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Sample records for surgical site infection

  1. Surgical site infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the development of SSI. Complications associated with surgical site infections7. • Longer hospital stay with risk of acquiring other hospital acquired infections like pneumonia. • Require more surgical procedures. • Risk for development of resistance to antibiotics. • Risk for development of necrotizing fasciitis with skin loss.

  2. Surgical site infection among patients undergone orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical site infection among patients undergone orthopaedic surgery at Muhimbili Orthopaedic Institute, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ... of surgical site infection at Muhimbili Orthopedic Institute was high. This was associated with more than 2 hours length of surgery, lack of prophylaxis use, and pre-operative hospital stay.

  3. Fighting surgical site infections in small animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verwilghen, Denis; Singh, Ameet

    2015-01-01

    A diverse array of pathogen-related, patient-related, and caretaker-related issues influence risk and prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs). The entire surgical team involved in health care settings in which surgical procedures are performed play a pivotal role in the prevention of SSIs. ...

  4. Mycobacterium fortuitum causing surgical site wound infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaleem, F.; Usman, J.; Omair, M.; Din, R.U.; Hassan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum, a rapidly growing mycobacterium, is ubiquitous in nature. The organism was considered to be a harmless saprophyte but now there have been several reports from different parts of the world wherein it has been incriminated in a variety of human infections. We report a culture positive case of surgical site infection caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum, who responded well to the treatment. (author)

  5. Surgical site infection in posterior spine surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-20

    Mar 20, 2016 ... fluid at the surgical site, and microbiological evidence. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C‑reactive protein (CRP) values are also considered useful in the detection and monitoring of spinal infection.[6,7]. The majority of SSIs become apparent within 30 days of an operative procedure and longer in ...

  6. Pelvic Surgical Site Infections in Gynecologic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P. Lachiewicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of surgical site infection (SSI remains the most common complication of gynecologic surgical procedures and results in significant patient morbidity. Gynecologic procedures pose a unique challenge in that potential pathogenic microorganisms from the skin or vagina and endocervix may migrate to operative sites and can result in vaginal cuff cellulitis, pelvic cellulitis, and pelvic abscesses. Multiple host and surgical risk factors have been identified as risks that increase infectious sequelae after pelvic surgery. This paper will review these risk factors as many are modifiable and care should be taken to address such factors in order to decrease the chance of infection. We will also review the definitions, microbiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of pelvic SSIs after gynecologic surgery.

  7. Surgical Site Infection Rate and Risk Factors among Obstetric Cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Surgical Site infections are the second most frequently reported infections of all nosocomial infections among hospital patients. Among surgical patients in obstetrics, Surgical Site Infections were the most common nosocomial infections and the rate is higher in sub-Saharan Africa. There has not been a ...

  8. Preventing surgical site infection. Where now?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2009-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is increasingly recognised as a measure of the quality of patient care by surgeons, infection control practitioners, health planners and the public. There is increasing pressure to compare SSI rates between surgeons, institutions and countries. For this to be meaningful, data must be standardised and must include post-discharge surveillance (PDS) as many superficial SSIs do not present to the original institution. Further work is required to determine the best method of conducting PDS. In 2008 two important documents on SSI were published from the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America\\/The Infectious Disease Society of America and the National Institute for Health and Clincal Excellence, UK. Both emphasise key aspects during the preoperative, operative and postoperative phases of patient care. In addition to effective interventions known to be important for some time, e.g. not shaving the surgical site until the day of the procedure, there is increasing emphasis on physiological parameters, e.g. blood glucose concentrations, oxygen tensions and body temperature. Laparoscopic procedures are increasingly associated with reduced SSI rates, and the screening and decontamination of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers is effective for certain surgical procedures but has to be balanced by cost and the risk of mupirocin resistance. Finally, there is a need to convert theory into practice by the rigorous application of SSI healthcare bundles. Recent studies suggest that, with a multidisciplinary approach, simple measures can be effective in reducing SSI rates.

  9. Surgical Site Infections and Associated Operative Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, Paul K; Zuckerbraun, Brian S

    Surgical site infection (SSI) contributes significantly to surgical morbidity. Patient factors and operative factors contribute to the risk of development of SSI. This review focuses on understanding operative characteristics that are associated with an increased risk of SSI. Much attention has been given to protocol care to reduce SSI, such as hair removal, skin preparation, and pre-operative antibiotic agents. Even with this, the appropriate antibiotic and re-dosing regimens often remain a challenge. Other operative factors such as blood loss/transfusion, emergency/urgent cases, duration of the operation, type of anesthesia, and resident involvement are also potentially modifiable to reduce the risk of SSI. Data are reviewed to highlight the increased risk associated with such factors. Strategies to reduce risk, such as operative care bundles, have significant promise to reduce the incidence of SSI for any given procedure.

  10. Improved risk adjustment for comparison of surgical site infection rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geubbels, Eveline L. P. E.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Wille, Jan C.; de Boer, Annette S.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop prognostic models for improved risk adjustment in surgical site infection surveillance for 5 surgical procedures and to compare these models with the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance system (NNIS) risk index. DESIGN: In a multicenter cohort study, prospective

  11. Evolving issues in the prevention of surgical site infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, A

    2009-06-01

    Surgical site infection is one of the more common causes of post-operative morbidity. Such infections contribute to prolonged recovery, delayed discharge and increasing costs to both patients and the health service. In the current climate increased emphasis is being placed on minimising the risks of acquiring or transmitting these nosocomial infections. This article reviews the current literature obtained from a Pubmed database search in relation to three specific aspects of surgical site infection: compliance with prophylactic antibiotics, post-discharge surveillance and novel methods for preventing surgical site infections. These topics represent areas where many institutions will find room for improvement in the prevention of surgical site infections. Tight adherence to prophylactic antibiotic guidelines, close followup of surgical wounds during and after hospital discharge, and attention to oxygenation status and the body temperature of patients may all prove to be useful adjuncts in significantly decreasing surgical site infections.

  12. Preventing surgical site infections: a surgeon's perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Nichols, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Wound site infections are a major source of postoperative illness, accounting for approximately a quarter of all nosocomial infections. National studies have defined the patients at highest risk for infection in general and in many specific operative procedures. Advances in risk assessment comparison may involve use of the standardized infection ratio, procedure-specific risk factor collection, and logistic regression models. Adherence to recommendations in the 1999 Centers for Disease Contro...

  13. Surgical site infection rates following laparoscopic urological procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Arvin K; Srinivasan, Arun K; Cho, Jane; Sadek, Mostafa A; Kavoussi, Louis R

    2011-04-01

    Surgical site infections have been categorized by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as "never events". The incidence of surgical site infection following laparoscopic urological surgery and its risk factors are poorly defined. We evaluated surgical site infection following urological laparoscopic surgery and identified possible factors that may influence occurrence. Patients who underwent transperitoneal laparoscopic procedures during a 4-year period by a single laparoscopic surgeon were retrospectively reviewed. Surgical site infections were identified postoperatively and defined using the Centers for Disease Control criteria. Clinical parameters, comorbidities, smoking history, preoperative urinalysis and culture results as well as operative data were analyzed. Nonparametric testing using the Mann-Whitney U test, multivariable logistic regression and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. In 556 patients undergoing urological laparoscopic procedures 14 surgical site infections (2.5%) were identified at mean postoperative day 21.5. Of the 14 surgical site infections 10 (71.4%) were located at a specimen extraction site. Operative time, procedure type and increasing body mass index were significantly associated with the occurrence of surgical site infections (p = 0.007, p = 0.019, p = 0.038, respectively), whereas history of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.071) and intraoperative transfusion (p = 0.053) were found to trend toward significance. Age, gender, positive urine culture, steroid use, procedure type and smoking history were not significantly associated with surgical site infection. Body mass index and operative time remained significant predictors of surgical site infection on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Surgical site infection is an infrequent complication following laparoscopic surgery with the majority occurring at the specimen extraction site. Infection is associated with prolonged operative time and

  14. Surgical Site Infection Following Fixation of Acetabular Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Faizan; Younus, Sajid; Asmatullah; Zia, Osama Bin; Khan, Naveed

    2017-09-01

    Acetabular fractures are mainly caused by high energy trauma. Surgical fixation of these fractures requires extensive surgical exposure which increases the length of operation and blood loss as well. This may increase the risk of surgical site infection. Our aim is to evaluate the prevalence of surgical site infections and the risk factors associated with it so as to minimize its chances. A total of 261 patients who underwent acetabular fracture surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into 2 groups, with or without surgical site infection. Factors examined include patients' gender, age, body mass index (BMI), time between injury and surgery, operative time, estimated blood loss, number of packed red blood cell transfused, length of total intensive care unit (ICU) stay, fracture type, surgical approach, smoking status, patients' comorbids and associated injuries. Fourteen patients (5.4%) developed surgical site infection. Out of 14 infections, 4 were superficial and 10 were deep. The factors that were found to be associated with surgical site infection following acetabular fracture fixation were prolonged operation time, increased BMI, prolonged ICU stay, larger amount of packed red blood cell transfused and associated genitourinary and abdominal trauma. In our study, we conclude that measures should be undertaken to attenuate the chances of surgical site infection in this major surgery by considering the risk factors significantly associated with it.

  15. IMPORTANCE OF SOUTHAMPTON WOUND GRADING SYSTEM IN SURGICAL SITE INFECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Shaleen; Mahendra; Shahapurkar; Md. Javed; Ankur; Shiv; Eshan

    2014-01-01

    : Post-operative wound infection is defined as surgical site infection from 0-30 days after surgery, or infection to surgical site till one year in cases of implants like mesh, vascular grafts and prosthesis. This study was done to find out incidence of post-operative wound infection in surgical patients in rural setup. This study of post-operative wound infection was carried out from August 2008 to August 2010. The study is of 3275 patients who underwent surgery in the A.V.B....

  16. Early and late surgical site infections in ear surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastier, P L; Leroyer, C; Lashéras, A; Rogues, A-M; Darrouzet, V; Franco-Vidal, V

    2016-04-01

    A retroauricular approach is routinely used for treating chronic otitis media. The incidence of surgical site infections after ear surgery is around 10% in contaminated or dirty procedures. This observational prospective study describes surgical site infections after chronic otitis media surgery with the retroauricular approach and investigated their potential predictive factors. This observational prospective study included patients suffering from chronic otitis media and eligible for therapeutic surgery with a retroauricular approach. During follow-up, surgical site infections were defined as "early" if occurring within 30 days after surgery or as "late" if occurring thereafter. The data of 102 patients were analysed. Concerning early surgical site infections, four cases were diagnosed (3.9%) and a significant association was found with preoperative antibiotic therapy, wet ear at pre-operative examination, class III (contaminated) in the surgical wound classification, NNIS (National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance) index > 1, and oral post-operative antibiotic use. Seven late surgical site infections were diagnosed (7.1%) between 90 and 160 days after surgery and were significantly correlated to otorrhoea during the 6 months before surgery, surgery duration ≤60 minutes, canal wall down technique and use of fibrin glue. Surgical site infections after chronic otitis media surgery seem to be associated with factors related to the inflammatory state of the middle ear at the time of surgery in early infections and with chronic inflammation in late infections. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  17. Surgical site infection and timing of prophylactic antibiotics for appendectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wan-Ting; Tai, Feng-Chuan; Wang, Pa-Chun; Tsai, Ming-Lin

    2014-12-01

    Pre-operative prophylactic antibiotics may decrease the frequency of surgical site infection after appendectomy. However, the optimal timing for administration of pre-operative prophylactic antibiotics is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of timing of prophylactic antibiotics on the frequency of surgical site infection after appendectomy. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively for 577 consecutive patients who had appendectomy for acute appendicitis from 2006 to 2009. Quality assurance guidelines for timing of prophylactic antibiotics before the skin incision were changed from 0 to 30 min before the skin incision (before June 2008) to 30 to 60 min before the skin incision (after June 2008). Surgical site infection occurred in 28 patients (4.9%). There was no difference in frequency of surgical site infection with different timing of pre-operative prophylactic antibiotic (pre-operative time 0 to 30 min: 9 infections [3.6%]; 31 to 60 min: 13 infections [5.4%]; 61 to 120 min: 5 infections [7.0%]; >120 min: 1 infection [6.6%]). Multivariable analysis showed that surgical site infection was associated significantly with medical comorbidity but not perforated appendicitis. The frequency of surgical site infection was independent of timing of preoperative prophylactic antibiotics but was associated with the presence of medical comorbidity.

  18. Adherence to Surgical Site Infection Guidelines in Cardiac Surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    National Surgical Infection Prevention Project (NSIPP), Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) and. American College of ... 89.1 and 79.3% of the patients received the recommended pre- and post-operative antibiotics, respectively. On the other hand, ... INTRODUCTION. Surgical site infection (SSI) represents one of the most ...

  19. Incidence of Surgical Site Infections and Microbial Pattern at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is an infection that develops within 30 days after an operation or within one year if an implant was placed, and the infection appears to be related to the surgery (14). It remains a major cause of morbidity and death among the operated patients(1). Post-operative. SSIs are the most common ...

  20. Post-cesarean surgical site infection due to Buttiauxella agrestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonello, Vicente Sperb; Dallé, Jessica; Domingues, Guilherme Campos; Ferreira, Jorge Alberto Santiago; Fontoura, Maria do Carmo Queiroz; Knapp, Fábio Borges

    2014-05-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are postoperative complications that constitute a major public health problem. We present a rare case report of infection by Buttiauxella agrestis, a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family, occurring after a cesarean delivery in a young woman with no comorbidities. The authors further discuss the origin of this infection. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of two surveillance methods for surgical site infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haji Abdolbaghi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical wound infection surveillance is an important facet of hospital infection control processes. There are several surveillance methods for surgical site infections. The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of two different surgical site infection surveillance methods. Methods: In this prospective cross sectional study 3020 undergoing surgey in general surgical wards of Imam Khomeini hospital were included. Surveillance methods consisted of review of medical records for postoperative fever and review of nursing daily note for prescription of antibiotics postoperatively and during patient’s discharge. Review of patient’s history and daily records and interview with patient’s surgeon and the head-nurse of the ward considered as a gold standard for surveillance. Results: The postoperative antibiotic consumption especially when considering its duration is a proper method for surgical wound infection surveillance. Accomplishments of a prospective study with postdischarge follow up until 30 days after surgery is recommended. Conclusion: The result of this study showed that postoperative antibiotic surveillance method specially with consideration of the antibiotic usage duration is a proper method for surgical site infection surveillance in general surgery wards. Accomplishments of a prospective study with post discharge follow up until 30 days after surgery is recommended.

  2. Surveillance, Auditing, and Feedback Can Reduce Surgical Site Infection Dramatically: Toward Zero Surgical Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, Bhavani; Gowda, Deepak; Bulagonda, Pradeep; Rao, Abhishek; Raman, Sai Suguna; Natarajan, Shanmuga Vadivoo

    2018-04-01

    We evaluated the Surveillance of Surgical Site Infection (SSI), Auditing, and Feedback (SAF) effect on the rate of compliance with an SSI care bundle and measured its effectiveness in reducing the SSI rate. A prospective cohort study from January 2014 to December 2016 was classified into three phases: pre-SAF, early-SAF, and late-SAF. Pre-operative baseline characteristics of 24,677 patients who underwent orthopedic, cardiovascular thoracic surgery (CTVS) or urologic operations were recorded. Univariable analyses of the SSI rates in the pre-SAF and post-SAF phases were performed. Percentage compliance and non-compliance with each care component were calculated. Correlation between reduction in the SSI rate and increase in compliance with the pre-operative, peri-operative, and post-operative care-bundle components was performed using the Spearman test. There was a significant decrease in the SSI rate in orthopedic procedures that involved surgical implantation and in mitral valve/aortic valve (MVR/AVR) cardiac operations, with a relative risk (RR) ratio of 0.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.12-0.31) and 0.08 (95% CI 0.03-0.22), respectively. The SSI rate was inversely correlated with the rate of compliance with pre-operative (r = -0.738; p = 0.037), peri-operative (r = - 0.802; p = 0.017), and post-operative (r = -0.762; p = 0.028) care bundles. Implementation of the Surveillance of SSI, Auditing, and Feedback bundle had a profound beneficial effect on the SSI rate, thereby reducing healthcare costs and improving patient quality of life.

  3. Risk Factors of Surgical Site Infection at Muhimbili National Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Superficial SSI was the most commonly observed type, 54.8%. Overall HIV prevalence in this study was 16.9% with a 5 times risk of developing SSI. Conclusions: Surgical site infection has remained a major Nosocomial infection in developing countries. Factors shown to be associated with increased risk are wound class, ...

  4. Post-operative Salmonella surgical site infection in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Marc; Boozer, Lindsay; Glass, Eric N; Sanchez, Susan; Platt, Simon R; Freeman, Lisa M

    2017-09-01

    Following decompressive surgery for degenerative lumbosacral stenosis, a 6-year-old German shepherd dog developed a subcutaneous infection at the surgical site and discospondylitis at the lumbosacral intervertebral disc. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, serotype Dublin was recovered from the surgical site. Salmonella of a different serovar was isolated from a sample of the raw meat-based diet that the owner fed the dog.

  5. Surgical site infection in women undergoing surgery for gynecologic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Haider; Gojayev, Anar; Buechel, Megan; Knight, Jason; SanMarco, Janice; Lockhart, David; Michener, Chad; Moslemi-Kebria, Mehdi

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the rate and predictors of surgical site infection (SSI) after gynecologic cancer surgery and identify any association between SSI and postoperative outcome. Patients with endometrial, cervical, or ovarian cancers from 2005 to 2011 were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. The extent of surgical intervention was categorized into modified surgical complexity scoring (MSCS) system. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used. Odds ratios were adjusted for patient demographics, comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, and operative factors. Of 6854 patients, 369 (5.4%) were diagnosed with SSI. Surgical site infection after laparotomy was 3.5 times higher compared with minimally invasive surgery (7% vs 2%; P laparotomy group, independent predictors of SSI included endometrial cancer diagnosis, obesity, ascites, preoperative anemia, American Society of Anesthesiologists class greater than or equal to 3, MSCS greater than or equal to 3, and perioperative blood transfusion. Among laparoscopic cases, independent predictors of SSI included only preoperative leukocytosis and overweight. For patients with deep or organ space SSI, significant predictors included hypoalbuminemia, preoperative weight loss, respiratory comorbidities, MSCS greater than 4, and perioperative blood transfusion for laparotomy and only preoperative leukocytosis for minimally invasive surgery. Surgical site infection was associated with longer mean hospital stay and higher rate of reoperation, sepsis, and wound dehiscence. Surgical site infection was not associated with increased risk of acute renal failure or 30-day mortality. These findings were consistent in subset of patients with deep or organ space SSI. Seven percent of patients undergoing laparotomy for gynecologic malignancy developed SSI. Surgical site infection is associated with longer hospital stay and more

  6. [Risk factors related to surgical site infection in elective surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeles-Garay, Ulises; Morales-Márquez, Lucy Isabel; Sandoval-Balanzarios, Miguel Antonio; Velázquez-García, José Arturo; Maldonado-Torres, Lulia; Méndez-Cano, Andrea Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    The risk factors for surgical site infections in surgery should be measured and monitored from admission to 30 days after the surgical procedure, because 30% of Surgical Site Infection is detected when the patient was discharged. Calculate the Relative Risk of associated factors to surgical site infections in adult with elective surgery. Patients were classified according to the surgery contamination degree; patient with surgery clean was defined as no exposed and patient with clean-contaminated or contaminated surgery was defined exposed. Risk factors for infection were classified as: inherent to the patient, pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative. Statistical analysis; we realized Student t or Mann-Whitney U, chi square for Relative Risk (RR) and multivariate analysis by Cox proportional hazards. Were monitored up to 30 days after surgery 403 patients (59.8% women), 35 (8.7%) developed surgical site infections. The factors associated in multivariate analysis were: smoking, RR of 3.21, underweight 3.4 hand washing unsuitable techniques 4.61, transfusion during the procedure 3.22, contaminated surgery 60, and intensive care stay 8 to 14 days 11.64, permanence of 1 to 3 days 2.4 and use of catheter 1 to 3 days 2.27. To avoid all risk factors is almost impossible; therefore close monitoring of elective surgery patients can prevent infectious complications.

  7. Timing of surgical site infection and pulmonary complications after laparotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundel, Ossian; Gundersen, Sofie Kirchhoff; Dahl, Rikke Maria

    2018-01-01

    . The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic timing of surgical site infections and pulmonary complications after laparotomy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of the PROXI trial which was a randomized clinical trial conducted in 1400 patients undergoing elective or emergent......BACKGROUND: Surgical site infection (SSI) and other postoperative complications are associated with high costs, morbidity, secondary surgery, and mortality. Many studies have identified factors that may prevent SSI and pulmonary complications, but it is important to know when they in fact occur...... laparotomy. Patients were randomly allocated to either 80% or 30% perioperative inspiratory oxygen fraction. RESULTS: SSI or pulmonary complications were diagnosed in 24.2% (95% CI: 22.0%-26.5%) of the patients at a median of 9 days [IQR: 5-15] after surgery. Most common was surgical site infection (19...

  8. Surgical Site Infection among Patients Undergone Orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    5Hubert Kairuki Memorial University (HKMU), Department of Maternal and Child Health, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania ... Other effects of SSIs include revision surgery, delayed wound healing, increased use of antibiotics, all of ... following signs or symptoms of wound infection: pain or tenderness, localized swelling, redness and ...

  9. Risk control of surgical site infection after cardiothoracic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, P.; de Jong, A. P.; Kloek, J. J.; Spanjaard, L.; de Mol, B. A. J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate whether a risk control programme based on risk assessment, new treatment modalities and the presence of a surveillance programme reduces the incidence of surgical site infections (SSI). Between January 2001 and December 2003, 167 patients were

  10. Surgical site infection in posterior spine surgery | Ojo | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSIs) in spine surgery remain a significant cause of morbidity and prolonged hospitalization. Factors affecting SSI includes patient's comorbidities, duration of surgery, type and indication for surgery among others. We intend to document our experience in our center and highlight ...

  11. Risk factors for surgical site infections following clean orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is recommended that preoperative hospital stay should be as short as possible and extra care/precautions taken when working on the elderly, using implants or requiring drainage. Keywords: Clean orthopaedic operations, risk factors, surgical site infection. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • Oct-Dec 2013 • Vol 16 ...

  12. Surgical-site Infection Following Cesarean Section in Kano, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence, risk factors and common bacterial pathogens for surgical site infection (SSI), following cesarean section (CS). Materials and Methods: A retrospective case-control study of patients delivered by CS in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria. The cases were the patients whose ...

  13. Surgical site infections following instrumented stabilization of the spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapunt U

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ulrike Dapunt,1 Caroline Bürkle,1 Frank Günther,2 Wojciech Pepke,1 Stefan Hemmer,1 Michael Akbar1 1Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Center for Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, 2Department for Infectious Diseases, Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany Background: Implant-associated infections are still a feared complication in the field of orthopedics. Bacteria attach to the implant surface and form so-called biofilm colonies that are often difficult to diagnose and treat. Since the majority of studies focus on prosthetic joint infections (PJIs of the hip and knee, current treatment options (eg, antibiotic prophylaxis of implant-associated infections have mostly been adapted according to these results. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate patients with surgical site infections following instrumented stabilization of the spine with regard to detected bacteria species and the course of the disease. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective single-center analysis of implant-associated infections of the spine from 2010 to 2014. A total of 138 patients were included in the study. The following parameters were evaluated: C-reactive protein serum concentration, microbiological evaluation of tissue samples, the time course of the disease, indication for instrumented stabilization of the spine, localization of the infection, and the number of revision surgeries required until cessation of symptoms. Results: Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. were most commonly detected (n=69, 50%, followed by fecal bacteria (n=46, 33.3%. In 23.2% of cases, no bacteria were detected despite clinical suspicion of an infection. Most patients suffered from degenerative spine disorders (44.9%, followed by spinal fractures (23.9%, non-degenerative scoliosis (20.3%, and spinal tumors (10.1%. Surgical site infections occurred predominantly within 3

  14. The surgical care improvement project and prevention of post-operative infection, including surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Laura H; Politano, Amani D; Sawyer, Robert G

    2011-06-01

    In response to inconsistent compliance with infection prevention measures, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services collaborated with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the Surgical Infection Prevention (SIP) project, introduced in 2002. Quality improvement measures were developed to standardize processes to increase compliance. In 2006, the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) developed out of the SIP project and its process measures. These initiatives, published in the Specifications Manual for National Inpatient Quality Measures, outline process and outcome measures. This continually evolving manual is intended to provide standard quality measures to unify documentation and track standards of care. Seven of the SCIP initiatives apply to the peri-operative period: Prophylactic antibiotics should be received within 1 h prior to surgical incision (1), be selected for activity against the most probable antimicrobial contaminants (2), and be discontinued within 24 h after the surgery end-time (3); (4) euglycemia should be maintained, with well-controlled morning blood glucose concentrations on the first two post-operative days, especially in cardiac surgery patients; (6) hair at the surgical site should be removed with clippers or by depilatory methods, not with a blade; (9) urinary catheters are to be removed within the first two post-operative days; and (10) normothermia should be maintained peri-operatively. There is strong evidence that implementation of protocols that standardize practices reduce the risk of surgical infection. The SCIP initiative targets complications that account for a significant portion of preventable morbidity as well as cost. One of the goals of the SCIP guidelines was a 25% reduction in the incidence of surgical site infections from implementation through 2010. Process measures are becoming routine, and as we practice more evidence-based medicine, it falls to us, the surgeons and scientists, to be active

  15. Implementation of surgical quality improvement: auditing tool for surgical site infection prevention practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Hobson, Deborah B; Bennett, Jennifer L; Wick, Elizabeth C

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infections are a potentially preventable patient harm. Emerging evidence suggests that the implementation of evidence-based process measures for infection reduction is highly variable. The purpose of this work was to develop an auditing tool to assess compliance with infection-related process measures and establish a system for identifying and addressing defects in measure implementation. This was a retrospective cohort study using electronic medical records. We used the auditing tool to assess compliance with 10 process measures in a sample of colorectal surgery patients with and without postoperative infections at an academic medical center (January 2012 to March 2013). We investigated 59 patients with surgical site infections and 49 patients without surgical site infections. First, overall compliance rates for the 10 process measures were compared between patients with infection vs patients without infection to assess if compliance was lower among patients with surgical site infections. Then, because of the burden of data collection, the tool was used exclusively to evaluate quarterly compliance rates among patients with infection. The results were reviewed, and the key factors contributing to noncompliance were identified and addressed. Ninety percent of process measures had lower compliance rates among patients with infection. Detailed review of infection cases identified many defects that improved following the implementation of system-level changes: correct cefotetan redosing (education of anesthesia personnel), temperature at surgical incision >36.0°C (flags used to identify patients for preoperative warming), and the use of preoperative mechanical bowel preparation with oral antibiotics (laxative solutions and antibiotics distributed in clinic before surgery). Quarterly compliance improved for 80% of process measures by the end of the study period. This study was conducted on a small surgical cohort within a select subspecialty. The

  16. ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERN OF ORGANISMS CAUSING SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS (SSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Murlidhar Gajbhiye

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND CDC defines surgical site infection as ‘Infections related to operative procedure that occurs at or near surgical incision within 30 days of operative procedure or within one year if the implant is left in situ’. Surgical site infection (SSI is 3 rd most frequently reported nosocomial infection (12%-16% as per National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of organisms causing SSI. MATERIALS AND METHODS During a two year study period in a tertiary care hospital, 19,127 patients underwent surgeries in various surgical departments. Of these 517 (2.7% developed surgical site infection. The surgical wounds were classified by CDC & NNIS criteria into 4 classes. Two wound swabs were taken and processed by standard microbiological techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility along with testing of ESBLs, MBLs, AmpCβ lactamases was done for all isolates causing SSI. RESULTS Among 19,127 patients, 517 (2.7% developed SSI. It was highest in patients of perforation peritonitis (11.99%.Among 517 specimens, 340 (65.76% showed growth and 177 (34.23% were culture negative. E.coli (23.33% was the commonest organism isolated followed by Acinetobacter spp. (16%, Klebsiella spp. (15.66%, Pseudomonas spp. (15.33%, S. aureus (10.33%, S. epidermidis(7.3%, Proteus spp. (6.00% and Citrobacter spp. (2.66%.Staphylococcus spp. were 100 % sensitive to Vancomycin & Linezolid. (27.5% S. aureus were MRSA and (17.5% were Inducible Clindamycin resistant (ICR. Enterobacteriaceae isolates showed maximum sensitivity towards Imipenem, Piperacillin-Tazobactam and Amikacin. Klebsiella spp. (40.62%, E.coli (35.89%, Citrobacter spp. (33.33%, Proteus spp. (26.08% were ESBL producers. Klebsiella spp. (17.18%, E.coli (10.25%, Proteus spp. (11.11% and Citrobacter spp. (8.69% were AmpC producers. Acinetobacter spp. (28.57% was commonest MBL producer followed by Klebsiella spp. (20

  17. Surgical site infections in paediatric otolaryngology operative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifeacho, S N; Bajaj, Y; Jephson, C G; Albert, D M

    2012-07-01

    An assessment of the rate of surgical site infections associated with elective paediatric otolaryngology surgical procedures. Prospective data was collected for a 3-week period for all children undergoing surgery where either mucosa or skin was breached. The parents of the children were requested to complete a questionnaire at 30 days after the operation. Data was collected on 80 consecutive cases. The majority of cases were admitted on the day of the procedure. The procedures included adenotonsillectomy (24), grommets (12), cochlear implantation (6), bone-anchored hearing aid (2), submandibular gland excision (1), branchial sinus excision (1), cystic hygroma excision (3), nasal glioma excision (1), microlaryngobronchoscopy (13), tracheostomy (3) and other procedures (14). Nearly half the cases had more than one operation done at the same time. 26/80 (32.5%) patients had a temporary or permanent implant inserted at the time of operation (grommet, bone-anchored hearing aid, cochlear implant). 25/80 (31%) operative fields were classed as clean and 55/80 (68.7%) as clean contaminated operations. The duration of the operation varied from 6 min to 142 min. Hospital antibiotic protocol was adhered to in 69/80 (86.3%) cases but not in 11/80 cases. In our series, 3/80 (3.7%) patients had an infection in the postoperative period. Surgical site infections do occur at an appreciable rate in paediatric otolaryngology. With the potential for serious consequences, reduction in the risk of surgical site infections is important. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Laparoscopic surgery compared with open surgery decreases surgical site infection in obese patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel M; Sørensen, Lars T

    2012-01-01

    : To compare surgical site infections rate in obese patients after laparoscopic surgery with open general abdominal surgery.......: To compare surgical site infections rate in obese patients after laparoscopic surgery with open general abdominal surgery....

  19. Risk factors for surgical site infection after dermatological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, Clare F; Buettner, Petra G; Drobetz, Herwig

    2012-07-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following minor surgery contributes to patient morbidity and compromises cosmetic outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of and risk factors for SSI after dermatological surgery in general practice.   A prospective, observational study which assessed infection among 972 patients was conducted in regional north Queensland, Australia. Consecutive patients presenting for minor skin excisions were invited to participate. Wounds were assessed for SSI at the time of removal of sutures. Infection occurred in 85 of the 972 excisions; thus, the overall incidence of infection was 8.7% (95% confidence interval 6.5-11.0). Excisions in the upper (Prisk factors for wound infection. The length of the excision (Prisk factors for infection. Diabetes was not found to be an independent risk factor for infection (P=0.891). Prophylactic antibiotics are probably prescribed excessively or inappropriately for dermatological surgery, and overall we wish to discourage their use. The results of this study may encourage the more judicial use of prophylactic antibiotics by defining high-risk procedures, such as excisions from the extremities, excision of BCC or SCC, and larger excisions, and patients who are at high risk for infection, such as ex-smokers. © 2012 The International Society of Dermatology.

  20. The Surgical Site Infection Risk Score (SSIRS: A Model to Predict the Risk of Surgical Site Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl van Walraven

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections (SSI are an important cause of peri-surgical morbidity with risks that vary extensively between patients and surgeries. Quantifying SSI risk would help identify candidates most likely to benefit from interventions to decrease the risk of SSI.We randomly divided all surgeries recorded in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program from 2010 into a derivation and validation population. We used multivariate logistic regression to determine the independent association of patient and surgical covariates with the risk of any SSI (including superficial, deep, and organ space SSI within 30 days of surgery. To capture factors particular to specific surgeries, we developed a surgical risk score specific to all surgeries having a common first 3 numbers of their CPT code.Derivation (n = 181 894 and validation (n = 181 146 patients were similar for all demographics, past medical history, and surgical factors. Overall SSI risk was 3.9%. The SSI Risk Score (SSIRS found that risk increased with patient factors (smoking, increased body mass index, certain comorbidities (peripheral vascular disease, metastatic cancer, chronic steroid use, recent sepsis, and operative characteristics (surgical urgency; increased ASA class; longer operation duration; infected wounds; general anaesthesia; performance of more than one procedure; and CPT score. In the validation population, the SSIRS had good discrimination (c-statistic 0.800, 95% CI 0.795-0.805 and calibration.SSIRS can be calculated using patient and surgery information to estimate individual risk of SSI for a broad range of surgery types.

  1. Association of Safety Culture with Surgical Site Infection Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Caleb J; Pawlik, Timothy M; Daniels, Tania; Vernon, Nora; Banks, Katie; Westby, Peggy; Wick, Elizabeth C; Sexton, J Bryan; Makary, Martin A

    2016-02-01

    Hospital workplace culture may have an impact on surgical outcomes; however, this association has not been established. We designed a study to evaluate the association between safety culture and surgical site infection (SSI). Using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture and National Healthcare Safety Network definitions, we measured 12 dimensions of safety culture and colon SSI rates, respectively, in the surgical units of Minnesota community hospitals. A Pearson's r correlation was calculated for each of 12 dimensions of surgical unit safety culture and SSI rate and then adjusted for surgical volume and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification. Seven hospitals participated in the study, with a mean survey response rate of 43%. The SSI rates ranged from 0% to 30%, and surgical unit safety culture scores ranged from 16 to 92 on a scale of 0 to 100. Ten dimensions of surgical unit safety culture were associated with colon SSI rates: teamwork across units (r = -0.96; 95% CI [-0.76, -0.99]), organizational learning (r = -0.95; 95% CI [-0.71, -0.99]), feedback and communication about error (r = -0.92; 95% CI [-0.56, -0.99]), overall perceptions of safety (r = -0.90; 95% CI [-0.45, -0.99]), management support for patient safety (r = -0.90; 95% CI [-0.44, -0.98]), teamwork within units (r = -0.88; 95% CI [-0.38, -0.98]), communication openness (r = -0.85; 95% CI [-0.26, -0.98]), supervisor/manager expectations and actions promoting safety (r = -0.85; 95% CI [-0.25, -0.98]), non-punitive response to error (r = -0.78; 95% CI [-0.07, -0.97]), and frequency of events reported (r = -0.76; 95% CI [-0.01, -0.96]). After adjusting for surgical volume and ASA classification, 9 of 12 dimensions of surgical unit safety culture were significantly associated with lower colon SSI rates. These data suggest an important role for positive safety and teamwork culture and engaged hospital management in producing high-quality surgical

  2. Risk factors for surgical site infection and association with infliximab administration during surgery for Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Motoi; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Matsuoka, Hiroki; Bando, Toshihiro; Ichiki, Kaoru; Nakajima, Kazuhiko; Tomita, Naohiro; Takesue, Yoshio

    2013-10-01

    Preoperative infliximab treatment may influence postoperative infectious complications in patients with Crohn's disease. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of surgical site infection after surgery for Crohn's disease and evaluate the effects of preoperative infliximab administration. We performed a prospective surveillance and review of surgical site infections. This study was conducted in the Surgical Department of Hyogo College of Medicine. A total of 405 consecutive patients with Crohn's disease who underwent abdominal surgery between January 2008 and December 2011 were included. Infection was diagnosed by the infection control team. The possible risk factors were analyzed by using logistic regression analyses to determine their predictive significance. Within the patient population, 20% of patients received infliximab, and 60% had penetrating disease. The median duration from the last infliximab infusion to surgery was 43 days (range, 4-80). The overall incidence of surgical site infection was 27%. The incidence of incisional surgical site infection was 18%, and the organ/space surgical site infection rate was 8%. In the multivariate analysis, proctectomy was the highest risk factor for all surgical site infection (OR, 3.4-11.8; p risk factor for surgical site infection. By contrast, there was a significantly reduced risk of incisional surgical site infection in patients with penetrating disease who received infliximab (OR, 0.1; p risk factor for surgical site infection in patients with Crohn's disease. The administration of preoperative infliximab was not a risk factor for surgical site infection.

  3. Patients at High-Risk for Surgical Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueck, Krislynn M; Kao, Lillian S

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a significant healthcare quality issue, resulting in increased morbidity, disability, length of stay, resource utilization, and costs. Identification of high-risk patients may improve pre-operative counseling, inform resource utilization, and allow modifications in peri-operative management to optimize outcomes. Review of the pertinent English-language literature. High-risk surgical patients may be identified on the basis of individual risk factors or combinations of factors. In particular, statistical models and risk calculators may be useful in predicting infectious risks, both in general and for SSIs. These models differ in the number of variables; inclusion of pre-operative, intra-operative, or post-operative variables; ease of calculation; and specificity for particular procedures. Furthermore, the models differ in their accuracy in stratifying risk. Biomarkers may be a promising way to identify patients at high risk of infectious complications. Although multiple strategies exist for identifying surgical patients at high risk for SSIs, no one strategy is superior for all patients. Further efforts are necessary to determine if risk stratification in combination with risk modification can reduce SSIs in these patient populations.

  4. Surgical site infections in spine surgery: identification of microbiologic and surgical characteristics in 239 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Jabbar, Amir; Berven, Sigurd H; Hu, Serena S; Chou, Dean; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Takemoto, Steven; Ames, Christopher; Deviren, Vedat; Tay, Bobby; Weinstein, Phil; Burch, Shane; Liu, Catherine

    2013-10-15

    Retrospective analysis. The objective of this study was to describe the microbiology of surgical site infection (SSI) in spine surgery and relationship with surgical management characteristics. SSI is an important complication of spine surgery that results in significant morbidity. A comprehensive and contemporary understanding of the microbiology of postoperative spine infections is valuable to direct empiric antimicrobial treatment and prophylaxis and other infection prevention strategies. All cases of spinal surgery associated with SSI between July 2005 and November 2010 were identified by the hospital infection control surveillance program using Centers for Disease Control National Health Safety Network criteria. Surgical characteristics and microbiologic data for each case were gathered by direct medical record review. Of 7529 operative spine cases performed between July 2005 and November 2010, 239 cases of SSI were identified. The most commonly isolated pathogen was Staphylococcus aureus (45.2%), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (31.4%). Methicillin-resistant organisms accounted for 34.3% of all SSIs and were more common in revision than in primary surgical procedures (47.4% vs. 28.0%, P = 0.003). Gram-negative organisms were identified in 30.5% of the cases. Spine surgical procedures involving the sacrum were significantly associated with gram-negative organisms (P spine. Cefazolin-resistant gram-negative organisms accounted for 61.6% of all gram-negative infections and 18.8% of all SSIs. Although gram-positive organisms predominated, gram-negative organisms accounted for a sizeable portion of SSI, particularly among lower lumbar and sacral spine surgical procedures. Nearly half of infections in revision surgery were due to a methicillin-resistant organism. These findings may help guide choice of empiric antibiotics while awaiting culture data and antimicrobial prophylaxis strategies in specific spine surgical procedures. 3.

  5. Long-term effect of infection prevention practices and case mix on cesarean surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittur, Nupur D; McMullen, Kathleen M; Russo, Anthony J; Ruhl, Loie; Kay, Helen H; Warren, David K

    2012-08-01

    To estimate trends in patient characteristics and obstetric complications in an 8-year cohort of patients undergoing cesarean delivery and to use time series analysis to estimate the effect of infection prevention interventions and secular trends in patient characteristics on postcesarean delivery surgical site infections. A multivariable autoregressive integrated moving average model was used to perform time series analysis on a 96-month retrospective cohort of patients who underwent cesarean delivery (January 2003-December 2010) in a U.S. tertiary care hospital. We identified 8,668 women who underwent cesarean delivery. Median age was 26 years (range 12-53 years), 3,093 (35.7%) of patients had body mass indexes (BMIs) of 35 or greater, 2,561 (29.5%) were of white race, and 303 (3.5%) had a surgical site infection. Over the study period, there was a significant increase in the proportion of patients who underwent cesarean delivery who had BMIs of 35 or higher, hypertension or mild preeclampsia, and severe preeclampsia or eclampsia. A nonseasonal autoregressive integrated moving average model with a linear trend and no autocorrelation was identified. In the multivariable autoregressive integrated moving average model of postcesarean surgical site infections, implementation of a policy to administer prophylactic antibiotics within 1 hour before incision, instead of at the time of cord clamp, led to a 48% reduction in cesarean delivery surgical site infections (Δ=-5.4 surgical site infections per 100 cesarean deliveries; Pinfections. III.

  6. Operative Duration and Risk of Surgical Site Infection in Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Coy, Shannon; Simmons, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    The association of surgical duration with the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has not been quantified in neurosurgery. We investigated the association of operative duration in neurosurgical procedures with the incidence of SSI. We performed a retrospective cohort study involving patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures from 2005 to 2012 and were registered in the American College of Surgeons National Quality Improvement Project registry. To control for confounding, we used multivariable regression models and propensity score conditioning. During the study period there were 94,744 patients who underwent a neurosurgical procedure and met the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 4.1% developed a postoperative SSI within 30 days. Multivariable logistic regression showed an association between longer operative duration with higher incidence of SSI (odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.20). Compared with procedures of moderate duration (third quintile, 40th-60th percentile), patients undergoing the longest procedures (>80th percentile) had higher odds (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.86-2.31) of developing SSI. The shortest procedures (operative duration was associated with increased incidence of SSI for neurosurgical procedures. These results can be used by neurosurgeons to inform operative management and to stratify patients with regard to SSI risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of Antibiotics on Surgical Site Infection in Cases of Open and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. Surgical site infection (SSI) comes as third most ... The incidence of surgical site infection is approximately 3‑4%.[2,3] .... and one male patient. They had discharge from wound at third and fourth post operative day. The rate of infection was 2.63% in both the groups. In rest of the patients were there was no ...

  8. Surgical site infections in an Italian surgical ward: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leo, Alberto; Piffer, Silvano; Ricci, Francesco; Manzi, Alberto; Poggi, Elena; Porretto, Vincenzo; Fambri, Paolo; Piccini, Giannina; Patrizia, Trentini; Fabbri, Luca; Busetti, Rosanna

    2009-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains a major cause of morbidity and death. This study analyzed the results of surveillance to evaluate the incidence, risk factors, and characteristics of SSI in patients who underwent an operation in a typical Italian surgical ward. A group of 1,281 patients operated on from August 2005 to December 2007 underwent prospective and direct observation of incisions by a surgeon according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) method. The minimum follow-up was 30 days. A locally-modified risk index score (LRI) based on the NNIS was calculated for each patient, using as a cut point the 75(th) percentile of the duration of surgery (in minutes) for that particular procedure. Seventy-six patients were affected by incision site infection, and the SSI rate was 5.9%. Thirty-four (2.6% of the series) were superficial incisional, 32 (2.5%) deep incisional, and 10 (0.8%) organ/space SSIs. An increasing value of the LRI was significantly (p or=2, respectively. Obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m(2)), diabetes mellitus, and emergency surgery were associated with a higher risk of infection by multivariable analysis independent of the LRI. The NNIS method can be useful for SSI surveillance and monitoring in single surgical wards. Longer operations, diabetes mellitus, and obesity increase the risk of SSI, as does performance of surgery in an emergency situation.

  9. Evaluation of adherence to measures for the prevention of surgical site infections by the surgical team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cristina de Oliveira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVEEvaluate pre- and intraoperative practices adopted by medical and nursing teams for the prevention of surgical infections.METHODA prospective study carried out in the period of April to May 2013, in a surgical center of a university hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais.RESULTS18 surgeries were followed and 214 surgical gloves were analyzed, of which 23 (10.7% had postoperative glove perforation detected, with 52.2% being perceived by users. Hair removal was performed on 27.7% of patients in the operating room, with the use of blades in 80% of the cases. Antibiotic prophylaxis was administered to 81.8% of patients up to 60 minutes prior to surgical incision. An average of nine professionals were present during surgery and the surgery room door remained open in 94.4% of the procedures.CONCLUSIONPartial adhesion to the recommended measures was identified, reaffirming a need for greater attention to these critical steps/actions in order to prevent surgical site infection.

  10. Patient engagement with surgical site infection prevention: an expert panel perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tartari, E.; Weterings, V.; Gastmeier, P.; Bano, J.R.; Widmer, A.; Kluytmans, J.; Voss, A.

    2017-01-01

    Despite remarkable developments in the use of surgical techniques, ergonomic advancements in the operating room, and implementation of bundles, surgical site infections (SSIs) remain a substantial burden, associated with increased morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. National and international

  11. Surgical Site Infection Following Posterior Instrumented Surgery for Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zulkefli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To study the prevalence and the risk factors for surgical site infection in patients who underwent posterior instrumented surgery for thoracolumbar burst fractures. METHODOLOGY: Retrospective review of cases operated between year 2006 and 2007. The final end point is the detection of surgical site infection within one year. RESULTS: A total of 38 cases were reviewed. Surgical site infection occurred in 5 cases. Only one had deep infection. The onset of infection occurred within one month in all cases. The risk factors studied were smoking, timing of surgery, duration of surgery, neurological deficit, associated injuries and high dose methylprednisolone administration. None of them were statistically significant as risk factors for surgical site infection. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of surgical site infection in patients who underwent posterior instrumented surgery for thoracolumbar burst fractures was 13%.

  12. Quality improvement initiative: Preventative Surgical Site Infection Protocol in Vascular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizh, David; Ascher, Enrico; Raza Rizvi, Syed Ali; Hingorani, Anil; Amaturo, Michael; Johnson, Eric

    2018-02-01

    Objective A quality improvement initiative was employed to decrease single institution surgical site infection rate in open lower extremity revascularization procedures. In an attempt to lower patient morbidity, we developed and implemented the Preventative Surgical Site Infection Protocol in Vascular Surgery. Surgical site infections lead to prolonged hospital stays, adjunctive procedure, and additive costs. We employed targeted interventions to address the common risk factors that predispose patients to post-operative complications. Methods Retrospective review was performed between 2012 and 2016 for all surgical site infections after revascularization procedures of the lower extremity. A quality improvement protocol was initiated in January 2015. Primary outcome was the assessment of surgical site infection rate reduction in the pre-protocol vs. post-protocol era. Secondary outcomes evaluated patient demographics, closure method, perioperative antibiotic coverage, and management outcomes. Results Implementation of the protocol decreased the surgical site infection rate from 6.4% to 1.6% p = 0.0137). Patient demographics and comorbidities were assessed and failed to demonstrate a statistically significant difference among the infection and no-infection groups. Wound closure with monocryl suture vs. staple proved to be associated with decreased surgical site infection rate ( p site infections in the vascular surgery population are effective and necessary. Our data suggest that there may be benefit in the incorporation of MRSA and Gram-negative coverage as part of the Surgical Care Improvement Project perioperative guidelines.

  13. Surgical site infection in patients submitted to heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jussara Aparecida Souza do Nascimento; Ferretti-Rebustini, Renata Eloah de Lucena; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2016-08-29

    to analyze the occurrence and predisposing factors for surgical site infection in patients submitted to heart transplantation, evaluating the relationship between cases of infections and the variables related to the patient and the surgical procedure. retrospective cohort study, with review of the medical records of patients older than 18 years submitted to heart transplantation. The correlation between variables was evaluated by using Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test. the sample consisted of 86 patients, predominantly men, with severe systemic disease, submitted to extensive preoperative hospitalizations. Signs of surgical site infection were observed in 9.3% of transplanted patients, with five (62.5%) superficial incisional, two (25%) deep and one (12.5%) case of organ/space infection. There was no statistically significant association between the variables related to the patient and the surgery. there was no association between the studied variables and the cases of surgical site infection, possibly due to the small number of cases of infection observed in the sample investigated. analisar a ocorrência e os fatores predisponentes para infecção de sítio cirúrgico em pacientes submetidos a transplante cardíaco e verificar a relação entre os casos de infecção e as variáveis referentes ao paciente e ao procedimento cirúrgico. estudo de coorte retrospectivo, com exame dos prontuários médicos de pacientes maiores de 18 anos, submetidos a transplante cardíaco. A correlação entre variáveis foi realizada por meio dos testes exato de Fischer e de Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon. a amostra foi constituída por 86 pacientes, predominantemente homens, com doença sistêmica grave, submetidos a internações pré-operatórias extensas. Apresentaram sinais de infecção do sítio cirúrgico 9,3% dos transplantados, sendo cinco (62,5%) incisionais superficiais, duas (25%) profundas e um (12,5%) caso de infecção de órgão/espaço. Não houve associa

  14. Improving Surveillance and Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Melissa; Hersey, Diane; Harrison, Sheilah; Joy, Brian; Naguib, Aymen; Galantowicz, Mark; Simsic, Janet

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative cardiovascular surgical site infections are preventable events that may lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. To improve surgical wound surveillance and reduce the incidence of surgical site infections. An institutional review of surgical site infections led to implementation of 8 surveillance and process measures: appropriate preparation the night before surgery and the day of surgery, use of appropriate preparation solution in the operating room, appropriate timing of preoperative antibiotic administration, placement of a photograph of the surgical site in the patient's chart at discharge, sending a photograph of the surgical site to the patient's primary care physician, 30-day follow-up of the surgical site by an advanced nurse practitioner, and placing a photograph of the surgical site obtained on postoperative day 30 in the patient's chart. Mean overall compliance with the 8 measures from March 2013 through February 2014 was 88%. Infections occurred in 10 of 417 total operative cases (2%) in 2012, in 8 of 437 total operative cases (2%) in 2013, and in 7 of 452 total operative cases (1.5%) in 2014. Institution of the surveillance process has resulted in improved identification of suspected surgical site infections via direct rather than indirect measures, accurate identification of all surgical site infections based on definitions of the National Healthcare Safety Network, collaboration with all persons involved, and enhanced communication with patients' family members and referring physicians. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  15. Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections in Dermatological Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Current literature on risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI in dermatological surgery in the absence of antibiotic prophylaxis is limited. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate patients presenting for dermatological surgery. A total of 1,977 procedures were reviewed. SSI was clinically suspected in 79 (4.0% patients and confirmed by culture in 38 (1.9%. Using the strictest definition of SSI (clinical symptoms with positive culture significantly higher risk of SSI was found for location on the ear (odds ratio (OR 6.03, 95% confidence interval (95% CI 2.12–17.15, larger defects (OR 1.08 per cm2 increase, 95% CI 1.03–1.14, closure with flaps (OR 6.35, 95% CI 1.33–30.28 and secondary intention (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.11–8.13. These characteristics were also associated with higher risk of clinically suspected SSI regardless of culture results with slightly lower ORs. In conclusion, the risk of acquiring a SSI is increased in surgeries performed on the ear, in larger wounds and in defects closed with flaps or healed by secondary intention.

  16. Surgical site infection following cesarean deliveries: trends and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Yuval; Walfisch, Asnat; Sheiner, Eyal

    2017-01-01

    To identify trends and risk factors for early surgical site infection (SSI) following cesarean delivery (CD). A population-based study comparing characteristics of women who have and have not developed post cesarean SSI was conducted. Deliveries occurred between the years 1988 and 2013 in a tertiary medical center. A multivariable logistic regression model, with backwards elimination, was used to control for confounders. Of the 41 375 cesarean deliveries performed during the study period, 1521 (3.7%) were complicated with SSI. SSI rates significantly deceased over the years, from 7.4% in 1988 to 1.5% in 2012. Using a multivariable regression model, the following independent risk factors for SSI were identified: obesity (OR 2.0; 95% CI, 1.6-2.5); previous CD (OR 1.8; 95% CI, 1.6-2.0); hypertensive disorders (OR 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.6); premature rupture of membranes (OR 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.6); gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM, OR 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.4); and recurrent pregnancy losses (OR 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.5). Independent risk factors for post-cesarean SSI include obesity, GDM, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, premature rupture of membranes, and recurrent pregnancy losses. Information regarding higher rates of SSI and preventative measures should be provided to these high-risk women prior to surgery.

  17. Patient Self-Assessment of Surgical Site Infection is Inaccurate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Vered; Cohen, Matan J; Benenson, Shmuel; Almogy, Gideon; Brezis, Mayer

    2017-08-01

    Availability of surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance rates challenges clinicians, healthcare administrators and leaders and the public. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate the consequences patient self-assessment strategies have on SSI reporting rates. We performed SSI surveillance among patients undergoing general surgery procedures, including telephone follow-up 30 days after surgery. Additionally we undertook a separate validation study in which we compared patient self-assessments of SSI with surgeon assessment. Finally, we performed a meta-analysis of similar validation studies of patient self-assessment strategies. There were 22/266 in-hospital SSIs diagnosed (8.3%), and additional 16 cases were detected through the 30-day follow-up. In total, the SSI rate was 16.8% (95% CI 10.1-18.5). In the validation survey, we found patient telephone surveillance to have a sensitivity of 66% (95% CI 40-93%) and a specificity of 90% (95% CI 86-94%). The meta-analysis included five additional studies. The overall sensitivity was 83.3% (95% CI 79-88%), and the overall specificity was 97.4% (95% CI 97-98%). Simulation of the meta-analysis results divulged that when the true infection rate is 1%, reported rates would be 4%; a true rate of 50%, the reported rates would be 43%. Patient self-assessment strategies in order to fulfill 30-day SSI surveillance misestimate SSI rates and lead to an erroneous overall appreciation of inter-institutional variation. Self-assessment strategies overestimate SSIs rate of institutions with high-quality performance and underestimate rates of poor performance. We propose such strategies be abandoned. Alternative strategies of patient follow-up strategies should be evaluated in order to provide valid and reliable information regarding institutional performance in preventing patient harm.

  18. Risk factors for acute surgical site infections after lumbar surgery: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Qi; Song, Quanwei; Guo, Runsheng; Bi, Haidi; Liu, Xuqiang; Yu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Jianghao; Dai, Min; Zhang, Bin

    2017-07-19

    Currently, many scholars are concerned about the treatment of postoperative infection; however, few have completed multivariate analyses to determine factors that contribute to the risk of infection. Therefore, we conducted a multivariate analysis of a retrospectively collected database to analyze the risk factors for acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery, including fracture fixation, lumbar fusion, and minimally invasive lumbar surgery. We retrospectively reviewed data from patients who underwent lumbar surgery between 2014 and 2016, including lumbar fusion, internal fracture fixation, and minimally invasive surgery in our hospital's spinal surgery unit. Patient demographics, procedures, and wound infection rates were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and risk factors were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. Twenty-six patients (2.81%) experienced acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery in our study. The patients' mean body mass index, smoking history, operative time, blood loss, draining time, and drainage volume in the acute surgical site infection group were significantly different from those in the non-acute surgical site infection group (p operative type in the acute surgical site infection group were significantly different than those in the non-acute surgical site infection group (p operative type, operative time, blood loss, and drainage time were independent predictors of acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery. In order to reduce the risk of infection following lumbar surgery, patients should be evaluated for the risk factors noted above.

  19. Triclosan sutures for surgical site infection in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Kanefumi; Takeno, Shinsuke; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Shiwaku, Hironari; Aisu, Naoya; Yoshida, Yoichiro; Tanimura, Syu; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2016-11-01

    Among all procedures, surgical site infections (SSIs) in colorectal surgery continue to have the highest rate, accounting for 5%-45%. To prevent the bacterial colonization of suture material, which disables local mechanisms of wound decontamination, triclosan-coated sutures were developed. We assessed the effectiveness of triclosan-coated sutures used for skin closure on the rate of SSIs in colorectal cancer surgery. Until August 2012, we used conventional methods for skin closure in colorectal cancer surgery at the Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Fukuoka University Faculty of Medicine. Therefore, for the control group, we retrospectively collected surveillance data over a 1.5-y period. From September 2012, we began using triclosan-coated polydioxanone antimicrobial sutures (PDS plus) for skin and fascia closure. Hence, we collected data for the study group from September 2012 to October 2013. Differences in baseline characteristics and selection bias were adjusted using the propensity score-matching method. A total of 399 patients who underwent colorectal surgery were included in this study. There were 214 patients in the control group and 185 patients in the study group. Baseline patient characteristics were similar between the propensity score-matched groups. The incidence of SSIs was less in the study group. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the site of the procedure, laparoscopic surgery, and using triclosan-coated sutures remained the independent predictors of SSIs. The use of triclosan-coated sutures was advantageous for decreasing the risk of SSIs after colorectal surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Surgical risk index and surgical site infection in postpartum women submitted to cesarean section.

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    Luana Machado Chianca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Considering the use of active surveillance assists in infection identification and the need for studies that use Surgical Risk Index (SRI for assessment of Surgical Site Infection (SSI in cesareans, this study aims to determine the incidence of SSI and analyze the applicability of SRI in the prediction of SSI in women in the postpartum period after being submitted to a cesarean section at a university hospital between April 2012 and March of 2013. Methods: Prospective cohort study. Information notifying SSI by active surveillance was collected daily from the medical records. After hospital discharge, the mothers were contacted through telephone calls to identify infection criteria within 30 days after the cesarean. Descriptive and comparative analyses were performed. The chi-square test was used to compare groups. Results: 737 cesareans were performed. Telephone contact was achieved with 507 (68.8% women up to 30 days postpartum, with loss of follow-up of 230 cases (31.2%. The medical consultation in the post-partum period occurred with 188 (37.08% women, with whom telephone contact was obtained, on average, 17.28 days (SD=8.39 after delivery. It was verified that 21 patients met the criteria for SSI, with a 4.14% rate. A total of 12 cases (57.1% were classified as superficial SSI, 5 (23.8% as deep and 4 (19.1% as infection of organs and cavities. The SRI and its risk variables were not associated with SSI in patients submitted to cesarean sections. Conclusion: The SRI and the risk variables included in this index were not associated to SSI in patients submitted to cesarean sections. KEYWORDS: Cesarean Section; Surgical Wound Infection; Epidemiological Surveillance; Infection Control; Risk Index; Disease Notification.

  1. Analysis of Malpractice Claims Associated with Surgical Site Infection in the Field of Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bo Young; Kwon, Jung Woo; Kang, So Ra; Hong, Seung Eun

    2016-12-01

    Postoperative infections are rare after plastic surgery; however, when present, they can affect the aesthetic outcome. Currently, many malpractice lawsuits are associated with surgical site infection. The present study aimed to analyze malpractice claims associated with surgical site infection in the field of plastic surgery through a review of Korean precedents. We analyzed the type of procedure, associated complications, and legal judgment in these cases. Most claimants were women, and claims were most often related to breast surgery. The common complications related to surgical site infection were deformity, scar, and asymmetry. Among the 40 cases, 34 were won by the plaintiff, and the mean claim settlement was 2,832,654 KRW (USD 2,636.6). The reasons for these judgements were as follows: 1) immediate bacterial culture tests were not performed and appropriate antibiotics were not used; 2) patients were not transferred to a high-level hospital or the infection control department was not consulted; 3) surgical site infection control measures were not appropriate; and 4) surgical procedures were performed without preoperative explanation about surgical site infection. The number of claims owing to surgical site infection after surgery is increasing. Infection handling was one of the key factors that influenced the judgement, and preoperative explanation about the possibility of infection is important. The findings will help surgeons achieve high patient satisfaction and reduce liability concerns.

  2. Advance pre-operative chlorhexidine reduces the incidence of surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zywiel, Michael G; Daley, Jacqueline A; Delanois, Ronald E; Naziri, Qais; Johnson, Aaron J; Mont, Michael A

    2011-07-01

    Surgical site infections following elective knee arthroplasties occur most commonly as a result of colonisation by the patient's native skin flora. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of deep surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty patients who used an advance cutaneous disinfection protocol and who were compared to patients who had peri-operative preparation only. All adult reconstruction surgeons at a single institution were approached to voluntarily provide patients with chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths and a printed sheet instructing their use the night before and morning of surgery. Records for all knee arthroplasties performed between January 2007 and December 2008 were reviewed to determine the incidence of deep incisional and periprosthetic surgical site infections. Overall, the advance pre-operative protocol was used in 136 of 912 total knee arthroplasties (15%). A lower incidence of surgical site infection was found in patients who used the advance cutaneous preparation protocol as compared to patients who used the in-hospital protocol alone. These findings were maintained when patients were stratified by surgical infection risk category. No surgical site infections occurred in the 136 patients who completed the protocol as compared to 21 infections in 711 procedures (3.0%) performed in patients who did not. Patient-directed skin disinfection using chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths the evening before, and the morning of, elective knee arthroplasty appeared to effectively reduce the incidence of surgical site infection when compared to patients who underwent in-hospital skin preparation only.

  3. Analysis of Malpractice Claims Associated with Surgical Site Infection in the Field of Plastic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Bo Young; Kwon, Jung Woo; Kang, So Ra; Hong, Seung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative infections are rare after plastic surgery; however, when present, they can affect the aesthetic outcome. Currently, many malpractice lawsuits are associated with surgical site infection. The present study aimed to analyze malpractice claims associated with surgical site infection in the field of plastic surgery through a review of Korean precedents. We analyzed the type of procedure, associated complications, and legal judgment in these cases. Most claimants were women, and clai...

  4. Incidence of and risk factors for surgical site infections in women undergoing hysterectomy for endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomi, Taru; Pasanen, Annukka; Leminen, Arto; Bützow, Ralf; Loukovaara, Mikko

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of, and risk factors for, surgical site infections in a contemporary cohort of women with endometrial carcinoma. We retrospectively studied 1164 women treated for endometrial carcinoma by hysterectomy at a single institution in 2007-2013. In all, 912 women (78.4%) had minimally invasive hysterectomy. Data on surgical site infections were collected from medical records. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify risk factors for incisional and organ/space infections. Ninety-four women (8.1%) were diagnosed with a surgical site infection. Twenty women (1.7%) had an incisional infection and 74 (6.4%) had an organ/space infection. The associations of 17 clinico-pathologic and surgical variables were tested by univariate analyses. Those variables that were identified as potential risk factors in univariate analyses (p infections as dependent variables. Obesity (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), diabetes, and long operative time (>80th centile) were independently associated with a higher risk of incisional infection, whereas minimally invasive surgery was associated with a smaller risk. Smoking, conversion to laparotomy, and lymphadenectomy were associated with a higher risk of organ/space infection. Organ/space infections comprised the majority of surgical site infections. Risk factors for incisional and organ/space infections differed. Minimally invasive hysterectomy was associated with a smaller risk of incisional infections but not of organ/space infections. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  5. Surgical site infections in Italian Hospitals: a prospective multicenter study

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    Ippolito Giuseppe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infections (SSI remain a major clinical problem in terms of morbidity, mortality, and hospital costs. Nearly 60% of SSI diagnosis occur in the postdischarge period. However, literature provides little information on risk factors associated to in-hospital and postdischarge SSI occurrence. A national prospective multicenter study was conducted with the aim of assessing the incidence of both in-hospital and postdisharge SSI, and the associated risk factors. Methods In 2002, a one-month, prospective national multicenter surveillance study was conducted in General and Gynecological units of 48 Italian hospitals. Case ascertainment of SSI was carried out using standardized surveillance methodology. To assess potential risk factors for SSI we used a conditional logistic regression model. We also reported the odds ratios of in-hospital and postdischarge SSI. Results SSI occurred in 241 (5.2% of 4,665 patients, of which 148 (61.4% during in-hospital, and 93 (38.6% during postdischarge period. Of 93 postdischarge SSI, sixty-two (66.7% and 31 (33.3% were detected through telephone interview and questionnaire survey, respectively. Higher SSI incidence rates were observed in colon surgery (18.9%, gastric surgery (13.6%, and appendectomy (8.6%. If considering risk factors for SSI, at multivariate analysis we found that emergency interventions, NNIS risk score, pre-operative hospital stay, and use of drains were significantly associated with SSI occurrence. Moreover, risk factors for total SSI were also associated to in-hospital SSI. Additionally, only NNIS, pre-operative hospital stay, use of drains, and antibiotic prophylaxis were associated with postdischarge SSI. Conclusion Our study provided information on risk factors for SSI in a large population in general surgery setting in Italy. Standardized postdischarge surveillance detected 38.6% of all SSI. We also compared risk factors for in-hospital and postdischarge SSI

  6. Evaluation of the surveillance of surgical site infections within the Dutch PREZIES network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manniën, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are the most-common healthcare-associated infections among surgical patients and have severe adverse consequences. Surveillance is the ongoing systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and feedback of data, and has been accepted worldwide as a primary step

  7. Prophylactic Antibiotic Choice and Risk of Surgical Site Infection After Hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Shitanshu; Harris, John; Al-Niaimi, Ahmed; Swenson, Carolyn W; Pearlman, Mark D; Reynolds, R Kevin; Kamdar, Neil; Bazzi, Ali; Campbell, Darrell A; Morgan, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate associations between prophylactic preoperative antibiotic choice and surgical site infection rates after hysterectomy. A retrospective cohort study was performed of patients in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative undergoing hysterectomy from July 2012 to February 2015. The primary outcome was a composite outcome of any surgical site infection (superficial surgical site infections or combined deep organ space surgical site infections). Preoperative antibiotics were categorized based on the recommendations set forth by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Surgical Care Improvement Project. Patients receiving a recommended antibiotic regimen were categorized into those receiving β-lactam antibiotics and those receiving alternatives to β-lactam antibiotics. Patients receiving nonrecommended antibiotics were categorized into those receiving overtreatment (excluded from further analysis) and those receiving nonstandard antibiotics. Multivariable logistic regression models were developed to estimate the independent effect of antibiotic choice. Propensity score matching analysis was performed to validate the results. The study included 21,358 hysterectomies. The overall rate of any surgical site infection was 2.06% (n=441). Unadjusted rates of "any surgical site infection" were 1.8%, 3.1%, and 3.7% for β-lactam, β-lactam alternatives, and nonstandard groups, respectively. After adjusting for patient and operative factors within clusters of hospitals, compared with the β-lactam antibiotics (reference group), the risk of "any surgical site infection" was higher for the group receiving β-lactam alternatives (odds ratio [OR] 1.7, confidence interval [CI] 1.27-2.07) or the nonstandard antibiotics (OR 2.0, CI 1.31-3.1). Compared with women receiving β-lactam antibiotic regimens, there is a higher risk of surgical site infection after hysterectomy among those receiving a recommended β-lactam alternative or nonstandard regimen.

  8. Surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shishui; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for surgical site infections and to quantify the contribution of independent risk factors to the probability of developing infection after definitive fixation of tibial plateau fractures in adult patients. A retrospective analysis was performed at a level I trauma center between January 2004 and December 2010. Data were collected from a review of the patient's electronic medical records. A total of 251 consecutive patients (256 cases) were divided into two groups, those with surgical site infections and those without surgical site infections. Preoperative and perioperative variables were compared between these groups, and risk factors were determined by univariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression. Variables analyzed included age, gender, smoking history, diabetes, presence of an open fracture, presence of compartment syndrome, Schatzker classification, polytrauma status, ICU stay, time from injury to surgery, use of temporary external fixation, surgical approach, surgical fixation, operative time, and use of a drain. The overall rate of surgical site infection after ORIF of tibial plateau fractures during the 7 years of this study was 7.8% (20 of 256). The most common causative pathogens was Staphylococcus aureus (n=15, 75%). Independent predictors of surgical site infection identified by multivariate analyses were open tibial plateau fracture (odds ratio=3.9; 95% CI=1.3-11.6; p=0.015) and operative time (odds ratio=2.7; 95% CI=1.6-4.4; psite infection. Both open fracture and operative time are independent risks factors for postoperative infection.

  9. Pre-operative antibiotic use reduces surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Asad Ali; Farooka, Muhammad Waris; Ayyaz, Mahmood; Sarwar, Hassan; Malik, Awais Amjad; Shabbir, Faisal

    2015-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of World Health Organisation Surgical Safety Checklist as a simple, reliable and effective tool to ensure appropriate administration of intravenous antibiotics. The prospective interventional study was conducted in three phases at Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from May 2011 to January 2012. The first phase comprised baseline data collection, followed by implementation of World Health Organisation Surgical Safety Checklist, and finally post-implementation data collection. The duration of each phase was 3 months. Primary end points were discharge from hospital, 30 days or death of the patient. Of the 613 patients in the study, 303(49.4%) were in the pre-implementation phase and 310(50.5%) in post-implementation phase. Adherence of optimal administration of antibiotic increased from 114(37.6%) to 282(91%) (poperative infection fell from 99(32.7%) to 47(15.2%) (psite infection by more than half. Hospital stay was shortened by 1.3 days on average which results in considerable reduction in morbidity, mortality and costs.

  10. The presentation, incidence, etiology, and treatment of surgical site infections after spinal surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Mohamed, A.S.; Skolasky, R.L.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive, retrospective cohort analysis. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the presentation, etiology, and treatment of surgical site infections (SSI) after spinal surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: SSI after spine surgery is frequently seen. Small case control studies have been published

  11. Prevention and treatment of surgical site infection in HIV-infected patients

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    Zhang Lei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infection (SSI are the third most frequently reported nosocomial infection, and the most common on surgical wards. HIV-infected patients may increase the possibility of developing SSI after surgery. There are few reported date on incidence and the preventive measures of SSI in HIV-infected patients. This study was to determine the incidence and the associated risk factors for SSI in HIV-infected patients. And we also explored the preventive measures. Methods A retrospective study of SSI was conducted in 242 HIV-infected patients including 17 patients who combined with hemophilia from October 2008 to September 2011 in Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. SSI were classified according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC criteria and identified by bedside surveillance and post-discharge follow-up. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 statistical software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL. Results The SSI incidence rate was 47.5% (115 of 242; 38.4% incisional SSIs, 5.4% deep incisional SSIs and 3.7% organ/space SSIs. The SSI incidence rate was 37.9% in HIV-infected patients undergoing abdominal operation. Patients undergoing abdominal surgery with lower preoperative CD4 counts were more likely to develop SSIs. The incidence increased from 2.6% in clean wounds to 100% in dirty wounds. In the HIV-infected patients combined with hemophilia, the mean preoperative albumin and postoperative hemoglobin were found significantly lower than those in no-SSIs group (P Conclusions SSI is frequent in HIV-infected patients. And suitable perioperative management may decrease the SSIs incidence rate of HIV-infected patients.

  12. A potential method to lower risk for surgical site infection during cesarean birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Laura S; Witter, Frank R

    2014-12-01

    It's common practice to use a preparation containing chlorhexidine to prepare the surgical site before cesarean birth. We observed an interaction between ultrasound gel, used for electronic fetal heart monitoring before birth, and chlorhexidine. This interaction creates the potential for surgical site infection. Using isopropyl alcohol to thoroughly remove all gel before application of chlorhexidine was associated with reduced rates of postsurgical infection at our institution. © 2014 AWHONN.

  13. Toward the rational use of standardized infection ratios to benchmark surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Haruhisa; Morikane, Keita; Kuroki, Manabu; Taniguchi, Shinichiro; Shinzato, Takashi; Sakamoto, Fumie; Okada, Kunihiko; Matsukawa, Hiroshi; Ieiri, Yuko; Hayashi, Kouji; Kawai, Shin

    2013-09-01

    The National Healthcare Safety Network transitioned from surgical site infection (SSI) rates to the standardized infection ratio (SIR) calculated by statistical models that included perioperative factors (surgical approach and surgery duration). Rationally, however, only patient-related variables should be included in the SIR model. Logistic regression was performed to predict expected SSI rate in 2 models that included or excluded perioperative factors. Observed and expected SSI rates were used to calculate the SIR for each participating hospital. The difference of SIR in each model was then evaluated. Surveillance data were collected from a total of 1,530 colon surgery patients and 185 SSIs. C-index in the model with perioperative factors was statistically greater than that in the model including patient-related factors only (0.701 vs 0.621, respectively, P operative process or the competence of surgical teams, these factors should not be considered predictive variables. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Risk factors for surgical site infection following cesarean delivery: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketcheson, Felicia; Woolcott, Christy; Allen, Victoria; Langley, Joanne M

    2017-07-11

    The rate of cesarean delivery is increasing in North America. Surgical site infection following this operation can make it difficult to recover, care for a baby and return home. We aimed to determine the incidence of surgical site infection to 30 days following cesarean delivery, associated risk factors and whether risk factors differed for predischarge versus postdischarge infection. We identified a retrospective cohort in Nova Scotia by linking the provincial perinatal database to hospital admissions and physician billings databases to follow women for 30 days after they had given birth by cesarean delivery between Jan. 1, 1997 and Dec. 31, 2012. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations was used to determine risk factors for infection. A total of 25 123 women had 33 991 cesarean deliveries over the study period. Of the 25 123, 923 had surgical site infections, giving an incidence rate of 2.7% (95% CI 2.54%-2.89%); the incidence decreased over time. Risk factors for infection (adjusted odds ratios ≥ 1.5) were prepregnancy weight 87.0 kg or more, gaining 30.0 kg or more during pregnancy, chorioamnionitis, maternal blood transfusion, anticoagulation therapy, alcohol or drug abuse, second stage of labour before surgery, delivery in 1997-2000 and delivery in a hospital performing 130-1249 cesarean deliveries annually. Women who gave birth earlier in the study period, those who gave birth in a hospital with 130-949 cesarean deliveries per year and those with more than 1 fetus were at a significantly higher risk for surgical site infection before discharge; women who smoked were at significantly higher risk for surgical site infection after discharge. Most risk factors are known before delivery, and some are potentially modifiable. Although the incidence of surgical site infection decreased over time, targeted clinical and infection prevention and control interventions could further reduce the burden of illness associated with this health

  15. Risk factors for surgical site infection and urinary tract infection after spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Hiroyuki; Setoguchi, Takao; Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Nagano, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Komiya, Setsuro

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to identify and compare risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) and non-surgical site infections (non-SSIs), particularly urinary tract infection (UTI), after spine surgery. We retrospectively reviewed 825 patients (median age 59.0 years (range 33-70 years); 442 males) who underwent spine surgery at Kagoshima University Hospital from January 2009 to December 2014. Patient parameters were compared using the Mann-Whitney U and Fisher's exact tests. Risk factors associated with SSI and UTI were analyzed via the multiple logistic regression analysis. P operation time (P = 0.0019 and 0.0162, respectively) and ASA classification 3 (P = 0.0132 and 0.0356, respectively). The 1 week post-operative C-reactive protein (CRP) level was a risk factor for UTI (P = 0.0299), but not for SSI (P = 0.4996). There was no relationship between SSI and symptomatic UTI after spine surgery. Risk factors for post-operative SSI and UTI were operative time and ASA classification 3; 1 week post-operative CRP was a risk factor for UTI only.

  16. Surgical Site Infection in Colorectal Surgery: A Study in Antibiotic Duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornfeld, Mark; Lovely, Jenna K; Huebner, Marianne; Larson, David W

    2017-09-01

    Despite distant historical studies that demonstrated the adequacy of preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis, current surgical practice continues to use antibiotics for postoperative coverage up to 24 hours. The aim of this study was to evaluate a change in antibiotic prophylaxis duration and its effect on surgical site infection in a high-volume modern colorectal practice. A case-controlled series retrospectively reviewed outcomes through a prospective validated data base. The study was conducted at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. A total of 965 patients were evaluated. Our study analyzed patient outcomes related to surgical site infection comparing cohort 1 (2012-2013), which had the same antibiotic coverage preoperatively up to 24 hours postoperatively, and cohort 2 (2014-2015), which eliminated postoperative doses and relied solely on pre- and intraoperative dosing duration. The primary outcomes of this study are superficial and deep surgical site infection. There were no differences identified for superficial or deep surgical site infection rates between cohorts. Before the change in antibiotic dosing duration (2012-2013), 28 of 493 patients (5.7%) vs after the practice change (2014-2015), 25 of 472 patients (5.3%) were reported to have superficial or deep surgical site infection (p = 0.794). This study is limited by its retrospective design within a single institution. These equivalent results present an opportunity for surgeons to reconsider optimal antibiotic duration and minimize unnecessary antibiotic dosing. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A322.

  17. Surgical site infection surveillance: analysis of adherence to recommendations for routine infection control practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castella, Annalisa; Charrier, Lorena; Di Legami, Valeria; Pastorino, Francesca; Farina, Enzo Carlo; Argentero, Pier Angelo; Zotti, Carla Maria

    2006-08-01

    To evaluate the application of surgical site infection control procedures in general surgery departments in hospitals in the Piemonte region of Italy. The descriptive study entailed 1 week of observation in the general surgery departments and 1 week of observation in the operating rooms of 49 hospitals in Piemonte; the survey was conducted in 2003. Data collection forms were designed to record information about presurgical patient preparation (form 1) and infection control practices routinely used by surgical teams (form 2). A total of 856 patients were observed; 88% of operations were surgical wound class I or II; 70.6% of patients had hair removed, 28.8% showered the day before the operation; antimicrobial prophylaxis was administered in 63.3% of cases (68.4% on induction of anesthesia and 26% on the day of the operation) and was continued into the postoperative period in 43% of cases. A total of 799 operations were observed; the mean number of healthcare personnel in the operating room was 6; doors were opened an average of 12 times during an operation; 88% of the surgical team members wore a cap/hood and mask correctly; 25% of surgeons and 41% of instrument nurses wore an eye shield; preoperative hand and forearm scrubbing technique was correct in 78% of cases (surgeons, 74.6%; instrument nurses, 86.6%; and anesthesiologists, 73%). A comparison between the survey data and the international recommendations for SSI prevention highlighted practices that could be improved with corrective interventions. The study provided an opportunity for sharing feedback on appropriate data with healthcare personnel and was an effective instrument to audit infection control practices.

  18. Glycemic control strategies and the occurrence of surgical site infection: a systematic review

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    Caroline Maria Herrero Domingos

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To analyze the evidence available in the scientific literature regarding the relationship between the glycemic control strategies used and the occurrence of surgical site infection in adult patients undergoing surgery. METHOD This is a systematic review performed through search on the databases of CINAHL, MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and EMBASE. RESULTS Eight randomized controlled trials were selected. Despite the diversity of tested interventions, studies agree that glycemic control is essential to reduce rates of surgical site infection, and should be maintained between 80 and 120 mg/dL during the perioperative period. Compared to other strategies, insulin continuous infusion during surgery was the most tested and seems to get better results in reducing rates of surgical site infection and achieving success in glycemic control. CONCLUSION Tight glycemic control during the perioperative period benefits the recovery of surgical patients, and the role of the nursing team is key for the successful implementation of the measure.

  19. Preoperative skin preparation with 2% chlorhexidine as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection

    OpenAIRE

    Evelyn Solano Castro

    2014-01-01

    The results of secondary research that refers to preoperative skin preparation with antiseptic chlorhexidine 2% are presented. Surgical Site Infections are one of the most common complications in surgical procedures are associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the user and are the third -associated infection more frequent in the health care . Steps of clinical practice based on evidence were applied, considering in the first instance a question in PICO format, then a search for ...

  20. What Factors are Associated With a Surgical Site Infection After Operative Treatment of an Elbow Fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessen, Femke M A P; Braun, Yvonne; van Leeuwen, Wouter F; Dyer, George S; van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Ring, David

    2016-02-01

    Surgical site infections are one of the more common major complications of elbow fracture surgery and can contribute to other adverse outcomes, prolonged hospital stays, and increased healthcare costs. We asked: (1) What are the factors associated with a surgical site infection after elbow fracture surgery? (2) When taking the subset of closed elbow fractures only, what are the factors associated with a surgical site infection? (3) What are the common organisms isolated from an elbow infection after open treatment? One thousand three hundred twenty adult patients underwent surgery for an elbow fracture between January 2002 and July 2014 and were included in our study. Forty-eight of 1320 patients (4%) had a surgical site infection develop. Thirty-four of 1113 patients with a closed fracture (3%) had a surgical site infection develop. For all elbow fractures, use of plate and screw fixation (adjusted odds ratio [OR]= 2.2; 95% CI, 1.0-4.5; p = 0.041) and use of external fixation before surgery (adjusted OR = 4.7; 95% CI, 1.1-21; p = 0.035) were associated with higher infection rates. When subset analysis was performed for closed fractures, only smoking (adjusted OR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1-4.5; p = 0.023) was associated with higher infection rates. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common bacteria cultured (59%). The only modifiable risk factor for a surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation was cigarette smoking. Plate fixation and temporary external fixation are likely surrogates for more complex injuries, therefore no recommendations should be inferred from this association. Surgeons should counsel patients who smoke. Level IV, prognostic study.

  1. Surgical site infection rates in six cities of India: findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjeev; Chakravarthy, Murali; Rosenthal, Victor Daniel; Myatra, Sheila N; Dwivedy, Arpita; Bagasrawala, Iqbal; Munshi, Nita; Shah, Sweta; Panigrahi, Bishnu; Sood, Sanjeev; Kumar-Nair, Pravin; Radhakrishnan, Kavitha; Gokul, B N; Sukanya, R; Pushparaj, L; Pramesh, C S; Shrikhande, S V; Gulia, A; Puri, A; Moiyadi, A; Divatia, J V; Kelkar, Rohini; Biswas, Sanjay; Raut, Sandhya; Sampat, Sulochana; Shetty, Suvin; Binu, Sheena; Pinto, Preethi; Arora, Sohini; Kamble, Asmita; Kumari, Neelakshi; Mendonca, Angelina; Singhal, Tanu; Naik, Reshma; Kothari, Vatsal; Sharma, Bindu; Verma, Neeru; Khanna, D K; Chacko, Felcy

    2015-09-01

    Surgical site infections are a threat to patient safety. However, in India, data on their rates stratified by surgical procedure are not available. From January 2005 to December 2011, the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) conducted a cohort prospective surveillance study on surgical site infections in 10 hospitals in 6 Indian cities. CDC National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC-NHSN) methods were applied and surgical procedures were classified into 11 types, according to the ninth edition of the International Classification of Diseases. We documented 1189 surgical site infections, associated with 28 340 surgical procedures (4.2%; 95% CI: 4.0-4.4). Surgical site infections rates were compared with INICC and CDC-NHSN reports, respectively: 4.3% for coronary bypass with chest and donor incision (4.5% vs 2.9%); 8.3% for breast surgery (1.7% vs 2.3%); 6.5% for cardiac surgery (5.6% vs 1.3%); 6.0% for exploratory abdominal surgery (4.1% vs 2.0%), among others. In most types of surgical procedures, surgical site infections rates were higher than those reported by the CDC-NHSN, but similar to INICC. This study is an important advancement towards the knowledge of surgical site infections epidemiology in the participating Indian hospitals that will allow us to introduce targeted interventions. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Is there an increased risk of post-operative surgical site infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is dilemma as to whether patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) requiring implant orthopaedic surgery are at an increased risk for post-operative surgical site infection (SSI). We conducted a systematic review to determine the effect of HIV on the risk of post-operative SSI and ...

  3. is there an increased risk of post-operative surgical site infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-06

    Sep 6, 2012 ... ABSTRACT. Background:There is dilemma as to whether patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) requiring implant orthopaedic surgery are at an increased risk for post-operative surgical site infection (SSI). We conducted a systematic review to determine the effect of HIV on the risk ...

  4. Decreasing cesarean section surgical site infection: an ongoing comprehensive quality improvement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, Frank R; Lawson, Patricia; Ferrell, Janis

    2014-04-01

    This report illustrates how the "plan-do-study-act" method of continuous quality improvement can be effective in reducing surgical site infection after cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fluid Overload and Cumulative Thoracostomy Output Are Associated With Surgical Site Infection After Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochet, Anthony A; Nyhan, Aoibhinn; Spaeder, Michael C; Cartron, Alexander M; Song, Xiaoyan; Klugman, Darren; Brown, Anna T

    2017-08-01

    To determine the impact of cumulative, postoperative thoracostomy output, amount of bolus IV fluids and peak fluid overload on the incidence and odds of developing a deep surgical site infection following pediatric cardiothoracic surgery. A single-center, nested, retrospective, matched case-control study. A 26-bed cardiac ICU in a 303-bed tertiary care pediatric hospital. Cases with deep surgical site infection following cardiothoracic surgery were identified retrospectively from January 2010 through December 2013 and individually matched to controls at a ratio of 1:2 by age, gender, Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery score, Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgery category, primary cardiac diagnosis, and procedure. None. Twelve cases with deep surgical site infection were identified and matched to 24 controls without detectable differences in perioperative clinical characteristics. Deep surgical site infection cases had larger thoracostomy output and bolus IV fluid volumes at 6, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively compared with controls. For every 1 mL/kg of thoracostomy output, the odds of developing a deep surgical site infection increase by 13%. By receiver operative characteristic curve analysis, a cutoff of 49 mL/kg of thoracostomy output at 48 hours best discriminates the development of deep surgical site infection (sensitivity 83%, specificity 83%). Peak fluid overload was greater in cases than matched controls (12.5% vs 6%; p operative characteristic curve analysis, a threshold value of 10% peak fluid overload was observed to identify deep surgical site infection (sensitivity 67%, specificity 79%). Conditional logistic regression of peak fluid overload greater than 10% on the development of deep surgical site infection yielded an odds ratio of 9.4 (95% CI, 2-46.2). Increased postoperative peak fluid overload and cumulative thoracostomy output were associated with deep surgical site infection after pediatric

  6. Obstetric Surgical Site Infections: 2 Grams Compared With 3 Grams of Cefazolin in Morbidly Obese Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzia, Homa K; Patel, Emily M; Joshi, Dipa; Liao, Caiyun; Witter, Frank; Heine, R Phillips; Coleman, Jenell S

    2015-10-01

    To estimate whether morbidly obese gravid patients were less likely to develop a surgical site infection after receiving a higher dose of preoperative prophylactic antibiotics. A retrospective cohort study of morbidly obese pregnant women undergoing cesarean delivery was conducted at two tertiary care centers from 2008 to 2013. Exposure was defined as receiving 2 g compared with 3 g cefazolin preoperatively. Disease was defined by diagnosis of a surgical site infection using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. We estimated a sample size of 141 patients in each group for a 67% reduction (15% to 5%) in risk for a surgical site infection. There were 335 women included in the cohort with a median absolute weight of 310 (interquartile range 299-333) pounds. Forty-four (13.1%) women were diagnosed with a surgical site infection. There was no difference in surgical site infection among those women who received 2 g compared with 3 g cefazolin (13.1% [23/175] compared with 13.1% [21/160]; P=.996). Labor (crude odds ratio [OR] 2.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-4.40), internal labor monitoring (OR 2.78, 1.45-5.31), blood loss greater than 1,500 mL (OR 2.15, 1.09-5.78), and staple closure (OR 2.2, 1.15-4.21) were associated with a surgical site infection among the entire cohort. After multivariable analysis, blood loss greater than 1,500 mL (adjusted OR 3.32, 1.32-8.37) and staple closure (adjusted OR 2.45, 1.19-5.02) remained associated with an increased risk for a surgical site infection, whereas 3 g cefazolin still was not associated with reduced risk for a surgical site infection (adjusted OR 1.33, 0.64-2.74). In our multicenter retrospective cohort study, preoperative 3 g cefazolin prophylaxis administered to morbidly obese gravid patients did not reduce surgical site infections. III.

  7. Morbidity and risk factors for surgical site infection following cesarean section in Guangdong Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shi-Peng; Guo, Hong-Xia; Zhou, Hong-Zhen; Chen, Li; Yu, Yan-Hong

    2012-03-01

    To estimate the incidence of and identify the risk factors for a surgical site infection after a cesarean section. A survey of women who underwent a cesarean section was conducted in eight hospitals in Guangdong Province, China. The rate of surgical site infection was estimated and a nested case control study was then carried out to identify the risk factors. Among 13 798 women surveyed, 96 (0.7%) developed a surgical site infection after a cesarean section. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified six factors independently associated with an increased risk of surgical site infection, which included obesity, premature rupture of membranes, lower preoperative hemoglobin, prolonged surgery, lack of prophylactic antibiotics and excessive anal examinations performed during hospitalization. Surgical site infection occurs in approximately 0.7% of cesarean section cases in the general obstetric population in China. Obesity, premature rupture of membranes, lower preoperative hemoglobin, prolonged surgery, lack of prophylactic antibiotics and excessive anal examinations during hospitalization are considered to be independent risk factors. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2012 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  8. Cyanoacrylate Skin Microsealant for Preventing Surgical Site Infection after Vascular Surgery : A Discontinued Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vierhout, Bastiaan P.; Ott, Alewijn; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.; Oskam, Jacques; Ott, Alewijn; van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) after vascular surgery are related to substantial morbidity. Restriction of bacterial access to the site of surgery with a cyanoacrylate sealant is a new concept. We performed a randomized clinical trial to assess the effect of the sealing of skin with a

  9. Incidence and risk factors of surgical site infection following cesarean section at Dhulikhel Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, S; Shrestha, R; Shrestha, B; Dongol, A

    2014-01-01

    Cesarean Section (CS) is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in obstetrical and gynecological department. Surgical site infection (SSI) after a cesarean section increases maternal morbidity prolongs hospital stay and medical costs. The aim of this study was to find out the incidence and associated risk factors of surgical site infection among cesarean section cases. A prospective, descriptive study was conducted at Dhulikhel Hospital, department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology from July 2013 to June 2014. Total of 648 women who underwent surgical procedure for delivery during study period were included in the study. Data was collected from patient using structred pro forma and examination of wound till discharge was done. Data was compared in terms of presence of surgical site infection and study variables. Wound was evaluated for the development of SSI on third day, and fifth post-operative day, and on the day of discharge. Total of 648 cases were studied. The mean age was 24±4.18. Among the studied cases 92% were literate and 8% were illiterate. Antenatal clinic was attended by 97.7%. The incidence rate of surgical site infection was 82 (12.6%). SSI was found to be common in women who had rupture of membrane before surgery (p=0.020), who underwent emergency surgery (p=0.0004), and the women who had vertical skin incision (p=0.0001) and interrupted skin suturing (p=0.0001) during surgery. Surgical site infection following caesarean section is common. Various modifiable risk factors were observed in this study. Development of SSI is related to multifactorial rather than one factor. Development and strict implementation of protocol by all the health care professionals could be effective to minimize and prevent the infection rate after caesarean section.

  10. Skin Preparation for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection After Cesarean Delivery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, Ivan M; Van Arsdale, Anne; Govindappagari, Shravya; Judge, Nancy E; Neto, Nicole K; Bernstein, Jeffrey; Bernstein, Peter S; Garry, David J

    2015-12-01

    To compare chlorhexidine with alcohol, povidone-iodine with alcohol, and both applied sequentially to estimate their relative effectiveness in prevention of surgical site infections after cesarean delivery. Women undergoing nonemergent cesarean birth at greater than 37 0/7 weeks of gestation were randomly allocated to one of three antiseptic skin preparations: povidone-iodine with alcohol, chlorhexidine with alcohol, or the sequential combination of both solutions. The primary outcome was surgical site infection reported within the first 30 days postpartum. Based on a surgical site infection rate of 12%, an anticipated 50% reduction for the combination group relative to either single skin preparation group, with a power of 0.90 and an α of 0.05, 430 women per group were needed to detect a difference. From January 2013 to July 2014, 1,404 women were randomly assigned to one of three groups: povidone-iodine with alcohol (n=463), chlorhexidine with alcohol (n=474), or both (n=467). The groups were similar with respect to demographics, medical disorders, indication for cesarean delivery, operative time, and blood loss. The overall rate of surgical site infection-4.3%-was lower than anticipated. The skin preparation groups had similar surgical site infection rates: povidone-iodine 4.6%, chlorhexidine with alcohol 4.5%, and sequential 3.9% (P=.85). The skin preparation techniques resulted in similar rates of surgical site infections. Our study provides no support for any particular method of skin preparation before cesarean delivery. ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01870583. I.

  11. Do antibiotics reduce the frequency of surgical site infections after impacted mandibular third molar surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarla, Srinivas M; Sharaf, Basel; Dodson, Thomas B

    2011-11-01

    Surgical removal of impacted third molars remains the most common procedure performed by oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Given the abundance of host bacteria within the operative sites, surgical site infections are among the most common complications of third molar removal, with an estimated frequency of 1% to 30%. In this setting, significant controversy has surrounded the use of prophylactic antibiotics in the surgical management of impacted third molars. This article provides a comprehensive review of the available data on antibiotic prophylaxis in impacted third molar surgery and offers specific recommendations on antibiotic use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Intraoperative technique as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-02-28

    Approximately five percent of patients who undergo surgery develop surgical site infections (SSIs) which are associated with an extra seven days as an inpatient and with increased postoperative mortality. The competence and technique of the surgeon is considered important in preventing SSI. We have reviewed the evidence on different aspects of surgical technique and its role in preventing SSI. The most recent guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK recommend avoiding diathermy for skin incision even though this reduces incision time and blood loss, both associated with lower infection rates. Studies comparing different closure techniques, i.e. continuous versus interrupted sutures, have not found a statistically significant difference in the SSI rate, but using continuous sutures is quicker. For contaminated wounds, the surgical site should be left open for four days to allow for treatment of local infection before subsequent healing by primary intention. Surgical drains should be placed through separate incisions, closed suction drains are preferable to open drains, and all drains should be removed as soon as possible. There are relatively few large studies on the impact of surgical techniques on SSI rates. Larger multicentre prospective studies are required to define what aspects of surgical technique impact on SSI, to better inform surgical practice and support education programmes for surgical trainees.

  13. Intraoperative technique as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2012-02-01

    Approximately five percent of patients who undergo surgery develop surgical site infections (SSIs) which are associated with an extra seven days as an inpatient and with increased postoperative mortality. The competence and technique of the surgeon is considered important in preventing SSI. We have reviewed the evidence on different aspects of surgical technique and its role in preventing SSI. The most recent guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK recommend avoiding diathermy for skin incision even though this reduces incision time and blood loss, both associated with lower infection rates. Studies comparing different closure techniques, i.e. continuous versus interrupted sutures, have not found a statistically significant difference in the SSI rate, but using continuous sutures is quicker. For contaminated wounds, the surgical site should be left open for four days to allow for treatment of local infection before subsequent healing by primary intention. Surgical drains should be placed through separate incisions, closed suction drains are preferable to open drains, and all drains should be removed as soon as possible. There are relatively few large studies on the impact of surgical techniques on SSI rates. Larger multicentre prospective studies are required to define what aspects of surgical technique impact on SSI, to better inform surgical practice and support education programmes for surgical trainees.

  14. An evaluation of surgical site infections by wound classification system using the ACS-NSQIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Gezzer; Rhee, Daniel S; Papandria, Dominic J; Yang, Jessica; Ibrahim, Andrew M; Shore, Andrew D; Makary, Martin A; Abdullah, Fizan

    2012-05-01

    Surgical wound classification has been the foundation for infectious risk assessment, perioperative protocol development, and surgical decision-making. The wound classification system categorizes all surgeries into: clean, clean/contaminated, contaminated, and dirty, with estimated postoperative rates of surgical site infection (SSI) being 1%-5%, 3%-11%, 10%-17%, and over 27%, respectively. The present study evaluates the associated rates of the SSI by wound classification using a large risk adjusted surgical patient database. A cross-sectional study was performed using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) dataset between 2005 and 2008. All surgical cases that specified a wound class were included in our analysis. Patient demographics, hospital length of stay, preoperative risk factors, co-morbidities, and complication rates were compared across the different wound class categories. Surgical site infection rates for superficial, deep incisional, and organ/space infections were analyzed among the four wound classifications using multivariate logistic regression. A total of 634,426 cases were analyzed. From this sample, 49.7% were classified as clean, 35.0% clean/contaminated, 8.56% contaminated, and 6.7% dirty. When stratifying by wound classification, the clean, clean/contaminated, contaminated, and dirty wound classifications had superficial SSI rates of 1.76%, 3.94%, 4.75%, and 5.16%, respectively. The rates of deep incisional infections were 0.54%, 0.86%, 1.31%, and 2.1%. The rates for organ/space infection were 0.28%, 1.87%, 2.55%, and 4.54%. Using ACS-NSQIP data, the present study demonstrates substantially lower rates of surgical site infections in the contaminated and dirty wound classifications than previously reported in the literature. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Surgical Site Infection in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, U. I.; Khan, A.; Nawaz, A.; Mansoor, R.; Malik, A. A.; Sher, F.; Ayyaz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the frequency of surgical site infections in patients with type II diabetes undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy as compared with non-diabetic patients. Study Design: Cohort study. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical Unit 2, Services Hospital, Lahore, from May to October 2012. Methodology: Patients were divided into two groups of 60 each, undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Group A comprised non-diabetic patients and group B comprised type II diabetic patients. Patients were followed postoperatively upto one month for the development of SSIs. Proportion of patients with surgical site infections or otherwise was compared between the groups using chi-square test with significance of p < 0.05. Results: In group A, 35 patients were above the age of 40 years. In group B, 38 patients were above the age of 40 years. Four patients in group A developed a surgical site infection. Seven patients in group B developed SSIs (p = 0.07). Conclusion: Presence of diabetes mellitus did not significantly affect the onset of surgical site infection in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. (author)

  16. Perioperative oxygen supplementation and surgical site infection after cesarean delivery: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Neena; Poddatoori, Vineela; Poddatorri, Vineela; Noroozkhani, Sara; Siddik-Ahmad, R Iram; Caughey, Aaron B

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate whether supplemental perioperative oxygen decreases surgical site wound infections or endometritis. This was a prospective, randomized trial. Patients who were to undergo cesarean delivery were recruited and randomly allocated to either 30% or 80% oxygen during the cesarean delivery and for 1 hour after surgery. The obstetricians and patients were blinded to the concentration of oxygen used. Patients were evaluated for wound infection or endometritis during their hospital stay and by 6 weeks postpartum. The primary end point was a composite of either surgical site infection or endometritis. Eight hundred thirty-one patients were recruited. Of these, 415 participants received 30% oxygen perioperatively and 416 received 80% oxygen. The groups were well matched for age, race, parity, diabetes, number of previous cesarean deliveries, and scheduled compared with unscheduled cesarean deliveries. An intention-to-treat analysis was used. There was no difference in the primary composite outcome (8.2% in women who received 30% oxygen compared with 8.2% in women who received 80% oxygen, P=.89), no difference in surgical site infection in the two groups (5.5% compared with 5.8%, P=.98), and no significant difference in endometritis in the two groups (2.7% compared with 2.4%, P=.66), respectively. Women who received 80% supplemental oxygen perioperatively did not have a lower rate of a surgical site infection or endometritis as compared with women who received 30% supplemental oxygen concentration. ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clincaltrials.gov, NCT00876005. I.

  17. Incidence and predictors of surgical site infection in Ethiopia: prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legesse Laloto, Tamrat; Hiko Gemeda, Desta; Abdella, Sadikalmahdi Hussen

    2017-02-03

    Surgical site infections are commonest nosocomial infections and responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality as well as increased hospitalizations and treatment cost related to surgical operations. The aim of this study was to determine incidence and predictors of surgical site infections at surgical ward of Hawassa University Referral Hospital, Southern Ethiopia. We performed prospective study involving 105 patients that undergone major surgical procedure at Hawassa University Referral Hospital from March 2 to May 2, 2015. Data were extracted from paper based medical charts, operational and anesthesia note, by direct observation and patients' interview. All patients were followed daily before, during and after operation for 30 days starting from the date of operation. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) for window version 20.0 software. Predictors of Surgical site infections were identified using multivariable logistic regression model. P-value less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. We studied 105 patients. Sixty four patients (61%) were males. The mean age of the patients was 30.85 ± 17.72 years. The mean Body Mass Index (BMI) was 21.6 ± 4 kg/m 2 . Twenty patients (19.1%) developed surgical site infections. Age greater than 40 years, AOR = 7.7(95% CI [1.610-40.810 p = 0.016,]), preoperative hospital stay more than 7 days, AOR = 22.4(95% CI [4.544-110.780, p = 0.001]), duration of operation more than 1 hour, AOR = 8.01(95% CI [1.562-41.099, p = 0.013]) and administering antimicrobial prophylaxis before 1 hour of operation, AOR = 11.1 (95% CI [1.269-75.639, p = 0.014]) were independent predictors for surgical site infections. Surgical site infection is relatively high.

  18. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-07-01

    Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics.

  19. Aetiological agents of surgical site infection in a specialist hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Despite the advances made in asepsis, antimicrobial drugs, sterilization and operative techniques, surgical site infections (SSI) continue to be a major problem in all branches of surgery in the hospitals. The objective of this study was to establish the incidence of SSI, the type and frequency of various pathogens.

  20. Alcohol Drinking does not Affect Postoperative Surgical Site Infection or Anastomotic Leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse appears to increase postoperative complications, but clinical trials have reported conflicting results. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to clarify how alcohol drinking affects postoperative surgical site infection and anastomotic leakage and to determine...... the impact of perioperative alcohol intervention....

  1. Treatment of surgical site infections (SSI) IN patients with peripheral arterial disease : an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slegt, Jasper; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; de Groot, Hans G W; van der Laan, Lijckle

    INTRODUCTION: The management of surgical site infections (SSI's) in vascular surgery has been challenging over the years. To assess the outcomes associated with the various strategies, we performed a review of all SSI's after elective vascular procedures in patients with moderate to severe

  2. Aetiological agents of surgical site infection in a specialist hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the advances made in asepsis, antimicrobial drugs, sterilization and operative techniques, surgical site infections (SSI) continue to be a major problem in all branches of surgery in the hospitals. The objective of this study was to establish the incidence of SSI, the type and frequency of various pathogens and their ...

  3. Effect of high perioperative oxygen fraction on surgical site infection and pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyhoff, Christian S; Wetterslev, Jørn; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2009-01-01

    Control and Prevention. Secondary outcomes included atelectasis, pneumonia, respiratory failure, and mortality. RESULTS: Surgical site infection occurred in 131 of 685 patients (19.1%) assigned to receive 80% oxygen vs 141 of 701 (20.1%) assigned to receive 30% oxygen (odds ratio [OR], 0.94; 95...

  4. Off-label Usage of Absorbable Beads Containing Antibiotics for Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Jeffrey M; Logue, Mary E; Kunkel, Ryan; Demas, Christopher P

    2017-10-01

    Surgical site infections account for about 17% of all nosocomial infections, second only to urinary tract infections. Antibiotic beads deliver high local antibiotic concentrations and maintain low systemic levels. The authors assessed the efficacy of calcium sulfate absorbable antibiotic beads (CSAAB) in the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs) for complex wound closures. Patient records from the University of New Mexico Hospital (UNMH; Albuquerque, NM) and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC; Lebanon, NH) were retrospectively analyzed from 2004 to 2015. Each patient received CSAAB prophylaxis during operations performed by the principle investigator. Charts were grouped by wound location and category. Outcomes were defined solely by readmission within 30 days for repeat intervention. Zero of the 38 UNMH and 15 of the 104 DHMC patients were readmitted. Data reached statistical significance based on 95% confidence intervals using the binomial distribution. This brief retrospective chart review shows promising use for CSAAB in the prevention of soft tissue SSIs.

  5. Risk factors for surgical site infection following operative ankle fracture fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, E G; Cashman, J P; Groarke, P J; Morris, S F

    2013-09-01

    Ankle fracture is a common injury and there is an increasingly greater emphasis on operative fixation. The purpose of the study was to determine the complication rate in this cohort of patients and, in doing so, determine risk factors which predispose to surgical site infection. A prospective cohort study was performed at a tertiary referral trauma center examining risk factors for surgical site infection in operatively treated ankle fractures. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed. Female gender and advancing age were determined to be the risk factors in univariate analysis. Drain usage and peri-operative pyrexia were found to be significant for infection in multivariate analysis. This study allows surgeons to identify those at increased risk of infection and counsel them appropriately. It also allows for a high level of vigilance with regard to soft tissue handling intra-operatively in this higher risk group.

  6. Reducing surgical site infections after hysterectomy: metronidazole plus cefazolin compared with cephalosporin alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Sara R; Morgan, Daniel M; Bazzi, Ali A; Pearlman, Mark D; Abdelsattar, Zaid; Campbell, Darrell A; Uppal, Shitanshu

    2017-08-01

    Organisms that are isolated from vaginal cuff infections and pelvic abscesses after hysterectomy frequently include anaerobic vaginal flora. Metronidazole has outstanding coverage against nearly all anaerobic species, which is superior to both cefazolin and second-generation cephalosporins. Cefazolin plus metronidazole has been demonstrated to reduce infectious morbidity compared with either cefazolin or second-generation cephalosporins in other clean-contaminated procedures, which include both as colorectal surgery and cesarean delivery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the combination of cefazolin plus metronidazole before hysterectomy was more effective in the prevention of surgical site infection than existing recommendations of cefazolin or second-generation cephalosporin. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative from July 2012 through February 2015. The primary outcome was surgical site infection. Patients who were >18 years old and who underwent abdominal, vaginal, laparoscopic, or robotic hysterectomy for benign or malignant indications were included if they received 1 of the following prophylactic antibiotic regimens: cefazolin, second-generation cephalosporin, or cefazolin plus metronidazole. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was performed to evaluate the independent effect of an antibiotic regimen, and propensity score matching was used to validate the findings. The study included 18,255 hysterectomies. The overall rate of surgical site infection was 1.8% (n=329). The unadjusted rate of surgical site infection was 1.8% (n=267) for cefazolin, 2.1% (n=49) for second-generation cephalosporin, and 1.4% (n=13) for cefazolin plus metronidazole. After adjustment for differences in patient and operative factors among the antibiotic cohorts, compared with cefazolin plus metronidazole, we found the risk of surgical site infection was significantly higher for patients who received

  7. The efficacy of normal saline irrigation to prevent surgical site infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, V.; Awan, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of normal saline irrigation to prevent surgical site Infection The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of normal saline irrigations to prevent surgical site infection (SSI). Study Design: A comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at surgery and gynecology Dept CMH Chunian from 1st Jan 2012 to 1st Nov 2012. Patients and Methods: Two hundred clean surgical and gynecological cases were included in the study. Hundred cases which were randomly selected had their wound washed with warm normal saline for 60 sec and then mopped dry with clean swabs. Subcuticular Stitches were applied to all the 200 cases. The surgical wounds were examined on 3rd post operative day and then finally on 15th post operative day. Patients with wound infection developed pain at the operation site and fever on third post operative day. Wounds were examined for swelling, redness, discharge and stitch abscess. Routine investigations were done as per protocol. Wound swabs were taken for culture and sensitivity. Results: The study was carried out on 200 clean cases (general and gynecological). They were 130 females and 70 males. The 100 cases whose wounds were washed with normal saline only 1 patient developed wound infection while in the other group who did not had saline irrigations 8 patients out of 100 developed wound infection. The commonest infective organisms were staphylococcus aureus and the other organisms were streptococcus pyogenes, proteus, Klaebsiella, E coli and pseudomonas. No MRSA was detected. Conclusion: In our study washing the wound with warm normal saline for 60 seconds resulted in the wound being infection free. Wound infection is associated with delayed wound healing, prolonged hospital stay and increased economic pressure on the patient and on the state. (author)

  8. [Vacuum-assisted closure as a treatment modality for surgical site infection in cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simek, M; Nemec, P; Zálesák, B; Hájek, R; Kaláb, M; Fluger, I; Kolár, M; Jecmínková, L; Gráfová, P

    2007-08-01

    The vacuum-asssited closure has represented an encouraging treatment modality in treatment of surgical site infection in cardiac surgery, providing superior results compared with conventional treatment strategies, particularly in the treatment of deep sternal wound infection. From November 2004 to January 2007, 40 patients, undergoing VAC therapy (VAC system, KCI, Austria, Hartmann-Rico Inc., Czech Republic) for surgical site infection following cardiac surgery, were prospectively evaluated. Four patients (10%) were treated for extensive leg-wound infection, 10 (25%) were treated for superficial sternal wound infection and 26 (65%) for deep sternal wound infection. The median age was 69.9 +/- 9.7 years and the median BMI was 33.2 +/- 5.0 kg/m2. Twenty-three patients (57%) were women and diabetes was present in 22 patients (55%). The VAC was employed after the previous failure of the conventional treatment strategy in 7 patients (18%). Thirty-eight patients (95%) were successfully healed. Two patients (5%) died, both of deep sternal infetion consequences. The overall length of hospitalization was 36.4 +/- 22.6 days. The median number of dressing changes was 4.6 +/- 1.8. The median VAC treatment time until surgical closure was 9.7 +/- 3.9 days. The VAC therapy was solely used as a bridge to the definite wound closure. Four patients (10%) with a chronic fistula were re-admitted with the range of 1 to 12 months after the VAC therapy. The VAC therapy is a safe and reliable option in the treatment of surgical site infection in the field of cardiac surgery. The VAC therapy can be considered as an effective adjunct to convetional treatment modalities for the therapy of extensive and life-threatening wound infection following cardiac surgery, particurlarly in the group of high-risk patients.

  9. Methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: preventing surgical site infections following plastic surgery.

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    Elward, Alexis M; McAndrews, Joanne M; Young, V Leroy

    2009-01-01

    The reader is presumed to have a broad understanding of aesthetic surgical procedures. After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Explain the microbiology of Staphylococcus species and discuss antibiotic resistance development in Staphylococcus species and assess how clinical outcomes are affected. 2. Identify the epidemiology of Staphylococcus carriers and the impact on the clinical practice and regulation. Practice effective measures that prevent surgical site infections. 3. Practice screening for and decolonizing of patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Physicians may earn 2.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit by successfully completing the examination based on material covered in this article. The examination begins on page 245. As a measure of the success of the education we hope you will receive from this article, we encourage you to log on to the Aesthetic Society website and take the preexamination before reading this article. Once you have completed the article, you may then take the examination again for CME credit. The Aesthetic Society will be able to compare your answers and use this data for future reference as we attempt to continually improve the CME articles we offer. ASAPS members can complete this CME examination online by logging on to the ASAPS Members-Only Website (http://www.surgery.org/members) and clicking on "Clinical Education" in the menu bar. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of surgical site infections (SSI), with both methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant strains causing these infections. The incidence of methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) has increased in the US over the past decade, largely due to the emergence of community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA). This article reviews the microbiology and epidemiology of methicillin-sensitive S aureus (MSSA) and MRSA, risk factors for surgical site infections among plastic surgery patients, the evidence supporting preoperative

  10. Stratification of surgical site infection by operative factors and comparison of infection rates after hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Margaret A; Nickel, Katelin B; Wallace, Anna E; Mines, Daniel; Fraser, Victoria J; Warren, David K

    2015-03-01

    To investigate whether operative factors are associated with risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after hernia repair. Retrospective cohort study. Patients Commercially insured enrollees aged 6 months-64 years with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure or Current Procedural Terminology, fourth edition, codes for inguinal/femoral, umbilical, and incisional/ventral hernia repair procedures from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2010. SSIs within 90 days after hernia repair were identified by diagnosis codes. The χ2 and Fisher exact tests were used to compare SSI incidence by operative factors. A total of 119,973 hernia repair procedures were analyzed. The incidence of SSI differed significantly by anatomic site, with rates of 0.45% (352/77,666) for inguinal/femoral, 1.16% (288/24,917) for umbilical, and 4.11% (715/17,390) for incisional/ventral hernia repair. Within anatomic sites, the incidence of SSI was significantly higher for open versus laparoscopic inguinal/femoral (0.48% [295/61,142] vs 0.34% [57/16,524], P=.020) and incisional/ventral (4.20% [701/16,699] vs 2.03% [14/691], P=.005) hernia repairs. The rate of SSI was higher following procedures with bowel obstruction/necrosis than procedures without obstruction/necrosis for open inguinal/femoral (0.89% [48/5,422] vs 0.44% [247/55,720], Poperative factors may facilitate accurate comparison of SSI rates between facilities.

  11. A Practice Improvement Project to Reduce Cesarean Surgical Site Infection Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Cindra; Foster, Peggy; Ulrich, Deborah; Adkins, Kathryn

    We implemented an evidence-based practice improvement project at a health care facility in the Midwestern United States to address the increasing rate of cesarean surgical site infections. Women who experienced cesarean birth were cared for using a standardized evidence-based protocol including preoperative and postoperative care and education. In addition, a team-created educational video was used by both women and their families during the postoperative period and at home after discharge. This new protocol resulted in a decrease in the rate of cesarean surgical site infections from 1.35% in 2013 to 0.7% in 2014 and 0.36% in 2015. Our interdisciplinary approach to integrate best-practice strategies resulted in decreased infection rates and improved patient satisfaction scores. © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  12. Outcome and treatment of postoperative spine surgical site infections: predictors of treatment success and failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Keishi; Berven, Sigurd H

    2014-05-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is an important complication after spine surgery. The management of SSI is characterized by significant variability, and there is little guidance regarding an evidence-based approach. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors associated with treatment failure of SSI after spine surgery. A total of 225 consecutive patients with SSI after spine surgery between July 2005 and July 2010 were studied retrospectively. Patients were treated with aggressive surgical debridement and prolonged antibiotic therapy. Outcome and risk factors were analyzed in 197 patients having 1 year of follow-up. Treatment success was defined as resolution within 90 days. A total of 126 (76 %) cases were treated with retention of implants. Forty-three (22 %) cases had treatment failure with five (2.5 %) cases resulting in death. Lower rates of treatment success were observed with late infection (38 %), fusion with fixation to the ilium (67 %), Propionibacterium acnes (43 %), poly microbial infection (68 %), >6 operated spinal levels (67 %), and instrumented cases (73 %). Higher rates of early resolution were observed with superficial infection (93 %), methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (95 %), and failure. Superficial infection and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus were predictors of early resolution. Postoperative spine infections were treated with aggressive surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy. High rates of treatment failure occurred in cases with late infection, long instrumented fusions, polymicrobial infections, and Propionibacterium acnes. Removal of implants and direct or staged re-implantation may be a useful strategy in cases with high risk of treatment failure.

  13. Patient readmission for orthopaedic surgical site infection: an hermeneutic phenomenological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Lilian Machado; Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa; Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa

    2017-04-01

    To explore the individual experience of being readmitted for surgical site infection resulting from orthopaedic surgery. Surgical site infection has been a cause of concern worldwide and contributes to the greatest number of hospital readmission occurrences. Health professionals must understand the meaning of these readmissions for the individual, as an understanding of these exclusive experiences improves the quality of surgical care. Qualitative research based on the existential phenomenology of Martin Heidegger. Eleven individuals who were readmitted because of surgical site infection participated in the study. The testimonials were obtained over an 11-month period in 2014-2015 based on the following leading question: What has it been like for you to be readmitted because of orthopaedic surgical site infection? The phenomenological analysis identified the sentiment units of the testimonials and their interrelation, revealing the meanings. The revealed contents were fear and insecurity of the unknown, frustration, and the sense of time passing them by and being unable to live their lives. The individuals felt neglected, and they experienced their social relationality as impaired and sometimes approaching a breakdown. The patients connected with God as an attempt to avoid complications and death. We urge healthcare professionals to deepen their knowledge of the dimensions of care by developing competencies that consider the subjectivity of experiences of the health-disease process. When the only listening that takes place is qualified listening, the professional's attitudes compromise his or her ability to provide true care, which transcends the knowledge of doing and reaches the knowledge of doing with sensitivity. Nursing care requires an attitude that considers the patient as more than a carrier of illness and should not be limited to what is described and prescribed, although the latter cannot be excluded in an organisational point of view. © 2017 John Wiley

  14. A comparative assessment of surgeons' tracking methods for surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ramshorst, Gabrielle H; Vos, Margreet C; den Hartog, Dennis; Hop, Wim C J; Jeekel, Johannes; Hovius, Steven E R; Lange, Johan F

    2013-04-01

    The incidence of surgical site infections (SSI) is considered increasingly to be an indicator of quality of care. We conducted a study in which daily inspection of the surgical incision was performed by an independent, trained team to monitor the incidence of SSI using U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) definitions, as a gold-standard measure of care. In the department of surgery, two registration systems for SSI were used routinely by the surgeon: An electronic and a plenary tracking system. The results of the independent team were compared with the outcomes provided by two registration systems for SSI, so as to evaluate the reliability of these systems as a possible alternative for indicating quality of care. The study was an incidence study conducted from May 2007 to January 2009 that included 1,000 adult patients scheduled to undergo open abdominal surgery in an academic teaching hospital. Surgical incisions were inspected daily to check for SSI according to definitions of health care-associated infections established by the CDC. Follow-up after discharge was done at the outpatient clinic of the hospital by telephone or letter in combination with patient diaries and reviews of patient charts, discharge letters, electronic files, and reported complications. Univariate and multivariable analyses were done to identify putative risk factors for missing registrations. Of the 1,000 patients in the study, 33 were not evaluated. Surgical site infections were diagnosed in 26.8% of the 967 remaining patients, of which 18.0% were superficial incisional infections, 5.4% were deep incisional infections, and 3.4% were organ/space infections. More than 60% of SSIs were unreported in either of the department's two tracking systems for such infections. For these two systems, independent major risk factors for missing registrations were (1) the lack of occurrence of an SSI, (2) transplantation surgery, and (3) admission to non-surgical departments. Most SSIs

  15. Risk of surgical site infection in paediatric herniotomies without any prophylactic antibiotics: A preliminary experience

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    Dhananjay Vaze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different studies underline the use of pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis in clean surgeries like herniotomy and inguinal orchiopexy. But, the meta-analyses do not recommend nor discard the use of prophylactic pre-operative antibiotics. The scarcity of controlled clinical trials in paediatric population further vitiates the matter. This study assessed the difference in the rate of early post-operative wound infection cases in children who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and children who did not receive antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. Materials and Methods: This randomised prospective study was conducted in Paediatric Surgery department of PGIMER Chandigarh. Out of 251 patients, 112 patients were randomised to the case group and 139 were ascribed to the control group. The patients in control group were given a standard regimen of single dose of intravenous antibiotic at the time of induction followed by 3-4 days of oral antibiotic. Case group patients underwent the surgical procedure in similar manner with no antibiotic either at the time of induction or post-operatively. Results: The incidence of surgical site infection in case group was 3.73 % and that in control group was 2.22%. The observed difference in the incidence of surgical site infection was statistically insignificant (P value = 0.7027. The overall infection rate in case and control group was 2.89%. Conclusions: Our preliminary experience suggests that there is no statistically significant difference in the proportion of early post-operative wound infection between the patients who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and the patients who received no antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. The risk of surgical site infection in paediatric heriotomies does not increase even if the child′s weight is less than his/her expected weight for age.

  16. Preoperative bathing or showering with skin antiseptics to prevent surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joan; Osborne, Sonya

    2015-02-20

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are wound infections that occur after invasive (surgical) procedures. Preoperative bathing or showering with an antiseptic skin wash product is a well-accepted procedure for reducing skin bacteria (microflora). It is less clear whether reducing skin microflora leads to a lower incidence of surgical site infection. To review the evidence for preoperative bathing or showering with antiseptics for preventing hospital-acquired (nosocomial) surgical site infections. For this fifth update we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 18 December 2014); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2014 Issue 11); Ovid MEDLINE (2012 to December Week 4 2014), Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations December 18, 2014); Ovid EMBASE (2012 to 2014 Week 51), EBSCO CINAHL (2012 to December 18 2014) and reference lists of articles. Randomised controlled trials comparing any antiseptic preparation used for preoperative full-body bathing or showering with non-antiseptic preparations in people undergoing surgery. Two review authors independently assessed studies for selection, risk of bias and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for additional information. We did not identify any new trials for inclusion in this fifth update. Seven trials involving a total of 10,157 participants were included. Four of the included trials had three comparison groups. The antiseptic used in all trials was 4% chlorhexidine gluconate (Hibiscrub/Riohex). Three trials involving 7791 participants compared chlorhexidine with a placebo. Bathing with chlorhexidine compared with placebo did not result in a statistically significant reduction in SSIs; the relative risk of SSI (RR) was 0.91 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80 to 1.04). When only trials of high quality were included in this comparison, the RR of SSI was 0.95 (95%CI 0.82 to 1.10). Three trials of 1443 participants compared bar soap with

  17. Increased Total Anesthetic Time Leads to Higher Rates of Surgical Site Infections in Spinal Fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffer, Ross C; Murphy, Meghan; Maloney, Patrick; Kor, Daryl; Nassr, Ahmad; Freedman, Brett; Fogelson, Jeremy; Bydon, Mohamad

    2017-06-01

    A retrospective review of a consecutive series of spinal fusions comparing patient and procedural characteristics of patients who developed surgical site infections (SSIs) after spinal fusion. It is known that increased surgical time (incision to closure) is associated with a higher rate of postoperative SSIs. We sought to determine whether increased total anesthetic time (intubation to extubation) is a factor in the development of SSIs as well. In spine surgery for deformity and degenerative disease, SSI has been associated with operative time, revealing a nearly 10-fold increase in SSI rates in prolonged surgery. Surgical time is associated with infections in other surgical disciplines as well. No studies have reported whether total anesthetic time (intubation to extubation) has an association with SSIs. Surgical records were searched in a retrospective fashion to identify all spine fusion procedures performed between January 2010 and July 2012. All SSIs during that timeframe were recorded and compared with the list of cases performed between 2010 and 2012 in a case-control design. There were 20 (1.7%) SSIs in this fusion cohort. On univariate analyses of operative factors, there was a significant association between total anesthetic time (Infection 7.6 ± 0.5 hrs vs. no infection -6.0 ± 0.1 hrs, P operative time (infection 5.5 ± 0.4 hrs vs. no infection - 4.4 ± 0.06 hrs, P infections, whereas level of pathology and emergent surgery were not significant. On multivariate logistic analysis, BMI and total anesthetic time remained independent predictors of SSI whereas ASA status and operative time did not. Increasing BMI and total anesthetic time were independent predictors of SSIs in this cohort of over 1000 consecutive spinal fusions. 3.

  18. Post-Caesarean Section Surgical Site Infection Surveillance Using an Online Database and Mobile Phone Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Eliana; McIsaac, Corrine; MacDougall, Bhreagh; Wilson, Douglas; Kohr, Rosemary

    2017-08-01

    Obstetric surgical site infections (SSIs) are common and expensive to the health care system but remain under reported given shorter postoperative hospital stays and suboptimal post-discharge surveillance systems. SSIs, for the purpose of this paper, are defined according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (1999) as infection incurring within 30 days of the operative procedure (in this case, Caesarean section [CS]). Demonstrate the feasibility of real-life use of a patient driven SSIs post-discharge surveillance system consisting of an online database and mobile phone technology (surgical mobile app - how2trak) among women undergoing CS in a Canadian urban centre. Estimate the rate of SSIs and associated predisposing factors. Prospective cohort of consecutive women delivering by CS at one urban Canadian hospital. Using surgical mobile app-how2trak-predetermined demographics, comorbidities, procedure characteristics, and self-reported symptoms and signs of infection were collected and linked to patients' incision self-portraits (photos) on postpartum days 3, 7, 10, and 30. A total of 105 patients were enrolled over a 5-month period. Mean age was 31 years, 13% were diabetic, and most were at low risk of surgical complications. Forty-six percent of surgeries were emergency CSs, and 104/105 received antibiotic prophylaxis. Forty-five percent of patients (47/105) submitted at least one photo, and among those, one surgical site infection was detected by photo appearance and self-reported symptoms by postpartum day 10. The majority of patients whom uploaded photos did so multiple times and 43% of them submitted photos up to day 30. Patients with either a diagnosis of diabetes or self-reported Asian ethnicity were less likely to submit photos. Post-discharge surveillance for CS-related SSIs using surgical mobile app how2trak is feasible and deserves further study in the post-discharge setting. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. ANTIMICROBIOLOGICAL PROFILE AND EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ORGANISM ISOLATED FROM SURGICAL SITE INFECTION

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    Ravindra Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Infection that occurs in the wound created by a surgical procedure is generally called as surgical site infection. (1 Surgical site infection is a frequent complication of surgery and its incidence varies from 0.5 to 15% depending upon the type of surgery and status of the patient. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study was conducted over a period of 16 months and sample was collected from various surgical departments of Konaseema Institute of Medical Science, Amalapuram. Standard operating procedures for sample collection, transport, culture and susceptibility testing for isolated organisms were followed to ensure procedural quality. Swab samples were plated on nutrient agar, blood agar, and MacConkey agar medium. RESULT Staphylococcus was the most common organism isolated. But Gram-negative organism was more common organism resistant to commonly used antibiotic. CONCLUSION Idea about the antimicrobial sensitivity pattern is essential for selection of drugs. Every institution should have an antimicrobial use policy as per the resistance pattern of organism. So a longterm and large scale study is required to have the idea and detail of resistance pattern.

  20. A pregnant woman with a surgical site infection after mesh repair of an abdominal wall incisional hernia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Kana; Tanimura, Kenji; Ebina, Yasuhiko; Kanemitsu, Kiyonori; Yamada, Hideto

    2017-03-11

    Surgical meshes are widely used in incisional hernia repair. However, there are no reports of pregnancies complicated by infection of surgical meshes used for hernia repair. This is the first case report of a pregnant woman who experienced surgical site infection associated with surgical mesh used for repair of an abdominal wall incisional hernia. We report a case of a 41-year-old pregnant Japanese woman with surgical site infection after mesh repair of an abdominal wall incisional hernia. She was diagnosed with an abdominal wall incisional hernia at 3 months after her third cesarean section, and she underwent an operation of hernia repair with use of monofilament polypropylene mesh 7 months after the third cesarean section. However, a surgical site infection associated with surgical mesh occurred. During antibiotic treatment, she was found to be pregnant. She was referred to our hospital at 13 weeks and 2 days of gestation. The surgeons removed the infected mesh at 16 weeks and 3 days of gestation. Neither the hernia nor infection at the surgical site recurred throughout pregnancy. We planned a cesarean section using a transverse uterine fundal incision method with an upper abdominal incision. The patient delivered a 2478-g healthy female infant. The present report shows that removal of mesh can safely control surgical site infection during pregnancy.

  1. Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site Infection after High Energy Fracture Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0588 TITLE: Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site Infection after High- Energy Fracture Surgery...High- Energy Fracture Surgery 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0588 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert V. O’Toole, MD...14 4 1. INTRODUCTION: The overall scope of this project is to address the treatment of high- energy military fractures, which has

  2. Surgical site infection after cesarean delivery: incidence and risk factors at a US academic institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Laura J; Munoz, Jessian L; Lachiewicz, Mark; Liu, Xiaobo; Goje, Oluwatosin

    2017-06-08

    To identify the rate of surgical site infection (SSI) after Cesarean delivery (CD) and determine risk factors predictive for infection at a large academic institution. This was a retrospective cohort study in women undergoing CD during 2013. SSIs were defined by Centers for Disease Control (CDC) criteria. Chi square and t-tests were used for bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression was used to identify SSI risk factors. In 2419 patients, the rate of SSI was 5.5% (n = 133) with cellulitis in 4.9% (n = 118), deep incisional infection in 0.6% (n = 15) and intra-abdominal infection in 0.3% (n = 7). On multivariate analysis, SSI was higher among CD for labor arrest (OR 2.4; 95%CI 1.6-3.5; p infection control interventions.

  3. Surgical site infection and its associated factors following cesarean section: a cross sectional study from a public hospital in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelaw, Kelemu Abebe; Aweke, Amlaku Mulat; Astawesegn, Feleke Hailemichael; Demissie, Birhanu Wondimeneh; Zeleke, Liknaw Bewket

    2017-01-01

    A cesarean section is a surgical procedure in which incisions are made through a woman's abdomen and uterus to deliver her baby. Surgical site infections are a common surgical complication among patients delivered with cesarean section. Further it caused to increase maternal morbidity, stay of hospital and the cost of treatment. Hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the magnitude of surgical site infection following cesarean Site Infections and its associated factors at Lemlem Karl hospital July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2016. Retrospective card review was done on 384 women who gave birth via cesarean section at Lemlem Karl hospital from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2016. Systematic sampling technique was used to select patient medical cards. The data were entered by Epi info version 7.2 then analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences windows version 20. Both bivariate and multivariate logistic regression was done to test association between predictors and dependent variables. P value of cesarean section, the magnitude of surgical site infection following cesarean section Infection was 6.8%. The identified independent risk factors for surgical site infections were the duration of labor AOR=3.48; 95%CI (1.25, 9.68), rupture of membrane prior to cesarean section AOR=3.678; 95%CI (1.13, 11.96) and the abdominal midline incision (AOR=5.733; 95%CI (2.05, 16.00). The magnitude of surgical site infection following cesarean section is low compare to other previous studies. The independent associated factors for surgical site infection after cesarean section in this study: Membranes rupture prior to cesarean section, duration of labor and sub umbilical abdominal incision. In addition to ensuring sterile environment and aseptic surgeries, use of WHO surgical safety checklist would appear to be a very important intervention to reduce surgical site infections.

  4. Optimum Operating Room Environment for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Sara; Luo, James N; Gilbert, Jack; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C

    Surgical site infections (SSI), whether they be incisional or deep, can entail major morbidity and death to patients and additional cost to the healthcare system. A significant amount of effort has gone into optimizing the surgical patient and the operating room environment to reduce SSI. Relevant guidelines and literature were reviewed. The modern practice of surgical antisepsis involves the employment of strict sterile techniques inside the operating room. Extensive guidelines are available regarding the proper operating room antisepsis as well as pre-operative preparation. The use of pre-operative antimicrobial prophylaxis has become increasingly prevalent, which also presents the challenge of opportunistic and nosocomial infections. Ongoing investigative efforts have brought about a greater appreciation of the surgical patient's endogenous microflora, use of non-bactericidal small molecules, and pre-operative microbial screening. Systematic protocols exist for optimizing the surgical sterility of the operating room to prevent SSIs. Ongoing research efforts aim to improve the precision of peri-operative antisepsis measures and personalize these measures to tailor the patient's unique microbial environment.

  5. Surgical site infections in adults patients undergoing of clean and contaminated surgeries at a university Brazilian hospital

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    Maria de Lourdes Gonçalves Santos

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Surgical site infections are a risk inherent to surgical procedures, especially after digestive surgeries. They occur up to 30 days after surgery, or up to a year later if a prosthesis is implanted. The Surgical-site Infection Risk Index (SIRI, NISS (National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance methodology, is a method to evaluate the risk of surgical site infections, which takes into account the potential contamination of the surgery, the patient's health status and surgery duration. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the correlation between the surgical-site infection risk index score on the 1st day postoperatively, and the development of surgical site infection up to 30 days postoperatively. METHODS: The postoperative surgical site infections (NNIS was evaluated by following-up in hospital and as an outpatient. The patients followed prospectively were those submitted to elective surgeries, clean (hernioplasties or contaminated (colorretal, performed by conventional approach at a university hospital, during the period from June 2007 to August 2008. The mean age of the patients was 55.5 years, 133 (65.5% male; 120 (59.1% submitted to clean surgeries and 83 (40.9% contaminated. RESULTS: The global index of surgical site infections was 10.3%; 10 (8.3% in clean procedures and 111(3.2% in contaminated ones. Four (19.1% of the surgical site infections were diagnosed at the time of hospitalization and 17 (80.9% at post-discharge follow-up. Twelve (57.1% of the surgical site infections were superficial, 2 (9.5% deep and 7 (33.3% at a specific site. Of these, 5 (6.6% were in patients classified as SIRI 0 (76; 9 (15% for SIRI 1 (60; 5 (9.1% for SIRI 2 (55 and 2 (16.7% for SIRI 3. CONCLUSION: The global index of surgical site infections and its incidence among contaminated procedures are within the expected limits. On the other hand according to SIRI, the surgical site infection indexes are above the expected standards both for the clean and for the

  6. ‘This wound has spoilt everything’: emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to ‘germs’ or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system. PMID:25470322

  7. 'This wound has spoilt everything': emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to 'germs' or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system. © 2014 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2014 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Surgical treatment approaches and reimbursement costs of surgical site infections post hip arthroplasty in Australia: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merollini, Katharina M D; Crawford, Ross W; Graves, Nicholas

    2013-03-11

    The treatment for deep surgical site infection (SSI) following primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) varies internationally and it is at present unclear which treatment approaches are used in Australia. The aim of this study is to identify current treatment approaches in Queensland, Australia, show success rates and quantify the costs of different treatments. Data for patients undergoing primary THA and treatment for infection between January 2006 and December 2009 in Queensland hospitals were extracted from routinely used hospital databases. Records were linked with pathology information to confirm positive organisms. Diagnosis and treatment of infection was determined using ICD-10-AM and ACHI codes, respectively. Treatment costs were estimated based on AR-DRG cost accounting codes assigned to each patient hospital episode. A total of n=114 patients with deep surgical site infection were identified. The majority of patients (74%) were first treated with debridement, antibiotics and implant retention (DAIR), which was successful in eradicating the infection in 60.3% of patients with an average cost of $13,187. The remaining first treatments were 1-stage revision, successful in 89.7% with average costs of $27,006, and 2-stage revisions, successful in 92.9% of cases with average costs of $42,772. Multiple treatments following 'failed DAIR' cost on average $29,560, for failed 1-stage revision were $24,357, for failed 2-stage revision were $70,381 and were $23,805 for excision arthroplasty. As treatment costs in Australia are high primary prevention is important and the economics of competing treatment choices should be carefully considered. These currently vary greatly across international settings.

  9. Surgical site infections following transcatheter apical aortic valve implantation: incidence and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillot, Richard; Fréchette, Éric; Cloutier, Daniel; Rodès-Cabau, Josep; Doyle, Daniel; Charbonneau, Éric; Mohammadi, Siamak; Dumont, Éric

    2012-11-13

    The present study was undertaken to examine the incidence and management of surgical site infection (SSI) in patients submitted to transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TA-TAVI). From April 2007 to December 2011, 154 patients underwent TA-TAVI with an Edwards Sapien bioprosthesis (ES) at the Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et Pneumologie de Québec (IUCPQ) as part of a multidisciplinary program to prospectively evaluate percutaneous aortic valve implantation. Patient demographics, perioperative variables, and postoperative complications were recorded in a prospective registry. Five (3.2%) patients in the cohort presented with an SSI during the study period. The infections were all hospital-acquired (HAI) and were considered as organ/space SSI's based on Center for Disease Control criteria (CDC). Within the first few weeks of the initial procedure, these patients presented with an abscess or chronic draining sinus in the left thoracotomy incision and were re-operated. The infection spread to the apex of the left ventricle in all cases where pledgeted mattress sutures could be seen during debridement. Patients received multiple antibiotic regimens without success until the wound was surgically debrided and covered with viable tissue. The greater omentum was used in three patients and the pectoralis major muscle in the other two. None of the patients died or had a recurrent infection. Three of the patients were infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis, one with Staphylococcus aureus, and one with Enterobacter cloacae. Patients with surgical site infections were significantly more obese with higher BMI (31.4±3.1 vs 26.2±4.4 p=0.0099) than the other patients in the cohort. While TA-TAVI is a minimally invasive technique, SSIs, which are associated with obesity, remain a concern. Debridement and rib resection followed by wound coverage with the greater omentum and/or the pectoralis major muscle were used successfully in these patients.

  10. Surgical site infections following transcatheter apical aortic valve implantation: incidence and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baillot Richard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The present study was undertaken to examine the incidence and management of surgical site infection (SSI in patients submitted to transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TA-TAVI. Methods From April 2007 to December 2011, 154 patients underwent TA-TAVI with an Edwards Sapien bioprosthesis (ES at the Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et Pneumologie de Québec (IUCPQ as part of a multidisciplinary program to prospectively evaluate percutaneous aortic valve implantation. Patient demographics, perioperative variables, and postoperative complications were recorded in a prospective registry. Results Five (3.2% patients in the cohort presented with an SSI during the study period. The infections were all hospital-acquired (HAI and were considered as organ/space SSI’s based on Center for Disease Control criteria (CDC. Within the first few weeks of the initial procedure, these patients presented with an abscess or chronic draining sinus in the left thoracotomy incision and were re-operated. The infection spread to the apex of the left ventricle in all cases where pledgeted mattress sutures could be seen during debridement. Patients received multiple antibiotic regimens without success until the wound was surgically debrided and covered with viable tissue. The greater omentum was used in three patients and the pectoralis major muscle in the other two. None of the patients died or had a recurrent infection. Three of the patients were infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis, one with Staphylococcus aureus, and one with Enterobacter cloacae. Patients with surgical site infections were significantly more obese with higher BMI (31.4±3.1 vs 26.2±4.4 p=0.0099 than the other patients in the cohort. Conclusions While TA-TAVI is a minimally invasive technique, SSIs, which are associated with obesity, remain a concern. Debridement and rib resection followed by wound coverage with the greater omentum and/or the pectoralis major

  11. Improving surgical site infection prevention practices through a multifaceted educational intervention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owens, P

    2015-03-01

    As part of the National Clinical Programme on healthcare-associated infection prevention, a Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) and Royal College of Physicians of Ireland (RCPI) working group developed a quality improvement tool for prevention of surgical site infection (SS). We aimed to validate the effectiveness of an educational campaign, which utilises this quality improvement tool to prevent SSI in a tertiary hospital. Prior to the SSI educational campaign, surgical patients were prospectively audited and details of antibiotic administration recorded. Prophylactic antibiotic administration recommendations were delivered via poster and educational presentations. Post-intervention, the audit was repeated. 50 patients were audited pre-intervention, 45 post-intervention. Post-intervention, prophylaxis within 60 minutes prior to incision increased from 54% to 68% (p = 0.266). Appropriate postoperative prescribing improved from 71% to 92% (p = 0.075). A multifaceted educational program may be effective in changing SSI prevention practices.

  12. A Journey to Zero: Reduction of Post-Operative Cesarean Surgical Site Infections over a Five-Year Period

    OpenAIRE

    Hickson, Evelyn; Harris, Jeanette; Brett, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) are a substantial concern for cesarean deliveries in which a surgical site complication is most unwelcome for a mother with a new infant. Steps taken pre- and post-operatively to reduce the number of complications may be of substantial benefit clinically, economically, and psychologically.

  13. Risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative treatment of ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovaska, Mikko T; Mäkinen, Tatu J; Madanat, Rami; Huotari, Kaisa; Vahlberg, Tero; Hirvensalo, Eero; Lindahl, Jan

    2013-02-20

    Surgical site infection is one of the most common complications following ankle fracture surgery. These infections are associated with substantial morbidity and lead to increased resource utilization. Identification of risk factors is crucial for developing strategies to prevent these complications. We performed an age and sex-matched case-control study to identify patient and surgery-related risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative ankle fracture treatment. We identified 1923 ankle fracture operations performed in 1915 patients from 2006 through 2009. A total of 131 patients with deep infection were identified and compared with an equal number of uninfected control patients. Risk factors for infection were determined with use of conditional logistic regression analysis. The incidence of deep infection was 6.8%. Univariate analysis showed diabetes (odds ratio [OR] = 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0, 4.9), alcohol abuse (OR = 3.8, 95% CI = 1.6, 9.4), fracture-dislocation (OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.2, 3.5), and soft-tissue injury (a Tscherne grade of ≥1) (OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.3, 5.3) to be significant patient-related risk factors for infection. Surgery-related risk factors were suboptimal timing of prophylactic antibiotics (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0, 3.4), difficulties encountered during surgery, (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.1, 4.0), wound complications (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.6, 14.0), and fracture malreduction (OR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.3, 9.2). Independent risk factors for infection identified by multivariable analyses were tobacco use (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.6, 8.5) and a duration of surgery of more than ninety minutes (OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.1, 5.7). Cast application in the operating room was independently associated with a decreased infection rate (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2, 0.8). We identified several modifiable risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative treatment of ankle fractures.

  14. Wound management with vacuum assisted closure in surgical site infection after ankle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Ya-Ke; Chen, Hong-Lin; Liu, Fan

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) with standard moist wound care (SMWC) in surgical site infection after ankle surgery. A prospective cohort was performed among patients with surgical site infection after ankle surgery between 2012 and 2013. The follow-up period was three month, and the efficacy end point was complete wound closure rate. Ninety-four patients were analyzed, with 61 patients in the VAC group and 33 in the SMWC group. The complete wound closure rate in the VAC group was higher than that in the SMWC group at 3 month follow up (90.2% Vs. 72.7%, p = 0.028). The median time to complete wound closure was 31 days (95% CI 20.2-41.8) for VAC, and 63 days (95% CI 46.9-79.1) for SMWC (χ(2) = 4.023, p = 0.045). In the superficial infection subgroup, the median times to complete wound closure were 20 days (95% CI 14.2-35.1) in the VAC group and 42 days (95% CI 35.4-69.4) in SMWC group (χ(2) = 4.331, p = 0.041). In the deep subgroup, the median times to complete wound closure were 46 days (95% CI 28.2-65.9) in the VAC group and 75 days (95% CI 43.2-79.6) in SMWC group (χ(2) = 6.475, p = 0.026). Our result showed that vacuum assisted closure was more effective than standard moist wound care in surgical site infection after ankle surgery. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Surveillance of surgical site infection after cesarean section and time of notification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Júnia Leonne Dourado de Almeida; de Aguiar, Regina Amélia Lopes Pessoa; Leite, Henrique Vitor; Silva, Hercules Hermes Riani Martins; de Oliveira, Werlley Meira; Sacramento, João Paulo Tomaz da Cunha; Wakabayashi, Eduarda Almeida; de Souza, Helen Cristina; Clemente, Wanessa Trindade; Romanelli, Roberta Maia de Castro

    2016-03-01

    Cesarean section is a surgical procedure the main complication of which is surgical site infection (SSI), which is related to maternal morbidity and mortality. To evaluate active monitoring by telephone to identify infection and time of SSI report in postpartum women and associated risk factors. We conducted a prospective observational study from 2013-2014, at a referral service for high-risk pregnancies. Surveillance was conducted via telephone at least 30 days after cesarean delivery. Incidence ratio and time of infection occurrence (days) was analyzed. Survival analysis was conducted to assess the temporal distribution of the development of infection. Of a total of 353 patients, 14 (4%) cases of SSI were reported, and 10 (7.4%) of the reported cases occurred within 15 days after cesarean and average time of infection was12.21 days. American Society of Anesthesiologists score was the only risk factor associated with SSI after cesarean section. The prevalence of SSI after cesarean section via telephone is similar to several services with different methods of surveillance, considering it could be used by services with limited resources. Superficial incisional SSI was the most common type of infection, time of infection report was mainly before the 15th day postprocedure, and American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 2 or less was protective against SSI. Telephone calls can be a viable method to identify women with infection briefly after discharge, particularly at-risk patients. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of primary and delayed primary closure in dirty abdominal wounds in terms of frequency of surgical site infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, O.B.A.; Ahmed, N.; Butt, M.W.U.D.; Saleem, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Objective of this study was to compare primary and delayed primary wound closure for dirty abdominal wounds in terms of frequency of surgical site infection. Study Design: Randomized Controlled Trial. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital, Multan. From 16 Sep 2010 to 15 Mar 2011. Patients and Methods: A total of 110 patients were randomly divided into two groups of 55 patients each using random numbers table. Abdominal wounds of one group were closed primarily and of other group were subjected to delayed primary wound closure. The wounds were then checked for surgical site infection for seven post operative days. Results: A higher frequency of surgical site infection was observed in primary closure group (27.3%) as compared to delayed primary closure group (9.1%) which was statistically significant (p=0.013). Conclusion: Delayed primary closure is superior to primary closure in dirty abdominal wounds in terms of frequency of surgical site infection. (author)

  17. Surgical site wound infection in relation to antibiotic prophylaxis given before skin incision and after cord clamping during cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, B; Marhatha, R; Giri, A; Jaisi, S; Maskey, U

    2014-12-01

    Surgical site infection is one of the most common complications following Lower Segment Cesarean Section, which accounts for prolonged hospital stay thereby increasing expense. Prophylactic antibiotics in cesarean section reduces surgical site infection significantly. The best protection is provided when tissue level of antibiotics are adequate before incision, without prejudice to neonatal infectious morbidity. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of surgical site wound infection with prophylactic antibiotics given before skin incision and after cord clamping following delivery of baby. This was a prospective, hospital based study, in which hundred cases of cesarean deliveries who received antibiotics prophylaxis one hour before the skin incision were compared with another 100 cases where antibiotic was given after cord clamping following delivery of the baby. Surgical site infection occurred in 3% of women who received antibiotics prophylaxis before skin incision as compared to 6% in whom antibiotic was given after cord clamping. It was statistically not significant (p = 0.465).

  18. Automated Detection of Postoperative Surgical Site Infections Using Supervised Methods with Electronic Health Record Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Simon, Gyorgy J; Arsoniadis, Elliot G; Wang, Yan; Kwaan, Mary R; Melton, Genevieve B

    2015-01-01

    The National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (NSQIP) is widely recognized as "the best in the nation" surgical quality improvement resource in the United States. In particular, it rigorously defines postoperative morbidity outcomes, including surgical adverse events occurring within 30 days of surgery. Due to its manual yet expensive construction process, the NSQIP registry is of exceptionally high quality, but its high cost remains a significant bottleneck to NSQIP's wider dissemination. In this work, we propose an automated surgical adverse events detection tool, aimed at accelerating the process of extracting postoperative outcomes from medical charts. As a prototype system, we combined local EHR data with the NSQIP gold standard outcomes and developed machine learned models to retrospectively detect Surgical Site Infections (SSI), a particular family of adverse events that NSQIP extracts. The built models have high specificity (from 0.788 to 0.988) as well as very high negative predictive values (>0.98), reliably eliminating the vast majority of patients without SSI, thereby significantly reducing the NSQIP extractors' burden.

  19. The effect of Surgical Care Improvement Project measures on national trends on surgical site infections in open vascular procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Anahita; Desai, Sapan S; Seabrook, Gary R; Brown, Kellie R; Lewis, Brian D; Rossi, Peter J; Edmiston, Charles E; Lee, Cheong J

    2014-12-01

    The Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) is a national initiative to reduce surgical complications, including postoperative surgical site infection (SSI), through protocol-driven antibiotic usage. This study aimed to determine the effect SCIP guidelines have had on in-hospital SSIs after open vascular procedures. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) was retrospectively analyzed using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, diagnosis codes to capture SSIs in hospital patients who underwent elective carotid endarterectomy, elective open repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), and peripheral bypass. The pre-SCIP era was defined as 2000 to 2005 and post-SCIP was defined as 2007 to 2010. The year 2006 was excluded because this was the transition year in which the SCIP guidelines were implemented. Analysis of variance and χ(2) testing were used for statistical analysis. The rate of SSI in the pre-SCIP era was 2.2% compared with 2.3% for carotid endarterectomy (P = .06). For peripheral bypass, both in the pre- and post-SCIP era, infection rates were 0.1% (P = .22). For open, elective AAA, the rate of infection in the post-SCIP era increased significantly to 1.4% from 1.0% in the pre-SCIP era (P < .001). Demographics and in-hospital mortality did not differ significantly between the groups. Implementation of SCIP guidelines has made no significant effect on the incidence of in-hospital SSIs in open vascular operations; rather, an increase in SSI rates in open AAA repairs was observed. Patient-centered, bundled approaches to care, rather than current SCIP practices, may further decrease SSI rates in vascular patients undergoing open procedures. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Management of Spinal Implants in Acute Pediatric Surgical Site Infections: A Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotzbecker, Michael P; Gomez, Jaime A; Miller, Patricia E; Troy, Michael J; Skaggs, David L; Vitale, Michael G; Flynn, John M; Barrett, Kody K; Pace, Gregory I; Atuahene, Brittany N; Hedequist, Daniel J

    2016-07-01

    A retrospective review of patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion (PSF) and returned within 90 days with an acute infection. The study motive is to identify and understand the risk factors associated with failure of retaining spinal implants and failure to treat acute infection. The natural history of early surgical site infection (SSI) (less than 3 months) after PSF is not known and removing the implants early after PSF risks pseudarthrosis and deformity progression. Patients ranging from 1999 to 2011 with surgical site infections (SSIs) who required irrigation and debridement within 3 months of PSF were identified from 4 institutions. Univariable and multivariable regression analysis were used to identify risk factors associated with failure of acute infection treatment. Eighty-two patients (59 female, 23 male) with a mean age of 13.6 years were identified. Median follow-up after initial surgery was 33 months (range: 12-112 months). Sixty-two (76%) were treated successfully with acute treatment and did not return with recurrent infection (cleared infection, group C); 20 (24%) returned later with chronic infection (recurrent infection, group R). Multivariable analysis indicated that patients with stainless steel implants (OR = 6.4, 95% CI = 1.7-32.1; p = .009) and older subjects (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.0-1.6; p = .03) were more likely to present with recurrent infection. There was no difference between the groups with regard to the initial time of presentation post fusion, proportion of non-idiopathic diagnosis, rate of positive cultures, culture species, presence of fusion to pelvis, and time on antibiotic treatment. Seventy-six percent of patients presenting with an SSI less than 3 months after PSF did not require implant removal to clear their infection. Early postoperative SSIs can be treated with retention or implant exchange. Older patients and patients with stainless steel instrumentation are more likely to present with a late recurrent infection

  1. STUDY ON SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS CAUSED BY ESBL PRODUCING GRAM NEGATIVE BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambabu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections have been a major problem, because of the emergence of drug resistant bacteria, in particular B - lactamase producing bacteria. Extended spectrum beta lactamase producing gram negative organisms pose a great challenge in treatment o f SSI present study is aimed at determining multiple drug resistance in gram negative bacteria & to find out ESBL producers, in correlation with treatment outcome. A total of 120 wound infected cases were studied. Staphylococcus aureus was predominant bact erium - 20.Among gram negative bacteria, Pseudomonas species is predominant (14 followed by Escherichia coli (13 , Klebsiella species (12 , Proteus (9 Citrobacter (4 Providencia (2 & Acinetobacter species (2 . Out of 56 gramnegative bacteria isolated, 20 were i dentified as ESBL producers, which was statistically significant. Delay in wound healing correlated with infection by ESBL producers, which alarms the need of abstinence from antibiotic abuse

  2. Patient, Surgery, and Hospital Related Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections following Total Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Triantafyllopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections (SSI following total hip arthroplasty (THA have a significantly adverse impact on patient outcomes and pose a great challenge to the treating surgeon. Therefore, timely recognition of those patients at risk for this complication is very important, as it allows for adopting measures to reduce this risk. This review discusses literature reported risk factors for SSI after THA. These can be classified into patient-related factors (age, gender, obesity, comorbidities, history of infection, primary diagnosis, and socioeconomic profile, surgery-related factors (allogeneic blood transfusion, DVT prophylaxis and coagulopathy, duration of surgery, antibiotic prophylaxis, bearing surface and fixation, bilateral procedures, NNIS index score, and anesthesia type, and hospital-related factors (duration of hospitalization, institution and surgeon volume, and admission from a healthcare facility. All these factors are discussed with respect to potential measures that can be taken to reduce their effect and consequently the overall risk for infection.

  3. Post-caesarean section surgical site infections at a Tanzanian tertiary hospital: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nardo, P; Gentilotti, E; Nguhuni, B; Vairo, F; Chaula, Z; Nicastri, E; Nassoro, M M; Bevilacqua, N; Ismail, A; Savoldi, A; Zumla, A; Ippolito, G

    2016-08-01

    Few data are available on the determinants and characteristics of post-caesarean section (CS) surgical site infections (SSIs) in resource-limited settings. We conducted a prospective observational cohort study to evaluate the rates, determinants, and microbiological characteristics of post-CS SSI at the Dodoma Regional Referral Hospital (DRRH) Gynaecology and Obstetrics Department in Tanzania. Spanning a three-month period, all pregnant women who underwent CS were enrolled and followed up for 30 days. SSI following CS occurred in 224 (48%) women. Only 10 (2.1%) women received pre-incision antibiotic prophylaxis. Urgent intervention is needed to prevent and control infections and contain the rising rate of post-CS SSI at the DRRH. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Post liposuction Mycobacterium abscessus surgical site infection in a returned medical tourist complicated by a paradoxical reaction during treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siong H. Hui

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly growing mycobacterial skin and soft tissue infections are known to complicate cosmetic surgical procedures. Treatment consists of more surgery and prolonged antibiotic therapy guided by drug susceptibility testing. Paradoxical reactions occurring during antibiotic therapy can further complicate treatment of non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections. We report a case of post liposuction Mycobacterium abscessus surgical site infection in a returned medical tourist and occurrence of paradox during treatment.

  5. Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site Infection After High Energy Fracture Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a...completion of the OXYGEN study in a reasonable time. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Supplemental perioperative oxygen, surgical site infection, fracture fixation...Conclusion…………………………………………………………… 11 6. Publications, Abstracts, and Presentations……….….……………. 12 7. Inventions , Patents and Licenses…………………………………… 12

  6. Structure, Process, and Outcome Quality of Surgical Site Infection Surveillance in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Stefan P; Eisenring, Marie-Christine; Sax, Hugo; Troillet, Nicolas

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the structure and quality of surveillance activities and to validate outcome detection in the Swiss national surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance program. DESIGN Countrywide survey of SSI surveillance quality. SETTING 147 hospitals or hospital units with surgical activities in Switzerland. METHODS Site visits were conducted with on-site structured interviews and review of a random sample of 15 patient records per hospital: 10 from the entire data set and 5 from a subset of patients with originally reported infection. Process and structure were rated in 9 domains with a weighted overall validation score, and sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated for the identification of SSI. RESULTS Of 50 possible points, the median validation score was 35.5 (range, 16.25-48.5). Public hospitals (P<.001), hospitals in the Italian-speaking region of Switzerland (P=.021), and hospitals with longer participation in the surveillance (P=.018) had higher scores than others. Domains that contributed most to lower scores were quality of chart review and quality of data extraction. Of 49 infections, 15 (30.6%) had been overlooked in a random sample of 1,110 patient records, accounting for a sensitivity of 69.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 54.6%-81.7%), a specificity of 99.9% (95% CI, 99.5%-100%), a positive predictive value of 97.1% (95% CI, 85.1%-99.9%), and a negative predictive value of 98.6% (95% CI, 97.7%-99.2%). CONCLUSIONS Irrespective of a well-defined surveillance methodology, there is a wide variation of SSI surveillance quality. The quality of chart review and the accuracy of data collection are the main areas for improvement. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:1172-1181.

  7. Laminar airflow and the prevention of surgical site infection. More harm than good?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, S M; Hill, A D K; Humphreys, H

    2015-02-01

    Laminar airflow (LAF) systems are thought to minimise contamination of the surgical field with airborne microbes and thus to contribute to reducing surgical site infections (SSI). However recent publications have questioned whether LAF ventilation confers any significant benefit and may indeed be harmful. A detailed literature review was undertaken through www.Pubmed.com and Google scholar (http://scholar.google.com). Search terms used included "laminar flow". "laminar airflow", "surgical site infection prevention", "theatre ventilation" and "operating room ventilation", "orthopaedic theatre" and "ultra-clean ventilation". Peer-reviewed publications in the English language over the last 50 years were included, up to and including March 2014. Laminar airflow systems are predominantly used in clean prosthetic implant surgery. Several studies have demonstrated decreased air bacterial contamination with LAF using bacterial sedimentation plates placed in key areas of the operating room. However, apart from the initial Medical Research Council study, there are few clinical studies demonstrating a convincing correlation between decreased SSI rates and LAF. Moreover, recent analyses suggest increased post-operative SSI rates. It is premature to dispense with LAF as a measure to improve air quality in operating rooms where prosthetic joint surgery is being carried out. However, new multi-centre trials to assess this or the use of national prospective surveillance systems to explore other variables that might explain these findings such as poor operating room discipline are needed, to resolve this important surgical issue. Copyright © 2014 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of postoperative surgical site infection after preoperative marking done with non-sterile stationary grade markers versus sterile surgical markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mir, Z.A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the frequencies of post- operative surgical site infection after preoperative marking done with non-sterile stationary. grade markers versus sterile surgical markers in the same patient. Design: Randomized control trial. Place and Duration of Study: The department of Plastic surgery, Mayo hospital, Lahore from August 2013 to August 2014. Methods: This study was conducted after taking approval from the departmental ethical committee. Forty consecutive patients were included. A sterile surgical marker was used to mark one incision site while an alcohol based stationary grade marker was used to mark another incision site on the same patient. A standard preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative protocol was followed. Cultures were performed on swabs taken from the incision sites and surgical site infection was assessed for 30 days. Results: The study included 40 patients; 17 males and 23 females. The mean age of subjects was 25.32 ± 19.69 years with the minimum age being 2 years and the maximum being 63 years. No growth was seen in cultures taken from all the incision sites after skin preparation in the non sterile stationary grade marker group as well as the sterile surgical grade marker group. Also no surgical site infection appeared during the 30 day postoperative observation period in the non sterile stationary grade marker group as well as the sterile surgical grade marker group. (author)

  9. Hospital costs associated with surgical site infections in general and vascular surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Melissa M; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Julian, Kathleen G; Ortenzi, Gail; Dillon, Peter W

    2011-11-01

    Although much has been written about excess cost and duration of stay (DOS) associated with surgical site infections (SSIs) after cardiothoracic surgery, less has been reported after vascular and general surgery. We used data from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) to estimate the total cost and DOS associated with SSIs in patients undergoing general and vascular surgery. Using standard NSQIP practices, data were collected on patients undergoing general and vascular surgery at a single academic center between 2007 and 2009 and were merged with fully loaded operating costs obtained from the hospital accounting database. Logistic regression was used to determine which patient and preoperative variables influenced the occurrence of SSIs. After adjusting for patient characteristics, costs and DOS were fit to linear regression models to determine the effect of SSIs. Of the 2,250 general and vascular surgery patients sampled, SSIs were observed in 186 inpatients. Predisposing factors of SSIs were male sex, insulin-dependent diabetes, steroid use, wound classification, and operative time (P general and vascular surgical procedures share many risk factors with SSIs after cardiothoracic surgery. Although the excess costs and DOS associated with SSIs after general and vascular surgery are somewhat less, they still represent substantial financial and opportunity costs to hospitals and suggest, along with the implications for patient care, a continuing need for cost-effective quality improvement and programs of infection prevention. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bacteriuria is not associated with surgical site infection in patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Juan Carlos; Reyes, Patricia; Bermúdez, Diana; Alzate, Juan Pablo; Maldonado, Javier Darío; Cortés, Jorge Alberto

    2018-02-01

    Despite absence of evidence, in practice, asymptomatic bacteriuria is perceived as a risk factor for surgical site infection (SSI) among patients with cardiac surgery. We aimed to identify whether an association exists between the preoperative presence of asymptomatic bacteriuria or urinary tract infection and SSI in patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery. This is an analytical study with a retrospective cohort of patients undergoing coronary revascularization or valve replacement surgery. We identified cases of bacteriuria, urinary tract infection, and cardiovascular SSI and adjusted the results according to exposure to antibiotics and known risk factors for SSI using a multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 840 patients were included in the study, of whom 33 (3.9%) had asymptomatic bacteriuria and 13 (1.5%) had urinary tract infections. The incidence of SSI was 9.5% (80 patients), with 2.3% of cases having mediastinitis. In the multivariate analysis, asymptomatic bacteriuria (relative risk, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.26-2.56; P = .74) and urinary tract infection (relative risk, 2.54; 95% confidence interval, 0.60-10.69; P = .20) were not risk factors for SSI. Traditional risk factors were found to increase the risk of SSI. The presence of bacteriuria is not a risk factor for presenting SSI in cardiovascular surgery. Screening with urinalysis or urine culture would not be recommended for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bundle Prevention Form Filling Completeness of Surgical Site Infection (SSI on Sectio Caesarea Patients in 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adita Puspitasari Swastya Putri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hospital Acquired Infections (HAIs is an infection acquired during a patient undergoing treatment proedur and medical measures in health care facilities within ≥ 48 hours or within ≤ 30 days and infection was observed after the patients leaving the health care facility. The one of Hais what often happens is Surgical Site Infection (SSI so that SSI surveillance is needed for prevention and control of infection. Bundle prevention is an instrument used for data collection the incidence of SSI in Hospital X Surabaya. This study aims to look at the picture of existence, charging and completeness of bundle SSI prevention on patients sectio caesarea in Hospital X Surabaya. The study design used is cross sectional with a total sample of 47 patients were taken by simple random sampling on patients sectio caesarea in January-June 2016. The result showed that 64% of patient records status is not accompanied by SSI prevention bundle with charging and completeness of the data that is still below the predetermined standard that is equal to 80%. Although SSI surveillance is in conformity with the guidelines infection surveillance but there are still some shortcomings in terms of the accuracy of the data so that the information obtained is still not able to be reported as well. Keywords: surveillance, SSI, hospital

  12. Surgical site infection following hernia repair in the day care setting of a developing country: a retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardhan, A.; Mazahir, S.; Alvi, A.R.; Murtaza, G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence proportion of surgical site infection following hernia repair in a daycare setting at a tertiary care hospital of a low-income country. Methods: The retrospective audit was done at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from June 1, 2008 to May 30, 2009. Patients with age >15 years who underwent Lichenstein's open mesh repair in daycare were included. Surgical Site Infection was labelled if the records revealed any of the following: opening of the wound by the primary surgeon; pain, tenderness and raised temperature of skin; purulent discharge from the wound; if the surgeon had documented it as a surgical site infection. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis. Results: After reviewing the retrieved files, 104 patients were found eligible. Of them, 102 (98%) were males. Overall wound-related complications were found in 13 (12.5%), whereas surgical site infection was found in 8 (7.7%) patients. The mean age of those with infections was 38.7+-18 year, while that of those with no surgical site infection was 47.8+-18 years. Smoking was found significantly associated with surgical site infection with 5.8 times higher incidence as compared to the non-smokers (OR with 95% CI: 5.6 (1.2, 25.3)). Conclusions: The incidence of surgical site infection after hernia repair with mesh in a daycare setting at a tertiary care hospital of a low-income country was higher than internationally reported incidence. Smoking was found to be a significant risk factor. (author)

  13. Infirmity and injury complexity are risk factors for surgical-site infection after operative fracture care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachoura, Abdo; Guitton, Thierry G; Smith, R Malcolm; Vrahas, Mark S; Zurakowski, David; Ring, David

    2011-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgical-site infections prolong hospital stays, double rehospitalization rates, and increase healthcare costs. Additionally, patients with orthopaedic surgical-site infections (SSI) have substantially greater physical limitations and reductions in their health-related quality of life. However, the risk factors for SSI after operative fracture care are unclear. We determined the incidence and quantified modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors for SSIs in patients with orthopaedic trauma undergoing surgery. We retrospectively indentified, from our prospective trauma database and billing records, 1611 patients who underwent 1783 trauma-related procedures between 2006 and 2008. Medical records were reviewed and demographics, surgery-specific data, and whether the patients had an SSI were recorded. We determined which if any variables predicted SSI. Six factors independently predicted SSI: (1) the use of a drain, OR 2.3, 95% CI (1.3-3.8); (2) number of operations OR 3.4, 95% CI (2.0-6.0); (3) diabetes, OR 2.1, 95% CI (1.2-3.8); (4) congestive heart failure (CHF), OR 2.8, 95% CI (1.3-6.5); (5) site of injury tibial shaft/plateau, OR 2.3, 95% CI (1.3-4.2); and (6) site of injury, elbow, OR 2.2, 95% CI (1.1-4.7). The risk factors for SSIs after skeletal trauma are most strongly determined by nonmodifiable factors: patient infirmity (diabetes and heart failure) and injury complexity (site of injury, number of operations, use of a drain). Level II, prognostic study. See the Guideline for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  14. The Impact of Bile Duct Cultures on Surgical Site Infections in Pancreatic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Torsten; Belyaev, Orlin; Akkuzu, Rehsan; Hölling, Janine; Uhl, Waldemar; Chromik, Ansgar M

    2015-08-01

    In pancreatic surgery pre-operative biliary drainage (PBD) is associated with bacteribilia, which increases the risk for surgical site infections (SSIs). This study is a retrospective observational cohort design that compared micro-organisms of intra-operative bile duct cultures with micro-organisms of SSIs after pancreaticoduodenectomy. From January 2004 until December 2010, 887 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy or hepaticojejunostomy for benign and malignant peri-ampullary lesions. Surgical site infections occurred in 10% (87/887). Cultures of SSIs with corresponding intra-operative bile duct cultures were available for 59 patients. Sixty-four percent (38/59) had undergone PBD. Pre-operative biliary drainage was associated with positive intra-operative bile duct cultures in 95% (36/38), versus 48% (10/21; p≤0.001). The correlation of SSIs with intra-operative bile duct cultures was 59% (35/59). There was a significant association between the micro-organisms cultured from SSIs and the corresponding bile duct cultures for Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Enterobacteriaceae with extended spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL), and Candida spp. After pancreaticoduodenectomy, SSIs are often caused by the same micro-organisms that are present on intra-operative bile duct cultures, especially after PBD. Therefore, intra-operative bile duct cultures should be performed routinely to adjust the antibiotic prophylaxis according to the local hospital surveillance data.

  15. Surgical site infection after cesarean section: implementing 3 changes to improve the quality of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Suzanne; Jackson, Valerie; Coulter-Smith, Sam; Loughrey, John; McKenna, Peter; Cafferkey, Mary

    2013-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is an important complication of cesarean section (CS) delivery and a key quality indicator of patient care. A baseline assessment was undertaken to determine SSI rates, and subsequently a quality improvement program was introduced, followed by repeat surveillance. Data were collected during in-hospital stays and for up to 30 days after CS during both periods. Interventions in the quality improvement program included the use of nonabsorbable sutures for skin closure, use of clippers instead of razors, and use of 2% ChloraPrep for skin disinfection before incision. A total of 710 patients were surveyed before the interventions, and 824 patients were surveyed after the interventions. Of these, 114 (16%) had an SSI before the interventions, and 40 (4.9%) had an SSI after the interventions (P Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Postdischarge surveillance following cesarean section: the incidence of surgical site infection and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso Del Monte, Meire Celeste; Pinto Neto, Aarão Mendes

    2010-08-01

    The rate of surgical site infections (SSI) and their associated risk factors was identified by performing postdischarge surveillance following cesarean section at a public university teaching hospital in Brazil. The study was conducted at the Center for Women's Integrated Health Care in Brazil between May 2008 and March 2009. Women were contacted by telephone 15 and 30 days after cesarean section. During hospitalization, a form was completed on factors associated with post-cesarean SSI. The chi(2) test and Fisher exact test were used to analyze categorical variables and the Mann-Whitney test for numerical variables. Relative risks (RR) and their respective 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated for factors associated with SSI. P values cesarean section SSI. A 15-day postdischarge follow-up was shown to be sufficient. Hypertension was a factor associated with SSI. Copyright 2010 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgical Site Infection by Corynebacterium macginleyi in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

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    Bruno Cacopardo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium (C. macginleyi is a gram positive, lipophilic rod, usually considered a colonizer of skin and mucosal surfaces. Several reports have associated C. macginleyi with ocular infections, such as conjunctivitis and endophthalmitis. However, even if rare, extraocular infections from C. macginleyi may occur, especially among immunocompromised patients and patients with indwelling medical devices. We report herein the first case of surgical site infection by C. macginleyi after orthopaedic surgery for the correction of kyphoscoliosis in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1. Our patient developed a nodular granulomatous lesion of about two centimetres along the surgical scar, at the level of C4-C5, with purulent discharge and formation of a fistulous tract. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of a two-centimetre fluid pocket in the subcutaneous tissue. Several swabs were collected from the borders of the lesion as well as from the exudate, with isolation of C. macginleyi. The isolate was susceptible to beta-lactams, cotrimoxazole, linezolid, and glycopeptides but resistant to quinolones, third-generation cephalosporins, and erythromycin. Two 30-day courses of antibiotic therapy with amoxicillin/clavulanate (1 g three times/day and cotrimoxazole (800/160 mg twice a day were administered, obtaining a complete healing of the lesion.

  18. Surgical site infections in women and their association with clinical conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Zélia de Araújo Madeira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Surgical site infections (SSIs can affect body tissues, cavities, or organs manipulated in surgery and constitute 14% to 16% of all infections. This study aimed to determine the incidence of SSIs in women following their discharge from a gynecology outpatient clinic, to survey different types of SSIs among women, and to verify the association of SSIs with comorbidities and clinical conditions. Methods Data were collected via analytical observation with a cross-sectional design, and the study was conducted in 1,026 women who underwent gynecological surgery in a teaching hospital in the municipality of Teresina, in the northeast Brazilian State of Piauí, from June 2011 to March 2013. Results The incidence of SSIs after discharge was 5.8% among the women in the outpatient clinic. The most prevalent surgery among the patients was hysterectomy, while the most prevalent type of SSI was superficial incisional. Comorbidities in women with SSIs included cancer, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Conclusions Surveillance of SSIs during the post-discharge period is critical for infection prevention and control. It is worth reflecting on the planning of surgical procedures for patients who have risk factors for the development of SSIs.

  19. Patients' experiences of acquiring a deep surgical site infection: an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Annette Erichsen; Bergh, Ingrid; Karlsson, Jon; Nilsson, Kerstin

    2010-11-01

    The negative impact of surgical site infection (SSI) in terms of morbidity, mortality, additional costs, and length of stay (LOS) in the hospital is well described in the literature, as are risk factors and preventive measures. Given the lack of knowledge regarding patients' experiences of SSI, the aim of the present study was to describe patients' experiences of acquiring a deep SSI. Content analysis was used to analyze data obtained from 14 open interviews with participants diagnosed with a deep SSI. Patients acquiring a deep SSI suffer significantly from pain, isolation, and insecurity. The SSI changes physical, emotional, social, and economic aspects of life in extremely negative ways, and these changes are often persistent. Health care professionals should focus on strategies to enable early diagnosis and treatment of SSIs. The unacceptable suffering related to the infection, medical treatment, and an insufficient patient-professional relationship should be addressed when planning individual care, because every effort is needed to support this group of patients and minimize their distress. All possible measures should be taken to avoid bacterial contamination of the surgical wound during and after surgery to prevent the development of SSI. Copyright © 2010 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibiotic Prophylaxis and Resistance in Surgical Site Infection After Immediate Tissue Expander Reconstruction of the Breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Meghan C; Chu, Carrie K; Duggal, Claire S; Losken, Albert; Carlson, Grant W

    2016-11-01

    A recent survey of plastic surgeons showed that the majority prescribed prophylactic antibiotics after hospital discharge for breast reconstruction. There is no clinical evidence that this practice reduces surgical site infection (SSI) after immediate tissue expander breast reconstruction. Furthermore, multiple studies have suggested that current antibiotic choices may not be appropriately covering the causative organisms of SSI. An institutional breast reconstruction database from January 2005 to December 2011 was queried to identify patients undergoing immediate tissue expander reconstruction of the breast. The bacteriology of the infection, prophylactic and empiric antibiotic use, and antibiotic sensitivities were analyzed. In 557 cases of immediate tissue expander breast reconstruction performed in 378 patients, SSIs were diagnosed in 50 (9.0%) cases. Two hundred patients were given oral antibiotics at discharge; 178 did not receive antibiotics. Surgical site infection developed in 12.0% of patients given oral antibiotics and in 13.5% of those not receiving antibiotics (P = 0.67). Wound culture data were obtained in 34 SSIs. Twenty-nine had positive cultures. The most common offending organisms were methicillin-sensitive (11) and methicillin-resistant (6) Staphylococcus aureus. Despite increased use of postoperative prophylaxis over the years, SSI incidence remained unchanged. However, trends toward increased resistance of SSI organisms to the preoperative and postoperative prophylaxis agents were observed. When first-generation cephalosporins were used as prophylaxis, SSI organisms showed resistance rates of 20.5% (preoperative cefazolin) and 54.5% (postoperative cephalexin). Administration of extended prophylactic antibiotics does not reduce overall risk of SSI after expander-based breast reconstruction but may influence antibiotic resistance patterns when infections occur. The organisms most commonly responsible for SSI are often resistant to cefazolin.

  1. The vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C®) system for surgical site infection with involved vascular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saziye, Karaca; Afksendiyos, Kalangos

    2015-04-01

    In vascular surgery, surgical site infection is the most common postoperative morbidity, occurring in 5-10% of vascular patients. The optimal management of surgical site infection with involved lower limb vascular grafts remains controversial. We present our 6-year results of using the V.A.C.® system in surgical site infection with involved vascular grafts. A retrospective 6-year review of patient who underwent a VAC® therapy for postoperative surgical site infection in lower limb with involved vascular grafts in our department between January 2006 and December 2011. V.A.C therapy was used in 40 patients. All patients underwent surgical wound revision with VAC® therapy and antibiotics. The mean time of use of the V.A.C. system was 14.2 days. After mean of 12 days in 34 of 40 patients, in whom the use of VAC® therapy resulted in delayed primary closure or healing by secondary intention. The mean postoperative follow-up time was 61.67 months, during which 3 patients died. We showed that the V.A.C.® system is valuable for managing specifically surgical site infection with involved vascular grafts. Using the V.A.C.® system, reoperation rates are reduced; 85% of patients avoided graft replacement. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Glycemic control strategies and the occurrence of surgical site infection: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Caroline Maria Herrero; Iida, Luciana Inaba Senyer; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the evidence available in the scientific literature regarding the relationship between the glycemic control strategies used and the occurrence of surgical site infection in adult patients undergoing surgery. This is a systematic review performed through search on the databases of CINAHL, MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and EMBASE. Eight randomized controlled trials were selected. Despite the diversity of tested interventions, studies agree that glycemic control is essential to reduce rates of surgical site infection, and should be maintained between 80 and 120 mg/dL during the perioperative period. Compared to other strategies, insulin continuous infusion during surgery was the most tested and seems to get better results in reducing rates of surgical site infection and achieving success in glycemic control. Tight glycemic control during the perioperative period benefits the recovery of surgical patients, and the role of the nursing team is key for the successful implementation of the measure. Analisar as evidências disponíveis na literatura científica sobre a relação entre as estratégias de controle glicêmico efetuadas e a ocorrência de infecção do sítio cirúrgico em pacientes adultos submetidos à cirurgia. Trata-se de revisão sistemática, por meio das bases de dados CINAHL, MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews e EMBASE. Foram selecionados oito ensaios clínicos randomizados. Apesar da diversidade de intervenções testadas, os estudos concordam que o controle glicêmico é essencial para a redução das taxas de infecção do sítio cirúrgico e deve ser mantido entre 80 e 120 mg/dL durante o perioperatório. A infusão contínua de insulina no transoperatório foi a mais testada e parece obter melhores resultados na redução das taxas de infecção do sítio cirúrgico e sucesso no controle glicêmico comparada às demais estratégias. O controle glicêmico rigoroso durante o perioperat

  3. High prevalence of methicillin resistant staphylococci strains isolated from surgical site infections in Kinshasa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyamba, Jean-Marie Liesse; Wambale, José Mulwahali; Lukukula, Cyprien Mbundu; za Balega Takaisi-Kikuni, Ntondo

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) after surgery are usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). In low income countries, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CNS) surgical site infections are particularly associated with high treatment cost and remain a source of mortality and morbidity. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and the sensitivity to antibiotics of MRSA and MR-CNS isolated from SSIs. Wound swabs were collected from 130 hospitalized surgical patients in two major hospitals of Kinshasa. S. aureus and CNS strains were identified by standard microbiological methods and latex agglutination test (Pastorex Staph-Plus). The antibiotic susceptibility of all staphylococcal strains was carried out using disk-diffusion method. Eighty nine staphylococcal strains were isolated. Out of 74 S. aureus and 15 CNS isolated, 47 (63.5%) and 9 (60%) were identified as MRSA and MR-CNS respectively. Among the MRSA strains, 47 strains (100%) were sensitive to imipenem, 39 strains (89%) to amoxycillin-clavulanic acid and 38 strains (81%) to vancomycin. All MR-CNS were sensitive to imipenem, amoxycillin-clavulanic acid and vancomycin. The isolated MRSA and MR-CNS strains showed multidrug resistance. They were both resistant to ampicillin, cotrimoxazole, erythromycin, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime and ceftazidime. The results of the present study showed a high prevalence of MRSA and MR-CNS. Imipenem, amoxycillin-clavulanic acid and vancomycin were the most active antibiotics. This study suggests that antibiotic surveillance policy should become national priority as MRSA and MR-CNS were found to be multidrug resistant.

  4. Normothermia to prevent surgical site infections after gastrointestinal surgery: holy grail or false idol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, Simon J; Onicescu, Georgiana; Kuhn, Kathy M; Cole, David J; Esnaola, Nestor F

    2010-10-01

    To analyze the association between perioperative normothermia (temperature ≥36°C) and surgical site infections (SSIs) after gastrointestinal (GI) surgery. Although active warming during colorectal surgery reduces SSIs, there is limited evidence that perioperative normothermia is associated with lower rates of SSI. Nonetheless, hospitals participating in the Surgical Care Improvement Project must report normothermia rates during major surgery. We conducted a nested, matched, case-control study; cases consisted of GI surgery patients enrolled in our National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database between March 2006 and March 2009 who developed SSIs. Patient/surgery risk factors for SSI were obtained from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Perioperative temperature/antibiotic/glucose data were obtained from medical records. Cases/controls were compared using univariate/random effects/logistic regression models. Independent risk factors for SSIs were identified using multivariate/random effects/logistic regression models. A total of 146 cases and 323 matched controls were identified; 82% of patients underwent noncolorectal surgery. Cases were more likely to have final intraoperative normothermia compared with controls (87.6% vs. 77.8%, P = 0.015); rates of immediate postoperative normothermia were similar (70.6% vs. 65.3%, respectively, P = 0.19). Emergent surgery/higher wound class were associated with higher rates of intraoperative normothermia. Independent risk factors for SSI were diabetes, surgical complexity, small bowel surgery, and nonlaparoscopic surgery. There was no independent association between perioperative normothermia and SSI (adjusted odds ratio, 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 0.48-2.33; P = 0.90). Pay-for-reporting measures focusing on perioperative normothermia may be of limited value in preventing SSI after GI surgery. Studies to define the benefit of active warming after noncolorectal GI surgery are warranted.

  5. Association between Pre-Operative Cefazolin Dose and Surgical Site Infection in Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppard, William J; Eberle, David G; Kugler, Nathan W; Mabrey, Danielle M; Weigelt, John A

    A fixed dose of cefazolin results in serum concentrations that decrease as body mass increases. Current national guidelines suggest a pre-operative cefazolin dose of two grams may be insufficient for patients ≥120 kg; thus a three gram dose is recommended. These recommendations, however, are based on pharmacokinetic rather than outcome data. We evaluate the efficacy of pre-operative cefazolin two gram and three gram doses as measured by the rate of surgical site infection (SSI). We conducted a retrospective review of adult patients ≥100 kg who were prescribed cefazolin as surgical prophylaxis between September 1, 2012 and May 31, 2013 at an academic medical center. Patients were excluded if cefazolin was prescribed but not administered, had a known infection at the site of surgery, or inappropriately received cefazolin prophylaxis based on surgical indication. The SSIs were identified by documentation of SSI in the medical record or findings consistent with the standard Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition. Inpatient and outpatient records up to 90 days post-operative were reviewed for delayed SSI. Four hundred eighty-three surgical cases were identified in which pre-operative cefazolin was prescribed. Forty-seven patients were excluded leaving a total of 436 patients for final analysis: 152 in the cefazolin two gram group and 284 in the three gram group. Baseline demographics were similar between groups with a mean follow-up duration of 77 days for both groups. Unadjusted SSI rates were 7.2% and 7.4% (odds ratio [OR] 0.98, p = 0.95), for the two gram and three gram groups, respectively. When differences in follow-up between groups were considered and logistic regression was adjusted with propensity score, there remained no difference in SSI rates (OR 0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.36-2.06, p = 0.77). In otherwise similar obese surgical patients weighing ≥100 kg, the administration of a pre-operative cefazolin two gram dose is

  6. Surgical-site infections and postoperative complications: agreement between the Danish Gynecological Cancer Database and a randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Sofie L; Meyhoff, Christian Sylvest; Lundvall, Lene

    2011-01-01

    between November 2006 and October 2008 and data from the DGCD. METHODS: Outcomes within 30 days from the trial and the database were compared and levels of agreements were calculated with kappa-statistics. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was surgical-site infection. Other outcomes included re-operation...... registered in the PROXI trial, but not in the DGCD. Agreements between secondary outcomes were very varying (kappa-value 0.77 for re-operation, 0.37 for urinary tract infections, 0.19 for sepsis and 0.18 for pneumonia). CONCLUSIONS: The randomized trial reported significantly more surgical-site infections......OBJECTIVE: Surgical-site infections are serious complications and thorough follow-up is important for accurate surveillance. We aimed to compare the frequency of complications recorded in a clinical quality database with those noted in a randomized clinical trial with follow-up visits. DESIGN...

  7. Prolonged Operative Duration Increases Risk of Surgical Site Infections: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hang; Chen, Brian Po-Han; Soleas, Ireena M; Ferko, Nicole C; Cameron, Chris G; Hinoul, Piet

    The incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) across surgical procedures, specialties, and conditions is reported to vary from 0.1% to 50%. Operative duration is often cited as an independent and potentially modifiable risk factor for SSI. The objective of this systematic review was to provide an in-depth understanding of the relation between operating time and SSI. This review included 81 prospective and retrospective studies. Along with study design, likelihood of SSI, mean operative times, time thresholds, effect measures, confidence intervals, and p values were extracted. Three meta-analyses were conducted, whereby odds ratios were pooled by hourly operative time thresholds, increments of increasing operative time, and surgical specialty. Pooled analyses demonstrated that the association between extended operative time and SSI typically remained statistically significant, with close to twice the likelihood of SSI observed across various time thresholds. The likelihood of SSI increased with increasing time increments; for example, a 13%, 17%, and 37% increased likelihood for every 15 min, 30 min, and 60 min of surgery, respectively. On average, across various procedures, the mean operative time was approximately 30 min longer in patients with SSIs compared with those patients without. Prolonged operative time can increase the risk of SSI. Given the importance of SSIs on patient outcomes and health care economics, hospitals should focus efforts to reduce operative time.

  8. Patient engagement with surgical site infection prevention: an expert panel perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartari, E; Weterings, V; Gastmeier, P; Rodríguez Baño, J; Widmer, A; Kluytmans, J; Voss, A

    2017-01-01

    Despite remarkable developments in the use of surgical techniques, ergonomic advancements in the operating room, and implementation of bundles, surgical site infections (SSIs) remain a substantial burden, associated with increased morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. National and international recommendations to prevent SSIs have been published, including recent guidelines by the World Health Organization, but implementation into clinical practice remains an unresolved issue. SSI improvement programs require an integrative approach with measures taken during the pre-, intra- and postoperative care from the numerous stakeholders involved. The current SSI prevention strategies have focused mainly on the role of healthcare workers (HCWs) and procedure related risk factors. The importance and influence of patient participation is becoming an increasingly important concept and advocated as a means to improve patient safety. Novel interventions supporting an active participative role within SSI prevention programs have not been assessed. Empowering patients with information they require to engage in the process of SSI prevention could play a major role for the implementation of recommendations. Based on available scientific evidence, a panel of experts evaluated options for patient involvement in order to provide pragmatic recommendations for pre-, intra- and postoperative activities for the prevention of SSIs. Recommendations were based on existing guidelines and expert opinion. As a result, 9 recommendations for the surgical patient are presented here, including a practice brief in the form of a patient information leaflet. HCWs can use this information to educate patients and allow patient engagement.

  9. Patient engagement with surgical site infection prevention: an expert panel perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tartari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite remarkable developments in the use of surgical techniques, ergonomic advancements in the operating room, and implementation of bundles, surgical site infections (SSIs remain a substantial burden, associated with increased morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. National and international recommendations to prevent SSIs have been published, including recent guidelines by the World Health Organization, but implementation into clinical practice remains an unresolved issue. SSI improvement programs require an integrative approach with measures taken during the pre-, intra- and postoperative care from the numerous stakeholders involved. The current SSI prevention strategies have focused mainly on the role of healthcare workers (HCWs and procedure related risk factors. The importance and influence of patient participation is becoming an increasingly important concept and advocated as a means to improve patient safety. Novel interventions supporting an active participative role within SSI prevention programs have not been assessed. Empowering patients with information they require to engage in the process of SSI prevention could play a major role for the implementation of recommendations. Based on available scientific evidence, a panel of experts evaluated options for patient involvement in order to provide pragmatic recommendations for pre-, intra- and postoperative activities for the prevention of SSIs. Recommendations were based on existing guidelines and expert opinion. As a result, 9 recommendations for the surgical patient are presented here, including a practice brief in the form of a patient information leaflet. HCWs can use this information to educate patients and allow patient engagement.

  10. [Post-appendectomy surgical site infection: overall rate and type according to open/laparoscopic approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda-Narváez, José Manuel; Prieto-Puga Arjona, Tatiana; García-Albiach, Beatriz; Montiel-Casado, María Custodia; González-Sánchez, Antonio Jesús; Sánchez-Pérez, Belinda; Titos-García, Alberto; Santoyo-Santoyo, Julio

    2014-02-01

    To compare the incidence and profile of surgical site infection (SSI) after laparoscopic (LA) or open (OA) appendicectomy. Observational and analytical study was conducted on patients older than 14years-old with suspected acute appendicitis operated on within a 4-year period (2007-2010) at a third level hospital (n=868). They were divided in two groups according to the type of appendicectomy (LA, study group, 135; OA, control group, 733). The primary endpoint was a surgical site infection (SSI), and to determine the overall rate and types (incisional/organ-space). The risk of SSI was stratified by: i)National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) index (low risk: 0E, 0 and 1; high risk: 2 and 3); ii)status on presentation (low risk: normal or phlegmonous; high risk: gangrenous or perforated). The statistical analysis was performed using the software SPSS. The main result and stratified analysis was determined with χ(2), and the risk parameters using OR and Mantel-Haenszel OR with 95%CI, accepting statistical significance with P<.05. Age, gender, ASA index and incidence of advanced cases were similar in both groups. The overall SSI rate was 13.4% (more than a half of them detected during follow-up after discharge). Type of SSI: OA, 13% (superficial 9%, deep 2%, organ-space 2%); AL, 14% (superficial 5%, deep 1%, organ-space 8%) (overall: not significant; distribution: P<.000). Stratified analysis showed that there is an association between incisional SSI/OA and organ-space SSI/LA, and is particularly stronger in those patients with high risk of postoperative SSI (high risk NNIS or gangrenous-perforated presentation). OA and LA are associated with a higher rate of incisional and organ-space SSI respectively. This is particularly evident in patients with high risk of SSI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Preoperative skin preparation with 2% chlorhexidine as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection

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    Evelyn Solano Castro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of secondary research that refers to preoperative skin preparation with antiseptic chlorhexidine 2% are presented. Surgical Site Infections are one of the most common complications in surgical procedures are associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the user and are the third -associated infection more frequent in the health care . Steps of clinical practice based on evidence were applied, considering in the first instance a question in PICO format, then a search for information in databases recommended in the Course of Clinical Nursing Practice Evidence-Based, taught by the program for Collaborative Research in Evidence-Based Nursing of Costa Rica ( CIEBE -CR . The PubMed database and Cochrane LIBRARY was consulted, National Center for Biotechnology Information ( NCBI, Google Scholar, CINAHL (cummulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature. SCIELO (Scientific Electronic Library on line www.Scielo.org . 22 documents were recovered, but only three were selected because had methodological rigor. For the critical analysis Critical Reading Sheets 2.0 ( FLC software was used. Was concluded that 2% chlorhexidine, is the best choice for preoperative skin preparation antiseptic, however, it is necessary to conduct further studies in order to determine which is the correct way in strength, frequency, technical and adverse effects in the pediatric population.

  12. Morbidity associated with 30-day surgical site infection following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery

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    Sherrod, Brandon A.; Rocque, Brandon G.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Morbidity associated with surgical site infection (SSI) following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgical procedures is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to analyze acute morbidity and mortality associated with SSI after nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery using a nationwide cohort. Methods The authors reviewed data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pediatric (NSQIP-P) 2012–2014 database, including all neurosurgical procedures performed on pediatric patients. Procedures were categorized by Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes. CSF shunts were excluded. Deep and superficial SSIs occurring within 30 days of an index procedure were identified. Deep SSIs included deep wound infections, intracranial abscesses, meningitis, osteomyelitis, and ventriculitis. The following outcomes occurring within 30 days of an index procedure were analyzed, along with postoperative time to complication development: sepsis, wound disruption, length of postoperative stay, readmission, reoperation, and death. Results A total of 251 procedures associated with a 30-day SSI were identified (2.7% of 9296 procedures). Superficial SSIs were more common than deep SSIs (57.4% versus 42.6%). Deep SSIs occurred more frequently after epilepsy or intracranial tumor procedures. Superficial SSIs occurred more frequently after skin lesion, spine, Chiari decompression, craniofacial, and myelomeningocele closure procedures. The mean (± SD) postoperative length of stay for patients with any SSI was 9.6 ± 14.8 days (median 4 days). Post-SSI outcomes significantly associated with previous SSI included wound disruption (12.4%), sepsis (15.5%), readmission (36.7%), and reoperation (43.4%) (p neurosurgery. Rates of SSI-associated complications are significantly lower in patients with superficial infection than in those with deep infection. There were no cases of SSI-related mortality within 30 days of the index procedure. PMID:28186474

  13. Intracavity lavage and wound irrigation for prevention of surgical site infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Gill; Atkinson, Ross A; Smith, Tanya A; Rowlands, Ceri; Rithalia, Amber D; Crosbie, Emma J; Dumville, Jo C

    2017-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSIs) are wound infections that occur after an operative procedure. A preventable complication, they are costly and associated with poorer patient outcomes, increased mortality, morbidity and reoperation rates. Surgical wound irrigation is an intraoperative technique, which may reduce the rate of SSIs through removal of dead or damaged tissue, metabolic waste, and wound exudate. Irrigation can be undertaken prior to wound closure or postoperatively. Intracavity lavage is a similar technique used in operations that expose a bodily cavity; such as procedures on the abdominal cavity and during joint replacement surgery. Objectives To assess the effects of wound irrigation and intracavity lavage on the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI). Search methods In February 2017 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid Embase and EBSCO CINAHL Plus. We also searched three clinical trials registries and references of included studies and relevant systematic reviews. There were no restrictions on language, date of publication or study setting. Selection criteria We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of participants undergoing surgical procedures in which the use of a particular type of intraoperative washout (irrigation or lavage) was the only systematic difference between groups, and in which wounds underwent primary closure. The primary outcomes were SSI and wound dehiscence. Secondary outcomes were mortality, use of systemic antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, adverse events, re-intervention, length of hospital stay, and readmissions. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion at each stage. Two review authors also undertook data extraction, assessment of risk of bias and GRADE assessment. We calculated risk ratios or differences in means with 95% confidence intervals where

  14. A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED STUDY OF RISK FACTORS AND ROLE OF PROPHYLACTIC ANTIBIOTICS IN PREVENTION OF SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS

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    Avijeet Mukherjee, Naveen N

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Surgical site infection (SSI is the most common nosocomial infection encountered in post operative surgical wards. The use of prophylactic antibiotic in clean elective surgical cases is still a subject of controversy to surgeons. The objective of the study is to identify the need for using prophylactic antibiotics in clean surgeries, prevalence of organisms in patients who are not given prophylactic antibiotics and to study whether the presence of risk factors increase the incidence of surgical site infection. Methodology: The comparative study consists of 100 cases admitted under two groups of 50 each: Group A was given prophylactic antibiotic and Group B didn’t receive any. All surgeries other than clean surgical cases were excluded from the study. Results: Out of 50 patients in group B who were not given prophylactic antibiotic, 2 patients had more than one risk factor for development of SSI and both of them developed SSI. Of the 50 patients who received prophylactic antibiotic, none developed SSI. The rate of infection in group A was nil and in Group B was 4%. Conclusion: Prophylactic antibiotics are not recommended for clean elective surgical cases as there is no statistically significant change in the infection rate seen in patients not receiving prophylactic antibiotic(P=0.4952. Meticulous surgical technique and correcting risk factors prior to surgery is a must for reducing incidence of SSI.

  15. Surgical site infection and pattern of antibiotic use in a tertiary care hospital in Peshawar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, W.A.; Khan, M.; Jehanzeb, M.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is most common complication following surgical procedures. The objective of the study was to collect information on SSI regarding the most frequent pathogen in cases operated in casualty of Lady Read ing Hospital (LRH) Peshawar, and sensitivity of the isolated pathogens to different antibiotics used. Methods: The study was carried out at surgical 'B' unit (SBU) LRH from Jan 1, 2009 till Dec 31, 2009. A total of 100 patients who developed SSI after being operated for peritonitis following traumatic gut perforations, perforated appendix and enteric perforation. The patients included presented to casualty, operated in casualty OT and were shifted to the SBU, LRH. Children and patients operated on the elective list were excluded. Data was collected on specially designed proforma. Demographic details, details of SSI, culture/sensitivity reports and antibiotic used for prophylaxis and after C/S report were recorded. Results: Out of a total of 100, 72 had superficial, 20 had organ/space and 8 had deep SSI. Organisms were isolated in 77 cases (77%). E. coli being most common pathogen (46%), followed by Pseudomonas (23%), mixed growth of Staph. Aureus or MRSA (13%), MRSA (5%) and Staph aureus (4%) in descending order. No growth was reported in 23% of cases. Conclusion: E.coli was the most common organism involved in SSI in SBU LRH. The incidence of infection with MRSA in our unit is high. Combination of antibiotics like pipreacillin/Tazobactam, Cefoperazone/Sulbactam, were most effective against the isolated organisms, except MRSA where Linezolid, vancomycin and Tiecoplanin were effective. (author)

  16. Risk Factors and Predictive Model Development of Thirty-Day Post-Operative Surgical Site Infection in the Veterans Administration Surgical Population.

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    Li, Xinli; Nylander, William; Smith, Tracy; Han, Soonhee; Gunnar, William

    2018-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) complicates approximately 2% of surgeries in the Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals. Surgical site infections are responsible for increased morbidity, length of hospital stay, cost, and mortality. Surgical site infection can be minimized by modifying risk factors. In this study, we identified risk factors and developed accurate predictive surgical specialty-specific SSI risk prediction models for the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) surgery population. In a retrospective observation study, surgical patients who underwent surgery from October 2013 to September 2016 from 136 VA hospitals were included. The Veteran Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP) database was used for the pre-operative demographic and clinical characteristics, intra-operative characteristics, and 30-day post-operative outcomes. The study population represents 11 surgical specialties: neurosurgery, urology, podiatry, otolaryngology, general, orthopedic, plastic, thoracic, vascular, cardiac coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), and cardiac valve/other surgery. Multivariable logistic regression models were developed for the 30-day post-operative SSIs. Among 354,528 surgical procedures, 6,538 (1.8%) had SSIs within 30 days. Surgical site infection rates varied among surgical specialty (0.7%-3.0%). Surgical site infection rates were higher in emergency procedures, procedures with long operative duration, greater complexity, and higher relative value units. Other factors associated with increased SSI risk were high level of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification (level 4 and 5), dyspnea, open wound/infection, wound classification, ascites, bleeding disorder, chemotherapy, smoking, history of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), radiotherapy, steroid use for chronic conditions, and weight loss. Each surgical specialty had a distinct combination of risk factors. Accurate SSI risk-predictive surgery specialty

  17. Medicaid status is associated with higher surgical site infection rates after spine surgery.

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    Manoso, Mark W; Cizik, Amy M; Bransford, Richard J; Bellabarba, Carlo; Chapman, Jens; Lee, Michael J

    2014-09-15

    The Spine End Results Registry (2003-2004) is a registry of prospectively collected data of all patients undergoing spinal surgery at the University of Washington Medical Center and Harborview Medical Center. Insurance data were prospectively collected and used in multivariate analysis to determine risk of perioperative complications. Given the negative financial impact of surgical site infections (SSIs) and the higher overall complication rates of patients with a Medicaid payer status, we hypothesized that a Medicaid payer status would have a significantly higher SSI rate. The medical literature demonstrates lesser outcomes and increased complication rates in patients who have public insurance than those who have private insurance. No one has shown that patients with a Medicaid payer status compared with Medicare and privately insured patients have a significantly increased SSI rate for spine surgery. The prospectively collected Spine End Results Registry provided data for analysis. SSI was defined as treatment requiring operative debridement. Demographic, social, medical, and the surgical severity index risk factors were assessed against the exposure of payer status for the surgical procedure. The population included Medicare (N = 354), Medicaid (N = 334), the Veterans' Administration (N = 39), private insurers (N = 603), and self-pay (N = 42). Those patients whose insurer was Medicaid had a 2.06 odds (95% confidence interval: 1.19-3.58, P = 0.01) of having a SSI compared with the privately insured. The study highlights the increased cost of spine surgical procedures for patients with a Medicaid payer status with the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 provisions could cause a reduction in reimbursement to the hospital for taking care of patients with Medicaid insurance due to their higher complication rates and higher costs. This very issue could inadvertently lead to access

  18. The impact of recent hospitalization on surgical site infection after a pancreatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Dominic E; Strasberg, Steven M; Hawkins, William G; Fields, Ryan C

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSI) are a major cause of increased morbidity and cost after a pancreatectomy. Patients undergoing a pancreatectomy frequently have had recent inpatient hospital admissions prior to their surgical admission (recent pre-surgical admission, RPSA), which could increase the risk of SSI. Methods The 2009–2011 Healthcare Cost Utilization Project California State Inpatient Database was used. Chi-square tests, Student's t-tests and multivariable logistic regression were used. Results Three thousand three hundred and seventy-six patients underwent a pancreatectomy, and 444 (13.2%) had RPSA. One hundred and eighty (40.5%) RPSAs were to different hospitals other than where patients' pancreatectomy took place. In univariate analysis, patients with RPSA had a significantly higher rate of post-operative SSIs, and this was associated with a longer length of post-operative stay, higher post-operative hospital costs and increased postoperative 30-day readmission rates (Table 1). In Multivariate analysis, RPSA was an independent predictor of post-operative SSI [odds ratio (OR) = 1.68, P = 0.013], and the risk of SSI increased with increasing RPSA length of stay (OR = 1.07 per day, P = 0.001). Conclusions Recent pre-surgical admission is an important risk factor for SSI after a pancreatectomy. Many patients with RPSA are not admitted pre-operatively to the same hospital where the pancreatectomy occurs; in such circumstances, SSI rates may not be a sole reflection of the care provided by operating hospitals. PMID:26221859

  19. Surveillance of surgical site infection after cholecystectomy using the hospital in Europe link for infection control through surveillance protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanic, Branko; Bosnjak, Zrinka; Budimir, Ana; Augustin, Goran; Milosevic, Milan; Plecko, Vanda; Kalenic, Smilja; Fiolic, Zlatko; Vanek, Maja

    2013-06-01

    The third most common healthcare-associated infection is surgical site infection (SSI), accounting for 14%-16% of infections. These SSIs are associated with high morbidity, numerous deaths, and greater cost. A prospective study was conducted to assess the incidence of SSI in a single university hospital in Croatia. We used the Hospital in Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance (HELICS) protocol for surveillance. The SSIs were classified using the standard definition of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) system. The overall incidence of SSI was 1.44%. The incidence of infection in the open cholecystectomy group was 6.06%, whereas in the laparoscopic group, it was only 0.60%. The incidence density of in-hospital SSIs per 1,000 post-operative days was 5.76. Patients who underwent a laparoscopic cholecystectomy were significantly younger (53.65±14.65 vs. 64.42±14.17 years; pconcept for the monitoring of SSI, but in the case of cholecystectomy, additional factors such as antibiotic appropriateness, gallbladder entry, empyema of the gallbladder, and obstructive jaundice must be considered.

  20. Overview: the health care burden and financial costs of surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C Lowry

    2011-12-01

    Although the rate of surgical site infections (SSIs) in total hip and knee arthroplasties is low relative to total number of procedures performed, SSIs can debilitate patients, prolong hospital stays, and dramatically increase health care costs. Constant adherence to anti-SSI measures (preoperative, perioperative, postoperative) benefits everyone. Carefully analyzing the major cause of SSIs, conducting risk assessments around each modifiable factor, and implementing robust SSI prevention programs are crucial. The US government recently funded an SSI prevention educational initiative for health care facilities and workers. Project JOINTS (Joining Organization IN Tackling SSIs), a program of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, was developed to disseminate new information and provide training in SSI prevention. Use of risk assessment and prevention measures, including those recommended by Project JOINTS, should help reduce the incidence of SSIs in total hip and knee arthroplasties.

  1. Is chlorhexidine-gluconate superior than Povidone-Iodine in preventing surgical site infections? A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Safia; Shah, Syed Aslam; Qureshi, Shamim; Siddiqui, Taranum Ruba; Soomro, Iftikhar Ahmed; Ahmed, Waquaruddin; Alam, Syed Ejaz

    2015-11-01

    To compare the efficacy of povidone-iodine and chlorhexidine gluconate scrubs in preventing surgical site infections. The randomised controlled clinical trial was conducted from May 2012 to April 2013 in two public-sector hospitals of Pakistan; one each in Karachi and Islamabad. Patients undergoing clean or clean contaminated surgeries were included and were randomly assigned to one of the two groups: group I comprised patients whose skin was preoperatively disinfected using 10% povidone-iodine, and in group II by 2% chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% alcohol. A predesigned proforma was filled for all patients to record demographic data, diagnosis, surgical procedure and antibiotic used. Patients in both groups were followed up for one month postoperatively to monitor any signs of surgical site infections. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 388 patients from the two hospitals, 220(57%) were in group I and 168(43%) were in group II. Surgical site infection was observed in 22(10%) cases in group I and 12(7.1%) in group II (p=0.324). Pseudomonas aeruginosa (23.5%) was the predominant pathogen associated with surgical site infections followed by Staphylococcus aureus (17.6%). Chlorhexidine gluconate was associated with lower infection rates compared to povidone-iodine; but it was not statistically significant.

  2. Impact of sarcopenia on surgical site infection after restorative proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Araki, Toshimitsu; Okita, Yoshiki; Kondo, Satoru; Kawamura, Mikio; Hiro, Junichiro; Toiyama, Yuji; Kobayashi, Minako; Tanaka, Koji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Uchida, Keiichi; Kusunoki, Masato

    2017-01-01

    The coexistence of sarcopenia is associated with postoperative complications, including infection after abdominal surgery. We evaluated the association between sarcopenia and surgical site infection (SSI) after surgery for ulcerative colitis. The subjects of this retrospective study were 69 patients who underwent restorative proctocolectomy with perioperative abdominal computed tomography (CT). Sarcopenia was diagnosed by measuring the cross-sectional area of the right and left psoas muscles as the total psoas muscle area on CT images. We assessed whether sarcopenia was associated with SSI and clinical factors, including nutritional and inflammatory markers. The lowest quartiles defined as sarcopenia in men and women were 567.4 and 355.8 mm 2 /m 2 , respectively. According to this classification, 12 men and 6 women had sarcopenia. Patients with sarcopenia had a lower body mass index (p = 0.0004) and a higher C-reactive protein concentration (p = 0.05) than those without sarcopenia. SSIs were identified in 12 patients (17.3 %) and included six pelvic abscesses and seven wound infections. According to multivariate analysis, sarcopenia was an independent risk factor for SSI (odds ratio = 4.91, 95 % confidence interval 1.09-23.5, p = 0.03). Sarcopenia is predictive of SSI after pouch surgery for ulcerative colitis.

  3. Risk factors for cesarean surgical site infections at a Thai-Myanmar border hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assawapalanggool, Srisuda; Kasatpibal, Nongyao; Sirichotiyakul, Supatra; Arora, Rajin; Suntornlimsiri, Watcharin

    2016-09-01

    Cesarean surgical site infections (SSIs) are a major challenge in Thai-Myanmar border hospital settings. This study aimed to examine risk factors for SSIs after cesarean section. This was a prospective cohort study conducted in a Thai-Myanmar border hospital between January 2007 and December 2012. Data were collected from the medical record database by trained infection control nurses. Stepwise multivariable logistic regression was used for risk factor analysis and expressed as a risk ratio (RR). The cesarean SSI rate was 5.9% (293 SSIs in 4,988 cases). Of these, 17.1% were incisional SSIs (10.9% superficial and 6.2% deep incisional SSIs), and 82.9% were organ or space SSIs. Risk factors for cesarean organ-space SSIs included a wound class ≥3 (RR, 4.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.41-6.83), ethnic minority (RR, 2.51; 95% CI, 1.61-3.92), hemoglobin Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Surgical site infection in orthopedic implants and its common bacteria with their sensitivities to antibiotics, in open reduction internal fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.Q.; Zardad, M.S.; Khan, A.; Ahmed, S.; Awan, A. S.; Mohammad, T.

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infection in orthopaedic implants is a major problem, causing long hospital stay, cost to the patient and is a burden on health care facilities. It increases rate of non-union, osteomyelitis, implant failure, sepsis, multiorgan dysfunction and even death. Surgical site infection is defined as pain, erythema, swelling and discharge from wound site. Surgical site infection in orthopaedic implants is more challenging to the treating orthopaedic surgeon as the causative organism is protected by a biofilm over the implant's surface. Antibiotics cannot cross this film to reach the bacteria's, causing infection. Method: This descriptive case series study includes 132 patients of both genders with ages between 13 years to 60 years conducted at Orthopaedic Unit, Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad from 1st October 2015 to 31st March 2016. Patients with close fractures of long bones were included in the study to determine the frequency of surgical site infection in orthopaedic implants and the type of bacteria involved and their sensitivity to various antibiotics. All implants were of stainless steel. The implants used were Dynamic hip screws, Dynamic compression screws, plates, k-wires, Interlocking nails, SIGN nails, Austin Moore prosthesis and tension band wires. Pre-op and post-op antibiotics used were combination of Sulbactum and Cefoperazone which was given 1 hour before surgery and continued for 72 hours after surgery. Patients were followed up to 4 weeks. Pus was taken on culture stick, from those who developed infection. Results were entered in the pro forma. Results: A total of 132 patients of long bone fractures, who were treated with open reduction and internal fixation, were studied. Only 7 patients developed infection. Staphylococcus Aureus was isolated from all 7 patients. Staphylococcus aureus was sensitive to Linezolid, Fusidic Acid, and vancomycin. Cotrimoxazole, tetracycline, Gentamycin and Clindamycin were partially effective

  5. Pre-operative urinary tract infection: is it a risk factor for early surgical site infection with hip fracture surgery? A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassa, Rafik Rd; Khalfaoui, Mahdi Y; Veravalli, Karunakar; Evans, D Alun

    2017-03-01

    The aims of the current study were to determine whether pre-operative urinary tract infections in patients presenting acutely with neck of femur fractures resulted in a delay to surgery and whether such patients were at increased risk of developing post-operative surgical site infections. A retrospective review of all patients presenting with a neck of femur fracture, at a single centre over a one-year period. The hospital hip fracture database was used as the main source of data. UK University Teaching Hospital. All patients ( n  = 460) presenting across a single year study period with a confirmed hip fracture. The presence of pre-operative urinary tract infection, the timing of surgical intervention, the occurrence of post-operative surgical site infection and the pathogens identified. A total of 367 patients were operated upon within 24 hours of admission. Urinary infections were the least common cause of delay. A total of 99 patients (21.5%) had pre-operative urinary tract infection. Post-operatively, a total of 57 (12.4%) patients developed a surgical site infection. Among the latter, 31 (54.4%) did not have a pre-operative urinary infection, 23 (40.4%) patients had a pre-operative urinary tract infection, 2 had chronic leg ulcers and one patient had a pre-operative chest infection. Statistically, there was a strong relationship between pre-operative urinary tract infection and the development of post-operative surgical site infection ( p -value: 0.0005). The results of our study indicate that pre-operative urinary tract infection has a high prevalence amongst those presenting with neck of femur fractures, and this is a risk factor for the later development of post-operative surgical site infection.

  6. Surgical site infection in lumbar surgeries, pre and postoperative antibiotics and length of stay: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.U.; Janjua, M.B.; Hasan, S.; Shah, S.

    2009-01-01

    Postoperative wound infection also called as surgical site infection (SSI), is a trouble some complication of lumbar spine surgeries and they can be associated with serious morbidities, mortalities and increase resource utilization. With the improvement in diagnostic modalities, proper surgical techniques, antibiotic therapy and postoperative care, infectious complications can result in various compromises afterwards. The objective was to study the relation of surgical site infection in clean lumbar surgeries with the doses of antibiotics. This Retrospective study was conducted at Shifa International Hospital, from January 2006 to March 2008. Methods: Hundred post operated cases of lumber disc prolapse, lumbar stenosis or both studied retrospectively by tracing their operated data from hospital record section for the development of surgical site infection (SSI). The patients were divided into three groups depending upon whether they received single, three or more than three doses of antibiotics respectively. Complete data analyses and cross tabulation done with SPSS version 16. Result: Of 100 cases, only 6% had superficial surgical site infection; only 1 case with co morbidity of hypertension was detected. Twenty-one cases had single dose of antibiotic (Group-I), 59 cases had 3 doses (Group-II) and 20 cases received multiple doses (Group-III). There was no infection in Group-I. Only one patient in Group-II and 5 patients in Group-III developed superficial SSI. While 4 in Group-II, 3 in Group-III, and none of Group-I had >6 days length of stay (LOS). Conclusion The dose of antibiotic directly correlates with the surgical site infection in clean lumbar surgeries. When compared with multiple doses of antibiotics a single preoperative shot of antibiotic is equally effective for patients with SSI. (author)

  7. Abdominal surgical site infections: incidence and risk factors at an Iranian teaching hospital

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    Sabouri Kashani Ahmad

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal surgical site infections are among the most common complications of inpatient admissions and have serious consequences for outcomes and costs. Different risk factors may be involved, including age, sex, nutrition and immunity, prophylactic antibiotics, operation type and duration, type of shaving, and secondary infections. This study aimed to determine the risk factors affecting abdominal surgical site infections and their incidence at Imam Khomeini, a major referral teaching hospital in Iran. Methods Patients (n = 802 who had undergone abdominal surgery were studied and the relationships among variables were analyzed by Student's t and Chi-square tests. The subjects were followed for 30 days and by a 20-item questionnaire. Data were collected through pre- and post-operative examinations and telephone follow-ups. Results Of the 802 patients, 139 suffered from SSI (17.4%. In 40.8% of the cases, the wound was dirty infected. The average age for the patients was 46.7 years. The operations were elective in 75.7% of the cases and 24.7% were urgent. The average duration of the operation was 2.24 hours, the average duration of pre-operative hospital stay 4.31 days and the average length of (pre- and post-operation hospital stay 11.2 days. Three quarters of the cases were shaved 12 hours before the operation. The increased operation time, increased bed stay, electivity of the operation, septicity of the wound, type of incision, the administration of prophylactic antibiotic, type of operation, background disease, and the increased time lapse between shaving and operation all significantly associated with SSI with a p-value less than 0.001. Conclusion In view of the high rate of SSI reported here (17.4% compared with the 14% quoted in literature, this study suggests that by reducing the average operation time to less than 2 hours, the average preoperative stay to 4 days and the overall stay to less than 11 days, and

  8. Crohn's disease but not diverticulitis is an independent risk factor for surgical site infections in colectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideroff, Matthew; Xing, Yunfan; Liao, Junlin; Byrn, John C

    2014-10-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) after colectomy for colon cancer (CC), Crohn's disease (CD), and diverticulitis (DD) significantly impact both the immediate postoperative course and long-term disease-specific outcomes. We aim to profile the effect of diagnosis on SSI after segmental colectomy using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) data set. NSQIP data from 2006 to 2011 were investigated, and segmental colectomy procedures performed for the diagnoses of Crohn's disease, DD, and colon malignancy were included. SSI complications were compared by diagnosis using univariate and multivariate analysis. We included 35,557 colectomy cases in the analysis. CD had the highest rate of postoperative SSI (17 vs. 13% DD vs. 10% CC; p risk for acquiring at least one SSI (odds ratio (OR) = 1.38, p ≤ 0.001), deep incisional SSI (OR = 1.85, p = 0.03), and organ space SSI (OR = 1.51, p = 0.02). For patients undergoing segmental colectomy in the NSQIP data set, statistically significant increases in SSI are seen in CD, but not DD, when compared to CC, thus confirming CD as an independent risk factor for SSI.

  9. Triclosan-coated sutures for the prevention of surgical-site infections: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantelias, Athanasios A; Andriakopoulou, Chrysi Stefania I; Mourgela, Sofia

    2017-06-01

    The scope of this article is to perform a meta-analysis of the studies that compare the use of triclosan-coated sutures (TCS) to uncoated sutures in prevention of surgical-site infections (SSIs). A systematic search of randomized and non-randomized studies was carried out on Pubmed and Scopus databases until July 2016. The meta-analysis of 30 studies (19 randomized, 11 non-randomized; 15,385 procedures) gave evidence that TCS were associated with a lower risk of SSIs (risk ratio [RR] = 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.57-0.81). Triclosan-coated sutures were associated with lower risk for SSIs in high-quality randomized studies (Jadad score 4 or 5). A lower risk for the development of SSIs based on wound classification was observed in clean, clean-contaminated, and contaminated but not for dirty procedures. No benefit was observed in specific types of surgery: colorectal, cardiac, lower limb vascular or breast surgery. Only a trend was found for lower risk for wound dehiscence, whereas no difference was observed for all-cause mortality. Further randomized studies are needed to confirm the role of TCS in specific surgical procedures and whether or not they are related with lower risk for mortality.

  10. Functional outcomes following surgical-site infections after operative fixation of closed ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Markus G; Sigurdsen, Ulf; Utvåg, Stein Erik; Stavem, Knut

    2017-12-01

    To compare the functional outcomes between patients with and without postoperative surgical-site infection (SSI) after surgical treatment in closed ankle fractures. Retrospective cohort study with prospective follow-up. Of 1011 treated patients, 959 were eligible for inclusion in a postal survey. Functional outcomes were assessed using three self-reported questionnaires. In total 567 patients responded a median of 4.3 years (range 3.1-6.2 years) after surgery. In total 29/567 had an SSI. The mean Olerud and Molander Ankle Score was 19.8 points lower for patients with a deep SSI (p=0.02), the Lower Extremity Functional Scale score was 10.2 points lower (p<0.01) and the Self-Reported Foot & Ankle Questionnaire score was 5.0 points higher (p=0.10) than for those without an SSI, after adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, diabetes, physical status, fracture classification and duration of surgery. Patients with a deep SSI had worse long-term functional outcomes than those without an SSI. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Peri-operative glycaemic control regimens for preventing surgical site infections in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Lillian S; Meeks, Derek; Moyer, Virginia A; Lally, Kevin P

    2009-07-08

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and resource utilization and are potentially preventable. Peri-operative hyperglycaemia has been associated with increased SSIs and previous recommendations have been to treat glucose levels above 200 mg/dL. However, recent studies have questioned the optimal glycaemic control regimen to prevent SSIs. Whether the benefits of strict or intensive glycaemic control with insulin infusion as compared to conventional management outweigh the risks remains controversial. To summarise the evidence for the impact of glycaemic control in the peri-operative period on the incidence of surgical site infections, hypoglycaemia, level of glycaemic control, all-cause and infection-related mortality, and hospital length of stay and to investigate for differences of effect between different levels of glycaemic control. A search strategy was developed to search the following databases: Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 25 March 2009), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1; Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to March Week 2 2009); Ovid EMBASE (1980 to 2009 Week 12) and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to March Week 3 2009). The search was not limited by language or publication status. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were eligible for inclusion if they evaluated two (or more) glycaemic control regimens in the peri-operative period (within one week pre-, intra-, and/or post-operative) and reported surgical site infections as an outcome. The standard method for conducting a systematic review in accordance with the Cochrane Wounds Group was used. Two review authors independently reviewed the results from the database searches and identified relevant studies. Two review authors extracted study data and outcomes from each study and reviewed each study for methodological quality. Any disagreement was resolved by discussion or by referral to a third review author. Five

  12. Surgical site infections following colorectal cancer surgery: a randomized prospective trial comparing common and advanced antimicrobial dressing containing ionic silver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biffi Roberto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An antimicrobial dressing containing ionic silver was found effective in reducing surgical-site infection in a preliminary study of colorectal cancer elective surgery. We decided to test this finding in a randomized, double-blind trial. Methods Adults undergoing elective colorectal cancer surgery at two university-affiliated hospitals were randomly assigned to have the surgical incision dressed with Aquacel® Ag Hydrofiber dressing or a common dressing. To blind the patient and the nursing and medical staff to the nature of the dressing used, scrub nurses covered Aquacel® Ag Hydrofiber with a common wound dressing in the experimental arm, whereas a double common dressing was applied to patients of control group. The primary end-point of the study was the occurrence of any surgical-site infection within 30 days of surgery. Results A total of 112 patients (58 in the experimental arm and 54 in the control group qualified for primary end-point analysis. The characteristics of the patient population and their surgical procedures were similar. The overall rate of surgical-site infection was lower in the experimental group (11.1% center 1, 17.5% center 2; overall 15.5% than in controls (14.3% center 1, 24.2% center 2, overall 20.4%, but the observed difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.451, even with respect to surgical-site infection grade 1 (superficial versus grades 2 and 3, or grade 1 and 2 versus grade 3. Conclusions This randomized trial did not confirm a statistically significant superiority of Aquacel® Ag Hydrofiber dressing in reducing surgical-site infection after elective colorectal cancer surgery. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00981110

  13. Surgical site infections following colorectal cancer surgery: a randomized prospective trial comparing common and advanced antimicrobial dressing containing ionic silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Roberto; Fattori, Luca; Bertani, Emilio; Radice, Davide; Rotmensz, Nicole; Misitano, Pasquale; Cenciarelli, Sabine; Chiappa, Antonio; Tadini, Liliana; Mancini, Marina; Pesenti, Giovanni; Andreoni, Bruno; Nespoli, Angelo

    2012-05-23

    An antimicrobial dressing containing ionic silver was found effective in reducing surgical-site infection in a preliminary study of colorectal cancer elective surgery. We decided to test this finding in a randomized, double-blind trial. Adults undergoing elective colorectal cancer surgery at two university-affiliated hospitals were randomly assigned to have the surgical incision dressed with Aquacel Ag Hydrofiber dressing or a common dressing. To blind the patient and the nursing and medical staff to the nature of the dressing used, scrub nurses covered Aquacel Ag Hydrofiber with a common wound dressing in the experimental arm, whereas a double common dressing was applied to patients of control group. The primary end-point of the study was the occurrence of any surgical-site infection within 30 days of surgery. A total of 112 patients (58 in the experimental arm and 54 in the control group) qualified for primary end-point analysis. The characteristics of the patient population and their surgical procedures were similar. The overall rate of surgical-site infection was lower in the experimental group (11.1% center 1, 17.5% center 2; overall 15.5%) than in controls (14.3% center 1, 24.2% center 2, overall 20.4%), but the observed difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.451), even with respect to surgical-site infection grade 1 (superficial) versus grades 2 and 3, or grade 1 and 2 versus grade 3. This randomized trial did not confirm a statistically significant superiority of Aquacel Ag Hydrofiber dressing in reducing surgical-site infection after elective colorectal cancer surgery. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00981110.

  14. A case-control study of risk factors for surgical site infection after cesarean delivery in eastern Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaboré, Boezemwendé; Soudouem, Georges; Seck, Ibrahima; Millogo, Tieba; Evariste Yaméogo, Wambi Maurice; Kouanda, Seni

    2016-11-01

    To identify the risk factors for surgical site infection after cesarean delivery in a rural area in eastern Burkina Faso. A matched case-control study was conducted in Fada N'Gourma Regional Hospital Center and the Diapaga Medical Center with Surgical Antenna using data from 2011-2014. A total of 99 cases of surgical site infection after cesarean delivery were included in the study. Each case was matched with a control patient similar for age, admission date, and facility where the cesarean took place. Risk factors were identified using conditional logistic regression. Multivariate analysis identified hyperthermia at admission (OR 2.37; P=0.035), the presence of caput succedaneum in newborns (OR 7.07; P=0.001), and difficult delivery (OR 3.69; P=0. 019) as risk factors for surgical site infection. Provision of quality prenatal care, use of the partograph during labor, and the responsiveness of health workers during labor can reduce surgical site infection after cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Predictors of surgical site infection in laparoscopic and open ventral incisional herniorrhaphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Kaufman, Derrick; Reda, Domenic; Itani, Kamal M F

    2010-10-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after ventral incisional hernia repair (VIH) can result in serious consequences. We sought to identify patient, procedure, and/or hernia characteristics that are associated with SSI in VIH. Between 2004 and 2006, patients were randomized in four Veteran Affairs (VA) hospitals to undergo laparoscopic or open VIH. Patients who developed SSI within eight weeks postoperatively were compared to those who did not. A bivariate analysis for each factor and a multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to determine factors associated with SSI. The variables studied included patient characteristics and co-morbidities (e.g., age, gender, race, ethnicity, body mass index, ASA classification, diabetes, steroid use), hernia characteristics (e.g., size, duration, number of previous incisions), procedure characteristics (e.g., open versus laparoscopic, blood loss, use of postoperative drains, operating room temperature) and surgeons' experience (resident training level, number of open VIH previously performed by the attending surgeon). Antibiotic prophylaxis, anticoagulation protocols, preparation of the skin, draping of the wound, body temperature control, and closure of the surgical site were all standardized and monitored throughout the study period. Out of 145 patients who underwent VIH, 21 developed a SSI (14.5%). Patients who underwent open VIH had significantly more SSIs than those who underwent laparoscopic VIH (22.1% versus 3.4%; P = 0.002). Among patients who underwent open VIH, those who developed SSI had a recorded intraoperative blood loss greater than 25 mL (68.4% versus 40.3%; P = 0.030), were more likely to have a drain placed (79.0% versus 49.3%; P = 0.021) and were more likey to be operated on by surgeons with less than 75 open VIH case experience (52.6% versus 28.4%; P = 0.048). Patient and hernia characteristics were similar between the two groups. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, the open surgical technique was

  16. Influence of Enhanced Recovery Pathway on Surgical Site Infection after Colonic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Gronnier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The present study aimed to evaluate a potential effect of ERAS on surgical site infections (SSI. Methods. Colonic surgical patients operated between May 2011 and September 2015 constituted the cohort for this retrospective analysis. Over 100 items related to demographics, surgical details, compliance, and outcome were retrieved from a prospectively maintained database. SSI were traced by an independent National surveillance program. Risk factors for SSI were identified by univariate and multinomial logistic regression. Results. Fifty-four out of 397 patients (14% developed SSI. Independent risk factors for SSI were emergency surgery (OR 1.56; 95% CI 1.09–1.78, p=0.026, previous abdominal surgery (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.32–1.87, p=0.004, smoking (OR 1.71; 95% CI 1.22–1.89, p=0.014, and oral bowel preparation (OR 1.86; 95% CI 1.34–1.97, p=0.013, while minimally invasive surgery (OR 0.3; 95% CI 0.16–0.56, p70% was not retained as a protective factor for SSI after multivariate analysis (OR 0.94; 95% CI 0.46–1.92, p=0.86. Conclusions. Smoking, open and emergency surgery, and bowel preparation were risk factors for SSI. ERAS pathway had no independent impact while minimally invasive approach did. This study was registered under ResearchRegistry.com (UIN researchregistry2614.

  17. A socio-technical, probabilistic risk assessment model for surgical site infections in ambulatory surgery centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, Ebru K; El-Amine, Hadi; Steighner, Laura A; Slonim, Anthony D

    2014-10-01

    To understand how structural and process elements may affect the risk for surgical site infections (SSIs) in the ambulatory surgery center (ASC) environment, the researchers employed a tool known as socio-technical probabilistic risk assessment (ST-PRA). ST-PRA is particularly helpful for estimating risks in outcomes that are very rare, such as the risk of SSI in ASCs. Study objectives were to (1) identify the risk factors associated with SSIs resulting from procedures performed at ASCs and (2) design an intervention to mitigate the likelihood of SSIs for the most common risk factors that were identified by the ST-PRA for a particular surgical procedure. ST-PRA was used to study the SSI risk in the ASC setting. Both quantitative and qualitative data sources were utilized, and sensitivity analysis was performed to ensure the robustness of the results. The event entitled "fail to protect the patient effectively" accounted for 51.9% of SSIs in the ambulatory care setting. Critical components of this event included several failure risk points related to skin preparation, antibiotic administration, staff training, proper response to glove punctures during surgery, and adherence to surgical preparation rules related to the wearing of jewelry, watches, and artificial nails. Assuming a 75% reduction in noncompliance on any combination of 2 of these 5 components, the risk for an SSI decreased from 0.0044 to between 0.0027 and 0.0035. An intervention that targeted the 5 major components of the major risk point was proposed, and its implications were discussed.

  18. Reducing surgical site infection in spinal surgery with betadine irrigation and intrawound vancomycin powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Marko; Mitsunaga, Lance; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Nallur, Deepak; Roberto, Rolando

    2015-04-01

    Retrospective analysis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a surgical site infection (SSI) prevention protocol instituted in the Orthopaedic Spine Department at our institution. SSI is an undesired complication of orthopedic spine surgical procedures. It poses a significant risk to the patient, as well as a financial toll on the health care system. A wide range of prophylactic measures have been used to attempt to reduce SSI rates. A protocol consisting of a combination of 0.3% Betadine wound irrigation and 1 g of intrawound Vancomycin powder application was developed at our institution. Multiple data sources were consolidated for thorough evaluation of changes in SSI rates, patient risk factors, and changes in bacteriology. Identification of risk factors that predispose patients to SSI was performed using mixed-effects logistic regression in a univariate fashion. Risk factors with P values of 0.05 or less in univariate analysis were included together in a multivariate mixed-effects logistic regression model. SSI rates were reduced by 50% after the intervention; χ analysis comparing the SSI rates between the pre- and postintervention periods yielded a P value of 0.042. Rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus dropped from 30% to 7% and the rates of multibacterial infections dropped from 37% to 27%. The risk factors that were statistically significant in multivariate analysis were the following: age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.93), anemia (OR = 30.73), prior operation (OR = 27.45), and vertebral fracture (OR = 22.22). The combination of Betadine wound irrigation and intrawound vancomycin powder application led to both a clinically and statistically significant decrease in SSI rates by 50%. Bacteriology analysis and risk factor assessment proved to be valuable tools in assessing the efficacy of a new prophylactic measure and in the planning of future protocols. 4.

  19. Surgical site infection rates and risk factors in orthopedic pediatric patients in Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viqueira, Almudena Quintás; Caravaca, Gil Rodríguez; Quesada Rubio, José Antonio; Francés, Victoria Soler

    2014-07-01

    The objective of the study is to study surgical site infection (SSI) rates and risk factors in a pediatric population. We conducted a prospective cohort study to estimate the SSI rate at a national pediatric referral center, covering all patients managed at the Orthopedic Surgery Department of the Niño Jesús Children's University Teaching Hospital from January 2010 through December 2012. Risk factors and antibiotic prophylaxis were monitored. A comparison between Spanish and US data was performed, with a breakdown by National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance risk indices. We also conducted a comparative study of SSI rates from 2010 to 2012 to assess the impact of the epidemiologic surveillance system. The study population of 1079 patients had a SSI rate of 2.8%. SSI rates were calculated for spinal fusion and other musculoskeletal procedures according to the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance risk index. In the case of other musculoskeletal procedures, our SSI rates were 0.8 times lower than the overall Spanish rate, but higher than US rates for all risk categories. For spinal fusion procedures, our SSI rates were 1.2 times higher than the Spanish rates and 3.5 times higher than National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance rates. This latter finding should be interpreted with caution because it was based on a small sample. The multivariate analysis indicated that the only predictive factors of SSI were American Society of Anesthesiologists score and age. The surveillance program showed that for clean procedures, SSI incidence decreased from 4% in 2010 to 3.2% in 2011 and to 2.4% in 2012.

  20. Harvest surgical site infection following coronary artery bypass grafting: risk factors, microbiology, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mamta; Fakih, Mohamad G; Berriel-Cass, Dorine; Meisner, Susan; Saravolatz, Louis; Khatib, Riad

    2009-10-01

    Our goals were to evaluate the risk factors predisposing to saphenous vein harvest surgical site infection (HSSI), the microbiology implicated, associated outcomes including 30-day mortality, and identify opportunities for prevention of infection. All patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) procedures from January 2000 through September 2004 were included. Data were collected on preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors, in addition to microbiology and outcomes. Eighty-six of 3578 (2.4%) patients developed HSSI; 28 (32.6%) of them were classified as deep. The median time to detection was 17 (range, 4-51) days. An organism was identified in 64 (74.4%) cases; of them, a single pathogen was implicated in 50 (78%) cases. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated pathogen: 19 (38% [methicillin-susceptible S aureus (MSSA) = 12, methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) = 7]). Gram-negative organisms were recovered in 50% of cases, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa predominating in 11 (22%) because of a single pathogen. Multiple pathogens were identified in 14 (22%) cases. The 30-day mortality was not significantly different in patients with or without HSSI. Multivariate analysis showed age, diabetes mellitus, obesity, congestive heart failure, renal insufficiency, and duration of surgery to be associated with increased risk. Diabetes mellitus, obesity, congestive heart failure, renal insufficiency, and duration of surgery were associated with increased risk for HSSI. S aureus was the most frequently isolated pathogen.

  1. Preoperative chlorhexidine shower or bath for prevention of surgical site infection: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlebicki, Maciej Piotr; Safdar, Nasia; O'Horo, John Charles; Maki, Dennis G

    2013-02-01

    Chlorhexidine showering is frequently recommended as an important preoperative measure to prevent surgical site infection (SSI). However, the efficacy of this approach is uncertain. A search of electronic databases was undertaken to identify prospective controlled trials evaluating whole-body preoperative bathing with chlorhexidine versus placebo or no bath for prevention of SSI. Summary risk ratios were calculated using a DerSimonian-Laird random effects model and a Mantel-Haenzel dichotomous effects model. Sixteen trials met inclusion criteria with a total of 17,932 patients: 7,952 patients received a chlorhexidine bath, and 9,980 patients were allocated to various comparator groups. Overall, 6.8% of patients developed SSI in the chlorhexidine group compared with 7.2% of patients in the comparator groups. Chlorhexidine bathing did not significantly reduce overall incidence of SSI when compared with soap, placebo, or no shower or bath (relative risk, 0.90; 95% confidence interval: 0.77-1.05, P = .19). Meta-analysis of available clinical trials suggests no appreciable benefit of preoperative whole-body chlorhexidine bathing for prevention of SSI. However, most studies omitted details of chlorhexidine application. Better designed trials with a specified duration and frequency of exposure to chlorhexidine are needed to determine whether preoperative whole-body chlorhexidine bathing reduces SSI. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Combination of Oral Antibiotics and Mechanical Bowel Preparation Reduces Surgical Site Infection in Colorectal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohman, Kerri A; Wan, Leping; Guthrie, Tracey; Johnston, Bonnie; Leinicke, Jennifer A; Glasgow, Sean C; Hunt, Steven R; Mutch, Matthew G; Wise, Paul E; Silviera, Matthew L

    2017-10-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are a common complication after colorectal surgery. An infection prevention bundle (IPB) was implemented to improve outcomes. A standardized IPB that included the administration of oral antibiotics with a mechanical bowel preparation, preoperative shower with chlorhexidine, hair removal and skin preparation in holding, antibiotic wound irrigation, and a "clean-closure" protocol was implemented in January 2013. Data from the American College of Surgeons NSQIP were analyzed at a single academic institution to compare pre-IPB and post-IPB SSI rates. In January 2014, a prospective database was implemented to determine compliance with individual IPB elements and their effect on outcomes. For the 24 months pre-IPB, the overall SSI rate was 19.7%. During the 30 months after IPB implementation, the SSI rate decreased to 8.2% (p preparation (4.4% vs 14.3%; p = 0.008). Patients who received a full bowel preparation of both oral antibiotics and a mechanical bowel preparation had a 2.7% SSI rate compared with 15.8% for all others (p preparation was independently associated with significantly fewer SSI (adjusted odds ratio 0.2; 95% CI 0.1 to 0.9; p = 0.006). Implementation of an IPB was successful in decreasing SSI rates in colorectal surgery patients. The combination of oral antibiotics with a mechanical bowel preparation was the strongest predictor of decreased SSI. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  3. Surgical Site Infection following Cesarean Delivery: Patient, Provider, and Procedure-Specific Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shree, Raj; Park, Seo Young; Beigi, Richard H; Dunn, Shannon L; Krans, Elizabeth E

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to identify risk factors for cesarean delivery (CD) surgical site infection (SSI). study design: Retrospective analysis of 2,739 CDs performed at the University of Pittsburgh in 2011. CD SSIs were defined using National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) criteria. Chi-square test and t-test were used for bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression was used to identify SSI risk factors. Of 2,739 CDs, 178 (6.5%) were complicated by SSI. Patients with a SSI were more likely to have Medicaid, have resident physicians perform the CD, an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class of ≥ 3, chorioamnionitis, tobacco use, and labor before CD. In multivariable analysis, labor (odds ratio [OR], 2.35; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.65-3.38), chorioamnionitis (OR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.25-3.83), resident teaching service (OR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.54-3.00), tobacco use (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.04-2.70), ASA class ≥ 3 (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.06-2.39), and CDs performed for nonreassuring fetal status (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.26-0.67) were significantly associated with CD SSI. Multiple patient, provider, and procedure-specific risk factors contribute to CD SSI risk which may be targeted in infection-control efforts. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Evidence-Based Bundles and Cesarean Delivery Surgical Site Infections: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Ebony B; Temming, Lorene A; Fowler, Susan; Eppes, Catherine; Gross, Gilad; Srinivas, Sindhu K; Macones, George A; Colditz, Graham A; Tuuli, Methodius G

    2017-10-01

    To estimate the association of implementation of evidence-based bundles with surgical site infection rates after cesarean delivery. We searched MEDLINE through PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We searched electronic databases for randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing evidence-based infection prevention bundles for cesarean delivery, defined as implementation of three or more processes proven to prevent surgical site infection such as chlorhexidine skin preparation, antibiotic prophylaxis, and hair clipping, with usual care. The primary outcome was overall surgical site infection, defined using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. Secondary outcomes were superficial or deep surgical site infection and endometritis. Quality of studies and heterogeneity were assessed using validated measures. Pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95% CIs were calculated using random-effects models. Numbers needed to treat were estimated for outcomes with significant reduction. We found no randomized controlled trials. Fourteen preintervention and postintervention studies met inclusion criteria. Eight were full-text articles, and six were published abstracts. Quality of most of the primary studies was adequate with regard to the intervention, but modest in terms of implementation. The rate of surgical site infection was significantly lower after implementing an evidence-based bundle (14 studies: pooled rates 6.2% baseline compared with 2.0% intervention, pooled RR 0.33, 95% CI 0.25-0.43, number needed to treat=24). Evidence-based bundles were also associated with a lower rate of superficial or deep surgical site infection (six studies: pooled rate 5.9% baseline compared with 1.1% intervention, pooled RR 0.19, 95% CI 0.12-0.32, number needed to treat=21). The rate of endometritis was low at baseline and not significantly different after

  5. Incidence and risk factors of surgical site infection and septic arthritis after elective arthroscopy in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsting, Julie Y; Pille, Frederik J; Oosterlinck, Maarten; Haspeslagh, Maarten; Wilderjans, Hans C

    2018-01-01

    To determine the incidence of infection and associated risk factors, after elective arthroscopy. Retrospective case study. Horses (n=1079) undergoing elective arthroscopy. Medical records of all horses that underwent elective arthroscopy between 2006 and 2013 were reviewed. Age, gender, breed, surgeon, number of joints operated, total anesthetic time, perioperative antimicrobial administration, and the presence and size of osteochondral fragments/subchondral lesions were recorded. For each operated joint, the development of postoperative infection (surgical site infection [SSI] and/or septic arthritis) and long-term outcome (>6 months) were recorded. Multivariate logistic regression was used to test for association between the independent variables and the dependent outcomes. A total of 1741 joints in 1079 horses underwent arthroscopy. SSI without septic arthritis occurred in 1 fetlock joint (0.14%), 1 tibiotarsal joint (0.19%), and 6 femoropatellar joints (1.67%). Thirteen joints (0.75%) were diagnosed with septic arthritis, including 1 fetlock joint (0.14%), 4 tibiotarsal joints (0.74%), and 8 femoropatellar joints (2.23%). The probability of postoperative SSI was higher when large lesions (>40 mm long) were treated, compared to medium (20-40 mm, P = .005) and small (septic arthritis (P septic arthritis rate (P = .028). Septic arthritis after elective arthroscopy was more likely in the presence of SSI and younger age. Horses with large lesions were at risk for SSI, which translated into a higher incidence of postoperative septic arthritis after femoropatellar arthroscopy. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. Surgical site infection after liver transplantation: risk factors and association with graft loss or death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinger, Walter C; Crook, Julia E; Heckman, Michael G; Diehl, Nancy N; Shalev, Jefree A; Zubair, Abba C; Willingham, Darrin L; Hewitt, Winston R; Grewal, Hani P; Nguyen, Justin H; Hughes, Christopher B

    2009-05-15

    Risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) after liver transplantation and outcomes associated with these infections have not been assessed using consensus surveillance and optimal analytic methods. A cohort study was performed of patients undergoing first liver transplantation at Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida, in 2003 and 2004. SSIs were identified by definitions and methods of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System. Measures of known or suspected risk factors for SSI, graft loss, or death were collected on all patients. Associations of SSI with these factors and also with the primary composite endpoint of graft loss or death within 1 year of liver transplantation were examined using Cox proportional hazards models; relative risks (RRs) were estimated along with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Of 370 patients, 66 (18%) had SSI and 57 (15%) died or sustained graft loss within 1 year after liver transplantation. Donor liver mass-to-recipient body mass ratio of less than 0.01 (RR 2.56; 95% CI 1.17-5.62; P=0.019) and increased operative time (RR 1.19 [1-hr increase]; 95% CI 1.03-1.37; P=0.018) were associated with increased SSI risk. SSI was associated with increased risk of death or graft loss within the first year after liver transplantation (RR 3.06; 95% CI 1.66-5.64; P<0.001). SSI is associated with increased risk of death or graft loss during the first year after liver transplantation. Increased operative time and decreased donor liver-to-recipient body mass ratio showed evidence of association with SSI.

  7. Do Prolonged Prophylactic Antibiotics Reduce the Incidence of Surgical-Site Infections in Immediate Prosthetic Breast Reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Frederick; Chin, Robin; Piper, Merisa; Esserman, Laura; Sbitany, Hani

    2016-12-01

    Approximately 50,000 women in the United States undergo mastectomy and immediate prosthetic breast reconstruction annually, and most receive postoperative prophylactic antibiotics. The effect of these antibiotics on the risk of surgical-site infections remains unclear. The authors searched the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases for studies that compared less than 24 hours and greater than 24 hours of antibiotics following immediate prosthetic breast reconstruction. Primary outcomes were surgical-site infections and implant loss. Conservative random effects models were used to obtain pooled relative risk estimates. The authors identified 927 studies, but only four cohort studies and one randomized controlled trial met their inclusion criteria. Unadjusted incidences of surgical-site infections were 14 percent with more than 24 hours of antibiotics, 19 percent with less than 24 hours of antibiotics, and 16 percent overall. Unadjusted incidences of implant loss were 8 percent with more than 24 hours of antibiotics, 10 percent with less than 24 hours of antibiotics, and 9 percent overall. The pooled relative risk of implant loss was 1.17 (95 percent CI, 0.39 to 3.6) with less than 24 hours of antibiotics, which was not statistically significant. Prolonged antibiotic use did not have a statistically significant effect on reducing surgical-site infections or implant loss. There was significant heterogeneity between studies, and prolonged antibiotics may have increased the risk of implant loss in the randomized controlled trial. Definitive evidence may only be obtained with data from more prospective randomized controlled trials.

  8. Surgical site infections following craniotomy focusing on possible post-operative acquisition of infection: prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneh-Arbib, O; Shiferstein, A; Dagan, N; Fein, S; Telem, L; Muchtar, E; Eliakim-Raz, N; Rubinovitch, B; Rubin, G; Rappaport, Z H; Paul, M

    2013-12-01

    Neurosurgery is characterized by a prolonged risk period for surgical site infection (SSI), mainly related to the presence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains. We aimed to examine factors associated with post-neurosurgical SSIs, focusing on post-operative factors. A prospective cohort study was conducted in a single center over a period of 18 months in Israel. Included were adult patients undergoing clean or clean-contaminated craniotomy, including craniotomies with external CSF drainage or shunts. SSIs were defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria for healthcare-associated infections. All patients were followed up for 90 days and those with foreign body insertion for 1 year. We compared patients with and without SSI. A multivariable regression analysis for SSI was conducted including uncorrelated variables significantly associated with SSI. A total of 502 patients were included, with 138 (27.5%) undergoing emergent or urgent craniotomy. The overall SSI rate was 5.6% (28 patients), of which 3.2% (16 patients) were intracerebral. Non-elective surgery, external CSF drainage/monitoring devices, re-operation, and post-operative respiratory failure were independently associated with subsequent SSI. External CSF devices was the only significant risk factor for intracerebral SSIs (p operative infection acquisition through external CSF devices. Standard operating procedures for their maintenance are necessary.

  9. Surgical site infections following spine surgery: eliminating the controversies in the diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahoud, Jad; Kanafani, Zeina; Kanj, Souha S

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following spine surgery is a dreaded complication with significant morbidity and economic burden. SSIs following spine surgery can be superficial, characterized by obvious wound drainage or deep-seated with a healed wound. Staphylococcus aureus remains the principal causal agent. There are certain pre-operative risk factors that increase the risk of SSI, mainly diabetes, smoking, steroids, and peri-operative transfusions. Additionally, intra-operative risk factors include surgical invasiveness, type of fusion, implant use, and traditional instead of minimally invasive approach. A high level of suspicion is crucial to attaining an early definitive diagnosis and initiating appropriate management. The most common presenting symptom is back pain, usually manifesting 2-4 weeks and up to 3 months after a spinal procedure. Scheduling a follow-up visit between weeks 2 and 4 after surgery is therefore necessary for early detection. Inflammatory markers are important diagnostic tools, and comparing pre-operative with post-operative levels should be done when suspecting SSIs following spine surgery. Particularly, serum amyloid A is a novel inflammatory marker that can expedite the diagnosis of SSIs. Magnetic resonance imaging remains the diagnostic modality of choice when suspecting a SSI following spine surgery. While 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography is not widely used, it may be useful in challenging cases. Despite their low yield, blood cultures should be collected before initiating antibiotic therapy. Samples from wound drainage should be sent for Gram stain and cultures. When there is a high clinical suspicion of SSI and in the absence of superficial wound drainage, computed tomography-guided aspiration of paraspinal collections is warranted. Unless the patient is hemodynamically compromised, antibiotics should be deferred until proper specimens for culture are secured.

  10. Failure to Redose Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Long Surgery Increases Risk of Surgical Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasatpibal, Nongyao; Whitney, Joanne D; Dellinger, E Patchen; Nair, Bala G; Pike, Kenneth C

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is a key component of the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI). Failure to manage antibiotic prophylaxis effectively may increase the risk of SSI. This study aimed to examine the effects of antibiotic prophylaxis on SSI risk. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among patients having general surgery between May 2012 and June 2015 at the University of Washington Medical Center. Peri-operative data extracted from hospital databases included patient and operation characteristics, intra-operative medication and fluid administration, and survival outcome. The effects of antibiotic prophylaxis and potential factors on SSI risk were estimated using multiple logistic regression and were expressed as risk ratios (RRs). A total of 4,078 patients were eligible for analysis. Of these, 180 had an SSI. Mortality rates within and after 30 days were 0.8% and 0.3%, respectively. Improper antibiotic redosing increased the risk of SSI (RR 4.61; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.33-15.91). Other risk factors were in-patient status (RR 4.05; 95% CI 1.69-9.66), smoking (RR 1.63; 95% CI 1.03-2.55), emergency surgery (RR 1.97; 95% CI 1.26-3.08), colectomy (RR 3.31; 95% CI 1.19-9.23), pancreatectomy (RR 4.52; 95% CI 1.53-13.39), proctectomy (RR 5.02; 95% CI 1.72-14.67), small bowel surgery (RR 6.16; 95% CI 2.13-17.79), intra-operative blood transfusion >500 mL (RR 2.76; 95% CI 1.45-5.26), and multiple procedures (RR 1.40; 95% CI 1.01-1.95). These data demonstrate that failure to redose prophylactic antibiotic during long operations increases the risk of SSI. Strengthening a collaborative surgical quality improvement program may help to eradicate this risk.

  11. Surgical Site Infections Following Spine Surgery: Eliminating the Controversies in the Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jad eChahoud

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infection (SSI following spine surgery is a dreaded complication with significant morbidity and economic burden. SSIs following spine surgery can be superficial, characterized by obvious wound drainage, or deep-seated with a healed wound. Staphylococcus aureus remains the principal causal agent. There are certain pre-operative risk factors that increase the risk of SSI, mainly diabetes, smoking, steroids, and peri-operative transfusions. Additionally, intra-operative risk factors include surgical invasiveness, type of fusion, implant use, and traditional instead of minimally invasive approach. A high level of suspicion is crucial to attaining an early definitive diagnosis and initiating appropriate management. The most common presenting symptom is back pain, usually manifesting 2 to 4 weeks and up to 3 months after a spinal procedure. Scheduling a follow-up visit between weeks 2 to 4 after surgery is therefore necessary for early detection. Inflammatory markers are important diagnostic tools, and comparing pre-operative with post-operative levels should be done when suspecting SSIs following spine surgery. Particularly, Serum Amyloid A (SAA is a novel inflammatory marker that can expedite the diagnosis of SSIs. Magnetic resonance imaging remains the diagnostic modality of choice when suspecting a SSI following spine surgery. While 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography is not widely used, it may be useful in challenging cases. Despite their low yield, blood cultures should be collected before initiating antibiotic therapy. Samples from wound drainage should be sent for Gram stain and cultures. When there is a high clinical suspicion of SSI and in the absence of superficial wound drainage, CT guided aspiration of paraspinal collections is warranted. Unless the patient is hemodynamically compromised, antibiotics should be deferred until proper specimens for culture are secured.

  12. An audit and trial aiming to reduce the rate of surgical site infections for women having a caesarean section

    OpenAIRE

    Ridley, Neesha

    2016-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following caesarean is a common cause of morbidity. To ensure best practice, Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust decided to audit the rate of SSI following caesarean section. The results revealed that women who had the wound covered for a longer time were less likely to develop a wound infection. A trial was undertaken using two different wound dressings. Following the trial, new wound dressings were introduced for all women having a caesarean sect...

  13. The role of topical antibiotics used as prophylaxis in surgical site infection prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-04-01

    Compared with systemic antibiotic therapy, the topical or local delivery of an antibiotic has many potential advantages. However, local antibiotics at the surgical site have received very limited approval in any of the surgical prophylaxis consensus guidelines that we are aware of. A review of the literature was carried out through searches of peer-reviewed publications in PubMed in the English language over a 30 year period between January 1980 and May 2010. Both retrospective and prospective studies were included, as well as meta-analyses. With regard to defining \\'topical\\' or \\'local\\' antibiotic application, the application of an antibiotic solution to the surgical site intraoperatively or immediately post-operatively was included. A number of surgical procedures have been shown to significantly benefit from perioperative topical prophylaxis, e.g. joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. The selective use of topical antibiotics as surgical prophylaxis is justified for specific procedures, such as joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In selective cases, such as obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. Apart from these specific indications, the evidence for use of topical antibiotics in surgery is lacking in conclusive randomized controlled trials.

  14. The role of topical antibiotics used as prophylaxis in surgical site infection prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2012-02-01

    Compared with systemic antibiotic therapy, the topical or local delivery of an antibiotic has many potential advantages. However, local antibiotics at the surgical site have received very limited approval in any of the surgical prophylaxis consensus guidelines that we are aware of. A review of the literature was carried out through searches of peer-reviewed publications in PubMed in the English language over a 30 year period between January 1980 and May 2010. Both retrospective and prospective studies were included, as well as meta-analyses. With regard to defining \\'topical\\' or \\'local\\' antibiotic application, the application of an antibiotic solution to the surgical site intraoperatively or immediately post-operatively was included. A number of surgical procedures have been shown to significantly benefit from perioperative topical prophylaxis, e.g. joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. The selective use of topical antibiotics as surgical prophylaxis is justified for specific procedures, such as joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In selective cases, such as obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. Apart from these specific indications, the evidence for use of topical antibiotics in surgery is lacking in conclusive randomized controlled trials.

  15. [Implementation of a post-discharge surgical site infection system in herniorrhaphy and mastectomy procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Juan Sanz, Isabel; Díaz-Agero-Pérez, Cristina; Robustillo-Rodela, Ana; Pita López, María José; Oliva Iñiguez, Lourdes; Monge-Jodrá, Vicente

    2014-10-01

    Monitoring surgical site infection (SSI) performed during hospitalization can underestimate its rates due to the shortening in hospital stay. The aim of this study was to determine the actual rates of SSI using a post-discharge monitoring system. All patients who underwent herniorraphy or mastectomy in the Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal from 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2011 were included. SSI data were collected prospectively according to the continuous quality improvement indicators (Indicadores Clinicos de Mejora Continua de la Calidad [INCLIMECC]) monitoring system. Post-discharge follow-up was conducted by telephone survey. A total of 409patients were included in the study, of whom 299 underwent a herniorraphy procedure, and 110 underwent a mastectomy procedure. For herniorrhaphy, the SSI rate increased from 6.02% to 7.6% (the post-discharge survey detected 21.7% of SSI). For mastectomy, the SSI rate increased from 1.8% to 3.6% (the post-discharge survey detected 50% of SSI). Post-discharge monitoring showed an increased detection of SSI incidence. Post-discharge monitoring is useful to analyze the real trend of SSI, and evaluate improvement actions. Post-discharge follow-up methods need to standardised. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of oral antibiotics prophylaxis in prevention of surgical site infection in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koullouros, Michalis; Khan, Nadir; Aly, Emad H

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) continues to be a challenge in colorectal surgery. Over the years, various modalities have been used in an attempt to reduce SSI risk in elective colorectal surgery, which include mechanical bowel preparation before surgery, oral antibiotics and intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis at induction of surgery. Even though IV antibiotics have become standard practice, there has been a debate on the exact role of oral antibiotics. The primary aim was to identify the role of oral antibiotics in reduction of SSI in elective colorectal surgery. The secondary aim was to explore any potential benefit in the use of mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) in relation to SSI in elective colorectal surgery. Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched. Any randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or cohort studies after 1980, which investigated the effectiveness of oral antibiotic prophylaxis and/or MBP in preventing SSIs in elective colorectal surgery were included. Twenty-three RCTs and eight cohorts were included. The results indicate a statistically significant advantage in preventing SSIs with the combined usage of oral and systemic antibiotic prophylaxis. Furthermore, our analysis of the cohort studies shows no benefits in the use of MBP in prevention of SSIs. The addition of oral antibiotics to systemic antibiotics could potentially reduce the risk of SSIs in elective colorectal surgery. Additionally, MBP does not seem to provide a clear benefit with regard to SSI prevention.

  17. Analysis of Surgical Site Infection after Musculoskeletal Tumor Surgery: Risk Assessment Using a New Scoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nagano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infection (SSI has not been extensively studied in musculoskeletal tumors (MST owing to the rarity of the disease. We analyzed incidence and risk factors of SSI in MST. SSI incidence was evaluated in consecutive 457 MST cases (benign, 310 cases and malignant, 147 cases treated at our institution. A detailed analysis of the clinical background of the patients, pre- and postoperative hematological data, and other factors that might be associated with SSI incidence was performed for malignant MST cases. SSI occurred in 0.32% and 12.2% of benign and malignant MST cases, respectively. The duration of the surgery (P=0.0002 and intraoperative blood loss (P=0.0005 was significantly more in the SSI group than in the non-SSI group. We established the musculoskeletal oncological surgery invasiveness (MOSI index by combining 4 risk factors (blood loss, operation duration, preoperative chemotherapy, and the use of artificial materials. The MOSI index (0–4 points score significantly correlated with the risk of SSI, as demonstrated by an SSI incidence of 38.5% in the group with a high score (3-4 points. The MOSI index score and laboratory data at 1 week after surgery could facilitate risk evaluation and prompt diagnosis of SSI.

  18. High-concentration oxygen and surgical site infections in abdominal surgery: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunil V; Coughlin, Shaun C; Malthaner, Richard A

    2013-08-01

    There has been recent interest in using high-concentration oxygen to prevent surgical site infections (SSIs). Previous meta-analyses in this area have produced conflicting results. With the publication of 2 new randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that were not included in previous meta-analyses, an updated review is warranted. Our objective was to perform a meta-analysis on RCTs comparing high- and low- concentration oxygen in adults undergoing open abdominal surgery. We completed independent literature reviews using electronic databases, bibliographies and other sources of grey literature to identify relevant studies. We assessed the overall quality of evidence using grade guidelines. Statistical analysis was performed on pooled data from included studies. A priori subgroup analyses were planned to explain statistical and clinical heterogeneity. Overall, 6 studies involving a total of 2585 patients met the inclusion criteria. There was no evidence of a reduction in SSIs with high-concentration oxygen (risk ratio 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.50-1.19, p = 0.24). We observed substantial heterogeneity among studies. There is moderate evidence that high-concentration oxygen does not reduce SSIs in adults undergoing open abdominal surgery.

  19. Preoperative skin antiseptic preparations for preventing surgical site infections: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Chris; McGahan, Lynda; Polisena, Julie; Mierzwinski-Urban, Monika; Embil, John M

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of preoperative skin antiseptic preparations and application techniques for the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs). Systematic review of the literature using Medline, EMBASE, and other databases, for the period January 2001 to June 2011. Comparative studies (including randomized and nonrandomized trials) of preoperative skin antisepsis preparations and application techniques were included. Two researchers reviewed each study and extracted data using standardized tables developed before the study. Studies were reviewed for their methodological quality and clinical findings. Twenty studies (n = 9,520 patients) were included in the review. The results indicated that presurgical antiseptic showering is effective for reducing skin flora and may reduce SSI rates. Given the heterogeneity of the studies and the results, conclusions about which antiseptic is more effective at reducing SSIs cannot be drawn. The evidence suggests that preoperative antiseptic showers reduce bacterial colonization and may be effective at preventing SSIs. The antiseptic application method is inconsequential, and data are lacking to suggest which antiseptic solution is the most effective. Disinfectant products are often mixed with alcohol or water, which makes it difficult to form overall conclusions regarding an active ingredient. Large, well-conducted randomized controlled trials with consistent protocols comparing agents in the same bases are needed to provide unequivocal evidence on the effectiveness of one antiseptic preparation over another for the prevention of SSIs.

  20. Umbilical Microflora, Antiseptic Skin Preparation, and Surgical Site Infection in Abdominal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeff, Jörg; Erkan, Mert; Jäger, Carsten; Menacher, Maximilian; Gebhardt, Friedemann; Hartel, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) following abdominal surgery are frequent and a major cause of postoperative morbidity and prolonged hospital stay. Besides antibiotic prophylaxis, antiseptic skin preparation is an important measure to prevent SSI. Here we prospectively analyzed the effectiveness of antiseptic skin preparation in a cohort of 93 patients undergoing laparotomy, with special emphasis on the umbilical region. The microflora of the umbilicus contained a large number of resident (mostly staphylococci species and corynebacteria) and transient germs (including enterococci species). Following antiseptic skin preparation, bacteria could still be cultured from 24.7% of the patients' umbilici. In case of postoperative SSI, only one of seven SSI was caused by the microorganism that was present in the umbilicus before and after skin preparation. Antiseptic skin preparation fails to completely eradicate the microflora of the umbilical region in one quarter of the patients. However, at least in abdominal surgery, the vast majority of SSI are caused by intra-abdominal contamination rather than the skin microflora.

  1. Economic Value of Dispensing Home-Based Preoperative Chlorhexidine Bathing Cloths to Prevent Surgical Site Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Rachel R.; Stuckey, Dianna R.; Norman, Bryan A.; Duggan, Andrew P.; Bacon, Kristina M.; Connor, Diana L.; Lee, Ingi; Muder, Robert R.; Lee, Bruce Y.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the economic value of dispensing preoperative home-based chlorhexidine bathing cloth kits to orthopedic patients to prevent surgical site infection (SSI). METHODS A stochastic decision-analytic computer simulation model was developed from the hospital’s perspective depicting the decision of whether to dispense the kits preoperatively to orthopedic patients. We varied patient age, cloth cost, SSI-attributable excess length of stay, cost per bed-day, patient compliance with the regimen, and cloth antimicrobial efficacy to determine which variables were the most significant drivers of the model’s outcomes. RESULTS When all other variables remained at baseline and cloth efficacy was at least 50%, patient compliance only had to be half of baseline (baseline mean, 15.3%; range, 8.23%–20.0%) for chlorhexidine cloths to remain the dominant strategy (ie, less costly and providing better health outcomes). When cloth efficacy fell to 10%, 1.5 times the baseline bathing compliance also afforded dominance of the preoperative bath. CONCLUSIONS The results of our study favor the routine distribution of bathing kits. Even with low patient compliance and cloth efficacy values, distribution of bathing kits is an economically beneficial strategy for the prevention of SSI. PMID:21515977

  2. [Incidence of surgical site infections in sub-Saharan Africa: systematic review and meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngaroua; Ngah, Joseph Eloundou; Bénet, Thomas; Djibrilla, Yaouba

    2016-01-01

    Surgical Site Infections (SSI) cause morbi-mortality and additional healthcare expenditures. Developing countries are the most affected. The objective was to estimate the pooled incidence of SSI in Sub-Saharan Africa and describe its major risk factors. Systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted using the databases of the World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa, PubMed and standard search to select electronic articles published between 2006 and 2015. Only articles investigating SSI impact and risk factors in Sub-Saharan African countries were retained. Out of 95 articles found, 11 met the inclusion criteria. Only 9 countries out of 45 have contributed, with a huge amount of information coming from Nigeria (5 articles out of 11). The impact of SSI ranged from 6.8% to 26% with predominance in general surgery. The pooled incidence of SSI was 14.8% (95% CI: 15,5-16,2%) with significant heterogeneity according to the specialty and the method of monitoring. Most cited risk factors were long procedure length and categories 3 and 4 of Altemeier contamination class. Other factors included hospital environment, inadequate care practices and underlying pathologies. SSI incidence is high in Sub-Saharan Africa. Studies in this area could improve knowledge, prevention and control of these multiple risk factors.

  3. Surgical site infection after caesarean section: space for post-discharge surveillance improvements and reliable comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Federica; Piselli, Pierluca; Pittalis, Silvia; Ruscitti, Luca E; Cimaglia, Claudia; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Puro, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) after caesarean section (CS) represent a substantial health system concern. Surveying SSI has been associated with a reduction in SSI incidence. We report the findings of three (2008, 2011 and 2013) regional active SSI surveillances after CS in community hospital of the Latium region determining the incidence of SSI. Each CS was surveyed for SSI occurrence by trained staff up to 30 post-operative days, and association of SSI with relevant characteristics was assessed using binomial logistic regression. A total of 3,685 CS were included in the study. A complete 30 day post-operation follow-up was achieved in over 94% of procedures. Overall 145 SSI were observed (3.9% cumulative incidence) of which 131 (90.3%) were superficial and 14 (9.7%) complex (deep or organ/space) SSI; overall 129 SSI (of which 89.9% superficial) were diagnosed post-discharge. Only higher NNIS score was significantly associated with SSI occurrence in the regression analysis. Our work provides the first regional data on CS-associated SSI incidence, highlighting the need for a post-discharge surveillance which should assure 30 days post-operation to not miss data on complex SSI, as well as being less labour intensive.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus screening and decolonization in orthopaedic surgery and reduction of surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Antonia F; Wessel, Charles B; Rao, Nalini

    2013-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common organism responsible for orthopaedic surgical site infections (SSIs). Patients who are carriers for methicillin-sensitive S. aureus or methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) have a higher likelihood of having invasive S. aureus infections. Although some have advocated screening for S. aureus and decolonizing it is unclear whether these efforts reduce SSIs. The purposes of this study were to determine (1) whether S. aureus screening and decolonization reduce SSIs in orthopaedic patients and (2) if implementing this protocol is cost-effective. Studies for this systematic review were identified by searching PubMed, which includes MEDLINE (1946-present), EMBASE.com (1974-present), and the Cochrane Library's (John Wiley & Sons) Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Health Technology Assessment Database (HTAD), and the NHS Economic Evaluation Database (NHSEED). Comprehensive literature searches were developed using EMTREE, MeSH, and keywords for each of the search concepts of decolonization, MRSA, and orthopedics/orthopedic surgery. Studies published before 1968 were excluded. We analyzed 19 studies examining the ability of the decolonization protocol to reduce SSIs and 10 studies detailing the cost-effectiveness of S. aureus screening and decolonization. All 19 studies showed a reduction in SSIs or wound complications by instituting a S. aureus screening and decolonization protocol in elective orthopaedic (total joints, spine, and sports) and trauma patients. The S. aureus screening and decolonization protocol also saved costs in orthopaedic patients when comparing the costs of screening and decolonization with the reduction of SSIs. Preoperative screening and decolonization of S. aureus in orthopaedic patients is a cost-effective means to reduce SSIs. Level IV, systematic review of Level I-IV studies. See the

  5. An intraoperative irrigation regimen to reduce the surgical site infection rate following adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Herwijnen, B; Evans, NR; Dare, CJ; Davies, EM

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a gentamicin antibiotic intraoperative irrigation regimen (regimen A) with a povidone-iodine intraoperative irrigation regimen (regimen B) and to evaluate the ability of adjunctive local vancomycin powder (regimen C) to reduce the surgical site infection (SSI) rate following idiopathic scoliosis correction. Methods This was a retrospective, single centre, two-surgeon cohort study of paediatric scoliosis procedures involving 118 patients under the age of 18 years who underwent correction for idiopathic scoliosis over a period of 42 months. Patients’ baseline characteristics, pseudarthrosis and rates of SSI were compared. Results Baseline characteristics were comparable in all three groups, with the exception of sex distribution. Over a quarter (27%) of patients with regimen B were male compared with 13% and 6% for regimens A and C respectively. Patients were mostly followed up for a minimum of 12 months. The SSI rate for both superficial and deep infections was higher with regimen A (26.7%) than with regimens B and C (7.0% and 6.3% respectively). The SSI rates for regimens B and C were comparable. No patients developed complications related to vancomycin toxicity, metalwork failure or pseudarthrosis. Conclusions Wound irrigation with a povidone-iodine solution reduces SSIs following adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery. The direct application of vancomycin powder to the wound is safe but does not reduce the SSI rate further in low risk patients. Additional studies are needed to elucidate whether it is effective at higher doses and in high risk patient groups. PMID:27087324

  6. Reducing Surgical Site Infection in Spinal Surgery with Betadine Irrigation and Intra-Wound Vancomycin Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Marko; Mitsunaga, Lance; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Nallur, Deepak; Roberto, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a surgical site infection (SSI) prevention protocol instituted in the Orthopaedic Spine Department at our institution. Summary of Background Data SSI is an undesired complication of orthopaedic spine surgeries. It poses a significant risk to the patient, as well as a financial toll on the healthcare system. A wide range of prophylactic measures have been used to attempt to reduce SSI rates. Methods A protocol consisting of a combination of 0.3% Betadine wound irrigation and 1 gram of intra-wound Vancomycin powder application was developed at our institution. Multiple data sources were consolidated for thorough evaluation of changes in SSI rates, patient risk factors, and changes in bacteriology. Identification of risk factors that predispose patients to SSI was performed using mixed effects logistic regression in a univariate fashion. Risk factors with p-values of ≤ 0.05 in univariate analysis were included together in a multivariate mixed effects logistic regression model. Results SSI rates were reduced by 50% following the intervention; Chi square analysis comparing the SSI rates between the pre- and post-intervention periods yielded a p-value of 0.042. Rates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus dropped from 30% to 7% and the rates of multi-bacterial infections dropped from 37% to 27%. The risk factors that were statistically significant in multivariate analysis were the following: age (OR 0.93), anemia (OR 30.73), prior operation (OR 27.45), and vertebral fracture (OR 22.22). Conclusion The combination of Betadine wound irrigation and intra-wound vancomycin powder application led to both a clinically and statistically significant decrease in SSI rates by 50%. Bacteriology analysis and risk factor assessment proved to be valuable tools in assessing the efficacy of a new prophylactic measure and in the planning of future protocols. PMID:25608241

  7. Incidence and predictors of surgical site infections following caesarean sections at Bugando Medical Centre, Mwanza, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpogoro, Filbert J; Mshana, Stephen E; Mirambo, Mariam M; Kidenya, Benson R; Gumodoka, Balthazar; Imirzalioglu, Can

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is the second most common infectious complication after urinary tract infection following a delivery by caesarean section (CS). At Bugando Medical Centre there has no study documenting the epidemiology of SSI after CS despite the large number of CSs performed and the relatively common occurrence of SSIs. This was a prospective cohort study involving pregnant women who underwent a CS between October 2011 and February 2012 at Bugando Medical Centre. A total of 345 pregnant women were enrolled. Preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative data were collected using a standardized questionnaire. Wound specimens were collected and processed as per standard operative procedures; and susceptibility testing was carried out using a disc diffusion technique. Data was analyzed using STATA version 11. The overall cumulative incidence of SSI was 10.9% with an incidence rate of 37.5 per 10,000 people/day (95% CI, 26.8-52.4). The median time from CS to the development of SSI was 7 days (interquartile range [IQR] = 6-9 days). Six independent risk factors for post caesarean SSI as identified in this study by multivariate analysis are: hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HR: 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1-5.6; P = 0.021), severe anaemia (HR: 3.8; 95% CI, 1.2-12.4, P = 0.028), surgical wound class III (HR: 2.4; 95% CI, 1.1-5.0; P = 0.021), multiple vaginal examinations (HR: 2.5; 95% CI, 1.2-5.1; P = 0.011), prolonged duration of operation (HR: 2.6; 95% CI, 1.2-5.5; P = 0.015) and an operation performed by an intern or junior doctor (HR: 4.0; 95% CI, 1.7-9.2; P = 0.001). Staphylococcus aureus was the most common organism (27.3%), followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (22.7%). Patients with a SSI had a longer average hospital stay than those without a SSI (12.7 ± 6.9 vs. 4 ± 1.7; P < 0.0001) and the case fatality rate among patients with a SSI was 2.9%. SSIs are common among women undergoing CSs at Bugando Medical Centre. SSIs were commonly associated with multiple

  8. Risk factors for surgical site infection after low transverse cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Margaret A; Butler, Anne M; Willers, Denise M; Devkota, Preetishma; Gross, Gilad A; Fraser, Victoria J

    2008-06-01

    Independent risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) after cesarean section have not been well documented, despite the large number of cesarean sections performed and the relatively common occurrence of SSI. To determine independent risk factors for SSI after low transverse cesarean section. Retrospective case-control study. Barnes-Jewish Hospital, a 1,250-bed tertiary care hospital. A total of 1,605 women who underwent low transverse cesarean section during the period from July 1999 to June 2001. Using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis codes for SSI or wound complication and/or data on antibiotic use during the surgical hospitalization or at readmission to the hospital or emergency department, we identified potential cases of SSI in a cohort of patients who underwent a low transverse cesarean section. Cases of SSI were verified by chart review using the definitions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System. Control patients without SSI or endomyometritis were randomly selected from the population of patients who underwent cesarean section. Independent risk factors for SSI were determined by logistic regression. SSIs were identified in 81 (5.0%) of 1,605 women who underwent low transverse cesarean section. Independent risk factors for SSI included development of subcutaneous hematoma after the procedure (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 11.6 [95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1-33.2]), operation performed by the university teaching service (aOR, 2.7 [95% CI, 1.4-5.2]), and a higher body mass index at admission (aOR, 1.1 [95% CI, 1.0-1.1]). Cephalosporin therapy before or after the operation was associated with a significantly lower risk of SSI (aOR, 0.2 [95% CI, 0.1-0.5]). Use of staples for skin closure was associated with a marginally increased risk of SSI. These independent risk factors should be incorporated into approaches for the prevention

  9. [An investigation on surgical-site infection among post cesarean section patients with Burkholderia cepacia contaminated ultrasonic couplant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Man; Zhang, Lijie; Xia, Shenglin; Wu, Haidong; Zhang, Ruihong; Fan, Mugeng; Wang, Tao

    2014-05-01

    In May 2013, an abnormal increase of surgical-site infection among post cesarean section patients was reported at one hospital in Zhongshan. An investigation was conducted to identify the risk factors and related control measures. All the reported surgical-site infection records among post cesarean section patients were checked. A review of cesarean section schedules of health workers was also performed. An 1 : 2 case-control study was conducted among surgical-site infection cases in May 2013. Microbiologic cultures were performed on 2 surgical site secretion samples and 12 samples from the environment. All the positive isolates were molecular typed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In May 2013, 4 post cesarean section patients who developed surgical-site infection symptom at one hospital in Zhongshan were reported, with an attack rate as 10.3% (4/39). The emergence time of symptom was 2-3 days after operation. All of the 4 cases underwent an emergency operation. The median time interval for cases from admission to operation was 7.2 hours (ranged from 2 to 9 hours), lower than that seen in the controls, with a median time of 20.8 hours (Z = 5.50, P = 0.03). Two of the 4 cases took type-B ultrasonic inspection 1.4 h and 8.4 h before the operation, and the other two cases took continuous fetal heart monitoring 2 hours before the operation. Skin of the operation area on the 4 cases had been exposed to ultrasonic couplant, without a thorough clean. The proportion of type-B ultrasonic inspection or continuous fetal heart monitoring was much higher in cases than in controls (χ² = 5.19, P = 0.01). Burkholderia cepacia (BC) isolates were discovered from:one surgical site secretion, 2 type-B ultrasonic probe samples, one ultrasonic couplant in use and one ultrasonic couplant unopened. All the isolates were identified as 100% identical by PFGE. The skin of operation area of cesarean section patients had been exposed to BC contaminated ultrasonic couplant without

  10. STUDY OF SURGICAL SITE INFECTION AT TERTIARY CARE CENTRE IN DAKSHINA KANNADA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijith Sudhakar Shetty

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of the study is to study relation of emergency and elective surgery to postoperative wound infection and common organisms encountered. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seventy surgical infection were studied from postop patients. Culture and sensitivity reports were noted and documented. RESULTS Most common organism encountered is Pseudomonas (34.3%. Postoperative wound infection was commonly encountered in emergency cases (62.9% and clean contaminated type of cases (32.9%. CONCLUSION Most common organism in postoperative wound infection is Pseudomonas. Postoperative wound infection is more in emergency case, clean contaminated type of cases and patients prepared by shaving in more than 24 hours before surgery and who have not taken bath.

  11. Multi-Institution Analysis of Infection Control Practices Identifies the Subset Associated with Best Surgical Site Infection Performance: A Texas Alliance for Surgical Quality Collaborative Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Catherine H; Kao, Lillian S; Fleming, Jason B; Aloia, Thomas A

    2017-08-16

    In an effort to reduce surgical site infection (SSI) rates, a large number of infection control practices (ICPs), including operating room attire policies, have been recommended. However, few have proven benefits and many are costly, time-consuming, and detrimental to provider morale. The goal of this multi-institution study was to determine which ICPs are associated with lower postoperative SSI rates. Twenty American College of Surgeons NSQIP and Texas Alliance for Surgical Quality-affiliated hospitals completed this Quality Improvement Assessment Board-approved study. Surgeon champions at each hospital ranked current surgery, anesthesia, and nursing adherence to 38 separate ICPs in 6 categories (attire, preoperative, intraoperative, preoperative, intraoperative, antibiotics, postoperative, and reporting) on 4-point scales for general surgery cases. These data were compared with the risk-adjusted general surgery SSI odds ratios contained in the July 2016 American College of Surgeons NSQIP hospital-level, risk-adjusted reports. Compliance rates were compared between the 7 best (median SSI odds ratio, 0.64; range, 0.56 to 0.70) and 7 worst (median SSI odds ratio, 1.16; range, 0.94 to 1.65) performers using ANOVA. Nearly all hospitals reported maximal adherence to hair removal with clippers (Surgical Care Improvement Project measure Inf-6) and to best-practice prophylactic antibiotic metrics (Surgical Care Improvement Project measure Inf-1-3). Variable adherence was identified across many ICPs and more frequent compliance with 8 ICPs correlated with lower SSI odds ratios, including preoperative shower; skin preparation technique; using clean instruments, gowns, and gloves for wound closure and dressing changes; and transparent internal reporting of SSI data. Operating room attire ICPs, including coverage of nonscrubbed provider head and arm hair, did not correlate with SSI rates. This analysis suggests that the subset of ICPs that focus on perioperative patient

  12. Pattern of pathogens and their sensitivity isolated from superficial surgical site infections in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.A.; Tahir, S.M.; Shaikh, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    Infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. Rapidly emerging nosocomial pathogens and the problem of multi-drug resistance necessitates periodic review of isolation patterns and sensitivity in surgical practice. Surgical site infections (SSI) are defined as an infections that occurs at the incision site within thirty days after surgery. Objectives of the study were to determine the pattern of pathogens involved and their antibiotic sensitivity isolated from superficial surgical site infections in a teaching hospital. This observational study was conducted for 1 year from January 2008 to December 2008 in all 4 surgical units of Liaquat University Hospital Hyderabad which caters to patients from low socioeconomic status. Pus culture and sensitivity reports were collected prospectively from hospitalised patients who developed postoperative wound infection. The patients who developed fecal/biliary/urinary fistula or operated for malignancies, and with negative cultures were excluded from the study. Analysis was carried out using SPSS 10. During the study period 112 pus culture and sensitivity reports were analyzed. E. coli 68 (60.7%) was the most common organism isolated followed by Klebsiella 23 (20.5%). The least frequent organism was staph. Epidermidis 1 (0.9%). All isolates were sensitive to penicillin derivatives and carbapenem. Quinolones, Aminoglycosides and Monobactum were also showing some promise in our study. However, Cephalosporins were ineffective against most of the important isolates in our study. E. coli and klebsiella were the most important isolates form SSI in our study, and penicillin derivatives and carbapenem were showing 100% antibiotic sensitivity to all of the isolates. (author)

  13. Effectiveness of local vancomycin powder to decrease surgical site infections: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsiu-Yin; Herwaldt, Loreen A; Blevins, Amy E; Cho, Edward; Schweizer, Marin L

    2014-03-01

    Some surgeons use systemic vancomycin to prevent surgical site infections (SSIs), but patients who do not carry methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus have an increased risk of SSIs when given vancomycin alone for intravenous prophylaxis. Applying vancomycin powder to the wound before closure could increase the local tissue vancomycin level without significant systemic levels. However, the effectiveness of local vancomycin powder application for preventing SSIs has not been established. Our objective was to systematically review and evaluate studies on the effectiveness of local vancomycin powder for decreasing SSIs. Meta-analysis. We included observational studies, quasi-experimental studies, and randomized controlled trials of patients undergoing surgical procedures that involved vancomycin powder application to surgical wounds, reported SSI rates, and had a comparison group that did not use local vancomycin powder. The primary outcome was postoperative SSIs. The secondary outcomes included deep incisional SSIs and S. aureus SSIs. We performed systematic literature searches in PubMed, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials via Wiley, Scopus (including EMBASE abstracts), Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov, BMC Proceedings, ProQuest Dissertation, and Thesis in Health and Medicine, and conference abstracts from IDWeek, the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons annual meetings, and also the Scoliosis Research Society Annual Meeting and Course. We ran the searches from inception on May 9, 2013 with no limits on date or language. After reviewing 373 titles or abstracts and 22 articles in detail, we included 10 independent studies and used a random-effects model when pooling risk estimates to assess the effectiveness of local

  14. Influence of Peri-Operative Hypothermia on Surgical Site Infection in Prolonged Gastroenterological Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Toshie; Takesue, Yoshio; Ichiki, Kaoru; Uede, Takashi; Nakajima, Kazuhiko; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Uchino, Motoi

    2016-10-01

    There have been several recent studies on the correlation between intra-operative hypothermia and the occurrence of surgical site infection (SSI). Differences in the depth and timing of hypothermia and the surgical procedure may have led to conflicting results. Patients undergoing gastroenterologic surgery with a duration of >3 h were analyzed. Hypothermia was defined as a core temperature <36°C and was classified as mild (35.5-35.9°C), moderate (35.0-35.4°C), or severe (<35.0°C). Hypothermia also was classified as early-nadir (<36°C within two h of anesthesia induction) and late-nadir (after that time). Risk factors for SSIs were analyzed according to these classifications. Among 1,409 patients, 528 (37.5%) had hypothermia, which was classified as mild in 358, moderate in 137, and severe in 33. Early-nadir and late-nadir hypothermia was found in 23.7% and 13.8%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the incidence of SSIs between patients with and without hypothermia (relative risk 1.00; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80-1.25; p = 0.997). However, there was a significantly greater incidence of SSIs in patients with severe hypothermia (33.3%) than in those with normothermia (19.2%; p = 0.045) or mild hypothermia (17.0%; p = 0.021). The incidence of SSIs also was significantly greater in patients with late-nadir than in those with early-nadir hypothermia (23.7% vs. 16.5%; p = 0.041). The incidence of organ/space SSIs was significantly greater in patients with late-nadir hypothermia (19.6%) than in patients with normothermia (12.7%; p = 0.012). In multivariable analysis, neither severe hypothermia (odds ratio 1.24; 95% CI 0.56-2.77] nor late-nadir hypothermia (OR 0.71; 95% CI 0.46-1.01) was an independent risk factor for SSIs. Severe and late-nadir hypothermia were associated with a greater incidence of SSIs and organ/space SSIs. However, neither of these patterns was identified as an independent risk factor for SSIs, possibly

  15. Short Operative Duration and Surgical Site Infection Risk in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicks, Kristen V; Baker, Arthur W; Durkin, Michael J; Anderson, Deverick J; Moehring, Rebekah W; Chen, Luke F; Sexton, Daniel J; Weber, David J; Lewis, Sarah S

    2015-12-01

    To determine the association (1) between shorter operative duration and surgical site infection (SSI) and (2) between surgeon median operative duration and SSI risk among first-time hip and knee arthroplasties. Retrospective cohort study A total of 43 community hospitals located in the southeastern United States. Adults who developed SSIs according to National Healthcare Safety Network criteria within 365 days of first-time knee or hip arthroplasties performed between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012. Log-binomial regression models estimated the association (1) between operative duration and SSI outcome and (2) between surgeon median operative duration and SSI outcome. Hip and knee arthroplasties were evaluated in separate models. Each model was adjusted for American Society of Anesthesiology score and patient age. A total of 25,531 hip arthroplasties and 42,187 knee arthroplasties were included in the study. The risk of SSI in knee arthroplasties with an operative duration shorter than the 25th percentile was 0.40 times the risk of SSI in knee arthroplasties with an operative duration between the 25th and 75th percentile (risk ratio [RR], 0.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38-0.56; Poperative duration did not demonstrate significant association with SSI for hip arthroplasties (RR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.79-1.37; P=.36). Knee arthroplasty surgeons with shorter median operative durations had a lower risk of SSI than surgeons with typical median operative durations (RR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.43-0.64; Poperative durations were not associated with a higher SSI risk for knee or hip arthroplasty procedures in our analysis.

  16. A Prognostic Scoring Tool for Cesarean Organ/Space Surgical Site Infections: Derivation and Internal Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assawapalanggool, Srisuda; Kasatpibal, Nongyao; Sirichotiyakul, Supatra; Arora, Rajin; Suntornlimsiri, Watcharin

    Organ/space surgical site infections (SSIs) are serious complications after cesarean delivery. However, no scoring tool to predict these complications has yet been developed. This study sought to develop and validate a prognostic scoring tool for cesarean organ/space SSIs. Data for case and non-case of cesarean organ/space SSI between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 from a tertiary care hospital in Thailand were analyzed. Stepwise multivariable logistic regression was used to select the best predictor combination and their coefficients were transformed to a risk scoring tool. The likelihood ratio of positive for each risk category and the area under receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves were analyzed on total scores. Internal validation using bootstrap re-sampling was tested for reproducibility. The predictors of 243 organ/space SSIs from 4,988 eligible cesarean delivery cases comprised the presence of foul-smelling amniotic fluid (four points), vaginal examination five or more times before incision (two points), wound class III or greater (two points), being referred from local setting (two points), hemoglobin less than 11 g/dL (one point), and ethnic minorities (one point). The likelihood ratio of cesarean organ/space SSIs with 95% confidence interval among low (total score of 0-1 point), medium (total score of 2-5 points), and high risk (total score of ≥6 points) categories were 0.11 (0.07-0.19), 1.03 (0.89-1.18), and 13.25 (10.87-16.14), respectively. Both AUROCs of the derivation and validation data were comparable (87.57% versus 86.08%; p = 0.418). This scoring tool showed a high predictive ability regarding cesarean organ/space SSIs on the derivation data and reproducibility was demonstrated on internal validation. It could assist practitioners prioritize patient care and management depending on risk category and decrease SSI rates in cesarean deliveries.

  17. Clinical relevance of surgical site infection as defined by the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, N A; Meyhoff, C S; Wetterslev, J

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after abdominal surgery and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria are commonly used for diagnosis and surveillance. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SSI diagnosed according to CDC is clinically relevant...... diagnosed with SSI and a matched control group (N=46) without SSI according to the CDC criteria after laparotomy. Two blinded experienced surgeons evaluated the hospital records and determined whether patients had CRSSI, based on the following criteria: antibiotic treatment, surgical intervention, prolonged...

  18. The Role of Pre-Operative and Post-Operative Glucose Control in Surgical-Site Infections and Mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Christie Y.; Furuya, E. Yoko; Berman, Mitchell F.; Larson, Elaine L.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective The impact of glucose control on surgical-site infection (SSI) and death remains unclear. We examined how pre- and post-operative glucose levels and their variability are associated with the risk of SSI or in-hospital death. Methods This retrospective cohort study employed data on 13,800 hospitalized patients who underwent a surgical procedure at a large referral hospital in New York between 2006 and 2008. Over 20 different sources of electronic data were used to anal...

  19. Multivariable predictors of postoperative surgical site infection after general and vascular surgery: results from the patient safety in surgery study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumayer, Leigh; Hosokawa, Patrick; Itani, Kamal; El-Tamer, Mahmoud; Henderson, William G; Khuri, Shukri F

    2007-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a potentially preventable complication. We developed and tested a model to predict patients at high risk for surgical site infection. Data from the Patient Safety in Surgery Study/National Surgical Quality Improvement Program from a 3-year period were used to develop and test a predictive model of SSI using logistic regression analyses. From October 2001 through September 2004, 7,035 of 163,624 (4.30%) patients undergoing vascular and general surgical procedures at 14 academic and 128 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers experienced SSI. Fourteen variables independently associated with increased risk of SSI included patient factors (age greater than 40 years, diabetes, dyspnea, use of steroids, alcoholism, smoking, recent radiotherapy, and American Society of Anesthesiologists class 2 or higher), preoperative laboratory values (albumin1.0 mg/dL), and operative characteristics (emergency, complexity [work relative value units>/=10], type of procedure, and wound classification). The SSI risk score is more accurate than the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance score in predicting SSI (c-indices 0.70, 0.62, respectively). We developed and tested an accurate prediction score for SSI. Clinicians can use this score to predict their patient's risk of an SSI and implement appropriate prevention strategies.

  20. Prospective multicenter surveillance and risk factor analysis of deep surgical site infection after posterior thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Takashi; Maruyama, Toru; Oka, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Kota; Azuma, Seiichi; Yamada, Takashi; Murakami, Motoaki; Kawamura, Naohiro; Hara, Nobuhiro; Terayama, Sei; Morii, Jiro; Kato, So; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infection is a serious and significant complication after spinal surgery and is associated with high morbidity rates, high healthcare costs and poor patient outcomes. Accurate identification of risk factors is essential for developing strategies to prevent devastating infections. The purpose of this study was to identify independent risk factors for surgical site infection among posterior thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adult patients using a prospective multicenter surveillance research method. From July 2010 to June 2012, we performed a prospective surveillance study in adult patients who had developed surgical site infection after undergoing thoracic and/or lumbar posterior spinal surgery at 11 participating hospitals. Detailed preoperative and operative patient characteristics were prospectively recorded using a standardized data collection format. Surgical site infection was based on the definition established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A total of 2,736 consecutive adult patients were enrolled, of which 24 (0.9%) developed postoperative deep surgical site infection. Multivariate regression analysis indicated four independent risk factors. Preoperative steroid therapy (P = 0.001), spinal trauma (P = 0.048) and gender (male) (P = 0.02) were statistically significant independent patient-related risk factors, whereas an operating time ≥3 h (P operating time ≥3 h were independent risk factors for deep surgical site infection after thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adult patients. Identification of these risk factors can be used to develop protocols aimed at decreasing the risk of surgical site infection.

  1. Surgical site infection after total en bloc spondylectomy: risk factors and the preventive new technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Hideki; Demura, Satoru; Kato, Satoshi; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Shinmura, Kazuya; Yokogawa, Noriaki; Ishii, Takayoshi; Fang, Xiang; Shirai, Toshiharu; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) associated with instruments remains a serious and common complication in patients who undergo total en bloc spondylectomy (TES). It is very important that the risk factors for SSI are known to prevent it. The purpose of the study was to identify independent risk factors for SSI after TES and evaluate the positive effect of iodine-supported spinal instruments in the prevention of SSI after TES. This is a retrospective clinical study. One hundred twenty-five patients who underwent TES for vertebral tumor were evaluated. Incidence rate of SSI, risk factors for SSI after TES, and safety of iodine-supported spinal instruments were the outcome measures. Risk factors for SSI were analyzed using logistic regression. In recent 69 patients with iodine-supported spinal instruments, the thyroid hormone levels in the blood were examined to confirm if iodine from the implant influenced thyroid function. Postoperative radiological evaluations were performed regularly. The rate of SSI was 6.4% (8/125 patients). By multivariate logistic regression, combined anterior and posterior approach and nonuse of iodine-supported spinal instruments were associated with an increased risk of SSI. The rate of SSI without iodine-supported spinal instruments was 12.5%, whereas the rate with iodine-supported spinal instruments was 1.4%. This difference was statistically significant. There were no detected abnormalities of thyroid gland function with the use of iodine-supported instruments. Among the 69 patients with iodine-supported spinal instruments, 2 patients required additional surgery because of instrument failure. However, there were no obvious involvements with the use of iodine-supported spinal instruments. This study identified combined anterior and posterior approach and nonuse of iodine-supported spinal instruments to be independent risk factors for SSI after TES. Iodine-supported spinal instrument was extremely effective for prevention of SSI in patients

  2. Effect of laminar airflow ventilation on surgical site infections: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Peter; Kubilay, N Zeynep; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Egger, Matthias; Gastmeier, Petra

    2017-05-01

    The role of the operating room's ventilation system in the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs) is widely discussed, and existing guidelines do not reflect current evidence. In this context, laminar airflow ventilation was compared with conventional ventilation to assess their effectiveness in reducing the risk of SSIs. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and WHO regional medical databases from Jan 1, 1990, to Jan 31, 2014. We updated the search for MEDLINE for the period between Feb 1, 2014, and May 25, 2016. We included studies most relevant to our predefined question: is the use of laminar airflow in the operating room associated with the reduction of overall or deep SSI as outcomes in patients of any age undergoing surgical operations? We excluded studies not relevant to the study question, studies not in the selected languages, studies published before Jan 1, 1990, or after May 25, 2016, meeting or conference abstracts, and studies of which the full text was not available. Data were extracted by two independent investigators, with disagreements resolved through further discussion. Authors were contacted if the full-text article was not available, or if important data or information on the paper's content was absent. Studies were assessed for publication bias. Grading of recommendations assessment, development, and evaluation was used to assess the quality of the identified evidence. Meta-analyses were done with RevMan (version 5.3). We identified 1947 records of which 12 observational studies were comparing laminar airflow ventilation with conventional turbulent ventilation in orthopaedic, abdominal, and vascular surgery. The meta-analysis of eight cohort studies showed no difference in risk for deep SSIs following total hip arthroplasty (330 146 procedures, odds ratio [OR] 1·29, 95% CI 0·98-1·71; p=0·07, I 2 =83%). For total knee arthroplasty, the meta-analysis of six cohort studies showed no difference

  3. Intraoperative interventions for preventing surgical site infection: an overview of Cochrane Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenmi; Dumville, Jo C; Norman, Gill; Westby, Maggie J; Blazeby, Jane; McFarlane, Emma; Welton, Nicky J; O'Connor, Louise; Cawthorne, Julie; George, Ryan P; Crosbie, Emma J; Rithalia, Amber D; Cheng, Hung-Yuan

    2018-02-06

    Surgical site infection (SSI) rates vary from 1% to 5% in the month following surgery. Due to the large number of surgical procedures conducted annually, the costs of these SSIs can be considerable in financial and social terms. Many interventions are used with the aim of reducing the risk of SSI in people undergoing surgery. These interventions can be broadly delivered at three stages: preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively. The intraoperative interventions are largely focused on decontamination of skin using soap and antiseptics; the use of barriers to prevent movement of micro-organisms into incisions; and optimising the patient's own bodily functions to promote best recovery. Both decontamination and barrier methods can be aimed at people undergoing surgery and operating staff. Other interventions focused on SSI prevention may be aimed at the surgical environment and include methods of theatre cleansing and approaches to managing theatre traffic. To present an overview of Cochrane Reviews of the effectiveness and safety of interventions, delivered during the intraoperative period, aimed at preventing SSIs in all populations undergoing surgery in an operating theatre. Published Cochrane systematic reviews reporting the effectiveness of interventions delivered during the intraoperative period in terms of SSI prevention were eligible for inclusion in this overview. We also identified Cochrane protocols and title registrations for future inclusion into the overview. We searched the Cochrane Library on 01 July 2017. Two review authors independently screened search results and undertook data extraction and 'Risk of bias' and certainty assessment. We used the ROBIS (risk of bias in systematic reviews) tool to assess the quality of included reviews, and we used GRADE methods to assess the certainty of the evidence for each outcome. We summarised the characteristics of included reviews in the text and in additional tables. We included 32 Cochrane Reviews

  4. Case of late-onset, relapsing surgical site infection related to a venous coupler placed during free flap reconstruction for major head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yin; Deschler, Daniel G; Sajed, Dipti; Durand, Marlene L

    2018-01-12

    Venous coupling devices are widely used during reconstructive surgery involving microvascular anastomosis but have not served as foreign bodies in head and neck surgical site infections. We conducted a case report. A patient underwent resection and free flap reconstruction for recurrent tongue squamous cell carcinoma. She developed a neck abscess due to Streptococcus intermedius 7 weeks postoperatively, days after starting chemoradiotherapy. The surgical site infection healed with drainage and antibiotics. Two surgical site infection relapses due to S. intermedius occurred 3 and 8 weeks after completing radiation, the second relapse after a prolonged course of i.v. antibiotics. Surgical exploration revealed a venous coupler within granulation tissue. The device was removed and no further surgical site infection relapses occurred. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a delayed-onset head and neck surgical site infection in which a venous coupler served as a foreign body. An infected foreign body should be suspected in relapsing surgical site infections due to a single organism. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Prospective Randomized Evaluation of Intraoperative Application of Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma on Surgical Site Infection or Delayed Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanGiovanni, Thomas P; Kiebzak, Gary M

    2016-05-01

    Prevention of surgical site infections and the reduction of wound-related complication rates have become increasingly emphasized by hospital task groups and government agencies given the degree of economic burden it places on the health care system. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains growth factors and other biomolecules that promote endogenous microbicidal activity. We hypothesized that PRP would help prevent postoperative infection and delayed wound healing (DWH). We randomized patients having foot or ankle surgery to the treatment group receiving intraoperative PRP (applied to operative field) and platelet-poor plasma at closing (PPP, on the sutured skin) or the control group (no PRP/PPP). The incidence of deep surgical site infection and DWH (collectively called endpoints) was compared between groups (n = 250/group). PRP had a mean 5.3-fold platelet concentration compared to whole blood, with concentrated white blood cells. Mean age (±SD) of patients was 52 years (±15), 65% were women. Minor and major operative procedures were included. Patients were followed for 60 days. Seventy controls had PRP prepared for assay of growth factors. Procedure mix, ASA scores, mean operative times, and comorbidity mix were similar between groups. The primary result was no difference in number of endpoints between groups: 19 patients in the PRP group (7.6%) versus 18 controls (7.2%). Endpoints were deep surgical site infections in 2 PRP/PPP patients and 1 control, and DWH in 17 PRP/PPP patients and 17 controls. Analysis of PRP samples revealed a large variation in growth factor concentrations between patients. Intraoperative application of PRP/PPP did not reduce the incidence of postoperative infection or DWH. Growth factor profiles varied greatly between patients, suggesting that the potentially therapeutic treatment delivered was not consistent from patient-to-patient. Level I, prospective randomized trial. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Predictors of surgical site infections among patients undergoing major surgery at Bugando Medical Centre in Northwestern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imirzalioglu Can

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infection (SSI continues to be a major source of morbidity and mortality in developing countries despite recent advances in aseptic techniques. There is no baseline information regarding SSI in our setting therefore it was necessary to conduct this study to establish the prevalence, pattern and predictors of surgical site infection at Bugando Medical Centre Mwanza (BMC, Tanzania. Methods This was a cross-sectional prospective study involving all patients who underwent major surgery in surgical wards between July 2009 and March 2010. After informed written consent for the study and HIV testing, all patients who met inclusion criteria were consecutively enrolled into the study. Pre-operative, intra-operative and post operative data were collected using standardized data collection form. Wound specimens were collected and processed as per standard operative procedures; and susceptibility testing was done using disc diffusion technique. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 15 and STATA. Results Surgical site infection (SSI was detected in 65 (26.0% patients, of whom 56 (86.2% and 9 (13.8% had superficial and deep SSI respectively. Among 65 patients with clinical SSI, 56(86.2% had positive aerobic culture. Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant organism 16/56 (28.6%; of which 3/16 (18.8% were MRSA. This was followed by Escherichia coli 14/56 (25% and Klebsiella pneumoniae 10/56 (17.9%. Among the Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates 9(64.3% and 8(80% were ESBL producers respectively. A total of 37/250 (14.8% patients were HIV positive with a mean CD4 count of 296 cells/ml. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, presence of pre-morbid illness (OR = 6.1, use of drain (OR = 15.3, use of iodine alone in skin preparation (OR = 17.6, duration of operation ≥ 3 hours (OR = 3.2 and cigarette smoking (OR = 9.6 significantly predicted surgical site infection (SSI Conclusion SSI is common

  7. Introduction to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomkin, Joseph S; Mazuski, John; Blanchard, Joan C; Itani, Kamal M F; Ricks, Philip; Dellinger, E Patchen; Allen, George; Kelz, Rachel; Reinke, Caroline E; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common type of health-care-associated infection (HAI) and adds considerably to the individual, social, and economic costs of surgical treatment. This document serves to introduce the updated Guideline for the Prevention of SSI from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC). The Core section of the guideline addresses issues relevant to multiple surgical specialties and procedures. The second procedure-specific section focuses on a high-volume, high-burden procedure: Prosthetic joint arthroplasty. While many elements of the 1999 guideline remain current, others warrant updating to incorporate new knowledge and changes in the patient population, operative techniques, emerging pathogens, and guideline development methodology.

  8. A study comparing preoperative intra-incisional antibiotic infiltration and prophylactic intravenous antibiotic administration for reducing surgical site infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Bhushan Dogra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical site infection (SSI continues to be a distressing problem since time immemorial, as it happens to be one of the major causes of post-operative morbidity and mortality. Many methods have been evolved to combat wound infection, but the rate of wound infection has been more or less static over the past few decades. The search for alternative modes of management is going on and one of the methods is intra-incisional infiltration of antibiotics. Aims and Objectives: To study the comparative efficacy of pre-operative intra-incisional antibiotic infiltration and prophylactic parenteral antibiotic therapy in reducing surgical site infection. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled study comprising of 120 patients divided in to three groups i.e. 40 in each group. Group A comprising 40 patients were subjected to local infiltration of 1 gram of Cefotaxime around the site of incision, 20 min before the induction of anesthesia. Group B comprising of 40 patients were administered a single dose of 1 gram of Cefotaxime intravenously 20 minutes before the surgical incision and Group C comprising of 40 patients were administered local infiltration of 1 gram of Cefotaxime as well as intravenous administration of 1 gram of Cefotaxime, 20 minutes before surgical incision. Inclusion criteria were patients in age group of 20-60 yrs, procedures that lasted for less than 2 hours, clean and clean contaminated surgical procedures. The exclusion criteria were patients with diabetes mellitus and those on steroid therapy. Incidence of SSI, type of organisms cultured in case of infection were studied. Results: Overall incidence of SSI in Group A was 10%, in Group B 18%, and Group C 2.5%. Frequency of infection due to gram positive bacteria was more as compared to gram negative in the cases that developed SSI. The commonest organism isolated was Methicillin Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA. Conclusion: The incidence of SSI

  9. Surgical Site Infection after Sternotomy in Low- and Middle-Human Development Index Countries: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Joseph D; Cai, Lawrence Z; Zeigler, Sanford; Weiser, Thomas G

    2017-10-01

    The burden of cardiovascular disease is increasing in low- and middle-human development index (LMHDI) countries, and cardiac operations are an important component of a comprehensive cardiovascular care package. Little is known about the baseline incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs) among patients undergoing sternotomy in LMHDI countries. A prospectively registered, systematic literature review of articles in the PubMed, Ovid, and Web of Science databases describing the epidemiology and management of SSIs among persons undergoing sternotomy in LMHDI countries was performed. We performed a quantitative synthesis of patients undergoing sternotomy for CABG to estimate published sternotomy SSI rates. Of the 423 abstracts identified after applying search criteria, 14 studies were reviewed in detail. The pooled SSI rate after sternotomy among reviewed studies was 4.3 infections per 100 sternotomies (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-6.0 infections per 100 sternotomies), which is comparable to infection rates in high-human development index countries. As the burden of cardiovascular disease in LMHDI settings increases, the ability to provide safe cardiac surgical care is paramount. Describing the baseline SSI rate after sternotomy in LMHDI countries is an important first step in creating baseline expectations for SSI rates in cardiac surgical programs in these settings.

  10. Risk factors for surgical site infection following cesarean section in a Brazilian Women's Hospital: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farret, Túlio Cícero Franco; Dallé, Jessica; Monteiro, Vinícius da Silva; Riche, Cezar Vinícius Würdig; Antonello, Vicente Sperb

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated patients with diagnosis of surgical site infection (SSI) following cesarean section and their controls to determinate risk factors and impact of antibiotic prophylaxis on this condition. All cesareans performed from January 2009 to December 2012 were evaluated for SSI, based on criteria established by CDC/NHSN. Control patients were determined after inclusion of case patients. Medical records of case and control patients were reviewed and compared regarding sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Our study demonstrated an association following univariate analysis between post-cesarean SSI and number of internal vaginal examinations, time of membrane rupture, emergency cesarean and improper use of antibiotic prophylaxis. This same situation did not repeat itself in multivariate analysis with adjustment for risk factors, especially with regard to antibiotic prophylaxis, considering the emergency cesarean factor only. The authors of the present study not only question surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis use based on data presented here and in literature, but suggest that the prophylaxis is perhaps indicated primarily in selected groups of patients undergoing cesarean section. Further research with greater number of patients and evaluated risk factors are fundamental for better understanding of the causes and evolution of surgical site infection after cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  11. The Overview of Surgical Site Infection of Pasca Caesarean Section at Arifin Achmad General Hospital of Riau Province 1 January – 31 December 2014 Period

    OpenAIRE

    Muttaqien, M. Imam; Hamidy, Muhammad Yulis; Rustam, Ruza Prima

    2016-01-01

    Caesarean section has high risk of surgical site infection (SSI). This research explain about surgical site infection after caesarean section in RSUD Arifin Achmad Province of Riau 1 January – 31 December period. The method of this research is retrospective descriptive. The source of data were taken from medical record of patient that underwent caesarean section in RSUD Arifin Achmad Province of Riau. This research found 573 patients that underwent caesarean section in 2014. The number of SSI...

  12. A Quality Improvement Approach to Reducing the Caesarean section Surgical Site Infection Rate in a Regional Hospital

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’ Hanlon, M

    2016-09-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) rates are used extensively by hospitals as a basis for quality improvement. A 30-day post-discharge SSI programme for Caesarean section operations has been implemented in Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital since 2011. It has been shown that skin antisepsis and antibiotic prophylaxis are key factors in the prevention of SSI. Using quality improvement methodology, an infection prevention bundle was introduced to address these two factors. Skin antisepsis was changed from povidone-iodine to chlorhexidine-alcohol. Compliance with choice of antibiotic prophylaxis increased from 89.6% in 2014 to 98.5% in 2015. Compliance with timing also improved. The SSI rate of 7.5% was the lowest recorded to date, with the majority of SSIs (64%) diagnosed after hospital discharge. The level of variation was also reduced. However, the continued presence of variation and possibility of lower infection rates from the literature imply that further improvements are required.

  13. A Quality Improvement Approach to Reducing the Caesarean section Surgical Site Infection Rate in a Regional Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanlon, M; McKenna, C; Carton, E; Diviney, D; Costello, M R; O'Sullivan, L; Fitzsimons, J; Toland, L; Dornikova, G; Curran, R; McCann, C; O'Sullivan, L; Doherty, T; Crowley, C; O'Coigligh, S

    2016-09-09

    Surgical site infection (SSI) rates are used extensively by hospitals as a basis for quality improvement. A 30-day post-discharge SSI programme for Caesarean section operations has been implemented in Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital since 2011. It has been shown that skin antisepsis and antibiotic prophylaxis are key factors in the prevention of SSI. Using quality improvement methodology, an infection prevention bundle was introduced to address these two factors. Skin antisepsis was changed from povidone-iodine to chlorhexidine-alcohol. Compliance with choice of antibiotic prophylaxis increased from 89.6% in 2014 to 98.5% in 2015. Compliance with timing also improved. The SSI rate of 7.5% was the lowest recorded to date, with the majority of SSIs (64%) diagnosed after hospital discharge. The level of variation was also reduced. However, the continued presence of variation and possibility of lower infection rates from the literature imply that further improvements are required.

  14. An Inexpensive Modified Primary Closure Technique for Class IV (Dirty) Wounds Significantly Decreases Superficial and Deep Surgical Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bradford J; Aloia, Thomas A

    2016-11-01

    Despite the creation of several programs to decrease the incidence of surgical site infection, it remains a common complication that has a significant impact on patient recovery and medical costs. The following is a description and brief outcome report of a modified primary closure technique used for dirty (Class IV) wounds. There were 14 consecutive patients who had a laparotomy with Class IV wounds treated by a single surgeon (TAA) from 2011 to 2015. All patients had a history of cancer and either showed signs suggestive for an acute abdomen and required an emergent exploratory laparotomy or were found to have purulent intraabdominal infection at the time of elective surgery. The operation and "modified primary closure" technique (subcutaneous wound wicks with stapled skin closure) were performed in every case. The modified primary closure technique was utilized in 14 patients with a Class IV wound. There were no 30-day mortalities or readmissions. Wound wicks were slowly advanced out over a 7-day period, and only one patient required subsequent wound packing of a single-wicked area. There were no superficial or deep surgical site infections, or wound dehiscence during the hospital course, or 30-day postoperative period. The modified primary closure technique is efficient and inexpensive and was effective in a series of 14 patients with wounds classified as dirty.

  15. Pattern of Bacterial Pathogens and Their Susceptibility Isolated from Surgical Site Infections at Selected Referral Hospitals, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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    Walelign Dessie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens in hospitals is becoming a challenge for surgeons to treat hospital acquired infections. Objective. To determine bacterial pathogens and drug susceptibility isolated from surgical site infections at St. Paul Specialized Hospital Millennium Medical College and Yekatit 12 Referral Hospital Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted between October 2013 and March 2014 on 107 surgical site infected patients. Wound specimens were collected using sterile cotton swab and processed as per standard operative procedures in appropriate culture media; and susceptibility testing was done using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique. The data were analyzed by using SPSS version 20. Result. From a total of 107 swabs collected, 90 (84.1% were culture positive and 104 organisms were isolated. E. coli (24 (23.1% was the most common organism isolated followed by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter species (23 (22.1%. More than 58 (75% of the Gram negative isolates showed multiple antibiotic resistance (resistance ≥ 5 drugs. Pan-antibiotic resistance was noted among 8 (34.8% Acinetobacter species and 3 (12.5% E. coli. This calls for abstinence from antibiotic abuse. Conclusion. Gram negative bacteria were the most important isolates accounting for 76 (73.1%. Ampicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, cephazoline, and tetracycline showed resistance while gentamicin and ciprofloxacin were relatively effective antimicrobials.

  16. Incidence and risk factors for surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jiashen; Chang, Hengrui; Zhu, Yanbin; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Zhanle; Zhang, Huixin; Zhang, Yingze

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively summarize the risk factors associated with surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture. Medline, Embase, CNKI, Wanfang database and Cochrane central database were searched for relevant original studies from database inception to October 2016. Eligible studies had to meet quality assessment criteria according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, and had to evaluate the risk factors for surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture. Stata 11.0 software was used for this meta-analysis. Eight studies involving 2214 cases of tibial plateau fracture treated by open reduction and internal fixation and 219 cases of surgical site infection were included in this meta-analysis. The following parameters were identified as significant risk factors for surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture (p operative time (OR 2.15; 95% CI 1.53-3.02), tobacco use (OR 2.13; 95% CI 1.13-3.99), and external fixation (OR 2.07; 95% CI 1.05-4.09). Other factors, including male sex, were not identified as risk factors for surgical site infection. Patients with the abovementioned medical conditions are at risk of surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture. Surgeons should be cognizant of these risks and give relevant preoperative advice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. A journey to zero: reduction of post-operative cesarean surgical site infections over a five-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, Evelyn; Harris, Jeanette; Brett, David

    2015-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are a substantial concern for cesarean deliveries in which a surgical site complication is most unwelcome for a mother with a new infant. Steps taken pre- and post-operatively to reduce the number of complications may be of substantial benefit clinically, economically, and psychologically. A risk-based approach to incision management was developed and implemented for all cesarean deliveries at our institution. A number of incremental interventions for low-risk and high-risk patients including pre-operative skin preparations, standardized pre- and post-operative protocols, post-operative nanocrystalline silver anti-microbial barrier dressings, and incisional negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) were implemented sequentially over a 5-y period. A systematic clinical chart review of 4,942 patients spanning all cesarean deliveries between 2007-2012 was performed to determine what effects the interventions had on the rate of SSI for cesarean deliveries. The percentage of SSI was reduced from 2.13% (2007) to 0.10% (2012) (poperative SSIs were avoided: A total cost saving of nearly $5,000,000. Applying a clinical algorithm for assessing the risk of surgical site complication and making recommendations on pre-operative and post-operative incision management can result in a substantial and sustainable reduction in cesarean SSI.

  18. Preoperative bathing with chlorhexidine reduces the incidence of surgical site infections after total knee arthroplasty: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Zheng, Jia; Zhao, Yongqiang; Xiang, Yungai; Chen, Xiao; Zhao, Fei; Jin, Yi

    2017-11-01

    Surgical site infection is a devastating postoperative complication, and the occurrence ranges from 1% to 2% after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The efficacy of the preoperative use of chlorhexidine for reducing infection has been debated. This meta-analysis aimed to examine the efficacy of the use of chlorhexidine to prevent surgical site infections after TKA. In February 2017, a systematic literature review was conducted using the following electronic databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the Google database. Data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and retrospective comparative study (RCS) that compared the use of chlorhexidine versus control washes to prep patients for TKA were retrieved. The primary endpoint was to compare the total incidence of infection with and without the use of chlorhexidine. The secondary outcomes were the incidence of infection in low-risk category patients, moderate-risk category patients, and high-risk category patients. After testing for publication bias and heterogeneity between studies, data were aggregated for random-effects modeling when necessary. Four clinical trials that included 8787 patients (chlorhexidine group: n = 2615, control group: n = 6172) were ultimately included in the meta-analysis. Chlorhexidine was associated with a reduced total incidence of infection, corresponding to a reduction of 1.69% [risk ratio (RR) = 0.22; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.12-0.40; P = .000]. Similarly, chlorhexidine was associated with a reduction in the incidence of infection among patients in the moderate-risk category (RR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.05-0.63; P = .007) and the high-risk category (RR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.03-0.67; P = .014). There was no significant difference between the incidence of infection in low-risk category patients with chlorhexidine use compared with the use of control washes (RR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.22-1.60; P = .330). The preoperative

  19. Surveillance of surgical site infections at a tertiary care hospital in Greece: incidence, risk factors, microbiology, and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumbelaki, Maria; Kritsotakis, Evangelos I; Tsioutis, Constantinos; Tzilepi, Penelope; Gikas, Achilleas

    2008-12-01

    In this first attempt to implement a standardized surveillance system of surgical site infections (SSI) in a Greek hospital, our objective was to identify areas for improvement by comparing main epidemiologic and microbiologic features of SSI with international data. The National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) system protocols were employed to prospectively collect data for patients in 8 surgical wards who underwent surgery during a 9-month period. SSI rates were benchmarked with international data using standardized infection ratios. Risk factors were evaluated by multivariate logistic regression. A total of 129 SSI was identified in 2420 operations (5.3%), of which 47.3% developed after discharge. SSI rates were higher for 2 of 20 operation categories compared with Spanish and Italian data and for 12 of 20 categories compared with NNIS data. Gram-positive microorganisms accounted for 52.1% of SSI isolates, and Enterococci were predominant. Alarming resistance patterns for Enterococcus faecium and Acinetobacter baumannii were recorded. Potentially modifiable risk factors for SSI included multiple procedures, extended duration of operation, and antibiotic prophylaxis. SSI was associated with prolongation of postoperative stay but not with mortality. Comparisons of surveillance data in our hospital with international benchmarks provided useful information for infection control interventions to reduce the incidence of SSI.

  20. Can surgical site infections be reduced with the adoption of a bundle of simultaneous initiatives? The use of NSQIP incidence data to follow multiple quality improvement interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozario, Duncan

    2018-02-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are a common complication after surgical procedures. To reduce the incidence of SSIs, Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital decided to institute a bundle of initiatives to change multiple factors simultaneously based on best available evidence and the understanding of infection pathophysiology. We used National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data on the incidence of SSIs in our targeted and essentials, general surgery and orthopedic surgery cases before and after the implementation of an SSI reduction bundle. This article discusses whether the use of intervention bundles may assist in the reduction of a variety of postoperative surgical complications.

  1. Comparison of laparoscopic and open appendectomy in terms of operative time, hospital stay and frequency of surgical site infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, T.; Saleem, M.R.; Aziz, O.B.; Arshad, A.

    2014-01-01

    To compare laparoscopic and conventional open appendectomy in terms of operative time, hospital stay and frequency of surgical site infection (SSI). Patient and Methods: A total of 417 patients underwent appendectomy during this period. 137 patients underwent laparoscopic appendectomy (group A) while 280 patient had open appendectomy (group B). The samples include all patients who were operated open between the time span of june 2010 to september 2011. A chi square-test was performed to compare the data for statistical significance. Result: Mean operative time for group A was 79.21+-23.42 minitues where as in group B, the mean operative time was 41.49+-20.86 minitues. Group A patients had a shorter hospital 1 stay (3.6+-1 day) but in group B it was (5.2+-3 days). Seven patients (5.1 %) developed surgical site infection (SSI) in group A and 34 patients (12.14 %)developed postoperative SSI in group B. Conclusion: Laparoscopic appendectomy is superior to open appendectomy because of shorter hospital stay and laser-operative SSI, but requires longer operative time. (author)

  2. Deep surgical site infection after anterior decompression and fusion with plate fixation for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy or myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qunfeng; Zhang, Mei; Wang, Liang; Lu, Xuhua; Ni, Bin

    2016-02-01

    To analyze the diagnosis and management of deep surgical site infection (SSI) with implant involved after anterior decompression and fusion for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy/myelopathy (CSR/CSM). Data of the patients who underwent anterior cervical decompression and fusion with plate fixation due to CSR/CSM were retrospectively reviewed. Cases with postoperative deep SSI with implant involved were identified and analyzed. A total of 1287 patients were finally included. Five patients (0.4%) were found to be with deep SSI. Bone fusion was not obtained when SSI was confirmed in each patient. Three cases were cured using one or two debridement and postoperative antibiotic therapy. Two cases with delayed diagnosis needed anterior implants removal, interbody fusion with autologous iliac bone and posterior lateral mass screw fixation at the first/second debridement. One of the two patients developed esophagus perforation after a second debridement and experienced one-month open drainage. All of the patients were cured without relapse of infection. For early deep SSI after anterior cervical decompression and fusion, surgical debridement was effective to eradicate infection. But for cases with delayed diagnosis, anterior debridement with prophylactic implant removal and posterior reconstruction was an ideal option. Esophagus perforation complicated with multiple debridements should be paid attention to and avoided. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. A study of organisms causing surgical site infections and their antimicrobial susceptibility in a tertiary care Government Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha S Mundhada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical site infection (SSI is one of the most common postoperative complication and causes significant postoperative morbidity and mortality. Patients: A prospective study was carried out in a total of 100 patients operated for clean and clean-contaminated surgeries from department of orthopedics, surgery and obstetrics & gynecology. Materials and Methods: Relevant details were noted in clinical history. Each patient was followed from the time of admission till discharge from the hospital and also for 30 days postoperatively (CDC, 1999. The identification of the infecting organism was done by staining, and culture and antibiotic susceptibility by Disc Diffusion method. Results: Out of 100 patients, 32 patients got infected post-operatively. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common organism isolated. None of the strains were Methicillin resistant. Drug resistance was widespread, especially in Enterobacteriaceae, where the Cefotaxime resistant strains of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were ESBL producing. Another concern in recent times is the isolation of Acinetobacter from surgical wounds. Various patient factors and hospital protocol were analyzed with regard to the treatment outcome. Judicious use of antibiotics along with evidence-based medicine is the need of the hour to stop the rise of these superbugs.

  4. Pre-operative urinary tract infection: is it a risk factor for early surgical site infection with hip fracture surgery? A retrospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yassa, Rafik RD; Khalfaoui, Mahdi Y; Veravalli, Karunakar; Evans, D Alun

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aims of the current study were to determine whether pre-operative urinary tract infections in patients presenting acutely with neck of femur fractures resulted in a delay to surgery and whether such patients were at increased risk of developing post-operative surgical site infections. Design A retrospective review of all patients presenting with a neck of femur fracture, at a single centre over a one-year period. The hospital hip fracture database was used as the main source of ...

  5. Intra-Operative Inspired Fraction of Oxygen and the Risk of Surgical Site Infections in Patients with Type 1 Surgical Incisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanta, Brendan T; Hanson, Kristine T; Hyder, Joseph A; Stewart, Thomas M; Curry, Timothy B; Berbari, Elie F; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Kor, Daryl J; Brown, Michael J

    2018-04-02

    Whether the fraction of inspired oxygen (F I O 2 ) influences the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) is controversial. The World Health Organization and the World Federation of Societies of Anesthesiologists offer conflicting recommendations. In this study, we evaluate simultaneously three different definitions of F I O 2 exposure and the risk of SSI in a large surgical population. Patients with clean (type 1) surgical incisions who developed superficial and deep organ/space SSI within 30 days after surgery from January 2003 through December 2012 in five surgical specialties were matched to specialty-specific controls. Fraction of inspired oxygen exposure was defined as (1) nadir F I O 2 , (2) percentage of operative time with F I O 2 greater than 50%, and (3) cumulative hyperoxia exposure, calculated as the area under the curve (AUC) of F I O 2 by time for the duration in which F I O 2 greater than 50%. Stratified univariable and multivariable logistic regression models tested associations between F I O 2 and SSI. One thousand two hundred fifty cases of SSI were matched to 3,248 controls. Increased oxygen exposure, by any of the three measures, was not associated with the outcome of any SSI in a multivariable logistic regression model. Elevated body mass index (BMI; 35+ vs. operative oxygen exposure was associated with higher odds of SSI in the neurosurgical and spine populations. Increased intra-operative inspired fraction of oxygen was not associated with a reduction in SSI. These findings do not support the practice of increasing F I O 2 for the purpose of SSI reduction in patients with clean surgical incisions.

  6. Developing algorithms for healthcare insurers to systematically monitor surgical site infection rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livingston James M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Claims data provide rapid indicators of SSIs for coronary artery bypass surgery and have been shown to successfully rank hospitals by SSI rates. We now operationalize this method for use by payers without transfer of protected health information, or any insurer data, to external analytic centers. Results We performed a descriptive study testing the operationalization of software for payers to routinely assess surgical infection rates among hospitals where enrollees receive cardiac procedures. We developed five SAS programs and a user manual for direct use by health plans and payers. The manual and programs were refined following provision to two national insurers who applied the programs to claims databases, following instructions on data preparation, data validation, analysis, and verification and interpretation of program output. A final set of programs and user manual successfully guided health plan programmer analysts to apply SSI algorithms to claims databases. Validation steps identified common problems such as incomplete preparation of data, missing data, insufficient sample size, and other issues that might result in program failure. Several user prompts enabled health plans to select time windows, strata such as insurance type, and the threshold number of procedures performed by a hospital before inclusion in regression models assessing relative SSI rates among hospitals. No health plan data was transferred to outside entities. Programs, on default settings, provided descriptive tables of SSI indicators stratified by hospital, insurer type, SSI indicator (inpatient, outpatient, antibiotic, and six-month period. Regression models provided rankings of hospital SSI indicator rates by quartiles, adjusted for comorbidities. Programs are publicly available without charge. Conclusion We describe a free, user-friendly software package that enables payers to routinely assess and identify hospitals with potentially high SSI

  7. Timing of antimicrobial prophylaxis and the risk of surgical site infections: results from the Trial to Reduce Antimicrobial Prophylaxis Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, James P; Braun, Barbara I; Hellinger, Walter C; Kusek, Linda; Bozikis, Michele R; Bush, Andrew J; Dellinger, E Patchen; Burke, John P; Simmons, Bryan; Kritchevsky, Stephen B

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the optimal timing for surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis (AMP). National AMP guidelines should be supported by evidence from large contemporary data sets. Twenty-nine hospitals prospectively obtained information on AMP from 4472 randomly selected cardiac, hip/knee arthroplasty, and hysterectomy cases. Surgical site infections (SSIs) were ascertained through routine surveillance, using National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance system methodology. The association between the prophylaxis timing and the occurrence of SSI was assessed using conditional logistic regression (conditioning on hospital). One-hundred thirteen SSI were detected in 109 patients. SSI risk increased incrementally as the interval of time between antibiotic infusion and the incision increased (overall association between timing and infection risk P = 0.04). When antibiotics requiring long infusion times (vancomycin and fluoroquinolones) were excluded, the infection risk following administration of antibiotic within 30 minutes prior to incision was 1.6% compared with 2.4% associated with administration of antibiotic between 31 to 60 minutes prior to surgery (OR: 1.74; 95% confidence interval, 0.98-3.04). The infection risk increased as the time interval between preoperative antibiotic and incision increased or if the antibiotic was first infused after incision. Intraoperative redosing (performed in only 21% of long operations) appeared to reduce SSI risk in operations lasting more than 4 hours (OR of 3.08 with no redosing; 95% confidence interval 0.74-12.90), but only when the preoperative dose was given correctly. These data from a large multicenter collaborative study confirm and extend previous observations and show a consistent relationship between the timing of AMP and SSI risk with a trend toward lower risk occurring when AMP with cephalosporins and other antibiotics with short infusion times were given within 30 minutes prior to incision.

  8. Effect of a Standardized Protocol of Antibiotic Therapy on Surgical Site Infection after Laparoscopic Surgery for Complicated Appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyoung-Chul; Kim, Min Jeong; Lee, Bong Hwa

    Although it is accepted that complicated appendicitis requires antibiotic therapy to prevent post-operative surgical infections, consensus protocols on the duration and regimens of treatment are not well established. This study aimed to compare the outcome of post-operative infectious complications in patients receiving old non-standardized and new standard antibiotic protocols, involving either 5 or 10 days of treatment, respectively. We enrolled 1,343 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery for complicated appendicitis between January 2009 and December 2014. At the beginning of the new protocol, the patients were divided into two groups; 10 days of various antibiotic regimens (between January 2009 and June 2012, called the non-standardized protocol; n = 730) and five days of cefuroxime and metronidazole regimen (between July 2012 and December 2014; standardized protocol; n = 613). We compared the clinical outcomes, including surgical site infection (SSI) (superficial and deep organ/space infections) in the two groups. The standardized protocol group had a slightly shorter operative time (67 vs. 69 min), a shorter hospital stay (5 vs. 5.4 d), and lower medical cost (US$1,564 vs. US$1,654). Otherwise, there was no difference between the groups. No differences were found in the non-standardized and standard protocol groups with regard to the rate of superficial infection (10.3% vs. 12.7%; p = 0.488) or deep organ/space infection (2.3% vs. 2.1%; p = 0.797). In patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for complicated appendicitis, five days of cefuroxime and metronidazole did not lead to more SSIs, and it decreased the medical costs compared with non-standardized antibiotic regimens.

  9. Implementation of a referral to discharge glycemic control initiative for reduction of surgical site infections in gynecologic oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Laura; Brown-Broderick, Jennifer; Hearn, James; Malcolm, Janine; Chan, James; Hicks-Boucher, Wendy; De Sousa, Filomena; Walker, Mark C; Gagné, Sylvain

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the frequency of surgical site infections before and after implementation of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary perioperative glycemic control initiative. As part of a CUSP (Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program) initiative, between January 5 and December 18, 2015, we implemented comprehensive, multidisciplinary glycemic control initiative to reduce SSI rates in patients undergoing major pelvic surgery for a gynecologic malignancy ('Group II'). Key components of this quality of care initiative included pre-operative HbA1c measurement with special triage for patients meeting criteria for diabetes or pre-diabetes, standardization of available intraoperative insulin choices, rigorous pre-op/intra-op/post-op glucose monitoring with control targets set to maintain BG ≤10mmol/L (180mg/dL) and communication/notification with primary care providers. Effectiveness was evaluated against a similar control group of patients ('Group I') undergoing surgery in 2014 prior to implementation of this initiative. We studied a total of 462 patients. Subjects in the screened (Group II) and comparison (Group I) groups were of similar age (avg. 61.0, 60.0years; p=0.422) and BMI (avg. 31.1, 32.3kg/m 2 ; p=0.257). Descriptive statistics served to compare surgical site infection (SSI) rates and other characteristics across groups. Women undergoing surgery prior to implementation of this algorithm (n=165) had an infection rate of 14.6%. Group II (n=297) showed an over 2-fold reduction in SSI compared to Group I [5.7%; p=0.001, adjRR: 0.45, 95% CI: (0.25, 0.81)]. Additionally, approximately 19% of Group II patients were newly diagnosed with either prediabetes (HbA1C 6.0-6.4) or diabetes (HbA1C≥6.5) and were referred to family or internal medicine for appropriate management. Implementation of a comprehensive multidisciplinary glycemic control initiative can lead to a significant reduction in surgical site infections in addition to early identification of an important health

  10. Pre-operative and early post-operative factors associated with surgical site infection after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tovar, Jaime; Oller, Inmaculada; Llavero, Carolina; Arroyo, Antonio; Muñoz, Jose Luis; Calero, Alicia; Diez, María; Zubiaga, Lorea; Calpena, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Surgical procedures on obese patients are expected to have a high incidence of surgical site infection (SSI). The identification of pre-operative or early post-operative risk factors for SSI may help the surgeon to identify subjects in risk and adequately optimize their status. We conducted a study of the association of comorbidities and pre- and post-operative analytical variables with SSI following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for the treatment of morbid obesity. We performed a prospective study of all morbidly obese patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy as a bariatric procedure between 2007 and 2011. An association of clinical and analytical variables with SSI was investigated. The study included 40 patients with a mean pre-operative body mass index (BMI) of 51.2±7.9 kg/m(2). Surgical site infections appeared in three patients (7.5%), of whom two had an intra-abdominal abscess located in the left hypochondrium and the third had a superficial incisional SSI. Pre-operatively, a BMI >45 kg/m(2) (OR 8.7; p=0.008), restrictive disorders identified by pulmonary function tests (OR 10.0; p=0.012), a serum total protein concentration 30 mcg/dL (OR 13.0; p=0.003), and a mean corpuscular volume (MCV) operative SSI. Post-operatively, a serum glucose >128 mg/dL (OR 4.7; p=0.012) and hemoglobin operative anemia and hyperglycemia as risk factors for SSI. In these situations, the surgeon must be aware of and seek to control these risk factors.

  11. Predictors of Surgical Site Infection Following Craniotomy for Intracranial Neoplasms: An Analysis of Prospectively Collected Data in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, Brandon A; Ubl, Daniel S; Babu, Maya; Maloney, Patrick; Murphy, Meghan; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Bydon, Mohamad; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Parney, Ian

    2016-04-01

    To determine the rate of surgical site infection (SSI) after resection of an intracranial neoplasm using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data set and to identify potential risk factors associated with SSI. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Participant Use Data File was queried during the period 2006-2013 for patients who underwent a resection for an intracranial neoplasm. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors associated with SSI. Inclusion criteria were met by 12,021 patients. SSI occurred at a rate of 2.04%. SSI was significantly associated with increased rates of return to the operating room (56.1% vs. 4.0%, P 30 days (5.3% vs. 1.3%, P 4 hours (OR = 1.891, 95% CI = 1.298-2.756) were associated with an increased odds of SSI. Among cases with available chemotherapy data (n = 3504), recent chemotherapy (OR = 3.007, 95% CI = 1.460-6.196) was associated with an increased odds of SSI. This study identified patient risk factors that may assist clinical decision making regarding patient risk stratification, timing of surgery, and preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis for patients with an intracranial neoplasm undergoing craniotomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Povidone-Iodine Irrigation of Subcutaneous Tissues May Decrease Surgical Site Infections in Elective Colorectal Operations: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Richdeep S; Al-Adra, David P; Campbell, Sandy; Olson, David W; Rowe, Brian H

    2011-06-01

    Postoperative wound infection is the most common complication following abdominal surgery and leads to delayed wound healing, prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS), and causes morbidity. Povidone-Iodine (PVI) is a broad-spectrum anti-septic and disinfectant solution, and can be used intra-operatively to irrigate subcutaneous tissues prior to abdominal skin closure. We systematically reviewed the literature regarding the efficacy of intra-operative PVI irrigation of subcutaneous tissues following elective colorectal surgery. A comprehensive search of electronic databases and various grey literature sources was completed. Unpublished and non-English-language results were included. All clinical controlled trials involving PVI solution in adult colorectal surgery were included. Two independent reviewers assessed the studies for relevance, inclusion, methodological quality and extracted data from the full versions of the manuscripts. Disagreements were resolved by re-extraction or third party adjudication. Data for dichotomous outcomes are reported as relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). For continuous data, mean differences (MD) are reported with 95% CIs. Five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving 205 patients comparing PVI solution or spray to a control group following abdominal fascial closure in elective colorectal or clean-contaminated operations were identified. Pooled results demonstrated a reduction in surgical site infection for patients treated with PVI (RR = 1.97; 95% CI: 1.22 to 3.17) compared to controls. Irrigation of subcutaneous tissues with PVI following abdominal fascial closure is associated with a reduced incidence of surgical site infection. Due to the small number of included trials and patients, additional robust randomized trials are needed.

  13. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Prophylactic Intra-Operative Wound Irrigation for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Stijn W.; Boldingh, Quirine J. J.; Solomkin, Joseph S.; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Egger, Matthias; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are one of the most common hospital-acquired infections. To reduce SSIs, prophylactic intra-operative wound irrigation (pIOWI) has been advocated, although the results to date are equivocal. To develop recommendations for the new World Health Organization (WHO) SSI

  14. Is There an Increased Risk of Post-Operative Surgical Site Infection after Orthopaedic Surgery in HIV Patients? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kigera, James W. M.; Straetemans, Masja; Vuhaka, Simplice K.; Nagel, Ingeborg M.; Naddumba, Edward K.; Boer, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is dilemma as to whether patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) requiring implant orthopaedic surgery are at an increased risk for post-operative surgical site infection (SSI). We conducted a systematic review to determine the effect of HIV on the risk of

  15. Effect of Pre-Operative Use of Medications on the Risk of Surgical Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eton, Vic; Sinyavskaya, Liliya; Langlois, Yves; Morin, Jean François; Suissa, Samy; Brassard, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Median sternotomy, the most common means of accessing the heart for cardiac procedures, is associated with higher risk of surgical site infections (SSIs). A limited number of studies reporting the impact of medication use prior to cardiac surgery on the subsequent risk of SSIs usually focused on antibacterial prophylaxis. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of medications prescribed commonly to cardiac patients on the risk of incident SSIs. The study analyzed data on consecutive cardiac surgery patients undergoing median sternotomy at a McGill University teaching hospital between April 1, 2011 and October 31, 2013. Exposure of interest was use of medications for heart disease and cardiovascular conditions in the seven days prior to surgery and those for comorbid conditions. The main outcome was SSIs occurring within 90 d after surgery. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]) was used to evaluate the effect. The cohort included 1,077 cardiac surgery patients, 79 of whom experienced SSIs within 90 d of surgery. The rates for sternal site infections and harvest site infections were 5.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4-7.3) and 2.5 (95% CI: 1.4-3.7) per 100 procedures, respectively. The risk of SSI was increased with the pre-operative use of immunosuppressors/steroids (AOR 3.47, 95% CI: 1.27-9.52) and α-blockers (AOR 3.74, 95% CI: 1.21-1.47). Our findings support the effect of immunosuppressors/steroids on the risk of SSIs and add evidence to the previously reported association between the use of anti-hypertensive medications and subsequent development of infection/sepsis.

  16. Preoperative bathing of the surgical site with chlorhexidine for infection prevention: Systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Lúcia Maciel de Castro; Cota, Gláucia Fernandes; Pinto, Tatiana Saraiva; Ercole, Flávia Falci

    2017-04-01

    Preoperative bathing with 4% chlorhexidine is recommended as a measure to prevent surgical site infection (SSI) despite uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of the intervention. This review aimed to assess the effect of bathing with 4% chlorhexidine on the prevention of SSIs in clean surgeries compared with bathing with placebo solution or soap. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines for systematic reviews and the Cochrane manual were followed. Sources were MEDLINE and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature databases and manual search of references from evaluated studies. We included randomized studies evaluating clean surgical wounds and reporting SSIs after preoperative bathing with 4% chlorhexidine. A total of 243 primary studies were identified and 8 were considered methodologically appropriate based on the Jadad Scale. Data were gathered from 10,655 patients. The global SSI rate was 7.2%. The SSI rate for chlorhexidine bathing, placebo, and soap without antiseptic groups was 7.1%, 9.1%, and 5.1%, respectively. A significant reduction in the infection rates was not found in the comparison between patients subjected to preoperative bathing with 4% chlorhexidine versus placebo solution (relative risk, 0.91; 95% confidence interval, 0.76-1.09). The same absence of benefit was observed comparing chlorhexidine bathing with soap (relative risk, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.68-1.66). Controlled clinical trials are needed to assess the effect of preoperative chlorhexidine bathing on infection rates following clean surgery before the incorporation of this intervention in health care services. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgical site infection in cesarean sections with the use of a plastic sheath wound retractor compared to the traditional self-retaining metal retractor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkson, Larry; Siedentopf, Jan-Peter; Weichert, Alexander; Henrich, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    A cesarean section rate of up to 19.4% is reported worldwide. Surgical site infection occurs with rates of up to 13.5%. Plastic-sheath wound retractors show reduced rates of surgical site infections in abdominal surgery. There is limited evidence in women having cesarean sections. This study evaluates the use of the Alexis(®) O C-Section Retractor in the prevention of surgical site infection in patients undergoing their first planned cesarean section compared to the traditional Collins self-retaining metal retractor. A single center, prospective, randomized, controlled, observational trial. The primary outcome is surgical site infection as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The secondary outcomes included intraoperative surgical parameters, postoperative pain scores and the short and long-term satisfaction with wound healing. From October 2013 to December 2015 at the Charité University Hospital, Berlin. 98 patients to the Alexis(®) O C-Section Retractor group and 100 to the traditional Collins self-retaining metal retractor group. A statistically significant reduction in the rate of surgical site infections, when the Alexis(®) O C-Section Retractor was used for wound retraction compared to the traditional Collins metal self-retaining wound retractor, 1% vs. 8% (RR 7.84, 95% CI (2.45-70.71) p=0.035). The use of plastic-sheath wound retractors compared to the traditional self-retaining metal retractor in low risk women, having the first cesarean section is associated with a significantly reduced risk of surgical site infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of surgical site infection on healthcare costs and patient outcomes: a systematic review in six European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, J M; Casey, A L; Petrosillo, N; Hudson, P M; Mitchell, S A; Crosby, C

    2017-05-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, SSIs constitute a financial burden and negatively impact on patient quality of life (QoL). To assess, and evaluate the evidence for, the cost and health-related QoL (HRQoL) burden of SSIs across various surgical specialties in six European countries. Electronic databases and conference proceedings were systematically searched to identify studies reporting the cost and HRQoL burden of SSIs. Studies published post 2005 in France, Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, Spain, and the UK were eligible for data extraction. Studies were categorized by surgical specialty, and the primary outcomes were the cost of infection, economic evaluations, and HRQoL. Twenty-six studies met the eligibility criteria and were included for analysis. There was a paucity of evidence in the countries of interest; however, SSIs were consistently associated with elevated costs, relative to uninfected patients. Several studies reported that SSI patients required prolonged hospitalization, reoperation, readmission, and that SSIs increased mortality rates. Only one study reported QoL evidence, the results of which demonstrated that SSIs reduced HRQoL scores (EQ-5D). Hospitalization reportedly constituted a substantial cost burden, with additional costs arising from medical staff, investigation, and treatment costs. Disparate reporting of SSIs makes direct cost comparisons difficult, but this review indicated that SSIs are extremely costly. Thus, rigorous procedures must be implemented to minimize SSIs. More economic and QoL studies are required to make accurate cost estimates and to understand the true burden of SSIs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Dialkylcarbamoyl chloride-impregnated dressing for the prevention of surgical site infection in women undergoing cesarean section: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanirowski, Paweł J; Kociszewska, Anna; Cendrowski, Krzysztof; Sawicki, Włodzimierz

    2016-10-01

    Incisional surgical site infections (SSIs) occur in approximately 1.8-9.2% of patients undergoing cesarean section (CS) and contribute to prolonged hospitalization time and increased treatment costs. Dressings impregnated with dialkylcarbamoyl chloride (DACC) are an innovative approach to wound treatment based on a solely physical mechanism of action, and therefore can be used safely and without time restrictions in women during the puerperal and lactation period. A single-blinded randomized, controlled pilot study was conducted at the Mazovian Bródno Hospital, a tertiary care hospital, between December 2013 and March 2014, and it evaluated the presence of superficial and deep SSIs in patients during the first 14 days after a CS. Patients were randomly allocated to receive treatment with either a DACC dressing or a standard surgical dressing. One hundred and forty-two patients after planned or emergency CS were enrolled in the study. No significant differences between the groups were observed with regard to patients' basic demographic and perioperative characteristics. The rate of superficial and deep SSIs was 2.8% in the group of patients who received a DACC dressing compared to 9.8% in the group with a standard surgical dressing ( p = 0.08). Patients with SSIs who received a standard surgical dressing required systemic antibiotic therapy significantly more frequently ( p = 0.03). Based on the logistic regression model developed, the pre-pregnancy body mass index was the only statistically significant risk factor for SSI ( p = 0.015). The results of the pilot study indicate a decreasing tendency of the SSI rate in patients after a CS who received DACC impregnated dressings.

  20. Mandatory Change From Surgical Skull Caps to Bouffant Caps Among Operating Room Personnel Does Not Reduce Surgical Site Infections in Class I Surgical Cases: A Single-Center Experience With More Than 15 000 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shallwani, Hussain; Shakir, Hakeem J; Aldridge, Ashley M; Donovan, Maureen T; Levy, Elad I; Gibbons, Kevin J

    2017-05-10

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are noteworthy and costly complications. New recommendations from a national organization have urged the elimination of traditional surgeon's caps (surgical skull caps) and mandated the use of bouffant caps to prevent SSIs. To report SSI rates for >15 000 class I (clean) surgical procedures 13 mo before and 13 mo after surgical skull caps were banned at a single site with 25 operating rooms. SSI data were acquired from hospital infection control monthly summary reports from January 2014 to March 2016. Based on a change in hospital policy mandating obligatory use of bouffant caps since February 2015, data were categorized into nonbouffant and bouffant groups. Monthly and cumulative infection rates for 13 mo before (7513 patients) and 13 mo after (8446 patients) the policy implementation were collected and analyzed for the groups, respectively. An overall increase of 0.07% (0.77%-0.84%) in the cumulative rate of SSI in all class I operating room cases and of 0.03% (0.79%-0.82%) in the cumulative rate of SSI in all spinal procedures was noted. However, neither increase reached statistical significance ( P > .05). The cumulative rate of SSI in neurosurgery craniotomy/craniectomy cases decreased from 0.95% to 0.75%; this was also not statistically significant ( P = 1.00). National efforts at improving healthcare performance are laudable but need to be evidence based. Guidelines, especially when applied in a mandatory fashion, should be assessed for effectiveness. In this large, single-center series of patients undergoing class I surgical procedures, elimination of the traditional surgeon's cap did not reduce infection rates. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  1. Routine Use of Prophylactic Antibiotics during Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy Does Not Reduce the Risk of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkut, Pinar; Kilicturgay, Sadik; Aktas, Hikmet; Ozen, Yilmaz; Kaya, Ekrem

    2017-07-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is the gold standard for the treatment of symptomatic gallbladder stones. As infections are rare in uncomplicated LC, it is widely accepted that prophylactic antibiotics need not be administered, and guidelines do not support routine antibiotic prophylaxis during elective LC. However, routine antibiotic prophylaxis for elective LC is still popular in many clinical settings. We investigated this situation in our department. This randomized double-blind controlled study included 570 patients who underwent LC between March 2007 and February 2010. The exclusion criteria were antibiotic intake before surgery, steroid treatment, and the presence of pancreatitis, cholangitis, obstructive jaundice, cephalosporin allergy, or pregnancy. The patients were randomized into three groups. Group 1 (n = 193) received physiologic saline as placebo, Group 2 (n = 191) received a first-generation cephalosporin (cefazolin; 1 g), and Group 3 (n = 186) received a second-generation cephalosporin (cefuroksim aksetil; 750 mg). Bile and epigastric and umbilical port tissue samples were harvested for culture. All patients were observed until the end of the fourth week after surgery. Patient age, sex, weight, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, diabetes mellitus, smoking history, history of biliary colic in the past month, length of the hospital stay before the operation, operational findings (acute or chronic cholecystitis), operation duration, use of drainage, type of prophylaxis administered if any, culture results, surgical site infection (SSI) development, and time to SSI development along with associated treatments were evaluated. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups with respect to any of the demographic and clinical features analyzed in this study. The SSI rate was 1.2% in total, and in Groups 1, 2, and 3, it was 1.5%, 1.04%, and 1.07%, respectively. There was no statistical difference

  2. Evidence-Based Update to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection: Developmental Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berríos-Torres, Sandra I

    2016-04-01

    Recommendations in the "Guideline for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection, 1999" were based on experts' selective interpretation of the scientific evidence. Effective 2009, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and its Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) updated their guideline development process. This is a narrative summary of the updated process focusing on key changes and challenges specific to the Guideline for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection. The guideline development process now incorporates evidence-based methodology and provides explicit links between the evidence and the recommendations using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) method. There is also participation by professional surgical societies, an updated guideline structure (core and procedure-specific sections), additional planned related manuscripts (introductions to the guideline and research opportunities), and new proposed venues for publication. The new CDC and HICPAC "Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection" represents a substantial advancement from recommendations for infection control practices based on expert opinion to evidence-based practices. The new structure is meant to facilitate future updates, in particular, those addressing specialty or procedure-specific surgical site infection prevention questions. Increased presence by the surgical community through the professional surgical societies' engagement in the guideline development process, lead authorship of related manuscripts, and proposed publication in the surgical literature not only increase adherence by the surgical community, but also promote an ongoing collaboration with public health and other partners in a multidisciplinary approach to SSI prevention.

  3. The Current State of Screening and Decolonization for the Prevention of Staphylococcus aureus Surgical Site Infection After Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Mitchell C; Moucha, Calin S

    2015-09-02

    The most common pathogens in surgical site infections after total hip and knee arthroplasty are methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and coagulase-negative staphylococci. Patients colonized with MSSA or MRSA have an increased risk for a staphylococcal infection at the site of a total hip or knee arthroplasty. Most colonized individuals who develop a staphylococcal infection at the site of a total hip or total knee arthroplasty have molecularly identical S. aureus isolates in their nares and wounds. Screening and nasal decolonization of S. aureus can potentially reduce the rates of staphylococcal surgical site infection after total hip and total knee arthroplasty. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  4. Impact of the Antibiotic Stewardship Program on Prevention and Control of Surgical Site Infection during Peri-Operative Clean Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juyuan; Li, Na; Hao, Jinjuan; Li, Yanming; Liu, Anlei; Wu, Yinghong; Cai, Meng

    2018-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections and are associated with substantial healthcare costs, with increased morbidity and mortality. To investigate the effects of the antibiotic stewardship program on prevention and control of SSI during clean surgery, we investigated this situation in our institution. We performed a quasi-experimental study to compare the effect before and after the antibiotic stewardship program intervention. During the pre-intervention stage (January 1, 2010 through December 31, 2011), comprehensive surveillance was performed to determine the SSI baseline data. In the second stage (January 1, 2012 through December 31, 2016), an infectious diseases physician and an infection control practitioner identified the surgical patients daily and followed up on the duration of antimicrobial prophylaxis. From January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2016, 41,426 patients underwent clean surgeries in a grade III, class A hospital. The rate of prophylactic antibiotic use in the 41,426 clean surgeries was reduced from 82.9% to 28.0% after the interventions. The rate of antibiotic agents administered within 120 minutes of the first incision increased from 20.8% to 85.1%. The rate at which prophylactic antimicrobial agents were discontinued in the first 24 hours after surgery increased from 22.1% to 60.4%. Appropriate antibiotic selection increased from 37.0% to 93.6%. Prophylactic antibiotic re-dosing increased from 3.8% to 64.8%. The SSI rate decreased from 0.7% to 0.5% (p < 0.05). The pathogen detection rate increased from 16.7% up to 41.8% after intervention. The intensity of antibiotic consumption reduced from 74.9 defined daily doses (DDDs) per 100 bed-days to 34.2 DDDs per 100 bed-days after the interventions. Long-term and continuous antibiotic stewardship programs have important effects on the prevention and control of SSI during clean surgery.

  5. Source-case investigation of Mycobacterium wolinskyi cardiac surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, C; Terru, D; Aguilhon, S; Frapier, J-M; Paquis, M-P; Morquin, D; Lamy, B; Godreuil, S; Parer, S; Lotthé, A; Jumas-Bilak, E; Romano-Bertrand, S

    2016-07-01

    The non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) Mycobacterium wolinskyi caused bacteraemia and massive colonization of an aortic prosthesis in a patient 16 days after cardiac surgery, necessitating repeat surgery and targeted antimicrobial chemotherapy. The infection control team investigated the source and conditions of infection. Peri-operative management of the patient complied with recommendations. The environmental investigation showed that although M. wolinskyi was not recovered, diverse NTM species were present in water from point-of-use taps and heater-cooler units for extracorporeal circulation. This case and increasing evidence of emerging NTM infections in cardiac surgery led to the implementation of infection control procedures in cardiac surgery wards. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [A case of refractory deep incisional surgical site infection due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and successfully treated with oral linezolid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hironori; Kawabata, Ryohei; Kishimoto, Tomono; Yamamoto, Emiko; Kimura, Yutaka; Imamura, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tameyoshi; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Fukunaga, Mutsumi; Ohzato, Hiroki

    2012-11-01

    We report a case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) surgical site infection successfully treated with linezolid. A 66-year-old man had undergone total gastrectomy for gastric cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Three days after the operation, he was diagnosed with deep incisional surgical site infection due to MRSA, and wound care was started. After discharge, he received adjuvant chemotherapy and wound care, but the wound had not healed in 10 months. We started treatment with oral linezolid and nutritional support, and the wound was fully healed 12 months after the operation. Antibiotic treatment with oral linezolid may be effective for refractory deep incisional surgical site infection due to MRSA in outpatients.

  7. Nutritional risk index as an independent predictive factor for the development of surgical site infection after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkawa, Hiroji; Takemura, Shigekazu; Uenishi, Takahiro; Sakae, Masayuki; Ohata, Kazunori; Urata, Yorihisa; Kaneda, Kazuhisa; Nozawa, Akinori; Kubo, Shoji

    2013-03-01

    Malnutrition has been considered a risk factor for the development of a surgical site infection (SSI). The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between preoperative nutritional screening scores and the development of SSI after pancreaticoduodenectomy. We examined 64 patients who had undergone pancreaticoduodenectomy. Their clinical data, nutritional risk index (NRI), and nutritional risk screening 2002 (NRS-2002) score were recorded. SSIs were diagnosed according to the definitions of wound infection established by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and were confirmed by a microbiological examination. Data were analyzed using the Fisher exact probability method and a multivariate logistic regression analysis. SSIs developed in 21 patients (33 %). Eleven patients had wound infections, and 14 patients had an intra-abdominal abscess. A univariate analysis of perioperative factors revealed that a pancreatic fistula, the NRS-2002, and the NRI were significantly associated with the development of SSI (p NRI were independent risk factors for SSI. By analyzing the pre- and intra-operative factors after excluding the 11 patients with pancreatic fistulas, the NRI was still an independent risk factor for SSI. The present study showed the NRI to be an independent factor for predicting the risk of SSI after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

  8. Epidemiology and risk factors associated with surgical site infection after different types of hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikane, Keita

    2017-10-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is one of the most common healthcare-associated infections (HAIs); however, SSI after hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery (HBPS) has not been well investigated in a large cohort of patients. This study analyzed the factors associated with SSI following HBPS in Japan, using a Japanese national database. Data on HBPS performed between 2012 and 2014 were extracted from a national monitoring system for HAI: The Japan Nosocomial Infections Surveillance. Using multivariate logistic regression, I assessed the factors associated with SSI. The cumulative incidence of SSI following HBPS was 15.6% (2873/18,398). The incidence of SSI after pancreatoduodenectomy was 28.0%, which was significantly higher than that after liver resection and other types of HBPS (8.8 and 15.5%, respectively). Among the four traditional risk factors, the American Society of Anesthesiologists score was ineffective for predicting SSI in the final model of all three types of surgery. Additional risk factors were identified, including age and male gender. The incidence of and factors associated with SSI after the three types of HBPS analyzed differed significantly. To accurately compare hospital performance in relation to SSI following HBPS, the operative procedure category in the surveillance system must be divided into three types.

  9. Frontal Sinus Breach During Routine Frontal Craniotomy Significantly Increases Risk of Surgical Site Infection: 10-Year Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linzey, Joseph R; Wilson, Thomas J; Sullivan, Stephen E; Thompson, B Gregory; Pandey, Aditya S

    2017-09-01

    Frontotemporal craniotomies are commonly performed for a variety of neurosurgical pathologies. Infections related to craniotomies cause significant morbidity. We hypothesized that the risk of cranial surgical site infections (SSIs) may be increased in patients whose frontal sinuses are breached during craniotomy. To compare the rate of cranial SSIs in patients undergoing frontotemporal craniotomies with and without frontal sinus breach (FSB). We performed a retrospective analysis of all patients undergoing frontotemporal craniotomies for the management of cerebral aneurysms from 2005 to 2014. This study included 862 patients undergoing 910 craniotomies. Primary outcome of interest was occurrence of a cranial SSI. Standard statistical methods were utilized to explore associations between a variety of variables including FSB, cranial SSI, and infections requiring reoperation. Of the 910 craniotomies, 141 (15.5%) involved FSB. Of those involving FSB, 22 (15.6%) developed a cranial SSI, compared to only 56 of the 769 without FSB (7.3%; P = .001). Cranial SSI requiring reoperation was much more likely in patients with FSB compared to those without a breach (7.8% vs 1.6%; P craniotomies are at significantly greater risk of serious cranial SSIs if the frontal sinus has been breached. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  10. Surgical infections with Mycoplasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi-Mazloum, Niels Donald; Prag, Jørgen Brorson; Jensen, J S

    1997-01-01

    Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum are common inhabitants of the human genital tract. Evidence for an aetiological role in pyelonephritis, pelvic inflammatory disease, post-abortion and post-partum fever has been presented. There are sporadic reports of Mycoplasma causing serious extra...... extragenital infection such as septicemia, septic arthritis, neonatal meningitis and encephalitis. We review 38 cases of surgical infections with Mycoplasma.......Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum are common inhabitants of the human genital tract. Evidence for an aetiological role in pyelonephritis, pelvic inflammatory disease, post-abortion and post-partum fever has been presented. There are sporadic reports of Mycoplasma causing serious...

  11. Incidence of surgical site infection with pre-operative skin preparation using 10% polyvidone-iodine and 0.5% chlorhexidine-alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ana Luzia; Simões, Maria de Lourdes Pessole Biondo

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the incidence of surgical site infection when the preoperative skin preparation was performed with 10% povidone-iodine and 0.5% chlorhexidine-alcohol. We conducted a randomized, longitudinal study based on variables obtained from patients undergoing clean and potentially contaminated operations. Those involved were divided into two groups. In group 1 (G1) we included 102 patients with skin prepared with povidone-iodine, and in group 2 (G2), 103, whose skin was prepared with chlorhexidine. In the third, seventh and 30th postoperative days we evaluated the surgical site, searching for signs of infection. Data related to clinical profile, such as diabetes mellitus, smoking, alcoholism, haematological data (Hb, VG and leukocytes), age and gender, and the related variables, such as number of days of preoperative hospitalization, shaving, topography of incision, antibiotic prophylaxis and resident participation in the operation were not predisposing factors for surgical site infection. Two patients in G1 and eight in G2 undergoing clean operations had some type of infection (p = 0.1789), five in G1 and three in G2 undergoing potentially contaminated operations had some type of infection (p = 0.7205). The incidence of surgical site infection in operations classified as clean and as potentially contaminated for which skin preparation was done with 10% povidone-iodine and 0.5% chlorhexidine-alcohol was similar.

  12. Vacuum-assisted closure versus closure without vacuum assistance for preventing surgical site infections and infections of chronic wounds: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansarli, Giannoula S; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z; Stratoulias, Constantinos; Peppas, George; Kapaskelis, Anastasios; Falagas, Matthew E

    2014-08-01

    We sought to examine whether vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is associated with fewer surgical site infections (SSIs) or infections of chronic wounds than other management procedures for surgical wounds. The PubMed and Scopus databases were searched systematically. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the development of SSIs or infections of chronic wounds between patients treated with VAC for acute or chronic wounds and those whose wounds were treated without VAC were considered eligible for inclusion in the study. Eight RCTs met the inclusion criteria for the study. Four of the studies included chronic or diabetic lower extremity wounds and four included fractures. In three of four studies reporting on fractures, the wounds were not closed post-operatively, whereas in one study primary closure of the wound was performed. With regard to wounds left open after the stabilization of fractures, patients whose wounds were treated with VAC developed fewer SSIs than those whose wounds were treated without VAC ([367 patients (196 with VAC; 171 without VAC) relative risk [RR], 0.47; 95% CI 0.28-0.81]). On the contrary, no difference in the development of SSIs occurred among patients with chronic or diabetic lower-extremity wounds treated with VAC and those whose wounds were treated without VAC ([638 patients (320 with VAC; 318 without VAC) RR 1.67; 95% CI: 0.71-3.94]). The available evidence suggests that the development of infections in wounds treated with VAC depends on the type of wound being treated.

  13. Incidence and risk factors for surgical site infections in obstetric and gynecological surgeries from a teaching hospital in rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Pathak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infections (SSI are one of the most common healthcare associated infections in the low-middle income countries. Data on incidence and risk factors for SSI following surgeries in general and Obstetric and Gynecological surgeries in particular are scare. This study set out to identify risk factors for SSI in patients undergoing Obstetric and Gynecological surgeries in an Indian rural hospital. Methods Patients who underwent a surgical procedure between September 2010 to February 2013 in the 60-bedded ward of Obstetric and Gynecology department were included. Surveillance for SSI was based on the Centre for Disease Control (CDC definition and methodology. Incidence and risk factors for SSI, including those for specific procedure, were calculated from data collected on daily ward rounds. Results A total of 1173 patients underwent a surgical procedure during the study period. The incidence of SSI in the cohort was 7.84% (95% CI 6.30–9.38. Majority of SSI were superficial. Obstetric surgeries had a lower SSI incidence compared to gynecological surgeries (1.2% versus 10.3% respectively. The risk factors for SSI identified in the multivariate logistic regression model were age (OR 1.03, vaginal examination (OR 1.31; presence of vaginal discharge (OR 4.04; medical disease (OR 5.76; American Society of Anesthesia score greater than 3 (OR 12.8; concurrent surgical procedure (OR 3.26; each increase in hour of surgery, after the first hour, doubled the risk of SSI; inappropriate antibiotic prophylaxis increased the risk of SSI by nearly 5 times. Each day increase in stay in the hospital after the surgery increased the risk of contacting an SSI by 5%. Conclusions Incidence and risk factors from prospective SSI surveillance can be reported simultaneously for the Obstetric and Gynecological surgeries and can be part of routine practice in resource-constrained settings. The incidence of SSI was lower for Obstetric surgeries

  14. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus from patients with surgical site infections at Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah Seni

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is progressively increasing globally with significant regional variation. Understanding the Staphylococcus aureus lineages is crucial in controlling nosocomial infections. Recent studies on S. aureus in Uganda have revealed an escalating burden of MRSA. However, the S. aureus genotypes circulating among patients are not known. Here, we report S. aureus lineages circulating in patients with surgical site infections (SSI at Mulago National hospital, Kampala, Uganda.A cross-sectional study involving 314 patients with SSI at Mulago National Hospital was conducted from September 2011 to April 2012. Pus swabs from the patients' SSI were processed using standard microbiological procedures. Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA were identified using phenotypic tests and confirmed by PCR-detection of the nuc and mecA genes, respectively. SCCmec genotypes were determined among MRSA isolates using multiplex PCR. Furthermore, to determine lineages, spa sequence based-genotyping was performed on all S. aureus isolates.Of the 314 patients with SSI, S. aureus accounted for 20.4% (64/314, of which 37.5% (24/64 were MRSA. The predominant SCCmec types were type V (33.3%, 8/24 and type I (16.7%, 4/24. The predominant spa lineages were t645 (17.2%, 11/64 and t4353 (15.6%, 10/64, and these were found to be clonally circulating in all the surgical wards. On the other hand, lineages t064, t355, and t4609 were confined to the obstetrics and gynecology wards. A new spa type (t10277 was identified from MSSA isolate. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, cancer and inducible clindamycin resistance remained as independent predictors of MRSA-SSI.SCCmec types I and V are the most prevalent MRSA mecA types from the patients' SSI. The predominant spa lineages (t645 and t4353 are clonally circulating in all the surgical wards, calling for strengthening of infection control practices

  15. A case-control study of surgical site infection following operative fixation of fractures of the ankle in a large U.K. trauma unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korim, M T; Payne, R; Bhatia, M

    2014-05-01

    Most of the literature on surgical site infections following the surgical treatment of fractures of the ankle is based on small series of patients, focusing on diabetics or the elderly. None have described post-operative functional scores in those patients who develop an infection. We performed an age- and gender-matched case-control study to identify patient- and surgery-related risk factors for surgical site infection following open reduction and internal fixation of a fracture of the ankle. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify significant risk factors for infection and to calculate odds ratios (OR). Function was assessed using the Olerud and Molander Ankle Score. The incidence of infection was 4% (29/717) and 1.1% (8/717) were deep infections. The median ankle score was significantly lower in the infection group compared with the control group (60 vs 90, Mann-Whitney test p infection. A low incidence of infection following open reduction and internal fixation of fractures of the ankle was observed. Both superficial and deep infections result in lower functional scores.

  16. Reporting surgical site infections following total hip and knee arthroplasty: impact of limiting surveillance to the operative hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Avery, Taliser R; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S

    2013-11-01

    Public reporting of surgical site infections (SSIs) by hospitals is largely limited to infections detected during surgical hospitalizations or readmissions to the same facility. SSI rates may be underestimated if patients with SSIs are readmitted to other hospitals. We assessed the impact of readmissions to other facilities on hospitals' SSI rates following primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients who underwent primary THA or TKA at California hospitals between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2009. SSIs were identified using ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes predictive of SSI assigned at any California hospital within 365 days of surgery using a statewide repository of hospital data that allowed tracking of patients between facilities. We used statewide data to estimate the fraction of each hospital's THA and TKA SSIs identified at the operative hospital versus other hospitals. A total of 91 121 THA and 121 640 TKA procedures were identified. Based on diagnosis codes, SSIs developed following 2214 (2.3%) THAs and 2465 (2.0%) TKAs. Seventeen percent of SSIs would have been missed by operative hospital surveillance alone. The proportion of hospitals' SSIs detected at nonoperative hospitals ranged from 0% to 100%. Including SSIs detected at nonoperative hospitals resulted in better relative ranking for 61% of THA hospitals and 61% of TKA hospitals. Limiting SSI surveillance to the operative hospital caused varying degrees of SSI underestimation and substantially impacted hospitals' relative rankings, suggesting that alternative methods for comprehensive postdischarge surveillance are needed for accurate benchmarking.

  17. A retrospective analysis of surgical site infections after chlorhexidine-alcohol versus iodine-alcohol for pre-operative antisepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charehbili, Ayoub; Swijnenburg, Rutger-Jan; van de Velde, Cornelis; van den Bremer, Jephta; van Gijn, Willem

    2014-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is the most common hospital-acquired infection in the Netherlands. There is little evidence in regard to differences in the efficacy of pre-operative topical antisepsis with iodine-alcohol as compared with chlorhexidine-alcohol for preventing SSI. We conducted a retrospective analysis at a single center, involving all patients who underwent breast, colon, or vascular surgery in 2010 and 2011, in which pre-operative disinfection of the skin was done with iodine-alcohol in 2010 and with chlorhexidine-alcohol in 2011. Demographic characteristics, surgical parameters, and rates of SSI were compared in the two groups of patients. Subgroup analyses were done for wound classification, wound type, and type of surgery performed. Associations of patient characteristics with SSI were also investigated. Data were analyzed with χ(2) tests, Student t-tests, and logistic regression analysis. No statistically significant difference was found in the rates of SSI in the two study groups, at 6.1% for the patients who underwent antisepsis with iodine-alcohol and 3.8% for those who underwent disinfection with chlorhexidine-alcohol (p=0.20). After multivariable analysis, an odds ratio (OR) of 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.30-1.47) in favor of chlorhexidine-alcohol was found. Male gender, acute surgery, absence of antibiotic prophylaxis, and longer hospital length of stay (LOS) were all associated with SSI after pre-operative topical antisepsis. In this single-center study conducted over a course of one year with each of the preparations investigated, no difference in the rate of SSI was found after an instantaneous protocol change from iodine-alcohol to chlorhexidine-alcohol for pre-operative topical antisepsis.

  18. Surgical Site Infections in a Rehabilitation Hospital-Pattern and Types

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Five months prospective surveillance of surgicalsite infections was conducted at NKST Rehabilitation Hospital ,Mkar from 1st June 2010 to 30th October 2010. All the patients who underwent orthopaedic operation were evaluated. Patients who had completed cast(POP) application postoperatively were excluded ...

  19. Peri-operative antibiotic treatment of bacteriuria reduces early deep surgical site infections in geriatric patients with proximal femur fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenhan, Ronny; Bushuven, Stefanie; Reimers, Niklas; Probst, Axel

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a re-evaluation of current strategies for peri-operative prophylaxis of infections in orthopaedic surgery of geriatric patients (≥65 years) with proximal femoral fractures (PFF). Between 01/2010 and 08/2014 all post-operative infections after stabilization of PFF of 1,089 geriatric patients were recorded retrospectively. All patients pre-operatively received a single dose of 1.5 g cefuroxime (group 1). These were compared to prospectively determined post-operative rates of surgical site infection (SSI) of 441 geriatric patients, which were operated on between 09/2014 and 03/2017 due to PFF. In this second group we investigated the urinary tract on admission. Bacteriuria was treated with the pre-operative single dose of 1.5 g cefuroxime along with ciprofloxacin for five days, beginning on admission. Level of significance was set to p infection. Multi-resistant pathogens were found in 15 patients and pathogens were cefuroxime-resistant in 37. The differences of SSI after at least three months were 2.1% in group 1 and 0.45% in group 2 for all patients with surgery of PFF (p < 0.02) and for those with arthroplasty (p < 0.037) significant. The immediate antibiotic therapy of a prevalent bacteriuria for five days decreases the risk of SSI after surgery of PFF. Our single-centre study can only point out the problem of prevalent reservoirs of pathogens and the need for treatment. Evidence-based therapy concepts (indications of antibiotics, classes, duration) have to be developed in multi-centric and prospective studies.

  20. Effect of Post–Cesarean Delivery Oral Cephalexin and Metronidazole on Surgical Site Infection Among Obese Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, Amy M.; DeArmond, Chris; Houston, Judy M.; Reddy, Srinidhi; Masters, Heather R.; Gold, Alison; Boldt, Michael; DeFranco, Emily; Evans, Arthur T.

    2017-01-01

    Importance The rate of obesity among US women has been increasing, and obesity is associated with increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI) following cesarean delivery. The optimal perioperative antibiotic prophylactic regimen in this high-risk population undergoing cesarean delivery is unknown. Objective To determine rates of SSI among obese women who receive prophylactic oral cephalexin and metronidazole vs placebo for 48 hours following cesarean delivery. Design, Setting, and Participants Randomized, double-blind clinical trial comparing oral cephalexin and metronidazole vs placebo for 48 hours following cesarean delivery for the prevention of SSI in obese women (prepregnancy BMI ≥30) who had received standard intravenous preoperative cephalosporin prophylaxis. Randomization was stratified by intact vs rupture of membranes prior to delivery. The study was conducted at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, an academic and urban setting, between October 2010 and December 2015, with final follow-up through February 2016. Interventions Participants were randomly assigned to receive oral cephalexin, 500 mg, and metronidazole, 500 mg (n = 202 participants), vs identical-appearing placebo (n = 201 participants) every 8 hours for a total of 48 hours following cesarean delivery. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome was SSI, defined as any superficial incisional, deep incisional, or organ/space infections within 30 days after cesarean delivery. Results Among 403 randomized participants who were included (mean age, 28 [SD, 6] years; mean BMI, 39.7 [SD, 7.8]), 382 (94.6%) completed the trial. The overall rate of SSI was 10.9% (95% CI, 7.9%-14.0%). Surgical site infection was diagnosed in 13 women (6.4%) in the cephalexin-metronidazole group vs 31 women (15.4%) in the placebo group (difference, 9.0% [95% CI, 2.9%-15.0%]; relative risk, 0.41 [95% CI, 0.22-0.77]; P = .01). There were no serious adverse events, including

  1. Randomized controlled trial of the effect of 30% versus 80% fraction of inspired oxygen on cesarean delivery surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ned L; Glover, Melanie M; Crisp, Catrina; Acton, Angus L; Mckenna, David S

    2013-10-01

    To determine if supplemental perioperative oxygen will reduce surgical site infection (SSI) following cesarean delivery. This is a randomized, controlled trial evaluating SSI following either 30% or 80% fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2) during and 2 hours after cesarean delivery. Anesthesia providers administered FIO2 via a high-flow oxygen blender. Subjects, surgeons, and wound evaluation teams were blinded. Serial wound evaluations were performed. Data were analyzed using logistic regression models, Fisher exact test, and t test. In all, 179 women were randomized, and 160 subjects were included in the analysis. There were 12/83 (14.5%) SSIs in the control group versus 10/77 (13.0%) in the investigational group (p = 0.82). Caucasian race, increased body mass index, and longer operative time were identified as significant risk factors for infection (p = 0.026, odds ratio 0.283; p = 0.05, odds ratio = 1.058; p = 0.037, odds ratio = 1.038, respectively). Perioperative oxygenation with 80% Fio2 is not effective in reducing SSI following cesarean delivery. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Comparative effectiveness of skin antiseptic agents in reducing surgical site infections: a report from the Washington State Surgical Care and Outcomes Assessment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Timo W; Dellinger, E Patchen; Evans, Heather L; Farjah, Farhood; Farrokhi, Ellen; Steele, Scott R; Thirlby, Richard; Flum, David R

    2014-03-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are an important source of morbidity and mortality. Chlorhexidine in isopropyl alcohol is effective in preventing central venous-catheter associated infections, but its effectiveness in reducing SSI in clean-contaminated procedures is uncertain. Surgical studies to date have had contradictory results. We aimed to further evaluate the relationship of commonly used antiseptic agents and SSI, and to determine if isopropyl alcohol has a unique effect. We performed a prospective cohort analysis to evaluate the relationship of commonly used skin antiseptic agents and SSI for patients undergoing mostly clean-contaminated surgery from January 2011 through June 2012. Multivariate regression modeling predicted expected rates of SSI. Risk adjusted event rates (RAERs) of SSI were compared across groups using proportionality testing. Among 7,669 patients, the rate of SSI was 4.6%. The RAERs were 0.85 (p = 0.28) for chlorhexidine (CHG), 1.10 (p = 0.06) for chlorhexidine in isopropyl alcohol (CHG+IPA), 0.98 (p = 0.96) for povidone-iodine (PVI), and 0.93 (p = 0.51) for iodine-povacrylex in isopropyl alcohol (IPC+IPA). The RAERs were 0.91 (p = 0.39) for the non-IPA group and 1.10 (p = 0.07) for the IPA group. Among elective colorectal patients, the RAERs were 0.90 (p = 0.48) for CHG, 1.04 (p = 0.67) for CHG+IPA, 1.04 (p = 0.85) for PVI, and 1.00 (p = 0.99) for IPC+IPA. For clean-contaminated surgical cases, this large-scale state cohort study did not demonstrate superiority of any commonly used skin antiseptic agent in reducing the risk of SSI, nor did it find any unique effect of isopropyl alcohol. These results do not support the use of more expensive skin preparation agents. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Standard abdominal wound edge protection with surgical dressings vs coverage with a sterile circular polyethylene drape for prevention of surgical site infections (BaFO: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaljevic André L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postoperative surgical site infections cause substantial morbidity, prolonged hospitalization, costs and even mortality and remain one of the most frequent surgical complications. Approximately 14% to 30% of all patients undergoing elective open abdominal surgery are affected and methods to reduce surgical site infection rates warrant further investigation and evaluation in randomized controlled trials. Methods/design To investigate whether the application of a circular plastic wound protector reduces the rate of surgical site infections in general and visceral surgical patients that undergo midline or transverse laparotomy by 50%. BaFO is a randomized, controlled, patient-blinded and observer-blinded multicenter clinical trial with two parallel surgical groups. The primary outcome measure will be the rate of surgical site infections within 45 days postoperative assessed according to the definition of the Center for Disease Control. Statistical analysis of the primary endpoint will be based on the intention-to-treat population. The global level of significance is set at 5% (2 sided and sample size (n = 258 per group is determined to assure a power of 80% with a planned interim analysis for the primary endpoint after the inclusion of 340 patients. Discussion The BaFO trial will explore if the rate of surgical site infections can be reduced by a single, simple, inexpensive intervention in patients undergoing open elective abdominal surgery. Its pragmatic design guarantees high external validity and clinical relevance. Trial registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01181206. Date of registration: 11 August 2010; date of first patient randomized: 8 September 2010

  4. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Surgical Site Infections in Women Undergoing Elective Caesarean Sections: A Pilot RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaboyer, Wendy; Anderson, Vinah; Webster, Joan; Sneddon, Anne; Thalib, Lukman; Gillespie, Brigid M

    2014-09-30

    Obese women undergoing caesarean section (CS) are at increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI). Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) is growing in use as a prophylactic approach to prevent wound complications such as SSI, yet there is little evidence of its benefits. This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) assessed the effect of NPWT on SSI and other wound complications in obese women undergoing elective caesarean sections (CS) and also the feasibility of conducting a definitive trial. Ninety-two obese women undergoing elective CS were randomized in theatre via a central web based system using a parallel 1:1 process to two groups i.e., 46 women received the intervention (NPWT PICO™ dressing) and 46 women received standard care (Comfeel Plus(®) dressing). All women received the intended dressing following wound closure. The relative risk of SSI in the intervention group was 0.81 (95% CI 0.38-1.68); for the number of complications excluding SSI it was 0.98 (95% CI 0.34-2.79). A sample size of 784 (392 per group) would be required to find a statistically significant difference in SSI between the two groups with 90% power. These results demonstrate that a larger definitive trial is feasible and that careful planning and site selection is critical to the success of the overall study.

  5. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Surgical Site Infections in Women Undergoing Elective Caesarean Sections: A Pilot RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Chaboyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Obese women undergoing caesarean section (CS are at increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT is growing in use as a prophylactic approach to prevent wound complications such as SSI, yet there is little evidence of its benefits. This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT assessed the effect of NPWT on SSI and other wound complications in obese women undergoing elective caesarean sections (CS and also the feasibility of conducting a definitive trial. Ninety-two obese women undergoing elective CS were randomized in theatre via a central web based system using a parallel 1:1 process to two groups i.e., 46 women received the intervention (NPWT PICO™ dressing and 46 women received standard care (Comfeel Plus® dressing. All women received the intended dressing following wound closure. The relative risk of SSI in the intervention group was 0.81 (95% CI 0.38–1.68; for the number of complications excluding SSI it was 0.98 (95% CI 0.34–2.79. A sample size of 784 (392 per group would be required to find a statistically significant difference in SSI between the two groups with 90% power. These results demonstrate that a larger definitive trial is feasible and that careful planning and site selection is critical to the success of the overall study.

  6. Viable adhered Staphylococcus aureus highly reduced on novel antimicrobial sutures using chlorhexidine and octenidine to avoid surgical site infection (SSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jochen; Harrasser, Norbert; Tübel, Jutta; Mühlhofer, Heinrich; Pförringer, Dominik; von Deimling, Constantin; Foehr, Peter; Kiefel, Barbara; Krämer, Christina; Stemberger, Axel; Schieker, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    coated sutures with higher roughness for palmitate coatings and sustaining integrity of coated sutures. Adherent S. aureus were found via SEM on all types of investigated sutures. The novel antimicrobial sutures showed significantly less viable adhered S. aureus bacteria (up to 6.1 log) compared to Vicryl® Plus (0.5 log). Within 11 μg/cm drug-containing sutures, octenidine-palmitate (OL11) showed the highest number of viable adhered S. aureus (0.5 log), similar to Vicryl® Plus. Chlorhexidine-laurate (CL11) showed the lowest number of S. aureus on sutures (1.7 log), a 1.2 log greater reduction. In addition, planktonic S. aureus in suspensions were highly inhibited by CL11 (0.9 log) represents a 0.6 log greater reduction compared to Vicryl® Plus (0.3 log). Conclusions Novel antimicrobial sutures can potentially limit surgical site infections caused by multiple pathogenic bacterial species. Therefore, a potential inhibition of multispecies biofilm formation is assumed. In detail tested with S. aureus, the chlorhexidine-laurate coating (CL11) best meets the medical requirements for a fast bacterial eradication. This suture coating shows the lowest survival rate of adhering as well as planktonic bacteria, a high drug release during the first–clinically most relevant– 48 hours, as well as biocompatibility. Thus, CL11 coatings should be recommended for prophylactic antimicrobial sutures as an optimal surgical supplement to reduce wound infections. However, animal and clinical investigations are important to prove safety and efficacy for future applications. PMID:29315313

  7. Viable adhered Staphylococcus aureus highly reduced on novel antimicrobial sutures using chlorhexidine and octenidine to avoid surgical site infection (SSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeier, Andreas; Schneider, Jochen; Harrasser, Norbert; Tübel, Jutta; Mühlhofer, Heinrich; Pförringer, Dominik; Deimling, Constantin von; Foehr, Peter; Kiefel, Barbara; Krämer, Christina; Stemberger, Axel; Schieker, Matthias; Burgkart, Rainer; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger

    2018-01-01

    palmitate coatings and sustaining integrity of coated sutures. Adherent S. aureus were found via SEM on all types of investigated sutures. The novel antimicrobial sutures showed significantly less viable adhered S. aureus bacteria (up to 6.1 log) compared to Vicryl® Plus (0.5 log). Within 11 μg/cm drug-containing sutures, octenidine-palmitate (OL11) showed the highest number of viable adhered S. aureus (0.5 log), similar to Vicryl® Plus. Chlorhexidine-laurate (CL11) showed the lowest number of S. aureus on sutures (1.7 log), a 1.2 log greater reduction. In addition, planktonic S. aureus in suspensions were highly inhibited by CL11 (0.9 log) represents a 0.6 log greater reduction compared to Vicryl® Plus (0.3 log). Novel antimicrobial sutures can potentially limit surgical site infections caused by multiple pathogenic bacterial species. Therefore, a potential inhibition of multispecies biofilm formation is assumed. In detail tested with S. aureus, the chlorhexidine-laurate coating (CL11) best meets the medical requirements for a fast bacterial eradication. This suture coating shows the lowest survival rate of adhering as well as planktonic bacteria, a high drug release during the first-clinically most relevant- 48 hours, as well as biocompatibility. Thus, CL11 coatings should be recommended for prophylactic antimicrobial sutures as an optimal surgical supplement to reduce wound infections. However, animal and clinical investigations are important to prove safety and efficacy for future applications.

  8. Microbial colonisation of orthopaedic tourniquets: A potential risk for surgical site infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Sahu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatic tourniquets have been used in orthopaedic surgery to get avascular fields. Sixteen such tourniquets were analysed for microbial colonisation. Samples were taken from two inner and two outer areas of each tourniquet and cultured on sheep blood agar. Eight of these were wiped with Savlon and the rest with Sterillium solution. Post-treatment samples from the same sites were again cultured. After incubation, colonies from each site were identified and counted. It was observed that the tourniquets were colonised with coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus, diphtheroids, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, enterococci, enterobacteria, and Candida. On treating with Savlon and Sterillium, there was 92.18% and 95.70% reduction in the colony count, respectively.

  9. Five-year decreased incidence of surgical site infections following gastrectomy and prosthetic joint replacement surgery through active surveillance by the Korean Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H J; Adiyani, L; Sung, J; Choi, J Y; Kim, H B; Kim, Y K; Kwak, Y G; Yoo, H; Lee, Sang-Oh; Han, S H; Kim, S R; Kim, T H; Lee, H M; Chun, H K; Kim, J-S; Yoo, J D; Koo, H-S; Cho, E H; Lee, K W

    2016-08-01

    Surveillance of healthcare-associated infection has been associated with a reduction in surgical site infection (SSI). To evaluate the Korean Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System (KONIS) in order to assess its effects on SSI since it was introduced. SSI data after gastrectomy, total hip arthroplasty (THA), and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) between 2008 and 2012 were analysed. The pooled incidence of SSI was calculated for each year; the same analyses were also conducted from hospitals that had participated in KONIS for at least three consecutive years. Standardized SSI rates for each year were calculated by adjusting for SSI risk factors. SSI trends were analysed using the Cochran-Armitage test. The SSI rate following gastrectomy was 3.12% (522/16,918). There was a significant trend of decreased crude SSI rates over five years. This trend was also evident in analysis of hospitals that had participated for more than three years. The SSI rate for THA was 2.05% (157/7656), which decreased significantly from 2008 to 2012. The risk factors for SSI after THA included the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance risk index, trauma, reoperation, and age (60-69 years). The SSI rate for TKA was 1.90% (152/7648), which also decreased significantly during a period of five years. However, the risk-adjusted analysis of SSI did not show a significant decrease for all surgical procedures. The SSI incidence of gastrectomy and prosthetic joint replacement declined over five years as a result of active surveillance by KONIS. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy on organ/space surgical site infection in patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Duan, X; Xu, J; Jin, Q; Chen, F; Wang, P; Yang, Y; Tang, X

    2015-11-01

    Various risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) have been identified such as age, overweight, duration of surgery, blood loss, etc. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy during surgery is a common procedure in patients with gastric cancer, yet its impact on SSI has not been evaluated. To evaluate whether intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy is a key risk factor for organ/space SSI in patients with gastric cancer. All patients with gastric cancer who underwent surgery at the Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery between January 2008 and December 2013 were studied. The organ/space SSI rates were compared between patients who received intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy and patients who did not receive intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy, and the risk factors for organ/space SSI were analysed by univariate and multi-variate regression analyses. The microbial causes of organ/space SSI were also identified. Of the eligible 845 patients, 356 received intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy, and the organ/space SSI rate was higher in these patients compared with patients who did not receive intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (9.01% vs 3.88%; P = 0.002). Univariate analysis confirmed the significance of this finding (odds ratio 2.443; P = 0.003). As a result, hospital stay was increased in patients who received intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy {mean 20.91 days [95% confidence interval (CI) 19.76-22.06] vs 29.72 days (95% CI 25.46-33.99); P = 0.000}. The results also suggested that intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy may be associated with more Gram-negative bacterial infections. Intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy is a significant risk factor for organ/space SSI in patients with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. EFFECT OF PROPHYLACTIC ANTIBIOTIC ON SURGICAL SITE INFECTION AFTER TENSION-FREE HERNIOPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Saskia-Javi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: prophylactic antibiotics were remains applied for hernioplasty treatment at Sanglah General Hospital Bali-Indonesia. On the other hand, there were no comprehensive infection incidence data gathered. This research aims to determine incidence differences of post operative infection inpatients underwent tension-free hernioplasty and received prophylactic antibiotics compared to thosewho received placebo. The general purpose of this research is to determine the necessity of prophylactic antibiotics in the hope of setting new procedural standards in elective hernia procedures thus reducing cost and bacteria resistance.Patients and Method: This was an open label randomizedclinical trial conducted at Sanglah General Hospital Department of General Surgery from October 2011. The target population was all patients who underwent tension-free hernioplasty procedure, in Sanglah General Hospital. The acquired data was analyzed after an independent t test was performed. a Mann-Whitney U test, Fisher’s exact test, and Two-Sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test were used todetermine the correlations between variables, where p < 0.05 was regardless of significant.Results: From 54 subjects 3 (5.6% of them were found to have a slight erythema around the operation wound,on the 7th,14th,21th, and 28th day no signs of erythema were found. From the three subjects two (7.4% were from the placebo group and one (3.7% from the antibiotic group. All clinical assessment of post operative wound was made using Southampton Wound Assessment Scale, where erythema is a grade 1C, all subjects healed primarily.Conclusion: An Open Label Randomized Clinical Trial comparing SSI in post tension-free hernioplasty patients who were given prophylactic antibiotics and placebo.No significant difference were found.

  12. Early Surgical Site Infection Following Tissue Expander Breast Reconstruction with or without Acellular Dermal Matrix: National Benchmarking Using National Surgical Quality Improvement Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Winocour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSurgical site infections (SSIs result in significant patient morbidity following immediate tissue expander breast reconstruction (ITEBR. This study determined a single institution's 30-day SSI rate and benchmarked it against that among national institutions participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP.MethodsWomen who underwent ITEBR with/without acellular dermal matrix (ADM were identified using the ACS-NSQIP database between 2005 and 2011. Patient characteristics associated with the 30-day SSI rate were determined, and differences in rates between our institution and the national database were assessed.Results12,163 patients underwent ITEBR, including 263 at our institution. SSIs occurred in 416 (3.4% patients nationwide excluding our institution, with lower rates observed at our institution (1.9%. Nationwide, SSIs were significantly more common in ITEBR patients with ADM (4.5% compared to non-ADM patients (3.2%, P=0.005, and this trend was observed at our institution (2.1% vs. 1.6%, P=1.00. A multivariable analysis of all institutions identified age ≥50 years (odds ratio [OR], 1.4; confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.7, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 vs. 4.25 hours (OR, 1.9; CI, 1.5-2.4 as risk factors for SSIs. Our institutional SSI rate was lower than the nationwide rate (OR, 0.4; CI, 0.2-1.1, although this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.07.ConclusionsThe 30-day SSI rate at our institution in patients who underwent ITEBR was lower than the nation. SSIs occurred more frequently in procedures involving ADM both nationally and at our institution.

  13. Perioperative oxygen fraction - effect on surgical site infection and pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery: a randomized clinical trial. Rationale and design of the PROXI-Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyhoff, Christian Sylvest; Wetterslev, Jørn; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2008-01-01

    A high perioperative inspiratory oxygen fraction may reduce the risk of surgical site infections, as bacterial eradication by neutrophils depends on wound oxygen tension. Two trials have shown that a high perioperative inspiratory oxygen fraction (FiO(2) = 0.80) significantly reduced risk of surg...... complications, such as atelectasis, pneumonia and respiratory failure. The aim of our trial is to assess the potential benefits and harms of a high perioperative oxygen fraction in patients undergoing abdominal surgery....... of surgical site infections after elective colorectal surgery, but a third trial was stopped early because the frequency of surgical site infections was more than doubled in the group receiving FiO(2) = 0.80. It has not been settled if a high inspiratory oxygen fraction increases the risk of pulmonary......A high perioperative inspiratory oxygen fraction may reduce the risk of surgical site infections, as bacterial eradication by neutrophils depends on wound oxygen tension. Two trials have shown that a high perioperative inspiratory oxygen fraction (FiO(2) = 0.80) significantly reduced risk...

  14. A retrospective analysis of the risk factors for surgical site infections and long-term follow-up after transpalpebral enucleation in horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huppes, Tsjester; Hermans, Hanneke; Ensink, Jos M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implants are often used to improve the cosmetic appearance of horses after enucleation of the eye. When surgical site infection (SSI) occurs, the implant will almost always be lost. The aim of this study is to collect data on the risk factors for SSIs and report long-term follow-up

  15. Reducing Surgical Site Infections in Abdominal Surgery: Are Ring Retractors Effective? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khalid; Bashar, Khalid; Connelly, Tara T M; Fahey, Tom; Walsh, Stewart R

    2016-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is one of the main causes of morbidity and death after surgical intervention. The use of physical barriers, including gloves, drapes, and gowns to reduce SSI after abdominal surgery is long-standing practice. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the efficacy of ring incision retractors in reducing the risk of SSI in abdominal surgery. PubMed, CINAHL, the Cochrane randomized controlled trials (RCTs) Central Register, and the ISRCTN registry were searched for RCTs in which ring retractors were utilized to reduce SSI in abdominal surgery. The PRISMA guidelines and RevMan 5.3 were used for study selection and analysis. Additional subgroup analyses were performed, including trials using incision class (clean, clean-contaminated contaminated, and dirty) and trials that used the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's SSI definition in their protocol. A total of 19 RCTs inclusive of 4,229 patients were included. The utility of ring retractors in reducing SSI was suggested by an overall risk ratio of 0.62 (95% confidence interval 0.48-0.81). However, study heterogeneity caused by differences in effect size between individual RCTs, the non-standardized utilization of concomitant measures to reduce SSI, and an overall lack of high-quality trials was found. A reduction in SSI incidence with the use of ring retractors is suggested by the findings. However, this result must be treated with caution because in addition to some old trials poor quality and the large number of factors affecting SSI, there were substantial differences between trials in effect sizes in statistical heterogeneity. Further RCTs are needed to confirm this provisional finding.

  16. The role of pre-operative and post-operative glucose control in surgical-site infections and mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie Y Jeon

    Full Text Available The impact of glucose control on surgical-site infection (SSI and death remains unclear. We examined how pre- and post-operative glucose levels and their variability are associated with the risk of SSI or in-hospital death.This retrospective cohort study employed data on 13,800 hospitalized patients who underwent a surgical procedure at a large referral hospital in New York between 2006 and 2008. Over 20 different sources of electronic data were used to analyze how thirty-day risk of SSI and in-hospital death varies by glucose levels and variability. Maximum pre- and post-operative glucose levels were determined for 72 hours before and after the operation and glucose variability was defined as the coefficient of variation of the glucose measurements. We employed logistic regression to model the risk of SSI or death against glucose variables and the following potential confounders: age, sex, body mass index, duration of operation, diabetes status, procedure classification, physical status, emergency status, and blood transfusion.While association of pre- and post-operative hyperglycemia with SSI were apparent in the crude analysis, multivariate results showed that SSI risk did not vary significantly with glucose levels. On the other hand, in-hospital deaths were associated with pre-operative hypoglycemia (OR = 5.09, 95% CI (1.80, 14.4 and glucose variability (OR = 1.14, 95% CI (1.03, 1.27 for 10% increase in coefficient of variation.In-hospital deaths occurred more often among those with pre-operative hypoglycemia and higher glucose variability. These findings warrant further investigation to determine whether stabilization of glucose and prevention of hypoglycemia could reduce post-operative deaths.

  17. The role of pre-operative and post-operative glucose control in surgical-site infections and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Christie Y; Furuya, E Yoko; Berman, Mitchell F; Larson, Elaine L

    2012-01-01

    The impact of glucose control on surgical-site infection (SSI) and death remains unclear. We examined how pre- and post-operative glucose levels and their variability are associated with the risk of SSI or in-hospital death. This retrospective cohort study employed data on 13,800 hospitalized patients who underwent a surgical procedure at a large referral hospital in New York between 2006 and 2008. Over 20 different sources of electronic data were used to analyze how thirty-day risk of SSI and in-hospital death varies by glucose levels and variability. Maximum pre- and post-operative glucose levels were determined for 72 hours before and after the operation and glucose variability was defined as the coefficient of variation of the glucose measurements. We employed logistic regression to model the risk of SSI or death against glucose variables and the following potential confounders: age, sex, body mass index, duration of operation, diabetes status, procedure classification, physical status, emergency status, and blood transfusion. While association of pre- and post-operative hyperglycemia with SSI were apparent in the crude analysis, multivariate results showed that SSI risk did not vary significantly with glucose levels. On the other hand, in-hospital deaths were associated with pre-operative hypoglycemia (OR = 5.09, 95% CI (1.80, 14.4)) and glucose variability (OR = 1.14, 95% CI (1.03, 1.27) for 10% increase in coefficient of variation). In-hospital deaths occurred more often among those with pre-operative hypoglycemia and higher glucose variability. These findings warrant further investigation to determine whether stabilization of glucose and prevention of hypoglycemia could reduce post-operative deaths.

  18. The efficacy of active drainage for preventing postoperative organ/space surgical site infections in patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeshima, Ryo; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Nishimura, Junichi; Hata, Taishi; Matsuda, Chu; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Murata, Kohei; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2018-01-01

    Patients with Crohn's disease (CD) show a higher incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs) after bowel resection in comparison to other patient populations because CD patients commonly suffer from anemia, malnutrition, and immunosuppression. In comparison to conventional passive drainage, active drainage using a closed-suction drain reportedly reduces postoperative wound-related complications in several diseases. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the incidence of SSI and to identify the risk factors for SSI in patients with CD. We retrospectively analyzed the patient characteristics and perioperative data of 106 CD patients who underwent bowel resection at our institution between January 2000 and June 2016. We statistically analyzed the incidence of different types of SSI (overall, incisional, and organ/space) in relation to patient-related and surgery-related risk factors. Overall postoperative SSIs were diagnosed in 19 patients (17.9%), including incisional SSI (n = 16; 15.1%), organ/space SSI (n = 7; 6.6%), and both (n = 4; 3.8%). A long operative time (p = 0.036) and colonic involvement (p = 0.011) were significantly associated with the overall risk of developing an SSI. Active drainage significantly reduced the incidence of organ/space SSI (p = 0.037). Intraabdominal active drainage was more useful than passive drainage for preventing organ/space SSI development.

  19. The New World Health Organization Recommendations on Perioperative Administration of Oxygen to Prevent Surgical Site Infections: A Dangerous Reductionist Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenk, Manuel; Van Aken, Hugo; Zarbock, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    In October 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) published recommendations for preventing surgical site infections (SSIs). Among those measures is a recommendation to administer oxygen at an inspired fraction of 80% intra- and postoperatively for up to 6 hours. SSIs have been identified as a global health problem, and the WHO should be commended for their efforts. However, this recommendation focuses only on the patient's "wound," ignores other organ systems potentially affected by hyperoxia, and may ultimately worsen patient outcomes.The WHO advances a "strong recommendation" for the use of a high inspired oxygen fraction even though the quality of evidence is only moderate. However, achieving this goal by disregarding other potentially lethal complications seems inappropriate, particularly in light of the weak evidence underpinning the use of high fractions of oxygen to prevent SSI. Use of such a strategy thus should be intensely discussed by anesthesiologists and perioperative physicians.Normovolemia, normotension, normoglycemia, normothermia, and normoventilation can clearly be safely applied to most patients in most clinical scenarios. But the liberal application of hyperoxemia intraoperatively and up to 6 hours postoperatively, as suggested by the WHO, is questionable from the viewpoint of anesthesia and perioperative medicine, and its effects will be discussed in this article.

  20. Risk factors for incisional surgical site infections in elective surgery for colorectal cancer: focus on intraoperative meticulous wound management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itatsu, Keita; Sugawara, Gen; Kaneoka, Yuji; Kato, Takehito; Takeuchi, Eiji; Kanai, Michio; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Arai, Toshiyuki; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Nagino, Masato

    2014-07-01

    An incisional surgical site infection (I-SSI) is a frequently observed complication following colorectal surgery. Intraoperative wound management is one of the most important factors that determine the incidence of postoperative I-SSI. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the methods used for intraoperative wound management on the incidence of I-SSI following elective surgery for colorectal cancer. Between November 2009 and February 2011, the data of 1,980 consecutive patients who underwent elective colorectal resection for colorectal cancer were prospectively collected from 19 affiliated hospitals. The incidence of and risk factors for I-SSI were investigated. Overall, 233 I-SSIs were identified (11.7 %). Forty-two possible risk factors were analyzed. Using a multivariate analysis, the independent risk factors for I-SSI were identified to be a high body mass index, previous laparotomy, chronic liver disease, wound length, contaminated wound class, creation or closure of an ostomy, right hemicolectomy procedure, the suture material used for fascial closure and the incidence of organ/space SSI. To prevent I-SSI following elective colorectal surgery, it is crucial to avoid making large incisions and reduce fecal contamination whenever possible. A high quality randomized control trial is necessary to confirm the definitive intraoperative procedure(s) that can minimize the incidence of I-SSI.

  1. A standardized perioperative surgical site infection care process among children with stoma closure: a before-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras-Hernandez, Juan; Bracho-Blanchet, Eduardo; Tovilla-Mercado, Jose; Vilar-Compte, Diana; Nieto-Zermeño, Jaime; Davila-Perez, Roberto; Teyssier-Morales, Gustavo; Lule-Dominguez, Martha

    2008-10-01

    We report on the effectiveness of a standardized perioperative care process for lowering surgical site infection (SSI) rates among children with stoma closure at a tertiary-care public pediatric teaching hospital in Mexico City. All consecutive children with stoma closure operated on between November 2003 and October 2005 were prospectively followed for 30 days postoperatively. We conducted a before-after study to evaluate standardized perioperative bowel- and abdominal-wall care process results on SSI rates. Seventy-one patients were operated on, and all completed follow-up. SSI rates declined from 42.8% (12/28) before to 13.9% (6/43) after the standardization procedure (relative risk (RR) = 3.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.3-7.2; p = 0.006). SSI independently associated risk factors comprised peristomal skin inflammation >3 mm (odds ratio (OR) = 9.6; 95% CI = 1.8-49.6; p = 0.007) and intraoperative complications (OR = 13.3; 95% CI = 1.4-127.2; p = 0.02). Being operated on during the after-study period was shown to be a protective factor against SSI (OR = 0.2; 95% CI = 0.4-0.97; p = 0.04). Standardization was able to reduce SSI rates threefold in children with stoma closure in a short period of time.

  2. Does Pre-Operative Multiple Immunosuppressive Therapy Associate with Surgical Site Infection in Surgery for Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Motoi; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Bando, Toshihiro; Hirose, Kei; Hirata, Akihiro; Chohno, Teruhiro; Sasaki, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Takesue, Yoshio; Hida, Nobuyuki; Hori, Kazutoshi; Nakamura, Shiro

    2015-01-01

    Almost all surgeries for ulcerative colitis (UC) are performed under immunosuppressive conditions. Immunomodulators or biologics, with the exception of corticosteroids, do not appear to be risk factors for post-operative infectious complications. However, many patients are on multiagent immunosuppressive therapy at the time of surgery. Therefore, we evaluated the influence of pre-operative multiple immunosuppressives on the occurrence of surgical site infection (SSI) in UC. We reviewed surveillance data from 181 patients who underwent restorative proctocolectomy between January 2012 and March 2014. The incidences of SSI and the possible risk factors among patients receiving different immunosuppressive therapies were compared and analyzed. The incidence of incisional (INC) SSI was 13.3% and that of organ/space (O/S) SSI was 7.2%. The number of immunosuppressives did not significantly correlate with each incidence. Total prednisolone administration ≥12,000 mg (OR 2.6) and an American Society of Anesthesiologists score ≥3 (OR 2.8) were shown to be independent risk factors for overall SSI, whereas corticosteroid use in INC SSI (OR 17.4) and severe disease (OR 5.2) and a large amount of blood loss (OR 3.9) in O/S SSI were identified as risk factors. Although a correlation between multiple immunosuppressive therapy and SSIs was not found, it is not recommended that all patients be treated with multiple immunosuppressive therapy. Treatment strategy should be applied based on the patient's condition. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Post-discharge surveillance (PDS) for surgical site infections: a good method is more important than a long duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koek, M B; Wille, J C; Isken, M R; Voss, A; van Benthem, B H

    2015-02-26

    Post-discharge surveillance (PDS) for surgical site infections (SSIs) normally lasts 30 days, or one year after implant surgery, causing delayed feedback to healthcare professionals. We investigated the effect of shortened PDS durations on SSI incidence to determine whether shorter PDS durations are justified. We also studied the impact of two national PDS methods (those mandatory since 2009 (‘mandatory’) and other methods acceptable before 2009 (‘other’)) on SSI incidence. From Dutch surveillance (PREZIES) data (1999-2008), four implant-free surgeries (breast amputation, Caesarean section, laparoscopic cholecystectomy and colectomy) and two implant surgeries (knee replacement and total hip replacement) were selected. We studied the impact of PDS duration and method on SSI incidences by survival and Cox regression analyses. We included 105,607 operations. Shortened PDS duration for implant surgery from one year to 90 days resulted in 6–14% of all SSIs being missed. For implant-free procedures, PDS reduction from 30 to 21 days caused similar levels of missed SSIs. In contrast, up to 62% of SSIs (for cholecystectomy) were missed if other instead of mandatory PDS methods were used. Inferior methods of PDS, rather than shortened PDS durations, may lead to greater underestimation of SSI incidence. Our data validate international recommendations to limit the maximum PDS duration (for implant surgeries) to 90 days for surveillance purposes, as this provides robust insight into trends.

  4. Can we reduce the surgical site infection rate in cesarean sections using a chlorhexidine-based antisepsis protocol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer-Alshiek, Jonia; Alshiek, Tahani; Almog, Benny; Lessing, Joseph B; Satel, Abed; Many, Ariel; Levin, Ishai

    2013-11-01

    To determine whether chlorhexidine-based antisepsis reduces the rate of surgical site infections (SSIs) in elective and non-elective cesarean sections (CS) compared with povidone-iodine protocol. This was a retrospective study. Women undergoing elective and non-elective CS during two periods of time who were treated with two different antisepsis protocols were included. The protocols for antisepsis were povidone-iodine 10% scrub followed by 10% povidone-iodine in 65% alcohol (n = 163) and chlorhexidine 2% followed by 70% alcohol (n = 163). The rate of SSIs and the risk factors for their occurrence were calculated and compared between the two groups. Antisepsis with chlorhexidine and alcohol was associated with a lower rate of SSIs, 10.43% versus 3.07% with povidone-iodine (p = 0.08). The two groups of patients were similar in baseline characteristics. Risk factors associated with SSIs were body mass index, urgent CS, and the use of the povidone-iodine protocol. Antisepsis with Chlorhexidine-based regimen was associated with a significant reduction in the rate of SSIs compared to povidone-iodine antisepsis in women undergoing elective and non-elective CS. This is of extreme clinical importance, as a change in antisepsis protocol can significantly reduce the morbidity and healthcare costs regarding cesarean sections.

  5. A meta-analysis of the effect of inspired oxygen concentration on the incidence of surgical site infection following cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingel, M L; Patel, S V

    2013-04-01

    There has been interest in using high inspired oxygen concentrations to reduce surgical site infections in the obstetric population. Previous meta-analyses looking at the effect of high-concentration oxygen in other surgical populations have reported conflicting results. However, no meta-analysis has been performed on women undergoing cesarean section, who are generally a healthier population and thus may have different outcomes. The aim of this study was to complete a meta-analysis comparing high (>60%) and low (infections in patients undergoing cesarean section. A full systematic review and meta-analysis were completed. Two independent literature searches were conducted using electronic databases, bibliographies and sources of gray literature to identify appropriate randomized controlled studies. These studies were assessed for quality and the results were pooled. Five studies, with a total of 1966 patients, were included in the review. There was no evidence that the perioperative use of high concentrations of oxygen reduced surgical site infections in this group (risk ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval 0.86-1.46, P=0.40). The meta-analysis has an overall moderate GRADE. There is no evidence to suggest a difference in risk of surgical site infection by administration of high inspired oxygen concentrations among women undergoing cesarean section. Future studies with better adherence to the intervention may affect the results of this analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Does Fine Needle Aspiration Microbiology Offer Any Benefit Over Wound Swab in Detecting the Causative Organisms in Surgical Site Infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudharsanan, Sundaramurthi; Gs, Sreenath; Sureshkumar, Sathasivam; Vijayakumar, Chellappa; Sujatha, Sistla; Kate, Vikram

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the role of ne needle aspiration microbiology (FNAM) in detecting the causative organisms of postoperative surgical site infections (SSIs) in comparison with the standard technique of surface swabbing. Ma- terials and Methods. In this study, 150 patients with SSIs following elective and emergency operations were included. In all patients, FNAM was performed along with conventional surface swabbing to identify the causative microorganism. Sensitivity of surface swab and FNAM was calculated as the number of samples collected from the diagnosed case of SSI. A total of 115 positive cultures were obtained from the 150 patients with SSIs; surface swab was positive in 110 cases and FNAM was positive in 94 cases. The mean number of organisms isolated by surface swab, and FNAM was 0.95 and 0.8, respectively. The sensitivity of surface swab was 94.3% in elective cases and 96.25% in emergency cases. The sensitivity of FNAM was 82.8% in elective cases and 82.5% in emergency cases. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of FNAM and surface swab did not signi cantly differ in clean elective cases. The overall sensitivity of surface swab and FNAM was 95.65% and 81.7%, respectively. Comparing the antibiotic suscep- tibility pattern, no difference was observed when the same organ- ism was isolated by both methods, indicating that FNAM does not offer bene t over the conventional wound surface swab in detecting microorganisms in SSI in both elective and emergency surgeries. In certain cases with unexplained wound infections, FNAM can be used as an investigation to identify speci c pathogens not detected by conventional surface swab.

  7. Temporal trends and epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus surgical site infection in the Swiss surveillance network: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M; Aghayev, E; Troillet, N; Eisenring, M-C; Kuster, S P; Widmer, A F; Harbarth, S

    2018-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading pathogen in surgical site infections (SSI). To explore trends and risk factors associated with S. aureus SSI. Risk factors for monomicrobial S. aureus SSI were identified from the Swiss multi-centre SSI surveillance system using multi-variate logistic regression. Both in-hospital and postdischarge SSI were identified using standardized definitions. Over a six-year period, data were collected on 229,765 surgical patients, of whom 499 (0.22%) developed monomicrobial S. aureus SSI; 459 (92.0%) and 40 (8.0%) were due to meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), respectively. There was a significant decrease in the rate of MSSA SSI (P = 0.007), but not in the rate of MRSA SSI (P = 0.70). Independent protective factors for S. aureus SSI were older age [≥75 years vs <50 years: odds ratio (OR) 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44-0.83], laparoscopy/minimally invasive surgery (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.50-0.92), non-clean surgery [OR 0.78 (per increase in wound contamination class), 95% CI 0.64-0.94] and correct timing of pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.65-0.98). Independent risk factors were male sex (OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.14-1.66), higher American Society of Anesthesiologists' score (per one-point increment: OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.13-1.51), re-operation for non-infectious reasons (OR 4.59, 95% CI 3.59-5.87) and procedure type: cardiac surgery, laminectomy, and hip or knee arthroplasty had two-to nine-fold increased odds of S. aureus SSI compared with other procedures. SSI due to S. aureus are decreasing and becoming rare events in Switzerland. High-risk procedures that may benefit from specific preventive measures were identified. Unfortunately, many of the independent risk factors are not easily modifiable. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of hospital infection control policy on the prevalence of surgical site infection in a tertiary hospital in South-South Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisibe, Seiyefa Fun-Akpa; Ordinioha, Best; Gbeneolol, Precious K

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a significant cause of morbidity, emotional stress and financial cost to the affected patients and health care institutions; and infection control policy has been shown to reduce the burden of SSIs in several health care institutions. This study assessed the effects of the implementation of the policy on the prevalence of SSI in the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. A review of the records of all Caesarean sections carried out in the hospital, before and 2 years after the implementation of the infection control policy was conducted. Data collected include the number and characteristics of the patients that had Caesarean section in the hospital during the period and those that developed SSI while on admission. The proportion of patients with SSI decreased from 13.33% to 10.34%, 2 years after the implementation of the policy (P-value = 0.18). The implementation of the policy did not also result in any statistically significant change in the nature of the wound infection (P-value = 0.230), in the schedule of the operations (P-value = 0.93) and in the other predisposing factors of the infections (P-value = 0.72); except for the significant decrease in the infection rate among the un-booked patients (P-value = 0.032). The implementation of the policy led to a small decrease in SSI, due to the non-implementation of some important aspects of the WHO policy. The introduction of surveillance activities, continuous practice reinforcing communications and environmental sanitation are recommended to further decrease the prevalence of SSI in the hospital.

  9. Surgical site infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A significant number of multidrug resistant micro- organisms are frequently encountered. With no new antibiotics due for release in the nearby future, this is of particular concern. It should be every practitioners' priority to use antibiotics judiciously. Antibiotic stewardship is needed in every institution. Practitioners should work.

  10. Effectiveness of triclosan-coated PDS Plus versus uncoated PDS II sutures for prevention of surgical site infection after abdominal wall closure: the randomised controlled PROUD trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Markus K; Knebel, Phillip; Kieser, Meinhard; Schüler, Philipp; Schiergens, Tobias S; Atanassov, Vladimir; Neudecker, Jens; Stein, Erwin; Thielemann, Henryk; Kunz, Reiner; von Frankenberg, Moritz; Schernikau, Utz; Bunse, Jörg; Jansen-Winkeln, Boris; Partecke, Lars I; Prechtl, Gerald; Pochhammer, Julius; Bouchard, Ralf; Hodina, René; Beckurts, K Tobias E; Leißner, Lothar; Lemmens, Hans-Peter; Kallinowski, Friedrich; Thomusch, Oliver; Seehofer, Daniel; Simon, Thomas; Hyhlik-Dürr, Alexander; Seiler, Christoph M; Hackert, Thilo; Reissfelder, Christoph; Hennig, René; Doerr-Harim, Colette; Klose, Christina; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W

    2014-07-12

    Postoperative surgical site infections are one of the most frequent complications after open abdominal surgery, and triclosan-coated sutures were developed to reduce their occurrence. The aim of the PROUD trial was to obtain reliable data for the effectiveness of triclosan-coated PDS Plus sutures for abdominal wall closure, compared with non-coated PDS II sutures, in the prevention of surgical site infections. This multicentre, randomised controlled group-sequential superiority trial was done in 24 German hospitals. Adult patients (aged ≥18 years) who underwent elective midline abdominal laparotomy for any reason were eligible for inclusion. Exclusion criteria were impaired mental state, language problems, and participation in another intervention trial that interfered with the intervention or outcome of this trial. A central web-based randomisation tool was used to randomly assign eligible participants by permuted block randomisation with a 1:1 allocation ratio and block size 4 before mass closure to either triclosan-coated sutures (PDS Plus) or uncoated sutures (PDS II) for abdominal fascia closure. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of superficial or deep surgical site infection according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria within 30 days after the operation. Patients, surgeons, and the outcome assessors were masked to group assignment. Interim and final analyses were by modified intention to treat. This trial is registered with the German Clinical Trials Register, number DRKS00000390. Between April 7, 2010, and Oct 19, 2012, 1224 patients were randomly assigned to intervention groups (607 to PDS Plus, and 617 to PDS II), of whom 1185 (587 PDS Plus and 598 PDS II) were analysed by intention to treat. The study groups were well balanced in terms of patient and procedure characteristics. The occurrence of surgical site infections did not differ between the PDS Plus group (87 [14·8%] of 587) and the PDS II group (96 [16·1%] of 598

  11. Surgical site infections following operative management of cervical spondylotic myelopathy: prevalence, predictors of occurence, and influence on peri-operative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalai, C M; Worley, N; Poorman, G W; Cruz, D L; Vira, S; Passias, P G

    2016-06-01

    Studies have examined infection rates following spine surgery and their relationship to post-operative complications and increased length of stay. Few studies, however, have investigated predictors of infection, specifically in the setting of operative intervention for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). This study aims to identify the incidence and factors predictive of infection amongst this cohort. This study performed a retrospective review of the prospectively collected American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database. Patients included those treated surgically for CSM (ICD-9 code 721.1) from 2010 to 2012. Patient demographics and surgical data were collected with outcome variables including the occurrence of one of the following surgical site infections (SSIs) within 30 days of index operation: superficial SSI, deep incisional SSI, and organ/space SSI. 3057 patients were included in this analysis. Overall infection rate was 1.15 % (35/3057), of which 54.3 % (19/35) were superficial SSIs, 28.6 % (10/35) were deep incisional SSI, and 20 % (7/35) were peri-spinal SSI. Logistic regression revealed factors associated with SSI included: higher BMI [OR 1.162 (CI 1.269-1.064), p = 0.001] and operative time ≥208 min [OR 4.769 (CI 20.220-1.125), p = 0.034]. The overall SSI rate for the examined CSM cohort was 1.15 %. This study identified increased BMI and operative time ≥208 min as predictors of infection in surgical CSM patients. This information should be carefully considered in delivering patient education and future efforts to optimize risk in CSM patients indicated for surgical intervention.

  12. Network meta-analysis of antibiotic prophylaxis for prevention of surgical-site infection after groin hernia surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonchan, T; Wilasrusmee, C; McEvoy, M; Attia, J; Thakkinstian, A

    2017-01-01

    First-generation cephalosporins (such as cefazolin) are recommended as antibiotic prophylaxis in groin hernia repair, but other broad-spectrum antibiotics have also been prescribed in clinical practice. This was a systematic review and network meta-analysis to compare the efficacy of different antibiotic classes for prevention of surgical-site infection (SSI) after hernia repair. RCTs were identified that compared efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis on SSI after inguinal or femoral hernia repair from PubMed and Scopus databases up to March 2016. Data were extracted independently by two reviewers. Network meta-analysis was applied to assess treatment efficacy. The probability of being the best antibiotic prophylaxis was estimated using surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) analysis. Fifteen RCTs (5159 patients) met the inclusion criteria. Interventions were first-generation (7 RCTs, 1237 patients) and second-generation (2 RCTs, 532) cephalosporins, β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitors (6 RCTs, 619) and fluoroquinolones (2 RCTs, 581), with placebo as the most common comparator (14 RCTs, 2190). A network meta-analysis showed that β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitors and first-generation cephalosporins were significantly superior to placebo, with a pooled risk ratio of 0·44 (95 per cent c.i. 0·25 to 0·75) and 0·62 (0·42 to 0·92) respectively. However, none of the antibiotic classes was significantly different from the others. SUCRA results indicated that β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitors and first-generation cephalosporins were ranked first and second respectively for best prophylaxis. β-Lactam/β-lactamase inhibitors followed by first-generation cephalosporins ranked as the most effective SSI prophylaxis for adult patients undergoing groin hernia repair. © 2017 The Authors. BJS published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of BJS Society Ltd.

  13. Secondary surgical-site infection after coronary artery bypass grafting: A multi-institutional prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulack, Brian C; Kirkwood, Katherine A; Shi, Wei; Smith, Peter K; Alexander, John H; Burks, Sandra G; Gelijns, Annetine C; Thourani, Vinod H; Bell, Daniel; Greenberg, Ann; Goldfarb, Seth D; Mayer, Mary Lou; Bowdish, Michael E

    2018-04-01

    To analyze patient risk factors and processes of care associated with secondary surgical-site infection (SSI) after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Data were collected prospectively between February and October 2010 for consenting adult patients undergoing CABG with saphenous vein graft (SVG) conduits. Patients who developed a deep or superficial SSI of the leg or groin within 65 days of CABG were compared with those who did not develop a secondary SSI. Among 2174 patients identified, 65 (3.0%) developed a secondary SSI. Median time to diagnosis was 16 days (interquartile range 11-29) with the majority (86%) diagnosed after discharge. Gram-positive bacteria were most common. Readmission was more common in patients with a secondary SSI (34% vs 17%, P < .01). After adjustment, an open SVG harvest approach was associated with an increased risk of secondary SSI (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28-3.48). Increased body mass index (adjusted HR, 1.08, 95% CI, 1.04-1.12) and packed red blood cell transfusions (adjusted HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.05-1.22) were associated with a greater risk of secondary SSI. Antibiotic type, antibiotic duration, and postoperative hyperglycemia were not associated with risk of secondary SSI. Secondary SSI after CABG continues to be an important source of morbidity. This serious complication often occurs after discharge and is associated with open SVG harvesting, larger body mass, and blood transfusions. Patients with a secondary SSI have longer lengths of stay and are readmitted more frequently. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intra-operative wound irrigation to reduce surgical site infections after abdominal surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Tara C; Loos, Martin; Haller, Bernhard; Mihaljevic, André L; Nitsche, Ulrich; Wilhelm, Dirk; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg; Bader, Franz G

    2015-02-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains to be one of the most frequent infectious complications following abdominal surgery. Prophylactic intra-operative wound irrigation (IOWI) before skin closure has been proposed to reduce bacterial wound contamination and the risk of SSI. However, current recommendations on its use are conflicting especially concerning antibiotic and antiseptic solutions because of their potential tissue toxicity and enhancement of bacterial drug resistances. To analyze the existing evidence for the effect of IOWI with topical antibiotics, povidone-iodine (PVP-I) solutions or saline on the incidence of SSI following open abdominal surgery, a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was carried out according to the recommendations of the Cochrane Collaboration. Forty-one RCTs reporting primary data of over 9000 patients were analyzed. Meta-analysis on the effect of IOWI with any solution compared to no irrigation revealed a significant benefit in the reduction of SSI rates (OR = 0.54, 95 % confidence Interval (CI) [0.42; 0.69], p < 0.0001). Subgroup analyses showed that this effect was strongest in colorectal surgery and that IOWI with antibiotic solutions had a stronger effect than irrigation with PVP-I or saline. However, all of the included trials were at considerable risk of bias according to the quality assessment. These results suggest that IOWI before skin closure represents a pragmatic and economical approach to reduce postoperative SSI after abdominal surgery and that antibiotic solutions seem to be more effective than PVP-I solutions or simple saline, and it might be worth to re-evaluate their use for specific indications.

  15. Laparoscopic Appendectomy Is Safe: Influence of Appendectomy Technique on Surgical-site Infections and Intra-abdominal Abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Maximilian; Hoffmann, Maria; Hochrein, Alfred; Buhr, Heinz J; Lehmann, Kai S

    2015-06-01

    Surgical-site infections (SSIs) and intra-abdominal abscesses (IAAs) are the most frequent complications of appendectomy. The role of laparoscopy in the treatment of appendicitis remains controversial concerning the complication rate. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to compare open and laparoscopic appendectomy for SSI and IAA. All patients undergoing appendectomy between January 1, 2007 and May 31, 2010 were included in the study. Perioperative data and data on postoperative complications were collected from patient files. A questionnaire was used to assess complications after discharge. Main outcome parameters were SSI and IAA. Open appendectomy (OAG) and laparoscopic appendectomy (LAG) were compared with univariate and multivariate analyses for the outcome parameters. Four hundred thirty patients were included in the study. SSI (all: 10.6%, OAG: 11.7%, LAG: 7.5%, P=0.293) and IAA (all: 2.8%, OAG: 2.4%, LAG: 3.8%, P=0.506) were not significantly different between OAG and LAG. Risk factors for SSI were age (P=0.003), body mass index (P=0.017), ASA score (P=0.001), the intraoperative grade of inflammation (P=0.004), and the histologic grade of inflammation (P=0.015). The only risk factor for IAA was the intraoperative grade of inflammation (P=0.028). ASA score (odds ratio: 1.992, P=0.032) and the intraoperative grade of inflammation (odds ratio: 1.573, P=0.006) remained significant in the multivariate analysis for SSI. A higher ASA score correlates with SSI. A higher grade of intraoperative inflammation correlates with SSI and IAA. Laparoscopy has no impact on SSI and IAA in appendectomy.

  16. Independent risk factors for surgical site infection after cesarean delivery in a rural tertiary care medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Manuel C; Attaallah, Ahmed F; Shapiro, Robert E; Elzamzamy, Osama M; Mueller, Michael G; Eller, Warren S

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to determine the incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) after cesarean delivery (CD) and identify the risk factors in a rural population. We identified 218 SSI patients by International Classification of Disease codes and matched them with 3131 parturients (control) from the electronic record database in a time-matched retrospective quality assurance analysis. The incidence of SSI after CD was 7.0 %. Risk factors included higher body mass index (BMI) [40.30 ± 10.60 kg/m 2 SSI (95 % CI 38.73-41.87) vs 34.05 ± 8.24 kg/m 2 control (95 % CI 33.75-34.35, P < 0.001)], years of education [13.28 ± 2.44 years SSI (95 % CI 12.9-13.66) vs 14.07 ± 2.81 years control (95 % CI 13.96-14.18, P < 0.001)], number of prior births [2 (1-9) SSI vs 1 (1-11) control (P < 0.001)], tobacco use (OR 1.49; 95 % CI 1.06-2.09, P = 0.03), prior diagnosis of hypertension (OR 1.80; 95 % CI 1.34-2.42, P < 0.001), gestational diabetes (OR 1.59; 95 % CI 1.18-2.13, P = 0.003), and an emergency/STAT CD (OR 1.6; 95 % CI 1.1-2.3, P = 0.01). Risk factors for SSI after CD included higher BMI, less years of education, higher prior births, tobacco use, prior diagnosis of hypertension, gestational diabetes, and emergency/STAT CD. The presence of ruptured membranes was protective against SSI.

  17. The efficacy of ampicillin compared with ceftriaxone on preventing cesarean surgical site infections: an observational prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srisuda Assawapalanggool

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cesarean surgical site infections (SSIs can be prevented by proper preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis. Differences in antibiotic selection in clinical practice exist according to obstetricians’ preferences despite clear guidelines on preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of ampicillin and ceftriaxone in preventing cesarean SSIs. Methods The observational prospective cohort study was conducted at a tertiary hospital in Thailand from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2012. Propensity scores for ceftriaxone prophylaxis were calculated from potential influencing confounders. The cesarean SSI rates of the ceftriaxone group vs. those of the ampicillin prophylactic group were estimated by multilevel mixed-effects Poisson regression nested by propensity score. Results Data of 4149 cesarean patients were collected. Among these, 911 patients received ceftriaxone whereas 3238 patients received ampicillin as preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis. The incidence of incisional SSIs was (0.1% vs. 1.2%; p = 0.001 and organ space SSIs was (1.2% vs. 2.9%; p = 0.003 in the ceftriaxone group compared with the ampicillin group. After adjusting for confounders, the rate ratios of incisional and organ/space SSIs in the ceftriaxone compared with the ampicillin group did not differ (RR, 0.23; 95% CI 0.03–1.78, and (RR, 1.62; 95% CI 0.83–3.18, respectively. Conclusion These data indicate no difference exists between ampicillin and ceftriaxone to prevent SSIs after cesarean section. Ampicillin may be used as antibiotic prophylaxis in cesarean section.

  18. Efficacy of vacuum-assisted closure therapy on rehabilitation during the treatment for surgical site infection after cardiovascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Akihiro; Inoue, Takafumi; Fujisaki, Masayuki; Morizumi, Sei; Suematsu, Yoshihiro

    2016-08-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after cardiovascular procedures is a severe complication, potentially leading to high morbidity and mortality. In addition, during the treatment of SSI, rehabilitation is delayed, which can severely impair postoperative recovery. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy on rehabilitation during the treatment of SSI after cardiovascular surgery. From January 2008 to March 2015, 10 patients underwent VAC therapy for SSI after cardiovascular operations. The patient characteristics, duration of VAC therapy, time interval from the implementation of VAC to physical therapy (PT) (T1), ambulation (T2) and walking (T3), functional independent measure (FIM), and maximum consecutive walking capacity (MCWC) were retrospectively analyzed. Nine patients underwent mid-sternal incision and one patient underwent thoraco-abdominal incision. The mean time interval from the beginning of VAC therapy to PT, ambulation, and walking was 0.38 ± 0.50, 0.63 ± 0.71, and 1.38 ± 1.86 days, respectively. The average FIM was 84.5 ± 14.0 at the beginning of VAC therapy and 106.7 ± 18.5 at the end of VAC therapy (P = 0.000494). On average, MCWC was 52.3 ± 54.6 m at the installation of VAC therapy and 189.7 ± 152.8 m at the completion of VAC therapy (P = 0.0169). FIM and MCWC improvement rate was better in VAC group than non-VAC group although these data are not suitable for statistical analysis because of a small sample size. Although further studies are warranted, VAC therapy may have a role in facilitating rehabilitation and improving the prognosis of SSI cases after major cardiovascular operations.

  19. PRE-OPERATIVE HAIR REMOVAL WITH TRIMMERS AND RAZORS AND ITS IMPACT ON SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS IN ELECTIVE INGUINAL HERNIA REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Kurien

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Despite major advances in infection control interventions, health care-associated infections (HAI remain a major public health problem and patient safety threat worldwide. The global data suggests that the SSI incidence rate varies from 0.5 to 20% depending upon the type of operation and underlying patient status. Several factors preoperative, intraoperative & postoperative, determine the occurrence of surgical site infections, Preoperative hair removal is considered as a risk for the development of surgical site infections. The objective of the study is to find out the difference in the incidence of surgical site infections in patients undergoing pre-operative hair removal by shaving with Razor blades and hair trimmers prior to elective inguinal hernia surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS Written informed consent from 160 patients with no significant comorbidities planning to undergo elective inguinal hernia surgery at the general surgery wards in Government Medical College Kottayam and who were willing to participate in the study were to be obtained. 80 of them to undergo pre-operative hair removal with hair trimmers and 80 to undergo preoperative hair removal by shaving with razor blades on the day prior to the surgery randomised into two groups. During their stay in the postoperative ward the surgical wounds of the patients were examined daily for the development of erythema, pain, discharge, induration and gaping of the wound. The daily findings were noted down till the patient was discharged from the ward. The patients were again reassessed 2 weeks later, when they came for review in the Surgery OPD after their discharge from the ward; finally the patients were examined on the 30th day post-surgery to look for the clinical features of surgical site infections. RESULTS Out of the total 160 patients who were studied, 29 (18.1% of them had post-operative infection within 30 days, in the form of erythema, induration, discharge and gaping

  20. Effect of a preoperative decontamination protocol on surgical site infections in patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery with hardware implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebko, Serge P; Green, David M; Awad, Samir S

    2015-05-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs), commonly caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, specifically when hardware is implanted in the patient. Previously, we have demonstrated that a preoperative decontamination protocol using chlorhexidine gluconate washcloths and intranasal antiseptic ointment is effective in eradicating MRSA in the nose and on the skin of patients. To examine the effect of a decontamination protocol on SSIs in patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery with hardware implantation. A prospective database of patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery with hardware implantation at the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Houston, Texas, was analyzed from October 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013. Cohort groups before and after the intervention were compared. Starting in May 2013, during their preoperative visit, all of the patients watched an educational video about MRSA decontamination and were given chlorhexidine washcloths and oral rinse and nasal povidone-iodine solution to be used the night before and the morning of scheduled surgery. Thirty-day SSI rates were collected according to the definitions of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance. Data on demographics, comorbidities such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and coronary artery disease, tobacco use, alcohol use, and body mass index were also collected. Univariate analysis was performed between the 2 groups of patients. Multivariate analysis was used to identify independent predictors of SSI. A total of 709 patients were analyzed (344 controls and 365 patients who were decolonized). Both groups were well matched with no significant differences in age, body mass index, sex, or comorbidities. All of the patients (100%) completed the MRSA decontamination protocol. The SSI rate in the intervention group was significantly lower (1.1%; 4 of

  1. The Importance of Perioperative Prophylaxis with Cefuroxime or Ceftriaxone in the Surgical Site Infections Prevention after Cranial and Spinal Neurosurgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimovska-Gavrilovska, Aleksandra; Chaparoski, Aleksandar; Gavrilovski, Andreja; Milenkovikj, Zvonko

    2017-09-01

    Introduction Surgical site infections pose a significant problem in the treatment of neurosurgical procedures, regardless of the application of perioperative prophylaxis with systemic antibiotics. The infection rate in these procedures ranges from less than 1% to above 15%. Different antibiotics and administration regimes have been used in the perioperative prophylaxis so far, and there are numerous comparative studies regarding their efficiency, however, it is generally indicated that the choice thereof should be based on information and local specifics connected to the most probable bacterial causers, which would possibly contaminate the surgical site and cause infection, and moreover, the mandatory compliance with the principles of providing adequate concentration of the drug at the time of the anticipated contamination. Objective Comparing the protective effect of two perioperative prophylactic antibiotic regimes using cefuroxime (second generation cephalosporin) and ceftriaxone (third generation cephalosporin) in the prevention of postoperative surgical site infections after elective and urgent cranial and spinal neurosurgical procedures at the University Clinic for Neurosurgery in Skopje in the period of the first three months of 2016. Design of the study Prospective randomized comparative study. Outcome measures Establishing the clinical outcome represented as prevalence of superficial and deep incision and organ/space postoperative surgical site infections. Material and method We analyzed prospectively 40 patients who received parenteral antibiotic prophylaxis with two antibiotic regimes one hour before the routine neurosurgical cranial and spinal surgical procedures; the patients were randomized in two groups, according to the order of admission and participation in the study, alternately, non-selectively, those persons who fulfilled inclusion criteria were placed in one of the two programmed regimes with cefuroxime in the first, and cefotaxime in the

  2. Proportions of Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Patients with Surgical Site Infections in Mainland China: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhirong; Wang, Jing; Wang, Weiwei; Zhang, Yuelun; Han, Lizhong; Zhang, Yuan; Nie, Xiaolu; Zhan, Siyan

    2015-01-01

    Background Sufficient details have not been specified for the epidemiological characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among surgical site infections (SSIs) in mainland China. This systematic review aimed to estimate proportions of S. aureus and MRSA in SSIs through available published studies. Methods PubMed, Embase and four Chinese electronic databases were searched to identify relevant primary studies published between 2007...

  3. Clinical relevance and effect of surgical wound classification in appendicitis: Retrospective evaluation of wound classification discrepancies between surgeons, Swissnoso-trained infection control nurse, and histology as well as surgical site infection rates by wound class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang-Chan, Anastasija; Gingert, Christian; Angst, Eliane; Hetzer, Franc Heinrich

    2017-07-01

    Surgical wound classification (SWC) is used for risk stratification of surgical site infection (SSI) and serves as the basis for measuring quality of care. The objective was to examine the accuracy and reliability of SWC. This study was purposed to evaluate the discrepancies in SWC as assessed by three groups: surgeons, an infection control nurse, and histopathologic evaluation. The secondary aim was to compare the risk-stratified SSI rates using the different SWC methods for 30 d postoperatively. An analysis was performed of the appendectomies from January 2013 to June 2014 in the Cantonal Hospital of Schaffhausen. SWC was assigned by the operating surgeon at the end of the procedure and retrospectively reviewed by a Swissnoso-trained infection control nurse after reading the operative and pathology report. The level of agreement among the three different SWC assessment groups was determined using kappa statistic. SSI rates were analyzed using a chi-square test. In 246 evaluated cases, the kappa scores for interrater reliability among the SWC assessments across the three groups ranged from 0.05 to 0.2 signifying slight agreement between the groups. SSIs were more frequently associated with trained infection control nurse-assigned SWC than with surgeons based SWC. Our study demonstrated a considerable discordance in the SWC assessments performed by the three groups. Unfortunately, the currently practiced SWC system suffers from ambiguity in definition and/or implementation of these definitions is not clearly stated. This lack of reliability is problematic and may lead to inappropriate comparisons within and between hospitals and surgeons. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Surgical wound infection - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hours There are different levels of wound infections: Superficial -- the infection is in the skin area only ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  5. Ability to predict the development of surgical site infection in cardiac surgery using the Australian Clinical Risk Index versus the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance-derived Risk Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuerola-Tejerina, A; Bustamante, E; Tamayo, E; Mestres, C A; Bustamante-Munguira, J

    2017-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a major infectious complication that increases mortality, morbidity, and healthcare costs. There are scores attempting to classify patients for calculating SSI risk. Our objectives were to validate the Australian Clinical Risk Index (ACRI) in a European population after cardiac surgery, comparing it against the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance-derived risk index (NNIS) and analyzing the predictive power of ACRI for SSI in valvular patients. All the patients that who underwent cardiac surgery in a tertiary university hospital between 2011 and 2015 were analyzed. The patients were divided into valvular and coronary groups, excluding mixed patients. The ACRI score was validated in both groups and its ability to predict SSI was compared to the NNIS risk index. We analyzed 1,657 procedures. In the valvular patient group (n: 1119), a correlation between the ACRI score and SSI development (p < 0.05) was found; there was no such correlation with the NNIS index. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.64 (confidence interval [CI] 95%, 0.5-0.7) for ACRI and 0.62 (95% CI, 0.5-0.7) for NNIS. In the coronary group (n: 281), there was a correlation between ACRI and SSI but no between NNIS and SSI. The ACRI AUC was 0.70 (95% CI, 0.5-0.8) and the NNIS AUC was 0.60 (95% CI, 0.4-0.7). The ACRI score has insufficient predictive power, although it predicts SSI development better than the NNIS index, fundamentally in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Further studies analyzing determining factors are needed.

  6. Effect of triclosan-coated sutures on the incidence of surgical site infection after abdominal wall closure in gastroenterological surgery: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial in a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichida, Kosuke; Noda, Hiroshi; Kikugawa, Rina; Hasegawa, Fumi; Obitsu, Tamotsu; Ishioka, Daisuke; Fukuda, Rintaro; Yoshizawa, Ayuha; Tsujinaka, Shingo; Rikiyama, Toshiki

    2018-02-02

    Surgical site infection is one of the most common postoperative complications after gastroenterologic surgery. This study investigated the effect of triclosan-coated sutures in decreasing the incidence of surgical site infections after abdominal wall closure in gastroenterologic surgery. A prospective, double-blind, randomized, controlled parallel adaptive group-sequential superiority trial was conducted from March 2014 to March 2017 in a single center. Eligible patients were those who underwent gastroenterologic surgery. Patients were allocated randomly to receive either abdominal wall closure with triclosan-coated sutures (the study group) or sutures without triclosan (the control group). The primary end point was the incidence of superficial or deep surgical site infections within 30 days after operation. This study was registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network-Clinical Trials Registry (http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/), identification number UMIN000013054. A total of 1,013 patients (study group, 508 patients; control group, 505 patients) were analyzed by a modified intention-to-treat approach. The wounds in 990 (97.7%) of the 1,013 patients were classified as clean-contaminated. The primary end point (incidence of superficial or deep surgical site infections) was 35 (6.9%) of 508 patients in the study group and 30 (5.9%) of 505 in the control group. The incidence of surgical site infections did not differ markedly between the 2 groups (95% confidence interval: 0.686-2.010, P = .609). Of the 65 infections, 42 (64.6%) were superficial surgical site infections, with similar frequencies in the 2 groups, and 23 (35.4%) were deep surgical site infections, again with similar frequencies in the 2 groups. Triclosan-coated sutures did not decrease the incidence of surgical site infections after abdominal wall closure in gastroenterologic surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Is hospital information system relevant to detect surgical site infection? Findings from a prospective surveillance study in posterior instrumented spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boetto, J; Chan-Seng, E; Lonjon, G; Pech, J; Lotthé, A; Lonjon, N

    2015-11-01

    Spinal instrumentation has a high rate of surgical site infection (SSI), but results greatly vary depending on surveillance methodology, surgical procedures, or quality of follow-up. Our aim was to study true incidence of SSI in spinal surgery by significant data collection, and to compare it with the results obtained through the hospital information system. This work is a single center prospective cohort study that included all patients consecutively operated on for spinal instrumentation by posterior approach over a six-month period regardless the etiology. For all patients, a "high definition" prospective method of surveillance was performed by the infection control (IC) department during at least 12 months after surgery. Results were then compared with findings from automatic surveillance though the hospital information system (HIS). One hundred and fifty-four patients were included. We found no hardly difference between "high definition" and automatic surveillance through the HIS, even if HIS tended to under-estimate the infection rate: rate of surgical site infection was 2.60% and gross SSI incidence rate via the hospital information system was 1.95%. Smoking and alcohol consumption were significantly related to a SSI. Our SSI rates to reflect the true incidence of infectious complications in posterior instrumented adult spinal surgery in our hospital and these results were consistent with the lower levels of published infection rate. In-house surveillance by surgeons only is insufficiently sensitive. Further studies with more patients and a longer inclusion time are needed to conclude if SSI case detection through the HIS could be a relevant and effective alternative method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Using the Electronic Health Record Data in Real Time and Predictive Analytics to Prevent Hospital-Acquired Postoperative/Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falen, Thomas; Noblin, Alice M; Russell, O Lucia; Santiago, Nonica

    Of critical concern to hospitals today is the prevention of postoperative (surgical site) infections that often result in increased lengths of stays for patients, increased resource demands and costs, loss of public trust and lawsuits, and needless pain and suffering for patients and their families. While all surgical patients have the potential to develop a postoperative infection, the main challenge is to identify key risk factors (both patient centered and operational) through an electronic early-warning system to reduce the likelihood of a postoperative infection from occurring. Currently, most postoperative infection risk prevention practices encompass limited use of informatics technologies or do not maximize the potential benefits. In addition, from a research perspective, there has been more focus on extrapolating electronically housed data (eg, from progress notes, operative notes, laboratory, pharmacy, radiology) retrospectively to describe poor patient outcomes for benchmarking purposes (revealing poor results and opportunities for improvement) rather than using similar sources of real-time data to prevent poor patient outcomes from occurring. This article proposes that standardized indicators, both patient centered and operational, linked to the patient's electronic health record could allow for implementation of 24/7, "real-time" monitoring/surveillance to implement well-timed preventive interventions scaled to each patient and facility to assist caregivers in reducing the numbers of postoperative infections and improve the overall quality and costs of patient care.

  9. Surgical Adhesive Drape (IO-ban) as Postoperative Surgical Site Dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felbaum, Daniel; Syed, Hasan R; Snyder, Rita; McGowan, Jason E; Jha, Ribhu T; Nair, Mani N

    2015-12-04

    Retrospective chart analysis. The objective of this study is to describe the senior author's (MNN) experience applying a widely available surgical drape as a postoperative sterile surgical site dressing for both cranial and spinal procedures. Surgical site infection (SSI) is an important complication of spine surgery that can result in significant morbidity. There is wide variation in wound care management in practice, including dressing type. Given the known bactericidal properties of the surgical drape, there may be a benefit of continuing its use immediately postoperatively. All of the senior author's cases from September 2014 through September 2015 were reviewed. These were contrasted to the previous year prior to the institution of a sterile surgical drape as a postoperative dressing. Only one surgical case out of 157 operative interventions (35 cranial, 124 spinal) required operative debridement due to infection. From September 2013 to September 2014, prior to the institution of a sterile surgical drape as dressing, the author had five infections out of 143 operations (46 cranial, 97 spinal) requiring intervention. The implementation of a sterile surgical drape as a closed postoperative surgical site dressing has led to a decrease in surgical site infections. The technique is simple and widely available, and should be considered for use to diminish surgical site infections.

  10. Sodium Mercaptoethane Sulfonate Reduces Collagenolytic Degradation and Synergistically Enhances Antimicrobial Durability in an Antibiotic-Loaded Biopolymer Film for Prevention of Surgical-Site Infections

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    Joel Rosenblatt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Implant-associated surgical-site infections can have significant clinical consequences. Previously we reported a method for prophylactically disinfecting implant surfaces in surgical pockets, where an antibiotic solution containing minocycline (M and rifampin (R was applied as a solid film in a crosslinked biopolymer matrix that partially liquefied in situ to provide extended prophylaxis. Here we studied the effect of adding sodium 2-mercaptoethane sulfonate (MeSNA on durability of prophylaxis in an in vitro model of implant-associated surgical-site infection. Adding MeSNA to the M/R biopolymer, antimicrobial film extended the duration for which biofilm formation by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA was prevented on silicone surfaces in the model. M/R films with and without MeSNA were effective in preventing colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Independent experiments revealed that MeSNA directly inhibited proteolytic digestion of the biopolymer film and synergistically enhanced antimicrobial potency of M/R against MDR-PA. Incubation of the MeSNA containing films with L929 fibroblasts revealed no impairment of cellular metabolic activity or viability.

  11. Surgical Site Irrigation in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhadan, Olga; Becker, Hilton

    2018-02-15

    The incidence of infection following breast implant reconstruction remains high at the level of 24%. Surgical site irrigation is commonly used for its prevention. However, the lack of evidence-based guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis in breast implant surgery necessitates research for optimal irrigation technique. composition and exposure time of irrigation solution for surgical site infection (SSI) prophylaxis using an in vitro model of a surgical site. The study design was an in vitro model to assess antibiotic irrigation of a surgical site. Strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Group A Streptococcus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were seeded on blood agar growth medium and irrigated with various antibiotic and antiseptic solutions under different exposure times. The presence and quantity of the colonies grown were estimated after 24-hour incubation. Repetition of the studies for 5 times with each investigated irrigation solution and microorganism was performed. Optimal irrigation agents were chosen based on the ability to achieve sterility with minimal tissue toxicity. The optimal wound irrigation agents for SSI prophylaxis in our study were found to be 0.05% chlorhexidine or triple antibiotic antibiotic solutions. Adding of vancomycin to the irrigation solutions did not show an increase in their effectiveness. Prolonged irrigation exposure time was necessary to achieve sterility of the in vitro model of a surgical site. We recommend 0.05% chlorhexidine or triple antibiotic solution for topical SSI prophylaxis in breast implant surgery. Sufficient time of irrigation can be achieved by maintaining some of the solution in the pocket and delaying drainage for at least 30 minutes. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. ABDOMINAL CLOSURE WITH ANTI BACTERIAL COATED SUTURE MATERIALS AND ITS RELATION TO THE INCIDENCE OF POST OPERATIVE SUPERFICIAL SURGICAL SITE INFECTION RATES

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    Josephine Pudumai Selvi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Surgical site infection (SSI is an immense burden on healthcare resources even in the modern era of immaculate sterilization approaches and highly effective antibiotics. An estimated 234 million various surgical procedures, involving skin incisions requiring various types of wound closure techniques, are performed in the world, with the majority resulting in a wound healing by primary intention. Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2, 4-dichlorophenoxy phenol is a broad-spectrum bactericidal agent that has been used for more than 40 years in various products, such as toothpaste and soaps. Higher concentrations of Triclosan work as a bactericide by attacking different structures in the bacterial cytoplasm and cell membrane. Use of Triclosan-coated sutures should theoretically result in the reduction of SSI. The aim of the study is to assess the abdominal closure with antibacterial coated suture materials and its relation to the incidence of post-operative superficial surgical site infection rates. MATERIALS AND METHODS The data will be collected from hospital records of surgery performed, post-operative daily progress notes and outpatient folders and telephonic conversations with patients after discharge. All patients undergoing laparotomy procedure for any cause. 100 patients divided as 50 in each group. RESULTS The positive outcome of infection (21.5% in patients using ordinary sutures was significantly differed with the positive outcome of infection (11.4% of Triclosan coated sutures. CONCLUSION In conclusion since there was a definite advantage inferred to the patients by using Triclosan coated polyglactin 910, it is the opinion of the researcher that Triclosan coated sutures has a role to play in reducing SSI in clean wounds and its use should be confined to areas where its application has proven benefits. However more studies should be done to clearly define its role and indications in surgery.

  13. Review of MRSA screening and antibiotics prophylaxis in orthopaedic trauma patients; The risk of surgical site infection with inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis in patients colonized with MRSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, H J; Ponniah, N; Long, S; Rath, N; Kent, M

    2017-07-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine whether orthopaedic trauma patients receive appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis keeping in view the results of their MRSA screening. The secondary aim was to analyse the risk of developing MRSA surgical site infection with and without appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis in those colonized with MRSA. We reviewed 400 consecutive orthopaedic trauma patient episodes. Preoperative MRSA screening results, operative procedures, prophylactic antibiotics and postoperative course were explored. In addition to these consecutive patients, the hospital MRSA database over the previous 5 years identified 27 MRSA colonized acute trauma patients requiring surgery. Of the 400 consecutive patient episodes, 395(98.7%) had MRSA screening performed on admission. However, in 236 (59.0%) cases, the results were not available before the surgery. Seven patient episodes (1.8%) had positive MRSA colonization. Analysis of 27 MRSA colonized patients revealed that 20(74%) patients did not have the screening results available before the surgery. Only 5(18.5%) received Teicoplanin and 22(81.4%) received cefuroxime for antibiotic prophylaxis before their surgery. Of those receiving cefuroxime, five (22.73%) patients developed postoperative MRSA surgical site infection (SSI) but none of those (0%) receiving Teicoplanin had MRSA SSI. The absolute risk reduction for SSI with Teicoplanin as antibiotic prophylaxis was 22.73% (CI=5.22%-40.24%) and NNT (Number Needed to Treat) was 5 (CI=2.5-19.2) CONCLUSION: Lack of available screening results before the surgery may lead to inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis increasing the risk of MRSA surgical site infection. Glycopeptide (e.g.Teicoplanin) prophylaxis should be considered when there is history of MRSA colonization or MRSA screening results are not available before the surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. The Betadine trial - antiseptic wound irrigation prior to skin closure at caesarean section to prevent surgical site infection: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Kassam; Ibiebele, Ibinabo; Buchanan, Julie

    2016-06-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) occur in around 10% of women following a caesarean section. Efforts to reduce SSI include wound irrigation with povidone-iodine (PVI), but studies are nonconclusive, mostly old and few on women having caesarean section (CS). To assess povidone-iodine (PVI) (Betadine) irrigation of wound prior to skin closure in reducing incidence of SSI after CS. Our hypothesis was that there would be no benefit with its use in reducing SSIs. A randomised controlled trial with 3027 women. Women having CS were allocated to receive PVI irrigation or no irrigation after closure of fascia and before skin closure. Women were followed up to four weeks to assess for SSI. Main outcome measure was surgical site infection. The two groups (1520 in Betadine and 1507 on no Betadine group) were well balanced. The incidence of SSI was similar in the two groups (9.5% vs 9.8%, RR 0.97; 95% CI 0.78-1.21). There was no difference between groups (2.6% vs 2.0%, RR 1.29, 95% CI 0.81-2.06 Betadine vs no Betadine, respectively) in readmission for wound infection requiring intravenous antibiotics; this was so in both the elective CS group as well as CS in labour group. PVI irrigation after the closure of fascia and before closure of skin is of no benefit in the prevention of SSI in women undergoing CS. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  15. Low skeletal muscle radiation attenuation and visceral adiposity are associated with overall survival and surgical site infections in patients with pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, David P J; Bakens, Maikel J A M; Coolsen, Mariëlle M E; Rensen, Sander S; van Dam, Ronald M; Bours, Martijn J L; Weijenberg, Matty P; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Olde Damink, Steven W M

    2017-04-01

    Cancer cachexia and skeletal muscle wasting are related to poor survival. In this study, quantitative body composition measurements using computed tomography (CT) were investigated in relation to survival, post-operative complications, and surgical site infections in surgical patients with cancer of the head of the pancreas. A prospective cohort of 199 patients with cancer of the head of the pancreas was analysed by CT imaging at the L3 level to determine (i) muscle radiation attenuation (average Hounsfield units of total L3 skeletal muscle); (ii) visceral adipose tissue area; (iii) subcutaneous adipose tissue area; (iv) intermuscular adipose tissue area; and (v) skeletal muscle area. Sex-specific cut-offs were determined at the lower tertile for muscle radiation attenuation and skeletal muscle area and the higher tertile for adipose tissues. These variables of body composition were related to overall survival, severe post-operative complications (Dindo-Clavien ≥ 3), and surgical site infections (wounds inspected daily by an independent trial nurse) using Cox-regression analysis and multivariable logistic regression analysis, respectively. Low muscle radiation attenuation was associated with shorter survival in comparison with moderate and high muscle radiation attenuation [median survival 10.8 (95% CI: 8.8-12.8) vs. 17.4 (95% CI: 14.7-20.1), and 18.5 (95% CI: 9.2-27.8) months, respectively; P site infection rate, OR: 2.4 (95% CI: 1.1-5.3; P = 0.027). Low muscle radiation attenuation was associated with reduced survival, and high visceral adiposity was associated with an increase in surgical site infections. The strong correlation between muscle radiation attenuation and intermuscular adipose tissue suggests the presence of ectopic fat in muscle, warranting further investigation. CT image analysis could be implemented in pre-operative risk assessment to assist in treatment decision-making. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle

  16. Prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy after cesarean is associated with reduced risk of surgical site infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lulu; Kronen, Ryan J; Simon, Laura E; Stoll, Carolyn R T; Colditz, Graham A; Tuuli, Methodius G

    2018-02-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the effect of prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy on surgical site infections and other wound complications in women after cesarean delivery. We searched Ovid Medline, Embase, SCOPUS, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We included randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy with standard wound dressing for cesarean delivery. The primary outcome was surgical site infection after cesarean delivery. Secondary outcomes were composite wound complications, wound dehiscence, wound seroma, endometritis, and hospital readmission. Heterogeneity was assessed using Higgin's I 2 . Relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were calculated using random-effects models. Six randomized controlled trials and 3 cohort studies in high-risk mostly obese women met inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Six were full-text articles, 2 published abstracts, and 1 report of trial results in ClinicalTrials.gov. Studies were also heterogeneous in the patients included and type of negative-pressure wound therapy device. The risk of surgical site infection was significantly lower with the use of prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy compared with standard wound dressing (7 studies: pooled risk ratio, 0.45; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-0.66; adjusted risk ratio, -6.0%, 95% confidence interval, -10.0% to -3.0%; number needed to treat, 17, 95% confidence interval, 10-34). There was no evidence of significant statistical heterogeneity (I 2  = 9.9%) or publication bias (Egger P = .532). Of the secondary outcomes, only composite wound complications were significantly reduced in patients receiving prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy compared with standard dressing (9 studies: pooled risk ratio, 0.68, 95% confidence interval, 0.49-0.94). Studies on the effectiveness of prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy at

  17. Risk factors for surgical site infections among 1,772 patients operated on for lumbar disc herniation: a multicentre observational registry-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habiba, Samer; Nygaard, Øystein P; Brox, Jens I; Hellum, Christian; Austevoll, Ivar M; Solberg, Tore K

    2017-06-01

    There are no previous studies evaluating risk factors for surgical site infections (SSIs) and the effectiveness of prophylactic antibiotic treatment (PAT), specifically for patients operated on for lumbar disc herniation. This observational multicentre study comprises a cohort of 1,772 consecutive patients operated on for lumbar disc herniation without laminectomy or fusion at 23 different surgical units in Norway. The patients were interviewed about SSIs according to a standardised questionnaire at 3 months' follow-up. Three months after surgery, 2.3% of the patients had an SSI. Only no PAT (OR = 5.3, 95% CI = 2.2-12.7, pdisc herniation. Senior surgeons assisting inexperienced colleagues to avoid prolonged duration of surgery could also reduce the occurrence of SSI.

  18. Surgical Site Infections after Open Reduction Internal Fixation for Trauma in Low and Middle Human Development Index Countries: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, Thomas J; Cai, Lawrence Z; Corcoran-Schwartz, Ian; Weiser, Thomas G; Forrester, Joseph D

    2018-01-17

    Musculoskeletal trauma represents a large source of morbidity in low and middle human development index countries (LMHDICs). Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of traumatic long bone fractures definitively manages these injuries and restores function when conducted safely and effectively. Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a common complication of operative fracture fixation, although the risks of infection are ill-defined in LMHDIC. This study reviewed systematically all studies describing SSI after ORIF in LMDHICs. Studies were reviewed based on their qualitative characteristics, after which a quantitative synthesis of weighted pooled infection rates based on available patient-level data was performed to estimate published incidence of SSI. Forty-two studies met criteria for qualitative review and 32 studies comprising 3,084 operations were included in the quantitative analysis. Among 3,084 operations, the weighted pooled SSI rate was 6.4 infections per 100 procedures (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.6-8.2 infections per 100 procedures). Higher rates of infection were noted among the sub-group of open fractures (95% CI 13.9-23.0 infections per 100 procedures). Lower extremity injuries and procedures utilizing intra-medullary nails also had slightly higher rates of infection versus upper extremity procedures and other fixation devices. Reported rates of SSI after ORIF are higher in LMHDICs, and may be driven by high rates of infection in the sub-group of open fractures. This study provides a baseline SSI rate obtained from literature produced from LMHDICs. Infection rates are highly dependent on fracture sub-types.

  19. Does surgical site infection after Caesarean section in Polish hospitals reflect high-quality patient care or poor postdischarge surveillance? Results from a 3-year multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Różańska, Anna; Jarynowski, Andrzej; Kopeć-Godlewska, Katarzyna; Wójkowska-Mach, Jadwiga; Misiewska-Kaczur, Agnieszka; Lech, Marzena; Rozwadowska, Małgorzata; Karwacka, Marlena; Liberda, Joanna; Domańska, Joanna

    2018-01-01

    Caesarean sections (CSs) are associated with a high infection risk. Surgical site infection (SSI) incidence is among the markers of effectiveness of infection prevention efforts. The aim of this study was to analyze risk factors for SSI, incidence, and microbiology in patients who underwent CS. The study was conducted during 2013-2015 using active infection surveillance in 5 Polish hospitals according to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control surveillance network known as HAI-Net. For each procedure, the following data were registered: age, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, procedure time, elective or emergency procedure, use of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis, microbiology, the treatment used, and other information. SSI incidence was 0.5% and significant differences were noted among hospitals (between 0.1% and 1.8%), for different American Society of Anesthesiologists scales (between 0.2% and 4.8%) and different values of standardized SSI risk index (between 0.0% and 0.8%). In 3.1% of procedures, with no antibiotic prophylaxis, SSI risk was significantly higher. Deep infections dominated: 61.5% with superficial infections in only approximately 30% of cases and 2.6% of infections were detected postdischarge without readmissions. Results showed high incidence of SSI in Poland without perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis, and secondly, ineffective surveillance according to CS status, considering outpatient obstetric care. Without postdischarge surveillance, it is not possible to recognize the epidemiologic situation, and further, to set priorities and needs when it comes to infection prophylaxis, especially because such low incidence may indicate no need for improvement in infection control. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of Pre-Operative Blood Transfusion and Subcutaneous Fat Thickness as Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infection after Posterior Thoracic Spine Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhoff, Georg; Burla, Laurin; Werner, Clément M L; Jentzsch, Thorsten; Wanner, Guido A; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Sprengel, Kai

    2015-06-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) increase morbidity and mortality rates and generate additional cost for the healthcare system. Pre-operative blood transfusion and the subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT) have been described as risk factors for SSI in other surgical areas. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of pre-operative blood transfusion and the SFT on the occurrence of SSI in posterior thoracic spine surgery. In total, 244 patients (median age 55 y; 97 female) who underwent posterior thoracic spine fusions from 2008 to 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Patient-specific characteristics, pre-operative hemoglobin concentration/hematocrit values, the amount of blood transfused, and the occurrence of a post-operative SSI were documented. The SFT was measured on pre-operative computed tomography scans. Surgical site infection was observed in 26 patients (11%). The SFT was 13 mm in patients without SSI and 14 mm in those with infection (p=0.195). The odds ratio for patients with pre-operative blood transfusion to present with SSI was 3.1 (confidence interval [CI] 1.4-7.2) and 2.7 (CI 1.1-6.4) when adjusted for age. There was no difference between the groups with regard to pre-operative hemoglobin concentration (p=0.519) or hematocrit (p=0.908). The SFT did not differ in the two groups. Allogeneic red blood cell transfusion within 48 h prior to surgery was an independent risk factor for SSI after posterior fusion for the fixation of thoracic spine instabilities. Pre-operative blood transfusion tripled the risk, whereas SFT had no influence on the occurrence of SSI.

  1. Is there an increased risk of post-operative surgical site infection after orthopaedic surgery in HIV patients? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigera, James W M; Straetemans, Masja; Vuhaka, Simplice K; Nagel, Ingeborg M; Naddumba, Edward K; Boer, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    There is dilemma as to whether patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) requiring implant orthopaedic surgery are at an increased risk for post-operative surgical site infection (SSI). We conducted a systematic review to determine the effect of HIV on the risk of post-operative SSI and sought to determine if this risk is altered by antibiotic use beyond 24 hours. We searched electronic databases, manually searched citations from relevant articles, and reviewed conference proceedings. The risk of postoperative SSI was pooled using Mantel-Haenszel method. We identified 18 cohort studies with 16 mainly small studies, addressing the subject. The pooled risk ratio of infection in the HIV patients when compared to non-HIV patients was 1.8 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.3-2.4), in studies in Africa this was 2.3 (95% CI 1.5-3.5). In a sensitivity analysis the risk ratio was reduced to 1.4 (95% CI 0.5-3.8). The risk ratio of infection in patients receiving prolonged antibiotics compared to patients receiving antibiotics for up to 24 hours was 0.7 (95% CI 0.1-4.2). The results may indicate an increased risk in HIV infected patients but these results are not robust and inconclusive after conducting the sensitivity analysis removing poor quality studies. There is need for larger good quality studies to provide conclusive evidence. To better develop surgical protocols, further studies should determine the effect of reduced CD4 counts, viral load suppression and prolonged antibiotics on the risk for infection.

  2. Infección de los sitios quirúrgicos: estudio de 1 año Infection of the surgical sites: a one-year study

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    Vivian Vialat Soto

    2008-03-01

    sitios quirúrgicos en el niño continúa siendo un problema de salud, al elevar la morbilidad operatoria y aumentar la duración de la estadía hospitalaria y los costes de esta.INTRODUCTION. The patient that undergoes surgery is exposed to diverse complications during the postoperative period. The Center for Disease Control (CDC, Atlanta, U.S.A. redifined the problem of postoperative infections and proposed the term "infection of the surgical sites" to refer to the third most reported cause of nosocomial infection. The objective of this study was to identify the behaviour of the infections of the surgical sites and their interrelation to the risk factors in children operated on in our surgery service during 2006. METHODS. A study on the incidence of infection of the surgical sites and the influence of the risk factors on children that were operated on at the surgery service of the Pediatric Teaching Hospital of Centro Habana in 2006 was conducted. The study group was composed of the 44 patients that presented postoperative infection of the total of 1158 patients that underwent surgery in this period. Different variables were studied and the data obtained from them were analyzed. RESULTS. The 44 patients with infection of the surgical sites accounted for an infection rate of 3.79 %. The sepsis of the surgical wound was the most frequent complication (93.2 %. In 25.0 % of the infected cases, perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis had been used. The infection predominated in the patients that underwent emergency surgery (75.0 % and in the dirty surgeries (43.2 %. The highest number of postoperative infections (31; 70.5 % was registered in the patients operated on of acute appendicitis. Only 7 infected patients had a hospital stay of more than 9 days (15.9 %, and there were only 6 readmissions: 4 patients with sepsis of deep wounds and 3 children with intraperitoneal abscesses secondary to acute appendicitis with generalized peritonitis. CONCLUSIONS. The infection of the

  3. Effectiveness of silver dressing in preventing surgical site infections in contaminated wounds = Efectividad de los apósitos de plata en la prevención de la infección del sitio operatorio en heridas contaminadas

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    Cabrales, Rodolfo Adrián

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Silver gauzes are designed to treat infected wounds, but there is controversial evidence about their effectiveness in preventing surgical site infections in contaminated wounds. Objective: To evaluate the effect of silver gauzes in patients undergoing surgery with contaminated wounds at a university-based tertiary referral center. Methods: This was a prospective, controlled trial comparing a silver gauze dressing with saline gauze dressings in patients undergoing abdominal surgeries with contaminated wounds. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either silver gauze (SG dressing or saline gauze dressings (SD. The primary end point was surgical site infection occurring within 30 days of surgery. Results: 65 patients were enrolled in the review. The incidence of surgical site infection was 14% (9/65. No differences were observed among groups (15.2% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.75. Multivariate analysis revealed no relationship between the type of dressing and surgical site infection. Conclusion: Silver gauzes are safe and effective in preventing surgical site infections in surgeries with contaminated wounds. Further trials are required to find out if they have advantages over standard dressings.

  4. Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Screening and Decolonization to Reduce Surgical Site Infection in Elective Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporer, Scott M; Rogers, Thea; Abella, Linda

    2016-09-01

    Deep infection after elective total joint arthroplasty remains a devastating complication. Preoperative nasal swab screening for Staphylococcus aureus colonization and subsequent treatment of colonized patients is one proposed method to identify at-risk patients and decrease surgical site infections (SSIs). The purpose of this study was to determine whether a preoperative staphylococcus screening and treatment program would decrease the incidence of SSI in elective joint arthroplasty patients. Since January 2009, a total of 9690 patients having an elective joint arthroplasty were screened before surgery for Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) with nares swabs. All patients with positive nare colonization for MSSA and MRSA were treated with mupirocin and chlorhexidine gluconate showers for 5 days before surgery. MRSA patients received vancomycin preoperatively and were placed in contact isolation. All elective arthroplasty patients used chlorhexidine gluconate antiseptic cloths the evening prior and the day of surgery. Perioperative infection rates were compared from 1 year before implementation to 5 years after implementation of this screening protocol. SSI rates have decreased from 1.11% (prescreening) to 0.34% (nasal screening; P Staphylococcus was identified in 66.7% of the SSI infections before nasal screening and in 33.3% of the SSI after routine screening (P > .05). The addition of MRSA and/or MSSA nares screening along with a perioperative decolonization protocol has resulted in a decreased SSI rate by 69%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Surgical site infections among high-risk patients in clean-contaminated head and neck reconstructive surgery: concordance with preoperative oral flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-Hsiang; Chew, Khong-Yik; Solomkin, Joseph S; Lin, Pao-Yuan; Chiang, Yuan-Cheng; Kuo, Yur-Ren

    2013-12-01

    Salivary contamination of surgical wounds in clean-contaminated head and neck surgery with free flap reconstruction remains a major cause of infection and leads to significant morbidity. This study investigates the correlation between intraoral flora and surgical site infections (SSIs) among high-risk head and neck cancer patients undergoing resection and free flap reconstruction. One hundred twenty-nine patients were identified as being at high risk for infective complications based on cancer stage, tumor size, comorbid factors, and extent of reconstruction. All patients had intraoral swab cultures before surgery. Patients with culture-confirmed SSI after surgery were chosen for analysis, using the κ index and its 95% confidence interval for concordance analysis. All patients received clindamycin and gentamicin for antibiotic prophylaxis for 5 days. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of all isolates was obtained and analyzed. Thirty-seven patients experienced SSI, or an infection rate of 28.3%, occurring at a mean of 9.3 postoperative days. The overall concordance between oral flora and SSI was fair to moderate (κ index of 0.25), but detailed analysis shows a higher concordance for known and opportunistic pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis, compared to typical oral commensals. Antibiotic susceptibility tests show rapid and significant increases in resistance to clindamycin, indicating a need for a more effective alternative. Predicting pathogens in SSI using preoperative oral swabs did not demonstrate a good concordance in general for patients undergoing clean-contaminated head and neck surgery, although concordance for certain pathogenic species seem to be higher than for typical intraoral commensals. The rapid development of resistance to clindamycin precludes its use as a prophylactic agent.

  6. Risk factors for extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli versus susceptible E. coli in surgical site infections among cancer patients in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Claudia V; Vilar-Compte, Diana; Velazquez, Consuelo; Golzarri, Maria Fernanda; Cornejo-Juarez, Patricia; Larson, Elaine L

    2014-10-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli are of increasing concern as a cause of healthcare-associated infections. Using a matched case-control design, demographics, antibiotic use, and relevant surgical data were obtained for 173 cases (ESBL E. coli surgical site infections, [SSI]) and 173 controls (antibiotic-susceptible E. coli SSI) in an oncology hospital in Mexico City. Conditional logistic regression modeling was used to calculate odds ratios (OR). The mean age of patients was 53.6 years, 214 (62%) were female. Demographics and comorbidities were similar between groups. Although antibiotic prophylaxis was common among both cases and controls (84% and 89%), more than one-half of cases (53%) were given prophylaxis outside the recommended window or were exposed for more than 24 h in comparison to 29% of controls. Patients who received untimely (OR=3.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-6.4) and discontinued inappropriately (OR 6.38, 95% CI=2.5-16.2) prophylaxis were more likely to develop an ESBL SSI. In addition, patients with an organ/space infection compared with superficial had a higher rate of a resistant infection (OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.3-13.9). Among patients not given timely or appropriately discontinued prophylaxis, post-operative cephalosporin use (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.4-7.7) was associated with ESBL E. coli SSIs. The appropriate timing and duration of perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis were associated with lower risk of ESBL E. coli in SSIs. Even though compliance to antimicrobial prophylaxis guidelines is of the utmost importance, reduced exposure to cephalosporins may also potentially decrease the risk of ESBL SSI.

  7. The impact of pre-operative weight loss on incidence of surgical site infection and readmission rates after total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inacio, Maria C S; Kritz-Silverstein, Donna; Raman, Rema; Macera, Caroline A; Nichols, Jeanne F; Shaffer, Richard A; Fithian, Donald C

    2014-03-01

    This study characterized a cohort of obese total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients (1/1/2008-12/31/2010) and evaluated whether a clinically significant amount of pre-operative weight loss (5% decrease in body weight) is associated with a decreased risk of surgical site infections (SSI) and readmissions post-surgery. 10,718 TKAs and 4066 THAs were identified. During the one year pre-TKA 7.6% of patients gained weight, 12.4% lost weight, and 79.9% remained the same. In the one year pre-THA, 6.3% of patients gained weight, 18.0% lost weight, and 75.7% remained the same. In TKAs and THAs, after adjusting for covariates, the risk of SSI and readmission was not significantly different in the patients who gained or lost weight pre-operatively compared to those who remained the same. © 2013.

  8. Use and Effectiveness of Peri-Operative Cefotetan versus Cefazolin Plus Metronidazole for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Abdominal Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danan, Eleanor; Smith, Janessa; Kruer, Rachel M; Avdic, Edina; Lipsett, Pamela; Curless, Melanie S; Jarrell, Andrew S

    2018-04-24

    Current practice guidelines for antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery recommend a cephamycin or cefazolin plus metronidazole for various abdominal surgeries. In February 2016, cephamycin drug shortages resulted in a change in The Johns Hopkins Hospital's (JHH) recommendation for peri-operative antibiotic prophylaxis in abdominal surgeries from cefotetan to cefazolin plus metronidazole. The primary objective of this study was to quantify the percentage of abdominal surgeries adherent to JHH peri-operative antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines. A sub-group analysis investigated whether prophylaxis with cefazolin plus metronidazole was associated with a lower rate of surgical site infections (SSIs) versus cefotetan. This retrospective cohort study included adult inpatients who underwent an abdominal surgery at JHH in September 2015 (Study Period I: cefotetan) or February to March 2016 (Study Period II: cefazolin plus metronidazole). Two hundred abdominal surgery cases were included in the primary analysis. A subset of 156 surgical cases were included in the sub-group analysis. The overall adherence rate to JHH guidelines was 75% in Study Period I versus 17% in Study Period II (p operative administration time (87% vs. 23%, p site infections occurred in 14% (12/83) of surgeries with cefotetan versus 8.2% (6/73) with cefazolin plus metronidazole for prophylaxis (p = 0.19). Adherence to an institution-specific peri-operative antibiotic prophylaxis guideline for abdominal surgeries was limited primarily by the longer infusion time required for pre-operative metronidazole. A higher percentage of SSIs occurred among abdominal surgeries with cefotetan versus cefazolin plus metronidazole for prophylaxis.

  9. A STUDY OF COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF PREOPERATIVE SKIN PREPARATION WITH CHLORHEXIDINE-ALCOHOL VERSUS POVIDONE-IODINE IN PREVENTION OF SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS

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    Geetha Danasekaran

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Surgical site infections is a dangerous condition posing a heavy burden on the patient and social health system. The use of preoperative skin preparation by effective antiseptic plays an important role in reducing postoperative wound infections. Hence, the present study was undertaken to compare and evaluate the efficacy of 2% chlorhexidine-alcohol versus 5% povidone-iodine in abdominal surgeries for prevention of SSI. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present one year randomised controlled trial was conducted in the Department of General Surgery, Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai, over a period from 2014 to 2015 on 120 patients undergoing elective abdominal surgeries. The patients were divided into two groups by computer randomisation that is Group A (chlorhexidine-alcohol group and Group B (povidone-iodine group. The surgical wounds were examined for any infections present. RESULTS Most of the patients were males in both the groups (73.33% and 61.67% in group A and B, respectively. Half of the patients (50% in both the groups had chronic appendicitis. The mean duration of surgery in group A was 44.66 ± 5.86 minutes, and in group B, it was 45.00 ± 6.24 minutes. Staphylococcus aureus (1.67% in group A and 10% in group B was the most common organism isolated after skin preparation. After the application of antiseptic agents, there was reduction of bacterial colonisation in both the groups, but significant reduction was seen in chlorhexidine group. In group A, two patients had superficial SSIs compared to 14 patients in group B (p=0.001. The mean length of hospital stay in group A was significantly less (7.20 ± 1.10 vs. 8.67 ± 3.17. CONCLUSION Preoperative skin cleansing with chlorhexidine significantly reduces risk of postoperative SSIs and colonisation of bacteria in clean abdominal surgeries.

  10. Risk Assessment of Abdominal Wall Thickness Measured on Pre-Operative Computerized Tomography for Incisional Surgical Site Infection after Abdominal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongyoo, Assanee; Chatthamrak, Putipan; Sriussadaporn, Ekkapak; Limpavitayaporn, Palin; Mingmalairak, Chatchai

    2015-07-01

    The surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication of abdominal operation. It relates to increased hospital stay, increased healthcare cost, and decreased patient's quality of life. Obesity, usually defined by BMI, is known as one of the risks of SSI. However, the thickness of subcutaneous layers of abdominal wall might be an important local factor affecting the rate of SSI after the abdominal operations. The objective of this study is to assess the importance of the abdominal wall thickness on incisional SSI rate. The subjects of the present study were patients who had undergone major abdominal operations at Thammasat University Hospital between June 2013 and May 2014, and had been investigated with CT scans before their operations. The demographic data and clinical information of these patients were recorded. The thickness ofsubcutaneous fatty tissue from skin down to the most superficial layer of abdominal wall muscle at the surgical site was measured on CT images. The wound infectious complication was reviewed and categorized as superficial and deep incisional SSIfollowing the definition from Centersfor Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines. The significance ofeach potentialfactors on SSI rates was determined separately with student t-test for quantitative data and χ2-test for categorical data. Then all factors, which had p operative CTscans. Post-operative SSI was 25.2% (35/139), superficial and deep types in 27 and 8 patients, respectively. The comparison of abdominal wall thickness between patients with and without infection was significantly different (20.0 ± 8.4 mm and 16.0 ± 7.2 mm, respectively). When the thickness at 20 mm was used as the cut-off value, 43 of 139 patients had abdominal wall thickness ≥ 20 mm. The incidence of SSI of the thickness ±20 mm group was 37.2% (16/43) and of the less thickness group was 19.8% (19/96), with p operation. However, only abdominal wall thickness and wound classification were still significant

  11. Rapid tests for the detection of the Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii strain responsible for an epidemic of surgical-site infections in Brazil

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    Cristianne Kayoko Matsumoto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A single strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii, characterised by a particular rpoB sequevar and two highly related pulsed field gel electrophoresis patterns has been responsible for a nationwide outbreak of surgical infections in Brazil since 2004. In this study, we developed molecular tests based on polymerase chain reaction restriction-enzyme analysis (PRA and sequencing for the rapid identification of this strain. Sequences of 15 DNA regions conserved in mycobacteria were retrieved from GenBank or sequenced and analysed in silico. Single nucleotide polymorphisms specific to the epidemic strain and located in enzyme recognition sites were detected in rpoB, the 3' region of the 16S rDNA and gyrB. The three tests that were developed, i.e., PRA-rpoB, PRA-16S and gyrB sequence analysis, showed 100%, 100% and 92.31% sensitivity and 93.06%, 90.28% and 100% specificity, respectively, for the discrimination of the surgical strain from other M. abscessus subsp. bolletii isolates, including 116 isolates from 95 patients, one environmental isolate and two type strains. The results of the three tests were stable, as shown by results obtained for different isolates from the same patient. In conclusion, due to the clinical and epidemiological importance of this strain, these tests could be implemented in reference laboratories for the rapid preliminary diagnosis and epidemiological surveillance of this epidemic strain.

  12. Timing of antibiotic prophylaxis in cesarean section: retrospective, difference-in-differences estimation of the effect on surgical-site-infection.

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    Ben Shoham, Assaf; Bar-Meir, Maskit; Ioscovich, Alexander; Samueloff, Arnon; Wiener-Well, Yonit

    2017-10-26

    Cesarean section (CS) is one of the most common surgical procedures performed worldwide. Surgical-site-infection (SSI) occurs in approximately 5-10% of CS. The benefit of prophylactic antibiotics for prevention of SSI has been demonstrated in the literature. The optimal timing of antibiotic prophylaxis (prior to surgical incision versus after cord clamping) was investigated in recent studies. In January 2014, the Israeli Ministry of Health introduced a national quality measure which monitors the administration of prophylactic antibiotics in CS. The custom clinical practice in our medical center was to administer prophylactic antibiotics immediately after cord clamping. Upon introduction of the national quality measurement program, the practice was changed to administration of antibiotics prior to surgical incision. Our objective was to examine the effect of timing of prophylactic antibiotics administration on the incidence of SSI following CS, in a single medical center that performs a large volume of deliveries, with a low rate of CS. Taking advantage of a discrete change in clinical practice, we used retrospective data and applied difference-in-differences design to estimate the effect of the timing of prophylactic antibiotics administration on SSI rates. The analysis included all CSs performed during 2012-2015 and all hysterectomies conducted during the study period. The coverage rates of prophylactic antibiotics in CS before and after the policy change were 99.10% and 99.03%, respectively. The rates of SSI following CS, before and after the policy change, were 2.63% (n = 2499) and 2.32% (n = 3840), respectively. The rates of SSI following hysterectomy, before and after the policy, change were 6.82% (n = 396) and 7.09% (n = 437), respectively. Difference-in-differences (DID) estimates of the effect of policy change on the incidence of SSI in linear and logistic regression models were not significant (B = -0.6%, p = .64; odds ratio = 0

  13. The need for unique risk adjustment for surgical site infections at a high-volume, tertiary care center with inherent high-risk colorectal procedures.

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    Gorgun, E; Benlice, C; Hammel, J; Hull, T; Stocchi, L

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to create a unique risk adjustment model for surgical site infection (SSI) in patients who underwent colorectal surgery (CRS) at the Cleveland Clinic (CC) with inherent high risk factors by using a nationwide database. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was queried to identify patients who underwent CRS between 2005 and 2010. Initially, CC cases were identified from all NSQIP data according to case identifier and separated from the other NSQIP centers. Demographics, comorbidities, and outcomes were compared. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between SSI and center-related factors. A total of 70,536 patients met the inclusion criteria and underwent CRS, 1090 patients (1.5%) at the CC and 69,446 patients (98.5%) at other centers. Male gender, work-relative value unit, diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease, pouch formation, open surgery, steroid use, and preoperative radiotherapy rates were significantly higher in the CC cases. Overall morbidity and individual postoperative complication rates were found to be similar in the CC and other centers except for the following: organ-space SSI and sepsis rates (higher in the CC cases); and pneumonia and ventilator dependency rates (higher in the other centers). After covariate adjustment, the estimated degree of difference between the CC and other institutions with respect to organ-space SSI was reduced (OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.08-1.77). The unique risk adjustment strategy may provide center-specific comprehensive analysis, especially for hospitals that perform inherently high-risk procedures. Higher surgical complexity may be the reason for increased SSI rates in the NSQIP at tertiary care centers.

  14. Magnitude and factors associated with post-cesarean surgical site ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Surgical site infection (SSI) after cesarean section (CS) increases maternal morbidity, hospital stay and medical cost. However, in Ethiopia, limited evidence exists regarding the magnitude and risk factors of post-CS wound infection. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of – and factors ...

  15. Effect of pre-operative octenidine nasal ointment and showering on surgical site infections in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, M; Scherag, A; Forstner, C; Brunkhorst, F M; Harbarth, S; Doenst, T; Pletz, M W; Hagel, S

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of pre-operative octenidine (OCT) decolonization on surgical site infection (SSI) rates. Before-and-after cohort study. Patients undergoing an elective isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) procedure: control group (1 st January to 31 st December 2013), N=475; intervention group (1 st January to 31 st December 2014), N=428. The intervention consisted of nasal application of OCT ointment three times daily, beginning on the day before surgery, and showering the night before and on the day of surgery with OCT soap. A median sternotomy was performed in 805 (89.1%) patients and a minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass procedure was performed in 98 (10.9%) patients. Overall, there was no difference in SSI rates between the control and intervention groups (15.4% vs 13.3%, P=0.39). The rate of harvest site SSIs was significantly lower in patients in the intervention group (2.5% vs 0.5%, P=0.01). Patients who had undergone a median sternotomy in the intervention group had a significantly lower rate of organ/space sternal SSIs (1.9% vs 0.3%, P=0.04). However, there was a trend towards an increased rate of deep incisional sternal SSIs (1.2% vs 2.9%, P=0.08). Multi-variate analysis did not identify a significant protective effect of the intervention (odds ratio 0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.53-1.15, P=0.27). Pre-operative decolonization with OCT did not reduce overall SSI rates in patients undergoing an elective isolated CABG procedure, but significantly decreased harvest site and organ/space sternal SSIs. Randomized controlled trials, including controlled patient adherence to the intervention, are required to confirm these observations and to determine the clinical utility of OCT in pre-operative decolonization. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ranking Hospitals Based on Colon Surgery and Abdominal Hysterectomy Surgical Site Infection Outcomes: Impact of Limiting Surveillance to the Operative Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Avery, Taliser R; Platt, Richard; Kleinman, Ken; Huang, Susan S

    2018-03-16

    Hospital-specific surgical site infection (SSI) performance following colon surgery and abdominal hysterectomies can impact hospitals' relative rankings around quality metrics used to determine financial penalties. Current SSI surveillance largely focuses on SSI detected at the operative hospital. Retrospective cohort study to assess the impact on hospitals' relative SSI performance rankings when SSI detected at non-operative hospitals are included. We utilized data from a California statewide hospital registry to assess for evidence of SSI following colon surgery or abdominal hysterectomies performed 3/1/2011-11/30/2013 using previously validated claims-based SSI surveillance methods. Risk-adjusted hospital-specific rankings based on SSI detected at operative hospitals versus any California hospital were generated. Among 60,059 colon surgeries at 285 hospitals and 64,918 abdominal hysterectomies at 270 hospitals, 5,921 (9.9%) colon surgeries and 1,481 (2.3%) abdominal hysterectomies received a diagnosis code for SSI within the 30 days following surgery. 7.2% of colon surgery and 13.4% of abdominal hysterectomy SSI would have been missed by operative hospital surveillance alone. The proportion of individual hospital's SSI detected during hospitalizations at other hospitals varied widely. Including non-operative hospital SSI resulted in improved relative ranking of 11 (3.9%) colon surgery and 13 (4.8%) hysterectomy hospitals so that they were no longer in the worst performing quartile, mainly among hospitals with relatively high surgical volumes. Standard SSI surveillance that mainly focuses on infections detected at the operative hospital causes varying degrees of SSI under-estimation, leading to inaccurate assignment or avoidance of financial penalties for approximately one in eleven to sixteen hospitals.

  17. Magnitude and Factors Associated With Post-Cesarean Surgical Site Infection at Hawassa University Teaching and Referral Hospital, Southern Ethiopia: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodajo, Samuel; Belayneh, Mehretu; Gebremedhin, Samson

    2017-05-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after cesarean section (CS) increases maternal morbidity, hospital stay and medical cost. However, in Ethiopia, limited evidence exists regarding the magnitude and risk factors of post-CS wound infection. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of - and factors associated with the problem among mothers who gave birth in Hawassa University Teaching and Referral Hospital, Southern Ethiopia. Hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted based on the medical records of 592 women who underwent CS from June 2012 to May 2013. Data on the occurrence and factors associated with SSIs were extracted. Factors associated with SSI were identified using multivariate logistic regression analysis. The output of the analysis is presented using adjusted odds ratio (OR) with the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI). The prevalence of SSI was 11.0% (95% CI: 8.6-13.8%). Mothers with prolonged labor (6.78, 95% CI: 2.54-18.00) and prolonged rupture of membrane (5.83, 95% CI: 2.14-15.89) had significantly increased odds of SSI. Compared to mothers who had no digital vaginal examination, those who had 1-4 and 5 or more examinations were at higher risk with OR of 2.91 (95% CI: 1.21-6.99) and 8.59 (95% CI: 1.74-42.23), respectively. Prolonged duration of surgery (12.32, 95% CI: 5.46-27.77), wound contamination class III (9.61, 95% CI: 1.84-50.06) and postoperative anemia (2.62, 95% CI: 1.21-5.69) were also significant predictors. CS conducted by junior practitioners is likely to be followed by infection. Post-CS SSI is relatively common in the hospital. Thus, it should be averted by implementing infection prevention techniques.

  18. Effect of Post-Cesarean Delivery Oral Cephalexin and Metronidazole on Surgical Site Infection Among Obese Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, Amy M; DeArmond, Chris; Houston, Judy M; Reddy, Srinidhi; Masters, Heather R; Gold, Alison; Boldt, Michael; DeFranco, Emily; Evans, Arthur T; Warshak, Carri R

    2017-09-19

    The rate of obesity among US women has been increasing, and obesity is associated with increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI) following cesarean delivery. The optimal perioperative antibiotic prophylactic regimen in this high-risk population undergoing cesarean delivery is unknown. To determine rates of SSI among obese women who receive prophylactic oral cephalexin and metronidazole vs placebo for 48 hours following cesarean delivery. Randomized, double-blind clinical trial comparing oral cephalexin and metronidazole vs placebo for 48 hours following cesarean delivery for the prevention of SSI in obese women (prepregnancy BMI ≥30) who had received standard intravenous preoperative cephalosporin prophylaxis. Randomization was stratified by intact vs rupture of membranes prior to delivery. The study was conducted at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, an academic and urban setting, between October 2010 and December 2015, with final follow-up through February 2016. Participants were randomly assigned to receive oral cephalexin, 500 mg, and metronidazole, 500 mg (n = 202 participants), vs identical-appearing placebo (n = 201 participants) every 8 hours for a total of 48 hours following cesarean delivery. The primary outcome was SSI, defined as any superficial incisional, deep incisional, or organ/space infections within 30 days after cesarean delivery. Among 403 randomized participants who were included (mean age, 28 [SD, 6] years; mean BMI, 39.7 [SD, 7.8]), 382 (94.6%) completed the trial. The overall rate of SSI was 10.9% (95% CI, 7.9%-14.0%). Surgical site infection was diagnosed in 13 women (6.4%) in the cephalexin-metronidazole group vs 31 women (15.4%) in the placebo group (difference, 9.0% [95% CI, 2.9%-15.0%]; relative risk, 0.41 [95% CI, 0.22-0.77]; P = .01). There were no serious adverse events, including allergic reaction, reported in either the antibiotic group or the placebo group. Among obese women

  19. Efficacy of triclosan-coated sutures for reducing risk of surgical site infection in adults: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiao; Pan, Ling-Hui; Li, Yun-Xi; Yang, Xiang-Di; Li, Le-Qun; Zhang, Chun-Yan; Zhong, Jian-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is the third most frequent type of nosocomial infections. Triclosan-coated sutures are often used to reduce the risk of SSI, but studies examining this have given conflicting results. Therefore, this meta-analysis was performed to assess the efficacy of triclosan-coated sutures for reducing risk of SSI in adults. PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched to identify randomized clinical trials evaluating triclosan-coated sutures for preventing SSI on patients 18 y or older. Thirteen randomized clinical trials involving 5256 participants were included. Triclosan-coated sutures were associated with lower risk of SSI than uncoated sutures across all surgeries (risk ratio [RR] 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65-0.88, P triclosan-coated sutures in abdominal surgeries (RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.50-0.99, P = 0.04) and group with prophylactic antibiotic (RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.63-0.99, P = 0.04). However, such risk reduction was not observed in cardiac surgeries, breast surgeries, or group without prophylactic antibiotic. Triclosan-coated sutures can decrease the incidence of SSI in abdominal surgeries and might not interfere with wound healing process. Nevertheless, further studies are needed to examine whether triclosan-coated sutures are effective at preventing SSI in non-abdominal surgeries and to further study the interaction of antibiotic prophylaxis with triclosan-coated sutures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Swab and Suction Drain Tip Cultures in 4573 Spinal Surgeries: Efficacy in Management of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Atsuyuki; Sakai, Kenichiro; Sato, Hirokazu; Sasaki, Shinichi; Torigoe, Ichiro; Tomori, Masaki; Yuasa, Masato; Matsukura, Yu; Arai, Yoshiyasu

    2018-04-01

    A retrospective single-center study. To assess the diagnostic value of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal swab and suction drain tip cultures. The prognostic value of MRSA nasal swab and suction drain tip cultures has not been firmly established in spinal surgery. This study retrospectively included 4573 consecutive patients who underwent spinal surgery between January 2008 and December 2014. Patients diagnosed with infectious disease were excluded. Prophylactic antibiotics were administered intraoperatively and postoperatively for 48 hours. MRSA nasal swab cultures were taken from all patients before surgery. Drains were removed when the volume of postoperative fluid drainage was less than 50 mL in the preceding 24 hours and cultures were made. Surgical site infection (SSI) was defined according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. SSI was identified in 94 cases (2.1%) and bacteria were isolated in 87 cases (92.6%). Positive MRSA nasal swab cultures were identified in 49 cases (1.1%). There was no significant difference in the SSI positivity rate between the MRSA nasal swab culture (+) and (-) groups. Positive drain tip cultures were found in 382 cases (8.4%), 28 of which developed SSI. There was a significant difference in the SSI positivity rate between the drain tip culture (+) and (-) groups. The sensitivity of drain tip culture was 29.8% and the specificity was 92.1%. In 16 of the 28 patients in the SSI (+) group with positive drain cultures, the same bacteria were isolated from the surgical site, giving a bacteria matching rate of 57.1%. MRSA nasal swab and drain tip cultures were not useful for predicting SSI. However, drain tip culture had a high positivity rate in the SSI group and the coincidence rate for the causative pathogen was relatively high. 4.

  1. Surgical infections: a microbiological study

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    Santosh Saini

    Full Text Available Surgical infections are mostly polymicrobial, involving both aerobes and anaerobes. One hundred seventeen cases comprised of abscesses (n=51, secondary peritonitis (n=25, necrotizing fascitis (n=22 and wounds with devitalized tissues (n=19 were studied. The number of microorganisms isolated per lesion was highest in secondary peritonitis (2.32. The aerobe/ anaerobe ratio was 0.81 in secondary peritonitis and 1.8 in necrotizing fascitis. Most secondary peritonitis (80%, necrotizing fascitis (75% and wounds with devitalized tissues (66.7% were polymicrobial. Common microorganisms isolated in our study were E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacteroides fragilis and Peptostreptococcus spp. The most effective antibiotics for S. aureus were clindamycin (79.1% and cefuroxime (70.8%. For Gram-negatives (Klebsiella spp., E. coli and Proteus spp., the most effective antibiotics were cefotaxime, ceftizoxime, amikacin and ciprofloxacin. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was maximally sensitive to amikacin (35.2% and ciprofloxacin (35.2%. The greatest degree of multidrug resistance to all the drugs was found in P. aeruginosa (52.9%, followed by Klebsiella spp. (33.3%, Proteus spp. (33.3%, E. coli (22.2%, and S. aureus (12.5%. All the anaerobes that we isolated were 100% sensitive to metronidazole and chloramphenicol, followed by clindamycin (95% to 100%. Apart from antibiotic therapy, non-antimicrobial methods, such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy and debridement also play an important role in the treatment of surgical infections.

  2. Effect of intra-operative high inspired oxygen fraction on surgical site infection: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W; Liu, Y; Zhang, Y; Zhao, Q-H; He, S-F

    2016-08-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) causes significant mortality and morbidity. Administration of a high inspired oxygen fraction (FiO2) to patients undergoing surgery may represent a potential preventive strategy. To conduct a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in which high FiO2 was compared with normal FiO2 in patients undergoing surgery to estimate the effect on the development of SSI. A comprehensive search was undertaken for randomized controlled trials (until December 2015) that compared high FiO2 with normal FiO2 in adults undergoing surgery with general anaesthesia and reported on SSI. This study included 17 randomized controlled trials with 8093 patients. Infection rates were 13.11% in the control group and 11.53% in the hyperoxic group, while the overall risk ratio was 0.893 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.794-1.003; P = 0.057]. Subgroup analyses stratified by country, definition of SSI, and type of surgery were also performed, and showed similar results. However, high FiO2 was found to be of significant benefit in patients undergoing colorectal surgery, with a risk ratio of 0.735 (95% CI 0.573-0.944; P=0.016). There is moderate evidence to suggest that administration of high FiO2 to patients undergoing surgery, especially colorectal surgery, reduces the risk of SSI. Further studies with better adherence to the intervention may affect the results of this meta-analysis. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Reduction and sustainability of cesarean section surgical site infection: An evidence-based, innovative, and multidisciplinary quality improvement intervention bundle program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chaur-Dong; Cohn, Inna; Caban, Rebeca

    2016-11-01

    We found cesarean section (C-section) surgical site infection (SSI) at our institution was significantly higher than the national benchmark. A retrospective cohort study was conducted under 4 phases from January 2008-December 2014. The hospital infection control (IC) policies and a presurgical checklist were bundled and implemented. The study was conducted with 3,334 cesarean deliveries: phase A (January 1, 2008-January 31,2010): 1,250 patients without intervention (baseline SSI rate), phase B (February 1, 2010-July 31, 2011): 682 patients were intervened with IC policies, phase C (August 1, 2011-December 31, 2012): 591 patients with an SSI reduction bundle, and phase D (January 1, 2013-December 31, 2014): 811 patients were monitored for C-section SSI sustainability. Patients not following strict protocols because of emergency C-section deliveries were excluded. The χ 2 test, Fisher exact test, and standard Z test were used for statistical analyses. C-section SSI rates were 6.2% (77/1,250) in phase A, 3.7% (25/682) in phase B, 1.7% (10/591) in phase C, and 0.1% (1/811) in phase D, respectively. By implementing the IC policies and bundle, the C-section SSI rate was reduced 40.3% (phase B vs phase A), 72.6% (phase C vs phase A), and 98.4% (phase D vs phase A). All statistics were significantly different. We conclude that implementing a C-section SSI reduction bundle was associated with reduced C-section SSI rate down toward zero. A future prospectively randomized controlled trial is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk factors for surgical site infection following laparotomy: Effect of season and perioperative variables and reporting of bacterial isolates in 287 horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isgren, C M; Salem, S E; Archer, D C; Worsman, F C F; Townsend, N B

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is an important cause of post operative morbidity following laparotomy. To investigate risk factors for SSI, including effect of season and surgery performed outside normal working hours, and to report bacterial isolates and antimicrobial resistance patterns. Retrospective cohort study. Data were obtained from horses that had undergone exploratory laparotomy over a 3-year period (2010-2013) in a UK hospital population. SSI was defined as any purulent or serous discharge from the laparotomy incision of >24 h duration that developed during hospitalisation. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify associations between pre-, intra- and post operative variables and altered likelihood of SSI. Surgical site infection developed in 73/287 (25.4%) horses during hospitalisation. Horses of greater bodyweight (odds ratio [OR] 1.002, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0002-1.005, P = 0.03), increased packed cell volume (≥48%) on admission (OR 3.03, 95% CI 1.32-6.94, P = 0.01), small intestinal resection (OR 2.27, 95% CI 1.15-4.46, P = 0.02) and post operative colic (OR 2.86, 95% CI 1.41-5.79, P = 0.003) were significantly associated with increased likelihood of SSI in a multivariable model. SSI was also significantly more likely to occur during winter (OR 3.84, 95% CI 1.38-10.70, P = 0.01) and summer (OR 5.63, 95% CI 2.07-15.3, P = 0.001) months in the model. Three-layer closure of the incision was protective (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.16-0.58, P<0.001) compared to 2-layer closure. There was no effect of surgery being performed outside normal working hours (P = 0.5). The most common bacterial isolates were Escherichia coli (59.5%), Enterococcus spp. (42.4%) and Staphylococcus spp. (25.4%). Penicillin resistant isolates accounted for 92% (96/104) of isolates while 18% (21/119) of isolates were gentamicin resistant. Laparotomy during winter and summer months was associated with increased likelihood of SSI but there was no effect of surgery

  5. 207-nm UV light - a promising tool for safe low-cost reduction of surgical site infections. I: in vitro studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Buonanno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: 0.5% to 10% of clean surgeries result in surgical-site infections, and attempts to reduce this rate have had limited success. Germicidal UV lamps, with a broad wavelength spectrum from 200 to 400 nm are an effective bactericidal option against drug-resistant and drug-sensitive bacteria, but represent a health hazard to patient and staff. By contrast, because of its limited penetration, ~200 nm far-UVC light is predicted to be effective in killing bacteria, but without the human health hazards to skin and eyes associated with conventional germicidal UV exposure. AIMS: The aim of this work was to test the biophysically-based hypothesis that ~200 nm UV light is significantly cytotoxic to bacteria, but minimally cytotoxic or mutagenic to human cells either isolated or within tissues. METHODS: A Kr-Br excimer lamp was used, which produces 207-nm UV light, with a filter to remove higher-wavelength components. Comparisons were made with results from a conventional broad spectrum 254-nm UV germicidal lamp. First, cell inactivation vs. UV fluence data were generated for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA bacteria and also for normal human fibroblasts. Second, yields of the main UV-associated pre-mutagenic DNA lesions (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts were measured, for both UV radiations incident on 3-D human skin tissue. RESULTS: We found that 207-nm UV light kills MRSA efficiently but, unlike conventional germicidal UV lamps, produces little cell killing in human cells. In a 3-D human skin model, 207-nm UV light produced almost no pre-mutagenic UV-associated DNA lesions, in contrast to significant yields induced by a conventional germicidal UV lamp. CONCLUSIONS: As predicted based on biophysical considerations, 207-nm light kills bacteria efficiently but does not appear to be significantly cytotoxic or mutagenic to human cells. Used appropriately, 207-nm light may have the potential for safely and inexpensively

  6. Surgical wound infection in clean-contaminated and contaminated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Surgical wound (site) infection is the commonest complication following laparotomy for clean-contaminated and contaminated abdominal operations. Good surgical technique and perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in clean-contaminated and contaminated abdominal operations contribute to the low rate of ...

  7. In the Absence of a Mechanical Bowel Prep, Does the Addition of Pre-Operative Oral Antibiotics to Parental Antibiotics Decrease the Incidence of Surgical Site Infection after Elective Segmental Colectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Sarah J; Swenson, Brian R; Hanseman, Dennis J; Midura, Emily F; Davis, Bradley R; Rafferty, Janice F; Abbott, Daniel E; Shah, Shimul A; Paquette, Ian M

    2015-12-01

    Pre-operative oral antibiotics administered the day prior to elective colectomy have been shown to decrease the incidence of surgical site infections (SSI) if a mechanical bowel prep (MBP) is used. Recently, the role for mechanical bowel prep has been challenged as being unnecessary and potentially harmful. We hypothesize that if MBP is omitted, oral antibiotics do not alter the incidence of SSI following colectomy. We selected patients who underwent an elective segmental colectomy from the 2012 and 2013 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program colectomy procedure targeted database. Indications for surgery included colon cancer, diverticulitis, inflammatory bowel disease, or benign polyp. Patients who received mechanical bowel prep were excluded. The primary outcome measured was surgical site infection, defined as the presence of superficial, deep or, organ space infection within 30 d from surgery. A total of 6,399 patients underwent elective segmental colectomy without MBP. The incidence of SSI differed substantially between patients who received oral antibiotics, versus those who did not (9.7% vs. 13.7%, p=0.01). Multivariate analysis indicated that age, smoking status, operative time, perioperative transfusions, oral antibiotics, and surgical approach were associated with post-operative SSI. When controlling for confounding factors, the use of pre-operative oral antibiotics decreased the incidence of surgical site infection (odds ratio=0.66, 95% confidence interval=0.48-0.90, p=0.01). Even in the absence of mechanical bowel prep, pre-operative oral antibiotics appear to reduce the incidence of surgical site infection following elective colectomy.

  8. Silver-containing dressing for surgical site infection in clean and clean-contaminated operations: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Zi; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Jia-Xi; Zheng, Yang; Zhu, Xiang-Nan

    2017-07-01

    Silver-containing dressings for the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs) remained controversial, and accumulating evidence was lacking, so a meta-analysis was conducted to systematically assess the effectiveness and safety of silver-containing dressings for clean and clean-contaminated surgical incisions. Pubmed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched from the inception to February 2016 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which explored silver-containing dressings for the prevention of SSIs in clean and clean-contaminated operations. Relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was pooled using random effects model. Predefined subgroup analyses, sensitivity analyses, and influence analyses were further undertaken. Nine RCTs totaling 2196 patients (1141 in silver-containing group and 1055 in control group) were included. Silver-containing dressings did not effectively prevent the incidence of SSIs (9 RCTs; RR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.66-1.29; I 2  = 40%), superficial SSIs (5 RCTs; RR: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.36-1.24; I 2  = 36%), and deep SSIs (5 RCTs; RR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.41-1.49; I 2  = 0). Subgroup analyses, sensitivity analyses, and influence analyses confirmed the robustness of the pooled estimate. The current available evidence indicated that silver-containing dressing as compared with silver-free dressing was not associated with lower incidence of SSIs. Considering the quality of evidence ranking very low, further studies with higher quality should be warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of the efficacy of chlorhexidine gluconate versus povidone iodine as preoperative skin preparation for the prevention of surgical site infections in clean-contaminated upper abdominal surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Anirudh; Kaman, Lileswar; Raj, Prithivi; Gautam, Vikas; Dahiya, Divya; Singh, Gurpreet; Singh, Rajinder; Medhi, Bikash

    2015-11-01

    To compare the efficacy of chlorhexidine-gluconate versus povidone iodine in preoperative skin preparation in the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs) in clean-contaminated upper abdominal surgeries. This was a prospective randomized controlled trial conducted on patients undergoing clean-contaminated upper abdominal surgeries. A total of 351 patients 18-70 years old were randomized into two groups; chlorhexidine and povidone iodine skin preparation before surgery. The incidence of SSIs in the chlorhexidine group was 10.8 %, in comparison to 17.9 % in the povidone iodine group. The odds ratio was 0.6 in favor of chlorhexidine use, but the results were not statistically significant (P = 0.06). In the first postoperative week, SSIs developed in 7 % of patients in the chlorhexidine group and 14.1 % in the povidone iodine group (P = 0.03), and in the second postoperative week, SSIs were present in 4.1 % of the patients in the chlorhexidine group and 4.4 % in the povidone iodine group, which was not statistically significant (P = 0.88). The incidence of SSIs after clean-contaminated upper abdominal surgeries was lower with the use of chlorhexidine skin preparation than with povidone iodine preparation, although the results were not statistically significant. However, the odds ratio between the two groups favored the use of chlorhexidine over povidone iodine for preventing SSIs.

  10. Allograft versus autograft in cervical and lumbar spinal fusions: an examination of operative time, length of stay, surgical site infection, and blood transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan E; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Grauberger, Jennifer; Shepherd, Daniel; Maloney, Patrick R; Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Fogelson, Jeremy L; Nassr, Ahmad; Bydon, Mohamad

    2016-11-23

    Autograft harvesting for spine arthrodesis has been associated with longer operative times and increased blood loss. Allograft compared to autograft in spinal fusions has not been studied in a multicenter cohort. Patients enrolled in the ACS-NSQIP registry between 2012 and 2013 who underwent cervical or lumbar spinal fusion with either allograft or autograft through a separate incision were included for analysis. The primary outcomes of interest were operative time, length of stay, blood transfusion, and surgical site infection (SSI). A total of 6,790 and 6,718 patients received a cervical or lumbar spinal fusion, respectively. On unadjusted analysis in both cervical and lumbar cohorts, autograft was associated with increased rates of blood transfusion (cervical: 2.9% vs 1.0%, poperative time (cervical: 167 vs 128 minutes, poperative times (cervical: 27.8 minutes, 95% CI 20.7-35.0; and lumbar: 25.4 minutes, 95% CI 17.7-33.1) relative to allograft. Autograft was not associated with either length of stay or SSI. In a multicenter cohort of patients undergoing cervical or lumbar spinal fusion, autograft was associated with increased rates of blood transfusion and increased operative time relative to allograft.

  11. Optimal skin antiseptic agents for prevention of surgical site infection in cesarean section: a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huaping; Li, Guirong; Wang, Haiyan; He, Mei

    2017-08-30

    The best choice of antiseptic agent for skin preparation at cesarean section remains controversial. We performed this meta-analysis to assess whether chlorhexidine (CH)-based skin antisepsis was more effective than povidone iodine (PI)-based antisepsis for the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI) after cesarean section. PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched to identify English publications that compared chlorhexidine gluconate (CH) as a skin preparation agent with PI in cesarean section. The primary outcome was SSI rate. Review Manager 5.3 was used to analyze the collected data and trial sequential analysis (TSA) Software 0.9 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK) beta was applied to estimate whether the overall pooled outcome was conclusive. Six articles involving 4385 participants were included in this study. The outcomes showed that CH-based skin antisepsis, compared with PI-based antisepsis, was not associated with a decreased overall rate of SSI (risk ratio [RR], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-1.02; p = .07). TSA indicated that the current available evidence was inconclusive. There were no differences in adverse skin reactions in the two groups. This study provides evidence that CH-based antisepsis for skin preparation does not show an additional advantage in reducing risk of SSI after cesarean section. However, additional high-quality, randomized clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  12. Prevention of Surgical Site Infection After Ankle Surgery Using Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy in High-Risk Patients With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Ya-Ke; Chen, Hong-Lin; Liu, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Patients with diabetes have a high risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after ankle surgery. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) in the prevention of SSI after ankle surgery compared with the efficacy of standard moist wound care (SMWC). A retrospective study was performed of unstable ankle fractures for surgical fixation in patients with diabetes from January 2012 to December 2014. VAC and SMWC were used for surgical incision coverage. The primary outcome was the incidence of SSI, and the secondary outcomes were the length of hospital stay and crude hospital costs. The data from 76 patients were analyzed, with 22 (28.95%) in the VAC group and 54 (71.05%) in the SMWC group. The incidence of SSI was 4.6% in the VAC group compared with 27.8% in the SMWC group (chi-square 5.076; p = .024), and the crude odds ratio for SSI in the VAC group was 0.124 (95% confidence interval 0.002 to 0.938). The length of hospital stay was lower in the VAC group than in the SMWC group (12.6 ± 2.7 days and 15.2 ± 3.5 days, respectively; t = 3.122, p = .003). The crude hospital costs were also lower in the VAC group than in the SMWC group (Chinese yuan 8643.2 ± 1195.3 and 9456.2 ± 1106.3, respectively; t = 2.839, p = .006). After logistic regression analysis, the adjusted odds ratio for the total SSI rate comparing VAC and SMWC was 0.324 (95% confidence interval 0.092 to 0.804; p = .021). Compared with SMWC, VAC can decrease the SSI rate after ankle surgery in patients with diabetes. This finding should be confirmed by prospective, randomized controlled clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Seasonal Variations in the Risk of Reoperation for Surgical Site Infection Following Elective Spinal Fusion Surgery: A Retrospective Study Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Junichi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Oichi, Takeshi; Kato, So; Matsui, Hiroki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Sakae; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2017-07-15

    A retrospective study of data abstracted from the Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC) database, a national representative database in Japan. The aim of this study was to examine seasonal variations in the risk of reoperation for surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal fusion surgery. Although higher rates of infection in the summer than in other seasons were thought to be caused by increasing inexperience of new staff, high temperature, and high humidity, no studies have examined seasonal variations in the risk of SSI following spinal fusion surgery in the country where medical staff rotation timing is not in summer season. In Japan, medical staff rotation starts in April. We retrospectively extracted the data of patients who were admitted between July 2010 and March 2013 from the DPC database. Patients were included if they were aged 20 years or older and underwent elective spinal fusion surgery. The primary outcome was reoperation for SSI during hospitalization. We performed multivariate analysis to clarify the risk factors of primary outcome with adjustment for patient background characteristics. We identified 47,252 eligible patients (23,659 male, 23,593 female). The mean age of the patients was 65.4 years (range, 20-101 yrs). Overall, reoperation for SSI occurred in 0.93% of the patients during hospitalization. The risk of reoperation for SSI was significantly higher in April (vs. February; odds ratio, 1.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-3.43, P = 0.03) as well as other known risk factors. In subgroup analysis with stratification for type of hospital, month of surgery was identified as an independent risk factor of reoperation for SSI among cases in an academic hospital, although there was no seasonal variation among those in a nonacademic hospital. This study showed that month of surgery is a risk factor of reoperation for SSI following elective spinal fusion surgery, nevertheless, in the country where medical staff rotation timing is not in

  14. Delayed wound healing and postoperative surgical site infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with or without biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Masahiro; Inui, Kentaro; Sugioka, Yuko; Mamoto, Kenji; Okano, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Takuya; Hidaka, Noriaki; Koike, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) have become more popular for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Whether or not bDMARDs increase the postoperative risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has remained controversial. We aimed to clarify the effects of bDMARDs on the outcomes of elective orthopedic surgery. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to analyze risk factors for SSI and delayed wound healing among 227 patients with RA (mean age, 65.0 years; disease duration, 16.9 years) after 332 elective orthopedic surgeries. We also attempted to evaluate the effects of individual medications on infection. Rates of bDMARD and conventional synthetic DMARD (csDMARD) administration were 30.4 and 91.0 %, respectively. Risk factors for SSI were advanced age (odds ratio [OR], 1.11; P = 0.045), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.03), and preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 3.66; P = 0.003). Those for delayed wound healing were advanced age (OR, 1.16; P = 0.001), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.007), preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 4.56; P = 0.02), and foot surgery (OR, 6.60; P = 0.001). Risk factors for SSI and medications did not significantly differ. No DMARDs were risk factors for any outcome examined. Biological DMARDs were not risk factors for postoperative SSI. Foot surgery was a risk factor for delayed wound healing.

  15. Reliability and validity of using telephone calls for post-discharge surveillance of surgical site infection following caesarean section at a tertiary hospital in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniface Nguhuni

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infection (SSI is a common post-operative complication causing significant morbidity and mortality. Many SSI occur after discharge from hospital. Post-discharge SSI surveillance in low and middle income countries needs to be improved. Methodology We conducted an observational cohort study in Dodoma, Tanzania to examine the sensitivity and specificity of telephone calls to detect SSI after discharge from hospital in comparison to a gold standard of clinician review. Women undergoing caesarean section were enrolled and followed up for 30 days. Women providing a telephone number were interviewed using a structured questionnaire at approximately days 5, 12 and 28 post-surgery. Women were then invited for out-patient review by a clinician blinded to the findings of telephone interview. Results A total of 374 women were enrolled and an overall SSI rate of 12% (n = 45 was observed. Three hundred and sixteen (84% women provided a telephone number, of which 202 had at least one telephone interview followed by a clinical review within 48 h, generating a total of 484 paired observations. From the clinical reviews, 25 SSI were diagnosed, of which telephone interview had correctly identified 18 infections; telephone calls did not incorrectly identify SSI in any patients. The overall sensitivity and specificity of telephone interviews as compared to clinician evaluation was 72 and 100%, respectively. Conclusion The use of telephone interview as a diagnostic tool for post-discharge surveillance of SSI had moderate sensitivity and high specificity in Tanzania. Telephone-based detection may be a useful method for SSI surveillance in low-income settings with high penetration of mobile telephones.

  16. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Prophylactic Intra-Operative Wound Irrigation for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Stijn W; Boldingh, Quirine J J; Solomkin, Joseph S; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Egger, Matthias; Dellinger, E Patchen; Boermeester, Marja A

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are one of the most common hospital-acquired infections. To reduce SSIs, prophylactic intra-operative wound irrigation (pIOWI) has been advocated, although the results to date are equivocal. To develop recommendations for the new World Health Organization (WHO) SSI prevention guidelines, a systematic literature review and a meta-analysis were conducted on the effectiveness of pIOWI using different agents as a means of reducing SSI. The PUBMED, Embase, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and WHO databases were searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing either pIOWI with no pIOWI or with pIOWI using different solutions and techniques were retrieved with SSI as the primary outcome. Meta-analyses were performed, and odds ratios (OR) and the mean difference with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were extracted and pooled with a random effects model. Twenty-one studies were suitable for analysis, and a distinction was made between intra-peritoneal, mediastinal, and incisional wound irrigation. A low quality of evidence demonstrated a statistically significant benefit for incisional wound irrigation with an aqueous povidone-iodine (PVP-I) solution in clean and clean contaminated wounds (OR 0.31; 95% CI 0.13-0.73; p = 0.007); 50 fewer SSIs per 1,000 procedures (from 19 fewer to 64 fewer)). Antibiotic irrigation had no significant effect in reducing SSIs (OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.64-2.12; p = 0.63). Low-quality evidence suggests considering the use of prophylactic incisional wound irrigation to prevent SSI with an aqueous povidone-iodine solution. Antibiotic irrigation does not show a benefit and therefore is discouraged.

  17. Pre-operative antiseptic shower and bath policy decreases the rate of S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus surgical site infections in patients undergoing joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colling, Kristin; Statz, Catherine; Glover, James; Banton, Kaysie; Beilman, Greg

    2015-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following joint arthroplasty increases length of stay, hospital cost, and leads to patient and healthcare provider dissatisfaction. Due to the presence of non-biologic implants (the prosthetic joint) in these procedures, infection is often devastating and treatment of the infection is more difficult. For this reason, prevention of SSI is of crucial importance in this population. Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the nares of approximately 30-40% of the population, is the most common pathogen causing SSI, and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rate. A pre-operative shower or bath with an antiseptic is an inexpensive and effective method of removal of these transient skin pathogens prior to the procedure and may be used to decrease SSI. We hypothesize that a preoperative antiseptic shower or bath will decrease the rate of SSI. A retrospective review was performed at two affiliated hospitals within the same system, one with a hospital-wide policy enforcing pre-operative antiseptic shower or bath and the other with no policy, with cases included from January 2010 to June 2012. International Classification of Disease-Ninth Revision-Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes and chart review were used to identify patients undergoing joint arthroplasty and to identify those with SSI. Two thousand three-hundred forty-nine arthroplasties were performed at the University of Minnesota Medical Center, a tertiary-care hospital with a pre-operative antiseptic shower or bath policy in place. An additional 1,693 procedures were performed at Fairview Ridges Hospital, a community hospital with no pre-operative policy. There was no difference in the rate of SSI between the two hospitals (1.96% vs. 1.95%; p=1.0). However, the rate of SSI caused by S. aureus was significantly decreased by pre-operative antiseptic shower/bath (17% vs. 61%; p=0.03), as was the rate of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections (2% vs. 24% p=0.002). A pre

  18. Association of the Addition of Oral Antibiotics to Mechanical Bowel Preparation for Left Colon and Rectal Cancer Resections With Reduction of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Elaine; Massarweh, Nader N; Chai, Christy Y; Tran Cao, Hop S; Zamani, Nader; Abraham, Sherry; Adigun, Kafayat; Awad, Samir S

    2018-02-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) after colorectal surgery remain a significant complication, particularly for patients with cancer, because they can delay the administration of adjuvant therapy. A combination of oral antibiotics and mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) is a potential, yet controversial, SSI prevention strategy. To determine the association of the addition of oral antibiotics to MBP with preventing SSIs in left colon and rectal cancer resections and its association with the timely administration of adjuvant therapy. A retrospective review was performed of 89 patients undergoing left colon and rectal cancer resections from October 1, 2013, to December 31, 2016, at a single institution. A bowel regimen of oral antibiotics and MBP (neomycin sulfate, metronidazole hydrochloride, and magnesium citrate) was implemented August 1, 2015. Patients receiving MBP and oral antibiotics and those undergoing MBP without oral antibiotics were compared using univariate analysis. Multivariable logistic regression controlling for factors that may affect SSIs was used to evaluate the association between use of oral antibiotics and MBP and the occurrence of SSIs. Surgical site infections within 30 days of the index procedure and time to adjuvant therapy. Of the 89 patients (5 women and 84 men; mean [SD] age, 65.3 [9.2] years) in the study, 49 underwent surgery with MBP but without oral antibiotics and 40 underwent surgery with MBP and oral antibiotics. The patients who received oral antibiotics and MBP were younger than those who received only MBP (mean [SD] age, 62.6 [9.1] vs 67.5 [8.8] years; P = .01), but these 2 cohorts of patients were otherwise similar in baseline demographic, clinical, and cancer characteristics. Surgical approach (minimally invasive vs open) and case type were similarly distributed; however, the median operative time of patients who received oral antibiotics and MBP was longer than that of patients who received MBP only (391 minutes

  19. A Targeted E-Learning Program for Surgical Trainees to Enhance Patient Safety in Preventing Surgical Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Seamus Mark; Corrigan, Mark; Dimitrov, Borislav; Cowman, Seamus; Tierney, Sean; Humphreys, Hilary; Hill, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infection accounts for 20% of all health care-associated infections (HCAIs); however, a program incorporating the education of surgeons has yet to be established across the specialty. Methods: An audit of surgical practice in infection prevention was carried out in Beaumont Hospital from July to November 2009. An…

  20. PREPARATIVE SKIN PREPARATION AND SURGICAL WOUND INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjanappa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: It is an established fact now that the normal skin of healthy human beings harbours a rich bacterial fl ora. Normally considered non - pathogenic , these organisms way be a potential source of infection of the surgical wound. Approximately 20% of the resident flora is beyond the reach of surgical scrubs and antiseptics. The goal of surgical preparation of the skin with antiseptics is to remove transient and pathogenic microorganisms on the skin surface and to reduce the resident flora to a low level. Povidone iodine (I odophors and chlorhexidine are most often used antiseptics for pre - operative skin preparation. OBJECTIVES : To evaluate the efficacy of povidone iodine alone and in combination with antiseptic agent containing alcoholic chlorhexidine in preoperative skin p reparation by taking swab culture. (2 To compare the rate of postoperative wound infection in both the groups. METHODS: One hundred patients (fifty in each group undergoing clean elective surgery with no focus of infection on the body were included in th e study. The pre - operative skin preparation in each group is done with the respective antiseptic regimen. In both the groups after application of antiseptics , sterile saline swab culture was taken immediately from site of incision. In cases which showed gr owth of organisms , the bacteria isolated were identified by their morphological and cultural characteristics. Grams staining , coagulase test and antibiotic sensitivity test were done wherever necessary and difference in colonization rates was determined as a measure of efficacy of antiseptic regimen. RESULTS: The results of the study showed that when compared to povidone iodine alone , using a combination of povidone iodine and alcoholic solution of chlorhexidine , the colonization rates of the site of incisi on were reduced significantly. As for the rate of post - operative wound infection , it is also proven that wound infections are also

  1. Systematic Review and Cost Analysis Comparing Use of Chlorhexidine with Use of Iodine for Preoperative Skin Antisepsis to Prevent Surgical Site Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ingi; Agarwal, Rajender K.; Lee, Bruce Y.; Fishman, Neil O.; Umscheid, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare use of chlorhexidine with use of iodine for preoperative skin antisepsis with respect to effectiveness in preventing surgical site infections (SSIs) and cost. Methods We searched the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality website, the Cochrane Library, Medline, and EMBASE up to January 2010 for eligible studies. Included studies were systematic reviews, meta-analyses, or randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing preoperative skin antisepsis with chlorhexidine and with iodine and assessing for the outcomes of SSI or positive skin culture result after application. One reviewer extracted data and assessed individual study quality, quality of evidence for each outcome, and publication bias. Meta-analyses were performed using a fixed-effects model. Using results from the meta-analysis and cost data from the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, we developed a decision analytic cost-benefit model to compare the economic value, from the hospital perspective, of antisepsis with iodine versus antisepsis with 2 preparations of chlorhexidine (ie, 4% chlorhexidine bottle and single-use applicators of a 2% chlorhexidine gluconate [CHG] and 70% isopropyl alcohol [IPA] solution), and also performed sensitivity analyses. Results Nine RCTs with a total of 3,614 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis revealed that chlorhexidine antisepsis was associated with significantly fewer SSIs (adjusted risk ratio, 0.64 [95% confidence interval, [0.51–0.80]) and positive skin culture results (adjusted risk ratio, 0.44 [95% confidence interval, 0.35–0.56]) than was iodine antisepsis. In the cost-benefit model baseline scenario, switching from iodine to chlorhexidine resulted in a net cost savings of $16–$26 per surgical case and $349,904–$568,594 per year for the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Sensitivity analyses showed that net cost savings persisted under most circumstances. Conclusions Preoperative skin antisepsis

  2. Building consensus: development of a Best Practice Guideline (BPG) for surgical site infection (SSI) prevention in high-risk pediatric spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Michael G; Riedel, Matthew D; Glotzbecker, Michael P; Matsumoto, Hiroko; Roye, David P; Akbarnia, Behrooz A; Anderson, Richard C E; Brockmeyer, Douglas L; Emans, John B; Erickson, Mark; Flynn, John M; Lenke, Lawrence G; Lewis, Stephen J; Luhmann, Scott J; McLeod, Lisa M; Newton, Peter O; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Richards, B Stephens; Shah, Suken A; Skaggs, David L; Smith, John T; Sponseller, Paul D; Sucato, Daniel J; Zeller, Reinhard D; Saiman, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Perioperative surgical site infection (SSI) after pediatric spine fusion is a recognized complication with rates between 0.5% and 1.6% in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and up to 22% in "high risk" patients. Significant variation in the approach to infection prophylaxis has been well documented. The purpose of this initiative is to develop a consensus-based "Best Practice" Guideline (BPG), informed by both the available evidence in the literature and expert opinion, for high-risk pediatric patients undergoing spine fusion. For the purpose of this effort, high risk was defined as anything other than a primary fusion in a patient with idiopathic scoliosis without significant comorbidities. The ultimate goal of this initiative is to decrease the wide variability in SSI prevention strategies in this area, ultimately leading to improved patient outcomes and reduced health care costs. An expert panel composed of 20 pediatric spine surgeons and 3 infectious disease specialists from North America, selected for their extensive experience in the field of pediatric spine surgery, was developed. Using the Delphi process and iterative rounds using a nominal group technique, participants in this panel were as follows: (1) surveyed for current practices; (2) presented with a detailed systematic review of the relevant literature; (3) given the opportunity to voice opinion collectively; and (4) asked to vote regarding preferences privately. Round 1 was conducted using an electronic survey. Initial results were compiled and discussed face-to-face. Round 2 was conducted using the Audience Response System, allowing participants to vote for (strongly support or support) or against inclusion of each intervention. Agreement >80% was considered consensus. Interventions without consensus were discussed and revised, if feasible. Repeat voting for consensus was performed. Consensus was reached to support 14 SSI prevention strategies and all participants agreed to implement the BPG in their

  3. Risk factors for surgical site infection following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery: a review of 9296 procedures from a national database and comparison with a single-center experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Brandon A.; Arynchyna, Anastasia A.; Johnston, James M.; Rozzelle, Curtis J.; Blount, Jeffrey P.; Oakes, W. Jerry; Rocque, Brandon G.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Surgical site infection (SSI) following CSF shunt operations has been well studied, yet risk factors for nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery are less well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine SSI rates and risk factors following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery using a nationwide patient cohort and an institutional dataset specifically for better understanding SSI. Methods The authors reviewed the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pediatric (ACS NSQIP-P) database for the years 2012–2014, including all neurosurgical procedures performed on pediatric patients except CSF shunts and hematoma evacuations. SSI included deep (intracranial abscesses, meningitis, osteomyelitis, and ventriculitis) and superficial wound infections. The authors performed univariate analyses of SSI association with procedure, demographic, comorbidity, operative, and hospital variables, with subsequent multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine independent risk factors for SSI within 30 days of the index procedure. A similar analysis was performed using a detailed institutional infection database from Children’s Hospital of Alabama (COA). Results A total of 9296 nonshunt procedures were identified in NSQIP-P with an overall 30-day SSI rate of 2.7%. The 30-day SSI rate in the COA institutional database was similar (3.3% of 1103 procedures, p = 0.325). Postoperative time to SSI in NSQIP-P and COA was 14.6 ± 6.8 days and 14.8 ± 7.3 days, respectively (mean ± SD). Myelomeningocele (4.3% in NSQIP-P, 6.3% in COA), spine (3.5%, 4.9%), and epilepsy (3.4%, 3.1%) procedure categoriess had the highest SSI rates by procedure category in both NSQIP-P and COA. Independent SSI risk factors in NSQIP-P included postoperative pneumonia (OR 4.761, 95% CI 1.269–17.857, p = 0.021), immune disease/immunosuppressant use (OR 3.671, 95% CI 1.371–9.827, p = 0.010), cerebral palsy (OR 2.835, 95% CI 1.463–5.494, p = 0.002), emergency

  4. Risk factors for surgical site infection following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery: a review of 9296 procedures from a national database and comparison with a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Brandon A; Arynchyna, Anastasia A; Johnston, James M; Rozzelle, Curtis J; Blount, Jeffrey P; Oakes, W Jerry; Rocque, Brandon G

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical site infection (SSI) following CSF shunt operations has been well studied, yet risk factors for nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery are less well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine SSI rates and risk factors following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery using a nationwide patient cohort and an institutional data set specifically for better understanding SSI. METHODS The authors reviewed the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric (ACS NSQIP-P) database for the years 2012-2014, including all neurosurgical procedures performed on pediatric patients except CSF shunts and hematoma evacuations. SSI included deep (intracranial abscesses, meningitis, osteomyelitis, and ventriculitis) and superficial wound infections. The authors performed univariate analyses of SSI association with procedure, demographic, comorbidity, operative, and hospital variables, with subsequent multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine independent risk factors for SSI within 30 days of the index procedure. A similar analysis was performed using a detailed institutional infection database from Children's of Alabama (COA). RESULTS A total of 9296 nonshunt procedures were identified in NSQIP-P with an overall 30-day SSI rate of 2.7%. The 30-day SSI rate in the COA institutional database was similar (3.3% of 1103 procedures, p = 0.325). Postoperative time to SSI in NSQIP-P and COA was 14.6 ± 6.8 days and 14.8 ± 7.3 days, respectively (mean ± SD). Myelomeningocele (4.3% in NSQIP-P, 6.3% in COA), spine (3.5%, 4.9%), and epilepsy (3.4%, 3.1%) procedure categories had the highest SSI rates by procedure category in both NSQIP-P and COA. Independent SSI risk factors in NSQIP-P included postoperative pneumonia (OR 4.761, 95% CI 1.269-17.857, p = 0.021), immune disease/immunosuppressant use (OR 3.671, 95% CI 1.371-9.827, p = 0.010), cerebral palsy (OR 2.835, 95% CI 1.463-5.494, p = 0.002), emergency operation (OR 1

  5. Meta-analysis of randomized and quasi-randomized clinical trials of topical antibiotics after primary closure for the prevention of surgical-site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, C F; Banks, J L; Lepper, P; Kontopantelis, E; van Driel, M L

    2017-08-01

    Surgical-site infections (SSIs) increase patient morbidity and costs. The aim was to identify and synthesize all RCTs evaluating the effect of topical antibiotics on SSI in wounds healing by primary intention. The search included Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, the Cochrane Wounds Specialized Register, Central Register of Controlled Trials and EBSCO CINAHL from inception to May 2016. There was no restriction of language, date or setting. Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. When sufficient numbers of comparable trials were available, data were pooled in meta-analysis. Fourteen RCTs with 6466 participants met the inclusion criteria. Pooling of eight trials (5427 participants) showed that topical antibiotics probably reduced the risk of SSI compared with no topical antibiotic (risk ratio (RR) 0·61, 95 per cent c.i. 0·42 to 0·87; moderate-quality evidence), equating to 20 fewer SSIs per 1000 patients treated. Pooling of three trials (3012 participants) for risk of allergic contact dermatitis found no clear difference between antibiotics and no antibiotic (RR 3·94, 0·46 to 34·00; very low-quality evidence). Pooling of five trials (1299 participants) indicated that topical antibiotics probably reduce the risk of SSI compared with topical antiseptics (RR 0·49, 0·30 to 0·80; moderate-quality evidence); 43 fewer SSIs per 1000 patients treated. Pooling of two trials (541 participants) showed no clear difference in the risk of allergic contact dermatitis with antibiotics or antiseptic agents (RR 0·97, 0·52 to 1·82; very low-quality evidence). Topical antibiotics probably prevent SSI compared with no topical antibiotic or antiseptic. No conclusion can be drawn regarding whether they cause allergic contact dermatitis. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Artificial neural network approach to predict surgical site infection after free-flap reconstruction in patients receiving surgery for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Pao-Jen; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chien, Peng-Chen; Chang, Shu-Shya; Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Tai, Hsueh-Ling; Peng, Shu-Hui; Lin, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2018-03-02

    The aim of this study was to develop an effective surgical site infection (SSI) prediction model in patients receiving free-flap reconstruction after surgery for head and neck cancer using artificial neural network (ANN), and to compare its predictive power with that of conventional logistic regression (LR). There were 1,836 patients with 1,854 free-flap reconstructions and 438 postoperative SSIs in the dataset for analysis. They were randomly assigned tin ratio of 7:3 into a training set and a test set. Based on comprehensive characteristics of patients and diseases in the absence or presence of operative data, prediction of SSI was performed at two time points (pre-operatively and post-operatively) with a feed-forward ANN and the LR models. In addition to the calculated accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, the predictive performance of ANN and LR were assessed based on area under the curve (AUC) measures of receiver operator characteristic curves and Brier score. ANN had a significantly higher AUC (0.892) of post-operative prediction and AUC (0.808) of pre-operative prediction than LR (both P <0.0001). In addition, there was significant higher AUC of post-operative prediction than pre-operative prediction by ANN (p<0.0001). With the highest AUC and the lowest Brier score (0.090), the post-operative prediction by ANN had the highest overall predictive performance. The post-operative prediction by ANN had the highest overall performance in predicting SSI after free-flap reconstruction in patients receiving surgery for head and neck cancer.

  7. Efficacy of Preoperative Oral Antibiotic Prophylaxis for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections in Patients with Crohn Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Motoi; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Bando, Toshihiro; Chohno, Teruhiro; Sasaki, Hirofumi; Horio, Yuki; Nakajima, Kazuhiko; Takesue, Yoshio

    2017-10-23

    We investigated the efficacy of oral antimicrobial prophylaxis in patients undergoing surgery for Crohn disease. Although oral antibiotic prophylaxis with mechanical bowel preparation has been recommended for colorectal surgery, the use of this approach remains somewhat controversial. Moreover, the efficacy of this approach for inflammatory bowel disease also remains unclear. This study was conducted as a randomized controlled trial at the Hyogo College of Medicine. The study protocols were registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry (000013369). In this study, 335 patients with Crohn disease who were scheduled to undergo intestinal resection with an open approach were randomly assigned to either group A or group B. The patients in group A received both preoperative oral antibiotics and intravenous antimicrobial prophylaxis, and intravenous antimicrobial prophylaxis alone was given to the patients in group B. All patients underwent preoperative mechanical bowel preparation with sodium picosulfate hydrate. The primary endpoint of this study was the incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) according to an intention-to-treat analysis. Although the incidences of overall and organ/space SSI were not significantly different, the incidence of incisional SSI was significantly lower in group A (12/163; 7.4%) than in group B (27/162; 16.6%) (P = 0.01). In the multivariate analysis, the absence of oral antibiotic prophylaxis was an independent risk factor for incisional SSI (odds ratio: 3.3; 95% confidence interval: 1.3-8.3; P = 0.01). Combined oral and intravenous antimicrobial prophylaxis in patients with Crohn disease contributed to the prevention of SSI.

  8. Antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of surgical site infection after tension-free hernia repair: a Bayesian and frequentist meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaki, Takero; Mado, Kazunari; Masuda, Hideki; Shiono, Motomi

    2013-11-01

    Efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI) after open tension-free hernia repair remains controversial. In light of additional data, the aim of this study was to determine whether antibiotic prophylaxis reduces SSI after hernia repair. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify randomized controlled trials comparing antibiotic prophylaxis and the subsequent incidence of SSI after inguinal or femoral hernia repair. The primary outcomes measure was the incidence of SSI. Subgroup analysis was evaluated by stratifying the categories of SSI. The meta-analysis was performed using Bayesian and frequentist methods. Twelve studies were included in this meta-analysis; 1,902 patients received antibiotic prophylaxis and the other 1,936 patients were allocated to the control group. Incidence of SSI was 47 (pooled rate 3.0%) in the antibiotic group and 91 (6.0%) in the control group. The number needed to treat to prevent 1 episode of SSI is 41. The Bayesian meta-analysis yielded a significant reduction of SSI in the antibiotic group (odds ratio = 0.49; 95% credible interval 0.25-0.81). Subgroup analysis showed that an antibiotic prophylaxis was beneficial for the prevention of superficial SSI (odds ratio = 0.40; 95% credible interval 0.12-0.98), but not beneficial for prevention of deep SSI (odds ratio = 0.59; 95% credible interval 0.11-3.20). Also, the results were similar to those with frequentist methods. This meta-analysis suggests that antibiotic prophylaxis is efficacious for the prevention of SSI after open mesh hernia repair. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Proportions of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in patients with surgical site infections in mainland China: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhirong; Wang, Jing; Wang, Weiwei; Zhang, Yuelun; Han, Lizhong; Zhang, Yuan; Nie, Xiaolu; Zhan, Siyan

    2015-01-01

    Sufficient details have not been specified for the epidemiological characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among surgical site infections (SSIs) in mainland China. This systematic review aimed to estimate proportions of S. aureus and MRSA in SSIs through available published studies. PubMed, Embase and four Chinese electronic databases were searched to identify relevant primary studies published between 2007 and 2012. Meta-analysis was conducted on the basis of logit-transformed metric for proportions of S. aureus and MRSA, followed by pre-defined subgroup meta-analysis. Random-effects meta-regression was also conducted to explore the impact of possible factors on S. aureus proportions. 106 studies were included, of which 38 studies involved MRSA. S. aureus accounted for 19.1% (95%CI 17.2-21.0%; I(2) = 84.1%) of all isolates in SSIs, which was roughly parallel to 18.5% in the United States (US) (P-value = 0.57) but significantly exceeded those calculated through the surveillance system in China (P-valueMRSA accounted for 41.3% (95%CI 36.5-46.3%; I(2) = 64.6%) of S. aureus, significantly lower than that in the US (P-value = 0.001). MRSA was sensitive to vancomycin (522/522) and linezolid (93/94), while 79.9% (95%CI 67.4-88.4%; I(2) = 0%) and 92.0% (95%CI 80.2-97.0%; I(2) = 0%) of MRSA was resistant to clindamycin and erythromycin respectively. The overall proportion of S. aureus among SSIs in China was similar to that in the US but seemed higher than those reported through the Chinese national surveillance system. Proportions of S. aureus SSIs may vary with different surgery types. Commonly seen in SSIs, MRSA tended to be highly sensitive to vancomycin and linezolid but mostly resistant to clindamycin and erythromycin.

  10. Superficial incisional surgical site infection rate after cesarean section in obese women: a randomized controlled trial of subcuticular versus interrupted skin suturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Moustafa I; Moustafa, Gamal Farag; Al-Hamid, Ahmed Sherif Abd; Hussein, May Raafat

    2014-05-01

    To compare the superficial incisional surgical site infection (SSI) rate after cesarean section (CS) in obese women using subcuticular versus interrupted skin suturing. The current randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at Ain Shams University Maternity Hospital. Obese non-diabetic women who underwent elective CS were randomized into two groups: group I included women who had their skin closed with interrupted mattress suture using non-absorbable polypropylene, and group II included women who had their skin closed with subcuticular suture using the same suture material. Primary outcome measure was superficial incisional SSI and secondary outcome measures were skin closure time, postoperative pain assessed by ten-point visual analog scale (VAS) and short-term cosmetic wound outcome according to the Stony Brook Scar Evaluation Scale (SBSES). A total of 130 obese women were finally analyzed. Group II (n = 67) was associated with higher incidence of superficial incisional SSI. There were nine cases (13.4 %) compared to three cases (4.8 %) in group I (n = 63); however, this difference was statistically not significant (P = 0.088). Skin closure time was significantly prolonged in group I (8.6 ± 2.3 min versus 5.7 ± 2.2 min, respectively, P < 0.001). Postoperative pain was significantly lower in group I and the mean VAS in group I was 4.7 ± 2 versus 5.5 ± 1.8 in group II (P = 0.017). Using SBSES, group II had mean score 4.5 ± 0.7, while group I had mean score 2.7 ± 1.1. This was statistically significant (P < 0.001), which means a better cosmetic outcome in group II. Subcuticular skin closure during CS for non-diabetic obese women was significantly associated with better short-term cosmetic outcome, less skin closure time, yet, with slightly higher risk of superficial incisional SSI and significantly more postoperative pain.

  11. A barrier retractor to reduce surgical site infections and wound disruptions in obese patients undergoing cesarean delivery: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolari Childress, Katherine M; Gavard, Jeffrey A; Ward, Donald G; Berger, Kinley; Gross, Gilad A

    2016-02-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are an important cause of morbidity following cesarean delivery, particularly in obese patients. Methods to reduce SSIs after cesarean delivery would have an important impact in obese obstetric patients. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the Alexis O cesarean delivery retractor, a barrier self-retaining retractor, reduces SSIs and wound disruptions in obese patients undergoing cesarean delivery. This was a randomized controlled trial of obese women (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) undergoing nonemergent cesarean delivery. Patients were randomized to the treatment group (using the Alexis O cesarean delivery retractor) or to the control group (using conventional handheld retractors). The primary outcome was SSI or wound disruption during the 30 day postoperative period. Secondary outcomes included operative time, estimated blood loss, change in hemoglobin, antiemetic use, length of postoperative hospital stay, hospital readmission, and other postoperative complications. A total of 301 patients were enrolled in the study. One hundred forty-four patients were randomized to the treatment group and 157 to the control group. Baseline characteristics and indications for cesarean delivery were similar between the 2 groups. Median body mass index was 40.1 kg/m(2). There were no significant differences between the treatment and the control group in the primary outcome of SSI or wound disruption rates at the 30 day assessment (20.6% vs 17.6%, P = .62), during the postoperative inpatient hospitalization or at the 1-2 week postoperative visit. There were also no differences in the primary outcome when adjusting for obesity class or thickness of the subcuticular layer. Patients in the treatment group had lower rates of uterine exteriorization (54.3% vs 87.3%, P cesarean delivery deliveries did not decrease SSI or wound disruption rates in an obese population. Its use as a retractor should be left to the discretion of the surgeon

  12. Port Site Infections After Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz KH Al-Naser

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Port site infection (PSI is an infrequent surgical site infection that complicates laparoscopic surgery but has a considerable influence in the overall outcome of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate factors that influence PSI after laparoscopic cholecystectomies and to analyze which of these factors can be modified to avoid PSI in a trail to achieve maximum laparoscopic advantages. Methods: A prospective descriptive qualitative study conducted on patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomies. Swabs were taken for culture & sensitivity in all patients who developed PSI. Exploration under general anaesthesia, for patients, had deep surgical site infections and wound debridement was done, excisional biopsies had been taken for histopathological studies, and tissue samples for polymerase chain reaction for detection of mycobacterium tuberculosis was done. All patients were followed up for six months postoperatively. Factors as gender, site of infected port, type of microorganism, acute versus chronic cholecystitis, type of infection (superficial or deep infection and intraoperative spillage of stones, bile or pus were analyzed in our sample. Results: Port site infection rate was recorded in 40/889 procedures (4.5%, higher rates were observed in male patients 8/89 (8.9%, in acute cholecystitis 13/125 (10.4%, when spillage of bile, stones or pus occurred 24/80 (30%, and at epigastric port 32/40 (80%. Most of the PSI were superficial infections 77.5% with non-specific microorganism 34/40 (85%. Conclusion: There is a significant association of port site infection with spillage of bile, stones, or pus, with the port of gallbladder extraction and with acute cholecystitis. Especial consideration should be taken in chronic deep surgical site infection as mycobacterium tuberculosis could be the cause. Most of the PSIs are superficial and more common in males.

  13. Surgical removal of infected transvenous pacemaker leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, R; Brodman, R F; Furman, S; Andrews, C A; Gross, J N

    1993-12-01

    Infection, though uncommon, can be the most lethal of all potential complications following transvenous pacemaker implantation. Eradication of infection associated with pacemakers requires complete removal of all hardware, including inactive leads. Since 1972, 5,089 patients have had 8,508 pacemaker generators implanted at Montefiore Medical Center. There were 91 infections (1.06%); four of our patients required surgical removal. Nine additional patients were referred for surgical removal of infected transvenous pacemaker leads from other institutions. Surgical methods for removal included use of cardiopulmonary bypass or inflow occlusion. Surgery may be safely used in unstable or elderly patients and should not be reserved as a last resort. This article reviews our surgical experience removing infected pacemaker leads at Montefiore Medical Center.

  14. A STUDY ON THE POST SURGICAL WOUND INFECTIONS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN KANCHIPURAM

    OpenAIRE

    Sivasankari; Thenmozhi Valli Pitchai; Anitha; Senthamarai; Venugopal

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Surgical site infections are the infections that occur within thirty days after the operative procedure (Except in case of added implants). Surgical site infections are the 3rd most commonly reported nosocomial infections accounting for a quarter of all such infections. A wide range of organisms are known to infect wounds like gram positive cocci, gram negative bacilli, spore formers, aerobes and anaerobes. Despite the advances in operative technique and better unde...

  15. Recurrent surgical site infection of the spine diagnosed by dual 18F-NaF-bone PET/CT with early-phase scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Jai-Joon; Lee, Jeong Won; Jeon, Min Hyok; Lee, Sang Mi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 31-year-old man who showed recurrently elevated level of the serum inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) after spinal operation. He underwent 18 F-flurodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and dual 18 F-sodium-fluoride ( 18 F-NaF) PET/CT with an additional early-phase scan to find a hidden inflammation focus. Only mildly increased 18 F-FDG was found at the surgical site of T11 spine on 18 F-FDG PET/CT. In contrast, dual 18 F-NaF bone PET/CT with early-phase scan demonstrated focal active inflammation at the surgical site of T11 spine. After a revision operation of the T11 spine, serum CRP level decreased to the normal range without any symptom or sign of inflammation. Inflammatory focus in the surgical site of the spine can be detected with using dual 18 F-NaF bone PET/CT scan with early-phase scan. (orig.)

  16. Graft infections after surgical aortic reconstructions

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, P.

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic vascular grafts are frequently used to reconstruct (part) of the aorta. Every surgical procedure caries a certain risk for infection and when a prosthetic aortic graft is implanted, this may lead to an aortic graft infection (AGI). Endovascular techniques have gradually replaced open surgical reconstructions as first line of treatment for aorto-iliac diseases. Nowadays, open reconstructions are primarily reserved for patients unsuitable for endovascular reconstructions or for redo ...

  17. Implementation of an Evidence-Based Protocol for Surgical Infection Prophylaxis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Savino, John A; Smeland, Jane; Flink, Ellen L; Ruperto, Angelo; Hines, Amanda; Sullivan, Thomas; Galvin, Kerri; Risucci, Donald A

    2005-01-01

    An evidence-based surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis (AMP) protocol was implemented in multiple facilities to determine if compliance led to a decrease in New York State reportable surgical site infections (SSIs...

  18. Does Administration of Oral Versus Intravenous Antibiotics for Third Molar Removal Have an Effect on the Incidence of Alveolar Osteitis or Postoperative Surgical Site Infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiland, Matthew D; Ettinger, Kyle S; Lohse, Christine M; Viozzi, Christopher F

    2017-09-01

    To compare the incidence of postoperative alveolar osteitis (AO) and surgical site infections (SSIs) in 2 separate cohorts of patients undergoing elective third molar removal: those wh