WorldWideScience

Sample records for surgical site markings

  1. Surgical skin-marking techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granick, M S; Heckler, F R; Jones, E W

    1987-04-01

    Surgical skin-marking inks and dyes are in everyday use for designing and planning incisions in plastic and reconstructive surgery. We have traced the historical development of surgical skin-marking techniques from ancient times to the present. The biochemical characteristics of the commonly used marking agents are discussed. A three-part experiment utilizing a pig model was carried out to test the tissue inflammatory response to the various dyes and inks when used intradermally as tattoos, the persistence of such tattoos, and the ease of skin erasure for each of eight stains. Methylene blue and gentian violet are recommended as the best all-purpose marking agents. The use of proprietary inks is discouraged.

  2. Surgical site infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and mortality as well as significant financial implications. Worldwide it has ... common nosocomial infection amongst surgical patients with up to 38% .... antibiotics as soon as the sensitivity results are available. ... Breast surgery. Staph Aureus/ ...

  3. Fighting surgical site infections in small animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verwilghen, Denis; Singh, Ameet

    2015-01-01

    A diverse array of pathogen-related, patient-related, and caretaker-related issues influence risk and prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs). The entire surgical team involved in health care settings in which surgical procedures are performed play a pivotal role in the prevention of SSIs...

  4. Surgical site infection in posterior spine surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-20

    Mar 20, 2016 ... Background: Surgical site infections (SSIs) in spine surgery remain a significant cause of ... before postoperative day 5 were associated with an increase in the rate of SSI. .... Table 1: Patient characteristics and associated wound .... patients with superficial or deep surgical site infection after spinal surgery.

  5. Untreatable Surgical Site Infection: Consider Pyoderma Gangrenosum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berlinrut, Ilan; Bhatia, Nitasha; Josse, Jonathan M; de Vinck, David; Kaul, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01

    .... Her initial presentation was thought to be consistent with a surgical site infection. Antibiotic therapy was initiated, and the patient was taken for multiple irrigation/lavage of her abdomen and debridement of necrotic tissue...

  6. Modifiable risk factors for surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moucha, Calin S; Clyburn, Terry A; Evans, Richard P; Prokuski, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Multiple risk factors for orthopaedic surgical site infection have been identified. Some of these factors directly affect the wound-healing process, whereas others can lead to blood-borne sepsis or relative immunosuppression. Modifying a patient's medications; screening for comorbidities, such as HIV or diabetes mellitus; and advising the patient on options to diminish or eliminate adverse behaviors, such as smoking, should lower the risk for surgical site infections.

  7. [Surgical site infections: antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are very common, and represent more than 20% of all hospital-acquired infections. SSIs are associated with a higher mortality, as well as to an extended hospital stay and costs, depending on the surgical procedure and type of SSI. Advances in control practices for these infections include improvement in operating room ventilation, sterilization methods, barriers, and surgical techniques, as well as in surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis. For the latter, the antimicrobial agent should: be active against the most common pathogens, be administered in an appropriate dosage and in a time frame to ensure serum and tissue concentrations over the period of potential contamination, be safe, and be administered over the shortest effective time period to minimize adverse events, development of resistances, and cost. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Pelvic Surgical Site Infections in Gynecologic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P. Lachiewicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of surgical site infection (SSI remains the most common complication of gynecologic surgical procedures and results in significant patient morbidity. Gynecologic procedures pose a unique challenge in that potential pathogenic microorganisms from the skin or vagina and endocervix may migrate to operative sites and can result in vaginal cuff cellulitis, pelvic cellulitis, and pelvic abscesses. Multiple host and surgical risk factors have been identified as risks that increase infectious sequelae after pelvic surgery. This paper will review these risk factors as many are modifiable and care should be taken to address such factors in order to decrease the chance of infection. We will also review the definitions, microbiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of pelvic SSIs after gynecologic surgery.

  9. [Current possibilities to influence surgical site infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bělina, F

    2017-01-01

    Infections associated with surgical procedures, also referred to as surgical site infections (SSIs), are the most common nosocomial infections (HAIs - Health Care-Associated Infections) in surgery departments. Although effectively preventable in most cases, they are still associated with significant morbidity and mortality, prolonged or repeated hospitalizations and increased treatment costs. Therefore, compliance with applicable procedures and guidelines is essential for SSI prevention, which was also shown in numerous EBM studies. Relevant procedures and clinical guidelines involve all phases of perioperative care, covering preoperative patient preparation, the course of the surgical procedure itself, as well as post-operative care. In order to effectively reduce the risk of postoperative infectious complications, these proven principles and procedures need to be implemented into daily practice with every single surgical patient. Continuous monitoring of compliance with these procedures, staff education, recording the incidence of SSI in individual departments with regular evaluation and presentation of results should form an integral part of these measures.Key words: surgical site infection - incidence - risk factors - prevention - guidelines.

  10. Untreatable Surgical Site Infection: Consider Pyoderma Gangrenosum

    OpenAIRE

    Ilan Berlinrut, MD; Nitasha Bhatia, MD; Jonathan M. Josse, MD, MSc; David de Vinck, DO; Sanjeev Kaul, MD

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an inflammatory disease characterized by sterile infiltration of the skin by neutrophils. We describe a case of a 63-year-old woman who developed PG following an abdominal wall reconstruction. Her initial presentation was thought to be consistent with a surgical site infection. Antibiotic therapy was initiated, and the patient was taken for multiple irrigation/lavage of her abdomen and debridement of necrotic tissue. Wound cultures remained negative, and ...

  11. Preventing surgical site infection. Where now?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2009-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is increasingly recognised as a measure of the quality of patient care by surgeons, infection control practitioners, health planners and the public. There is increasing pressure to compare SSI rates between surgeons, institutions and countries. For this to be meaningful, data must be standardised and must include post-discharge surveillance (PDS) as many superficial SSIs do not present to the original institution. Further work is required to determine the best method of conducting PDS. In 2008 two important documents on SSI were published from the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America\\/The Infectious Disease Society of America and the National Institute for Health and Clincal Excellence, UK. Both emphasise key aspects during the preoperative, operative and postoperative phases of patient care. In addition to effective interventions known to be important for some time, e.g. not shaving the surgical site until the day of the procedure, there is increasing emphasis on physiological parameters, e.g. blood glucose concentrations, oxygen tensions and body temperature. Laparoscopic procedures are increasingly associated with reduced SSI rates, and the screening and decontamination of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers is effective for certain surgical procedures but has to be balanced by cost and the risk of mupirocin resistance. Finally, there is a need to convert theory into practice by the rigorous application of SSI healthcare bundles. Recent studies suggest that, with a multidisciplinary approach, simple measures can be effective in reducing SSI rates.

  12. [Penal liability from retained foreign body inside the surgical site].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiò, L G; Ventura Spagnolo, E; Pirrone, G; Cardia, G

    2011-03-01

    The Authors focus on the liability of the surgery team members in the case they inadvertently forget behind in the patient's body a foreign object, which causes injuries and/or death. The Authors underline that, according to the current case law regarding medical malpractice, both the main surgeon and their assistant/subordinate are liable for engaging in a markedly imprudent and/or negligent conduct, such as not double-checking scrupulously the surgical site before its closure in order to highlight forgotten foreign bodies. As well, the Authors underline that either the circulator nurse or the theatre nurse can be considered punishable by law when that medical error occurs, even if they are responsible for the count of the instruments used in the course of the surgery. Conversely, the main surgeon and his or her assistant are always directly responsible, due to the fact that the nurses' count procedure represents merely an additional control measure, without substituting at all the check the surgeons must obligatory conduct on the surgical site. Finally, the Authors point out that, as the count procedure is performed by the members of a surgical team, where a hierarchy-based relationship rules, the main surgeon is the liable for any preventable and avoidable adverse event provoked by the nursing staff as a consequence of the objective responsibility due to culpa in eligendo and culpa in vigilando.

  13. Prospective surgical site infection surveillance in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Ryen; Singh, Ameet; Weese, J Scott

    2015-01-01

    To 1) describe the incidence of surgical site infections (SSI) in dogs undergoing surgery at the Ontario Veterinary College Health Sciences Centre; 2) describe and compare procedure-specific SSI rates; and 3) identify factors associated with development of SSI. Prospective, cohort study Dogs (n = 846) undergoing surgery during 45 weeks (September 2010-July 2011). Follow-up telephone conversation with dog owners was performed 30 days postoperatively, with additional 1-year follow-up performed for cases with surgical implants. A standardized questionnaire was administered to detect and characterize SSI. SSI were identified in 26 (3.0%) dogs; 11 (42%) were classified as superficial SSI, whereas 13 were deep, and 2 were organ/space. Of the confirmed SSI, only 17 (65%) were documented in the medical records. Hypotension (P = .011), class of surgery (P = .029), and use of an implant (P = .001) increased the risk of SSI. Microbial cultures were submitted for 19 cases (73%) and of those, 74% were staphylococci. SSI can result in devastating consequences in dogs and understanding risk factors is critical to target prevention practices. Whereas some risk factors such as hypotension are modifiable, others such as class of surgery are not. When possible, active surveillance should be used as part of a hospital infection control program. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  14. Local antimicrobial administration for prophylaxis of surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huiras, Paul; Logan, Jill K; Papadopoulos, Stella; Whitney, Dana

    2012-11-01

    Despite a lack of consensus guidelines, local antibiotic administration for prophylaxis of surgical site infections is used during many surgical procedures. The rationale behind this practice is to provide high antibiotic concentrations at the site of surgery while minimizing systemic exposure and adverse effects. Local antibiotic administration for surgical site prophylaxis has inherent limitations in that antibiotics are applied after the incision is made, rather than the current standard for surgical site prophylaxis that recommends providing adequate antibiotic concentrations at the site before the incision. The efficacy and safety of local application of antibiotics for surgical site prophylaxis have been assessed in different types of surgery with a variety of antibiotic agents and methods of application. We identified 22 prospective, randomized, controlled trials that evaluated local application of antibiotics for surgical site prophylaxis. These trials were subsequently divided and analyzed based on the type of surgical procedure: dermatologic, orthopedic, abdominal, colorectal, and cardiothoracic. Methods of local application analyzed included irrigations, powders, ointments, pastes, beads, sponges, and fleeces. Overall, there is a significant lack of level I evidence supporting this practice for any of the surgical genres evaluated. In addition, the literature spans several decades, and changes in surgical procedures, systemic antibiotic prophylaxis, and microbial flora make conclusions difficult to determine. Based on available data, the efficacy of local antibiotic administration for the prophylaxis of surgical site infections remains uncertain, and recommendations supporting this practice for surgical site prophylaxis cannot be made.

  15. Risk factors for surgical site infection of pilon fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Ren

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Pilon fracture is a complex injury that is often associated with severe soft tissue damage and high rates of surgical site infection. The goal of this study was to analyze and identify independent risk factors for surgical site infection among patients undergoing surgical fixation of a pilon fracture. METHODS: The medical records of all pilon fracture patients who underwent surgical fixation from January 2010 to October 2012 were reviewed to identify those who developed a surgical site infection. Then, we constructed univariate and multivariate logistic regressions to evaluate the independent associations of potential risk factors with surgical site infection in patients undergoing surgical fixation of a pilon fracture. RESULTS: A total of 519 patients were enrolled in the study from January 2010 to October 2012. A total of 12 of the 519 patients developed a surgical site infection, for an incidence of 2.3%. These patients were followed for 12 to 29 months, with an average follow-up period of 19.1 months. In the final regression model, open fracture, elevated postoperative glucose levels (≥125 mg/dL, and a surgery duration of more than 150 minutes were significant risk factors for surgical site infection following surgical fixation of a pilon fracture. CONCLUSIONS: Open fractures, elevated postoperative glucose levels (≥125 mg/dL, and a surgery duration of more than 150 minutes were related to an increased risk for surgical site infection following surgical fixation of a pilon fracture. Patients exhibiting the risk factors identified in this study should be counseled regarding the possible surgical site infection that may develop after surgical fixation.

  16. Evolving issues in the prevention of surgical site infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, A

    2009-06-01

    Surgical site infection is one of the more common causes of post-operative morbidity. Such infections contribute to prolonged recovery, delayed discharge and increasing costs to both patients and the health service. In the current climate increased emphasis is being placed on minimising the risks of acquiring or transmitting these nosocomial infections. This article reviews the current literature obtained from a Pubmed database search in relation to three specific aspects of surgical site infection: compliance with prophylactic antibiotics, post-discharge surveillance and novel methods for preventing surgical site infections. These topics represent areas where many institutions will find room for improvement in the prevention of surgical site infections. Tight adherence to prophylactic antibiotic guidelines, close followup of surgical wounds during and after hospital discharge, and attention to oxygenation status and the body temperature of patients may all prove to be useful adjuncts in significantly decreasing surgical site infections.

  17. Surgical site infection rates following laparoscopic urological procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Arvin K; Srinivasan, Arun K; Cho, Jane; Sadek, Mostafa A; Kavoussi, Louis R

    2011-04-01

    Surgical site infections have been categorized by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as "never events". The incidence of surgical site infection following laparoscopic urological surgery and its risk factors are poorly defined. We evaluated surgical site infection following urological laparoscopic surgery and identified possible factors that may influence occurrence. Patients who underwent transperitoneal laparoscopic procedures during a 4-year period by a single laparoscopic surgeon were retrospectively reviewed. Surgical site infections were identified postoperatively and defined using the Centers for Disease Control criteria. Clinical parameters, comorbidities, smoking history, preoperative urinalysis and culture results as well as operative data were analyzed. Nonparametric testing using the Mann-Whitney U test, multivariable logistic regression and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. In 556 patients undergoing urological laparoscopic procedures 14 surgical site infections (2.5%) were identified at mean postoperative day 21.5. Of the 14 surgical site infections 10 (71.4%) were located at a specimen extraction site. Operative time, procedure type and increasing body mass index were significantly associated with the occurrence of surgical site infections (p = 0.007, p = 0.019, p = 0.038, respectively), whereas history of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.071) and intraoperative transfusion (p = 0.053) were found to trend toward significance. Age, gender, positive urine culture, steroid use, procedure type and smoking history were not significantly associated with surgical site infection. Body mass index and operative time remained significant predictors of surgical site infection on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Surgical site infection is an infrequent complication following laparoscopic surgery with the majority occurring at the specimen extraction site. Infection is associated with prolonged operative time and

  18. Risk factors associated with surgical site infection after breast surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Esmael Nezhadhoseini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast surgical site infection is not only one of the main causes of the morbidity and mortality of cases under different types of surgeries, but also it results in longer hospitalization and additional expenses. Identifying various potential parameters related to the occurrence of surgical site infection after the surgery and getting accurate knowledge about them can be beneficial in preventing the surgical site infection. Various types of studies have been conducted to evaluate the possible risk parameters of surgical site infection in every surgery. In this study, we tried to provide a brief review of the available literature regarding the risk factors associated with breast surgical site infection. To this end, we searched the Pubmed database for the relevant articles. We selected eight articles, which have studied the parameters with statistically significant association with the breast surgical site infection. According to our review, further studies with larger sample size can be effective in better evaluating the associated risk factors and presenting the exact effect of some uncertain risk factors of the surgical site infection after breast surgeries.

  19. Surgical site infection in women undergoing surgery for gynecologic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Haider; Gojayev, Anar; Buechel, Megan; Knight, Jason; SanMarco, Janice; Lockhart, David; Michener, Chad; Moslemi-Kebria, Mehdi

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the rate and predictors of surgical site infection (SSI) after gynecologic cancer surgery and identify any association between SSI and postoperative outcome. Patients with endometrial, cervical, or ovarian cancers from 2005 to 2011 were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. The extent of surgical intervention was categorized into modified surgical complexity scoring (MSCS) system. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used. Odds ratios were adjusted for patient demographics, comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, and operative factors. Of 6854 patients, 369 (5.4%) were diagnosed with SSI. Surgical site infection after laparotomy was 3.5 times higher compared with minimally invasive surgery (7% vs 2%; P Surgical site infection was associated with longer mean hospital stay and higher rate of reoperation, sepsis, and wound dehiscence. Surgical site infection was not associated with increased risk of acute renal failure or 30-day mortality. These findings were consistent in subset of patients with deep or organ space SSI. Seven percent of patients undergoing laparotomy for gynecologic malignancy developed SSI. Surgical site infection is associated with longer hospital stay and more than 5-fold increased risk of reoperation. In this study, we identified several risk factors for developing SSI among gynecologic cancer patients. These findings may contribute toward identification of patients at risk for SSI and the development of strategies to reduce SSI rate and potentially reduce the cost of care in gynecologic cancer surgery.

  20. Early and late surgical site infections in ear surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastier, P L; Leroyer, C; Lashéras, A; Rogues, A-M; Darrouzet, V; Franco-Vidal, V

    2016-04-01

    A retroauricular approach is routinely used for treating chronic otitis media. The incidence of surgical site infections after ear surgery is around 10% in contaminated or dirty procedures. This observational prospective study describes surgical site infections after chronic otitis media surgery with the retroauricular approach and investigated their potential predictive factors. This observational prospective study included patients suffering from chronic otitis media and eligible for therapeutic surgery with a retroauricular approach. During follow-up, surgical site infections were defined as "early" if occurring within 30 days after surgery or as "late" if occurring thereafter. The data of 102 patients were analysed. Concerning early surgical site infections, four cases were diagnosed (3.9%) and a significant association was found with preoperative antibiotic therapy, wet ear at pre-operative examination, class III (contaminated) in the surgical wound classification, NNIS (National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance) index > 1, and oral post-operative antibiotic use. Seven late surgical site infections were diagnosed (7.1%) between 90 and 160 days after surgery and were significantly correlated to otorrhoea during the 6 months before surgery, surgery duration ≤60 minutes, canal wall down technique and use of fibrin glue. Surgical site infections after chronic otitis media surgery seem to be associated with factors related to the inflammatory state of the middle ear at the time of surgery in early infections and with chronic inflammation in late infections. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  1. Surgical site infection prevention: the operating room environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clyburn, Terry A; Evans, Richard P; Moucha, Calin S; Prokuski, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Surgical site infections can complicate orthopaedic procedures and contribute to morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. Extensive literature has been published on this topic; however, the quality of data using standards of evidence-based medicine is variable with a lack of well-controlled studies. A review of the literature concerning measures to prevent surgical site infections in the operating room environment may be helpful in preventing such infections.

  2. Elderly diabetic patient with surgical site mucormycosis extending to bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul K Patel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is rare in clinical practice. Most infections are acquired by inhalation; other portals of entry are traumatic implantation and ingestion in immunocompromised host. Mucormycosis is life threatening infection in immunocompromised host with variable moratlity ranging from 15 -81% depending upon site of infection. General treatment principles include early diagnosis, correction of underlying immunosuppression and metabolic disturbances, adequate surgical debridement along with amphotericin therapy. We describe surgical site mucormycosis extended to involve large bowel in elderly diabetic patient.

  3. Surgical site infection prevention and control: an emerging paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Richard P; Clyburn, Terry A; Moucha, Calin S; Prokuski, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Examining the current state of infection in orthopaedic surgery provides tools and techniques to reduce the risks of nosocomial infections and prevent and treat infections from drug-resistant organisms. It is important for surgeons to recognize modifiable surgical risk factors and be aware of the importance of preoperative patient screening in reducing surgical site infections. The latest evidence-based data from scientific exhibits, instructional course lectures, and the Orthopaedic Knowledge Online continuing medical education module gathered during the past 5 years by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Patient Safety Committee are useful in understanding and controlling the increasing and vital problem of surgical site infection.

  4. Current Approaches for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Florman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections (SSIs are the most common type of nosocomial infection among surgical patients and are commonly caused by the patients’ own microbial flora. The prevalence of SSI is a major concern because of the associated increase in the incidence of morbidity and mortality, length of hospitalization and cost of care for postoperative patients. Key factors that determine whether patients are at risk for developing SSI include the inherent potential contamination of the surgical site, the duration of the operation and the individual patient susceptibility. Preventive preoperative measures that can reduce the risk of SSIs include administration of antimicrobial prophylaxis, proper utilization of skin antiseptic agents for both the patient and the surgical team, proper patient preoperative hair removal and the policy of canceling elective procedures when remote skin, urinary or pulmonary infections occur. This paper will review the efficacy and safety of available antiseptic agents, as well as discuss patient-specific prevention strategies.

  5. Performance improvement initiative: prevention of surgical site infection (SSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wai Khuan; Awad, Nawal

    2015-01-01

    Mafraq Hospital performs an average of 10,000 surgeries every year. The impact of having high volume high risk surgical procedures calls for the need to ensure safe surgery and a prevention of surgical site infection (SSI). SSI represents a significant portion of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The impact on morbidity, mortality, and cost of care has resulted in identifying the need to reduce SSI as a top priority to prevent healthcare associated infections. The good news is that the majority of SSIs are preventable. Mafraq Hospital performs a range of surgical procedures that covers 14 surgical specialties. The infection prevention and control team performs surveillance for SSI for all patients who undergo operative procedure included in Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) Operative Procedure Category (40 surgical procedures). Out of the 40 CDC NHSN listed, 33 operative procedures were performed at Mafraq Hospital, of which 17 were reported with SSI for 2013 and 2014. Surgical site infection has implicated an increase average length of stay from seven to 10 additional postoperative hospital days and additional costs of AED 10,000 to AED 100,000/SSI depending on procedure and pathogen. A multidisciplinary team was formed to develop and implement measures to reduce/eliminate surgical site infection, as well as evaluate and monitor compliance. Hence a group of multidisciplinary teams were initiated to analyse the results, find out the gaps, and implement a quality improvement project to correct the deficits. Recommendations for appropriate improvement measures were formed on evidence-based international guidelines from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) and CDC. Evidence based practice supports that many of the causes of surgical site infection can be prevented with proper medical attention and care.

  6. Evaluation of two surveillance methods for surgical site infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haji Abdolbaghi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical wound infection surveillance is an important facet of hospital infection control processes. There are several surveillance methods for surgical site infections. The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of two different surgical site infection surveillance methods. Methods: In this prospective cross sectional study 3020 undergoing surgey in general surgical wards of Imam Khomeini hospital were included. Surveillance methods consisted of review of medical records for postoperative fever and review of nursing daily note for prescription of antibiotics postoperatively and during patient’s discharge. Review of patient’s history and daily records and interview with patient’s surgeon and the head-nurse of the ward considered as a gold standard for surveillance. Results: The postoperative antibiotic consumption especially when considering its duration is a proper method for surgical wound infection surveillance. Accomplishments of a prospective study with postdischarge follow up until 30 days after surgery is recommended. Conclusion: The result of this study showed that postoperative antibiotic surveillance method specially with consideration of the antibiotic usage duration is a proper method for surgical site infection surveillance in general surgery wards. Accomplishments of a prospective study with post discharge follow up until 30 days after surgery is recommended.

  7. Surgical attire, practices and their perception in the prevention of surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, S M; Corrigan, M A; Hill, A D K; Humphreys, H

    2014-02-01

    Clean surgical scrubs, surgical gowns and headgear are worn by operative teams to decrease bacterial contamination and lower surgical site infection (SSI) rates. A detailed review was undertaken of peer-reviewed publications and other sources of material in the English language over the last 50 years included. Surgical scrubs should be clean and made of tightly woven material. Studies investigating single-use gowns and drapes versus reusable gowns report conflicting evidence. Double gloving may reduce SSI rates in procedures where no antibiotic prophylaxis was administered. Bacterial contamination of the operative field has been shown to be decreased by the wearing of surgical headgear by the operating team. Further consideration and better trials are required to determine the impact of different theatre clothing on SSI rates. Copyright © 2013 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Teamwork and Collaboration for Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, E Patchen

    2016-04-01

    The surgeon has been regarded as the "captain of the ship" in the operating room (OR) for many years, but cannot accomplish successful operative intervention without the rest of the team. Review of the pertinent English-language literature. Many reports demonstrate very different impressions of teamwork and communication in the OR held by different members of the surgical team. Objective measures of teamwork and communication demonstrate a reduction in complications including surgical site infections with improved teamwork and communication, with fewer distractions such as noise, and with effective use of checklists. Efforts to improve teamwork and communication and promote the effective use of checklists promote patient safety and improved outcomes for patients with reduction in surgical site infections.

  9. IMPORTANCE OF SOUTHAMPTON WOUND GRADING SYSTEM IN SURGICAL SITE INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaleen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available : Post-operative wound infection is defined as surgical site infection from 0-30 days after surgery, or infection to surgical site till one year in cases of implants like mesh, vascular grafts and prosthesis. This study was done to find out incidence of post-operative wound infection in surgical patients in rural setup. This study of post-operative wound infection was carried out from August 2008 to August 2010. The study is of 3275 patients who underwent surgery in the A.V.B.R.H. Significant association was observed between the nature of surgery and Southampton Wound Grading System. It concluded that severity rate of post-operative wound infection was increased from grade I to grade V which was found to be similar in clean to contaminated nature of surgery and that was found to be statistically significant at P value less than 0.001.

  10. Surgical site infections : how high are the costs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broex, E. C. J.; van Asselt, A. D. I.; Bruggeman, C. A.; van Tiel, F. H.

    2009-01-01

    There is an increased interest in prevention of nosocomial. infections and in the potential, savings in healthcare costs. The aim of this review of recent studies on surgical site infections (SSIs) was to compare methods of cost research and magnitudes of costs due to SSI. The studies reviewed diffe

  11. Surgical site infections : how high are the costs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broex, E. C. J.; van Asselt, A. D. I.; Bruggeman, C. A.; van Tiel, F. H.

    There is an increased interest in prevention of nosocomial. infections and in the potential, savings in healthcare costs. The aim of this review of recent studies on surgical site infections (SSIs) was to compare methods of cost research and magnitudes of costs due to SSI. The studies reviewed

  12. Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge : Perimeter Levee Rehabilitation Location and Site Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Map 1 displays the Clarence Cannon NWR perimeter levee rehabilitation location and site plan portion of Mark Twain National Wildlife Refuge. Map 2 displays profiles...

  13. Operating theatre quality and prevention of surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, A M; Ottria, G; Amicizia, D; Perdelli, F; Cristina, M L

    2013-09-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) account for 14% to 17% of all hospital-acquired infections and 38% of nosocomial infections in surgical patients. SSI remain a substantial cause of morbidity and death, possibly because of the larger numbers of elderly surgical patients or those with a variety of chronic and immunocompromising conditions, and emergence of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. Factors causing surgical site infection are multifarious. Several studies have identified the main patient-related (endogenous risk factors) and procedure-related (external risk factors) factors that influence the risk of SSI. The rate of surgical wound infections is strongly influenced by operating theatre quality, too. A safe and salubrious operating theatre is an environment in which all sources of pollution and any micro-environmental alterations are kept strictly under control. This can be achieved only through careful planning, maintenance and periodic checks, as well as proper ongoing training for staff Many international scientific societies have produced guidelines regarding the environmental features of operating theatres (positive pressure, exchanges of filtered air per hour, air-conditioning systems with HEPA filters, etc.) and issued recommendations on healthcare-associated infection, including SSI, concerning surveillance methods, intervention to actively prevent SSI and approaches to monitoring the implementation of such strategies. Therefore, the prevention of SSI requires a multidisciplinary approach and the commitment of all concerned, including that of those who are responsible for the design, layout and functioning of operating theatres.

  14. The role of antimicrobial sutures in preventing surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaper, D; Wilson, P; Assadian, O; Edmiston, C; Kiernan, M; Miller, A; Bond-Smith, G; Yap, J

    2017-07-01

    INTRODUCTION Healthcare associated infections (HCAIs) are falling following widespread and enforced introduction of guidelines, particularly those that have addressed antibiotic resistant pathogens such as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus or emergent pathogens such as Clostridium difficile, but no such decline has been seen in the incidence of surgical site infection (SSI), either in the UK, the EU or the US. SSI is one of the HCAIs, which are all avoidable complications of a surgical patient's pathway through both nosocomial and community care. METHODS This report is based on a meeting held at The Royal College of Surgeons of England on 21 July 2016. Using PubMed, members of the panel reviewed the current use of antiseptics and antimicrobial sutures in their specialties to prevent SSI. FINDINGS The group agreed that wider use of antiseptics in surgical practice may help in reducing reliance on antibiotics in infection prevention and control, especially in the perioperative period of open elective colorectal, hepatobiliary and cardiac operative procedures. The wider use of antiseptics includes preoperative showering, promotion of hand hygiene, (including the appropriate use of surgical gloves), preoperative skin preparation (including management of hair removal), antimicrobial sutures and the management of dehisced surgical wounds after infection. The meeting placed emphasis on the level I evidence that supports the use of antimicrobial sutures, particularly in surgical procedures after which the SSI rate is high (colorectal and hepatobiliary surgery) or when a SSI can be life threatening even when the rate of SSI is low (cardiac surgery).

  15. Surgical site infection in patients submitted to heart transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussara Aparecida Souza do Nascimento Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: to analyze the occurrence and predisposing factors for surgical site infection in patients submitted to heart transplantation, evaluating the relationship between cases of infections and the variables related to the patient and the surgical procedure. Method: retrospective cohort study, with review of the medical records of patients older than 18 years submitted to heart transplantation. The correlation between variables was evaluated by using Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test. Results: the sample consisted of 86 patients, predominantly men, with severe systemic disease, submitted to extensive preoperative hospitalizations. Signs of surgical site infection were observed in 9.3% of transplanted patients, with five (62.5% superficial incisional, two (25% deep and one (12.5% case of organ/space infection. There was no statistically significant association between the variables related to the patient and the surgery. Conclusion: there was no association between the studied variables and the cases of surgical site infection, possibly due to the small number of cases of infection observed in the sample investigated.

  16. Molecular diagnosis of Raoultella planticola infection of a surgical site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolcott, R; Dowd, S

    2010-08-01

    Raoultella planticola has been rarely diagnosed in clinical specimens. A case of a polymicrobial surgical site infection primarily caused by R. planticola in a 66-year-old Caucasian male with a fractured left tibia after an open reduction internal fixation of his left ankle is described and confirms this organism to be an opportunistic human pathogen. This pathogen was diagnosed with rapid clinical molecular pathogen diagnostic methods, which allowed an appropriate therapy to be implemented, thereby improving prognosis.

  17. Biopsy site selfies--a quality improvement pilot study to assist with correct surgical site identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhawan, Rajiv I; Lee, Erica H; Nehal, Kishwer S

    2015-04-01

    Determining the biopsy site location of a skin cancer before treatment is often challenging. To study the implementation and effectiveness of biopsy site selfies as a quality improvement measure for correct surgical site identification. In the first phase, the ability of dermatologic surgeon and patient to definitively identify the biopsy site and whether photography was needed to ensure site agreement were recorded. In the second phase, patients were requested to take biopsy site selfies, and after implementation, similar data were collected including whether a biopsy site selfie was helpful for definitive site identification. In the first phase, the physician and patient were unable to identify the biopsy site 17.6% (49/278) and 25.5% (71/278) of cases, respectively. A photograph was needed in 22.7% of cases (63/278). After implementation of biopsy site selfies, the physician and patient were unable to identify the biopsy site 17.4% (23/132) and 15.2% (20/132) of cases, respectively. Biopsy site selfies were available for 64.1% of cases for which no internal image was available and critical for site identification in 21.4% of these cases. Biopsy site selfies has proven to be helpful for correct surgical site identification by both the physician and the patient and may also provide further reassurance and confidence for patients.

  18. Evaluation of adherence to measures for the prevention of surgical site infections by the surgical team

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    Adriana Cristina de Oliveira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVEEvaluate pre- and intraoperative practices adopted by medical and nursing teams for the prevention of surgical infections.METHODA prospective study carried out in the period of April to May 2013, in a surgical center of a university hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais.RESULTS18 surgeries were followed and 214 surgical gloves were analyzed, of which 23 (10.7% had postoperative glove perforation detected, with 52.2% being perceived by users. Hair removal was performed on 27.7% of patients in the operating room, with the use of blades in 80% of the cases. Antibiotic prophylaxis was administered to 81.8% of patients up to 60 minutes prior to surgical incision. An average of nine professionals were present during surgery and the surgery room door remained open in 94.4% of the procedures.CONCLUSIONPartial adhesion to the recommended measures was identified, reaffirming a need for greater attention to these critical steps/actions in order to prevent surgical site infection.

  19. Adherence to surgical care improvement project measures and post-operative surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Samir S

    2012-08-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is unequivocally morbid and costly. The estimated 300,000 SSIs annually in the United States represent the second most common infection among surgical patients, prolong hospitalization by 7-10 days, and have an estimated annual incremental cost of $1 billion. The mortality rate associated with SSI is 3%, with about three quarters of deaths being attributable directly to the infection. Prevention is possible for the most part, and concerted effort has been made to limit these infections, arguably to little effect. Review of pertinent English-language literature. Numerous risk factors for SSI and tactics for prevention have been described, but efforts to bundle these tactics into an effective, comprehensive prevention program have been disappointing. Numerous studies now demonstrate that the Surgical Care Improvement Program (SCIP), which focused on process improvement rather than outcomes, has been ineffective despite governmental support, financial penalties for non-compliance, and consequent widespread implementation. Required reporting has increased awareness of the problem of SSI, but just as the complexity of SSI risk, pathogenesis, and preventions reflects the complexity of the disease, many other factors must be taken into account, including the skill and knowledge of the surgical team and promulgation of a culture of quality and safety in surgical patient care.

  20. Surgical site infections in paediatric otolaryngology operative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifeacho, S N; Bajaj, Y; Jephson, C G; Albert, D M

    2012-07-01

    An assessment of the rate of surgical site infections associated with elective paediatric otolaryngology surgical procedures. Prospective data was collected for a 3-week period for all children undergoing surgery where either mucosa or skin was breached. The parents of the children were requested to complete a questionnaire at 30 days after the operation. Data was collected on 80 consecutive cases. The majority of cases were admitted on the day of the procedure. The procedures included adenotonsillectomy (24), grommets (12), cochlear implantation (6), bone-anchored hearing aid (2), submandibular gland excision (1), branchial sinus excision (1), cystic hygroma excision (3), nasal glioma excision (1), microlaryngobronchoscopy (13), tracheostomy (3) and other procedures (14). Nearly half the cases had more than one operation done at the same time. 26/80 (32.5%) patients had a temporary or permanent implant inserted at the time of operation (grommet, bone-anchored hearing aid, cochlear implant). 25/80 (31%) operative fields were classed as clean and 55/80 (68.7%) as clean contaminated operations. The duration of the operation varied from 6 min to 142 min. Hospital antibiotic protocol was adhered to in 69/80 (86.3%) cases but not in 11/80 cases. In our series, 3/80 (3.7%) patients had an infection in the postoperative period. Surgical site infections do occur at an appreciable rate in paediatric otolaryngology. With the potential for serious consequences, reduction in the risk of surgical site infections is important. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Incidence of surgical site infection associated with robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, Elizabeth D; Hinze, Tim; Sayles, Harlan; Sholtz, Lee; Rupp, Mark E

    2010-08-01

    Robot-assisted surgery is minimally invasive and associated with less blood loss and shorter recovery time than open surgery. We aimed to determine the duration of robot-assisted surgical procedures and the incidence of postoperative surgical site infection (SSI) and to compare our data with the SSI incidence for open procedures according to national data. Retrospective cohort study. A 689-bed academic medical center. All patients who underwent a surgical procedure with use of a robotic surgical system during the period from 2000-2007. SSIs were defined and procedure types were classified according to National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. National data for comparison were from 1992-2004. Because of small sample size, procedures were grouped according to surgical site or wound classification. Sixteen SSIs developed after 273 robot-assisted procedures (5.9%). The mean surgical duration was 333.6 minutes. Patients who developed SSI had longer mean surgical duration than did patients who did not (558 vs 318 minutes; P<.001). The prostate and genitourinary group had 5.74 SSIs per 100 robot-assisted procedures (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.81-11.37), compared with 0.85 SSIs per 100 open procedures from national data. The gynecologic group had 10.00 SSIs per 100 procedures (95% CI, 2.79-30.10), compared with 1.72 SSIs per 100 open procedures. The colon and herniorrhaphy groups had 33.33 SSIs per 100 procedures (95% CI, 9.68-70.00) and 37.50 SSIs per 100 procedures (95% CI, 13.68-69.43), respectively, compared with 5.88 and 1.62 SSIs per 100 open procedures from national data. Patients with a clean-contaminated wound developed 6.1 SSIs per 100 procedures (95% CI, 3.5-10.3), compared with 2.59 SSIs per 100 open procedures. No significant differences in SSI rates were found for other groups. Increased incidence of SSI after some types of robot-assisted surgery compared with traditional open surgery may be related to the learning curve associated with use of the

  2. ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERN OF ORGANISMS CAUSING SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS (SSI

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    Rohini Murlidhar Gajbhiye

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND CDC defines surgical site infection as ‘Infections related to operative procedure that occurs at or near surgical incision within 30 days of operative procedure or within one year if the implant is left in situ’. Surgical site infection (SSI is 3 rd most frequently reported nosocomial infection (12%-16% as per National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of organisms causing SSI. MATERIALS AND METHODS During a two year study period in a tertiary care hospital, 19,127 patients underwent surgeries in various surgical departments. Of these 517 (2.7% developed surgical site infection. The surgical wounds were classified by CDC & NNIS criteria into 4 classes. Two wound swabs were taken and processed by standard microbiological techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility along with testing of ESBLs, MBLs, AmpCβ lactamases was done for all isolates causing SSI. RESULTS Among 19,127 patients, 517 (2.7% developed SSI. It was highest in patients of perforation peritonitis (11.99%.Among 517 specimens, 340 (65.76% showed growth and 177 (34.23% were culture negative. E.coli (23.33% was the commonest organism isolated followed by Acinetobacter spp. (16%, Klebsiella spp. (15.66%, Pseudomonas spp. (15.33%, S. aureus (10.33%, S. epidermidis(7.3%, Proteus spp. (6.00% and Citrobacter spp. (2.66%.Staphylococcus spp. were 100 % sensitive to Vancomycin & Linezolid. (27.5% S. aureus were MRSA and (17.5% were Inducible Clindamycin resistant (ICR. Enterobacteriaceae isolates showed maximum sensitivity towards Imipenem, Piperacillin-Tazobactam and Amikacin. Klebsiella spp. (40.62%, E.coli (35.89%, Citrobacter spp. (33.33%, Proteus spp. (26.08% were ESBL producers. Klebsiella spp. (17.18%, E.coli (10.25%, Proteus spp. (11.11% and Citrobacter spp. (8.69% were AmpC producers. Acinetobacter spp. (28.57% was commonest MBL producer followed by Klebsiella spp. (20

  3. SURGICAL SITE INFECTION IN ABDOMINAL SURGERIES: A CLINICAL STUDY

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    Amit

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A prospective study of incisional surgical site infection in abdominal surgeries was conducted to find out incidence, common predisposing factors and microbiological profile. METHODS: 375 patients who underwent abdominal surgeries were studied in a span of 1 year. They were divided into two groups – group 1 – 316 cases who did not develop Surgical Site Infection (SSI, the 2nd group – 59 cases that developed SSI. These patients were studied by interviewing and examination according to a set proforma. The results were statistically analyzed by comparing averages using Chi square chart for finding significance of difference where applicable. RESULT: The overall SSI incidence was 15.7 % (59/375. In elective surgeries, the SSI rate was 5.7% and in emergency surgeries, it was 28.6%. It was found that SSI increased with increasing age linearly. Other significant factors involved were increasing class of wound (dirty > clean wound class, increased preoperative stay, presence of remote site infection, increased duration of surgery and use of drains. E. coli was found to be the most common organism causing SSI in abdominal operations. CONCLUSION: SSI can be reduced by decreasing the preoperative hospital stay, appropriate antibiotic administration policies, preoperative control of remote site infections, adequate preoperative patient preparation, reducing the duration of surgery to minimum, judicious use of drains and intraoperative maintenance of asepsis and following operation theatre discipline properly.

  4. Surgical site infection prevention: time to move beyond the surgical care improvement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawn, Mary T; Vick, Catherine C; Richman, Joshua; Holman, William; Deierhoi, Rhiannon J; Graham, Laura A; Henderson, William G; Itani, Kamal M F

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) improved surgical site infection (SSI) rates using national data at the patient level for both SCIP adherence and SSI occurrence. The SCIP was established in 2006 with the goal of reducing surgical complications by 25% in 2010. National Veterans' Affairs (VA) data from 2005 to 2009 on adherence to 5 SCIP SSI prevention measures were linked to Veterans' Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program SSI outcome data. Effect of SCIP adherence and year of surgery on SSI outcome were assessed with logistic regression using generalized estimating equations, adjusting for procedure type and variables known to predict SSI. Correlation between hospital SCIP adherence and SSI rate was assessed using linear regression. There were 60,853 surgeries at 112 VA hospitals analyzed. SCIP adherence ranged from 75% for normothermia to 99% for hair removal and all significantly improved over the study period (P Surgical site infection occurred after 6.2% of surgeries (1.6% for orthopedic surgeries to 11.3% for colorectal surgeries). None of the 5 SCIP measures were significantly associated with lower odds of SSI after adjusting for variables known to predict SSI and procedure type. Year was not associated with SSI (P = 0.71). Hospital SCIP performance was not correlated with hospital SSI rates (r = -0.06, P = 0.54). Adherence to SCIP measures improved whereas risk-adjusted SSI rates remained stable. SCIP adherence was neither associated with a lower SSI rate at the patient level, nor associated with hospital SSI rates. Policies regarding continued SCIP measurement and reporting should be reassessed.

  5. Laparoscopic surgery compared with open surgery decreases surgical site infection in obese patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel M; Sørensen, Lars T

    2012-01-01

    : To compare surgical site infections rate in obese patients after laparoscopic surgery with open general abdominal surgery.......: To compare surgical site infections rate in obese patients after laparoscopic surgery with open general abdominal surgery....

  6. [Cause and prevention of surgical site infection and hypertrophic scars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Rei

    2012-03-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) occurs at the site of surgery within 1 month of an operation or within 1 year of an operation if a foreign body is implanted as part of the surgery. Most SSIs (about 70%) are superficial infections involving the skin and subcutaneous tissues only. The remaining infections are more serious and can involve tissues under the skin, organs, or implanted material. Hypertrophic scars( HSs) occur frequently on particular sites, including the anterior chest wall. The anterior chest wall is frequently subjected to skin stretching caused by the natural daily movements of the body. Most cases of SSIs and HSs can be prevented by (1) suture technique modification to prevent high stretching tension and ischemia, and (2) appropriate wound care after surgery. It would be useful to avoid subjecting wounded skin to sustained mechanical force, thereby permitting the wound to rest and heal normally.

  7. Costs Associated With Surgical Site Infections in Veterans Affairs Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Marin L; Cullen, Joseph J; Perencevich, Eli N; Vaughan Sarrazin, Mary S

    2014-06-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are potentially preventable complications that are associated with excess morbidity and mortality. To determine the excess costs associated with total, deep, and superficial SSIs among all operations and for high-volume surgical specialties. Surgical patients from 129 Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals were included. The Veterans Health Administration Decision Support System and VA Surgical Quality Improvement Program databases were used to assess costs associated with SSIs among VA patients who underwent surgery in fiscal year 2010. Linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate incremental costs associated with SSIs, controlling for patient risk factors, surgical risk factors, and hospital-level variation in costs. Costs of the index hospitalization and subsequent 30-day readmissions were included. Additional analysis determined potential cost savings of quality improvement programs to reduce SSI rates at hospitals with the highest risk-adjusted SSI rates. Among 54,233 VA patients who underwent surgery, 1756 (3.2%) experienced an SSI. Overall, 0.8% of the cohort had a deep SSI, and 2.4% had a superficial SSI. The mean unadjusted costs were $31,580 and $52,620 for patients without and with an SSI, respectively. In the risk-adjusted analyses, the relative costs were 1.43 times greater for patients with an SSI than for patients without an SSI (95% CI, 1.34-1.52; difference, $11,876). Deep SSIs were associated with 1.93 times greater costs (95% CI, 1.71-2.18; difference, $25,721), and superficial SSIs were associated with 1.25 times greater costs (95% CI, 1.17-1.35; difference, $7003). Among the highest-volume specialties, the greatest mean cost attributable to SSIs was $23,755 among patients undergoing neurosurgery, followed by patients undergoing orthopedic surgery, general surgery, peripheral vascular surgery, and urologic surgery. If hospitals in the highest 10th percentile (ie, the worst hospitals) reduced their SSI rates to the

  8. Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infection After Cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, David K; Nickel, Katelin B; Wallace, Anna E; Mines, Daniel; Tian, Fang; Symons, William J; Fraser, Victoria J; Olsen, Margaret A

    2017-01-01

    There are limited data on risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) after open or laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A retrospective cohort of commercially insured persons aged 18-64 years was assembled using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) procedure or Current Procedural Terminology, 4th edition codes for cholecystectomy from December 31, 2004 to December 31, 2010. Complex procedures and patients (eg, cancer, end-stage renal disease) and procedures with pre-existing infection were excluded. Surgical site infections within 90 days after cholecystectomy were identified by ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify independent risk factors for SSI. Surgical site infections were identified after 472 of 66566 (0.71%) cholecystectomies; incidence was higher after open (n = 51, 4.93%) versus laparoscopic procedures (n = 421, 0.64%; P infection, laparoscopic approach with acute cholecystitis/obstruction (hazards ratio [HR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27-1.96), open approach with (HR, 4.29; 95% CI, 2.45-7.52) or without acute cholecystitis/obstruction (HR, 4.04; 95% CI, 1.96-8.34), conversion to open approach with (HR, 4.71; 95% CI, 2.74-8.10) or without acute cholecystitis/obstruction (HR, 7.11; 95% CI, 3.87-13.08), bile duct exploration, postoperative chronic anemia, and postoperative pneumonia or urinary tract infection. Acute cholecystitis or obstruction was associated with significantly increased risk of SSI with laparoscopic but not open cholecystectomy. The risk of SSI was similar for planned open and converted procedures. These findings suggest that stratification by operative factors is important when comparing SSI rates between facilities.

  9. Operative Duration and Risk of Surgical Site Infection in Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Coy, Shannon; Simmons, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    The association of surgical duration with the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has not been quantified in neurosurgery. We investigated the association of operative duration in neurosurgical procedures with the incidence of SSI. We performed a retrospective cohort study involving patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures from 2005 to 2012 and were registered in the American College of Surgeons National Quality Improvement Project registry. To control for confounding, we used multivariable regression models and propensity score conditioning. During the study period there were 94,744 patients who underwent a neurosurgical procedure and met the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 4.1% developed a postoperative SSI within 30 days. Multivariable logistic regression showed an association between longer operative duration with higher incidence of SSI (odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.20). Compared with procedures of moderate duration (third quintile, 40th-60th percentile), patients undergoing the longest procedures (>80th percentile) had higher odds (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.86-2.31) of developing SSI. The shortest procedures (surgical registry, longer operative duration was associated with increased incidence of SSI for neurosurgical procedures. These results can be used by neurosurgeons to inform operative management and to stratify patients with regard to SSI risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Patients at High-Risk for Surgical Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueck, Krislynn M; Kao, Lillian S

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a significant healthcare quality issue, resulting in increased morbidity, disability, length of stay, resource utilization, and costs. Identification of high-risk patients may improve pre-operative counseling, inform resource utilization, and allow modifications in peri-operative management to optimize outcomes. Review of the pertinent English-language literature. High-risk surgical patients may be identified on the basis of individual risk factors or combinations of factors. In particular, statistical models and risk calculators may be useful in predicting infectious risks, both in general and for SSIs. These models differ in the number of variables; inclusion of pre-operative, intra-operative, or post-operative variables; ease of calculation; and specificity for particular procedures. Furthermore, the models differ in their accuracy in stratifying risk. Biomarkers may be a promising way to identify patients at high risk of infectious complications. Although multiple strategies exist for identifying surgical patients at high risk for SSIs, no one strategy is superior for all patients. Further efforts are necessary to determine if risk stratification in combination with risk modification can reduce SSIs in these patient populations.

  11. The effect of antibiotic irrigation of surgical Incisions in prevention of Surgical Site Infection

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    Mirsharifi S R

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: surgical site infection is one of the most common post operative complications alongside with sepsis, cardiovascular, pulmonary and thromboembolic complications. The development of surgical site infection is related to three factors: the degree of microbial contamination of the wound during surgery, the duration of the procedure, and host factors such as diabetes, malnutrition, obesity, immune suppression, and a number of other underlying disease states. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of topical cephazolin in controlling infection of the site of surgery after non-laparoscopic cholecystecomy.Methods: One hundred and two of patients referred to the outpatient clinic of Imam Khomeini Hospital from fall 2005 to fall 2006 non- laparoscopic cholecystectomy enrolled in a randomized clinical trial. All patients underwent the same procedure of anesthesia and surgery and they were randomly assigned into two groups of cases with irrigation of the site of surgery with 1g of topical Cephazolin prior to the termination of the operation- and controls. Cephazolin is a first generation cephalosporin which binds penicillin binding protein and is a potent cell wall synthesis inhibitor. The patients were followed up for six weeks for symptoms and signs of infection including discharge of the wound; and presence of pain, warmness, swelling and erythema of the wound.Results: There were no significant differences between two study groups regarding mean age, duration of operation, and sex. There was no significant difference in the incidence of infection of the site of surgery (11.8% in both groups with p=0.99 between two groups.Conclusion: Analyzing the collected data confirms that prophylactic use of topical cephazolin was unable to decrease the risk of infection of the site of surgery in patients undergoing non- laparascopic cheolecystectomy.

  12. Factors predicting surgical site infection after posterior lumbar surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Hui; Yang, Da-Long; Jiang, Li-Qiang; Zhang, Li-Jun; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This is a retrospective study. The purpose of this study is to explore incidence and risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) after posterior lumbar surgery. SSI is a common complication after posterior lumbar surgery, bringing mental and physical pain and prolonging hospital stay. However, predisposing factors, as reported less, remain controversial. Patients who underwent posterior lumbar surgery at 3 centers between 2006 and 2016 were included. The possible factors include 3 aspects: demographic variables-age, sex, body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip radio (WHR), hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, smoking, drinking, steroidal injection, surgical time between June and September, preoperative shower; blood test variables-white blood cell (WBC), neutrophil, red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), total protein (TP), albumin, albumin/globulin (A/G), C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and surgical related variables-operation time, blood loss, operative level, instrumentation, incision length. Factors related with SSI were also performed by multivariate analysis. The prevalence of SSI was 3.00% (267 cases of 8879) had a postoperative wound infection. There were significant difference in WHR (0.92 vs 0.83), WBC (4.31 vs 6.69), TP (58.7 vs 65.2), albumin (36.9 vs 43.2), CRP (2.01 vs 0.57), PCT (0.097 vs 0.067), operation time (217.9 vs 195.7), blood loss (997.1 vs 915.3) and operative level (3.05 vs 2.45) and incision length (24.1 vs 20.0) between SSI group and non-SSI group. >60 years old, female, BMI 30.0, diabetes, male smoking, preoperative steroidal injection, surgical time between June and September, no preoperative shower, instrumentation surgery were risk factors for SSI after posterior lumbar surgery. Many factors, >60 years old, female, BMI, WHR, diabetes, male smoking, preoperative steroidal injection, surgical time between June and September, preoperative shower, WBC, TP, albumin, CRP, PCT

  13. Improving prediction of surgical site infection risk with multilevel modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Saunders

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surgical site infection (SSI surveillance is a key factor in the elaboration of strategies to reduce SSI occurrence and in providing surgeons with appropriate data feedback (risk indicators, clinical prediction rule. AIM: To improve the predictive performance of an individual-based SSI risk model by considering a multilevel hierarchical structure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data were collected anonymously by the French SSI active surveillance system in 2011. An SSI diagnosis was made by the surgical teams and infection control practitioners following standardized criteria. A random 20% sample comprising 151 hospitals, 502 wards and 62280 patients was used. Three-level (patient, ward, hospital hierarchical logistic regression models were initially performed. Parameters were estimated using the simulation-based Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedure. RESULTS: A total of 623 SSI were diagnosed (1%. The hospital level was discarded from the analysis as it did not contribute to variability of SSI occurrence (p  = 0.32. Established individual risk factors (patient history, surgical procedure and hospitalization characteristics were identified. A significant heterogeneity in SSI occurrence between wards was found (median odds ratio [MOR] 3.59, 95% credibility interval [CI] 3.03 to 4.33 after adjusting for patient-level variables. The effects of the follow-up duration varied between wards (p<10-9, with an increased heterogeneity when follow-up was <15 days (MOR 6.92, 95% CI 5.31 to 9.07]. The final two-level model significantly improved the discriminative accuracy compared to the single level reference model (p<10-9, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.84. CONCLUSION: This study sheds new light on the respective contribution of patient-, ward- and hospital-levels to SSI occurrence and demonstrates the significant impact of the ward level over and above risk factors present at patient level (i.e., independently from patient case-mix.

  14. Surgical site infection--the authors' own prospective research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Danuta; Grzebieniak, Zygmunt

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infection is a common complication in surgery, which increases treatment cost, extends hospitalization time and can lead to septic complications. The aim of the study was analysis of postoperative infections in own material and finding significant risk factors with preserving the obligatory procedures in the clinic. Prospective analysis of 270 consecutively operated patients aged from 18 to 101 was performed with observation of early infection until 7th day postoperatively. Factors judged included: age, sex, BMI, operation type: elective or urgent, physical preparation for surgery, antibiotic prophylaxis, length and type of surgery. Wound observation card was used. Data were analysed statistically (t-Student's test, chi2 test, U Mann Whitney test and logistic regression analysis). Wound infection was observed in 33 patients (12.22% of the entire group). In 24 (8.88%) it was a superficial infection and in 9 (3.33%) deep infection. Statistically significant risk factors were age, presence of diabetes, operation time and operations on large bowel. The average age of patients with present infection was 61.2. In the group without infection there were 6,3% patients with diabetes and 20.8% in the group with infection. In our study diabetes increased the risk of infection four times. The longer the operation time the higher was the risk of deep infection (without complications 76.2 minutes, superficial 94.9 minutes, deep 148.9 minutes). Operations on large bowel were performed in 11.9%of all study patients. In the group of 33 patients with surgical wound infection, 39.4% had colon surgery, 39.4% of all deep infections and 29.2% of all superficial infections. In own study material significant risk factors of surgical wound infection were: age, presence of diabetes, length of operation, large bowel surgery. In preoperative course risk factors should be identified to perform certain prophylactic procedures to lower the risk of infectious complications.

  15. Evidence update on prevention of surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaper, David; Ousey, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common healthcare-associated infection and complicates up to 10-20% of operations with considerable strain on healthcare resources. Apart from the widely adopted use of appropriate hair removal, antibiotic prophylaxis, avoidance of hypothermia and perioperative glycaemic control to reduce SSIs, this review has considered new research and systematic reviews, and whether their findings should be included in guidelines. The efficacy of preoperative bathing/showering, antibiotic prophylaxis for clean surgery and perioperative oxygen supplementation to reduce the risk of SSI is still in doubt. By contrast, the use of 2% chlorhexidine in alcohol skin preparation, postoperative negative pressure wound therapy and antiseptic surgical dressings do show promise. Antimicrobial sutures in independent meta-analyses were found to reduce the risk of SSI after all classes of surgery (except dirty) whereas the use of wound guards, or diathermy skin incision (compared with scalpel incision), did not. The incidence of SSI after surgery is not falling. Based on this review of published trials and evidence-based systematic reviews some advances might be included into these care bundles. More research is needed together with improved compliance with care bundles.

  16. Recognition and discrimination of tissue-marking dye color by surgical pathologists: recommendations to avoid errors in margin assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew S; Hache, Kelly Dakin

    2014-09-01

    A variety of tissue-marking dye (TMD) colors can be used to indicate surgical pathology specimen margins; however, the ability of pathologists to differentiate between specific microscopic margin colors has not been assessed systematically. This study aimed to evaluate pathologists' accuracy in identifying TMD color and determine the least ambiguous combinations of colors for use in surgical pathology. Seven colors of TMD were obtained from three manufacturers and applied to excess formalin-fixed uterine tissue. Study blocks contained multiple tissue pieces, each marked with a different color from the same manufacturer. Slides were assessed by eight participants for color and color distinctness of each piece of tissue. Black, green, red, and blue TMDs were accurately identified by most participants, but participants had difficulty identifying violet, orange, and yellow TMDs. Black, green, and blue TMDs were most commonly rated as "confidently discernable." Pathologists have difficulty identifying and distinguishing certain colors of TMDs. The combined use of certain colors of TMDs (yellow/orange/red, blue/violet, and red/violet) within the same specimen should be avoided to decrease the risk of inaccurately reporting specimen margins. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  17. SURGICAL RISK INDEX AND SURGICAL SITE INFECTION IN POSTPARTUM WOMEN SUBMITTED TO CESAREAN SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Machado Chianca

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Considering the use of active surveillance assists in infection identification and the need for studies that use Surgical Risk Index (SRI for assessment of Surgical Site Infection (SSI in cesareans, this study aims to determine the incidence of SSI and analyze the applicability of SRI in the prediction of SSI in women in the postpartum period after being submitted to a cesarean section at a university hospital between April 2012 and March of 2013. Methods: Prospective cohort study. Information notifying SSI by active surveillance was collected daily from the medical records. After hospital discharge, the mothers were contacted through telephone calls to identify infection criteria within 30 days after the cesarean. Descriptive and comparative analyses were performed. The chi-square test was used to compare groups. Results: 737 cesareans were performed. Telephone contact was achieved with 507 (68.8% women up to 30 days postpartum, with loss of follow-up of 230 cases (31.2%. The medical consultation in the post-partum period occurred with 188 (37.08% women, with whom telephone contact was obtained, on average, 17.28 days (SD=8.39 after delivery. It was verified that 21 patients met the criteria for SSI, with a 4.14% rate. A total of 12 cases (57.1% were classified as superficial SSI, 5 (23.8% as deep and 4 (19.1% as infection of organs and cavities. The SRI and its risk variables were not associated with SSI in patients submitted to cesarean sections. Conclusion: The SRI and the risk variables included in this index were not associated to SSI in patients submitted to cesarean sections. KEYWORDS: Cesarean Section; Surgical Wound Infection; Epidemiological Surveillance; Infection Control; Risk Index; Disease Notification.

  18. The effect of Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) compliance on surgical site infections (SSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataife, Guido; Weinberg, Daniel A; Wong, Hui-Hsing; Kahn, Katherine L

    2014-02-01

    The Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) has developed a set of process compliance measures in an attempt to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs). Previous research has been inconclusive on whether compliance with these measures is associated with lower SSI rates. To determine whether hospitals with higher levels of compliance with SCIP measures have lower incidence of SSIs and to identify the measures that are most likely to drive this association. Analysis of linked SCIP compliance rates and SSIs on 295 hospital groups observed annually over the study period 2007-2010. A hospital group comprises all hospitals sharing identical categories for location by state, teaching status, bed size, and urban/rural location. We used a generalized linear model regression with logistic link and binomial family to estimate the association between 3 SCIP measures and SSI rates. Hospital groups with higher compliance rates had significantly lower SSI rates for 2 SCIP measures: antibiotic timing and appropriate antibiotic selection. For a hospital group of median characteristics, a 10% improvement in the measure provision of antibiotic 1 hour before intervention led to a 5.3% decrease in the SSI rates (PSSI rates, supporting the validity of the 2 publicly available healthcare-associated infection metrics.

  19. Improving Surveillance and Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Melissa; Hersey, Diane; Harrison, Sheilah; Joy, Brian; Naguib, Aymen; Galantowicz, Mark; Simsic, Janet

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative cardiovascular surgical site infections are preventable events that may lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. To improve surgical wound surveillance and reduce the incidence of surgical site infections. An institutional review of surgical site infections led to implementation of 8 surveillance and process measures: appropriate preparation the night before surgery and the day of surgery, use of appropriate preparation solution in the operating room, appropriate timing of preoperative antibiotic administration, placement of a photograph of the surgical site in the patient's chart at discharge, sending a photograph of the surgical site to the patient's primary care physician, 30-day follow-up of the surgical site by an advanced nurse practitioner, and placing a photograph of the surgical site obtained on postoperative day 30 in the patient's chart. Mean overall compliance with the 8 measures from March 2013 through February 2014 was 88%. Infections occurred in 10 of 417 total operative cases (2%) in 2012, in 8 of 437 total operative cases (2%) in 2013, and in 7 of 452 total operative cases (1.5%) in 2014. Institution of the surveillance process has resulted in improved identification of suspected surgical site infections via direct rather than indirect measures, accurate identification of all surgical site infections based on definitions of the National Healthcare Safety Network, collaboration with all persons involved, and enhanced communication with patients' family members and referring physicians. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  20. Deep Surgical Site Infections Following Pediatric Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David A; Glotzbecker, Michael P; Timothy Hresko, M; Hedequist, Daniel J

    2016-06-08

    This is the first reported series looking specifically at factors associated with deep surgical site infections (SSI) following pediatric cervical spine surgery. To identify risk factors present in pediatric patients who are at risk for SSI following cervical spine surgery. Level of evidence: level IV-retrospective case series. To date there are no studies regarding SSI in pediatric cervical spine surgery and thus no benchmark data or risk factors have been identified. Patients with acute deep SSIs occurring within 90 days of the index operation were identified. Patient and surgical characteristics were analyzed for possible predictors of SSI outcome using penalized likelihood logistic regression analysis. Characteristics analyzed included: age, diagnosis, comorbidity, levels fused, approach, implants used, allograft, halo, body mass index, revision, antibiotic dosing, and occipital plating. A total of 112 patients were included in the study at a mean age of 12.5 years (2 to 18 y). Comorbidities were present in 51 (46%) patients, 15 patients had a documented connective tissue disorder (CTD). The mean number of levels fused was 3.7 (2 to 7) and mean number of screws was 4.4 (2 to 11). Allograft was used alone in 48 patients, occipital plating in 28 patients, and a halo in 39 patients. Deep SSI occurred in 3 patients: two of which had a CTD (1 Trisomy 21, 1 Ehlers-Danlos) and 1 patient with postradiation cervical kyphosis. All were gram-positive infections requiring return to operating room with prolonged IV antibiotics. All patients recovered and fused with spinal implant retention. The incidence of deep SSI was 2.7%. It was determined that a CTD was the only significant predictor of SSI. Subjects with a CTD had 12 times the odds of SSI [odds ratio=12 (1.5, 137.0); P=0.02]. In our series of pediatric patients the incidence of a deep SSI was 2.7%. The only predictor of SSI was the presence of a CTD.

  1. [Surgical site infections. Effectiveness of polyhexamethylene biguanide wound dressings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Trapero, Carlos; Martín-Torrijos, María; Fernández-Conde, Lourdes; Torrijos-Torrijos, Manuela; Manzano-Martín, Elena; Pacheco-del Cerro, J Luis; Díez-Valladares, Luis I

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the effectiveness of a 0,2% polyhexamethylene biguanide dressing against the infection of a superficial surgical incision site (ISSIS) after a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A randomized longitudinal single-blind study was conducted with two randomly assigned groups consisting of patients diagnosed with cholelithiasis soon to undergo an elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The dependent variable was ISSIS using the criteria of the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) (1999). The independent variables were the use of a 0,2% polyhexamethylene biguanide dressing (Group A), or a non occlusive dressing (Group B). The National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) index was used for assessing the risk of infection. The χ(2) test or Fisher test was used to evaluate the correlation between the independent variables. Of the total 197 cases, 96 (48.7%) were in group A and 101 (51.3%) in group B. No statistical differences were found between genders, duration of surgery (51.4 ± 21.2 vs 52.6 ± 23.4 minutes, in group A and B, respectively), or the NNIS index in either group. Six patients had an ISSIS (3.04%): 1 in group A (1.04%) and 5 in group B (4.95%), P=.212. The study was unable to correlate an ISSIS with the type of surgical dressing that was used, although it was not possible to rule out an association, as the study did not have sufficient statistical power. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Improved Surgical Site Infection (SSI) rate through accurately assessed surgical wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Honeymol; Nimeri, Abdelrahman; Ellahham, Samer

    2015-01-01

    Sheikh Khalifa Medical City's (SKMC) Surgery Institute was identified as a high outlier in Surgical Site Infections (SSI) based on the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) - Semi-Annual Report (SAR) in January 2012. The aim of this project was to improve SSI rates through accurate wound classification. We identified SSI rate reduction as a performance improvement and safety priority at SKMC, a tertiary referral center. We used the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) best practice guidelines as a guide. ACS NSQIP is a clinical registry that provides risk-adjusted clinical outcome reports every six months. The rates of SSI are reported in an observed/expected ratio. The expected ratio is calculated based on the risk factors of the patients which include wound classification. We established a multidisciplinary SSI taskforce. The members of the SSI taskforce included the ACS NSQIP team members, quality, surgeons, nurses, infection control, IT, pharmacy, microbiology, and it was chaired by a colorectal surgeon. The taskforce focused on five areas: pre-op showering and hair removal, skin antisepsis, prophylactic antibiotics, peri-operative maintenance of glycaemia, and normothermia. We planned audits to evaluate our wound classification and our SSI rates based on the SAR. Our expected SSI rates in general surgery and the whole department were 2.52% and 1.70% respectively, while our observed SSI rates were 4.68% and 3.57% respectively, giving us a high outlier status with an odd's ratio of 1.72 and 2.03. Wound classifications were identified as an area of concern. For example, wound classifications were preoperatively selected based on the default wound classification of the booked procedure in the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) which led to under classifying wounds in many occasions. A total of 998 cases were reviewed, our rate of incorrect wound classification

  3. Quality improvement initiative: Preventative Surgical Site Infection Protocol in Vascular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizh, David; Ascher, Enrico; Raza Rizvi, Syed Ali; Hingorani, Anil; Amaturo, Michael; Johnson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Objective A quality improvement initiative was employed to decrease single institution surgical site infection rate in open lower extremity revascularization procedures. In an attempt to lower patient morbidity, we developed and implemented the Preventative Surgical Site Infection Protocol in Vascular Surgery. Surgical site infections lead to prolonged hospital stays, adjunctive procedure, and additive costs. We employed targeted interventions to address the common risk factors that predispose patients to post-operative complications. Methods Retrospective review was performed between 2012 and 2016 for all surgical site infections after revascularization procedures of the lower extremity. A quality improvement protocol was initiated in January 2015. Primary outcome was the assessment of surgical site infection rate reduction in the pre-protocol vs. post-protocol era. Secondary outcomes evaluated patient demographics, closure method, perioperative antibiotic coverage, and management outcomes. Results Implementation of the protocol decreased the surgical site infection rate from 6.4% to 1.6% p = 0.0137). Patient demographics and comorbidities were assessed and failed to demonstrate a statistically significant difference among the infection and no-infection groups. Wound closure with monocryl suture vs. staple proved to be associated with decreased surgical site infection rate ( p surgical site infections in the vascular surgery population are effective and necessary. Our data suggest that there may be benefit in the incorporation of MRSA and Gram-negative coverage as part of the Surgical Care Improvement Project perioperative guidelines.

  4. Surgical site infection in patients submitted to heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jussara Aparecida Souza do Nascimento; Ferretti-Rebustini, Renata Eloah de Lucena; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2016-08-29

    to analyze the occurrence and predisposing factors for surgical site infection in patients submitted to heart transplantation, evaluating the relationship between cases of infections and the variables related to the patient and the surgical procedure. retrospective cohort study, with review of the medical records of patients older than 18 years submitted to heart transplantation. The correlation between variables was evaluated by using Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test. the sample consisted of 86 patients, predominantly men, with severe systemic disease, submitted to extensive preoperative hospitalizations. Signs of surgical site infection were observed in 9.3% of transplanted patients, with five (62.5%) superficial incisional, two (25%) deep and one (12.5%) case of organ/space infection. There was no statistically significant association between the variables related to the patient and the surgery. there was no association between the studied variables and the cases of surgical site infection, possibly due to the small number of cases of infection observed in the sample investigated. analisar a ocorrência e os fatores predisponentes para infecção de sítio cirúrgico em pacientes submetidos a transplante cardíaco e verificar a relação entre os casos de infecção e as variáveis referentes ao paciente e ao procedimento cirúrgico. estudo de coorte retrospectivo, com exame dos prontuários médicos de pacientes maiores de 18 anos, submetidos a transplante cardíaco. A correlação entre variáveis foi realizada por meio dos testes exato de Fischer e de Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon. a amostra foi constituída por 86 pacientes, predominantemente homens, com doença sistêmica grave, submetidos a internações pré-operatórias extensas. Apresentaram sinais de infecção do sítio cirúrgico 9,3% dos transplantados, sendo cinco (62,5%) incisionais superficiais, duas (25%) profundas e um (12,5%) caso de infecção de órgão/espaço. Não houve associa

  5. Evaluation of adherence to measures for the prevention of surgical site infections by the surgical team

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Cristina de Oliveira; Camila Sarmento Gama

    2015-01-01

    AbstractOBJECTIVEEvaluate pre- and intraoperative practices adopted by medical and nursing teams for the prevention of surgical infections.METHODA prospective study carried out in the period of April to May 2013, in a surgical center of a university hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais.RESULTS18 surgeries were followed and 214 surgical gloves were analyzed, of which 23 (10.7%) had postoperative glove perforation detected, with 52.2% being perceived by users. Hair removal was performed on ...

  6. Surgical Site Infections Following Pediatric Ambulatory Surgery: An Epidemiologic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Michael L; Jan, Dominique; Nassim, Janelle; Choi, Jaeun; Choi, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify surgical site infection (SSI) rates following pediatric ambulatory surgery, SSI outcomes and risk factors, and sensitivity and specificity of SSI administrative billing codes. DESIGN Retrospective chart review of pediatric ambulatory surgeries with International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for SSI, and a systematic random sampling of 5% of surgeries without SSI ICD-9 codes, all adjudicated for SSI on the basis of an ambulatory-adapted National Healthcare Safety Network definition. SETTING Urban pediatric tertiary care center April 1, 2009-March 31, 2014. METHODS SSI rates and sensitivity and specificity of ICD-9 codes were estimated using sampling design, and risk factors were analyzed in case-rest of cohort, and case-control, designs. RESULTS In 15,448 pediatric ambulatory surgeries, 34 patients had ICD-9 codes for SSI and 25 met the adapted National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. One additional SSI was identified with systematic random sampling. The SSI rate following pediatric ambulatory surgery was 2.9 per 1,000 surgeries (95% CI, 1.2-6.9). Otolaryngology surgeries demonstrated significantly lower SSI rates compared with endocrine (P=.001), integumentary (P=.001), male genital (Psurgeries. Almost half of patients with an SSI were admitted, 88% received antibiotics, and 15% returned to the operating room. No risk factors were associated with SSI. The sensitivity of ICD-9 codes for SSI following ambulatory surgery was 55.31% (95% CI, 12.69%-91.33%) and specificity was 99.94% (99.89%-99.97%). CONCLUSIONS SSI following pediatric ambulatory surgery occurs at an appreciable rate and conveys morbidity on children. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:931-938.

  7. Laparoscope use and surgical site infections in digestive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romy, Sébastien; Eisenring, Marie-Christine; Bettschart, Vincent; Petignat, Christiane; Francioli, Patrick; Troillet, Nicolas

    2008-04-01

    To compare surgical site infection (SSI) rates in open or laparoscopic appendectomy, cholecystectomy, and colon surgery. To investigate the effect of laparoscopy on SSI in these interventions. Lower rates of SSI have been reported among various advantages associated with laparoscopy when compared with open surgery, particularly in cholecystectomy. However, biases such as the lack of postdischarge follow-up and confounding factors might have contributed to the observed differences between the 2 techniques. This observational study was based on prospectively collected data from an SSI surveillance program in 8 Swiss hospitals between March 1998 and December 2004, including a standardized postdischarge follow-up. SSI rates were compared between laparoscopic and open interventions. Factors associated with SSI were identified by using logistic regression models to adjust for potential confounding factors. SSI rates in laparoscopic and open interventions were respectively 59/1051 (5.6%) versus 117/1417 (8.3%) in appendectomy (P = 0.01), 46/2606 (1.7%) versus 35/444 (7.9%) in cholecystectomy (P < 0.0001), and 35/311 (11.3%) versus 400/1781 (22.5%) in colon surgery (P < 0.0001). After adjustment, laparoscopic interventions were associated with a decreased risk for SSI: OR = 0.61 (95% CI 0.43-0.87) in appendectomy, 0.27 (0.16-0.43) in cholecystectomy, and 0.43 (0.29-0.63) in colon surgery. The observed effect of laparoscopic techniques was due to a reduction in the rates of incisional infections, rather than in those of organ/space infections. When feasible, a laparoscopic approach should be preferred over open surgery to lower the risks of SSI.

  8. Emergence of coryneforms in osteomyelitis and orthopaedic surgical site infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meher Rizvi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCoryneform species other than Corynebacterium diphtheriae are coming up as important pathogens with the potential to cause serious and life-threatening infections not only in immunocompromised but in immunocompetent individuals as well. The exact infectious potential of these bacteria and their rational antimicrobial treatment is a challenging but essential task.Method The study was conducted in the Department of Microbiology and the Department of Orthopaedics, JNMCH, AMU, Aligarh between August 2007 and May 2009. Pus samples were collected from patients of osteomyelitis and other bone infections including orthopaedic surgical site infections. The Corynebacterium species isolated in the study was identified using standard microbiological techniques and antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done by Kirby bauer disc diffusion method.ResultsA total of 312 Corynebacterium species were isolated. The majority of the coryneforms were isolated from the immunocompetent patients 270 (86.54%. C.jeikium was the most common coryneform isolated. Nearly half of the patients 153 (49.04% had acute infection caused by Corynebacterium species after orthopaedic surgery, a quarter 66 (21.15% had chronic infection and 72 (23.08% patients had device-related infection. Coryneforms exhibited maximum resistance to aminoglycosides (58.65% and β-lactams (penicillin group- 57.55%. C.jeikium was found to be the most resistant amongst all the Corynebacterium species.ConclusionThe study highlights the fact that the coryneforms are no longer just opportunistic pathogens but they are also becoming important pathogens among immunocompetent individuals as well. The emergence of drug resistance amongst these isolates is of most concern. More studies should be done on identification and on antimicrobial susceptibility of these organisms for the proper treatment of patients with such infections.

  9. Recommendations for prevention of surgical site infection in adult elective arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Chuluyán

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections complicating orthopedic implant surgeries prolong hospital stay and increase risk of readmission, hospitalization costs and mortality. These recommendations are aimed at: (i optimizing compliance and incorporating habits in all surgery phases by detecting risk factors for surgical site infections which are potentially correctable or modifiable; and (ii optimizing preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis as well as intraoperative and postoperative care

  10. Risk Factors for Surgical-Site Infection Following Common Femoral Artery Endarterectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, Wouter J. M.; Verhoeven, Bart A. N.; van de Mortel, Rob H. W.; Moll, Frans L.; de Vries, Jean-Paul P. M.

    2009-01-01

    Surgical-site infection is a major complication following endarterectomy of the common femoral artery. The aim of this single-center study was to determine risk factors for surgical-site infection after endarterectomy of the common femoral artery and especially the possible association between patch

  11. Implant associated surgical site infection in orthopaedics: a regional hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, K A; Enweani, U N; Katchy, A U; Madu, A J; Aguwa, E N

    2011-01-01

    Post operative surgical site infection following implant surgery is a major problem in orthopedic surgical practice. Infection occurring after internal fixation of a fracture is a devastating complication and may be difficult to treat. The frequency of occurrence of surgical site infection has decreased with improvements in aseptic technique. The objectives of the study are to determine the incidence of surgical site infection following orthopaedic related implant surgeries and to indentify the predisposing factors. The study was a prospective study conducted at the National orthopedic hospital, Enugu. Wound surveillance was carried out for the 97 patients included in this study for a period of 6 months postoperatively. The diagnosis of surgical site infection was in accordance with the CDC's guideline for prevention of surgical site infection published in 1999. The study included 61 males and 36 females giving a ratio of 1.7:1. The study population was aged 7 to 83 years with a mean age of 38.7 +/- 18.3 years. The infection rate was found to be 9.3% with staphylococcus aureus as the most common causative organism in 55.6% of cases. Two of the nine infected cases required implant removal. Significant factor was a theatre population of more than 6 persons. Surgical site infection following implant surgery is relatively common in our environment with staphylococcus aureus as the major causative organism. Increased theatre populations increase the risk of implant associated surgical site infection.

  12. Late Surgical-Site Infection in Immediate Implant-Based Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Indranil; Pusic, Andrea L; Wilkins, Edwin G; Hamill, Jennifer B; Chen, Xiaoxue; Kim, Hyungjin M; Guldbrandsen, Gretchen; Chun, Yoon S

    2017-01-01

    Surgical-site infection causes devastating reconstructive failure in implant-based breast reconstructions. Large national database studies offer insights into complication rates, but only capture outcomes within 30 days postoperatively. This study evaluates both early and late surgical-site infection in immediate implant-based reconstruction and identifies predictors. As part of the Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium Study, 1662 implant-based breast reconstructions in 1024 patients were evaluated for early versus late surgical-site infection. Early surgical-site infection was defined as infection occurring within 30 days postoperatively; late surgical-site infection was defined as infection occurring 31 days to 1 year postoperatively. Minor infection required oral antibiotics only, and major infection required hospitalization and/or surgical treatment. Direct-to-implant patients had 1-year follow-up, and tissue expander patients had 1-year post-exchange follow-up. Among 1491 tissue expander and 171 direct-to-implant reconstructions, overall surgical-site infection rate for tissue expander was 5.7 percent (85 of 1491) after first-stage, 2.5 percent (31 of 1266) after second-stage, and 9.9 percent (17 of 171) for direct-to-implant reconstruction. Over 47 to 71 percent of surgical-site infection complications were late surgical-site infection. Multivariate analysis identified radiotherapy and increasing body mass index as significant predictors of late surgical-site infection. No significant difference between the direct-to-implant and tissue expander groups in the occurrence of early, late, or overall surgical-site infection was found. The majority of surgical-site infection complications in immediate implant-based breast reconstructions occur more than 30 days after both first-stage and second-stage procedures. Radiotherapy and obesity are significantly associated with late-onset surgical-site infection. Current studies limited to early complications do

  13. Risk factors for acute surgical site infections after lumbar surgery: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Qi; Song, Quanwei; Guo, Runsheng; Bi, Haidi; Liu, Xuqiang; Yu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Jianghao; Dai, Min; Zhang, Bin

    2017-07-19

    Currently, many scholars are concerned about the treatment of postoperative infection; however, few have completed multivariate analyses to determine factors that contribute to the risk of infection. Therefore, we conducted a multivariate analysis of a retrospectively collected database to analyze the risk factors for acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery, including fracture fixation, lumbar fusion, and minimally invasive lumbar surgery. We retrospectively reviewed data from patients who underwent lumbar surgery between 2014 and 2016, including lumbar fusion, internal fracture fixation, and minimally invasive surgery in our hospital's spinal surgery unit. Patient demographics, procedures, and wound infection rates were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and risk factors were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. Twenty-six patients (2.81%) experienced acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery in our study. The patients' mean body mass index, smoking history, operative time, blood loss, draining time, and drainage volume in the acute surgical site infection group were significantly different from those in the non-acute surgical site infection group (p surgical site infection group were significantly different than those in the non-acute surgical site infection group (p surgical site infection following lumbar surgery. In order to reduce the risk of infection following lumbar surgery, patients should be evaluated for the risk factors noted above.

  14. Impact of postdischarge surveillance on surgical site infection rates for several surgical procedures: results from the nosocomial surveillance network in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manniën, Judith; Wille, Jan C; Snoeren, Ruud L M M; Hof, Susan van den

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the number of surgical site infections (SSIs) registered after hospital discharge with respect to various surgical procedures and to identify the procedures for which postdischarge surveillance (PDS) is most important. DESIGN: Prospective SSI surveillance with voluntary PDS.

  15. Advance pre-operative chlorhexidine reduces the incidence of surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zywiel, Michael G; Daley, Jacqueline A; Delanois, Ronald E; Naziri, Qais; Johnson, Aaron J; Mont, Michael A

    2011-07-01

    Surgical site infections following elective knee arthroplasties occur most commonly as a result of colonisation by the patient's native skin flora. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of deep surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty patients who used an advance cutaneous disinfection protocol and who were compared to patients who had peri-operative preparation only. All adult reconstruction surgeons at a single institution were approached to voluntarily provide patients with chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths and a printed sheet instructing their use the night before and morning of surgery. Records for all knee arthroplasties performed between January 2007 and December 2008 were reviewed to determine the incidence of deep incisional and periprosthetic surgical site infections. Overall, the advance pre-operative protocol was used in 136 of 912 total knee arthroplasties (15%). A lower incidence of surgical site infection was found in patients who used the advance cutaneous preparation protocol as compared to patients who used the in-hospital protocol alone. These findings were maintained when patients were stratified by surgical infection risk category. No surgical site infections occurred in the 136 patients who completed the protocol as compared to 21 infections in 711 procedures (3.0%) performed in patients who did not. Patient-directed skin disinfection using chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths the evening before, and the morning of, elective knee arthroplasty appeared to effectively reduce the incidence of surgical site infection when compared to patients who underwent in-hospital skin preparation only.

  16. A comparative assessment of surgeons' tracking methods for surgical site infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.H. van Ramshorst (Gabrielle); M.C. Vos (Margreet); D. den Hartog (Dennis); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J. Jeekel (Hans); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The incidence of surgical site infections (SSI) is considered increasingly to be an indicator of quality of care. We conducted a study in which daily inspection of the surgical incision was performed by an independent, trained team to monitor the incidence of SSI using U.S. C

  17. Surgical site infection after osteotomy of the adult spine: does type of osteotomy matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Surgical site infection after spinal surgery is frequently seen. It occurs between 0.7% and 12% of patients, leading to higher morbidity, mortality, and health-care costs. Osteotomy procedures are known to have increased blood losses and surgical times when compared with other sp

  18. Identification of potential surgical site infections leveraging an enterprise clinical information warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Jennifer; Erdal, Selnur; Wellington, Linda; Mekhjian, Hagop; Kamal, Jyoti

    2008-11-06

    At The Ohio State University Medical Center (OSUMC), infection control practitioners (ICPs) need an accurate list of patients undergoing defined operative procedures to track surgical site infections. Using data from the OSUMC Information Warehouse (IW), we have created an automated report detailing required data. This report also displays associated surgical and pathology text or dictated reports providing additional information to the ICPs.

  19. A comparative assessment of surgeons' tracking methods for surgical site infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.H. van Ramshorst (Gabrielle); M.C. Vos (Margreet); D. den Hartog (Dennis); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J. Jeekel (Hans); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The incidence of surgical site infections (SSI) is considered increasingly to be an indicator of quality of care. We conducted a study in which daily inspection of the surgical incision was performed by an independent, trained team to monitor the incidence of SSI using U.S.

  20. Evaluation of the surveillance of surgical site infections within the Dutch PREZIES network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manniën, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are the most-common healthcare-associated infections among surgical patients and have severe adverse consequences. Surveillance is the ongoing systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and feedback of data, and has been accepted worldwide as a primary step

  1. Surgical site infection after osteotomy of the adult spine: does type of osteotomy matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Surgical site infection after spinal surgery is frequently seen. It occurs between 0.7% and 12% of patients, leading to higher morbidity, mortality, and health-care costs. Osteotomy procedures are known to have increased blood losses and surgical times when compared with other

  2. Surgical site infection after osteotomy of the adult spine: does type of osteotomy matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Surgical site infection after spinal surgery is frequently seen. It occurs between 0.7% and 12% of patients, leading to higher morbidity, mortality, and health-care costs. Osteotomy procedures are known to have increased blood losses and surgical times when compared with other sp

  3. Hysterectomy in women with obesity: complications related to surgical site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveiro-Fuentes, Mariña; Rodríguez-Oliver, Antonio; Maroto-Martín, María T; González-Paredes, Aida; Aguilar-Romero, María T; Mozas-Moreno, Juan

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the trends in surgical routes in obese women who underwent hysterectomy for benign disease at our center and compare complications in different groups. Retrospective study done between 2011 and 2015 in women with a Body Mass Index≥30 who underwent hysterectomy for benign disease at Virgen de las Nieves Universitary Hospital in Granada, Spain. We studied three groups based on the surgical route chosen for hysterectomy: vaginal, abdominal or laparoscopic. The rates of intraoperative and postoperative complications, major complications, reintervention and days of hospital stay were compared. Abdominal hysterectomy was associated with the highest risk of postoperative complications and the longest hospital stay. Laparoscopic hysterectomy had a higher risk than vaginal hysterectomy of major complications. There were no significant differences between groups for any of the other variables. In obese women vaginal hysterectomy was associated with the lowest morbidity, and should be the approach of choice whenever feasible.

  4. Retroviral vector insertion sites associated with dominant hematopoietic clones mark "stemness" pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustikova, Olga S; Geiger, Hartmut; Li, Zhixiong; Brugman, Martijn H; Chambers, Stuart M; Shaw, Chad A; Pike-Overzet, Karin; de Ridder, Dick; Staal, Frank J T; von Keudell, Gottfried; Cornils, Kerstin; Nattamai, Kalpana Jekumar; Modlich, Ute; Wagemaker, Gerard; Goodell, Margaret A; Fehse, Boris; Baum, Christopher

    2007-03-01

    Evidence from model organisms and clinical trials reveals that the random insertion of retrovirus-based vectors in the genome of long-term repopulating hematopoietic cells may increase self-renewal or initiate malignant transformation. Clonal dominance of nonmalignant cells is a particularly interesting phenotype as it may be caused by the dysregulation of genes that affect self-renewal and competitive fitness. We have accumulated 280 retrovirus vector insertion sites (RVISs) from murine long-term studies resulting in benign or malignant clonal dominance. RVISs (22.5%) are located in or near (up to 100 kb [kilobase]) to known proto-oncogenes, 49.6% in signaling genes, and 27.9% in other or unknown genes. The resulting insertional dominance database (IDDb) shows substantial overlaps with the transcriptome of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and the retrovirus-tagged cancer gene database (RTCGD). RVISs preferentially marked genes with high expression in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, and Gene Ontology revealed an overrepresentation of genes associated with cell-cycle control, apoptosis signaling, and transcriptional regulation, including major "stemness" pathways. The IDDb forms a powerful resource for the identification of genes that stimulate or transform hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and is an important reference for vector biosafety studies in human gene therapy.

  5. A prospective randomised trial of isolated pathogens of surgical site infections (SSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Alexiou

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: In conclusion, surgical site infections are important complications affecting the healthcare services, the cost of hospitalization and the patient himself. Future thorough studies are expected to reveal much more data, regarding predisposing and precautionary patient and hospital characteristics.

  6. A Methodological Systematic Review on Surgical Site Infections Following Spinal Surgery: Part 1: Risk Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Hosman, A.J.F.; Cohen, D.B.; Schuetz, M.; Habil, D.; Laarhoven, C.J. van; Middendorp, J.J. van

    2012-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN.: A methodological systematic review. OBJECTIVE.: To critically appraise the validity of risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) after spinal surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: SSIs lead to higher morbidity, mortality, and increased health care costs. Understanding which

  7. The presentation, incidence, etiology, and treatment of surgical site infections after spinal surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Mohamed, A.S.; Skolasky, R.L.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive, retrospective cohort analysis. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the presentation, etiology, and treatment of surgical site infections (SSI) after spinal surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: SSI after spine surgery is frequently seen. Small case control studies have been published

  8. Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site Infection After High Energy Fracture Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0588 TITLE: Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site Infection After High Energy Fracture Surgery ...Infection After High Energy Fracture Surgery 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0588 5b. GRANT NUMBER OR110123 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...prospective randomized treatment trial investigating if supplemental perioperative oxygen use will reduce surgical site infection after surgery on fractures

  9. Study of the Variations of Archaeological Marks at Neolithic Site of Lucera, Italy Using High-Resolution Multispectral Datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athos Agapiou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Satellite images have been systematically explored by archaeologists to detect crop marks, which are considered as a proxy for the identification of buried archaeological remains. Even though several existing algorithms are frequently applied, such as histogram enhancements and vegetation indices, the detection of crop marks still remains a difficult task, while the final interpretation results can be very poor. This paper aims to present some of the current difficulties of “remote sensing archaeology” in terms of detection and interpretation of crop marks due to the crops’ phenological variations. At the same time, the presented work seeks to evaluate the recently proposed linear equations for the enhancement of crop marks, initially developed for the eastern Mediterranean region. These linear equations re-project the initial n-space spectral into a new 3D orthogonal space determined by three components: a crop mark component, a vegetation component, and a soil component. For the aims of this study, the Lucera archaeological site (southern Italy, where several Neolithic trenches have been identified, was selected. QuickBird and GeoEye high-resolution satellite images were analysed, indicating that vegetation indices may mismatch some crop marks depending on the phenological stage of the vegetation cultivated in the area of the archaeological site. On the contrary, ratios from linear equations were able to spot these crop marks even in shadow areas, indicating that improvements and developments of novel methodologies and equations based on remote sensing datasets can further assist archaeological research.

  10. A surgical site infection cluster: the process and outcome of an investigation--the impact of an alcohol-based surgical antisepsis product and human behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haessler, Sarah; Connelly, Neil Roy; Kanter, Gary; Fitzgerald, Jan; Scales, Mary Ellen; Golubchik, Anneta; Albert, Michael; Gibson, Charles

    2010-04-01

    The institution of a process used to successfully execute a perioperative antibiotic administration system is but 1 component of preventing postoperative infections. Continued surveillance of infections is an important part of the process of decreasing postoperative infections. We recently experienced an increase in the number of postoperative infections in our patients. Using standard infection control methods of outbreak investigation, we tracked multiple variables to search for a common cause. We describe herein the process by which Quality Improvement methodology was used to investigate and manage this surgical site infection (SSI) cluster. As part of routine surveillance for SSI, the infection control division seeks out evidence of postoperative infections. Patients were defined as having an SSI according to National Healthcare Safety Network SSI criteria. SSI data are reviewed monthly and aggregated on a quarterly basis. The SSI rate was above our usual level for 3 consecutive quarters of 2007. This increase in the infection rate led to an internal outbreak investigation, termed a "cluster investigation." This investigation comprised multiple concurrent methods including manual chart review of all cases; review of microbiological data; and inspection of operating rooms, instrument processing facilities, and storage areas. During 3 quarters, a trend emerged in our general surgical population that demonstrated that 4 surgical types had a sustained increase in SSI. The institutional antibiotic protocol was appropriate for prevention of the majority of these SSIs. As part of the investigation, direct observation of hand hygiene and surgical hand antisepsis technique was undertaken. At this time, there were 2 types of surgical hand preparation being used, at the discretion of the clinician: either a "standard" scrub with an antimicrobial soap or the application of a chlorhexidine gluconate and alcohol-based surgical hand antisepsis product. Observers noted

  11. Do antibiotics reduce the frequency of surgical site infections after impacted mandibular third molar surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarla, Srinivas M; Sharaf, Basel; Dodson, Thomas B

    2011-11-01

    Surgical removal of impacted third molars remains the most common procedure performed by oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Given the abundance of host bacteria within the operative sites, surgical site infections are among the most common complications of third molar removal, with an estimated frequency of 1% to 30%. In this setting, significant controversy has surrounded the use of prophylactic antibiotics in the surgical management of impacted third molars. This article provides a comprehensive review of the available data on antibiotic prophylaxis in impacted third molar surgery and offers specific recommendations on antibiotic use.

  12. The association of noise and surgical-site infection in day-case hernia repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dholakia, Shamik; Jeans, John Paul; Khalid, Usman; Dholakia, Shruti; D'Souza, Charlotte; Nemeth, Kristof

    2015-06-01

    Surgical-site infections (SSIs) are associated with an increased duration of hospital stay, poorer quality of life, and an marked increase in cost to the hospital. Lapses in compliance with aseptic principles are a substantial risk factor for SSI, which may be attributable to distractions such as noise during the operation. The aims of this study were to assess whether noise levels in the operating room are associated with the development of SSI and to elucidate the extent to which these levels affect the financial burden of surgery. Prospective data collection from elective, day-case male patients undergoing elective hernia repairs was undertaken. Patients were included if they were fit and at low risk for SSI. Sound levels during procedures was measured via a decibel meter and correlated with the incidence of SSI. Data analysis was performed with IBM SPSS (IBM, Armonk, NY). Noise levels were substantially greater in patients with SSI from time point of 50 minutes onwards, which correlated to when wound closure was occurring. Additional hospital costs for these patients were £243 per patient based on the National Health Service 2013 reference costing. Decreasing ambient noise levels in the operating room may aid in reducing the incidence of SSIs, particularly during closure, and decrease the associated financial costs of this complication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Intraoperative technique as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-02-28

    Approximately five percent of patients who undergo surgery develop surgical site infections (SSIs) which are associated with an extra seven days as an inpatient and with increased postoperative mortality. The competence and technique of the surgeon is considered important in preventing SSI. We have reviewed the evidence on different aspects of surgical technique and its role in preventing SSI. The most recent guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK recommend avoiding diathermy for skin incision even though this reduces incision time and blood loss, both associated with lower infection rates. Studies comparing different closure techniques, i.e. continuous versus interrupted sutures, have not found a statistically significant difference in the SSI rate, but using continuous sutures is quicker. For contaminated wounds, the surgical site should be left open for four days to allow for treatment of local infection before subsequent healing by primary intention. Surgical drains should be placed through separate incisions, closed suction drains are preferable to open drains, and all drains should be removed as soon as possible. There are relatively few large studies on the impact of surgical techniques on SSI rates. Larger multicentre prospective studies are required to define what aspects of surgical technique impact on SSI, to better inform surgical practice and support education programmes for surgical trainees.

  14. Intraoperative technique as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2012-02-01

    Approximately five percent of patients who undergo surgery develop surgical site infections (SSIs) which are associated with an extra seven days as an inpatient and with increased postoperative mortality. The competence and technique of the surgeon is considered important in preventing SSI. We have reviewed the evidence on different aspects of surgical technique and its role in preventing SSI. The most recent guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK recommend avoiding diathermy for skin incision even though this reduces incision time and blood loss, both associated with lower infection rates. Studies comparing different closure techniques, i.e. continuous versus interrupted sutures, have not found a statistically significant difference in the SSI rate, but using continuous sutures is quicker. For contaminated wounds, the surgical site should be left open for four days to allow for treatment of local infection before subsequent healing by primary intention. Surgical drains should be placed through separate incisions, closed suction drains are preferable to open drains, and all drains should be removed as soon as possible. There are relatively few large studies on the impact of surgical techniques on SSI rates. Larger multicentre prospective studies are required to define what aspects of surgical technique impact on SSI, to better inform surgical practice and support education programmes for surgical trainees.

  15. Intraoperative technique as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, S M; Hill, A D K; Humphreys, H

    2011-05-01

    Approximately five percent of patients who undergo surgery develop surgical site infections (SSIs) which are associated with an extra seven days as an inpatient and with increased postoperative mortality. The competence and technique of the surgeon is considered important in preventing SSI. We have reviewed the evidence on different aspects of surgical technique and its role in preventing SSI. The most recent guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK recommend avoiding diathermy for skin incision even though this reduces incision time and blood loss, both associated with lower infection rates. Studies comparing different closure techniques, i.e. continuous versus interrupted sutures, have not found a statistically significant difference in the SSI rate, but using continuous sutures is quicker. For contaminated wounds, the surgical site should be left open for four days to allow for treatment of local infection before subsequent healing by primary intention. Surgical drains should be placed through separate incisions, closed suction drains are preferable to open drains, and all drains should be removed as soon as possible. There are relatively few large studies on the impact of surgical techniques on SSI rates. Larger multicentre prospective studies are required to define what aspects of surgical technique impact on SSI, to better inform surgical practice and support education programmes for surgical trainees. Copyright © 2011 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fluid Overload and Cumulative Thoracostomy Output Are Associated With Surgical Site Infection After Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochet, Anthony A; Nyhan, Aoibhinn; Spaeder, Michael C; Cartron, Alexander M; Song, Xiaoyan; Klugman, Darren; Brown, Anna T

    2017-08-01

    To determine the impact of cumulative, postoperative thoracostomy output, amount of bolus IV fluids and peak fluid overload on the incidence and odds of developing a deep surgical site infection following pediatric cardiothoracic surgery. A single-center, nested, retrospective, matched case-control study. A 26-bed cardiac ICU in a 303-bed tertiary care pediatric hospital. Cases with deep surgical site infection following cardiothoracic surgery were identified retrospectively from January 2010 through December 2013 and individually matched to controls at a ratio of 1:2 by age, gender, Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery score, Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgery category, primary cardiac diagnosis, and procedure. None. Twelve cases with deep surgical site infection were identified and matched to 24 controls without detectable differences in perioperative clinical characteristics. Deep surgical site infection cases had larger thoracostomy output and bolus IV fluid volumes at 6, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively compared with controls. For every 1 mL/kg of thoracostomy output, the odds of developing a deep surgical site infection increase by 13%. By receiver operative characteristic curve analysis, a cutoff of 49 mL/kg of thoracostomy output at 48 hours best discriminates the development of deep surgical site infection (sensitivity 83%, specificity 83%). Peak fluid overload was greater in cases than matched controls (12.5% vs 6%; p thoracostomy output were associated with deep surgical site infection after pediatric cardiothoracic surgery. We suspect the observed increased thoracostomy output, fluid overload, and IV fluid boluses may have altered antimicrobial prophylaxis. Although analysis of additional pharmacokinetic data is warranted, providers may consider modification of antimicrobial prophylaxis dosing or alterations in fluid management and diuresis in response to assessment of peak fluid overload and fluid

  17. Performance assessment of the risk index category for surgical site infection after colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masanori; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Nomura, Satoshi; Hanawa, Hidetsugu; Chihara, Naoto; Mizutani, Satoshi; Yoshino, Masanori; Uchida, Eiji

    2015-02-01

    The traditional National Healthcare Safety Network (previously National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance) risk index is used to predict the risk of surgical site infection across many operative procedures. However, this index may be too simple to predict risk in the various procedures performed in colorectal surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the risk index by analyzing the impact of the risk index factors on surgical site infection after abdominal colorectal surgery. Using our surgical site infection surveillance database, we analyzed retrospectively 538 consecutive patients who underwent abdominal colorectal surgery between 2005 and 2010. Correlations between surgical site infection and the following risk index factors were analyzed: length of operation, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, wound classification, and use of laparoscopy. The 75th percentile for length of operation was determined separately for open and laparoscopic surgery in the study model. Univariate analyses showed that surgical site infection was more strongly associated with a >75th percentile length of operation in the study model (odds ratio [OR], 2.07) than in the traditional risk index model (OR, 1.64). Multivariable analysis found that surgical site infection was independently associated with a >75th percentile length of operation in the study model (OR, 2.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.66-4.55), American Society of Anesthesiologists score ≥3 (OR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.10-4.34), wound classification ≥III (OR, 5.29; 95% CI, 2.62-10.69), and open surgery (OR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.07-5.17). Performance of the risk index category was improved in the study model compared with the traditional model. The risk index category is sufficiently useful for predicting the risk of surgical site infection after abdominal colorectal surgery. However, the 75th percentile length of operation should be set separately for open and laparoscopic surgery.

  18. Cyanoacrylate Skin Microsealant for Preventing Surgical Site Infection after Vascular Surgery : A Discontinued Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vierhout, Bastiaan P.; Ott, Alewijn; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.; Oskam, Jacques; Ott, Alewijn; van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) after vascular surgery are related to substantial morbidity. Restriction of bacterial access to the site of surgery with a cyanoacrylate sealant is a new concept. We performed a randomized clinical trial to assess the effect of the sealing of skin with a

  19. Impact of the difference in surgical site on the physique in gastrointestinal tract cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Akira; Kogure, Eisuke; Ishii, Takaya

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to observe physical function, physique (only BMI), and nutrition status (evaluated by serum albumin levels) from before surgery to after discharge among perioperative patients with gastrointestinal tract cancer and to examine the effect of difference in surgical site (i.e., stomach, colon, and rectum) in these patients. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were 70 patients who underwent surgical treatment for gastrointestinal tract cancer [36 males and 34 females, aged 59.3 ± 11.4 years (mean ± SD)]. The subjects were classified into three levels according to surgical site (stomach, colon, and rectum). We evaluated patients' physical function, physique, and nutrition status in the three points: before surgery, after surgery, and after discharge. The 6-minute walk distance was measured for physical function. Body mass index was measured for physique. The serum albumin level was measured for nutrition status. [Results] Significant declines in 6-minute walk distance, body mass index, and serum albumin were observed after surgery among the study subjects. In addition, a significant decline in body mass index was observed after discharge compared with before surgery. Regarding body mass index, a significant interaction between surgical site and evaluation times was observed for ANOVA. [Conclusion] These results suggest that BMI after discharge is significantly less than that before surgery and that body mass index changes from before surgery to after surgery are efficacy the difference of surgical site in patients who undergo surgical treatment for gastrointestinal tract cancer.

  20. Laparoscope use and surgical site infections in digestive surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Romy, S.

    2009-01-01

    Rapport de synthèse : But: comparer les taux d'infections du site chirurgical (ISC) en fonction de la voie d'abord, ouverte ou laparoscopique, pour 3 procédures : l'appendicectomie, la cholécystectomie et la colectomie. Evaluer l'effet de la laparoscopie sur l'ISC pour ces trois interventions. Contexte : la laparoscopie est associée à de nombreux avantages par rapport à la chirurgie ouverte. Parmi ceux-ci, des taux inférieurs d'ISC ont été rapportés lors de laparoscopie. Ceci a été décr...

  1. Trends in surgical site infections in general surgery at a tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ravinder Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections (SSI are a preventable cause of hospital acquired infections, which increase morbidity and mortality. This is a retrospective analysis of SSIs in patients undergoing general surgical and gastroenterological operations. The observed incidence was 3.63%. The commonest procedures resulting in SSI were those who underwent laparotomy for bowel resections. The commonest organisms isolated were Enterococcus and Klebsiella species. SSIs can be further reduced by strict adherence to SSI prevention guide-lines.

  2. ANALYSIS OF SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS AFTER ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY: A CASE-CONTROL STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas, Mariana de Queiroz Leite; Costa, Ana Maria Magalhães; Mendes, Pedro Henrique Barros; Gomes, Saint Clair

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To describe the rate of surgical site infections in children undergoing orthopedic surgery in centers of excellence and analyze the patients’ profiles. Methods: Medical records of pediatric patients undergoing orthopedic surgery in the Jamil Haddad National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics from January 2012 to December 2013 were analyzed and monitored for one year. Patients diagnosed with surgical site infection were matched with patients without infection by age, date of admission, field of orthopedic surgery and type of surgical procedure. Patient, surgical and follow-up variables were examined. Descriptive, bivariate and correspondence analyses were performed to evaluate the patients’ profiles. Results: 347 surgeries and 10 surgical site infections (2.88%) were identified. There was association of infections with age - odds ratio (OR) 11.5 (confidence interval - 95%CI 1.41-94.9) -, implant - OR 7.3 (95%CI 1.46-36.3) -, preoperative period - OR 9.8 (95%CI 1.83-53.0), and length of hospitalization - OR 20.6 (95%CI 3.7-114.2). The correspondence analysis correlated the infection and preoperative period, weight, weight Z-score, age, implant, type of surgical procedure, and length of hospitalization. Average time to diagnosis of infection occurred 26.5±111.46 days after surgery. Conclusions: The rate of surgical site infection was 2.88%, while higher in children over 24 months of age who underwent surgical implant procedures and had longer preoperative periods and lengths of hospitalization. This study identified variables for the epidemiological surveillance of these events in children. Available databases and appropriate analysis methods are essential to monitor and improve the quality of care offered to the pediatric population.

  3. The role of topical antibiotics used as prophylaxis in surgical site infection prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-04-01

    Compared with systemic antibiotic therapy, the topical or local delivery of an antibiotic has many potential advantages. However, local antibiotics at the surgical site have received very limited approval in any of the surgical prophylaxis consensus guidelines that we are aware of. A review of the literature was carried out through searches of peer-reviewed publications in PubMed in the English language over a 30 year period between January 1980 and May 2010. Both retrospective and prospective studies were included, as well as meta-analyses. With regard to defining \\'topical\\' or \\'local\\' antibiotic application, the application of an antibiotic solution to the surgical site intraoperatively or immediately post-operatively was included. A number of surgical procedures have been shown to significantly benefit from perioperative topical prophylaxis, e.g. joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. The selective use of topical antibiotics as surgical prophylaxis is justified for specific procedures, such as joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In selective cases, such as obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. Apart from these specific indications, the evidence for use of topical antibiotics in surgery is lacking in conclusive randomized controlled trials.

  4. The role of topical antibiotics used as prophylaxis in surgical site infection prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2012-02-01

    Compared with systemic antibiotic therapy, the topical or local delivery of an antibiotic has many potential advantages. However, local antibiotics at the surgical site have received very limited approval in any of the surgical prophylaxis consensus guidelines that we are aware of. A review of the literature was carried out through searches of peer-reviewed publications in PubMed in the English language over a 30 year period between January 1980 and May 2010. Both retrospective and prospective studies were included, as well as meta-analyses. With regard to defining \\'topical\\' or \\'local\\' antibiotic application, the application of an antibiotic solution to the surgical site intraoperatively or immediately post-operatively was included. A number of surgical procedures have been shown to significantly benefit from perioperative topical prophylaxis, e.g. joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. The selective use of topical antibiotics as surgical prophylaxis is justified for specific procedures, such as joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In selective cases, such as obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. Apart from these specific indications, the evidence for use of topical antibiotics in surgery is lacking in conclusive randomized controlled trials.

  5. Incidence and risk factors of surgical site infection following cesarean section at Dhulikhel Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, S; Shrestha, R; Shrestha, B; Dongol, A

    2014-01-01

    Cesarean Section (CS) is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in obstetrical and gynecological department. Surgical site infection (SSI) after a cesarean section increases maternal morbidity prolongs hospital stay and medical costs. The aim of this study was to find out the incidence and associated risk factors of surgical site infection among cesarean section cases. A prospective, descriptive study was conducted at Dhulikhel Hospital, department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology from July 2013 to June 2014. Total of 648 women who underwent surgical procedure for delivery during study period were included in the study. Data was collected from patient using structred pro forma and examination of wound till discharge was done. Data was compared in terms of presence of surgical site infection and study variables. Wound was evaluated for the development of SSI on third day, and fifth post-operative day, and on the day of discharge. Total of 648 cases were studied. The mean age was 24±4.18. Among the studied cases 92% were literate and 8% were illiterate. Antenatal clinic was attended by 97.7%. The incidence rate of surgical site infection was 82 (12.6%). SSI was found to be common in women who had rupture of membrane before surgery (p=0.020), who underwent emergency surgery (p=0.0004), and the women who had vertical skin incision (p=0.0001) and interrupted skin suturing (p=0.0001) during surgery. Surgical site infection following caesarean section is common. Various modifiable risk factors were observed in this study. Development of SSI is related to multifactorial rather than one factor. Development and strict implementation of protocol by all the health care professionals could be effective to minimize and prevent the infection rate after caesarean section.

  6. Cut marks and terminal Pleistocene hominids in the Ma'anshan site:Evidence for meat-eating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yue; WANG ChunXue; ZHANG ShuangQuan; GAO Xing

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,cut marks on the long bones of class Ⅱ sized animals in the Ma'anshann site are studied.Based on the location and frequencies of the long bone cut marks,the distribution characteristics are analyzed as follows:(1) cut mark frequencies in the lower layer (LL) are much higher than those of the upper;(2) in the LL cut mark frequency of the upper limbs is the highest,and that of the middle and lower limbs is lower and the lowest;(3) In the upper layer (UL) the cut mark frequency,does not spread as orderly as in the LL.The data are compared to those of the experiment and it is demonstrated that values of the LL all fall into the experimental 95% confidence intervals,and the cut mark frequencies of the upper,middle and lower limbs coincide with those of the experiment;while the values of the UL are much lower,of which,those of the humerus,femur and radius are out of the intervals,and the frequencies of the upper,middle and lower limbs are far more different from those of the experiment.It implies that the earlier hominids (of the LL) defleshed the limbs of the class Ⅱ sized animals with stone tools more completely than the later hominids.With the evidence of burning marks,it is suggested that the difference on the roasting behaviors derived the cut mark difference of the Ma'anshan UL and LL.

  7. Incidence of and risk factors for surgical site infections in women undergoing hysterectomy for endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomi, Taru; Pasanen, Annukka; Leminen, Arto; Bützow, Ralf; Loukovaara, Mikko

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of, and risk factors for, surgical site infections in a contemporary cohort of women with endometrial carcinoma. We retrospectively studied 1164 women treated for endometrial carcinoma by hysterectomy at a single institution in 2007-2013. In all, 912 women (78.4%) had minimally invasive hysterectomy. Data on surgical site infections were collected from medical records. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify risk factors for incisional and organ/space infections. Ninety-four women (8.1%) were diagnosed with a surgical site infection. Twenty women (1.7%) had an incisional infection and 74 (6.4%) had an organ/space infection. The associations of 17 clinico-pathologic and surgical variables were tested by univariate analyses. Those variables that were identified as potential risk factors in univariate analyses (p infections as dependent variables. Obesity (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), diabetes, and long operative time (>80th centile) were independently associated with a higher risk of incisional infection, whereas minimally invasive surgery was associated with a smaller risk. Smoking, conversion to laparotomy, and lymphadenectomy were associated with a higher risk of organ/space infection. Organ/space infections comprised the majority of surgical site infections. Risk factors for incisional and organ/space infections differed. Minimally invasive hysterectomy was associated with a smaller risk of incisional infections but not of organ/space infections. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  8. Institution of The Steiros Algorithm(®) Outpatient Surgical Protocol reduced orthopedic surgical site infections (SSI) rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Paul A; Watson, Luke; Torress-Cook, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    Control of surgical site infections (SSI) is imperative for the safety of our patients. As orthopedic surgeons we strive to have the lowest infection rate possible for all our surgical procedures. this study evaluates the effects of a simple outpatient peri-operative patient cleaning protocol (The Steiros Algorithm(®) Outpatient Surgery Protocol) on SSI rates. We retrospectively reviewed the hospital's infection rate database for all procedures from July 2005 until February 2011 performed by one general orthopedic surgeon (PAW) within one hospital system. The Steiros Algorithm(®) Outpatient Surgery Protocol was instituted on January 1(st), 2009. We calculated and compared the deep and superficial SSI rate for orthopedic surgeries performed before and after the Outpatient Protocol was instituted. All patients had a minimum of one-year follow-up data. Lowest previously published estimated costs for SSI were used for a cost analysis ($17,708). The July 1(st), 2005 through December 31(st), 2008 SSI rate was 1.0% (13/1292). From January 1(st), 2009 through February 28(th), 2011 the SSI rate was zero (0/875). the SSI rates decreased 100%. Due to the reduction in SSI, the hospital saved a minimum of $154,059 over a two year period. In this retrospective review, the Steiros Algorithm(®) Outpatient Surgery Protocol dramatically reduced the overall SSI rate to zero and saved money. We believe this is a simple, effective protocol that can be used for all orthopedic surgical procedures.

  9. Incidence and predictors of surgical site infection in Ethiopia: prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legesse Laloto, Tamrat; Hiko Gemeda, Desta; Abdella, Sadikalmahdi Hussen

    2017-02-03

    Surgical site infections are commonest nosocomial infections and responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality as well as increased hospitalizations and treatment cost related to surgical operations. The aim of this study was to determine incidence and predictors of surgical site infections at surgical ward of Hawassa University Referral Hospital, Southern Ethiopia. We performed prospective study involving 105 patients that undergone major surgical procedure at Hawassa University Referral Hospital from March 2 to May 2, 2015. Data were extracted from paper based medical charts, operational and anesthesia note, by direct observation and patients' interview. All patients were followed daily before, during and after operation for 30 days starting from the date of operation. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) for window version 20.0 software. Predictors of Surgical site infections were identified using multivariable logistic regression model. P-value less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. We studied 105 patients. Sixty four patients (61%) were males. The mean age of the patients was 30.85 ± 17.72 years. The mean Body Mass Index (BMI) was 21.6 ± 4 kg/m(2). Twenty patients (19.1%) developed surgical site infections. Age greater than 40 years, AOR = 7.7(95% CI [1.610-40.810 p = 0.016,]), preoperative hospital stay more than 7 days, AOR = 22.4(95% CI [4.544-110.780, p = 0.001]), duration of operation more than 1 hour, AOR = 8.01(95% CI [1.562-41.099, p = 0.013]) and administering antimicrobial prophylaxis before 1 hour of operation, AOR = 11.1 (95% CI [1.269-75.639, p = 0.014]) were independent predictors for surgical site infections. Surgical site infection is relatively high.

  10. Scalp flora in Indian patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumors - Implications for pre-surgical site preparation and surgical site infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasgar V Moiyadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Causation of surgical site infection (SSI following craniotomy is multifactorial. Most preventive strategies (including site preparation and antibiotic prophylaxis revolve around reducing preoperative contamination of the local site. There is little evidence, however, linking site contamination with postoperative infections. This is important given the preference for performing non-shaved cranial surgery. We undertook a prospective study to document the scalp flora in neurosurgical patients in an Indian setting and to assess possible association with SSI. Materials and Methods: A prospective study recruited 45 patients undergoing non-shaved clean craniotomies for various brain tumors. Standard perioperative procedures and antibiotic policy were employed. Prior to and immediately following the pre-surgical scrubbing, we collected swabs and evaluated their growth qualitatively. SSI was documented adhering to CDC guidelines. The association of swab-positivity with various parameters (including SSI was evaluated. Results: Pre-scrub positivity was seen in 18 of 44 patients, three of them developed subsequent SSI. Most were known skin contaminants. Five patients had swab positivity after scrubbing, though none of these developed any SSI. Four of these five had pre-scrub positivity. In three the same organisms persisted (two being Staphylococcus aureus, and one had different growth post-scrub, whereas one patient developed new growth (contaminant mycelial fungus in the post-scrub swab. We did not find any association between swab positivity and SSI. Swab positivity was also not related to hair-length or hygiene. Conclusion: Scalp flora in Indian patients is similar to that described. Pre-surgical preparation does not always eliminate this contamination (especially staphylococcus. However, this does not necessarily translate into increased SSI. Moreover, the results also provide objective evidence to support the performance of non

  11. A prospective randomised trial of isolated pathogens of surgical site infections (SSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Konstantinos; Drikos, Ioannis; Terzopoulou, Maria; Sikalias, Nikolaos; Ioannidis, Argyrios; Economou, Nikolaos

    2017-09-01

    Every surgical wound is colonized by bacteria, but only a small percentage displays symptoms of infection. The distribution of pathogens isolated in surgical site infections has not significantly changed over the last decades. Staph. Aureus, Coag(-) Staphylococci, Enterococcus spp and E. Coli are the main strains appearing. In addition, a continuously rising proportion of surgical site infections caused by resistant bacterial species (MRSA, C. Albicans) has been reported. This prospective and randomized clinical study was performed in the 1st Surgical Clinic of Sismanoglion General Hospital of Athens, from February 2009 to February 2015. Patients undergoing elective surgery in the upper or lower digestive system were randomized to receive antimicrobial treatment as chemoprophylaxis. Each patient filled a special monitoring form, recording epidemiological data, surgery related information, surgical site infections (deep and superficial), as well as postoperative morbidity (urinary and respiratory infections included). The monitoring of patients was carried by multiple visits on a daily basis during their hospitalization and continued after they were discharged via phone to postoperative day 30. Our overall SSI incidence was 4,3% (31patients out of a whole of 715 patients). Specifically, the incidence of SSIs for scheduled surgery of the upper GI tract was 2,2% (11 out of 500 patients) and for the lower GI tract was 9,3% (20 out of 215 patients). Seven main pathogens were isolated from patients with SSIs: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacteroides fragilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. Their growth rates were respectively: S. Aureus (17,3%), E. faecalis (19,5%), P. aeruginosa (10,5%), B. Fragilis (13,4%) E. coli (20,4%), Enterobacter cloacae (9,1%) and K. Pneumoniae (9,8%). In addition, all the SSIs were found to be multimicrobial. Several studies have already revealed that patient

  12. A Simple and Safe Technique for CT Guided Lung Nodule Marking prior to Video Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgical Resection Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Stephenson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We describe our experience of a simple, safe, and reproducible technique for lung nodule marking prethoracoscopic metastasectomy. Thoracoscopic lung nodule resection reduces patient discomfort, complications, higher level of care, hospital stay, and cost; however, small deeply placed lung nodules are difficult to locate and resect thoracoscopically. Materials and Methods. We describe and review the success of our novel technique, where nodules are identified on a low dose CT and marked with methylene blue using CT fluoroscopy guidance immediately prior to surgery. Results. 30 nodules were marked with a mean size of 8 mm (4–18 mm located at a mean depth of 17 mm, distributed through both lungs. Dye was detected at the pleural surface in 97% of the patients and at the nodule in 93%. There were no major complications. Thoracoscopic resection was possible in 90%. Conclusion. This is a simple and safe method of lung nodule marking to facilitate thoracoscopic resection in cases where this may not be technically possible due to nodule location.

  13. Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site Infection After High Energy Fracture Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0588 TITLE: Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site Infection After High Energy Fracture Surgery...Operations and Reports (0704-0188), 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding...Site Infection After High Energy Fracture Surgery 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0588 5b. GRANT NUMBER OR110123 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  14. Incidence of surgical site infection following adult spinal deformity surgery: an analysis of patient risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal surgery is a frequent complication and results in higher morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Patients undergoing surgery for spinal deformity (scoliosis/kyphosis) have longer surgeries, involving more spinal levels and larger blood losses than ty

  15. Incidence of surgical site infection following adult spinal deformity surgery: an analysis of patient risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal surgery is a frequent complication and results in higher morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Patients undergoing surgery for spinal deformity (scoliosis/kyphosis) have longer surgeries, involving more spinal levels and larger blood losses than

  16. Effect of optimized antibiotic prophylaxis on the incidence of surgical site infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannien, J.; Kasteren, M.E.E. van; Nagelkerke, N.J.; Gyssens, I.C.J.; Kullberg, B.J.; Wille, J.C.; Boer, A.S. de

    2006-01-01

    Objective. To compare the rate of surgical site infection (SSI) before and after an intervention period in which an optimized policy for antibiotic prophylaxis was implemented. To demonstrate that a more prudent, restrictive policy would not have a detrimental effect on patient outcomes.Design.

  17. Treatment of surgical site infections (SSI) IN patients with peripheral arterial disease : an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slegt, Jasper; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; de Groot, Hans G W; van der Laan, Lijckle

    INTRODUCTION: The management of surgical site infections (SSI's) in vascular surgery has been challenging over the years. To assess the outcomes associated with the various strategies, we performed a review of all SSI's after elective vascular procedures in patients with moderate to severe

  18. Alcohol Drinking does not Affect Postoperative Surgical Site Infection or Anastomotic Leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse appears to increase postoperative complications, but clinical trials have reported conflicting results. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to clarify how alcohol drinking affects postoperative surgical site infection and anastomotic leakage and to determine...... the impact of perioperative alcohol intervention....

  19. Distinct patterns of epigenetic marks and transcription factor binding sites across promoters of sense-intronic long noncoding RNAs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saurav Ghosh; Satish Sati; Shantanu Sengupta; Vinod Scaria

    2015-03-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a new class of noncoding RNAs that have been extensively studied in the recent past as a regulator of gene expression, including modulation of epigenetic regulation. The lncRNAs class encompasses a number of subclasses, classified based on their genomic loci and relation to protein-coding genes. Functional differences between subclasses have been increasingly studied in the recent years, though the regulation of expression and biogenesis of lncRNAs have been poorly studied. The availability of genome-scale datasets of epigenetic marks has motivated us to understand the patterns and processes of epigenetic regulation of lncRNAs. Here we analysed the occurrence of expressive and repressive histone marks at the transcription start site (TSS) of lncRNAs and their subclasses, and compared these profiles with that of the protein-coding regions. We observe distinct differences in the density of histone marks across the TSS of a few lncRNA subclasses. The sense-intronic lncRNA subclass showed a paucity for mapped histone marks across the TSS which were significantly different than all the lncRNAs and protein-coding genes in most cases. Similar pattern was also observed for the density of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). These observations were generally consistent across cell and tissue types. The differences in density across the promoter were significantly associated with the expression level of the genes, but the differences between the densities across long noncoding and protein-coding gene promoters were consistent irrespective of the expression levels. Apart from suggesting general differences in epigenetic regulatory marks across long noncoding RNA promoters, our analysis suggests a possible alternative mechanism of regulation and/or biogenesis of sense-intronic lncRNAs.

  20. Reducing surgical site infections after hysterectomy: metronidazole plus cefazolin compared with cephalosporin alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Sara R; Morgan, Daniel M; Bazzi, Ali A; Pearlman, Mark D; Abdelsattar, Zaid; Campbell, Darrell A; Uppal, Shitanshu

    2017-08-01

    Organisms that are isolated from vaginal cuff infections and pelvic abscesses after hysterectomy frequently include anaerobic vaginal flora. Metronidazole has outstanding coverage against nearly all anaerobic species, which is superior to both cefazolin and second-generation cephalosporins. Cefazolin plus metronidazole has been demonstrated to reduce infectious morbidity compared with either cefazolin or second-generation cephalosporins in other clean-contaminated procedures, which include both as colorectal surgery and cesarean delivery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the combination of cefazolin plus metronidazole before hysterectomy was more effective in the prevention of surgical site infection than existing recommendations of cefazolin or second-generation cephalosporin. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative from July 2012 through February 2015. The primary outcome was surgical site infection. Patients who were >18 years old and who underwent abdominal, vaginal, laparoscopic, or robotic hysterectomy for benign or malignant indications were included if they received 1 of the following prophylactic antibiotic regimens: cefazolin, second-generation cephalosporin, or cefazolin plus metronidazole. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was performed to evaluate the independent effect of an antibiotic regimen, and propensity score matching was used to validate the findings. The study included 18,255 hysterectomies. The overall rate of surgical site infection was 1.8% (n=329). The unadjusted rate of surgical site infection was 1.8% (n=267) for cefazolin, 2.1% (n=49) for second-generation cephalosporin, and 1.4% (n=13) for cefazolin plus metronidazole. After adjustment for differences in patient and operative factors among the antibiotic cohorts, compared with cefazolin plus metronidazole, we found the risk of surgical site infection was significantly higher for patients who received

  1. Antibiotic Prophylaxis to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Children: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshbin, Amir; So, Jeannette P; Aleem, Ilyas S; Stephens, Derek; Matlow, Anne G; Wright, James G

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the association between antibiotic prophylaxis (AP) and surgical-site infection in pediatric patients. Surgical-site infections (SSIs) are a major cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Despite numerous studies in adults, benefit of AP in preventing SSIs in children is uncertain. Patients aged 0 to 21 years who underwent surgical procedures at a pediatric acute care hospital from April 1, 2009, to December 31, 2010, were assessed. Antibiotic prophylaxis indication and administration according to an evidence-based guideline were recorded. Complete compliance was defined as AP given, when indicated, within 60 minutes before incision. Surgical-site infections were identified using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria and documented in the medical records using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Multiple logistic regressions adjusting for age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists status, wound classification, admission status, surgical discipline, and surgical duration evaluated association of AP compliance and SSI. Of 5309 patients for whom antibiotics were indicated, 3901 (73.5%) with complete compliance had an infection rate of 3.0%, whereas 1408 (26.5%) who were not compliant had an infection rate of 4.3% (adjusted relative risk: 0.7; 95% confidence interval: 0.5-0.9; P = 0.02). Of 4156 patients for whom antibiotics were not indicated, the 895 (21.5%) who received antibiotics had an infection rate of 1.7% compared with 0.7% in the 3261 (78.5%) who did not receive antibiotics (adjusted relative risk: 1.6; 95% confidence interval: 0.8-3.1; P = 0.18). In pediatric surgery, complete compliance with AP was associated with 30% decreased risk of SSI.

  2. Preventing surgical site infections after bariatric surgery: value of perioperative antibiotic regimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Teena; Zhao, Jing J; Alangaden, George; Wood, Michael H; Kaye, Keith S

    2010-01-01

    Bariatric surgery for obesity has emerged as an effective and commonly used treatment modality. This paper reviews the surgical site infections (SSIs) that occur post bariatric surgery and SSI prevention. The benefit of bariatric surgery resulting in profound weight loss brings with it consequences in the form of postoperative complications that can have profound effects on morbidity and mortality in these patients. This paper sets out to define different types of SSIs that occur following bariatric surgery and to discuss existing literature on the critical aspects of SSI prevention and the appropriate use of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis for bariatric surgery. PMID:20545596

  3. Surgical site infections in genital reconstruction surgery for gender reassignment, Detroit: 1984-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing J; Marchaim, Dror; Palla, Mohan B; Bogan, Christopher W; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Tansek, Ryan; Moshos, Judy; Muthusamy, Arunkumar; Kotra, Harikrishna; Lephart, Paul R; Wilson, Alan N; Kaye, Keith S

    2014-04-01

    Gender reassignment surgery (i.e., male-to-female or female-to-male) entails a series of complex surgical procedures. We conducted a study to explore epidemiologic characteristics of patients who underwent genital reconstruction operations as components of gender reassignment and to analyze risk factors for surgical-site infections (SSIs) following these operations. The study was a retrospective cohort study conducted from 1984-2008 at Harper University Hospital, a tertiary hospital with 625 beds in Detroit, Michigan. Surgical site infection was defined according to established criteria. Records were available for 82 patients who underwent a total of 1,383 operations as part of genital-reconstruction processes. Thirty-nine (47.6%) of the patients underwent female-to-male reassignment (FTM) and 43 (52.4%) underwent male-to-female reassignment (MTF). The average age of the study cohort was 39.5±9.8 y. Of the patients in the cohort, 56 (68.3%) were Caucasian and 67 (81.7%) were single. The average number of operative encounters per patient was 11.8±4.6 for FTM and 4.9±2.4 for MTF. Forty-three (52.4%) patients developed an SSI at least once during their genital reconstruction process, of whom 34 (87%) were in the FTM group and nine (21%) in the MTF group (pinfections, followed by Enterobacteriaceae (50%), Enterococcus (39%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (33.3%). Surgical site infection was associated independently with an increased frequency of operative procedures and operating room encounters. More than 50% of patients who underwent genital reconstruction operations developed an SSI at some point during the genital reconstruction process. Surgical site infections are more common in FTM than in MTF reconstruction operations, and for both FTM and MTF, SSIs are associated independently with an increased frequency of total operative procedures and encounters.

  4. Relationship of hyperglycemia and surgical-site infection in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Justin E; Kauffmann, Rondi M; Zuckerman, Scott L; Obremskey, William T; May, Addison K

    2012-07-03

    The impact of perioperative hyperglycemia in orthopaedic surgery is not well defined. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia is an independent risk factor for thirty-day surgical-site infection in orthopaedic trauma patients without a history of diabetes at hospital admission. Patients eighteen years of age or older with isolated orthopaedic injuries requiring acute operative intervention were studied. Patients with diabetes, injuries to other body systems, a history of corticosteroid use, or admission to the intensive care unit were excluded. Blood glucose values were obtained, and hyperglycemia was defined in two ways. First, patients with two or more blood glucose levels of ≥200 mg/dL were identified. Second, the hyperglycemic index, a validated measure of overall glucose control during hospitalization, was calculated for each patient. A hyperglycemic index of ≥1.76 (equivalent to ≥140 mg/dL) was considered to indicate hyperglycemia. The primary outcome was thirty-day surgical-site infection. Multivariable logistic regression models evaluating the effect of the markers of hyperglycemia, after controlling for open fractures, were constructed. Seven hundred and ninety patients were identified. There were 268 open fractures (33.9%). Twenty-one thirty-day surgical-site infections (2.7%) were recorded. Age, race, comorbidities, injury severity, and blood transfusion were not associated with the primary outcome. Of the 790 patients, 294 (37.2%) had more than one glucose value of ≥200 mg/dL. This factor was associated with thirty-day surgical-site infection, with thirteen (4.4%) of the 294 patients with that indication of hyperglycemia having a surgical-site infection versus eight (1.6%) of the 496 patients without more than one glucose value of ≥200 mg/dL (p = 0.02). One hundred and thirty-four (17.0%) of the 790 patients had a hyperglycemic index of ≥1.76, and this was also associated was thirty-day surgical-site infection (ten [7.5%] of 134 versus eleven [1

  5. Marked reduction in the number of platelet-tritiated imipramine binding sites in geriatric depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemeroff, C.B.; Knight, D.L.; Krishnan, R.R.; Slotkin, T.A.; Bissette, G.; Melville, M.L.; Blazer, D.G.

    1988-10-01

    The number (Bmax) and affinity (Kd) of platelet-tritiated imipramine binding sites was determined in young and middle-aged controls 50 years of age and younger (n = 25), elderly normal controls over 60 years of age (n = 18), patients who fulfilled DSM-III criteria for major depression who were under 50 years of age (n = 29), patients who fulfilled DSM-III criteria for major depression who were 60 years of age and older (n = 19), and patients who fulfilled both DSM-III criteria for primary degenerative dementia and National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke-Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association criteria for probable Alzheimer's disease (n = 13). Both groups of depressed patients (under 50 and over 60 years of age) exhibited significant reductions (decreases 42%) in the number of platelet-tritiated imipramine binding sites with no change in affinity, when compared with their age-matched controls. There was little overlap in Bmax values between the elderly depressed patients and their controls. The patients with probable Alzheimer's disease showed no alteration in platelet-tritiated imipramine binding. There was no statistically significant relationship between postdexamethasone plasma cortisol concentrations and tritiated imipramine binding. These results indicate that platelet-tritiated imipramine binding may have potential utility as a diagnostic adjunct in geriatric depression, and moreover that the reduction in the number of platelet-tritiated imipramine binding sites is not due to hypercortisolemia.

  6. Statewide collaboration to evaluate the effects of blood loss and transfusion on surgical site infection after hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Heather; Berumen, Crystal; Knepper, Bryan; Miller, Amber; Silverman, Morgan; Gilmartin, Heather; Wodrich, Elizabeth; Alexander, Sandy; Price, Connie S

    2012-01-01

    We used mandatory public reporting as an impetus to perform a statewide study to define risk factors for surgical site infection. Among women who underwent abdominal hysterectomy, blood transfusion was a significant risk factor for surgical site infection in patients who experienced blood loss of less than 500 mL.

  7. Snoring Sounds Predict Obstruction Sites and Surgical Response in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Ang; Lo, Yu-Lun; Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Gui-She; Ni, Yung-Lun; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Cheng, Wen-Nuan; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Snoring sounds generated by different vibrators of the upper airway may be useful indicators of obstruction sites in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). This study aimed to investigate associations between snoring sounds, obstruction sites, and surgical responses (≥50% reduction in the apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and DISE), and relocation pharyngoplasty. All patients received follow-up polysomnography after 6 months. Fifteen (42%) patients with at least two complete obstruction sites defined by DISE were significantly, positively associated with maximal snoring sound intensity (40–300 Hz; odds ratio [OR], 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–1.49) and body mass index (OR, 1.48, 95% CI 1.02–2.15) after logistic regression analysis. Tonsil obstruction was significantly, inversely correlated with mean snoring sound intensity (301–850 Hz; OR, 0.84, 95% CI 0.74–0.96). Moreover, baseline tonsil obstruction detected by either DISE or mean snoring sound intensity (301–850 Hz), and AHI could significantly predict the surgical response. Our findings suggest that snoring sound detection may be helpful in determining obstruction sites and predict surgical responses. PMID:27471038

  8. Post-Caesarean Section Surgical Site Infection Surveillance Using an Online Database and Mobile Phone Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Eliana; McIsaac, Corrine; MacDougall, Bhreagh; Wilson, Douglas; Kohr, Rosemary

    2017-08-01

    Obstetric surgical site infections (SSIs) are common and expensive to the health care system but remain under reported given shorter postoperative hospital stays and suboptimal post-discharge surveillance systems. SSIs, for the purpose of this paper, are defined according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (1999) as infection incurring within 30 days of the operative procedure (in this case, Caesarean section [CS]). Demonstrate the feasibility of real-life use of a patient driven SSIs post-discharge surveillance system consisting of an online database and mobile phone technology (surgical mobile app - how2trak) among women undergoing CS in a Canadian urban centre. Estimate the rate of SSIs and associated predisposing factors. Prospective cohort of consecutive women delivering by CS at one urban Canadian hospital. Using surgical mobile app-how2trak-predetermined demographics, comorbidities, procedure characteristics, and self-reported symptoms and signs of infection were collected and linked to patients' incision self-portraits (photos) on postpartum days 3, 7, 10, and 30. A total of 105 patients were enrolled over a 5-month period. Mean age was 31 years, 13% were diabetic, and most were at low risk of surgical complications. Forty-six percent of surgeries were emergency CSs, and 104/105 received antibiotic prophylaxis. Forty-five percent of patients (47/105) submitted at least one photo, and among those, one surgical site infection was detected by photo appearance and self-reported symptoms by postpartum day 10. The majority of patients whom uploaded photos did so multiple times and 43% of them submitted photos up to day 30. Patients with either a diagnosis of diabetes or self-reported Asian ethnicity were less likely to submit photos. Post-discharge surveillance for CS-related SSIs using surgical mobile app how2trak is feasible and deserves further study in the post-discharge setting. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Derivation and Validation of the Surgical Site Infections Risk Model Using Health Administrative Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Walraven, Carl; Jackson, Timothy D; Daneman, Nick

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical site infections (SSIs) are common hospital-acquired infections. Tracking SSIs is important to monitor their incidence, and this process requires primary data collection. In this study, we derived and validated a method using health administrative data to predict the probability that a person who had surgery would develop an SSI within 30 days. METHODS All patients enrolled in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) from 2 sites were linked to population-based administrative datasets in Ontario, Canada. We derived a multivariate model, stratified by surgical specialty, to determine the independent association of SSI status with patient and hospitalization covariates as well as physician claim codes. This SSI risk model was validated in 2 cohorts. RESULTS The derivation cohort included 5,359 patients with a 30-day SSI incidence of 6.0% (n=118). The SSI risk model predicted the probability that a person had an SSI based on 7 covariates: index hospitalization diagnostic score; physician claims score; emergency visit diagnostic score; operation duration; surgical service; and potential SSI codes. More than 90% of patients had predicted SSI risks lower than 10%. In the derivation group, model discrimination and calibration was excellent (C statistic, 0.912; Hosmer-Lemeshow [H-L] statistic, P=.47). In the 2 validation groups, performance decreased slightly (C statistics, 0.853 and 0.812; H-L statistics, 26.4 [P=.0009] and 8.0 [P=.42]), but low-risk patients were accurately identified. CONCLUSION Health administrative data can effectively identify postoperative patients with a very low risk of surgical site infection within 30 days of their procedure. Records of higher-risk patients can be reviewed to confirm SSI status.

  10. Is Staphylococcal Screening and Suppression an Effective Interventional Strategy for Reduction of Surgical Site Infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmiston, Charles E; Ledeboer, Nathan A; Buchan, Blake W; Spencer, Maureen; Seabrook, Gary R; Leaper, David

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has been recognized as a major microbial pathogen for over 100 y, having the capacity to produce a variety of suppurative and toxigenic disease processes. Many of these infections are life-threatening, with particularly enhanced virulence in hospitalized patients with selective risk factors. Strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have rapidly spread throughout the healthcare environment such that approximately 20% of S. aureus isolates recovered from surgical site infections are methicillin-resistant, (although this is now reducing following national screening and suppression programs and high impact interventions). Widespread nasal screening to identify MRSA colonization in surgical patients prior to admission are controversial, but selective, evidence-based studies have documented a reduction of surgical site infection (SSI) after screening and suppression. Culture methods used to identify MRSA colonization involve selective, differential, or chromogenic media. These methods are the least expensive, but turnaround time is 24-48 h. Although real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technology provides rapid turnaround (1-2 h) with exceptional testing accuracy, the costs can range from three to 10 times more than conventional culture methodology. Topical mupirocin, with or without pre-operative chlorhexidine showers or skin wipes, is the current "gold-standard" for nasal decolonization, but inappropriate use of mupirocin is associated with increasing staphylococcal resistance. Selection of an effective active universal or targeted surveillance strategy should be based upon the relative risk of MSSA or MRSA surgical site infection in patients undergoing orthopedic or cardiothoracic device related surgical procedures.

  11. ANTIMICROBIOLOGICAL PROFILE AND EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ORGANISM ISOLATED FROM SURGICAL SITE INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Infection that occurs in the wound created by a surgical procedure is generally called as surgical site infection. (1 Surgical site infection is a frequent complication of surgery and its incidence varies from 0.5 to 15% depending upon the type of surgery and status of the patient. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study was conducted over a period of 16 months and sample was collected from various surgical departments of Konaseema Institute of Medical Science, Amalapuram. Standard operating procedures for sample collection, transport, culture and susceptibility testing for isolated organisms were followed to ensure procedural quality. Swab samples were plated on nutrient agar, blood agar, and MacConkey agar medium. RESULT Staphylococcus was the most common organism isolated. But Gram-negative organism was more common organism resistant to commonly used antibiotic. CONCLUSION Idea about the antimicrobial sensitivity pattern is essential for selection of drugs. Every institution should have an antimicrobial use policy as per the resistance pattern of organism. So a longterm and large scale study is required to have the idea and detail of resistance pattern.

  12. Monetary implications of Surgical Site Infections Health Services: an Integrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suellen Rodrigues de Oliveira Maier

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: In order to meet the costs related to the Surgical Site Infection (SSI and that they were linked, this research guided the scientific literature was developed with the following objective: to perform an integrative review of literature related to expenses and costs of surgical site infections, or surgical wound, to health systems. Methods: We selected 11 scientific articles available in electronic databases of the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE, and Latin American Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS, through the portal of the Virtual Health Library (VHL. It is also one of the research methods used in Evidence Based Practice (EBP. Results: It was observed that SAIs are costly to health services, publications in very differ and used methods not specifically describe how the results of the costs were obtained. Conclusion: Thus, other studies adopt an effective and standardized assessment for the collection and calculation of costs are needed to ensure greater reliability of the information obtained. KEYWORDS: Surgical wound infection.Costs and Cost Analysis. Health service.

  13. A Practice Improvement Project to Reduce Cesarean Surgical Site Infection Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Cindra; Foster, Peggy; Ulrich, Deborah; Adkins, Kathryn

    We implemented an evidence-based practice improvement project at a health care facility in the Midwestern United States to address the increasing rate of cesarean surgical site infections. Women who experienced cesarean birth were cared for using a standardized evidence-based protocol including preoperative and postoperative care and education. In addition, a team-created educational video was used by both women and their families during the postoperative period and at home after discharge. This new protocol resulted in a decrease in the rate of cesarean surgical site infections from 1.35% in 2013 to 0.7% in 2014 and 0.36% in 2015. Our interdisciplinary approach to integrate best-practice strategies resulted in decreased infection rates and improved patient satisfaction scores. © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  14. Observations on Forced Colony Emigration in Parachartergus fraternus (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Epiponini: New Nest Site Marked with Sprayed Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidnei Mateus

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Five cases of colony emigration induced by removal of nest envelope and combs and a single one by manipulation are described. The disturbance was followed by defensive patterns, buzz running, and adult dispersion. An odor trail created by abdomen dragging, probably depositing venom or Dufour's gland secretions, connected the original nest to the newly selected nesting place and guided the emigration. The substrate of the selected nesting place is intensely sprayed with venom prior to emigration, and this chemical cue marked the emigration end point. The colony moves to the new site in a diffuse cloud with no temporary clusters formed along the odor trail. At the original nest, scouts performed rapid gaster dragging and intense mouth contacts stimulating inactive individuals to depart. Males were unable to follow the swarm. Individual scouts switched between different behavioral tasks before and after colony emigration. Pulp collected from the old nest was reused at the new nest site.

  15. Foaming Betadine Spray as a potential agent for non-labor-intensive preoperative surgical site preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Kargupta, Roli; Hull, Garret J; Rood, Kyle D; Galloway, James; Matthews, Clinton F; Dale, Paul S.; Sengupta, Shramik

    2015-01-01

    Background The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention?s (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) report published in 2009 shows that there were about 16,000 cases of surgical site infection (SSI) following?~?850,000 operative procedures making SSI one of the most predominant infection amongst nosocomial infections. Preoperative skin preparation is a standard procedure utilized to prevent SSIs thereby improving patient outcomes and controlling associated healthcare costs. Multiple t...

  16. The effect of preoperative skin preparation products on surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Heather L; Reese, Sara; Knepper, Bryan; Miller, Amber; Mauffrey, Cyril; Price, Connie S

    2014-12-01

    Skin preparation products contribute to surgical site infection (SSI) prevention. In a case-control study, diabetes was associated with increased SSI (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 5.74 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.22-27.0]), while the use of chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) plus isopropyl alcohol versus CHG alone was found to be protective (adjusted OR, 2.64 [95% CI, 1.12-6.20]).

  17. Standardized Infection Ratio for Surgical Site Infection after Colon Surgery: Discord in Models Measuring Healthcare Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Raymond; Lempp, Jason M; Huang, Susan S; Murthy, Rekha; Torriani, Francesca J; Daley, Jacqueline; Dekker, Elaine; Goss-Bottorff, Barbara; Kaler, Wendy; Meyer, Karen; Myers, Frank; Nichols, Amy; Kathleen Quan; Birnbaum, David

    2016-11-01

    The government publishes 3 different public report surgical site infection (SSI) metrics, all called standardized infection ratios (SIRs), that impact perceived hospital quality. We conducted a non-random cross-sectional observational pilot study of 20 California hospitals that voluntarily submitted colon surgery and SSI data. Discordant SIR values, leading to contradictory conclusions, occurred in 35% of these hospitals. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;1-5.

  18. A preliminary study for the development of indices and the current state of surgical site infections (SSIs) in Korea: the Korean Surgical Site Infection Surveillance (KOSSIS) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Jin; Lee, Kil Yeon; Park, Ji Won; Lee, Jae Gil; Choi, Hee Jung; Chun, Hee Kyung; Kang, Jung Gu

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to develop an effective system for surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance and examine the current domestic state of SSIs for common abdominal surgeries in Korea. The Korean Surgical Site Infection Surveillance (KOSSIS) program was developed as an SSI surveillance system. A prospective multicenter study in nine university-affiliated or general hospitals was conducted for patients who underwent gastrectomy, cholecystectomy, appendectomy, colectomy, or proctectomy between August 16 and September 30 in 2012. Patients were monitored for up to 30 days by combining direct observation and a postdischarge surgeon survey. Data on SSIs were prospectively collected with KOSSIS secretarial support according to a common protocol. Operation-specific SSI rates were stratified according to risk factors and compared with data from the Korean Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System (KONIS) and National Healthcare Safety Network. A focus group interview was conducted with participating hospitals for feedback. A total of 1,088 operations were monitored: 207 gastrectomies, 318 cholecystectomies, 270 appendectomies, 197 colectomies, and 96 proctectomies. Operation-specific SSI rates determined by the KOSSIS program were substantially higher than those found in KONIS (7.73% [95% confidence interval, 4.5%-12.3%] vs. 3.4% for gastrectomies, 10.15% [95% confidence interval, 6.1%-15.2%] vs. 4.0% for colectomy, and 13.5% [95% confidence interval, 7.4%-22.0%] vs. 4.2% for proctectomy). Despite a short surveillance period and heterogenous group of hospitals, our results suggest that KOSSIS could be a useful program to enhance SSI surveillance in Korea.

  19. Diabetes and Risk of Surgical Site Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Emily T; Kaye, Keith S; Knott, Caitlin; Nguyen, Huong; Santarossa, Maressa; Evans, Richard; Bertran, Elizabeth; Jaber, Linda

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the independent association between diabetes and surgical site infection (SSI) across multiple surgical procedures. DESIGN Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS Studies indexed in PubMed published between December 1985 and through July 2015 were identified through the search terms "risk factors" or "glucose" and "surgical site infection." A total of 3,631 abstracts were identified through the initial search terms. Full texts were reviewed for 522 articles. Of these, 94 articles met the criteria for inclusion. Standardized data collection forms were used to extract study-specific estimates for diabetes, blood glucose levels, and body mass index (BMI). A random-effects meta-analysis was used to generate pooled estimates, and meta-regression was used to evaluate specific hypothesized sources of heterogeneity. RESULTS The primary outcome was SSI, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention surveillance criteria. The overall effect size for the association between diabetes and SSI was odds ratio (OR)=1.53 (95% predictive interval [PI], 1.11-2.12; I2, 57.2%). SSI class, study design, or patient BMI did not significantly impact study results in a meta-regression model. The association was higher for cardiac surgery 2.03 (95% PI, 1.13-4.05) compared with surgeries of other types (P=.001). CONCLUSIONS These results support the consideration of diabetes as an independent risk factor for SSIs for multiple surgical procedure types. Continued efforts are needed to improve surgical outcomes for diabetic patients. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;37(1):88-99.

  20. Hand-rubbing with an aqueous alcoholic solution vs traditional surgical hand-scrubbing and 30-day surgical site infection rates: a randomized equivalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parienti, Jean Jacques; Thibon, Pascal; Heller, Remy; Le Roux, Yannick; von Theobald, Peter; Bensadoun, Henri; Bouvet, Alain; Lemarchand, François; Le Coutour, Xavier; Bensadoun, Hervé

    2002-08-14

    Surgical site infections prolong hospital stays, are among the leading nosocomial causes of morbidity, and a source of excess medical costs. Clinical studies comparing the risk of nosocomial infection after different hand antisepsis protocols are scarce. To compare the effectiveness of hand-cleansing protocols in preventing surgical site infections during routine surgical practice. Randomized equivalence trial. Six surgical services from teaching and nonteaching hospitals in France. A total of 4387 consecutive patients who underwent clean and clean-contaminated surgery between January 1, 2000, and May 1, 2001. Surgical services used 2 hand-cleansing methods alternately every other month: a hand-rubbing protocol with 75% aqueous alcoholic solution containing propanol-1, propanol-2, and mecetronium etilsulfate; and a hand-scrubbing protocol with antiseptic preparation containing 4% povidone iodine or 4% chlorhexidine gluconate. Thirty-day surgical site infection rates were the primary end point; operating department teams' tolerance of and compliance with hand antisepsis were secondary end points. The 2 protocols were comparable in regard to surgical site infection risk factors. Surgical site infection rates were 55 of 2252 (2.44%) in the hand-rubbing protocol and 53 of 2135 (2.48%) in the hand-scrubbing protocol, for a difference of 0.04% (95% confidence interval, -0.88% to 0.96%). Based on subsets of personnel, compliance with the recommended duration of hand antisepsis was better in the hand-rubbing protocol of the study compared with the hand-scrubbing protocol (44% vs 28%, respectively; P =.008), as was tolerance, with less skin dryness and less skin irritation after aqueous solution use. Hand-rubbing with aqueous alcoholic solution, preceded by a 1-minute nonantiseptic hand wash before each surgeon's first procedure of the day and before any other procedure if the hands were soiled, was as effective as traditional hand-scrubbing with antiseptic soap in

  1. Preoperative delay of more than 1 hour increases the risk of surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliff, Kris E; Rasouli, Mohammad R; Neusner, Alex; Kepler, Christopher K; Albert, Todd J; Rihn, Jeffrey A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2013-07-01

    Retrospective institutional database review. To determine whether preoperative in-room time is a risk factor for surgical site infection (SSI). Prior to spine surgery, while the patient is in the operating room, several procedures may be performed that may delay surgery. During this time, the sterile field may be exposed and may become contaminated. The hypothesis of this study was that the length of time in the operative room prior to surgical incision (anesthesia ready time [ART]) was related to the risk of SSI. From 2005 to 2009, we identified 276 patients who developed SSI out of 7991 cases that underwent spine surgery from 2005 to 2009. Patient demographic factors, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, wound classification, number of levels, anatomic region, type of surgical approach, and length of surgery were extrapolated. ART was calculated as the time after the patient was brought into the operating room prior to surgical incision. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify risk factors for SSI. Mean ART was significantly (P = 0.001) higher in patients with infection (68 min) compared with those without infection (60 min). The infection rate was higher in cases with ART more than 1 hour compared with those with less than 1 hour (4.9% vs. 2.3%, P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, ART more than 1 hour was an independent risk factor for SSI, along with number of levels, American Society of Anesthesiologists score and posterior approach. The highest percentage of cases with ART more than 1 hour occurred in August and September. Preoperative in-room time prior to the start of surgical incision is an independent risk factor for SSI. All possible steps should be taken prior to entry into the operating theater to reduce in-room time and opening of surgical sterile instrumentation be delayed until the surgery is ready to proceed.

  2. Surgical site infection and its associated factors following cesarean section: a cross sectional study from a public hospital in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelaw, Kelemu Abebe; Aweke, Amlaku Mulat; Astawesegn, Feleke Hailemichael; Demissie, Birhanu Wondimeneh; Zeleke, Liknaw Bewket

    2017-01-01

    A cesarean section is a surgical procedure in which incisions are made through a woman's abdomen and uterus to deliver her baby. Surgical site infections are a common surgical complication among patients delivered with cesarean section. Further it caused to increase maternal morbidity, stay of hospital and the cost of treatment. Hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the magnitude of surgical site infection following cesarean Site Infections and its associated factors at Lemlem Karl hospital July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2016. Retrospective card review was done on 384 women who gave birth via cesarean section at Lemlem Karl hospital from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2016. Systematic sampling technique was used to select patient medical cards. The data were entered by Epi info version 7.2 then analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences windows version 20. Both bivariate and multivariate logistic regression was done to test association between predictors and dependent variables. P value of cesarean section, the magnitude of surgical site infection following cesarean section Infection was 6.8%. The identified independent risk factors for surgical site infections were the duration of labor AOR=3.48; 95%CI (1.25, 9.68), rupture of membrane prior to cesarean section AOR=3.678; 95%CI (1.13, 11.96) and the abdominal midline incision (AOR=5.733; 95%CI (2.05, 16.00). The magnitude of surgical site infection following cesarean section is low compare to other previous studies. The independent associated factors for surgical site infection after cesarean section in this study: Membranes rupture prior to cesarean section, duration of labor and sub umbilical abdominal incision. In addition to ensuring sterile environment and aseptic surgeries, use of WHO surgical safety checklist would appear to be a very important intervention to reduce surgical site infections.

  3. Risk of surgical site infection in paediatric herniotomies without any prophylactic antibiotics: A preliminary experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Vaze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different studies underline the use of pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis in clean surgeries like herniotomy and inguinal orchiopexy. But, the meta-analyses do not recommend nor discard the use of prophylactic pre-operative antibiotics. The scarcity of controlled clinical trials in paediatric population further vitiates the matter. This study assessed the difference in the rate of early post-operative wound infection cases in children who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and children who did not receive antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. Materials and Methods: This randomised prospective study was conducted in Paediatric Surgery department of PGIMER Chandigarh. Out of 251 patients, 112 patients were randomised to the case group and 139 were ascribed to the control group. The patients in control group were given a standard regimen of single dose of intravenous antibiotic at the time of induction followed by 3-4 days of oral antibiotic. Case group patients underwent the surgical procedure in similar manner with no antibiotic either at the time of induction or post-operatively. Results: The incidence of surgical site infection in case group was 3.73 % and that in control group was 2.22%. The observed difference in the incidence of surgical site infection was statistically insignificant (P value = 0.7027. The overall infection rate in case and control group was 2.89%. Conclusions: Our preliminary experience suggests that there is no statistically significant difference in the proportion of early post-operative wound infection between the patients who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and the patients who received no antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. The risk of surgical site infection in paediatric heriotomies does not increase even if the child′s weight is less than his/her expected weight for age.

  4. Compact teleoperated laparoendoscopic single-site robotic surgical system: Kinematics, control, and operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac-Lowry, Oran Jacob; Okamoto, Steele; Pedram, Sahba Aghajani; Woo, Russell; Berkelman, Peter

    2017-03-27

    To date a variety of teleoperated surgical robotic systems have been developed to improve a surgeon's ability to perform demanding single-port procedures. However typical large systems are bulky, expensive, and afford limited angular motion, while smaller designs suffer complications arising from limited motion range, speed, and force generation. This work was to develop and validate a simple, compact, low cost single site teleoperated laparoendoscopic surgical robotic system, with demonstrated capability to carry out basic surgical procedures. This system builds upon previous work done at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and includes instrument and endoscope manipulators as well as compact articulated instruments designed to overcome single incision geometry complications. A robotic endoscope holder was used for the base, with an added support frame for teleoperated manipulators and instruments fabricated mostly from 3D printed parts. Kinematics and control methods were formulated for the novel manipulator configuration. Trajectory following results from an optical motion tracker and sample task performance results are presented. Results indicate that the system has successfully met the goal of basic surgical functionality while minimizing physical size, complexity, and cost. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Impact of a surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance program in orthopedics and traumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabit, C; Marcheix, P S; Mounier, M; Dijoux, P; Pestourie, N; Bonnevialle, P; Bonnomet, F

    2012-10-01

    Surveillance of surgical site infections (SSI) is a priority. One of the fundamental principles for the surveillance of SSI is based on receiving effective field feedback (retro-information). The aim of this study was to report the results of a program of SSI surveillance and validate the hypothesis that there is a correlation between creating a SSI surveillance program and a reduction in SSI. The protocol was based on the weekly collection of surveillance data obtained directly from the different information systems in different departments. A delay of 3 months was established before extraction and analysis of data and information from the surgical teams. The NNIS index (National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System) developed by the American surveillance system and the reduction of length of hospital stay index Journées d'hospitalisation évitées (JHE). Since the end of 2009, 7156 surgical procedures were evaluated (rate of inclusion 97.3%), and 84 SSI were registered with a significant decrease over time from 1.86% to 0.66%. A total of 418 days of hospitalization have been saved since the beginning of the surveillance system. Our surveillance system has three strong points: follow-up is continuous, specifically adapted to orthopedic traumatology and nearly exhaustive. The extraction of data directly from hospital information systems effectively improves the collection of data on surgical procedures. The implementation of a SSI surveillance protocol reduces SSI. Level III. Prospective study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Treatment of surgical site infections (SSI) IN patients with peripheral arterial disease: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Slegt, Jasper; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; de Groot, Hans G W; van der Laan, Lijckle

    2015-02-01

    The management of surgical site infections (SSI's) in vascular surgery has been challenging over the years. To assess the outcomes associated with the various strategies, we performed a review of all SSI's after elective vascular procedures in patients with moderate to severe peripheral arterial disease in a single centre hospital. All patients with a SSI after peripheral vascular surgery were retrieved from a database on Surgical site infections (SSI)-surveillance after vascular surgery between March 2009 and January 2012. At admission, all patients were approached by microbiological wound sampling and empirical start of antibiotics. Further wound management was based on personal experience and preference of the attending vascular surgeon. Endpoints were treatment success (complete wound healing while staying alive and without major amputation), survival and major amputation during one year follow up. A total of 40 patients with a SSI were identified (60% superficial SSI and 40% deep SSI). In 92% of the patients with a superficial SSI's were successfully treated with adjusted antibiotics and incisional drainages. In the contrast, 25% of the patients with deep-SSI's were successfully treated. No particular treatment was more successful than the others. Adjusted antibiotic use and adequate wound drainage are sufficient strategies for superficial SSI management. The management of deep-SSI's is a challenging undertaking and future research on indications and timing of these wide arrays of treatment options is suggested. Copyright © 2015 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. ‘This wound has spoilt everything’: emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to ‘germs’ or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system. PMID:25470322

  8. 'This wound has spoilt everything': emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to 'germs' or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system.

  9. Preoperative hair removal and surgical site infections: network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, A; Saliou, P; Lucet, J C; Mimoz, O; Keita-Perse, O; Grandbastien, B; Bruyère, F; Boisrenoult, P; Lepelletier, D; Aho-Glélé, L S

    2015-10-01

    Preoperative hair removal has been used to prevent surgical site infections (SSIs) or to prevent hair from interfering with the incision site. We aimed to update the meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials about hair removal for the prevention of SSIs, and conduct network meta-analyses to combine direct and indirect evidence and to compare chemical depilation with clipping. The PubMed, ScienceDirect and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized controlled trials analysing different hair removal techniques and no hair removal in similar groups. Paired and network meta-analyses were conducted. Two readers independently assessed the study limitations for each selected article according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) method. Nineteen studies met the inclusion criteria. No study compared clipping with chemical depilation. Network meta-analyses with shaving as the reference showed significantly fewer SSIs with clipping, chemical depilation, or no depilation [relative risk 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.38-0.79; 0.60, 0.36-0.97; and 0.56, 0.34-0.96, respectively]. No significant difference was observed between the absence of depilation and chemical depilation or clipping (1.05, 0.55-2.00; 0.97, 0.51-1.82, respectively] or between chemical depilation and clipping (1.09, 0.59-2.01). This meta-analysis of 19 randomized controlled trials confirmed the absence of any benefit of depilation to prevent surgical site infection, and the higher risk of surgical site infection when shaving is used for depilation. Chemical depilation and clipping were compared for the first time. The risk of SSI seems to be similar with both methods.

  10. Investigating the tool marks on oracle bones inscriptions from the Yinxu site (ca., 1319-1046 BC), Henan province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaolong; Tang, Jigen; Gu, Zhou; Shi, Jilong; Yang, Yimin; Wang, Changsui

    2016-09-01

    Oracle Bone Inscriptions in the Shang dynasty (1600-1046 BC) are the earliest well-developed writing forms of the Chinese character system, and their carving techniques have not been studied by tool marks analysis with microscopy. In this study, a digital microscope with three-dimensional surface reconstruction based on extended depth of focus technology was used to investigate tool marks on the surface of four pieces of oracle bones excavated at the eastern area of Huayuanzhuang, Yinxu site(ca., 1319-1046 BC), the last capital of the Shang dynasty, Henan province, China. The results show that there were two procedures to carve the characters on the analyzed tortoise shells. The first procedure was direct carving. The second was "outlining design," which means to engrave a formal character after engraving a draft with a pointed tool. Most of the strokes developed by an engraver do not overlap the smaller draft, which implies that the outlining design would be a sound way to avoid errors such as wrong and missing characters. The strokes of these characters have different shape at two ends and variations on width and depth of the grooves. Moreover, the bottom of the grooves is always rugged. Thus, the use of rotary wheel-cutting tools could be ruled out. In most cases, the starting points of the strokes are round or flat while the finishing points are always pointed. Moreover, the strokes should be engraved from top to bottom. When vertical or horizontal strokes had been engraved, the shell would be turned about 90 degrees to engrave the crossed strokes from top to bottom. There was no preferred order to engrave vertical or horizontal strokes. Since both sides of the grooves of the characters are neat and there exists no unorganized tool marks, then it is suggested that some sharp tools had been used for engraving characters on the shells. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:827-832, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Improving surgical site infection prevention practices through a multifaceted educational intervention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owens, P

    2015-03-01

    As part of the National Clinical Programme on healthcare-associated infection prevention, a Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) and Royal College of Physicians of Ireland (RCPI) working group developed a quality improvement tool for prevention of surgical site infection (SS). We aimed to validate the effectiveness of an educational campaign, which utilises this quality improvement tool to prevent SSI in a tertiary hospital. Prior to the SSI educational campaign, surgical patients were prospectively audited and details of antibiotic administration recorded. Prophylactic antibiotic administration recommendations were delivered via poster and educational presentations. Post-intervention, the audit was repeated. 50 patients were audited pre-intervention, 45 post-intervention. Post-intervention, prophylaxis within 60 minutes prior to incision increased from 54% to 68% (p = 0.266). Appropriate postoperative prescribing improved from 71% to 92% (p = 0.075). A multifaceted educational program may be effective in changing SSI prevention practices.

  12. Towards optical fibre based Raman spectroscopy for the detection of surgical site infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alex J.; Koziej, Lukasz; Williams, Huw D.; Elson, Daniel S.; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2016-03-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are common post-surgical complications that remain significant clinical problems, as they are associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. As such, there is significant interest in the development of minimally invasive techniques that permit early detection of SSIs. To this end, we are applying a compact, clinically deployable Raman spectrometer coupled to an optical fibre probe to the study of bacteria, with the long term goal of using Raman spectroscopy to detect infection in vivo. Our system comprises a 785 nm laser diode for excitation and a commercial (Ocean Optics, Inc.) Raman spectrometer for detection. Here we discuss the design, optimisation and validation of this system, and describe our first experiences interrogating bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) in vitro.

  13. Incidence of surgical site infections in children: active surveillance in an Italian academic children's hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofi Degli Atti, M L; Serino, L; Piga, S; Tozzi, A E; Raponi, M

    2017-01-01

    Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) account for 16-34% of all health-care associated infections. This study aimed to assess the incidence rate of SSIs in children who underwent surgical procedures in an academic children's hospital in Italy. Prospective cohort study. We actively followed-up 0-17 year old children at 30 days of surgical procedures without implants conducted during one index week per quarter, from the second quarter of 2014, to the first quarter of 2016 (8 index weeks in total). Follow up data were collected by telephone interview, or derived by clinical records if patients were still hospitalized. SSIs were defined according to case definitions of Centers for Diseases Control, Atlanta, USA. We calculated cumulative incidence of SSIs per 100 surgical procedures, by patient characteristics, procedure characteristics, and quarter. To investigate variables associated with SSIs, we compared characteristics of procedures with SSIs with those of procedures without SSIs. Over the study period, SSI incidence was 1.0% (19 cases/1,830 surgical procedures). SSI incidence was significantly lower after ear, nose and throat procedures compared to all other procedures, and significantly decreased over time. Duration of surgery was a risk factor for SSIs; patients with SSIs had a significantly longer total length of stay (LOS), due to a prolonged post-operative LOS. As reported in adults, this study confirms that SSIs are associated with longer hospitalizations in children. Active surveillance of SSIs is an important component of the overall strategy to reduce the incidence of these infections in children.

  14. Evaluation of long-term surgical site occurrences in ventral hernia repair: implications of preoperative site independent MRSA infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baucom, R B; Ousley, J; Oyefule, O O; Stewart, M K; Phillips, S E; Browman, K K; Sharp, K W; Holzman, M D; Poulose, B K

    2016-10-01

    Previous work demonstrated that prior MRSA infection [MRSA(+)] is associated with 30-day surgical site infection (SSI) following ventral hernia repair (VHR). We aimed to determine the impact of MRSA(+) on long-term wound outcomes after VHR. A retrospective cohort study was performed at a tertiary center between July 11, 2005, and May 18, 2012, of patients undergoing elective VHR with class I wounds. Patients with documented preoperative MRSA infection at any site (urinary, bloodstream, SSI, etc.) were considered MRSA(+). Primary outcome was 2-year surgical site occurrence (SSO), defined as SSI, cellulitis, necrosis, nonhealing wound, seroma, hematoma, dehiscence, or fistula. SSOs were subdivided into those that required procedural intervention (SSOPI) and those that did not. Among 632 patients, 46 % were female with average age 53 ± 13 years. There were 368 SSOs in 193 patients (31 %); an SSOPI occurred in 9.8 % (n = 62). The most common SSOs were cellulitis (91/632), seroma (91/632), and serous drainage (58/632). The rate of 2-year SSO was higher with MRSA(+) compared to those without (46 vs. 29 %, p = 0.023), attributed to increased soft tissue necrosis, purulent drainage, serous drainage, cellulitis, and fistula. In multivariable analysis, MRSA(+) was not associated with 2-year SSO (HR 1.5, 95 % CI 0.91-2.55, p = 0.113); factors associated with SSO included obesity, immunosuppression, mesh repair, and operative times. This study is the first to evaluate long-term SSOs and SSOPIs after VHR, highlighting the importance of long-term follow-up. Though not independently associated with SSOs, MRSA(+) may be a marker of hernia complexity.

  15. 5-millimeter Trocar-site Hernias After Laparoscopy Requiring Surgical Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Nigel; Hutchinson, Anne P; Irani, Mohamad; Chung, Eric R; Lekovich, Jovana P; Chung, Pak H; Zarnegar, Rasa; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2016-01-01

    Trocar-site hernias are rare complications of laparoscopic surgery. Although trocar-site hernias occur more often at >10-mm sites, hernias can still develop at 5-mm sites after laparoscopy and can lead to serious complications. The primary objective of this review is to summarize the current medical literature pertaining to the clinical presentation and predisposing risk factors of trocar-site hernias at 5-mm sites after laparoscopy. A total of 295 publications were identified, 17 (5.76%) of which met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-seven patients with trocar-site hernias were identified after laparoscopic cases. The median age (interquartile range) for all adult patients with trocar-site hernias was 63 years (interquartile range, 39.5-66.5 years). Eight of the 18 patients (44.4%) undergoing gynecologic laparoscopy were parous although details of parity were not reported in most publications. Simple manual reduction or laparoscopic reduction with fascial closure (21 patients [84%]) was used more often compared with exploratory laparotomy (4 patients [16%], p manipulation can extend 5-mm fascial incisions, thereby increasing the risk of trocar-site hernias. Parous women older than 60 years may have unrecognized fascial defects, which confer a higher risk of trocar-site hernias after laparoscopic surgery, even in the absence of incision manipulation or prolonged surgical duration. Such patients may benefit from closure of 5-mm fascial incisions although prospective data are required to validate the overall generalizability of this management strategy.

  16. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berríos-Torres, Sandra I; Umscheid, Craig A; Bratzler, Dale W; Leas, Brian; Stone, Erin C; Kelz, Rachel R; Reinke, Caroline E; Morgan, Sherry; Solomkin, Joseph S; Mazuski, John E; Dellinger, E Patchen; Itani, Kamal M F; Berbari, Elie F; Segreti, John; Parvizi, Javad; Blanchard, Joan; Allen, George; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Donlan, Rodney; Schecter, William P

    2017-08-01

    The human and financial costs of treating surgical site infections (SSIs) are increasing. The number of surgical procedures performed in the United States continues to rise, and surgical patients are initially seen with increasingly complex comorbidities. It is estimated that approximately half of SSIs are deemed preventable using evidence-based strategies. To provide new and updated evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of SSI. A targeted systematic review of the literature was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library from 1998 through April 2014. A modified Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was used to assess the quality of evidence and the strength of the resulting recommendation and to provide explicit links between them. Of 5759 titles and abstracts screened, 896 underwent full-text review by 2 independent reviewers. After exclusions, 170 studies were extracted into evidence tables, appraised, and synthesized. Before surgery, patients should shower or bathe (full body) with soap (antimicrobial or nonantimicrobial) or an antiseptic agent on at least the night before the operative day. Antimicrobial prophylaxis should be administered only when indicated based on published clinical practice guidelines and timed such that a bactericidal concentration of the agents is established in the serum and tissues when the incision is made. In cesarean section procedures, antimicrobial prophylaxis should be administered before skin incision. Skin preparation in the operating room should be performed using an alcohol-based agent unless contraindicated. For clean and clean-contaminated procedures, additional prophylactic antimicrobial agent doses should not be administered after the surgical incision is closed in the operating room, even in the presence of a drain. Topical antimicrobial agents should not be applied to the surgical incision. During surgery, glycemic control should be

  17. Surgical site wound infection in relation to antibiotic prophylaxis given before skin incision and after cord clamping during cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, B; Marhatha, R; Giri, A; Jaisi, S; Maskey, U

    2014-12-01

    Surgical site infection is one of the most common complications following Lower Segment Cesarean Section, which accounts for prolonged hospital stay thereby increasing expense. Prophylactic antibiotics in cesarean section reduces surgical site infection significantly. The best protection is provided when tissue level of antibiotics are adequate before incision, without prejudice to neonatal infectious morbidity. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of surgical site wound infection with prophylactic antibiotics given before skin incision and after cord clamping following delivery of baby. This was a prospective, hospital based study, in which hundred cases of cesarean deliveries who received antibiotics prophylaxis one hour before the skin incision were compared with another 100 cases where antibiotic was given after cord clamping following delivery of the baby. Surgical site infection occurred in 3% of women who received antibiotics prophylaxis before skin incision as compared to 6% in whom antibiotic was given after cord clamping. It was statistically not significant (p = 0.465).

  18. Prevention of Surgical Site Infections : Decontamination With Mupirocin Based on Preoperative Screening for Staphylococcus aureus Carriers or Universal Decontamination?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hetem, David J; Bootsma, Martin C J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830305; Bonten, Marc J M

    2016-01-01

    Perioperative decolonization of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriers with mupirocin together with chlorhexidine body washing reduces the incidence of S. aureus surgical site infection. A targeted strategy, applied in S. aureus carriers only, is costly, and implementation may reduce effectiveness.

  19. Infirmity and injury complexity are risk factors for surgical-site infection after operative fracture care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachoura, Abdo; Guitton, Thierry G; Smith, R Malcolm; Vrahas, Mark S; Zurakowski, David; Ring, David

    2011-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgical-site infections prolong hospital stays, double rehospitalization rates, and increase healthcare costs. Additionally, patients with orthopaedic surgical-site infections (SSI) have substantially greater physical limitations and reductions in their health-related quality of life. However, the risk factors for SSI after operative fracture care are unclear. We determined the incidence and quantified modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors for SSIs in patients with orthopaedic trauma undergoing surgery. We retrospectively indentified, from our prospective trauma database and billing records, 1611 patients who underwent 1783 trauma-related procedures between 2006 and 2008. Medical records were reviewed and demographics, surgery-specific data, and whether the patients had an SSI were recorded. We determined which if any variables predicted SSI. Six factors independently predicted SSI: (1) the use of a drain, OR 2.3, 95% CI (1.3-3.8); (2) number of operations OR 3.4, 95% CI (2.0-6.0); (3) diabetes, OR 2.1, 95% CI (1.2-3.8); (4) congestive heart failure (CHF), OR 2.8, 95% CI (1.3-6.5); (5) site of injury tibial shaft/plateau, OR 2.3, 95% CI (1.3-4.2); and (6) site of injury, elbow, OR 2.2, 95% CI (1.1-4.7). The risk factors for SSIs after skeletal trauma are most strongly determined by nonmodifiable factors: patient infirmity (diabetes and heart failure) and injury complexity (site of injury, number of operations, use of a drain). Level II, prognostic study. See the Guideline for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  20. [Effect of compliance with an antibiotic prophylaxis protocol in surgical site infections in appendectomies. Prospective cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Santana, Tomás; Del-Moral-Luque, Juan Antonio; Gil-Yonte, Pablo; Bañuelos-Andrío, Luis; Durán-Poveda, Manuel; Rodríguez-Caravaca, Gil

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is the most suitable tool for preventing surgical site infection. This study assessed compliance with antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery for acute appendicitis, and the effect of this compliance on surgical site infection. Prospective cohort study to evaluate compliance with antibiotic prophylaxis protocol in appendectomies. An assessment was made of the level of compliance with prophylaxis, as well as the causes of non-compliance. The incidence of surgical site infection was studied after a maximum incubation period of 30 days. The relative risk adjusted with a logistic regression model was used to assess the effect of non-compliance of prophylaxis on surgical site infection. The study included a total of 930 patients. Antibiotic prophylaxis was indicated in all patients, and administered in 71.3% of cases, with an overall protocol compliance of 86.1%. The principal cause of non-compliance was time of initiation. Cumulative incidence of surgical site infection was 4.6%. No relationship was found between inadequate prophylaxis compliance and infection (relative risk=0.5; 95% CI: 0.1-1.9) (P>.05). Compliance of antibiotic prophylaxis was high, but could be improved. No relationship was found between prophylaxis compliance and surgical site infection rate. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. Incidence of surgical site infection in postoperative patients at a tertiary care centre in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, M Siddique J; Verma, R; Madhukar, K Premjeet; Vaishampayan, A Rajiv; Unadkat, P C

    2016-04-01

    A prospective observational was carried out to calculate the incidence of surgical site infections (SSI) along with the main risk factors and causative organisms in postoperative patients at a tertiary care setting in Mumbai. A total number of 1196 patients between June 2011 to March 2013 admitted to the general surgical ward or surgical ICU of our hospital were included in the study. Post laproscopy patients and organ space SSIs were excluded. Patient data were collected using a preformed pro forma and a wound Southampton score tabulated and checked repeatedly until suture removal of patient. Regular follow-up was maintained until at least 30 days postoperatively. The study showed a SSI rate of 11%. Risk factors associated with a higher incidence of SSI were found to be age (>55 years), diabetes mellitus (especially uncontrolled sugar in the perioperative period), immunocompromised patients (mainly HIV and immunosuppressive therapy patients), surgeon skill (higher in senior professors compared with junior residents), nature of the cases, (emergency surgeries), placement of drains, wound class (highest in dirty wounds), type of closure (multilayer closure), prolonged duration of hospital stay, longer duration of surgery (>2 hours), type of surgery (highest in cholecystectomy). The highest rates of causative organisms for SSIs found were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella ssp. Prevention of SSIs requires a multipronged approach with particular emphasis on optimising preoperative issues, adhering religiously to strict protocols during the intraoperative period and addressing and optimising metabolic and nutritional status in postoperative period.

  2. Prolonged Operative Duration Increases Risk of Surgical Site Infections: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hang; Chen, Brian Po-Han; Soleas, Ireena M; Ferko, Nicole C; Cameron, Chris G; Hinoul, Piet

    The incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) across surgical procedures, specialties, and conditions is reported to vary from 0.1% to 50%. Operative duration is often cited as an independent and potentially modifiable risk factor for SSI. The objective of this systematic review was to provide an in-depth understanding of the relation between operating time and SSI. This review included 81 prospective and retrospective studies. Along with study design, likelihood of SSI, mean operative times, time thresholds, effect measures, confidence intervals, and p values were extracted. Three meta-analyses were conducted, whereby odds ratios were pooled by hourly operative time thresholds, increments of increasing operative time, and surgical specialty. Pooled analyses demonstrated that the association between extended operative time and SSI typically remained statistically significant, with close to twice the likelihood of SSI observed across various time thresholds. The likelihood of SSI increased with increasing time increments; for example, a 13%, 17%, and 37% increased likelihood for every 15 min, 30 min, and 60 min of surgery, respectively. On average, across various procedures, the mean operative time was approximately 30 min longer in patients with SSIs compared with those patients without. Prolonged operative time can increase the risk of SSI. Given the importance of SSIs on patient outcomes and health care economics, hospitals should focus efforts to reduce operative time.

  3. Risk factors of surgical site infections in patients with Crohn's disease complicated with gastrointestinal fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Ren, Jianan; Li, Guanwei; Hu, Qiongyuan; Wu, Xiuwen; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Gefei; Gu, Guosheng; Ren, Huajian; Hong, Zhiwu; Li, Jieshou

    2017-05-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is the most common complication following surgical procedures. This study aimed to determine risk factors associated with SSI in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) complicated with gastrointestinal fistula. This was a retrospective review of patients who underwent surgical resection in gastrointestinal fistula patients with CD between January 2013 and January 2015, identified from a prospectively maintained gastrointestinal fistula database. Demographic information, preoperative medication, intraoperative findings, and postoperative outcome data were collected. Univariate and multivariate analysis was carried out to assess possible risk factors for SSI. A total of 118 patients were identified, of whom 75.4% were men, the average age of the patients was 34.1 years, and the average body mass index (BMI) was 18.8 kg/m(2). The rate of SSI was 31.4%. On multivariate analysis, preoperative anemia (P = 0.001, OR 7.698, 95% CI 2.273-26.075), preoperative bacteria present in fistula tract (P = 0.029, OR 3.399, 95% CI 1.131-10.220), and preoperative enteral nutrition (EN) fistula tract, and preoperative EN fistula complicated with CD. Preoperative identification of these risk factors may assist in risk assessment and then to optimize preoperative preparation and perioperative care.

  4. Medicaid status is associated with higher surgical site infection rates after spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoso, Mark W; Cizik, Amy M; Bransford, Richard J; Bellabarba, Carlo; Chapman, Jens; Lee, Michael J

    2014-09-15

    The Spine End Results Registry (2003-2004) is a registry of prospectively collected data of all patients undergoing spinal surgery at the University of Washington Medical Center and Harborview Medical Center. Insurance data were prospectively collected and used in multivariate analysis to determine risk of perioperative complications. Given the negative financial impact of surgical site infections (SSIs) and the higher overall complication rates of patients with a Medicaid payer status, we hypothesized that a Medicaid payer status would have a significantly higher SSI rate. The medical literature demonstrates lesser outcomes and increased complication rates in patients who have public insurance than those who have private insurance. No one has shown that patients with a Medicaid payer status compared with Medicare and privately insured patients have a significantly increased SSI rate for spine surgery. The prospectively collected Spine End Results Registry provided data for analysis. SSI was defined as treatment requiring operative debridement. Demographic, social, medical, and the surgical severity index risk factors were assessed against the exposure of payer status for the surgical procedure. The population included Medicare (N = 354), Medicaid (N = 334), the Veterans' Administration (N = 39), private insurers (N = 603), and self-pay (N = 42). Those patients whose insurer was Medicaid had a 2.06 odds (95% confidence interval: 1.19-3.58, P = 0.01) of having a SSI compared with the privately insured. The study highlights the increased cost of spine surgical procedures for patients with a Medicaid payer status with the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 provisions could cause a reduction in reimbursement to the hospital for taking care of patients with Medicaid insurance due to their higher complication rates and higher costs. This very issue could inadvertently lead to access

  5. Chronic swelling from entrapment of acrylic resin in a surgical extraction site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiting Ho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available When acrylic resin is inadvertently embedded in oral tissue, it can result in a pronounced chronic inflammatory response. This report describes a case in which temporary crown and bridge resin was forced into a surgical extraction site after the two adjacent teeth were prepared for a bridge immediately following extraction of a maxillary premolar. The patient experienced swelling at the extraction site over a ten month period despite treatment with antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs. After detection and removal of the foreign body, the symptoms resolved. The episode contributed to periodontal bone loss around an adjacent tooth. While morbidity of this nature is rare, this case reinforces the need to investigate persistent signs of inflammation and account for dental materials that are lost during the course of treatment.

  6. Use of administrative data for surgical site infection surveillance after congenital cardiac surgery results in inaccurate reporting of surgical site infection rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchley, Krista D; Pappas, Janine M; Kennedy, Andrea T; Coffin, Susan E; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Fuller, Stephanie M; Spray, Thomas L; McCardle, Kenneth; Gaynor, J William

    2014-02-01

    The National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) is a safety surveillance system managed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that monitors procedure specific rates of surgical site infections (SSIs). At our institution, SSI data is collected and reported by three different methods: (1) the NHSN database with reporting to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; (2) the hospital billing database with reporting to payers; and (3) The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database. A quality improvement initiative was undertaken to better understand issues with SSI reporting and to evaluate the effect of different data sources on annual SSI rates. Annual cardiac surgery procedure volumes for all three data sources were compared. All episodes of SSI identified in any data source were reviewed and adjudicated using NHSN SSI criteria, and the effect on SSI rates was evaluated. From January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2011, 2,474 cardiac procedures were performed and reported to The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database. Billing data identified 1,865 cardiac surgery procedures using the 63 CARD International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision codes from the NHSN inclusion criteria. Only 1,425 procedures were targeted for NHSN surveillance using the NHSN's CARD operative procedure group in the same period. Procedures identified for NHSN surveillance annually underestimated the number of cardiac operations performed by 17% to 71%. As a result, annual SSI rates potentially differed by 12% to 270%. The NHSN CARD surveillance guidelines for SSI fail to identify all pediatric cardiac surgical procedures. Failure to target all at-risk procedures leads to inaccurate reporting of SSI rates largely based on identifying the denominator. Inaccurate recording of SSI data has implications for public reporting, benchmarking of outcomes, and denial of payment. Use of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery

  7. Versatility of the Latissimus Dorsi Free Flap during the Treatment of Complex Postcraniotomy Surgical Site Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background: Some intractable cases of postcraniotomy infection, which can involve compromised skin, an open frontal air sinus, and residual epidural dead space, have been reported. In such cases, reconstructing the scalp and skull is challenging. Methods: Between 2009 and 2016, the author treated 12 patients with recalcitrant postcraniotomy surgical site infections with latissimus dorsi (LD) free flaps. The patients’ ages ranged from 37 to 79 years (mean, 63.5 years), and their underlying diseases included subarachnoid hemorrhaging (n = 5), brain tumors (n = 4), and cerebral arteriovenous malformations (n = 3). Results: The LD free flap was used for scalp reconstruction in 3 cases, scalp reconstruction and separation of the intracranial and nasal cavities in 5 cases, and the obliteration of epidural dead space in 4 cases. Debridement followed by staged cranial reconstruction was carried out in 8 cases, and single-stage cranial reconstruction was conducted in 2 cases. The bone defects of the other 2 cases, which were small, were filled with LD musculo-adipose free flaps. The postoperative local appearance of the wounds was acceptable in every case, and no complications occurred. Conclusions: The LD free flap is a versatile tool for the treatment of complex postcraniotomy surgical site infections. This vascularized muscle flap is useful for controlling local infections because of its abundant vascularity. Moreover, its variety of uses means that it can resolve several problems in cases involving complex cranial wounds. PMID:28740770

  8. PROPHYLAXIS OF SURGICAL SITE INFECTION WITH VANCOMYCIN IN 513 PATIENTS THAT UNDERWENT TO LUMBAR FUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Scheverin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To assess the prophylactic effects of local vancomycin on an infection of the surgical site in patients undergoing lumbar instrumented fusion.Methods:Retrospective study from January 2011 to June 2014 in patients with symptomatic and refractory lumbar spine stenosis and listhesis who underwent instrumented pedicle screw spinal fusion. Two groups of patient were analyzed, one using vancomycin on the surgical site, vancomycin group (VG and the control group (CG without topical vancomycin. The routine prophylactic procedures were performed in both groups: aseptic scrub technique, skin preparation, preoperative intravenous antibiotic therapy. The VG received a dose of 1g of vancomycin mixed with the bone graft every three spinal levels fused and the group consisted of 232 patients.Results:513 patients were analyzed, 232 in the VG and 281 in the CG. There was no statistical difference between the groups when the sex, mean surgery length, and mean bleeding volume were considered. The rate of infection for VG was reduced from 4.98% to 1.29% when compared with CG.Conclusion:The use of vancomycin added to the bone graft in posterior spinal fusion is associated with significantly lower rates of infection.

  9. Incidence and Etiology of Surgical Site Infections in Appendectomies: A 3-Year Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcell, Humberto Guanche; Arias, Ariadna Villanueva; Sandoval, Cristobal A. Pancorbo; García, Elias Guilarte; Gamboa, Moraima E. Valle; Sado, Adam Bode; Serrano, Ramón N. Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Surgical site infections (SSIs) constitute a threat, especially in complicated appendicitis, and are commonly due to gram-negative organisms. We sought to describe the incidence of SSIs in appendectomies performed during a three-year period (January 2013 to December 2015) in a community hospital in Qatar, and compare this with external benchmarks. Methods We conducted a longitudinal study at The Cuban Hospital, Qatar. We used the standardized surveillance criteria to define SSI developed by the Centers for Disease Control. Information about age, sex, smoking habits, diabetes mellitus status, body mass index, and the result of bacteriologic studies were collected. Results Of a total 603 patients, 22 (3.6%) cases of SSI were reported, with an infection rate of 13.6%, 4.5%, and 1.0% in 2013, 2014, and 2015, respectively. SSIs were observed more frequently in patients with contaminated/dirty wounds (6.6%). About 65% of isolates from the surgical site were multidrug-resistant organisms (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp.). Conclusions This study describes the incidence of SSI in appendectomy, which could be used as a benchmark for the facility improvement program. The high frequency of multidrug-resistant organisms in SSIs requires additional studies focused on evaluating the effectiveness of the current preventive practices with a particular reference to antimicrobial prophylaxis. PMID:28042400

  10. Factors predicting surgical site infection after posterior lumbar surgery: A multicenter retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Hui; Yang, Da-Long; Jiang, Li-Qiang; Zhang, Li-Jun; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2017-02-01

    This is a retrospective study.The purpose of this study is to explore incidence and risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) after posterior lumbar surgery.SSI is a common complication after posterior lumbar surgery, bringing mental and physical pain and prolonging hospital stay. However, predisposing factors, as reported less, remain controversial.Patients who underwent posterior lumbar surgery at 3 centers between 2006 and 2016 were included. The possible factors include 3 aspects: demographic variables-age, sex, body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip radio (WHR), hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, smoking, drinking, steroidal injection, surgical time between June and September, preoperative shower; blood test variables-white blood cell (WBC), neutrophil, red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), total protein (TP), albumin, albumin/globulin (A/G), C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and surgical related variables-operation time, blood loss, operative level, instrumentation, incision length. Factors related with SSI were also performed by multivariate analysis.The prevalence of SSI was 3.00% (267 cases of 8879) had a postoperative wound infection. There were significant difference in WHR (0.92 vs 0.83), WBC (4.31 vs 6.69), TP (58.7 vs 65.2), albumin (36.9 vs 43.2), CRP (2.01 vs 0.57), PCT (0.097 vs 0.067), operation time (217.9 vs 195.7), blood loss (997.1 vs 915.3) and operative level (3.05 vs 2.45) and incision length (24.1 vs 20.0) between SSI group and non-SSI group. >60 years old, female, BMI 30.0, diabetes, male smoking, preoperative steroidal injection, surgical time between June and September, no preoperative shower, instrumentation surgery were risk factors for SSI after posterior lumbar surgery.Many factors, >60 years old, female, BMI, WHR, diabetes, male smoking, preoperative steroidal injection, surgical time between June and September, preoperative shower, WBC, TP, albumin, CRP, PCT, operation time

  11. Predictors of surgical site infection in laparoscopic and open ventral incisional herniorrhaphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Kaufman, Derrick; Reda, Domenic; Itani, Kamal M F

    2010-10-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after ventral incisional hernia repair (VIH) can result in serious consequences. We sought to identify patient, procedure, and/or hernia characteristics that are associated with SSI in VIH. Between 2004 and 2006, patients were randomized in four Veteran Affairs (VA) hospitals to undergo laparoscopic or open VIH. Patients who developed SSI within eight weeks postoperatively were compared to those who did not. A bivariate analysis for each factor and a multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to determine factors associated with SSI. The variables studied included patient characteristics and co-morbidities (e.g., age, gender, race, ethnicity, body mass index, ASA classification, diabetes, steroid use), hernia characteristics (e.g., size, duration, number of previous incisions), procedure characteristics (e.g., open versus laparoscopic, blood loss, use of postoperative drains, operating room temperature) and surgeons' experience (resident training level, number of open VIH previously performed by the attending surgeon). Antibiotic prophylaxis, anticoagulation protocols, preparation of the skin, draping of the wound, body temperature control, and closure of the surgical site were all standardized and monitored throughout the study period. Out of 145 patients who underwent VIH, 21 developed a SSI (14.5%). Patients who underwent open VIH had significantly more SSIs than those who underwent laparoscopic VIH (22.1% versus 3.4%; P = 0.002). Among patients who underwent open VIH, those who developed SSI had a recorded intraoperative blood loss greater than 25 mL (68.4% versus 40.3%; P = 0.030), were more likely to have a drain placed (79.0% versus 49.3%; P = 0.021) and were more likey to be operated on by surgeons with less than 75 open VIH case experience (52.6% versus 28.4%; P = 0.048). Patient and hernia characteristics were similar between the two groups. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, the open surgical technique was

  12. Collagen implant with gentamicin sulphate reduces surgical site infection in vascular surgery: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Perdigão; Reis, Luis; Carvalho, Luis; Costa Almeida, Carlos Manuel

    2014-10-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after vascular surgery. It may cause exposure of the underlying prosthesis causing graft infection, which may require the removal of the vascular graft, increasing amputation and mortality risks. Graft contamination usually occurs during operative procedure or by direct spread from an infected wound. It is therefore advisable to a strong effort in reducing SSI. Topic antibiotics have not been fully studied in vascular surgery, but collagen implant with gentamicin sulphate has shown to reduce SSI in cardiac surgery, orthopaedics, and general surgery procedures. Sixty (60) non-diabetic and non-obese patients with lower limb ischaemia with indication for femoropopliteal PTFE prosthetic bypass were allocated into 2 groups of 30 patients. A collagen implant impregnated with gentamicin sulphate (Collatamp(®)) was applied in the groin incision adjacent to the prosthesis in one group, and the other was a control group. The same surgical team operated all patients. Szilagyi classification was used. There was no SSI (0% - 0/30) in the collagen implant with gentamicin sulphate group, contrasting with 6 cases (20% - 6/30) of SSI (grade I and II) in the control group (p = 0.024). In-hospital day's data shows a significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.004) with a mean of 5.66 days for implant group and 8.10 days for control group. There was no SSI grade III. Collagen implant with gentamicin sulphate (Collatamp(®)) reduces SSI in the groin incision in ischaemic patients submitted to femoropopliteal PTFE prosthetic bypass. Days of hospitalization are also reduced. Decreasing SSI rate and in-hospital days, this implant may also reduce health care costs. Because this is a small pilot study, a multicentre RCT is necessary for validation. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reducing the risk of surgical site infection using a multidisciplinary approach: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillespie BM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Brigid M Gillespie,1 Evelyn Kang,1 Shelley Roberts,1 Frances Lin,1,2 Nicola Morley,3 Tracey Finigan,3 Allison Homer,3 Wendy Chaboyer1 1National Health and Medical Research Council Research Centre for Clinical Excellence in Nursing Interventions (NCREN and Centre for Healthcare Practice Innovation (HPI, Menzies Health Institute, 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, 3Surgical and Procedural Services, Gold Coast University Hospital, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia Purpose: To identify and describe the strategies and processes used by multidisciplinary teams of health care professionals to reduce surgical site infections (SSIs.Materials and methods: An integrative review of the research literature was undertaken. Searches were conducted in April 2015. Following review of the included studies, data were abstracted using summary tables and the methodological quality of each study assessed using the Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence guidelines by two reviewers. Discrepancies were dealt with through consensus. Inductive content analysis was used to identify and describe the strategies/processes used by multidisciplinary health care teams to prevent SSI.Results and discussion: In total, 13 studies met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 12 studies used quantitative methods, while a single study used qualitative interviews. The majority of the studies were conducted in North America. All quantitative studies evaluated multifaceted quality-improvement interventions aimed at preventing SSI in patients undergoing surgery. Across the 13 studies reviewed, the following multidisciplinary team-based approaches were enacted: using a bundled approach, sharing responsibility, and, adhering to best practice. The majority of studies described team collaborations that were circumscribed by role. None of the reviewed studies used strategies that included the input of allied health professionals or patient participation in SSI prevention

  14. Reduction of surgical site infections after implementation of a bundle of care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier M P H Crolla

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surgical Site Infections (SSI are relatively frequent complications after colorectal surgery and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: Implementing a bundle of care and measuring the effects on the SSI rate. DESIGN: Prospective quasi experimental cohort study. METHODS: A prospective surveillance for SSI after colorectal surgery was performed in the Amphia Hospital, Breda, from January 1, 2008 until January 1, 2012. As part of a National patient safety initiative, a bundle of care consisting of 4 elements covering the surgical process was introduced in 2009. The elements of the bundle were perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis, hair removal before surgery, perioperative normothermia and discipline in the operating room. Bundle compliance was measured every 3 months in a random sample of surgical procedures. RESULTS: Bundle compliance improved significantly from an average of 10% in 2009 to 60% in 2011. 1537 colorectal procedures were performed during the study period and 300 SSI (19.5% occurred. SSI were associated with a prolonged length of stay (mean additional length of stay 18 days and a significantly higher 6 months mortality (Adjusted OR: 2.71, 95% confidence interval 1.76-4.18. Logistic regression showed a significant decrease of the SSI rate that paralleled the introduction of the bundle. The adjusted Odds ratio of the SSI rate was 36% lower in 2011 compared to 2008. CONCLUSION: The implementation of the bundle was associated with improved compliance over time and a 36% reduction of the SSI rate after adjustment for confounders. This makes the bundle an important tool to improve patient safety.

  15. Surgical Site Infections Following Bimaxillary Orthognathic, Osseous Genioplasty, and Intranasal Surgery: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posnick, Jeffrey C; Choi, Elbert; Chavda, Anish

    2017-03-01

    Frequency estimates of surgical site infection (SSI) after orthognathic surgery vary considerably. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and site of SSIs and associated risk factors after bimaxillary orthognathic, osseous genioplasty, and intranasal surgery. The authors executed a retrospective cohort study of patients with a bimaxillary developmental dentofacial deformity (DFD) and symptomatic chronic obstructive nasal breathing. All patients underwent at a minimum Le Fort I osteotomy, bilateral sagittal ramus osteotomies (SROs), septoplasty, inferior turbinate reduction, and osseous genioplasty. The primary outcome variable studied was the incidence and site of SSI. Predictor variables were type and extent of prophylactic antibiotic used, demographic (age and gender), and anatomic (pattern of DFD, surgical site, and presence of third molar). Two hundred sixty-two patients met the inclusion criteria. Their average age at surgery was 25 years (range, 13 to 63 yr) and there were 134 female patients (51%). The major presenting patterns of DFD included long face (30%) and maxillary deficiency (25%). Forty percent of patients undergoing an SRO and 47% of those undergoing a Le Fort I osteotomy underwent simultaneous removal of a third molar. Ninety percent of patients received cefazolin or cephalexin antibiotics. Overall, 5 of 1,048 (0.5%) osteotomy sites sustained an infection, including 1 chin and 4 ramus SSIs. There were no delays in bone healing. Fixation hardware removal was not required in any patient who developed an infection. Two of the 25 patients (8%) given clindamycin prophylaxis developed an SSI, whereas 3 of 237 patients (1%) receiving cefazolin did. Three of the 4 patients who developed an SRO SSI underwent simultaneous removal of an erupted or partially erupted mandibular third molar (P < .05). In this study, the incidence of SSI was limited to 1% of patients who were given cefazolin or cephalexin extended for 5 days. The removal of

  16. A simple protocol for the management of deep sternal surgical site infection: a retrospective study of twenty-five cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yu-Jen; Chang, Shun-Cheng; Wang, Chih-Hsin; Dai, Niann-Tzyy; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Chen, Tim-Mo; Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng

    2014-12-01

    Deep sternal incisional surgical site infection is a serious and potentially life-threatening complication after open heart surgery. Although a rare post-operative complication, the rates of post-operative morbidity and mortality are greater in patients who develop a deep sternal incisional surgical site infection than in those who do not. We evaluated retrospectively the results of patients who developed a deep sternal incisional surgical site infection who were treated with either a pectoralis major flap or delayed primary closure after previous negative-pressure wound therapy (NWPT). From July 2007 to July 2012, 25 patients had a deep sternal incisional surgical site infection after open heart surgery in the Departments of Plastic Surgery and Cardiac Surgery of the Tri-Service General Hospital Medical Center. Sternal refixation was not performed in our patients. In 15 patients, a unilateral or bilateral pectoralis major advancement flap with a myocutaneous or muscle flap was used. In seven patients, delayed primary closure was performed after NPWT. One patient received a rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap and another received a free anterior lateral thigh flap. One patient died after developing nosocomial pneumonia with severe sepsis after debridement. In our series, no patient required sternal re-fixation. Our findings suggest that delayed primary closure and use of a unilateral or bilateral pectoralis major flap following NPWT for a deep sternal incisional surgical site infection are simple and quick methods for managing such difficult surgical incisions even if the deep sternal surgical site infection is located in the lower one-third of the sternum.

  17. Surgical Site Infection by Corynebacterium macginleyi in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Cacopardo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium (C. macginleyi is a gram positive, lipophilic rod, usually considered a colonizer of skin and mucosal surfaces. Several reports have associated C. macginleyi with ocular infections, such as conjunctivitis and endophthalmitis. However, even if rare, extraocular infections from C. macginleyi may occur, especially among immunocompromised patients and patients with indwelling medical devices. We report herein the first case of surgical site infection by C. macginleyi after orthopaedic surgery for the correction of kyphoscoliosis in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1. Our patient developed a nodular granulomatous lesion of about two centimetres along the surgical scar, at the level of C4-C5, with purulent discharge and formation of a fistulous tract. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of a two-centimetre fluid pocket in the subcutaneous tissue. Several swabs were collected from the borders of the lesion as well as from the exudate, with isolation of C. macginleyi. The isolate was susceptible to beta-lactams, cotrimoxazole, linezolid, and glycopeptides but resistant to quinolones, third-generation cephalosporins, and erythromycin. Two 30-day courses of antibiotic therapy with amoxicillin/clavulanate (1 g three times/day and cotrimoxazole (800/160 mg twice a day were administered, obtaining a complete healing of the lesion.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus and surgical site infections: benefits of screening and decolonization before surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, H; Becker, K; Dohmen, P M; Petrosillo, N; Spencer, M; van Rijen, M; Wechsler-Fördös, A; Pujol, M; Dubouix, A; Garau, J

    2016-11-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are among the most common healthcare-associated infections, and contribute significantly to patient morbidity and healthcare costs. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common microbial cause. The epidemiology of S. aureus is changing with the dissemination of newer clones and the emergence of mupirocin resistance. The prevention and control of SSIs is multi-modal, and this article reviews the evidence on the value of screening for nasal carriage of S. aureus and subsequent decolonization of positive patients pre-operatively. Pre-operative screening, using culture- or molecular-based methods, and subsequent decolonization of patients who are positive for meticillin-susceptible S. aureus and meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) reduces SSIs and hospital stay. This applies especially to major clean surgery, such as cardiothoracic and orthopaedic, involving the insertion of implanted devices. However, it requires a multi-disciplinary approach coupled with patient education. Universal decolonization pre-operatively without screening for S. aureus may compromise the capacity to monitor for the emergence of new clones of S. aureus, contribute to mupirocin resistance, and prevent the adjustment of surgical prophylaxis for MRSA (i.e. replacement of a beta-lactam agent with a glycopeptide or alternative).

  19. Obesity and the Risk for Surgical Site Infection in Abdominal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfield, Robert D; Reese, Stacey; Bochicchio, Kelly; Mazuski, John E; Bochicchio, Grant V

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for surgical site infection (SSI) after abdominal procedures; however, data characterizing the risk of SSI in obese patients during abdominal procedures are lacking. We hypothesized that obesity is an independent risk factor for SSI across wound classes. We analyzed American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) data for 2011. We calculated body mass index (BMI), classifying patients according to National Institute of Health (NIH) BMI groups. We excluded records in which height/weight was not recorded and patients with BMI less than 18.5. We examined patients undergoing open abdominal procedures, performing univariate and multivariate analyses to assess the relative contribution of obesity to SSI. Study criteria were met by 89,148 patients. Obese and morbidly obese patients had significantly greater SSI rates in clean and clean-contaminated cases but not contaminated or dirty/infected cases. Logistic regression confirmed obesity and morbid obesity as being independently associated with the overall SSI development, specifically in clean [Obesity odds ratio (OR) = 1.757, morbid obesity OR = 2.544, P obesity OR = 1.239, morbid obesity OR = 1.287, P Obesity is associated with increased risk of SSI overall, specifically in clean and clean-contaminated abdominal procedures; this is independent of diabetes mellitus. Novel techniques are needed to reduce SSI in this high-risk patient population.

  20. Surgical site infections in women and their association with clinical conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Zélia de Araújo Madeira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Surgical site infections (SSIs can affect body tissues, cavities, or organs manipulated in surgery and constitute 14% to 16% of all infections. This study aimed to determine the incidence of SSIs in women following their discharge from a gynecology outpatient clinic, to survey different types of SSIs among women, and to verify the association of SSIs with comorbidities and clinical conditions. Methods Data were collected via analytical observation with a cross-sectional design, and the study was conducted in 1,026 women who underwent gynecological surgery in a teaching hospital in the municipality of Teresina, in the northeast Brazilian State of Piauí, from June 2011 to March 2013. Results The incidence of SSIs after discharge was 5.8% among the women in the outpatient clinic. The most prevalent surgery among the patients was hysterectomy, while the most prevalent type of SSI was superficial incisional. Comorbidities in women with SSIs included cancer, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Conclusions Surveillance of SSIs during the post-discharge period is critical for infection prevention and control. It is worth reflecting on the planning of surgical procedures for patients who have risk factors for the development of SSIs.

  1. Effect of high perioperative oxygen fraction on surgical site infection and pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyhoff, Christian S; Wetterslev, Jørn; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Use of 80% oxygen during surgery has been suggested to reduce the risk of surgical wound infections, but this effect has not been consistently identified. The effect of 80% oxygen on pulmonary complications has not been well defined. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether use of 80% oxygen reduces...... Control and Prevention. Secondary outcomes included atelectasis, pneumonia, respiratory failure, and mortality. RESULTS: Surgical site infection occurred in 131 of 685 patients (19.1%) assigned to receive 80% oxygen vs 141 of 701 (20.1%) assigned to receive 30% oxygen (odds ratio [OR], 0.94; 95......% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-1.22; P = .64). Atelectasis occurred in 54 of 685 patients (7.9%) assigned to receive 80% oxygen vs 50 of 701 (7.1%) assigned to receive 30% oxygen (OR, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.75-1.66; P = .60), pneumonia in 41 (6.0%) vs 44 (6.3%) (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.61-1.48; P = .82), respiratory...

  2. Preoperative skin preparation with 2% chlorhexidine as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Solano Castro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of secondary research that refers to preoperative skin preparation with antiseptic chlorhexidine 2% are presented. Surgical Site Infections are one of the most common complications in surgical procedures are associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the user and are the third -associated infection more frequent in the health care . Steps of clinical practice based on evidence were applied, considering in the first instance a question in PICO format, then a search for information in databases recommended in the Course of Clinical Nursing Practice Evidence-Based, taught by the program for Collaborative Research in Evidence-Based Nursing of Costa Rica ( CIEBE -CR . The PubMed database and Cochrane LIBRARY was consulted, National Center for Biotechnology Information ( NCBI, Google Scholar, CINAHL (cummulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature. SCIELO (Scientific Electronic Library on line www.Scielo.org . 22 documents were recovered, but only three were selected because had methodological rigor. For the critical analysis Critical Reading Sheets 2.0 ( FLC software was used. Was concluded that 2% chlorhexidine, is the best choice for preoperative skin preparation antiseptic, however, it is necessary to conduct further studies in order to determine which is the correct way in strength, frequency, technical and adverse effects in the pediatric population.

  3. Surgical site infection in tibial plateau fractures with ipsilateral compartment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubina, Andrew G; Paryavi, Ebrahim; Manson, Theodore T; Allmon, Christopher; O'Toole, Robert V

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of compartment syndrome and timing of fasciotomy wound closure on surgical site infection (SSI) after surgical fixation of tibial plateau fractures. Our primary hypothesis was that SSI rate is increased for fractures with compartment syndrome versus those without, even accounting for confounders associated with infection. Our secondary hypothesis was that infection rates are unrelated to timing of fasciotomy closure or fixation. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of operative tibial plateau fractures with ipsilateral compartment syndrome (n=71) treated with fasciotomy at our level I trauma center from 2003 through 2011. A control group consisted of 602 patients with 625 operatively treated tibial plateau fractures without diagnosis of compartment syndrome. The primary outcome measure was deep SSI after ORIF. Fractures with compartment syndrome had a higher rate of SSI (25% versus 8%, pcompartment syndrome have a significant increase in rates of SSI compared with those without compartment syndrome (p<0.001). Delays in fasciotomy wound closure were also associated with increased odds of SSI (p<0.05). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. STUDY ON SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS CAUSED BY ESBL PRODUCING GRAM NEGATIVE BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambabu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections have been a major problem, because of the emergence of drug resistant bacteria, in particular B - lactamase producing bacteria. Extended spectrum beta lactamase producing gram negative organisms pose a great challenge in treatment o f SSI present study is aimed at determining multiple drug resistance in gram negative bacteria & to find out ESBL producers, in correlation with treatment outcome. A total of 120 wound infected cases were studied. Staphylococcus aureus was predominant bact erium - 20.Among gram negative bacteria, Pseudomonas species is predominant (14 followed by Escherichia coli (13 , Klebsiella species (12 , Proteus (9 Citrobacter (4 Providencia (2 & Acinetobacter species (2 . Out of 56 gramnegative bacteria isolated, 20 were i dentified as ESBL producers, which was statistically significant. Delay in wound healing correlated with infection by ESBL producers, which alarms the need of abstinence from antibiotic abuse

  5. Surgical site infections in dermatologic surgery: etiology, pathogenesis, and current preventative measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Karim; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2015-05-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) after dermatologic surgery continue to represent undesirable complications that affect patients in several aspects. The etiology and pathogenesis of SSIs are not completely understood, and as a result, current preventative measures are debatable. To review and summarize the current available literature specific to SSIs in dermatologic surgery. The pathogenesis of SSIs, factors contributing to SSIs, current preventative guidelines, and evidence supporting their use are explored. A review of the medical literature. Most measures used to prevent SSIs in dermatologic surgery are based on studies of wounds in general surgery. Evidence specific to dermatologic surgery is scarce. More research related to the pathogenesis of SSIs is needed to establish effective preventative measures that are key to reducing incidences of SSIs.

  6. Low- and intermediate level radioactive waste from Risoe, Denmark. Site studies. Report no. 3. Kertinge Mark, Kerteminde Municipality; Lav- og mellem radioaktivt affald fra Risoe, Danmark. Omegnsstudier. Rapport nr. 3. Omraede Kertinge Mark, Kerteminde Kommune

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravesen, P.; Nilsson, B.; Binderup, M.; Larsen, Tine; Schack Pedersen, S.A.

    2012-07-01

    The low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes from Risoe (the nuclear reactor buildings, different types of material from the research periods and waste from hospitals and research institutes) have to be stored in a final disposal in Denmark for at least 300 years. In 2011, the results of the first analyses of 20 potential areas for siting a waste disposal were published. Of these potential areas, 6 specific sites were selected for further detailed studies. The site studies include information about geology, land use, nature preservation, archaeology, drinking water supply etc. The 5 municipalities with the 6 selected sites have been visited to obtain as much information about local conditions as possible. The present report describes the results for the area Kertinge Mark in the Municipality of Kerteminde, the island Funen. (LN)

  7. Post liposuction Mycobacterium abscessus surgical site infection in a returned medical tourist complicated by a paradoxical reaction during treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siong H. Hui

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly growing mycobacterial skin and soft tissue infections are known to complicate cosmetic surgical procedures. Treatment consists of more surgery and prolonged antibiotic therapy guided by drug susceptibility testing. Paradoxical reactions occurring during antibiotic therapy can further complicate treatment of non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections. We report a case of post liposuction Mycobacterium abscessus surgical site infection in a returned medical tourist and occurrence of paradox during treatment.

  8. The role of other stakeholders than the surgeon in relation to surgical site infections following total joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuyts, Bart; Van den Eeden, Elke; Fennema, Peter

    2015-12-01

    In contemporary orthopaedics, surgical site infections (SSIs) can have significant negative consequences for both patients and the healthcare system overall. To date, most efforts at combating the risk of SSIs have focused on the role of the surgeon, yet recent data suggest that a more expansive approach is warranted. The current review offers an overview of the most-relevant factors associated with SSIs in orthopaedic surgery, and the crucial role that the full surgical staff can play in addressing them.

  9. Post Liposuction Mycobacterium Abscessus Surgical Site Infection in a Returned Medical tourist Complicated by a Paradoxical Reaction During Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Siong H; Noonan, Lisa; Chavada, Ruchir

    2015-12-22

    Rapidly growing mycobacterial skin and soft tissue infections are known to complicate cosmetic surgical procedures. Treatment consists of more surgery and prolonged antibiotic therapy guided by drug susceptibility testing. Paradoxical reactions occurring during antibiotic therapy can further complicate treatment of non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections. We report a case of post liposuction Mycobacterium abscessus surgical site infection in a returned medical tourist and occurrence of paradox during treatment.

  10. Foaming Betadine Spray as a potential agent for non-labor-intensive preoperative surgical site preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargupta, Roli; Hull, Garret J; Rood, Kyle D; Galloway, James; Matthews, Clinton F; Dale, Paul S; Sengupta, Shramik

    2015-04-02

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) report published in 2009 shows that there were about 16,000 cases of surgical site infection (SSI) following ~ 850,000 operative procedures making SSI one of the most predominant infection amongst nosocomial infections. Preoperative skin preparation is a standard procedure utilized to prevent SSIs thereby improving patient outcomes and controlling associated healthcare costs. Multiple techniques/ products have been used for pre-operative skin preparation, like 2 step scrubbing and painting, 2 step scrubbing and drying, and 1 step painting with a drying time. However, currently used products require strict, time consuming and labor-intensive protocols that involve repeated mechanical scrubbing. It can be speculated that a product requiring a more facile protocol will increase compliance, thus promoting a reduction in SSIs. Hence, the antimicrobial efficacy of a spray-on foaming formulation containing Betadine (povidone-iodine aerosol foam) that can be administered with minimum effort is compared to that of an existing formulation/technique (Wet Skin Scrub). In vitro antimicrobial activities of (a) 5% Betadine delivered in aerosolized foam, (b) Wet Skin Scrub Prep Tray and (c) liquid Betadine are tested against three clinically representative microorganisms (S. aureus, S. epidermidis and P. aeruginosa,) on two surfaces (agar-gel on petri-dish and porcine skin). The log reduction/growth of the bacteria in each case is noted and ANOVA statistical analysis is used to establish the effectiveness of the antimicrobial agents, and compare their relative efficacies. With agar gel as the substrate, no growth of bacteria is observed for all the three formulations. With porcine skin as the substrate, the spray-on foam's performance was not statistically different from that of the Wet Skin Scrub Prep technique for the microorganisms tested. The povidone-iodine aerosolized foam

  11. [Post-appendectomy surgical site infection: overall rate and type according to open/laparoscopic approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda-Narváez, José Manuel; Prieto-Puga Arjona, Tatiana; García-Albiach, Beatriz; Montiel-Casado, María Custodia; González-Sánchez, Antonio Jesús; Sánchez-Pérez, Belinda; Titos-García, Alberto; Santoyo-Santoyo, Julio

    2014-02-01

    To compare the incidence and profile of surgical site infection (SSI) after laparoscopic (LA) or open (OA) appendicectomy. Observational and analytical study was conducted on patients older than 14years-old with suspected acute appendicitis operated on within a 4-year period (2007-2010) at a third level hospital (n=868). They were divided in two groups according to the type of appendicectomy (LA, study group, 135; OA, control group, 733). The primary endpoint was a surgical site infection (SSI), and to determine the overall rate and types (incisional/organ-space). The risk of SSI was stratified by: i)National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) index (low risk: 0E, 0 and 1; high risk: 2 and 3); ii)status on presentation (low risk: normal or phlegmonous; high risk: gangrenous or perforated). The statistical analysis was performed using the software SPSS. The main result and stratified analysis was determined with χ(2), and the risk parameters using OR and Mantel-Haenszel OR with 95%CI, accepting statistical significance with P<.05. Age, gender, ASA index and incidence of advanced cases were similar in both groups. The overall SSI rate was 13.4% (more than a half of them detected during follow-up after discharge). Type of SSI: OA, 13% (superficial 9%, deep 2%, organ-space 2%); AL, 14% (superficial 5%, deep 1%, organ-space 8%) (overall: not significant; distribution: P<.000). Stratified analysis showed that there is an association between incisional SSI/OA and organ-space SSI/LA, and is particularly stronger in those patients with high risk of postoperative SSI (high risk NNIS or gangrenous-perforated presentation). OA and LA are associated with a higher rate of incisional and organ-space SSI respectively. This is particularly evident in patients with high risk of SSI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Incidence and Risk Factors of Surgical Site Infection Among Patients Undergoing Cesarean Section

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    Hanan Hussein Jasim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wound infections constitute a significant problem in surgical procedures. In cesarean sections (CS, this is particularly important as a wound infection not only results in increased morbidity but also has far-reaching implications by way of pelvic organ disease, disturbance of the bonding process between mother and baby in the puerperium, and a longer hospital stay with its inherent problems. Objective: This study was conducted with the aim to determine the incidence and risk factor associated with surgical site infection (SSI following cesarean section. Methodology: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted for 400 women undergoing cesarean section procedures during an 18-month period from January 2013 to June 2014 at Hospital Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. Patients’ socio-demographic, clinical data and incidence of SSI following the CS were noted using a standardized data collection form. SPSS v 21 was used for data analysis. Results: In total, 18.8% of the study participants developed SSI. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the following: higher body mass index (≥30 kg/m 2 (odds ratio [OR]: 0.555; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.313-0.985, P  = .044, increase in the blood loss during surgery (≥500 mL (OR: 0.757; 95% CI = 0.423-1.354, P  = .034, prolonged hospital stay (≥4 days (OR: 0.439; 95% CI = 0.260-0.740, P  = .002, spinal anesthesia (OR: 1.543; 95% CI = 1.230-1.937, P  = .021, breech baby presentation (OR:2.927 95% CI = 1.020-8.400, P  = .046, and intrathecal analgesia (OR:1.567; 95% CI = 1.246-1.970, P  = .001 had statistically significant association with incidence of SSI. Conclusions: Surgical site infections are common among women undergoing CS at Hospital Pulau Pinang. Special attention and enhanced clinical management of patients with identified risk factors for developing SSI may decrease its incidence.

  13. Surgical Site Infection (SSI) Rates in the United States, 1992-1998: The National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System Basic SSI Risk Index

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robert P. Gaynes; David H. Culver; Teresa C. Horan; Jonathan R. Edwards; Chesley Richards; James S. Tolson; The National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System

    2001-01-01

    By use of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) System's surgical patient surveillance component protocol, the NNIS basic risk index was examined to predict the risk of a surgical site infection (SSI...

  14. Surgical site infections following colorectal cancer surgery: a randomized prospective trial comparing common and advanced antimicrobial dressing containing ionic silver

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    Biffi Roberto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An antimicrobial dressing containing ionic silver was found effective in reducing surgical-site infection in a preliminary study of colorectal cancer elective surgery. We decided to test this finding in a randomized, double-blind trial. Methods Adults undergoing elective colorectal cancer surgery at two university-affiliated hospitals were randomly assigned to have the surgical incision dressed with Aquacel® Ag Hydrofiber dressing or a common dressing. To blind the patient and the nursing and medical staff to the nature of the dressing used, scrub nurses covered Aquacel® Ag Hydrofiber with a common wound dressing in the experimental arm, whereas a double common dressing was applied to patients of control group. The primary end-point of the study was the occurrence of any surgical-site infection within 30 days of surgery. Results A total of 112 patients (58 in the experimental arm and 54 in the control group qualified for primary end-point analysis. The characteristics of the patient population and their surgical procedures were similar. The overall rate of surgical-site infection was lower in the experimental group (11.1% center 1, 17.5% center 2; overall 15.5% than in controls (14.3% center 1, 24.2% center 2, overall 20.4%, but the observed difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.451, even with respect to surgical-site infection grade 1 (superficial versus grades 2 and 3, or grade 1 and 2 versus grade 3. Conclusions This randomized trial did not confirm a statistically significant superiority of Aquacel® Ag Hydrofiber dressing in reducing surgical-site infection after elective colorectal cancer surgery. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00981110

  15. Usefulness of Color Coding Resected Samples from a Pancreaticoduodenectomy with Tissue Marking Dyes for a Detailed Examination of Surgical Margin Surrounding the Uncinate Process of the Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Satoshi; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aimoto, Takayuki; Yamagishi, Seiji; Mishima, Keisuke; Watanabe, Masanori; Kitayama, Yasuhiko; Motoda, Norio; Isshiki, Saiko; Uchida, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    Characteristics of a cancer-positive margin around a resected uncinate process of the pancreas (MUP) due to a pancreticoduodenectomy are difficult to understand by standardized evaluation because of its complex anatomy. The purposes of this study were to subclassify the MUP with tissue marking dyes of different colors and to identify the characteristics of sites that showed positivity for cancer cells in patients with pancreatic head carcinoma who underwent circumferential superior mesenteric arterial nerve plexus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. Results of this evaluation were used to review operation procedures and perioperative methods. We divided the MUP into 4 sections and stained each section with a different color. These sections were the pancreatic head nerve plexus margin (Area A), portal vein groove margin (Area B), superior mesenteric artery margin (Area C), and left of the superior mesenteric artery margin (Area D). The subjects evaluated were 45 patients who had carcinoma of the pancreatic head and were treated with circumferential superior mesenteric arterial nerve plexus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. Of the 45 patients, nine cases (90%) of incomplete resection showed cancer-positivity in the MUP. Among the 4 sections of the MUP, the most cases of positive results [MUP (+) ] were found in Area B, with Area A (+), 0 case; Area B (+), 6 cases; Area C (+), 2 cases; and Area D (+), 3 cases (total, 11 sites in 9 patients). Relapse occurred in 7 of the 9 patients with MUP (+). Local recurrence was observed as initial relapse in all 3 patients with Area D (+). In contrast, the most common site of recurrence other than that in patients with Area D (+) was the liver. By subclassifying the MUP with tissue marking dyes of different colors, we could confirm regional characteristics of MUP (+). As a result, circumferential superior mesenteric arterial nerve plexus-preserving pancreticoduodenectomy was able to be performed in R0 operations in selected

  16. Surgical-site infections and postoperative complications: agreement between the Danish Gynecological Cancer Database and a randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Sofie L; Meyhoff, Christian Sylvest; Lundvall, Lene

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Surgical-site infections are serious complications and thorough follow-up is important for accurate surveillance. We aimed to compare the frequency of complications recorded in a clinical quality database with those noted in a randomized clinical trial with follow-up visits. DESIGN......-operation, urinary tract infection, pneumonia and sepsis. RESULTS: Surgical-site infection was found in 21 of 222 patients (9.5%) in the PROXI trial versus 6 of 222 patients (2.7%) in the DGCD (p ... registered in the PROXI trial, but not in the DGCD. Agreements between secondary outcomes were very varying (kappa-value 0.77 for re-operation, 0.37 for urinary tract infections, 0.19 for sepsis and 0.18 for pneumonia). CONCLUSIONS: The randomized trial reported significantly more surgical-site infections...

  17. Role of recipient-site preparation techniques and post-operative wound dressing in the surgical management of vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Al-Hadidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is an acquired skin disorder characterized by the destruction of melanocytes resulting in achromic macules and patches involving the affected skin. Multiple methods of treatments have emerged to manage vitiligo, including medical and surgical techniques. Among the surgical techniques described in the management of vitiligo are minipunch grafting, split-thickness skin grafting, hair follicle transplantation, suction blister grafting, and cultured and non-cultured autologous melanocyte transplantation. However, prior to grafting optimal recipient-site preparation is needed for graft survival and successful repigmentation outcomes. Similarly, post-operative care of the recipient site is vital to yielding a viable graft irrespective of the transplantation technique employed. This article reviews the multiple methods employed to prepare the recipient site in vitiligo surgeries and the post-surgical conditions which optimize graft viability. A pubmed search was conducted utilizing the key words listed below.

  18. Effects of surgical side and site on mood and behavior outcome in children with pharmacoresistant epilepsy

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    Elizabeth N Andresen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Children with epilepsy have a high rate of mood and behavior problems yet few studies consider the emotional and behavioral impact of surgery. No study to date has been sufficiently powered to investigate effects of both side (left/right and site (temporal/frontal of surgery. One hundred patients (aged 6-16 and their families completed measures of depression, anxiety and behavioral function as part of neuropsychological evaluations before and after surgery for pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Among children who had left-sided surgeries (frontal=16; temporal=38, there were significant interactions between time (pre to postoperative neuropsychological assessment and resection site (frontal/temporal on Anhedonia, Social Anxiety, and Withdrawn/Depressed scales. Patients with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE endorsed greater presurgical anhedonia and social anxiety than patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE, with scores normalizing following surgery. While scores on the Withdrawn/Depressed scale were similar between groups before surgery, the FLE group showed greater symptom improvement after surgery. In children who underwent right-sided surgeries (FLE=20; TLE=26 main effects of time (patients in both groups improved and resection site (caregivers of FLE patients endorsed greater symptoms than those with TLE were observed primarily on behavior scales. Individual data revealed that a greater proportion of children with left FLE demonstrated clinically significant improvements in Anhedonia, Social Anxiety, and Aggressive Behavior than children with TLE. This is the first study to demonstrate differential effects of both side and site of surgery in children with epilepsy at group and individual levels. Results suggest that children with FLE have greater emotional and behavioral dysfunction before surgery, but show marked improvement after surgery. Overall, most children had good emotional and behavioral outcomes, with most scores remaining stable or improving.

  19. Analysis of risk factors of surgical site infections in breast cancer

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    GAO Yang-xu; XU Ling; YE Jing-ming; WANG Dong-min; ZHAO Jian-xin; ZHANG Lan-bo; DUAN Xue-ning; LIU Yin-hua

    2010-01-01

    Background Adjuvant chemotherapy has become an important component of standard therapy for breast cancer. However, until now, there have been few reports on the surgical site infections (SSI) after breast cancer surgery, specially after adjuvent chemotherapy. To study the risk factors of SSI of breast cancer, we analyzed patients diagnosed with breast cancer and treated with surgery. Methods Fifty-five patients diagnosed with breast cancer and received breast conserving or modified radical operations in our hospital during January 2008 to March 2008 were selected. Factors (patients' age, body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus, no or administered adjuvant chemotherapy, with or without onset of myelosuppression and the degree, surgical approaches, duration of operation, postoperative drainage duration and total drainage volume) associated with SSI were retrospectively reviewed and statistically analyzed by single factor analysis. Results Five patients suffered SSI (5/55, 9.1%); nineteen receiving adjuvant chemotherapy experienced Grade III+ myelosuppression, among which 4 had SSI; only 1 out of the remaining 36 patients without adjuvant chemotherapy had SSI. The difference between the two groups was significant (P=0.043). The incidence of SSI in patients with postoperative drainage tube indwelling longer than 10 days was 5/21, whereas no SSI occurred in that less than 10 days (R=0.009). in our study, there was no significient difference in other associated factors. Conclusions Concurrent Grade III+ myelosuppression after adjuvant chemotherapy is an important risk factor of SSI in breast cancer and needs further study. No SSI was detected with indwelling time of post operative drainage less than 10 days.

  20. Abdominal Hysterectomy: Reduced Risk of Surgical Site Infection Associated with Robotic and Laparoscopic Technique.

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    Colling, Kristin P; Glover, James K; Statz, Catherine A; Geller, Melissa A; Beilman, Greg J

    2015-10-01

    Hysterectomy is one of the most common procedures performed in the United States. New techniques utilizing laparoscopic and robotic technology are becoming increasingly common. It is unknown if these minimally invasive surgical techniques alter the risk of surgical site infections (SSI). We performed a retrospective review of all patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy at our institution between January 2011 and June 2013. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth edition (ICD-9) codes and chart review were used to identify patients undergoing hysterectomy by open, laparoscopic, or robotic approach and to identify patients who developed SSI subsequently. Chi-square and analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests were used to identify univariate risk factors and logistic regression was used to perform multivariable analysis. During this time period, 986 patients were identified who had undergone abdominal hysterectomy, with 433 receiving open technique (44%), 116 laparoscopic (12%), 407 robotic (41%), and 30 cases that were converted from minimally invasive to open (3%). Patients undergoing laparoscopic-assisted hysterectomy were significantly younger and had lower body mass index (BMI) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores than those undergoing open or robotic hysterectomy. There were no significant differences between patients undergoing open versus robotic hysterectomy. The post-operative hospital stay was significantly longer for open procedures compared with those using laparoscopic or robotic techniques (5.1, 1.7, and 1.6 d, respectively; physterectomy procedures was 4.2%. More SSI occurred in open cases (6.5%) than laparoscopic (0%) or robotic (2.2%) (pobesity were all associated with increased risk of SSI. Laparoscopic and robotic hysterectomies were associated with a significantly lower risk of SSI and shorter hospital stays. Body mass index, advanced age, and wound class were also independent risk factors for SSI.

  1. The minimally invasive approach is associated with reduced surgical site infections in obese patients undergoing proctectomy.

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    Pasam, R T; Esemuede, I O; Lee-Kong, S A; Kiran, R P

    2015-12-01

    While laparoscopic colorectal resection may be underused in technically challenging circumstances, the minimally invasive approach may in fact maximally benefit patients at the greatest risk of complications. Obesity and proctectomy pose particular technical challenges during laparoscopic resection and are also associated with the greatest risks of complications, especially surgical site infections (SSIs). We evaluated the role of laparoscopy in minimizing SSI in such patients. From the American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, outcomes for obese [body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m(2)] and non-obese (BMI laparoscopy on SSI for obese patients undergoing proctectomy. OC patients were more likely than OP, LC, and LP, respectively, to undergo emergency operation and have an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score of 3-5. Overall SSI rates after OC, OP, LC, and LP were 15.2, 17.6, 8.6, and 10.1 %, respectively (p obese patients, the rates were 18.7, 22.3, 10.7, and 13.3 % (p obesity, proctectomy, younger age, race, steroid use, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, prior wound infection, transfusion history, previous operation within 30 days, coronary artery or vascular disease, ASA class 3-5, tobacco use, resident involvement, male gender, albumin Laparoscopy reduced the risk of SSI by at least 35 % across all BMI classes and procedures, an effect that persisted on multivariate analysis even in obese patients undergoing proctectomy. In colorectal surgery, an already high-risk outlier for SSI, obesity and proctectomy are associated with the highest risk of SSI. Despite the particular technical challenges of laparoscopy in these circumstances, the minimally invasive approach attenuates the risk of SSI in these high-risk patients and thus should be strongly considered during treatment planning.

  2. Prevention and treatment of surgical site infection in HIV-infected patients

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    Zhang Lei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infection (SSI are the third most frequently reported nosocomial infection, and the most common on surgical wards. HIV-infected patients may increase the possibility of developing SSI after surgery. There are few reported date on incidence and the preventive measures of SSI in HIV-infected patients. This study was to determine the incidence and the associated risk factors for SSI in HIV-infected patients. And we also explored the preventive measures. Methods A retrospective study of SSI was conducted in 242 HIV-infected patients including 17 patients who combined with hemophilia from October 2008 to September 2011 in Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. SSI were classified according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC criteria and identified by bedside surveillance and post-discharge follow-up. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 statistical software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL. Results The SSI incidence rate was 47.5% (115 of 242; 38.4% incisional SSIs, 5.4% deep incisional SSIs and 3.7% organ/space SSIs. The SSI incidence rate was 37.9% in HIV-infected patients undergoing abdominal operation. Patients undergoing abdominal surgery with lower preoperative CD4 counts were more likely to develop SSIs. The incidence increased from 2.6% in clean wounds to 100% in dirty wounds. In the HIV-infected patients combined with hemophilia, the mean preoperative albumin and postoperative hemoglobin were found significantly lower than those in no-SSIs group (P Conclusions SSI is frequent in HIV-infected patients. And suitable perioperative management may decrease the SSIs incidence rate of HIV-infected patients.

  3. Diagnoses influence surgical site infections (SSI) in colorectal surgery: a must consideration for SSI reporting programs?

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    Pendlimari, Rajesh; Cima, Robert R; Wolff, Bruce G; Pemberton, John H; Huebner, Marianne

    2012-04-01

    Colorectal surgery is associated with high rates of surgical site infection (SSI). The National Surgery Quality Improvement Program is a validated, risk-adjusted quality-improvement program for surgical patients. Patient stratification and risk adjustment are associated with Current Procedural Terminology codes and primary disease diagnosis is not considered. Our aim was to determine the association between disease diagnosis and SSI rates. Data from all 2009 National Surgery Quality Improvement Program institutions were analyzed. ICD-9 codes were used to differentiate patients into cancer (colon or rectal), ulcerative colitis, regional enteritis, diverticular disease, and others. Diagnosis-specific SSI rates were compared with benign neoplasm, which had the lowest rate (8.9%). Logistic regression was performed adjusting for age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, wound type, and relative value unit. There were 24,673 colorectal procedures, with 1,956 superficial incisional (SSSI), 398 deep incisional (DSSI), and 1,096 organ/space (O/SSSI) infections. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals compared with benign neoplasm diagnosis were computed after adjustment for each diagnosis category. In rectal cancer patients, significantly more SSSI (OR = 1.6; 95% CI, 1.3-2.1; p SSI type is associated with the underlying disease diagnosis. To facilitate colorectal SSI-reduction efforts, the disease process must be considered to design appropriate interventions. In addition, institutional comparisons based on aggregate or stratified SSI rates can be misleading if the colorectal disease mix is not considered. Copyright © 2012 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Microbial sealants do not decrease surgical site infection for clean-contaminated colorectal procedures.

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    Doorly, M; Choi, J; Floyd, A; Senagore, A

    2015-05-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are costly complications that may cause significant morbidity and increase the cost of care, particularly in colorectal surgery. Microbial sealants (MS) are a new class of wound barriers aimed at decreasing SSI; however, there is only evidence of benefit in clean class 1 procedures. Based on its success in class 1 procedures, we hypothesized that a microbial sealant could reduce the rate of SSI by half for clean-contaminated colorectal procedures (class 2). This was a single institution, multihospital, prospective, randomized study approved by the institutional review board. The primary objective was to determine the rate of SSI when microbial sealant (InteguSeal© Kimberly-Clark) is used compared to control (no microbial sealant). Data collected included: open versus laparoscopy, age, body mass index (BMI), diabetes and morbidity [American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class], hospital readmission, reoperation and wound dehiscence. Enrolled subjects received the same preoperative mechanical bowel preparation with oral antibiotics, operative skin preparation (Chloraprep), Surgical Care Improvement Project guidelines implementation), and postoperative care glycemic control for diabetics. A total of 100 subjects were recruited over 15 months (MS-50; no MS-50). The overall incidence of SSI was 12 %, 14 % (7/50) in the MS versus 10 % (5/50) in the no MS group (p = 0.545). SSI incidence with and without microbial sealant was not significantly different in either the open or the laparoscopic subgroup. Laparoscopy decreased absolute risk of SSI by 16 %. Secondary data (age, BMI, diabetes, ASA) and tertiary data (readmission, reoperation, wound dehiscence) were positively correlated with SSI. Microbial sealant as employed in this study did not appear to offer any benefit in a class 2 (clean contaminated) operative procedure when perioperative care is standardized. The relative benefit of laparoscopy was also confirmed but unaffected by

  5. Factors Associated With Surgical Site Infection Following Gastric Surgery in Japan.

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    Morikane, Keita; Honda, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Satowa

    2016-10-01

    BACKGROUND Surgical site infection (SSI) following gastric surgery has not been well documented. OBJECTIVE To describe and assess factors associated with SSI following gastric surgery in Japan using a Japanese national database for healthcare-associated infections. DESIGN A retrospective nationwide surveillance-based study. SETTING Japanese healthcare facilities. METHODS Data on gastric surgeries performed between 2012 and 2014 were extracted from the Japan Nosocomial Infections Surveillance. Gastric surgery was divided into 3 types of procedures: total gastrectomy (GAST-T), distal gastrectomy (GAST-D), and other types of gastric surgery (GAST-O). The incidence of and factors associated with SSI following gastric surgery were assessed by the 3 types of procedures. RESULTS The cumulative incidence of SSI following gastric surgery was 8.8% (3,156/36,052). The incidence of SSI following GAST-T (12.4%) was significantly higher than that following GAST-D (7.01%) or GAST-O (7.84%). Besides the 4 conventional risk factors for predicting SSI, additional risk factors were identified. Male sex was significantly associated with SSI following all types of gastric surgery, but the effect of the association was substantially different (adjusted odds ratio, 1.52, 1.47, and 1.28 for GAST-T, GAST-D, and GAST-O, respectively). The effect of an emergency operation was similar. Age was also identified as a risk factor, but the most suitable modification of age as a variable differed. CONCLUSIONS The incidence and factors associated with SSI following 3 types of gastric surgery differed. To accurately compare hospital performance in SSI prevention following gastric surgery, dividing surgical procedures in the surveillance system into 3 types should be considered. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;1-6.

  6. Morbidity associated with 30-day surgical site infection following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery

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    Sherrod, Brandon A.; Rocque, Brandon G.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Morbidity associated with surgical site infection (SSI) following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgical procedures is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to analyze acute morbidity and mortality associated with SSI after nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery using a nationwide cohort. Methods The authors reviewed data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pediatric (NSQIP-P) 2012–2014 database, including all neurosurgical procedures performed on pediatric patients. Procedures were categorized by Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes. CSF shunts were excluded. Deep and superficial SSIs occurring within 30 days of an index procedure were identified. Deep SSIs included deep wound infections, intracranial abscesses, meningitis, osteomyelitis, and ventriculitis. The following outcomes occurring within 30 days of an index procedure were analyzed, along with postoperative time to complication development: sepsis, wound disruption, length of postoperative stay, readmission, reoperation, and death. Results A total of 251 procedures associated with a 30-day SSI were identified (2.7% of 9296 procedures). Superficial SSIs were more common than deep SSIs (57.4% versus 42.6%). Deep SSIs occurred more frequently after epilepsy or intracranial tumor procedures. Superficial SSIs occurred more frequently after skin lesion, spine, Chiari decompression, craniofacial, and myelomeningocele closure procedures. The mean (± SD) postoperative length of stay for patients with any SSI was 9.6 ± 14.8 days (median 4 days). Post-SSI outcomes significantly associated with previous SSI included wound disruption (12.4%), sepsis (15.5%), readmission (36.7%), and reoperation (43.4%) (p neurosurgery. Rates of SSI-associated complications are significantly lower in patients with superficial infection than in those with deep infection. There were no cases of SSI-related mortality within 30 days of the index procedure. PMID:28186474

  7. Stratification of surgical site infection by operative factors and comparison of infection rates after hernia repair.

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    Olsen, Margaret A; Nickel, Katelin B; Wallace, Anna E; Mines, Daniel; Fraser, Victoria J; Warren, David K

    2015-03-01

    To investigate whether operative factors are associated with risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after hernia repair. Retrospective cohort study. Patients Commercially insured enrollees aged 6 months-64 years with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure or Current Procedural Terminology, fourth edition, codes for inguinal/femoral, umbilical, and incisional/ventral hernia repair procedures from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2010. SSIs within 90 days after hernia repair were identified by diagnosis codes. The χ2 and Fisher exact tests were used to compare SSI incidence by operative factors. A total of 119,973 hernia repair procedures were analyzed. The incidence of SSI differed significantly by anatomic site, with rates of 0.45% (352/77,666) for inguinal/femoral, 1.16% (288/24,917) for umbilical, and 4.11% (715/17,390) for incisional/ventral hernia repair. Within anatomic sites, the incidence of SSI was significantly higher for open versus laparoscopic inguinal/femoral (0.48% [295/61,142] vs 0.34% [57/16,524], P=.020) and incisional/ventral (4.20% [701/16,699] vs 2.03% [14/691], P=.005) hernia repairs. The rate of SSI was higher following procedures with bowel obstruction/necrosis than procedures without obstruction/necrosis for open inguinal/femoral (0.89% [48/5,422] vs 0.44% [247/55,720], P<.001) and umbilical (1.57% [131/8,355] vs 0.95% [157/16,562], P<.001), but not incisional/ventral hernia repair (4.01% [224/5,585] vs 4.16% [491/11,805], P=.645). The incidence of SSI was highest after open procedures, incisional/ventral repairs, and hernia repairs with bowel obstruction/necrosis. Stratification of hernia repair SSI rates by some operative factors may facilitate accurate comparison of SSI rates between facilities.

  8. A study on Surgical Site Infections (SSI and associated factors in a government tertiary care teaching hospital in Mysore, Karnataka

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    Naveen Kikkeri Hanumantha Setty

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical site infections (SSI are the most common nosocomial infection and frequently cause morbidity and mortality among inpatients of hospitals. The incidence varies from hospital to hospital. Several factors affect the development of SSI. Objectives: To study the incidence of and to identify the risk factors for Surgical Site Infections in the surgical wards of K.R.Hospital, Mysore. Materials and Methods: Study Period: July to August 2007 Study Subjects: One hundred and eighty patients who underwent various surgeries in the General Surgery department of K.R. Hospital Mysore. A predesigned and pretested proforma was used to collect the data. Surgical sites were examined and graded. Culture and sensitivity testing was done on infected wounds. Data was analyzed using SPSS 13 software. Results: Among 180 patients 39 (21.66% developed surgical site infections (SSI. Of 39 SSIs 20 were grade 3 and 19 were grade 4 infections. SSIs were found more commonly among the aged, males, underweight and overweight, anaemics, diabetics, hypertensives, patients with longer pre operative waiting time, with multiple blood transfusions and without antibiotic prophylaxis. Age, Sex, BMI, Diabetes mellitus, Blood transfusion and pre operative waiting had univariate statistical significance. Gender, extreme BMI, Diabetes mellitus and Blood transfusion remained independent predictors of surgical site infection in multivariate analysis. Most of the SSIs yielded multiple organisms and Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant. Resistance to tetracycline was most common. Conclusion: The incidence of SSI is high. Gender, extremes of BMI, diabetes mellitus and blood transfusion are the important risk factors for it.

  9. Abdominal surgical site infections: incidence and risk factors at an Iranian teaching hospital

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    Sabouri Kashani Ahmad

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal surgical site infections are among the most common complications of inpatient admissions and have serious consequences for outcomes and costs. Different risk factors may be involved, including age, sex, nutrition and immunity, prophylactic antibiotics, operation type and duration, type of shaving, and secondary infections. This study aimed to determine the risk factors affecting abdominal surgical site infections and their incidence at Imam Khomeini, a major referral teaching hospital in Iran. Methods Patients (n = 802 who had undergone abdominal surgery were studied and the relationships among variables were analyzed by Student's t and Chi-square tests. The subjects were followed for 30 days and by a 20-item questionnaire. Data were collected through pre- and post-operative examinations and telephone follow-ups. Results Of the 802 patients, 139 suffered from SSI (17.4%. In 40.8% of the cases, the wound was dirty infected. The average age for the patients was 46.7 years. The operations were elective in 75.7% of the cases and 24.7% were urgent. The average duration of the operation was 2.24 hours, the average duration of pre-operative hospital stay 4.31 days and the average length of (pre- and post-operation hospital stay 11.2 days. Three quarters of the cases were shaved 12 hours before the operation. The increased operation time, increased bed stay, electivity of the operation, septicity of the wound, type of incision, the administration of prophylactic antibiotic, type of operation, background disease, and the increased time lapse between shaving and operation all significantly associated with SSI with a p-value less than 0.001. Conclusion In view of the high rate of SSI reported here (17.4% compared with the 14% quoted in literature, this study suggests that by reducing the average operation time to less than 2 hours, the average preoperative stay to 4 days and the overall stay to less than 11 days, and

  10. Surgical site infections after lower extremity revascularization procedures involving groin incisions.

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    Kuy, SreyRam; Dua, Anahita; Desai, Sapan; Dua, Arshish; Patel, Bhavin; Tondravi, Nader; Seabrook, Gary R; Brown, Kellie R; Lewis, Brian D; Lee, Cheong J; Kuy, SreyReath; Subbarayan, Rishi; Rossi, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the incidence, epidemiology, and factors associated with surgical site infections (SSIs) after lower extremity revascularization procedures involving groin incisions and determine outcomes based on SSI status. This is a single-institution, retrospective cohort study of 106 patients who underwent lower extremity revascularization procedures involving femoral artery exposure through a groin incision at a tertiary referral hospital. The primary outcome was occurrence of SSI at the groin wound. The duration of hospital stay, reoperation within 30 days, discharge disposition, and 30-day mortality were also evaluated. Independent variables included patient demographics and operative variables (i.e., procedure type, transfusion requirements, preoperative antibiotics, intraoperative vasopressors, and operative duration). Statistical analysis included chi-squared tests, t-tests, and multivariable regression analysis. Of the 106 patients who underwent a lower extremity revascularization procedure with a groin incision for femoral artery exposure, 62% were male, and the mean age was 62 years. Comorbidities included hypertension (93%), dyslipidemia (65%), statin use (63%), active smoker (50%), diabetes (24%), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (23%). All patients received preoperative antibiotics, 50% required intraoperative pressors, 21% received a blood transfusion, and the mean operative time was 296 min. The overall duration of stay was 10.7 days, the 30-day reoperation rate was 18%, and the 30-day mortality rate was 12%. Overall, 22% developed a seroma or hematoma, and 31% developed a SSI. Patients who developed an SSI compared with those who did not were more likely to have a postoperative seroma or hematoma (55% vs 5%) and to receive a blood transfusion (33% vs 15%), but less likely to be treated with a statin (47% vs 69%) or carry a diagnosis of dyslipidemia (50% vs 72%), respectively, all P surgical site complications after lower

  11. Do Prolonged Prophylactic Antibiotics Reduce the Incidence of Surgical-Site Infections in Immediate Prosthetic Breast Reconstruction?

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    Wang, Frederick; Chin, Robin; Piper, Merisa; Esserman, Laura; Sbitany, Hani

    2016-12-01

    Approximately 50,000 women in the United States undergo mastectomy and immediate prosthetic breast reconstruction annually, and most receive postoperative prophylactic antibiotics. The effect of these antibiotics on the risk of surgical-site infections remains unclear. The authors searched the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases for studies that compared less than 24 hours and greater than 24 hours of antibiotics following immediate prosthetic breast reconstruction. Primary outcomes were surgical-site infections and implant loss. Conservative random effects models were used to obtain pooled relative risk estimates. The authors identified 927 studies, but only four cohort studies and one randomized controlled trial met their inclusion criteria. Unadjusted incidences of surgical-site infections were 14 percent with more than 24 hours of antibiotics, 19 percent with less than 24 hours of antibiotics, and 16 percent overall. Unadjusted incidences of implant loss were 8 percent with more than 24 hours of antibiotics, 10 percent with less than 24 hours of antibiotics, and 9 percent overall. The pooled relative risk of implant loss was 1.17 (95 percent CI, 0.39 to 3.6) with less than 24 hours of antibiotics, which was not statistically significant. Prolonged antibiotic use did not have a statistically significant effect on reducing surgical-site infections or implant loss. There was significant heterogeneity between studies, and prolonged antibiotics may have increased the risk of implant loss in the randomized controlled trial. Definitive evidence may only be obtained with data from more prospective randomized controlled trials.

  12. Postoperative recovery after mandibular third molar surgery: a criteria for selection of type of surgical site closure.

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    Damodar, Neeliahgari Durga Akhila; Nandakumar, Hanumanthaiah; Srinath, Narashimha Murthy

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate postoperative recovery after mandibular third molar surgery, with and without the use of sutures. This study utilized 50 healthy subjects (19 females and 31 males, 18-40 years of age) with bilateral impacted third molars. Two impacted teeth were removed from each patient (60 min maximum operating time). For each patient, the surgical site on one side of the mouth was closed for primary healing by using nonresorbable sutures, while the surgical site on the other side of the mouth was left open for secondary healing. Postoperative recovery was assessed by determining pain (using a visual analog scale) and swelling (by measuring anatomical landmarks pre- and postoperatively on Days 2, 5, and 7) Any incidence of socket infection and hemorrhage were considered to be complications. Both statistical analysis and clinical observation showed that the surgical sites with nonresorbable sutures showed greater swelling and a higher intensity of pain than the surgical sites without sutures; however, there were no statistical or clinical differences in pain and swelling postsurgery at Day 7. The results suggest secondary closure (that is, without sutures) after third molar surgery will produce less postoperative discomfort than primary closure (with nonresorbable sutures).

  13. A novel method of surgical site infection surveillance after cardiac surgery by active participation of stake holders.

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    Noman, Fatima; Mahmood, Syed Faisal; Asif, Shaheen; Rahim, Noureen; Khan, Ghufranullah; Hanif, Bashir

    2012-06-01

    We describe a comprehensive surveillance system involving infection control practitioners, surgeons, administrative staff, and patients aimed at improving the postdischarge surveillance of surgical site infections. The system was able to detect 22 infections out of 538 procedures, 95% of which were detected during the postdischarge period.

  14. New WHO recommendations on preoperative measures for surgical site infection prevention : an evidence-based global perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allegranzi, Benedetta; Bischoff, Peter; de Jonge, Stijn; Kubilay, N Zeynep; Zayed, Bassim; Gomes, Stacey M; Abbas, Mohamed; Atema, Jasper J; Gans, Sarah; van Rijen, Miranda; Boermeester, Marja A; Egger, Matthias; Kluytmans, Jan; Pittet, Didier; Solomkin, Joseph S

    2016-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are among the most preventable health-care-associated infections and are a substantial burden to health-care systems and service payers worldwide in terms of patient morbidity, mortality, and additional costs. SSI prevention is complex and requires the integration of

  15. Improving risk-adjusted measures of surgical site infection for the national healthcare safety network.

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    Mu, Yi; Edwards, Jonathan R; Horan, Teresa C; Berrios-Torres, Sandra I; Fridkin, Scott K

    2011-10-01

    The National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) has provided simple risk adjustment of surgical site infection (SSI) rates to participating hospitals to facilitate quality improvement activities; improved risk models were developed and evaluated. Data reported to the NHSN for all operative procedures performed from January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2008, were analyzed. Only SSIs related to the primary incision site were included. A common set of patient- and hospital-specific variables were evaluated as potential SSI risk factors by univariate analysis. Some ific variables were available for inclusion. Stepwise logistic regression was used to develop the specific risk models by procedure category. Bootstrap resampling was used to validate the models, and the c-index was used to compare the predictive power of new procedure-specific risk models with that of the models with the NHSN risk index as the only variable (NHSN risk index model). From January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2008, 847 hospitals in 43 states reported a total of 849,659 procedures and 16,147 primary incisional SSIs (risk, 1.90%) among 39 operative procedure categories. Overall, the median c-index of the new procedure-specific risk was greater (0.67 [range, 0.59-0.85]) than the median c-index of the NHSN risk index models (0.60 [range, 0.51-0.77]); for 33 of 39 procedures, the new procedure-specific models yielded a higher c-index than did the NHSN risk index models. A set of new risk models developed using existing data elements collected through the NHSN improves predictive performance, compared with the traditional NHSN risk index stratification.

  16. Incisional Surgical Site Infection after Elective Open Surgery for Colorectal Cancer

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    Kosuke Ishikawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence and risk factors for incisional surgical site infections (SSI in patients undergoing elective open surgery for colorectal cancer. Methods. We conducted prospective surveillance of incisional SSI after elective colorectal resections performed by a single surgeon for a 1-year period. Variables associated with infection, as identified in the literature, were collected and statistically analyzed for their association with incisional SSI development. Results. A total of 224 patients were identified for evaluation. The mean patient age was 67 years, and 120 (55% were male. Thirty-three (14.7% patients were diagnosed with incisional SSI. Multivariate analysis suggested that incisional SSI was independently associated with TNM stages III and IV (odds ratio [OR], 2.4 and intraoperative hypotension (OR, 3.4. Conclusions. The incidence of incisional SSI in our cohort was well within values generally reported in the literature. Our data suggest the importance of the maintenance of intraoperative normotension to reduce the development of incisional SSI.

  17. Outcomes of surgical site infections in orthopedic trauma surgeries in a tertiary care centre in India

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    N Rajkumari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical site infections (SSIs still cause significant morbidity and mortality despite advances in trauma care. We have studied in this paper the rate of SSIs, their outcomes in patients undergoing interventions for trauma and SSI trends in developing countries. Materials and Methods: A 16-month study (May, 2011- August, 2012 was carried out. Patients undergoing interventions for orthopedic trauma were followed and assessed for SSIs and their outcomes and antimicrobial sensitivity patterns of the micro-organisms isolated were noted and correlated. Results: A total of 40 (4.4% confirmed cases of SSIs were identified among 852 patients of orthopedic trauma. Based on the new CDC criteria, after ruling out cellulitis, only 24 (2.6% were found to have SSIs. A total of 12.5% of the SSIs were detected during follow-up. Acinetobacter baumannii was the predominant organism as also Staphylococcus aureus. Outcomes observed included changes in antibiotic regime, revision surgery, readmission to hospital and deaths. Conclusion: SSI is prevalent in orthopaedic trauma patients and an active surveillance program will help in early management and prevention.

  18. Analysis of Surgical Site Infection after Musculoskeletal Tumor Surgery: Risk Assessment Using a New Scoring System

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    Satoshi Nagano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infection (SSI has not been extensively studied in musculoskeletal tumors (MST owing to the rarity of the disease. We analyzed incidence and risk factors of SSI in MST. SSI incidence was evaluated in consecutive 457 MST cases (benign, 310 cases and malignant, 147 cases treated at our institution. A detailed analysis of the clinical background of the patients, pre- and postoperative hematological data, and other factors that might be associated with SSI incidence was performed for malignant MST cases. SSI occurred in 0.32% and 12.2% of benign and malignant MST cases, respectively. The duration of the surgery (P=0.0002 and intraoperative blood loss (P=0.0005 was significantly more in the SSI group than in the non-SSI group. We established the musculoskeletal oncological surgery invasiveness (MOSI index by combining 4 risk factors (blood loss, operation duration, preoperative chemotherapy, and the use of artificial materials. The MOSI index (0–4 points score significantly correlated with the risk of SSI, as demonstrated by an SSI incidence of 38.5% in the group with a high score (3-4 points. The MOSI index score and laboratory data at 1 week after surgery could facilitate risk evaluation and prompt diagnosis of SSI.

  19. Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site Infection After High-Energy Fracture Surgery (OXYGEN Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    OʼToole, Robert V; Joshi, Manjari; Carlini, Anthony R; Sikorski, Robert A; Dagal, Armagan; Murray, Clinton K; Weaver, Michael J; Paryavi, Ebrahim; Stall, Alec C; Scharfstein, Daniel O; Agel, Julie; Zadnik, Mary; Bosse, Michael J; Castillo, Renan C

    2017-04-01

    Supplemental perioperative oxygen (SPO) therapy has been proposed as one approach for reducing the risk of surgical site infection (SSI). Current data are mixed regarding efficacy in decreasing SSI rates and hospital inpatient stays in general and few data exist for orthopaedic trauma patients. This study is a phase III, double-blind, prospective randomized clinical trial with a primary goal of assessing the efficacy of 2 different concentrations of perioperative oxygen in the prevention of SSIs in adults with tibial plateau, pilon (tibial plafond), or calcaneus fractures at higher risk of infection and definitively treated with plate and screw fixation. Patients are block randomized (within center) in a 1:1 ratio to either treatment group (FiO2 80%) or control group (FiO2 30%) and stratified by each study injury location. Secondary objectives of the study are to compare species and antibacterial sensitivities of the bacteria in patients who develop SSIs, to validate a previously developed risk prediction model for the development of SSI after fracture surgery, and to measure and compare resource utilization and cost associated with SSI in the 2 study groups. SPO is a low cost and readily available resource that could be easily disseminated to trauma centers across the country and the world if proved to be effective.

  20. [Implementation of a post-discharge surgical site infection system in herniorrhaphy and mastectomy procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Juan Sanz, Isabel; Díaz-Agero-Pérez, Cristina; Robustillo-Rodela, Ana; Pita López, María José; Oliva Iñiguez, Lourdes; Monge-Jodrá, Vicente

    2014-10-01

    Monitoring surgical site infection (SSI) performed during hospitalization can underestimate its rates due to the shortening in hospital stay. The aim of this study was to determine the actual rates of SSI using a post-discharge monitoring system. All patients who underwent herniorraphy or mastectomy in the Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal from 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2011 were included. SSI data were collected prospectively according to the continuous quality improvement indicators (Indicadores Clinicos de Mejora Continua de la Calidad [INCLIMECC]) monitoring system. Post-discharge follow-up was conducted by telephone survey. A total of 409patients were included in the study, of whom 299 underwent a herniorraphy procedure, and 110 underwent a mastectomy procedure. For herniorrhaphy, the SSI rate increased from 6.02% to 7.6% (the post-discharge survey detected 21.7% of SSI). For mastectomy, the SSI rate increased from 1.8% to 3.6% (the post-discharge survey detected 50% of SSI). Post-discharge monitoring showed an increased detection of SSI incidence. Post-discharge monitoring is useful to analyze the real trend of SSI, and evaluate improvement actions. Post-discharge follow-up methods need to standardised. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  1. The role of oral antibiotics prophylaxis in prevention of surgical site infection in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koullouros, Michalis; Khan, Nadir; Aly, Emad H

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) continues to be a challenge in colorectal surgery. Over the years, various modalities have been used in an attempt to reduce SSI risk in elective colorectal surgery, which include mechanical bowel preparation before surgery, oral antibiotics and intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis at induction of surgery. Even though IV antibiotics have become standard practice, there has been a debate on the exact role of oral antibiotics. The primary aim was to identify the role of oral antibiotics in reduction of SSI in elective colorectal surgery. The secondary aim was to explore any potential benefit in the use of mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) in relation to SSI in elective colorectal surgery. Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched. Any randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or cohort studies after 1980, which investigated the effectiveness of oral antibiotic prophylaxis and/or MBP in preventing SSIs in elective colorectal surgery were included. Twenty-three RCTs and eight cohorts were included. The results indicate a statistically significant advantage in preventing SSIs with the combined usage of oral and systemic antibiotic prophylaxis. Furthermore, our analysis of the cohort studies shows no benefits in the use of MBP in prevention of SSIs. The addition of oral antibiotics to systemic antibiotics could potentially reduce the risk of SSIs in elective colorectal surgery. Additionally, MBP does not seem to provide a clear benefit with regard to SSI prevention.

  2. Laparoscopic Repair Reduces Incidence of Surgical Site Infections for All Ventral Hernias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Nestor A.; Nguyen, Mylan T.; Nguyen, Duyen H.; Berger, Rachel L.; Lew, Debbie F.; Suliburk, James T.; Askenasy, Erik P.; Kao, Lillian S.; Liang, Mike K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of laparoscopic repair of ventral hernias remains incompletely defined. We hypothesize that laparoscopy, compared to open repair with mesh, decreases surgical site infection (SSI) for all ventral hernia types. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were reviewed to identify studies evaluating outcomes of laparoscopic versus open repair with mesh of ventral hernias and divided into groups (primary or incisional). Studies with high risk of bias were excluded. Primary outcomes of interest were recurrence and SSI. Fixed effects model was used unless significant heterogeneity, assessed with the Higgins I-square (I2), was encountered. Results There were five and fifteen studies for primary and incisional cohorts. No difference was seen in recurrence between laparoscopic and open repair in the two hernia groups. SSI was more common with open repair in both hernia groups: primary (OR 4.17, 95%CI [2.03–8.55]) and incisional (OR 5.16, 95%CI [2.79–9.57]). Conclusions Laparoscopic repair, compared to open repair with mesh, decreases rates of SSI in all types of ventral hernias with no difference in recurrence. This data suggests that laparoscopic approach may be the treatment of choice for all types of ventral hernias. PMID:25294541

  3. Surveillance of surgical site infections after thyroidectomy in a one-day surgery setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionigi, G; Rovera, F; Boni, L; Dionigi, R

    2008-01-01

    Different studies underline the importance of hospital stay on the development of infectious complications. We performed an audit of surgical site infections (SSI) after thyroidectomy was performed in a one-day surgery setting. One hundred and twelve consecutive patients admitted between April 2007 and discharged before May 2008 were studied. Patient selection criteria for one-day surgery were specific medical and social-logistic status. The technique of thyroidectomy was standardized. SSI affect 2.6% of patients undergoing thyroid surgery with short hospitalization. The incidence of SSI was 3.2% following thyroidectomy, 2% for lobectomy. Mean time interval to symptom onset was 3 days (range 2-6). Most likely organism was Staphylococcus aureus. WI was associated with prolonged ambulatory medications. Rates of SSI are similar to those described in the literature with longer hospitalization. All SSI become evident only after patient discharge. Prevention of SSI is very much the responsibility of the persons working in the operating theater. Effort should be made to improve sterile technique. Appropriate antibiotic coverage is indicated when infection develops postoperatively.

  4. Surgical site infection after caesarean section: space for post-discharge surveillance improvements and reliable comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Federica; Piselli, Pierluca; Pittalis, Silvia; Ruscitti, Luca E; Cimaglia, Claudia; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Puro, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) after caesarean section (CS) represent a substantial health system concern. Surveying SSI has been associated with a reduction in SSI incidence. We report the findings of three (2008, 2011 and 2013) regional active SSI surveillances after CS in community hospital of the Latium region determining the incidence of SSI. Each CS was surveyed for SSI occurrence by trained staff up to 30 post-operative days, and association of SSI with relevant characteristics was assessed using binomial logistic regression. A total of 3,685 CS were included in the study. A complete 30 day post-operation follow-up was achieved in over 94% of procedures. Overall 145 SSI were observed (3.9% cumulative incidence) of which 131 (90.3%) were superficial and 14 (9.7%) complex (deep or organ/space) SSI; overall 129 SSI (of which 89.9% superficial) were diagnosed post-discharge. Only higher NNIS score was significantly associated with SSI occurrence in the regression analysis. Our work provides the first regional data on CS-associated SSI incidence, highlighting the need for a post-discharge surveillance which should assure 30 days post-operation to not miss data on complex SSI, as well as being less labour intensive.

  5. Drainage Systems Effect on Surgical Site Infection in Children with Perforated Appendicitis

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    Seref Kilic

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Effect of replacing open drainage system to closed drainage system on surgical site infection (SSI in children operated for perforated appendicitis was evaluated. Material and Method: Hospital files and computer records of perforated appendicitis cases operated in 2004-2010 were evaluated retrospectively. Open drainage systems were used for 70 in cases (group I and closed systems were used in the others (group II. Results: Eleven of SSI cases had superficial infection and 3 had the organ/space infection. SSI rate was 15.7% for group I and 7.5% for the group II. The antibiotic treatment length was 7.5 ± 3.4 days for group I and 6.4 ± 2.2 days for group II and the difference between groups was not statistically significant. Hospitalization length for group I was 8.2 ± 3.1 days and 6.8 ± 1.9 days for group II and the difference was statistically significant. Discussion: SSI is an important problem increasing morbidity and treatment costs through increasing hospitalization and antibiotic treatment length. Open drainage system used in operation in patients with perforated appendicitis leads an increased frequency of SSI when compared to the closed drainage system. Thus, closed drainage systems should be preferred in when drainage is necessary in operations for perforated appendicitis in children.

  6. Review of Subcutaneous Wound Drainage in Reducing Surgical Site Infections after Laparotomy

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    B. Manzoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Surgical site infections (SSIs remain a significant problem after laparotomies. The aim of this review was to assess the evidence on the efficacy of subcutaneous wound drainage in reducing SSI. Methods. MEDLINE database was searched. Studies were identified and screened according to criteria to determine their eligibility for meta-analysis. Meta-analysis was performed using the Mantel-Haenszel method and a fixed effects model. Results. Eleven studies were included with two thousand eight hundred and sixty-four patients. One thousand four hundred and fifty patients were in the control group and one thousand four hundred and fourteen patients were in the drain group. Wound drainage in all patients shows no statistically significant benefit in reducing SSI incidence. Use of drainage in high risk patients, contaminated wound types, and obese patients appears beneficial. Conclusion. Using subcutaneous wound drainage after laparotomy in all patients is unnecessary as it does not reduce SSI risk. Similarly, there seems to be no benefit in using it in clean and clean contaminated wounds. However, there may be benefit in using drains in patients who are at high risk, including patients who are obese and/or have contaminated wound types. A well designed trial is needed which examines these factors.

  7. Patient-related risk factors for surgical site infection following eight types of gastrointestinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, H

    2016-08-01

    To identify patient-related risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) following eight types of gastrointestinal surgery that could be collected as part of infection surveillance efforts. Record linkage from existing datasets comprising the Japan Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (JANIS) and Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC) programmes. Patient data from 35 hospitals were retrieved using JANIS and DPC from 2007 to 2011. Patient-related factors and the incidence of SSI were recorded and analysed. Risk factors associated with SSI were examined using multi-level mixed-effects logistic regression models. In total, 2074 appendectomies; 2084 bile duct, liver or pancreatic procedures; 3460 cholecystectomies; 7273 colonic procedures; 482 oesophageal procedures; 4748 gastric procedures; 2762 rectal procedures and 1202 small bowel procedures were analysed. Using multi-variate analyses, intra-operative blood transfusion was found to be a risk factor for SSI following all types of gastrointestinal surgery, except appendectomy and small bowel surgery. In addition, diabetes was found to be a risk factor for SSI following colon surgery [odds ratio (OR) 1.23, P=0.028] and gastric surgery (OR 1.70, PInfection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Incidence of surgical site infections in sub-Saharan Africa: systematic review and meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngaroua; Ngah, Joseph Eloundou; Bénet, Thomas; Djibrilla, Yaouba

    2016-01-01

    Surgical Site Infections (SSI) cause morbi-mortality and additional healthcare expenditures. Developing countries are the most affected. The objective was to estimate the pooled incidence of SSI in Sub-Saharan Africa and describe its major risk factors. Systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted using the databases of the World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa, PubMed and standard search to select electronic articles published between 2006 and 2015. Only articles investigating SSI impact and risk factors in Sub-Saharan African countries were retained. Out of 95 articles found, 11 met the inclusion criteria. Only 9 countries out of 45 have contributed, with a huge amount of information coming from Nigeria (5 articles out of 11). The impact of SSI ranged from 6.8% to 26% with predominance in general surgery. The pooled incidence of SSI was 14.8% (95% CI: 15,5-16,2%) with significant heterogeneity according to the specialty and the method of monitoring. Most cited risk factors were long procedure length and categories 3 and 4 of Altemeier contamination class. Other factors included hospital environment, inadequate care practices and underlying pathologies. SSI incidence is high in Sub-Saharan Africa. Studies in this area could improve knowledge, prevention and control of these multiple risk factors.

  9. Standardizing preoperative preparation to reduce surgical site infections among pediatric neurosurgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffzin, Joshua K; Simon, Katherine; Connelly, Beverly L; Mangano, Francesco T

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical site infections (SSIs) are costly to patients and the health care system. Pediatric neurosurgery SSI risk factors are not well defined. Intraoperative protocols have reduced, but have not eliminated, SSIs. The effect of preoperative intervention is unknown. Using quality improvement methods, a preoperative SSI prevention protocol for pediatric neurosurgical patients was implemented to assess its effect on SSI rate. METHODS Patients who underwent a scheduled neurosurgical procedure between January 2014 and December 2015 were included. Published evidence and provider consensus were used to guide preoperative protocol development. The Model for Improvement was used to test interventions. Intraoperative and postoperative management was not standardized or modified systematically. Staff, family, and overall adherence was measured as all-or-nothing. In addition, SSI rates among eligible procedures were measured before and after protocol implementation. RESULTS Within 4 months, overall protocol adherence increased from 51.3% to a sustained 85.7%. SSI rates decreased from 2.9 per 100 procedures preintervention to 0.62 infections postintervention (p = 0.003). An approximate 79% reduction in SSI risk was identified (risk ratio 0.21, 95% CI 0.08-0.56; p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Clinical staff and families successfully collaborated on a standardized preoperative protocol for pediatric neurosurgical patients. Standardization of the preoperative phase of care alone reduced SSI rates. Attention to the preoperative in addition to the intraoperative and postoperative phases of care may lead to further reduction in SSI rates.

  10. Shorter duration of femoral-popliteal bypass is associated with decreased surgical site infection and shorter hospital length of stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tze-Woei; Kalish, Jeffrey A; Hamburg, Naomi M; Rybin, Denis; Doros, Gheorghe; Eberhardt, Robert T; Farber, Alik

    2012-10-01

    Duration of femoral-popliteal bypass is based on multiple patient-specific, system-specific, and surgeon-specific factors, and is subject to considerable variability. We hypothesized that shorter operative duration is associated with improved outcomes and might represent a potential quality-improvement measure. Patients who underwent primary femoral-popliteal bypass with autogenous vein between 2005 and 2009 were identified from the American College of Surgeons NSQIP dataset using ICD-9 codes. Operative duration quartiles (Q) were determined (Q1: ≤149 minutes, Q2: 150 to 192 minutes, Q3: 193 to 248 minutes; and Q4: ≥249 minutes). Perioperative outcomes included mortality, surgical site infection, cardiopulmonary complications, and length of hospital stay. Relevant patient-specific and system-specific confounders, including age, body mass index, smoking, diabetes, end-stage renal disease, indication, American Society of Anesthesiologists' class, type of anesthesia, intraoperative transfusion, nonoperative time in the operating room, and participation of a trainee during the procedure, were adjusted for using multivariable regression. There were 2,644 femoral-popliteal bypass procedures in our study. Mean age was 65.9 years and 62% of patients were male. Longer duration of surgery was associated with increased perioperative surgical site infection (Q1: 6.3%; Q2: 9.0%; Q3: 10.1%; and Q4: 13.9%; p surgical site infection and longer hospital length of stay. Operative duration of ≥260 minutes increased the risk of surgical site infection by 50% compared with operative time of 150 minutes. Longer duration of femoral-popliteal bypass with autogenous vein was associated with a significantly higher risk of perioperative surgical site infection and longer hospital length of stay. Surgeon-specific parameters that lead to faster operative time might lead to improved clinical outcomes and more efficient hospital resource use. Copyright © 2012 American College of Surgeons

  11. Influence of Peri-Operative Hypothermia on Surgical Site Infection in Prolonged Gastroenterological Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Toshie; Takesue, Yoshio; Ichiki, Kaoru; Uede, Takashi; Nakajima, Kazuhiko; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Uchino, Motoi

    2016-10-01

    There have been several recent studies on the correlation between intra-operative hypothermia and the occurrence of surgical site infection (SSI). Differences in the depth and timing of hypothermia and the surgical procedure may have led to conflicting results. Patients undergoing gastroenterologic surgery with a duration of >3 h were analyzed. Hypothermia was defined as a core temperature <36°C and was classified as mild (35.5-35.9°C), moderate (35.0-35.4°C), or severe (<35.0°C). Hypothermia also was classified as early-nadir (<36°C within two h of anesthesia induction) and late-nadir (after that time). Risk factors for SSIs were analyzed according to these classifications. Among 1,409 patients, 528 (37.5%) had hypothermia, which was classified as mild in 358, moderate in 137, and severe in 33. Early-nadir and late-nadir hypothermia was found in 23.7% and 13.8%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the incidence of SSIs between patients with and without hypothermia (relative risk 1.00; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80-1.25; p = 0.997). However, there was a significantly greater incidence of SSIs in patients with severe hypothermia (33.3%) than in those with normothermia (19.2%; p = 0.045) or mild hypothermia (17.0%; p = 0.021). The incidence of SSIs also was significantly greater in patients with late-nadir than in those with early-nadir hypothermia (23.7% vs. 16.5%; p = 0.041). The incidence of organ/space SSIs was significantly greater in patients with late-nadir hypothermia (19.6%) than in patients with normothermia (12.7%; p = 0.012). In multivariable analysis, neither severe hypothermia (odds ratio 1.24; 95% CI 0.56-2.77] nor late-nadir hypothermia (OR 0.71; 95% CI 0.46-1.01) was an independent risk factor for SSIs. Severe and late-nadir hypothermia were associated with a greater incidence of SSIs and organ/space SSIs. However, neither of these patterns was identified as an independent risk factor for SSIs, possibly

  12. Implementation of a bundle of care to reduce surgical site infections in patients undergoing vascular surgery.

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    Jasper van der Slegt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surgical site infections (SSI's are associated with severe morbidity, mortality and increased health care costs in vascular surgery. OBJECTIVE: To implement a bundle of care in vascular surgery and measure the effects on the overall and deep-SSI's rates. DESIGN: Prospective, quasi-experimental, cohort study. METHODS: A prospective surveillance for SSI's after vascular surgery was performed in the Amphia hospital in Breda, from 2009 through 2011. A bundle developed by the Dutch hospital patient safety program (DHPSP was introduced in 2009. The elements of the bundle were (1 perioperative normothermia, (2 hair removal before surgery, (3 the use of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis and (4 discipline in the operating room. Bundle compliance was measured every 3 months in a random sample of surgical procedures and this was used for feedback. RESULTS: Bundle compliance improved significantly from an average of 10% in 2009 to 60% in 2011. In total, 720 vascular procedures were performed during the study period and 75 (10.4% SSI were observed. Deep SSI occurred in 25 (3.5% patients. Patients with SSI's (28,5±29.3 vs 10.8±11.3, p<0.001 and deep-SSI's (48.3±39.4 vs 11.4±11.8, p<0.001 had a significantly longer length of hospital stay after surgery than patients without an infection. A significantly higher mortality was observed in patients who developed a deep SSI (Adjusted OR: 2.96, 95% confidence interval 1.32-6.63. Multivariate analysis showed a significant and independent decrease of the SSI-rate over time that paralleled the introduction of the bundle. The SSI-rate was 51% lower in 2011 compared to 2009. CONCLUSION: The implementation of the bundle was associated with improved compliance over time and a 51% reduction of the SSI-rate in vascular procedures. The bundle did not require expensive or potentially harmful interventions and is therefore an important tool to improve patient safety and reduce SSI's in patients undergoing

  13. Surgical Site Infections Rates in More Than 13,000 Surgical Procedures in Three Cities in Peru: Findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium.

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    Ramírez-Wong, Fernando M; Atencio-Espinoza, Teodora; Rosenthal, Victor D; Ramirez, Eliza; Torres-Zegarra, Socorro L; Díaz Tavera, Zoila Rosa; Sarmiento López, Favio; Silva Astete, Nazario; Campos Guevara, Francisco; Bazan Mendoza, Carlos; Valencia Ramírez, Augusto; Soto Pastrana, Javier

    2015-10-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a threat to patient safety. However, there are not available data on SSI rates stratified by surgical procedure (SP) in Peru. From January 2005 to December 2010, a cohort prospective surveillance study on SSIs was conducted by the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) in four hospitals in three cities of Peru. Data were recorded from hospitalized patients using the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC-NHSN) methods and definitions for SSI. Surgical procedures (SPs) were classified into 4 types, according to ICD-9 criteria. We recorded 352 SSIs, associated to 13,904 SPs (2.5%; CI, 2.3-2.8) SSI rates per type of SP were the following for this study's Peruvian hospitals, compared with rates of the INICC and CDC-NHSN reports, respectively: 2.9% for appendix surgery (vs. 2.9% vs. 1.4%); 2.8% for gallbladder surgery (vs. 2.5% vs. 0.6%); 2.2% for cesarean section (vs. 0.7% vs. 1.8%); 2.8% for vaginal hysterectomy (vs. 2.0% vs. 0.9%). Our SSIs rates were higher in all of the four analyzed types of SPs compared with CDC-NHSN, whereas compared with INICC, most rates were similar. This study represents an important advance in the knowledge of SSI epidemiology in Peru that will allow us to introduce targeted interventions.

  14. Improving wound healing and preventing surgical site complications of closed surgical incisions: a possible role of Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy. A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, Alessandro; Calamita, Roberto; Tartaglione, Caterina; Pierangeli, Marina; Bolletta, Elisa; Gioacchini, Matteo; Gesuita, Rosaria; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    Advances in preoperative care, surgical techniques and technologies have enabled surgeons to achieve primary closure in a high percentage of surgical procedures. However, often, underlying patient comorbidities in addition to surgical-related factors make the management of surgical wounds primary closure challenging because of the higher risk of developing complications. To date, extensive evidence exists, which demonstrate the benefits of negative pressure dressing in the treatment of open wounds; recently, Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (INPWT) technology as delivered by Prevena™ (KCI USA, Inc., San Antonio, TX) and Pico (Smith & Nephew Inc, Andover, MA) systems has been the focus of a new investigation on possible prophylactic measures to prevent complications via application immediately after surgery in high-risk, clean, closed surgical incisions. A systematic review was performed to evaluate INPWT's effect on surgical sites healing by primary intention. The primary outcomes of interest are an understanding of INPWT functioning and mechanisms of action, extrapolated from animal and biomedical engineering studies and incidence of complications (infection, dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, skin and fat necrosis, skin and fascial dehiscence or blistering) and other variables influenced by applying INPWT (re-operation and re-hospitalization rates, time to dry wound, cost saving) extrapolated from human studies. A search was conducted for published articles in various databases including PubMed, Google Scholar and Scopus Database from 2006 to March 2014. Supplemental searches were performed using reference lists and conference proceedings. Studies selection was based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria and data extraction regarding study quality, model investigated, epidemiological and clinical characteristics and type of surgery, and the outcomes were applied to all the articles included. 1 biomedical engineering study, 2 animal studies, 15

  15. Revisiting the effectiveness of interventions to decrease surgical site infections in colorectal surgery: A Bayesian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phatak, Uma R; Pedroza, Claudia; Millas, Stefanos G; Chang, George J; Lally, Kevin P; Kao, Lillian S

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the evidence for interventions to decrease surgical site infections (SSIs) in colorectal operations using Bayesian meta-analysis. Interventions other than appropriate administration of prophylactic antibiotics to prevent SSIs have not been adopted widely, in part because of lack of recommendations for these interventions based on traditional meta-analyses. Bayesian methods can provide probabilities of specific thresholds of benefit, which may be more useful in guiding clinical decision making. We hypothesized that Bayesian meta-analytic methods would complement the interpretation of traditional analyses regarding the effectiveness of interventions to decrease SSIs. We conducted a systematic search of the Cochrane database for reviews of interventions to decrease SSIs after colorectal surgery other than prophylactic antibiotics. Traditional and Bayesian meta-analyses were performed using RevMan (Nordic Cochrane Center, Copenhagen, Denmark) and WinBUGS (MRC Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge, UK). Bayesian posterior probabilities of any benefit, defined as a relative risk of Bayesian analysis, several interventions that did not result in "significant" decreases in SSIs using traditional analytic methods had a >85% probability of benefit. Also, nonuse of 2 interventions (mechanical bowel preparation and adhesive drapes) had a high probability of decreasing SSIs compared with their use. Bayesian probabilities and traditional point estimates of treatment effect yield similar information in terms of potential effectiveness. Bayesian meta-analysis, however, provides complementary information on the probability of a large magnitude of effect. The clinical impact of using Bayesian methods to inform decisions about which interventions to institute first or which interventions to combine requires further study. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. SURGICAL SITE INFECTION FOLLOWING LOWER SEGMENT CAESAREAN SECTION IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Nishi Roshini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM OF THE STUDY To identify infection rates and risk factors associated with Surgical Site Infection (SSI following Caesarean Section. DESIGN OF THE STUDY Case control study. PLACE OF STUDY Academic Tertiary Care Obstetrics and Gynaecology Centre with 60 Beds. PATIENTS All women who delivered by caesarean section in Govt. Medical College, Thrissur, during 1st June 2010 to 30th September 2011. METHODS Wound infections were identified during hospital stay using the criteria of the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System. A case control study of 50 patients with wound infection after Lower Segment Caesarean Section (LSCS was undertaken between 1st June 2010 and 30th September 2011. The control group comprised of 50 patients selected randomly from among those who had LSCS during the study period with no wound infection. The CDC definition describes three levels of SSI (Superficial incisional, Deep incisional and Organ or Space infection. Comparisons for categorical variables were performed using the X2 or Fisher exact test. Continuous variables were compared using the 2-tailed Student ‘t’ test and p 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS The overall wound infection rate in the study was 3.5%, (50 among 1410 Lower Transverse CS. Obesity, Hypertension and Poorly Controlled Diabetes are associated with significant risk for development of SSI. The commonest presentation of SSI in LSCS was fever 40 (80% followed by local pain and induration 25 (50%. SSI was detected on 6±3 days. Average duration of hospital stay among SSI was 22.78±10.2 days. Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest pathogen for SSI in our series. The increase in the presence of (Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus MRSA (20.83% might alter the pattern of prophylactic antibiotic given preoperatively in the near future. CONCLUSIONS Increased incidence of drug resistant organisms needs proper attention and strategies for

  17. Past history of skin infection and risk of surgical site infection after elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraday, Nauder; Rock, Peter; Lin, Elaina E; Perl, Trish M; Carroll, Karen; Stierer, Tracey; Robarts, Polly; McFillin, Angela; Ross, Tracy; Shah, Ashish S; Riley, Lee H; Tamargo, Rafael J; Black, James H; Blasco-Colmenares, Elena; Guallar, Eliseo

    2013-01-01

    To identify baseline patient characteristics associated with increased susceptibility to surgical site infection (SSI) after elective surgery. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services considers SSI to be preventable through adherence to current infection control practices; however, the etiology of wound infection is incompletely understood. Prospective cohort study involving patients undergoing cardiac, vascular, craniotomy, and spinal surgery at 2 academic medical centers in Baltimore, MD. A comprehensive medical history was obtained at baseline, and participants were followed for 6 months using active inpatient and outpatient surveillance for deep SSI and infectious death. Infection control best practices were monitored perioperatively. The relative risk of SSI/infectious death was determined comparing those with versus those without a past medical history of skin infection using Cox proportional hazards models. Of 613 patients (mean [SD] = 62.3 [11.5] years; 42.1% women), 22.0% reported a history of skin infection. The cumulative incidence of deep SSI/infectious death was 6.7% versus 3.1% for those with and without a history of skin infection, respectively (unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 2.25; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.98-5.14; P = 0.055). Risk estimates increased after adjustments for demographic and socioeconomic variables (HR = 2.82; 95% CI, 1.18-6.74; P = 0.019) and after propensity score adjustment for all potential confounders (HR = 3.41; 95% CI, 1.36-8.59; P = 0.009). Adjustments for intraoperative infection risk factors and adherence to infection control best practice metrics had no impact on risk estimates. A history of skin infection identified a state of enhanced susceptibility to SSI at baseline that is independent of traditional SSI risk factors and adherence to current infection control practices.

  18. Surgical Site Infections: Volume-Outcome Relationship and Year-to-Year Stability of Performance Rankings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderwood, Michael S; Kleinman, Ken; Huang, Susan S; Murphy, Michael V; Yokoe, Deborah S; Platt, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) rates are publicly reported as quality metrics and increasingly used to determine financial reimbursement. To evaluate the volume-outcome relationship as well as the year-to-year stability of performance rankings following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery and hip arthroplasty. We performed a retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries who underwent CABG surgery or hip arthroplasty at US hospitals from 2005 to 2011, with outcomes analyzed through March 2012. Nationally validated claims-based surveillance methods were used to assess for SSI within 90 days of surgery. The relationship between procedure volume and SSI rate was assessed using logistic regression and generalized additive modeling. Year-to-year stability of SSI rates was evaluated using logistic regression to assess hospitals' movement in and out of performance rankings linked to financial penalties. Case-mix adjusted SSI risk based on claims was highest in hospitals performing year and year compared with hospitals performing ≥200 procedures/year. At that same time, hospitals in the worst quartile in a given year based on claims had a low probability of remaining in that quartile the following year. This probability increased with volume, and when using 2 years' experience, but the highest probabilities were only 0.59 for CABG (95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.66) and 0.48 for hip arthroplasty (95% confidence interval, 0.42-0.55). Aggregate SSI risk is highest in hospitals with low annual procedure volumes, yet these hospitals are currently excluded from quality reporting. Even for higher volume hospitals, year-to-year random variation makes past experience an unreliable estimator of current performance.

  19. Systematic review of risk factors for surgical site infection in pediatric scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanyam, Rajeev; Schaffzin, Joshua; Cudilo, Elizabeth M; Rao, Marepalli B; Varughese, Anna M

    2015-06-01

    Risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) in children derived from the studies in the adult population are potentially misleading because of differences in pathophysiology and management. This systematic review addresses the key question: What are the risk factors for SSI in pediatric patients undergoing scoliosis surgery? This is a qualitative systematic literature review. Retrospective and observational trials of children undergoing scoliosis surgery reported on the occurrence of risk factors for SSI and the occurrence of SSI. Pubmed (Medline), Ovid Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews (EBMR), Scopus, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL) were searched electronically for relevant articles in all the languages between January 1, 1991 and August 27, 2012, and cross-references were checked. Two independent reviewers identified articles and appraised quality with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) criteria based on a weighted scoring of 0 to 100. Our search identified 135 abstracts and 14 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. The AHRQ grading showed that five articles were high quality with a score of greater than 67, and five articles were moderate quality with a score between 50 and 67. The percent agreement between the two independent reviewers was 84%, and kappa agreement score was 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78-1.03). There were 76 risk factors identified, of which 22 factors were reported in more than one study. Odds ratios and 95% CIs were reported inconsistently. Pooled p analysis of high- and moderate-quality articles identified five risk factors predictive of SSI: inappropriate antibiotic use (p=.001), neuromuscular scoliosis (p=.014), instrumentation (p=.023), increased hospital stay days (p=.003), and residual postoperative curve (p=.003). The systematic review identified inappropriate antibiotic use, neuromuscular scoliosis, instrumentation, increased hospital stay days, and residual postoperative curve

  20. A Prognostic Scoring Tool for Cesarean Organ/Space Surgical Site Infections: Derivation and Internal Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assawapalanggool, Srisuda; Kasatpibal, Nongyao; Sirichotiyakul, Supatra; Arora, Rajin; Suntornlimsiri, Watcharin

    Organ/space surgical site infections (SSIs) are serious complications after cesarean delivery. However, no scoring tool to predict these complications has yet been developed. This study sought to develop and validate a prognostic scoring tool for cesarean organ/space SSIs. Data for case and non-case of cesarean organ/space SSI between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 from a tertiary care hospital in Thailand were analyzed. Stepwise multivariable logistic regression was used to select the best predictor combination and their coefficients were transformed to a risk scoring tool. The likelihood ratio of positive for each risk category and the area under receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves were analyzed on total scores. Internal validation using bootstrap re-sampling was tested for reproducibility. The predictors of 243 organ/space SSIs from 4,988 eligible cesarean delivery cases comprised the presence of foul-smelling amniotic fluid (four points), vaginal examination five or more times before incision (two points), wound class III or greater (two points), being referred from local setting (two points), hemoglobin less than 11 g/dL (one point), and ethnic minorities (one point). The likelihood ratio of cesarean organ/space SSIs with 95% confidence interval among low (total score of 0-1 point), medium (total score of 2-5 points), and high risk (total score of ≥6 points) categories were 0.11 (0.07-0.19), 1.03 (0.89-1.18), and 13.25 (10.87-16.14), respectively. Both AUROCs of the derivation and validation data were comparable (87.57% versus 86.08%; p = 0.418). This scoring tool showed a high predictive ability regarding cesarean organ/space SSIs on the derivation data and reproducibility was demonstrated on internal validation. It could assist practitioners prioritize patient care and management depending on risk category and decrease SSI rates in cesarean deliveries.

  1. Incidence of surgical site infection following caesarean section: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Richard A; Corcoran, Paul; O'Neill, Sinéad M

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Caesarean section (CS) rates have increased globally during the past three decades. Surgical site infection (SSI) following CS is a common cause of morbidity with reported rates of 3–15%. SSI represents a substantial burden to the health system including increased length of hospitalisation and costs of postdischarge care. The definition of SSI varies with the postoperative follow-up period among different health systems, resulting in differences in the reporting of SSI incidence. We propose to conduct the first systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the pooled estimate for the overall incidence of SSI following CS. Methods and analysis We will perform a comprehensive search to identify all potentially relevant published studies on the incidence of SSI following CS reported from 1992 in the English language. Electronic databases including PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE and Scopus will be searched using a detailed search strategy. Following study selection, full-text paper retrieval, data extraction and synthesis, we will appraise study quality and risk of bias and assess heterogeneity. Incidence data will be combined where feasible in a meta-analysis using Stata software and fixed-effects or random-effects models as appropriate. This systematic review will be reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required as this review will use published data. The review will evaluate the overall incidence of SSI following CS and will provide the first quantitative estimate of the magnitude of SSI. It will serve as a benchmark for future studies, identify research gaps and remaining challenges, and emphasise the need for appropriate prevention and control measures for SSI post-CS. A manuscript reporting the results of the systematic review and meta-analysis will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal and presented at scientific conferences

  2. Nationwide surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of pathogens isolated from surgical site infections (SSI) in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takesue, Yoshio; Watanabe, Akira; Hanaki, Hideaki; Kusachi, Shinya; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Totsuka, Kyoichi; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Yagisawa, Morimasa; Sato, Junko; Oguri, Toyoko; Nakanishi, Kunio; Sumiyama, Yoshinobu; Kitagawa, Yuko; Wakabayashi, Go; Koyama, Isamu; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Konishi, Toshiro; Fukushima, Ryoji; Seki, Shiko; Imai, Shun; Shintani, Tsunehiro; Tsukada, Hiroki; Tsukada, Kazuhiro; Omura, Kenji; Mikamo, Hiroshige; Takeyama, Hiromitsu; Kusunoki, Masato; Kubo, Shoji; Shimizu, Junzo; Hirai, Toshihiro; Ohge, Hiroki; Kadowaki, Akio; Okamoto, Kohji; Yanagihara, Katsunori

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the trends of antimicrobial resistance in pathogens isolated from surgical site infections (SSI), a Japanese surveillance committee conducted the first nationwide survey. Seven main organisms were collected from SSI at 27 medical centers in 2010 and were shipped to a central laboratory for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. A total of 702 isolates from 586 patients with SSI were included. Staphylococcus aureus (20.4 %) and Enterococcus faecalis (19.5 %) were the most common isolates, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (15.4 %) and Bacteroides fragilis group (15.4 %). Methicillin-resistant S. aureus among S. aureus was 72.0 %. Vancomycin MIC 2 μg/ml strains accounted for 9.7 %. In Escherichia coli, 11 of 95 strains produced extended-spectrum β-lactamase (Klebsiella pneumoniae, 0/53 strains). Of E. coli strains, 8.4 % were resistant to ceftazidime (CAZ) and 26.3 % to ciprofloxacin (CPFX). No P. aeruginosa strains produced metallo-β-lactamase. In P. aeruginosa, the resistance rates were 7.4 % to tazobactam/piperacillin (TAZ/PIPC), 10.2 % to imipenem (IPM), 2.8 % to meropenem, cefepime, and CPFX, and 0 % to gentamicin. In the B. fragilis group, the rates were 28.6 % to clindamycin, 5.7 % to cefmetazole, 2.9 % to TAZ/PIPC and IPM, and 0 % to metronidazole (Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron; 59.1, 36.4, 0, 0, 0 %). MIC₉₀ of P. aeruginosa isolated 15 days or later after surgery rose in TAZ/PIPC, CAZ, IPM, and CPFX. In patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score ≥3, the resistance rates of P. aeruginosa to TAZ/PIPC and CAZ were higher than in patients with ASA ≤2. The data obtained in this study revealed the trend of the spread of resistance among common species that cause SSI. Timing of isolation from surgery and the patient's physical status affected the selection of resistant organisms.

  3. Surgical Site Infection (SSI) After Breast Surgery: Impact of 2010 CDC Reporting Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnim, Amy C.; Throckmorton, Alyssa D.; Boostrom, Sarah Y.; Boughey, Judy C.; Holifield, Andrea; Baddour, Larry M.; Hoskin, Tanya L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Reported surgical site infection (SSI) rates after breast operations range from 0.8–26% in the literature. Aims of the present study were to characterize SSI after breast/axillary operations and determine the impact on the SSI rate of the 2010 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reporting guidelines that now specifically exclude cellulitis. Methods Retrospective chart review identified 368 patients, with 449 operated sides, between 07/2004 and 6/2006. SSI was defined using CDC criteria: purulent drainage (CDC #1), positive aseptically collected culture (CDC #2), signs of inflammation with opening of incision and absence of negative culture (CDC#3), or physician diagnosis of infection (CDC #4). The impact of excluding cellulitis was assessed. Results Using prior CDC reporting guidelines, among 368 patients, 32 (8.7%) experienced SSI in 33/449 (7.3%) operated sides. Of these, 11 (33%) met CDC criteria 1–3, while 22 (67%) met CDC criterion 4. Excluding cellulitis cases per 2010 CDC SSI reporting guidelines eliminates 21 of the 22 infections previously meeting CDC criterion 4. Under the new reporting guidelines, the SSI rate is 12/449 (2.7%) operated sides. SSI rates varied by procedure but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions Cellulitis after breast and axillary surgery is much more common than other criteria for SSI, and SSI rates are reduced almost three-fold if cellulitis cases are excluded. Recently revised CDC reporting guidelines may result in underestimates of the clinical burden of SSI after breast/axillary surgery. PMID:22732837

  4. Short Operative Duration and Surgical Site Infection Risk in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicks, Kristen V; Baker, Arthur W; Durkin, Michael J; Anderson, Deverick J; Moehring, Rebekah W; Chen, Luke F; Sexton, Daniel J; Weber, David J; Lewis, Sarah S

    2015-12-01

    To determine the association (1) between shorter operative duration and surgical site infection (SSI) and (2) between surgeon median operative duration and SSI risk among first-time hip and knee arthroplasties. Retrospective cohort study A total of 43 community hospitals located in the southeastern United States. Adults who developed SSIs according to National Healthcare Safety Network criteria within 365 days of first-time knee or hip arthroplasties performed between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012. Log-binomial regression models estimated the association (1) between operative duration and SSI outcome and (2) between surgeon median operative duration and SSI outcome. Hip and knee arthroplasties were evaluated in separate models. Each model was adjusted for American Society of Anesthesiology score and patient age. A total of 25,531 hip arthroplasties and 42,187 knee arthroplasties were included in the study. The risk of SSI in knee arthroplasties with an operative duration shorter than the 25th percentile was 0.40 times the risk of SSI in knee arthroplasties with an operative duration between the 25th and 75th percentile (risk ratio [RR], 0.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38-0.56; P<.01). Short operative duration did not demonstrate significant association with SSI for hip arthroplasties (RR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.79-1.37; P=.36). Knee arthroplasty surgeons with shorter median operative durations had a lower risk of SSI than surgeons with typical median operative durations (RR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.43-0.64; P<.01). Short operative durations were not associated with a higher SSI risk for knee or hip arthroplasty procedures in our analysis.

  5. Does chlorhexidine and povidone-iodine preoperative antisepsis reduce surgical site infection in cranial neurosurgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, B M; Patel, H C

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Surgical site infection (SSI) is a significant cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Effective preoperative antisepsis is a recognised prophylactic, with commonly used agents including chlorhexidine (CHG) and povidone-iodine (PVI). However, there is emerging evidence to suggest an additional benefit when they are used in combination. Methods We analysed data from our prospective SSI database on patients undergoing clean cranial neurosurgery between October 2011 and April 2014. We compared the case-mix adjusted odds of developing a SSI in patients undergoing skin preparation with CGH or PVI alone or in combination. Results SSIs were detected in 2.6% of 1146 cases. Antisepsis with PVI alone was performed in 654 (57%) procedures, while 276 (24%) had CHG alone and 216 (19%) CHG and PVI together. SSIs were associated with longer operating time (p<0.001) and younger age (p=0.03). Surgery type (p<0.001) and length of operation (p<0.001) were significantly different between antisepsis groups. In a binary logistic regression model, CHG and PVI was associated with a significant reduction in the likelihood of developing an SSI (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02-0.63) than either agent alone. There was no difference in SSI rates between CHG and PVI alone (AOR 0.60, 95% CI 0.24-1.5). Conclusions Combination skin preparation with CHG and PVI significantly reduced SSI rates compared to CHG or PVI alone. A prospective, randomized study validating these findings is now warranted.

  6. Impact of Postoperative Antibiotic Prophylaxis Duration on Surgical Site Infections in Autologous Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Kerry E; Lanier, Steven T; Khavanin, Nima; Hume, Keith M; Gutowski, Karol A; Thornton, Brian P; Hansen, Nora M; Murphy, Robert X; Fine, Neil A; Kim, John Y S

    2016-02-01

    Although some surgeons prescribe prolonged postoperative antibiotics after autologous breast reconstruction, evidence is lacking to support this practice. We used the Tracking Operations and Outcomes for Plastic Surgeons database to evaluate the association between postoperative antibiotic duration and the rate of surgical site infection (SSI) in autologous breast reconstruction. The intervention of interest for this study was postoperative duration of antibiotic prophylaxis: either discontinued 24 hours after surgery or continued beyond 24 hours. The primary outcome variable of interest for this study was the presence of SSI within 30 days of autologous breast reconstruction. Cohort characteristics and 30-day outcomes were compared using χ² and Fischer exact tests for categorical variables and Student t tests for continuous variables. Multivariate logistic regression was used to control for confounders. A total of 1036 patients met inclusion criteria for our study. Six hundred fifty-nine patients (63.6%) received antibiotics for 24 hours postoperatively, and 377 patients (36.4%) received antibiotics for greater than 24 hours. The rate of SSI did not differ significantly between patients given antibiotics for only 24 hours and those continued on antibiotics beyond the 24-hour postoperative time period (5.01% vs 2.92%, P = 0.109). Furthermore, antibiotic duration was not predictive of SSI in multivariate regression modeling. We did not find a statistically significant difference in the rate of SSI in patients who received 24 hours of postoperative antibiotics compared to those that received antibiotics for greater than 24 hours. These findings held for both purely autologous reconstruction as well as latissimus dorsi reconstruction in conjunction with an implant. Thus, our study does not support continuation of postoperative antibiotics beyond 24 hours after autologous breast reconstruction.

  7. Incidence of and risk factors for surgical-site infections in a Peruvian hospital.

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    Hernandez, Katherine; Ramos, Elizabeth; Seas, Carlos; Henostroza, German; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2005-05-01

    To determine the incidence of and risk factors for surgical-site infections (SSIs) after abdominal surgery. A cohort study was conducted from January to June 1998. CDC criteria for SSI and the NNIS System risk index were used. A tertiary-care hospital in Peru. Adult patients undergoing abdominal surgery who consented were enrolled and observed until 30 days after surgery. Patients who had undergone surgery at another hospital or who died or were transferred to another hospital within 24 hours after surgery were excluded. Four hundred sixty-eight patients were enrolled. Their mean age was 37.2 years. One hundred twenty-five patients developed SSIs, 18% of which were identified after discharge. The overall incidence rate (IR) was 26.7%. The IR was 13.9% for clean, 15.9% for clean-contaminated, 13.5% for contaminated, and 47.2% for dirty interventions. The IR was 3.6% for NNIS System risk index 0 and 60% for index 3. Risk factors for SSI on logistic regression analysis were dirty or infected wound (RR, 3.8; CI95, 1.7-8.4), drain use longer than 9 days (RR, 6.0; CI95, 2.5-12.5), and length of surgery greater than the 75th percentile (RR, 2.1; CI95, 1.0-4.4). Patients with SSI had a longer hospital stay than did non-infected patients (14.0 vs 6.1 days; p < .001). SSI is a major problem in this hospital, which has a higher IR (especially for clean interventions) than those of developed countries. In developing countries, prevention of SSI should include active surveillance and interventions targeting modifiable risk factors.

  8. The predictors of surgical site infection post cardiac surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musallam, Eyad

    2014-09-01

    We sought to conduct a systematic review to evaluate the predictors of surgical site infection (SSI) after cardiac surgery. We included published, peer-reviewed, English-language, retrospective and prospective studies identified in a search of Medline, CINAHL, and PubMed from 2005 and through February 20, 2012. The studies involved adults (age >18 years) undergoing cardiac surgery (defined by ICD-9 codes) and could be of any study design, in English, published within last 7 years, with data collection taking place in United States within last 10 years. We excluded animal studies, duplicates, summaries, commentaries, editorials, case reports, studies that conducted outside United States, and studies published before last 7 years or studies with data collection take place before last 10 years (2002). Three types of predictors emerge: Predictors of general infection post cardiac surgery, predictors of micro-organisms' specific SSIs and tracheotomy, and allogenic blood transfusion as specific predictors of SSI. Although the reviewed articles cover wide range of SSIs predictors, none of these articles investigate preoperative skin preparation, using pre- and postoperative prophylaxes antibiotics, postoperative wound care (appropriate time for first dressing), and patient nutritional status as a predictors of SSIs after cardiac surgery. Investigating these predictors for SSIs will enhance nurses' understanding of the importance of specific types of nutrition in preventing SSIs and enhancing wound healing, implementing a protocol for the wound care postoperatively, and implementing a protocol for the use of prophylactic antibiotics. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence of modifiable surgical site infection risk factors in hip and knee joint arthroplasty patients at an urban academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruzansky, Jason S; Bronson, Michael J; Grelsamer, Ronald P; Strauss, Elton; Moucha, Calin S

    2014-02-01

    Surgical site infections after hip and knee arthroplasty can be devastating if they lead to periprosthetic joint infection. We examined the prevalence of the modifiable risk factors for surgical site infection described by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery Patient Safety Committee. Our study of 300 cases revealed that only 20% of all cases and 7% of revision cases for infection had no modifiable risk factors. The most common risk factors were obesity (46%), anemia (29%), malnutrition (26%), and diabetes (20%). Cases with obesity or diabetes were associated with all histories of remote orthopedic infection, 89% of urinary tract infections, and 72% of anemia cases. The high prevalence of several modifiable risk factors demonstrates that there are multiple opportunities for perioperative optimization of such comorbidities.

  10. Influence of Surgical Technique, Performance Status, and Peritonitis Exposure on Surgical Site Infection in Acute Complicated Diverticulitis: A Matched Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonta, Sandro; De Martino, Michela; Podetta, Michele; Viganò, Jacopo; Dominioni, Tommaso; Picheo, Roberto; Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Alessiani, Mario; Dionigi, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    Acute generalized peritonitis secondary to complicated diverticulitis is a life-threatening condition; the standard treatment is surgery. Despite advances in peri-operative care, this condition is accompanied by a high peri-operative complication rate (22%-25%). No definitive evidence is available to recommend a preferred surgical technique in patients with Hinchey stage III/IV disease. A matched case-control study enrolling patients from four surgical units at Italian university hospital was planned to assess the most appropriate surgical treatment on the basis of patient performance status and peritonitis exposure, with the aim of minimizing the surgical site infection (SSI). A series of 1,175 patients undergoing surgery for Hinchey III/IV peritonitis in 2003-2013 were analyzed. Cases (n=145) were selected from among those patients who developed an SSI. control ratio was 1:3. Cases and control groups were matched by age, gender, body mass index, and Hinchey grade. We considered three surgical techniques: T1=Hartman's procedure; T2=sigmoid resection, anastomosis, and ileostomy; and T3=sigmoid resection and anastomosis. Six scoring systems were analyzed to assess performance status; subsequently, patients were divided into low, mild, and high risk (LR, MR, HR) according to the system producing the highest area under the curve. We classified peritonitis exposition as P1=24 h. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed. The Apgar scoring system defined the risk groups according to performance status. Lowest SSI risk was expected when applying T3 in P1 (OR=0.22), P2 (OR=0.5) for LR and in P1 (OR=0.63) for MR; T2 in P2 (OR=0.5) in LR and in P1 (OR=0.61) in MR; T1 in P3 (OR=0.56) in LR; in P2 (OR=0.63) and P3 (OR=0.54) in MR patients, and in each P subgroup (OR=0.93;0.97;1.01) in HR. Pre-operative assessment based on Apgar scoring system integrated with peritonitis exposure in complicated diverticulitis may offer a ready-to-use tool for reducing SSI

  11. Risk Adjustment for Determining Surgical Site Infection in Colon Surgery: Are All Models Created Equal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratore, Sydne; Statz, Catherine; Glover, J J; Kwaan, Mary; Beilman, Greg

    2016-04-01

    Colon surgical site infections (SSIs) are being utilized increasingly as a quality measure for hospital reimbursement and public reporting. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) now require reporting of colon SSI, which is entered through the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). However, the CMS's model for determining expected SSIs uses different risk adjustment variables than does NHSN. We hypothesize that CMS's colon SSI model will predict lower expected infection rates than will NHSN. Colon SSI data were reported prospectively to NHSN from 2012-2014 for the six Fairview Hospitals (1,789 colon procedures). We compared expected quarterly SSIs and standardized infection ratios (SIRs) generated by CMS's risk-adjustment model (age and American Society of Anesthesiologist [ASA] classification) vs. NHSN's (age, ASA classification, procedure duration, endoscope [including laparoscope] use, medical school affiliation, hospital bed number, and incision class). The patients with more complex colon SSIs were more likely to be male (60% vs. 44%; p = 0.011), to have contaminated/dirty incisions (21% vs. 10%; p = 0.005), and to have longer operations (235 min vs. 156 min; p < 0.001) and were more likely to be at a medical school-affiliated hospital (53% vs. 40%; p = 0.032). For Fairview Hospitals combined, CMS calculated a lower number of expected quarterly SSIs than did the NHSN (4.58 vs. 5.09 SSIs/quarter; p = 0.002). This difference persisted in a university hospital (727 procedures; 2.08 vs. 2.33; p = 0.002) and a smaller, community-based hospital (565 procedures; 1.31 vs. 1.42; p = 0.002). There were two quarters in which CMS identified Fairview's SIR as an outlier for complex colon SSIs (p = 0.05 and 0.04), whereas NHSN did not (p = 0.06 and 0.06). The CMS's current risk-adjustment model using age and ASA classification predicts lower rates of expected colon

  12. Predictors of surgical site infections among patients undergoing major surgery at Bugando Medical Centre in Northwestern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imirzalioglu Can

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infection (SSI continues to be a major source of morbidity and mortality in developing countries despite recent advances in aseptic techniques. There is no baseline information regarding SSI in our setting therefore it was necessary to conduct this study to establish the prevalence, pattern and predictors of surgical site infection at Bugando Medical Centre Mwanza (BMC, Tanzania. Methods This was a cross-sectional prospective study involving all patients who underwent major surgery in surgical wards between July 2009 and March 2010. After informed written consent for the study and HIV testing, all patients who met inclusion criteria were consecutively enrolled into the study. Pre-operative, intra-operative and post operative data were collected using standardized data collection form. Wound specimens were collected and processed as per standard operative procedures; and susceptibility testing was done using disc diffusion technique. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 15 and STATA. Results Surgical site infection (SSI was detected in 65 (26.0% patients, of whom 56 (86.2% and 9 (13.8% had superficial and deep SSI respectively. Among 65 patients with clinical SSI, 56(86.2% had positive aerobic culture. Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant organism 16/56 (28.6%; of which 3/16 (18.8% were MRSA. This was followed by Escherichia coli 14/56 (25% and Klebsiella pneumoniae 10/56 (17.9%. Among the Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates 9(64.3% and 8(80% were ESBL producers respectively. A total of 37/250 (14.8% patients were HIV positive with a mean CD4 count of 296 cells/ml. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, presence of pre-morbid illness (OR = 6.1, use of drain (OR = 15.3, use of iodine alone in skin preparation (OR = 17.6, duration of operation ≥ 3 hours (OR = 3.2 and cigarette smoking (OR = 9.6 significantly predicted surgical site infection (SSI Conclusion SSI is common

  13. Atypical epigenetic mark in an atypical location: cytosine methylation at asymmetric (CNN sites within the body of a non-repetitive tomato gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iusem Norberto D

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic DNA methylation is one of the most studied epigenetic processes, as it results in a direct and heritable covalent modification triggered by external stimuli. In contrast to mammals, plant DNA methylation, which is stimulated by external cues exemplified by various abiotic types of stress, is often found not only at CG sites but also at CNG (N denoting A, C or T and CNN (asymmetric sites. A genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in Arabidopsis has shown that CNN methylation is preferentially concentrated in transposon genes and non-coding repetitive elements. We are particularly interested in investigating the epigenetics of plant species with larger and more complex genomes than Arabidopsis, particularly with regards to the associated alterations elicited by abiotic stress. Results We describe the existence of CNN-methylated epialleles that span Asr1, a non-transposon, protein-coding gene from tomato plants that lacks an orthologous counterpart in Arabidopsis. In addition, to test the hypothesis of a link between epigenetics modifications and the adaptation of crop plants to abiotic stress, we exhaustively explored the cytosine methylation status in leaf Asr1 DNA, a model gene in our system, resulting from water-deficit stress conditions imposed on tomato plants. We found that drought conditions brought about removal of methyl marks at approximately 75 of the 110 asymmetric (CNN sites analysed, concomitantly with a decrease of the repressive H3K27me3 epigenetic mark and a large induction of expression at the RNA level. When pinpointing those sites, we observed that demethylation occurred mostly in the intronic region. Conclusions These results demonstrate a novel genomic distribution of CNN methylation, namely in the transcribed region of a protein-coding, non-repetitive gene, and the changes in those epigenetic marks that are caused by water stress. These findings may represent a general mechanism for the

  14. Numerical dating of the Eckfeld maar fossil site, Eifel, Germany: a calibration mark for the Eocene time scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, D F; Swisher, C C; Franzen, J L; Neuffer, F O; Lutz, H

    2000-06-01

    Sediments of the Eckfeld maar (Eifel, Germany) bear a well-preserved Eocene fauna and flora. Biostratigraphically, Eckfeld corresponds to the Middle Eocene mammal reference level MP (Mammals Paleogene) 13 of the ELMA (European Land Mammal Age) Geiseltalian. In the maar crater, basalt fragments were drilled, representing explosion crater eruption products. By 40Ar/39Ar dating of the basalt, for the first time a direct numerical calibration mark for an Eocene European mammal locality has been established. The Eckfeld basalt inverse isochron date of 44.3 +/- 0.4 Ma suggests an age for the Geiseltalian/Robiacian boundary at 44 Ma and, together with the 1995 time scale of Berggren et al., a time span ranging from 49 to 44 Ma for the Geiseltalian and from 44 to 37 Ma for the Robiacian, respectively. Additional 40Ar/39Ar dating on a genetically related basalt occurrence close to the maar confirms a period of volcanism of ca. 0.6 m.y. in the Eckfeld area, matching the oldest Eocene volcanic activity of the Hocheifel volcanic field.

  15. Marked depletion of glycosylation sites in HIV-1 gp120 under selection pressure by the mannose-specific plant lectins of Hippeastrum hybrid and Galanthus nivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzarini, Jan; Van Laethem, Kristel; Hatse, Sigrid; Froeyen, Matheus; Van Damme, Els; Bolmstedt, Anders; Peumans, Willy; De Clercq, Erik; Schols, Dominique

    2005-05-01

    The plant lectins from Hippeastrum hybrid (HHA) and Galanthus nivalis (GNA) are 50,000-D tetramers showing specificity for alpha-(1,3) and/or alpha-(1,6)-mannose oligomers. They inhibit HIV-1 infection at a 50% effective concentration of 0.2 to 0.3 microg/ml. Escalating HHA or GNA concentrations (up to 500 microg/ml) led to the isolation of three HIV-1(III(B)) strains in CEM T cell cultures that were highly resistant to HHA and GNA, several other related mannose-specific plant lectins, and the monoclonal antibody 2G12, modestly resistant to the mannose-specific cyanovirin, which is derived from a blue-green alga, but fully susceptible to other HIV entry inhibitors as well as HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors. These mutant virus strains were devoid of up to seven or eight of 22 glycosylation sites in the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 because of mutations at the Asn or Thr/Ser sites of the N-glycosylation motifs. In one of the strains, a novel glycosylation site was created near a deleted glycosylation site. The affected glycosylation sites were predominantly clustered in regions of gp120 that are not involved in the direct interaction with either CD4, CCR5, CXCR4, or gp41. The mutant viruses containing the deleted glycosylation sites were markedly more infectious in CEM T-cell cultures than wild-type virus.

  16. Transversus Abdominis Plane Block for Surgical Anaesthesia at Multiple Sites-Not Ideal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanth RaoKadam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US guided Transversus abdominis plane (TAP block is commonly used for postoperative analgesia and there are case reports of its use for providing surgical anaesthesia in emergency procedures. We report its use as a regional anaesthetic technique in inguinal hernia and epigastric hernia repair in an elective setting and discuss issues during the intra and postoperative period.

  17. The fat-fascia paddle only with a composite fibula flap: marked reduction in donor site morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohindra, A; Parmar, S; Praveen, P; Martin, T

    2016-08-01

    Fibula free flaps are used widely in head and neck reconstruction, primarily for their versatility and contribution to aesthetic and functional outcomes. The literature suggests that early complications such as wound dehiscence and skin graft loss can occur in up to a third of patients. The healing of these donor sites can be prolonged, and in certain cases may require an operative intervention. A method to overcome this problem is described herein. In raising the skin paddle, a standard lateral approach to the fibula harvest is used. The skin paddle is not isolated and the posterior margin of the paddle is maintained. The skin paddle epithelium is separated with a small cuff of adipose tissue from the underlying fat-fascia layer. This fat-fascia paddle is then raised with the fibula as normal and tacked to the margins of the recipient soft tissue defect. The fat-fascia paddle heals, resulting in a thin mucosal covering for prosthetic dental rehabilitation. This technique can reduce the incidence of donor site wound complications when raising a composite fibula flap.

  18. X-ray follow up of end-to-end nerve repair site: A new technique, Nerve Repair Site Marking (NRSM

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    Aydin Yuceturk

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: To get the best results following end-to-end nerve repair, nerve continuity must continued, though there is always the risk of rupture at the repair site. As ultrasonography and MRI can be utilized to examine the repair site, they are not helpful in brachial plexus repairs, are expensive and can be time-consuming when employed with peripheral nerves. NRSM is an easy, objective, and cheap follow-up technique after nerve repair and provides a chance for early re-repair. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(3.000: 118-123

  19. Strategies for handling missing clinical data for automated surgical site infection detection from the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Melton, Genevieve B; Arsoniadis, Elliot G; Wang, Yan; Kwaan, Mary R; Simon, Gyorgy J

    2017-03-16

    Proper handling of missing data is important for many secondary uses of electronic health record (EHR) data. Data imputation methods can be used to handle missing data, but their use for analyzing EHR data is limited and specific efficacy for postoperative complication detection is unclear. Several data imputation methods were used to develop data models for automated detection of three types (i.e., superficial, deep, and organ space) of surgical site infection (SSI) and overall SSI using American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (NSQIP) Registry 30-day SSI occurrence data as a reference standard. Overall, models with missing data imputation almost always outperformed reference models without imputation that included only cases with complete data for detection of SSI overall achieving very good average area under the curve values. Missing data imputation appears to be an effective means for improving postoperative SSI detection using EHR clinical data.

  20. Increasing Compliance With an Antibiotic Prophylaxis Guideline to Prevent Pediatric Surgical Site Infection: Before and After Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Jeannette P; Aleem, Ilyas S; Tsang, Derek S; Matlow, Anne G; Wright, James G

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate an intervention for improving antibiotic prophylaxis (AP) guideline compliance to prevent surgical site infections in children. Although appropriate AP reduces surgical site infection, and guidelines improve quality of care, changing practice is difficult. To facilitate behavioral change, various barriers need to be addressed. A multidisciplinary task force at a pediatric hospital developed an evidence-based AP guideline. Subsequently, the guideline was posted in operating rooms and the online formulary, only recommended antibiotics were available in operating rooms, incoming trainees received orientation, antibiotic verification was included in time-out, computerized alerts were set for inappropriate postoperative prophylaxis, and surgeons received e-mails when guideline was not followed. AP indication and administration were documented for surgical procedures in July 2008 (preintervention), September 2011 (postintervention), and April-May 2013 (follow-up). Compliance was defined as complete--appropriate antibiotic, dose, timing, redosing, and duration when prophylaxis was indicated; partial--appropriate drug and timing when prophylaxis was indicated; and appropriate use--complete compliance when prophylaxis was indicated, no antibiotics when not indicated. Compliance at preintervention and follow-up was compared using χ(2) tests. AP was indicated in 43.9% (187/426) and 62.0% (124/200) of surgical procedures at preintervention and follow-up, respectively. There were significant improvements in appropriate antibiotic use (51.6%-67.0%; P < 0.001), complete (26.2%-53.2%; P < 0.001) and partial compliance (73.3%-88.7%, P = 0.001), correct dosage (77.5%-90.7%; P = 0.003), timing (83.3%-95.8%; P = 0.001), redosing (62.5%-95.8%, P = 0.003), and duration (47.1%-65.3%; P < 0.002). A multifaceted intervention improved compliance with a pediatric AP guideline.

  1. Reducing the risk of surgical site infection using a multidisciplinary approach: an integrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Gillespie BM; Kang E.; Roberts S; Lin F; Morley N; Finigan T; Homer A; Chaboyer W

    2015-01-01

    Brigid M Gillespie,1 Evelyn Kang,1 Shelley Roberts,1 Frances Lin,1,2 Nicola Morley,3 Tracey Finigan,3 Allison Homer,3 Wendy Chaboyer1 1National Health and Medical Research Council Research Centre for Clinical Excellence in Nursing Interventions (NCREN) and Centre for Healthcare Practice Innovation (HPI), Menzies Health Institute, 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, 3Surgical and Procedural Services, Gold Coast University Hospital, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia Purpose: To iden...

  2. Predictors of surgical site infection in women undergoing hysterectomy for benign gynecologic disease: a multicenter analysis using the national surgical quality improvement program data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Haider; Goodrich, Sarah; Lockhart, David; DeBernardo, Robert; Moslemi-Kebria, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the rate and predictors of surgical site infection (SSI) after hysterectomy performed for benign indications and to identify any association between SSI and other postoperative complications. Retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data. Women who underwent abdominal or laparoscopic hysterectomy performed for benign indications from 2005 to 2011. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors of SSI and its association with other postoperative complications. Odds ratios were adjusted for patient demographic data, comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, and operative factors. Of 28 366 patients, 758 (3%) were diagnosed with SSI. SSI occurred more often after abdominal than laparoscopic hysterectomy (4% vs 2%; p hysterectomy, predictors of SSI included diabetes, smoking, respiratory comorbidities, overweight or obesity, American Society of Anesthesiologists class ≥ 3, perioperative blood transfusion, and operative time >180 minutes. Among those who underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy, predictors of SSI included perioperative blood transfusion, operative time >180 minutes, serum creatinine concentration ≥ 2 mg/dL, and platelet count ≥ 350 000 cells/mL(3). For patients with deep or organ/space SSI, significant predictors included perioperative blood transfusion and American Society of Anesthesiologists class ≥ 3 for abdominal hysterectomy, and non-white race, renal comorbidities, preoperative or perioperative blood transfusion, and operative time >180 minutes for laparoscopic hysterectomy. SSI was associated with longer hospital stay and higher rates of repeat operation, sepsis, renal failure, and wound dehiscence. SSI was not associated with increased 30-day mortality. SSI occurred more often after abdominal hysterectomy than laparoscopic hysterectomy performed to treat benign gynecologic disease. SSI was associated with

  3. Early Surgical Site Infection Following Tissue Expander Breast Reconstruction with or without Acellular Dermal Matrix: National Benchmarking Using National Surgical Quality Improvement Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Winocour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSurgical site infections (SSIs result in significant patient morbidity following immediate tissue expander breast reconstruction (ITEBR. This study determined a single institution's 30-day SSI rate and benchmarked it against that among national institutions participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP.MethodsWomen who underwent ITEBR with/without acellular dermal matrix (ADM were identified using the ACS-NSQIP database between 2005 and 2011. Patient characteristics associated with the 30-day SSI rate were determined, and differences in rates between our institution and the national database were assessed.Results12,163 patients underwent ITEBR, including 263 at our institution. SSIs occurred in 416 (3.4% patients nationwide excluding our institution, with lower rates observed at our institution (1.9%. Nationwide, SSIs were significantly more common in ITEBR patients with ADM (4.5% compared to non-ADM patients (3.2%, P=0.005, and this trend was observed at our institution (2.1% vs. 1.6%, P=1.00. A multivariable analysis of all institutions identified age ≥50 years (odds ratio [OR], 1.4; confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.7, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 vs. 4.25 hours (OR, 1.9; CI, 1.5-2.4 as risk factors for SSIs. Our institutional SSI rate was lower than the nationwide rate (OR, 0.4; CI, 0.2-1.1, although this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.07.ConclusionsThe 30-day SSI rate at our institution in patients who underwent ITEBR was lower than the nation. SSIs occurred more frequently in procedures involving ADM both nationally and at our institution.

  4. Prospective Randomized Evaluation of Intraoperative Application of Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma on Surgical Site Infection or Delayed Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanGiovanni, Thomas P; Kiebzak, Gary M

    2016-05-01

    Prevention of surgical site infections and the reduction of wound-related complication rates have become increasingly emphasized by hospital task groups and government agencies given the degree of economic burden it places on the health care system. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains growth factors and other biomolecules that promote endogenous microbicidal activity. We hypothesized that PRP would help prevent postoperative infection and delayed wound healing (DWH). We randomized patients having foot or ankle surgery to the treatment group receiving intraoperative PRP (applied to operative field) and platelet-poor plasma at closing (PPP, on the sutured skin) or the control group (no PRP/PPP). The incidence of deep surgical site infection and DWH (collectively called endpoints) was compared between groups (n = 250/group). PRP had a mean 5.3-fold platelet concentration compared to whole blood, with concentrated white blood cells. Mean age (±SD) of patients was 52 years (±15), 65% were women. Minor and major operative procedures were included. Patients were followed for 60 days. Seventy controls had PRP prepared for assay of growth factors. Procedure mix, ASA scores, mean operative times, and comorbidity mix were similar between groups. The primary result was no difference in number of endpoints between groups: 19 patients in the PRP group (7.6%) versus 18 controls (7.2%). Endpoints were deep surgical site infections in 2 PRP/PPP patients and 1 control, and DWH in 17 PRP/PPP patients and 17 controls. Analysis of PRP samples revealed a large variation in growth factor concentrations between patients. Intraoperative application of PRP/PPP did not reduce the incidence of postoperative infection or DWH. Growth factor profiles varied greatly between patients, suggesting that the potentially therapeutic treatment delivered was not consistent from patient-to-patient. Level I, prospective randomized trial. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Evaluating the cost of adult voluntary medical male circumcision in a mixed (surgical and PrePex site compared to a hypothetical PrePex-only site in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Young Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several circumcision devices have been evaluated for a safe and simplified male circumcision among adults. The PrePex device was prequalified for voluntary male medical circumcision (VMMC in May 2013 by the World Health Organization and is expected to simplify the procedure safely while reducing cost. South Africa is scaling up VMMC. Objective: To evaluate the overall unit cost of VMMC at a mixed site vs. a hypothetical PrePex-only site in South Africa. Design: We evaluated the overall unit cost of VMMC at a mixed site where PrePex VMMC procedure was added to routine forceps-guided scalpel-based VMMC in Soweto, South Africa. We abstracted costs and then modeled these costs for a hypothetical PrePex-only site, at which 9,600 PrePex circumcisions per year could be done. We examined cost drivers and modeled costs, varying the price of the PrePex device. The healthcare system perspective was used. Results: In both sites, the main contributors of cost were personnel and consumables. If 10% of all VMMC were by PrePex at the mixed site, the overall costs of the surgical method and PrePex were similar – US$59.62 and $59.53, respectively. At the hypothetical PrePex-only site, the unit cost was US$51.10 with PrePex circumcisions having markedly lower personnel and biohazardous waste management costs. In sensitivity analysis with the cost of PrePex kit reduced to US$10 and $2, the cost of VMMC was further reduced. Conclusions: Adding PrePex to an existing site did not necessarily reduce the overall costs of VMMC. However, starting a new PrePex-only site is feasible and may significantly reduce the overall cost by lowering both personnel and capital costs, thus being cost-effective in the long term. Achieving a lower cost for PrePex will be an important contributor to the scale-up of VMMC.

  6. Standard abdominal wound edge protection with surgical dressings vs coverage with a sterile circular polyethylene drape for prevention of surgical site infections (BaFO: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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    Mihaljevic André L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postoperative surgical site infections cause substantial morbidity, prolonged hospitalization, costs and even mortality and remain one of the most frequent surgical complications. Approximately 14% to 30% of all patients undergoing elective open abdominal surgery are affected and methods to reduce surgical site infection rates warrant further investigation and evaluation in randomized controlled trials. Methods/design To investigate whether the application of a circular plastic wound protector reduces the rate of surgical site infections in general and visceral surgical patients that undergo midline or transverse laparotomy by 50%. BaFO is a randomized, controlled, patient-blinded and observer-blinded multicenter clinical trial with two parallel surgical groups. The primary outcome measure will be the rate of surgical site infections within 45 days postoperative assessed according to the definition of the Center for Disease Control. Statistical analysis of the primary endpoint will be based on the intention-to-treat population. The global level of significance is set at 5% (2 sided and sample size (n = 258 per group is determined to assure a power of 80% with a planned interim analysis for the primary endpoint after the inclusion of 340 patients. Discussion The BaFO trial will explore if the rate of surgical site infections can be reduced by a single, simple, inexpensive intervention in patients undergoing open elective abdominal surgery. Its pragmatic design guarantees high external validity and clinical relevance. Trial registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01181206. Date of registration: 11 August 2010; date of first patient randomized: 8 September 2010

  7. Stretch Marks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to get rid of stretch marks, but the truth is that most don't work and are ... The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  8. Stretch marks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stretch marks can appear when there is rapid stretching of the skin. They are often seen when ... often disappear after the cause of the skin stretching is gone. Avoiding rapid weight gain helps reduce ...

  9. Risk of surgical site infection in older patients in a cohort survey: targets for quality improvement in antibiotic prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agodi, Antonella; Quattrocchi, Annalisa; Barchitta, Martina; Adornetto, Veronica; Cocuzza, Aldo; Latino, Rosalia; Li Destri, Giovanni; Di Cataldo, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    The aims of the present study were to: (1) assess surgical site infection (SSI) incidence in a cohort of surgical patients and (2) estimate the compliance with national guidelines for perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis (PAP). SSIs, among the most common health care-associated infections, are an important target for surveillance and an official priority in several European countries. SSI commonly complicates surgical procedures in older people and is associated with substantial attributable mortality and costs. The implementation of PAP guidelines is difficult among surgeons, and failure to comply with the standard of care has been widely reported. A 12-month prospective survey was performed in accordance with the methods, protocols, and definitions of the Hospital in Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance (HELICS) protocol. The compliance of the current PAP practices with the published national guidelines was assessed. A total of 249 patients were enrolled. The cumulative SSI incidence was 3.2 per 100 operative procedures. Cumulative compliance for PAP was 12.4%. Overall, only infection risk index ≥ 1 was confirmed as a significant risk factor for SSI (odds ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-42.59; P = 0.045). When only older patients (age >65 years) were considered, no significant risk factors for SSI were identified. Our study indicates an overall inadequate compliance with PAP recommendations, thus highlighting the need to develop multimodal and targeted intervention programs to improve compliance with PAP guidelines.

  10. The Current State of Screening and Decolonization for the Prevention of Staphylococcus aureus Surgical Site Infection After Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Mitchell C; Moucha, Calin S

    2015-09-01

    The most common pathogens in surgical site infections after total hip and knee arthroplasty are methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and coagulase-negative staphylococci. Patients colonized with MSSA or MRSA have an increased risk for a staphylococcal infection at the site of a total hip or knee arthroplasty. Most colonized individuals who develop a staphylococcal infection at the site of a total hip or total knee arthroplasty have molecularly identical S. aureus isolates in their nares and wounds. Screening and nasal decolonization of S. aureus can potentially reduce the rates of staphylococcal surgical site infection after total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

  11. Microbial colonisation of orthopaedic tourniquets: A potential risk for surgical site infection

    OpenAIRE

    Sahu, S. K.; B Tudu; P K Mall

    2015-01-01

    Pneumatic tourniquets have been used in orthopaedic surgery to get avascular fields. Sixteen such tourniquets were analysed for microbial colonisation. Samples were taken from two inner and two outer areas of each tourniquet and cultured on sheep blood agar. Eight of these were wiped with Savlon and the rest with Sterillium solution. Post-treatment samples from the same sites were again cultured. After incubation, colonies from each site were identified and counted. It was observed that the t...

  12. 73. Surgical site infection after CABG: Root cause analysis and quality measures recommendation SSI quality improvement project

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    A. Arifi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infection (SSI, is a preventable and devastating complication with significant morbidity after cardiac surgery. The reported SSI rate at our center, ranging from 3.4% to 11.2% (2007–2013. This rate is considered to be above the standardized rate recommended by the NHSN. Quality improvement project team to address the issue of SSI, (SCIP, where formed by the medical administration late 2014. The aim of the study was to identify SSI risk factors at our cardiac surgical unit, using evidence based practices while taking a local approach to problem solving. We performed Root Cause Analysis (RCA, and we applied other quality improvement tools to identify the area for potential improvement. Data include a Process Map of the pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative factors that might contribute to SSI risk. We prospectively used the RCA form to investigate all the stages of the patient process map (pre, intra op, and post operatively. The data included the Patient related factors, the sterilization and the hygiene practice in the operating room, and the operating room traffic, and the compliance to the bundle of care. Figure represent the “Fishbone” diagram of the possible causes of SSI after cardiac surgery in our unit. Demographic features of patients with SSI were as follows: mean age-65 years; female 83%; time to infection (mean 101 days; range 1–36 days;. The root cause analysis identified a significant weakness in the compliance to the bundle of care to prevent SSI. Furthermore, the patient flow, the operating theatre cleaning and traffic was also identified as a contributing factor to SSI. Surgical site infection after cardiac surgery is a preventable complication. The application of the evidence based practice and structured way of thinking in problem solving, will help identify the potential risk factors. Focusing on solving the right patient process and visually represents the problem will help identifying the

  13. Pre-operative and early post-operative factors associated with surgical site infection after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tovar, Jaime; Oller, Inmaculada; Llavero, Carolina; Arroyo, Antonio; Muñoz, Jose Luis; Calero, Alicia; Diez, María; Zubiaga, Lorea; Calpena, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Surgical procedures on obese patients are expected to have a high incidence of surgical site infection (SSI). The identification of pre-operative or early post-operative risk factors for SSI may help the surgeon to identify subjects in risk and adequately optimize their status. We conducted a study of the association of comorbidities and pre- and post-operative analytical variables with SSI following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for the treatment of morbid obesity. We performed a prospective study of all morbidly obese patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy as a bariatric procedure between 2007 and 2011. An association of clinical and analytical variables with SSI was investigated. The study included 40 patients with a mean pre-operative body mass index (BMI) of 51.2±7.9 kg/m(2). Surgical site infections appeared in three patients (7.5%), of whom two had an intra-abdominal abscess located in the left hypochondrium and the third had a superficial incisional SSI. Pre-operatively, a BMI >45 kg/m(2) (OR 8.7; p=0.008), restrictive disorders identified by pulmonary function tests (OR 10.0; p=0.012), a serum total protein concentration 30 mcg/dL (OR 13.0; p=0.003), and a mean corpuscular volume (MCV) 128 mg/dL (OR 4.7; p=0.012) and hemoglobin <11g/dL (OR 7.5; p=0.002) were associated with SSI. The study supports the role of restrictive lung disorders and the values specified above for preoperative BMI, serum total protein and cortisol concentrations, and MCV, and of post-operative anemia and hyperglycemia as risk factors for SSI. In these situations, the surgeon must be aware of and seek to control these risk factors.

  14. Pattern of Bacterial Pathogens and Their Susceptibility Isolated from Surgical Site Infections at Selected Referral Hospitals, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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    Walelign Dessie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens in hospitals is becoming a challenge for surgeons to treat hospital acquired infections. Objective. To determine bacterial pathogens and drug susceptibility isolated from surgical site infections at St. Paul Specialized Hospital Millennium Medical College and Yekatit 12 Referral Hospital Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted between October 2013 and March 2014 on 107 surgical site infected patients. Wound specimens were collected using sterile cotton swab and processed as per standard operative procedures in appropriate culture media; and susceptibility testing was done using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique. The data were analyzed by using SPSS version 20. Result. From a total of 107 swabs collected, 90 (84.1% were culture positive and 104 organisms were isolated. E. coli (24 (23.1% was the most common organism isolated followed by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter species (23 (22.1%. More than 58 (75% of the Gram negative isolates showed multiple antibiotic resistance (resistance ≥ 5 drugs. Pan-antibiotic resistance was noted among 8 (34.8% Acinetobacter species and 3 (12.5% E. coli. This calls for abstinence from antibiotic abuse. Conclusion. Gram negative bacteria were the most important isolates accounting for 76 (73.1%. Ampicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, cephazoline, and tetracycline showed resistance while gentamicin and ciprofloxacin were relatively effective antimicrobials.

  15. INCIDENCE AND RISK FACTORS FOR EARLY SURGICAL SITE INFECTION IN ELECTIVE ORTHOPAEDIC IMPLANT SURGERIES: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

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    Suneet

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Surgical site infections in orthopaedic implant surgery is devasting complication range from 1 - 2% to 22%. It leads to increase case cost , prolongs antibiotic use/abuse , increases morbidity and rehabilitation. METHOD : This prospective cross sectional study was conducted on 624 patients with closed fracture cases undergoing clean and elective orthopaedic implant surgeries admitted at Gandhi Medical College and Hamidia Hospital , Bhopal (Madhya Pradesh , India between ‘1st November 2013 to 31st October 2014’. RESULTS : The surgical site infection was diagnosed in 43 (6.89% pati ents within 30 days after surgery. Klebsiella was most common infective organism islolated in 39.53% cases. On data analysis SSI was significantly associated with increasing age , duration of hospital stay more than 7 days , duration of surgery more than 120 minutes , pre - operative Hb less than 12 gm% , diabetes mellitus , use of intra - operative negative suction and tourniquet. CONCLUSION : Incidence of SSI in implants surgeries are quite high , proper measure are needed to control it. In this study gram negative organism has emerged as major threat in contrast to staphylococcus aureus.

  16. A reassessment of the study of cut mark patterns to infer hominid manipulation of fleshed carcasses at the Flk Zinj 22 site, Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania

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    Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous experimental studies on cut marks have suggested that cut mark percentages and their anatomical distribution (based on element type and bone section type could be used to differentiate primary access to fleshed carcasses from secondary access to defleshed carcasses. In this study, the experimental sample of this type of studies is increased and further data are included to infer a primary access by hominids to carcasses at the FLK Zinj site of Olduvai.

    Estudios experimentales anteriores sobre marcas de corte han sugerido que los porcentajes de marcas de corte y su distribución (basada en tipo de hueso y tipo de sección ósea podrían usarse para diferenciar un acceso primario a carcasas con carne de un acceso secundario a carcasas descarnadas. En este estudio semejante muestra experimental se ve ampliada y se muestran más datos que sirven para inferir que los homínidos tuvieron un acceso primario a las carcasas representadas en el yacimiento FLK Zinj de Olduvai.

  17. STUDY OF SURGICAL SITE INFECTION AT TERTIARY CARE CENTRE IN DAKSHINA KANNADA

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    Abhijith Sudhakar Shetty

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of the study is to study relation of emergency and elective surgery to postoperative wound infection and common organisms encountered. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventy surgical infection were studied from postop patients. Culture and sensitivity reports were noted and documented. RESULTS Most common organism encountered is Pseudomonas (34.3%. Postoperative wound infection was commonly encountered in emergency cases (62.9% and clean contaminated type of cases (32.9%. CONCLUSION Most common organism in postoperative wound infection is Pseudomonas. Postoperative wound infection is more in emergency case, clean contaminated type of cases and patients prepared by shaving in more than 24 hours before surgery and who have not taken bath.

  18. Preventing surgical-site infections in nasal carriers of Staphylococcus aureus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bode, L.G.; Kluytmans, J.A.; Wertheim, H.F.; Bogaers, D.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C.M.; Roosendaal, R.; Troelstra, A.; Box, A.T.; Voss, A.; Tweel, I. van de; Belkum, A. van; Verbrugh, H.A.; Vos, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nasal carriers of Staphylococcus aureus are at increased risk for health care-associated infections with this organism. Decolonization of nasal and extranasal sites on hospital admission may reduce this risk. METHODS: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial,

  19. Implementation of a referral to discharge glycemic control initiative for reduction of surgical site infections in gynecologic oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Laura; Brown-Broderick, Jennifer; Hearn, James; Malcolm, Janine; Chan, James; Hicks-Boucher, Wendy; De Sousa, Filomena; Walker, Mark C; Gagné, Sylvain

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the frequency of surgical site infections before and after implementation of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary perioperative glycemic control initiative. As part of a CUSP (Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program) initiative, between January 5 and December 18, 2015, we implemented comprehensive, multidisciplinary glycemic control initiative to reduce SSI rates in patients undergoing major pelvic surgery for a gynecologic malignancy ('Group II'). Key components of this quality of care initiative included pre-operative HbA1c measurement with special triage for patients meeting criteria for diabetes or pre-diabetes, standardization of available intraoperative insulin choices, rigorous pre-op/intra-op/post-op glucose monitoring with control targets set to maintain BG ≤10mmol/L (180mg/dL) and communication/notification with primary care providers. Effectiveness was evaluated against a similar control group of patients ('Group I') undergoing surgery in 2014 prior to implementation of this initiative. We studied a total of 462 patients. Subjects in the screened (Group II) and comparison (Group I) groups were of similar age (avg. 61.0, 60.0years; p=0.422) and BMI (avg. 31.1, 32.3kg/m(2); p=0.257). Descriptive statistics served to compare surgical site infection (SSI) rates and other characteristics across groups. Women undergoing surgery prior to implementation of this algorithm (n=165) had an infection rate of 14.6%. Group II (n=297) showed an over 2-fold reduction in SSI compared to Group I [5.7%; p=0.001, adjRR: 0.45, 95% CI: (0.25, 0.81)]. Additionally, approximately 19% of Group II patients were newly diagnosed with either prediabetes (HbA1C 6.0-6.4) or diabetes (HbA1C≥6.5) and were referred to family or internal medicine for appropriate management. Implementation of a comprehensive multidisciplinary glycemic control initiative can lead to a significant reduction in surgical site infections in addition to early identification of an important health

  20. Capturing orthopaedic surgical site infection data and assessing dental recommendations with respect to total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florschutz, Anthony V; Parsley, Brian S; Shapiro, Irving M

    2015-04-01

    Greater documentation of patient history and clinical course is crucial for identifying factors that can influence surgical outcomes. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have already begun public reporting of hospital data on readmission, complication, and infection rates and will soon launch a website to make physician-specific outcomes data public. The orthopaedic community has the opportunity to lead the way in ensuring that adequate and accurate data is collected to facilitate appropriate comparisons that are based on patients' true risk of complications and the complexity of treatment. Several studies have reported a link between oral pathogens and periprosthetic infection, although it remains unclear whether organisms unique to dental tissues are also present in osteoarthritic joints and tissues affected by periprosthetic joint infection. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the American Dental Association are aware of these concerns and have created guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis in patients who have undergone total hip or knee arthroplasty and require high-risk dental procedures. Because these guidelines have received considerable criticism, recommendations that are based on scientific and case-controlled clinical studies and provide effective guidance on this important subject are needed.

  1. Microbial colonisation of orthopaedic tourniquets: A potential risk for surgical site infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Sahu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatic tourniquets have been used in orthopaedic surgery to get avascular fields. Sixteen such tourniquets were analysed for microbial colonisation. Samples were taken from two inner and two outer areas of each tourniquet and cultured on sheep blood agar. Eight of these were wiped with Savlon and the rest with Sterillium solution. Post-treatment samples from the same sites were again cultured. After incubation, colonies from each site were identified and counted. It was observed that the tourniquets were colonised with coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus, diphtheroids, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, enterococci, enterobacteria, and Candida. On treating with Savlon and Sterillium, there was 92.18% and 95.70% reduction in the colony count, respectively.

  2. Microbial colonisation of orthopaedic tourniquets: a potential risk for surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, S K; Tudu, B; Mall, P K

    2015-02-01

    Pneumatic tourniquets have been used in orthopaedic surgery to get avascular fields. Sixteen such tourniquets were analysed for microbial colonisation. Samples were taken from two inner and two outer areas of each tourniquet and cultured on sheep blood agar. Eight of these were wiped with Savlon and the rest with Sterillium solution. Post-treatment samples from the same sites were again cultured. After incubation, colonies from each site were identified and counted. It was observed that the tourniquets were colonised with coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus, diphtheroids, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, enterococci, enterobacteria, and Candida. On treating with Savlon and Sterillium, there was 92.18% and 95.70% reduction in the colony count, respectively.

  3. Supportive periodontal therapy of furcation sites: non-surgical instrumentation with or without topical doxycycline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannewitz, Bettina; Lippert, Katherine; Lang, Niklaus P; Tonetti, Maurizio S; Eickholz, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Evaluation of the clinical effect of topical subgingival application of doxycycline gel adjunctively to scaling and root planing (SRP) at furcation sites during supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). In 39 SPT patients exhibiting at least four pockets > or m with bleeding on probing, SRP was rendered in all pockets > or m. Additionally, 14% doxycycline gel was applied subgingivally in 20 patients after random assignment (SRP&DOXY). Clinical parameters were assessed at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months after therapy. Additional benefit of topical doxycycline was evaluated as a short-term (3 months) improvement of furcation involvement and influence on the frequency of re-instrumentation up to 12 months. A total of 323 furcation sites (class 0: 160; class I: 101; class II: 18; and class III: 44) were treated (SRP: 165, SRP&DOXY: 158). SRP&DOXY resulted in better improvement of furcation involvement than SRP alone 3 months after treatment (p=0.041). However, SRP&DOXY failed to show a significant difference between both groups in the number of re-instrumentations. Single subgingival application of doxycycline in addition to SRP had a short-term effect on furcation involvement. However, it failed to reduce the frequency of re-instrumentation up to 12 months at furcation sites.

  4. [Long-term survival after surgical resection of a cancer of unknown primary site-a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukao, Yukiko; Moon, Jeong Ho; Kobayashi, Kenji; Hyuga, Satoshi; Chono, Teruhiro; Watanabe, Risa; Matsumoto, Takashi; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Takachi, Ko; Nishioka, Kiyonori; Aoki, Taro; Uemura, Yoshio

    2013-11-01

    We report a case of long-term survival after combination chemotherapy and surgical resection of a cancer of unknown primary site[ CUPs]. A septuagenarian female was identified as having high blood levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) during follow-up monitoring of asthma. Endoscopy and imaging studies including computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT revealed a malignant lymph node adjacent to the abdominal aorta; however, no other lesion was detected. Therefore, we performed CT-guided biopsy and diagnosed the lesion to be a lymph node metastasis of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. As we considered this as a systemic disease, the patient received 2 courses of combination chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil( 5-FU)/cisplatin( CDDP) and achieved a partial response (PR). Later, the patient received S-1 therapy as second-line chemotherapy and S-1/irinotecan( CPT-11) as third-line chemotherapy in an outpatient clinic. However, the tumor continued to grow, and therefore, we decided to perform surgical resection. Histopathological examination of the resected specimen yielded a diagnosis of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lymph node. The patient has been well without any signs of recurrence for more than 9 years since surgery. As CUPs is generally associated with poor prognosis, this case raises the possibility that combination therapy might improve convalescence.

  5. Incidence and Etiology of Surgical Site Infections among Emergency Postoperative Patients in Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital, South Western Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubaker Lubega

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This prospective hospital based study was conducted to determine the incidence, risk factors, and causative agents of surgical site infection their susceptibility to among 114 emergency postoperative patients at the Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital between September 2014 and January 2015. Methods. Consented patients were consecutively enrolled and their preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data were collected. Follow-ups were done in the surgical outpatient clinics. Wound specimens were collected and processed as per Sops; susceptibility testing was done using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique. Data was analyzed using STATA 11.0. Results. Overall SSI incidence was 16.4%: 5.9% superficial and 47.1% deep and organ space SSIs each. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most predominant organism (50% followed by Staphylococcus aureus (27.8%. E. coli and P. aeruginosa both accounted for 11.1%. Wound class (p=0.009, anaemia (p=0.024, low serum albumin (p=0.046, and property of suture material used (p=0.006 were significantly associated with SSIs. All organisms had 100% resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, septrin, and erythromycin. Ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone are highly sensitive to all organisms. Conclusion. The incidence of SSI in this hospital is very high. Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant cause. Ciprofloxacin are very potent antibiotics against organisms that cause SSI.

  6. Incidence and Etiology of Surgical Site Infections among Emergency Postoperative Patients in Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital, South Western Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel, Bazira; Justina Lucy, Najjuka

    2017-01-01

    Background. This prospective hospital based study was conducted to determine the incidence, risk factors, and causative agents of surgical site infection their susceptibility to among 114 emergency postoperative patients at the Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital between September 2014 and January 2015. Methods. Consented patients were consecutively enrolled and their preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data were collected. Follow-ups were done in the surgical outpatient clinics. Wound specimens were collected and processed as per Sops; susceptibility testing was done using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique. Data was analyzed using STATA 11.0. Results. Overall SSI incidence was 16.4%: 5.9% superficial and 47.1% deep and organ space SSIs each. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most predominant organism (50%) followed by Staphylococcus aureus (27.8%). E. coli and P. aeruginosa both accounted for 11.1%. Wound class (p = 0.009), anaemia (p = 0.024), low serum albumin (p = 0.046), and property of suture material used (p = 0.006) were significantly associated with SSIs. All organisms had 100% resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, septrin, and erythromycin. Ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone are highly sensitive to all organisms. Conclusion. The incidence of SSI in this hospital is very high. Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant cause. Ciprofloxacin are very potent antibiotics against organisms that cause SSI. PMID:28168215

  7. Risk factors for surgical site infection and delayed wound healing after orthopedic surgery in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Yasutaka; Nishida, Keiichiro; Hashizume, Kenzo; Nasu, Yoshihisa; Nakahara, Ryuichi; Kanazawa, Tomoko; Ozawa, Masatsugu; Harada, Ryozo; Machida, Takahiro; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and the risk factors of surgical-site infection (SSI) and delayed wound healing (DWH) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) underwent orthopedic surgery. We reviewed the records of 1036 elective orthopedic procedures undertaken in RA patients. Risk factors for SSI and DWH were assessed by logistic regression analysis using age, body mass index, disease duration, pre-operative laboratory data, surgical procedure, corticosteroid use, co-morbidity, and use of conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (csDMARDs) and biological DMARDs (bDMARDs) as variables. SSI and DWH were identified in 19 cases and 15 cases, respectively. One case of SSI and three cases of DWH were recorded among 196 procedures in patients using bDMARDs. Foot and ankle surgery was associated with an increased risk of SSI (odds ratio (OR), 3.167; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.256-7.986; p = 0.015). Total knee arthroplasty (TKA; OR, 4.044; 95% CI, 1.436-11.389; p = 0.008) and disease duration (OR, 1.004; 95% CI, 1.000-1.007; p = 0.029) were associated with an increased risk of DWH. Our results indicated foot and ankle surgery, and TKA and disease duration as risk factors for SSI and DWH, respectively. bDMARDs was not associated with an increased risk of SSI and DWH.

  8. Developing algorithms for healthcare insurers to systematically monitor surgical site infection rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livingston James M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Claims data provide rapid indicators of SSIs for coronary artery bypass surgery and have been shown to successfully rank hospitals by SSI rates. We now operationalize this method for use by payers without transfer of protected health information, or any insurer data, to external analytic centers. Results We performed a descriptive study testing the operationalization of software for payers to routinely assess surgical infection rates among hospitals where enrollees receive cardiac procedures. We developed five SAS programs and a user manual for direct use by health plans and payers. The manual and programs were refined following provision to two national insurers who applied the programs to claims databases, following instructions on data preparation, data validation, analysis, and verification and interpretation of program output. A final set of programs and user manual successfully guided health plan programmer analysts to apply SSI algorithms to claims databases. Validation steps identified common problems such as incomplete preparation of data, missing data, insufficient sample size, and other issues that might result in program failure. Several user prompts enabled health plans to select time windows, strata such as insurance type, and the threshold number of procedures performed by a hospital before inclusion in regression models assessing relative SSI rates among hospitals. No health plan data was transferred to outside entities. Programs, on default settings, provided descriptive tables of SSI indicators stratified by hospital, insurer type, SSI indicator (inpatient, outpatient, antibiotic, and six-month period. Regression models provided rankings of hospital SSI indicator rates by quartiles, adjusted for comorbidities. Programs are publicly available without charge. Conclusion We describe a free, user-friendly software package that enables payers to routinely assess and identify hospitals with potentially high SSI

  9. A Quality Improvement Approach to Reducing the Caesarean section Surgical Site Infection Rate in a Regional Hospital

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’ Hanlon, M

    2016-09-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) rates are used extensively by hospitals as a basis for quality improvement. A 30-day post-discharge SSI programme for Caesarean section operations has been implemented in Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital since 2011. It has been shown that skin antisepsis and antibiotic prophylaxis are key factors in the prevention of SSI. Using quality improvement methodology, an infection prevention bundle was introduced to address these two factors. Skin antisepsis was changed from povidone-iodine to chlorhexidine-alcohol. Compliance with choice of antibiotic prophylaxis increased from 89.6% in 2014 to 98.5% in 2015. Compliance with timing also improved. The SSI rate of 7.5% was the lowest recorded to date, with the majority of SSIs (64%) diagnosed after hospital discharge. The level of variation was also reduced. However, the continued presence of variation and possibility of lower infection rates from the literature imply that further improvements are required.

  10. Intraoperative PaO2 is not related to the development of surgical site infections after major cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fierro Inma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The perioperative use of high inspired oxygen fraction (FIO2 for preventing surgical site infections (SSIs has demonstrated a reduction in their incidence in some types of surgery however there exist some discrepancies in this respect. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between PaO2 values and SSIs in cardiac patients. Methods We designed a prospective study in which 1,024 patients undergoing cardiac surgery were analyzed. Results SSIs were observed in 5.3% of patients. There was not significant difference in mortality at 30 days between patients with and without SSIs. In the uni and multivariate analysis no differences in function of the inspired oxygen fraction administrated were observed. Conclusions We observed that the PaO2 in adult cardiac surgery patients was not related to SSI rate.

  11. ABDOMINAL CLOSURE WITH ANTI BACTERIAL COATED SUTURE MATERIALS AND ITS RELATION TO THE INCIDENCE OF POST OPERATIVE SUPERFICIAL SURGICAL SITE INFECTION RATES

    OpenAIRE

    Josephine Pudumai Selvi; Celine Foustina Mary; Karthikeyan Rajashekar

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Surgical site infection (SSI) is an immense burden on healthcare resources even in the modern era of immaculate sterilization approaches and highly effective antibiotics. An estimated 234 million various surgical procedures, involving skin incisions requiring various types of wound closure techniques, are performed in the world, with the majority resulting in a wound healing by primary intention. Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2, 4-dichlorophenoxy) phenol) is a broad-spectrum b...

  12. The Association Between Operating Room Personnel and Turnover With Surgical Site Infection in More Than 12 000 Neurosurgical Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathen, Connor; Kshettry, Varun R; Krishnaney, Ajit; Gordon, Steven M; Fraser, Thomas; Benzel, Edward C; Modic, Michael T; Butler, Sam; Machado, Andre G

    2016-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) contributes significantly to postoperative morbidity and mortality and greatly increases the cost of care. To identify the impact of workflow and personnel-related risk factors contributing to the incidence of SSIs in a large sample of neurological surgeries. Data were obtained using an enterprisewide electronic health record system, operating room, and anesthesia records for neurological procedures conducted between January 1, 2009, and November 30, 2012. SSI data were obtained from prospective surveillance by infection preventionists using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definitions. A multivariate model was constructed and refined using backward elimination logistic regression methods. The analysis included 12 528 procedures. Most cases were elective (94.5%), and the average procedure length was 4.8 hours. The average number of people present in the operating room at any time during the procedure was 10.0. The overall infection rate was 2.3%. Patient body mass index (odds ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.04) and sex (odds ratio, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.07-1.72) as well as procedure length (odds ratio, 1.19 per additional hour; 95% CI, 1.15-1.23) and nursing staff turnovers (odds ratio, 1.095 per additional turnover; 95% CI, 1.02-1.21) were significantly correlated with the risk of SSI. This study found that patient body mass index and male sex were associated with an increased risk of SSI. Operating room personnel turnover, a modifiable, work flow-related factor, was an independent variable positively correlated with SSI. This study suggests that efforts to reduce operating room turnover may be effective in preventing SSI. OR, operating roomSSI, surgical site infection.

  13. Economic and organizational sustainability of a negative-pressure portable device for the prevention of surgical-site complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foglia E

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Emanuela Foglia,1 Lucrezia Ferrario,1 Elisabetta Garagiola,1 Giuseppe Signoriello,2 Gianluca Pellino,3 Davide Croce,1,4 Silvestro Canonico3 1Centre for Health Economics, Social and Health Care Management - LIUC University, Castellanza, Italy; 2Department of Mental Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy; 3School of Medicine, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy; 4School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South \tAfrica Purpose: Surgical-site complications (SSCs affect patients’ clinical pathway, prolonging their hospitalization and incrementing their management costs. The present study aimed to assess the economic and organizational implications of a portable device for negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT implementation, compared with the administration of pharmacological therapies alone for preventing surgical complications in patients undergoing general, cardiac, obstetrical–gynecological, or orthopedic surgical procedures.Patients and methods: A total of 8,566 hospital procedures, related to the year 2015 from one hospital, were evaluated considering infection risk index, occurrence rates of SSCs, drug therapies, and surgical, diagnostic, and specialist procedures and hematological exams. Activity-based costing and budget impact analyses were implemented for the economic assessment.Results: Patients developing an SSC absorbed i 64.27% more economic resources considering the length of stay (€ 8,269±2,096 versus € 5,034±2,901, p<0.05 and ii 42.43% more economic resources related to hematological and diagnostic procedures (€ 639±117 versus € 449±72, p<0.05. If the innovative device had been used over the 12-month time period, it would have decreased the risk of developing SSCs; the hospital would have realized an average reduction in health care expenditure equal to −0.69% (−€ 483

  14. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Surgical Site Infections in Women Undergoing Elective Caesarean Sections: A Pilot RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaboyer, Wendy; Anderson, Vinah; Webster, Joan; Sneddon, Anne; Thalib, Lukman; Gillespie, Brigid M

    2014-09-30

    Obese women undergoing caesarean section (CS) are at increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI). Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) is growing in use as a prophylactic approach to prevent wound complications such as SSI, yet there is little evidence of its benefits. This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) assessed the effect of NPWT on SSI and other wound complications in obese women undergoing elective caesarean sections (CS) and also the feasibility of conducting a definitive trial. Ninety-two obese women undergoing elective CS were randomized in theatre via a central web based system using a parallel 1:1 process to two groups i.e., 46 women received the intervention (NPWT PICO™ dressing) and 46 women received standard care (Comfeel Plus(®) dressing). All women received the intended dressing following wound closure. The relative risk of SSI in the intervention group was 0.81 (95% CI 0.38-1.68); for the number of complications excluding SSI it was 0.98 (95% CI 0.34-2.79). A sample size of 784 (392 per group) would be required to find a statistically significant difference in SSI between the two groups with 90% power. These results demonstrate that a larger definitive trial is feasible and that careful planning and site selection is critical to the success of the overall study.

  15. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Surgical Site Infections in Women Undergoing Elective Caesarean Sections: A Pilot RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Chaboyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Obese women undergoing caesarean section (CS are at increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT is growing in use as a prophylactic approach to prevent wound complications such as SSI, yet there is little evidence of its benefits. This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT assessed the effect of NPWT on SSI and other wound complications in obese women undergoing elective caesarean sections (CS and also the feasibility of conducting a definitive trial. Ninety-two obese women undergoing elective CS were randomized in theatre via a central web based system using a parallel 1:1 process to two groups i.e., 46 women received the intervention (NPWT PICO™ dressing and 46 women received standard care (Comfeel Plus® dressing. All women received the intended dressing following wound closure. The relative risk of SSI in the intervention group was 0.81 (95% CI 0.38–1.68; for the number of complications excluding SSI it was 0.98 (95% CI 0.34–2.79. A sample size of 784 (392 per group would be required to find a statistically significant difference in SSI between the two groups with 90% power. These results demonstrate that a larger definitive trial is feasible and that careful planning and site selection is critical to the success of the overall study.

  16. Reducing surgical site infection incidence through a network: results from the French ISO-RAISIN surveillance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astagneau, P; L'Hériteau, F; Daniel, F; Parneix, P; Venier, A-G; Malavaud, S; Jarno, P; Lejeune, B; Savey, A; Metzger, M-H; Bernet, C; Fabry, J; Rabaud, C; Tronel, H; Thiolet, J-M; Coignard, B

    2009-06-01

    Surgical-site infections (SSIs) are a key target for nosocomial infection control programmes. We evaluated the impact of an eight-year national SSI surveillance system named ISO-RAISIN (infection du site opératoire - Réseau Alerte Investigation Surveillance des Infections). Consecutive patients undergoing surgery were enrolled during a three-month period each year and surveyed for 30 days following surgery. A standardised form was completed for each patient including SSI diagnosis according to standard criteria, and several risk factors such as wound class, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, operation duration, elective/emergency surgery, and type of surgery. From 1999 to 2006, 14,845 SSIs were identified in 964,128 patients (overall crude incidence: 1.54%) operated on in 838 participating hospitals. The crude overall SSI incidence decreased from 2.04% to 1.26% (P<0.001; relative reduction: -38%) and the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance system (NNIS)-0 adjusted SSI incidence from 1.10% to 0.74% (P<0.001; relative reduction: -33%). The most significant SSI incidence reduction was observed for hernia repair and caesarean section, and to a lesser extent, cholecystectomy, hip prosthesis arthroplasty, and mastectomy. Active surveillance striving for a benchmark throughout a network is an effective strategy to reduce SSI incidence.

  17. Role of ChIP-seq in the discovery of transcription factor binding sites, differential gene regulation mechanism, epigenetic marks and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundade, Rasika; Ozer, Hatice Gulcin; Wei, Han; Prabhu, Lakshmi; Lu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Many biologically significant processes, such as cell differentiation and cell cycle progression, gene transcription and DNA replication, chromosome stability and epigenetic silencing etc. depend on the crucial interactions between cellular proteins and DNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is an important experimental technique for studying interactions between specific proteins and DNA in the cell and determining their localization on a specific genomic locus. In recent years, the combination of ChIP with second generation DNA-sequencing technology (ChIP-seq) allows precise genomic functional assay. This review addresses the important applications of ChIP-seq with an emphasis on its role in genome-wide mapping of transcription factor binding sites, the revelation of underlying molecular mechanisms of differential gene regulation that are governed by specific transcription factors, and the identification of epigenetic marks. Furthermore, we also describe the ChIP-seq data analysis workflow and a perspective for the exciting potential advancement of ChIP-seq technology in the future.

  18. The role of pre-operative and post-operative glucose control in surgical-site infections and mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie Y Jeon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The impact of glucose control on surgical-site infection (SSI and death remains unclear. We examined how pre- and post-operative glucose levels and their variability are associated with the risk of SSI or in-hospital death. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study employed data on 13,800 hospitalized patients who underwent a surgical procedure at a large referral hospital in New York between 2006 and 2008. Over 20 different sources of electronic data were used to analyze how thirty-day risk of SSI and in-hospital death varies by glucose levels and variability. Maximum pre- and post-operative glucose levels were determined for 72 hours before and after the operation and glucose variability was defined as the coefficient of variation of the glucose measurements. We employed logistic regression to model the risk of SSI or death against glucose variables and the following potential confounders: age, sex, body mass index, duration of operation, diabetes status, procedure classification, physical status, emergency status, and blood transfusion. RESULTS: While association of pre- and post-operative hyperglycemia with SSI were apparent in the crude analysis, multivariate results showed that SSI risk did not vary significantly with glucose levels. On the other hand, in-hospital deaths were associated with pre-operative hypoglycemia (OR = 5.09, 95% CI (1.80, 14.4 and glucose variability (OR = 1.14, 95% CI (1.03, 1.27 for 10% increase in coefficient of variation. CONCLUSION: In-hospital deaths occurred more often among those with pre-operative hypoglycemia and higher glucose variability. These findings warrant further investigation to determine whether stabilization of glucose and prevention of hypoglycemia could reduce post-operative deaths.

  19. Clinical relevance of surgical site infection as defined by the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, N A; Meyhoff, C S; Wetterslev, J; Wille-Jørgensen, P; Rasmussen, L S; Jorgensen, L N

    2010-07-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after abdominal surgery and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria are commonly used for diagnosis and surveillance. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SSI diagnosed according to CDC is clinically relevant (CRSSI) and whether there is agreement between evaluations according to the CDC criteria, the ASEPSIS score (Additional treatment, presence of Serous discharge, Erythema, Purulent exudate, Separation of the deep tissues, Isolation of bacteria and duration of Stay) and CRSSI. We included 54 patients diagnosed with SSI and a matched control group (N=46) without SSI according to the CDC criteria after laparotomy. Two blinded experienced surgeons evaluated the hospital records and determined whether patients had CRSSI, based on the following criteria: antibiotic treatment, surgical intervention, prolonged hospital stay or referral to an intensive care unit for SSI. The rate of CRSSI was 38 of 54 (70%) in patients with CDC-diagnosed SSI and none in patients without a CDC-diagnosed SSI. Sixty-one percent of the CDC-diagnosed SSIs were superficial, of which 48% were considered clinically relevant. There was substantial agreement between the CDC criteria and CRSSI [kappa=0.69; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.55-0.83] and fair agreement between the ASEPSIS score and the CDC criteria (kappa=0.23; 95% CI: 0-0.49) and between the ASEPSIS score and CRSSI (kappa=0.39; 95% CI: 0.17-0.61). The CDC criteria represent a suitable standard definition for monitoring and identifying SSI, even if some cases of less clinically significant superficial SSI are included.

  20. Reporting surgical site infections following total hip and knee arthroplasty: impact of limiting surveillance to the operative hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Avery, Taliser R; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S

    2013-11-01

    Public reporting of surgical site infections (SSIs) by hospitals is largely limited to infections detected during surgical hospitalizations or readmissions to the same facility. SSI rates may be underestimated if patients with SSIs are readmitted to other hospitals. We assessed the impact of readmissions to other facilities on hospitals' SSI rates following primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients who underwent primary THA or TKA at California hospitals between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2009. SSIs were identified using ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes predictive of SSI assigned at any California hospital within 365 days of surgery using a statewide repository of hospital data that allowed tracking of patients between facilities. We used statewide data to estimate the fraction of each hospital's THA and TKA SSIs identified at the operative hospital versus other hospitals. A total of 91 121 THA and 121 640 TKA procedures were identified. Based on diagnosis codes, SSIs developed following 2214 (2.3%) THAs and 2465 (2.0%) TKAs. Seventeen percent of SSIs would have been missed by operative hospital surveillance alone. The proportion of hospitals' SSIs detected at nonoperative hospitals ranged from 0% to 100%. Including SSIs detected at nonoperative hospitals resulted in better relative ranking for 61% of THA hospitals and 61% of TKA hospitals. Limiting SSI surveillance to the operative hospital caused varying degrees of SSI underestimation and substantially impacted hospitals' relative rankings, suggesting that alternative methods for comprehensive postdischarge surveillance are needed for accurate benchmarking.

  1. Association Between Intraoperative Low Blood Pressure and Development of Surgical Site Infection After Colorectal Surgery: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babazade, Rovnat; Yilmaz, Huseyin O; Zimmerman, Nicole M; Stocchi, Luca; Gorgun, Emre; Kessler, Hermann; Sessler, Daniel I; Kurz, Andrea; Turan, Alparslan

    2016-12-01

    We tested the primary hypothesis that surgical site infections (SSIs) are more common in patients who had longer periods of intraoperative low blood pressure. Our secondary hypothesis was that hospitalization is prolonged in patients experiencing longer periods of critically low systolic blood pressure (SBP) and/or mean arterial pressure (MAP). Hypotension compromises local tissue perfusion, thereby reducing tissue oxygenation. Hypotension might thus be expected to promote infection, but the extent to which low blood pressure contributes remains unclear. We considered patients who had colorectal surgery lasting at least 1 hour at the Cleveland Clinic between 2009 and 2013. The duration of hypotensive exposure and development of SSI was assessed with logistic regression; the association between hypotensive exposure and duration of hospitalization was assessed with Cox proportional hazard regression. A total of 2521 patients were eligible for analysis. There was no adjusted association between SBP hypotension < 80 mm Hg and SSI, with an estimated odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.97 (0.81, 1.17) per 5-minute increase in SBP hypotension (P = 0.54). There was also no adjusted association between MAP hypotension time and SSI, with estimated odds ratio of 0.97 (0.81, 1.17) for a 5-minute increase in MAP hypotension < 55 mm Hg time (P = 0.71). There was no association between duration of hypotension and time to discharge. Intraoperative hypotension does not seem to be a clinically important predictor of SSI after colorectal surgery, probably because the outcomes are overwhelmingly determined by other baseline and surgical factors-and perhaps postoperative hypotension.

  2. Effect of Pre-Operative Use of Medications on the Risk of Surgical Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

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    Eton, Vic; Sinyavskaya, Liliya; Langlois, Yves; Morin, Jean François; Suissa, Samy; Brassard, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Median sternotomy, the most common means of accessing the heart for cardiac procedures, is associated with higher risk of surgical site infections (SSIs). A limited number of studies reporting the impact of medication use prior to cardiac surgery on the subsequent risk of SSIs usually focused on antibacterial prophylaxis. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of medications prescribed commonly to cardiac patients on the risk of incident SSIs. The study analyzed data on consecutive cardiac surgery patients undergoing median sternotomy at a McGill University teaching hospital between April 1, 2011 and October 31, 2013. Exposure of interest was use of medications for heart disease and cardiovascular conditions in the seven days prior to surgery and those for comorbid conditions. The main outcome was SSIs occurring within 90 d after surgery. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]) was used to evaluate the effect. The cohort included 1,077 cardiac surgery patients, 79 of whom experienced SSIs within 90 d of surgery. The rates for sternal site infections and harvest site infections were 5.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4-7.3) and 2.5 (95% CI: 1.4-3.7) per 100 procedures, respectively. The risk of SSI was increased with the pre-operative use of immunosuppressors/steroids (AOR 3.47, 95% CI: 1.27-9.52) and α-blockers (AOR 3.74, 95% CI: 1.21-1.47). Our findings support the effect of immunosuppressors/steroids on the risk of SSIs and add evidence to the previously reported association between the use of anti-hypertensive medications and subsequent development of infection/sepsis.

  3. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus from patients with surgical site infections at Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda.

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    Jeremiah Seni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is progressively increasing globally with significant regional variation. Understanding the Staphylococcus aureus lineages is crucial in controlling nosocomial infections. Recent studies on S. aureus in Uganda have revealed an escalating burden of MRSA. However, the S. aureus genotypes circulating among patients are not known. Here, we report S. aureus lineages circulating in patients with surgical site infections (SSI at Mulago National hospital, Kampala, Uganda. METHODS: A cross-sectional study involving 314 patients with SSI at Mulago National Hospital was conducted from September 2011 to April 2012. Pus swabs from the patients' SSI were processed using standard microbiological procedures. Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA were identified using phenotypic tests and confirmed by PCR-detection of the nuc and mecA genes, respectively. SCCmec genotypes were determined among MRSA isolates using multiplex PCR. Furthermore, to determine lineages, spa sequence based-genotyping was performed on all S. aureus isolates. RESULTS: Of the 314 patients with SSI, S. aureus accounted for 20.4% (64/314, of which 37.5% (24/64 were MRSA. The predominant SCCmec types were type V (33.3%, 8/24 and type I (16.7%, 4/24. The predominant spa lineages were t645 (17.2%, 11/64 and t4353 (15.6%, 10/64, and these were found to be clonally circulating in all the surgical wards. On the other hand, lineages t064, t355, and t4609 were confined to the obstetrics and gynecology wards. A new spa type (t10277 was identified from MSSA isolate. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, cancer and inducible clindamycin resistance remained as independent predictors of MRSA-SSI. CONCLUSION: SCCmec types I and V are the most prevalent MRSA mecA types from the patients' SSI. The predominant spa lineages (t645 and t4353 are clonally circulating in all the surgical wards, calling for

  4. Pre-operative urinary tract infection: is it a risk factor for early surgical site infection with hip fracture surgery? A retrospective analysis.

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    Yassa, Rafik Rd; Khalfaoui, Mahdi Y; Veravalli, Karunakar; Evans, D Alun

    2017-03-01

    The aims of the current study were to determine whether pre-operative urinary tract infections in patients presenting acutely with neck of femur fractures resulted in a delay to surgery and whether such patients were at increased risk of developing post-operative surgical site infections. A retrospective review of all patients presenting with a neck of femur fracture, at a single centre over a one-year period. The hospital hip fracture database was used as the main source of data. UK University Teaching Hospital. All patients (n = 460) presenting across a single year study period with a confirmed hip fracture. The presence of pre-operative urinary tract infection, the timing of surgical intervention, the occurrence of post-operative surgical site infection and the pathogens identified. A total of 367 patients were operated upon within 24 hours of admission. Urinary infections were the least common cause of delay. A total of 99 patients (21.5%) had pre-operative urinary tract infection. Post-operatively, a total of 57 (12.4%) patients developed a surgical site infection. Among the latter, 31 (54.4%) did not have a pre-operative urinary infection, 23 (40.4%) patients had a pre-operative urinary tract infection, 2 had chronic leg ulcers and one patient had a pre-operative chest infection. Statistically, there was a strong relationship between pre-operative urinary tract infection and the development of post-operative surgical site infection (p-value: 0.0005). The results of our study indicate that pre-operative urinary tract infection has a high prevalence amongst those presenting with neck of femur fractures, and this is a risk factor for the later development of post-operative surgical site infection.

  5. Incidence and risk factors for surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Shao, Jiashen; Chang, Hengrui; Zhu, Yanbin; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Zhanle; Zhang, Huixin; Zhang, Yingze

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively summarize the risk factors associated with surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture. Medline, Embase, CNKI, Wanfang database and Cochrane central database were searched for relevant original studies from database inception to October 2016. Eligible studies had to meet quality assessment criteria according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, and had to evaluate the risk factors for surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture. Stata 11.0 software was used for this meta-analysis. Eight studies involving 2214 cases of tibial plateau fracture treated by open reduction and internal fixation and 219 cases of surgical site infection were included in this meta-analysis. The following parameters were identified as significant risk factors for surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture (p internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture. Surgeons should be cognizant of these risks and give relevant preoperative advice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY TO ASSESS RISK FACTORS FOR SURGICAL SITE INFECTI ONS IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTER

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    Ashwin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Surgical site infections (SSI remain a significant problem following an operation and the second most frequently reported nosocomial infections. Aim: The current study was undertaken to identify various risk factors for SSI. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The prospective study was carried out on 50 abdominal surgeries of class III and class IV contamination. Details various functional parameters, laboratory inve stigation and surgery of patient were evaluated and analyzed with occurrence of wound infection . RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The infection rate was 36.0% in our study population. The SSI rate was 19.04 % in contaminated ones and 48.2% in dirty surgeries. Male patients were affected more (21% than the female patients (18.88%. The SSI rate increased with increasing age and it also increased in patients with low hemoglobin. The SSI rate was higher in emergency surgeries as compared to the elective surgeries. Th e infection rate was significantly higher as the order and the duration of the surgery increased.

  7. ROLE OF INCISION SITE IN REDUCING SURGICALLY INDUCE D ASTIGMATISM IN MANUAL SMALL INCISION CATARACT SURGE RY

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    Sathish

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Phacoemulsification and foldable IOLs allow modern day surgeon to aim at minimal induction of any astigmatic error as well a s correct any pre-operative refractive errors thus making patients’ life, spectacle free i.e. una ided emmetropia. But its high price and maintenance with a long learning curve for the surg eon make it unsuitable for the Indian camp scenario. Manual SICS in comparison needs a larger incision f or both nucleus removal and a rigid IOL insertion, but still provides for a sutureless and c onvenient alternative to phaco. Manual SICS does induce some amount of astigmatism by altering corneal curvatures (i.e., by coupling effect, while phaco surgery with 3 mm incision is astigmatic ally neutral. Manifold of studies have been done to compare Surgically Induced Astigmatism of ma nual SICS to phaco surgery but not much has been done to compare various techniques in manua l SICS itself. In this study an attempt has been made to analyze t he role of incision site depending on the pre operative keratometry readings in reducing su rgically induced astigmatism in manual small incision cataract surgery.

  8. Development of a single, practical measure of surgical site infection (SSI) for patient report or observer completion

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    Macefield, Rhiannon C; Reeves, Barnaby C; Milne, Thomas K; Nicholson, Alexandra; Blencowe, Natalie S; Calvert, Melanie; Avery, Kerry NL; Messenger, David E; Bamford, Richard; Pinkney, Thomas D; Blazeby, Jane M

    2017-01-01

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the third most common hospital-associated infection and can lead to significant patient morbidity and healthcare costs. Identification of SSIs is key to surveillance and research but reliable assessment is challenging, particularly after hospital discharge when most SSIs present. Existing SSI measurement tools have limitations and their suitability for post-discharge surveillance is uncertain. Aims: This study aimed to develop a single measure to identify SSI after hospital discharge, suitable for patient or observer completion. Methods: A three-phase mixed methods study was undertaken: Phase 1, an analysis of existing tools and semi-structured interviews with patients and professionals to establish the content of the measure; Phase 2, development of questionnaire items suitable for patients and professionals; Phase 3, pre-testing the single measure to assess acceptability and understanding to both stakeholder groups. Interviews and pre-testing took place over 12 months in 2014–2015 with patients and professionals from five specialties recruited from two UK hospital Trusts. Findings: Analyses of existing tools and interviews identified 19 important domains for assessing SSIs. Domains were developed into provisional questionnaire items. Pre-testing and iterative revision resulted in a final version with 16 items that were understood and easily completed by patients and observers (healthcare professionals). Conclusion: A single patient and observer measure for post-discharge SSI assessment has been developed. Further testing of the validity, reliability and accuracy of the measure is underway.

  9. Surgical site infections following craniotomy focusing on possible post-operative acquisition of infection: prospective cohort study.

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    Sneh-Arbib, O; Shiferstein, A; Dagan, N; Fein, S; Telem, L; Muchtar, E; Eliakim-Raz, N; Rubinovitch, B; Rubin, G; Rappaport, Z H; Paul, M

    2013-12-01

    Neurosurgery is characterized by a prolonged risk period for surgical site infection (SSI), mainly related to the presence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains. We aimed to examine factors associated with post-neurosurgical SSIs, focusing on post-operative factors. A prospective cohort study was conducted in a single center over a period of 18 months in Israel. Included were adult patients undergoing clean or clean-contaminated craniotomy, including craniotomies with external CSF drainage or shunts. SSIs were defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria for healthcare-associated infections. All patients were followed up for 90 days and those with foreign body insertion for 1 year. We compared patients with and without SSI. A multivariable regression analysis for SSI was conducted including uncorrelated variables significantly associated with SSI. A total of 502 patients were included, with 138 (27.5%) undergoing emergent or urgent craniotomy. The overall SSI rate was 5.6% (28 patients), of which 3.2% (16 patients) were intracerebral. Non-elective surgery, external CSF drainage/monitoring devices, re-operation, and post-operative respiratory failure were independently associated with subsequent SSI. External CSF devices was the only significant risk factor for intracerebral SSIs (p infection acquisition through external CSF devices. Standard operating procedures for their maintenance are necessary.

  10. Implementation of a care bundle and evaluation of risk factors for surgical site infection in cranial neurosurgery.

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    Davies, Benjamin M; Jones, Anna; Patel, Hiren C

    2016-05-01

    Surgical site infection [SSI] increases mortality, morbidity and length of hospital stay. Peri-operative 'care bundles' have reduced SSI in some fields of surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of bundle compliance on SSI in patients undergoing a craniotomy. Cohort study of patients [N=1253] undergoing a craniotomy over 17 months at a single centre. SSI was defined as arising within 30days of operation or 1year where an implant(s) remains. 'Bundle compliance' required administration of antibiotics 36°C. SSI incidence was compared between bundle compliant and non-compliant groups. Case mix adjustment was performed using binary logistic regression. Over the study period, 1253 procedures were carried out and 66 patients (5.3%) developed a SSI. The majority (38, 57.6%) of these cultured Staphyloccoccus species. Only the use of an implant was found to be an independent risk factor for SSI [AOR 2.5, p<0.005, 95%CI 1.4, 4.3]. The use of the bundle did not reduce the occurrence of SSI. An evidence-based bundle did not reduce SSI in this neurosurgical series. The use of an implant was an independent risk factor of its occurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Pre-operative smoking cessation does not always reduce the incidence of surgical site infection after gastrointestinal surgery].

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    Kuri, Michioki; Yamada, Terumasa; Nakagawa, Masashi; Tanigami, Hironobu; Kishi, Yoshihiko

    2011-02-01

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommend pre-operative smoking cessation to reduce the risk of surgical site infection (SSI). However, whether pre-operative smoking cessation reduces the incidence of SSI for gastrointestinal surgery is unclear. We investigated whether pre-operative smoking cessation reduces the incidence of SSI among patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery. The study subjects were 512 consecutive patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery at Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases. SSI occurrence was determined by the hospital SSI surveillance team. Pre-operative smoking status was obtained by interview, and the patients were divided into four groups. Information on age, sex, operation time, operational organ, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status (ASA-PS), elective or emergency surgery, co-existing procedures, use of scopes, ileo-colostomy, properties of drain tube, use of floss, and wound contamination was obtained from the medical records. The relationship between smoking status and incidence of SSI, and risk factors associated with the incidence of SSI were investigated. SSI occurred in 83 patients. Pre-operative smoking status had no relation with the incidence of SSI. Operation time, gallbladder and pancreatic surgery, colon surgery, emergency surgery, co-existing procedures, ilea-colostomy, closed drain, usage of floss, and wound contamination were related significantly with SSI. Pre-operative smoking cessation does not reduce the incidence of SSI. However, since continuation of smoking has no benefits for the safety of surgery, anesthesiologists must advice patients to quit smoking before surgery.

  12. Improving Public Reporting and Data Validation for Complex Surgical Site Infections After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery and Hip Arthroplasty

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    Calderwood, Michael S.; Kleinman, Ken; Murphy, Michael V.; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    Background  Deep and organ/space surgical site infections (D/OS SSI) cause significant morbidity, mortality, and costs. Rates are publicly reported and increasingly used as quality metrics affecting hospital payment. Lack of standardized surveillance methods threaten the accuracy of reported data and decrease confidence in comparisons based upon these data. Methods  We analyzed data from national validation studies that used Medicare claims to trigger chart review for SSI confirmation after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) and hip arthroplasty. We evaluated code performance (sensitivity and positive predictive value) to select diagnosis codes that best identified D/OS SSI. Codes were analyzed individually and in combination. Results  Analysis included 143 patients with D/OS SSI after CABG and 175 patients with D/OS SSI after hip arthroplasty. For CABG, 9 International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (ICD-9) diagnosis codes identified 92% of D/OS SSI, with 1 D/OS SSI identified for every 4 cases with a diagnosis code. For hip arthroplasty, 6 ICD-9 diagnosis codes identified 99% of D/OS SSI, with 1 D/OS SSI identified for every 2 cases with a diagnosis code. Conclusions  This standardized and efficient approach for identifying D/OS SSI can be used by hospitals to improve case detection and public reporting. This method can also be used to identify potential D/OS SSI cases for review during hospital audits for data validation. PMID:25734174

  13. Effectiveness of N-butyl cyanoacrylate-based microbial skin sealant on the prevention of surgical site infections.

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    Ozer, Mustafa Tahir; Sinan, Huseyin; Saydam, Mehmet; Kilic, Abdullah; Akyol, Mesut; Coskun, Ali Kagan; Bedir, Orhan; Demibas, Sezai

    2014-02-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a serious concern in health care, and wound contamination by endogenous skin flora is a major factor in the development of SSIs. Despite preventive tactics in pre-operative skin care, antibiotic prophylaxis, surgical technique, and post-operative incision care, complete sterilization of the skin is not possible. Recently developed microbial skin sealant forms a continuous but breathable barrier that prevents migration of endogenous skin flora into the incision. The skin sealant closes dermal microabrasions, preventing re-colonization of potential pathogens at the incision. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an N-butyl cyanoacrylate-based microbial skin sealant in reducing the occurrence of SSIs in an experimental rodent model. This was a randomized, controlled animal trial. Forty-eight Wistar albino rats were divided into six groups of eight rats each. Three groups received application of sealant against specific bacteria, and three matched control groups received only the bacteria without the sealant. Group one underwent pre-operative hair removal, followed by application of skin sealant, then abdominal incision and closure. Group two (control) simply underwent hair removal, followed by incision and closure, with no skin sealant applied. Group three received an application of cage swabs (containing a mixture of urine, stool and sawdust from the animals' cages) before application of skin sealant, and group four (control) received cage swabs without subsequent skin sealant. Group five received methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) followed by skin sealant, and group six (control) received MRSA without skin sealant. Seven days after surgery, the animals were sacrificed. Samples were taken from the abdomen of each rat and placed in culture medium. Proliferation of the following bacteria were observed: Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), gram-positive bacilli (GPB), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and

  14. Continuous intraoperative temperature measurement and surgical site infection risk: analysis of anesthesia information system data in 1008 colorectal procedures.

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    Melton, Genevieve B; Vogel, Jon D; Swenson, Brian R; Remzi, Feza H; Rothenberger, David A; Wick, Elizabeth C

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the association between intraoperative temperature and surgical site infection (SSI) in colorectal surgery with anesthesia information system data. Continuously measured intraoperative anesthesia information system temperature data for adult abdominal colorectal surgery procedures at a large tertiary center for 1 year were linked to 30-day American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program SSI outcomes. Univariable and multivariable analyses of SSI to descriptive temperature statistics, absolute and relative temperature threshold times, and other clinically relevant variables were performed. Overall, 1008 patients (48% female, median age: 53 years) underwent major colorectal procedures (7% emergent, 72% open, 173 ± 95 minutes mean procedure time) with median intraoperative temperature 36.0°C, using active rewarming in 92% and 1-hour presurgical antibiotic administration in 91%. Thirty-day overall and organ/space infection rates were 17.4% (175) and 8.5% (86). Maximum, minimum, ending, and median temperatures were similar for those with or without SSI (36.6°C vs 36.5°C, 34.9°C vs 35.0°C, 36.4°C vs 36.2°C, and 36.1°C vs 36.0°C, P = not significant) and percent minutes using incremental cutoffs failed to correlate SSI with temperature. Absolute minutes for higher temperature cutoffs correlated with SSI because of longer procedure times. On multivariable analysis, factors associated with SSI were preoperative diabetes [odds ratio: 1.81 (1.07-3.07), P = 0.022] and blood loss of more than 500 mL [odds ratio: 1.61 (1.01-2.58), P = 0.047]. Although active rewarming remains an accepted and valid process measure, highly granular anesthesia information system temperature data did not demonstrate a correlation between temperature measures and SSI. SSI prevention efforts should focus on more efficacious interventions as opposed to currently mandated publicly reported normothermia measures.

  15. Surgical Site Infection Rates in Seven Cities in Vietnam: Findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium.

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    Viet Hung, Nguyen; Anh Thu, Truong; Rosenthal, Victor D; Tat Thanh, Do; Quoc Anh, Nguyen; Le Bao Tien, Nguyen; Ngo Quang, Nguyen

    2016-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the most common healthcare-associated infections (HAI) in lower-income countries. This is the first study to report the results of surveillance on SSI stratified by surgical procedure in seven Vietnamese cities. This was a prospective, active SSI surveillance study conducted from November 2008-December 2010 in seven hospitals using the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC-NHSN) definitions and methods. Surgical procedures (SPs) were classified into 26 types according to the International Classification of Diseases Edition 9 criteria. We recorded 241 SSIs, associated with 4,413 SPs (relative risk [RR] 5.5%; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 4.8-6.2). The highest SSI rates were found for limb amputation (25%), colon surgery (33%), and small bowel surgery (21%). Compared with CDC-NHSN SSI report, our SSI rates were higher for the following SPs: Limb amputation (25% vs. 1.3%; RR 20.0; p = 0.001); appendix surgery (8.8% vs. 3.5%; RR 2.54; 95% CI 1.3-5.1; p = 0.001); gallbladder surgery (13.7% vs. 1.7%; RR 7.76; 95% CI 1.9-32.1; p = 0.001); colon surgery (18.2% vs. 4.0%; RR 4.56; 95% CI 2.0-10.2; p = 0.001); open reduction of fracture (15.8% vs. 3.4%; RR 4.70, 95% CI 1.5-15.2; p = 0.004); gastric surgery (7.3% vs. 1.7%; RR 4.26; 95% CI 2.2-8.4, p = 0.001); kidney surgery (8.9% vs. 0.9%; RR 10.2; 95% CI 3.8-27.4; p = 0.001); prostate surgery (5.1% vs. 0.9%; RR 5.71; 95% CI 1.9-17.4; p = 0.001); small bowel surgery (20.8% vs. 6.7%; RR 3.07; 95% CI 1.7-5.6; p = 0.001); thyroid or parathyroid surgery (2.4% vs. 0.3%; RR 9.27; 95% CI 1.0-89.1; p = 0.019); and vaginal hysterectomy (14.3% vs. 1.2%; RR 12.3; 95% CI 1.7-88.4; p = 0.001). Our SSIs rates were significantly higher for 11 of the 26 types of SPs than for the CDC-NHSN. This study advances our knowledge of SSI epidemiology in Vietnam and will allow us to introduce targeted interventions.

  16. Abdominoperineal Resection, Pelvic Exenteration, and Additional Organ Resection Increase the Risk of Surgical Site Infection after Elective Colorectal Surgery: An American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Analysis.

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    Kwaan, Mary R; Melton, Genevieve B; Madoff, Robert D; Chipman, Jeffrey G

    2015-12-01

    Determining predictors of surgical site infection (SSI) in a large cohort is important for the design of accurate SSI surveillance programs. We hypothesized that additional organ resection and pelvic exenterative procedures are associated independently with a higher risk of SSI. Patients in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program® (ACS NSQIP®; American College of Surgeons, Chicago, IL) database (2005-2012) were identified (n=112,282). Surgical site infection (superficial or deep SSI) at 30 d was the primary outcome. Using primary and secondary CPT® codes (American Medical Association, Chicago, IL) pelvic exenteration was defined and additional organ resection was defined as: bladder resection/repair, hysterectomy, partial vaginectomy, additional segmental colectomy, small bowel, gastric, or diaphragm resection. Univariable analysis of patient and procedure factors identified significant (p40 (OR: 2.51), pulmonary comorbidities (OR: 1.22), smoking (OR: 1.24), bowel obstruction (OR: 1.40), wound classification 3 or 4 (OR: 1.18), and abdominoperineal resection (OR: 1.58). Laparoscopic or laparoscopically assisted procedures offered a protective effect against incision infection (OR: 0.55). Additional organ resection (OR: 1.08) was also associated independently with SSI, but the magnitude of the effect was decreased after accounting for operative duration. In the analysis that excludes operative duration, pelvic exenteration is associated with SSI (OR: 1.38), but incorporating operative duration into the model results in this variable becoming non-significant. In addition to other factors, obesity, surgery for bowel obstruction, abdominoperineal resection, and additional organ resection are independently associated with a higher risk of SSI. Surgical site infection risk in pelvic exenteration and multiple organ resection cases appears to be mediated by prolonged operative duration. In these established high-risk sub-groups of

  17. Surgical site infection after valvular or coronary artery bypass surgery: 2008-2011 French SSI national ISO-RAISIN surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossin, S; Malavaud, S; Jarno, P; Giard, M; L'Hériteau, F; Simon, L; Bieler, L; Molinier, L; Marcheix, B; Venier, A-G

    2015-11-01

    Multisite information regarding surgical site infection (SSI) rates for cardiac surgery programmes is not widely available. Ward characteristics that may affect outcomes have not been analysed previously. To determine individual- and ward-level factors associated with SSI occurrence after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and valvular surgery. A dataset from the French national SSI database ISO-RAISIN 2008-2011 was used. Only adult patients were included. A standardized questionnaire was completed for each patient who underwent surgery, and patients with and without SSI were characterized. Patients and ward risk factors for SSI were analysed using a multilevel logistic regression model with SSI as binary outcome (two levels: patient and ward). Out of 8569 patients from 39 wards, the SSI rate was 2.2%. Micro-organisms were isolated in 144 patients (74%): 35% coagulase-negative staphylococci (N = 51), 23% Staphylococcus aureus (N = 33), 6% Escherichia coli (N = 8). Higher probability of SSI was associated with the duration of preoperative hospitalization, the duration of follow-up, the duration of surgery >75th percentile and the SSI rate in the surgery ward. The residual heterogeneity between wards (median odds ratio: 1.53) was as relevant as duration of preoperative hospitalization (odds ratio: 1.57). Although patient risk factors were more strongly associated with SSI occurrence, this study provided evidence for the existence of a ward-level effect. This should be taken into account when considering possible corrective interventions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis of triclosan-coated sutures for the prevention of surgical-site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, S W; Atema, J J; Solomkin, J S; Boermeester, M A

    2017-01-01

    Triclosan-coated sutures (TCS) were developed to reduce the risk of surgical-site infection (SSI). Level 1A evidence of effectiveness has been presented in various recent meta-analyses, yet well designed RCTs have not been able to reproduce these favourable results. The aim of this study was to evaluate all available evidence critically with comprehensive analysis to seek a more reliable answer regarding the effectiveness of TCS in the prevention of SSI. PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane Library databases were searched from 1990 to November 2015 for RCTs that compared TCS with sutures that were exactly the same, but uncoated, in the prevention of SSI. Pooled relative risks (RRs) with corresponding 95 per cent confidence intervals were estimated using a random-effects model. Metaregression was used to substantiate subgroup effects, trial sequential analysis was employed to assess the risk of random error, and quality of evidence was determined using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. Twenty-one RCTs including 6462 patients were included. Risk of bias was serious. Pooled effects showed a RR of 0·72 (95 per cent c.i. 0·60 to 0·86; P < 0·001) for all publications. At a risk of 138 SSIs per 1000 procedures, the use of TCS reduced this by 39 (95 per cent c.i. 19, 55). Trial sequential analysis confirmed a RR reduction of 15 per cent for the use of TCS. GRADE assessment shows moderate-quality evidence that TCS are effective in reducing SSI. Trial sequential analysis indicates that the effect was robust, and additional data are unlikely to alter the summary effect. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of surgical site infections: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zheng, Qiu-Jian; Wang, Sheng; Zeng, Shi-Xing; Zhang, You-Ping; Bai, Xue-Jiao; Hou, Tie-Ying

    2015-08-01

    Observational studies have suggested an association between diabetes mellitus and the risk of surgical site infections (SSIs), but the results remain inconclusive. We conducted a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to elucidate the relationship between diabetes mellitus and SSIs. We searched PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases and reviewed the reference lists of the retrieved articles to identify relevant studies. Associations were tested in subgroups representing different patient characteristics and study quality criteria. The random-effect model was used to calculate the overall relative risk (RR). Fourteen prospective cohort studies (N = 91,094 participants) were included in this meta-analysis, and the pooled crude RR was 2.02 (95% confidence interval, 1.68-2.43) with significant between-study heterogeneity observed (I(2) = 56.50%). Significant association was also detected after we derived adjusted RRs for studies not reporting the adjusted RRs and calculated the combined adjusted RR of the 14 studies (RR, 1.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.33-2.13). Results were consistent and statistically significant in all subgroups. Stratified analyses found the number of confounders adjusted for, sample size, and method of diabetes case ascertainment might be the potential sources of heterogeneity. Sensitivity analysis further demonstrated the robustness of the result. This meta-analysis suggests diabetes mellitus is significantly associated with increased risk of SSIs. Future studies are encouraged to reveal the mechanisms underlying this association. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Introduction to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomkin, Joseph S; Mazuski, John; Blanchard, Joan C; Itani, Kamal M F; Ricks, Philip; Dellinger, E Patchen; Allen, George; Kelz, Rachel; Reinke, Caroline E; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common type of health-care-associated infection (HAI) and adds considerably to the individual, social, and economic costs of surgical treatment. This document serves to introduce the updated Guideline for the Prevention of SSI from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC). The Core section of the guideline addresses issues relevant to multiple surgical specialties and procedures. The second procedure-specific section focuses on a high-volume, high-burden procedure: Prosthetic joint arthroplasty. While many elements of the 1999 guideline remain current, others warrant updating to incorporate new knowledge and changes in the patient population, operative techniques, emerging pathogens, and guideline development methodology.

  1. [Use of plastic adhesive drapes during surgery may increase the risk of surgical site infections. A survey of a Cochrane review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvist, Niels; Kolmos, Hans Jørn J

    2009-10-05

    In theory, the products act as a barrier, which hinders the spreading of bacteria from the deeper skin layers and hair follicles to the incision. On the other hand, the use of plastic adhesive drapes may promote bacterial overgrowth due to a >greenhouse effectplastic adhesive drapes reduces the surgical site infection rate and some evidence that they increase infection rates in clean operations. Consequently, their use should be abandoned. Further studies are warranted to determine the effect of other adhesive products currently used.

  2. Perioperative oxygen fraction - effect on surgical site infection and pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery: a randomized clinical trial. Rationale and design of the PROXI-Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyhoff, Christian Sylvest; Wetterslev, Jørn; Jorgensen, Lars N;

    2008-01-01

    A high perioperative inspiratory oxygen fraction may reduce the risk of surgical site infections, as bacterial eradication by neutrophils depends on wound oxygen tension. Two trials have shown that a high perioperative inspiratory oxygen fraction (FiO(2) = 0.80) significantly reduced risk...... complications, such as atelectasis, pneumonia and respiratory failure. The aim of our trial is to assess the potential benefits and harms of a high perioperative oxygen fraction in patients undergoing abdominal surgery....

  3. Surveillance for surgical site infection (SSI) after neurosurgery: influence of the US or Brest (France) National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance risk index on SSI rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietard, Claire; Thébaud, Véronique; Besson, Gérard; Lejeune, Benoist

    2008-11-01

    A total of 5,628 neurosurgical patients were observed in France to assess the occurrence of surgical site infection (SSI). Their risk of SSI was defined by calculating both the US National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance and the Brest National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance risk indexes. This study compares SSI rates stratified according to either the US or Brest (France) National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance risk index. The SSI rates were correlated with National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance data involving only local operation durations.

  4. The Effect of Participating in a Surgical Site Infection (SSI) Surveillance Network on the Time Trend of SSI Rates: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mohamed; Tartari, Ermira; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Pittet, Didier; Harbarth, Stephan

    2017-08-24

    This systematic literature review reveals that participating in a surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance network is associated with short-term reductions in SSI rates: relative risk [RR] for year 2, 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-0.82); year 3 RR, 0.92 (95% CI, 0.90-0.94); year 4 RR, 0.98 (95% CI, 0.96-1.00). Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;1-3.

  5. Development and Validation of a Preoperative Surgical Site Infection Risk Score for Primary or Revision Knee and Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Joshua S; Andridge, Rebecca R; Scharschmidt, Thomas J; Mayerson, Joel L; Glassman, Andrew H; Lemeshow, Stanley

    2016-09-21

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a major complication following total joint arthroplasty. Host susceptibility to infection has emerged as an important predictor of SSI. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a preoperative SSI risk-assessment tool for primary or revision knee and hip arthroplasty. Data for 6,789 patients who underwent total joint arthroplasty (from the years 2000 to 2011) were obtained from a single hospital system. SSI was defined as a superficial infection within 30 days or deep infection within 1 year. Logistic regression modeling was utilized to create a risk scoring system for a derivation sample (n = 5,789; 199 SSIs), with validation performed on a hold-out sample (a subset of observations chosen randomly from the initial sample to form a testing set; n = 1,000; 41 SSIs). On the basis of logistic regression modeling, we created a scoring system to assess SSI risk (range, 0 to 35 points) that is the point sum of the following: primary hip arthroplasty (0 points); primary knee (1); revision hip (3); revision knee (3); non-insulin-dependent diabetes (1); insulin-dependent diabetes (1.5); chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (1); inflammatory arthropathy (1.5); tobacco use (1.5); lower-extremity osteomyelitis or pyogenic arthritis (2); pelvis, thigh, or leg traumatic fracture (2); lower-extremity pathologic fracture (2.5); morbid obesity (2.5); primary bone cancer (4); reaction to prosthesis in the last 3 years (4); and history of staphylococcal septicemia (4.5). The risk score had good discriminatory capability (area under the ROC [receiver operating characteristic] curve = 0.77) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-square test, p = 0.34) and was validated using the independent sample (area under the ROC curve = 0.72). A small subset of patients (5.9%) had a >10% estimated infection risk. The patient comorbidities composing the risk score heavily influenced SSI risk for primary or revision knee and hip arthroplasty. We

  6. Surgical site infection prevention: the importance of operative duration and blood transfusion--results of the first American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Best Practices Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Darrell A; Henderson, William G; Englesbe, Michael J; Hall, Bruce L; O'Reilly, Michael; Bratzler, Dale; Dellinger, E Patchen; Neumayer, Leigh; Bass, Barbara L; Hutter, Matthew M; Schwartz, James; Ko, Clifford; Itani, Kamal; Steinberg, Steven M; Siperstein, Allan; Sawyer, Robert G; Turner, Douglas J; Khuri, Shukri F

    2008-12-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) continue to be a significant problem in surgery. The American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) Best Practices Initiative compared process and structural characteristics among 117 private sector hospitals in an effort to define best practices aimed at preventing SSI. Using standard NSQIP methodologies, we identified 20 low outlier and 13 high outlier hospitals for SSI using data from the ACS-NSQIP in 2006. Each hospital was administered a process of care survey, and site visits were conducted to five hospitals. Comparisons between the low and high outlier hospitals were made with regard to patient characteristics, operative variables, structural variables, and processes of care. Hospitals that were high outliers for SSI had higher trainee-to-bed ratios (0.61 versus 0.25, p site visitors. Overall, low outlier hospitals were smaller, efficient in the delivery of care, and experienced little operative staff turnover. Our findings suggest that evidence-based SSI prevention practices do not easily distinguish well from poorly performing hospitals. But structural and process of care characteristics of hospitals were found to have a significant association with good results.

  7. Distribution of methicillin-resistant coagulase-positive staphylococci (MRCoPS) in a surgical unit and cystotomy operation sites in a veterinary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungwithaya, Punpichaya; Brikshavana, Pasakorn; Chanchaithong, Pattrarat; Prapasarakul, Nuvee

    2017-02-28

    This study aimed to investigate the spread of methicillin-resistant coagulase-positive staphylococci (MRCoPS) among veterinary staff, hand-touch sites and surgical tissue during cystotomy operations on cats and dogs that were patients, and to analyze the genetic relatedness and antimicrobial resistance profiles of the isolates. Human and environmental samples were obtained from the nasal passageways of 12 surgeons and veterinary assistants and from 29 hand-touch sites of instruments in operative units and subjected to bacterial isolation and enumeration. Swab samples were collected in triplicate from 29 dogs and three cats at the site of incision, from the incision area, from the peritoneum during surgery and from the peritoneum before suture. MRCoPS were identified by mecA gene detection and characterized by their antibiogram profile, SCCmec type and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Twenty-four staphylococci were isolated, derived from one veterinary assistant, 12 operating room floor areas and hand-touch sites, three dogs and one cat. Methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) was found on an electric clipper and rebreathing circuits in the operating room. Three dogs were positive for MRSP during surgery, and one methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was detected in a cat. All MRCoPS were resistant to doxycycline, erythromycin, clindamycin and enrofloxacin, but no patients developed surgical site infections. According to their genotypic patterns, the clones obtained from the environment and human sources differed from the animal clones. Despite intensive hygienic management, a variety of MRCoPS clones were present within the surgical unit and during surgery.

  8. Matching bacteriological and medico-administrative databases is efficient for a computer-enhanced surveillance of surgical site infections: retrospective analysis of 4,400 surgical procedures in a French university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclère, Brice; Lasserre, Camille; Bourigault, Céline; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Chaillet, Marie-Pierre; Mauduit, Nicolas; Caillon, Jocelyne; Hanf, Matthieu; Lepelletier, Didier

    2014-11-01

    Our goal was to estimate the performance statistics of an electronic surveillance system for surgical site infections (SSIs), generally applicable in French hospitals. Three detection algorithms using 2 different data sources were tested retrospectively on 9 types of surgical procedures performed between January 2010 and December 2011 in the University Hospital of Nantes. The first algorithm was based on administrative codes, the second was based on bacteriological data, and the third used both data sources. For each algorithm, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were calculated. The reference method was the hospital's routine surveillance: a comprehensive review of the computerized medical charts of the patients who underwent one of the targeted procedures during the study period. A 3,000-bed teaching hospital in western France. We analyzed 4,400 targeted surgical procedures. Sensitivity results varied significantly between the three algorithms, from 25% (95% confidence interval, 17-33) when using only administrative codes to 87% (80%-93%) with the bacteriological data and 90% (85%-96%) with the combined algorithm. Fewer variations were observed for specificity (91%-98%), PPV (21%-25%), and NPV (98% to nearly 100%). Overall, performance statistics were higher for deep SSIs than for superficial infections. A reliable computer-enhanced SSI surveillance can easily be implemented in French hospitals using common data sources. This should allow infection control professionals to spend more time on prevention and education duties. However, a multicenter study should be conducted to assess the generalizability of this method.

  9. Effect of surgical drill guide and irrigans temperature on thermal bone changes during drilling implant sites - thermographic analysis on bovine ribs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Aleksa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. During drilling implant sites, mechanical energy is converted into thermal one resulting in transient rise in temperature of surrounding bone. The temperature of 47°C exeeding one minute impairs osseointegration, compromises mechanical properties of the local bone and could cause early implant failure. This in vitro study aimed to assess the effect of surgical drill guide and temperature of irrigans on thermal changes of the local bone during drilling implant sites, and to test the influence of irrigans temperature on the temperature of surgical drill guide. Methods. A total of 48 specimens obtained from bovine ribs were randomly allocated to four experimental conditions according to the 2 x 2 factorial design: drill guide (with or without and saline (at 25°C or 5°C. Real-time infrared thermography was used as a method for temperature measurement. The primary outcome was bone temperature change during drilling implant sites measured at 3 osteotomy depths, whereas the second one was change in the temperature of the drill guide. Data were analyzed by Brunner and Langer nonparametric analysis and Wilcoxon test. Results. The effect of drill guide on the changes of bone temperature was significant at the entrance of osteotomy, whereas the effect of saline temperature was significant at all osteotomy levels (p 0.05. Guided surgery and irrigation with saline at 25°C were associated with the highest bone temperature increase. Increase in drill guide temperature was significantly higher when saline at 25°C was used (p < 0.001. Conclusion. Guided implant site preparation generates higher temperature of the local bone than conventional drilling, not exceeding the threshold for thermal bone necrosis. Although saline at room temperature provides sufficient heat control during drilling, cooled saline is more effective regardless the use of surgical drill guide.

  10. Review of MRSA screening and antibiotics prophylaxis in orthopaedic trauma patients; The risk of surgical site infection with inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis in patients colonized with MRSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, H J; Ponniah, N; Long, S; Rath, N; Kent, M

    2017-07-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine whether orthopaedic trauma patients receive appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis keeping in view the results of their MRSA screening. The secondary aim was to analyse the risk of developing MRSA surgical site infection with and without appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis in those colonized with MRSA. We reviewed 400 consecutive orthopaedic trauma patient episodes. Preoperative MRSA screening results, operative procedures, prophylactic antibiotics and postoperative course were explored. In addition to these consecutive patients, the hospital MRSA database over the previous 5 years identified 27 MRSA colonized acute trauma patients requiring surgery. Of the 400 consecutive patient episodes, 395(98.7%) had MRSA screening performed on admission. However, in 236 (59.0%) cases, the results were not available before the surgery. Seven patient episodes (1.8%) had positive MRSA colonization. Analysis of 27 MRSA colonized patients revealed that 20(74%) patients did not have the screening results available before the surgery. Only 5(18.5%) received Teicoplanin and 22(81.4%) received cefuroxime for antibiotic prophylaxis before their surgery. Of those receiving cefuroxime, five (22.73%) patients developed postoperative MRSA surgical site infection (SSI) but none of those (0%) receiving Teicoplanin had MRSA SSI. The absolute risk reduction for SSI with Teicoplanin as antibiotic prophylaxis was 22.73% (CI=5.22%-40.24%) and NNT (Number Needed to Treat) was 5 (CI=2.5-19.2) CONCLUSION: Lack of available screening results before the surgery may lead to inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis increasing the risk of MRSA surgical site infection. Glycopeptide (e.g.Teicoplanin) prophylaxis should be considered when there is history of MRSA colonization or MRSA screening results are not available before the surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. 术前备皮对手术野感染的影响%Influence of hair removal on surgical site infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘畅; 王聪敏; 赵志力

    2011-01-01

    @@ 手术野感染(surgical site infection,SSI)是外科手术的并发症之一,易发生于切口或器官(组织),通常会采取术前清洁皮肤及剃除手术野毛发的准备方式预防SSl.上世纪20年代开始将备皮作为一种常规,一般于手术前一日进行.

  12. Can the surgical checklist reduce the risk of wrong site surgery in orthopaedics? - can the checklist help? Supporting evidence from analysis of a national patient incident reporting system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleary Kevin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical procedures are now very common, with estimates ranging from 4% of the general population having an operation per annum in economically-developing countries; this rising to 8% in economically-developed countries. Whilst these surgical procedures typically result in considerable improvements to health outcomes, it is increasingly appreciated that surgery is a high risk industry. Tools developed in the aviation industry are beginning to be used to minimise the risk of errors in surgery. One such tool is the World Health Organization's (WHO surgery checklist. The National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA manages the largest database of patient safety incidents (PSIs in the world, already having received over three million reports of episodes of care that could or did result in iatrogenic harm. The aim of this study was to estimate how many incidents of wrong site surgery in orthopaedics that have been reported to the NPSA could have been prevented by the WHO surgical checklist. Methods The National Reporting and Learning Service (NRLS database was searched between 1st January 2008- 31st December 2008 to identify all incidents classified as wrong site surgery in orthopaedics. These incidents were broken down into the different types of wrong site surgery. A Likert-scale from 1-5 was used to assess the preventability of these cases if the checklist was used. Results 133/316 (42% incidents satisfied the inclusion criteria. A large proportion of cases, 183/316 were misclassified. Furthermore, there were fewer cases of actual harm [9% (12/133] versus 'near-misses' [121/133 (91%]. Subsequent analysis revealed a smaller proportion of 'near-misses' being prevented by the checklist than the proportion of incidents that resulted in actual harm; 18/121 [14.9% (95% CI 8.5 - 21.2%] versus 10/12 [83.3% (95%CI 62.2 - 104.4%] respectively. Summatively, the checklist could have been prevented 28/133 [21.1% (95%CI 14.1 - 28.0%] patient safety

  13. Clinical and economic burden of surgical site infection (SSI) and predicted financial consequences of elimination of SSI from an English hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, P J; Laurent, M; McQuarry, S; Watkins, R

    2014-01-01

    Although surgical site infections (SSIs) are known to be associated with increased length of stay (LOS) and additional cost, their impact on the profitability of surgical procedures is unknown. To determine the clinical and economic burden of SSI over a two-year period and to predict the financial consequences of their elimination. SSI surveillance and Patient Level Information and Costing System (PLICS) datasets for patients who underwent major surgical procedures at Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust between April 2010 and March 2012 were consolidated. The main outcome measures were the attributable postoperative length of stay (LOS), cost, and impact on the margin differential (profitability) of SSI. A secondary outcome was the predicted financial consequence of eliminating all SSIs. The median additional LOS attributable to SSI was 10 days [95% confidence interval (CI): 7-13 days] and a total of 4694 bed-days were lost over the two-year period. The median additional cost attributable to SSI was £5,239 (95% CI: 4,622-6,719) and the aggregate extra cost over the study period was £2,491,424. After calculating the opportunity cost of eliminating all SSIs that had occurred in the two-year period, the combined overall predicted financial benefit of doing so would have been only £694,007. For seven surgical categories, the hospital would have been financially worse off if it had successfully eliminated all SSIs. SSI causes significant clinical and economic burden. Nevertheless the current system of reimbursement provided a financial disincentive to their reduction. Copyright © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of Quantile Regression to Determine the Impact on Total Health Care Costs of Surgical Site Infections Following Common Ambulatory Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Margaret A; Tian, Fang; Wallace, Anna E; Nickel, Katelin B; Warren, David K; Fraser, Victoria J; Selvam, Nandini; Hamilton, Barton H

    2017-02-01

    To determine the impact of surgical site infections (SSIs) on health care costs following common ambulatory surgical procedures throughout the cost distribution. Data on costs of SSIs following ambulatory surgery are sparse, particularly variation beyond just mean costs. We performed a retrospective cohort study of persons undergoing cholecystectomy, breast-conserving surgery, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and hernia repair from December 31, 2004 to December 31, 2010 using commercial insurer claims data. SSIs within 90 days post-procedure were identified; infections during a hospitalization or requiring surgery were considered serious. We used quantile regression, controlling for patient, operative, and postoperative factors to examine the impact of SSIs on 180-day health care costs throughout the cost distribution. The incidence of serious and nonserious SSIs was 0.8% and 0.2%, respectively, after 21,062 anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, 0.5% and 0.3% after 57,750 cholecystectomy, 0.6% and 0.5% after 60,681 hernia, and 0.8% and 0.8% after 42,489 breast-conserving surgery procedures. Serious SSIs were associated with significantly higher costs than nonserious SSIs for all 4 procedures throughout the cost distribution. The attributable cost of serious SSIs increased for both cholecystectomy and hernia repair as the quantile of total costs increased ($38,410 for cholecystectomy with serious SSI vs no SSI at the 70th percentile of costs, up to $89,371 at the 90th percentile). SSIs, particularly serious infections resulting in hospitalization or surgical treatment, were associated with significantly increased health care costs after 4 common surgical procedures. Quantile regression illustrated the differential effect of serious SSIs on health care costs at the upper end of the cost distribution.

  15. Role of culture of postoperative drainage fluid in the prediction of infection of the surgical site after major oncological operations of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candau-Alvarez, A; Linares-Sicilia, M J; Dean-Ferrer, A; Pérez-Navero, J L

    2015-02-01

    Infection of the surgical site after major oncological operations of the head and neck increases mortality and morbidity. The aim of this prospective pilot study was to assess the efficacy of culturing the exudate from the drain after cervical neck dissection to see if it predicted such infection. We studied 40/112 patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck who were treated during the last two years and met our inclusion criteria. Six patients developed infections (15%). Reconstruction with pedicled rather than local or microvascular flaps, duration of operation of over 7 hours, the presence of a tracheostomy, and bilateral neck dissection were considered risk factors (p=0.01). Culture of drainage fluid on postoperative day 3 that grew no pathogens predicted that the site would not become infected, with a negative predictive value of 96%. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. ABDOMINAL CLOSURE WITH ANTI BACTERIAL COATED SUTURE MATERIALS AND ITS RELATION TO THE INCIDENCE OF POST OPERATIVE SUPERFICIAL SURGICAL SITE INFECTION RATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Pudumai Selvi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Surgical site infection (SSI is an immense burden on healthcare resources even in the modern era of immaculate sterilization approaches and highly effective antibiotics. An estimated 234 million various surgical procedures, involving skin incisions requiring various types of wound closure techniques, are performed in the world, with the majority resulting in a wound healing by primary intention. Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2, 4-dichlorophenoxy phenol is a broad-spectrum bactericidal agent that has been used for more than 40 years in various products, such as toothpaste and soaps. Higher concentrations of Triclosan work as a bactericide by attacking different structures in the bacterial cytoplasm and cell membrane. Use of Triclosan-coated sutures should theoretically result in the reduction of SSI. The aim of the study is to assess the abdominal closure with antibacterial coated suture materials and its relation to the incidence of post-operative superficial surgical site infection rates. MATERIALS AND METHODS The data will be collected from hospital records of surgery performed, post-operative daily progress notes and outpatient folders and telephonic conversations with patients after discharge. All patients undergoing laparotomy procedure for any cause. 100 patients divided as 50 in each group. RESULTS The positive outcome of infection (21.5% in patients using ordinary sutures was significantly differed with the positive outcome of infection (11.4% of Triclosan coated sutures. CONCLUSION In conclusion since there was a definite advantage inferred to the patients by using Triclosan coated polyglactin 910, it is the opinion of the researcher that Triclosan coated sutures has a role to play in reducing SSI in clean wounds and its use should be confined to areas where its application has proven benefits. However more studies should be done to clearly define its role and indications in surgery.

  17. Role of Pre-Operative Blood Transfusion and Subcutaneous Fat Thickness as Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infection after Posterior Thoracic Spine Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhoff, Georg; Burla, Laurin; Werner, Clément M L; Jentzsch, Thorsten; Wanner, Guido A; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Sprengel, Kai

    2015-06-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) increase morbidity and mortality rates and generate additional cost for the healthcare system. Pre-operative blood transfusion and the subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT) have been described as risk factors for SSI in other surgical areas. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of pre-operative blood transfusion and the SFT on the occurrence of SSI in posterior thoracic spine surgery. In total, 244 patients (median age 55 y; 97 female) who underwent posterior thoracic spine fusions from 2008 to 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Patient-specific characteristics, pre-operative hemoglobin concentration/hematocrit values, the amount of blood transfused, and the occurrence of a post-operative SSI were documented. The SFT was measured on pre-operative computed tomography scans. Surgical site infection was observed in 26 patients (11%). The SFT was 13 mm in patients without SSI and 14 mm in those with infection (p=0.195). The odds ratio for patients with pre-operative blood transfusion to present with SSI was 3.1 (confidence interval [CI] 1.4-7.2) and 2.7 (CI 1.1-6.4) when adjusted for age. There was no difference between the groups with regard to pre-operative hemoglobin concentration (p=0.519) or hematocrit (p=0.908). The SFT did not differ in the two groups. Allogeneic red blood cell transfusion within 48 h prior to surgery was an independent risk factor for SSI after posterior fusion for the fixation of thoracic spine instabilities. Pre-operative blood transfusion tripled the risk, whereas SFT had no influence on the occurrence of SSI.

  18. A GWAS sequence variant for platelet volume marks an alternative DNM3 promoter in megakaryocytes near a MEIS1 binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nürnberg, Sylvia T; Rendon, Augusto; Smethurst, Peter A; Paul, Dirk S; Voss, Katrin; Thon, Jonathan N; Lloyd-Jones, Heather; Sambrook, Jennifer G; Tijssen, Marloes R; Italiano, Joseph E; Deloukas, Panos; Gottgens, Berthold; Soranzo, Nicole; Ouwehand, Willem H

    2012-12-06

    We recently identified 68 genomic loci where common sequence variants are associated with platelet count and volume. Platelets are formed in the bone marrow by megakaryocytes, which are derived from hematopoietic stem cells by a process mainly controlled by transcription factors. The homeobox transcription factor MEIS1 is uniquely transcribed in megakaryocytes and not in the other lineage-committed blood cells. By ChIP-seq, we show that 5 of the 68 loci pinpoint a MEIS1 binding event within a group of 252 MK-overexpressed genes. In one such locus in DNM3, regulating platelet volume, the MEIS1 binding site falls within a region acting as an alternative promoter that is solely used in megakaryocytes, where allelic variation dictates different levels of a shorter transcript. The importance of dynamin activity to the latter stages of thrombopoiesis was confirmed by the observation that the inhibitor Dynasore reduced murine proplatelet for-mation in vitro.

  19. Preserving the socket dimensions with bone grafting in single sites: an esthetic surgical approach when planning delayed implant placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irinakis, Tassos; Tabesh, Moe

    2007-01-01

    Recent advancements in barrier membranes, bone grafting substitutes, and surgical techniques have led to a predictable arsenal of treatment methods for clinicians who practice implant dentistry. The contemporary clinician is supplied with proven knowledge, substantiated materials, and instrument inventory that allows implant placement in cases that used to be reserved for the specialist in the past because of their complexity. Nowadays, postextraction alveolar ridge maintenance can be a predictable procedure and can certainly aid the clinician in preventing ridge collapse, thereby allowing for implant placement in a position that satisfies esthetics and function. Extraction socket maintenance for future implant therapy does not rule out immediate implant placement but rather provides an additional option when treatment planning implant patients. This article will focus on the concept of extraction socket preservation using regenerative materials. It will describe a technique suggested by the authors to resist bone resorption and soft tissue shrinkage following tooth extraction.

  20. Abortion - surgical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion involves dilating the opening to the uterus (cervix) and placing a small suction tube into the uterus. ...

  1. Risk factors for surgical site infection after posterior cervical spine surgery: an analysis of 5,441 patients from the ACS NSQIP 2005-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Arjun; Huddleston, Paul; Kakar, Sanjeev; Habermann, Elizabeth; Wagie, Amy; Nassr, Ahmad

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) following posterior cervical surgery has been reported as high as 18% in the literature. Few large studies have specifically examined posterior cervical procedures. The study aims to examine the incidence, timing, and risk factors for SSI following posterior cervical surgery. This is a retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected data in a national surgical outcomes database. The sample includes patients who underwent posterior cervical spine surgery between 2005 and 2012 identified in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (ACS NSQIP) Participant Use Data File. The 30-day rate of postoperative SSI, timing of diagnosis, and associated risk factors were determined. The ACS NSQIP was used to identify 5,441 patients who underwent posterior cervical spine surgery by Current Procedural Terminology codes from 2005 to 2012. Thirty-day readmission data were obtained for 2011-2012. The incidence and timing of SSI were determined. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was then performed to identify significant risk factors. Of the 5,441 patients identified as having undergone posterior cervical surgery, 3,724 had a posterior cervical decompression, 1,310 had a posterior cervical fusion, and 407 underwent cervical laminoplasty. Surgical site infection within 30 days was identified in 160 patients (2.94%), with 80 of those cases being superficial SSI. There was no significant difference in SSI rate among the three procedure groups. The average time for diagnosis of SSI was over 2 weeks. In 2011-2012, 36.9% of patients with SSI were readmitted within 30 days. Several significant predictors of SSI were identified in univariate analysis, including body mass index (BMI) >35, chronic steroid use, albumin 35 (odds ratio [OR]=1.78, p=.003), chronic steroid use (OR=1.73, p=.049), and operative time >197 minutes (OR=2.08, p=.005), were identified in multivariable analysis. Optimization

  2. Computed tomography evidence of fluid in the hernia sac predicts surgical site infection following mesh repair of acutely incarcerated ventral and groin hernias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Tyler J; Go, Kristina L; Jordan, Janeen R; Croft, Chasen A; Smith, R Stephen; Moore, Frederick A; Efron, Philip A; Mohr, Alicia M; Brakenridge, Scott C

    2017-07-01

    Mesh placement during repair of acutely incarcerated ventral and groin hernias is associated with high rates of surgical site infection (SSI). The utility of preoperative computed tomography (CT) in this setting is unclear. We hypothesized that CT evidence of bowel wall compromise would predict SSI while accounting for physiologic parameters. We performed a 4-year retrospective cohort analysis of 50 consecutive patients who underwent mesh repair of acutely incarcerated ventral or groin hernias. We analyzed chronic disease burden, acute illness severity, CT findings, operative management, and herniorrhaphy-specific outcomes within 180 days. The primary outcome was SSI by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. Multiple logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of SSI. Eighty-four percent of all patients were American Society of Anesthesiologists class III or IV, 28% were active smokers, and mean body mass index (BMI) was 35 kg/m. Fifty-four percent had ventral hernias, 40% had inguinal hernias, and 6% had femoral or combined inguinal/ femoral hernias. Seventy percent of preoperative CT scans had features suggesting bowel compromise, abdominal free fluid, or fluid in the hernia sac. Surgical site infection occurred in 32% of all patients (8% superficial, 24% deep or organ/space). The strongest predictors of SSI were CT evidence of fluid in the hernia sac (odds ratio [OR], 8.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7-41), initial heart rate 90 beats/min or greater (OR, 6.3; 95% CI, 1.1-34), and BMI 35 kg/m or greater (OR, 5.8; 95% CI, 1.2-28). Surgical site infection rates were significantly higher among patients who had CT evidence of fluid in the hernia sac (56% vs. 19%, p = 0.012). More than half of all patients with CT scan evidence of fluid in the hernia sac developed an SSI. Computed tomography evidence of fluid in the hernia sac was the strongest predictor of SSI, followed by heart rate and BMI. Together, these parameters

  3. Site and type of craniopharyngiomas impact differently on 24-hour circadian rhythms and surgical outcome. A neurophysiological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foschi, M; Sambati, L; Zoli, M; Pierangeli, G; Cecere, A; Mignani, F; Barletta, G; Sturiale, C; Faustini-Fustini, M; Milanese, L; Cortelli, P; Mazzatenta, D; Provini, F

    2017-08-18

    This study aimed to quantify 24h body core temperature (BcT°) and sleep-wake cycle rhythm alterations in craniopharyngioma (CP) patients and to identify markers related to the postsurgical outcomes. Ten consecutive CP patients underwent neuroradiological, endocrinological and ophthalmological evaluations, 24h BcT° and sleep-wake cycle recordings before and after endoscopic endonasal surgery. The sample included four women and six men. Nocturnal sleep efficiency was pathologically reduced in eight patients before surgery. Seven out of ten patients presented one to three daytime naps. 24h BcT° rhythm was pathological in six out of ten cases. Post-surgery sleep efficiency normalized in four out of eight patients, whereas nine out of ten patients presented with two to six longer daytime naps. Diurnal naps were mainly present in patients showing pre-operative involvement of the third ventricle floor. 24h BcT° remained pathological in only one out of six cases, returned to normal in two and improved in three. 24h BcT° rhythm improved more in papillary CPs than in adamantomatous CPs. Our data confirmed that both CP and surgery frequently disrupt the sleep-wake cycle and BcT° rhythms. Tumour location and histotype may be related to a worse postsurgical outcome. Therefore, in-depth investigation including circadian monitoring is crucial for surgical outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence of Pathogenic Bacteria Isolated from Surgical Site and Wound Infection among Patients Admitted in some selected Hospitals in Sokoto Metropolis, Nigeria

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    UK Muhammad

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Surgical and open wounds are commonly encountered in clinical practice. This study was aim to determine the prevalence of pathogenic bacteria in surgical and open wound infection among patients admitted in some selected hospitals in Sokoto metropolis. A total of one hundred and fifty one (151 isolates were obtained from two hundred (200 surgical site and wound samples collected from patients in this study. The result showed that Usmanu Danfodiyo Teaching Hospital Sokoto (UDUTH had the highest number of clinical isolates with 64 gram positive and gram negative bacteria followed by Specialist Hospital Sokoto (S.H.S with 57 gram positive and gram negative bacteria and then Maryam Abacha Women and Children Hospital (MAWCH with 30 gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Gram positive cocci 108 (71.5% were more predominant pathogen isolated in the hospitals than gram negative bacilli 43 (28.5%. Staphylococcus aureus had the highest number of occurrence with 54(35.76% followed by Coagulate negative Staphylococci with 47(31.1% while Citrobacter freundii had the lowest number of occurrence with 2(1.32% isolates. Also, the susceptibility of the isolates to antimicrobial agents were carried out using Amoxacillin, Ampicillin, Erythromycin, Chloramphenicol, Ampiclox, Ciprofloxacin, Gentamycin, Tetracycline, Pefloxacin and Cotrimoxazole. The mean zone of inhibition recorded against Staphlococcus aureus by using Amoxacillin antibiotic is 2.20mm while with Citrobacter freundii is 1.00. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i3.11066 International Journal of Environment Vol.3(3 2014: 89-103

  5. The OneTogether collaborative approach to reduce the risk of surgical site infection: identifying the challenges to assuring best practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topley, Katherine; Stott, Dawn; Neachell, Jonathan; Gallagher, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) account for 16% of healthcare associated infections, and are associated with considerable morbidity, mortality and increased costs of care. Ensuring evidence-based practice to prevent SSI is incorporated across the patient’s surgical journey is complex. OneTogether is a quality improvement collaborative of infection prevention and operating department specialists, formed to support the spread and adoption of best practice to prevent SSI. This paper describes the findings of an expert workshop on infection prevention in operating departments. Methods: A total of 84 delegates from 75 hospitals attended the workshop, comprising 46 (55%) theatre nurses/operating department practitioners; 16 (19%) infection control practitioners and 22 (26%) other healthcare practitioners. Discussion focused on evidence, policy implementation and barriers to best practice. Responses were synthesised into a narrative review. Results: Delegates reported significant problems in translating evidence-based guidance into everyday practice, lack of local polices and poor compliance. Major barriers were lack of leadership, poorly defined responsibilities, and lack of knowledge/training. Conclusions: This workshop has provided important insights into major challenges in assuring compliance with best practice in relation to the prevention of SSI. The OneTogether partnership aims to support healthcare practitioners to improve the outcomes of patients undergoing surgery by reducing the risk of SSI.

  6. Rapid tests for the detection of the Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii strain responsible for an epidemic of surgical-site infections in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristianne Kayoko Matsumoto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A single strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii, characterised by a particular rpoB sequevar and two highly related pulsed field gel electrophoresis patterns has been responsible for a nationwide outbreak of surgical infections in Brazil since 2004. In this study, we developed molecular tests based on polymerase chain reaction restriction-enzyme analysis (PRA and sequencing for the rapid identification of this strain. Sequences of 15 DNA regions conserved in mycobacteria were retrieved from GenBank or sequenced and analysed in silico. Single nucleotide polymorphisms specific to the epidemic strain and located in enzyme recognition sites were detected in rpoB, the 3' region of the 16S rDNA and gyrB. The three tests that were developed, i.e., PRA-rpoB, PRA-16S and gyrB sequence analysis, showed 100%, 100% and 92.31% sensitivity and 93.06%, 90.28% and 100% specificity, respectively, for the discrimination of the surgical strain from other M. abscessus subsp. bolletii isolates, including 116 isolates from 95 patients, one environmental isolate and two type strains. The results of the three tests were stable, as shown by results obtained for different isolates from the same patient. In conclusion, due to the clinical and epidemiological importance of this strain, these tests could be implemented in reference laboratories for the rapid preliminary diagnosis and epidemiological surveillance of this epidemic strain.

  7. Late-onset deep surgical-site infection after posterior lumbar interbody fusion in a patient treated with tocilizumab; unusual changes in inflammatory markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Takahiro; Kaito, Takashi; Tsuboi, Hideki; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Yonenobu, Kazuo

    2014-05-01

    To describe a case of late-onset deep surgical-site infection (SSI) after posterior lumbar interbody fusion in a patient treated with tocilizumab (TCZ) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with emphasis on the clinical symptoms and changes in inflammatory markers such as white blood cell (WBC) count and C-reactive protein (CRP) level. A 74-year-old woman with 3-year history of RA underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion at the L4/5/S1 level. After confirmation of no clinical symptom of SSI postoperatively, we decided to use TCZ for the patient after 2 months postoperatively. At 8 months after beginning of TCZ, she suffered from sudden onset of severe low back pain (LBP) with fever (38 °C) 1 day after administration of TCZ. Local tissues around the operative wound showed no sign of redness, warmth, or swelling. Increases in body temperature, WBC count, and CRP level were well suppressed by TCZ. Magnetic resonance imaging performed 2 weeks after onset of LBP revealed deep SSI. After surgical debridement and administration of the sensitive antibiotics, no clinical signs of recurrent spondylitis or osteolysis of vertebral body have been seen for 3 years. As TCZ strongly suppresses inflammatory reactions, detecting deep SSI based on local and systemic findings and laboratory data is quite difficult. Care must be taken regarding SSI when patients treated with TCZ complain of long-lasting LBP after lumbar surgery.

  8. Minimum Alveolar Concentration Needed to Block Adrenergic Response of Sevoflurane with Nitrous Oxide Varies Depending on the Stimulation Sites in Adult Surgical Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsu Kimura

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background We examined whether minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration needed to block adrenergic response (MAC-BAR of sevoflurane with nitrous oxide (N2O varies depending on body surface sites to which noxious stimuli are applied. Methods Seventy-seven ASA I adult patients, aged 18-50 years old, were anesthetized with sevoflurane and 66% N2O in O2, and their tracheas were intubated. The anesthesia was maintained with 66% N2O in O2 plus sevoflurane at predetermined end-tidal concentrations (0.8, 1.1, 1.4, 1.7, 2.0, 2.3, or 2.6%, n = 11 in each concentration for at least 15 minutes. Heart rate (HR and non-invasive blood pressure (BP was recorded at 1-minute interval automatically. As a noxious stimulus, electrical tetanic stimulation with a 15 sec burst of 50 Hz, 0.25 msec square-wave, 55 mA electric current was applied at three different sites; forehead, abdomen, or thigh. A positive cardiovascular response was defined as an increase of either mean BP or HR by more than 15% from the pre-stimulation value. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine MAC-BAR. Results MAC-BAR of sevoflurane with 66% N2O obtained by stimulating forehead, abdomen, and thigh were 2.01% (95% CI: 1.70-2.57%, 1.71% (1.13-2.74%, and 1.31% (0.77-1.66%, respectively. MAC-BAR on the forehead was significantly higher than that on the thigh. Conclusion MAC-BAR of sevoflurane with 66% N2O varied depending on the body surface sites to which noxious stimuli were applied. These findings support our clinical impression that sensitivities to pain vary among body surface sites, and that anesthetic requirement to stabilize hemodynamic variables vary among surgical sites.

  9. Preoperative screening/decolonization for Staphylococcus aureus to prevent orthopedic surgical site infection: prospective cohort study with 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Nalini; Cannella, Barbara A; Crossett, Lawrence S; Yates, Adolph J; McGough, Richard L; Hamilton, Cindy W

    2011-12-01

    We quantified surgical site infections (SSIs) after preoperative screening/selective decolonization before elective total joint arthroplasty (TJA) with 2-year follow-up and 2 controls. Concurrent controls (n = 2284) were patients of surgeons not participating in screening/decolonization. Preintervention controls (n = 741) were patients of participating surgeons who underwent TJA the previous year. Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriers (321/1285 [25%]) used intranasal mupirocin and chlorhexidine baths as outpatients. Staphylococcal SSIs occurred in no intervention patients (0/321) and 19 concurrent controls. If all SSIs occurred in carriers and 25% of controls were carriers, staphylococcal SSI rate would have been 3.3% in controls (19/571; P = .001). Overall SSI rate decreased from 2.7% (20/741) in preintervention controls to 1.2% (17/1440) in intervention patients (P = .009). Preoperative screening/selective decolonization was associated with fewer SSIs after elective TJA.

  10. Sperm recovery and IVF after testicular sperm extraction (TESE: effect of male diagnosis and use of off-site surgical centers on sperm recovery and IVF.

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    Kenan Omurtag

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Determine whether testicular sperm extractions and pregnancy outcomes are influenced by male and female infertility diagnoses, location of surgical center and time to cryopreservation. PATIENTS: One hundred and thirty men undergoing testicular sperm extraction and 76 couples undergoing 123 in vitro fertilization cycles with testicular sperm. OUTCOME MEASURES: Successful sperm recovery defined as 1-2 sperm/0.5 mL by diagnosis including obstructive azoospermia (n = 60, non-obstructive azoospermia (n = 39, cancer (n = 14, paralysis (n = 7 and other (n = 10. Obstructive azoospermia was analyzed as congenital absence of the vas deferens (n = 22, vasectomy or failed vasectomy reversal (n = 37 and "other"(n = 1. Sperm recovery was also evaluated by surgical site including infertility clinic (n = 54, hospital operating room (n = 67 and physician's office (n = 11. Treatment cycles were evaluated for number of oocytes, fertilization, embryo quality, implantation rate and clinical/ongoing pregnancies as related to male diagnosis, female diagnosis, and use of fresh or cryopreserved testicular sperm. RESULTS: Testicular sperm recovery from azoospermic males with all diagnoses was high (70 to 100% except non-obstructive azoospermia (31% and was not influenced by distance from surgical center to laboratory. Following in vitro fertilization, rate of fertilization was significantly lower with non-obstructive azoospermia (43%, p = <0.0001 compared to other male diagnoses (66%, p = <0.0001, 59% p = 0.015. No differences were noted in clinical pregnancy rate by male diagnosis; however, the delivery rate per cycle was significantly higher with obstructive azoospermia (38% p = 0.0371 compared to diagnoses of cancer, paralysis or other (16.7%. Women diagnosed with diminished ovarian reserve had a reduced clinical pregnancy rate (7.4% p = 0.007 compared to those with other diagnoses (44

  11. Mastering Marking Madness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brooke

    2009-01-01

    Teachers are smart people, so why does marking reduce them to stressed and soulless messes? Because in their hearts they know that students do not learn from it, and that drives them nuts. Researchers like Lorna Earl and Dylan Wiliam have looked closely at marking systems and have proven what teachers already know deep down: marking student work…

  12. Cochlear implants in children: surgical site infections and prevention and treatment of acute otitis media and meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Lorry G; Papsin, Blake

    2010-08-01

    therapy is inappropriate for children with implants with acute otitis media. If feasible, tympanocentesis should be performed for acute otitis media, and the material should be sent for culture, but performance of this procedure should not result in an undue delay in initiating antimicrobial therapy. For patients with suspected meningitis, cerebrospinal fluid as well as middle-ear fluid, if present, should be sent for culture. Empiric antimicrobial therapy for meningitis occurring within 2 months of implantation should include an agent with broad activity against Gram-negative bacilli (eg, meropenem) plus vancomycin. For meningitis occurring 2 months or longer after implantation, standard empiric antimicrobial therapy for meningitis (eg, ceftriaxone plus vancomycin) is indicated. For patients with meningitis, urgent evaluation by an otolaryngologist is indicated for consideration of imaging and surgical exploration.

  13. Reconfiguring trade mark law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsmore, Matthew James

    2013-01-01

    -border setting, with a particular focus on small business and consumers. The article's overall message is to call for a rethink of received wisdom suggesting that trade marks are effective trade-enabling devices. The case is made for reassessing how we think about European trade mark law.......First, this article argues that trade mark law should be approached in a supplementary way, called reconfiguration. Second, the article investigates such a reconfiguration of trade mark law by exploring the interplay of trade marks and service transactions in the Single Market, in the cross...

  14. Infección de los sitios quirúrgicos: estudio de 1 año Infection of the surgical sites: a one-year study

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    Vivian Vialat Soto

    2008-03-01

    sitios quirúrgicos en el niño continúa siendo un problema de salud, al elevar la morbilidad operatoria y aumentar la duración de la estadía hospitalaria y los costes de esta.INTRODUCTION. The patient that undergoes surgery is exposed to diverse complications during the postoperative period. The Center for Disease Control (CDC, Atlanta, U.S.A. redifined the problem of postoperative infections and proposed the term "infection of the surgical sites" to refer to the third most reported cause of nosocomial infection. The objective of this study was to identify the behaviour of the infections of the surgical sites and their interrelation to the risk factors in children operated on in our surgery service during 2006. METHODS. A study on the incidence of infection of the surgical sites and the influence of the risk factors on children that were operated on at the surgery service of the Pediatric Teaching Hospital of Centro Habana in 2006 was conducted. The study group was composed of the 44 patients that presented postoperative infection of the total of 1158 patients that underwent surgery in this period. Different variables were studied and the data obtained from them were analyzed. RESULTS. The 44 patients with infection of the surgical sites accounted for an infection rate of 3.79 %. The sepsis of the surgical wound was the most frequent complication (93.2 %. In 25.0 % of the infected cases, perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis had been used. The infection predominated in the patients that underwent emergency surgery (75.0 % and in the dirty surgeries (43.2 %. The highest number of postoperative infections (31; 70.5 % was registered in the patients operated on of acute appendicitis. Only 7 infected patients had a hospital stay of more than 9 days (15.9 %, and there were only 6 readmissions: 4 patients with sepsis of deep wounds and 3 children with intraperitoneal abscesses secondary to acute appendicitis with generalized peritonitis. CONCLUSIONS. The infection of the

  15. Surgical Assisting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Insert and remove Foley urinary bladder catheter Place pneumatic tourniquet Confirm procedure with surgeon Drape patient within ... Technology and Surgical Assisting (NBSTSA) offers the CertifiedSurgical First Assistant (CSFA) credential, and the National Surgical Assistant ...

  16. Risk factors for superficial surgical site infection after elective rectal cancer resection: a multivariate analysis of 8880 patients from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Elie; Miyagaki, Hiromichi; Bellini, Geoffrey; Shantha Kumara, H M C; Yan, Xiaohong; Howe, Brett; Feigel, Amanda; Whelan, Richard L

    2017-01-01

    Superficial surgical site infection (sSSI) is one of the most common complications after colorectal resection. The goal of this study was to determine the comorbidities and operative characteristics that place patients at risk for sSSI in patients who underwent rectal cancer resection. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was queried (via diagnosis and Current Procedural Terminology codes) for patients with rectal cancer who underwent elective resection between 2005 and 2012. Patients for whom data concerning 27 demographic factors, comorbidities, and operative characteristics were available were eligible. A univariate and multivariate analysis was performed to identify possible risk factors for sSSI. A total of 8880 patients met the entry criteria and were included. sSSIs were diagnosed in 861 (9.7%) patients. Univariate analysis found 14 patients statistically significant risk factors for sSSI. Multivariate analysis revealed the following risk factors: male gender, body mass index (BMI) >30, current smoking, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), American Society of Anesthesiologists III/IV, abdominoperineal resection (APR), stoma formation, open surgery (versus laparoscopic), and operative time >217 min. The greatest difference in sSSI rates was noted in patients with COPD (18.9 versus 9.5%). Of note, 54.2% of sSSIs was noted after hospital discharge. With regard to the timing of presentation, univariate analysis revealed a statistically significant delay in sSSI presentation in patients with the following factors and/or characteristics: BMI Multivariate analysis suggested that only laparoscopic surgery (versus open) and preoperative RT were risk factors for delay. Rectal cancer resections are associated with a high incidence of sSSIs, over half of which are noted after discharge. Nine patient and operative characteristics, including smoking, BMI, COPD, APR, and open surgery were found to be

  17. A STUDY OF COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF PREOPERATIVE SKIN PREPARATION WITH CHLORHEXIDINE-ALCOHOL VERSUS POVIDONE-IODINE IN PREVENTION OF SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS

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    Geetha Danasekaran

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Surgical site infections is a dangerous condition posing a heavy burden on the patient and social health system. The use of preoperative skin preparation by effective antiseptic plays an important role in reducing postoperative wound infections. Hence, the present study was undertaken to compare and evaluate the efficacy of 2% chlorhexidine-alcohol versus 5% povidone-iodine in abdominal surgeries for prevention of SSI. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present one year randomised controlled trial was conducted in the Department of General Surgery, Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai, over a period from 2014 to 2015 on 120 patients undergoing elective abdominal surgeries. The patients were divided into two groups by computer randomisation that is Group A (chlorhexidine-alcohol group and Group B (povidone-iodine group. The surgical wounds were examined for any infections present. RESULTS Most of the patients were males in both the groups (73.33% and 61.67% in group A and B, respectively. Half of the patients (50% in both the groups had chronic appendicitis. The mean duration of surgery in group A was 44.66 ± 5.86 minutes, and in group B, it was 45.00 ± 6.24 minutes. Staphylococcus aureus (1.67% in group A and 10% in group B was the most common organism isolated after skin preparation. After the application of antiseptic agents, there was reduction of bacterial colonisation in both the groups, but significant reduction was seen in chlorhexidine group. In group A, two patients had superficial SSIs compared to 14 patients in group B (p=0.001. The mean length of hospital stay in group A was significantly less (7.20 ± 1.10 vs. 8.67 ± 3.17. CONCLUSION Preoperative skin cleansing with chlorhexidine significantly reduces risk of postoperative SSIs and colonisation of bacteria in clean abdominal surgeries.

  18. Does an information leaflet about surgical site infection (SSI) improve recollection of information and satisfaction of patients? A randomized trial in patients scheduled for digestive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Véronique; Marini, Hélène; Rongère, Julie; Tavolacci, Marie-Pierre; Scotté, Michel; Czernichow, Pierre

    2011-06-01

    A previous study suggested that most surgical patients do not remember having received information about surgical site infection (SSI). In other fields, written information has been suggested to improve patient satisfaction and recollection of information. Our objective was to assess if providing patients with written information about SSI, in addition to oral information, could influence patient satisfaction, recall of information, and opinion regarding SSI. A total of 207 patients scheduled for digestive surgery at a university hospital were randomized between usual oral information about SSI, plus an information leaflet about SSI (group O/L), or usual oral information alone (group O). Patients were interviewed 5 weeks after surgery to assess their recall and satisfaction regarding information, opinion regarding SSI, and declared intention of seeking legal action in case of SSI. Surgeons and interviewer were blinded to patients' group allocation. Recruitment occurred between October 2005 and August 2006. Of the original 207 patients, 161 patients (O/L=87, O=74) underwent operation and were interviewed as scheduled. Satisfaction was higher in group O/L (67% vs. O: 43%; P=0.003). The recall of having received information (O/L: 39% vs. O: 31%; P=0.29), was similar between the two groups. Judging SSI as always preventable was more frequent in group O/L (28% vs. O: 9%; P=0.004) with a trend toward a more frequent intention of seeking legal action (O/L: 10% vs. O: 3%; P=0.055). The leaflet did not improve patient recall of information about SSI, but it was associated with an increased level of satisfaction. The association between the leaflet and judging SSI as always preventable was unexpected.

  19. Is there an increased risk of post-operative surgical site infection after orthopaedic surgery in HIV patients? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigera, James W M; Straetemans, Masja; Vuhaka, Simplice K; Nagel, Ingeborg M; Naddumba, Edward K; Boer, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    There is dilemma as to whether patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) requiring implant orthopaedic surgery are at an increased risk for post-operative surgical site infection (SSI). We conducted a systematic review to determine the effect of HIV on the risk of post-operative SSI and sought to determine if this risk is altered by antibiotic use beyond 24 hours. We searched electronic databases, manually searched citations from relevant articles, and reviewed conference proceedings. The risk of postoperative SSI was pooled using Mantel-Haenszel method. We identified 18 cohort studies with 16 mainly small studies, addressing the subject. The pooled risk ratio of infection in the HIV patients when compared to non-HIV patients was 1.8 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.3-2.4), in studies in Africa this was 2.3 (95% CI 1.5-3.5). In a sensitivity analysis the risk ratio was reduced to 1.4 (95% CI 0.5-3.8). The risk ratio of infection in patients receiving prolonged antibiotics compared to patients receiving antibiotics for up to 24 hours was 0.7 (95% CI 0.1-4.2). The results may indicate an increased risk in HIV infected patients but these results are not robust and inconclusive after conducting the sensitivity analysis removing poor quality studies. There is need for larger good quality studies to provide conclusive evidence. To better develop surgical protocols, further studies should determine the effect of reduced CD4 counts, viral load suppression and prolonged antibiotics on the risk for infection.

  20. Risk factors for extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli versus susceptible E. coli in surgical site infections among cancer patients in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Claudia V; Vilar-Compte, Diana; Velazquez, Consuelo; Golzarri, Maria Fernanda; Cornejo-Juarez, Patricia; Larson, Elaine L

    2014-10-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli are of increasing concern as a cause of healthcare-associated infections. Using a matched case-control design, demographics, antibiotic use, and relevant surgical data were obtained for 173 cases (ESBL E. coli surgical site infections, [SSI]) and 173 controls (antibiotic-susceptible E. coli SSI) in an oncology hospital in Mexico City. Conditional logistic regression modeling was used to calculate odds ratios (OR). The mean age of patients was 53.6 years, 214 (62%) were female. Demographics and comorbidities were similar between groups. Although antibiotic prophylaxis was common among both cases and controls (84% and 89%), more than one-half of cases (53%) were given prophylaxis outside the recommended window or were exposed for more than 24 h in comparison to 29% of controls. Patients who received untimely (OR=3.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-6.4) and discontinued inappropriately (OR 6.38, 95% CI=2.5-16.2) prophylaxis were more likely to develop an ESBL SSI. In addition, patients with an organ/space infection compared with superficial had a higher rate of a resistant infection (OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.3-13.9). Among patients not given timely or appropriately discontinued prophylaxis, post-operative cephalosporin use (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.4-7.7) was associated with ESBL E. coli SSIs. The appropriate timing and duration of perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis were associated with lower risk of ESBL E. coli in SSIs. Even though compliance to antimicrobial prophylaxis guidelines is of the utmost importance, reduced exposure to cephalosporins may also potentially decrease the risk of ESBL SSI.

  1. Effect of pre-operative octenidine nasal ointment and showering on surgical site infections in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, M; Scherag, A; Forstner, C; Brunkhorst, F M; Harbarth, S; Doenst, T; Pletz, M W; Hagel, S

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of pre-operative octenidine (OCT) decolonization on surgical site infection (SSI) rates. Before-and-after cohort study. Patients undergoing an elective isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) procedure: control group (1(st) January to 31(st) December 2013), N=475; intervention group (1(st) January to 31(st) December 2014), N=428. The intervention consisted of nasal application of OCT ointment three times daily, beginning on the day before surgery, and showering the night before and on the day of surgery with OCT soap. A median sternotomy was performed in 805 (89.1%) patients and a minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass procedure was performed in 98 (10.9%) patients. Overall, there was no difference in SSI rates between the control and intervention groups (15.4% vs 13.3%, P=0.39). The rate of harvest site SSIs was significantly lower in patients in the intervention group (2.5% vs 0.5%, P=0.01). Patients who had undergone a median sternotomy in the intervention group had a significantly lower rate of organ/space sternal SSIs (1.9% vs 0.3%, P=0.04). However, there was a trend towards an increased rate of deep incisional sternal SSIs (1.2% vs 2.9%, P=0.08). Multi-variate analysis did not identify a significant protective effect of the intervention (odds ratio 0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.53-1.15, P=0.27). Pre-operative decolonization with OCT did not reduce overall SSI rates in patients undergoing an elective isolated CABG procedure, but significantly decreased harvest site and organ/space sternal SSIs. Randomized controlled trials, including controlled patient adherence to the intervention, are required to confirm these observations and to determine the clinical utility of OCT in pre-operative decolonization. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. 2013~2014年清洁手术抗菌药物使用率与切口感染率相关性分析%Correlation analysis of the utilization rate of antibacterials and surgical site infection rates in clean surgical incision from 2013 to 2014

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹栋; 孙福生; 范春

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo study the correlation between the utilization rate of antibacterials and surgical site infection rates in clean surgical incision.Methods All the clean surgical incisions in our hospital from January in 2013 to December in 2014 were enrolled in this study. The utilization rate of antibacterials and surgical site infection rates were retrospectively investigated according to each month. On the condition that the utilization rate of antibacterials and surgical site infection rates were independent variable and dependent variable alternately, with Pearson Correlation Analysis and scatter diagram, we studied the relationship of the utilization rate of antibacterials and surgical site infection rates in clean surgical incision. Results Before logarithmic transformation of the utilization rate of antibacterials and surgical site infection rates, Pearson coeffi cient of correlation was 0.196,P=0.36>0.05.After logarithmic transformation of the utilization rate of antibacterials and surgical site infection rates, Pearson coeffi cient of correlation was 0.069, P=0.75>0.05. The results showed that there was no correlation between the utilization rate of antibacterials and surgical site infection rates, wether logarithmic transformation or not. The scatter diagram of the utilization rate of antibacterials and surgical site infection rates also demonstrated the same results. Conclusion To decrease the utilization rate of antibacterials in clean surgical incision not lead to increase of surgical site infection rates.%目的:探讨清洁手术抗菌药物使用率与切口感染率之间的相关性。方法对本院2013年1月至2014年12月清洁手术进行回顾性调查,按月份分别统计抗菌药物使用率和切口感染率。以抗菌药物使用率与切口感染率互为自变量与因变量,进行Pearson相关性分析和散点图评价。结果抗菌药物使用率与切口感染率对数转换前Pearson相关性分析,相关系数r=0.196, P

  3. Treatment of the positive surgical margin following radical prostatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective With increased incidence of prostate cancer and an increased number of patients undergoing radical prostatectomy in China,it will be necessary to elaborate the diagnosis,clinical significance and treatment of patients whose tumors have positive surgical margins following radical prostatectomy.Data sources Positive surgical margin,prostate cancer and radical prostatectomy were used as subject words and the medical literature in recent decades was searched using the PubMed database and the results are summarized.Study selection Using positive surgical margin,prostate cancer and radical prostatectomy as subject words the PubMed medical database produced 275 papers of pertinent literature.By further screening 28 papers were selected and they represent relatively large-scale clinical randomized and controlled clinical trials.Results A pertinent literature of 275 papers was identified and 28 papers on large clinical studies were obtained.Analysis of results indicated that the positive rate of surgical margin after radical prostatectomy is 20%-40%,and although most patients with positive surgical margins are stable for a considerable period,the data available now suggested that the presence of a positive surgical margin will have an impact on the patient's prognosis.The risk factors of positive surgical margin include preoperative prostate specific antigen level,Gleason's score and pelvic lymph node metastasis.The most common site with positive surgical margin is in apical areas of the prostate;therefore surgical technique is also a factor resulting in positive surgical margins.From data available now it appears that as long as the surgical technique is skilled,different surgical modes do not affect the rate of surgical margin.Adjuvant radiotherapy is mainly used to treat patients with positive surgical margin after radical prostatectomy,but combination with androgen deprivation therapy may increase the curative effect.Conclusion The current data indicated that

  4. Assessment of protocols for surgical-site preparation in a regional network of hospitals Evaluación de la normalización de la preparación prequirúrgica en una red regional de hospitales Avaliação da normatização da preparação pré-cirúrgica em uma rede regional de hospitais

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Surgical-site infection is a preventable adverse event. Implementation of good practices for correct surgical-site preparation can contribute to lessen this safety problem. The objective of this study was to describe the presence and quality of protocols on surgical-site preparation in the Murcia (Spain) regional network of public hospitals. The indicator "existence of protocol for surgical-site preparation" was assessed, as well as the formal quality (expected attributes) and contents (compa...

  5. On denture marking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrman, H I; DiZinno, J A; Wasén, J; René, N

    1999-06-01

    During the last decades in Sweden dentures have been permanently marked with a stainless steel metal band incorporated into the acrylic and containing the patient's birth date, a special number, and "S" for Sweden. The last recommendation issued by the National Board of Health and Welfare states that "the patients shall always be offered denture marking and be informed about the benefit thereof. Denture marking is not permitted if the patient refuses it". Requirements for denture markers have been that they should be biologically inert (when incorporated into the denture), not be expensive, be easy to inscribe, be possible to retrieve after an accident, and survive elevated temperatures for a reasonable time under normal circumstances. Although the frequency of edentulousness has decreased in recent years due to the improvement in oral health there remains a need to address the issue of marking of complete dentures, because there is a large variation in the oral status of populations in different countries. Given that only one marked denture can reveal the identity of a deceased person when all other methods fail to do so, makes it worthwhile. Furthermore, denture marking is important in long-term care facilities. We have investigated the issue of denture marking in Europe and in the United States. The results from the European survey show that denture marking is, to our knowledge regulated by law only in Sweden and Iceland. In the US denture marking is so far mandatory in 21 states while New York State requires dentures to be marked if the patient requests it and several other states impose the obligation to mark dentures on long-term care facilities. Since there is no international consensus regarding the issue of denture marking it is important to address it. A survey from the Nordic countries has shown that if denture marking was in general use, the contribution to the establishment of identity by forensic odontology in cases of fire would increase by about 10

  6. Marking as Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Val

    2012-01-01

    An aspect of assessment which has received little attention compared with perennial concerns, such as standards or reliability, is the role of judgment in marking. This paper explores marking as an act of judgment, paying particular attention to the nature of judgment and the processes involved. It brings together studies which have explored…

  7. Marking as Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Val

    2012-01-01

    An aspect of assessment which has received little attention compared with perennial concerns, such as standards or reliability, is the role of judgment in marking. This paper explores marking as an act of judgment, paying particular attention to the nature of judgment and the processes involved. It brings together studies which have explored…

  8. Risk factors for surgical site infections and other complications in elective surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with special attention for anti-tumor necrosis factor: a large retrospective study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeder, A. den; Creemers, M.C.W.; Fransen, J.; Jong, Eefje de; Rooij, D.J.R.A.M. de; Wymenga, A.B.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with special attention for anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) treatment. METHODS: All patients with RA who had undergone elective orthopedic surgery since introduction of anti-TNF were

  9. Effect site concentrations of remifentanil maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis in response to surgical stimuli during bispectral index guided propofol anestesia in seriously obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertin, A; La Colla, G; La Colla, L; Bergonzi, P C; Deni, F; Moizo, E

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to determine the effect site concentrations of remifentanil maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis in response to surgical stimuli during bispectral index (BIS) guided propofol anesthesia in seriously obese patients. Twenty-two patients, female/male 15/7, ASA physical status II - III, aged 29-69 years, body mass index (BMI) 54.5+/-12, undergoing major open bariatric surgery, were enrolled to receive a propofol-remifentanil total intravenous anesthesia. All patients were intubated by using a flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopic technique facilitated by a target controlled effect site concentration of remifentanil set at 2.5 ng/mL. After endotracheal intubation, anesthesia was started with a target controlled infusion of propofol initially set at 6 microg/mL, then adjusted to maintain a BIS value between 40 and 50. The mean effect site concentration of remifentanil was recorded at different intervals time during surgery: skin incision-opening of peritoneum (T1), bowel resection (T2), cholecystojejunal anastomosis (T3), ileojejunal anastomosis (T4), closing of peritoneum (T5). The mean plasma concentrations of propofol required to maintain a BIS value between 40 and 50 were 4+/-0.55, 3.8+/-0.64, 3.8+/- 0.63, 3.8+/-0.65 and 3.8+/-0.63 microg/mL at T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5 interval time, respectively. The mean values of remifentanil target effect site concentration were 5.2+/-1.3, 7.7+/-1.7, 9.1+/-1.8, 9.7+/- 2.2 and 9.9+/-2.5 ng/mL at T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5 interval time. This study suggests that tolerance to remifentanil infusion is profound and develops very rapidly in morbidly obese patients submitted to open bariatric surgery during BIS guided propofol anesthesia. The administration of opiates during anesthesia based on target-controlled infusion should include corrections for the development of tolerance.

  10. Effectiveness of cyanoacrylate microbial sealant in the reduction of surgical site infection in gynecologic oncology procedures: A phase III single institution prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Eric D; Nugent, Elizabeth K; MacAllister, Matthew C; Moxley, Katherine M; Landrum, Lisa; L Walker, Joan; McMeekin, D S; Mannel, Robert S; McGwin, Gerald; Moore, Kathleen N

    2017-01-01

    Surgery is a cornerstone for patients with gynecologic malignancies. Surgical site infections (SSI) remain a source of post-operative morbidity. Consequences range from escalated costs, delay in adjuvant therapy, and increased morbidity. Our primary objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of a cyanoacrylate microbial sealant (CMS) to reduce post-operative SSI following laparotomy for suspected gynecologic malignancy. Patients were randomized using a 1:1 allocation to receive either standard skin preparation or standard preparation with CMS and stratified by BMI. Patients were followed for 6weeks for SSI. Demographic data was collected through the EMR. Associations between SSI, use of CMS, and clinicopathologic factors were explored using descriptive statistics, chi-square and multivariate analysis. 300 patients underwent randomization. Median age of the cohort was 58. Arms were matched and there was no difference in rate of medical comorbidities. Mean BMI was 38.8kg/m(2) in patients randomized to BMI≥30 and 26.3kg/m(2) randomized to BMISurgical characteristics for the entire cohort: 66% malignancy, 91% clean-contaminated, 21% bowel surgery, 25% transfusion. Seventy-six (25%) patients developed a SSI: 43 patients (28%) treated with CMS, compared to 33 (21%) patients treated without CMS (p=0.18). Multivariate model demonstrated that BMI≥30 (psurgical-site complications in up to 30% of cases. The addition of CMS alone does not appear to reduce risk of overall SSI. Additional risk-reducing strategies including use of antimicrobial agents and optimization of modifiable risk factors prior to surgery should be explored as pathways for reducing this significant post-operative morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Assessing the effect of subcuticular buried sutures with subcutaneous closed suction drain to prevent surgical site infection in patients undergoing total cystectomy with urinary diversion using intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamaru, Sojun; Tsuchihashi, Kazunari; Makino, Yuki; Shimizu, Yosuke; Ito, Noriyuki

    2014-11-01

    We assessed the effect of subcuticular buried sutures with subcutaneous closed suction drain to prevent surgical site infection (SSI) in patients undergoing total cystectomy with urinary diversion using the intestine. We reviewed the clinical charts of 43 consecutive patients who underwent total cystectomy with urinary diversion using the intestine from February 2006 to March 2011 at Nishi-Kobe Medical Center. All patients received intravenous prophylactic antibiotics before and throughout surgery as well as for three days after surgery. Skin closure was performed with interrupted vertical mattress sutures with 2-0 nylon on the first 22 patients (mattress group), and with interrupted subcuticular buried sutures with 4-0 absorbable monofilament with subcutaneous closed suction drain on the remaining 21 patients (subcuticular buried suture with subcutaneous drain; SBD group). SSI occurred in 7 (31.8%) patients in the mattress group, but did not affect any patient in the SBD group. We compared risk factors for SSI between the groups, and found that the method of skin closure was significant risk factor for SSI (P = 0.005). We concluded that interrupted subcuticular buried sutures with 4-0 absorbable monofilament with subcutaneous suction drain is effective for prevention of SSI in total cystectomy with urinary diversion using the intestine.

  12. Evaluation of routinely reported surgical site infections against microbiological culture results: a tool to identify patient groups where diagnosis and treatment may be improved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kievit Job

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgeons may improve their decision making by assessing the extent to which their initial clinical diagnosis of a surgical site infection (SSI was supported by culture results. Aim of the present study was to evaluate routinely reported SSI by surgeons against microbiological culture results, to identify patient groups with lower agreement where decision making may be improved. Methods 701 admissions with SSI were reported by surgeons in a university medical centre in the period 1997-2005, which were retrospectively checked for microbiological culture results. Reporting a SSI was conditional on treatment being given (e.g. antibiotics and was classified by severity. To identify specific patient groups, patients were classified according to the surgery group of the first operation during admission (e.g. trauma. Results Of all reported SSI, 523 (74.6% had a positive culture result, 102 (14.6% a negative culture result and 76 (10.8% were classified as unknown culture result (due to no culture taken. Given a known culture result, reported SSI with positive culture results less often concerned trauma patients (16% versus 26%, X2 = 4.99 p = 0.03 and less severe SSI (49% versus 85%, X2 = 10.11 p Conclusion Routine reporting of SSI was mostly supported by culture results. However, this support was less often found in trauma patients and less severe SSI, thereby giving surgeons feedback that diagnosis and treatment may be improved in these cases.

  13. Optimal skin antiseptic agents for prevention of surgical site infection in cesarean section: a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huaping; Li, Guirong; Wang, Haiyan; He, Mei

    2017-08-30

    The best choice of antiseptic agent for skin preparation at cesarean section remains controversial. We performed this meta-analysis to assess whether chlorhexidine (CH)-based skin antisepsis was more effective than povidone iodine (PI)-based antisepsis for the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI) after cesarean section. PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched to identify English publications that compared chlorhexidine gluconate (CH) as a skin preparation agent with PI in cesarean section. The primary outcome was SSI rate. Review Manager 5.3 was used to analyze the collected data and trial sequential analysis (TSA) Software 0.9 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK) beta was applied to estimate whether the overall pooled outcome was conclusive. Six articles involving 4385 participants were included in this study. The outcomes showed that CH-based skin antisepsis, compared with PI-based antisepsis, was not associated with a decreased overall rate of SSI (risk ratio [RR], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-1.02; p = .07). TSA indicated that the current available evidence was inconclusive. There were no differences in adverse skin reactions in the two groups. This study provides evidence that CH-based antisepsis for skin preparation does not show an additional advantage in reducing risk of SSI after cesarean section. However, additional high-quality, randomized clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  14. Selection of prophylactic antibiotics according to the microorganisms isolated from surgical site infections (SSIs) in a previous series of surgeries reduces SSI incidence after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Kazuhiro; Chijiiwa, Kazuo; Ohuchida, Jiro; Kai, Masahiro; Fujii, Yoshiro; Otani, Kazuhiro; Hiyoshi, Masahide; Nagano, Motoaki; Imamura, Naoya

    2013-03-01

    The incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs) is high after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). We divided 116 consecutive patients who underwent PD into an early group (n = 58) and a later group (n = 58) according to time of surgery. In both groups, endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage was mainly employed for the patients with obstructive jaundice. In the later group, prophylactic antibiotics were selected according to the susceptibility of microorganisms isolated from SSIs in the early group. The incidence of SSIs was compared between the groups. The background characteristics (including methods of preoperative biliary drainage and microorganisms in the bile obtained before or during operation) of the patients were not significantly different between the groups, except for the serum albumin level, which was lower in the later group than in the early group (P = 0.0026). The incidence of SSIs was significantly lower in the later group (24.1 %) than in the early group (46.6 %) (P = 0.0116). Belonging to the later group was one independent negative risk factor for SSI. Selection of prophylactic antibiotics on the basis of microorganisms isolated from SSIs in the early group contributed to the reduced incidence of SSIs in the later group after PD.

  15. Perioperative Allogeneic Blood Transfusion Is Associated With Surgical Site Infection After Abdominoperineal Resection-a Space for the Implementation of Patient Blood Management Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kensuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Tsuno, Nelson H; Ishihara, Soichiro; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Sunami, Eiji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-05-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) has been reported as a major risk factor for surgical site infection (SSI) in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. However, the association of ABT with SSI in patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection (APR) and total pelvic exenteration (TPE) still remains to be evaluated. Here, we aim to elucidate this association. The medical records of all patients undergoing APR and TPE at our institution in the period between January 2000 and December 2012 were reviewed. Patients without SSI (no SSI group) were compared with patients who developed SSI (SSI group), in terms of clinicopathologic features, including ABT. In addition, data for 262 patients who underwent transabdominal rectal resection at our institution in the same period were also enrolled, and their data on differential leukocyte counts were evaluated. Multivariate analysis showed that intraoperative transfusion was an independent predictive factor for SSI after APR and TPE (P = 0.004). In addition, the first-operative day lymphocyte count of patients undergoing APR, TPE, and transabdominal rectal resection was significantly higher in nontransfusion patients compared with transfusion ones (P = 0.026). ABT in the perioperative period of APR and TPE may have an important immunomodulatory effect, leading to an increased incidence of SSI. This fact should be carefully considered, and efforts to avoid allogeneic blood exposure while still achieving adequate patient blood management would be very important for patients undergoing APR and TPE as well.

  16. Length of stay and cost for surgical site infection after abdominal and cardiac surgery in Japanese hospitals: multi-center surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusachi, Shinya; Kashimura, Nobuichi; Konishi, Toshiro; Shimizu, Junzo; Kusunoki, Masato; Oka, Masaaki; Wakatsuki, Toshiro; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Sawa, Yoshiki; Imoto, Hiroshi; Motomura, Noboru; Makuuchi, Haruo; Tanemoto, Kazuo; Sumiyama, Yoshinobu

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the influence of surgical site infections (SSIs) after abdominal or cardiac surgery on the post-operative duration of hospitalization and cost. A retrospective 1:1 matched case-control study of length of stay and healthcare expenditures for patients who were discharged from nine hospitals, between April 1, 2006 and March 31, 2008, after undergoing abdominal or cardiac surgery and who did and did not have a SSI. Information was obtained from 246 pairs of patients who had undergone abdominal surgery and 27 pairs of patients who had undergone cardiac surgery. Overall, the mean post-operative hospitalization was 20.7 days longer and the mean post-operative healthcare expenditure was $8,791 higher in the SSI group than for the SSI-free group. Among the patients who had undergone abdominal surgery, development of SSI extended the average hospitalization by 17.6 days and increased the average healthcare expenditure by $6,624. Among the patients who had undergone cardiac surgery, SSI extended the post-operative hospitalization by an average of 48.9 days and increased the post-operative healthcare expenditure by an average of $28,534. Under the current healthcare system in Japan, the development of SSI after abdominal surgery necessitates extension of hospitalization two-fold and increases the post-operative healthcare expenditure 2.5-fold. Development of SSI after cardiac surgery necessitates extension of hospitalization fourfold and increases the healthcare expenditure six-fold.

  17. Bite Mark Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SK Padmakumar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bite mark analysis plays an important role in personal identi- fi cation in forensic odontology. They are commonly seen in violent crimes such as sexual assaults, homicides, child abuse, etc. Human bites are common on the face and are usually seen on prominent locations of the face such as the ears, nose and lips. Individual characteristics recorded in the bite marks such as fractures, rotations, attrition, and congenital malformations are helpful in identifying the individual who caused it. We are reporting the case of a 55-year-old lady with bite marks on her left ear, who was allegedly assaulted by the suspect. On the basis of characteristic features of the suspect’s dentition, it was concluded that the bite marks seen on the victim was most probably caused by the suspect.

  18. Mark Raidpere portreefotod Kielis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    Kieli Linnagaleriis avatud 2. Ars Baltica fototriennaalil 'Can You Hear Me?' esindab Eestit Mark Raidpere seeriaga 'Portreed 1998'. Näituse Eesti-poolne kuraator Anu Liivak, kataloogiteksti kirjutas Anders Härm. Tuntumaid osalejaid triennaalil Wolfgang Tillmans

  19. Mark 1 Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Mark I Test Facility is a state-of-the-art space environment simulation test chamber for full-scale space systems testing. A $1.5M dollar upgrade in fiscal year...

  20. Mark IVA microprocessor support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, A. L.

    1982-01-01

    The requirements and plans for the maintenance support of microprocessor-based controllers in the Deep Space Network Mark IVA System are discussed. Additional new interfaces and 16-bit processors have introduced problems not present in the Mark III System. The need for continuous training of maintenance personnel to maintain a level of expertise consistent with the sophistication of the required tools is also emphasized.

  1. Marks of Metal Copenhell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Planchebaseret udendørs udstilling på musikfestivalen Copenhell 18-20/6 2015. En mindre udgave af udstillingen Marks of Metal - Logodesign og visualitet i heavy metal. Udarbejdet i samarbejde med Mediemuseet.......Planchebaseret udendørs udstilling på musikfestivalen Copenhell 18-20/6 2015. En mindre udgave af udstillingen Marks of Metal - Logodesign og visualitet i heavy metal. Udarbejdet i samarbejde med Mediemuseet....

  2. COMPUTER HARDWARE MARKING

    CERN Multimedia

    Groupe de protection des biens

    2000-01-01

    As part of the campaign to protect CERN property and for insurance reasons, all computer hardware belonging to the Organization must be marked with the words 'PROPRIETE CERN'.IT Division has recently introduced a new marking system that is both economical and easy to use. From now on all desktop hardware (PCs, Macintoshes, printers) issued by IT Division with a value equal to or exceeding 500 CHF will be marked using this new system.For equipment that is already installed but not yet marked, including UNIX workstations and X terminals, IT Division's Desktop Support Service offers the following services free of charge:Equipment-marking wherever the Service is called out to perform other work (please submit all work requests to the IT Helpdesk on 78888 or helpdesk@cern.ch; for unavoidable operational reasons, the Desktop Support Service will only respond to marking requests when these coincide with requests for other work such as repairs, system upgrades, etc.);Training of personnel designated by Division Leade...

  3. 19 CFR 134.43 - Methods of marking specific articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN MARKING Method and Location of Marking Imported Articles § 134... Tariff Act of 1930. Except for goods of a NAFTA country, articles of a class or kind listed below shall..., cleavers, clippers, shears, scissors, safety razors, blades for safety razors, surgical instruments,...

  4. Building consensus: development of a Best Practice Guideline (BPG) for surgical site infection (SSI) prevention in high-risk pediatric spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Michael G; Riedel, Matthew D; Glotzbecker, Michael P; Matsumoto, Hiroko; Roye, David P; Akbarnia, Behrooz A; Anderson, Richard C E; Brockmeyer, Douglas L; Emans, John B; Erickson, Mark; Flynn, John M; Lenke, Lawrence G; Lewis, Stephen J; Luhmann, Scott J; McLeod, Lisa M; Newton, Peter O; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Richards, B Stephens; Shah, Suken A; Skaggs, David L; Smith, John T; Sponseller, Paul D; Sucato, Daniel J; Zeller, Reinhard D; Saiman, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Perioperative surgical site infection (SSI) after pediatric spine fusion is a recognized complication with rates between 0.5% and 1.6% in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and up to 22% in "high risk" patients. Significant variation in the approach to infection prophylaxis has been well documented. The purpose of this initiative is to develop a consensus-based "Best Practice" Guideline (BPG), informed by both the available evidence in the literature and expert opinion, for high-risk pediatric patients undergoing spine fusion. For the purpose of this effort, high risk was defined as anything other than a primary fusion in a patient with idiopathic scoliosis without significant comorbidities. The ultimate goal of this initiative is to decrease the wide variability in SSI prevention strategies in this area, ultimately leading to improved patient outcomes and reduced health care costs. An expert panel composed of 20 pediatric spine surgeons and 3 infectious disease specialists from North America, selected for their extensive experience in the field of pediatric spine surgery, was developed. Using the Delphi process and iterative rounds using a nominal group technique, participants in this panel were as follows: (1) surveyed for current practices; (2) presented with a detailed systematic review of the relevant literature; (3) given the opportunity to voice opinion collectively; and (4) asked to vote regarding preferences privately. Round 1 was conducted using an electronic survey. Initial results were compiled and discussed face-to-face. Round 2 was conducted using the Audience Response System, allowing participants to vote for (strongly support or support) or against inclusion of each intervention. Agreement >80% was considered consensus. Interventions without consensus were discussed and revised, if feasible. Repeat voting for consensus was performed. Consensus was reached to support 14 SSI prevention strategies and all participants agreed to implement the BPG in their

  5. Multicenter, Prospective, Longitudinal Study of the Recurrence, Surgical Site Infection, and Quality of Life After Contaminated Ventral Hernia Repair Using Biosynthetic Absorbable Mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael J.; Bauer, Joel J.; Harmaty, Marco; Carbonell, Alfredo M.; Cobb, William S.; Matthews, Brent; Goldblatt, Matthew I.; Selzer, Don J.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Hansson, Bibi M. E.; Rosman, Camiel; Chao, James J.; Jacobsen, Garth R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate biosynthetic absorbable mesh in single-staged contaminated (Centers for Disease Control class II and III) ventral hernia (CVH) repair over 24 months. Background: CVH has an increased risk of postoperative infection. CVH repair with synthetic or biologic meshes has reported chronic biomaterial infections and high hernia recurrence rates. Methods: Patients with a contaminated or clean-contaminated operative field and a hernia defect at least 9 cm2 had a biosynthetic mesh (open, sublay, retrorectus, or intraperitoneal) repair with fascial closure (n = 104). Endpoints included overall Kaplan-Meier estimates for hernia recurrence and postoperative wound infection rates at 24 months, and the EQ-5D and Short Form 12 Health Survey (SF-12). Analyses were conducted on the intent-to-treat population, and health outcome measures evaluated using paired t tests. Results: Patients had a mean age of 58 years, body mass index of 28 kg/m2, 77% had contaminated wounds, and 84% completed 24-months follow-up. Concomitant procedures included fistula takedown (n = 24) or removal of infected previously placed mesh (n = 29). Hernia recurrence rate was 17% (n = 16). At the time of CVH repair, intraperitoneal placement of the biosynthetic mesh significantly increased the risk of recurrences (P ≤ 0.04). Surgical site infections (19/104) led to higher risk of recurrence (P < 0.01). Mean 24-month EQ-5D (index and visual analogue) and SF-12 physical component and mental scores improved from baseline (P < 0.05). Conclusions: In this prospective longitudinal study, biosynthetic absorbable mesh showed efficacy in terms of long-term recurrence and quality of life for CVH repair patients and offers an alternative to biologic and permanent synthetic meshes in these complex situations. PMID:28009747

  6. Closed-suction drain placement at laparotomy in isolated solid organ injury is not associated with decreased risk of deep surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Shahin; Talving, Peep; Kobayashi, Leslie; Kim, Dennis; Inaba, Kenji; Lam, Lydia; Chan, Linda S; Coimbra, Raul; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of intra-abdominal closed-suction drainage after emergent trauma laparotomy for isolated solid organ injuries (iSOI) and to determine its association with deep surgical site infections (DSSI). All patients subjected to trauma laparotomy between January 2006 and December 2008 for an iSOI at two Level I urban trauma centers were identified. Patients with isolated hepatic, splenic, or renal injuries were included. Study variables extracted included demographics, clinical characteristics, intra-abdominal injuries, drain placement, DSSI, septic events, intensive care unit and hospital length of stay, and in-hospital mortality. Diagnosis of DSSI was based on abdominal computed tomography scan demonstrating an intra-abdominal collection combined with fever and elevated white blood cell count. For the analysis, patients were stratified based on injury severity. To identify an independent association between closed-suction drain placement and DSSI, stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed. Overall, 142 patients met the inclusion criteria with 80 per cent (n=114) having severe iSOI. In 47 per cent (n=53) of the patients with a severe injury, an intra-abdominal drain was placed. A drain was placed more often in patients with a blunt trauma with more severe injury defined by Injury Severity Score and abdominal Abbreviated Injury Scale Score and those who underwent splenectomy (Pdrain placement (odds ratio, 2.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.0 to 8.2; P=0.046). Subgroup analysis demonstrated those who sustained severe hepatic injury receiving a drain had a significantly increase risk of DSSI (P=0.02). There was no statistical difference in the rate of DSSI based on the presence or absence of an intra-abdominal drain after severe splenic injury (17 vs 18%, P=0.88). The use of intra-abdominal closed-suction drains after iSOI is not associated with decreased risk of DSSI.

  7. Seasonal Variations in the Risk of Reoperation for Surgical Site Infection Following Elective Spinal Fusion Surgery: A Retrospective Study Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Junichi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Oichi, Takeshi; Kato, So; Matsui, Hiroki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Sakae; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2017-07-15

    A retrospective study of data abstracted from the Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC) database, a national representative database in Japan. The aim of this study was to examine seasonal variations in the risk of reoperation for surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal fusion surgery. Although higher rates of infection in the summer than in other seasons were thought to be caused by increasing inexperience of new staff, high temperature, and high humidity, no studies have examined seasonal variations in the risk of SSI following spinal fusion surgery in the country where medical staff rotation timing is not in summer season. In Japan, medical staff rotation starts in April. We retrospectively extracted the data of patients who were admitted between July 2010 and March 2013 from the DPC database. Patients were included if they were aged 20 years or older and underwent elective spinal fusion surgery. The primary outcome was reoperation for SSI during hospitalization. We performed multivariate analysis to clarify the risk factors of primary outcome with adjustment for patient background characteristics. We identified 47,252 eligible patients (23,659 male, 23,593 female). The mean age of the patients was 65.4 years (range, 20-101 yrs). Overall, reoperation for SSI occurred in 0.93% of the patients during hospitalization. The risk of reoperation for SSI was significantly higher in April (vs. February; odds ratio, 1.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-3.43, P = 0.03) as well as other known risk factors. In subgroup analysis with stratification for type of hospital, month of surgery was identified as an independent risk factor of reoperation for SSI among cases in an academic hospital, although there was no seasonal variation among those in a nonacademic hospital. This study showed that month of surgery is a risk factor of reoperation for SSI following elective spinal fusion surgery, nevertheless, in the country where medical staff rotation timing is not in

  8. A randomized controlled trial of subcutaneous closed-suction Blake drains for the prevention of incisional surgical site infection after colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Jun; Ota, Mitsuyoshi; Kawamoto, Makoto; Akikazu, Yago; Suwa, Yusuke; Suwa, Hirokazu; Momiyama, Masashi; Ishibe, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuteru; Masui, Hidenobu; Nagahori, Kaoru

    2017-03-01

    The effects of subcutaneous closed-suction Blake drain for preventing incisional surgical site infections (SSIs) after colorectal surgery have never been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Thus, we performed a RCT to evaluate the clinical benefits of using a subcutaneous closed-suction Blake drain in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. Consecutive patients who underwent colorectal surgery were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomly assigned to the subcutaneous closed-suction drainage arm or the control (no subcutaneous drainage) arm. The primary endpoint was incidence rate of incisional SSIs. And, we performed logistic regression analysis to detect predictive factors for incisional SSIs after colorectal surgery. From November 2012 to September 2014, a total of 240 patients were enrolled in this study. One-hundred-seventeen patients who were treated by the control arm and 112 patients by the subcutaneous drainage arm were judged to be eligible for analysis. The incidence of incisional SSIs rate was 8.7 % in the overall patients. The incidence of incisional SSIs rate was 12.8 % in the control arm and 4.5 % in the subcutaneous drainage arm. There was significantly reduction of the incidence in the subcutaneous drainage arm than in the control arm (p = 0.025). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that thickness of subcutaneous fat >3.0 cm, forced expiratory volume in 1 s as percent of forced vital capacity (FEV1.0 %) >70 %, and subcutaneous drain were independent predictors of postoperative incisional SSIs (p = 0.008, p = 0.004, and p = 0.017, respectively). The results of our RCT suggest that a subcutaneous Blake drain is beneficial for preventing incisional SSIs in patients undergoing colorectal surgery.

  9. Meta-analysis of randomized and quasi-randomized clinical trials of topical antibiotics after primary closure for the prevention of surgical-site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, C F; Banks, J L; Lepper, P; Kontopantelis, E; van Driel, M L

    2017-08-01

    Surgical-site infections (SSIs) increase patient morbidity and costs. The aim was to identify and synthesize all RCTs evaluating the effect of topical antibiotics on SSI in wounds healing by primary intention. The search included Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, the Cochrane Wounds Specialized Register, Central Register of Controlled Trials and EBSCO CINAHL from inception to May 2016. There was no restriction of language, date or setting. Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. When sufficient numbers of comparable trials were available, data were pooled in meta-analysis. Fourteen RCTs with 6466 participants met the inclusion criteria. Pooling of eight trials (5427 participants) showed that topical antibiotics probably reduced the risk of SSI compared with no topical antibiotic (risk ratio (RR) 0·61, 95 per cent c.i. 0·42 to 0·87; moderate-quality evidence), equating to 20 fewer SSIs per 1000 patients treated. Pooling of three trials (3012 participants) for risk of allergic contact dermatitis found no clear difference between antibiotics and no antibiotic (RR 3·94, 0·46 to 34·00; very low-quality evidence). Pooling of five trials (1299 participants) indicated that topical antibiotics probably reduce the risk of SSI compared with topical antiseptics (RR 0·49, 0·30 to 0·80; moderate-quality evidence); 43 fewer SSIs per 1000 patients treated. Pooling of two trials (541 participants) showed no clear difference in the risk of allergic contact dermatitis with antibiotics or antiseptic agents (RR 0·97, 0·52 to 1·82; very low-quality evidence). Topical antibiotics probably prevent SSI compared with no topical antibiotic or antiseptic. No conclusion can be drawn regarding whether they cause allergic contact dermatitis. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Cosmetic outcome and surgical site infection rates of antibacterial absorbable (Polyglactin 910) suture compared to Chinese silk suture in breast cancer surgery: a randomized pilot research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhong-tao; Jessica Shen; Martin Weisberg; ZHANG Hong-wei; FANG Xue-dong; WANG Li-ming; LI Xiao-xi; LI Ya-fen; SUN Xiao-wei; Judith Carver; Dorella Simpkins

    2011-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this multicenter post-market study was to compare the cosmetic outcome of triclosan-coated VICRYL* Plus sutures with Chinese silk sutures for skin closure of modified radical mastectomy. A secondary objective was to assess the incidence of surgical site infection (SSI).Methods Patients undergoing modified radical mastectomy were randomly assigned to coated VICRYL* Plus antibacterial (Polyglactin 910) suture or Chinese silk suture. Cosmetic outcomes were evaluated postoperatively at days 12 (±2) and 30 (±5), and the evidence of SSI was assessed at days 3, 5, 7, 12 (±2), 30 (±5), and 90 (±7). Cosmetic outcomes were independently assessed via visual analogue scale (VAS) score evaluations of blinded incision photographs (primary endpoint) and surgeon-assessed modified Hollander Scale (mHCS) scores (secondary endpoint).SSI assessments used both CDC criteria and ASEPSIS scores.Results Six Chinese hospitals randomized 101 women undergoing modified radical mastectomy to closure with coated VICRYL* Plus suture (n=51) or Chinese silk suture (n=50). Mean VAS cosmetic outcome scores for antibacterial suture (67.2) were better than for Chinese silk (45.4) at day 30 (P<0.0001)). Mean mHCS cosmetic outcome total scores, were also higher for antibacterial suture (5.7) than for Chinese silk (5.0) at day 30 (P=0.002).Conclusions Patients using coated VICRYL* Plus suture had significantly better cosmetic outcomes than those with Chinese silk sutures. Patients using coated VICRYL* Plus suture had a lower SSI incidence compared to the Chinese silk sutures, although the difference did not reach statistical significance. (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00768222)

  11. Reduction and sustainability of cesarean section surgical site infection: An evidence-based, innovative, and multidisciplinary quality improvement intervention bundle program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chaur-Dong; Cohn, Inna; Caban, Rebeca

    2016-11-01

    We found cesarean section (C-section) surgical site infection (SSI) at our institution was significantly higher than the national benchmark. A retrospective cohort study was conducted under 4 phases from January 2008-December 2014. The hospital infection control (IC) policies and a presurgical checklist were bundled and implemented. The study was conducted with 3,334 cesarean deliveries: phase A (January 1, 2008-January 31,2010): 1,250 patients without intervention (baseline SSI rate), phase B (February 1, 2010-July 31, 2011): 682 patients were intervened with IC policies, phase C (August 1, 2011-December 31, 2012): 591 patients with an SSI reduction bundle, and phase D (January 1, 2013-December 31, 2014): 811 patients were monitored for C-section SSI sustainability. Patients not following strict protocols because of emergency C-section deliveries were excluded. The χ(2) test, Fisher exact test, and standard Z test were used for statistical analyses. C-section SSI rates were 6.2% (77/1,250) in phase A, 3.7% (25/682) in phase B, 1.7% (10/591) in phase C, and 0.1% (1/811) in phase D, respectively. By implementing the IC policies and bundle, the C-section SSI rate was reduced 40.3% (phase B vs phase A), 72.6% (phase C vs phase A), and 98.4% (phase D vs phase A). All statistics were significantly different. We conclude that implementing a C-section SSI reduction bundle was associated with reduced C-section SSI rate down toward zero. A future prospectively randomized controlled trial is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Multicenter, Prospective, Longitudinal Study of the Recurrence, Surgical Site Infection, and Quality of Life After Contaminated Ventral Hernia Repair Using Biosynthetic Absorbable Mesh: The COBRA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael J; Bauer, Joel J; Harmaty, Marco; Carbonell, Alfredo M; Cobb, William S; Matthews, Brent; Goldblatt, Matthew I; Selzer, Don J; Poulose, Benjamin K; Hansson, Bibi M E; Rosman, Camiel; Chao, James J; Jacobsen, Garth R

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate biosynthetic absorbable mesh in single-staged contaminated (Centers for Disease Control class II and III) ventral hernia (CVH) repair over 24 months. CVH has an increased risk of postoperative infection. CVH repair with synthetic or biologic meshes has reported chronic biomaterial infections and high hernia recurrence rates. Patients with a contaminated or clean-contaminated operative field and a hernia defect at least 9 cm had a biosynthetic mesh (open, sublay, retrorectus, or intraperitoneal) repair with fascial closure (n = 104). Endpoints included overall Kaplan-Meier estimates for hernia recurrence and postoperative wound infection rates at 24 months, and the EQ-5D and Short Form 12 Health Survey (SF-12). Analyses were conducted on the intent-to-treat population, and health outcome measures evaluated using paired t tests. Patients had a mean age of 58 years, body mass index of 28 kg/m, 77% had contaminated wounds, and 84% completed 24-months follow-up. Concomitant procedures included fistula takedown (n = 24) or removal of infected previously placed mesh (n = 29). Hernia recurrence rate was 17% (n = 16). At the time of CVH repair, intraperitoneal placement of the biosynthetic mesh significantly increased the risk of recurrences (P ≤ 0.04). Surgical site infections (19/104) led to higher risk of recurrence (P < 0.01). Mean 24-month EQ-5D (index and visual analogue) and SF-12 physical component and mental scores improved from baseline (P < 0.05). In this prospective longitudinal study, biosynthetic absorbable mesh showed efficacy in terms of long-term recurrence and quality of life for CVH repair patients and offers an alternative to biologic and permanent synthetic meshes in these complex situations.

  13. Augmented marked graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, King Sing

    2014-01-01

    Petri nets are a formal and theoretically rich model for the modelling and analysis of systems. A subclass of Petri nets, augmented marked graphs possess a structure that is especially desirable for the modelling and analysis of systems with concurrent processes and shared resources.This monograph consists of three parts: Part I provides the conceptual background for readers who have no prior knowledge on Petri nets; Part II elaborates the theory of augmented marked graphs; finally, Part III discusses the application to system integration. The book is suitable as a first self-contained volume

  14. Risk factors for surgical site infection following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery: a review of 9296 procedures from a national database and comparison with a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Brandon A; Arynchyna, Anastasia A; Johnston, James M; Rozzelle, Curtis J; Blount, Jeffrey P; Oakes, W Jerry; Rocque, Brandon G

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical site infection (SSI) following CSF shunt operations has been well studied, yet risk factors for nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery are less well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine SSI rates and risk factors following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery using a nationwide patient cohort and an institutional data set specifically for better understanding SSI. METHODS The authors reviewed the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric (ACS NSQIP-P) database for the years 2012-2014, including all neurosurgical procedures performed on pediatric patients except CSF shunts and hematoma evacuations. SSI included deep (intracranial abscesses, meningitis, osteomyelitis, and ventriculitis) and superficial wound infections. The authors performed univariate analyses of SSI association with procedure, demographic, comorbidity, operative, and hospital variables, with subsequent multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine independent risk factors for SSI within 30 days of the index procedure. A similar analysis was performed using a detailed institutional infection database from Children's of Alabama (COA). RESULTS A total of 9296 nonshunt procedures were identified in NSQIP-P with an overall 30-day SSI rate of 2.7%. The 30-day SSI rate in the COA institutional database was similar (3.3% of 1103 procedures, p = 0.325). Postoperative time to SSI in NSQIP-P and COA was 14.6 ± 6.8 days and 14.8 ± 7.3 days, respectively (mean ± SD). Myelomeningocele (4.3% in NSQIP-P, 6.3% in COA), spine (3.5%, 4.9%), and epilepsy (3.4%, 3.1%) procedure categories had the highest SSI rates by procedure category in both NSQIP-P and COA. Independent SSI risk factors in NSQIP-P included postoperative pneumonia (OR 4.761, 95% CI 1.269-17.857, p = 0.021), immune disease/immunosuppressant use (OR 3.671, 95% CI 1.371-9.827, p = 0.010), cerebral palsy (OR 2.835, 95% CI 1.463-5.494, p = 0.002), emergency operation (OR 1

  15. Risk factors for surgical site infection following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery: a review of 9296 procedures from a national database and comparison with a single-center experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Brandon A.; Arynchyna, Anastasia A.; Johnston, James M.; Rozzelle, Curtis J.; Blount, Jeffrey P.; Oakes, W. Jerry; Rocque, Brandon G.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Surgical site infection (SSI) following CSF shunt operations has been well studied, yet risk factors for nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery are less well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine SSI rates and risk factors following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery using a nationwide patient cohort and an institutional dataset specifically for better understanding SSI. Methods The authors reviewed the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pediatric (ACS NSQIP-P) database for the years 2012–2014, including all neurosurgical procedures performed on pediatric patients except CSF shunts and hematoma evacuations. SSI included deep (intracranial abscesses, meningitis, osteomyelitis, and ventriculitis) and superficial wound infections. The authors performed univariate analyses of SSI association with procedure, demographic, comorbidity, operative, and hospital variables, with subsequent multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine independent risk factors for SSI within 30 days of the index procedure. A similar analysis was performed using a detailed institutional infection database from Children’s Hospital of Alabama (COA). Results A total of 9296 nonshunt procedures were identified in NSQIP-P with an overall 30-day SSI rate of 2.7%. The 30-day SSI rate in the COA institutional database was similar (3.3% of 1103 procedures, p = 0.325). Postoperative time to SSI in NSQIP-P and COA was 14.6 ± 6.8 days and 14.8 ± 7.3 days, respectively (mean ± SD). Myelomeningocele (4.3% in NSQIP-P, 6.3% in COA), spine (3.5%, 4.9%), and epilepsy (3.4%, 3.1%) procedure categoriess had the highest SSI rates by procedure category in both NSQIP-P and COA. Independent SSI risk factors in NSQIP-P included postoperative pneumonia (OR 4.761, 95% CI 1.269–17.857, p = 0.021), immune disease/immunosuppressant use (OR 3.671, 95% CI 1.371–9.827, p = 0.010), cerebral palsy (OR 2.835, 95% CI 1.463–5.494, p = 0.002), emergency

  16. Fathoming Mark Twain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggar, Joanna

    1988-01-01

    Relates the efforts of completing two collections of the works and papers of Mark Twain. Describes the combined efforts of the University of Iowa and the University of California to publish both a scholarly edition and a reader's edition devoted to Twain. (KO)

  17. Teaching with Mark Dion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Mark Dion creates sculptures, installations, and interactive environments that sometimes seem contrary to what one expects from visual artists. Remarkable curiosity cabinets and carefully arranged artifacts from specific places and time periods make up a large part of his work. His work does not neatly fit into traditional lessons about elements…

  18. Marked metric measure spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Depperschmidt, Andrej; Pfaffelhuber, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A marked metric measure space (mmm-space) is a triple (X,r,mu), where (X,r) is a complete and separable metric space and mu is a probability measure on XxI for some Polish space I of possible marks. We study the space of all (equivalence classes of) marked metric measure spaces for some fixed I. It arises as state space in the construction of Markov processes which take values in random graphs, e.g. tree-valued dynamics describing randomly evolving genealogical structures in population models. We derive here the topological properties of the space of mmm-spaces needed to study convergence in distribution of random mmm-spaces. Extending the notion of the Gromov-weak topology introduced in (Greven, Pfaffelhuber and Winter, 2009), we define the marked Gromov-weak topology, which turns the set of mmm-spaces into a Polish space. We give a characterization of tightness for families of distributions of random mmm- spaces and identify a convergence determining algebra of functions, called polynomials.

  19. Marked PCP is decidable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halava, V.; Hirvensalo, M.; de Wolf, R.

    2001-01-01

    We show that the marked version of the Post Correspondence Problem, where the words on a list are required to differ in the first letter, is decidable. On the other hand, we prove that the PCP remains undecidable if we only require the words to differ in the first two letters. Thus we locate the

  20. Systematic review and meta-analysis of sutures coated with triclosan for the prevention of surgical site infection after elective colorectal surgery according to the PRISMA statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandini, Marta; Mattavelli, Ilaria; Nespoli, Luca; Uggeri, Fabio; Gianotti, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Several randomized clinical trials (RCTs) conducted to evaluate the effect of triclosan-coated suture on surgical site infection (SSI) yield to controversial results. The primary purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to analyze the available RCTs, comparing the effect of triclosan-coated suture with uncoated suture on the incidence of SSI after elective colorectal operations. As secondary endpoint of the analysis, we considered length of hospital stay after surgery. We performed a systematic literature review through Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Scopus, Ovid, ISI Web of Science, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register searching for RCTs published from 1990 to 2015. To conduct these meta-analyses, we followed the guidelines and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Study inclusion criteria were as follows: parallel-group RCTs in adult populations reporting the closure of the abdominal wall after elective colorectal operation with triclosan-coated suture or noncoated suture, and reporting the outcomes considered in the meta-analysis. Six trials including 2168 patients (1102 treated and 1066 controls) provided data on SSIs. The overall rate was 11.7% (129/1102) in the triclosan group and 13.4% (143/1066) in the control group (odds ratio 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.58-1.13, P = 0.220). Heterogeneity among studies was moderate (I = 44.9%). No evidence of publication bias was detectable. Five RCTs (1783 patients; 914 treated and 689 controls) described hospital length of stay with no significant effect (mean difference: -0.02, 95% CI -0.11 to -0.07, P = 0.668). The I test for heterogeneity was 0% (P = 0.836). Moderator analyses showed no significant differences were detected in analyses comparing the suture materials (polydioxanone vs polyglactin). In open-label trials, the odds ratio for SSI risk was 0.62 (95% CI 0.20-1.93, P = 0.413), 0.77 in single-blind (95% CI 0.31-1.95, P

  1. Pre-operative antiseptic shower and bath policy decreases the rate of S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus surgical site infections in patients undergoing joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colling, Kristin; Statz, Catherine; Glover, James; Banton, Kaysie; Beilman, Greg

    2015-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following joint arthroplasty increases length of stay, hospital cost, and leads to patient and healthcare provider dissatisfaction. Due to the presence of non-biologic implants (the prosthetic joint) in these procedures, infection is often devastating and treatment of the infection is more difficult. For this reason, prevention of SSI is of crucial importance in this population. Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the nares of approximately 30-40% of the population, is the most common pathogen causing SSI, and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rate. A pre-operative shower or bath with an antiseptic is an inexpensive and effective method of removal of these transient skin pathogens prior to the procedure and may be used to decrease SSI. We hypothesize that a preoperative antiseptic shower or bath will decrease the rate of SSI. A retrospective review was performed at two affiliated hospitals within the same system, one with a hospital-wide policy enforcing pre-operative antiseptic shower or bath and the other with no policy, with cases included from January 2010 to June 2012. International Classification of Disease-Ninth Revision-Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes and chart review were used to identify patients undergoing joint arthroplasty and to identify those with SSI. Two thousand three-hundred forty-nine arthroplasties were performed at the University of Minnesota Medical Center, a tertiary-care hospital with a pre-operative antiseptic shower or bath policy in place. An additional 1,693 procedures were performed at Fairview Ridges Hospital, a community hospital with no pre-operative policy. There was no difference in the rate of SSI between the two hospitals (1.96% vs. 1.95%; p=1.0). However, the rate of SSI caused by S. aureus was significantly decreased by pre-operative antiseptic shower/bath (17% vs. 61%; p=0.03), as was the rate of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections (2% vs. 24% p=0.002). A pre

  2. Factors associated with surgical site infection after lower extremity bypass in the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalish, Jeffrey A; Farber, Alik; Homa, Karen; Trinidad, Magdiel; Beck, Adam; Davies, Mark G; Kraiss, Larry W; Cronenwett, Jack L

    2014-11-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a major source of morbidity after infrainguinal lower extremity bypass (LEB). This study examines processes of care associated with in-hospital SSI after LEB and identifies factors that could potentially be modified to improve outcomes. The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) registry (2003 to 2012) was queried to identify in-hospital SSI after 7908 consecutive LEB procedures performed by 365 surgeons at 91 academic and community hospitals in 45 states. Variables associated with SSI were identified using multivariable logistic regression and hierarchical clustering. Expected and observed SSI rates were calculated for each hospital. The overall in-hospital SSI rate after LEB was 4.8%. Univariate analysis showed that obesity, dialysis, tissue loss, preoperative ankle-brachial index 2 units of packed red blood cells, procedure time >220 minutes, and estimated blood loss >100 mL were associated with higher SSI rates, whereas chlorhexidine (compared with iodine) skin preparation was protective. Multivariable analysis showed independent predictors of SSI included ankle-brachial index 2 units (OR, 3.30; 95% CI, 2.17-5.02; P 220 minutes (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.05-4.23; P < .04). Chlorhexidine was protective against SSI (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.35-0.79; P = .002). Stratified analyses based on the presence of tissue loss yielded similar results. Across VQI hospitals, observed SSI rates ranged from 0% to 30%, whereas expected SSI rates adjusted by the four independent predictors ranged from 0% to 7.2%. In-hospital SSI after LEB varies substantially across VQI hospitals. Three modifiable processes of care (transfusion rate, procedure time, and type of skin preparation) were identified and may be used by hospitals to reduce SSI rates. This study demonstrates the value of the SVS VQI detailed shared clinical registry to identify improvement opportunities directly pertinent to providers that are not available in

  3. Accounting for incomplete postdischarge follow-up during surveillance of surgical site infection by use of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance system's risk index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscione, Fernando Martín; Couto, Renato Camargos; Pedrosa, Tânia M G

    2009-05-01

    We examined the usefulness of a simple method to account for incomplete postdischarge follow-up during surveillance of surgical site infection (SSI) by use of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) system's risk index. Retrospective cohort study that used data prospectively collected from 1993 through 2006. Five private, nonuniversity healthcare facilities in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Consecutive patients undergoing the following NNIS operative procedures: 20,981 operations on the genitourinary system, 11,930 abdominal hysterectomies, 7,696 herniorraphies, 6,002 cholecystectomies, and 6,892 laparotomies. For each operative procedure category, 2 SSI risk models were specified. First, a model based on the NNIS system's risk index variables was specified (hereafter referred to as the NNIS-based model). Second, a modified model (hereafter referred to as the modified NNIS-based model), which was also based on the NNIS system's risk index, was specified with a postdischarge surveillance indicator, which was assigned the value of 1 if the patient could be reached during follow-up and a value of 0 if the patient could not be reached. A formal comparison of the capabilities of the 2 models to assess the risk of SSI was conducted using measures of calibration (by use of the Pearson goodness-of-fit test) and discrimination (by use of receiver operating characteristic curves). Goodman-Kruskal correlations (G) were also calculated. The rate of incomplete postdischarge follow-up varied between 29.8% for abdominal hysterectomies and 50.5% for cholecystectomies. The modified NNIS-based model for laparotomy did not show any significant benefit over the NNIS-based model in any measure. For all other operative procedures, the modified NNIS-based model showed a significantly improved discriminatory ability and higher G statistics, compared with the NNIS-based model, with no significant impairment in calibration, except if used to assess the risk of SSI after operations

  4. Efficiency of Local Antiseptic Alkosol (Ethanol, Isopropanol-30g and Ortophenilphenol) and Povidone Iodide on the Incidence Of Surgical Site Infection After Inguinal Hernioplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djozic, Harun; Pandza, Haris; Hasukic, Sefik; Custovic, Samir; Pandza, Berina; Krupalija, Amina; Beciragic, Edin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The risk of wound infection after elective inguinal hernia repair depends on several factors. One of the most important factors is the preoperative skin preparation. The use of antisepsis is performed to reduce the risk of surgical site infections (SSIs) and to remove causing organisms. This work compares two different agent forms for preoperative skin preparation to prevent SSIs. Objectives: The objective of the study is comparing the effects of two different agents used for preoperative skin preparation and prevention of SSIs. Material and methods: 100 adult patients were divided and randomized into two groups, each containing 50 patients. Both groups included patients that are scheduled for elective Lichtenstein inguinal hernia repair. The first group includes patients whose skin preparations were done with povidone iodine (PI) only. The second group included patients that are treated with two antiseptics; Alkosol (96% ethanol, isopropanol-30g and ortophenilphenol-0.1g) and povidone iodide. Alkosol is applied before the induction of anesthesia. The povidone iodide is applied after Alkosol has evaporated. The presence of bacterial growth in the wound was determined 24 and 48 hours after operation. Swabs were used to take samples, which were then cultivated to check for bacterial growth. The presence of infection was also determined by the following criteria: pain or tenderness, induration, erythema, local warmth of the wound etc. Results: The surgeon or clinician declared that after 24 hours the wound was infected in 20 patients in the control group and in 22 patients after 48 hours. In the Alkosol (96% ethanol, isopropanol-30g and ortophenilphenol-0.1g) and povidone iodide group infection was declared in only 3 patients after 24 hours. Discussion: Compared to the use of providone only, the use of Alkosol (96% ethanol, isopropanol-30g and ortophenilphenol-0.1g) and povidone iodide has many advantages and was associated with lower rates of SSIs

  5. Enamel-based mark performance for marking Chinese mystery snail Bellamya chinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alec; Allen, Craig R.; Hart, Noelle M.; Haak, Danielle M.; Pope, Kevin L.; Smeenk, Nicholas A.; Stephen, Bruce J.; Uden, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    The exoskeleton of gastropods provides a convenient surface for carrying marks, and i the interest of improving future marking methods our laboratory assessed the performance of an enamel paint. The endurance of the paint was also compared to other marking methods assessed in the past. We marked the shells of 30 adult Chinese mystery snails Bellamya chinensis and held them in an aquarium for 181 days. We observed no complete degradation of any enamel-paint mark during the 181 days. The enamel-paint mark was superior to a nai;-polish mark, which lasted a median of 100 days. Enamel-paint marks also have a lower rate of loss (0.00 month-1 181 days) than plastic bee tags (0.01 month-1, 57 days), gouache paint (0.07 month-1, 18.5 days), or car body paint from studies found in scientific literature. Legibility of enamel-paint marks had a median lifetime of 102 days. The use of enamel paint on the shells of gastropods is a viable option for studies lasting up to 6 months. Furthermore, visits to capture-mark-recapture site 1 year after application of enamel-paint marks on B. chinesnis shells produced several individuals on which the enamel paint was still visible, although further testing is required to clarify durability over longer periods.

  6. News Conference: The Big Bangor Day Meeting Lecture: Charterhouse plays host to a physics day Festival: Science on Stage festival 2013 arrives in Poland Event: Scottish Physics Teachers' Summer School Meeting: Researchers and educators meet at Lund University Conference: Exeter marks the spot Recognition: European Physical Society uncovers an historic site Education: Initial teacher education undergoes big changes Forthcoming events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Conference: The Big Bangor Day Meeting Lecture: Charterhouse plays host to a physics day Festival: Science on Stage festival 2013 arrives in Poland Event: Scottish Physics Teachers' Summer School Meeting: Researchers and educators meet at Lund University Conference: Exeter marks the spot Recognition: European Physical Society uncovers an historic site Education: Initial teacher education undergoes big changes Forthcoming events

  7. Interview with Mark Watson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy Shaw

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mark Watson is a British comedian and novelist. His five novels to date – 'Bullet Points' (2004, 'A Light-Hearted Look At Murder' (2007, 'Eleven' (2010, 'The Knot' (2012 and 'Hotel Alpha' (2014 – explore human relationships and communities in contemporary society. His latest novel Hotel Alpha tells the story of an extraordinary hotel in London and two mysterious disappearances that raise questions no one seems willing to answer. External to the novel, readers can also discover more about the hotel and its inhabitants in one hundred extra stories that expand the world of the novel and can be found at http://www.hotelalphastories.com. In conversation here with Dr Katy Shaw, Mark offers some reflections on his writing process, the field of contemporary literature, and the vitality of the novel form in the twenty-first century.

  8. Mark Twain on phrenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James L

    2003-12-01

    Mark Twain was a noted 19th century American writer and humorist. He often elaborated upon the personalities of his characters, and his observational skills reflected a strong interest in psychology. Similarly, he found an interest in phrenology, a pseudoscience that purported to characterize personality traits according to elevations or depressions on the head. Twain's style is clearly reflected in the interesting essay he wrote regarding his personal experience with phrenology.

  9. Telicity marking in Hungarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éva Kardos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the encoding of telicity in Hungarian. While proposing a mereological, scalar semantic analysis, it shows that Hungarian uses a telicity-marking strategy in which it contrasts with English, where telicity is not the direct consequence of an overt marker but arises as a cumulative effect of specific, well-definable properties of various components of verbal predicates including the head verb and its argument(s. A major contribution of the analysis, which mainly addresses telicity marking in the class of non-creation/non-consumption predicates in neutral sentences, lies in the fact that it reveals important cross-linguistic differences with respect to the aspectual role of verbal particles and resultative/locative expressions and the referential properties of telic verbal predicates. As for the former, it is demonstrated that Hungarian verbal particles and resultative/locative expressions mark telicity by directly placing bounds on events by virtue of serving an event maximalizing function, whereas the English counterparts of these elements do not have such direct event-bounding effects. As for the latter, it emerges that in Hungarian quantized reference is a necessary and sufficient condition for telicity in cases where in English it is only sufficient.

  10. Ceremony marking Einstein Year

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Sunday 13th November at 10:00amat Geneva's St. Peter's Cathedral To mark Einstein Year and the importance of the intercultural dialogue of which it forms a part, a religious service will take place on Sunday 13 November at 10 a.m. in St. Peter's Cathedral, to which CERN members and colleagues are warmly welcomed. Pastor Henry Babel, senior minister at the Cathedral, will speak on the theme: 'God in Einstein's Universe'. Diether Blechschmidt will convey a message on behalf of the scientific community.

  11. Ceremony marking Einstein Year

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Sunday 13th November at 10:00amat Geneva's St. Peter's Cathedral To mark Einstein Year and the importance of the intercultural dialogue of which it forms a part, a religious service will take place on Sunday 13 November at 10 a.m. in St. Peter's Cathedral, to which CERN members and colleagues are warmly welcomed. Pastor Henry Babel, senior minister at the Cathedral, will speak on the theme: 'God in Einstein's Universe'. Diether Blechschmidt will convey a message on behalf of the scientific community.

  12. Impact of integrated hand management on incidence of surgical site infections%手卫生整合管理对手术切口感染率的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭月琼; 许琍文; 熊欢

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the integrated hand management on the incidence of surgical site infections. METHODS Integrated hand management mainly including the surgical hand-disinfectants in the operating room, none-contacting gloves wearing, and double gloves wearing were performed since Jan 2009, the change of the incidence of surgical site infections before and after the implementation was retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS The qualified rates of hand cleaning and disinfection and the compliance of the operation staff have been significantly improved after the implementation of integrated hand management, and the incidence of surgical site infections significantly decreased from 0. 87% during 2007-2007 to 0. 18% during 2009-2010, the difference was statistically significant (χ2 = 12. 463,P<0. 01). CONCLUSION Integrated hand management is helpful in improving the quality of disinfection and isolation and reducing exogenous contacting infections, resulting in minimizing the surgical site infections.%目的 了解针对手术人员实施手卫生整合管理后,对手术切口感染发生率的影响.方法 自2009年1月起对手术医护人员实施以手术间内实行手消毒剂干洗手法、外科手消毒揉搓、无触式戴无菌手套方法及戴双层手套等为主要措施的规范化手卫生整合管理,并回顾性分析实施前后手术切口感染发生率的变化情况.结果 通过对参加手术人员手卫生进行整合管理方法后,手术人员的手卫生清洁消毒合格率和洗手依从性得到提高,手术切口感染发生率由2007-2008年的0.87%降至2009-2010年的0.18%,差异有统计学意义(x2=12.463,P<0.01).结论 规范的手卫生整合管理措施有利于提高消毒隔离质量,减少外源性接触感染,对降低手术切口感染率具有重要意义.

  13. 手术室优质护理对手术部位感染影响的分析%Impact of high-quality nursing on surgical site infections in operating rooms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彩霞; 郑建萍; 杨东; 张敏丽; 姚霞

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the impact of high-quality nursing on surgical site infections in operating rooms . METHODS In Apr 2012 ,the high-quality nursing was carried out to strengthen the organization and nursing man-agement ,improve nursing quality ,and enhance the environment of the operating rooms as well as the management of surgery ,then the monitoring indicators of control of the surgical site infections in Apr-Sep 2011 and Apr-Sep 2012 were analyzed ,and the quality of control of the surgical site infections was compared between before and after the conduct of high-quality nursing .RESULTS Before the conduct of high-quality nursing ,the surgical site infec-tions occurred in 60 of 6 386 patients who underwent the surgery ,with the infection rate of 0 .94% ;after the con-duct of high-quality nursing ,the surgical site infections occurred in 53 of 7 561 patients who underwent the surger-y ,with the infection rate of 0 .70% .The qualified rates of the surgical hand disinfection ,common hand washing , surveillance of air ,surveillance of object surfaces ,and environmental health were respectively 93 .33% ,86 .67% , 97 .22% ,88 .89% ,and 82 .86% before the conduct of high-quality nursing and were respectively 100 .00% ,and 96 .67% ,100 .00% ,94 .44% ,and 97 .77% after the conduct of high-quality nursing .CONCLUSION The conduct of high-quality nursing can promote the control of surgical site infections in the operating rooms .%目的:探讨手术室开展优质护理对手术部位感染的影响。方法2012年4月手术室开展以加强组织、护理管理,提高护理质量,加强手术室环境及手术管理为重点内容的优质护理服务;对2011年4-9月及2012年4-9月手术部位感染管理的各项监测进行分析,比较开展优质护理服务前后手术部位感染控制的质量。结果开展优质护理活动前,外科手术患者6386例,发生手术部位感染60例,感染率0.94%;开展优质护理

  14. 肥胖对结直肠癌手术部位感染的影响%Impact of obesity on surgical site infection following colorectal cancer surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄新玲; 郑丽英; 何文英; 张焱

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨肥胖对结直肠癌手术部位感染(SSI)的影响。方法回顾性调查2008年1月—2013年12月某院行结直肠癌根治性手术的215例患者,其中100例体重指数(BMI)≥25 kg/m2(肥胖组),115例 BMI<25 kg/m2(正常体重组),比较两组患者术中情况、术后恢复、手术并发症等指标。结果肥胖患者72例(72.00%)术中出血量>60 mL,58例(58.00%)手术持续时间>220 min,其中20例(20.00%)发生 SSI;正常体重组中仅30例(26.09%)术中出血量>60 mL,20例(17.39%)手术持续时间>220 min,8例(6.96%)发生 SSI。肥胖组患者术中出血量、SSI 发病率高于正常体重组,手术持续时间、术后住院时间长于正常体重组,各组比较,差异均有统计学意义(均 P <0.05)。结论结直肠癌患者 SSI 发病率较高,肥胖、手术持续时间长、出血量多是结直肠患者 SSI 的危险因素。%Objective To evaluated the impact of obesity on surgical site infection (SSI)following colorectal cancer surgery.Methods A total of 215 patients undergoing radical surgery for colorectal cancer in a hospital be-tween January 2008 and December 2013 were investigated retrospectively,100 patients were with body mass index (BMI)≥25 kg/m2 (obesity group)and 115 patients with BMI60 mL,58(58.00%)patients’duration of surgery was >220 min ,20 (20.00%)of whom developed postoperative SSI;in normal weight group,30(26.09%)patients had intra-operative blood loss of >60 mL,20(17.39%)patients’duration of surgery was >220 min,8(6.96%)of whom developed postoperative SSI.Intra-operative blood loss and incidence of SSI in obesity group were both signif-icantly higher than normal weight group,duration of surgery and postoperative length of hospital stay were both longer than normal weight group(both P <0.05).Conclusion Incidence of SSI in colorectal cancer patients is high. Obesity,long duration

  15. Laser treatment of stretch marks: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Leonardo; Piccinetti, A. L.; Monache, G. D.; Botta, G.; Mancini, S.

    2000-06-01

    The best treatment of these stretch mark is still unknown. Some authors proposed the treatment with flash-lamp-pumped dye laser 585 nm, with fluence over 8 J/cm2. Reviewing our experiences on no-surgical effects of lasers in the various phases of the wound healing, including the re- epithelization, we would like to apply the no-surgical laser therapy treating the stretch marks of breast, abdomen and lumbo-sacral region. The goal is to inhibit the fibrous tissue metabolism, encouraging the destruction of the collagen fibers with inflammatory mechanism, and increasing the reconstitution of the superficial dermis layers. We treated five cases of stretch marks in women 22-35 years old, since May 1999, with a cycle of applications of double lasers, 511 and 577 nm, with energy of 20 Joule for spot, respecting the maximum thermal relaxation times of the skin. We waited two weeks interval between the applications. Results obtained after five applications are very positive, and we are encouraged to continue this experimentation.

  16. Surgical Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azarmehr, Iman; Stokbro, Kasper; Bell, R. Bryan

    2017-01-01

    were identified in the field of traumatology. Treatment of complex orbital fractures was considerably improved by the use of SN compared with traditionally treated control groups. Conclusions: SN seems to be a very promising addition to the surgical toolkit. Planning details of the surgical procedure...... in a 3-dimensional virtual environment and execution with real-time guidance can significantly improve precision. Among factors to be considered are the financial investments necessary and the learning curve....

  17. Receptor Binding Sites for Substance P, but not Substance K or Neuromedin K, are Expressed in High Concentrations by Arterioles, Venules, and Lymph Nodules in Surgical Specimens Obtained from Patients with Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantyh, Christopher R.; Gates, Troy S.; Zimmerman, Robert P.; Welton, Mark L.; Passaro, Edward P.; Vigna, Steven R.; Maggio, John E.; Kruger, Lawrence; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    1988-05-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that tachykinin neuropeptides [substance P (SP), substance K (SK), and neuromedin K (NK)] play a role in regulating the inflammatory and immune responses. To test this hypothesis in a human inflammatory disease, quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to examine possible abnormalities in tachykinin binding sites in surgical specimens from patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Surgical specimens of colon were obtained from patients with ulcerative colitis (n = 4) and Crohn disease (n = 4). Normal tissue was obtained from uninvolved areas of extensive resections for carcinoma (n = 6). In all cases, specimens were obtained germinal center of lymph nodules, whereas the concentrations of SP and SK binding sites expressed by the external muscle layers are not altered significantly. These results demonstrate that receptor binding sites for SP, but not SK or NK, are ectopically expressed in high concentrations (1000-2000 times normal) by cells involved in mediating inflammatory and immune responses. These data suggest that SP may be involved in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease and might provide some insight into the interaction between the nervous system and the regulation of inflammation and the immune response in human inflammatory disease.

  18. Readers of histone methylarginine marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayatri, Sitaram; Bedford, Mark T

    2014-08-01

    Arginine methylation is a common posttranslational modification (PTM) that alters roughly 0.5% of all arginine residues in the cells. There are three types of arginine methylation: monomethylarginine (MMA), asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA). These three PTMs are enriched on RNA-binding proteins and on histones, and also impact signal transduction cascades. To date, over thirty arginine methylation sites have been cataloged on the different core histones. These modifications alter protein structure, impact interactions with DNA, and also generate docking sites for effector molecules. The primary "readers" of methylarginine marks are Tudor domain-containing proteins. The complete family of thirty-six Tudor domain-containing proteins has yet to be fully characterized, but at least ten bind methyllysine motifs and eight bind methylarginine motifs. In this review, we will highlight the biological roles of the Tudor domains that interact with arginine methylated motifs, and also address other types of interactions that are regulated by these particular PTMs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Molecular mechanisms of histone modification function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Shark Mark Recapture Database (MRDBS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Shark Mark Recapture Database is a Cooperative Research Program database system used to keep multispecies mark-recapture information in a common format for...

  20. Infarct size in primary angioplasty without on-site cardiac surgical backup versus transferal to a tertiary center: a single photon emission computed tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knaapen, Paul; Rossum, Albert C. van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mulder, Maarten de; Peels, Hans O.; Cornel, Jan H.; Umans, Victor A.W.M. [Medical Center Alkmaar, Department of Cardiology, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Zant, Friso M. van der [Medical Center Alkmaar, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Twisk, Jos W.R. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-02-15

    Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) performed in large community hospitals without cardiac surgery back-up facilities (off-site) reduces door-to-balloon time compared with emergency transferal to tertiary interventional centers (on-site). The present study was performed to explore whether off-site PCI for acute myocardial infarction results in reduced infarct size. One hundred twenty-eight patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were randomly assigned to undergo primary PCI at the off-site center (n = 68) or to transferal to an on-site center (n = 60). Three days after PCI, {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT was performed to estimate infarct size. Off-site PCI significantly reduced door-to-balloon time compared with on-site PCI (94 {+-} 54 versus 125 {+-} 59 min, respectively, p < 0.01), although symptoms-to-treatment time was only insignificantly reduced (257 {+-} 211 versus 286 {+-} 146 min, respectively, p = 0.39). Infarct size was comparable between treatment centers (16 {+-} 15 versus 14 {+-} 12%, respectively p = 0.35). Multivariate analysis revealed that TIMI 0/1 flow grade at initial coronary angiography (OR 3.125, 95% CI 1.17-8.33, p = 0.023), anterior wall localization of the myocardial infarction (OR 3.44, 95% CI 1.38-8.55, p < 0.01), and development of pathological Q-waves (OR 5.07, 95% CI 2.10-12.25, p < 0.01) were independent predictors of an infarct size > 12%. Off-site PCI reduces door-to-balloon time compared with transferal to a remote on-site interventional center but does not reduce infarct size. Instead, pre-PCI TIMI 0/1 flow, anterior wall infarct localization, and development of Q-waves are more important predictors of infarct size. (orig.)

  1. 手术室优质护理对手术部位感染影响的分析%Analysis of the Impact of the Operating Room Nursing Quality on Surgical Site Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘素琼

    2015-01-01

    Objective:Analyze the influence of the operating room nursing quality to surgical site infection.Methods:Since March 2012,our hospital began the implementation of formal quality of nursing, and improved the quality of nursing by the behavior of strengthening supervision,optimizing the environment of the operating room and standard operation,such as behavior.Make the results of the manageG ment of surgical site monitoring to our hospital in March 2012 to August 2013 as the research object,analyze the operating room nursing quality to the influence of surgical site infection.Result:Before impleG menting high quality nursing,the hospital surgery patients with surgical site infection rate was 1.36%;With a high quality nursing after implementation,surgery surgical site infection control within 0.63%. Before implement high quality nursing,surgical hand disinfection percent of pass is 92.1%;Ordinary washing percent of pass is 88.4%;Air disinfection qualified rate 93.3%;An object's surface monitoring percent of pass is 90.6%;Environmental health percent of pass is 95.2%.After the implementation of high quality nursing,surgical hand disinfection percent of pass is 100%;Ordinary washing,percent of pass is 98.7%;Air disinfection qualified rate 100%;An object's surface monitoring percent of pass is 96.4%;Environmental health percent of pass is 98.8%.Conclusion:The implementation of the operating room nursing quality can ef ectively reduce the surgical site infections,and create favorable conditions for surgical site infection control work,it is suitable for clinical application.%目的::分析手术室优质护理对手术部位感染的影响.方法:我院自2012年3月起,正式实施优质护理,通过加强监管力度、改善护理行为、优化手术室环境、规范手术操作等行为,提高护理质量.将我院2012年3月~2013年8月,手术部位管理的监测结果作为研究对象,分析总结手术室优质护理对手术部位感染的影

  2. Risk factors of surgical site infection after incarcerated inguinal hernia repair%腹股沟嵌顿疝术后手术部位感染因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨林华; 陈涛; 王坚

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨引起腹股沟嵌顿疝手术部位感染的危险因素.方法 回顾性分析上海交通大学医学院附属仁济医院普外科2005年1月至2010年12月经手术治疗的301例腹股沟嵌顿疝病人的临床资料及随访结果,其中伴有绞窄坏死者予以剔除.结果 术后近期(3个月内)全部随访,术后发生伤口血肿1例(0.3%),伤口积液8例(2.7%),伤口感染4例(1.3%),无深部补片感染,术后近期浅表切口手术部位感染与糖尿病(P=0.015)、嵌顿时间(P=0.005)、伤口积液(P=0.000)相关.远期随访病例226例,随访率75.1%,随访期6~72个月,平均随访时间34.2个月,3例复发,无伤口感染或深部补片感染.结论 腹股沟嵌顿疝术后近期切口手术部位感染的危险因素为合并糖尿病、嵌顿时间>24h及切口积液;腹股沟嵌顿疝行无张力修补术是安全可行的.%Objective To investigate risk factors of surgical site infection after incarcerated inguinal hernia repair. Methods The clinical data and follow-up of 301 cases of incarcerated inguinal hernia repair performed from January 2005 to December 2010 in Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University were analyzed retrospectively. Cases of intestinal necrosis were excluded. Results All cases had shortterm followup (3 month). There were 13 cases of postoperative complication including 1 case of localized hematoma (0.3%), 8 cases of seroma (2.7% ) and 4 cases of superficial surgical site infection (1.3%). Diabetes (P=0.015), incarcerated time (P=0.005)and seroma (P =0.000) were related to superficial surgical site infection in shortterm follow-up and no mesh infection was found. Among 226 cases (75.1%) of long-term follow-up (6-72 months), neither surgical site infection nor mesh infection was found, except for 3 cases of hernia recurrences. Conclusion Surgical site infection rate in short-term is related to diabetes, incarcerated time (>24 hours) and seroma. Tension-free hernia repair is safe and

  3. Surgical attire and the operating room: role in infection prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salassa, Tiare E; Swiontkowski, Marc F

    2014-09-01

    ➤ Although there is some evidence that scrubs, masks, and head coverings reduce bacterial counts in the operating room, there is no evidence that these measures reduce the prevalence of surgical site infection.➤ The use of gloves and impervious surgical gowns in the operating room reduces the prevalence of surgical site infection.➤ Operating-room ventilation plays an unclear role in the prevention of surgical site infection.➤ Exposure of fluids and surgical instruments to the operating-room environment can lead to contamination. Room traffic increases levels of bacteria in the operating room, although the role of this contamination in surgical site infection is unclear.

  4. Mark Kostabi soovib muuta inimesi õnnelikumaks / Kalev Mark Kostabi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kostabi, Kalev Mark, 1960-

    2008-01-01

    Kalev Mark Kostabi oma sisekujunduslikest eelistustest, ameeriklaste ja itaallaste kodude sisekujunduse erinevustest, kunstist kui ruumikujunduse ühest osast, oma New Yorgi ja Rooma korterite kujundusest

  5. Mark Kostabi soovib muuta inimesi õnnelikumaks / Kalev Mark Kostabi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kostabi, Kalev Mark, 1960-

    2008-01-01

    Kalev Mark Kostabi oma sisekujunduslikest eelistustest, ameeriklaste ja itaallaste kodude sisekujunduse erinevustest, kunstist kui ruumikujunduse ühest osast, oma New Yorgi ja Rooma korterite kujundusest

  6. Incidence of early symptomatic port-site hernia: a case series from a department where laparoscopy is the preferred surgical approach.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, D C

    2012-12-01

    Potential benefits of laparoscopic surgery include decreased post-operative pain, improved cosmesis and a shorter hospital stay. However as the volume and complexity of laparoscopic procedures increase, there appears to be a simultaneous increase in complications relating to laparoscopic access. Development of a port-site hernia is one such complication.

  7. Improving Marking Quality through a Taxonomy of Mark Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ayesha; Pollitt, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    At the heart of most assessments lies a set of questions, and those who write them must achieve "two" things. Not only must they ensure that each question elicits the kind of performance that shows how "good" pupils are at the subject, but they must also ensure that each mark scheme gives more marks to those who are…

  8. Mark Zuckerberg biography of an accidental billionaire

    CERN Document Server

    Melendez, Macie

    2012-01-01

    ABOUT THE BOOK Mark Zuckerberg is one of the world's youngest billionaires, thanks to his role in co-founding social networking site, Facebook. As Facebook has grown exponentially since its founding in 2004 (with 845 million monthly active users as of the end of December 2011 according to Facebook), Zuckerberg's popularity has also flown through the roof. Interesting on so many levels, Zuckerberg's quick rise to fame is one that the mass media and general public just can't get enough of. There's his Harvard education, his invention of one of the most popular Internet sites this world has ev

  9. [Optimizing surgical hand disinfection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, G; Kramer, A; Rotter, M; Widmer, A

    2006-08-01

    For more than 110 years hands of surgeons have been treated before a surgical procedure in order to reduce the bacterial density. The kind and duration of treatment, however, has changed significantly over time. Recent scientific evidence suggests a few changes with the aim to optimize both the efficacy and the dermal tolerance. Aim of this article is the presentation and discussion of new insights in surgical hand disinfection. A hand wash should be performed before the first disinfection of a day, ideally at least 10 min before the beginning of the disinfection as it has been shown that a 1 min hand wash significantly increases skin hydration for up to 10 min. The application time may be as short as 1.5 min depending on the type of hand rub. Hands and forearms should be kept wet with the hand rub for the recommended application time in any case. A specific rub-in procedure according to EN 12791 has been found to be suitable in order to avoid untreated skin areas. The alcohol-based hand rub should have a proven excellent dermal tolerance in order to ensure appropriate compliance. Considering these elements in clinical practice can have a significant impact to optimize the high quality of surgical hand disinfection for prevention of surgical site infections.

  10. Investigation of clustering events of surgical site infections in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting%冠状动脉搭桥术患者手术部位感染聚集性调查研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程丽峰; 阿依古丽; 朱敏; 卢辉; 魏育涛

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the high risk factors for clustering events of surgical site infections in wards of cardiothoracic surgery department so as to provide guidance for prevention and control of nosocomial infections . METHODS The epidemiological survey was conducted for the patients with suspected surgical site infections who were treated in the cardiothoracic surgery department from Jul to Aug ,2012 ,the high risk factors were analyzed , and the comprehensive interventions were taken to avoid the spread of nosocomial infections .RESULTS The surgical site infections occurred in 4 of 8 patients who underwent the coronary artery bypass grafting in the cardiothoracic surgery department ,with the infection rate of 50 .00% .All the 4 cases were complicated with se‐vere underlying diseases ,and 3 cases were complicated with diabetic mellitus ;the surgical procedures were com‐plex ,the operation duration was long ,and the symptoms of surgical incision infections were the same ,all the ca‐ses had the redness ,swelling ,heat ,and bloody discharge ,accompanied by incision dehiscence ,and the culture of wound secretions showed that there was no growth of bacteria .The hand hygiene of the health care workers and the cleaning of object surfaces were unqualified ,the environmental hygiene surveillance indicated that the Staphy‐lococcus aureus have been isolated , the outbreak of the surgical site infections could not completely excluded , which was defined as the clustering events of surgical site infections ,and the 4 patients were cured and discharged successively after the active treatment .CONCLUSION It is an effective way to intensify the consciousness of control of the nosocomial infections and take targeted prevention measures so as to control the clustering events of nosoco‐mial infections .%目的:调查医院心胸外科病房手术部位感染聚集性事件发生的高危因素,为预防与控制医院感染提供参考依据。方法对2012年7

  11. Mark-specific hazard ratio model with missing multivariate marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraska, Michal; Gilbert, Peter B

    2016-10-01

    An objective of randomized placebo-controlled preventive HIV vaccine efficacy (VE) trials is to assess the relationship between vaccine effects to prevent HIV acquisition and continuous genetic distances of the exposing HIVs to multiple HIV strains represented in the vaccine. The set of genetic distances, only observed in failures, is collectively termed the 'mark.' The objective has motivated a recent study of a multivariate mark-specific hazard ratio model in the competing risks failure time analysis framework. Marks of interest, however, are commonly subject to substantial missingness, largely due to rapid post-acquisition viral evolution. In this article, we investigate the mark-specific hazard ratio model with missing multivariate marks and develop two inferential procedures based on (i) inverse probability weighting (IPW) of the complete cases, and (ii) augmentation of the IPW estimating functions by leveraging auxiliary data predictive of the mark. Asymptotic properties and finite-sample performance of the inferential procedures are presented. This research also provides general inferential methods for semiparametric density ratio/biased sampling models with missing data. We apply the developed procedures to data from the HVTN 502 'Step' HIV VE trial.

  12. Eesti vajab riigiarhitekti / Mark Soosaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Soosaar, Mark, 1946-

    2006-01-01

    Linnade tekkimisest Eestis, linnaehitusest ja linnaplaneerimisest. Pärnu muinsuskaitsealast ja uute korruselamute ehitamisest. Arhitektuuriameti loomise ja riigiarhitekti ametikoha vajalikkusest. Kommenteerivad Ülar Mark, Triin Ojari, Harry Liivrand, Karin Paulus

  13. Lane marking aided vehicle localization

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    International audience; A localization system that exploits L1-GPS estimates, vehicle data, and features from a video camera as well as lane markings embedded in digital navigation maps is presented. A sensitivity analysis of the detected lane markings is proposed in order to quantify both the lateral and longitudinal errors caused by 2D-world hypothesis violation. From this, a camera observation model for vehicle localization is proposed. The paper presents also a method to build a map of th...

  14. Civilsamfundets ABC: M for Marked

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anker Brink; Meyer, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    Bogstaveligt talt: Hvad er civilsamfundet? Anker Brink Lund og Gitte Meyer fra CBS Center for Civil Society Studies gennemgår civilsamfundet bogstav for bogstav. Vi er nået til M for Marked.......Bogstaveligt talt: Hvad er civilsamfundet? Anker Brink Lund og Gitte Meyer fra CBS Center for Civil Society Studies gennemgår civilsamfundet bogstav for bogstav. Vi er nået til M for Marked....

  15. Inflectional marking in Hungarian aphasics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacWhinney, B; Osmán-Sági, J

    1991-08-01

    How do aphasics deal with the rich inflectional marking available in agglutinative languages like Hungarian? For the Hungarian noun alone, aphasics have to deal with over 15 basic case markings and dozens of possible combinations of these basic markings. Using the picture description task of MacWhinney and Bates (1978), this study examined the use of inflectional markings in nine Broca's and five Wernicke's aphasic speakers of Hungarian. The analysis focused on subject, direct object, indirect object, and locative nominal arguments. Compared to normals, both groups had a much higher rate of omission of all argument types. Subject ellipsis was particularly strong, as it is in normal Hungarian. There was a tendency for Broca's to omit the indirect object and for Wernicke's to omit the direct object. Across argument types, Wernicke's had a much higher level of pronoun usage than did Broca's. Broca's also showed a very high level of article omission. Compared to similar data reported by Slobin (this issue) for Turkish, the Hungarian aphasics showed an elevated level of omission of case markings. Addition errors were quite rare, but there were 14 substitutions of one case marking for another. These errors all involved the substitution of some close semantic competitor. There were no errors in the basic rules for vowel harmony or morpheme order. Overall the results paint a picture of a group of individuals whose grammatical abilities are damaged and noisy, but still largely functional. Neither the view of Broca's as agrammatic nor the view of Wernicke's as paragrammatic was strongly supported.

  16. Feasibility and surgical outcome in obese versus nonobese patients undergoing laparoendoscopic single-site hysterectomy: a multicenter case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanfani, Francesco; Boruta, David M; Fader, Amanda N; Vizza, Enrico; Growdon, Withfiel B; Kushnir, Cristina L; Corrado, Giacomo; Scambia, Giovanni; Turco, Luigi C; Fagotti, Anna

    2015-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and perioperative outcomes of laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) hysterectomy in obese and nonobese women. A multicentric retrospective case-control study (Canadian Task Force II-2). Catholic University of the Sacred Heart and National Cancer Institute "Regina Elena" (Rome, Italy), Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MD), and Johns Hopkins Hospital (Baltimore, MD). From July 2009 to April 2013, 120 women underwent LESS hysterectomy. Five women (8%) were excluded from the analysis. The remaining 115 women were divided into 2 groups: obese (n = 43, body mass index [BMI] ≥30 kg/m(2)) and nonobese (n = 72, BMI laparoscopy occurred in 2 obese (5%) and 2 (5%) nonobese women (p = .62). Conversion to laparotomy occurred in 1 obese (2.3%) and 3 (4.2%) nonobese women (p = .212). The median operative time was 115 minutes (range, 48-300 minutes) in obese and 114 minutes (range, 55-342 minutes) in nonobese women (p = .787). The intraoperative complication rate was 11.6% and 9.6% in obese and nonobese women, respectively (p = .712). The early postoperative complication rate was 6.9% in obese and 4.1% in nonobese women (p = .516). Despite the fact that the present analysis was performed in a relatively small group of patients, this study suggests that obesity (BMI ≥30) does not preclude successful completion of total LESS hysterectomy. Further prospective studies are required to confirm these preliminary data and to clarify potential advantages and disadvantages of LESS in obese women. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Utility of telepathology as a consultation tool between an off-site surgical pathology suite and affiliated hospitals in the frozen section diagnosis of lung neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taisia Vitkovski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increasingly, as in our institution, operating rooms are located in hospitals and the pathology suite is located at a distant location because of off-site consolidation of pathology services. Telepathology is a technology which bridges the gap between pathologists and offers a means to obtain a consultation remotely. We aimed to evaluate the utility of telepathology as a means to assist the pathologist at the time of intraoperative consultation of lung nodules when a subspecialty pathologist is not available to directly review the slide. Methods: Cases of lung nodules suspicious for a neoplasm were included. Frozen sections were prepared in the usual manner. The pathologists on the intraoperative consultation service at two of our system hospitals notified the thoracic pathologist of each case after rendering a preliminary diagnosis. The consultation was performed utilizing a Nikon™ Digital Sight camera and web-based Remote Medical Technologies™ software with live video streaming directed by the host pathologist. The thoracic pathologist rendered a diagnosis without knowledge of the preliminary interpretation then discussed the interpretation with the frozen section pathologist. The interpretations were compared with the final diagnosis rendered after sign-out. Results: One hundred and three consecutive cases were included. The frozen section pathologist and a thoracic pathologist had concordant diagnoses in 93 cases (90.2%, discordant diagnoses in nine cases (8.7%, and one case in which both deferred. There was an agreement between the thoracic pathologist′s diagnosis and the final diagnosis in 98% of total cases including 8/9 (88.9% of the total discordant cases. In two cases, if the thoracic pathologist had not been consulted, the patient would have been undertreated. Conclusions: We have shown that telepathology is an excellent consultation tool in the frozen section diagnosis of lung nodules.

  18. The application of evidence-based measures to reduce surgical site infections during orthopedic surgery - report of a single-center experience in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson Annette Erichsen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current knowledge suggests that, by applying evidence-based measures relating to the correct use of prophylactic antibiotics, perioperative normothermia, urinary tract catheterization and hand hygiene, important contributions can be made to reducing the risk of postoperative infections and device-related infections. The aim of this study was to explore and describe the application of intraoperative evidence-based measures, designed to reduce the risk of infection. In addition, we aimed to investigate whether the type of surgery, i.e. total joint arthroplasty compared with tibia and femur/hip fracture surgery, affected the use of protective measures. Method Data on the clinical application of evidence-based measures were collected structurally on site during 69 consecutively included operations involving fracture surgery (n = 35 and total joint arthroplasties (n = 34 using a pre-tested observation form. For observations in relation to hand disinfection, a modified version of the World Health Organization hand hygiene observation method was used. Results In all, only 29 patients (49% of 59 received prophylaxis within the recommended time span. The differences in the timing of prophylactic antibiotics between total joint arthroplasty and fracture surgery were significant, i.e. a more accurate timing was implemented in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty (p = 0.02. Eighteen (53% of the patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty were actively treated with a forced-air warming system. The corresponding number for fracture surgery was 12 (34% (p = 0.04. Observations of 254 opportunities for hand hygiene revealed an overall adherence rate of 10.3% to hand disinfection guidelines. Conclusions The results showed that the utilization of evidence-based measures to reduce infections in clinical practice is not sufficient and there are unjustifiable differences in care depending on the type of surgery. The poor

  19. Antibiotic prophylaxis in prevention of surgical site infections after breast cancer surgery%乳腺癌手术预防应用抗菌药物对降低手术部位感染的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾会学; 林金兰

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis on the incidence of surgical site infections after breast cancer surgery. METHODS We searched the Cochrane Library, Ovid MEDI.INE and EMBASE to select articles published before Dec 2011. No language restrictions were applied. Randomized controlled trials of pre and peri-operative antibiotics for patients undergoing surgery for breast cancer were included. Primary outcomes were incidence of breast wound infections. The authors examined the titles and abstracts of all studies identified by the search strategy, then assessed study quality and extracted data from those that met the inclusion criteria. RESULTS A total of eight studies were included in the review. All eight evaluated pre-operative antibiotic compared with no antibiotic or placebo, and all of them had high quality as randomized controlled trial. The results demonstrated that prophylactic antibiotics significantly reduced the incidence of surgical site infections for the patients undergoing breast cancer surgery (pooled RR= 0. 71, 95% CI:.0. 55 to 0. 92); through the Begg's test (z = 0. 12, P = 0. 90) and Egger's test (t = 0. 16. P = 0. 88), there were no obvious publication bias. CONCLUSION Prophylactic antibiotics may reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in the patients undergoing breast cancer surgery. The potential risks caused by the infections, such as the increase in the cost, drug reaction and the bacterial resistance due to the delay in wound healing or adjuvant antibiotics, must be weighed.%目的 明确预防应用抗菌药物对乳腺癌手术后手术部位感染发病率的影响.方法 通过检索Medline、Embase和Cochrane图书馆数据库,筛选2011年12月之的公开发表的文献,无语言限制;选择标准为乳腺癌患者接受围手术期抗菌药物的随机对照试验、研究结局为手术部位感染;数据收集和分析由作者审查检索的所有研究的标题和摘要,然后评估研究质

  20. Design of teleoperated surgical instruments for minimally invasive surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhani, Akhil Jiten

    1998-12-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is performed today using hand held instruments passed through small incisions into the body. The internal surgical site and instruments are viewed remotely on a monitor using images obtained with an endoscopic camera. It is well recognized that the marked therapeutic benefits of MIS must be weighed against the increased technical difficulty for the surgeon and the ensuing risk of surgical errors. Here I describe the design, construction, and operation of teleoperated surgical instruments that solve several key problems in current minimally invasive surgical practice. These improvements are primarily achieved through (1) an increase in dexterity and degrees of freedom, (2) force feedback to allow surgeons to feel instrument-tissue interactions, and (3) the elimination of geometrical discrepancies between actual and observed tool motions. I present the design of two teleoperator slave manipulators for minimally invasive surgery, the seven- degree-of-freedom Silver Falcon and the eight-degree-of- freedom Black Falcon. Both systems were tested using an existing PHANToM TM haptic interface which was modified for use as a master manipulator. Position based bilateral force-reflecting teleoperation was implemented using sound cable design principles, without force sensors. Through the design of system dynamics that accommodate a macro-micro control scheme, a substantial reduction was achieved in slave endpoint inertia and friction reflected to the user. The Black Falcon was successfully used to drive surgical sutures along arbitrarily oriented paths, a task which is rarely feasible using today's instruments. This test demonstrates successful kinematic design and range of motion, although the quality of force reflection was not sufficient to be helpful when suturing soft tissue. Force reflection was found to be more useful during rigid contact tasks where force information is not already available to the operator via visual cues. (Copies

  1. Mark Napier / Mark Napier ; interv. Tilman Baumgärtel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Napier, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Ameerika kunstnikust Mark Napierist (sünd. 1961) ja tema loomingust, 2001. a. tehtud meiliintervjuu kunstnikuga. Võrguteosest "The Digital Landfill" (1998), koos Andy Deckiga loodud tööst "GrafficJam" (1999), töödest "Shredder" (1998), "Feed", "Riot", "P-Soup" (2000), võrgukunstist ja muust

  2. Vastab Mark Lubotski / Mark Lubotski ; interv. Toomas Velmet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lubotski, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Hamburgi Muusikakõrgkooli viiuliprofessor Mark Lubotskist, kes viibis Tallinnas oktoobris 2008 ja oli IV rahvusvahelise Heino Elleri nimelise viiuldajate konkursi žürii esimeheks. Tema sidemetest Eesti muusikutega, pagemisest Läände, Heino Elleri nimelisest konkursist ja tööst žüriis

  3. Mark Napier / Mark Napier ; interv. Tilman Baumgärtel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Napier, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Ameerika kunstnikust Mark Napierist (sünd. 1961) ja tema loomingust, 2001. a. tehtud meiliintervjuu kunstnikuga. Võrguteosest "The Digital Landfill" (1998), koos Andy Deckiga loodud tööst "GrafficJam" (1999), töödest "Shredder" (1998), "Feed", "Riot", "P-Soup" (2000), võrgukunstist ja muust

  4. Minimal Marking: A Success Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne McNeilly

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The minimal-marking project conducted in Ryerson’s School of Journalism throughout 2012 and early 2013 resulted in significantly higher grammar scores in two first-year classes of minimally marked university students when compared to two traditionally marked classes. The “minimal-marking” concept (Haswell, 1983, which requires dramatically more student engagement, resulted in more successful learning outcomes for surface-level knowledge acquisition than the more traditional approach of “teacher-corrects-all.” Results suggest it would be effective, not just for grammar, punctuation, and word usage, the objective here, but for any material that requires rote-memory learning, such as the Associated Press or Canadian Press style rules used by news publications across North America.

  5. [Orthognathic surgery: surgical failures and complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyot, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Orthognathic surgery procedures mark the endpoint of lengthy orthodontic-surgical preparations and herald the completion of treatment for patients and their families. The main types of procedure are full maxillary Le Fort I osteotomies, mandibular osteotomies and chin surgery. To ensure a successful outcome, all require a favorable environment and extreme technical skill. But, like all surgical operations, they are also subject to peri- and post-operative complications resulting from treatment hazards or errors. Whatever the cause, surgical complications can entail failures in the management of the malformation. By seeking to understand and analyzing these complications, we can already help to prevent and reduce the contingent risks of failure.

  6. Surgical pearl: the temporary assistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Aleda A; Orengo, Ida F

    2008-04-15

    A simple maneuver is presented which simultaneously facilitates both adequate surgical site exposure and sufficient traction. A single suture with high tensile strength can be utilized to this end. This technique is especially helpful when the cutaneous surgeon is operating alone.

  7. Two Stories about Mark Twain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张策; 李秀云

    2004-01-01

    ⅠAsyouknow,MarkTwainwasafamousAmericanwriterandJamesWhistlerwasafa-mouspainter.TwainlikedWhistler’sworkverymuch,andthere’sastoryaboutthedayhevisitedWhistlerinhisstudio.Whistlerwasaratherseriousperson,butTwainen-joyedjokes.TwainwalkedroundthestudiolookingatWhistler’swonderfulpaintings.“Ilikethispictureofthesea,”Twainsaid.“Yes,Ipainteditsometimeago.It’scalled‘AngrySea’.”“Thecolorsarebeautiful,”Twainsaid.Thenhepointedatanotherpicture.“Ilikethewaythewomanisstandinginthepicture.Ilikethewayshe’slookingoutofthewin...

  8. Business Education Receives High Marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yopp, Martha C.; Brumley, Debbie

    1996-01-01

    A national survey of state superintendents of public instruction (n=35) and state directors of employment and training (n=28) gives business education programs, courses, and competencies high marks. Suggests that business educators should take advantage of this support by becoming more active in professional organizations. (JOW)

  9. Visual marking of old objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theeuwes, J.; Kramer, A.F.; Atchley, P.

    1998-01-01

    Watson and Humphreys (1997) presented evidence that selection of new elements can be prioritized by on-line top-down attentional inhibition of old stimuli already in the visual field (visual marking). The experiments on which this evidence was based always presented old elements in green and new ele

  10. Evaluation of analgesic effect of two different doses of fentanyl in combination with bupivacaine for surgical site infiltration in cases of modified radical mastoidectomy: A double blind randomized study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Geeta; Shahi, Kedar Singh; Parmar, Nitish Kumar; Asad, Mohammad; Joshi, Hemchandra Kumar; Bhakuni, Rajni

    2013-01-01

    Background: Limited evidence supports the efficacy of peripheral route fentanyl and local anesthetic combination for postoperative analgesia. Our study was therefore designed to demonstrate the analgesic efficacy of two different doses of fentanyl in combination with bupivacaine for surgical site infiltration in patients undergoing modified radical mastoidectomy (MRM). Materials and Methods: 60 patients undergoing MRM under general anesthesia were randomly allocated into two groups, first group receiving 0.5% bupivacaine at a dose of 2 mg/kg body weight with 50 μg fentanyl and second group receiving bupivacaine 0.5% at a dose of 2 mg/kg body weight with 100 μg fentanyl as infiltration of operative field in and around the incision site, after the incision and just before completion of surgery. In postoperative period pain, nausea-vomiting and sedation was recorded at 0 hr, 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hrs. Results: Both the combinations of bupivacaine and fentanyl (Group I and Group II) were effective for postoperative analgesia. In both the groups the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score was less than 3 at each time interval. None of the patients required rescue analgesia. The comparison of VAS scores at different intervals showed that group II had lower VAS scores at all time points. Conclusions: Fentanyl and bupivacaine combinations in doses of 50 and 100 μg along with 0.5% bupivacaine at a fixed dose of 2 mg/kg body weight are effective in the management of postoperative pain. Patients who received 100 μg fentanyl (Group II) had lower VAS scores as compared to the patients who received 50 μg fentanyl (Group I) with similar side effects. PMID:25885841

  11. Risk factors of early surgical site infection after total hip arthroplasty%人工全髋关节置换术后早期手术部位感染的危险因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢章家; 庞安琪; 谢壮

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨人工全髋关节置换术(THA)后早期手术部位感染的危险因素.方法 回顾分析2000年1月至2010年10月本组所行153例单侧THA的患者,其中男46例,女107例,年龄29~79岁,平均(61.0±8.9)岁.回顾性分析多项临床因素与手术部位感染的相关性.连续变量包括:年龄、手术时间、手术出血量、术前白蛋白血清浓度、伤口引流管停留时间;分类变量包括:性别、有无长期使用激素病史、是否合并糖尿病、有无前次手术史、是否使用骨水泥、预防性抗生素使用方案.153例患者按照是否发生手术部位感染分成两组,对连续变量采用t检验、分类变量采用X2检验进行比较.结果 153例患者中8例出现手术部位感染,发生率为5.23%.单因素分析发现术前白蛋白血清浓度因素差异有统计学意义(t=2.752,P35 g/L比较差异有统计学意义(X2= 7.23,P<0.05).有无长期口服激素、有无前次手术比较差异有统计学意义(其X2值分别为3.93与12.38,P<0.05).年龄、性别、手术时间、术中出血量、抗生素使用时间、引流管停留时间、是否合并糖尿病、是否使用骨水泥等因素对手术部位感染发生无影响,均无统计学差异.结论 THA术前低蛋白血症、前次手术史、长期口服激素史是手术部位感染的高危因素.%Objective To analyse risk factors of infection at surgical site after total hip arthroplasty ( THA ). Methods From January, 2000 to October, 2010, 153 patients. including 46 men and 107 women. received THA in our hospital. The average age was ( 61. 0 ±8. 9 ) years ( range , 29 to 79 years ). Eleven clinical factors were analyzed retrospectively to determine their association with surgical site infection. Five continous variables were analyzed by t test while six categorical variables were analyzed by X2 test. Results The incidence of surgical site infection in this series was 5. 23% ( 8/153 ). Single factor analysis indicated

  12. Evolution of surgical treatment for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Letyagin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers main surgical interventions used to treat breast cancer. It defines the role and place of conservative surgery and describes current procedures for the organ-saving treatment of cancer at this site.

  13. 49 CFR 1520.13 - Marking SSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marking SSI. 1520.13 Section 1520.13... SECURITY INFORMATION § 1520.13 Marking SSI. (a) Marking of paper records. In the case of paper records containing SSI, a covered person must mark the record by placing the protective marking conspicuously on the...

  14. Frequently Asked Questions about Surgical Site Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infection FAQs about SSIs Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infection FAQs about CAUTI Ventilator-associated Pneumonia FAQs about VAP Diseases and Organisms Acinetobacter Burkholderia cepacia Clostridium difficile Patients Clinicians FAQs about ...

  15. Surgical Site Infection among Patients Undergone Orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    7Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), Department of Surgery, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania ..... 11, 13 stress old age to be a risk factor for development of SSI probably mainly due to the elderly associated ... nutrition status and diabetes mellitus11.

  16. Mark Twain: inocente ou pecador? = Mark Twain: innocent or sinner?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Helou Doca

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A leitura cuidadosa do texto do “Tratado de Paris”, em 1900, leva Mark Twain a concluir que a intenção política norte-americana era, claramente, a de subjugação. Declara-se, abertamente, antiimperialista, nesse momento, apesar das inúmeras críticasrecebidas por antagonistas políticos que defendiam o establishment dos Estados Unidos. Após viajar para a Europa e Oriente, em 1867, como correspondente do jornal Daily Alta Califórnia, Mark Twain publica, em 1869, seu relato de viagem, The Innocents Abroad or TheNew Pilgrim’s Progress. Nosso estudo demonstra que o autor, apesar das diversas máscaras usadas em seus relatos, narra histórias, culturas e tradições, tanto da Europa quanto do Oriente, já com os olhos bem abertos pelo viés antiimperialista. Faz uso da paródia, sátira, ironia e humor para dessacralizar impérios, monarcas e a Igreja que subjugavam os mais fracos, iluminando, desde então, os estudos sobre culturas. Nosso estudo, outrossim, faz uma reflexão sobre cultura, tradição e o olhar do viajante, justificando o “olhar inocente” do narrador em seu relato.After carefully reading the Treaty of Paris in 1900, Mark Twain concluded that the goal of U.S. policy was clearly one ofsubjugation. He openly declared himself an anti-imperialist at that time, in spite of the numerous criticisms he received from political opponents who supported the United States status quo. After traveling to Europe and the East in 1867 as a correspondent for The DailyAlta California newspaper, Mark Twain published his travel report, The Innocents Abroad or The New Pilgrim’s Progress in 1869. Our study demonstrates that the author, in spite of using different guises in his reports, narrated histories, cultures and traditions – from both Europe and the East – with a viewpoint already imbued by his anti-imperialistic ideals. Twain made use of parody, satire, irony and humor within his texts in order to desecrate empires,monarchs and

  17. Vigilancia de las infecciones de herida quirúrgica. Experiencia de 18 meses en el Instituto Nacional de Cancerología Surgical site infection surveillance at the National Cancer Institute in Mexico. An 18 months experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Vilar-Compte

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. Conocer la frecuencia de infecciones quirúrgicas con un programa prospectivo de vigilancia de cirugías y seguimiento postegreso, en el Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, que es un hospital de tercer nivel de la Ciudad de México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Durante 18 meses se captaron y se vigilaron todas las cirugías efectuadas en el hospital. Se calcularon las razones (por 100 cirugías de infecciones de herida quirúrgica (IHQX por servicio y por el grado de contaminación bacteriana. Se utilizaron las definiciones de IHQX del Centro para la Prevención y el Control de las Enfermedades de Estados Unidos de América (1992. RESULTADOS. Se vigilaron 3 372 cirugías. Trescientos trece casos se infectaron: 140 (44.7% fueron incisionales superficiales; 137 (43.7%, incisionales profundas, y 36 (11.5%, de órganos y espacios. La frecuencia de IHQX fue de 9.28%; para las cirugías limpias, limpias-contaminadas, contaminadas y sucias fue de 7.35, 10.5, 17.3 y 21.5%, respectivamente. La frecuencia de infecciones por servicio fue: gastroenterología, 14.13%; tumores de mama, 11.08%; piel y partes blandas, 10.98%; ginecología, 9.06%; urología, 7.38%; cabeza y cuello, 7.13%, y neumología, 1.81%. La IHQX ocurrió en promedio a los 11.6±6.23 días; 85 casos (27.16% se diagnosticaron mientras el paciente estaba hospitalizado, y 228 (72.84%, después del egreso del paciente. Se obtuvo algún cultivo en 134 (42.8% casos. Los gérmenes más comunes fueron: E. coli, 38 (22.5%; estafilococo coagulasa negativo, 23 (13.6%; Pseudomonas sp., 22 (13%; S. aureus, 16 (9.4%, y enterococos,13 (7.7%. CONCLUSIONES. La vigilancia prospectiva de las cirugías con un seguimiento por 30 días aumentó hasta en 400% la posibilidad de detectar una IHQX. La frecuencia de IHQX en las cirugías limpias y limpias-contaminadas se encuentra por arriba de lo informado.OBJECTIVES. To calculate the surgical site infection (SSI rates with a surgical prospective surveillance

  18. Bacterial migration through punctured surgical gloves under real surgical conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidecke Claus-Dieter

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to confirm recent results from a previous study focussing on the development of a method to measure the bacterial translocation through puncture holes in surgical gloves under real surgical conditions. Methods An established method was applied to detect bacterial migration from the operating site through the punctured glove. Biogel™ double-gloving surgical gloves were used during visceral surgeries over a 6-month period. A modified Gaschen-bag method was used to retrieve organisms from the inner glove, and thus-obtained bacteria were compared with micro-organisms detected by an intra-operative swab. Results In 20 consecutive procedures, 194 gloves (98 outer gloves, 96 inner gloves were examined. The rate of micro-perforations of the outer surgical glove was 10% with a median wearing time of 100 minutes (range: 20-175 minutes. Perforations occurred in 81% on the non-dominant hand, with the index finger most frequently (25% punctured. In six cases, bacterial migration could be demonstrated microbiologically. In 5% (5/98 of outer gloves and in 1% (1/96 of the inner gloves, bacterial migration through micro-perforations was observed. For gloves with detected micro-perforations (n = 10 outer layers, the calculated migration was 50% (n = 5. The minimum wearing time was 62 minutes, with a calculated median wearing time of 71 minutes. Conclusions This study confirms previous results that bacterial migration through unnoticed micro-perforations in surgical gloves does occur under real practical surgical conditions. Undetected perforation of surgical gloves occurs frequently. Bacterial migration from the patient through micro-perforations on the hand of surgeons was confirmed, limiting the protective barrier function of gloves if worn over longer periods.

  19. Effectiveness of Epidural Analgesia, Continuous Surgical Site Analgesia, and Patient-Controlled Analgesic Morphine for Postoperative Pain Management and Hyperalgesia, Rehabilitation, and Health-Related Quality of Life After Open Nephrectomy: A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdevila, Xavier; Moulard, Sebastien; Plasse, Christian; Peshaud, Jean-Luc; Molinari, Nicolas; Dadure, Christophe; Bringuier, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    There is no widely recognized effective technique to optimally reduce pain scores and prevent persistent postoperative pain after nephrectomy. We compared continuous surgical site analgesia (CSSA), epidural analgesia (EA), and a control group (patient-controlled analgesic morphine) in patients undergoing open nephrectomy. Sixty consecutive patients were randomized to be part of EA, CSSA, or control groups postoperatively for 72 hours. All patients received patient-controlled analgesic morphine, if needed. Hyperalgesia was assessed on the first, second, and third postoperative days. Chronic pain characteristics and quality of life were analyzed at 1 and 3 months. The primary outcome was the pain score at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes were morphine consumption, postoperative rehabilitation, hyperalgesia, chronic pain incidence, and quality-of-life parameters. At 24 hours, mean ± standard deviation pain values at rest (2.4 ± 1.7, 2.2 ± 1.2, and 4.2 ± 1.2, respectively, in EA, CSSA, and control groups, P control group. Rehabilitation parameters improved sooner in the EA and CSSA groups. Median values of area of hyperalgesia differed at 48 hours between the EA group and the control group (36.4 cm) and (52 cm) (P = .01) and at 72 hours among the EA group, CSSA group, and the control group (40 cm, 39.5 cm, and 59 cm, respectively; P = .002). CSSA reduced the severity of pain and hyperalgesia at 1 month and optimized quality of life 3 months after surgery (role physical scores, P = .005). CSSA and EA significantly improve postoperative analgesia, reduce postoperative morphine consumption, area of wound hyperalgesia, and accelerate patient rehabilitation after open nephrectomy. CSSA significantly reduces the severity of residual pain 1 month after surgery and optimizes quality-of-life parameters 3 months after surgery.

  20. Micro-surgical endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyas, S; Vere, J; Ali, Z; Harris, I

    2014-02-01

    Non-surgical endodontic retreatment is the treatment of choice for endodontically treated teeth with recurrent or residual disease in the majority of cases. In some cases, surgical endodontic treatment is indicated. Successful micro-surgical endodontic treatment depends on the accuracy of diagnosis, appropriate case selection, the quality of the surgical skills, and the application of the most appropriate haemostatic agents and biomaterials. This article describes the armamentarium and technical procedures involved in performing micro-surgical endodontics to a high standard.

  1. Surgical innovation as sui generis surgical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, Mianna

    2013-12-01

    Successful innovative 'leaps' in surgical technique have the potential to contribute exponentially to surgical advancement, and thereby to improved health outcomes for patients. Such innovative leaps often occur relatively spontaneously, without substantial forethought, planning, or preparation. This feature of surgical innovation raises special challenges for ensuring sufficient evaluation and regulatory oversight of new interventions that have not been the subject of controlled investigatory exploration and review. It is this feature in particular that makes early-stage surgical innovation especially resistant to classification as 'research', with all of the attendant methodological and ethical obligations--of planning, regulation, monitoring, reporting, and publication--associated with such a classification. This paper proposes conceptual and ethical grounds for a restricted definition according to which innovation in surgical technique is classified as a form of sui generis surgical 'research', where the explicit goal of adopting such a definition is to bring about needed improvements in knowledge transfer and thereby benefit current and future patients.

  2. 21 CFR 878.4370 - Surgical drape and drape accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4370 Surgical drape... site of surgical incision from microbial and other contamination. The device includes a plastic wound... insertion of the surgeon's finger into the rectum during performance of a transurethral prostatectomy....

  3. Laser therapy of stretch marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, David H

    2002-01-01

    Striae distensae, better known as stretch marks, are a common disfiguring skin disorder of significant cosmetic concern. Many sources have reported the use of lasers to diminish the appearance of striae. Controlled clinical studies of the various treatment modalities available for striae are relatively uncommon, and much of the clinical data are anecdotal. The use of lasers alone or in combination with other therapeutic modalities can provide a safe and effective reduction in the appearance of both red and white striae distensae. Many of these therapies require special measures for darker skin phototypes. This article reviews the historical use of laser therapy for this disorder and discusses current therapeutic options.

  4. 49 CFR 221.14 - Marking devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marking devices. 221.14 Section 221.14..., DEPARTMENT