangkan alternative strategi yang perlu dilakukanoleh PT Sinar Mayang Lestari untuk pengembangan usahanya. Penelitian ini menggunakan analisis rantai

  15. Intracranial meningiomas managed at Memfys hospital for neurosurgery in Enugu, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezue, Wilfred C; Ohaegbulam, Samuel C; Ndubuisi, Chika C; Chikani, Mark C; Achebe, David S

    2012-09-01

    The epidemiology and pathology of meningioma in Nigeria are still evolving and little has been published about this tumor in Nigeria, especially in the southeast region. The aim of this paper is to compare the characteristics of intracranial meningioma managed in our center with the pattern reported in the literature worldwide. Retrospective analysis of prospectively recorded data of patients managed for intracranial meningioma between January 2002 and December 2010 at a Private neurosurgery Hospital in Enugu, Nigeria. We excluded patients whose histology results were inconclusive. Meningiomas constituted 23.8% of all intracranial tumors seen in the period. The male to female ratio was 1:1.1. The peak age range for males and females were in the fifth and sixth decades, respectively. The most common location is the Olfactory groove in 26.5% of patients followed by convexity in 23.5%. Presentation varied with anatomical location of tumor. Patients with olfactory groove meningioma (OGM) mostly presented late with personality changes and evidence of raised ICP. Tuberculum sellar and sphenoid region tumors presented earlier with visual impairment with or without hormonal abnormalities. Seizures occurred in 30.9% of all patients and in 45% of those with convexity meningiomas. Only 57.4% of the patients were managed surgically and there was no gender difference in this group. WHO grade1 tumors were the most common histological types occurring in 84.6%. One patient had atypical meningioma and two had anaplastic tumors. The pattern of meningioma in our area may have geographical differences in location and histology. Childhood meningioma was rare.

  16. Intracranial meningiomas managed at Memfys hospital for neurosurgery in Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfred C Mezue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The epidemiology and pathology of meningioma in Nigeria are still evolving and little has been published about this tumor in Nigeria, especially in the southeast region. The aim of this paper is to compare the characteristics of intracranial meningioma managed in our center with the pattern reported in the literature worldwide. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of prospectively recorded data of patients managed for intracranial meningioma between January 2002 and December 2010 at a Private neurosurgery Hospital in Enugu, Nigeria. We excluded patients whose histology results were inconclusive. Results: Meningiomas constituted 23.8% of all intracranial tumors seen in the period. The male to female ratio was 1:1.1. The peak age range for males and females were in the fifth and sixth decades, respectively. The most common location is the Olfactory groove in 26.5% of patients followed by convexity in 23.5%. Presentation varied with anatomical location of tumor. Patients with olfactory groove meningioma (OGM mostly presented late with personality changes and evidence of raised ICP. Tuberculum sellar and sphenoid region tumors presented earlier with visual impairment with or without hormonal abnormalities. Seizures occurred in 30.9% of all patients and in 45% of those with convexity meningiomas. Only 57.4% of the patients were managed surgically and there was no gender difference in this group. WHO grade1 tumors were the most common histological types occurring in 84.6%. One patient had atypical meningioma and two had anaplastic tumors. Conclusion: The pattern of meningioma in our area may have geographical differences in location and histology. Childhood meningioma was rare.

  17. [A new human machine interface in neurosurgery: The Leap Motion(®). Technical note regarding a new touchless interface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tommaso, L; Aubry, S; Godard, J; Katranji, H; Pauchot, J

    2016-06-01

    Currently, cross-sectional imaging viewing is used in routine practice whereas the surgical procedure requires physical contact with an interface (mouse or touch-sensitive screen). This type of contact results in a risk of lack of aseptic control and causes loss of time. The recent appearance of devices such as the Leap Motion(®) (Leap Motion society, San Francisco, USA) a sensor which enables to interact with the computer without any physical contact is of major interest in the field of surgery. However, its configuration and ergonomics produce key challenges in order to adapt to the practitioner's requirements, the imaging software as well as the surgical environment. This article aims to suggest an easy configuration of the Leap Motion(®) in neurosurgery on a PC for an optimized utilization with Carestream(®) Vue PACS v11.3.4 (Carestream Health, Inc., Rochester, USA) using a plug-in (to download at: https://drive.google.com/?usp=chrome_app#folders/0B_F4eBeBQc3ybElEeEhqME5DQkU) and a video tutorial (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVPTgxg-SIk). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Dentistry's oldest specialty: orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) has 15,500 members worldwide and is the oldest and largest of the recognized dental specialties. A strategic planning process has identified six key challenges, and this article describes the progress that is being made in the areas of (a) consumer education, (b) volunteer leadership development, (c) recruitment and retention of orthodontic educators, (d) relationships with ADA and other healthcare organizations, (e) the AAO's role in international orthodontics, and (f) advocacy. The AAO is working for freedom of choice in dental healthcare providers; fee-for-service dental care; orthodontic insurance coverage as a benefit of employment, with direct reimbursement as the preferred plan; self-referred access to specialists; private and public funding that promote quality orthodontic care; and the retention of tax deductibility of dental healthcare benefits, including orthodontic care.

  19. Predictors of Stroke and Coma After Neurosurgery: An ACS-NSQIP Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Alexandra M G; Cote, David J; Karhade, Aditya V; Smith, Timothy R

    2016-09-01

    The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database aims to reduce 30-day postoperative complications. Reduction of postoperative stroke and coma can decrease length and cost of hospitalization, improve patient functional status, and decrease morbidity and mortality. We performed a search of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database for all patients from 2006 to 2013 undergoing an operation with a surgeon whose primary specialty was neurologic surgery. Of 94,546 neurosurgical patients reported, there were 687 (0.73%) cases of postoperative stroke and coma. The annual rate of coma longer than 24 hours decreased from 0.90% in 2006 to 0.002% in 2013 (P coma longer than 24 hours (P coma. The rate of postneurosurgical stroke decreased from 1.2% in 2006 to 0.5% in 2013 and the rate of postneurosurgical coma greater than 24 hours decreased from 0.9% in 2006 to 0.002% in 2013. Ten risk factors for developing postneurosurgical stroke and coma were identified using multivariable analysis. These risk factors should be assessed preoperatively and incorporated into clinical decision making so that individuals who are at higher risk for the development of stroke and coma can be appropriately monitored during the postoperative period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Providing care for critically ill surgical patients: challenges and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisherman, Samuel A; Kaplan, Lewis; Gracias, Vicente H; Beilman, Gregory J; Toevs, Christine; Byrnes, Matthew C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-07-01

    Providing optimal care for critically ill and injured surgical patients will become more challenging with staff shortages for surgeons and intensivists. This white paper addresses the historical issues behind the present situation, the need for all intensivists to engage in dedicated critical care per the intensivist model, and the recognition that intensivists from all specialties can provide optimal care for the critically ill surgical patient, particularly with continuing involvement by the surgeon of record. The new acute care surgery training paradigm (including trauma, surgical critical care, and emergency general surgery) has been developed to increase interest in trauma and surgical critical care, but the number of interested trainees remains too few. Recommendations are made for broadening the multidisciplinary training and practice opportunities in surgical critical care for intensivists from all base specialties and for maintaining the intensivist model within acute care surgery practice. Support from academic and administrative leadership, as well as national organizations, will be needed.

  1. Simulation training in neurosurgery: advances in education and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konakondla, Sanjay; Fong, Reginald; Schirmer, Clemens M

    2017-01-01

    The current simulation technology used for neurosurgical training leaves much to be desired. Significant efforts are thoroughly exhausted in hopes of developing simulations that translate to give learners the “real-life” feel. Though a respectable goal, this may not be necessary as the application for simulation in neurosurgical training may be most useful in early learners. The ultimate uniformly agreeable endpoint of improved outcome and patient safety drives these investments. We explore the development, availability, educational taskforces, cost burdens and the simulation advancements in neurosurgical training. The technologies can be directed at achieving early resident milestones placed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. We discuss various aspects of neurosurgery disciplines with specific technologic advances of simulation software. An overview of the scholarly landscape of the recent publications in the realm of medical simulation and virtual reality pertaining to neurologic surgery is provided. We analyze concurrent concept overlap between PubMed headings and provide a graphical overview of the associations between these terms. PMID:28765716

  2. Three-dimensional printing: technologies, applications, and limitations in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci, Josephine U; Christophe, Brandon R; Sisti, Jonathan A; Connolly, Edward S

    2017-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printers are a developing technology penetrating a variety of markets, including the medical sector. Since its introduction to the medical field in the late 1980s, 3D printers have constructed a range of devices, such as dentures, hearing aids, and prosthetics. With the ultimate goals of decreasing healthcare costs and improving patient care and outcomes, neurosurgeons are utilizing this dynamic technology, as well. Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) can be translated into Stereolithography (STL) files, which are then read and methodically built by 3D Printers. Vessels, tumors, and skulls are just a few of the anatomical structures created in a variety of materials, which enable surgeons to conduct research, educate surgeons in training, and improve pre-operative planning without risk to patients. Due to the infancy of the field and a wide range of technologies with varying advantages and disadvantages, there is currently no standard 3D printing process for patient care and medical research. In an effort to enable clinicians to optimize the use of additive manufacturing (AM) technologies, we outline the most suitable 3D printing models and computer-aided design (CAD) software for 3D printing in neurosurgery, their applications, and the limitations that need to be overcome if 3D printers are to become common practice in the neurosurgical field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Robotic Stereotaxy in Cranial Neurosurgery: A Qualitative Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenko, Anton; Serletis, Demitre

    2017-12-14

    Modern-day stereotactic techniques have evolved to tackle the neurosurgical challenge of accurately and reproducibly accessing specific brain targets. Neurosurgical advances have been made in synergy with sophisticated technological developments and engineering innovations such as automated robotic platforms. Robotic systems offer a unique combination of dexterity, durability, indefatigability, and precision. To perform a systematic review of robotic integration for cranial stereotactic guidance in neurosurgery. Specifically, we comprehensively analyze the strengths and weaknesses of a spectrum of robotic technologies, past and present, including details pertaining to each system's kinematic specifications and targeting accuracy profiles. Eligible articles on human clinical applications of cranial robotic-guided stereotactic systems between 1985 and 2017 were extracted from several electronic databases, with a focus on stereotactic biopsy procedures, stereoelectroencephalography, and deep brain stimulation electrode insertion. Cranial robotic stereotactic systems feature serial or parallel architectures with 4 to 7 degrees of freedom, and frame-based or frameless registration. Indications for robotic assistance are diversifying, and include stereotactic biopsy, deep brain stimulation and stereoelectroencephalography electrode placement, ventriculostomy, and ablation procedures. Complication rates are low, and mainly consist of hemorrhage. Newer systems benefit from increasing targeting accuracy, intraoperative imaging ability, improved safety profiles, and reduced operating times. We highlight emerging future directions pertaining to the integration of robotic technologies into future neurosurgical procedures. Notably, a trend toward miniaturization, cost-effectiveness, frameless registration, and increasing safety and accuracy characterize successful stereotactic robotic technologies. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  4. Investigating the scope of resident patient care handoffs within neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Maya A; Nahed, Brian V; Heary, Robert F

    2012-01-01

    Handoffs are defined as verbal and written communications during patient care transitions. With the passage of recent ACMGE work hour rules further limiting the hours interns can spend in the hospital, many fear that more handoffs will occur, putting patient safety at risk. The issue of handoffs has not been studied in the neurosurgical literature. A validated, 20-question online-survey was sent to neurosurgical residents in all 98 accredited U.S. neurosurgery programs. Survey results were analyzed using tabulations. 449 surveys were completed yielding a 56% response rate. 63% of neurosurgical residents surveyed had not received formal instruction in what constitutes an effective handoff; 24% believe there is high to moderate variability among their co-residents in terms of the quality of the handoff provided; 55% experience three or more interruptions during handoffs on average. 90% of neurosurgical residents surveyed say that handoff most often occurs in a quiet, private area and 56% report a high level of comfort for knowing the potential acute, critical issues affecting a patient when receiving a handoff. There needs to be more focused education devoted to learning effective patient-care handoffs in neurosurgical training programs. Increasingly, handing off a patient adequately and safely is becoming a required skill of residency.

  5. Investigating the scope of resident patient care handoffs within neurosurgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya A Babu

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Handoffs are defined as verbal and written communications during patient care transitions. With the passage of recent ACMGE work hour rules further limiting the hours interns can spend in the hospital, many fear that more handoffs will occur, putting patient safety at risk. The issue of handoffs has not been studied in the neurosurgical literature. METHODS: A validated, 20-question online-survey was sent to neurosurgical residents in all 98 accredited U.S. neurosurgery programs. Survey results were analyzed using tabulations. RESULTS: 449 surveys were completed yielding a 56% response rate. 63% of neurosurgical residents surveyed had not received formal instruction in what constitutes an effective handoff; 24% believe there is high to moderate variability among their co-residents in terms of the quality of the handoff provided; 55% experience three or more interruptions during handoffs on average. 90% of neurosurgical residents surveyed say that handoff most often occurs in a quiet, private area and 56% report a high level of comfort for knowing the potential acute, critical issues affecting a patient when receiving a handoff. CONCLUSIONS: There needs to be more focused education devoted to learning effective patient-care handoffs in neurosurgical training programs. Increasingly, handing off a patient adequately and safely is becoming a required skill of residency.

  6. Using Electronic Noses to Detect Tumors During Neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Margie L.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Lara, Liana M.; Kateb, Babak; Chen, Mike

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed to develop special-purpose electronic noses and algorithms for processing the digitized outputs of the electronic noses for determining whether tissue exposed during neurosurgery is cancerous. At present, visual inspection by a surgeon is the only available intraoperative technique for detecting cancerous tissue. Implementation of the proposal would help to satisfy a desire, expressed by some neurosurgeons, for an intraoperative technique for determining whether all of a brain tumor has been removed. The electronic-nose technique could complement multimodal imaging techniques, which have also been proposed as means of detecting cancerous tissue. There are also other potential applications of the electronic-nose technique in general diagnosis of abnormal tissue. In preliminary experiments performed to assess the viability of the proposal, the problem of distinguishing between different types of cultured cells was substituted for the problem of distinguishing between normal and abnormal specimens of the same type of tissue. The figure presents data from one experiment, illustrating differences between patterns that could be used to distinguish between two types of cultured cancer cells. Further development can be expected to include studies directed toward answering questions concerning not only the possibility of distinguishing among various types of normal and abnormal tissue but also distinguishing between tissues of interest and other odorous substances that may be present in medical settings.

  7. Rapidly photo-cross-linkable chitosan hydrogel for peripheral neurosurgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickett, Todd A; Amoozgar, Zohreh; Tuchek, Chad A; Park, Joonyoung; Yeo, Yoon; Shi, Riyi

    2011-01-10

    Restoring continuity to severed peripheral nerves is crucial to regeneration and enables functional recovery. However, the two most common agents for coaptation, sutures and fibrin glues, have drawbacks such as inflammation, pathogenesis, and dehiscence. Chitosan-based adhesives are a promising alternative, reported to have good cytocompatibility and favorable immunogenicity. A photo-cross-linkable hydrogel based on chitosan is proposed as a new adhesive for peripheral nerve anastomosis. Two Az-chitosans were synthesized by conjugating 4-azidobenzoic acid with low (LMW, 15 kDa) and high (HMW, 50-190 kDa) molecular weight chitosans. These solutions formed a hydrogel in less than 1 min under UV light. The LMW Az-chitosan was more tightly cross-linked than the HMW variant, undergoing significantly less swelling and possessing a higher rheological storage modulus, and both Az-chitosan gels were stiffer than commercial fibrin glue. Severed nerves repaired by Az-chitosan adhesives tolerated longitudinal forces comparable or superior to fibrin glue. Adhesive exposure to intact nerves and neural cell culture showed both Az-chitosans to be nontoxic in the acute (minutes) and chronic (days) time frames. These results demonstrate that Az-chitosan hydrogels are cytocompatible and mechanically suitable for use as bioadhesives in peripheral neurosurgeries.

  8. Gendered Perceptions of Typical Engineers across Specialties for Engineering Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Margaret S.; Bryan, Kimberley K.

    2018-01-01

    Young women do not choose to be engineers nearly as often as young men, and they tend to cluster in particular specialties when they do. We examine these patterns and the role of gender schemas as applied to perceptions of typical engineers in understanding the choices that women make in terms of engineering specialties. We use Part 1 of two waves…

  9. 75 FR 42431 - Onyx Specialty Papers, Inc; Notice Soliciting Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-21

    ... Papers, Inc; Notice Soliciting Applications July 14, 2010. On April 29, 2009, Onyx Specialty Papers, Inc... is located in the basement of MeadWestvaco's paper mill. There are no transmission lines associated... information from the licensee, please contact Mr. John Clements, Counsel for Onyx Specialty Papers, Inc., Van...

  10. Gender bias in specialty preferences among Danish medical students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Laura Erna Toftegaard; Skytte, Nanna Hasle Bak; Dissing, Agnete Skovlund

    2011-01-01

    Female medical students tend to prefer person-oriented specialties characterized by close doctor-patient contact and aspects of care. Conversely, male medical students tend to seek towards specialties with elements of autonomy, technology and "action" . Furthermore, female doctors will outnumber ...

  11. The Orientation and Development of the Public Affair Management Specialty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenghui; Fu, Yongxian; Chen, Rongxiang; Hu, Xueqi

    2010-01-01

    Though the specialty of the public affair management has been developed for ten years, but it is still facing the actuality that the orientation and development are difficult. Only by confirming the cultivation target and the development orientation, the development of the specialty could find the development approach and method. According to the…

  12. Integration of specialties: An institutional and organizational view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Elihu M

    2013-12-01

    By what mechanisms of organizational and institutional change do different specialties succeed in accommodating and working with one another? How do these mechanisms function over time to support and retard the emergence and stability of new knowledge? This paper considers two such mechanisms, metawork (work that determines the organization of work) and common knowledge (knowledge that participants know is known by all participants). These mechanisms integrate specialties by making the activities of multiple specialties dependent upon one another, and by segmenting the common effort from the parent specialties. Integration of specialties can lead to the development of new specialties. Integration is facilitated and impeded by the anchoring of specialties in the system of institutions that participate in research. Host organizations, degree programs, sponsors, associations, regulators, and other organizations provide resources and impose demands that shape research. Some of these impacts are obvious and direct; others are indirect and more subtle. The research specialties form a network (not a hierarchy) in which connections constantly form and reform, and in which the influence of different anchoring institutions are constantly waxing and waning. The complexity of connections and their pattern of change are especially obvious in the life sciences, which are an especially good place to study problems of integration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Medical costs, Cesarean delivery rates, and length of stay in specialty hospitals vs. non-specialty hospitals in South Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Ju Kim

    Full Text Available Since 2011, specialty hospitals in South Korea have been known for providing high- quality care in specific clinical areas. Much research related to specialty hospitals and their performance in many such areas has been performed, but investigations about their performance in obstetrics and gynecology are lacking. Thus, we aimed to compare specialty vs. non-specialty hospitals with respect to mode of obstetric delivery, especially the costs and length of stay related to Cesarean section (CS procedures, and to provide evidence to policy-makers for evaluating the success of hospitals that specialize in obstetric and gynecological (OBGYN care.We obtained National Health Insurance claim data from 2012 to 2014, which included information from 418,141 OBGYN cases at 214 hospitals. We used a generalized estimating equation model to identify a potential association between the likelihood of CS at specialty hospitals compared with other hospitals. We also evaluated medical costs and length of stay in specialty hospitals according to type of delivery.We found that 150,256 (35.9% total deliveries were performed by CS. The odds ratio of CS was significantly lower in specialty hospitals (OR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.93-0.96compared to other hospitals Medical costs (0.74% and length of stay (1% in CS cases increased in specialty hospitals, although length of stay following vaginal delivery was lower (0.57% in specialty hospitals compared with other hospitals.We determined that specialty hospitals are significantly associated with a lower likelihood of CS delivery and shorter length of stay after vaginal delivery. Although they are also associated with higher costs for delivery, the increased cost could be due to the high level of intensive care provided, which leads to improve quality of care. Policy-makers should consider incentive programs to maintain performance of specialty hospitals and promote efficiency that could reduce medical costs accrued by patients.

  14. Current management of surgical oncologic emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosscher, Marianne R F; van Leeuwen, Barbara L; Hoekstra, Harald J

    2015-01-01

    For some oncologic emergencies, surgical interventions are necessary for dissolution or temporary relieve. In the absence of guidelines, the most optimal method for decision making would be in a multidisciplinary cancer conference (MCC). In an acute setting, the opportunity for multidisciplinary discussion is often not available. In this study, the management and short term outcome of patients after surgical oncologic emergency consultation was analyzed. A prospective registration and follow up of adult patients with surgical oncologic emergencies between 01-11-2013 and 30-04-2014. The follow up period was 30 days. In total, 207 patients with surgical oncologic emergencies were included. Postoperative wound infections, malignant obstruction, and clinical deterioration due to progressive disease were the most frequent conditions for surgical oncologic emergency consultation. During the follow up period, 40% of patients underwent surgery. The median number of involved medical specialties was two. Only 30% of all patients were discussed in a MCC within 30 days after emergency consultation, and only 41% of the patients who underwent surgery were discussed in a MCC. For 79% of these patients, the surgical procedure was performed before the MCC. Mortality within 30 days was 13%. In most cases, surgery occurred without discussing the patient in a MCC, regardless of the fact that multiple medical specialties were involved in the treatment process. There is a need for prognostic aids and acute oncology pathways with structural multidisciplinary management. These will provide in faster institution of the most appropriate personalized cancer care, and prevent unnecessary investigations or invasive therapy.

  15. National healthcare spending in the U.S. and Japan: national economic policy and implications for neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, James R

    2005-01-01

    Growth of national healthcare spending is a problem confronting national governments of all industrially advanced countries. Healthcare spending in the U.S. reached 13.9% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2003, compared to only 8% in Japan. In the U.S., health insurance is voluntary, with 15% of the population uninsured. In Japan, health insurance is mandatory and virtually universal, with growth in national health costs about half the rate of growth in the U.S. U.S. healthcare costs are projected to reach 18.4% of GDP 2013. The predicted growth in health care costs is expected to cause strain on the federal budget and a growing inability of employers and employees to pay for private insurance. Different national policies are the reason for different national health care costs in the U.S. and Japan. The U.S. has higher healthcare prices for salaries, equipment, supplies, and pharmaceuticals as compared to Japan. Higher prices, higher service intensity and volume during hospitalization create higher total cost in the U.S. Price controls in Japan kept medical inflation low at 0.46%/yr from 1980-2000. Market-pricing mechanisms in the U.S. have proven ineffective in controlling national healthcare costs, while Japan's national fee and price control policies have kept national costs among the lowest within the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. To guide insurance coverage policy, neurosurgery and other highly technical specialties should better define the comparative health benefit of high price technical services by prospective outcome studies.

  16. Phantom study and accuracy evaluation of an image-to-world registration approach used with electro-magnetic tracking system for neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Senhu; Sarment, David

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive neurosurgery needs intraoperative imaging updates and high efficient image guide system to facilitate the procedure. An automatic image guided system utilized with a compact and mobile intraoperative CT imager was introduced in this work. A tracking frame that can be easily attached onto the commercially available skull clamp was designed. With known geometry of fiducial and tracking sensor arranged on this rigid frame that was fabricated through high precision 3D printing, not only was an accurate, fully automatic registration method developed in a simple and less-costly approach, but also it helped in estimating the errors from fiducial localization in image space through image processing, and in patient space through the calibration of tracking frame. Our phantom study shows the fiducial registration error as 0.348+/-0.028mm, comparing the manual registration error as 1.976+/-0.778mm. The system in this study provided a robust and accurate image-to-patient registration without interruption of routine surgical workflow and any user interactions involved through the neurosurgery.

  17. Intraoperative Image Guidance in Neurosurgery: Development, Current Indications, and Future Trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Ch.; Mauer, U.M.; Waldeck, S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. As minimally invasive surgery becomes the standard of care in neurosurgery, it is imperative that surgeons become skilled in the use of image-guided techniques. The development of image-guided neurosurgery represents a substantial improvement in the microsurgical treatment of tumors, vascular malformations, and other intracranial lesions. Objective. There have been numerous advances in neurosurgery which have aided the neurosurgeon to achieve accurate removal of pathological tissue with minimal disruption of surrounding healthy neuronal matter including the development of microsurgical, endoscopic, and endovascular techniques. Neuro navigation systems and intraoperative imaging should improve success in cranial neurosurgery. Additional functional imaging modalities such as PET, SPECT, DTI (for fiber tracking), and fMRI can now be used in order to reduce neurological deficits resulting from surgery; however the positive long-term effect remains questionable for many indications. Method. Pub Med database search using the search term “image guided neurosurgery.” More than 1400 articles were published during the last 25 years. The abstracts were scanned for prospective comparative trials. Results and Conclusion. 14 comparative trials are published. To date significant data amount show advantages in intraoperative accuracy influencing the perioperative morbidity and long-term outcome only for cerebral glioma surgery.

  18. Physician wages across specialties: informing the physician reimbursement debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, J Paul; Tancredi, Daniel; Jerant, Anthony; Kravitz, Richard L

    2010-10-25

    Disparities in remuneration between primary care and other physician specialties may impede health care reform by undermining the sustainability of a primary care workforce. Previous studies have compared annual incomes across specialties unadjusted for work hours. Wage (earnings-per-hour) comparisons could better inform the physician payment debate. In a cross-sectional analysis of data from 6381 physicians providing patient care in the 2004-2005 Community Tracking Study (adjusted response rate, 53%), we compared wages across broad and narrow categories of physician specialties. Tobit and linear regressions were run. Four broad specialty categories (primary care, surgery, internal medicine and pediatric subspecialties, and other) and 41 specific specialties were analyzed together with demographic, geographic, and market variables. In adjusted analyses on broad categories, wages for surgery, internal medicine and pediatric subspecialties, and other specialties were 48%, 36%, and 45% higher, respectively, than for primary care specialties. In adjusted analyses for 41 specific specialties, wages were significantly lower for the following than for the reference group of general surgery (wage near median, $85.98): internal medicine and pediatrics combined (-$24.36), internal medicine (-$24.27), family medicine (-$23.70), and other pediatric subspecialties (-$23.44). Wage rankings were largely impervious to adjustment for control variables, including age, race, sex, and region. Wages varied substantially across physician specialties and were lowest for primary care specialties. The primary care wage gap was likely conservative owing to exclusion of radiologists, anesthesiologists, and pathologists. In light of low and declining medical student interest in primary care, these findings suggest the need for payment reform aimed at increasing incomes or reducing work hours for primary care physicians.

  19. Detecting clinically relevant new information in clinical notes across specialties and settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Pakhomov, Serguei V S; Arsoniadis, Elliot G; Lee, Janet T; Wang, Yan; Melton, Genevieve B

    2017-07-05

    Automated methods for identifying clinically relevant new versus redundant information in electronic health record (EHR) clinical notes is useful for clinicians and researchers involved in patient care and clinical research, respectively. We evaluated methods to automatically identify clinically relevant new information in clinical notes, and compared the quantity of redundant information across specialties and clinical settings. Statistical language models augmented with semantic similarity measures were evaluated as a means to detect and quantify clinically relevant new and redundant information over longitudinal clinical notes for a given patient. A corpus of 591 progress notes over 40 inpatient admissions was annotated for new information longitudinally by physicians to generate a reference standard. Note redundancy between various specialties was evaluated on 71,021 outpatient notes and 64,695 inpatient notes from 500 solid organ transplant patients (April 2015 through August 2015). Our best method achieved at best performance of 0.87 recall, 0.62 precision, and 0.72 F-measure. Addition of semantic similarity metrics compared to baseline improved recall but otherwise resulted in similar performance. While outpatient and inpatient notes had relatively similar levels of high redundancy (61% and 68%, respectively), redundancy differed by author specialty with mean redundancy of 75%, 66%, 57%, and 55% observed in pediatric, internal medicine, psychiatry and surgical notes, respectively. Automated techniques with statistical language models for detecting redundant versus clinically relevant new information in clinical notes do not improve with the addition of semantic similarity measures. While levels of redundancy seem relatively similar in the inpatient and ambulatory settings in the Fairview Health Services, clinical note redundancy appears to vary significantly with different medical specialties.

  20. Functional neurosurgery for movement disorders: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabid, Alim Louis; Chabardes, Stephan; Torres, Napoleon; Piallat, Brigitte; Krack, Paul; Fraix, Valerie; Pollak, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1960s, deep brain stimulation and spinal cord stimulation at low frequency (30 Hz) have been used to treat intractable pain of various origins. For this purpose, specific hardware have been designed, including deep brain electrodes, extensions, and implantable programmable generators (IPGs). In the meantime, movement disorders, and particularly parkinsonian and essential tremors, were treated by electrolytic or mechanic lesions in various targets of the basal ganglia, particularly in the thalamus and in the internal pallidum. The advent in the 1960s of levodopa, as well as the side effects and complications of ablative surgery (e.g., thalamotomy and pallidotomy), has sent functional neurosurgery of movement disorders to oblivion. In 1987, the serendipitous discovery of the effect of high-frequency stimulation (HFS), mimicking lesions, allowed the revival of the surgery of movement disorders by stimulation of the thalamus, which treated tremors with limited morbidity, and adaptable and reversible results. The stability along time of these effects allowed extending it to new targets suggested by basic research in monkeys. The HFS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has profoundly challenged the practice of functional surgery as the effect on the triad of dopaminergic symptoms was very significant, allowing to decrease the drug dosage and therefore a decrease of their complications, the levodopa-induced dyskinesias. In the meantime, based on the results of previous basic research in various fields, HFS has been progressively extended to potentially treat epilepsy and, more recently, psychiatric disorders, such as obsessive-compulsive disorders, Gilles de la Tourette tics, and severe depression. Similarly, suggested by the observation of changes in PET scan, applications have been extended to cluster headaches by stimulation of the posterior hypothalamus and even more recently, to obesity and drug addiction. In the field of movement disorders, it has become

  1. Consensus on guidelines for stereotactic neurosurgery for psychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttin, Bart; Wu, Hemmings; Mayberg, Helen; Hariz, Marwan; Gabriëls, Loes; Galert, Thorsten; Merkel, Reinhard; Kubu, Cynthia; Vilela-Filho, Osvaldo; Matthews, Keith; Taira, Takaomi; Lozano, Andres M; Schechtmann, Gastón; Doshi, Paresh; Broggi, Giovanni; Régis, Jean; Alkhani, Ahmed; Sun, Bomin; Eljamel, Sam; Schulder, Michael; Kaplitt, Michael; Eskandar, Emad; Rezai, Ali; Krauss, Joachim K; Hilven, Paulien; Schuurman, Rick; Ruiz, Pedro; Chang, Jin Woo; Cosyns, Paul; Lipsman, Nir; Voges, Juergen; Cosgrove, Rees; Li, Yongjie; Schlaepfer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background For patients with psychiatric illnesses remaining refractory to ‘standard’ therapies, neurosurgical procedures may be considered. Guidelines for safe and ethical conduct of such procedures have previously and independently been proposed by various local and regional expert groups. Methods To expand on these earlier documents, representative members of continental and international psychiatric and neurosurgical societies, joined efforts to further elaborate and adopt a pragmatic worldwide set of guidelines. These are intended to address a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders, brain targets and neurosurgical techniques, taking into account cultural and social heterogeneities of healthcare environments. Findings The proposed consensus document highlights that, while stereotactic ablative procedures such as cingulotomy and capsulotomy for depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder are considered ‘established’ in some countries, they still lack level I evidence. Further, it is noted that deep brain stimulation in any brain target hitherto tried, and for any psychiatric or behavioural disorder, still remains at an investigational stage. Researchers are encouraged to design randomised controlled trials, based on scientific and data-driven rationales for disease and brain target selection. Experienced multidisciplinary teams are a mandatory requirement for the safe and ethical conduct of any psychiatric neurosurgery, ensuring documented refractoriness of patients, proper consent procedures that respect patient's capacity and autonomy, multifaceted preoperative as well as postoperative long-term follow-up evaluation, and reporting of effects and side effects for all patients. Interpretation This consensus document on ethical and scientific conduct of psychiatric surgery worldwide is designed to enhance patient safety. PMID:24444853

  2. Causes and Timing of Unplanned Early Readmission After Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Blake E S; Youngerman, Brett E; Goldstein, Hannah; Kabat, Daniel H; Appelboom, Geoffrey; Gold, William E; Connolly, Edward Sander

    2016-09-01

    Reducing the rate of 30-day hospital readmission has become a priority in healthcare quality improvement policy, with a focus on better characterizing the reasons for unplanned readmission. In neurosurgery, however, peer-reviewed analyses describing the patterns of readmission have been limited in their number and generalizability. To determine the incidence, timing, and causes of 30-day readmission after neurosurgical procedures. We conducted a retrospective longitudinal study from 2009 to 2012 using the Statewide Planning And Research Cooperative System, which collects patient-level details for all admissions and discharges within New York. We identified patients readmitted within 30 days of initial discharge. The rate of, reasons for, and time to readmission were determined overall and within 4 subgroups: craniotomies, cranial surgery without craniotomy, spine, and neuroendovascular procedures. There were 163 743 index admissions, of whom 14 791 (9.03%) were readmitted. The most common reasons for unplanned readmission were infection (29.52%) and medical complications (19.22%). Median time to readmission was 11 days, with hemorrhagic strokes and seizures occurring earlier, and medical complications and infections occurring later. Readmission rates were highest among patients undergoing cerebrospinal fluid shunt revision and malignant tumor resection (15.57%-22.60%). Spinal decompressions, however, accounted for the largest volume of readmissions (33.13%). Many readmissions may be preventable and occur at predictable time intervals. The causes and timing of readmission vary significantly across neurosurgical subgroups. Future studies should focus on detecting specific complications in select cohorts at predefined time points, which may allow for interventions to lower costs and reduce patient morbidity. CSF, cerebrospinal fluidIQR, interquartile rangeSPARCS, Statewide Planning And Research Cooperative System.

  3. Robotic System for MRI-Guided Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Cole, Gregory A.; Shang, Weijian; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alex; Pilitsis, Julie G.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotaxy is a neurosurgical technique that can take several hours to reach a specific target, typically utilizing a mechanical frame and guided by preoperative imaging. An error in any one of the numerous steps or deviations of the target anatomy from the preoperative plan such as brain shift (up to 20 mm), may affect the targeting accuracy and thus the treatment effectiveness. Moreover, because the procedure is typically performed through a small burr hole opening in the skull that prevents tissue visualization, the intervention is basically “blind” for the operator with limited means of intraoperative confirmation that may result in reduced accuracy and safety. The presented system is intended to address the clinical needs for enhanced efficiency, accuracy, and safety of image-guided stereotactic neurosurgery for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) lead placement. The work describes a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided, robotically actuated stereotactic neural intervention system for deep brain stimulation procedure, which offers the potential of reducing procedure duration while improving targeting accuracy and enhancing safety. This is achieved through simultaneous robotic manipulation of the instrument and interactively updated in situ MRI guidance that enables visualization of the anatomy and interventional instrument. During simultaneous actuation and imaging, the system has demonstrated less than 15% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) variation and less than 0.20% geometric distortion artifact without affecting the imaging usability to visualize and guide the procedure. Optical tracking and MRI phantom experiments streamline the clinical workflow of the prototype system, corroborating targeting accuracy with 3-axis root mean square error 1.38 ± 0.45 mm in tip position and 2.03 ± 0.58° in insertion angle. PMID:25376035

  4. Nurse specialty subcultures and patient outcomes in acute care hospitals: A multiple-group structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallidou, Anastasia A; Cummings, Greta G; Estabrooks, Carole A; Giovannetti, Phyllis B

    2011-01-01

    Hospital organizational culture is widely held to matter to the delivery of services, their effectiveness, and system performance in general. However, little empirical evidence exists to support that culture affects provider and patient outcomes; even less evidence exists to support how this occurs. To explore causal relationships and mechanisms between nursing specialty subcultures and selected patient outcomes (i.e., quality of care, adverse patient events). Martin's differentiation perspective of culture (nested subcultures within organizations) was used as a theoretical framework to develop and test a model. Hospital nurse subcultures were identified as being reflected in formal practices (i.e., satisfactory salary, continuing education, quality assurance program, preceptorship), informal practices (i.e., autonomy, control over practice, nurse-physician relationships), and content themes (i.e., emotional exhaustion). A series of structural equation models were assessed using LISREL on a large nurse survey database representing four specialties (i.e., medical, surgical, intensive care, emergency) in acute care hospitals in Alberta, Canada. Nursing specialty subcultures differentially influenced patient outcomes. Specifically, quality of care (a) was affected by nurses' control over practice, (b) was better in intensive care than in medical specialty, and (c) was related to lower adverse patient events; nurses in intensive care and emergency specialties reported fewer adverse events than did their counterparts in medical specialties. Understanding the meaning of subcultures in clinical settings would influence nurses and administrators efforts to implement clinical change and affect outcomes. More research is needed on nested subcultures within healthcare organizations for better understanding differentiated subspecialty effects on complexity of care and outcomes in hospitals. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Open surgical simulation--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jennifer; Khatib, Manaf; Bello, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Surgical simulation has benefited from a surge in interest over the last decade as a result of the increasing need for a change in the traditional apprentice model of teaching surgery. However, despite the recent interest in surgical simulation as an adjunct to surgical training, most of the literature focuses on laparoscopic, endovascular, and endoscopic surgical simulation with very few studies scrutinizing open surgical simulation and its benefit to surgical trainees. The aim of this review is to summarize the current standard of available open surgical simulators and to review the literature on the benefits of open surgical simulation. Open surgical simulators currently used include live animals, cadavers, bench models, virtual reality, and software-based computer simulators. In the current literature, there are 18 different studies (including 6 randomized controlled trials and 12 cohort studies) investigating the efficacy of open surgical simulation using live animal, bench, and cadaveric models in many surgical specialties including general, cardiac, trauma, vascular, urologic, and gynecologic surgery. The current open surgical simulation studies show, in general, a significant benefit of open surgical simulation in developing the surgical skills of surgical trainees. However, these studies have their limitations including a low number of participants, variable assessment standards, and a focus on short-term results often with no follow-up assessment. The skills needed for open surgical procedures are the essential basis that a surgical trainee needs to grasp before attempting more technical procedures such as laparoscopic procedures. In this current climate of medical practice with reduced hours of surgical exposure for trainees and where the patient's safety and outcome is key, open surgical simulation is a promising adjunct to modern surgical training, filling the void between surgeons being trained in a technique and a surgeon achieving fluency in that

  6. Practical guidelines for setting up neurosurgery skills training cadaver laboratory in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Ashish; Roy, Tara Sankar; Lalwani, Sanjeev; Deo, Rama Chandra; Tripathi, Manjul; Dhingra, Renu; Bhardwaj, Daya Nand; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Though the necessity of cadaver dissection is felt by the medical fraternity, and described as early as 600 BC, in India, there are no practical guidelines available in the world literature for setting up a basic cadaver dissection laboratory for neurosurgery skills training. Hands-on dissection practice on microscopic and endoscopic procedures is essential in technologically demanding modern neurosurgery training where ethical issues, cost constraints, medico-legal pitfalls, and resident duty time restrictions have resulted in lesser opportunities to learn. Collaboration of anatomy, forensic medicine, and neurosurgery is essential for development of a workflow of cadaver procurement, preservation, storage, dissection, and disposal along with setting up the guidelines for ethical and legal concerns.

  7. Image-guidance for surgical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Terry M

    2006-01-01

    Contemporary imaging modalities can now provide the surgeon with high quality three- and four-dimensional images depicting not only normal anatomy and pathology, but also vascularity and function. A key component of image-guided surgery (IGS) is the ability to register multi-modal pre-operative images to each other and to the patient. The other important component of IGS is the ability to track instruments in real time during the procedure and to display them as part of a realistic model of the operative volume. Stereoscopic, virtual- and augmented-reality techniques have been implemented to enhance the visualization and guidance process. For the most part, IGS relies on the assumption that the pre-operatively acquired images used to guide the surgery accurately represent the morphology of the tissue during the procedure. This assumption may not necessarily be valid, and so intra-operative real-time imaging using interventional MRI, ultrasound, video and electrophysiological recordings are often employed to ameliorate this situation. Although IGS is now in extensive routine clinical use in neurosurgery and is gaining ground in other surgical disciplines, there remain many drawbacks that must be overcome before it can be employed in more general minimally-invasive procedures. This review overviews the roots of IGS in neurosurgery, provides examples of its use outside the brain, discusses the infrastructure required for successful implementation of IGS approaches and outlines the challenges that must be overcome for IGS to advance further. (topical review)

  8. Commercial production of specialty chemicals and pharmaceuticals from biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McChesney, J.D. [Univ. of Mississippi, University, MS (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The chemical substances utilized in consumer products, and for pharmaceutical and agricultural uses are generally referred to as specialty chemicals. These may be flavor or fragrance substances, intermediates for synthesis of drugs or agrochemicals or the drugs or agrochemicals themselves, insecticides or insect pheromones or antifeedants, plant growth regulators, etc. These are in contrast to chemicals which are utilized in large quantities for fuels or preparation of plastics, lubricants, etc., which are usually referred to as industrial chemicals. The specific utilization of specialty chemicals is associated with a specific important physiochemical or biological property. They may possess unique properties as lubricants or waxes or have a very desirable biological activity such as a drug, agrochemical or perfume ingredient. These unique properties convey significant economic value to the specific specialty chemical. The economic commercial production of specialty chemicals commonly requires the isolation of a precursor or the specialty chemical itself from a natural source. The discovery, development and commercialization of specialty chemicals is presented and reviewed. The economic and sustainable production of specialty chemicals is discussed.

  9. The Richard C. Schneider Lecture. New dimensions of neurosurgery in the realm of high technology: possibilities, practicalities, realities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apuzzo, M L

    1996-04-01

    Fueled by a buoyant economy, popular attitudes and demands, and parallel progress in transferable technical and biological areas, neurosurgery has enjoyed a remarkable quarter of a century of progress. Developmental trends in the discipline have included the following: 1) a refinement of preoperative definition of the structural substrate, 2) miniaturization of operative corridors, 3) reduction of operative trauma, 4) increased effectiveness at the target site, and 5) incorporation of improved technical adjuvants and physical operative tools into treatment protocols. In particular, the computer has become a formidable ally in diagnostic and surgical events. Trends in technical development indicate that we are entering an exciting era of advanced surgery of the human cerebrum, which is heralded by the following: 1) current developments in areas of imaging, sensors, and visualization; 2) new devices for localization and navigation; 3) new capabilities for action at the target point; and 4) innovative concepts related to advanced operative venues. Imaging has provided structurally based surgical maps, which now are being given the new dimension of function in complex and integrated formats for preoperative planning and intraoperative tactical direction. Cerebral localization and navigation based on these advances promise to provide further refinement to the field of stereotactic neurosurgery, as linked systems are superseded by more flexible nonlinked methodologies in functionally defined volume-oriented navigational databases. Target point action now includes not only ablative capabilities through micro-operative methods and the use of stereotactically directed high-energy forms but also the emergence of restorative capabilities through applications of principles of genetic engineering in the areas of molecular and cellular neurosurgery. Complex, dedicated, and self-contained operative venues will be required to optimize the emergence and development of these

  10. Surgical orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohl, Alexis M; Vitkus, Lauren

    2017-08-01

    The article reviews some commonly used orthodontic treatments as well as new strategies to assist in the correction of malocclusion. Many techniques are used in conjunction with surgical intervention and are a necessary compliment to orthognathic surgery. Basic knowledge of these practices will aid in the surgeon's ability to adequately treat the patient. Many orthodontists and surgeons are eliminating presurgical orthodontics to adopt a strategy of 'surgery first' orthodontics in orthognathic surgery. This has the benefit of immediate improvement in facial aesthetics and shorter treatment times. The advent of virtual surgical planning has helped facilitate the development of this new paradigm by making surgical planning faster and easier. Furthermore, using intraoperative surgical navigation is improving overall precision and outcomes. A variety of surgical and nonsurgical treatments may be employed in the treatment of malocclusion. It is important to be familiar with all options available and tailor the patient's treatment plan accordingly. Surgery-first orthodontics, intraoperative surgical navigation, virtual surgical planning, and 3D printing are evolving new techniques that are producing shorter treatment times and subsequently improving patient satisfaction without sacrificing long-term stability.

  11. Collaboration between paediatric surgery and other medical specialties in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philemon E Okoro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The quality of service and success of patient care and research in most fields of medicine depend on effective collaboration between different specialties. Paediatric surgery is a relatively young specialty in Nigeria and such collaborations are desirable. This survey assesses the nature and extent of collaboration between paediatric surgery and other specialties in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a questionnaire survey carried out in November 2008 among paediatric surgeons and their trainees practising in Nigeria. Questionnaires were distributed and retrieved either by hand or e-mailing. The responses were then collated and analysed using the SPSS 17.0. Results: Forty-seven respondents were included in the survey. Forty-five (95.7% respondents thought that there was inadequate collaboration and that there was a need for an increased collaboration between paediatric surgery and other specialties. Anaesthesia, paediatrics and radiology are among the specialties where collaborations were most required but not adequately received. Collaboration had been required from these specialties in areas of patient care, training and research. Reasons for inadequate collaboration included the paucity of avenues for inter-specialty communication and exchange of ideas 33 (70.3%, lack of awareness of the need for collaboration 32 (68.1%, tendency to apportion blames for bad outcome 13 (27.7%, and mutual suspicion 8 (17%. Conclusion: There is presently inadequate collaboration between paediatric surgery and other specialties in Nigeria. There is a need for more inter-specialty support, communication, and exchange of ideas in order to achieve desirable outcomes.

  12. Personality traits and career choices among physicians in Finland: employment sector, clinical patient contact, specialty and change of specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullola, Sari; Hakulinen, Christian; Presseau, Justin; Gimeno Ruiz de Porras, David; Jokela, Markus; Hintsa, Taina; Elovainio, Marko

    2018-03-27

    Personality influences an individual's adaptation to a specific job or organization. Little is known about personality trait differences between medical career and specialty choices after graduating from medical school when actually practicing different medical specialties. Moreover, whether personality traits contribute to important career choices such as choosing to work in the private or public sector or with clinical patient contact, as well as change of specialty, have remained largely unexplored. In a nationally representative sample of Finnish physicians (N = 2837) we examined how personality traits are associated with medical career choices after graduating from medical school, in terms of employment sector, patient contact, medical specialty and change of specialty. Personality was assessed using the shortened version of the Big Five Inventory (S-BFI). An analysis of covariance with posthoc tests for pairwise comparisons was conducted, adjusted for gender and age with confounders (employment sector, clinical patient contact and medical specialty). Higher openness was associated with working in the private sector, specializing in psychiatry, changing specialty and not practicing with patients. Lower openness was associated with a high amount of patient contact and specializing in general practice as well as ophthalmology and otorhinolaryngology. Higher conscientiousness was associated with a high amount of patient contact and specializing in surgery and other internal medicine specialties. Lower conscientiousness was associated with specializing in psychiatry and hospital service specialties. Higher agreeableness was associated with working in the private sector and specializing in general practice and occupational health. Lower agreeableness and neuroticism were associated with specializing in surgery. Higher extraversion was associated with specializing in pediatrics and change of specialty. Lower extraversion was associated with not practicing with

  13. 75 FR 39664 - Grant of Authority For Subzone Status Materials Science Technology, Inc. (Specialty Elastomers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ... Status Materials Science Technology, Inc. (Specialty Elastomers and Fire Retardant Chemicals) Conroe... specialty elastomer manufacturing and distribution facility of Materials Science Technology, Inc., located... and distribution of specialty elastomers and fire retardant chemicals at the facility of Materials...

  14. Association of medical student burnout with residency specialty choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoch, Lindsey; Chibnall, John T; Schindler, Debra L; Slavin, Stuart J

    2013-02-01

    Given the trend among medical students away from primary care medicine and toward specialties that allow for more controllable lifestyles, the identification of factors associated with specialty choice is important. Burnout is one such factor. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between burnout and residency specialty choice in terms of provision for a less versus more controllable lifestyle (e.g. internal medicine versus dermatology) and a lower versus higher income (e.g. paediatrics versus anaesthesiology). A survey was sent to 165 Year 4 medical students who had entered the residency matching system. Students answered questions about specialty choice, motivating factors (lifestyle, patient care and prestige) and perceptions of medicine as a profession. They completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services (MBI), which defines burnout in relation to emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalisation (DP) and personal accomplishment (PA). Burnout and other variables were tested for associations with specialty lifestyle controllability and income. A response rate of 88% (n = 145) was achieved. Experiences of MBI-EE, MBI-DP and MBI-PA burnout were reported by 42 (29%), 26 (18%) and 30 (21%) students, respectively. Specialties with less controllable lifestyles were chosen by 87 (60%) students and lower-income specialties by 81 (56%). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) indicated that the choice of a specialty with a more controllable lifestyle was associated with higher MBI-EE burnout (OR = 1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06-2.96), as well as stronger lifestyle- and prestige-related motivation, and weaker patient care-related motivation. The choice of a higher-income specialty was associated with lower MBI-PA burnout (OR = 0.56, 95% CI 0.32-0.98), weaker lifestyle- and patient care-related motivation, and stronger prestige-related motivation. Specialty choices regarding lifestyle controllability and income were associated with the amount and type of

  15. Two interesting cases highlighting an oblivious specialty of psychoneuroendocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari Kumar, K V S; Dhull, Pawan; Somasekharan, Manoj; Seshadri, K

    2012-01-01

    Psychoneuroendocrinology deals with the overlap disorders pertaining to three different specialties. Awareness about the somatic manifestations of psychiatric diseases and vice versa is a must for all the clinicians. The knowledge of this interlinked specialty is essential because of the obscure presentation of certain disorders. Our first case was treated as depressive disorder, whereas the diagnosis was hypogonadism with empty sella. Our second patient was managed as schizophrenia and the evaluation revealed bilateral basal ganglia calcification and a diagnosis of Fahr's disease. We report these cases for their unusual presentation and to highlight the importance of this emerging specialty.

  16. Constantin N. Arseni (1912-1994) centenary: the birth of modern neurosurgery in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Eduard B; Banu, Matei; Ciurea, Alexandru V

    2014-01-01

    Prof. Dr. Constantin N. Arseni and his mentor, Prof. Dr. D. Bagdasar, are revered by later generations of doctors as the forefathers of Romanian neurosurgery. In 2012, we have celebrated 100 years since Prof. Arseni's birth in a small village within a deprived area of the country. Through his talents and perseveration, he rose to be a neurosurgical school creator and one of the most prominent figures in 20th-century Eastern European neurosurgery. This historical vignette is a modest tribute to his legacy and tells the story of his titanic endeavor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Statement of Ethics in Neurosurgery of the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umansky, Felix; Black, Peter L; DiRocco, Concenzio; Ferrer, Enrique; Goel, Atul; Malik, Ghaus M; Mathiesen, Tiit; Mendez, Ivar; Palmer, James D; Juanotena, Jorge Rodriguez; Fraifeld, Shifra; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2011-01-01

    This Statement of Ethics in Neurosurgery was developed by the Committee for Ethics and Medico-Legal Affairs of the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies to help neurosurgeons resolve problems in the treatment of individual patients and meet obligations to the larger society. This document is intended as a framework rather than a set of rules. It cannot cover every situation and should be used with flexibility. However, it is our intent that the fundamental principles enunciated here should serve as a guide in the day-to-day practice of neurosurgery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Exploring challenges and solutions in the preparation of surgical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Münter, Kristine Husum; Østergaard, Doris

    2015-01-01

    management system tasks, 26% of anaesthesia record tasks, 24% of medication tasks, 14% of blood test tasks and 12% of patient record tasks. In two workshops held for each of four specialties, a total of 21 participants mapped the preoperative patient journey with related responsibilities, tasks and written......, workshops including table simulations involving the various professions and specialties were held. RESULTS: In total, 314 surgical procedures were performed of which 196 were eligible for analysis. Emergency procedures showed the poorest results with non-completed tasks comprising 58% of electronic patient...... documentation. Furthermore, challenges and suggestions for solutions were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Completion of mandatory tasks for surgical patient preparation was poor. Workshops with table simulations actively involved the stakeholders from various professions and specialties in describing the patient...

  19. Use of neurosurgical decision-making and damage-control neurosurgery courses in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts: a surgeon's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teff, Richard J

    2010-05-01

    A shortage of Coalition neurological surgeons in the Iraq conflict prompted a creative approach to standardized neurosurgical care in 2007. After formulation of theater-wide clinical pathway guidelines, a need for standardized triage and neurological resuscitation was identified. The object was to establish a simple, reproducible course for medics, forward surgical and emergency room personnel, and other critical care providers to quickly standardize the ability of all deployed health care personnel to provide state-of-the-art neurosurgical triage and damage-control interventions. The methods applied were Microsoft PowerPoint presentations and hands-on learning. The year-long project resulted in more than 100 individuals being trained in neurosurgical decision making and in more than 15 surgeons being trained in damage-control neurosurgery. At the year's conclusion, hundreds of individuals received exceptional neurosurgical care from nonneurosurgical providers and a legacy course was left for future deployed providers to receive ongoing education at their own pace.

  20. Surgical Oncology Nursing: Looking Back, Looking Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Patrick C; Selanders, Louise

    2017-02-01

    To provide a historical perspective in the development of oncology nursing and surgical oncology as critical components of today's health care system. Review of the literature and Web sites of key organizations. The evolution of surgical oncology nursing has traversed a historical journey from that of a niche subspecialty of nursing that had very little scientific underpinning, to a highly sophisticated discipline within a very short time. Nursing continues to contribute its expertise to the encyclopedic knowledge base of surgical oncology and cancer care, which have helped improve the lives of countless patients and families who have had to face the difficulties of this diagnosis. An understanding of the historical context for which a nursing specialty such as surgical oncology nursing evolves is critical to gaining an appreciation for the contributions of nursing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Gender and Specialty Influences on Personal and Professional Life Among Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Ailín C; Wren, Sherry M; McNamara, Deborah A

    2017-11-02

    This study aimed to determine the impact of surgical training on lifestyle and parenthood, and to assess for gender-based workplace issues. The effects of a surgical career on lifestyle are difficult to quantify and may vary between male and female doctors. A gender gap is present in the highest tiers of the profession, and reasons why women do not attain senior positions are complex but likely relate to factors beyond merit alone. An anonymous Web-based survey was distributed to Irish surgical and nonsurgical trainees. They were asked questions regarding family planning, pregnancy outcomes, parenthood, and gender issues in the workplace, with results analyzed by sex and specialty. Four hundred sixty trainees responded with a response rate of 53.0%; almost two thirds were female. Female trainee surgeons were less likely to have children than their male counterparts (22.5% vs 40.0%, P = 0.0215). Pregnant surgical trainees were more likely to have adverse pregnancy events than the partners of their male contemporaries (65.0% vs 11.5%, P = 0.0002), or than their female nonsurgical colleagues (P = 0.0329). Women were more likely to feel that they had missed out on a job opportunity (P gender (P genders.

  2. Future Choice of Specialty among Students in a Caribbean Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The medical specialities chosen by medical students for their careers play an important part in ... data, generic factors considered as important in their specialty choice as well as factors that influence the students\\' attractiveness to ...

  3. Awareness and perception of the specialty of family medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Family Medicine is the medical specialty that provides ... the World Health Organization (WHO) has acknowledged the critical importance and positive ... This study evaluated the awareness, knowledge and perception of Family ...

  4. 15 CFR 2011.204 - Entry of specialty sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE ALLOCATION OF TARIFF-RATE QUOTA ON IMPORTED SUGARS, SYRUPS AND... present a certificate to the appropriate customs official at the date of entry of specialty sugars. Entry...

  5. Fiber Fabrication Facility for Non-Oxide and Specialty Glasses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Unique facility for the research, development, and fabrication of non-oxide and specialty glasses and fibers in support of Navy/DoD programs.DESCRIPTION:...

  6. Comparison between skin-mounted fiducials and bone-implanted fiducials for image-guided neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Jennifer; Harris, Steven S.; Stefansic, James D.; Sillay, Karl; Galloway, Robert L., Jr.

    2004-05-01

    Point-based registration for image-guided neurosurgery has become the industry standard. While the use of intrinsic points is appealing because of its retrospective nature, affixing extrinsic objects to the head prior to scanning has been demonstrated to provide much more accurate registrations. Points of reference between image space and physical space are called fiducials. The extrinsic objects which generate those points are fiducial markers. The markers can be broken down into two classifications: skin-mounted and bone-implanted. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages. Skin-mounted fiducials require simply sticking them on the patient in locations suggested by the manufacturer, however, they can move with tractions placed on the skin, fall off and perhaps the most dangerous problem, they can be replaced by the patient. Bone implanted markers being rigidly affixed to the skull do not present such problems. However, a minor surgical intervention (analogous to dental work) must be performed to implant the markers prior to surgery. Therefore marker type and use has become a decision point for image-guided surgery. We have performed a series of experiments in an attempt to better quantify aspects of the two types of markers so that better informed decisions can be made. We have created a phantom composed of a full-size plastic skull [Wards Scientific Supply] with a 500 ml bag of saline placed in the brain cavity. The skull was then sealed. A skin mimicking material, DragonSkinTM [SmoothOn Company] was painted onto the surface and allowed to dry. Skin mounted fiducials [Medtronic-SNT] and bone-implanted markers [Z-Kat]were placed on the phantom. In addition, three additional bone-implanted markers were placed (two on the base of the skull and one in the eye socket for use as targets). The markers were imaged in CT and 4 MRI sequences (T1-weighted, T2 weighted, SPGR, and a functional series.) The markers were also located in physical space using an Optotrak

  7. Neurosurgery for mental disorders: a review | Heeramun-Aubeeluck ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neurosurgical interventions date back to ancient civilization, 5100 BC through a practice known as trephination. Due to past abuse and ethical considerations, neurosurgical interventions in psychiatry remain a controversial issue. This article aims to review the different surgical techniques and their current application in the ...

  8. Role of Endoscopy in Neurosurgery – A Historical Perspective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endoscopic third ventriculostomy and other neurendoscopic procedures are now commonly used to treat a wide array of neurosurgical disease conditions. This has reduced appreciably surgical time, morbidity, mortality, in-hospital stay and ultimately the cost when compared with that of open neurosurgical procedures.

  9. Factors affecting future specialty choice among medical students in Kuwait

    OpenAIRE

    Marwan, Yousef; Al-Fouzan, Rawan; Al-Ajlan, Sarah; Al-Saleh, Mervat

    2012-01-01

    Background: Choosing a medical specialty can be either a daunting and confusing experience for some medical students and junior doctors or a foregone conclusion to others. The aim of this study is to evaluate factors affecting future specialty choice among medical students in Kuwait University. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from medical students registered in Kuwait University during the academic year 2011/2012. Chi-square test and logistic regression wer...

  10. Opioid Prescriptions by Specialty in Ohio, 2010-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Scott G; Baker, Olesya; Rodgers, Ann F; Garner, Chad; Nelson, Lewis S; Kreiner, Peter W; Schuur, Jeremiah D

    2018-05-01

    The current US opioid epidemic is attributed to the large volume of prescribed opioids. This study analyzed the contribution of different medical specialties to overall opioids by evaluating the pill counts and morphine milligram equivalents (MMEs) of opioid prescriptions, stratified by provider specialty, and determined temporal trends. This was an analysis of the Ohio prescription drug monitoring program database, which captures scheduled medication prescriptions filled in the state as well as prescriber specialty. We extracted prescriptions for pill versions of opioids written in the calendar years 2010 to 2014. The main outcomes were the number of filled prescriptions, pill counts, MMEs, and extended-released opioids written by physicians in each specialty, and annual prescribing trends. There were 56,873,719 prescriptions for the studied opioids dispensed, for which 41,959,581 (73.8%) had prescriber specialty type available. Mean number of pills per prescription and MMEs were highest for physical medicine/rehabilitation (PM&R; 91.2 pills, 1,532 mg, N = 1,680,579), anesthesiology/pain (89.3 pills, 1,484 mg, N = 3,261,449), hematology/oncology (88.2 pills, 1,534 mg, N = 516,596), and neurology (84.4 pills, 1,230 mg, N = 573,389). Family medicine (21.8%) and internal medicine (17.6%) wrote the most opioid prescriptions overall. Time trends in the average number of pills and MMEs per prescription also varied depending on specialty. The numbers of pills and MMEs per opioid prescription vary markedly by prescriber specialty, as do trends in prescribing characteristics. Pill count and MME values define each specialty's contribution to overall opioid prescribing more accurately than the number of prescriptions alone.

  11. Review of influential articles in surgical education: 2002-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlauer, Max V; George, Brian; Lawrence, Peter F; Pugh, Carla M; Van Eaton, Erik G; Darosa, Debra

    2013-06-01

    Exploring the trends in surgical education research offers insight into concerns, developments, and questions researchers are exploring that are relevant to teaching and learning in surgical specialties. We conducted a review of the surgical education literature published between 2002 and 2012. The purpose was 2-fold: to provide an overview of the most frequently cited articles in the field of surgical education during the last decade and to describe the study designs and themes featured in these articles. Articles were identified through Web of Science by using "surgical education" and "English language" as search terms. Using a feature in Web of Science, we tracked the number of citations of any publication. Of the 800 articles produced by the initial search, we initially selected 23 articles with 45 or more citations, and ultimately chose the 20 articles that were most frequently cited for our analysis. Analysis of the most frequently cited articles published in US journals between the years 2002-2012 identified 7 research themes and presented them in order of frequency with which they appear: use of simulation, issues in student/resident assessment, specialty choice, patient safety, team training, clinical competence assessment, and teaching the clinical sciences, with surgical simulation being the central theme. Researchers primarily used descriptive methods. Popular themes in surgical education research illuminate the information needs of surgical educators as well as topics of high interest to the surgical community.

  12. The Spectrum of Altmetrics in Neurosurgery: The Top 100 "Trending" Articles in Neurosurgical Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Justin; Alotaibi, Naif M; Ibrahim, George M; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Lozano, Andres M

    2017-07-01

    Social media are increasingly used for the dissemination of scientific publications by most medical journals. The role of social media in increasing awareness of published works in neurosurgery has not been previously explored. Here, we present a qualitative analysis of the highest trending works in neurosurgery along with a correlation analysis with their social media metrics. We performed a comprehensive search for neurosurgical publications using the Altmetric database. The Altmetric database provides a weighted total score of all online mentions for an article received on Facebook, Twitter, blogs, and mainstream media sources. Our search was limited to articles published within the social media era (January 2010-January 2017). Descriptive and correlational statistics were performed for all articles. The top 100 articles in altmetrics were selected for qualitative analysis. A total of 5794 articles were included in this study. The average Altmetric score in neurosurgical articles was 4.7 (standard deviation ±22.4). Journals with a social media account had significantly higher Altmetric scores for their articles compared with those without an account (P articles in altmetrics belonged primarily to the Journal of Neurosurgery (33%) followed by Neurosurgery (29%). This is the first study that details the spectrum of Altmetric scores among neurosurgical journals. Social media presence for journals is important for greater outreach and engagement. Prediction of traditional citation using altmetrics data requires a future prospective study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Experiential Learning of Robotics Fundamentals Based on a Case Study of Robot-Assisted Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Carlos; Vale, Carolina; Machado, Toni; Erlhagen, Wolfram; Rito, Manuel; Monteiro, Sérgio; Bicho, Estela

    2016-01-01

    Robotics has been playing an important role in modern surgery, especially in procedures that require extreme precision, such as neurosurgery. This paper addresses the challenge of teaching robotics to undergraduate engineering students, through an experiential learning project of robotics fundamentals based on a case study of robot-assisted…

  14. Smartphone Usage Patterns by Canadian Neurosurgery Residents: A National Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda-Smith, Michelle Masayo; Iorio-Morin, Christian; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Ahmed, Uzair S; Bergeron, David; Bigder, Mark; Dakson, Ayoub; Elliott, Cameron A; Guha, Daipayan; Lavergne, Pascal; Makarenko, Serge; Taccone, Michael S; Tso, Michael; Wang, Bill; Fortin, David

    2018-03-01

    Smartphones and their apps are used ubiquitously in medical practice. However, in some cases their use can be at odds with current patient data safety regulations such as Canada's Personal Health Information Protection Act of 2004. To assess current practices and inform mobile application development, we sought to better understand mobile device usage patterns among Canadian neurosurgery residents. Through the Canadian Neurosurgery Research Collaborative, an online survey characterizing smartphone ownership and usage patterns was developed and sent to all Canadian neurosurgery resident in April of 2016. Questionnaires were collected and completed surveys analyzed. Of 146 eligible residents, 76 returned completed surveys (52% response rate). Of these 99% of respondents owned a smartphone, with 79% running on Apple's iOS. Four general mobile uses were identified: 1) communication between members of the medical team, 2) decision support, 3) medical reference, and 4) documentation through medical photography. Communication and photography were areas where the most obvious breaches in the Canadian Personal Health Information Protection Act were noted, with 89% of respondents taking pictures of patients' radiologic studies and 75% exchanging them with Short Message System. Hospital policies had no impact on user behaviors. Smartphones are used daily by most neurosurgery residents. Identified usage patterns are associated with perceived gains in efficacy and challenges in privacy and data reliability. We believe creating and improving workflows that address these usage patterns has a greater potential to improve privacy than changing policies and enforcing regulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Roots of neuroanatomy, neurology, and neurosurgery as found in the Bible and Talmud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Wellons, John C; Oakes, W Jerry

    2008-07-01

    Historical observations and interpretations regarding the treatment of components of the nervous system can be found in the writings of the Bible and Talmud. A review of topics germane to modern neuroanatomy, neurology, and neurosurgery from these early, rich writings is presented herein. These historic writings provide a glimpse into the early understanding, description, and treatment of pathologies of the nervous system.

  16. [Perceived quality in hospitals of the Andalusia Healthcare System. The case of neurosurgery departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero Tous, N; Horcajadas Almansa, Á; Bermúdez González, G J; Tous Zamora, D

    2014-01-01

    To analyse the characteristics of the perceived quality in hospitals of the Andalusia healthcare system and compare this with that in Andalusian Neurosurgery departments. Randomised surveys, adjusted for working age, were performed in Andalusia using a telephone questionnaire based on the SERVQUAL model with the appropriate modification, with the subsequent selection of a subgroup associated with neurosurgery. Perceived quality was classified as; technical, functional and infrastructure quality. The overall satisfaction was 76.3%. Frequency analysis found that variables related to the technical quality (good doctors, successful operations, trained staff, etc.) obtained more favourable outcomes. Those related to time (wait, consulting, organizing schedules) obtained worse outcomes. The care of families variables obtained poor results. There was no difference between the overall Andalusian healthcare system and neurosurgery departments. In the mean analysis, women and older people gave more favourable responses, especially for variables related to infrastructure quality. In the "cluster" analysis, there were more favourable responses by elderly people, with no differences in gender (P<.009). There is no difference in perceived quality between the Andalusian healthcare system overall and neurosurgery departments. The perceived quality of the Andalusian healthcare system is higher in the elderly people. The analysis of perceived quality is useful for promoting projects to improve clinical management. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Implementation of a "Flipped Classroom" for Neurosurgery Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, Fady; Miller, Jonathan P

    2018-01-01

    Engaging residents across a multiyear training spectrum is challenging given the heterogeneity of experience and limited time available for educational activities. A "flipped classroom" model, in which residents prepare ahead of time for mentored topic discussions, has potential advantages. We implemented a curriculum consisting of topics distributed across the specialty. Weekly, each resident was randomly assigned to research a specific aspect of an assigned topic appropriate to his or her level of experience: junior residents about what characterizes each clinical entity, midlevel residents about when to intervene, and chief residents about how to administer treatment. Residents completed an anonymous survey 6 months after implementation. Board examination performance was assessed before and after implementation. A total of 12 residents participated in the program. Weekly, 1.75±0.40 hours were spent in preparation, with senior residents reporting less time than junior residents. All residents indicated that the accumulation of experience across 7 years of residency was a major advantage of this program, and all preferred it to lectures. Performance on the board examination significantly increased after implementation (from 316±36 to 468±45, pflipped classroom is a viable approach to resident education and is associated with increased engagement and improved performance using validated knowledge-assessment tools.

  18. Surgical competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Nivritti G; Cheng, Stephen W K; Wong, John

    2003-08-01

    Recent high-profile cases have heightened the need for a formal structure to monitor achievement and maintenance of surgical competence. Logbooks, morbidity and mortality meetings, videos and direct observation of operations using a checklist, motion analysis devices, and virtual reality simulators are effective tools for teaching and evaluating surgical skills. As the operating theater is also a place for training, there must be protocols and guidelines, including mandatory standards for supervision, to ensure that patient care is not compromised. Patients appreciate frank communication and honesty from surgeons regarding their expertise and level of competence. To ensure that surgical competence is maintained and keeps pace with technologic advances, professional registration bodies have been promoting programs for recertification. They evaluate performance in practice, professional standing, and commitment to ongoing education.

  19. Robotically-adjustable microstereotactic frames for image-guided neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratchman, Louis B.; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael

    2013-03-01

    Stereotactic frames are a standard tool for neurosurgical targeting, but are uncomfortable for patients and obstruct the surgical field. Microstereotactic frames are more comfortable for patients, provide better access to the surgical site, and have grown in popularity as an alternative to traditional stereotactic devices. However, clinically available microstereotactic frames require either lengthy manufacturing delays or expensive image guidance systems. We introduce a robotically-adjusted, disposable microstereotactic frame for deep brain stimulation surgery that eliminates the drawbacks of existing microstereotactic frames. Our frame can be automatically adjusted in the operating room using a preoperative plan in less than five minutes. A validation study on phantoms shows that our approach provides a target positioning error of 0.14 mm, which exceeds the required accuracy for deep brain stimulation surgery.

  20. Orthopedic specialty hospitals: centers of excellence or greed machines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badlani, Neil; Boden, Scott; Phillips, Frank

    2012-03-07

    Orthopedic specialty hospitals have recently been the subject of debate. They are patient-centered, physician-friendly health care alternatives that take advantage of the economic efficiencies of specialization. Medically, they provide a higher quality of care and increase patient and physician satisfaction. Economically, they are more efficient and profitable than general hospitals. They also positively affect society through the taxes they pay and the beneficial aspects of the competition they provide to general hospitals. Their ability to provide a disruptive innovation to the existing hospital industry will lead to lower costs and greater access to health care. However, critics say that physician ownership presents potential conflicts of interest and leads to overuse of medical care. Some general hospitals are suffering as a result of unfair specialty hospital practices, and a few drastic medical complications have occurred at specialty hospitals. Specialty hospitals have been scrutinized for increasing the inequality of health care and continue to be a target of government regulations. In this article, the pros and cons are examined, and the Emory Orthopaedics and Spine Hospital is analyzed as an example. Orthopedic specialty hospitals provide excellent care and are great assets to society. Competition between specialty and general hospitals has provided added value to patients and taxpayers. However, physicians must take more responsibility in their appropriate and ethical leadership. It is critical to recognize financial conflicts of interest, disclose ownership, and act ethically. Patient care cannot be compromised. With thoughtful and efficient leadership, specialty hospitals can be an integral part of improving health care in the long term. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Surgical Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azarmehr, Iman; Stokbro, Kasper; Bell, R. Bryan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This systematic review investigates the most common indications, treatments, and outcomes of surgical navigation (SN) published from 2010 to 2015. The evolution of SN and its application in oral and maxillofacial surgery have rapidly developed over recent years, and therapeutic indicatio...

  2. Surgical Instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dankelman, J.; Horeman, T.

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a surgical instrument for minimall-invasive surgery, comprising a handle, a shaft and an actuating part, characterised by a gastight cover surrounding the shaft, wherein the cover is provided with a coupler that has a feed- through opening with a loskable seal,

  3. Why are junior doctors deterred from choosing a surgical career?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Mary E; Creed, Peter A; Searle, Judy

    2012-05-01

    To identify the reasons why interns would not choose a surgical career. This qualitative study used semi-structured telephone interviews to explore the future career choices of 41 junior doctors (14 men, 27 women). Doctors were asked to identify specialties they would not take up, and state why this was the case. Thirty (73.2%) of the 41 interns nominated surgery as a specialty they would not choose. Themes relating to reasons for not wanting to pursue a surgical career included the lifestyle associated with surgery (66.7%), the culture within the surgical work environment (53.3%), the lack of interest in performing surgical work (36.7%), and the training requirements associated with surgery (33.3%). Both sexes had similar reasons for not wanting to choose a surgical career; but additionally, women referred to the male domination of surgery, and the difficulty and inflexibility of the training program as deterrents. Efforts are needed to promote interest in surgery as a career especially for women, to improve the surgical work environment so that medical students and junior doctors have exposure to positive role models and surgical placements, and to provide a more flexible approach to surgical training.

  4. Seashell specialties and food handling in Slovene Istria restaurants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara POKLAR VATOVEC

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to evaluate the offer of seashell specialties in Slovene Istria restaurants, and to assess food safety knowledge (gained through formal and informal education as well as to assess the behaviour of food handlers in preparing shell dishes. A self-administered questionnaire was designed that included four sections: a demographic section, a general section, a restaurant menu offer, and a food safety section related to preparation of seashell specialties. Seashell specialties were offered in 41 restaurants, of which the employed food handlers 24 attended formal education and 17 informal education. Seashells specialties and seashell menus are commonly part of the culinary and gastronomic specialties along the Slovene coast, with the most frequently offered main dish being “Blue Mussels alla Busara”. Results the questionnaire indicated poor food safety knowledge and poor behaviour regardless of the (informal education of those who prepared the dishes. We propose that formal education for catering workers preparing shell dishes should be much more emphasized.

  5. [Assessment of surgical teleconsultations in a developing country: two years of experience in Djibouti].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, A; Menguy, P; Delmas, J M; Launay, F; Mathieu, L; Candoni, P; Dulou, R; Rongiéras, F

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to assess the influence of teleconsultations on patient management and clinical outcomes in a developing country. All the surgical teleconsultations by a single surgeon (orthopedist) between November 2009 and November 2011 were recorded. Neurosurgery and pediatric orthopedics were the two most important specialities most often concerned, accounting for 67% of the 157 teleconsultations for 138 patients. The teleconsultations resolved the diagnostic uncertainties in 29 of 37 cases (78%). Advice from the expert modified management in 69% cases. Clinical outcomes were good or very good in 86% of the treated patients. This study establishes the feasibility and usefulness of surgical teleconsultations in Djibouti.

  6. Don't all veins look alike? Comprehensively attending to diversity within the vascular surgical specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Ange-Marie; Hancock, Charles R

    2010-04-01

    Prior research has established diversity as a topic of empirical analysis in the vascular surgery literature. Building on the work of previously published articles on diversity in the Journal of Vascular Surgery and elsewhere, this article engages in a broad discussion of diversity in two interrelated arenas: educational/workplace diversity and culturally competent care. Interdisciplinary review of the literature indicates that diversity is often thought of as an end-state to be accomplished. A more fruitful way to encompass the changing aspects of diversity work is to think of diversity as a set of processes that can be adjusted based on a set of interrelated goals that matter differently to different groups. In considering diversity as a process, an approach to diversity emerges that considers both independent effects of gender and race/ethnicity as well as interactive effects between the two variables to address future trends in medical education. Such trends are diagnosed and multiple courses of intervention are offered as reasonable options for future efforts. A comprehensive definition of diversity will be established in order to encompass two different arenas in which diversity concerns arise: educational diversity and culturally competent patient care. Second, a discussion of the rationales for attention to diversity among vascular surgeons will provide different avenues into a conversation about diversity in the profession. In so doing, three successful efforts will be briefly discussed: the Ohio State University's MED-Path program, the Keck School of Medicine's chair-centered approach to diversity in residency training, and the American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons' (AAOS) approach to culturally competent care. Copyright 2010. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  7. Specialty pharmacy: an emerging area of interest for medical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoli; Fetterolf, Donald

    2005-04-01

    Specialty pharmaceuticals are expensive injectable and infusion therapies used to treat patients with chronic or life-threatening diseases. The high cost of these agents and their frequent usage in chronic diseases represent not only challenges, but also opportunities for medical management programs to improve the quality of care and moderate the rapid cost escalation seen in the industry. The number and variety of these agents have been increasing significantly, with hundreds of drug candidates in the development pipeline. The specialty pharmacy industry also is going through a consolidation stage, both horizontally and vertically. Industry approaches to medical management include the acquisition of specialty pharmacy companies, restrictive contracting to achieve concentrated buying power, and the development of utilization management strategies.

  8. Obesity in Neurosurgery: A Narrative Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle-Kirszbaum, Mendel D; Tee, Jin W; Chan, Patrick; Hunn, Martin K

    2017-10-01

    Obesity is an important consideration in neurosurgical practice. Of Australian adults, 28.3% are obese and it is estimated that more than two thirds of Australia's population will be overweight or obese by 2025. This review of the effects of obesity on neurosurgical procedures shows that, in patients undergoing spinal surgery, an increased body mass index is a significant risk factor for surgical site infection, venous thromboembolism, major medical complications, prolonged length of surgery, and increased financial cost. Although outcome scores and levels of patient satisfaction are generally lower after spinal surgery in obese patients, obesity is not a barrier to deriving benefit from surgery and, when the natural history of conservative management is taken into account, the long-term benefits of surgery may be equivalent or even greater in obese patients than in nonobese patients. In cranial surgery, the impact of obesity on outcome and complication rates is generally lower. Specific exceptions are higher rates of distal catheter migration after shunt surgery and cerebrospinal fluid leak after posterior fossa surgery. Minimally invasive approaches show promise in mitigating some of the adverse effects of obesity in patients undergoing spine surgery but further studies are needed to develop strategies to reduce obesity-related surgical complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Women otolaryngologist representation in specialty society membership and leadership positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sukgi S; Miller, Robert H

    2012-11-01

    To determine the proportion of female otolaryngologists in leadership positions relative to their number in the specialty, their membership in various otolaryngology organizations, and age. Cross-sectional analyses of otolaryngology organization membership with a subgroup analysis on female membership and leadership proportion comparing 5-year male/female cohort groups. Information on the number of members and leaders was obtained from various specialty societies by direct communication and from their Web sites between June and December 2010. The number of female and male otolaryngologists and their age distribution in 5-year age groups was obtained from the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS). Statistical analyses were used to determine whether women had proportional membership and leadership representation in various specialty societies. Additionally, female representation in other leadership roles was analyzed using the male/female ratio within the 5-year cohort groups. Female otolaryngologists were found to constitute approximately 11% of practicing otolaryngologists. The American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology had a higher proportion of female members (22%) compared to five other societies. When the gender composition within each organization was taken into account, female representation in specialty society leadership positions was proportionate to their membership across all societies. When gender and age were considered, women have achieved proportionate representation in each of the specialty societies' leadership positions. There was also proportionate representation of females as program directors, American Board of Otolaryngology directors, Residency Review Committee members, and journal editors/editorial board members. Finally, fewer female chairs or chiefs of departments/divisions were seen, but when age was taken into consideration, this difference was no longer significant. Women have achieved parity in

  10. Current management of surgical oncologic emergencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne R F Bosscher

    Full Text Available For some oncologic emergencies, surgical interventions are necessary for dissolution or temporary relieve. In the absence of guidelines, the most optimal method for decision making would be in a multidisciplinary cancer conference (MCC. In an acute setting, the opportunity for multidisciplinary discussion is often not available. In this study, the management and short term outcome of patients after surgical oncologic emergency consultation was analyzed.A prospective registration and follow up of adult patients with surgical oncologic emergencies between 01-11-2013 and 30-04-2014. The follow up period was 30 days.In total, 207 patients with surgical oncologic emergencies were included. Postoperative wound infections, malignant obstruction, and clinical deterioration due to progressive disease were the most frequent conditions for surgical oncologic emergency consultation. During the follow up period, 40% of patients underwent surgery. The median number of involved medical specialties was two. Only 30% of all patients were discussed in a MCC within 30 days after emergency consultation, and only 41% of the patients who underwent surgery were discussed in a MCC. For 79% of these patients, the surgical procedure was performed before the MCC. Mortality within 30 days was 13%.In most cases, surgery occurred without discussing the patient in a MCC, regardless of the fact that multiple medical specialties were involved in the treatment process. There is a need for prognostic aids and acute oncology pathways with structural multidisciplinary management. These will provide in faster institution of the most appropriate personalized cancer care, and prevent unnecessary investigations or invasive therapy.

  11. Development of neurosurgery in Germany: comparison of data collected by polls for 1997, 2003, and 2008 among providers of neurosurgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Hans J; Krämer, Michael; Reulen, Hans J

    2012-01-01

    To deduce structural trends in neurosurgery in Germany by comparison of data derived from polls conducted by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC) in 1997, 2003 and 2008. The questionnaires of the different polls probed a comparable set of issues. The data from the responding sample were extrapolated to the nationwide average or sum and compared between the different time periods. The number of identified neurosurgical departments increased from 146 to 201 during the years 1997-2008 largely as a result of the new foundation of numerous private groups. Nationwide total neurosurgical bed capacity and intensive care unit bed capacity increased modestly over the time period. The extrapolated total number of neurosurgical operations increased from 196,341 to 319,295. Although cranial and spinal neurosurgery remain the dominant subspecialties, the number of functional neurosurgical procedures and operations for pain increased more than proportionally. Outpatient procedures were established during the time period and corresponded in 2008 to a substantial proportion of the surgical volume. The total number of residents and board-certified neurosurgeons increased during the period 1997-2008 from 1513 to 1961. The proportion of residents decreased during 1997-2003 and then increased again. The number of neurosurgical operations increased in Germany proportionally to the economic growth of other service branches over the time period. Private organizations developed more than neurosurgical departments at university and other general hospitals. Work density measured as operations per physician increased during the period 1997-2008. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Graph theory analysis of complex brain networks: new concepts in brain mapping applied to neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael G; Ypma, Rolf J F; Romero-Garcia, Rafael; Price, Stephen J; Suckling, John

    2016-06-01

    Neuroanatomy has entered a new era, culminating in the search for the connectome, otherwise known as the brain's wiring diagram. While this approach has led to landmark discoveries in neuroscience, potential neurosurgical applications and collaborations have been lagging. In this article, the authors describe the ideas and concepts behind the connectome and its analysis with graph theory. Following this they then describe how to form a connectome using resting state functional MRI data as an example. Next they highlight selected insights into healthy brain function that have been derived from connectome analysis and illustrate how studies into normal development, cognitive function, and the effects of synthetic lesioning can be relevant to neurosurgery. Finally, they provide a précis of early applications of the connectome and related techniques to traumatic brain injury, functional neurosurgery, and neurooncology.

  13. Surgical bedside master console for neurosurgical robotic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Jumpei; Kenmotsu, Hajime; Takagi, Motoki; Hori, Tatsuya; Miyagi, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Hideo; Kajita, Yasukazu; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Chinzei, Kiyoyuki; Hashizume, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    We are currently developing a neurosurgical robotic system that facilitates access to residual tumors and improves brain tumor removal surgical outcomes. The system combines conventional and robotic surgery allowing for a quick conversion between the procedures. This concept requires a new master console that can be positioned at the surgical bedside and be sterilized. The master console was developed using new technologies, such as a parallel mechanism and pneumatic sensors. The parallel mechanism is a purely passive 5-DOF (degrees of freedom) joystick based on the author's haptic research. The parallel mechanism enables motion input of conventional brain tumor removal surgery with a compact, intuitive interface that can be used in a conventional surgical environment. In addition, the pneumatic sensors implemented on the mechanism provide an intuitive interface and electrically isolate the tool parts from the mechanism so they can be easily sterilized. The 5-DOF parallel mechanism is compact (17 cm width, 19cm depth, and 15cm height), provides a 505,050 mm and 90° workspace and is highly backdrivable (0.27N of resistance force representing the surgical motion). The evaluation tests revealed that the pneumatic sensors can properly measure the suction strength, grasping force, and hand contact. In addition, an installability test showed that the master console can be used in a conventional surgical environment. The proposed master console design was shown to be feasible for operative neurosurgery based on comprehensive testing. This master console is currently being tested for master-slave control with a surgical robotic system.

  14. Diabetes insipidus following neurosurgery at a university hospital in Western Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza A. Qari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To review the incidence, spectrum of clinical manifestation, course, risk factors, as well as treatment of diabetes insipidus (DI following neurosurgery of the pituitary gland. Methods: The files of 24 patients that underwent neurosurgery for sellar lesions, or tumor near the hypothalamus or pituitary gland at the Department of Neurosurgery, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia were retrospectively reviewed between January 2011 to December 2014. A total of 24 patients were studied, and were divided into 2 groups namely; DI and non-DI. Patient characteristics were studied using descriptive statistics. The differences in proportion between the 2 groups were found out using Z-test for proportion in 2 populations. The mean differences in the hormonal abnormalities for the 2 groups were assessed using independent t-test. All statistics are considered statistically significant when p less than 0.05. Results: During hospitalization, 13 (54.2% out of 24 patient that underwent neurosurgery had manifestations of DI, which was transient in 5 (38.8% and permanent in 8 (61.2%. The DI subgroup contained higher prevalence of prolactinoma, craniopharyngioma, pre-operative panhypopituitarism, and macroadenoma in MRI imaging and transphenoidal surgery. Furthermore, urine osmolality was significantly lower in the DI group post-operatively with a significant p=0.023. It was recognized that the permanent DI documented more significant numbers than other studies. Conclusion: In our study group, it was recognized that permanent DI meant that our patients needed desmopressin for more than 3 months, which documented a more significant number than other studies.

  15. Influence of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging used in neurosurgery on anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-wei GONG

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the influcences of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging(iMRI used in neurosurgery on anesthesia.Methods Sixty patients with glioma were randomly divided into two groups(30 each,the patients in iMRI group underwent craniotomy and glioma ablation under the guidance of iMRI and functional neuro-navigation,and in N group with the functional neuro-navigation only.The patients’ general status and concerning parameters were observed and recorded,including anesthesia duration,preparation time for surgery,duration of surgery,blood loss,volume of fluid administration,number of patients who needed blood transfusion,preoperative and postoperative hemoglobin,postoperative body temperature,dosage of muscle relaxant,and the unforeseen incidents related to iMRI and anesthesia.Results No significant differences existed between the two groups(P > 0.05 in patients’ general status,anesthesia duration,blood loss,volume of fluid administration,numbers of patients who needed blood transfusion,preoperative and postoperative hemoglobin,and body temperature.However,the preparation time for and duration of surgery were longer,the dosage of muscle relaxant was larger in iMRI group than in N group(P < 0.05.No inadvertent incident related to iMRI and anesthesia occurred in both groups.Conclusions The application of iMRI in neurosurgery may improve the accuracy in operative manipulation and make the tumor resection more thorough,but it may prolong duration of surgery.Other perimoperative care related to iMRI surgery is similar to that of traditional functional neuro-navigation surgery.Besides the basic rules of neurosurgery anesthetic management for neurosurgery,anesthetist should focus on anesthetic adjustment for a long operation.

  16. Diabetes insipidus following neurosurgery at a university hospital in Western Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qari, Faiza A; AbuDaood, Elaff A; Nasser, Tariq A

    2016-02-01

    To review the incidence, spectrum of clinical manifestation, course, risk factors, as well as treatment of diabetes insipidus (DI) following neurosurgery of the pituitary gland. The files of 24 patients that underwent neurosurgery for sellar lesions, or tumor near the hypothalamus or pituitary gland at the Department of Neurosurgery, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia were retrospectively reviewed between January 2011 to December 2014. A total of 24 patients were studied, and were divided into 2 groups namely; DI and non-DI. Patient characteristics were studied using descriptive statistics. The differences in proportion between the 2 groups were found out using Z-test for proportion in 2 populations. The mean differences in the hormonal abnormalities for the 2 groups were assessed using independent t-test. All statistics are considered statistically significant when p less than 0.05. During hospitalization, 13 (54.2%) out of 24 patient that underwent neurosurgery had manifestations of DI, which was transient in 5 (38.8%) and permanent in 8 (61.2%). The DI subgroup contained higher prevalence of prolactinoma, craniopharyngioma, pre-operative panhypopituitarism, and macroadenoma in MRI imaging and transphenoidal surgery. Furthermore, urine osmolality was significantly lower in the DI group post-operatively with a significant p=0.023. It was recognized that the permanent DI documented more significant numbers than other studies. In our study group, it was recognized that permanent DI meant that our patients needed desmopressin for more than 3 months, which documented a more significant number than other studies.

  17. Medical Department, United States Army. Surgery in World War 2. Neurosurgery. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1959-01-01

    extension, without respect for such anatonlic barriers as fascia , peri- osteuni, or the serosal mnenmbranes or the capsules of viscera. T[ie appearance...NEUROSURGERY a bilateral atypical plantar response was obtained in complete lesions, in the form of a delayed, weak, slow, vermicular type of plantar ...wound after closure of the dura, and closure was effected in layers. Because this was a re- opened wound, a slip drain was left beneath the fascia for

  18. Studying Behaviors Among Neurosurgery Residents Using Web 2.0 Analytic Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Benjamin; Alotaibi, Naif M; Guha, Daipayan; Amaral, Sandi; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Lozano, Andres M

    Web 2.0 technologies (e.g., blogs, social networks, and wikis) are increasingly being used by medical schools and postgraduate training programs as tools for information dissemination. These technologies offer the unique opportunity to track metrics of user engagement and interaction. Here, we employ Web 2.0 tools to assess academic behaviors among neurosurgery residents. We performed a retrospective review of all educational lectures, part of the core Neurosurgery Residency curriculum at the University of Toronto, posted on our teaching website (www.TheBrainSchool.net). Our website was developed using publicly available Web 2.0 platforms. Lecture usage was assessed by the number of clicks, and associations were explored with lecturer academic position, timing of examinations, and lecture/subspecialty topic. The overall number of clicks on 77 lectures was 1079. Most of these clicks were occurring during the in-training examination month (43%). Click numbers were significantly higher on lectures presented by faculty (mean = 18.6, standard deviation ± 4.1) compared to those delivered by residents (mean = 8.4, standard deviation ± 2.1) (p = 0.031). Lectures covering topics in functional neurosurgery received the most clicks (47%), followed by pediatric neurosurgery (22%). This study demonstrates the value of Web 2.0 analytic tools in examining resident study behavior. Residents tend to "cram" by downloading lectures in the same month of training examinations and display a preference for faculty-delivered lectures. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Postoperative Central Nervous System Infection After Neurosurgery in a Modernized, Resource-Limited Tertiary Neurosurgical Center in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram, Swathi; Nair, M Nathan; Krishnan, Shyam Sundar; Cai, Ling; Gu, Weiling; Vasudevan, Madabushi Chakravarthy

    2015-12-01

    Postoperative central nervous system infections (PCNSIs) are rare but serious complications after neurosurgery. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and causative pathogens of PCNSIs at a modernized, resource-limited neurosurgical center in South Asia. A retrospective analysis was conducted of the medical records of all 363 neurosurgical cases performed between June 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013, at a neurosurgical center in South Asia. Data from all operative neurosurgical cases during the 13-month period were included. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis indicated that 71 of the 363 surgical cases had low CSF glucose or CSF leukocytosis. These 71 cases were categorized as PCNSIs. The PCNSIs with positive CSF cultures (9.86%) all had gram-negative bacteria with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 5), Escherichia coli (n = 1), or Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 1). The data suggest a higher rate of death (P = 0.031), a higher rate of CSF leak (P < 0.001), and a higher rate of cranial procedures (P < 0.001) among the infected patients and a higher rate of CSF leak among the patients with culture-positive infections (P = 0.038). This study summarizes the prevalence, causative organism of PCNSI, and antibiotic usage for all of the neurosurgical cases over a 13-month period in a modernized yet resource-limited neurosurgical center located in South Asia. The results from this study highlight the PCNSI landscape in an area of the world that is often underreported in the neurosurgical literature because of the paucity of clinical neurosurgical research undertaken there. This study shows an increasing prevalence of gram-negative organisms in CSF cultures from PCNSIs, which supports a trend in the recent literature of increasing gram-negative bacillary meningitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Aura of technology and the cutting edge: a history of lasers in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Robert W; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2009-09-01

    In this historical review the authors examine the important developments that have led to the availability of laser energy to neurosurgeons as a unique and sometimes invaluable tool. They review the physical science behind the function of lasers, as well as how and when various lasers based on different lasing mediums were discovered. They also follow the close association between advances in laser technology and their application in biomedicine, from early laboratory experiments to the first clinical experiences. Because opinions on the appropriate role of lasers in neurosurgery vary widely, the historical basis for some of these views is explored. Initial enthusiasm for a technology that appears to have innate advantages for safe resections has often given way to the strict limitations and demands of the neurosurgical operating theater. However, numerous creative solutions to improve laser delivery, power, safety, and ergonomics demonstrate the important role that technological advances in related scientific fields continue to offer neurosurgery. Benefiting from the most recent developments in materials science, current CO(2) laser delivery systems provide a useful addition to the neurosurgical armamentarium when applied in the correct circumstances and reflect the important historical advances that come about from the interplay between neurosurgery and technology.

  1. A study on CT-guided stereotactic technique for functional neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uetsuhara, Koichi; Asakura, Tetsuhiko; Hirahara, Kazuho; Gondo, Masazumi; Oda, Hiroshige

    1987-01-01

    Recently, CT-guided stereotactic surgery has become of major interest, and some authors have discussed its potential in functional neurosurgery. The following is a comparative study of the CT-guided stereotactic technique and the conventional roentogenographic stereotactic technique. The Brown-Roberts-Wells apparatus was used for both types of procedures. 37 stereotactic procedures were performed on 35 patients under local anesthesia; 16 for stereotactic biopsy and 21 for stereotactic functional neurosurgery. Target points for stereotactic biopsy were determined by the CT-guided technique and target points for functional neurosurgery were determined by the conventional roentogenographic technique. The correlation with the position of target point determined by both techniques was investigated in the 21 functional neurosurgical procedures. On these occasions the authors used the reformatted horizontal and sagittal CT through the anterior and posterior commissure to determine the position of target point by the CT-guided technique. Results: It was found that the AC-PC line crossed with Reid's base line at angle of 11 ± 1 deg, and therefore it is important to obtain a CT images including AC-PC line at this angle. When applying the CT guided stereotactic procedure for functional surgery, it should be known that there could be a discrepancy within 2 mm from the conventional target determination. (author)

  2. Candida infection of the central nervous system following neurosurgery: a 12-year review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Deirdre

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Candida infection of the central nervous system (CNS) following neurosurgery is relatively unusual but is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present our experience with this infection in adults and discuss clinical characteristics, treatment options, and outcome. METHODS: All episodes of Candida isolated from the central nervous system were identified by searching our laboratory database. Review of the cases was performed by means of a retrospective chart review. RESULTS: Eleven episodes of Candida CSF infection following neurosurgery were identified over a 12-year period. Candida albicans was the predominant species isolated (n = 8, 73%). All infections were associated with foreign intracranial material, nine with external ventricular drains (82%), one with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt, one with a lumbar drain, and one with Gliadel wafers (1,3-bis [2-chloroethyl]-1-nitrosurea). Fluconazole or liposomal amphotericin B were the most common anti-fungal agents used. The mortality rate identified in our series was 27%. CONCLUSIONS: Candida infection following neurosurgery remains a relatively rare occurrence but one that causes significant mortality. These are complex infections, the management of which benefits from a close liaison between the clinical microbiologist and neurosurgeon. Prompt initiation of antifungal agents and removal of infected devices offers the best hope of a cure.

  3. Neurosurgery and brain shift: review of the state of the art and main contributions of robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Correa-Arana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review about neurosurgery, robotic assistants in this type of procedure, and the approach to the problem of brain tissue displacement, including techniques for obtaining medical images. It is especially focused on the phenomenon of brain displacement, commonly known as brain shift, which causes a loss of reference between the preoperative images and the volumes to be treated during image-guided surgery. Hypothetically, with brain shift prediction and correction for the neuronavigation system, minimal invasion trajectories could be planned and shortened. This would reduce damage to functional tissues and possibly lower the morbidity and mortality in delicate and demanding medical procedures such as the removal of a brain tumor. This paper also mentions other issues associated with neurosurgery and shows the way robotized systems have helped solve these problems. Finally, it highlights the future perspectives of neurosurgery, a branch of medicine that seeks to treat the ailments of the main organ of the human body from the perspective of many disciplines.

  4. Effectiveness of hospital-wide methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection control policies differs by ward specialty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemarie Sadsad

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a major cause of preventable nosocomial infections and is endemic in hospitals worldwide. The effectiveness of infection control policies varies significantly across hospital settings. The impact of the hospital context towards the rate of nosocomial MRSA infections and the success of infection control is understudied. We conducted a modelling study to evaluate several infection control policies in surgical, intensive care, and medical ward specialties, each with distinct ward conditions and policies, of a tertiary public hospital in Sydney, Australia. We reconfirm hand hygiene as the most successful policy and find it to be necessary for the success of other policies. Active screening for MRSA, patient isolation in single-bed rooms, and additional staffing were found to be less effective. Across these ward specialties, MRSA transmission risk varied by 13% and reductions in the prevalence and nosocomial incidence rate of MRSA due to infection control policies varied by up to 45%. Different levels of infection control were required to reduce and control nosocomial MRSA infections for each ward specialty. Infection control policies and policy targets should be specific for the ward and context of the hospital. The model we developed is generic and can be calibrated to represent different ward settings and pathogens transmitted between patients indirectly through health care workers. This can aid the timely and cost effective design of synergistic and context specific infection control policies.

  5. The recognition of radiation protection training as a professional specialty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touzet, R. E.

    2003-01-01

    After Chernobyl accident, the radiation protection training was recognized as a professional specialty. To improve this training we focussed the project in 3 points: - The recognition of radiation protective in the legislation. - Stablishment of minimum programs - Different categories: nuclear facilities, radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals

  6. IPM of specialty crops and community gardens in north Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insect pests post serious challenges to specialty crops (vegetables, fruits and nut crops) and community gardens in North Florida. The major vegetable pests include silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia argentifolii; the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae; southeastern green stinkbug, Nezara viridula; brown s...

  7. Assessing Student Interest and Familiarity with Professional Psychology Specialty Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark-Wroblewski, Kimberly; Wiggins, Tina L.; Ryan, Joseph J.

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined undergraduate psychology students' (N = 83) self-reported interest in and familiarity with five specialty areas in professional psychology: counseling psychology, clinical psychology, school psychology, forensic psychology, and criminal profiling. Results suggest that although students are quite interested in careers…

  8. The preference of radiology as a postgraduate medical specialty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Recruitment into medical specialties outside the core clinical departments remains a stumbling block to advancing medical practice in Nigeria. We set out to determine the factors influencing choice of diagnostic radiology as a field of specialization by the final year medical students in Usmanu Danfodiyo ...

  9. Personality and Values as Predictors of Medical Specialty Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Brian J.; Hartung, Paul J.; Borges, Nicole J.

    2011-01-01

    Research rarely considers the combined influence of personality traits and values in predicting behavioral outcomes. We aimed to advance a germinal line of inquiry that addresses this gap by separately and simultaneously examining personality traits and physician work values to predict medical specialty choice. First-year medical students (125…

  10. Knowledge of Medical House Officers about Dental Specialties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Some patients with oral diseases present initially to a general medical practitioner who is expected to refer the patients to the appropriate dental specialist for management. Thus they are expected to have a good knowledge of the different specialties in dentistry. This study was designed to determine the ...

  11. 76 FR 22733 - Cable Statutory License: Specialty Station List

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... Counsel, Copyright GC/I&R, P.O. Box 70400, Southwest Station, Washington, DC 20024. Telephone: (202) 707... foreign- language, religious, and/or automated programming in one-third of the hours of an average... programming comports with the 1981 FCC definition, and hence, qualifies it as a specialty station. 55 FR 40021...

  12. This Specialty Line of Clothing Really Is the "Bee's Knees"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jan Carter

    2009-01-01

    This article features "Bee's Knees," a specialty line of clothing. While not the typical product one would think of when considering mobility equipment, this line of clothing certainly does aid in helping those with disabilities access their world more safely and comfortably. "Bee's Knees" offers pint-sized pants made of kid-friendly, durable…

  13. Burnout Comparison among Residents in Different Medical Specialties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Shahm; Arfken, Cynthia L.; Churchill, Amy; Balon, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate resident burnout in relation to work and home-related factors. Method: Maslach Burnout Inventory was mailed to residents in eight different medical specialties, with a response rate of 35%. Results: Overall, 50% of residents met burnout criteria, ranging from 75% (obstetrics/gynecology) to 27% (family medicine). The first…

  14. 76 FR 42112 - Specialty Crop Committee Stakeholder Listening Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... Specialty Crop Committee Stakeholder Listening Sessions AGENCY: Research, Education, and Economics, USDA. ACTION: Notice of stakeholder listening sessions. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App 2, the United States Department of Agriculture announces two stakeholder...

  15. Cortical gluing and Ringer lactate solution inflation to avoid cortical mantle collapse and subdural fluid collections in pediatric neurosurgery: safety and feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirone, Giuseppe; Ruggiero, Claudio; Spennato, Pietro; Aliberti, Ferdinando; Trischitta, Vincenzo; Cinalli, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Subdural fluid collections following intraventricular and/or paraventricular procedures in pediatric neurosurgery are common and can be hard to treat. We describe our technique to close cortical defects by the aid of a fibrin adhesive and subsequent Ringer inflation with the aim to avoid cortical mantle collapse and to prevent the development of subdural fluid collections. We report the preliminary results of a prospective study on a consecutive series of 29 children who underwent 37 transcortical or transcallosal surgical procedures since 2008 in our department. In 17 procedures, we performed a transcortical approach on lesions, and in other 19 operations, we operated by a transcallosal. In 5/17 transcortical approaches (29%) and in 3/20 transcallosal approaches (15%), we observed a 5-mm-thick subdural fluid collection of the 5 patients with subdural fluid collections in the transcortical group, 3 patients (17%) underwent surgery for symptomatic or progressive subdural fluid collections. Of the 3 patients in the transcallosal group, a subduro-peritoneal shunt was necessary only for 1 patient (5%). At the very end of the treatment (including chemotherapy and radiotherapy), it was possible to remove the subduro-peritoneal shunt in all these patients because of disappearance of the subdural fluid collections. In pediatric patients after transcortical or transcallosal procedures, the use of a fibrin adhesive to seal surgical opening and subsequent inflation of the residual cavity with Ringer lactate solution to avoid cortical mantle collapse seems safe and appears to prevent the development of subdural fluid collections.

  16. Efficacy of neurosurgery resident education in the new millennium: the 2008 Council of State Neurosurgical Societies post-residency survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Catherine A; Lobel, Darlene A; Krishnamurthy, Satish; Bloomgarden, Gary M; Benzil, Deborah L

    2010-08-01

    Neurosurgical residency training paradigms have changed in response to Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education mandates and demands for quality patient care. Little has been done to assess resident education from the perspective of readiness to practice. To assess the efficacy of resident training in preparing young neurosurgeons for practice. In response to Resolution V-2007F of the Council of State Neurosurgical Societies, a survey was developed for neurosurgeons who applied for oral examination, Part II of the American Board of Neurological Surgery boards, in 2002 through 2007 (N = 800). The survey was constructed in "survey monkey" format and sent to 775 of 800 (97%) neurosurgeons for whom e-mail addresses were available. The response rate was 30% (233/775). Most neurosurgeons were board certified (n = 226, 97%). General neurosurgical training was judged as adequate by a large majority (n = 188, 80%). Sixty-percent chose to pursue at least 1 additional year of fellowship training (n = 138, 60%). Surgical skills training was acceptable, but 6 skill-technique areas were reported to be inadequate (endovascular techniques, neurosurgical treatment of pain, stereotactic radiosurgery, epilepsy surgery, cranial base surgery, and stereotactic neurosurgery). Respondents also noted inadequate education in contract negotiation, practice evaluation, and management. The study suggests that neurosurgeons believed that they were well trained in their surgical skills except for some areas of subspecialization. However, there is a significant need for improvement of resident training in the areas of socioeconomic and medicolegal education. Continued evaluation of the efficacy of neurosurgical education is important.

  17. Quantifying attention shifts in augmented reality image-guided neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Étienne; Drouin, Simon; Collins, D Louis; Popa, Tiberiu; Kersten-Oertel, Marta

    2017-10-01

    Image-guided surgery (IGS) has allowed for more minimally invasive procedures, leading to better patient outcomes, reduced risk of infection, less pain, shorter hospital stays and faster recoveries. One drawback that has emerged with IGS is that the surgeon must shift their attention from the patient to the monitor for guidance. Yet both cognitive and motor tasks are negatively affected with attention shifts. Augmented reality (AR), which merges the realworld surgical scene with preoperative virtual patient images and plans, has been proposed as a solution to this drawback. In this work, we studied the impact of two different types of AR IGS set-ups (mobile AR and desktop AR) and traditional navigation on attention shifts for the specific task of craniotomy planning. We found a significant difference in terms of the time taken to perform the task and attention shifts between traditional navigation, but no significant difference between the different AR set-ups. With mobile AR, however, users felt that the system was easier to use and that their performance was better. These results suggest that regardless of where the AR visualisation is shown to the surgeon, AR may reduce attention shifts, leading to more streamlined and focused procedures.

  18. Multimodal correlation and intraoperative matching of virtual models in neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceresole, Enrico; Dalsasso, Michele; Rossi, Aldo

    1994-01-01

    The multimodal correlation between different diagnostic exams, the intraoperative calibration of pointing tools and the correlation of the patient's virtual models with the patient himself, are some examples, taken from the biomedical field, of a unique problem: determine the relationship linking representation of the same object in different reference frames. Several methods have been developed in order to determine this relationship, among them, the surface matching method is one that gives the patient minimum discomfort and the errors occurring are compatible with the required precision. The surface matching method has been successfully applied to the multimodal correlation of diagnostic exams such as CT, MR, PET and SPECT. Algorithms for automatic segmentation of diagnostic images have been developed to extract the reference surfaces from the diagnostic exams, whereas the surface of the patient's skull has been monitored, in our approach, by means of a laser sensor mounted on the end effector of an industrial robot. An integrated system for virtual planning and real time execution of surgical procedures has been realized.

  19. Intraoperative complications in pediatric neurosurgery: review of 1807 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lindert, Erik J; Arts, Sebastian; Blok, Laura M; Hendriks, Mark P; Tielens, Luc; van Bilsen, Martine; Delye, Hans

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Minimal literature exists on the intraoperative complication rate of pediatric neurosurgical procedures with respect to both surgical and anesthesiological complications. The aim of this study, therefore, was to establish intraoperative complication rates to provide patients and parents with information on which to base their informed consent and to establish a baseline for further targeted improvement of pediatric neurosurgical care. METHODS A clinical complication registration database comprising a consecutive cohort of all pediatric neurosurgical procedures carried out in a general neurosurgical department from January 1, 2004, until July 1, 2012, was analyzed. During the study period, 1807 procedures were performed on patients below the age of 17 years. RESULTS Sixty-four intraoperative complications occurred in 62 patients (3.5% of procedures). Intraoperative mortality was 0.17% (n = 3). Seventy-eight percent of the complications (n = 50) were related to the neurosurgical procedures, whereas 22% (n = 14) were due to anesthesiology. The highest intraoperative complication rates were for cerebrovascular surgery (7.7%) and tumor surgery (7.4%). The most frequently occurring complications were cerebrovascular complications (33%). CONCLUSIONS Intraoperative complications are not exceptional during pediatric neurosurgical procedures. Awareness of these complications is the first step in preventing them.

  20. Ethical issues in instructions to authors of journals in oral-craniomaxillofacial/facial plastic surgery and related specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitak-Arnnop, Poramate; Bauer, Ute; Dhanuthai, Kittipong; Brückner, Martin; Herve, Christian; Meningaud, Jean-Paul; Hemprich, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    Ethical standards of biomedical publications are associated with editorial leadership, such as contents of instructions to authors and journal's mechanisms for research and publication ethics. To compare ethical issues in the guidelines for authors in oral-craniomaxillofacial/facial plastic surgery (OCM-FPS) journals with those in plastic surgery and otorhinolaryngology/head and neck surgery (ORL-HNS) journals, and to evaluate the relationship between journal's impact factor (IF) and ethical issues in the instructions to authors. This study used a cross-sectional study design. The predictor variables were journal's specialty and IF. The outcome variable was the presence of seven ethical issues in the online versions of journal's instructions to authors in October 2009. We included only journals with identifiable IF for 2008, published in English, French, German and Thai. Appropriate descriptive and univariate statistics were computed for all study variables. The level of statistical significance was set at Pjournals: seven OCM-FPS (14.6%), 14 plastic surgery (29.2%) and 27 ORL-HNS (56.2%) journals. Only four journals (8.3%) mentioned all ethical issues in their guidelines for authors. Neither journal's specialty nor IF was linked to completeness of the ethical requirements. The results of this study suggest that ethical issues in the instructions to authors of most IF-indexed journals in OCM-FPS, plastic surgery and ORL-HNS are incomplete, regardless of specialty and IF. There is room for substantial improvement to uphold scientific integrity of these surgical specialties. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Trigeminal neuralgia – a coherent cross-specialty management program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinskou, Tone; Maarbjerg, Stine; Rochat, Per Bjørnstad

    2015-01-01

    of TN. METHODS: Based on collaboration between neurologists, neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons a standardized program for TN was implemented in May 2012 at the Danish Headache Center (DHC). First out-patient visit and subsequent 3.0 Tesla MRI scan was booked in an accelerated manner. The MRI scan...... for neurosurgery was continuously evaluated. Scientific data was collected in a structured and prospective manner. RESULTS: From May 2012 to April 2014, 130 patients entered the accelerated program. Waiting time for the first out-patient visit was 42 days. Ninety-four percent of the patients had a MRI performed......: The described cross-speciality management program proved to be feasible and to have acceptable waiting times for referral and highly specialized work-up of TN patients in a public tertiary referral centre for headache and facial pain. Early high quality MRI ensured correct diagnosis and that the neurosurgeons...

  2. Admissions for isolated nonoperative mild head injuries: Sharing the burden among trauma surgery, neurosurgery, and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ting; Mejaddam, Ali Y; Chang, Yuchiao; DeMoya, Marc A; King, David R; Yeh, Daniel D; Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Alam, Hasan B; Velmahos, George C

    2016-10-01

    Isolated nonoperative mild head injuries (INOMHI) occur with increasing frequency in an aging population. These patients often have multiple social, discharge, and rehabilitation issues, which far exceed the acute component of their care. This study was aimed to compare the outcomes of patients with INOMHI admitted to three services: trauma surgery, neurosurgery, and neurology. Retrospective case series (January 1, 2009 to August 31, 2013) at an academic Level I trauma center. According to an institutional protocol, INOMHI patients with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of 13 to 15 were admitted on a weekly rotational basis to trauma surgery, neurosurgery, and neurology. The three populations were compared, and the primary outcomes were survival rate to discharge, neurological status at hospital discharge as measured by the Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS), and discharge disposition. Four hundred eighty-eight INOMHI patients were admitted (trauma surgery, 172; neurosurgery, 131; neurology, 185). The mean age of the study population was 65.3 years, and 58.8% of patients were male. Seventy-seven percent of patients has a GCS score of 15. Age, sex, mechanism of injury, Charlson Comorbidity Index, Injury Severity Score, Abbreviated Injury Scale in head and neck, and GCS were similar among the three groups. Patients who were admitted to trauma surgery, neurosurgery and neurology services had similar proportions of survivors (98.8% vs 95.7% vs 94.7%), and discharge disposition (home, 57.0% vs 61.6% vs 55.7%). The proportion of patients with GOS of 4 or 5 on discharge was slightly higher among patients admitted to trauma (97.7% vs 93.0% vs 92.4%). In a logistic regression model adjusting for Charlson Comorbidity Index CCI and Abbreviated Injury Scale head and neck scores, patients who were admitted to neurology or neurosurgery had significantly lower odds being discharged with GOS 4 or 5. While the trauma group had the lowest proportion of repeats of brain computed tomography (61

  3. Force feedback in a piezoelectric linear actuator for neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Danilo; De Momi, Elena; Dyagilev, Ilya; Manganelli, Rudy; Formaglio, Alessandro; Prattichizzo, Domenico; Shoham, Moshe; Ferrigno, Giancarlo

    2011-09-01

    Force feedback in robotic minimally invasive surgery allows the human operator to manipulate tissues as if his/her hands were in contact with the patient organs. A force sensor mounted on the probe raises problems with sterilization of the overall surgical tool. Also, the use of off-axis gauges introduces a moment that increases the friction force on the bearing, which can easily mask off the signal, given the small force to be measured. This work aims at designing and testing two methods for estimating the resistance to the advancement (force) experienced by a standard probe for brain biopsies within a brain-like material. The further goal is to provide a neurosurgeon using a master-slave tele-operated driver with direct feedback on the tissue mechanical characteristics. Two possible sensing methods, in-axis strain gauge force sensor and position-position error (control-based method), were implemented and tested, both aimed at device miniaturization. The analysis carried out was aimed at fulfilment of the psychophysics requirements for force detection and delay tolerance, also taking into account safety, which is directly related to the last two issues. Controller parameters definition is addressed and consideration is given to development of the device with integration of a haptic interface. Results show better performance of the control-based method (RMSE sensors. Force feedback in minimally invasive surgery allows the human operator to manipulate tissues as if his/her hands were in contact with the patient organs. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Connectome analysis for pre-operative brain mapping in neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael G.; Price, Stephen J.; Suckling, John

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Object: Brain mapping has entered a new era focusing on complex network connectivity. Central to this is the search for the connectome or the brains ‘wiring diagram’. Graph theory analysis of the connectome allows understanding of the importance of regions to network function, and the consequences of their impairment or excision. Our goal was to apply connectome analysis in patients with brain tumours to characterise overall network topology and individual patterns of connectivity alterations. Methods: Resting-state functional MRI data were acquired using multi-echo, echo planar imaging pre-operatively from five participants each with a right temporal–parietal–occipital glioblastoma. Complex networks analysis was initiated by parcellating the brain into anatomically regions amongst which connections were identified by retaining the most significant correlations between the respective wavelet decomposed time-series. Results: Key characteristics of complex networks described in healthy controls were preserved in these patients, including ubiquitous small world organization. An exponentially truncated power law fit to the degree distribution predicted findings of general network robustness to injury but with a core of hubs exhibiting disproportionate vulnerability. Tumours produced a consistent reduction in local and long-range connectivity with distinct patterns of connection loss depending on lesion location. Conclusions: Connectome analysis is a feasible and novel approach to brain mapping in individual patients with brain tumours. Applications to pre-surgical planning include identifying regions critical to network function that should be preserved and visualising connections at risk from tumour resection. In the future one could use such data to model functional plasticity and recovery of cognitive deficits. PMID:27447756

  5. Connectome analysis for pre-operative brain mapping in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael G; Price, Stephen J; Suckling, John

    2016-10-01

    Brain mapping has entered a new era focusing on complex network connectivity. Central to this is the search for the connectome or the brains 'wiring diagram'. Graph theory analysis of the connectome allows understanding of the importance of regions to network function, and the consequences of their impairment or excision. Our goal was to apply connectome analysis in patients with brain tumours to characterise overall network topology and individual patterns of connectivity alterations. Resting-state functional MRI data were acquired using multi-echo, echo planar imaging pre-operatively from five participants each with a right temporal-parietal-occipital glioblastoma. Complex networks analysis was initiated by parcellating the brain into anatomically regions amongst which connections were identified by retaining the most significant correlations between the respective wavelet decomposed time-series. Key characteristics of complex networks described in healthy controls were preserved in these patients, including ubiquitous small world organization. An exponentially truncated power law fit to the degree distribution predicted findings of general network robustness to injury but with a core of hubs exhibiting disproportionate vulnerability. Tumours produced a consistent reduction in local and long-range connectivity with distinct patterns of connection loss depending on lesion location. Connectome analysis is a feasible and novel approach to brain mapping in individual patients with brain tumours. Applications to pre-surgical planning include identifying regions critical to network function that should be preserved and visualising connections at risk from tumour resection. In the future one could use such data to model functional plasticity and recovery of cognitive deficits.

  6. [Supply and demand of medical specialists in the health facilities of the Ministry of Health: national, regional and by type of specialty gaps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevallos, Leslie; Pastor, Reyna; Moscoso, Betsy

    2011-06-01

    To characterize the supply, demand and the gap of medical specialists in facilities of the Ministry of Health of Peru (MINSA) at the national, regional and specialty type levels. Observational, descriptive study through which we calculated the supply of medical specialists using secondary sources of MINSA. The analysis of the demand for medical specialists was based on two methodologies: the need for specialists according to the guidelines of classification of the health facilities and according to the epidemiological and demographic profile. The arithmetic difference between the estimated demand and the supply was the procedure used to calculate the gap of medical specialists. The Ministry of Health has a total supply at the national level of 6,074 medical specialists of which 61.5% belong to the clinical specialties, 33.2% to the surgical specialties, 4.9% specialities related to aid to diagnosis and treatment and 0.4% to public health specialties. According to the categorization guideline there is a total demand of 11,176 medical specialists and according to the epidemiological and demographic profile of 11,738. The national estimated gaps found are similar in both methods, although they differ widely across regions and by type of specialty. At the regional level, the gaps are greater in Loreto, Piura, Puno and Madre de Dios when estimating the defficit in relation to the supply. Regarding the speciality, the gap is greater in the four basic specialties: gynecology and obstetrics, pediatrics, internal medicine and general surgery. There is a waid gap between supply and demand of medical specialists at the national and regional levels, as a whole representing approximately 45% of the current offer, regardless of the estimation method.

  7. 75 FR 34418 - Notice of the Specialty Crop Committee's Stakeholder Listening Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Notice of the Specialty Crop Committee's Stakeholder Listening Session AGENCY: Research, Education, and Economics, USDA. ACTION: Notice of stakeholder listening session. SUMMARY: The notice announces the Specialty Crop Committee's Stakeholder Listening Session. The document contained the wrong date for the...

  8. Specialty Drug Spending Trends Among Medicare And Medicare Advantage Enrollees, 2007–11

    OpenAIRE

    Trish, Erin; Joyce, Geoffrey; Goldman, Dana P.

    2014-01-01

    Specialty pharmaceuticals include most injectable and biologic agents used to treat complex conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and cancer. We analyzed trends in specialty drug spending among Medicare beneficiaries ages sixty-five and older using 2007–11 pharmacy claims data from a 20 percent sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Annual specialty drug spending per beneficiary who used specialty drugs increased considerably during the study period, from $2,641 to $8,976. H...

  9. The application of quality control circle in neurosurgery ICU nurses in raising compliance of the head of a bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na LI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the application of quality control circle in raising compliance of the head of a bed in neurosurgery ICU nurses. Methods: The quality control circle was made up of 4 ICU nurses, determine the subject in order to improve the neurosurgery ICU nurses in raising compliance of the head of a bed, according to the QCC activity steps to formulate plans, including grasp the current situation, goal setting, through analysis, circle members develop strategy and plan implementation and review, finally compared the situation before and after neurosurgery ICU nurses raised bed activities compliance. Results: After implementation of QCC, neurosurgery ICU nurses raised bed to 30 ~ 45 degrees. After activities, circle members in the team cooperation ability, cohesion, to accept new things ability, and innovative thinking ability and to raise the understanding of the relevant knowledge of the head of a bed has improved significantly. Conclusion: The application of quality management circle activity improves the neurosurgery ICU nurses effectively raise the compliance of the head of a bed, improve the comprehensive quality of the clinical nurses.

  10. The value of independent specialty designation for interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, James C; Powell, Wayne A; Gray, Dawn R; Duffy, Peter L

    2017-01-01

    Interventional cardiology has finally completed, after 26 years of advocacy, a professional hat trick: independent board certification, membership as a unique specialty in the American Medical Association House of Delegates (AMA HOD), and recognition by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) as a separate medical specialty. This article points out how these distinctions for interventional cardiology and its professional society, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), have led to clear and definite benefits for interventional cardiologists and their patients. We focus on the least understood of these three-recognition by CMS and its implications for reimbursement and quality assessment for interventional cardiologists. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. An analysis of the medical specialty training system in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, José-Manuel; Infante, Alberto; de Aguiar, Adriana Cavalcanti; Carbajo, Pilar

    2015-06-02

    In this paper, we analyse the medical specialty training system in Spain (the so-called "residency system"). In order to do so, we a) summarize its historical evolution; b) describe the five major architectural pillars on which the system is currently based; c) analyse the special contract of the specialist-in-training; d) discuss the three major challenges for the medical specialist training future: the evolution and expansion of the residency system to other health professions, the issue of grouping specialties with a common core trunk and the continuity of the learning process; and e) draw four conclusions that may be relevant for those who are in the process of developing or revising their own medical specialization systems.

  12. [A historical view of the specialty of clinical microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Evelio Perea; Álvarez, Rogelio Martín

    2010-10-01

    Clinical microbiology today is a well established specialty in Spain whose development has necessarily been linked to improvements in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of infectious diseases. Over time, clinical, teaching, and research structures have been organized around these diseases. In addition, a scientific society for specialists in infectious diseases (Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica) has been set up, which in turn, publishes the journal ENFERMEDADES INFECCIOSAS Y MICROBIOLOGÍA CLÍNICA, and organizes congresses, meetings, working groups and a quality control program, etc. Clinical microbiologists will continue to be needed to meet future challenges (identification of new pathogenic microorganisms, methodological changes, diagnostic quality and speed, nosocomial infections, the development of antimicrobial resistance, etc.), which constitute a well-defined area of knowledge specific to our specialty. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Gender inflexion in the construction of a new medical specialty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Aisengart Menezes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the constitution of a new medical specialty, Palliative Care, directed to patients "out of therapeutic possibilities". The concept emerged around 1960 in England and was implemented in Brazil a couple of years before 1990. It is characterized by an active attendance of the dying process. It postulates a "spiritual assistance" to the patient and his/her family members, including the emotional universe. Ethnographical observation and interviews with Brazilian professionals showed a majority of women among the health teams involved in this proposal. This article discusses and analyses the connection between the construction of the specialty and gender representation among these professionals that reflects popular social images about death, beliefs, emotions and the roles played by women and men in these subjects.

  14. Gender Inflexion in the Construction of a New Medical Specialty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Aisengart Menezes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the constitution of a new medical specialty, Palliative Care, directed to patients “out of therapeutic possibilities”. The concept emerged around 1960 in England and was implemented in Brazil a couple of years before 1990. It is characterized by an active attendance of the dying process. It postulates a “spiritual assistance” to the patient and his/her family members, including the emotional universe. Ethnographical observation and interviews with Brazilian professionals showed a majority of women among the health teams involved in this proposal. This article discusses and analyses the connection between the construction of the specialty and gender representation among these professionals that reflects popular social images about death, beliefs, emotions and the roles played by women and men in these subjects.

  15. Initial experience with a robotically operated video optical telescopic-microscope in cranial neurosurgery: feasibility, safety, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Lior; Chakravarthi, Srikant S; Monroy-Sosa, Alejandro; Celix, Juanita M; Kojis, Nathaniel; Singh, Maharaj; Jennings, Jonathan; Fukui, Melanie B; Rovin, Richard A; Kassam, Amin B

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The move toward better, more effective optical visualization in the field of neurosurgery has been a focus of technological innovation. In this study, the authors' objectives are to describe the feasibility and safety of a new robotic optical platform, namely, the robotically operated video optical telescopic-microscope (ROVOT-m), in cranial microsurgical applications. METHODS A prospective database comprising patients who underwent a cranial procedure between April 2015 and September 2016 was queried, and the first 200 patients who met the inclusion criteria were selected as the cohort for a retrospective chart review. Only adults who underwent microsurgical procedures in which the ROVOT-m was used were considered for the study. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data were retrieved from electronic medical records. The authors address the feasibility and safety of the ROVOT-m by studying various intraoperative variables and by reporting perioperative morbidity and mortality, respectively. To assess the learning curve, cranial procedures were categorized into 6 progressively increasing complexity groups. The main categories of pathology were I) intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs); II) intraaxial tumors involving noneloquent regions or noncomplex extraaxial tumors; III) intraaxial tumors involving eloquent regions; IV) skull base pathologies; V) intraventricular lesions; and VI) cerebrovascular lesions. In addition, the entire cohort was evenly divided into early and late cohorts. RESULTS The patient cohort comprised 104 female (52%) and 96 male (48%) patients with a mean age of 56.7 years. The most common pathological entities encountered were neoplastic lesions (153, 76.5%), followed by ICH (20, 10%). The distribution of cases by complexity categories was 11.5%, 36.5%, 22%, 20%, 3.5%, and 6.5% for Categories I, II, II, IV, V, and VI, respectively. In all 200 cases, the surgical goal was achieved without the need for intraoperative conversion

  16. 77 FR 40644 - Specialty Bar Products Company; A Subsidiary of Doncasters, Inc., Blairsville, PA; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-80,511] Specialty Bar Products... Application for Reconsideration for the workers and former workers of Specialty Bar Products Company, a... resulted in reduction of work force within Specialty Bar Products.'' Information obtained during the...

  17. 76 FR 2148 - Specialty Minerals, Inc., Franklin, VA; Notice of Revised Determination on Reconsideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,057] Specialty Minerals, Inc...) applicable to workers of Specialty Minerals, Inc., Franklin, Virginia (the subject firm). The Notice was... workers of Specialty Minerals, Inc., Franklin, Virginia, who are engaged in employment related to the...

  18. Factors considered by undergraduate medical students when selecting specialty of their future careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawad, Awad Ali Mohamed Ahmed; Khan, Waleed Shabeer; Abdelrazig, Yousif Mohammed; Elzain, Yamin Ibrahim; Khalil, Hassan Osman; Ahmed, Omer Bakri Elsayed; Adam, Omeralfaroug Ahmed Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Medical students are the source of a country's physicians. Determining how medical students select their areas of specialization is the key to achieve a balanced distribution of doctors among all specialties. The objective is to identify the number of medical students who have decided their postgraduate specialty career, their career specialties preference, and factors that may influence their decision to select a particular specialty. A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted in September 2013 at Faculty of Medicine, University of Medical Sciences and Technology, Khartoum, Sudan. A self-administered semi-structured questionnaire comprising demographic data and questions about future specialties preferences and factors influencing those preferences was distributed to 887 male and female students, (from first to fifth academic years) recruited in the study. Response rate was 73% with 647 questionnaires collected, out of 887 eligible medical students. Of the returned questionnaires, 604 were valid. The majority of students (541, 89.6%) have chosen a specialty. Surgery, medicine, paediatrics and obstetrics and gynecology were the most selected specialties. The least selected specialty was anaesthesiology. A significant association was found between gender and specialty choice using Chi-square test (p = 0.00). There was no association between undergraduate level and specialty choice (p = 0.633). The most common reason for choosing a specific specialty was "Personal Interest" (215, 39.7%) followed by being "Helpful to the community" (144, 26.6%). Surgery, medicine, paediatrics and obstetrics and gynecology were the most selected specialties.

  19. 76 FR 45397 - Export Inspection and Weighing Waiver for High Quality Specialty Grain Transported in Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ...-AB18 Export Inspection and Weighing Waiver for High Quality Specialty Grain Transported in Containers... permanent a waiver due to expire on July 31, 2012, for high quality specialty grain exported in containers... of high quality specialty grain exported in containers are small entities that up until recently...

  20. The impact of clerkships on students' specialty preferences: what do undergraduates learn for their profession?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maiorova, T.; Stevens, F.; Scherpbier, A.; Zee, J. van der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Clinical experiences and gender have been shown to influence medical students' specialty choices. It remains unclear, however, which aspects of experiences make students favour some specialties and reject others. This study aimed to clarify the effects of clerkships on specialty choice

  1. The Price Elasticity of Specialty Drug Use: Evidence from Cancer Patients in Medicare Part D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jeah Kyoungrae; Feldman, Roger; McBean, A Marshall

    2017-12-01

    Specialty drugs can bring substantial benefits to patients with debilitating conditions, such as cancer, but their costs are very high. Insurers/payers have increased patient cost-sharing for specialty drugs to manage specialty drug spending. We utilized Medicare Part D plan formulary data to create the initial price (cost-sharing in the initial coverage phase in Part D), and estimated the total demand (both on- and off-label uses) for specialty cancer drugs among elderly Medicare Part D enrollees with no low-income subsidies (non-LIS) as a function of the initial price. We corrected for potential endogeneity associated with plan choice by instrumenting the initial price of specialty cancer drugs with the initial prices of specialty drugs in unrelated classes. We report three findings. First, we found that elderly non-LIS beneficiaries with cancer were less likely to use a Part D specialty cancer drug when the initial price was high: the overall price elasticity of specialty cancer drug spending ranged between -0.72 and -0.75. Second, the price effect in Part D specialty cancer drug use was not significant among newly diagnosed patients. Finally, we found that use of Part B-covered cancer drugs was not responsive to the Part D specialty cancer drug price. As the demand for costly specialty drugs grows, it will be important to identify clinical circumstances where specialty drugs can be valuable and ensure access to high-value treatments.

  2. Information Security: A Scientometric Study of the Profile, Structure, and Dynamics of an Emerging Scholarly Specialty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olijnyk, Nicholas Victor

    2014-01-01

    The central aim of the current research is to explore and describe the profile, dynamics, and structure of the information security specialty. This study's objectives are guided by four research questions: 1. What are the salient features of information security as a specialty? 2. How has the information security specialty emerged and evolved from…

  3. 78 FR 60766 - Clarification on Fireworks Policy Regarding Approvals or Certifications for Specialty Fireworks...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... 173 [Docket No. PHMSA-2013-0206; Notice No. 13-15] Clarification on Fireworks Policy Regarding Approvals or Certifications for Specialty Fireworks Devices AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... applications for specialty fireworks devices. Specialty fireworks devices are fireworks devices in various...

  4. Lipid components and oxidative status of selected specialty oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madawala, S. R. P.; Kochhar, S. P.; Dutta, P. C.

    2012-11-01

    Many vegetable oils are marketed as specialty oils because of their retained flavors, tastes and distinct characteristics. Specialty oil samples which were commercially produced and retailed were purchased from local superstores in Reading, UK, and Uppsala, Sweden and profiled for detailed lipid composition and oxidative status. These oil samples include: almond, hazelnut, walnut, macadamia nut, argan, avocado, grape seed, roasted sesame, rice bran, cold pressed, organic and cold pressed, warm pressed and refined rapeseed oils. The levels of PV were quite low (0.5-1.3mEq O{sub 2}/kg) but AV and Rancimat values at 100 degree centigrade (except for rapeseed oils) varied considerably at (0.5-15.5) and (4.2-37.0 h) respectively. Macadamia nut oil was found to be the most stable oil followed by argan oil, while walnut oil was the least stable. Among the specialty oils, macadamia nut oil had the lowest (4%) and walnut oil had the highest (71%) level of total PUFA. The organic cold pressed rapeseed oil had considerably lower PUFA (27%) compared with other rapeseed oils (28- 35%). In all the samples, {alpha}- and {gamma}- tocopherols were the major tocopherols; nut oils had generally lower levels. Total sterols ranged from 889 to 15,106 {mu}g/g oil. The major sterols were {beta}-sitosterol (61-85%) and campesterol (6-20%). Argan oil contained schottenol (35%) and spinasterol (32%). Compared with literature values, no marked differences were observed among the differently processed, organically grown or cold pressed rapeseed oils and other specialty oils in this study. (Author) 33 refs.

  5. Benchmarking specialty hospitals, a scoping review on theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, A; van Harten, W H

    2017-04-04

    Although benchmarking may improve hospital processes, research on this subject is limited. The aim of this study was to provide an overview of publications on benchmarking in specialty hospitals and a description of study characteristics. We searched PubMed and EMBASE for articles published in English in the last 10 years. Eligible articles described a project stating benchmarking as its objective and involving a specialty hospital or specific patient category; or those dealing with the methodology or evaluation of benchmarking. Of 1,817 articles identified in total, 24 were included in the study. Articles were categorized into: pathway benchmarking, institutional benchmarking, articles on benchmark methodology or -evaluation and benchmarking using a patient registry. There was a large degree of variability:(1) study designs were mostly descriptive and retrospective; (2) not all studies generated and showed data in sufficient detail; and (3) there was variety in whether a benchmarking model was just described or if quality improvement as a consequence of the benchmark was reported upon. Most of the studies that described a benchmark model described the use of benchmarking partners from the same industry category, sometimes from all over the world. Benchmarking seems to be more developed in eye hospitals, emergency departments and oncology specialty hospitals. Some studies showed promising improvement effects. However, the majority of the articles lacked a structured design, and did not report on benchmark outcomes. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of benchmarking to improve quality in specialty hospitals, robust and structured designs are needed including a follow up to check whether the benchmark study has led to improvements.

  6. Supply versus demand: a review of application trends to Canadian surgical training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ryan E; Wanzel, Kyle R

    2015-04-01

    Despite increases in medical school enrolment, applications to surgical residency programs in Canada have been in decline over the past decade, with an increasing number of unmatched surgical residency positions. We examined the current status of surgical residency in Canada and analyzed application trends (2002–2013) for surgical training programs across Canada. Our findings suggest that most undergraduate medical schools across Canada are having difficulty fostering interest in surgical careers. We propose that a lack of adequate early exposure to the surgical specialties during undergraduate training is a critical factor. Moving forward, we must examine how the best-performing institutions and surgical programs have maintained interest in pursuing surgical careers and adapt our recruitment methods to both maintain and grow future interest. As Mary Engelbreit said, "If you don't like something, change it; if you can't change it, change the way you think about it."

  7. Topical anaesthesia in children: reducing the need for specialty referral.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Gabrielle

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVE: The management of wounds in children is stressful, not only for the child, but also for parents and staff. In our Emergency Department (ED), we currently do not have a paediatric sedation policy, and thus children requiring suturing, not amenable to distraction and infiltrative anaesthesia, are referred to specialty teams for general anaesthesia. We proposed that the introduction of a topical anaesthetic gel (lidocaine, adrenaline, tetracaine - LAT) might help to reduce the number of referrals, by allowing the ED staff to perform the procedures, in combination with nonpharmacological approaches. METHODS: We carried out a retrospective review of ED records of all children aged 14 years or less attending with wounds, over an 8-month period, from 01 May 2007 to 31 January 2008. RESULTS: Two hundred and one (50.6%) patients presented before the introduction of LAT gel, whereas 196 (49.3%) patients presented afterwards. A total of 39 (19.4%) patients were referred for specialty review pre-LAT, whereas only 19 (9.7%) patients were referred in the LAT group. Of these, 31 (15.4%) pre-LAT and 15 (7.7%) LAT group required general anaesthesia. There is a significant difference between these two groups, using Fischer\\'s exact test, P=0.018. CONCLUSION: We have found that the introduction of topical anaesthetic gel in ED has significantly reduced the number of children with wounds referred to specialty teams for general anaesthesia. This has important implications for patient safety and hospital resources.

  8. Evaluation of feedback given to trainees in medical specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Tony Ck; Burr, Bill; Boohan, Mairead

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of feedback provided to specialty trainees (ST3 or higher) in medical specialties during their workplace-based assessments (WBAs). The feedback given in WBAs was examined in detail in a group of 50 ST3 or higher trainees randomly selected from those taking part in a pilot study of changes to the WBA system conducted by the Joint Royal Colleges of Physicians Training Board. They were based in Health Education Northeast (Northern Deanery) and Health Education East of England (Eastern Deanery). Thematic analysis was used to identify commonly occurring themes. Feedback was mainly positive but there were differences in quality between specialties. Problems with feedback included insufficient detail, such that it was not possible to map the progression of the trainee, insufficient action plans made and the timing of feedback not being contemporaneous (feedback not being given at the time of assessment). Recommendations included feedback should be more specific; there need to be more options in the feedback forms for the supervisor to compare the trainee's performance to what is expected and action plans need to be made. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  9. Shale oil specialty markets: Screening survey for United States applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-01

    EG and G requested J. E. Sinor Consultants Inc. to carry out an initial screening study on the possibilities for producing specialty chemicals from oil shale. Raw shale oil is not an acceptable feedstock to refineries and there are not enough user of heavy fuel oil in the western oil shale region to provide a dependable market. The only alternatives are to hydrotreat the oil, or else ship it long distances to a larger market area. Either of these alternatives results in a cost penalty of several dollars per barrel. Instead of attempting to enter the large-volume petroleum products market, it was hypothesized that a small shale oil facility might be able to produce specialty chemicals with a high enough average value to absorb the high costs of shipping small quantities to distant markets and still provide a higher netback to the plant site than sales to the conventional petroleum products market. This approach, rather than attempting to refine shale oil or to modify its characteristics to satisfy the specifications for petroleum feedstocks or products, focuses instead on those particular characteristics which distinguish shale oil from petroleum, and attempts to identify applications which would justify a premium value for those distinctive characteristics. Because byproducts or specialty chemicals production has been a prominent feature of oil shale industries which have flourished for periods of time in various countries, a brief review of those industries provides a starting point for this study. 9 figs., 32 tabs.

  10. Utilization of Total Joint Arthroplasty in Physician-Owned Specialty Hospitals vs Acute Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Antonia F; Pflug, Emily; O'Brien, Daniel; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Parvizi, Javad

    2017-07-01

    The recent emergence of physician-owned specialty hospitals has sparked controversy about overutilization. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare utilization patterns of total joint arthroplasty (TJA) between physician-specialty hospitals (PSHs) and acute care hospitals (ACHs). A retrospective study was conducted from January 2010 to August 2014 comparing primary TJA patients between a PSH and an ACH; 103 PSH patients were matched to 103 ACH patients by age, gender, BMI, and ASA classification with similar case distribution between facilities. All surgeons in the study operated at both hospitals and were shareholders of the PSH. Information on nonoperative treatments, and timing to the initial appointment, consent, and surgery were analyzed using univariate analysis. Nonoperative treatments before surgery were similar between hospitals (P = 1.00). The time from the initial appointment to consent was longer for PSH (P = .0001). However, the time from consent to the date of surgery (P = .04) and the timing from symptoms to initial appointment (P = .006) was shorter for PSH. The time from initial appointment to the day of surgery was similar between groups (P = .20). Patients were more likely to be consented for surgery on their first clinic visit when undergoing surgery at ACH (87 of 103, 84.4%) compared to PSH (61 of 103; 59.2%; P total knee arthroplasty (P = .001) and total hip arthroplasty patients (P = .001) at PSH. Facility ownership in PSH resulted in similar conservative treatment before TJA. The time to surgical consent after the initial appointment was longer PSH, whereas the time from consent to the date of surgery was shorter at the PSH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Practice of Cranial Neurosurgery and the Malpractice Liability Environment in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kendrew; MacKenzie, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Object The potential imbalance between malpractice liability cost and quality of care has been an issue of debate. We investigated the association of malpractice liability with unfavorable outcomes and increased hospitalization charges in cranial neurosurgery. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study involving patients who underwent cranial neurosurgical procedures from 2005-2010, and were registered in the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. We used data from the National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB) from 2005 to 2010 to create measures of volume and size of malpractice claim payments. The association of the latter with the state-level mortality, length of stay (LOS), unfavorable discharge, and hospitalization charges for cranial neurosurgery was investigated. Results During the study period, there were 189,103 patients (mean age 46.4 years, with 48.3% females) who underwent cranial neurosurgical procedures, and were registered in NIS. In a multivariable regression, higher number of claims per physician in a state was associated with increased ln-transformed hospitalization charges (beta 0.18; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.19). On the contrary, there was no association with mortality (OR 1.00; 95% CI, 0.94 to 1.06). We observed a small association with unfavorable discharge (OR 1.09; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.13), and LOS (beta 0.01; 95% CI, 0.002 to 0.03). The size of the awarded claims demonstrated similar relationships. The average claims payment size (ln-transformed) (Pearson’s rho=0.435, P=0.01) demonstrated a positive correlation with the risk-adjusted hospitalization charges but did not demonstrate a correlation with mortality, unfavorable discharge, or LOS. Conclusions In the present national study, aggressive malpractice environment was not correlated with mortality but was associated with higher hospitalization charges after cranial neurosurgery. In view of the association of malpractice with the economics of healthcare, further research on its impact is

  12. Big Data Research in Neurosurgery: A Critical Look at this Popular New Study Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravec, Chesney S; Motiwala, Mustafa; Reed, Kevin; Kondziolka, Douglas; Barker, Fred G; Michael, L Madison; Klimo, Paul

    2018-05-01

    The use of "big data" in neurosurgical research has become increasingly popular. However, using this type of data comes with limitations. This study aimed to shed light on this new approach to clinical research. We compiled a list of commonly used databases that were not specifically created to study neurosurgical procedures, conditions, or diseases. Three North American journals were manually searched for articles published since 2000 utilizing these and other non-neurosurgery-specific databases. A number of data points per article were collected, tallied, and analyzed.A total of 324 articles were identified since 2000 with an exponential increase since 2011 (257/324, 79%). The Journal of Neurosurgery Publishing Group published the greatest total number (n = 200). The National Inpatient Sample was the most commonly used database (n = 136). The average study size was 114 841 subjects (range, 30-4 146 777). The most prevalent topics were vascular (n = 77) and neuro-oncology (n = 66). When categorizing study objective (recognizing that many papers reported more than 1 type of study objective), "Outcomes" was the most common (n = 154). The top 10 institutions by primary or senior author accounted for 45%-50% of all publications. Harvard Medical School was the top institution, using this research technique with 59 representations (31 by primary author and 28 by senior).The increasing use of data from non-neurosurgery-specific databases presents a unique challenge to the interpretation and application of the study conclusions. The limitations of these studies must be more strongly considered in designing and interpreting these studies.

  13. Medical student debt and major life choices other than specialty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Rohlfing

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Median indebtedness at graduation is now more than $170,000 for graduates of US Medical Schools. Debate still exists as to whether higher debt levels influence students to choose high paying non-primary care specialties. Notably, no previous research on the topic has taken into account cost of attendance when constructing a debt model, nor has any research examined the non-career major life decisions that medical students face. Methods: Medical students were surveyed using an anonymous electronic instrument developed for this study. The survey was delivered through a link included in a study email and students were recruited from school wide listservs and through snowball sampling (students were encouraged to share a link to the survey with other medical students. No incentives were offered for survey completion. Results: Responses were recorded from 102 US Allopathic medical schools (n=3,032, with 22 institutions (11 public, 11 private meeting inclusion criteria of 10% student body response proportion (n=1,846. Students with higher debt relative to their peers at their home institution reported higher frequencies of feeling callous towards others, were more likely to choose a specialty with a higher average annual income, were less likely to plan to practice in underserved locations, and were less likely to choose primary care specialties. Students with higher aggregate amounts of medical student loan debt were more likely to report high levels of stress from their educational debt, to delay getting married and to report disagreement that they would choose to become a physician again, if given the opportunity to revisit that choice. Increases in both aggregate and relative debt were associated with delaying having children, delaying buying a house, concerns about managing and paying back educational debt, and worrying that educational debt will influence one's specialty choice. Conclusions: Medical student debt and particularly debt

  14. Medical student debt and major life choices other than specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfing, James; Navarro, Ryan; Maniya, Omar Z; Hughes, Byron D; Rogalsky, Derek K

    2014-01-01

    Median indebtedness at graduation is now more than $170,000 for graduates of US Medical Schools. Debate still exists as to whether higher debt levels influence students to choose high paying non-primary care specialties. Notably, no previous research on the topic has taken into account cost of attendance when constructing a debt model, nor has any research examined the non-career major life decisions that medical students face. Medical students were surveyed using an anonymous electronic instrument developed for this study. The survey was delivered through a link included in a study email and students were recruited from school wide listservs and through snowball sampling (students were encouraged to share a link to the survey with other medical students). No incentives were offered for survey completion. Responses were recorded from 102 US Allopathic medical schools (n=3,032), with 22 institutions (11 public, 11 private) meeting inclusion criteria of 10% student body response proportion (n=1,846). Students with higher debt relative to their peers at their home institution reported higher frequencies of feeling callous towards others, were more likely to choose a specialty with a higher average annual income, were less likely to plan to practice in underserved locations, and were less likely to choose primary care specialties. Students with higher aggregate amounts of medical student loan debt were more likely to report high levels of stress from their educational debt, to delay getting married and to report disagreement that they would choose to become a physician again, if given the opportunity to revisit that choice. Increases in both aggregate and relative debt were associated with delaying having children, delaying buying a house, concerns about managing and paying back educational debt, and worrying that educational debt will influence one's specialty choice. Medical student debt and particularly debt relative to peers at the same institution appears to

  15. Anaesthesia and analgesia in Göttingen minipigs - examples of protocols used for neurosurgery and scanning procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen

    Neurosurgery in Göttingen minipigs is often a welfare challenge, and therefore, the main goal of my talk will be to discuss how to improve animal welfare during brain surgery and the days following surgery. A combination of inhalation/infusion anaesthesia with opioids such as injections with bupr......Neurosurgery in Göttingen minipigs is often a welfare challenge, and therefore, the main goal of my talk will be to discuss how to improve animal welfare during brain surgery and the days following surgery. A combination of inhalation/infusion anaesthesia with opioids such as injections......, especially ensuring sufficient analgesia and water/food intake during the first hours and days. Compared to neurosurgery, scanning procedures are normally unproblematic from a welfare point of view. However, anaesthesia may influence the results of brain scans, particularly functional scans, such as positron...

  16. Does peroperative external pneumatic leg muscle compression prevent post-operative venous thrombosis in neurosurgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynke, O; Hillman, J; Lassvik, C

    1987-01-01

    Post-operative deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a frequent and potentially life-threatening complication in neurosurgery. In this field of surgery, with its special demands for exact haemostasis, prophylaxis against deep venous thrombosis with anticoagulant drugs has been utilized only reluctantly. Postoperative pneumatic muscle compression (EPC) has been shown to be effective, although there are several practical considerations involved with this method which limit its clinical applicability. In the present study per-operative EPC was evaluated and was found to provide good protection against DVT in patients with increased risk from this complication. This method has the advantage of being effective, safe, inexpensive and readily practicable.

  17. Innovation in Neurosurgery: Intellectual Property Strategy and Academia/Industrial Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Yuichi

    2016-09-15

    Neurosurgery has tremendous possibilities for development of innovative medical devices. However, most of the neurosurgical devices used in Japan are imported products. Promotion and development of domestic medical devices is highly encouraged and it is one of the pillars of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's growth strategy of Japanese economy. Innovative "Made in Japan" medical devices can be developed by interdisciplinary collaboration between industries and academic institutions. Proper orientation of medical and engineering education, social and administrative awareness of the need of facilitating the medical devices creative process with corresponding regulatory changes, and appropriate medical and technological infrastructure establishment are needed for stimulating medical device innovation.

  18. Sir Charles Bell (1774-1842) and his contributions to early neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Riech, Sheryl; Verma, Ketan; Mortazavi, Martin M; Loukas, Marios; Benninger, Brion; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2012-03-01

    The renowned surgeon, neuroanatomist, and artist Sir Charles Bell not only impacted the lives of his peers through his creative endeavors and passion for art, but also sparked noteworthy breakthroughs in the field of neuroscience. His empathetic nature and zest for life enabled him to develop an early proclivity for patient care. As a result of his innovative findings regarding sensory and motor nerves and the anatomical makeup of the brain, he accepted some of the most prestigious awards and received an honorable reputation in society. Bell is recognized for his diligence, perseverance, and his remarkable contributions to surgery. The present review will explore his contributions to the discipline now known as neurosurgery.

  19. Automated location detection of injection site for preclinical stereotactic neurosurgery procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Wu, Hemmings C. H.

    2017-03-01

    Currently, during stereotactic neurosurgery procedures, the manual task of locating the proper area for needle insertion or implantation of electrode/cannula/optic fiber can be time consuming. The requirement of the task is to quickly and accurately find the location for insertion. In this study we investigate an automated method to locate the entry point of region of interest. This method leverages a digital image capture system, pattern recognition, and motorized stages. Template matching of known anatomical identifiable regions is used to find regions of interest (e.g. Bregma) in rodents. For our initial study, we tackle the problem of automatically detecting the entry point.

  20. Computational Modeling for Enhancing Soft Tissue Image Guided Surgery: An Application in Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miga, Michael I

    2016-01-01

    With the recent advances in computing, the opportunities to translate computational models to more integrated roles in patient treatment are expanding at an exciting rate. One area of considerable development has been directed towards correcting soft tissue deformation within image guided neurosurgery applications. This review captures the efforts that have been undertaken towards enhancing neuronavigation by the integration of soft tissue biomechanical models, imaging and sensing technologies, and algorithmic developments. In addition, the review speaks to the evolving role of modeling frameworks within surgery and concludes with some future directions beyond neurosurgical applications.

  1. Specialty-service lines: salvos in the new medical arms race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenson, Robert A; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Pham, Hoangmai H

    2006-01-01

    Hospitals and physicians are developing and marketing discrete and profitable specialty-service lines. Although closely affiliated specialist physicians are central to hospitals' service-line products, other physicians compete directly with hospitals via physician-owned specialty facilities. Specialty-service lines may be provided in a variety of settings, both inside and outside traditional hospital walls. Thus far, the escalating battle between hospitals and physicians for control over specialty services has not affected hospital profitability. However, as the scope of care that can be safely performed in the outpatient arena expands, physician competition for control over specialty services may threaten hospitals' financial health.

  2. Current Limitations of Surgical Robotics in Reconstructive Plastic Microsurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youri P. A. Tan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Surgical robots have the potential to provide surgeons with increased capabilities, such as removing physiologic tremor, scaling motion and increasing manual dexterity. Several surgical specialties have subsequently integrated robotic surgery into common clinical practice. Plastic and reconstructive microsurgical procedures have not yet  benefitted significantly from technical developments observed over the last two decades. Several studies have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of utilising surgical robots in plastic surgery procedures, yet limited work has been done to identify and analyse current barriers that have prevented wide-scale adaptation of surgical robots for microsurgery. Therefore, a systematic review using PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase and Web of Science databases was performed, in order to evaluate current state of surgical robotics within the field of reconstructive microsurgery and their limitations. Despite the theoretical potential of surgical robots, current commercially available robotic systems are suboptimal for plastic or reconstructive microsurgery. Absence of bespoke microsurgical instruments, increases in operating time, and high costs associated with robotic-assisted provide a barrier to using such systems effectively for reconstructive microsurgery. Consequently, surgical robots provide currently little overall advantage over conventional microsurgery. Nevertheless, if current barriers can be addressed and systems are specifically designed for microsurgery, surgical robots may have the potential of meaningful impact on clinical outcomes within  this surgical subspeciality.

  3. Current Limitations of Surgical Robotics in Reconstructive Plastic Microsurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Youri P. A.; Liverneaux, Philippe; Wong, Jason K. F.

    2018-01-01

    Surgical robots have the potential to provide surgeons with increased capabilities, such as removing physiologic tremor, scaling motion and increasing manual dexterity. Several surgical specialties have subsequently integrated robotic surgery into common clinical practice. Plastic and reconstructive microsurgical procedures have not yet  benefitted significantly from technical developments observed over the last two decades. Several studies have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of utilising surgical robots in plastic surgery procedures, yet limited work has been done to identify and analyse current barriers that have prevented wide-scale adaptation of surgical robots for microsurgery. Therefore, a systematic review using PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase and Web of Science databases was performed, in order to evaluate current state of surgical robotics within the field of reconstructive microsurgery and their limitations. Despite the theoretical potential of surgical robots, current commercially available robotic systems are suboptimal for plastic or reconstructive microsurgery. Absence of bespoke microsurgical instruments, increases in operating time, and high costs associated with robotic-assisted provide a barrier to using such systems effectively for reconstructive microsurgery. Consequently, surgical robots provide currently little overall advantage over conventional microsurgery. Nevertheless, if current barriers can be addressed and systems are specifically designed for microsurgery, surgical robots may have the potential of meaningful impact on clinical outcomes within  this surgical subspeciality. PMID:29740585

  4. Surgical treatment of 137 cases with chronic subdural hematoma at the university clinical center of Kosovo during the period 2008?2012

    OpenAIRE

    Mekaj, Agon Y.; Morina, Arsim A.; Mekaj, Ymer H.; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana; Miftari, Ermira I.; Duci, Shkelzen B.; Hamza, Astrit R.; Gashi, Musli M.; Xhelaj, Mentor R.; Kelmendi, Fatos M.; Morina, Qamile Sh.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is frequent pathology in neurosurgical practice. The aim of this study is to present the first series of patients with CSDH, who got surgically treated in Clinic of Neurosurgery, University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study that included 137 patients with CSDH who had been treated during the period 2008-2012. The data were collected and analyzed from the archives and protocols of the University Clinical...

  5. Surgical Outreach for Children by International Humanitarian Organizations: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kynes, J Matthew; Zeigler, Laura; McQueen, Kelly

    2017-06-28

    Low- and middle-income countries carry a disproportionate share of the global burden of pediatric surgical disease and have limited local healthcare infrastructure and human resources to address this burden. Humanitarian efforts that have improved or provided access to necessary basic or emergency surgery for children in these settings have included humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, short-term surgical missions, and long-term projects such as building pediatric specialty hospitals and provider networks. Each of these efforts may also include educational initiatives designed to increase local capacity. This article will provide an overview of pediatric humanitarian surgical outreach including reference to available evidence-based analyses of these platforms and make recommendations for surgical outreach initiatives for children.

  6. Using marketing research concepts to investigate specialty selection by medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Charles; Schroeder, Josh; Elchalal, Uriel; Weiss, Yoram; Tandeter, Howard; Zisk-Rony, Rachel Y

    2012-10-01

    This study was intended to examine whether a marketing research approach improves understanding of medical specialty selection by medical students. This approach likens students to consumers who are deciding whether or not to purchase a product (specialty). This approach proposes that when consumers' criteria match their perceptions of a product's features, the likelihood that they will purchase it (select the specialty) increases. This study examines whether exploring students' selection criteria and perceptions of various specialties provides additional insights into the selection process. Using a consumer behaviour model as a framework, a questionnaire was designed and administered to Year 6 (final-year) students in 2008 and 2009 to elicit information on their knowledge about and interests in various specialties, the criteria they used in specialty selection, and their perceptions of six specialties. A total of 132 (67%) questionnaires were returned. In many instances, consistency between selection criteria and perceptions of a specialty was accompanied by interest in pursuing the specialty. Exceptions were noted and pointed to areas requiring additional research. For example, although > 70% of female students replied that the affordance of a controllable lifestyle was an important selection criterion, many were interested in obstetrics and gynaecology despite the fact that it was not perceived as providing a controllable lifestyle. Minimal overlap among students reporting interest in primary specialties that possess similar characteristics (e.g. paediatrics and family medicine) demonstrated the need to target marketing (recruitment) efforts for each specialty individually. Using marketing research concepts to examine medical specialty selection may precipitate a conceptual shift among health care leaders which acknowledges that, to attract students, specialties must meet students' selection criteria. Moreover, if consumers (students) deem a product (specialty

  7. A current assessment of diversity characteristics and perceptions of their importance in the surgical workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Judith C; O'Rourke, Colin; Walsh, R Matthew

    2014-11-01

    Diversity in the workforce is vital to successful businesses. Healthcare in general has suffered from a lack of cultural competence, which is the ability to successfully interact with individuals from diverse backgrounds. In order to eliminate discrimination and build a diverse workforce, physicians' perceptions and importance of diversity need to be measured. A 25-item, anonymous, online questionnaire was created, and a cross-sectional survey was performed. The instrument consisted of demographic and Likert-style questions which attempted to determine the participants' perceptions of the current level of diversity in their specialty and their perceived importance of particular diversity categories. Over 1,000 responses were received from US-based physicians across all specialties and levels of training. Statistically significant differences existed between surgical and nonsurgical specialties with regard to gender, prior work experience, and political identity. In the surgical workforce, there is significant perceived homogeneity regarding gender/sexual identity. Surgical respondents also deemed gender/sexual identity diversity to be less important than respondents from medical specialties. Surgeons and surgical trainees are less diverse than their medical colleagues, both by demographics and self-acknowledgement. The long-term impact and potential barriers to resolve these differences in diversity require further investigation.

  8. Expanding the Field of Surgical Researchers: The Jahnigen Career Development Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiner, Stacie

    2017-10-01

    Under a long-standing collaboration with the John A. Hartford Foundation (JAHF), the Atlantic Philanthropies (AP), and specialty societies in 10 targeted specialties, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) has been working to improve quality of care provided to older adults by surgical and related medical specialists. To support and nurture future academic leaders, the Geriatrics-for-Specialists Initiative (GSI) established the Dennis W. Jahnigen Career Development Scholar Award (JCDA) program in 2002, with AP joining JAHF as a core funder of the awards in 2003. Commencing in 2011, the National Institute on Aging (NIA) launched the Grants for Early Medical/Surgical Specialists' Transition to Aging Research (GEMSSTAR) program, using an RO3 mechanism. Recipients of the JCDA and the GEMSSTAR are provided with 2 years of research support and networking opportunities with other scholars; 79 JCDA and 26 surgical and related medical specialty GEMSSTAR scholars have been funded through these award mechanisms, with AGS, JAHF, and surgical and related medical specialty societies providing matching support for 20 of the GEMSSTAR scholars for leadership development programs. One of the primary criteria for judging the overall success of the program was eventual transition of the award to a federally funded program, which was achieved when NIA launched the GEMSSTAR program in 2011. © 2017, Copyright the Author Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  9. Otfrid Foerster, the great neurologist and neurosurgeon from Breslau (Wrocław): his influence on early neurosurgeons and legacy to present-day neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, Natalia; Winkler, Peter A

    2007-08-01

    As a result of the turbulences of World War II, Wrocław, Poland (formerly Breslau, Germany) lost its internationally acknowledged position in the field of neurosurgery, which it once had thanks to Otfrid Foerster. This innovative German doctor and scientist made a considerable contribution to the development of neurological and neurosurgical research worldwide. He also made Breslau a renowned center for scientific study, luring researchers from around the world. His achievements influenced many neurosurgeons during his lifetime, above all those from the US and England, including, for example, such well-known men as Fulton, Bucy, Bailey, and Penfield (who worked with Foerster in Breslau for quite a long time). Together Foerster and Penfield searched for the causes of epilepsy and the surgical methods to treat it. For young American neurosurgeons it was a very significant step in their careers to be able to train in Breslau under the guidance of Otfrid Foerster. In 1937 the British Association of Neurological Surgeons visited Breslau and awarded him with the honor of "Member Emeritus," which could be seen as the culmination of Foerster's career. In this paper the authors give an overview of Foerster's work and evaluate its significance. They also elucidate the difficult historical background during fascism in Germany using the sources of the Polish National Archives. Dr. Foerster's remaining traces in today's Wrocław are meticulously reported.

  10. Music and Medicine: The Tragic Case of Gershwin's Brain Tumor and the Challenges of Neurosurgery in the First Half of the 20th Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagatti, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Although neurosurgery has gone through moments of great renewal in recent decades, at the beginning of the 20th century it was still dealing with the unfathomable mysteries of the nervous system and its disorders. Historical insight improves understanding of the great personalities of the past and allows us to look at the efforts of pioneering surgeons with greater awareness. The literature was reviewed using online databases, textbooks, and retrieved articles. An overview of the case of Gershwin's brain tumor and its surgical resection is presented. This article presents the tragic case of Gershwin's brain tumor. Through his story, it is possible to get an idea of the difficulties with which the great neuroscientists and surgeons of the past approached the human nervous system and its pathologic manifestations. The first part of this article deals with the evolution of Gershwin's disease over the years and the subsequent brain surgery. In the second part, general considerations on the most striking symptoms experienced by the composer are reported, as well as a description of the different hypotheses on the nature of Gershwin's tumor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Korean Spinal Neurosurgery Society ; Are We Reimbursed Properly for Spinal Neurosurgical Practices under the Korean Resource Based Relative Value Scale Service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Woo-Keun; Kim, Joo Han; Moon, Hong Joo; Park, Youn-Kwan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The Korean Resource Based Relative Value Scale (K-RBRVS) was introduced in 2001 as an alternative of the previous medical fee schedule. Unfortunately, most neurosurgeons are unfamiliar with the details of the K-RBRVS and how it affects the reimbursement rates for the surgical procedures we perform. We summarize the K-RBRVS in brief, and discuss on how the relative value (RV) of the spinal neurosurgical procedures have changed since the introduction in 2001. Methods We analyzed the change of spinal procedure RVs since 2001, and compared it with the change of values in the brain neurosurgical procedures. RVs of 88 neurospinal procedures on the list of K-RBRVS were analyzed, while 24 procedures added during annual revisions were excluded. Results During the past 15 years, RVs for spinal procedures have increased 62.8%, which is not so different with the cumulative increase of consumer prices during this time period or the increase rate of 92.3% for brain surgeries. When comparing the change of RVs in more complex procedures between spinal and brain neurosurgery, the increase rate was 125.3% and 133%, respectively. Conclusion More effort of the society of spinal surgeons seems to be needed to get adequate reimbursement, as there have been some discrimination compared to brain surgeons in the increase of RVs. And considering the relative underestimation of spinal neurosurgeons’ labor, more objective measures of neurospinal surgeons’ work and productivity should be developed for impartial reimbursement. PMID:28061492

  12. MR-guided stereotactic neurosurgery-comparison of fiducial-based and anatomical landmark transformation approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsche, S; Sauner, D; Maarouf, M; Hoevels, M; Luyken, K; Schulte, O; Lackner, K; Sturm, V; Treuer, H

    2004-01-01

    For application in magnetic resonance (MR) guided stereotactic neurosurgery, two methods for transformation of MR-image coordinates in stereotactic, frame-based coordinates exist: the direct stereotactic fiducial-based transformation method and the indirect anatomical landmark method. In contrast to direct stereotactic MR transformation, indirect transformation is based on anatomical landmark coregistration of stereotactic computerized tomography and non-stereotactic MR images. In a patient study, both transformation methods have been investigated with visual inspection and mutual information analysis. Comparison was done for our standard imaging protocol, including t2-weighted spin-echo as well as contrast enhanced t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging. For t2-weighted spin-echo imaging, both methods showed almost similar and satisfying performance with a small, but significant advantage for fiducial-based transformation. In contrast, for t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging with more geometric distortions due to field inhomogenities and gradient nonlinearity than t2-weighted spin-echo imaging, mainly caused by a reduced bandwidth per pixel, anatomical landmark transformation delivered markedly better results. Here, fiducial-based transformation yielded results which are intolerable for stereotactic neurosurgery. Mean Euclidian distances between both transformation methods were 0.96 mm for t2-weighted spin-echo and 1.67 mm for t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging. Maximum deviations were 1.72 mm and 3.06 mm, respectively

  13. Role of gamma knife radiosurgery in neurosurgery. Past and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Tomoyuki; Shin, Masahiro; Saito, Nobuhito

    2010-01-01

    The gamma knife was the first radiosurgical device developed at the Karolinska Institute in 1967. Stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife has been widely accepted in clinical practice and has contributed to the development of neurosurgery. More than 500,000 patients have been treated by gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery so far, and the method is now an indispensable neurosurgical tool. Here we review long-term outcomes and development of stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife and discuss its future perspectives. The primary role of stereotactic radiosurgery is to control small well-demarcated lesions such as metastatic brain tumors, meningiomas, schwannomas, and pituitary adenomas while preserving the function of surrounding brain tissue. The gamma knife has been used as a primary treatment or in combination with surgery, and some applications have been accepted as standard treatment in the field of neurosurgery. Treatment of cerebral arteriovenous malformations has also been drastically changed after emergence of this technology. Controlling functional disorders is another role of stereotactic radiosurgery. There is a risk of radiation-induced adverse events, which are usually mild and less frequent. However, especially in large or invasive lesions, those risks are not negligible and pose limitations. Advancement of irradiation technology and dose planning software have enabled more sophisticated and safer treatment, and further progress will contribute to better treatment outcomes not only for brain lesions but also for cervical lesions with less invasive treatment. (author)

  14. Readiness for practice: a survey of neurosurgery graduates and program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji, Faizal A; Steven, David A

    2014-11-01

    Postgraduate neurosurgical education is undergoing significant reform, including transition to a competency-based training model. To support these efforts, the purpose of this study was to determine neurosurgical graduates' and program directors' (PDs) opinions about graduates' level of competence in reference to the 2010 Royal College Objectives of Training in Neurosurgery. An electronic survey was distributed to Canadian neurosurgery PDs and graduates from 2011. The questionnaire addressed graduates' abilities in nonprocedural knowledge and skills, CanMEDS roles, proficiency with core neurosurgical procedures and knowledge of complex neurosurgical techniques. Thirteen of 22 (59%) graduate and 17/25 (65%) PD surveys were completed. There were no significant differences between PD and graduate responses. Most respondents agreed that these graduates possess the knowledge and skills expected of an independently practicing neurosurgeon across current objectives of training. A small proportion felt some graduates did not achieve this level of proficiency on specific vascular, functional, peripheral nerve and endoscopic procedures. This was partially attributed to limited exposure to these procedures during training and perceptions that some techniques required fellowship-level training. Graduating neurosurgical residents are perceived to possess a high level of proficiency in the majority of neurosurgical practice domains. Inadequate exposure during training or a perception that subspecialists should perform some procedures may contribute to cases where proficiency is not as high. The trends identified in this study could be monitored on an ongoing basis to provide supplemental data to guide curricular decisions in Canadian neurosurgical training.

  15. Tissue Factor and Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor in the Wound-Healing Process After Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ślusarz, Robert; Głowacka, Mariola; Biercewicz, Monika; Barczykowska, Ewa; Haor, Beata; Rość, Danuta; Gadomska, Grażyna

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the concentrations of tissue factor (TF) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) in the blood of patients with a postoperative wound after neurosurgery. Participants included 20 adult patients who underwent neurosurgery because of degenerative spine changes. The concentration of TF and TFPI in the patients' blood serum was measured 3 times: before surgery, during the first 24 hr after surgery, and between the 5th and 7th days after surgery. The control group comprised 20 healthy volunteers similar to the patient group with respect to gender and age. A statistically significant difference was observed between TF concentration at all three measurement time points in the research group and TF concentration in the control group (p = .018, p = .010, p = .001). A statistically significant difference was found between TFPI concentration at the second time point in the research group and TFPI concentration in the control group (p = .041). No statistically significant within-subject difference was found between TF concentrations before and after surgery. A statistically significant within-subject difference was found between TFPI concentrations within 24 hr after surgery and 5-7 days after surgery (p = .004). High perioperative concentrations of TF indicate not only the presence of thrombophilia but also the importance of TF in the wound-healing process. Perioperative changes in TFPI concentrations are related to its compensatory influence on hemostasis in thrombophilic conditions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Quantifying cortical surface harmonic deformation with stereovision during open cranial neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Songbai; Fan, Xiaoyao; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-02-01

    Cortical surface harmonic motion during open cranial neurosurgery is well observed in image-guided neurosurgery. Recently, we quantified cortical surface deformation noninvasively with synchronized blood pressure pulsation (BPP) from a sequence of stereo image pairs using optical flow motion tracking. With three subjects, we found the average cortical surface displacement can reach more than 1 mm and in-plane principal strains of up to 7% relative to the first image pair. In addition, the temporal changes in deformation and strain were in concert with BPP and patient respiration [1]. However, because deformation was essentially computed relative to an arbitrary reference, comparing cortical surface deformation at different times was not possible. In this study, we extend the technique developed earlier by establishing a more reliable reference profile of the cortical surface for each sequence of stereo image acquisitions. Specifically, fast Fourier transform (FFT) was applied to the dynamic cortical surface deformation, and the fundamental frequencies corresponding to patient respiration and BPP were identified, which were used to determine the number of image acquisitions for use in averaging cortical surface images. This technique is important because it potentially allows in vivo characterization of soft tissue biomechanical properties using intraoperative stereovision and motion tracking.

  17. Straight trajectory planning for keyhole neurosurgery in sheep with automatic brain structures segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaro, Alberto; Lad, Akash; Formenti, Davide; Zani, Davide Danilo; De Momi, Elena

    2017-03-01

    In a translational neuroscience/neurosurgery perspective, sheep are considered good candidates to study because of the similarity between their brain and the human one. Automatic planning systems for safe keyhole neurosurgery maximize the probe/catheter distance from vessels and risky structures. This work consists in the development of a trajectories planner for straight catheters placement intended to be used for investigating the drug diffusivity mechanisms in sheep brain. Automatic brain segmentation of gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid is achieved using an online available sheep atlas. Ventricles, midbrain and cerebellum segmentation have been also carried out. The veterinary surgeon is asked to select a target point within the white matter to be reached by the probe and to define an entry area on the brain cortex. To mitigate the risk of hemorrhage during the insertion process, which can prevent the success of the insertion procedure, the trajectory planner performs a curvature analysis of the brain cortex and wipes out from the poll of possible entry points the sulci, as part of brain cortex where superficial blood vessels are naturally located. A limited set of trajectories is then computed and presented to the surgeon, satisfying an optimality criteria based on a cost function which considers the distance from critical brain areas and the whole trajectory length. The planner proved to be effective in defining rectilinear trajectories accounting for the safety constraints determined by the brain morphology. It also demonstrated a short computational time and good capability in segmenting gyri and sulci surfaces.

  18. MR-guided stereotactic neurosurgery-comparison of fiducial-based and anatomical landmark transformation approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunsche, S [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Sauner, D [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller-University of Jena, Jena (Germany); Maarouf, M [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Hoevels, M [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Luyken, K [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Schulte, O [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Lackner, K [Department