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Sample records for surgical quality improvement

  1. Quality improvement in the ambulatory surgical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, S W; Gutierrez, L

    1997-06-01

    Quality improvement is considered part of "business as usual" in the health care field. Some institutions have progressed further into their quality improvement efforts than others. Nonetheless, there is always the opportunity to learn from the efforts of others and to adopt their methods for use in one's own setting when possible. Included in this article is a case study outlining the use of the FOCUS PDCA methodology for quality improvement. The information identifies ways of introducing and beginning quality improvement efforts in a way that can be translated into other ambulatory health care settings.

  2. Use of national surgical quality improvement program data as a catalyst for quality improvement.

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    Rowell, Katherine S; Turrentine, Florence E; Hutter, Matthew M; Khuri, Shukri F; Henderson, William G

    2007-06-01

    Semiannually, the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) provides its participating sites with observed-to-expected (O/E) ratios for 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity. At each reporting period, there is typically a small group of hospitals with statistically significantly high O/E ratios, meaning that their patients have experienced more adverse events than would be expected on the basis of the population characteristics. An important issue is to determine which actions a surgical service should take in the presence of a high O/E ratio. This article reviews case studies of how some of the Department of Veterans Affairs and private-sector NSQIP participating sites used the clinically rich NSQIP database for local quality improvement efforts. Data on postoperative adverse events before and after these local quality improvement efforts are presented. After local quality improvement efforts, wound complication rates were reduced at the Salt Lake City Veterans Affairs medical center by 47%, surgical site infections in patients undergoing intraabdominal surgery were reduced at the University of Virginia by 36%, and urinary tract infections in vascular patients were reduced at the Massachusetts General Hospital by 74%. At some sites participating in the NSQIP, notably the Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of Virginia, the NSQIP has served as the basis for surgical service-wide outcomes research and quality improvement programs. The NSQIP not only provides participating sites with risk-adjusted surgical mortality and morbidity outcomes semiannually, but the clinically rich NSQIP database can also serve as a catalyst for local quality improvement programs to significantly reduce postoperative adverse event rates.

  3. Implementation of surgical quality improvement: auditing tool for surgical site infection prevention practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Hobson, Deborah B; Bennett, Jennifer L; Wick, Elizabeth C

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infections are a potentially preventable patient harm. Emerging evidence suggests that the implementation of evidence-based process measures for infection reduction is highly variable. The purpose of this work was to develop an auditing tool to assess compliance with infection-related process measures and establish a system for identifying and addressing defects in measure implementation. This was a retrospective cohort study using electronic medical records. We used the auditing tool to assess compliance with 10 process measures in a sample of colorectal surgery patients with and without postoperative infections at an academic medical center (January 2012 to March 2013). We investigated 59 patients with surgical site infections and 49 patients without surgical site infections. First, overall compliance rates for the 10 process measures were compared between patients with infection vs patients without infection to assess if compliance was lower among patients with surgical site infections. Then, because of the burden of data collection, the tool was used exclusively to evaluate quarterly compliance rates among patients with infection. The results were reviewed, and the key factors contributing to noncompliance were identified and addressed. Ninety percent of process measures had lower compliance rates among patients with infection. Detailed review of infection cases identified many defects that improved following the implementation of system-level changes: correct cefotetan redosing (education of anesthesia personnel), temperature at surgical incision >36.0°C (flags used to identify patients for preoperative warming), and the use of preoperative mechanical bowel preparation with oral antibiotics (laxative solutions and antibiotics distributed in clinic before surgery). Quarterly compliance improved for 80% of process measures by the end of the study period. This study was conducted on a small surgical cohort within a select subspecialty. The

  4. Evaluation of hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

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    Sheils, Catherine R; Dahlke, Allison R; Kreutzer, Lindsey; Bilimoria, Karl Y; Yang, Anthony D

    2016-11-01

    The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program is well recognized in surgical quality measurement and is used widely in research. Recent calls to make it a platform for national public reporting and pay-for-performance initiatives highlight the importance of understanding which types of hospitals elect to participate in the program. Our objective was to compare characteristics of hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program to characteristics of nonparticipating US hospitals. The 2013 American Hospital Association and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Healthcare Cost Report Information System datasets were used to compare characteristics and operating margins of hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program to those of nonparticipating hospitals. Of 3,872 general medical and surgical hospitals performing inpatient surgery in the United States, 475 (12.3%) participated in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Participating hospitals performed 29.0% of all operations in the United States. Compared with nonparticipating hospitals, American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program hospitals had a higher mean annual inpatient surgical case volume (6,426 vs 1,874; P quality-related accreditations (P Quality Improvement Program had established surgical quality improvement collaboratives. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program hospitals are large teaching hospitals with more quality-related accreditations and financial resources. These findings should be considered when reviewing research studies using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data, and the findings reinforce that efforts are needed to facilitate participation in surgical quality improvement by all

  5. Applying lean methods to improve quality and safety in surgical sterile instrument processing.

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    Blackmore, C Craig; Bishop, Robbi; Luker, Samuel; Williams, Barbara L

    2013-03-01

    Surgical instrument processing is critical to safe, high-quality surgical care but has received little attention in the medical literature. Typical hospitals have inventories in the tens of thousands of surgical instruments organized into thousands of instrument sets. The use of these instruments for multiple procedures per day leads to millions of instrument sets being reprocessed yearly in a single hospital. Errors in the processing of sterile instruments may lead to increased operative times and costs, as well as potentially contributing to surgical infections and perioperative morbidity. At Virginia Mason Medical Center (Seattle), a quality monitoring approach was developed to identify and categorize errors in sterile instrument processing, through use of a daily defect sheet. Lean methods were used to improve the quality of surgical instrument processing through redefining operator roles, alteration of the workspace, mistake-proofing, quality monitoring, staff training, and continuous feedback. To study the effectiveness of the quality improvement project, a before/after comparison of prospectively collected sterile processing error rates during a 37-month time frame was performed. Before the intervention, instrument processing errors occurred in 3.0% of surgical cases, decreasing to 1.5% at the final follow-up (p instrument processing errors are a barrier to the highest quality and safety in surgical care but are amenable to substantial improvement using Lean techniques.

  6. Quality improvement initiative: Preventative Surgical Site Infection Protocol in Vascular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizh, David; Ascher, Enrico; Raza Rizvi, Syed Ali; Hingorani, Anil; Amaturo, Michael; Johnson, Eric

    2018-02-01

    Objective A quality improvement initiative was employed to decrease single institution surgical site infection rate in open lower extremity revascularization procedures. In an attempt to lower patient morbidity, we developed and implemented the Preventative Surgical Site Infection Protocol in Vascular Surgery. Surgical site infections lead to prolonged hospital stays, adjunctive procedure, and additive costs. We employed targeted interventions to address the common risk factors that predispose patients to post-operative complications. Methods Retrospective review was performed between 2012 and 2016 for all surgical site infections after revascularization procedures of the lower extremity. A quality improvement protocol was initiated in January 2015. Primary outcome was the assessment of surgical site infection rate reduction in the pre-protocol vs. post-protocol era. Secondary outcomes evaluated patient demographics, closure method, perioperative antibiotic coverage, and management outcomes. Results Implementation of the protocol decreased the surgical site infection rate from 6.4% to 1.6% p = 0.0137). Patient demographics and comorbidities were assessed and failed to demonstrate a statistically significant difference among the infection and no-infection groups. Wound closure with monocryl suture vs. staple proved to be associated with decreased surgical site infection rate ( p site infections in the vascular surgery population are effective and necessary. Our data suggest that there may be benefit in the incorporation of MRSA and Gram-negative coverage as part of the Surgical Care Improvement Project perioperative guidelines.

  7. Implementation Science: A Neglected Opportunity to Accelerate Improvements in the Safety and Quality of Surgical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Louise; Athanasiou, Thanos; Russ, Stephanie

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this review was to emphasize the importance of implementation science in understanding why efforts to integrate evidence-based interventions into surgical practice frequently fail to replicate the improvements reported in early research studies. Over the past 2 decades, numerous patient safety initiatives have been developed to improve the quality and safety of surgical care. The surgical community is now faced with translating "promising" initiatives from the research environment into clinical practice-the World Health Organization (WHO) has described this task as one of the greatest challenges facing the global health community and has identified the importance of implementation science in scaling up evidence-based interventions. Using the WHO surgical safety checklist, a prominent example of a rapidly and widely implemented surgical safety intervention of the past decade, a review of literature, spanning surgery, and implementation science, was conducted to identify and describe a broad range of factors affecting implementation success, including contextual factors, implementation strategies, and implementation outcomes. Our current approach to conceptualizing and measuring the "effectiveness" of interventions has resulted in factors critical to implementing surgical safety interventions successfully being neglected. Improvements in the safety and quality of surgical care can be accelerated by drawing more heavily upon implementation science and that until this rapidly evolving field becomes more firmly embedded into surgical research and implementation efforts, our understanding of why interventions such as the checklist "work" in some settings and appear "not to work" in other settings will be limited.

  8. Decreasing cesarean section surgical site infection: an ongoing comprehensive quality improvement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, Frank R; Lawson, Patricia; Ferrell, Janis

    2014-04-01

    This report illustrates how the "plan-do-study-act" method of continuous quality improvement can be effective in reducing surgical site infection after cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A contemporary analysis of Fournier gangrene using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Stanley Y; Dupree, James M; Le, Brian V; Kim, Dae Y; Zhao, Lee C; Kundu, Shilajit D

    2015-05-01

    To determine a nationwide contemporary description of surgical Fournier gangrene (FG) and necrotizing fasciitis of the genitalia (NFG) outcomes because historically reported mortality rates for FG and NFG are based on small single-institution studies from the 1980s and the 1990s. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program is a risk-adjusted surgical database used by nearly 400 hospitals nationwide, which tracks preoperative, intraoperative, and 30-day postoperative clinical variables. Data are extracted from patient charts by an independent surgical clinical reviewer at each hospital. Using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data from 2005 to 2009, we calculated 30-day mortality rates and identified preoperative factors associated with increased mortality. A total of 650 patients were identified with surgery for FG or NFG. Fourteen patients with do not resuscitate orders placed preoperatively were excluded from analyses. For the remaining 636 patients, the overall 30-day mortality was 10.1% (64 of 636). Fifty-seven percent of patients (360 of 636) were men, 70% (446 of 636) were white, and 13% (81 of 636) were African American. Multivariate logistic regression indicated that increased age (odds ratio [OR], 1.041; P = .004), body mass index (OR, 1.045; P <.001), and preoperative white blood cell count (OR, 1.061; P = .001), and decreased platelet count (OR, 0.993; P <.001) were all associated with increased risk of death. We determined a surgical mortality rate for FG-NFG of 10.1%. This rate is about half of historically published estimates and similar to recent studies. The lower rate may indicate improvements in therapy. Increased age, body mass index, and white blood cell count, and decreased platelet count were all associated with an increased risk of 30-day mortality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sexual and Overall Quality of Life Improvements After Surgical Correction of "Buried Penis".

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    Hughes, Duncan B; Perez, Edgar; Garcia, Ryan M; Aragón, Oriana R; Erdmann, Detlev

    2016-05-01

    "Buried penis" is an increasing burden in our population with many possible etiologies. Although surgical correction of buried penis can be rewarding and successful for the surgeon, the psychological and functional impact of buried penis on the patient is less understood. The study's aim was to evaluate the sexual satisfaction and overall quality of life before and after buried penis surgery in a single-surgeon's patient population using a validated questionnaire (Changes in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire short-form). Using Likert scales generated from the questionnaire and 1-tailed paired t test analysis, we found that there was significantly improved sexual function after correction of a buried penis. Variables individually showed that there was significant improvement with sexual pleasure, urinating, and with genital hygiene postoperatively. There were no significant differences concerning frequency of pain with orgasms. Surgical correction of buried penis significantly improves the functional, sexual, and psychological aspects of patient's lives.

  11. National Surgical Quality Improvement Program surgical risk calculator poorly predicts complications in patients undergoing radical cystectomy with urinary diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Shay; Adamsky, Melanie A; Johnson, Scott C; Barashi, Nimrod S; Smith, Zachary L; Rodriguez, Maria V; Liao, Chuanhong; Smith, Norm D; Steinberg, Gary D; Shalhav, Arieh L

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Programs (ACS-NSQIP) surgical risk calculator in patients undergoing radical cystectomy (RC) with urinary diversion. Preoperative characteristics of patients who underwent RC with ileal conduit or orthotropic neobladder (ONB) between 2007 and 2016 were entered into the proprietary online ACS-NSQIP calculator to generate 30-day predicted risk profiles. Predicted and observed outcomes were compared by measuring Brier score (BS) and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Of 954 patients undergoing RC, 609 (64%) received ileal conduit and 345 (36%) received ONB. The calculator underestimated most risks by 10%-81%. The BSs exceeded the acceptable threshold of 0.01 and AUC were less than 0.8 for all outcomes in the overall cohort. The mean (standard deviation) predicted vs. observed length of stay was 9 (1.5) vs. 10.6 (7.4) days (Pearson's r = 0.09). Among patients who received ONB, adequate BS (calculator for cardiac complications (AUC = 0.69) and discharge to rehab center (AUC = 0.75) among patients who underwent RC with ONB. The universal ACS-NSQIP calculator poorly predicts most postoperative complications among patients undergoing RC with urinary diversion. A procedure-specific risk calculator is required to better counsel patients in the preoperative setting and generate realistic quality measures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Surgical process improvement tools: defining quality gaps and priority areas in gastrointestinal cancer surgery.

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    Wei, A C; Devitt, K S; Wiebe, M; Bathe, O F; McLeod, R S; Urbach, D R

    2014-04-01

    Surgery is a cornerstone of cancer treatment, but significant differences in the quality of surgery have been reported. Surgical process improvement tools (spits) modify the processes of care as a means to quality improvement (qi). We were interested in developing spits in the area of gastrointestinal (gi) cancer surgery. We report the recommendations of an expert panel held to define quality gaps and establish priority areas that would benefit from spits. The present study used the knowledge-to-action cycle was as a framework. Canadian experts in qi and in gi cancer surgery were assembled in a nominal group workshop. Participants evaluated the merits of spits, described gaps in current knowledge, and identified and ranked processes of care that would benefit from qi. A qualitative analysis of the workshop deliberations using modified grounded theory methods identified major themes. The expert panel consisted of 22 participants. Experts confirmed that spits were an important strategy for qi. The top-rated spits included clinical pathways, electronic information technology, and patient safety tools. The preferred settings for use of spits included preoperative and intraoperative settings and multidisciplinary contexts. Outcomes of interest were cancer-related outcomes, process, and the technical quality of surgery measures. Surgical process improvement tools were confirmed as an important strategy. Expert panel recommendations will be used to guide future research efforts for spits in gi cancer surgery.

  13. Surgical site infection after cesarean section: implementing 3 changes to improve the quality of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Suzanne; Jackson, Valerie; Coulter-Smith, Sam; Loughrey, John; McKenna, Peter; Cafferkey, Mary

    2013-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is an important complication of cesarean section (CS) delivery and a key quality indicator of patient care. A baseline assessment was undertaken to determine SSI rates, and subsequently a quality improvement program was introduced, followed by repeat surveillance. Data were collected during in-hospital stays and for up to 30 days after CS during both periods. Interventions in the quality improvement program included the use of nonabsorbable sutures for skin closure, use of clippers instead of razors, and use of 2% ChloraPrep for skin disinfection before incision. A total of 710 patients were surveyed before the interventions, and 824 patients were surveyed after the interventions. Of these, 114 (16%) had an SSI before the interventions, and 40 (4.9%) had an SSI after the interventions (P Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Thrombocytopenia and craniotomy for tumor: A National Surgical Quality Improvement Program analysis.

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    Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H; Devine, Christopher A; Liu, Kevin X; Gormley, William B; Claus, Elizabeth B; Smith, Timothy R; Dunn, Ian F

    2016-06-01

    To the authors' knowledge, the current study is the first national analysis of the association between preoperative platelet count and outcomes after craniotomy. Patients who underwent craniotomy for tumor were extracted from the prospective National Surgical Quality Improvement Program registry (2007-2014) and stratified by preoperative thrombocytopenia, defined as mild (125,000-149,000/μL), moderate (100,000-124,000/μL), severe (75,000-99,000/μL), or very severe (craniotomy for tumor. Cancer 2016;122:1708-17. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  15. Sepsis in general surgery: the 2005-2007 national surgical quality improvement program perspective.

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    Moore, Laura J; Moore, Frederick A; Todd, S Rob; Jones, Stephen L; Turner, Krista L; Bass, Barbara L

    2010-07-01

    To document the incidence, mortality rate, and risk factors for sepsis and septic shock compared with pulmonary embolism and myocardial infarction in the general-surgery population. Retrospective review. American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program institutions. General-surgery patients in the 2005-2007 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data set. Incidence, mortality rate, and risk factors for sepsis and septic shock. Of 363 897 general-surgery patients, sepsis occurred in 8350 (2.3%), septic shock in 5977 (1.6%), pulmonary embolism in 1078 (0.3%), and myocardial infarction in 615 (0.2%). Thirty-day mortality rates for each of the groups were as follows: 5.4% for sepsis, 33.7% for septic shock, 9.1% for pulmonary embolism, and 32.0% for myocardial infarction. The septic-shock group had a greater percentage of patients older than 60 years (no sepsis, 40.2%; sepsis, 51.7%; and septic shock, 70.3%; P surgery resulted in more cases of sepsis (4.5%) and septic shock (4.9%) than did elective surgery (sepsis, 2.0%; septic shock, 1.2%) (P surgery, and the presence of any comorbidity. This study emphasizes the need for early recognition of patients at risk via aggressive screening and the rapid implementation of evidence-based guidelines.

  16. Perioperative blood transfusion in gynecologic oncology surgery: analysis of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Lauren S; Aloia, Thomas A; Brown, Alaina J; Taylor, Jolyn S; Munsell, Mark F; Sun, Charlotte C; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Levenback, Charles F; Bodurka, Diane C

    2015-01-01

    To use a large-scale multi-institutional dataset to quantify the prevalence of packed red blood cell transfusions and examine the associations between transfusion and perioperative outcomes in gynecologic cancer surgery. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) participant use file was queried for all gynecologic cancer cases between 2010 and 2012. Demographic, preoperative and intraoperative variables were compared between transfusion and non-transfusion groups using chi-squared, Fisher's exact and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. The primary endpoint was 30-day composite morbidity. Secondary endpoints included composite surgical site infections, mortality and length of stay. A total of 8519 patients were analyzed, and 13.8% received a packed red blood cell transfusion. In the multivariate analysis, after adjusting for key clinical and perioperative factors, including preoperative anemia and case magnitude, transfusion was associated with higher composite morbidity (OR = 1.85, 95% CI 1.5-2.24), surgical site infections (OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.39-2.35), mortality (OR 3.38, 95% CI 1.80-6.36) and length of hospital stay (3.02 days v. 7.17 days, P gynecologic cancer should be scrutinized. Examination of institutional practices and creation of transfusion guidelines for gynecologic malignancies could potentially result in better utilization of blood bank resources and clinical outcomes among patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Length of hospital stay after craniotomy for tumor: a National Surgical Quality Improvement Program analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H; Liu, Kevin X; Devine, Christopher A; Chavakula, Vamsidhar; Smith, Timothy R; Gormley, William B; Dunn, Ian F

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Although the length of hospital stay is often used as a measure of quality of care, data evaluating the predictors of extended hospital stay after craniotomy for tumor are limited. The goals of this study were to use multivariate regression to examine which preoperative characteristics and postoperative complications predict a prolonged hospital stay and to assess the impact of length of stay on unplanned hospital readmission. METHODS Data were extracted from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database from 2007 to 2013. Patients who underwent craniotomy for resection of a brain tumor were included. Stratification was based on length of hospital stay, which was dichotomized by the upper quartile of the interquartile range (IQR) for the entire population. Covariates included patient age, sex, race, tumor histology, comorbidities, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, functional status, preoperative laboratory values, preoperative neurological deficits, operative time, and postoperative complications. Multivariate logistic regression with forward prediction was used to evaluate independent predictors of extended hospitalization. Thereafter, hierarchical multivariate logistic regression assessed the impact of length of stay on unplanned readmission. RESULTS The study included 11,510 patients. The median hospital stay was 4 days (IQR 3-8 days), and 27.7% (n = 3185) had a hospital stay of at least 8 days. Independent predictors of extended hospital stay included age greater than 70 years (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.28%-1.83%, p craniotomy for tumor score was created based on preoperative factors significant in regression models, with a moderate correlation with length of stay (p = 0.43, p craniotomy for tumor, much of the variance in hospital stay was attributable to baseline patient characteristics, suggesting length of stay may be an imperfect proxy for quality. Additionally, longer hospitalizations were not found to be associated

  18. Pulmonary complications after major abdominal surgery: National Surgical Quality Improvement Program analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun Kevin; Teng, Annabelle; Lee, David Y; Rose, Keith

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) after major abdominal surgery are common and associated with significant morbidity and high cost of care. The objective of this study was to identify the risk factors for PPCs after major abdominal surgery. The American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database from 2005-2012 was queried for patients who underwent major abdominal surgery (esophagectomy, gastrectomy, pacnreatectomy, enterectomy, hepatectomy, colectomy, and proctectomy). Predictors of PPCs were identified using multivariate logistic regression. Of 165,196 patients who underwent major abdominal surgery 9595 (5.8%) suffered PPCs (pneumonia 3.2%, prolonged ventilator support ≥48 h 3.0%, and unplanned intubation 2.8%). On multivariate analysis, significant predictors of overall and individual PPCs include esophagectomy, advanced American Society of Anesthesiology Classification System, dependent functional status, prolonged operative time, age ≥80 y, severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, preoperative shock, ascites, and smoking. Obesity was not a risk factor. Female gender was overall protective for PPCs. PPCs after abdominal procedures are associated with a number of clinical variables. Esophageal operations and American Society of Anesthesiology Classification System were the strongest predictors. These results provide a framework for identifying patients at risk for developing pulmonary complications after major abdominal surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Empowering Post-Surgical Patients to Improve Opioid Disposal: A Before and After Quality Improvement Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasak, Jessica M; Roth Bettlach, Carrie L; Santosa, Katherine B; Larson, Ellen L; Stroud, Jean; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2018-03-01

    Our country is in the midst of an opioid epidemic. Although the problem is multifactorial, one issue is the presence of excess prescription opioid medications circulating in our communities. Our objective was to determine whether dissemination of an educational brochure would improve the disposal of unused opioids after surgery. Eligible surgery patients from an upper extremity/peripheral nerve clinic were enrolled into this prospective before and after study between February 2017 and September 2017. Patients who reported opioid use preoperatively were excluded from this study. The same survey was administered to the group of patients who did not receive the intervention and to those who did receive the intervention. Our primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who disposed of unused opioid medications. A total of 334 patients were studied: 164 who did not receive the brochure and 170 who received the brochure. Seventy-six patients were excluded for preoperative opioid use. After dissemination of the brochure, there was a significant increase in the proportion of patients who disposed of their unused opioids (11% vs 22%, p = 0.02). Of those who disposed of their opioids, there was no significant difference in the proportion of patients from each group who disposed in a manner that was recommended by the brochure (43% vs 64%, p = 0.19). Dissemination of the educational brochure improved disposal of unused opioids after surgery. This low-cost, easily implemented intervention can improve disposal of unused opioids and ultimately, decrease the amount of excess opioids circulating in our communities. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Developing Process Maps as a Tool for a Surgical Infection Prevention Quality Improvement Initiative in Resource-Constrained Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Jared A; Koritsanszky, Luca A; Amenu, Demisew; Haynes, Alex B; Berry, William R; Alemu, Seifu; Jiru, Fekadu; Weiser, Thomas G

    2018-03-21

    Surgical infections cause substantial morbidity and mortality in low-and middle-income countries (LMICs). To improve adherence to critical perioperative infection prevention standards, we developed Clean Cut, a checklist-based quality improvement program to improve compliance with best practices. We hypothesized that process mapping infection prevention activities can help clinicians identify strategies for improving surgical safety. We introduced Clean Cut at a tertiary hospital in Ethiopia. Infection prevention standards included skin antisepsis, ensuring a sterile field, instrument decontamination/sterilization, prophylactic antibiotic administration, routine swab/gauze counting, and use of a surgical safety checklist. Processes were mapped by a visiting surgical fellow and local operating theater staff to facilitate the development of contextually-relevant solutions; processes were re-assessed for improvements. Process mapping helped identify barriers to using alcohol-based hand solution due to skin irritation, inconsistent administration of prophylactic antibiotics due to variable delivery outside of the operating theater, inefficiencies in assuring sterility of surgical instruments through lack of confirmatory measures, and occurrences of retained surgical items through inappropriate guidelines, staffing, and training in proper routine gauze counting. Compliance with most processes improved significantly following organizational changes to align tasks with specific process goals. Enumerating the steps involved in surgical infection prevention using a process mapping technique helped identify opportunities for improving adherence and plotting contextually relevant solutions, resulting in superior compliance with antiseptic standards. Simplifying these process maps into an adaptable tool could be a powerful strategy for improving safe surgery delivery in LMICs. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Improving the quality of colon cancer surgery through a surgical education program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, Nicholas P; Sutton, Kate M; Ingeholm, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated the importance of dissection in the correct tissue plane for the resection of colon cancer. We have previously shown that meticulous mesocolic plane surgery yields better outcomes and that the addition of central vascular ligation produces an oncologically superio...... specimen compared with standard techniques. We aimed to assess the effect of surgical education on the oncological quality of the resection specimen produced....

  2. A Quality Improvement Study on Avoidable Stressors and Countermeasures Affecting Surgical Motor Performance and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Claudius; Konuk, Yusuf; Werner, Paul D.; Cao, Caroline G.; Warshaw, Andrew L.; Rattner, David W.; Stangenberg, Lars; Ott, Harald C.; Jones, Daniel B.; Miller, Diane L; Gee, Denise W.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore how the two most important components of surgical performance - speed and accuracy - are influenced by different forms of stress and what the impact of music on these factors is. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA Based on a recently published pilot study on surgical experts, we designed an experiment examining the effects of auditory stress, mental stress, and music on surgical performance and learning, and then correlated the data psychometric measures to the role of music in a novice surgeon’s life. METHODS 31 surgeons were recruited for a crossover study. Surgeons were randomized to four simple standardized tasks to be performed on the Surgical SIM VR laparoscopic simulator, allowing exact tracking of speed and accuracy. Tasks were performed under a variety of conditions, including silence, dichotic music (auditory stress), defined classical music (auditory relaxation), and mental loading (mental arithmetic tasks). Tasks were performed twice to test for memory consolidation and to accommodate for baseline variability. Performance was correlated to the Brief Musical Experience Questionnaire (MEQ). RESULTS Mental loading influences performance with respect to accuracy, speed, and recall more negatively than does auditory stress. Defined classical music might lead to minimally worse performance initially, but leads to significantly improved memory consolidation. Furthermore, psychologic testing of the volunteers suggests that surgeons with greater musical commitment, measured by the MEQ, perform worse under the mental loading condition. CONCLUSION Mental distraction and auditory stress negatively affect specific components of surgical learning and performance. If used appropriately, classical music may positively affect surgical memory consolidation. It also may be possible to predict surgeons’ performance and learning under stress through psychological tests on the role of music in a surgeon’s life. Further investigation is necessary to determine

  3. A quality improvement study on avoidable stressors and countermeasures affecting surgical motor performance and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Claudius; Konuk, Yusuf; Werner, Paul D; Cao, Caroline G; Warshaw, Andrew L; Rattner, David W; Stangenberg, Lars; Ott, Harald C; Jones, Daniel B; Miller, Diane L; Gee, Denise W

    2012-06-01

    To explore how the 2 most important components of surgical performance--speed and accuracy-are influenced by different forms of stress and what the impact of music is on these factors. On the basis of a recently published pilot study on surgical experts, we designed an experiment examining the effects of auditory stress, mental stress, and music on surgical performance and learning and then correlated the data psychometric measures to the role of music in a novice surgeon's life. Thirty-one surgeons were recruited for a crossover study. Surgeons were randomized to 4 simple standardized tasks to be performed on the SurgicalSIM VR laparoscopic simulator (Medical Education Technologies, Inc, Sarasota, FL), allowing exact tracking of speed and accuracy. Tasks were performed under a variety of conditions, including silence, dichotic music (auditory stress), defined classical music (auditory relaxation), and mental loading (mental arithmetic tasks). Tasks were performed twice to test for memory consolidation and to accommodate for baseline variability. Performance was correlated to the brief Musical Experience Questionnaire (MEQ). Mental loading influences performance with respect to accuracy, speed, and recall more negatively than does auditory stress. Defined classical music might lead to minimally worse performance initially but leads to significantly improved memory consolidation. Furthermore, psychologic testing of the volunteers suggests that surgeons with greater musical commitment, measured by the MEQ, perform worse under the mental loading condition. Mental distraction and auditory stress negatively affect specific components of surgical learning and performance. If used appropriately, classical music may positively affect surgical memory consolidation. It also may be possible to predict surgeons' performance and learning under stress through psychological tests on the role of music in a surgeon's life. Further investigation is necessary to determine the

  4. Change in Adverse Events After Enrollment in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Montroy

    Full Text Available The American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP is the first nationally validated, risk-adjusted, outcomes-based program to measure and compare the quality of surgical care across North America. Participation in this program may provide an opportunity to reduce the incidence of adverse events related to surgery.A systematic review of the literature was performed. MedLine, EMBASE and PubMed were searched for studies relevant to NSQIP. Patient characteristics, intervention, and primary outcome measures were abstracted. The intervention was participation in NSQIP and monitoring of Individual Site Summary Reports with or without implementation of a quality improvement program. The outcomes of interest were change in peri-operative adverse events and mortality represented by pooled risk ratios (pRR and 95% confidence intervals (CI.Eleven articles reporting on 35 health care institutions were included. Nine (82% of the eleven studies implemented a quality improvement program. Minimal improvements in superficial (pRR 0.81; 95% CI 0.72-0.91, deep (pRR 0.82; 95% CI0.64-1.05 and organ space (pRR 1.15; 95% CI 0.96-1.37 infections were observed at centers that did not institute a quality improvement program. However, centers that reported formal interventions for the prevention and treatment of infections observed substantial improvements (superficial pRR 0.55, 95% CI 0.39-0.77; deep pRR 0.61, 95% CI 0.50-0.75, and organ space pRR 0.60, 95% CI 0.50-0.71. Studies evaluating other adverse events noted decreased incidence following NSQIP participation and implementation of a formal quality improvement program.These data suggest that NSQIP is effective in reducing surgical morbidity. Improvement in surgical quality appears to be more marked at centers that implemented a formal quality improvement program directed at the reduction of specific morbidities.

  5. Nationwide Inpatient Sample and National Surgical Quality Improvement Program give different results in hip fracture studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Daniel D; Basques, Bryce A; Golinvaux, Nicholas S; Baumgaertner, Michael R; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2014-06-01

    National databases are being used with increasing frequency to conduct orthopaedic research. However, there are important differences in these databases, which could result in different answers to similar questions; this important potential limitation pertaining to database research in orthopaedic surgery has not been adequately explored. The purpose of this study was to explore the interdatabase reliability of two commonly used national databases, the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) and the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP), in terms of (1) demographics; (2) comorbidities; and (3) adverse events. In addition, using the NSQIP database, we identified (4) adverse events that had a higher prevalence after rather than before discharge, which has important implications for interpretation of studies conducted in the NIS. A retrospective cohort study of patients undergoing operative stabilization of transcervical and intertrochanteric hip fractures during 2009 to 2011 was performed in the NIS and NSQIP. Totals of 122,712 and 5021 patients were included from the NIS and NSQIP, respectively. Age, sex, fracture type, and lengths of stay were compared. Comorbidities common to both databases were compared in terms of more or less than twofold difference between the two databases. Similar comparisons were made for adverse events. Finally, adverse events that had a greater postdischarge prevalence were identified from the NSQIP database. Tests for statistical difference were thought to be of little value given the large sample size and the resulting fact that statistical differences would have been identified even for small, clinically inconsequential differences resulting from the associated high power. Because it is of greater clinical importance to focus on the magnitude of differences, the databases were compared by absolute differences. Demographics and hospital lengths of stay were not different between the two databases. In terms of comorbidities

  6. Predictors of Surgical Site Infection Following Craniotomy for Intracranial Neoplasms: An Analysis of Prospectively Collected Data in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, Brandon A; Ubl, Daniel S; Babu, Maya; Maloney, Patrick; Murphy, Meghan; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Bydon, Mohamad; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Parney, Ian

    2016-04-01

    To determine the rate of surgical site infection (SSI) after resection of an intracranial neoplasm using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data set and to identify potential risk factors associated with SSI. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Participant Use Data File was queried during the period 2006-2013 for patients who underwent a resection for an intracranial neoplasm. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors associated with SSI. Inclusion criteria were met by 12,021 patients. SSI occurred at a rate of 2.04%. SSI was significantly associated with increased rates of return to the operating room (56.1% vs. 4.0%, P 30 days (5.3% vs. 1.3%, P 4 hours (OR = 1.891, 95% CI = 1.298-2.756) were associated with an increased odds of SSI. Among cases with available chemotherapy data (n = 3504), recent chemotherapy (OR = 3.007, 95% CI = 1.460-6.196) was associated with an increased odds of SSI. This study identified patient risk factors that may assist clinical decision making regarding patient risk stratification, timing of surgery, and preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis for patients with an intracranial neoplasm undergoing craniotomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Quality Improvement Approach to Reducing the Caesarean section Surgical Site Infection Rate in a Regional Hospital

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’ Hanlon, M

    2016-09-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) rates are used extensively by hospitals as a basis for quality improvement. A 30-day post-discharge SSI programme for Caesarean section operations has been implemented in Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital since 2011. It has been shown that skin antisepsis and antibiotic prophylaxis are key factors in the prevention of SSI. Using quality improvement methodology, an infection prevention bundle was introduced to address these two factors. Skin antisepsis was changed from povidone-iodine to chlorhexidine-alcohol. Compliance with choice of antibiotic prophylaxis increased from 89.6% in 2014 to 98.5% in 2015. Compliance with timing also improved. The SSI rate of 7.5% was the lowest recorded to date, with the majority of SSIs (64%) diagnosed after hospital discharge. The level of variation was also reduced. However, the continued presence of variation and possibility of lower infection rates from the literature imply that further improvements are required.

  8. A Quality Improvement Approach to Reducing the Caesarean section Surgical Site Infection Rate in a Regional Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanlon, M; McKenna, C; Carton, E; Diviney, D; Costello, M R; O'Sullivan, L; Fitzsimons, J; Toland, L; Dornikova, G; Curran, R; McCann, C; O'Sullivan, L; Doherty, T; Crowley, C; O'Coigligh, S

    2016-09-09

    Surgical site infection (SSI) rates are used extensively by hospitals as a basis for quality improvement. A 30-day post-discharge SSI programme for Caesarean section operations has been implemented in Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital since 2011. It has been shown that skin antisepsis and antibiotic prophylaxis are key factors in the prevention of SSI. Using quality improvement methodology, an infection prevention bundle was introduced to address these two factors. Skin antisepsis was changed from povidone-iodine to chlorhexidine-alcohol. Compliance with choice of antibiotic prophylaxis increased from 89.6% in 2014 to 98.5% in 2015. Compliance with timing also improved. The SSI rate of 7.5% was the lowest recorded to date, with the majority of SSIs (64%) diagnosed after hospital discharge. The level of variation was also reduced. However, the continued presence of variation and possibility of lower infection rates from the literature imply that further improvements are required.

  9. Adopting a surgical safety checklist could save money and improve the quality of care in U.S. hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semel, Marcus E; Resch, Stephen; Haynes, Alex B; Funk, Luke M; Bader, Angela; Berry, William R; Weiser, Thomas G; Gawande, Atul A

    2010-09-01

    Use of the World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist has been associated with a significant reduction in major postoperative complications after inpatient surgery. We hypothesized that implementing the checklist in the United States would generate cost savings for hospitals. We performed a decision analysis comparing implementation of the checklist to existing practice in U.S. hospitals. In a hospital with a baseline major complication rate after surgery of at least 3 percent, the checklist generates cost savings once it prevents at least five major complications. Using the checklist would both save money and improve the quality of care in hospitals throughout the United States.

  10. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Surgical Risk Calculator Has a Role in Predicting Discharge to Post-Acute Care in Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltz, Daniel E; Baumgartner, Billy T; Politzer, Cary S; DiLallo, Marcus; Bolognesi, Michael P; Seyler, Thorsten M

    2018-01-01

    Patient demand and increasing cost awareness have led to the creation of surgical risk calculators that attempt to predict the likelihood of adverse events and to facilitate risk mitigation. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Surgical Risk Calculator is an online tool available for a wide variety of surgical procedures, and has not yet been fully evaluated in total joint arthroplasty. A single-center, retrospective review was performed on 909 patients receiving a unilateral primary total knee (496) or hip (413) arthroplasty between January 2012 and December 2014. Patient characteristics were entered into the risk calculator, and predicted outcomes were compared with observed results. Discrimination was evaluated using the receiver-operator area under the curve (AUC) for 90-day readmission, return to operating room (OR), discharge to skilled nursing facility (SNF)/rehab, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). The risk calculator demonstrated adequate performance in predicting discharge to SNF/rehab (AUC 0.72). Discrimination was relatively limited for DVT (AUC 0.70, P = .2), 90-day readmission (AUC 0.63), PJI (AUC 0.67), and return to OR (AUC 0.59). Risk score differences between those who did and did not experience discharge to SNF/rehab, 90-day readmission, and PJI reached significance (P Calculator has fair utility in predicting discharge to SNF/rehab, but limited usefulness for 90-day readmission, return to OR, DVT, and PJI. Although length of stay predictions are similar to actual outcomes, statistical correlation remains relatively weak. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Laparoscopic Versus Open Bowel Resection in Emergency Small Bowel Obstruction: Analysis of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rohit; Reddy, Subhash; Thoman, David; Grotts, Jonathan; Ferrigno, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is commonly encountered by surgeons and has traditionally been handled via an open approach, especially when small bowel resection (SBR) is indicated, although recent series have shown improved outcomes with a laparoscopic approach. In this retrospective study, we sought to evaluate outcomes and identify risk factors for adverse events after emergency SBR for SBO with an emphasis on surgical approach. In this retrospective review using American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data, 1750 patients were identified who had emergency SBR with the principal diagnosis of SBO from 2006 to 2011. Mortality and postoperative adverse events were evaluated. Of 1750 patients who had emergency SBR, 51 (2.9%) had laparoscopic bowel resection (LBR). There was no difference in surgery duration (open bowel resection [OBR] versus LBR, 100 minutes versus 92 minutes; P=.38). Compared with the LBR group, the OBR group had a higher rate of baseline cardiac comorbidities and postoperative complications, and their length of stay was longer (10 versus 8 days; P70 years, pulmonary, renal, neurological, and cardiac comorbidities, preoperative sepsis, steroid use, and body mass index of surgical problem.

  12. Validity of the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program risk calculator in South Australian glossectomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, S S; Frauenfelder, C; Wong, D; Edwards, S; Krishnan, S; Ooi, E H

    2018-02-01

    Appropriate selection of tongue cancer patients considering surgery is critical in ensuring optimal outcomes. The American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program ('ACS-NSQIP') risk calculator was developed to assess patients' 30-day post-operative risk, providing surgeons with information to guide decision making. A retrospective review of 30-day actual mortality and morbidity of tongue cancer patients was undertaken to investigate the validity of this tool for South Australian patients treated from 2005 to 2015. One hundred and twenty patients had undergone glossectomy. Predicted length of stay using the risk calculator was significantly different from actual length of stay. Predicted mortality and other complications were found to be similar to actual outcomes. The American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program risk calculator was found to be effective in predicting post-operative complication rates in South Australian tongue cancer patients. However, significant discrepancies in predicted and actual length of stay may limit its use in this population.

  13. Changing use of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis in Thika Hospital, Kenya: a quality improvement intervention with an interrupted time series design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M Aiken

    Full Text Available In low-income countries, Surgical Site Infection (SSI is a common form of hospital-acquired infection. Antibiotic prophylaxis is an effective method of preventing these infections, if given immediately before the start of surgery. Although several studies in Africa have compared pre-operative versus post-operative prophylaxis, there are no studies describing the implementation of policies to improve prescribing of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis in African hospitals.We conducted SSI surveillance at a typical Government hospital in Kenya over a 16 month period between August 2010 and December 2011, using standard definitions of SSI and the extent of contamination of surgical wounds. As an intervention, we developed a hospital policy that advised pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis and discouraged extended post-operative antibiotics use. We measured process, outcome and balancing effects of this intervention in using an interrupted time series design.From a starting point of near-exclusive post-operative antibiotic use, after policy introduction in February 2011 there was rapid adoption of the use of pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis (60% of operations at 1 week; 98% at 6 weeks and a substantial decrease in the use of post-operative antibiotics (40% of operations at 1 week; 10% at 6 weeks in Clean and Clean-Contaminated surgery. There was no immediate step-change in risk of SSI, but overall, there appeared to be a moderate reduction in the risk of superficial SSI across all levels of wound contamination. There were marked reductions in the costs associated with antibiotic use, the number of intravenous injections performed and nursing time spent administering these.Implementation of a locally developed policy regarding surgical antibiotic prophylaxis is an achievable quality improvement target for hospitals in low-income countries, and can lead to substantial benefits for individual patients and the institution.

  14. Impact of operative indication and surgical complexity on outcomes after thoracic endovascular aortic repair at National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Bryan A; Durham, Christopher A; Parker, Frank M; Bogey, William M; Powell, Charles S; Stoner, Michael C

    2011-12-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) devices are increasingly being utilized to treat aortic pathologies outside of the original Food & Drug Administration (FDA) approval for nonruptured descending thoracic aorta aneurysms (DTAs). The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of patients undergoing TEVAR, elucidating the role of surgical and pathologic variables on morbidity and mortality. National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) data were reviewed for all patients undergoing endovascular thoracic aorta repair from 2005 to 2007. The patients' operative indication and surgical complexity were used to divide them into study and control populations. Comorbid profiles were assessed utilizing a modified Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Thirty-day occurrences of mortality and serious adverse events (SAEs) were used as study endpoints. Univariate and multivariate models were created using demographic and clinical variables to assess for significant differences in endpoints (P ≤ .05). A total of 440 patients undergoing TEVAR were identified. When evaluating patients based on operative indication, the ruptured population had increased mortality and SAE rates compared to the nonruptured DTA population (22.6% vs 6.2%;P < .01 and 35.5% vs 9.1%;P < .01, respectively). Further analysis by surgical complexity revealed increased mortality and SAE rates when comparing the brachiocephalic aortic debranching population to the noncovered left subclavian artery population (23.1% vs 6.5%; P = .02 and 30.8% vs 9.1%; P < .01, respectively). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that operative indication was not a correlate of mortality or SAEs (odds ratio [OR], 0.95; P = .92 and OR, 1.42; P = .39, respectively); however, brachiocephalic aortic debranching exhibited a deleterious effect on mortality (OR, 8.75; P < .01) and SAE rate (OR, 6.67; P = .01). The operative indication for a TEVAR procedure was not found to be a predictor of poor patient outcome

  15. Tailoring the operative approach for appendicitis to the patient: a prediction model from national surgical quality improvement program data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senekjian, Lara; Nirula, Raminder

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) is increasingly being performed in the United States, despite controversy about differences in infectious complication rates compared with open appendectomy (OA). Subpopulations exist in which infectious complication rates, both surgical site and organ space, differ with respect to LA compared with OA. All appendectomies in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database were analyzed with respect to surgical site infection (SSI) and organ space infection (OSI). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified independent predictors of SSI or OSI. Probabilities of SSI or OSI were determined for subpopulations to identify when LA was superior to OA. From 2005 to 2009, there were 61,830 appendectomies performed (77.5% LA), of which 9,998 (16.2%) were complicated (58.7% LA). The risk of SSI was considerably lower for LA in both noncomplicated and complicated appendicitis. Across all ages, body mass index, renal function, and WBCs, LA was associated with a lower probability of SSI. The risk of OSI was considerably greater for LA in both noncomplicated and complicated appendicitis. In complicated appendicitis, OA was associated with a lower probability of OSI in patients with WBC >12 cells × 10(3)/μL. In noncomplicated appendicitis, OA was associated with a lower probability of OSI in patients with a body mass index OSI, however, SSI is consistently lower in LA patients. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. What Metrics Accurately Reflect Surgical Quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Andrew M; Dimick, Justin B

    2018-01-29

    Surgeons are increasingly under pressure to measure and improve their quality. While there is broad consensus that we ought to track surgical quality, there is far less agreement about which metrics matter most. This article reviews the important statistical concepts of case mix and chance as they apply to understanding the observed wide variation in surgical quality. We then discuss the benefits and drawbacks of current measurement strategies through the framework of structure, process, and outcomes approaches. Finally, we describe emerging new metrics, such as video evaluation and network optimization, that are likely to take on an increasingly important role in the future of measuring surgical quality.

  17. Mediation of smoking-associated postoperative mortality by perioperative complications in veterans undergoing elective surgery: data from Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP)?a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Hawn, Mary; Campagna, Elizabeth J; Henderson, William G; Richman, Joshua; Houston, Thomas K

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the mediation of smoking-associated postoperative mortality by postoperative complications. Design Observational cohort study. Setting Using data from the Veterans Affairs (VA) Surgical Quality Improvement Programme, a quality assurance programme for major surgical procedures in the VA healthcare system, we assessed the association of current smoking at the time of the surgery with 6-month and 1-year mortality. Primary and secondary outcome measures Using mediation analyse...

  18. Mixed-Methods Assessment of Trauma and Acute Care Surgical Quality Improvement Programs in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGrone, Lacey N; Fuhs, Amy K; Egoavil, Eduardo Huaman; Rodriguez Castro, Manuel J A; Valderrama, Roberto; Isquith-Dicker, Leah N; Herrera-Matta, Jaime; Mock, Charles N

    2017-04-01

    Evidence for the positive impact of quality improvement (QI) programs on morbidity, mortality, patient satisfaction, and cost is strong. Data regarding the status of QI programs in low- and middle-income countries, as well as in-depth examination of barriers and facilitators to their implementation, are limited. This cross-sectional, descriptive study employed a mixed-methods design, including distribution of an anonymous quantitative survey and individual interviews with healthcare providers who participate in the care of the injured at ten large hospitals in Lima, Peru. Key areas identified for improvement in morbidity and mortality (M&M) conferences were the standardization of case selection, incorporation of evidence from the medical literature into case presentation and discussion, case documentation, and the development of a clear plan for case follow-up. The key barriers to QI program implementation were a lack of prioritization of QI, lack of sufficient human and administrative resources, lack of political support, and lack of education on QI practices. A national program that makes QI a required part of all health providers' professional training and responsibilities would effectively address a majority of identified barriers to QI programs in Peru. Specifically, the presence of basic QI elements, such as M&M conferences, should be required at hospitals that train pre-graduate physicians. Alternatively, short of this national-level organization, efforts that capitalize on local examples through apprenticeships between institutions or integration of QI into continuing medical education would be expected to build on the facilitators for QI programs that exist in Peru.

  19. Loop Ileostomy Closure as an Overnight Procedure: Institutional Comparison With the National Surgical Quality Improvement Project Data Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Nicholas G; Chou, Raymond; Toy, Elliot S; Ludwig, Kirk A; Ridolfi, Timothy J; Peterson, Carrie Y

    2017-08-01

    Enhanced recovery pathways have decreased length of stay after colorectal surgery. Loop ileostomy closure remains a challenge, because patients experience high readmission rates, and validation of enhanced recovery pathways has not been demonstrated. This study examined a protocol whereby patients were discharged on the first postoperative day and instructed to advance their diet at home with close telephone follow-up. The hypothesis was that patients can be safely discharged the day after loop closure, leading to shorter length of stay without increased rates of readmission or complications. Patients undergoing loop ileostomy closure were queried from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project and compared with a single institution (2012-2015). Length of stay, 30-day readmission, and 30-day morbidity data were analyzed. The study was conducted at a tertiary university department. The study includes 1602 patients: 1517 from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database and 85 from a single institution. Length of stay and readmission rates were measured. Median length of stay was less at the single institution compared with control (2 vs 4 d; p < 0.001). Thirty-day readmission (15.3% vs 10.4%; p = 0.15) and overall 30-day complications (15.3% vs 16.7%; p = 0.73) were similar between cohorts. Estimated adjusted length of stay was less in the single institution (2.93 vs 5.58 d; p < 0.0001). There was no difference in the odds of readmission (p = 0.22). The main limitations of this study include its retrospective nature and limitations of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Next-day discharge with protocoled diet advancement and telephone follow-up is acceptable after loop ileostomy closure. Patients can benefit from decreased length of stay without an increase in readmission or complications. This has the potential to change the practice of postoperative management of loop ileostomy closure, as

  20. Can surgical site infections be reduced with the adoption of a bundle of simultaneous initiatives? The use of NSQIP incidence data to follow multiple quality improvement interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozario, Duncan

    2018-02-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are a common complication after surgical procedures. To reduce the incidence of SSIs, Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital decided to institute a bundle of initiatives to change multiple factors simultaneously based on best available evidence and the understanding of infection pathophysiology. We used National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data on the incidence of SSIs in our targeted and essentials, general surgery and orthopedic surgery cases before and after the implementation of an SSI reduction bundle. This article discusses whether the use of intervention bundles may assist in the reduction of a variety of postoperative surgical complications.

  1. Predictors of readmission in nonagenarians: analysis of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hothem, Zachary; Baker, Dustin; Jenkins, Christina S; Douglas, Jason; Callahan, Rose E; Shuell, Catherine C; Long, Graham W; Welsh, Robert J

    2017-06-01

    Increased longevity has led to more nonagenarians undergoing elective surgery. Development of predictive models for hospital readmission may identify patients who benefit from preoperative optimization and postoperative transition of care intervention. Our goal was to identify significant predictors of 30-d readmission in nonagenarians undergoing elective surgery. Nonagenarians undergoing elective surgery from January 2011 to December 2012 were identified using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project participant use data files. This population was randomly divided into a 70% derivation cohort for model development and 30% validation cohort. Using multivariate step-down regression, predictive models were developed for 30-d readmission. Of 7092 nonagenarians undergoing elective surgery, 798 (11.3%) were readmitted within 30 d. Factors significant in univariate analysis were used to develop predictive models for 30-d readmissions. Diabetes (odds ratio [OR]: 1.51, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24-1.84), dialysis dependence (OR: 2.97, CI: 1.77-4.99), functional status (OR: 1.52, CI: 1.29-1.79), American Society of Anesthesiologists class II or higher (American Society of Anesthesiologist physical status classification system; OR: 1.80, CI: 1.42-2.28), operative time (OR: 1.05, CI: 1.02-1.08), myocardial infarction (OR: 5.17, CI: 3.38-7.90), organ space surgical site infection (OR: 8.63, CI: 4.04-18.4), wound disruption (OR: 14.3, CI: 4.80-42.9), pneumonia (OR: 8.59, CI: 6.17-12.0), urinary tract infection (OR: 3.88, CI: 3.02-4.99), stroke (OR: 6.37, CI: 3.47-11.7), deep venous thrombosis (OR: 5.96, CI: 3.70-9.60), pulmonary embolism (OR: 20.3, CI: 9.7-42.5), and sepsis (OR: 13.1, CI: 8.57-20.1), septic shock (OR: 43.8, CI: 18.2-105.0), were included in the final model. This model had a c-statistic of 0.73, indicating a fair association of predicted probabilities with observed outcomes. However, when applied to the validation

  2. Early Surgical Site Infection Following Tissue Expander Breast Reconstruction with or without Acellular Dermal Matrix: National Benchmarking Using National Surgical Quality Improvement Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Winocour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSurgical site infections (SSIs result in significant patient morbidity following immediate tissue expander breast reconstruction (ITEBR. This study determined a single institution's 30-day SSI rate and benchmarked it against that among national institutions participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP.MethodsWomen who underwent ITEBR with/without acellular dermal matrix (ADM were identified using the ACS-NSQIP database between 2005 and 2011. Patient characteristics associated with the 30-day SSI rate were determined, and differences in rates between our institution and the national database were assessed.Results12,163 patients underwent ITEBR, including 263 at our institution. SSIs occurred in 416 (3.4% patients nationwide excluding our institution, with lower rates observed at our institution (1.9%. Nationwide, SSIs were significantly more common in ITEBR patients with ADM (4.5% compared to non-ADM patients (3.2%, P=0.005, and this trend was observed at our institution (2.1% vs. 1.6%, P=1.00. A multivariable analysis of all institutions identified age ≥50 years (odds ratio [OR], 1.4; confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.7, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 vs. 4.25 hours (OR, 1.9; CI, 1.5-2.4 as risk factors for SSIs. Our institutional SSI rate was lower than the nationwide rate (OR, 0.4; CI, 0.2-1.1, although this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.07.ConclusionsThe 30-day SSI rate at our institution in patients who underwent ITEBR was lower than the nation. SSIs occurred more frequently in procedures involving ADM both nationally and at our institution.

  3. Wound healing in plastic surgery: does age matter? An American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanos, Efstathios; Osgood, Geoff; Siddiqui, Aamir; Rubinfeld, Ilan

    2015-03-01

    Increasing age has traditionally been associated with impairment in wound healing after operative interventions. This is based mostly on hearsay and anecdotal information. This idea fits with the authors’ understanding of biology in older organisms. This dictum has not been rigorously tested in clinical practice. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was retrospectively queried for all patients undergoing plastic surgery from 2005 to 2010. Variables extracted included basic demographics, comorbidities, previous steroid and tobacco use, wound classification at the end of the surgery, and development of postoperative surgical-site infections. Multivariate analyses were used to investigate the impact of aging in wound dehiscence. A total of 25,967 patients were identified. Overall, the incidence of wound dehiscence was 0.75 percent (n = 196). When patients younger than 30 years were compared to older patient groups, no difference in the probability of developing wound dehiscence was noted. Specifically, the groups of patients aged 61 to 70 years and older than 70 years did not have statistically significant wound healing deficiencies [adjusted OR, 0.63 (95 percent CI, 0.11 to 3.63), adjusted p = 0.609; 2.79 (0.55 to 14.18), adjusted p = 0.217, for 61 to 70 years and older than 70 years, respectively]. Factors independently associated with wound dehiscence included postoperative abscess development, paraplegia, quadriplegia, steroid and tobacco use, deep surgical-site infection development, increasing body mass index, and wound classification at the end of surgery. In patients undergoing plastic surgery, wound dehiscence is a rare complication (0.75 percent). Aging is not associated with an increased incidence of wound dehiscence. Risk, III.

  4. Improving quality of breast cancer surgery through development of a national breast cancer surgical outcomes (BRCASO research database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiello Bowles Erin J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common measures of surgical quality are 30-day morbidity and mortality, which poorly describe breast cancer surgical quality with extremely low morbidity and mortality rates. Several national quality programs have collected additional surgical quality measures; however, program participation is voluntary and results may not be generalizable to all surgeons. We developed the Breast Cancer Surgical Outcomes (BRCASO database to capture meaningful breast cancer surgical quality measures among a non-voluntary sample, and study variation in these measures across providers, facilities, and health plans. This paper describes our study protocol, data collection methods, and summarizes the strengths and limitations of these data. Methods We included 4524 women ≥18 years diagnosed with breast cancer between 2003-2008. All women with initial breast cancer surgery performed by a surgeon employed at the University of Vermont or three Cancer Research Network (CRN health plans were eligible for inclusion. From the CRN institutions, we collected electronic administrative data including tumor registry information, Current Procedure Terminology codes for breast cancer surgeries, surgeons, surgical facilities, and patient demographics. We supplemented electronic data with medical record abstraction to collect additional pathology and surgery detail. All data were manually abstracted at the University of Vermont. Results The CRN institutions pre-filled 30% (22 out of 72 of elements using electronic data. The remaining elements, including detailed pathology margin status and breast and lymph node surgeries, required chart abstraction. The mean age was 61 years (range 20-98 years; 70% of women were diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma, 20% with ductal carcinoma in situ, and 10% with invasive lobular carcinoma. Conclusions The BRCASO database is one of the largest, multi-site research resources of meaningful breast cancer surgical quality data

  5. Perioperative Morbidity of Open Versus Minimally Invasive Partial Nephrectomy: A Contemporary Analysis of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jorge; Renzulli, Joseph; Pareek, Gyan; Moreira, Daniel; Guo, Ruiting; Zhang, Zheng; Amin, Ali; Mega, Anthony; Golijanin, Dragan; Gershman, Boris

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, there has been a shift to minimally invasive partial nephrectomy (MIPN) with the dissemination of robot-assisted technology. However, contemporary data on the comparative morbidity of open partial nephrectomy (OPN) and MIPN are lacking. We, therefore, evaluated the perioperative morbidity of OPN and MIPN using a contemporary national cohort. We identified 13,658 patients aged 18 to 89 who underwent PN from 2010 to 2015 in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database, of whom 9018 (66.0%) underwent MIPN. The associations of MIPN with 30-day morbidity were evaluated using logistic regression, adjusted for patient features. Median age at surgery was 60 (interquartile range [IQR] 51, 68) years. Overall, 30-day complications occurred in 6.7% of patients. Compared with OPN, MIPN was associated with lower rates of 30-day complications (4.9% vs 10.1%, p contemporary national cohort, MIPN was independently associated with reduced rates of 30-day complications, perioperative blood transfusion, prolonged hospitalization, hospital readmission, and reoperation, compared with OPN.

  6. Development and Validation of a Methodology to Reduce Mortality Using the Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program Risk Calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Deborah S; Kroll, Donald; Papaconstantinou, Harry T; Ellis, C Neal

    2017-04-01

    To identify patients with a high risk of 30-day mortality after elective surgery, who may benefit from referral for tertiary care, an institution-specific process using the Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP) Risk Calculator was developed. The goal was to develop and validate the methodology. Our hypothesis was that the process could optimize referrals and reduce mortality. A VASQIP risk score was calculated for all patients undergoing elective noncardiac surgery at a single Veterans Affairs (VA) facility. After statistical analysis, a VASQIP risk score of 3.3% predicted mortality was selected as the institutional threshold for referral to a tertiary care center. The model predicted that 16% of patients would require referral, and 30-day mortality would be reduced by 73% at the referring institution. The main outcomes measures were the actual vs predicted referrals and mortality rates at the referring and receiving facilities. The validation included 565 patients; 90 (16%) had VASQIP risk scores greater than 3.3% and were identified for referral; 60 consented. In these patients, there were 16 (27%) predicted mortalities, but only 4 actual deaths (p = 0.007) at the receiving institution. When referral was not indicated, the model predicted 4 mortalities (1%), but no actual deaths (p = 0.1241). These data validate this methodology to identify patients for referral to a higher level of care, reducing mortality at the referring institutions and significantly improving patient outcomes. This methodology can help guide decisions on referrals and optimize patient care. Further application and studies are warranted. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  7. Collaborative quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckenbaugh, Amy N; Miller, David C; Ghani, Khurshid R

    2017-07-01

    Quality improvement collaboratives were developed in many medical and surgical disciplines with the goal of measuring and improving the quality of care provided to patients. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of surgical quality improvement collaboratives, and in particular those aimed at improving urological care. Quality improvement collaboratives collect high-quality data using standardized methodologies, and use the data to provide feedback to physicians and practices, and then implement processes to improve patient outcomes. The largest regional collaborative in urology is the Michigan Urological Surgery Improvement Collaborative (MUSIC). Recent efforts by this group have been focused at understanding variation in care, improving patient selection for treatment, reducing treatment morbidity and measuring and optimizing technical skill. The American Urological Association has also recently launched a national quality registry (AQUA), with an initial focus on prostate cancer care. By understanding factors that result in exemplary performance, quality improvement collaboratives are able to develop best practices around areas of care with high variation that have the potential to improve outcomes and reduce costs. These developments have been made possible by the unique model offered by the collaborative structure with the goal of improving patient care at a population level.

  8. Using the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist to Direct Perioperative Quality Improvement at a Surgical Hospital in Cambodia: The Importance of Objective Confirmation of Process Completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Naomi Y; Kheng, Sokhavatey; De Leon, Michael; Eap, Hourt; Forrester, Jared A; Hay, Janice; Oum, Palritha; Sam Ath, Socheat; Stock, Simon; Yem, Samprathna; Lucas, Gerlinda; Weiser, Thomas G

    2017-12-01

    The WHO surgical safety checklist (SSC) is known to prevent postoperative complications; however, strategies for effective implementation are unclear. In addition to cultural and organizational barriers faced by high-income countries, resource-constrained settings face scarcity of durable and consumable goods. We used the SSC to better understand barriers to improvement at a trauma hospital in Battambang, Cambodia. We introduced the SSC and trained data collectors to observe surgical staff performing the checklist. Members of the research team observed cases and data collection. After 3 months, we modified the data collection tool to focus on infection prevention and elicit more accurate responses. Over 16 months we recorded data on 695 operations (304 cases using the first tool and 391 cases with the modified tool). The first tool identified five items as being in high compliance, which were then excluded from further assessment. Two items-instrument sterility confirmation and sponge counting-were identified as being misinterpreted by the data collectors' tool. These items were reworded to capture objective assessment of task completion. Confirmation of instrument sterility was initially never performed but rectified to >95% compliance; sponge counting and prophylactic antibiotic administration were consistently underperformed. Staff complied with communication elements of the SSC and quickly adopted process improvements. The wording of our data collection tool affected interpretation of compliance with standards. Material resources are not the primary barrier to checklist implementation in this setting, and future work should focus on clarification of protocols and objective confirmation of tasks.

  9. Antibiotic stewardship in the newborn surgical patient: A quality improvement project in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sarah; Datta, Ankur; Massoumi, Roxanne L; Gross, Erica R; Uhing, Michael; Arca, Marjorie J

    2017-12-01

    There is significant diversity in the utilization of antibiotics for neonates undergoing surgical procedures. Our institution standardized antibiotic administration for surgical neonates, in which no empiric antibiotics were given to infants with surgical conditions postnatally, and antibiotics are given no more than 72 hours perioperatively. We compared the time periods before and after implementation of antibiotic protocol in an institution review board-approved, retrospective review of neonates with congenital surgical conditions who underwent surgical correction within 30 days after birth. Surgical site infection at 30 days was the primary outcome, and development of hospital-acquired infections or multidrug-resistant organism were secondary outcomes. One hundred forty-eight infants underwent surgical procedures pre-protocol, and 127 underwent procedures post-protocol implementation. Surgical site infection rates were similar pre- and post-protocol, 14% and 9% respectively, (P = .21.) The incidence of hospital-acquired infections (13.7% vs 8.7%, P = .205) and multidrug-resistant organism (4.7% vs 1.6%, P = .143) was similar between the 2 periods. Elimination of empiric postnatal antibiotics did not statistically change rates of surgical site infection, hospital-acquired infections, or multidrug-resistant organisms. Limiting the duration of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis to no more than 72 hours after surgery did not increase the rate of surgical site infection, hospital-acquired infections, or multidrug-resistant organism. Median antibiotic days were decreased with antibiotic standardization for surgical neonates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Leveraging electronic medical record (EMR) systems along with other health information systems (HIS) to improve data capture and reporting for a surgical quality improvement program at a tertiary care institution and integrated health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Stephen P; Oppedisano, Rocky; Breudigam, Marilyn

    2007-10-11

    Many EMR systems are focused on documentation but are not designed for discrete clinical data capture for outcomes and quality measurement. This requires new clinical workflow and methods to capture patient specific data as part of usual care, without negative impact on productivity. We describe a process to harness tools within a commercially available EMR, together with other electronic data sources to improve the accuracy and efficiency and scalability of a surgical quality reporting program.

  11. The effect of a Lean quality improvement implementation program on surgical pathology specimen accessioning and gross preparation error frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Maxwell L; Wilkerson, Trent; Grzybicki, Dana M; Raab, Stephen S

    2012-09-01

    Few reports have documented the effectiveness of Lean quality improvement in changing anatomic pathology patient safety. We used Lean methods of education; hoshin kanri goal setting and culture change; kaizen events; observation of work activities, hand-offs, and pathways; A3-problem solving, metric development, and measurement; and frontline work redesign in the accessioning and gross examination areas of an anatomic pathology laboratory. We compared the pre- and post-Lean implementation proportion of near-miss events and changes made in specific work processes. In the implementation phase, we documented 29 individual A3-root cause analyses. The pre- and postimplementation proportions of process- and operator-dependent near-miss events were 5.5 and 1.8 (P < .002) and 0.6 and 0.6, respectively. We conclude that through culture change and implementation of specific work process changes, Lean implementation may improve pathology patient safety.

  12. Transperitoneal versus retroperitoneal approach for open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in the targeted vascular National Surgical Quality Improvement Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck, Dominique B.; Ultee, Klaas H J; Zettervall, Sara L.; Soden, Pete A.; Darling, Jeremy; Wyers, Mark; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    Objective: We sought to compare current practices in patient selection and 30-day outcomes for transperitoneal and retroperitoneal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repairs. Methods: All patients undergoing elective transperitoneal or retroperitoneal surgical repair for AAA between January 2011 and

  13. Validation of Surgical Intensive Care-Infection Registry: a medical informatics system for intensive care unit research, quality of care improvement, and daily patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golob, Joseph F; Fadlalla, Adam M A; Kan, Justin A; Patel, Nilam P; Yowler, Charles J; Claridge, Jeffrey A

    2008-08-01

    We developed a prototype electronic clinical information system called the Surgical Intensive Care-Infection Registry (SIC-IR) to prospectively study infectious complications and monitor quality of care improvement programs in the surgical and trauma intensive care unit. The objective of this study was to validate SIC-IR as a successful health information technology with an accurate clinical data repository. Using the DeLone and McLean Model of Information Systems Success as a framework, we evaluated SIC-IR in a 3-month prospective crossover study of physician use in one of our two surgical and trauma intensive care units (SIC-IR unit versus non SIC-IR unit). Three simultaneous research methodologies were used: a user survey study, a pair of time-motion studies, and an accuracy study of SIC-IR's clinical data repository. The SIC-IR user survey results were positive for system reliability, graphic user interface, efficiency, and overall benefit to patient care. There was a significant decrease in prerounding time of nearly 4 minutes per patient on the SIC-IR unit compared with the non SIC-IR unit. The SIC-IR documentation and data archiving was accurate 74% to 100% of the time depending on the data entry method used. This accuracy was significantly improved compared with normal hand-written documentation on the non SIC-IR unit. SIC-IR proved to be a useful application both at individual user and organizational levels and will serve as an accurate tool to conduct prospective research and monitor quality of care improvement programs.

  14. Deep Neuromuscular Blockade Improves Laparoscopic Surgical Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Herring, W Joseph; Blobner, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sustained deep neuromuscular blockade (NMB) during laparoscopic surgery may facilitate optimal surgical conditions. This exploratory study assessed whether deep NMB improves surgical conditions and, in doing so, allows use of lower insufflation pressures during laparoscopic cholecys...

  15. Peer-to-peer nursing rounds and hospital-acquired pressure ulcer prevalence in a surgical intensive care unit: a quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Alyson Dare; Moorer, Amanda; Makic, MaryBeth Flynn

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a quality improvement project in order to evaluate the effect of nurse-to-nurse bedside "rounding" as a strategy to decrease hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) in a surgical intensive care unit. We instituted weekly peer-to-peer bedside skin rounds in a 17-bed surgical intensive care unit. Two nurses were identified as skin champions and trained by the hospital's certified WOC nurse to conduct skin rounds. The skin champion nurses conducted weekly peer-to-peer rounds that included discussions about key elements of our patients' skin status including current Braden Scale for Pressure Sore Risk score, and implementation of specific interventions related to subscale risk assessment. If a pressure ulcer was present, the current action plan was reevaluated for effectiveness. Quarterly HAPU prevalence studies were conducted from January 2008 to December 2010. Nineteen patients experienced a HAPU: 17 were located on the coccyx and 2 on the heel. Ten ulcers were classified as stage II, 3 PU were stage IV, 5 were deemed unstageable, and 1 was classified as a deep tissue injury. The frequency of preventive interventions rose during our quality improvement project. Specifically, the use of prevention surfaces increased 92%, repositioning increased 30%, nutrition interventions increased 77%, and moisture management increased 100%. Prior to focused nursing rounds, the highest HAPU prevalence rate was 27%. After implementing focused nursing rounds, HAPU rates trended down and were 0% for 3 consecutive quarters.

  16. Deep Neuromuscular Blockade Improves Laparoscopic Surgical Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Herring, W Joseph; Blobner, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sustained deep neuromuscular blockade (NMB) during laparoscopic surgery may facilitate optimal surgical conditions. This exploratory study assessed whether deep NMB improves surgical conditions and, in doing so, allows use of lower insufflation pressures during laparoscopic cholecys......INTRODUCTION: Sustained deep neuromuscular blockade (NMB) during laparoscopic surgery may facilitate optimal surgical conditions. This exploratory study assessed whether deep NMB improves surgical conditions and, in doing so, allows use of lower insufflation pressures during laparoscopic...

  17. “The National Surgery Quality Improvement Project” (NSQIP): a new tool to increase patient safety and cost efficiency in a surgical intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The “National Surgical Quality Improvement Program” (NSQIP) is a nationally validated, risk-adjusted database tracking surgical outcomes. NSQIP has been demonstrated to decrease complications, expenses, and mortality. In the study institution, a high rate of nosocomial pneumonia (PNEU) and prolonged ventilator days ≥48 hours (V48) was observed on the surgical service. Methods The hospital studied is a 500 bed university-affiliated teaching hospital performing approximately 20,000 surgical operations per year. A multidisciplinary team was formed and a series of interventions were implemented to address high pneumonia rates and prolonged intubation. Specific interventions included enforcement of protocols and adherence to the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) ventilator bundles, including head of bed elevation, sedation holidays, extubate when ready, and early nutrition. NSQIP collected pre-operative through 30-day postoperative data prospectively on 1,081 surgical patients in the intensive care unit from January 1, 2010 – July 31, 2012. The variables pneumonia and V48 undergo logistic regression and risk adjusted results of observed versus expected are calculated. Mean and confidence intervals are represented in caterpillar charts and bar graphs. Statistical analysis was via Fisher exact t-test. Results Progressive improvements were observed over a two-year period via three semiannual reports (SAR). Corrective measures showed a decrease in V48 with an observed to expected odds ratio (O: E) improving from 1.5 to 1.04, or 1.9% ( 7/368 patients) July 31, 2011 to 1.11% (12/1080 patients) July 31, 2012 respectively. Similarly, pneumonia rates decreased 1.36% (5/368 patients) July 31, 2011 to 1.2% ( 13/1081 patients) July 31, 2012 with O: E = 1.4 and 1.25 respectively. Statistical significance was achieved (p < .05). Conclusion Given an estimated annual volume of 20,000 cases per year with a cost of $22,097 per episode of pneumonia and

  18. "The National Surgery Quality Improvement Project" (NSQIP): a new tool to increase patient safety and cost efficiency in a surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNelis, John; Castaldi, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The "National Surgical Quality Improvement Program" (NSQIP) is a nationally validated, risk-adjusted database tracking surgical outcomes. NSQIP has been demonstrated to decrease complications, expenses, and mortality. In the study institution, a high rate of nosocomial pneumonia (PNEU) and prolonged ventilator days ≥48 hours (V48) was observed on the surgical service. The hospital studied is a 500 bed university-affiliated teaching hospital performing approximately 20,000 surgical operations per year. A multidisciplinary team was formed and a series of interventions were implemented to address high pneumonia rates and prolonged intubation. Specific interventions included enforcement of protocols and adherence to the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) ventilator bundles, including head of bed elevation, sedation holidays, extubate when ready, and early nutrition. NSQIP collected pre-operative through 30-day postoperative data prospectively on 1,081 surgical patients in the intensive care unit from January 1, 2010 - July 31, 2012. The variables pneumonia and V48 undergo logistic regression and risk adjusted results of observed versus expected are calculated. Mean and confidence intervals are represented in caterpillar charts and bar graphs. Statistical analysis was via Fisher exact t-test. Progressive improvements were observed over a two-year period via three semiannual reports (SAR). Corrective measures showed a decrease in V48 with an observed to expected odds ratio (O: E) improving from 1.5 to 1.04, or 1.9% ( 7/368 patients) July 31, 2011 to 1.11% (12/1080 patients) July 31, 2012 respectively. Similarly, pneumonia rates decreased 1.36% (5/368 patients) July 31, 2011 to 1.2% ( 13/1081 patients) July 31, 2012 with O: E = 1.4 and 1.25 respectively. Statistical significance was achieved (p < .05). Given an estimated annual volume of 20,000 cases per year with a cost of $22,097 per episode of pneumonia and $27,654 per episode of prolonged intubation

  19. Outcomes and palliative care utilization in patients with dementia and acute abdominal emergency: opportunities for surgical quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Ana; Hwang, Franchesca; Singh, Ranbir; Pentakota, Sri Ram; Singh, Roshansa; Chernock, Brad; Mosenthal, Anne C

    2018-02-01

    When patients with dementia develop acute surgical abdomen, patients, surrogates, and surgeons need accurate prognostic information to facilitate goal-concordant decision making. Palliative care can assist with communication, symptom management, and family and caregiver support in this population. We aimed to characterize outcomes and patterns of palliative care utilization among patients with dementia, presenting with abdominal surgical emergency. We retrospectively queried the National Inpatient Sample for patients aged >50 years with dementia and acute abdominal emergency who were admitted nonelectively 2009-2013, utilizing ICD-9-CM codes for dementia and surgical indication. We characterized outcomes and identified predictors of palliative care utilization. Among 15,209 patients, in-hospital mortality was 10.2%, the nonroutine discharge rate was 67.2%, and 7.5% received palliative care. Patients treated operatively were less likely to receive palliative care than those who did not undergo operation (adjusted OR = 0.50; 95% CI 0.41-0.62). Only 6.4% of patients discharged nonroutinely received palliative care. Patients with dementia and acute abdominal emergency have considerable in-hospital mortality, a high frequency of nonroutine discharge, and low palliative care utilization. In this group, we discovered a large gap in palliative care utilization, particularly among those treated operatively and those who are discharged nonroutinely. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Trainee participation is associated with adverse outcomes in emergency general surgery: an analysis of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasotakis, George; Lakha, Aliya; Sarkar, Beda; Kunitake, Hiroko; Kissane-Lee, Nicole; Dechert, Tracey; McAneny, David; Burke, Peter; Doherty, Gerard

    2014-09-01

    To identify whether resident involvement affects clinically relevant outcomes in emergency general surgery. Previous research has demonstrated a significant impact of trainee participation on outcomes in a broad surgical patient population. We identified 141,010 patients who underwent emergency general surgery procedures in the 2005-2010 Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Because of the nonrandom assignment of complex cases to resident participation, patients were matched (1:1) on known risk factors [age, sex, inpatient status, preexisting comorbidities (obesity, diabetes, smoking, alcohol, steroid use, coronary artery disease, chronic renal failure, pulmonary disease)] and preoperatively calculated probability for morbidity and mortality. Clinically relevant outcomes were compared with a t or χ test. The impact of resident participation on outcomes was assessed with multivariable regression modeling, adjusting for risk factors and operative time. The most common procedures in the matched cohort (n = 83,790) were appendectomy (39.9%), exploratory laparotomy (8.8%), and adhesiolysis (6.6%). Trainee participation is independently associated with intra- and postoperative events, wound, pulmonary, and venous thromboembolic complications, and urinary tract infections. Trainee participation is associated with adverse outcomes in emergency general surgery procedures.

  1. Incidence of Acute Complications Following Surgery for Syndactyly and Polydactyly: An Analysis of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database from 2012 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, Thomas J; Hawkins, Jessica E; Ladd, Amy L

    2017-09-01

    Congenital hand differences are infrequent phenomena, and their treatment represents a relatively small fraction of cases performed by hand surgeons. Little is known about the incidence of wound complications and acute postoperative problems given the relative rarity of these procedures. This study sought to characterize the incidence of complications within 30 days of surgery for congenital hand differences. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) contains prospective data regarding 30-day morbidity from 64 pediatric centers across the United States. Data from all available years (2012-2014) were queried for Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes pertinent to the treatment of congenital hand differences. Bivariate statistics, Fisher exact tests and Poisson 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were used to assess the incidence of complications and examine risk factors for these outcomes. We identified a total of 1,656 congenital hand cases that represented 4 different CPT codes, including surgery for simple syndactyly, complex syndactyly, and polydactyly. The overall incidence of complications was 2.2% (95% CI, 1.6%-3.1%; n = 37) with the most common complication being superficial surgical site infection (1.7%; 95% CI, 1.1%-2.4%) followed by related readmission (0.3%; 95% CI, 0.1%-0.7%). There was a higher incidence of complications observed in patients undergoing complex syndactyly repair (5.2% for complex syndactyly repair vs 2.3% for all others). The rate of acute complications following procedures to correct syndactyly and polydactyly is low, the most common of which is superficial surgical site infection. The incidence of acute complications may be helpful in counseling patients and families. We suggest that further research must prioritize collecting data on long-term functional outcomes. Therapeutic II. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Safer Delivery of Surgical Services Program (S3): Explaining Its Differential Effectiveness and Exploring Implications for Improving Quality in Complex Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Lorna C; McCulloch, Peter G; Morgan, Lauren J; Robertson, Eleanor R; New, Steve J; Stedman, Francesca E; Martin, Graham P

    2016-12-01

    To analyze the challenges encountered during surgical quality improvement interventions, and explain the relative success of different intervention strategies. Understanding why and how interventions work is vital for developing improvement science. The S3 Program of studies tested whether combining interventions addressing culture and system was more likely to result in improvement than either approach alone. Quantitative results supported this theory. This qualitative study investigates why this happened, what aspects of the interventions and their implementation most affected improvement, and the implications for similar programs. Semistructured interviews were conducted with hospital staff (23) and research team members (11) involved in S3 studies. Analysis was based on the constant comparative method, with coding conducted concurrently with data collection. Themes were identified and developed in relation to the program theory behind S3. The superior performance of combined intervention over single intervention arms appeared related to greater awareness and ability to act, supporting the S3 hypothesis. However, we also noted unforeseen differences in implementation that seemed to amplify this difference. The greater ambition and more sophisticated approach in combined intervention arms resulted in requests for more intensive expert support, which seemed crucial in their success. The contextual challenges encountered have potential implications for the replicability and sustainability of the approach. Our findings support the S3 hypothesis, triangulating with quantitative results and providing an explanatory account of the causal relationship between interventions and outcomes. They also highlight the importance of implementation strategies, and of factors outside the control of program designers.

  3. Can the quality of colonic surgery be improved by standardisation of surgical technique with complete mesorectal excision?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Claus Anders; Bols, Birgitte; Ingeholm, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Aim:  we analysed the influence of standardisation of colon cancer surgery with complete mesocolic excision (CME) on the quality of surgery measured by the pathological endpoints of number of harvested lymph nodes, high tie of supplying vessels, plane of mesocolic resection and rate of R0 resection...

  4. Patient satisfaction and quality of surgical care in US hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Thomas C; Orav, E John; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between patient satisfaction and surgical quality is unclear for US hospitals. Using national data, we examined if hospitals with high patient satisfaction have lower levels of performance on accepted measures of the quality and efficiency of surgical care. Federal policymakers have made patient satisfaction a core measure for the way hospitals are evaluated and paid through the value-based purchasing program. There is broad concern that performance on patient satisfaction may have little or even a negative correlation with the quality of surgical care, leading to potential trade-offs in efforts to improve patient experience with other surgical quality measures. We used the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey data from 2010 and 2011 to assess performance on patient experience. We used national Medicare data on 6 common surgical procedures to calculate measures of surgical efficiency and quality: risk-adjusted length of stay, process score, risk-adjusted mortality rate, risk-adjusted readmission rate, and a composite z score across all 4 metrics. Multivariate models adjusting for hospital characteristics were used to assess the independent relationships between patient satisfaction and measures of surgical efficiency and quality. Of the 2953 US hospitals that perform one of these 6 procedures, the median patient satisfaction score was 69.5% (interquartile range, 63%-75.5%). Length of stay was shorter in hospitals with the highest levels of patient satisfaction (7.1 days vs 7.7 days, P patient satisfaction had the higher process of care performance (96.5 vs 95.5, P patient satisfaction also had a higher composite score for quality across all measures (P patient satisfaction provided more efficient care and were associated with higher surgical quality. Our findings suggest there need not be a trade-off between good quality of care for surgical patients and ensuring a positive patient experience.

  5. Development and Validation of a Risk Calculator for Renal Complications after Colorectal Surgery Using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Participant Use Files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramonell, Kimberly M; Fang, Shuyang; Perez, Sebastian D; Srinivasan, Jahnavi K; Sullivan, Patrick S; Galloway, John R; Staley, Charles A; Lin, Edward; Sharma, Jyotirmay; Sweeney, John F; Shaffer, Virginia O

    2016-12-01

    Postoperative acute renal failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in colon and rectal surgery. Our objective was to identify preoperative risk factors that predispose patients to postoperative renal failure and renal insufficiency, and subsequently develop a risk calculator. Using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Participant Use Files database, all patients who underwent colorectal surgery in 2009 were selected (n = 21,720). We identified renal complications during the 30-day period after surgery. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, a predictive model was developed. The overall incidence of renal complications among colorectal surgery patients was 1.6 per cent. Significant predictors include male gender (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.8), dependent functional status (OR: 1.5), preoperative dyspnea (OR: 1.5), hypertension (OR: 1.6), preoperative acute renal failure (OR: 2.0), American Society of Anesthesiologists class ≥3 (OR: 2.2), preoperative creatinine >1.2 mg/dL (OR: 2.8), albumin discrimination (area under the curve: 0.76). Using this model, a risk calculator was developed with excellent predictive ability for postoperative renal complications in colorectal patients and can be used to aid clinical decision-making, patient counseling, and further research on measures to improve patient care.

  6. Lung resection is safe and feasible among stage IV cancer patients: An American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateni, Sarah B; David, Elizabeth A; Bold, Richard J; Cooke, David T; Meyers, Frederick J; Canter, Robert J

    2017-05-01

    Operative resection can be associated with improved survival for selected patients with stage IV malignancies but may also be associated with prohibitive acute morbidity and mortality. We sought to evaluate rates of acute morbidity and mortality after lung resection in patients with disseminated malignancy with primary lung cancer and non-lung cancer pulmonary metastatic disease. For 2011-2012, 6,360 patients were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program undergoing lung resections, including 603 patients with disseminated malignancy. Logistic regression analyses were used to compare outcomes between patients with and without disseminated malignancy. After controlling for preoperative and intraoperative differences, we observed no statistically significant differences in rates of 30-day overall and serious morbidity or mortality between disseminated malignancy and non-disseminated malignancy patients (P > .05). Disseminated malignancy patients were less likely to have a prolonged duration of stay and be discharged to a facility compared to non-disseminated malignancy patients (P < .05). Subgroup analyses by procedure type and diagnosis showed similar results. Disseminated malignancy patients undergoing lung resections experienced low rates of overall morbidity, serious morbidity, and mortality comparable to non-disseminated malignancy patients. These data suggest that lung resections may be performed safely on carefully selected, disseminated malignancy patients with both primary lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic disease, with important implications for multimodality care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Successful implementation of the Department of Veterans Affairs' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program in the private sector: the Patient Safety in Surgery study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuri, Shukri F; Henderson, William G; Daley, Jennifer; Jonasson, Olga; Jones, R Scott; Campbell, Darrell A; Fink, Aaron S; Mentzer, Robert M; Neumayer, Leigh; Hammermeister, Karl; Mosca, Cecilia; Healey, Nancy

    2008-08-01

    The Veterans Affairs' (VA) National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) has been associated with significant reductions in postoperative morbidity and mortality. We sought to determine if NSQIP methods and risk models were applicable to private sector (PS) hospitals and if implementation of the NSQIP in the PS would be associated with reductions in adverse postoperative outcomes. Data from patients (n = 184,843) undergoing major general or vascular surgery between October 1, 2001, and September 30, 2004, in 128 VA hospitals and 14 academic PS hospitals were used to develop prediction models based on VA patients only, PS patients only, and VA plus PS patients using logistic regression modeling, with measures of patient-related risk as the independent variables and 30-day postoperative morbidity or mortality as the dependent variable. Nine of the top 10 predictors of postoperative mortality and 7 of the top 10 for postoperative morbidity were the same in the VA and PS models. The ratios of observed to expected mortality and morbidity in the PS hospitals based on a model using PS data only versus VA + PS data were nearly identical (correlation coefficient = 0.98). Outlier status of PS hospitals was concordant in 26 of 28 comparisons. Implementation of the NSQIP in PS hospitals was associated with statistically significant reductions in overall postoperative morbidity (8.7%, P = 0.002), surgical site infections (9.1%, P = 0.02), and renal complications (23.7%, P = 0.004). The VA NSQIP methods and risk models in general and vascular surgery were fully applicable to PS hospitals. Thirty-day postoperative morbidity in PS hospitals was reduced with the implementation of the NSQIP.

  8. Predicting 30-day postoperative mortality for emergent anterior abdominal wall hernia repairs using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, P J; Lee, J S; Tam, S; Schwartzman, A; Bernstein, M O; Dresner, L; Alfonso, A; Sugiyama, G

    2017-06-01

    Anterior abdominal wall hernias are among the most commonly encountered surgical disease. We sought to identify risk factors that are associated with 30-day postoperative mortality following emergent abdominal wall hernia repair using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) database. A retrospective analysis of data from the ACS NSQIP from 2005 to 2010 was performed. Patients were selected using Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and International Classification of Disease 9 Clinical Modification (ICD9) codes for the repair of inguinal, femoral, umbilical, epigastric, ventral, or incisional hernias that were incarcerated, obstructed, strangulated, or gangrenous. Only emergent cases occurring within two days of admission and admitted as inpatients were included. Univariate and multivariable analysis was performed. A risk score was also created. There were 4298 cases of emergent anterior abdominal wall hernia surgery. The most common was inguinal (25.3 %), followed by incisional (23.8 %), umbilical (23.5 %), ventral (12.1 %), femoral (8.8 %), and epigastric (6.5 %) hernias. Multivariable analysis demonstrated six statistically significant predictors of short-term mortality, including history of congestive heart failure (CHF) [odds ratio (OR) 8.24, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 4.05-16.75), age (OR 5.52, 95 % CI 3.48-8.77), history of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) (OR 4.98, 95 % CI 2.08-11.92), presence of ascites (OR 3.16, 95 % CI 1.64-6.08), preoperative blood urea nitrogen (OR 1.35, 95 % CI 1.22-1.49), and preoperative white blood cell count (OR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.02-1.45). The C-statistic for the risk model was 0.858. We present a large study on short-term mortality following emergent anterior abdominal wall hernia repairs based on the ACS NSQIP with a derived risk model that demonstrates excellent discriminative ability.

  9. Missing data may lead to changes in hip fracture database studies: a study of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basques, B A; McLynn, R P; Lukasiewicz, A M; Samuel, A M; Bohl, D D; Grauer, J N

    2018-02-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize the frequency of missing data in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database and to determine how missing data can influence the results of studies dealing with elderly patients with a fracture of the hip. Patients who underwent surgery for a fracture of the hip between 2005 and 2013 were identified from the NSQIP database and the percentage of missing data was noted for demographics, comorbidities and laboratory values. These variables were tested for association with 'any adverse event' using multivariate regressions based on common ways of handling missing data. A total of 26 066 patients were identified. The rate of missing data was up to 77.9% for many variables. Multivariate regressions comparing three methods of handling missing data found different risk factors for postoperative adverse events. Only seven of 35 identified risk factors (20%) were common to all three analyses. Missing data is an important issue in national database studies that researchers must consider when evaluating such investigations. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:226-32. ©2018 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  10. The role of body mass index class in cholecystectomy after acute cholecystitis: An American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neylan, Christopher J; Damrauer, Scott M; Kelz, Rachel R; Farrar, John T; Dempsey, Daniel T; Lee, Major K; Karakousis, Giorgos C; Tewksbury, Colleen M; Pickett-Blakely, Octavia E; Williams, Noel N; Dumon, Kristoffel R

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for cholelithiasis leading to acute cholecystitis which is treated with cholecystectomy. The purpose of this study was to analyze the associations between body mass index class and the intended operative approach (laparoscopic versus open) for and outcomes of cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data from 2008-2013. The effects of body mass index class on intended procedure type (laparoscopic versus open), conversion from laparoscopic to open operation, and outcomes after cholecystectomy were examined using multivariable logistic regression. Data on 20,979 patients who underwent cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis showed that 18,228 (87%) had a laparoscopic operation; 639 (4%) of these patients required conversion to an open approach; and 2,751 (13%) underwent intended open cholecystectomy. There was an independent association between super obesity (body mass index 50+) and an intended open operation (odds ratio 1.53, 95% confidence interval 1.14-2.05, P = .01). An intended open procedure (odds ratio 3.10, 95% confidence interval 2.40-4.02, P cholecystitis, not body mass index class, is associated with worse outcomes after cholecystectomy. An initial attempt at laparoscopy may benefit patients, even those at the highest end of the body mass index spectrum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk factors for unplanned readmission within 30 days after pediatric neurosurgery: a nationwide analysis of 9799 procedures from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Brandon A; Johnston, James M; Rocque, Brandon G

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Hospital readmission rate is increasingly used as a quality outcome measure after surgery. The purpose of this study was to establish, using a national database, the baseline readmission rates and risk factors for patient readmission after pediatric neurosurgical procedures. METHODS The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric database was queried for pediatric patients treated by a neurosurgeon between 2012 and 2013. Procedures were categorized by current procedural terminology (CPT) code. Patient demographics, comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, operative variables, and postoperative complications were analyzed via univariate and multivariate techniques to find associations with unplanned readmissions within 30 days of the primary procedure. RESULTS A total of 9799 cases met the inclusion criteria, 1098 (11.2%) of which had an unplanned readmission within 30 days. Readmission occurred 14.0 ± 7.7 days postoperatively (mean ± standard deviation). The 4 procedures with the highest unplanned readmission rates were CSF shunt revision (17.3%; CPT codes 62225 and 62230), repair of myelomeningocele > 5 cm in diameter (15.4%), CSF shunt creation (14.1%), and craniectomy for infratentorial tumor excision (13.9%). The lowest unplanned readmission rates were for spine (6.5%), craniotomy for craniosynostosis (2.1%), and skin lesion (1.0%) procedures. On multivariate regression analysis, the odds of readmission were greatest in patients experiencing postoperative surgical site infection (SSI; deep, organ/space, superficial SSI, and wound disruption: OR > 12 and p 10 days (OR 1.411, p = 0.010), oxygen supplementation (OR 1.645, p = 0.010), nutritional support (OR 1.403, p = 0.009), seizure disorder (OR 1.250, p = 0.021), and longer operative time (per hour increase, OR 1.059, p = 0.029). CONCLUSIONS This study may aid in identifying patients at risk for unplanned readmission following pediatric neurosurgery

  12. Surgical innovation and quality assurance: Can we have both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgeson, Keith

    2015-06-01

    Innovation is the major force for progress in pediatric surgery. Most of the progress in surgery has evolved secondary to novel approaches developed by surgeons confronted with difficult pathologic conditions. Up to the present time, most surgical innovation has been practiced with few rules for guidance. Innovation to make surgical procedures more effective and less morbid is highly desirable. However, the absence of oversight has the potential to lead to unbridled human experimentation. The quality improvement movement in medicine is attempting to improve outcomes using evidence-based clinical pathways. Quality improvement aims to decrease the variation in therapeutic approaches by scientifically defining best practices. There is a significant potential for autonomous surgical innovators to clash with well-meaning proponents of quality improvement. A suggested remedy to encourage surgical innovators while protecting patients from unintended harm is for institutions to develop Surgical Innovation Committees to evaluate and give oversight to the early application of new techniques and devices. Scientific evaluation under the auspices of an IRB should follow when feasible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Does Receiving a Blood Transfusion Predict for Length of Stay in Children Undergoing Cranial Vault Remodeling for Craniosynostosis? Outcomes Using the Pediatric National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, Michael R; Alden, Tord; Momin, Mohmed Vasim; Olsson, Alexis B; Jurado, Ray J; Abdullah, Fizan; Miloro, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Recent interventions have aimed at reducing the need for blood transfusions in the perioperative period in patients with craniosynostosis undergoing cranial vault remodeling. However, little is known regarding whether the receipt of a blood transfusion influences the length of hospital stay. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the receipt of a blood transfusion in patients undergoing cranial vault remodeling is associated with an increased length of stay. To address the research purposes, we designed a retrospective cohort study using the 2014 Pediatric National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP Peds) dataset. The primary predictor variable was whether patients received a blood transfusion during cranial vault remodeling. The primary outcome variable was length of hospital stay after the operation. The association between the receipt of blood transfusions and length of stay was assessed using the Student t test. The association between other covariates and the outcome variable was assessed using linear regression, analysis of variance, and the Tukey test for post hoc pair-wise comparisons. The sample was composed of 756 patients who underwent cranial vault remodeling: 503 who received blood transfusions and 253 who did not. The primary predictor variable of blood transfusion was associated with an increased length of stay (4.1 days vs 3.0 days, P = .03). Other covariates associated with an increased length of stay included race, American Society of Anesthesiologists status, premature birth, presence of a congenital malformation, and number of sutures involved in craniosynostosis. The receipt of a blood transfusion in the perioperative period in patients with craniosynostosis undergoing cranial vault remodeling was associated with an increased length of stay. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of increasing prevalence of minimally invasive prostatectomy on open prostatectomy observed in the national inpatient sample and national surgical quality improvement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Matthias D; Meeks, Joshua J; Cashy, John; Kundu, Shilajit; Zhao, Lee C

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic and especially robot-assisted minimally invasive prostatectomy (MIP) has increased in popularity over the past decade. We analyzed how the increasing prevalence of MIP has affected the outcomes of MIP and open radical prostatectomy (RRP). In the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 23,473 patients undergoing MIP and 118,266 undergoing RRP between 2002 and 2008 are reported. We analyzed length of stay (LOS), hospital charges (THC), complication rates (CR), and socioeconomic characteristics. We used the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) to identify complication rates (RRP n=666, and MIP n=2205). The proportion of MIP increased from 1.4% in 2002 to 29.5% in 2008. Mean LOS decreased for MIP (2.4 days in 2002, 1.6 days in 2008) and RRP (3.1 days in 2002, 2.1 days in 2008). Mean THC for MIP decreased ($46k in 2002, $34k in 2008) and increased for RRP ($18k in 2002, $32k in 2008). After 2005, overall CRs of MIP were lower than for RRP. High-volume centers reported lower CRs for both procedures. MIP was associated with fewer transfusions and wound complications. Men living in ZIP codes with the top quartile of yearly mean household income were more likely to undergo MIP than RRP (P<0.001). Although there were more white patients receiving MIP and black or Hispanic patients more frequently underwent RRP, there was no statistically significant difference. Increasing use of MIP led to decreased hospital stay for all patients, increase charges for RRP, and decreased CRs for both MIP and RRP. In recent years, MIP was associated with fewer complications. Charges for RRP have increased over time to approach those for MIP, and patients with increased socio-economic status were more likely to undergo MIP.

  15. Incidence, Risk Factors, and Trends of Motor Peripheral Nerve Injury After Colorectal Surgery: Analysis of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Temimi, Mohammed H; Chandrasekaran, Bindupriya; Phelan, Michael J; Pigazzi, Alessio; Mills, Steven D; Stamos, Michael J; Carmichael, Joseph C

    2017-03-01

    Motor peripheral nerve injury is a rare but serious event after colorectal surgery, and a nationwide study of this complication is lacking. The purpose of this study was to report the incidence, trends, and risk factors of motor peripheral nerve injury during colorectal surgery. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was surveyed for motor peripheral nerve injury complicating colorectal procedures. Risk factors for this complication were identified using logistic regression analysis. The study used a national database. Patients undergoing colorectal resection between 2005 and 2013 were included. The incidence, trends, and risk factors for motor peripheral nerve injury complicating colorectal procedures were measured. We identified 186,936 colorectal cases, of which 50,470 (27%) were performed laparoscopically. Motor peripheral nerve injury occurred in 122 patients (0.065%). Injury rates declined over the study period, from 0.025% in 2006 to nerve injury were younger (mean ± SD; 54.02 ± 15.41 y vs 61.56 ± 15.95 y; p Nerve injury was also associated with longer operative times (277.16 ± 169.79 min vs 176.69 ± 104.80 min; p nerve injury (OR = 1.04 (95% CI, 1.03-1.04)), whereas increasing age was associated with a protective effect (OR = 0.80 (95% CI, 0.71-0.90)). This study was limited by its retrospective nature. Motor peripheral nerve injury during colorectal procedures is uncommon (0.065%), and its rate declined significantly over the study period. Prolonged operative time is the strongest predictor of motor peripheral nerve injury during colorectal procedures. Instituting and documenting measures to prevent nerve injury is imperative; however, special attention to this complication is necessary when surgeons contemplate long colorectal procedures.

  16. Accelerate Water Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is committed to accelerating water quality improvement and minimizing negative impacts to aquatic life from contaminants and other stressors in the Bay Delta Estuary by working with California Water Boards to strengthen water quality improvement plans.

  17. Identifying quality indicators of surgical training: A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Nasir I; Ahmed, Aadil; Choi, Sukgi S

    2015-12-01

    Evidence shows a positive association between quality of surgical training received and patient outcomes. Traditionally, improved patient outcomes are linked with increased operative volume. However, generalizing this finding to surgeons in training is unclear. In addition, reduced exposure due to work-hour restrictions calls for alternative methods to determine the quality of training. The purpose of this study was to identify the indicators of high-quality training by surveying the trainees and trainers. A questionnaire was developed based on input from faculty and previous studies. The survey was divided into three sections asking about the indicators of quality training, methods to measure them, and interventions for improvement. The questionnaire was administered to program directors (PDs) and senior residents of otolaryngology training programs nationwide. The strongest indicators of quality training that were agreed upon by both residents and PDs were having faculty development as an ideal trainer while having a balanced level of supervision and independence, logbooks for exposure to volume and variety of pathology, continuous evaluation and provision of feedback. However, structured teaching, simulation-based training, and trainee exam scores failed to reach an agreement as a metric of high-quality surgical training. Measuring quality of a residency training program is imperative to produce competent surgeons and ensuring patient safety. The results of this study will help the residency programs to better train their residents and improve the quality of their teaching. N/A. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Continuous quality improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourne, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the various statistical tools used at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory to achieve continuous quality improvement in the development of Breeder Reactor Technology and in reactor operations. The role of the quality assurance professionals in this process, including quantifiable measurements using actual examples, is provided. The commitment to quality improvement through top management involvement is dramatically illustrated

  19. Quantifying surgical complexity with machine learning: looking beyond patient factors to improve surgical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Esbroeck, Alexander; Rubinfeld, Ilan; Hall, Bruce; Syed, Zeeshan

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the use of machine learning to empirically determine the risk of individual surgical procedures and to improve surgical models with this information. American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) data from 2005 to 2009 were used to train support vector machine (SVM) classifiers to learn the relationship between textual constructs in current procedural terminology (CPT) descriptions and mortality, morbidity, Clavien 4 complications, and surgical-site infections (SSI) within 30 days of surgery. The procedural risk scores produced by the SVM classifiers were validated on data from 2010 in univariate and multivariate analyses. The procedural risk scores produced by the SVM classifiers achieved moderate-to-high levels of discrimination in univariate analyses (area under receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.871 for mortality, 0.789 for morbidity, 0.791 for SSI, 0.845 for Clavien 4 complications). Addition of these scores also substantially improved multivariate models comprising patient factors and previously proposed correlates of procedural risk (net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination improvement: 0.54 and 0.001 for mortality, 0.46 and 0.011 for morbidity, 0.68 and 0.022 for SSI, 0.44 and 0.001 for Clavien 4 complications; P risk for individual procedures. This information can be measured in an entirely data-driven manner and substantially improves multifactorial models to predict postoperative complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Quality measurement affecting surgical practice: Utility versus utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Leonard R; von Holzen, Urs W; Minarich, Michael J; Hardy, Ashley N; Beachy, Wilbur A; Franger, M Susan; Schwarz, Roderich E

    2018-03-01

    The Triple Aim: improving healthcare quality, cost and patient experience has resulted in massive healthcare "quality" measurement. For many surgeons the origins, intent and strengths of this measurement barrage seems nebulous-though their shortcomings are noticeable. This article reviews the major organizations and programs (namely the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) driving the somewhat burdensome healthcare quality climate. The success of this top-down approach is mixed, and far from convincing. We contend that the current programs disproportionately reflect the definitions of quality from (and the interests of) the national payer perspective; rather than a more balanced representation of all stakeholders interests-most importantly, patients' beneficence. The result is an environment more like performance management than one of valid quality assessment. Suggestions for a more meaningful construction of surgical quality measurement are offered, as well as a strategy to describe surgical quality from all of the stakeholders' perspectives. Our hope is to entice surgeons to engage in institution level quality improvement initiatives that promise utility and are less utopian than what is currently present. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Critical roles of orthopaedic surgeon leadership in healthcare systems to improve orthopaedic surgical patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Calvin C; Robb, William J

    2013-06-01

    The prevention of medical and surgical harm remains an important public health problem despite increased awareness and implementation of safety programs. Successful introduction and maintenance of surgical safety programs require both surgeon leadership and collaborative surgeon-hospital alignment. Documentation of success of such surgical safety programs in orthopaedic practice is limited. We describe the scope of orthopaedic surgical patient safety issues, define critical elements of orthopaedic surgical safety, and outline leadership roles for orthopaedic surgeons needed to establish and sustain a culture of safety in contemporary healthcare systems. We identified the most common causes of preventable surgical harm based on adverse and sentinel surgical events reported to The Joint Commission. A comprehensive literature review through a MEDLINE(®) database search (January 1982 through April 2012) to identify pertinent orthopaedic surgical safety articles found 14 articles. Where gaps in orthopaedic literature were identified, the review was supplemented by 22 nonorthopaedic surgical references. Our final review included 36 articles. Six important surgical safety program elements needed to eliminate preventable surgical harm were identified: (1) effective surgical team communication, (2) proper informed consent, (3) implementation and regular use of surgical checklists, (4) proper surgical site/procedure identification, (5) reduction of surgical team distractions, and (6) routine surgical data collection and analysis to improve the safety and quality of surgical patient care. Successful surgical safety programs require a culture of safety supported by all six key surgical safety program elements, active surgeon champions, and collaborative hospital and/or administrative support designed to enhance surgical safety and improve surgical patient outcomes. Further research measuring improvements from such surgical safety systems in orthopaedic care is needed.

  2. Quality of life before surgical ICU admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelha, Fernando J; Santos, Cristina C; Barros, Henrique

    2007-11-12

    Examining the quality of life (QOL) of patients before ICU admission will allow outcome variables to be compared and analyzed in relation to it. The objective of this study was to analyze QOL of patients before admission to a surgical ICU and to study its relationship to outcome and to the baseline characteristics of the patients. All adult patients consecutively admitted to the surgical ICU between November 2004 and April 2005, who underwent non-cardiac surgery, were enrolled in this observational and prospective study. The following patient characteristics were recorded: age, gender, body mass index, ASA physical status, type and magnitude of surgical procedure, length of stay (LOS), in ICU and in hospital, mortality, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS), history of co-morbidities and quality of life survey score (QOLSS). The relationships between QOLSS and ICU variables and outcome were evaluated. The relationship between the total QOLSS and each variable or outcome was assessed by multiple linear regression. One hundred eighty seven patients completed the study. The preadmission QOLSS of the patients studied was 4.43 +/- 4.90; 28% of patients had a normal quality of life (0 points), 38% had between 1 and 5 points (considered mild deterioration), 21% had between 6 and 10 points (moderate deterioration), 10% had between 11 and 15 points (considered major deterioration) and 3% had more than 15 points (severe limitation of quality of life). A worse preadmission QOLSS was associated with higher SAPS II scores, with older patients (age> 65 years) and with ASA physical status (ASA III/IV). Total QOLSS was significantly worse in elderly patients and in patients with co-morbidities and in patients more severely ill at ICU admission. Patients who died in the ICU and in hospital had worse QOLSS scores compared to those who survived. However, no statistical differences in QOLSS were found in relation to longer ICU stays (ICU LOS). Preadmission QOL correlates with

  3. Quality of life before surgical ICU admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros Henrique

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Examining the quality of life (QOL of patients before ICU admission will allow outcome variables to be compared and analyzed in relation to it. The objective of this study was to analyze QOL of patients before admission to a surgical ICU and to study its relationship to outcome and to the baseline characteristics of the patients. Methods: All adult patients consecutively admitted to the surgical ICU between November 2004 and April 2005, who underwent non-cardiac surgery, were enrolled in this observational and prospective study. The following patient characteristics were recorded: age, gender, body mass index, ASA physical status, type and magnitude of surgical procedure, length of stay (LOS, in ICU and in hospital, mortality, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS, history of co-morbidities and quality of life survey score (QOLSS. The relationships between QOLSS and ICU variables and outcome were evaluated. The relationship between the total QOLSS and each variable or outcome was assessed by multiple linear regression. Results: One hundred eighty seven patients completed the study. The preadmission QOLSS of the patients studied was 4.43 ± 4.90; 28% of patients had a normal quality of life (0 points, 38% had between 1 and 5 points (considered mild deterioration, 21% had between 6 and 10 points (moderate deterioration, 10% had between 11 and 15 points (considered major deterioration and 3% had more than 15 points (severe limitation of quality of life. A worse preadmission QOLSS was associated with higher SAPS II scores, with older patients (age> 65 years and with ASA physical status (ASA III/IV. Total QOLSS was significantly worse in elderly patients and in patients with co-morbidities and in patients more severely ill at ICU admission. Patients who died in the ICU and in hospital had worse QOLSS scores compared to those who survived. However, no statistical differences in QOLSS were found in relation to longer ICU stays

  4. Application of Six Sigma towards improving surgical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P J; Barreto, S G; Nadkarni, M S

    2008-01-01

    Six Sigma is a 'process excellence' tool targeting continuous improvement achieved by providing a methodology for improving key steps of a process. It is ripe for application into health care since almost all health care processes require a near-zero tolerance for mistakes. The aim of this study is to apply the Six Sigma methodology into a clinical surgical process and to assess the improvement (if any) in the outcomes and patient care. The guiding principles of Six Sigma, namely DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control), were used to analyze the impact of double stapling technique (DST) towards improving sphincter preservation rates for rectal cancer. The analysis using the Six Sigma methodology revealed a Sigma score of 2.10 in relation to successful sphincter preservation. This score demonstrates an improvement over the previous technique (73% over previous 54%). This study represents one of the first clinical applications of Six Sigma in the surgical field. By understanding, accepting, and applying the principles of Six Sigma, we have an opportunity to transfer a very successful management philosophy to facilitate the identification of key steps that can improve outcomes and ultimately patient safety and the quality of surgical care provided.

  5. The methodological quality of systematic reviews comparing temporomandibular joint disorder surgical and non-surgical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasconcelos Belmiro CE

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJD are multifactor, complex clinical problems affecting approximately 60–70% of the general population, with considerable controversy about the most effective treatment. For example, reports claim success rates of 70% and 83% for non-surgical and surgical treatment, whereas other reports claim success rates of 40% to 70% for self-improvement without treatment. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to (1 identify systematic reviews comparing temporomandibular joint disorder surgical and non-surgical treatment, (2 evaluate their methodological quality, and (3 evaluate the evidence grade within the systematic reviews. Methods A search strategy was developed and implemented for MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, LILACS, and Brazilian Dentistry Bibliography databases. Inclusion criteria were: systematic reviews (± meta-analysis comparing surgical and non-surgical TMJD treatment, published in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, or German between the years 1966 and 2007(up to July. Exclusion criteria were: in vitro or animal studies; narrative reviews or editorials or editorial letters; and articles published in other languages. Two investigators independently selected and evaluated systematic reviews. Three different instruments (AMSTAR, OQAQ and CASP were used to evaluate methodological quality, and the results averaged. The GRADE instrument was used to evaluate the evidence grade within the reviews. Results The search strategy identified 211 reports; of which 2 were systematic reviews meeting inclusion criteria. The first review met 23.5 ± 6.0% and the second met 77.5 ± 12.8% of the methodological quality criteria (mean ± sd. In these systematic reviews between 9 and 15% of the trials were graded as high quality, and 2 and 8% of the total number of patients were involved in these studies. Conclusion The results indicate that in spite of the widespread impact of TMJD, and the multitude of

  6. IMPROVING CONCEPTUAL DESIGN QUALITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bush, Stuart; Robotham, Antony John

    1999-01-01

    This paper will consider how Quality Function Deployment (QFD) and Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA) processes can be used to improve the design quality of products at the concept stage. We appreciate that both QFD and DFMA are techniques that have been used for some time by mature product...... quality is maintained in design project work. The projects described have been carried out with products manufactured by small to medium sized enterprises (SME's), where we have found significant opportunities for product improvement. The quantitative nature of DFMA analysis results allows the novice...... for continuous improvement of their products. However, we consider that if novice designers are able to successfully utilise design tools like QFD and DFMA and achieve improvements in design quality, then SME’s have no excuses for ignoring the benefits they could bring to their own product development activity....

  7. The surgical care improvement project and prevention of post-operative infection, including surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Laura H; Politano, Amani D; Sawyer, Robert G

    2011-06-01

    In response to inconsistent compliance with infection prevention measures, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services collaborated with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the Surgical Infection Prevention (SIP) project, introduced in 2002. Quality improvement measures were developed to standardize processes to increase compliance. In 2006, the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) developed out of the SIP project and its process measures. These initiatives, published in the Specifications Manual for National Inpatient Quality Measures, outline process and outcome measures. This continually evolving manual is intended to provide standard quality measures to unify documentation and track standards of care. Seven of the SCIP initiatives apply to the peri-operative period: Prophylactic antibiotics should be received within 1 h prior to surgical incision (1), be selected for activity against the most probable antimicrobial contaminants (2), and be discontinued within 24 h after the surgery end-time (3); (4) euglycemia should be maintained, with well-controlled morning blood glucose concentrations on the first two post-operative days, especially in cardiac surgery patients; (6) hair at the surgical site should be removed with clippers or by depilatory methods, not with a blade; (9) urinary catheters are to be removed within the first two post-operative days; and (10) normothermia should be maintained peri-operatively. There is strong evidence that implementation of protocols that standardize practices reduce the risk of surgical infection. The SCIP initiative targets complications that account for a significant portion of preventable morbidity as well as cost. One of the goals of the SCIP guidelines was a 25% reduction in the incidence of surgical site infections from implementation through 2010. Process measures are becoming routine, and as we practice more evidence-based medicine, it falls to us, the surgeons and scientists, to be active

  8. Improved risk adjustment for comparison of surgical site infection rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geubbels, Eveline L. P. E.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Wille, Jan C.; de Boer, Annette S.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop prognostic models for improved risk adjustment in surgical site infection surveillance for 5 surgical procedures and to compare these models with the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance system (NNIS) risk index. DESIGN: In a multicenter cohort study, prospective

  9. Surgical videos for accident analysis, performance improvement, and complication prevention: time for a surgical black box?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambadauro, Pietro; Magos, Adam

    2012-03-01

    Conventional audit of surgical records through review of surgical results provides useful knowledge but hardly helps identify the technical reasons lying behind specific outcomes or complications. Surgical teams not only need to know that a complication might happen but also how and when it is most likely to happen. Functional awareness is therefore needed to prevent complications, know how to deal with them, and improve overall surgical performance. The authors wish to argue that the systematic recording and reviewing of surgical videos, a "surgical black box," might improve surgical care, help prevent complications, and allow accident analysis. A possible strategy to test this hypothesis is presented and discussed. Recording and reviewing surgical interventions, apart from helping us achieve functional awareness and increasing the safety profile of our performance, allows us also to effectively share our experience with colleagues. The authors believe that those potential implications make this hypothesis worth testing.

  10. A Comparison of 30-Day Perioperative Outcomes in Open Versus Minimally Invasive Nephroureterectomy for Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma: Analysis of 896 Patients from the American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanske, Julian; Sanchez, Alejandro; Schmid, Marianne; Meyer, Christian P; Abdollah, Firas; Feldman, Adam S; Kibel, Adam S; Sammon, Jesse D; Menon, Mani; Eswara, Jairam R; Noldus, Joachim; Trinh, Quoc-Dien

    2015-09-01

    Minimally invasive surgery for nephroureterectomy (MINU) in patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is increasingly used among urologists with reported equivalent oncologic outcomes compared with open nephroureterectomy (ONU). Population-level data comparing perioperative outcomes between these approaches remain limited, however. We sought to compare perioperative outcomes between MINU and ONU in a prospectively collected national cohort of patients. Between 2006 and 2012, patients who underwent nephroureterectomy for UTUC within the American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database were categorized into MINU or ONU. Our primary outcome of interest was 30-day perioperative complications. Secondary outcomes included use of lymph node dissection (LND), transfusion, reintervention and readmission rate, operative time, length of stay (LOS), and perioperative mortality. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to examine the association between outcomes and surgical approach. A total of 599 (66.9%) and 297 (33.1%) patients underwent MINU and ONU, respectively. Overall, 12.7% of patients experienced a complication within 30 days postoperatively, and the rate did not differ among surgical approaches. Patients in the MINU group, however, had a decreased LOS (PONU. MINU, however, was associated with a decreased risk of blood transfusions, thromboembolic events, reintervention, and overall LOS compared with ONU. MINU should be considered as a primary approach in select groups of patients with UTUC.

  11. Quality assurance in surgical practice through auditing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, W T

    1980-05-01

    An efficient auditing method is presented which involves objective criteria-based numerical screening of medical process and treatment outcome by paramedical staff and detailed analysis of deviated cases by surgeons. If properly performed it requires the study of no more than 50 cases in a diagnostic category to provide sufficient information about the quality of care. Encouraging points as well as problems are communicated to the surgeons to induce the maintenance or improvement of the standard of care. Graphic documentation of case performance is possible, allowing surgeons to compare results with their colleagues. The general performance level of several consecutive studies can be compared at a glance. In addition, logical education programs to improve the medical process can be designed on the basis of the problems identified. As all the cases with an unacceptable outcome are traceable to inadequate medical process, improvement in this area will decrease outcome defects. With the use of auditing and the follow-up technique described, the quality of care in surgery may be assured.

  12. Quality of complication reporting in the surgical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Robert C G; Brennan, Murray F; Jaques, David P

    2002-06-01

    To identify 10 critical elements of accurate and comprehensive reports of surgical complications. Despite a venerable tradition of weekly morbidity and mortality conferences, inconsistent complication reporting is common in the surgical literature. An analysis of articles reporting short-term outcomes after pancreatectomy, esophagectomy, and hepatectomy was performed. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) published from 1975 to 2001 and retrospective series of more than 100 patients published from 1990 to 2001 were reviewed. A total of 119 articles reporting outcomes in 22,530 patients were analyzed. This included 42 RCTs and 77 retrospective series. Of the 10 criteria developed, no articles met all criteria; 2% met 9 criteria, 38% 7 or 8, 34% 5 or 6, 40% 3 or 4, and 12% 1 or 2. Outpatient information (22% of articles), definitions of complications provided (34% of articles), severity grade used (20% of articles), and risk factors included in analysis (29% of articles) were the most commonly unmet quality reporting criteria. Type of study (RCT vs. retrospective), site of institution (U.S. vs. non-U.S.) and journal (U.S. vs. non-U.S.) did not influence the quality of complication reporting. Short-term surgical outcomes are routinely included in the data reported in the surgical literature. This is often used to show improvements over time or to assess the impact of therapeutic changes on patient outcome. The inconsistency of reporting and the lack of accepted principles of accrual, display, and analysis of complication data argue strongly for the creation and generalized use of standards for reporting this information.

  13. Use of a Surgical Safety Checklist to Improve Team Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Richard A; Eggenberger, Terry; Keller, Kathryn; Gallison, Barry S; Newman, David

    2016-09-01

    To improve surgical team communication, a team at Broward Health Imperial Point Hospital, Ft Lauderdale, Florida, implemented a program for process improvement using a locally adapted World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist. This program included a standardized, comprehensive time out and a briefing/debriefing process. Postimplementation responses to the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire revealed a significant increase in the surgical team's perception of communication compared with that reported on the pretest (6% improvement resulting in t79 = -1.72, P improved surgical teamwork behaviors and an enhanced culture of safety in the OR. Copyright © 2016 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The study of surgical image quality evaluation system by subjective quality factor method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Xuan, Jason R.; Yang, Xirong; Yu, Honggang; Koullick, Edouard

    2016-03-01

    GreenLightTM procedure is an effective and economical way of treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH); there are almost a million of patients treated with GreenLightTM worldwide. During the surgical procedure, the surgeon or physician will rely on the monitoring video system to survey and confirm the surgical progress. There are a few obstructions that could greatly affect the image quality of the monitoring video, like laser glare by the tissue and body fluid, air bubbles and debris generated by tissue evaporation, and bleeding, just to name a few. In order to improve the physician's visual experience of a laser surgical procedure, the system performance parameter related to image quality needs to be well defined. However, since image quality is the integrated set of perceptions of the overall degree of excellence of an image, or in other words, image quality is the perceptually weighted combination of significant attributes (contrast, graininess …) of an image when considered in its marketplace or application, there is no standard definition on overall image or video quality especially for the no-reference case (without a standard chart as reference). In this study, Subjective Quality Factor (SQF) and acutance are used for no-reference image quality evaluation. Basic image quality parameters, like sharpness, color accuracy, size of obstruction and transmission of obstruction, are used as subparameter to define the rating scale for image quality evaluation or comparison. Sample image groups were evaluated by human observers according to the rating scale. Surveys of physician groups were also conducted with lab generated sample videos. The study shows that human subjective perception is a trustworthy way of image quality evaluation. More systematic investigation on the relationship between video quality and image quality of each frame will be conducted as a future study.

  15. [The Marburg surgical curriculum - improving the attraction of medical education by teaching central surgical competence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarting, T; Ruchholtz, S; Josephs, D; Oberkircher, L; Bartsch, D K; Fendrich, V

    2012-04-01

    The quality of medical education is an ongoing challenge due to the continuing changes of the health-care politics and general social conditions. At many German university hospitals the dominating picture is overfilled courses, lack of hands-on practice, reduced patient contact and the dull provision of theoretical, abstract knowledge. The reformed surgical curriculum at the University of Marburg university hospital is used to demonstrate that, in spite of large student numbers, a practice-oriented, small-group training at a high didactic level is possible. The surgical training courses are organized in detail and coordinated. Course contents and structure are media available in print and online versions for both students and teachers and thus fulfill not only transparency needs but also contemporary requirements. The strategy of a practice- and patient-oriented, small-group training is followed strictly in the surgical curriculum. In addition, accompanying tutorial possibilities for individual study in an up-to-date learning center are offered. Here the students have the opportunity to intensify knowledge acquired in previous or future courses with numerous attractive education means. Continuous evaluation of the individual training courses at the end of each semester not only document motivation of the students but also serve to continuously improve the training concepts. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. A calculator for mortality following emergency general surgery based on the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Ivy N; Maluso, Patrick J; Schroeder, Mary E; Amdur, Richard L; Vaziri, Khashayar; Agarwal, Samir; Sarani, Babak

    2017-06-01

    The complex nature of current morbidity and mortality predictor models do not lend themselves to clinical application at the bedside of patients undergoing emergency general surgery (EGS). Our aim was to develop a simplified risk calculator for prediction of early postoperative mortality after EGS. EGS cases other than appendectomy and cholecystectomy were identified within the American College of Surgeons National Surgery Quality Improvement Program database from 2005 to 2014. Seventy-five percent of the cases were selected at random for model development, whereas 25% of the cases were used for model testing. Stepwise logistic regression was performed for creation of a 30-day mortality risk calculator. Model accuracy and reproducibility was investigated using the concordance index (c statistic) and Pearson correlations. A total of 79,835 patients met inclusion criteria. Overall, 30-day mortality was 12.6%. A simplified risk model formula was derived from five readily available preoperative variables as follows: 0.034*age + 0.8*nonindependent status + 0.88*sepsis + 1.1 (if bun ≥ 29) or 0.57 (if bun ≥18 and < 29) + 1.16 (if albumin < 2.7), or 0.61 (if albumin ≥ 2.7 and < 3.4). The risk of 30-day mortality was stratified into deciles. The risk of 30-day mortality ranged from 2% for patients in the lowest risk level to 31% for patients in the highest risk level. The c statistic was 0.83 in both the derivation and testing samples. Five readily available preoperative variables can be used to predict the 30-day mortality risk for patients undergoing EGS. Further studies are needed to validate this risk calculator and to determine its bedside applicability. Prognostic/epidemiological study, level III.

  17. Surgical discharge summaries: improving the record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D C; Bristol, J B; Poskitt, K R

    1993-03-01

    The problem area of communication between hospital and general practitioners may potentially be improved by the advent of new information technology. The introduction of a regional computer database for general surgery allows the rapid automated production of discharge summaries and has provided us with the opportunity for auditing the quality of old and new styles of discharge communication. A total of 118 general practitioners were sent a postal questionnaire to establish their views on the relative importance of various aspects of patient information and management after discharge. A high response rate (97%) indicated the interest of general practitioners in this topic. The majority (73%) believed that summaries should be delayed no more than 3 days. The structured and shortened new format was preferred to the older style of discharge summary. The older format rarely arrived within an appropriate time and its content was often felt to be either inadequate (35%) or excessive (7%) compared with the new format (8% and 1%, respectively). The diagnosis, information given to the patient, clinic date, list of medications and investigations were considered the more important details in the summary. Improvements in the discharge information were suggested and have subsequently been incorporated in our discharge policy. The use of new information technology, intended to facilitate clinical audit, has improved our ability to generate prompt, well-structured discharge summaries which are accepted by the general practitioners.

  18. Improved patient selection by stratified surgical intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Miao; Bünger, Cody E; Li, Haisheng

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Choosing the best surgical treatment for patients with spinal metastases remains a significant challenge for spine surgeons. There is currently no gold standard for surgical treatments. The Aarhus Spinal Metastases Algorithm (ASMA) was established to help surgeons choose...... the most appropriate surgical intervention for patients with spinal metastases. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of stratified surgical interventions based on the ASMA, which combines life expectancy and the anatomical classification of patients with spinal metastases...... survival times in the five surgical groups determined by the ASMA were 2.1 (TS 0-4, TC 1-7), 5.1 (TS 5-8, TC 1-7), 12.1 (TS 9-11, TC 1-7 or TS 12-15, TC 7), 26.0 (TS 12-15, TC 4-6), and 36.0 (TS 12-15, TC 1-3) months. The 30-day mortality rate was 7.5%. Postoperative neurological function was maintained...

  19. Toyota production system quality improvement initiative improves perioperative antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkitt, Kelly H; Mor, Maria K; Jain, Rajiv; Kruszewski, Matthew S; McCray, Ellesha E; Moreland, Michael E; Muder, Robert R; Obrosky, David Scott; Sevick, Mary Ann; Wilson, Mark A; Fine, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    To assess the role of a Toyota production system (TPS) quality improvement (QI) intervention on appropriateness of perioperative antibiotic therapy and in length of hospital stay (LOS) among surgical patients. Pre-post quasi-experimental study using local and national retrospective cohorts. We used TPS methods to implement a multifaceted intervention to reduce nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections on a Veterans Affairs surgical unit, which led to a QI intervention targeting appropriate perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis. Appropriate perioperative antibiotic therapy was defined as selection of the recommended antibiotic agents for a duration not exceeding 24 hours from the time of the operation. The local computerized medical record system was used to identify patients undergoing the 25 most common surgical procedures and to examine changes in appropriate antibiotic therapy and LOS over time. Overall, 2550 surgical admissions were identified from the local computerized medical records. The proportion of surgical admissions receiving appropriate perioperative antibiotics was significantly higher (P <.01) in 2004 after initiation of the TPS intervention (44.0%) compared with the previous 4 years (range, 23.4%-29.8%) primarily because of improvements in compliance with antibiotic therapy duration rather than appropriate antibiotic selection. There was no statistically significant decrease in LOS over time. The use of TPS methods resulted in a QI intervention that was associated with an increase in appropriate perioperative antibiotic therapy among surgical patients, without affecting LOS.

  20. Reduction and sustainability of cesarean section surgical site infection: An evidence-based, innovative, and multidisciplinary quality improvement intervention bundle program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chaur-Dong; Cohn, Inna; Caban, Rebeca

    2016-11-01

    We found cesarean section (C-section) surgical site infection (SSI) at our institution was significantly higher than the national benchmark. A retrospective cohort study was conducted under 4 phases from January 2008-December 2014. The hospital infection control (IC) policies and a presurgical checklist were bundled and implemented. The study was conducted with 3,334 cesarean deliveries: phase A (January 1, 2008-January 31,2010): 1,250 patients without intervention (baseline SSI rate), phase B (February 1, 2010-July 31, 2011): 682 patients were intervened with IC policies, phase C (August 1, 2011-December 31, 2012): 591 patients with an SSI reduction bundle, and phase D (January 1, 2013-December 31, 2014): 811 patients were monitored for C-section SSI sustainability. Patients not following strict protocols because of emergency C-section deliveries were excluded. The χ 2 test, Fisher exact test, and standard Z test were used for statistical analyses. C-section SSI rates were 6.2% (77/1,250) in phase A, 3.7% (25/682) in phase B, 1.7% (10/591) in phase C, and 0.1% (1/811) in phase D, respectively. By implementing the IC policies and bundle, the C-section SSI rate was reduced 40.3% (phase B vs phase A), 72.6% (phase C vs phase A), and 98.4% (phase D vs phase A). All statistics were significantly different. We conclude that implementing a C-section SSI reduction bundle was associated with reduced C-section SSI rate down toward zero. A future prospectively randomized controlled trial is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mentoring console improves collaboration and teaching in surgical robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, Eric J; Miller, Brian E; Kumar, Rajesh; Hasser, Christopher J; Coste-Maniere, Eve; Talamini, Mark A; Aurora, Alexander A; Schenkman, Noah S; Marohn, Michael R

    2006-10-01

    One of the most significant limitations of surgical robots has been their inability to allow multiple surgeons and surgeons-in-training to engage in collaborative control of robotic surgical instruments. We report the initial experience with a novel two-headed da Vinci surgical robot that has two collaborative modes: the "swap" mode allows two surgeons to simultaneously operate and actively swap control of the robot's four arms, and the "nudge" mode allows them to share control of two of the robot's arms. The utility of the mentoring console operating in its two collaborative modes was evaluated through a combination of dry laboratory exercises and animal laboratory surgery. The results from surgeon-resident collaborative performance of complex three-handed surgical tasks were compared to results from single-surgeon and single-resident performance. Statistical significance was determined using Student's t-test. Collaborative surgeon-resident swap control reduced the time to completion of complex three-handed surgical tasks by 25% compared to single-surgeon operation of a four-armed da Vinci (P collaboration during robotic surgery and improves the performance of complex surgical tasks. The mentoring console has the potential to improve resident participation in surgical robotics cases, enhance resident education in surgical training programs engaged in surgical robotics, and improve patient safety during robotic surgery.

  2. ['Clinical auditing', a novel tool for quality assessment in surgical oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leersum, Nicoline J; Kolfschoten, Nikki E; Klinkenbijl, Jean H G; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Wouters, Michel W J M

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether systematic audit and feedback of information about the process and outcomes improve the quality of surgical care. Systematic literature review. Embase, PubMed, and Web of Science databases were searched for publications on 'quality assessment' and 'surgery'. The references of the publications found were examined as well. Publications were included in the review if the effect of auditing on the quality of surgical care had been investigated. In the databases 2415 publications were found. After selection, 28 publications describing the effect of auditing, whether or not combined with a quality improvement project, on guideline adherence or indications of outcomes of care were included. In 21 studies, a statistically significant positive effect of auditing was reported. In 5 studies a positive effect was found, but this was either not significant or statistical significance was not determined. In 2 studies no effect was observed. 5 studies compared the combination of auditing with a quality improvement project with auditing alone; 4 of these reported an additional effect of the quality improvement project. Audit and feedback of quality information seem to have a positive effect on the quality of surgical care. The use of quality information from audits for the purpose of a quality improvement project can enhance the positive effect of the audit.

  3. Surgical innovation-enhanced quality and the processes that assure patient/provider safety: A surgical conundrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruny, Jennifer; Ziegler, Moritz

    2015-12-01

    Innovation is a crucial part of surgical history that has led to enhancements in the quality of surgical care. This comprises both changes which are incremental and those which are frankly disruptive in nature. There are situations where innovation is absolutely required in order to achieve quality improvement or process improvement. Alternatively, there are innovations that do not necessarily arise from some need, but simply are a new idea that might be better. All change must assure a significant commitment to patient safety and beneficence. Innovation would ideally enhance patient care quality and disease outcomes, as well stimulate and facilitate further innovation. The tensions between innovative advancement and patient safety, risk and reward, and demonstrated effectiveness versus speculative added value have created a contemporary "surgical conundrum" that must be resolved by a delicate balance assuring optimal patient/provider outcomes. This article will explore this delicate balance and the rules that govern it. Recommendations are made to facilitate surgical innovation through clinical research. In addition, we propose options that investigators and institutions may use to address competing priorities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Beyond consent--improving understanding in surgical patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulsow, Jürgen J W

    2012-01-01

    Little is known of the actual understanding that underlies patient choices with regard to their surgical treatment. This review explores current knowledge of patient understanding and techniques that may be used to improve this understanding.

  5. Improving Surgical Skills of OBGYN Residents through Partnership ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improving Surgical Skills of OBGYN Residents through Partnership with Rural Hospitals: Experience from Southeast Nigeria. Odidika Ugochukwu Joannes Umeora, Azubuike Kanario Onyebuchi, Nkechi Bridget Emma-Echiegu, Justus Ndulue Eze, Paul Olisaemeka Ezeonu ...

  6. Surgical Process Improvement: Impact of a Standardized Care Model With Electronic Decision Support to Improve Compliance With SCIP Inf-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David J; Thompson, Jeffrey E; Suri, Rakesh; Prinsen, Sharon K

    2014-01-01

    The absence of standardization in surgical care process, exemplified in a "solution shop" model, can lead to unwarranted variation, increased cost, and reduced quality. A comprehensive effort was undertaken to improve quality of care around indwelling bladder catheter use following surgery by creating a "focused factory" model within the cardiac surgical practice. Baseline compliance with Surgical Care Improvement Inf-9, removal of urinary catheter by the end of surgical postoperative day 2, was determined. Comparison of baseline data to postintervention results showed clinically important reductions in the duration of indwelling bladder catheters as well as marked reduction in practice variation. Following the intervention, Surgical Care Improvement Inf-9 guidelines were met in 97% of patients. Although clinical quality improvement was notable, the process to accomplish this-identification of patients suitable for standardized pathways, protocol application, and electronic systems to support the standardized practice model-has potentially greater relevance than the specific clinical results. © 2013 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  7. [Quality assurance and quality improvement. Personal experiences and intentions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, B G; Sommer, C

    1995-01-01

    In may 1994 we were selected by the surgical Swiss association to make a study about quality in USA. During our travel we visited 3 types of institutions: Hospitals, National Institute of standard and Technology, Industry, Johnson & Johnson. We appreciate to compare 2 types of quality programs: Quality Assurance (QA) and Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI). In traditional healthcare circles, QA is the process established to meet external regulatory requirements and to assure that patient care is consistent with established standards. In a modern quality terms, QA outside of healthcare means designing a product or service, as well as controlling its production, so well that quality is inevitable. The ideas of W. Edward Deming is that there is never improvement just by inspection. He developed a theory based on 14 principles. A productive work is accomplished through processes. Understanding the variability of processes is a key to improve quality. Quality management sees each person in an organisation as part of one or more processes. The job of every worker is to receive the work of others, add value to that work, and supply it to the next person in the process. This is called the triple role the workers as customer, processor, and supplier. The main source of quality defects is problems in the process. The old assumption is that quality fails when people do the right thing wrong; the new assumption is that, more often, quality failures arise when people do the wrong think right. Exhortation, incentives and discipline of workers are unlikely to improve quality. If quality is failing when people do their jobs as designed, then exhorting them to do better is managerial nonsense. Modern quality theory is customer focused. Customers are identified internally and externally. The modern approach to quality is thoroughly grounded in scientific and statistical thinking. Like in medicine, the symptom is a defect in quality. The therapist of process must perform diagnostic

  8. Workers' Objectives in Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossard, Michel

    1990-01-01

    A case study of quality circles in an appliance factory found that circle members and nonmembers obtained better working conditions by improving quality through the direct impact of their work on the company's market position. The study of the quality improvement process shows that workers seek more than psychological rewards for their…

  9. What is the safety of nonemergent operative procedures performed at night? A study of 10,426 operations at an academic tertiary care hospital using the American College of Surgeons national surgical quality program improvement database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrentine, Florence E; Wang, Hongkun; Young, Jeffrey S; Calland, James Forrest

    2010-08-01

    Ever-increasing numbers of in-house acute care surgeons and competition for operating room time during normal daytime business hours have led to an increased frequency of nonemergent general and vascular surgery procedures occurring at night when there are fewer residents, consultants, nurses, and support staff available for assistance. This investigation tests the hypothesis that patients undergoing such procedures after hours are at increased risk for postoperative morbidity and mortality. Clinical data for 10,426 operative procedures performed over a 5-year period at a single academic tertiary care hospital were obtained from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database. The prevalence of preoperative comorbid conditions, postoperative length of stay, morbidity, and mortality was compared between two cohorts of patients: one who underwent nonemergent operative procedures at night and other who underwent similar procedures during the day. Subsequent statistical comparisons utilized chi tests for comparisons of categorical variables and F-tests for continuous variables. Patients undergoing procedures at night had a greater prevalence of serious preoperative comorbid conditions. Procedure complexity as measured by relative value unit did not differ between groups, but length of stay was longer after night procedures (7.8 days vs. 4.3 days, p operating rooms.

  10. Statistical methods for quality improvement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ryan, Thomas P

    2011-01-01

    ...."-TechnometricsThis new edition continues to provide the most current, proven statistical methods for quality control and quality improvementThe use of quantitative methods offers numerous benefits...

  11. Informatics Approach to Improving Surgical Skills Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Gazi

    2013-01-01

    Surgery as a profession requires significant training to improve both clinical decision making and psychomotor proficiency. In the medical knowledge domain, tools have been developed, validated, and accepted for evaluation of surgeons' competencies. However, assessment of the psychomotor skills still relies on the Halstedian model of…

  12. Dairy processing, Improving quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, G.

    2003-01-01

    This book discusses raw milk composition, production and quality, and reviews developments in processing from hygiene and HACCP systems to automation, high-pressure processing and modified atmosphere packaging.

  13. Gastric cancer : staging, treatment, and surgical quality assurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikken, Johannes Leen

    2012-01-01

    Research described in this thesis focuses on several aspects of gastric cancer care: staging and prognostication, multimodality treatment, and surgical quality assurance. PART I - STAGING AND PROGNOSTICATION Cancer staging is one of the fundamental activities in oncology.6,7 For over 50 years, the

  14. Surgical correction of pectus carinatum improves perceived body image, mental health and self-esteem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Marie Veje; Grosen, Kasper; Pilegaard, Hans K.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of surgical correction of pectus carinatum on health- related quality of life and self-esteem. METHODS: Between May 2012 and May 2013, a prospective observational single-center cohort study was conduct- ed on consecutive patients...... undergoing surgical correction of pectus carinatum at our institution. Patients filled in questionnaires on health-related quality of life and self-esteem before and six months after surgery. RESULTS: Disease-specific health-related quality of life was improved by 33% (95% CI: 23; 44%) according to responses...... to the Nuss Questionnaire modified for Adults. The improvement for generic mental health-related quality of life was 7% (95% CI: 3; 12%) in responses to the Short Form-36 Questionnaire. The improvement in self-esteem was 9% (95% CI: 2; 17%) as assessed with the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. A Single Step...

  15. Quantitative research versus quality assurance, quality improvement, total quality management, and continuous quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsang, J

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a review of the scientific method used in the quantitative research studies for consumers, evaluators, and applied nurse researchers. The fundamental characteristics of the problem-solving/ performance-improvement processes of quality assurance, quality improvement, total quality management, and continuous quality improvement are described. Research is compared with these processes, and is followed by a discussion about the publication of quantitative research findings.

  16. Surgical correction of pectus carinatum improves perceived body image, mental health and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Marie Veje; Grosen, Kasper; Pilegaard, Hans K; Laustsen, Sussie

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of surgical correction of pectus carinatum on health-related quality of life and self-esteem. Between May 2012 and May 2013, a prospective observational single-center cohort study was conducted on consecutive patients undergoing surgical correction of pectus carinatum at our institution. Patients filled in questionnaires on health-related quality of life and self-esteem before and six months after surgery. Disease-specific health-related quality of life was improved by 33% (95% CI: 23; 44%) according to responses to the Nuss Questionnaire modified for Adults. The improvement for generic mental health-related quality of life was 7% (95% CI: 3; 12%) in responses to the Short Form-36 Questionnaire. The improvement in self-esteem was 9% (95% CI: 2; 17%) as assessed with the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. A Single Step Questionnaire supported the improvements in health-related quality of life and self-esteem six months postsurgery. This study confirms positive effects of surgical correction of pectus carinatum on health-related quality of life and self-esteem. Patients were to a greater extent self-satisfied about chest appearance following surgery, indicating this to be a step in the right direction toward improved body image, mental health and self-esteem. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An interdisciplinary approach to improve surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaty, Oisín; Gaughan, Leah; Downey, Colum; Carolan, Noreen; Brophy, Megan Joanne; Kavanagh, Ruth; McNamara, Deborah A A; Smyth, Edmond; Burns, Karen; Fitzpatrick, Fidelma

    2018-03-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to improve surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis (SAP) prescribing in orthopaedic surgery using the model for improvement framework. Design/methodology/approach Orthopaedic patients receiving joint replacements, hip fracture repairs or open-reduction internal-fixation procedures were included. Antimicrobial(s); dose, time of administration and duration of SAP were evaluated for appropriateness based on the local SAP guidelines. After baseline data collection, a driver diagram was constructed with interventions devised for plan-do-study-act cycles. Data were fed back weekly using a point prevalence design (PPD). Interventions included SAP guideline changes, reminders and tools to support key messages. Findings SAP in 168 orthopaedic surgeries from 15 June 2016 to 31 January 2017 was studied. Prescribing appropriateness improved from 20 to 78 per cent. Junior doctor changeover necessitated additional education and reminders. Practical implications Due to constant staff changeover; continuous data collection, communication, education and reminders are essential to ensure continuous compliance with clinical guidance. Patients with hip fractures are difficult to weigh, requiring weight estimation for weight-based antimicrobial dosing. Unintended consequences of interventions included the necessity to change pre-operative workflow to accommodate reconstitution time of additional antimicrobials and inadvertent continuation of new antimicrobials post-operatively. Originality/value Rather than perform the traditional retrospective focused audit, we established a prospective, continuous, interventional quality improvement (QI) project focusing on internal processes within the control of the project team with rapid cyclical changes and interventions. The weekly PPD was pragmatic and enabled the QI project to be sustained with no additional resources.

  18. Superior quality of life and improved surgical margins are achievable with robotic radical prostatectomy after a long learning curve: a prospective single-surgeon study of 1552 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James E; Egger, Sam; Böhm, Maret; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Matthews, Jayne; Rasiah, Krishan; Stricker, Phillip D

    2014-03-01

    Comparative studies suggest functional and perioperative superiority of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) over open radical prostatectomy (ORP). To determine whether high-volume experienced open surgeons can improve their functional and oncologic outcomes with RARP and, if so, how many cases are required to surpass ORP outcomes and reach the learning curve plateau. A prospective observational study compared two surgical techniques: 1552 consecutive men underwent RARP (866) or ORP (686) at a single Australian hospital from 2006 to 2012, by one surgeon with 3000 prior ORPs. Demographic and clinicopathologic data were collected prospectively. The Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite quality of life (QoL) questionnaire was administered at baseline, 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 mo. Multivariate linear and logistic regression modelled the difference in QoL domains and positive surgical margin (PSM) odds ratio (OR), respectively, against case number. A total of 1511 men were included in the PSM and 609 in the QoL analysis. RARP sexual function scores surpassed ORP scores after 99 RARPs and increased to a mean difference at 861st case of 11.0 points (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.9-16.1), plateauing around 600-700 RARPs. Early urinary incontinence scores for RARP surpassed ORP after 182 RARPs and increased to a mean difference of 8.4 points (95% CI, 2.1-14.7), plateauing around 700-800 RARPs. The odds of a pT2 PSM were initially higher for RARP but became lower after 108 RARPs and were 55% lower (OR: 0.45; 95% CI, 0.22-0.92) by the 866th RARP. The odds of a pT3/4 PSM were initially higher for RARP but decreased, plateauing around 200-300 RARPs with an OR of 1.15 (0.68-1.95) at the 866th RARP. Limitations include single-surgeon data and residual confounding. RARP had a long learning curve with inferior outcomes initially, and then showed progressively superior sexual, early urinary, and pT2 PSM outcomes and similar pT3 PSM and late urinary outcomes. Learning RARP

  19. Surgical nurses' perceptions of ethical dilemmas, moral distress and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKeyser Ganz, Freda; Berkovitz, Keren

    2012-07-01

    To describe surgical nurses' perceived levels of ethical dilemmas, moral distress and perceived quality of care and the associations among them. Nurses are committed to providing quality care. They can experience ethical dilemmas and moral distress while providing patient care. Little research has focused on the effect of moral distress or ethical dilemmas on perceived quality of care. Descriptive, cross-sectional study. After administration and institutional Research Ethics Committee approval, a researcher requested 119 surgical nurses working in two Israeli hospitals to fill out three questionnaires (personal background characteristics; Ethical Dilemmas in Nursing and Quality of Nursing Care). Data collection took place from August 2007 to January 2008. Participant mean age was 39·7 years. The sample consisted mostly of women, Jewish and married staff nurses. The majority of nurses reported low to moderate levels of ethical dilemma frequency but intermediate levels of ethical dilemma intensity. Frequency of ethical dilemmas was negatively correlated with level of nursing skill, meeting patient's needs and total quality of care. No important correlations were found between intensity of ethical dilemmas and quality of care. Levels of ethical dilemma frequency were higher than intensity. Nurses tended to be satisfied with their level of quality of care. Increased frequency of ethical dilemmas was associated with some aspects of perceived quality of care. Quality of care is related to ethical dilemmas and moral distress among surgical nurses. Therefore, efforts should be made to decrease the frequency of these feelings to improve the quality of patient care. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Preanalytical quality improvement: in quality we trust

    OpenAIRE

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Becan-McBride, Kathleen; Behúlová, Darina; Bowen, Raffick A; Church, Stephen; Delanghe, Joris; Grankvist, Kjell; Kitchen, Steve; Nybo, Mads; Nauck, Matthias; Nikolac, Nora; Palicka, Vladimir; Plebani, Mario; Sandberg, Sverre; Simundic, Ana-Maria

    2013-01-01

    Total quality in laboratory medicine should be defined as the guarantee that each activity throughout the total testing process is correctly performed, providing valuable medical decision-making and effective patient care. In the past decades, a 10-fold reduction in the analytical error rate has been achieved thanks to improvements in both reliability and standardization of analytical techniques, reagents, and instrumentation. Notable advances in information technology, quality control and qu...

  1. Prevalence and Complications of Postoperative Transfusion for Cervical Fusion Procedures in Spine Surgery: An Analysis of 11,588 Patients from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoude, Ahmed; Aldebeyan, Sultan; Fortin, Maryse; Nooh, Anas; Jarzem, Peter; Ouellet, Jean A; Weber, Michael H

    2017-12-01

    Retrospective cohort study. The purpose of this study was to assess the rate of blood transfusion after cervical fusion surgery, and its effect on complication rates. Cervical spine fusions have gained interest in the literature since these procedures are now ever more frequently being performed in an outpatient setting with few complications. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database was used to identify patients that underwent cervical fusion from 2010 to 2013. Multivariate regression analysis was used to determine postoperative complications associated with transfusion and cervical fusion. We identified 11,588 patients who had cervical fusion between 2010 and 2013. The rate of blood transfusion following cervical fusion found to be 1.47%. All transfused patients were found to have increased risk of venous thromboembolism (TBE) (odds ratio [OR], 3.19; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.16-8.77), myocardial infarction (MI) (OR, 9.12; 95% CI, 2.53-32.8), increased length of stay (LOS) (OR, 28.03; 95% CI, 14.28-55.01) and mortality (OR, 4.14; 95% CI, 1.44-11.93). Single level fusion had increased risk of TBE (OR, 3.37; 95% CI, 1.01-11.33), MI (OR, 10.5; 95% CI, 1.88-59.89), and LOS (OR, 14.79; 95% CI, 8.2-26.67). Multilevel fusion had increased risk of TBE (OR, 5.64; 95% CI, 1.15-27.6), surgical site infection (OR, 16.29; 95% CI, 3.34-79.49), MI (OR, 10.84; 95% CI, 2.01-58.55), LOS (OR, 26.56; 95% CI, 11.8-59.78), and mortality (OR, 10.24; 95% CI, 2.45-42.71). Patients who had anterior cervical discectomy and fusion surgery and received a transfusion had an increased risk of TBE (OR, 4.87; 95% CI, 1.04-22.82), surgical site infection (OR, 9.73; 95% CI, 2.14-44.1), MI (OR, 9.88; 95% CI, 1.87-52.2), increased LOS of more than 2 days (OR, 28.34; 95% CI, 13.79-58.21) and increase in mortality (OR, 6.3; 95% CI, 1.76-22.48). While, transfused patients who had posterior fusion surgery had increased risk of MI (OR

  2. Deep neuromuscular block improves the surgical conditions for laryngeal microsurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H J; Lee, K; Park, W K; Lee, B R; Joo, H M; Koh, Y W; Seo, Y W; Kim, W S; Yoo, Y C

    2015-12-01

    Adequate neuromuscular block is required throughout laryngeal microsurgery. We hypothesized that the surgical conditions would improve under a deeper level of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block. Seventy-two patients undergoing laryngeal microsurgery were randomly allocated to either the 'post-tetanic counts 1-2' (PTC1-2) group or the 'train-of-four counts 1-2' (TOFcount1-2) group according to the level of neuromuscular block used. Two different doses of rocuronium (1.2 or 0.5 mg kg(-1)) were used after anaesthetic induction, and two respective targets of neuromuscular block (post-tetanic counts ≤2 or train-of-four count of 1 or 2) were used. Surgical conditions were assessed by the surgeon using a five-point rating scale (extremely poor/poor/acceptable/good/optimal), and clinically acceptable surgical conditions were defined as those which were rated acceptable, good, or optimal. The occurrence of vocal cord movement and postoperative adverse events was assessed. The surgical conditions were significantly different between the PTC1-2 and TOFcount1-2 groups (extremely poor/poor/acceptable/good/optimal: 0/2/1/7/26 and 3/10/2/14/7, respectively, Pneuromuscular block (post-tetanic count of 1-2) surgical conditions in patients undergoing laryngeal microsurgery improves. NCT01980069. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Improving Recruitment of surgical trainees and Training of Surgeons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    paper reports on how to improve recruitment of surgical trainees and training of surgeons in Uganda, focusing on perceptions of potential trainees, trainers, and medical administrators. Methods: This was cross sectional, descriptive study sampled at least 50% of each of the relevant category of interviewees.

  4. Improving Surgical Skills of OBGYN Residents through Partnership ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Odidika Ugochukwu Joannes Umeora

    Improving Surgical Skills of OBGYN Residents through Partnership with Rural Hospitals: Experience from Southeast Nigeria. Ann Med Health Sci Res. 2017; 7: 92-96. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons. Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License, which allows others ...

  5. Changes in quality of life associated with surgical risk in elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Paola Severo; de Souza, Emiliane Nogueira; Rodrigues, Juliane; Moraes, Maria Antonieta

    2015-10-01

    The study aims to verify quality of life of elderly patients submitted to cardiac surgery, and correlating surgical risk to health-related quality of life instrument domains. Prospective cohort study, performed at a cardiology hospital. It included elderly patients who had undergone elective cardiac surgery. Pre- and postoperative quality of life was evaluated by applying the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Old (WHOQOL-OLD) scale and the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire. Surgical risk was stratified using the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE). Fifty-four patients, mostly men (64.8%), were included, with a mean age of 69.3 ± 5.7 years. The eight domains of the SF-36 questionnaire, and the four facets presented for the WHOQOL-OLD scale showed improved quality of life 6 months after surgery (P quality of life instruments. The data showed improved quality of life of elderly people submitted to cardiac surgery, unrelated to surgical risk. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Hospitalwide quality improvement in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriratanaban, Jiruth; Wanavanichkul, Yuwaree

    2004-05-01

    In 1999 King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, a 1,500-bed teaching hospital in Thailand, started planning and implementing a hospitalwide quality improvement program, as required for accreditation. DEPLOYING THE NINE-STEP LADDER STRATEGY: The steps in the strategy were as follows: (1) ensure commitment and formulate mutual strategies; (2) develop teams, technical staff, and support; (3) pilot new improvement activities and expand existing quality programs; (4) improve core systems and functions; (5) expand to the whole organization; (6) perform self-assessment and internal survey, (7) complete the incomplete; (8) submit the request for accreditation; and (9) improve continuously for excellence. For example, for step 3, the hospital set up five pilot cross-functional quality lead teams: the infection control committee, emergency-care patient care team, medication system team, laboratory and x-ray services team, and operating room team. The hospital was accredited by the Institute of Hospital Quality Improvement and Accreditation, Thailand. Improvements were shown in inpatient mortality, patient satisfaction, and reporting of patient risk incidents and the number of serious incidents. Critical success factors in implementing a hospitalwide QI program were as follows: (1) role of leadership, (2) need for "quality strategists," (3) physician involvement and participation in QI teams, (4) vertical and horizontal communication, (5) performance drivers, (6) simplicity in continuous quality improvement, and (7) the value of a learning culture.

  7. Neuromuscular blockade for improvement of surgical conditions during laparotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Matias Vested; Scheppan, Susanne; Kissmeyer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: During laparotomy, surgeons frequently experience difficult surgical conditions if the patient's abdominal wall or diaphragm is tense. This issue is particularly pertinent while closing the fascia and placing the intestines into the abdominal cavity. Establishment of a deep neuromus......INTRODUCTION: During laparotomy, surgeons frequently experience difficult surgical conditions if the patient's abdominal wall or diaphragm is tense. This issue is particularly pertinent while closing the fascia and placing the intestines into the abdominal cavity. Establishment of a deep...... neuromuscular blockade (NMB), defined as a post-tetanic-count (PTC) of 0-1, paralyses the abdominal wall muscles and the diaphragm. We hypothesised that deep NMB (PTC 0-1) would improve surgical conditions during upper laparotomy as compared to standard NMB with bolus administration. METHODS...

  8. Preanalytical quality improvement: in quality we trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Becan-McBride, Kathleen; Behúlová, Darina; Bowen, Raffick A; Church, Stephen; Delanghe, Joris; Grankvist, Kjell; Kitchen, Steve; Nybo, Mads; Nauck, Matthias; Nikolac, Nora; Palicka, Vladimir; Plebani, Mario; Sandberg, Sverre; Simundic, Ana-Maria

    2013-01-01

    Total quality in laboratory medicine should be defined as the guarantee that each activity throughout the total testing process is correctly performed, providing valuable medical decision-making and effective patient care. In the past decades, a 10-fold reduction in the analytical error rate has been achieved thanks to improvements in both reliability and standardization of analytical techniques, reagents, and instrumentation. Notable advances in information technology, quality control and quality assurance methods have also assured a valuable contribution for reducing diagnostic errors. Nevertheless, several lines of evidence still suggest that most errors in laboratory diagnostics fall outside the analytical phase, and the pre- and postanalytical steps have been found to be much more vulnerable. This collective paper, which is the logical continuum of the former already published in this journal 2 years ago, provides additional contribution to risk management in the preanalytical phase and is a synopsis of the lectures of the 2nd European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM)-Becton Dickinson (BD) European Conference on Preanalytical Phase meeting entitled "Preanalytical quality improvement: in quality we trust" (Zagreb, Croatia, 1-2 March 2013). The leading topics that will be discussed include quality indicators for preanalytical phase, phlebotomy practices for collection of blood gas analysis and pediatric samples, lipemia and blood collection tube interferences, preanalytical requirements of urinalysis, molecular biology hemostasis and platelet testing, as well as indications on best practices for safe blood collection. Auditing of the preanalytical phase by ISO assessors and external quality assessment for preanalytical phase are also discussed.

  9. Improving surgical site infection prevention practices through a multifaceted educational intervention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owens, P

    2015-03-01

    As part of the National Clinical Programme on healthcare-associated infection prevention, a Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) and Royal College of Physicians of Ireland (RCPI) working group developed a quality improvement tool for prevention of surgical site infection (SS). We aimed to validate the effectiveness of an educational campaign, which utilises this quality improvement tool to prevent SSI in a tertiary hospital. Prior to the SSI educational campaign, surgical patients were prospectively audited and details of antibiotic administration recorded. Prophylactic antibiotic administration recommendations were delivered via poster and educational presentations. Post-intervention, the audit was repeated. 50 patients were audited pre-intervention, 45 post-intervention. Post-intervention, prophylaxis within 60 minutes prior to incision increased from 54% to 68% (p = 0.266). Appropriate postoperative prescribing improved from 71% to 92% (p = 0.075). A multifaceted educational program may be effective in changing SSI prevention practices.

  10. Health-related quality of life improves during one year of medical and surgical treatment in a European population-based inception cohort of patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, J; Weimers, P; Pedersen, N

    2014-01-01

    .4 and from 48.8 to 55.7, respectively. UC patients needing surgery or biologicals had lower SIBDQ scores before and after compared to the rest, while biological therapy improved SIBDQ scores in CD. CD and UC patients in both regions improved all SF-12 scores. Only Eastern European UC patients achieved SF-12......: The EpiCom inception cohort consists of 1560 IBD patients from 31 European centres covering a background population of approximately 10.1 million. Patients answered the disease specific Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (SIBDQ) and generic Short Form 12 (SF-12) questionnaire at diagnosis...... summary scores equal to or above the normal population. CONCLUSION: Medical and surgical treatment improved HRQoL during the first year of disease. The majority of IBD patients in both Eastern and Western Europe reported a positive perception of disease-specific but not generic HRQoL. Biological therapy...

  11. Whither surgical quality assurance of breast cancer surgery (surgical margins and local recurrence) after paterson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundred, N J; Thomas, J; Dixon, J M J

    2017-10-01

    The Kennedy report into the actions of the disgraced Breast Surgeon, Paterson focussed on issues of informed consent for mastectomy, management of surgical margins and raised concerns about local recurrence rates and the increasing emphasis on cosmesis after mastectomy for breast cancer. This article assesses whether Kennedy's recommendations apply to the UK as a whole and how to address these issues. New GMC advice on consent and newer nonevidenced innovations in immediate reconstruction have altered the level of informed consent required. Patients deserve a better understanding of the issues of oncological versus cosmetic outcomes on which to base their decisions. Involvement of the whole multidisciplinary team including Oncologists is necessary in surgical planning. Failure to obtain clear microscopic margins at mastectomy leads to an increased local recurrence, yet has received little attention in the UK. Whereas, other countries have used surgical quality assurance audits to reduce local recurrence; local recurrence rates are not available and the extent of variation across the UK in margin involvement after surgery, its management and relationship to local recurrence needs auditing prospectively to reduce unnecessary morbidity. To reassure public, patients and the NHS management, an accreditation system with more rigour than NHSBSP QA and peer review is now required. Resource and efforts to support its introduction will be necessary from the Royal College of Surgeons and the Association of Breast Surgeons. New innovations require careful evaluation before their backdoor introduction to the NHS. Private Hospitals need to have the same standards imposed.

  12. Continuous quality improvement program for hip and knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Deborah A; Christiansen, Tanya; Smith, Christopher; Squire Howden, Jane; Werle, Jason; Faris, Peter; Frank, Cy

    2015-01-01

    Improving quality of care and maximizing efficiency are priorities in hip and knee replacement, where surgical demand and costs increase as the population ages. The authors describe the integrated structure and processes from the Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) Program for Hip and Knee Replacement Surgical Care and summarize lessons learned from implementation. The Triple Aim framework and 6 dimensions of quality care are overarching constructs of the CQI program. A validated, evidence-based clinical pathway that measures quality across the continuum of care was adopted. Working collaboratively, multidisciplinary experts embedded the CQI program into everyday practices in clinics across Alberta. Currently, 83% of surgeons participate in the CQI program, representing 95% of the total volume of hip and knee surgeries. Biannual reports provide feedback to improve care processes, infrastructure planning, and patient outcomes. CQI programs evaluating health care services inform choices to optimize care and improve efficiencies through continuous knowledge translation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. IMPROVING QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN PANIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Petroman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Consumers of panification products (as well as consumers of any other type of product or service are concerned about the quality of the products they purchase. Implementing the quality management system in the food industry is not compulsory, but it can bring about numerous, palpable benefits, particularly in reducing the amount of acryl amide. It is a modern system allowing the management analysis aiming at checking and reaching the goals to define new objectives, and the continuous improvement of the quality of processes and products.

  14. Global quality imaging: improvement actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Lawrence S; Pérez, Maria R; Applegate, Kimberly E; Rehani, Madan M; Ringertz, Hans G; George, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Workforce shortage, workload increase, workplace changes, and budget challenges are emerging issues around the world, which could place quality imaging at risk. It is important for imaging stakeholders to collaborate, ensure patient safety, improve the quality of care, and address these issues. There is no single panacea. A range of improvement measures, strategies, and actions are required. Examples of improvement actions supporting the 3 quality measures are described under 5 strategies: conducting research, promoting awareness, providing education and training, strengthening infrastructure, and implementing policies. The challenge is to develop long-term, cost-effective, system-based improvement actions that will bring better outcomes and underpin a sustainable future for quality imaging. In an imaging practice, these actions will result in selecting the right procedure (justification), using the right dose (optimization), and preventing errors along the patient journey. To realize this vision and implement these improvement actions, a range of expertise and adequate resources are required. Stakeholders should collaborate and work together. In today's globalized environment, collaboration is strength and provides synergy to achieve better outcomes and greater success. Copyright © 2011 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quality Improvement with Trustee Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Ellen Earle; Seymour, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    Total Quality Management is a comprehensive system for developing organizationwide participation in planning for and implementing continuous improvement in critical processes. In colleges, trustees can be central to the success of the method through their commitment and the development of supportive policy and procedures. (MSE)

  16. Quality Improvement Practices and Trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Jens J.; Hartz, Ove; Edgeman, Rick L.

    1998-01-01

    The following article, "Quality Improvement Practices and Trends in Denmark," is the first in a series of papers arranged for and co-authored by Dr. Rick L. Edgeman. Rick is a member of QE's Editorial Board and is on sabbatical from Colorado State University. During the year, Rick and his family...... professor, as well as key individuals from various industries. In addition to the above activities, Rick will be working with the European Foundation for Quality Management on their "European Master's Programme in Total Quality Management." That program involves a consortium of European universities. Rick...... has begun the process of developing a comparable consortium of American universities for the same purpose-- an activity which is cosponsored by the Education Division of the American Society for Quality (ASQ)....

  17. Quality improvement tools and processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Catherine Y

    2015-04-01

    The Model for Improvement and the Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle is a popular quality improvement (QI) tool for health care providers to successfully lead QI projects and redesign care processes. This tool has several distinct components that must be addressed in sequence to organize and critically evaluate improvement activities. Unlike other health sciences clinical research, QI projects and research are based on dynamic hypotheses that develop into observable, serial tests of change with continuous collection and feedback of performance data to stakeholders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Improved patient specific seizure detection during pre-surgical evaluation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chua, Eric C-P

    2011-04-01

    There is considerable interest in improved off-line automated seizure detection methods that will decrease the workload of EEG monitoring units. Subject-specific approaches have been demonstrated to perform better than subject-independent ones. However, for pre-surgical diagnostics, the traditional method of obtaining a priori data to train subject-specific classifiers is not practical. We present an alternative method that works by adapting the threshold of a subject-independent to a specific subject based on feedback from the user.

  19. Understanding variation in the quality of the surgical treatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeck, Florian R; Jacobs, Bruce L; Hollenbeck, Brent K

    2013-01-01

    More than 80% of men with prostate cancer undergo active treatment, which can be associated with significant morbidity. Outcomes of surgical treatment vary widely depending on who treated the patient and where the patient was treated, implying that there is room for improvement. Factors influencing outcomes include patient characteristics as well as some measure of procedure volume. Although relationships between volume and outcomes for prostatectomy can most likely be explained by differences between surgeons (e.g., experience, technical skill), the hospital environment (e.g., team communication, safety culture) has the potential to either amplify or dampen the effects. Although most patient factors are immutable, these other aspects of surgical care and the delivery environment provide opportunities for quality improvement. Collaborative quality improvement initiatives may prove to be an important vehicle for achieving better prostate cancer care. These grass roots organizations, driven largely by urologists dedicated to providing prostate cancer care, have had initial successes in improving some aspects of quality in prostate cancer care, including reducing unwarranted use of imaging and perioperative morbidity. However, much of the variation in functional outcomes after prostate cancer surgery arises from differences in technical skill. Evaluating and improving intraoperative surgeon performance will inevitably be challenging, as they require acquisition and interpretation of data collected in the operating room. To this end, several methods have been described to objectively assess what happens in the operating room.

  20. Using Lean to Advance Quality Improvement Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Christopher Craig; Williams, Barbara L; Ching, Joan M; Chafetz, Lynne A; Kaplan, Gary S

    2016-01-01

    Quality improvement research skills are not commonplace among quality improvement practitioners, and research on the effectiveness of quality improvement has not always kept pace with improvement innovation. However, the Lean tools applied to quality improvement should be equally relevant to the advancement of quality improvement research. We applied the Lean methods to develop a simplified quality improvement publication pathway enabling a small research methodology group to increase quality improvement research throughout the institution. The key innovations of the pathway are horizontal integration of the quality improvement research methods group across the institution, implementation of a Lean quality improvement research pathway, and application of a just-in-time quality improvement research toolkit. This work provides a road map and tools for the acceleration of quality improvement research. At our institution, the Lean quality improvement research approach was associated with statistically significant increases in the number (annual mean increase from 3.0 to 8.5, p = .03) and breadth of published quality improvement research articles, and in the number of quality improvement research projects currently in process. Application of Lean methods to the quality improvement research process can aid in increasing publication of quality improvement articles from across the institution.

  1. Surgical drilling: design and performance of an improved drill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S; Pal, S; Albright, J A

    1982-08-01

    The majority of twist drills used in orthopaedics are very similar to chisel pointed metal drilling bits. Modifications usually observed are reduction of the point angle to 90 deg and sometimes grinding of the entire cutting lip at 0 deg rake angle, which appeared to have been made arbitrarily without any advantage. We have attempted to design a surgical drill bit with the objective of minimization of the drilling thrust and temperature and effective removal of bone chips. Our results showed that the presence of the chisel edge was mainly responsible for increasing the thrust force and the temperature developed. The effects of a constant feed rate and thrust on the peak temperature were also examined. The combined effect of the helix and the point angles on the rake angle which in turn determines the cutting efficiency was analyzed for various types of surgical bits. Based on our results and previously published data from the literature an optimized drill bit was designed with a split point, a point angle of 118 deg, a parabolic flute, and a helix angle of 36 deg and its performance was compared with other existing surgical drill bits. For drilling in compact bone, the new design decreased the thrust load by 45 percent an the peak temperature rise by 41 percent. Similar improvements were also recorded for drilling bone cement. The time of drilling a bone cortex was also significantly reduced and "walking" on the curved bone surface was eliminated and dimensional tolerance on hole sizes was improved. The new design is likely to reduce the time of surgery and also minimize the tissue damage.

  2. Involving vendors in continuous quality improvement efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, M C

    1995-03-01

    In the hospital environment, vendors supply a wide range of items, from surgical sutures to the latest in high-cost technological equipment. Also, many clinical and support services, such as respiratory therapy, transcription, and computer databanks are now outsourced to commercial vendors. Interaction with such vendors is often less than satisfactory, with prolonged timelines and disruption of an important process that is being computerized. Although hospitals deal with very few vendors in long-term relationships, such as those seen in manufacturing, this should not preclude the formation of a supplier-customer relationship that goes beyond management's interaction with the sales representative in response to a request for proposal. This is especially true when a process improvement team has studied an internal process and defined a key quality characteristic.

  3. A Comprehensive, High-Quality Orthopedic Intern Surgical Skills Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Samuel E; Patt, Joshua C; Scannell, Brian P

    2016-01-01

    To design and implement a month-long, low-cost, comprehensive surgical skills curriculum built to address the needs of orthopedic surgery interns with high satisfaction among both interns and faculty. The study design was retrospective and descriptive. The study was conducted at tertiary care referral center with a medium sized orthopedic residency surgery program (5 residents/year). Totally 5 orthopedic surgery residents and 16 orthopedic surgery faculty participated. A general mission was established-to orient the resident to the postgraduate year 1 and prepare them for success in residency. The basic tenets of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons surgical skills program framework were built. Curricular additions included anatomic study, surgical approaches, joint-specific physical examination, radiographic interpretation, preoperative planning, reduction techniques, basic emergency and operating room procedures, cadaveric procedure practice, and introduction to arthroplasty. The program was held in August during protected time for intern participants. In total, 16 orthopedic surgeons instructed 85% of the educational sessions. One faculty member did most of the preparation and organization to facilitate the program. The program ran for a cumulative 89 hours, including 14.5 hours working with cadaveric specimens. The program cost a total of $8100. The average module received a 4.15 rating on a 5-point scale, with 4 representing "good" and 5 representing "excellent." The program was appropriately timed and addressed topics relevant to the intern without sacrificing clinical experience or burdening inpatient services with interns' absence. The program received high satisfaction ratings from both the interns as well as the faculty. Additionally, the program fostered early relationships between interns and faculty-an unforeseen benefit. In the future, our program plans to better integrate validated learning metrics and improve instruction pertaining to both

  4. Distress and quality of life characteristics associated with seeking surgical treatment for stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cichowski Sara

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current research focuses on three variables in evaluating the impact of stress urinary incontinence (SUI on daily living: severity of incontinence, distress or bother resulting from incontinence, and effect on health related quality of life (HRQoL. Understanding the impact of these variables is important as they are the driving force behind women seeking surgical treatment. Given the importance of HRQoL in determining need for treatment, as well as evaluating treatment success, this review provides an assessment of the degree to which HRQoL is impaired in women seeking surgical treatment. Methods PubMed searches for the terms "quality of life and distress and urinary incontinence" and "quality of life and bother and urinary incontinence" were performed with limits of English, human and female subjects through May 2008. All studies using validated instruments were included. No time limit was placed on the search. Results Of 178 articles retrieved, 21 met the inclusion criteria, and 17 reported methods of scoring. The studies used the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI and the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ. Wide ranges of mean and individual levels of severity of symptoms, UDI and IIQ scores were seen among women seeking surgical treatment. Fourteen studies reported baseline and post-surgical treatment distress and QoL data. Statistically significant improvements between baseline and post-surgical UDI and IIQ scores were reported in 12 studies. Reported cure rates ranged from 46% to 97%. Satisfaction with the procedure was reported in 4 studies and ranged from 84% to 91%. A minority of studies reported the relationship between reduction in symptoms and change in HRQoL. Conclusion HRQoL is the main reason women seek surgical treatment for incontinence and surgical treatment leads to a significant improvement in mean HRQoL scores. Assessment of HRQoL has proved less useful in identifying why individual women seek

  5. The standardized surgical approach improves outcome of gallbladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igna Dorian

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to examine the extent of surgical procedures, pathological findings, complications and outcome of patients treated in the last 12 years for gallbladder cancer. Methods The impact of a standardized more aggressive approach compared with historical controls of our center with an individual approach was examined. Of 53 patients, 21 underwent resection for cure and 32 for palliation. Results Overall hospital mortality was 9% and procedure related mortality was 4%. The standardized approach in UICC stage IIa, IIb and III led to a significantly improved outcome compared to patients with an individual approach (Median survival: 14 vs. 7 months, mean+/-SEM: 26+/-7 vs. 17+/-5 months, p = 0.014. The main differences between the standardized and the individual approach were anatomical vs. atypical liver resection, performance of systematic lymph dissection of the hepaticoduodenal ligament and the resection of the common bile duct. Conclusion Anatomical liver resection, proof for bile duct infiltration and, in case of tumor invasion, radical resection and lymph dissection of the hepaticoduodenal ligament are essential to improve outcome of locally advanced gallbladder cancer.

  6. Surgical Technical Evidence Review for Elective Total Joint Replacement Conducted for the AHRQ Safety Program for Improving Surgical Care and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siletz, Anaar E.; Singer, Emily S.; Faltermeier, Claire; Hu, Q. Lina; Ko, Clifford Y.; Golladay, Gregory J.; Kates, Stephen L.; Wick, Elizabeth C.; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda

    2018-01-01

    Background: Use of enhanced recovery pathways (ERPs) can improve patient outcomes, yet national implementation of these pathways remains low. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ; funder), the American College of Surgeons, and the Johns Hopkins Medicine Armstrong Institute for Patent Safety and Quality have developed the Safety Program for Improving Surgical Care and Recovery—a national effort to catalyze implementation of practices to improve perioperative care and enhance recovery of surgical patients. This review synthesizes evidence that can be used to develop a protocol for elective total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA). Study Design: This review focuses on potential components of the protocol relevant to surgeons; anesthesia components are reported separately. Components were identified through review of existing pathways and from consultation with technical experts. For each, a structured review of MEDLINE identified systematic reviews, randomized trials, and observational studies that reported on these components in patients undergoing elective TKA/THA. This primary evidence review was combined with existing clinical guidelines in a narrative format. Results: Sixteen components were reviewed. Of the 10 preoperative components, most were focused on risk factor assessment including anemia, diabetes mellitus, tobacco use, obesity, nutrition, immune-modulating therapy, and opiates. Preoperative education, venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis, and bathing/Staphylococcus aureus decolonization were also included. The routine use of drains was the only intraoperative component evaluated. The 5 postoperative components included early mobilization, continuous passive motion, extended duration VTE prophylaxis, early oral alimentation, and discharge planning. Conclusion: This review synthesizes the evidence supporting potential surgical components of an ERP for elective TKA/THA. The AHRQ Safety Program for Improving

  7. Breathing and voice quality after surgical treatment for bilateral vocal cord paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnisch, Wilma; Brosch, Sibylle; Schmidt, Michael; Hagen, Rudolf

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate long-term results of surgical treatment for bilateral vocal cord paralysis using objective and subjective measures of breathing and voice quality. Prospective cross-sectional case series. Tertiary care otolaryngology and speech pathology referral center. Ten patients with bilateral vocal cord paralysis who underwent surgical treatment between October 1996 and May 2006 at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Würzburg, were examined at a mean of 27.2 months after surgery. Glottal area, voice range profile, Voice Handicap Index, pulmonary function test results, Göttingen Hoarseness Diagram, microlaryngostroboscopic findings, chronic respiratory disease questionnaire, and European Organization for Research and the Treatment of Cancer quality-of-life questionnaire, including the head and neck module. Residual recurrent nerve function was seen in 9 of 10 patients. Pulmonary data varied widely and did not correlate with the size of the glottal area. Quality of life, subjective dyspnea, and physical functioning correlated with expiratory airflow measures. Voice range was reduced in all patients. High breathiness and reduced maximum phonation time led to increased Voice Handicap Index scores. Microlaryngostroboscopic findings did not necessarily correlate with subjective dyspnea and vocal complaints. Reduction of inspiratory speaking efforts and acquisition of special breathing techniques improve airflow stability and effectiveness of respiration, leading to enhanced quality of life.

  8. Quality of life after stay in surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelha, Fernando J; Santos, Cristina C; Maia, Paula C; Castro, Maria A; Barros, Henrique

    2007-07-24

    In addition to mortality, Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) has increasingly been claimed as an important outcome variable. The aim of this study was to assess HRQOL and independence in activities of daily living (ADL) six months after discharge from an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), and to study its determinants. All post-operative adult patients admitted to a surgical ICU between October 2004 and July 2005, were eligible for the study. The following variables were recorded on admission: age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status (ASA-PS), type and magnitude of surgical procedure, ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS), mortality and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II). Six months after discharge, a Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36) and a questionnaire to assess dependency in ADL were sent to all survivors. Descriptive statistics was used to summarize data. Patient groups were compared using non-parametric tests. A logistic regression analysis was performed to identify covariate effects of each variable on dependency in personal and instrumental ADL, and for the change-in-health question of SF-36. Out of 333 hospital survivors, 226 completed the questionnaires. Fifty-nine percent reported that their general level of health was better on the day they answered the questionnaire than 12 months earlier. Patients with greater co-morbidities (ASA-PS III/IV), had lower SF-36 scores in all domains and were more frequently dependent in instrumental and personal ADL. Logistic regression showed that SAPS II was associated with changes in general level of health (OR 1.06, 95%CI, 1.01-1.11, p = 0,016). Six months after ICU discharge, 60% and 34% of patients, respectively, were dependent in at least one activity in instrumental ADL (ADLI) and personal ADL (ADLP). ASA-PS (OR 3.00, 95%CI 1.31-6.87, p = 0.009) and age (OR 2.36, 95%CI, 1.04-5.34, p = 0.04) were associated with dependency in ADLI. For ADLP, only ASA-PS (OR 4.58, 95%CI, 1

  9. Improving the Quality of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgical Notes in an Indian Public Sector Hospital in Accordance with the Royal College of Surgeons Guidelines: A Completed Audit Loop Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, B; Prasad, G Arun; Madhan, B

    2016-09-01

    Proper and adequate documentation in operation notes is a basic tool of clinical practice with medical and legal implications. An audit was done to ascertain if oral and maxillofacial surgery operative notes in an Indian public sector hospital adhered to the guidelines published by the Royal College of Surgeons England. Fifty randomly selected operative notes were evaluated against the guidelines by RCS England with regards to the essential generic components of an operation note. Additional criteria relevant to oral and Maxillofacial Surgery were also evaluated. Changes were introduced in the form of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery specific consent forms, diagram sheets and a computerized operation note proforma containing all essential and additional criteria along with prefilled template of operative findings. Re-audit of 50 randomly selected operation notes was performed after a 6 month period. In the 1st audit cycle, excellent documentation ranging from 94 to 100 % was seen in 9 essential criteria. Unsatisfactory documentation was observed in criteria like assistant name, date of surgery. Most consent forms contained abbreviations and some did not provide all details. Additional criteria specific to Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery scored poorly. In the 2nd Audit for loop completion, excellent documentation was seen in almost all essential and additional criteria. Mean percentage of data point inclusion improved from 84.6 to 98.4 % (0.001< P value <0.005). The use of abbreviations was seen in only 6 notes. Regular audits are now considered a mandatory quality improvement process that seeks to improve patient care and outcomes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first completed audit on operation notes documentation in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery from India. The introduction of a computerized operation note proforma showed excellent improvement in operation note documentation. Surgeons can follow the RCS guidelines to ensure standardization of

  10. Quality improvement and emerging global health priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah Abrampah, Nana; Syed, Shamsuzzoha Babar; Hirschhorn, Lisa R; Nambiar, Bejoy; Iqbal, Usman; Garcia-Elorrio, Ezequiel; Chattu, Vijay Kumar; Devnani, Mahesh; Kelley, Edward

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Quality improvement approaches can strengthen action on a range of global health priorities. Quality improvement efforts are uniquely placed to reorient care delivery systems towards integrated people-centred health services and strengthen health systems to achieve Universal Health Coverage (UHC). This article makes the case for addressing shortfalls of previous agendas by articulating the critical role of quality improvement in the Sustainable Development Goal era. Quality improvement can stimulate convergence between health security and health systems; address global health security priorities through participatory quality improvement approaches; and improve health outcomes at all levels of the health system. Entry points for action include the linkage with antimicrobial resistance and the contentious issue of the health of migrants. The work required includes focussed attention on the continuum of national quality policy formulation, implementation and learning; alongside strengthening the measurement-improvement linkage. Quality improvement plays a key role in strengthening health systems to achieve UHC.

  11. Relationship Between Hospital Performance on a Patient Satisfaction Survey and Surgical Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Greg D; Lawson, Elise H; Dawes, Aaron J; Russell, Marcia M; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda; Zingmond, David S; Ko, Clifford Y

    2015-09-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services include patient experience as a core component of its Value-Based Purchasing program, which ties financial incentives to hospital performance on a range of quality measures. However, it remains unclear whether patient satisfaction is an accurate marker of high-quality surgical care. To determine whether hospital performance on a patient satisfaction survey is associated with objective measures of surgical quality. Retrospective observational study of participating American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (ACS NSQIP) hospitals. We used data from a linked database of Medicare inpatient claims, ACS NSQIP, the American Hospital Association annual survey, and Hospital Compare from December 2, 2004, through December 31, 2008. A total of 103 866 patients older than 65 years undergoing inpatient surgery were included. Hospitals were grouped by quartile based on their performance on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey. Controlling for preoperative risk factors, we created hierarchical logistic regression models to predict the occurrence of adverse postoperative outcomes based on a hospital's patient satisfaction scores. Thirty-day postoperative mortality, major and minor complications, failure to rescue, and hospital readmission. Of the 180 hospitals, the overall mean patient satisfaction score was 68.0% (first quartile mean, 58.7%; fourth quartile mean, 76.7%). Compared with patients treated at hospitals in the lowest quartile, those at the highest quartile had significantly lower risk-adjusted odds of death (odds ratio = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.73-0.99), failure to rescue (odds ratio = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.70-0.96), and minor complication (odds ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.75-0.99). This translated to relative risk reductions of 11.1% (P = .04), 12.6% (P = .02), and 11.5% (P = .04), respectively. No significant relationship was noted between patient satisfaction

  12. The health-related quality of life journey of gynecologic oncology surgical patients: Implications for the incorporation of patient-reported outcomes into surgical quality metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Kemi M; Barber, Emma L; Bensen, Jeannette T; Snavely, Anna C; Gehrig, Paola A

    2016-05-01

    To report the changes in patient-reported quality of life for women undergoing gynecologic oncology surgeries. In a prospective cohort study from 10/2013-10/2014, women were enrolled pre-operatively and completed comprehensive interviews at baseline, 1, 3, and 6months post-operatively. Measures included the disease-specific Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-GP), general Patient Reported Outcome Measure Information System (PROMIS) global health and validated measures of anxiety and depression. Bivariate statistics were used to analyze demographic groups and changes in mean scores over time. Of 231 patients completing baseline interviews, 185 (80%) completed 1-month, 170 (74%) 3-month, and 174 (75%) 6-month interviews. Minimally invasive (n=115, 63%) and laparotomy (n=60, 32%) procedures were performed. Functional wellbeing (20 → 17.6, ptherapy administration. In an exploratory analysis of the interaction of QOL and quality, patients with increased postoperative healthcare resource use were noted to have higher baseline levels of anxiety. For women undergoing gynecologic oncology procedures, temporary declines in functional wellbeing are balanced by improvements in emotional wellbeing and decreased anxiety symptoms after surgery. Not all commonly used QOL surveys are sensitive to changes during the perioperative period and may not be suitable for use in surgical quality metrics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quality improvement in clinical documentation: does clinical governance work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghan M

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mahlegha Dehghan,1 Dorsa Dehghan,2 Akbar Sheikhrabori,3 Masoume Sadeghi,4 Mehrdad Jalalian5 1Department of Medical Surgical Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, 2Department of Pediatric Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Islamic Azad University Kerman Branch, Kerman, 3Department of Medical Surgical Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, 4Research Center for Modeling in Health, Institute of Futures Studies in Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, 5Electronic Physician Journal, Mashhad, Iran Introduction: The quality of nursing documentation is still a challenge in the nursing profession and, thus, in the health care industry. One major quality improvement program is clinical governance, whose mission is to continuously improve the quality of patient care and overcome service quality problems. The aim of this study was to identify whether clinical governance improves the quality of nursing documentation. Methods: A quasi-experimental method was used to show nursing documentation quality improvement after a 2-year clinical governance implementation. Two hundred twenty random nursing documents were assessed structurally and by content using a valid and reliable researcher made checklist. Results: There were no differences between a nurse's demographic data before and after 2 years (P>0.05 and the nursing documentation score did not improve after a 2-year clinical governance program. Conclusion: Although some efforts were made to improve nursing documentation through clinical governance, these were not sufficient and more attempts are needed. Keywords: nursing documentation, clinical governance, quality improvement, nursing record

  14. Structure, Process, and Outcome Quality of Surgical Site Infection Surveillance in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Stefan P; Eisenring, Marie-Christine; Sax, Hugo; Troillet, Nicolas

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the structure and quality of surveillance activities and to validate outcome detection in the Swiss national surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance program. DESIGN Countrywide survey of SSI surveillance quality. SETTING 147 hospitals or hospital units with surgical activities in Switzerland. METHODS Site visits were conducted with on-site structured interviews and review of a random sample of 15 patient records per hospital: 10 from the entire data set and 5 from a subset of patients with originally reported infection. Process and structure were rated in 9 domains with a weighted overall validation score, and sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated for the identification of SSI. RESULTS Of 50 possible points, the median validation score was 35.5 (range, 16.25-48.5). Public hospitals (P<.001), hospitals in the Italian-speaking region of Switzerland (P=.021), and hospitals with longer participation in the surveillance (P=.018) had higher scores than others. Domains that contributed most to lower scores were quality of chart review and quality of data extraction. Of 49 infections, 15 (30.6%) had been overlooked in a random sample of 1,110 patient records, accounting for a sensitivity of 69.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 54.6%-81.7%), a specificity of 99.9% (95% CI, 99.5%-100%), a positive predictive value of 97.1% (95% CI, 85.1%-99.9%), and a negative predictive value of 98.6% (95% CI, 97.7%-99.2%). CONCLUSIONS Irrespective of a well-defined surveillance methodology, there is a wide variation of SSI surveillance quality. The quality of chart review and the accuracy of data collection are the main areas for improvement. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:1172-1181.

  15. Surgical adverse outcomes and patients' evaluation of quality of care: inherent risk or reduced quality of care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; van Duijn-Bakker, Nanny; Kievit, Job

    2007-12-01

    Previous research has shown that sicker patients are less satisfied with their healthcare, but specific effects of adverse health outcomes have not been investigated. The present study aimed to assess whether patients who experience adverse outcomes, in hospital or after discharge, differ in their evaluation of quality of care compared with patients without adverse outcomes. In hospital adverse outcomes were prospectively recorded by surgeons and surgical residents as part of routine care. Four weeks after discharge, patients were interviewed by telephone about the occurrence of post-discharge adverse outcomes, and their overall evaluation of quality of hospital care and specific suggestions for improvements in the healthcare provided. Of 2145 surgical patients admitted to the Leiden University Medical Center in 2003, 1876 (88%) agreed to be interviewed. Overall evaluation was less favourable by patients who experienced post-discharge adverse outcomes only (average 19% lower). These patients were also more often dissatisfied (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.24 to 3.31) than patients without adverse outcomes, and they more often suggested that improvements were needed in medical care (OR 2.07, 1.45 to 2.95) and that patients were discharged too early (OR 3.26, 1.72 to 6.20). The effect of in hospital adverse outcomes alone was not statistically significant. Patients with both in hospital and post-discharge adverse outcomes also found the quality of care to be lower (on average 33% lower) than patients without adverse outcomes. Post-discharge adverse outcomes negatively influence patients' overall evaluation of quality of care and are perceived as being discharged too early, suggesting that patients need better information at discharge.

  16. Hyper-Realistic, Team-Centered Fleet Surgical Team Training Provides Sustained Improvements in Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tuan N; Kang, Jeff; Siriratsivawong, Kris; LaPorta, Anthony; Heck, Amber; Ferraro, Jessica; Robinson, Douglas; Walsh, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The high-stress, fast-paced environment of combat casualty care relies on effective teamwork and communication which translates into quality patient care. A training course was developed for U.S. Navy Fleet Surgical Teams to address these aspects of patient care by emphasizing efficiency and appropriate patient care. An effective training course provides knowledge and skills to pass the course evaluation and sustain the knowledge and skills acquired over time. The course included classroom didactic hours, and hands-on simulation sessions. A pretest was administered before the course, a posttest upon completion, and a sustainment test 5 months following course completion. The evaluation process measured changes in patient time to disposition and critical errors made during patient care. Naval Base San Diego, with resuscitation and surgical simulations carried out within the shipboard medical spaces. United States Navy medical personnel including physicians of various specialties, corpsmen, nurses, and nurse anesthetists deploying aboard ships. Time to disposition improved significantly, 11 ± 3 minutes, from pretest to posttest, and critical errors improved by 4 ± 1 errors per encounter. From posttest to sustainment test, time to disposition increased by 3 ± 1, and critical errors decreased by 1 ± 1. This course showed value in improving teamwork and communication skills of participants, immediately upon completion of the course, and after 5 months had passed. Therefore, with ongoing sustainment activities within 6 months, this course can substantially improve trauma care provided by shipboard deployed Navy medical personnel to wounded service members. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Module based training improves and sustains surgical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, C G; Lindorff-Larsen, K; Funch-Jensen, P

    2015-01-01

    -lab course followed by 20 supervised Lichtenstein hernia repairs. Operative performance was video recorded and blindly rated by two consultants using a previously validated skills rating scale (8-40 points). Outcome measures were change in the ratings of operative skills and operative time. RESULTS......PURPOSE: Traditional surgical training is challenged by factors such as patient safety issues, economic considerations and lack of exposure to surgical procedures due to short working hours. A module-based clinical training model promotes rapidly acquired and persistent surgical skills. METHODS......: A randomised controlled trial concerning supervised hernia repair in eight training hospitals in Denmark was performed. The participants were 18 registrars [Post graduate year (PGY) 3 or more] in their first year of surgical specialist training. The intervention consisted of different modules with a skills...

  18. Neuromuscular blockade for improvement of surgical conditions during laparotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Matias Vested; Scheppan, Susanne; Kissmeyer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: During laparotomy, surgeons frequently experience difficult surgical conditions if the patient's abdominal wall or diaphragm is tense. This issue is particularly pertinent while closing the fascia and placing the intestines into the abdominal cavity. Establishment of a deep neuromus......INTRODUCTION: During laparotomy, surgeons frequently experience difficult surgical conditions if the patient's abdominal wall or diaphragm is tense. This issue is particularly pertinent while closing the fascia and placing the intestines into the abdominal cavity. Establishment of a deep...

  19. The readability of psychosocial wellness patient resources: improving surgical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugar, Meredith A; Cohen, Adam C; Wooden, William; Tholpady, Sunil S; Chu, Michael W

    2017-10-01

    Patient education is increasingly accessed with online resources and is essential for patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes. The average American adult reads at a seventh grade level, and the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the American Medical Association (AMA) recommend that information be written at a sixth-grade reading level. Health literacy plays an important role in the disease course and outcomes of all patients, including those with depression and likely other psychiatric disorders, although this is an area in need of further study. The purpose of this study was to collect and analyze written, online mental health resources on the Veterans Health Administration (VA) website, and other websites, using readability assessment instruments. An internet search was performed to identify written patient education information regarding mental health from the VA (the VA Mental Health Website) and top-rated psychiatric hospitals. Seven mental health topics were included in the analysis: generalized anxiety disorder, bipolar, major depressive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia, substance abuse, and suicide. Readability analyses were performed using the Gunning Fog Index, the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, the Coleman-Liau Index, the SMOG Readability Formula, and the Automated Readability Index. These scores were then combined into a Readability Consensus score. A two-tailed t-test was used to compare the mean values, and statistical significance was set at P wellness resources could benefit patient understanding and outcomes, especially in patients with lower literacy. Surgical outcomes are correlated with patient mental health and psychosocial wellness and thus can be improved with more appropriate levels of readability of psychosocial wellness resources. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Determining the quality and effectiveness of surgical spine care: patient satisfaction is not a valid proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godil, Saniya S; Parker, Scott L; Zuckerman, Scott L; Mendenhall, Stephen K; Devin, Clinton J; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J

    2013-09-01

    . Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to determine whether extent of improvement in quality of life (SF-12 physical component summary [PCS]) and disability (ODI/NDI) accurately predicted patient satisfaction versus dissatisfaction. Standard interpretation of area under the curve (AUC) was used: less than 0.7, poor; 0.7 to 0.8, fair; and greater than 0.8, good accuracy. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine if surgical morbidity (quality) or improvement in disability and quality of life (effectiveness of care) were independently associated with patient satisfaction. Four hundred twenty-two (84%) patients completed all questionnaires 3 months after surgery during the reviewed time period (mean age 55±14 years). Lumbar surgery was performed in 287 (68%) and cervical surgery in 135 (32%) patients. There were 51 (12.1%) 90-day complications, including 21 (5.0%) readmissions and 12 (2.8%) return to operating room. Three hundred fifty-eight (84.8%) patients were satisfied with provider care and 288 (68.2%) with their outcome. Satisfaction with provider care: In ROC analyses, extent of improvement in quality of life (SF-12) and disability (ODI/NDI) differentiated satisfaction versus dissatisfaction with care with very poor accuracy (AUC 0.49-0.69). In regression analysis, 3-month morbidity (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.45 [0.79-2.66]), readmission (0.66 [0.24-1.80]), improvement in quality of life (SF-12 PCS), or improvement in general health (health transition index) were not associated with satisfaction with care. Satisfaction with outcome: In ROC analyses, improvement in quality of life (SF-12) and disability (ODI/NDI) failed to differentiate satisfaction with good accuracy (AUC 0.76). Neither 90-day morbidity (1.05 [0.46-2.34]) nor 90-day readmission (0.27 [0.04-2.04]) was associated with satisfaction with outcome in regression analysis. Patient satisfaction is not a valid measure of overall quality or

  1. Improved compliance with the World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist is associated with reduced surgical specimen labelling errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martis, Walston R; Hannam, Jacqueline A; Lee, Tracey; Merry, Alan F; Mitchell, Simon J

    2016-09-09

    A new approach to administering the surgical safety checklist (SSC) at our institution using wall-mounted charts for each SSC domain coupled with migrated leadership among operating room (OR) sub-teams, led to improved compliance with the Sign Out domain. Since surgical specimens are reviewed at Sign Out, we aimed to quantify any related change in surgical specimen labelling errors. Prospectively maintained error logs for surgical specimens sent to pathology were examined for the six months before and after introduction of the new SSC administration paradigm. We recorded errors made in the labelling or completion of the specimen pot and on the specimen laboratory request form. Total error rates were calculated from the number of errors divided by total number of specimens. Rates from the two periods were compared using a chi square test. There were 19 errors in 4,760 specimens (rate 3.99/1,000) and eight errors in 5,065 specimens (rate 1.58/1,000) before and after the change in SSC administration paradigm (P=0.0225). Improved compliance with administering the Sign Out domain of the SSC can reduce surgical specimen errors. This finding provides further evidence that OR teams should optimise compliance with the SSC.

  2. Obstacles to implementation of an intervention to improve surgical services in an Ethiopian hospital: a qualitative study of an international health partnership project

    OpenAIRE

    Aveling, Emma-Louise; Zegeye, Desalegn Tegabu; Silverman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Access to safe surgical care represents a critical gap in healthcare delivery and development in many low- and middle-income countries, including Ethiopia. Quality improvement (QI) initiatives at hospital level may contribute to closing this gap. Many such quality improvement initiatives are carried out through international health partnerships. Better understanding of how to optimise quality improvement in low-income settings is needed, including through partnership-based approach...

  3. San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPAs grant program to protect and restore San Francisco Bay. The San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund (SFBWQIF) has invested in 58 projects along with 70 partners contributing to restore wetlands, water quality, and reduce polluted runoff.,

  4. Voltage Quality Improvement Using Solar Photovoltaic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisa Galzina

    2015-06-01

    This paper briefly shows the methods of power quality improvement, and then the results of on-site power quality measurements in the grid before and after the connection of the solar photovoltaic system.

  5. Does quality improvement work in neonatology improve clinical outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsbury, Dan L; Clark, Reese H

    2017-04-01

    Quality improvement initiatives in neonatology have been promoted as an important way of improving outcomes of newborns. The purpose of this review is to examine the effectiveness of recent quality improvement work in improving the outcomes of infants requiring neonatal intensive care. Quality improvement collaboratives and single-center projects demonstrate improvement of clinical processes and outcomes in neonatology that impact both preterm and term infants. Declines in morbidities, resource use, and length of stay have been associated with reductions in healthcare costs. Recent quality improvement work has shown evidence of improvement in clinical outcomes in neonatal intensive care patients. These improvements have important implications for the reduction of healthcare costs in this population.

  6. Pediatric hospitalist comanagement of surgical patients: structural, quality, and financial considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, David I; Rosenberg, Rebecca E; Shaughnessy, Erin E; Schaffzin, Joshua K; O'Connor, Katherine M; Melwani, Anjna; McLeod, Lisa M

    2014-11-01

    Comanagement of surgical patients is occurring more commonly among adult and pediatric patients. These systems of care can vary according to institution type, comanagement structure, and type of patient. Comanagement can impact quality, safety, and costs of care. We review these implications for pediatric surgical patients. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  7. The Health-Related Quality of Life Journey of Gynecologic Oncology Surgical Patients: Implications for the incorporation of patient-reported outcomes into surgical quality metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Kemi M.; Barber, Emma L.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Snavely, Anna C.; Gehrig, Paola A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To report the changes in patient-reported quality of life for women undergoing gynecologic oncology surgeries. Methods In a prospective cohort study from 10/2013-10/2014, women were enrolled pre-operatively and completed comprehensive interviews at baseline, 1, 3, and 6 months post-operatively. Measures included the disease-specific Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-GP), general Patient Reported Outcome Measure Information System (PROMIS) global health and validated measures of anxiety and depression. Bivariate statistics were used to analyze demographic groups and changes in mean scores over time. Results Of 231 patients completing baseline interviews, 185 (80%) completed 1-month, 170 (74%) 3-month, and 174 (75%) 6-month interviews. Minimally invasive (n=115, 63%) and laparotomy (n=60, 32%) procedures were performed. Functional wellbeing (20 -> 17.6, p 20.1, p 49.0, pgynecologic oncology procedures, temporary declines in functional wellbeing are balanced by improvements in emotional wellbeing and decreased anxiety symptoms after surgery. Not all commonly used QOL surveys are sensitive to changes during the perioperative period and may not be suitable for use in surgical quality metrics. PMID:26957479

  8. Systematic video game training in surgical novices improves performance in virtual reality endoscopic surgical simulators: a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlickum, Marcus Kolga; Hedman, Leif; Enochsson, Lars; Kjellin, Ann; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies have shown a correlation between previous video game experience and performance in minimally invasive surgical simulators. The hypothesis is that systematic video game training with high visual-spatial demands and visual similarity to endoscopy would show a transfer effect on performance in virtual reality endoscopic surgical simulation. A prospective randomized study was performed. Thirty surgical novices were matched and randomized to five weeks of systematic video game training in either a first-person shooter game (Half Life) with high visual-spatial demands and visual similarities to endoscopy or a video game with mainly cognitive demands (Chessmaster). A matched control group (n = 10) performed no video game training during five weeks. Performance in two virtual reality endoscopic surgical simulators (MIST-VR and GI Mentor II) was measured pre- and post-training. Before simulator training we also controlled for students' visual-spatial ability, visual working memory, age, and previous video game experience. The group training with Half Life showed significant improvement in two GI Mentor II variables and the MIST-VR task MD level medium. The group training with Chessmaster only showed an improvement in the MIST-VR task. No effect was observed in the control group. As recently shown in other studies, current and previous video game experience was important for simulator performance. Systematic video game training improved surgical performance in advanced virtual reality endoscopic simulators. The transfer effect increased when increasing visual similarity. The performance in intense, visual-spatially challenging video games might be a predictive factor for the outcome in surgical simulation.

  9. How to Begin a Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Samuel A; Harel, Ziv; McQuillan, Rory; Weizman, Adam V; Thomas, Alison; Chertow, Glenn M; Nesrallah, Gihad; Bell, Chaim M; Chan, Christopher T

    2016-05-06

    Quality improvement involves a combined effort among health care staff and stakeholders to diagnose and treat problems in the health care system. However, health care professionals often lack training in quality improvement methods, which makes it challenging to participate in improvement efforts. This article familiarizes health care professionals with how to begin a quality improvement project. The initial steps involve forming an improvement team that possesses expertise in the quality of care problem, leadership, and change management. Stakeholder mapping and analysis are useful tools at this stage, and these are reviewed to help identify individuals who might have a vested interest in the project. Physician engagement is a particularly important component of project success, and the knowledge that patients/caregivers can offer as members of a quality improvement team should not be overlooked. After a team is formed, an improvement framework helps to organize the scientific process of system change. Common quality improvement frameworks include Six Sigma, Lean, and the Model for Improvement. These models are contrasted, with a focus on the Model for Improvement, because it is widely used and applicable to a variety of quality of care problems without advanced training. It involves three steps: setting aims to focus improvement, choosing a balanced set of measures to determine if improvement occurs, and testing new ideas to change the current process. These new ideas are evaluated using Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles, where knowledge is gained by testing changes and reflecting on their effect. To show the real world utility of the quality improvement methods discussed, they are applied to a hypothetical quality improvement initiative that aims to promote home dialysis (home hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis). This provides an example that kidney health care professionals can use to begin their own quality improvement projects. Copyright © 2016 by the American

  10. Surgical resident education in patient safety: where can we improve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Luke R; Levy, Shauna M; Kellagher, Caroline M; Etchegaray, Jason M; Thomas, Eric J; Kao, Lillian S; Lally, Kevin P; Tsao, KuoJen

    2015-12-01

    Effective communication and patient safety practices are paramount in health care. Surgical residents play an integral role in the perioperative team, yet their perceptions of patient safety remain unclear. We hypothesized that surgical residents perceive the perioperative environment as more unsafe than their faculty and operating room staff despite completing a required safety curriculum. Surgeons, anesthesiologists, and perioperative nurses in a large academic children's hospital participated in multifaceted, physician-led workshops aimed at enhancing communication and safety culture over a 3-y period. All general surgery residents from the same academic center completed a hospital-based online safety curriculum only. All groups subsequently completed the psychometrically validated safety attitudes questionnaire to evaluate three domains: safety culture, teamwork, and speaking up. Results reflect the percent of respondents who slightly or strongly agreed. Chi-square analysis was performed. Sixty-three of 84 perioperative personnel (75%) and 48 of 52 surgical residents (92%) completed the safety attitudes questionnaire. A higher percentage of perioperative personnel perceived a safer environment than the surgical residents in all three domains, which was significantly higher for safety culture (68% versus 46%, P = 0.03). When stratified into two groups, junior residents (postgraduate years 1-2) and senior residents (postgraduate years 3-5) had lower scores for all three domains, but the differences were not statistically significant. Surgical residents' perceptions of perioperative safety remain suboptimal. With an enhanced safety curriculum, perioperative staff demonstrated higher perceptions of safety compared with residents who participated in an online-only curriculum. Optimal surgical education on patient safety remains unknown but should require a dedicated, systematic approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Expectancy and better quality of life after surgical treatment of nefroblastoma in dog - Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Luiz Ferreira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Ferreira M.L., O’Dwyer H.N.S., Costa A.F.N., Azevedo S.C.S., Silva P.C. & Schanaider A. [Expectancy and better quality of life after surgical treatment of nefroblastoma in dog - Case report.] Expectativa e melhor qualidade de vida após o tratamento cirúrgico de nefroblastoma em um cão - Relato de caso. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 36(4:412-416, 2014. Curso de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Campus Soane Nazaré de Andrade (Salobrinho, Rodovia Jorge Amado, Km 16, Ilhéus, BA 45662-900, Brasil. E-mail: louiz_25@yahoo.com.br Renal neoplasms are rare in dogs and cats. The nephroblastoma is a renal tumor, common in poultry and pork, however difficult to find in dogs and cats. When diagnosed, occur in puppies. We report the case of an adult dog in with symptoms of vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, and mild dehydration. Investigations found that the animal was diagnosed with nephroblastoma, treated surgically by right nephrectomy, disease staging post. The postsurgical was accompanied by hematological and ultrasound. The animal was free of the disease for 22 months, with an improvement in life quality and expectancy.

  12. Improving the quality of mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, M; Lund, C; Freeman, M; Drew, N

    2009-12-01

    To develop international guidance for improving the quality of mental health care in low- and middle-income countries. A panel developed recommendations based on a comprehensive literature review, consultation with over 100 experts from 46 countries and an analysis of international best practices. Recommendations A 5-pronged approach to improving the quality of mental health care is recommended. Quality improvement requires the alignment of policy and legislation with the attainment of good quality mental health outcomes. Key partners must be brought into the quality improvement process. Funding can be an important tool for promoting good quality but needs to be correctly aligned to meet policy objectives and to promote evidence-based interventions. Accreditation procedures and quality standards need to be carefully developed and resources allocated for their implementation. Finally, quality improvement must be brought into routine service management and delivery. Through a systematic approach to quality improvement, it is possible to ensure that the best possible interventions are provided within the constraints of each country and that the rights and well-being of people with mental disorders is optimally promoted. Quality improvement is not a luxury but an integral part of ensuring that the best possible services are provided to all who need them.

  13. Physical Activity Improves Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Physical activity improves quality of life Updated:Mar 2,2015 Do ... becomes a part of their routine. Physical activity improves physical wellness. Reduced Risk Factors Too much sitting ...

  14. Quality measurement and improvement in liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Amit K; Talwalkar, Jayant

    2018-03-17

    There is growing interest in the quality of health care delivery in liver transplantation. Multiple stakeholders, including patients, transplant providers and their hospitals, payers, and regulatory bodies have an interest in measuring and monitoring quality in the liver transplant process, and understanding differences in quality across centers. This article aims to provide an overview of quality measurement and regulatory issues in liver transplantation performed within the United States. We review how broader definitions of health care quality should be applied to liver transplant care models, outline the status quo including regulatory agencies, public reporting mechanisms, and requirements around quality assurance and performance improvement (QAPI) activities. Additionally, we further discuss unintended consequences and opportunities for growth in quality measurement. Quality measurement and the integration of quality improvement strategies into liver transplant programs holds significant promise but multiple challenges to successful implementation must be addressed in order to optimize value. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Development of Service Quality Scale for Surgical Hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-I Teng

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: The SQSH has sufficient usefulness, reliability and validity. Future research on service quality can apply the SQSH scale to link with utilization intention and patient loyalty and attempt to develop a hospitalization quality scale for other departments.

  16. Evaluation of Quality Metrics for Surgically Treated Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graboyes, Evan M; Townsend, Melanie E; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Piccirillo, Jay F; Nussenbaum, Brian

    2016-12-01

    for all patients (OS aHR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.29-0.88; DFS aHR, 0.50, 95% CI, 0.32-0.80) and elective neck dissection yield of 18 lymph nodes or more (DFS aHR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.14-0.99) were associated with improved survival on multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis. In this cohort of patients with surgically treated laryngeal SCC, multidisciplinary evaluation and elective neck dissection yield of 18 lymph nodes or more are associated with improved survival. Development of better quality metrics is necessary because increased compliance with metrics described by the AHNS and NCCN is not associated with improved survival. Previously described metrics for surgically treated oral cavity cancer are not prognostic for surgically treated laryngeal SCC. Future multi-institutional collaboration will be required to validate these findings, develop better quality metrics, and evaluate whether quality metrics for head and neck cancer are site specific.

  17. Improving Surveillance and Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Melissa; Hersey, Diane; Harrison, Sheilah; Joy, Brian; Naguib, Aymen; Galantowicz, Mark; Simsic, Janet

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative cardiovascular surgical site infections are preventable events that may lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. To improve surgical wound surveillance and reduce the incidence of surgical site infections. An institutional review of surgical site infections led to implementation of 8 surveillance and process measures: appropriate preparation the night before surgery and the day of surgery, use of appropriate preparation solution in the operating room, appropriate timing of preoperative antibiotic administration, placement of a photograph of the surgical site in the patient's chart at discharge, sending a photograph of the surgical site to the patient's primary care physician, 30-day follow-up of the surgical site by an advanced nurse practitioner, and placing a photograph of the surgical site obtained on postoperative day 30 in the patient's chart. Mean overall compliance with the 8 measures from March 2013 through February 2014 was 88%. Infections occurred in 10 of 417 total operative cases (2%) in 2012, in 8 of 437 total operative cases (2%) in 2013, and in 7 of 452 total operative cases (1.5%) in 2014. Institution of the surveillance process has resulted in improved identification of suspected surgical site infections via direct rather than indirect measures, accurate identification of all surgical site infections based on definitions of the National Healthcare Safety Network, collaboration with all persons involved, and enhanced communication with patients' family members and referring physicians. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  18. Economics, innovation, and quality improvement in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witiw, Christopher D; Nathan, Vinitra; Bernstein, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Innovation to improve patient care quality is a priority of the neurosurgical specialty since its beginnings. As the strain on health care resources increases, the cost of these quality improvements is becoming increasingly important. The aims of this article are to review the available tools for assessing the cost of quality improvement along with the willingness to pay and to provide a conceptual framework for the assessment of innovations in terms of quality and economic metrics and provide examples from the neurosurgical literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of a "Lean" intervention to improve safety processes and outcomes on a surgical emergency unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Peter; Kreckler, Simon; New, Steve; Sheena, Yezen; Handa, Ashok; Catchpole, Ken

    2010-11-02

    Emergency surgical patients are at high risk for harm because of errors in care. Quality improvement methods that involve process redesign, such as “Lean,” appear to improve service reliability and efficiency in healthcare. Interrupted time series. The emergency general surgery ward of a university hospital in the United Kingdom. Seven safety relevant care processes. A Lean intervention targeting five of the seven care processes relevant to patient safety. 969 patients were admitted during the four month study period before the introduction of the Lean intervention (May to August 2007), and 1114 were admitted during the four month period after completion of the intervention (May to August 2008). Compliance with the five process measures targeted for Lean intervention (but not the two that were not) improved significantly (relative improvement 28% to 149%; PLean can substantially and simultaneously improve compliance with a bundle of safety related processes. Given the interconnected nature of hospital care, this strategy might not translate into improvements in safety outcomes unless a system-wide approach is adopted to remove barriers to change.

  20. Improving information availability in vascular surgical clinics. A service evaluation and improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Katherine; Kreckler, Simon; Handa, Ashok; Handa, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    This prospective service evaluation was designed to assess the availability of critical information required in vascular surgical clinics. All the data was collected via a repeated questionnaire, and the outcomes from each cycle were used to highlight where intervention was required to improve the surgical clinic experience. The first audit identified outpatient clinic deficiencies and allowed for problem analysis. Two Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) cycles then were undertaken. Interventions following each cycle included consultant access to online duplex scans and secretarial access to referral letters. Results from the first cycle showed that approximately 20% of clinic appointments were missing information and only 30% of these issues were resolved during the clinic using a work around. Following the first intervention; the numbers of missing patient notes reduced to 4.3% (10.5%), and referral letters to 3.6% (4.6%). Although the numbers of missing duplex scan results increased to 6.5% (3.3%), the new system of online scan results allowed for all scans to be accessed during the clinic. Following results of a second PDCA cycle, vascular surgical secretaries were given access to 'choose and book', a database of GP referral letters. Post intervention, all missing referral letters (2%) could be accessed immediately within the clinic setting. Data driven interventions and repeated PDCA cycles can improve hospital systems for minimal cost. With an annual clinic turnaround of 2500 patients, these interventions can reduce clinic delays and potential harm caused by unavailable records for up to 500 patients a year.

  1. Nationwide quality improvement in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik Winther; Green, Anders; Oesterlind, Kell

    2013-01-01

    To improve prognosis and quality of lung cancer care the Danish Lung Cancer Group has developed a strategy consisting of national clinical guidelines and a clinical quality and research database. The first edition of our guidelines was published in 1998 and our national lung cancer registry...... was opened for registrations in 2000. This article describes methods and results obtained by multidisciplinary collaboration and illustrates how quality of lung cancer care can be improved by establishing and monitoring result and process indicators....

  2. Practical Approaches to Quality Improvement for Radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Aine Marie; Cronin, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Continuous quality improvement is a fundamental attribute of high-performing health care systems. Quality improvement is an essential component of health care, with the current emphasis on adding value. It is also a regulatory requirement, with reimbursements increasingly being linked to practice performance metrics. Practice quality improvement efforts must be demonstrated for credentialing purposes and for certification of radiologists in practice. Continuous quality improvement must occur for radiologists to remain competitive in an increasingly diverse health care market. This review provides an introduction to the main approaches available to undertake practice quality improvement, which will be useful for busy radiologists. Quality improvement plays multiple roles in radiology services, including ensuring and improving patient safety, providing a framework for implementing and improving processes to increase efficiency and reduce waste, analyzing and depicting performance data, monitoring performance and implementing change, enabling personnel assessment and development through continued education, and optimizing customer service and patient outcomes. The quality improvement approaches and underlying principles overlap, which is not surprising given that they all align with good patient care. The application of these principles to radiology practices not only benefits patients but also enhances practice performance through promotion of teamwork and achievement of goals. © RSNA, 2015.

  3. Pros and Cons of Round Window Vibroplasty in Open Cavities: Audiological, Surgical, and Quality of Life Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassaletta, Luis; Calvino, Miryam; Sánchez-Cuadrado, Isabel; Pérez-Mora, Rosa M; Muñoz, Elena; Gavilán, Javier

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the audiological, surgical, quality of life, and quality of sound outcomes in adults with open cavities implanted with the Vibrant Soundbridge (VSB) implant using round window (RW) vibroplasty approach. Retrospective study. Otolaryngology department, tertiary referral hospital. Twelve adult patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss, all with previous middle ear surgery, underwent RW vibroplasty in an open cavity. Compound action potential thresholds were assessed during surgery. Surgical complications were recorded. Subjective benefit was evaluated using the Nijmegen Cochlear Implant Questionnaire (NCIQ), Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI), and Hearing Implant Sound Quality Index (HISQUI29) tests. Mean follow-up was 42 months (range 12-76). There was no significant change in bone conduction thresholds after surgery. Mean functional gain was 34.3 dB and speech discrimination score at 65 dB significantly improved from 14 to 83%. Extrusion of the wire link was the main surgical complication in four patients. All NCIQ domains improved after surgery. All patients had a positive overall GBI score (mean 35.0). Mean HISQUI29 score was 152.8, on average the quality of sound being defined as "very good." VSB is an effective method of hearing restoration for adults with open cavities suffering from conductive or mixed hearing loss. Intraoperative electrocochleography may be considered of significant help to check the coupling to the inner ear. The high rate of extrusion suggests that middle ear obliteration may be considered in these patients.

  4. Duration of Postoperative Mechanical Ventilation as a Quality Metric for Pediatric Cardiac Surgical Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaies, Michael; Werho, David K; Zhang, Wenying; Donohue, Janet E; Tabbutt, Sarah; Ghanayem, Nancy S; Scheurer, Mark A; Costello, John M; Gaynor, J William; Pasquali, Sara K; Dimick, Justin B; Banerjee, Mousumi; Schwartz, Steven M

    2018-02-01

    Few metrics exist to assess quality of care at pediatric cardiac surgical programs, limiting opportunities for benchmarking and quality improvement. Postoperative duration of mechanical ventilation (POMV) may be an important quality metric because of its association with complications and resource utilization. In this study we modelled case-mix-adjusted POMV duration and explored hospital performance across POMV metrics. This study used the Pediatric Cardiac Critical Care Consortium clinical registry to analyze 4,739 hospitalizations from 15 hospitals (October 2013 to August 2015). All patients admitted to pediatric cardiac intensive care units after an index cardiac operation were included. We fitted a model to predict duration of POMV accounting for patient characteristics. Robust estimates of SEs were obtained using bootstrap resampling. We created performance metrics based on observed-to-expected (O/E) POMV to compare hospitals. Overall, 3,108 patients (65.6%) received POMV; the remainder were extubated intraoperatively. Our model was well calibrated across groups; neonatal age had the largest effect on predicted POMV. These comparisons suggested clinically and statistically important variation in POMV duration across centers with a threefold difference observed in O/E ratios (0.6 to 1.7). We identified 1 hospital with better-than-expected and 3 hospitals with worse-than-expected performance (p < 0.05) based on the O/E ratio. We developed a novel case-mix-adjusted model to predict POMV duration after congenital heart operations. We report variation across hospitals on metrics of O/E duration of POMV that may be suitable for benchmarking quality of care. Identifying high-performing centers and practices that safely limit the duration of POMV could stimulate quality improvement efforts. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Validity evidence for Surgical Improvement of Clinical Knowledge Ops: a novel gaming platform to assess surgical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dana T; Park, Julia; Liebert, Cara A; Lau, James N

    2015-01-01

    Current surgical education curricula focus mainly on the acquisition of technical skill rather than clinical and operative judgment. SICKO (Surgical Improvement of Clinical Knowledge Ops) is a novel gaming platform developed to address this critical need. A pilot study was performed to collect validity evidence for SICKO as an assessment for surgical decision making. Forty-nine subjects stratified into 4 levels of expertise were recruited to play SICKO. Later, players were surveyed regarding the realism of the gaming platform as well as the clinical competencies required of them while playing SICKO. Each group of increasing expertise outperformed the less experienced groups. Mean total game scores for the novice, junior resident, senior resident, and expert groups were 5,461, 8,519, 11,404, and 13,913, respectively (P = .001). Survey results revealed high scores for realism and content. SICKO holds the potential to be not only an engaging and immersive educational tool, but also a valid assessment in the armamentarium of surgical educators. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Improving Quality in Colorectal Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Slieker, Juliette

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Colorectal surgery is an important aspect of our current health system, due to the high incidence of colorectal cancer combined with an ageing population, improved long-term outcomes after colorectal surgery, and the perfectioning of the operative and postoperative aspects through laparoscopy and enhanced recovery programs. However, postoperative complications painfully remain, despite efforts of amelioration of perioperative care. Research for molecular pathways ...

  7. Quality improvement through multiple response optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noorossana, R.; Alemzad, H.

    2003-01-01

    The performance of a product is often evaluated by several quality characteristics. Optimizing the manufacturing process with respect to only one quality characteristic will not always lead to the optimum values for other characteristics. Hence, it would be desirable to improve the overall quality of a product by improving quality characteristics, which are considered to be important. The problem consists of optimizing several responses using multiple objective decision making approach and design of experiments. A case study will be discussed to show the application of the proposal method

  8. Health-related quality of life and expectations of patients before surgical treatment of lumbar stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lílian Maria Pacola

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the expectations of patients awaiting surgical treatment of lumbar canal stenosis and the association of Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL with symptoms of anxiety and depression. METHODS: The sample included 49 patients from a university hospital. HRQoL was assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI and 36-item Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form (SF-36 and symptoms of anxiety and depression by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Expectations were investigated by means of questions used in international studies. Data were analyzed descriptively and by Student's t test. RESULTS: The mean time of disease progression was 34.5 months, the mean age was 58.8 years and 55.1% of the patients were women. Most patients had the expectation of improving with surgical treatment and 46.9% expected to be "much better" with regard to leg pain, walking ability, independence in activities and mental well being. The scores of anxiety and depression were respectively, 34.7% and 12.2%. We observed statistically significant differences between the groups with and without anxiety in the domains: General Health, Mental Health, and Vitality. Between the groups with and without depression there were statistically significant differences in the General Health and Mental Health domains. CONCLUSION: Patients showed great expectation to surgical treatment and the symptoms of anxiety and depression were related to some domains of HRQoL. Thus, the study contributes to broaden our knowledge and we can therefore guide the patients as to their expectations with respect to the real possibilities arising from surgery.

  9. The impact of leadership qualities on quality management improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoslaw Wolniak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the importance of leadership is considered more and more often in quality management. The need of an appropriate leader has been already emphasized in ISO 9000 standards, in TQM philosophy as well as in different models of improvement which are used in the methodologies of prizing quality. Yet, it is in the concept of TQL where the attitude based on the need of leadership in an organization has achieved its best-developed, full shape. On the basis of the conducted studies, the following publication presents the analysis of the dependence between leadership qualities of managers and the improvement of quality management. There has been an attempt to define the qualities, which a manager being responsible for quality management, should have.

  10. The impact of leadership qualities on quality management improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ph. D. Radoslaw Wolniak

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the importance of leadership is considered more and more often in quality management. The need of an appropriate leader has been already emphasized in ISO 9000 standards, in TQM philosophy as well as in different models of improvement which are used in the methodologies of prizing quality. Yet, it is in the concept of TQL where the attitude based on the need of leadership in an organization has achieved its best-developed, full shape. On the basis of the conducted studies, the following publication presents the analysis of the dependence between leadership qualities of managers and the improvement of quality management. There has been an attempt to define the qualities, which a manager being responsible for quality management, should have.

  11. Rapid core measure improvement through a "business case for quality".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, Jonathan B; Horner, Stephen J; Englebright, Jane D; Bracken, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Incentives to improve performance are emerging as revenue or financial penalties are linked to the measured quality of service provided. The HCA "Getting to Green" program was designed to rapidly increase core measure performance scores. Program components included (1) the "business case for quality"-increased awareness of how quality drives financial performance; (2) continuous communication of clinical and financial performance data; and (3) evidence-based clinical protocols, incentives, and tools for process improvement. Improvement was measured by comparing systemwide rates of adherence to national quality measures for heart failure (HF), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), pneumonia (PN), and surgical care (SCIP) to rates from all facilities reporting to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). As of the second quarter of 2011, 70% of HCA total measure set composite scores were at or above the 90th percentile of CMS scores. A test of differences in regression coefficients between the CMS national average and the HCA average revealed significant differences for AMI (p = .001), HF (p = .012), PN (p performance data, and clearly defined goals could cultivate the desire to use improvement tools and resources to raise performance. © 2012 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  12. Support for reporting guidelines in surgical journals needs improvement: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Riaz A; Barai, Ishani; Rajmohan, Shivanchan; Lee, Seon; Anwar, Mohammed O; Fowler, Alexander J; Orgill, Dennis P; Altman, Douglas G

    2017-09-01

    Evidence-based medicine works best if the evidence is reported well. Past studies have shown reporting quality to be lacking in the field of surgery. Reporting guidelines are an important tool for authors to optimize the reporting of their research. The objective of this study was to analyse the frequency and strength of recommendation for such reporting guidelines within surgical journals. A systematic review of the 198 journals within the Journal Citation Report 2014 (surgery category) published by Thomson Reuters was undertaken. The online guide for authors for each journal was screened by two independent groups and results compared. Data regarding the presence and strength of recommendation to use reporting guidelines was extracted. 193 journals were included (as five appeared twice having changed their name). These had a median impact factor of 1.526 (range 0.047-8.327), with a median of 145 articles published per journal (range 29-659), with 34,036 articles published in total over the two-year window 2012-2013. The majority (62%) of surgical journals made no mention of reporting guidelines within their guidelines for authors. Of the 73 (38%) that did mention them, only 14% (10/73) required the use of all relevant reporting guidelines. The most frequently mentioned reporting guideline was CONSORT (46 journals). The mention of reporting guidelines within the guide for authors of surgical journals needs improvement. Authors, reviewers and editors should work to ensure that research is reported in line with the relevant reporting guidelines. Journals should consider hard-wiring adherence to them. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Quality of life in morbidly obese patients after surgical weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzl, Johann F; Schrattenecker, Maria; Traweger, Christian; Aigner, Franz; Fiala, Michaela; Biebl, Wilfried

    2007-02-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is seen as a safe surgical procedure in individuals with morbid obesity, with satisfactory weight loss and significant postoperative improvement in quality of life (QoL). The present study investigates the predictive value of various parameters such as age, gender, weight loss, and preoperative psychiatric disorders with regard to QoL after LAGB. 300 obesity surgery patients were sent questionnaires to assess a variety of personal parameters. QoL was assessed using the Ardelt-Moorehead Quality of Life Questionnaire. Questionnaires were completed by 140 (63%) female patients and 36 (45%) male patients. Average weight loss in both sexes was 14.7 kg/m2; however, not all patients successfully lost weight. No difference was seen in satisfaction with weight loss among the age groups. Some correlations were seen between the amount of weight loss and QoL scores in females, but not in males. Greater weight loss showed a statistically significant positive correlation to self-esteem, physical activity, social relationships, sexuality, and eating pattern. Obese females with no preoperative psychiatric diagnosis had better self-esteem, more physical activity, and more satisfying social and sexual relationships than those with psychiatric diagnoses at follow-up. A majority of morbidly obese patients show psychological and interpersonal improvement after surgery. However, some obese patients, particularly those having a preoperative psychiatric or personality disorder, need more individual strategies for psychosocial intervention than do obese individuals with no psychiatric disorder.

  14. Healthcare quality improvement programme improves monitoring of people with diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denig, Petra

    2004-01-01

    Question. Does a healthcare quality improvement programme, incorporating education and claims-based feedback about practice-specific models of monitoring diabetes care, increase the regularity with which primary care physicians assess people with diabetes mellitus receiving Medicare benefits? Study

  15. Change in quality of life and cost/utility analysis in open stage-related surgical treatment of elbow stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannicola, Giuseppe; Bullitta, Gianluca; Sacchetti, Federico M; Scacchi, Marco; Polimanti, David; Citoni, Guido; Cinotti, Gianluca

    2013-07-01

    The goals of this study were to examine the improvement in quality of life achieved after open surgical treatment of elbow stiffness and to verify the cost/utility ratio of surgery. Thirty-three patients (22 men and 11 women) underwent surgery. The etiologies of elbow stiffness were posttraumatic conditions (n=26), primary osteoarthritis (n=5), and rheumatoid arthritis (n=2). Surgery included 14 ulnohumeral arthroplasties, 6 ulnohumeral arthroplasties associated with radiocapitellar replacement, 5 ulnohumeral arthroplasties associated with radial head replacement, and 8 total elbow arthroplasties. All patients were evaluated pre- and postoperatively with the Mayo Elbow Performance Score, the Mayo Elbow Performance Index, the modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score, and the Short Form 36 after a mean follow-up of 26 months. Possible variables affecting clinical outcome and quality of life improvement were assessed. The cost/utility ratio was evaluated as diagnosis-related group reimbursement per quality-adjusted life year. Mayo Elbow Performance Scores and modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores increased, on average, by 43 and 41 points, respectively (Pquality-adjusted life year. A significant correlation was found between pain score and quality of life improvement. An inverse correlation emerged between pre- and postoperative quality of life score. The current study shows that open surgery significantly improves quality of life and elbow function. Selecting the surgical procedure that most effectively reduces pain appears to be the most relevant variable responsible for quality of life improvement. Surgery shows a satisfactory cost/utility ratio, justifying a health spending increase to reduce the social costs resulting from lingering elbow stiffness. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Power theories for improved power quality

    CERN Document Server

    Pasko, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Power quality describes a set of parameters of electric power and the load’s ability to function properly under specific conditions. It is estimated that problems relating to power quality costs the European industry hundreds of billions of Euros annually. In contrast, financing for the prevention of these problems amount to fragments of these costs. Power Theories for Improved Power Quality addresses this imbalance by presenting and assessing a range of methods and problems related to improving the quality of electric power supply. Focusing particularly on active compensators and the DSP based control algorithms, Power Theories for Improved Power Quality introduces the fundamental problems of electrical power. This introduction is followed by chapters which discuss: •‘Power theories’ including their historical development and application to practical problems, •operational principles of active compensator’s DSP control based algorithms using examples and results from laboratory research, and •t...

  17. Reaching Rural Mammographers for Quality Improvement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urban, Nicole

    1998-01-01

    The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the University of Washington, and the Washington State Department of Health are collaborating to develop and implement a mammography quality improvement. program (MQIP...

  18. Reaching Rural Mammographers for Quality Improvement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urban, Nicole

    1997-01-01

    The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the University of Washington, and the Washington State Department of Health are collaborating to develop and implement a mammography quality improvement program (MQIP...

  19. Reaching Rural Mammographers for Quality Improvement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urban, Nicole

    1999-01-01

    The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the University of Washington, and the Washington State Department of Health are collaborating to develop and implement a mammography quality improvement program (MQIP...

  20. Multi-Institution Analysis of Infection Control Practices Identifies the Subset Associated with Best Surgical Site Infection Performance: A Texas Alliance for Surgical Quality Collaborative Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Catherine H; Kao, Lillian S; Fleming, Jason B; Aloia, Thomas A

    2017-08-16

    In an effort to reduce surgical site infection (SSI) rates, a large number of infection control practices (ICPs), including operating room attire policies, have been recommended. However, few have proven benefits and many are costly, time-consuming, and detrimental to provider morale. The goal of this multi-institution study was to determine which ICPs are associated with lower postoperative SSI rates. Twenty American College of Surgeons NSQIP and Texas Alliance for Surgical Quality-affiliated hospitals completed this Quality Improvement Assessment Board-approved study. Surgeon champions at each hospital ranked current surgery, anesthesia, and nursing adherence to 38 separate ICPs in 6 categories (attire, preoperative, intraoperative, preoperative, intraoperative, antibiotics, postoperative, and reporting) on 4-point scales for general surgery cases. These data were compared with the risk-adjusted general surgery SSI odds ratios contained in the July 2016 American College of Surgeons NSQIP hospital-level, risk-adjusted reports. Compliance rates were compared between the 7 best (median SSI odds ratio, 0.64; range, 0.56 to 0.70) and 7 worst (median SSI odds ratio, 1.16; range, 0.94 to 1.65) performers using ANOVA. Nearly all hospitals reported maximal adherence to hair removal with clippers (Surgical Care Improvement Project measure Inf-6) and to best-practice prophylactic antibiotic metrics (Surgical Care Improvement Project measure Inf-1-3). Variable adherence was identified across many ICPs and more frequent compliance with 8 ICPs correlated with lower SSI odds ratios, including preoperative shower; skin preparation technique; using clean instruments, gowns, and gloves for wound closure and dressing changes; and transparent internal reporting of SSI data. Operating room attire ICPs, including coverage of nonscrubbed provider head and arm hair, did not correlate with SSI rates. This analysis suggests that the subset of ICPs that focus on perioperative patient

  1. Quality Improvement Initiatives in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Sameer K; Siegel, Corey A; Melmed, Gil Y

    2017-08-01

    This article serves as an overview of several quality improvement initiatives in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is associated with significant variation in care, suggesting poor quality of care. There have been several efforts to improve the quality of care for patients with IBD. Quality improvement (QI) initiatives in IBD are intended to be patient-centric, improve outcomes for individuals and populations, and reduce costs-all consistent with "the triple aim" put forth by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). Current QI initiatives include the development of quality measure sets to standardize processes and outcomes, learning health systems to foster collaborative improvement, and patient-centered medical homes specific to patients with IBD in shared risk models of care. Some of these programs have demonstrated early success in improving patient outcomes, reducing costs, improving patient satisfaction, and facilitating patient engagement. However, further studies are needed to evaluate and compare the effects of these programs over time on clinical outcomes in order to demonstrate long-term value and sustainability.

  2. [Adverse event sheets, a quality improvement tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didry, Pascale; Lapp, Aymeric

    2017-05-01

    The declaration of adverse events comprises a written nurse report which helps to improve the quality and safety of care. Submitted to professionals from the quality department, this report will be used to perform an analysis of the causes and must therefore be descriptive and objective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Study of amended reports to evaluate and improve surgical pathology processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Frederick A; Varney, Ruan C; Zarbo, Richard J

    2011-09-01

    : Amended surgical pathology reports record defects in the process of transforming tissue specimens into diagnostic information. : Systematic study of amended reports tests 2 hypotheses: (a) that tracking amendment frequencies and the distribution of amendment types reveals relevant aspects of quality in surgical pathology's daily transformation of specimens into diagnoses and (b) that such tracking measures the effect, or lack of effect, of efforts to improve surgical pathology processes. : We applied a binary definition of altered reports as either amendments or addenda and a taxonomy of defects that caused amendments as misidentifications, specimen defects, misinterpretations, and report defects. During the introduction of a LEAN process improvement approach-the Henry Ford Productions System-we followed trends in amendment rates and defect fractions to (a) evaluate specific interventions, (b) sort case-by-case root causes of misidentifications, specimen defects, and misinterpretations, and (c) audit the ongoing accuracy of the classification of changed reports. LEAN is the management and production system of the Toyota Motor Corporation that promotes continuous improvement; it considers wasted resources expended for purposes other than creating value for end customers and targets such expenditures for elimination. : Introduction of real-time editing of amendments saw annual amendment rates increase from 4.8/1000 to 10.1/1000 and then decrease in an incremental manner to 5.6/1000 as Henry Ford Productions System-specific interventions were introduced. Before introduction of HFPS interventions, about a fifth of the amendments were due to misidentifications, a 10th were due to specimen defects, a quarter due to misinterpretation, and almost half were due to report defects. During the period of the initial application of HFPS, the fraction of amendments due to misidentifications decreased as those due to report defects increased, in a statistically linked manner. As

  4. Training responsibly to improve global surgical and anaesthesia capacity through institutional health partnerships: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Laura; Collins, Maggie

    2017-01-01

    , Asia and the Middle East. THET argues that these initiatives are both responsible and effective. The four partnerships featured in this paper have demonstrated not only their effectiveness in increasing health worker skills and knowledge, but have done so across a variety of surgical and anaesthesia disciplines and within different contexts. This wide reach and applicability of partnership initiatives adds even greater value to their use as responsible training interventions. One challenge that has faced these partnerships has been the capture of improvements to patient outcomes as a result of improved practice. To counteract the problems of data collection, partnerships are collecting anecdotal evidence of improvements at the patient outcome level. The interventions supported by THET have been able to demonstrate success in improving health worker skills and knowledge, and albeit to a lesser extent, in improving patient outcomes. The implementing partners are achieving these successes by training responsibly: responding to locally identified need, implementing projects that are appropriate to the local context and are of high quality, and establishing mechanisms that ensure self-sufficiency of the health worker training and education that is delivered. Greater investment in responsible training initiatives such as these are required to address the significant lack of access to appropriate and safe surgical and anaesthesia interventions when needed and the growing burden of disease. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Did surgical failure and complications affect incontinence-related quality of life in women after transobturator sling procedure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chu Huang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the objective outcome, subjective measurement of incontinence-related quality of life (QoL for female urodynamic stress incontinence (USI after transobturator sling surgery (TVT-O and to evaluate the effects of surgical failure and complications on QoL. Materials and methods: We analyzed the data from women who underwent TVT-O for USI and completed two validated QoL questionnaires, the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6 and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7 preoperatively and at least 12 months postoperatively. We evaluated the subjective results of QoL questionnaires, objective results and compare the effect of QoL on those with surgical failure and complications after TVT-O surgery. Results: A total of 78 women were followed for a median of 13.5 months (range 12–15 months after surgery. Within this group, 75 (96% were considered subjectively cured or improved after TVT-O. There were significant improvements in the IIQ-7 and total UDI-6 scores postoperatively, as well as in the UDI-6 subscales for urge, stress and voiding dysfunction symptoms. Even the 18 women with objective urodynamic failure had significant improvement in QoL scores. For those with surgical related complications, the QoL scores were also significantly improved. Conclusions: TVT-O for USI resulted in improvement of incontinence-related QoL including urgency, stress, and voiding dysfunction symptoms. Surgical failure and complications didn't impair postoperative QoL. Keywords: Complication, Quality of life, Stress urinary incontinence, Transobturator tape, Urodynamic stress incontinence

  6. Performance Indicators For Quality In Surgical And Laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology: Hospital records were reviewed and information recorded for planned and postponed operations, laboratory equipment, reagents, laboratory tests and quality assurance programmes. Results: In the year 2001 a total of 4332 non-emergency operations were planned, 3313 operations were performed and 1019 ...

  7. Functional outcome and quality of life after surgical management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the functional outcome and quality of life of acetabular fracture patients treated operatively with open reduction and internal fixation. Design: Retrospective case series. Subjects: Patients aged 18 to 65 years old undergoing operative treatment for acetabular fractures from October 2010 to September ...

  8. The health-related quality of life of obese persons seeking or not seeking surgical or non-surgical treatment: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PhD Joop Hox; MD Annemieke van Nunen; PhD Ad Vingerhoets; PhD Rinie Geenen; MD E.J.M. Wouters

    2007-01-01

    Background: A meta-analysis examined differences in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) between seekers of surgical and non-surgical treatment, and non-treatment seekers, over and above differences that are explained by weight, age, and gender. Methods: Our literature search focused on the

  9. Health-related quality of life and psychological functioning 9 years after restrictive surgical treatment for obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herpertz, Stephan; Müller, Astrid; Burgmer, Ramona; Crosby, Ross D; de Zwaan, Martina; Legenbauer, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery leads to initial weight loss that is associated with improvement in mental health; however, long-term effects are uncertain. To investigate the impact of restrictive surgical treatment for obesity on weight loss, psychological functioning, and quality of life 9 years after surgery. University hospitals and obesity centers, Germany. 152 patients undergoing restrictive surgical treatment (SURG), 249 individuals participating in a conventional weight loss treatment (CONV), and 128 obese control participants without weight loss treatment (OC) were studied using a prospective longitudinal cohort design. After 9 years, 55% of SURG patients, 51% of CONV patients, and 65% of OC participants were reassessed. Body mass index, anxiety, depression, self-esteem, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) were explored. The SURG group had significantly greater weight loss and improvements in physical HRQOL at all postbaseline assessments. Although SURG patients experienced initial improvements in depression, anxiety, self-esteem, and mental aspects of HRQOL, these improvements deteriorated at the 9-year assessment and were comparable to or worse than presurgical levels. Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for obesity and is linked to maintained improvement of physical aspects of HRQOL. Weight reduction after surgery is also associated with significant initial improvement in mental health that may erode over time. Therefore, psychosocial screening should be included at follow-ups, with referral to mental health professionals as appropriate. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Structured data quality reports to improve EHR data quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, Jane; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Yu, Hairong

    2015-12-01

    To examine whether a structured data quality report (SDQR) and feedback sessions with practice principals and managers improve the quality of routinely collected data in EHRs. The intervention was conducted in four general practices participating in the Fairfield neighborhood electronic Practice Based Research Network (ePBRN). Data were extracted from their clinical information systems and summarised as a SDQR to guide feedback to practice principals and managers at 0, 4, 8 and 12 months. Data quality (DQ) metrics included completeness, correctness, consistency and duplication of patient records. Information on data recording practices, data quality improvement, and utility of SDQRs was collected at the feedback sessions at the practices. The main outcome measure was change in the recording of clinical information and level of meeting Royal Australian College of General Practice (RACGP) targets. Birth date was 100% and gender 99% complete at baseline and maintained. DQ of all variables measured improved significantly (pdata quality and any associated improved safety and quality of care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Prosthetic versus surgical rehabilitation in patients with maxillary defect regarding the quality of life: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, M Y; Ibrahim, S I; Eskander, A E; Shaker, A F

    2018-03-01

    To assess the ability of prosthetic rehabilitation versus surgical rehabilitation in improving the QOL for patients with maxillary defects. A systematic search of PubMed, Scopus data base, Cochrane database, Ovid database, and Latin America & Caribbean database for articles published before September 2017 was performed by two independent reviewers. A manual search of articles published from January 2000 to September 2017 was also conducted. Only English studies were included which evaluate the QoL in patients with head and neck cancers. Any confusion between the two independent reviewers was resolved by means of a moderated discussion between the reviewers. Five studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria for this study. Many parameters were used regarding evaluation of QOL as the EORTC Head and Neck 35 assessment, UW-QOL, OHIP-14, VAS, OFS, MHI, HAD, Body Satisfaction Scale, Oral symptom check list, Swallowing, Diet consist, Pain control, Postoperative complication, and Speech. Two studies supported the surgical line of treatment for improving the QOL as compared to the prosthetic one; another two studies showed a statistically insignificant improvement in the patients' QOL with the surgical line, while only one revealed insignificant difference in QoL with both lines of treatment. Surgical rehabilitation provides a better line of treatment in improving the QOL for patients with maxillary defects. On the other hand, prosthetic has proved effectiveness in the immediate post-surgical times as temporary strategy, and it has represented a good alternative when the surgical obturation is compromised.

  12. Improving embryo quality in assisted reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantikou, E.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to improve embryo quality in assisted reproductive technologies by gaining more insight into human preimplantation embryo development and by improving in vitro culture conditions. To do so, we investigated an intriguing feature of the human preimplantation embryo, i.e.

  13. Improving effective surgical delivery in humanitarian disasters: lessons from Haiti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Chu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Chu and colleagues describe the experiences of Médecins sans Frontières after the 2010 Haiti earthquake, and discuss how to improve delivery of surgery in humanitarian disasters.

  14. Interactional Resources for Quality Improvement: Learning From Participants Through a Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Joanna Veazey; Gorbenko, Ksenia; Bosk, Charles

    Implementing quality improvement in hospitals requires a multifaceted commitment from leaders, including financial, material, and personnel resources. However, little is known about the interactional resources needed for project implementation. The aim of this analysis was to identify the types of interactional support hospital teams sought in a surgical quality improvement project. Hospital site visits were conducted using a combination of observations, interviews, and focus groups to explore the implementation of a surgical quality improvement project. Twenty-six site visits were conducted between October 2012 and August 2014 at a total of 16 hospitals that agreed to participate. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes using inductive analysis. We interviewed 321 respondents and conducted an additional 28 focus groups. Respondents reported needing the following types of interactional support during implementation of quality improvement interventions: (1) a critical outside perspective on their implementation progress; (2) opportunities to learn from peers, especially around clinical innovations; and (3) external validation to help establish visibility for and commitment to the project. Quality improvement in hospitals is both a clinical endeavor and a social endeavor. Our findings show that teams often desire interactional resources as they implement quality improvement initiatives. In-person site visits can provide these resources while also activating emotional energy for teams, which builds momentum and sustainability for quality improvement work. Policymakers and quality improvement leaders will benefit from developing strategies to maximize interactional learning and feedback for quality improvement teams. Further research should investigate the most effective methods for meeting these needs.

  15. Improvement of design of a surgical interface using an eye tracking device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol Barkana, Duygun; Açık, Alper; Duru, Dilek Goksel; Duru, Adil Deniz

    2014-05-07

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) and Short Post-Assessment Situational Awareness (SPASA) questionnaire results have shown that overall mental workload of surgeons related with surgical interface has been low as it has been aimed, and overall situational awareness scores of surgeons have been considerably high. This preliminary study highlights the improvement of a developed surgical interface using eye tracking technology to obtain the best SI configuration. The results presented here reveal that visual surgical interface design prepared according to eye movement characteristics may lead to improved usability.

  16. Improving PSA quality of KSNP PSA model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Joon Eon; Ha, Jae Joo

    2004-01-01

    In the RIR (Risk-informed Regulation), PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) plays a major role because it provides overall risk insights for the regulatory body and utility. Therefore, the scope, the level of details and the technical adequacy of PSA, i.e. the quality of PSA is to be ensured for the successful RIR. To improve the quality of Korean PSA, we evaluate the quality of the KSNP (Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant) internal full-power PSA model based on the 'ASME PRA Standard' and the 'NEI PRA Peer Review Process Guidance.' As a working group, PSA experts of the regulatory body and industry also participated in the evaluation process. It is finally judged that the overall quality of the KSNP PSA is between the ASME Standard Capability Category I and II. We also derive some items to be improved for upgrading the quality of the PSA up to the ASME Standard Capability Category II. In this paper, we show the result of quality evaluation, and the activities to improve the quality of the KSNP PSA model

  17. Improving patient safety through quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Stephen S

    2006-05-01

    Anatomic pathology laboratories use several quality assurance tools to detect errors and to improve patient safety. To review some of the anatomic pathology laboratory patient safety quality assurance practices. Different standards and measures in anatomic pathology quality assurance and patient safety were reviewed. Frequency of anatomic pathology laboratory error, variability in the use of specific quality assurance practices, and use of data for error reduction initiatives. Anatomic pathology error frequencies vary according to the detection method used. Based on secondary review, a College of American Pathologists Q-Probes study showed that the mean laboratory error frequency was 6.7%. A College of American Pathologists Q-Tracks study measuring frozen section discrepancy found that laboratories improved the longer they monitored and shared data. There is a lack of standardization across laboratories even for governmentally mandated quality assurance practices, such as cytologic-histologic correlation. The National Institutes of Health funded a consortium of laboratories to benchmark laboratory error frequencies, perform root cause analysis, and design error reduction initiatives, using quality assurance data. Based on the cytologic-histologic correlation process, these laboratories found an aggregate nongynecologic error frequency of 10.8%. Based on gynecologic error data, the laboratory at my institution used Toyota production system processes to lower gynecologic error frequencies and to improve Papanicolaou test metrics. Laboratory quality assurance practices have been used to track error rates, and laboratories are starting to use these data for error reduction initiatives.

  18. Laboratory quality improvement in Thailand's northernmost provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitvittaya, S; Suksai, U; Suksripanich, O; Pobkeeree, V

    2010-01-01

    In Thailand nearly 1000 public health laboratories serve 65 million people. A qualified indicator of a good quality laboratory is Thailand Medical Technology Council certification. Consequently, Chiang Rai Regional Medical Sciences Center established a development program for laboratory certification for 29 laboratories in the province. This paper seeks to examine this issue. The goal was to improve laboratory service quality by voluntary participation, peer review, training and compliance with standards. The program consisted of specific activities. Training and workshops to update laboratory staffs' quality management knowledge were organized. Staff in each laboratory performed a self-assessment using a standard check-list to evaluate ten laboratory management areas. Chiang Rai Regional Medical Sciences Center staff supported the distribution of quality materials and documents. They provided calibration services for laboratory equipment. Peer groups performed an internal audit and successful laboratories received Thailand Medical Technology Council certification. By December 2007, eight of the 29 laboratories had improved quality sufficiently to be certified. Factors that influenced laboratories' readiness for quality improvement included the number of staff, their knowledge, budget and staff commitment to the process. Moreover, the support of each hospital's laboratory working group or network was essential for success. There was no clear policy for supporting the program. Laboratories voluntarily conducted quality management using existing resources. A bottom-up approach to this kind of project can be difficult to accomplish. Laboratory professionals can work together to illustrate and highlight outcomes for top-level health officials. A top-down, practical approach would be much less difficult to implement. Quality certification is a critical step for laboratory staff, which also encourages them to aspire to international quality standards like ISO. The

  19. Breast cancer practice guidelines: evaluation and quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, S B

    1997-11-01

    The utility of practice guidelines in breast cancer management remains unproved. This paper examines the scope and goals of published guidelines and their utility in the process of breast cancer treatment quality improvement. Although existing breast cancer guidelines vary widely in scope and intent, they provide a framework for meaningful quality-of-care evaluation. Among the few comprehensive breast cancer guideline programs are those developed by the Ontario Cancer Treatment Practice Guidelines Initiative, the Revlon/UCLA Breast Center, the Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC), the Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO), and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN). Ultimately, guidelines will prove useful only if they are utilized as part of a comprehensive program to improve quality, cost-effectiveness, and outcomes. To accomplish this, they must include mechanisms for revision and evaluation. The evaluation of guideline utility in quality improvement, particularly in breast cancer care, is a complex long-term process, which should include input from practitioners, institutions, payors, and government.

  20. Development of an adhesive surgical ward round checklist: a technique to improve patient safety.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dhillon, P

    2012-02-01

    Checklists have been shown to improve patient outcomes. Checklist use is seen in the pre-operative to post-operative phases of the patient pathway. An adhesive checklist was developed for ward rounds due to the positive impact it could have on improving patient safety. Over an eight day period data were collected from five consultant-led teams that were randomly selected from the surgical department and divided into sticker groups and control groups. Across the board percentage adherence to the Good Surgical Practice Guidelines (GSPG) was markedly higher in the sticker study group, 1186 (91%) in comparison with the control group 718 (55%). There was significant improvement of documentation across all areas measured. An adhesive checklist for ward round note taking is a simple and cost-effective way to improve documentation, communication, hand-over, and patient safety. Successfully implemented in a tertiary level centre in Dublin, Ireland it is easily transferable to other surgical departments globally.

  1. Improving care at cystic fibrosis centers through quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraynack, Nathan C; McBride, John T

    2009-10-01

    Quality improvement (QI) using a clinical microsystems approach provides cystic fibrosis (CF) centers the opportunity to make a significant positive impact on the health of their patients. The availability of center-specific outcomes data and the support of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation are important advantages for these quality improvement efforts. This article illustrates how the clinical microsystems methodology can improve care delivery and outcomes by describing the gradual application of quality improvement principles over the past 5 years by the CF team at the Lewis Walker Cystic Fibrosis Center at Akron Children's Hospital in Akron, Ohio. Using the example of a project to improve the pulmonary function of the pediatric patients at our center as a framework, we describe the QI process from the initial team-building phase, through the assessment of care processes, standardization of care, and developing a culture of continuous improvement. We outline how enthusiastic commitment from physician leadership, clinical managers and central administration, the availability of coaches, and an appreciation of the importance of measurement, patient involvement, communication, and standardization are critical components for successful process improvement. Copyright Thieme Medical Publishers.

  2. Endoscopic transphenoidal surgery for acromegaly improves quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathalla, Hussein; Cusimano, Michael D; Alsharif, Omar M; Jing, Rowan

    2014-11-01

    Acromegaly has important effects on quality of life (QOL). This is the first study to measure QOL in acromegalic patients after endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery (ETSS). We prospectively collected the RAND-36, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D), and Pituitary QOL validated questionnaires and patients' demographics, clinical presentation, endocrine laboratory results, radiological studies, development of complications and remission rates from 20 consecutive acromegalic patients who had undergone endoscopic transphenoidal surgery. The eleven females and nine males had an average age of 42 years; 90 percent had macroadenomas and 70% had cavernous sinus invasion on their preoperative imaging. Ninety percent had improved symptoms post-operatively and 80% stated that treatment improved their QOL. Biochemically, 35% were cured, 35% had discordant results and 30% were not cured, while pan-hypopituitarism occurred in 4 patients. Physical health subscales and pituitary-related symptoms were similar to norms. "Social," "emotional health," and "energy levels" were significantly lower than norms. Seventy percent stated that their relationship with their physician "very much so" affected their quality of life. Pan hypopituitarism and adjuvant therapy were the most significant predictors of lower QOL subscale scores. Transsphenoidal surgery improves QOL in acromegaly. Attempts to achieve a cure, avoidance of surgically induced pan-hypotpituitarism and adjuvant therapy, will improve quality of life. Our study demonstrates the important role of the patient-physician relationship to QOL and the need to measure QOL in addition to the traditional measures of outcome.

  3. Semen quality improves marginally during young adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perheentupa, Antti; Sadov, Sergey; Rönkä, Riitta

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Does semen quality improve during early adulthood? SUMMARY ANSWER: Semen variables change little during the third decade of life, however some improvement in sperm morphology and motility may occur. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: A suspicion of deteriorating semen quality has been raised...... in several studies. The longitudinal development of semen quality in early adulthood is insufficiently understood. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: A longitudinal follow-up of two cohorts of volunteer young adult Finnish men representing the general population was carried out. Cohorts A (discovery cohort, born...... participated both in the first round and in the final fourth round (cohort A, n = 111 and cohort B, n = 90 men) and in all four rounds (cohort A, n = 61 and cohort B, n = 52). WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Almost full spermatogenic capacity is reached by the age of 19 years. However, the improvement...

  4. [Abdominal organ retrieval: strategies to improve quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loss, M; Bald, C; Breidenbach, T; Engehausen, D; Guba, M; Klein, I; Matevossian, E; Müller, V; Vergho, D; Kleespies, A

    2013-04-01

    The blatant problem of organ shortage leads to an increasing acceptance of organs from extended criteria donors. This increases the importance of the process of organ donation and retrieval. A working group of representatives of Bavarian retrieval surgeons and the procurement organization German Foundation of Organ Transplantation (DSO) was initiated to develop consensus-based recommendations for quality improvements in the field of organ retrieval on the basis of regional data. The main aim was to professionalize retrieval teams by specified training standards and to define objective qualifications for retrieval surgeons. Initial measures of the working group included agreement on standardized retrieval techniques and improvement of documentation in terms of quality forms and the return rate of the forms. Quality data are being analyzed prospectively with a new categorization of complications. Communication among centers and teams and complication reporting has already been improved and initial structural changes have been set up.

  5. Health-related quality of life measurement in randomized clinical trials in surgical oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blazeby, Jane M.; Avery, Kerry; Sprangers, Mirjam; Pikhart, Hynek; Fayers, Peter; Donovan, Jenny

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: There is debate about the value of measuring health-related quality of life (HRQL) in clinical trials in oncology because of evidence suggesting that HRQL does not influence clinical decisions. Analysis of HRQL in surgical trials, however, may inform decision making because it provides

  6. ISO certification pays off in quality improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeer, F.J.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that by obtaining and maintaining International Standards Organization (ISO) 9001 certification, a company can improve its quality control system, cut waste, and motivate its employees. In so doing it improves its competitive position in both international and domestic markets. The success of a number of countries (notably Japan) in the world markets has focused the attention of the industrialized countries on improving quality levels and striving for a unified, worldwide quality standard. This has been particularly true in Europe; with several countries competing in a single market, a common quality standard has been a highly desirable goal for decades. One of the first multinational quality standards evolved in the European Community, which is estimated to become a single market with a gross national product of $4.5 trillion by 1992. As a consequence, in 1987 the International Standards Organization created ISO 9000, a single standard to ensure uniform quality in products and services offered with this growing market. U.S. petroleum and natural gas companies must recognize and implement the ISO 9000 standards or possibly lose international markets. If the present worldwide trend towards ISO 9000 continues (and there is no reason to believe that it will not), the standards will be just as important in the domestic market

  7. Using evidence to improve satisfaction with medication side-effects education on a neuro-medical surgical unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Susan L; Wirges, Ashley M

    2013-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is viewed as a significant indicator of quality of care. More specifically, improving patient satisfaction related to communication about medications and potential side effects can improve healthcare outcomes. Patient satisfaction scores related to medication side effects on a neuro-medical surgical unit were monitored following a quality improvement program. These patients frequently experience cognitive impairment and functional difficulties that can affect the way they understand and handle medications. The purpose of this quality improvement practice change was to (a) develop an educational approach for post acute neurosurgical patients and (b) evaluate whether the use of the approach is successful in improving patient satisfaction scores related to medication education on side effects. The quality improvement program interventions included (a) patient informational handouts inserted into admission folders, (b) nurse education about the importance of providing education on side effects to patient and discussion of their involvement with the program, (c) unit flyers with nurse education, and (d) various communications with bedside nurses through personal work mail and emails. The primary focus was for nurses to employ the "teach back" method to review and reinforce the medication side-effect teaching with patients. Evaluation of the data showed an increase in patient satisfaction after the implementation of the "Always Ask" program.

  8. Distributed power quality improvement in residential microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naderi Zarnaghi, Yahya; Hosseini, Seyed Hossein; Ghassem Zadeh, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    The importance of power quality issue on micro grids and also the changing nature of power system distortions will lead the future power systems to use distributed power quality improvement (DPQI) devices. One possible choice of these DPQIs are multifunctional DGs that could compensate some...... the different situations. Finally a comparison is presented between different states of using DGs as PQI devices. To verify the feasibility of the control method a comparison is done between the presented method results and IEEE power quality standard limits....

  9. Does Audit Improve the Quality of Care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areti Tsaloglidou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The quality of health care and quality assurance are concepts which have been established for many years. Audit nowadays is adopted as a means of developing high quality care.AIM: This study aims to identify the perspectives of audit in practice and its relationship to quality assessment and assurance, quality improvement, and clinical effectiveness.METHODS: There were used the databases Medline and Cinahl to identify studies related to clinical audit. These databases were searched up to May 2009.DISCUSSION: Audit is used as a tool to assure and assess the quality of patient health care. It is also an educational tool as it creates a lot of opportunities for professionals to think about practice and to learn from the experience of others.CONCLUSIONS: Although that audit is a powerfull and useful tool to improve and evaluate the quality of health care, on the other hand there are many barriers that make its use difficult in everyday practice.

  10. The effect of Surgical Care Improvement Project measures on national trends on surgical site infections in open vascular procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Anahita; Desai, Sapan S; Seabrook, Gary R; Brown, Kellie R; Lewis, Brian D; Rossi, Peter J; Edmiston, Charles E; Lee, Cheong J

    2014-12-01

    The Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) is a national initiative to reduce surgical complications, including postoperative surgical site infection (SSI), through protocol-driven antibiotic usage. This study aimed to determine the effect SCIP guidelines have had on in-hospital SSIs after open vascular procedures. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) was retrospectively analyzed using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, diagnosis codes to capture SSIs in hospital patients who underwent elective carotid endarterectomy, elective open repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), and peripheral bypass. The pre-SCIP era was defined as 2000 to 2005 and post-SCIP was defined as 2007 to 2010. The year 2006 was excluded because this was the transition year in which the SCIP guidelines were implemented. Analysis of variance and χ(2) testing were used for statistical analysis. The rate of SSI in the pre-SCIP era was 2.2% compared with 2.3% for carotid endarterectomy (P = .06). For peripheral bypass, both in the pre- and post-SCIP era, infection rates were 0.1% (P = .22). For open, elective AAA, the rate of infection in the post-SCIP era increased significantly to 1.4% from 1.0% in the pre-SCIP era (P < .001). Demographics and in-hospital mortality did not differ significantly between the groups. Implementation of SCIP guidelines has made no significant effect on the incidence of in-hospital SSIs in open vascular operations; rather, an increase in SSI rates in open AAA repairs was observed. Patient-centered, bundled approaches to care, rather than current SCIP practices, may further decrease SSI rates in vascular patients undergoing open procedures. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. IMPROVEMENT OF SCHISTOSOMAL PORTAL HYPERTENSIVE COLOPATHY AFTER SURGICAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angelina Carvalho MIRANDA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Data on vascular alterations in patients with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis and portal hypertensive colopathy and changes in these after surgery to decrease portal hypertension are limited. Objective The purpose of this study was to analyse the alterations of portal hypertensive colopathy previously and 6-12 months after splenectomy and gastric devascularization. Methods Twelve patients with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis who also had upper gastrointestinal bleeding were studied prospectively. Their endoscopic findings before and 6-12 months after the surgery were analysed. In addition, mucosal biopsies from ascending colon, sigmoid colon and rectum at these time points were subjected to histological and histomorphometric assessment. It was used a control group due to lack of normal pattern of the histomorphometric measures of vessels in individuals without portal hypertension. The critical level of significance adopted in all tests was of a maximum probability error of 5%. Results Surgery did not lead to significant improvement in histological and endoscopic findings. However, on histomorphometry, there was a significant decrease in the area, diameter and thickness of the vessels in mucosa at all colonic sites. Conclusion Surgery for decompression of schistosomal portal hypertension has a beneficial effect on the associated colopathy, being best indicated in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding and esophageal varices.

  12. Improving Power Quality in AC Supply Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Fabijański

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a digital and actual model of the UPQC (Unified Power Quality Conditioner integrated system for power quality improvement. The UPQC’s design and its connection to an AC supply grid, 1-phase and 3-phase alike, provide effective compensation of unwanted interferences in the waveforms of load supply voltages and non-linear load currents. This article presents an overview of topologies and control strategies. The study of the UPQC confirmed its positive impact on the power quality. The electricity parameters were significantly improved. Total harmonic distortion in supply voltage THDu decreased six-fold to 1.89%, and total harmonic distortion in load current THDi decreased more than ten-fold to 2.38% for a non-linear load (uncontrolled bridge rectifier with load L. Additionally, symmetrisation of supply voltages and reactive power compensation Q of linear load was obtained. The UPQC integrated system for power quality improvement can be used wherever high-quality and PN-EN 50160 standard – compliant electricity is required.

  13. National Quality Improvement Center on Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Charlyn Harper

    2014-01-01

    The national Quality Improvement Center on early Childhood (QIC-eC) funded four research and demonstration projects that tested child maltreatment prevention approaches. The projects were guided by several key perspectives: the importance of increasing protective factors in addition to decreasing risk factors in child maltreatment prevention…

  14. Fostering Quality Improvement in EHDI Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradham, Tamala S.; Hoffman, Jeff; Houston, K. Todd; Guignard, Gayla Hutsell

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that consisted of 12 evaluative areas of EHDI programs. For the quality improvement area, a total of 218 items were listed by 47 EHDI coordinators, and themes were identified in each…

  15. Quality Improvements in Curricula for Global Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Lena; Bereuther, Tabea; Deutsch, Elisabeth; Edlinger, Julia; Fureder, Silvia; Kaspar, Emanuel; Kottstorfer, Marlene; Mautner, Claudia; Rossegger, Christine; Samonig, Alina; Samonig, Stefan; Schuster, Christoph; Witz, Gerhard; Zotter, Victoria; Ahamer, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Based on an in-depth comparison of 20 multicultural university curricula, this article aims to provide practical and implementable suggestions about how to improve such curricula in order to ensure highest and globally compatible academic quality. The recently founded developmental Master's curriculum "Global Studies" (GS) at…

  16. Teaching Quality Improvement Through a Book Club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Doolittle

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quality Improvement projects are an important part of residency education in the United States and are required for accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Participation in standard chart-based quality improvement had failed to generate excitement among residents in our program. The objective of our innovation was to inspire interest in quality improvement among our residents. Methods: Our residency program instituted a book discussion group. Attendance and participation of attendees was recorded, and residents were sent a follow-up survey one month after the activity to gauge their impressions. Results: Out of 16 residents in the program, 12 attended the discussion group, and all attendees participated in the discussion. The follow-up survey revealed that 10/11 (91% of respondents had read at least part of the book and 11/11 (100% wanted to have another book discussion group in the upcoming year. Conclusion: We believe that the use of a book discussion group can be a novel, inspiring strategy to teach quality improvement in a residency program.

  17. Improving the Quality of Constructive Peer Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner Denton, Ashley

    2018-01-01

    This article presents some simple strategies that instructors can use to improve the quality of the feedback students provide each other during a peer review activity. Briefly, I recommend that emphasis be placed solely on the provision of constructive comments, and that in order to qualify as constructive, a comment must: (1) identify a specific…

  18. Quality of life and self-esteem in patients submitted to surgical treatment of skin carcinomas: long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Paula Curitiba; Veiga-Filho, Joel; Carvalho, Marcelo Prado; Fonseca, Fernando Elias Martins; Ferreira, Lydia Masako; Veiga, Daniela Francescato

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease and skin carcinomas are the most common type of cancer. Assessing quality of life and self-esteem outcomes in skin cancer patients is important because these are indicators of the results of the treatment, translating how patients face their lives and their personal relationships. To assess the late impact of the surgical treatment of head and/or neck skin carcinomas on quality of life and self-esteem of the patients. Fifty patients with head or neck skin carcinomas were enrolled. Their age ranged between 30 and 75 years, 27 were men and 23 were women. Patients were assessed with regard to quality of life and self-esteem, preoperatively and five years postoperatively. Validated instruments were used: the MOS 36-item Short-form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Rosenberg Self-esteem/EPM-UNIFESP Scale. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for the statistical analysis. Twenty-two patients completed the five-year follow-up, 54.5% women and 45.5% men. Compared to the preoperative assessment, patients had an improvement in mental health (p=0.011) and in self-esteem (p=0.002). There was no statistical difference with regard to the other domains of the SF-36. Patients submitted to surgical treatment of skin carcinoma improved mental health and self-esteem in the late postsurgical testing.

  19. Engaging Clinical Nurses in Quality Improvement Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Susan; Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2015-10-01

    Clinical nurses have the knowledge and expertise required to provide efficient and proficient patient care. Time and knowledge deficits can prevent nurses from developing and implementing quality improvement or evidence-based practice projects. This article reviews a process for professional development of clinical nurses that helped them to define, implement, and analyze quality improvement or evidence-based practice projects. The purpose of this project was to educate advanced clinical nurses to manage a change project from inception to completion, using the Six Sigma DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) Change Acceleration Process as a framework. One-to-one mentoring and didactic in-services advanced the knowledge, appreciation, and practice of advanced practice clinicians who completed multiple change projects. The projects facilitated clinical practice changes, with improved patient outcomes; a unit cultural shift, with appreciation of quality improvement and evidence-based projects; and engagement with colleagues. Project outcomes were displayed in poster presentations at a hospital exposition for knowledge dissemination. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Long-term survival and quality of life in dogs with clinical signs associated with a congenital portosystemic shunt after surgical or medical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Stephen N; Reeve, Jenny A; Johnstone, Thurid; Goodfellow, Mark R; Dunning, Mark D; O'Neill, Emma J; Hall, Ed J; Watson, Penny J; Jeffery, Nick D

    2014-09-01

    To compare long-term survival and quality of life data in dogs with clinical signs associated with a congenital portosystemic shunt (CPSS) that underwent medical or surgical treatment. Prospective cohort study. 124 client-owned dogs with CPSS. Dogs received medical or surgical treatment without regard to signalment, clinical signs, or clinicopathologic results. Survival data were analyzed with a Cox regression model. Quality of life information, obtained from owner questionnaires, included frequency of CPSS-associated clinical signs (from which a clinical score was derived), whether owners considered their dog normal, and (for surgically treated dogs) any ongoing medical treatment for CPSS. A Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare mean clinical score data between surgically and medically managed dogs during predetermined follow-up intervals. 97 dogs underwent surgical treatment; 27 were managed medically. Median follow-up time for all dogs was 1,936 days. Forty-five dogs (24 medically managed and 21 surgically managed) died or were euthanized during the follow-up period. Survival rate was significantly improved in dogs that underwent surgical treatment (hazard ratio, 8.11; 95% CI, 4.20 to 15.66) than in those treated medically for CPSS. Neither age at diagnosis nor shunt type affected survival rate. Frequency of clinical signs was lower in surgically versus medically managed dogs for all follow-up intervals, with a significant difference between groups at 4 to 7 years after study entry. Surgical treatment of CPSS in dogs resulted in significantly improved survival rate and lower frequency of ongoing clinical signs, compared with medical management. Age at diagnosis did not affect survival rate and should not influence treatment choice.

  1. Mortality and health-related quality of life in patients surgically treated for spondylodiscitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Casper; Aagaard, Theis; Ohrt-Nissen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess mortality, disability, and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients surgically treated for spondylodiscitis. METHODS: A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted on all patients surgically treated for spondylodiscitis over a 6-year period at a single tertiary spine...... with spondylodiscitis not related to recent spine surgery. One-year mortality rate was 6%. In all, 36% and 27% had pre- and postoperative neurological impairment, respectively, with only one patient experiencing deterioration postoperatively. At final follow-up (median 2 years), mean ODI was 31% (SD = 22) and mean EQ-5...... neurological impairment. CONCLUSIONS: Several years after surgery, patients surgically treated for spondylodiscitis have significantly lower HRQL and more disability than the background population. Neurological impairment prior to index surgery predicts adverse outcome in terms of disability and lower HRQL....

  2. Mortality and health-related quality of life in patients surgically treated for spondylodiscitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Casper; Aagaard, Theis; Ohrt-Nissen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    center. Indications for surgery, pre- and postoperative neurological impairment, comorbidities, and mortality were recorded. A survey was conducted on all eligible patients with the EuroQol 5-dimension (EQ-5D) questionnaire and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). RESULTS: Sixty-five patients were diagnosed...... neurological impairment. CONCLUSIONS: Several years after surgery, patients surgically treated for spondylodiscitis have significantly lower HRQL and more disability than the background population. Neurological impairment prior to index surgery predicts adverse outcome in terms of disability and lower HRQL.......PURPOSE: To assess mortality, disability, and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients surgically treated for spondylodiscitis. METHODS: A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted on all patients surgically treated for spondylodiscitis over a 6-year period at a single tertiary spine...

  3. Association of hospital participation in a quality reporting program with surgical outcomes and expenditures for Medicare beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Nicholas H; Nicholas, Lauren H; Ryan, Andrew M; Thumma, Jyothi R; Dimick, Justin B

    2015-02-03

    The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) provides feedback to hospitals on risk-adjusted outcomes. It is not known if participation in the program improves outcomes and reduces costs relative to nonparticipating hospitals. To evaluate the association of enrollment and participation in the ACS NSQIP with outcomes and Medicare payments compared with control hospitals that did not participate in the program. Quasi-experimental study using national Medicare data (2003-2012) for a total of 1,226,479 patients undergoing general and vascular surgery at 263 hospitals participating in ACS NSQIP and 526 nonparticipating hospitals. A difference-in-differences analytic approach was used to evaluate whether participation in ACS NSQIP was associated with improved outcomes and reduced Medicare payments compared with nonparticipating hospitals that were otherwise similar. Control hospitals were selected using propensity score matching (2 control hospitals for each ACS NSQIP hospital). Thirty-day mortality, serious complications (eg, pneumonia, myocardial infarction, or acute renal failure and a length of stay >75th percentile), reoperation, and readmission within 30 days. Hospital costs were assessed using price-standardized Medicare payments during hospitalization and 30 days after discharge. After accounting for patient factors and preexisting time trends toward improved outcomes, there were no statistically significant improvements in outcomes at 1, 2, or 3 years after (vs before) enrollment in ACS NSQIP. For example, in analyses comparing outcomes at 3 years after (vs before) enrollment, there were no statistically significant differences in risk-adjusted 30-day mortality (4.3% after enrollment vs 4.5% before enrollment; relative risk [RR], 0.96 [95% CI, 0.89 to 1.03]), serious complications (11.1% after enrollment vs 11.0% before enrollment; RR, 0.96 [95% CI, 0.91 to 1.00]), reoperations (0.49% after enrollment vs 0.45% before

  4. Improving wind power quality with energy storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Claus Nygaard

    2009-01-01

    The results of simulation of the influence of energy storage on wind power quality are presented. Simulations are done using a mathematical model of energy storage. Results show the relation between storage power and energy, and the obtained increase in minimum available power from the combination...... probability. The amount of storage capacity necessary for significant wind power quality improvement in a given period is found to be 20 to 40% of the energy produced in that period. The necessary power is found to be 80 to 100% of the average power of the period....

  5. Multimedia-based training on Internet platforms improves surgical performance: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape-Koehler, Carolina; Immenroth, Marc; Sauerland, Stefan; Lefering, Rolf; Lindlohr, Cornelia; Toaspern, Jens; Heiss, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Surgical procedures are complex motion sequences that require a high level of preparation, training, and concentration. In recent years, Internet platforms providing surgical content have been established. Used as a surgical training method, the effect of multimedia-based training on practical surgical skills has not yet been evaluated. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of multimedia-based training on surgical performance. A 2 × 2 factorial, randomized controlled trial with a pre- and posttest design was used to test the effect of multimedia-based training in addition to or without practical training on 70 participants in four groups defined by the intervention used: multimedia-based training, practical training, and combination training (multimedia-based training + practical training) or no training (control group). The pre- and posttest consisted of a laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a Pelvi-Trainer and was video recorded, encoded, and saved on DVDs. These were evaluated by blinded raters using a modified objective structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS). The main evaluation criterion was the difference in OSATS score between the pre- and posttest (ΔOSATS) results in terms of a task-specific checklist (procedural steps scored as correct or incorrect). The groups were homogeneous in terms of demographic parameters, surgical experience, and pretest OSATS scores. The ΔOSATS results were highest in the multimedia-based training group (4.7 ± 3.3; p Multimedia-based training improved surgical performance significantly and thus could be considered a reasonable tool for inclusion in surgical curricula.

  6. Appraisal of face and content validity of a serious game improving situational awareness in surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graafland, Maurits; Bemelman, Willem A; Schijven, Marlies P

    2015-01-01

    Equipment-related malfunctions during minimally invasive surgery (MIS) are common and threaten patient safety. As they occur in the periphery of the surgeon's vision, the surgical team requires a high level of situational awareness in order to intercept these errors timely. A serious game has been developed to train surgical residents to deal with equipment-related errors. This study investigates to what extent surgical educators and trainees would accept a serious game as a training method. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 45 surgeons, surgical residents, and medical students who played the serious game at a scientific convention. The questionnaire contained statements on perceived realism, usefulness, teaching capability, user experience and application toward surgical training. RESULTS were analyzed according to participants' MIS experience ("expert," "intermediate," and "novice"). The majority found that important medical constructs are represented realistically (64.4%-88.9%) and indicated the game to be particularly useful for training operating room nurses and surgical residents (75%-86%). Both educators and trainees found the game to be useful for surgical training (53%). Serious gaming was viewed as positive (78%) and challenging (60%), and 66% would play the game in their leisure time. Licensed surgeons perceived the game more frequently as boring than the intermediate-level and trainee groups (23.5% versus 6.7% and 8.3%; P=.045). This is the first study to show acceptance of a serious game as a training format in surgical training by educators and trainees. Future research should investigate whether the serious game indeed improves problem-solving and situational awareness in the operating room.

  7. Creating Quality Improvement Culture in Public Health Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanna, Elizabeth; Joly, Brenda; Zelek, Michael; Riley, William; Verma, Pooja; Fisher, Jessica Solomon

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We conducted case studies of 10 agencies that participated in early quality improvement efforts. Methods. The agencies participated in a project conducted by the National Association of County and City Health Officials (2007–2008). Case study participants included health directors and quality improvement team leaders and members. We implemented multiple qualitative analysis processes, including cross-case analysis and logic modeling. We categorized agencies according to the extent to which they had developed a quality improvement culture. Results. Agencies were conducting informal quality improvement projects (n = 4), conducting formal quality improvement projects (n = 3), or creating a quality improvement culture (n = 4). Agencies conducting formal quality improvement and creating a quality improvement culture had leadership support for quality improvement, participated in national quality improvement initiatives, had a greater number of staff trained in quality improvement and quality improvement teams that met regularly with decision-making authority. Agencies conducting informal quality improvement were likely to report that accreditation is the major driver for quality improvement work. Agencies creating a quality improvement culture were more likely to have a history of evidence-based decision-making and use quality improvement to address emerging issues. Conclusions. Our findings support previous research and add the roles of national public health accreditation and emerging issues as factors in agencies’ ability to create and sustain a quality improvement culture. PMID:24228680

  8. Pediatric CT quality management and improvement program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, David B.; Chan, Frandics P.; Newman, Beverley; Fleischmann, Dominik [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Molvin, Lior Z. [Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford, CA (United States); Wang, Jia [Stanford University, Environmental Health and Safety, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Modern CT is a powerful yet increasingly complex technology that continues to rapidly evolve; optimal clinical implementation as well as appropriate quality management and improvement in CT are challenging but attainable. This article outlines the organizational structure on which a CT quality management and improvement program can be built, followed by a discussion of common as well as pediatric-specific challenges. Organizational elements of a CT quality management and improvement program include the formulation of clear objectives; definition of the roles and responsibilities of key personnel; implementation of a technologist training, coaching and feedback program; and use of an efficient and accurate monitoring system. Key personnel and roles include a radiologist as the CT director, a qualified CT medical physicist, as well as technologists with specific responsibilities and adequate time dedicated to operation management, CT protocol management and CT technologist education. Common challenges in managing a clinical CT operation are related to the complexity of newly introduced technology, of training and communication and of performance monitoring. Challenges specific to pediatric patients include the importance of including patient size in protocol and dose considerations, a lower tolerance for error in these patients, and a smaller sample size from which to learn and improve. (orig.)

  9. Pediatric CT quality management and improvement program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, David B.; Chan, Frandics P.; Newman, Beverley; Fleischmann, Dominik; Molvin, Lior Z.; Wang, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Modern CT is a powerful yet increasingly complex technology that continues to rapidly evolve; optimal clinical implementation as well as appropriate quality management and improvement in CT are challenging but attainable. This article outlines the organizational structure on which a CT quality management and improvement program can be built, followed by a discussion of common as well as pediatric-specific challenges. Organizational elements of a CT quality management and improvement program include the formulation of clear objectives; definition of the roles and responsibilities of key personnel; implementation of a technologist training, coaching and feedback program; and use of an efficient and accurate monitoring system. Key personnel and roles include a radiologist as the CT director, a qualified CT medical physicist, as well as technologists with specific responsibilities and adequate time dedicated to operation management, CT protocol management and CT technologist education. Common challenges in managing a clinical CT operation are related to the complexity of newly introduced technology, of training and communication and of performance monitoring. Challenges specific to pediatric patients include the importance of including patient size in protocol and dose considerations, a lower tolerance for error in these patients, and a smaller sample size from which to learn and improve. (orig.)

  10. Improved Coumadin therapy using a continuous quality improvement process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhart, J; Gilbert, P

    1996-01-01

    Through the Continuous Quality Improvement process, we determined that a significant number of patients were receiving too much Coumadin and having potentially serious side effects. The number of patients studied is limited, and there are only two time intervals reported postintervention. This makes it difficult to draw a definite relationship between the observed rates of Coumadin overdosing and the selected intervention. By educating the physicians on proper Coumadin dosing, we were able to reduce the number of patients experiencing hemorrhage or other complications. Our follow-up data review 1 year later showed that the gain had not been maintained as well as we would have hoped. This demonstrates that active review by Pharmacy and Laboratory on a regular basis and additional physician education would be beneficial. Through this process we gained valuable experience using the FOCUS PDCA method of continuous quality improvement.

  11. A cluster-randomised quality improvement study to improve two inpatient stroke quality indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Linda; Daggett, Virginia; Slaven, James E; Yu, Zhangsheng; Sager, Danielle; Myers, Jennifer; Plue, Laurie; Woodward-Hagg, Heather; Damush, Teresa M

    2016-04-01

    Quality indicator collection and feedback improves stroke care. We sought to determine whether quality improvement training plus indicator feedback was more effective than indicator feedback alone in improving inpatient stroke indicators. We conducted a cluster-randomised quality improvement trial, randomising hospitals to quality improvement training plus indicator feedback versus indicator feedback alone to improve deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis and dysphagia screening. Intervention sites received collaborative-based quality improvement training, external facilitation and indicator feedback. Control sites received only indicator feedback. We compared indicators pre-implementation (pre-I) to active implementation (active-I) and post-implementation (post-I) periods. We constructed mixed-effect logistic models of the two indicators with a random intercept for hospital effect, adjusting for patient, time, intervention and hospital variables. Patients at intervention sites (1147 admissions), had similar race, gender and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores to control sites (1017 admissions). DVT prophylaxis improved more in intervention sites during active-I period (ratio of ORs 4.90, pimproved similarly in both groups during active-I, but control sites improved more in post-I period (ratio of ORs 0.67, p=0.04). In logistic models, the intervention was independently positively associated with DVT performance during active-I period, and negatively associated with dysphagia performance post-I period. Quality improvement training was associated with early DVT improvement, but the effect was not sustained over time and was not seen with dysphagia screening. External quality improvement programmes may quickly boost performance but their effect may vary by indicator and may not sustain over time. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Improving quality of care through improved audit and feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hysong Sylvia J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA has led the industry in measuring facility performance as a critical element in improving quality of care, investing substantial resources to develop and maintain valid and cost-effective measures. The External Peer Review Program (EPRP of the VA is the official data source for monitoring facility performance, used to prioritize the quality areas needing most attention. Facility performance measurement has significantly improved preventive and chronic care, as well as overall quality; however, much variability still exists in levels of performance across measures and facilities. Audit and feedback (A&F, an important component of effective performance measurement, can help reduce this variability and improve overall performance. Previous research suggests that VA Medical Centers (VAMCs with high EPRP performance scores tend to use EPRP data as a feedback source. However, the manner in which EPRP data are used as a feedback source by individual providers as well as service line, facility, and network leadership is not well understood. An in-depth understanding of mental models, strategies, and specific feedback process characteristics adopted by high-performing facilities is thus urgently needed. This research compares how leaders of high, low, and moderately performing VAMCs use clinical performance data from the EPRP as a feedback tool to maintain and improve quality of care. Methods We will conduct a qualitative, grounded theory analysis of up to 64 interviews using a novel method of sampling primary care, facility, and Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN leadership at high-, moderate-, and low-performing facilities. We will analyze interviews for evidence of cross-facility differences in perceptions of performance data usefulness and strategies for disseminating performance data evaluating performance, with particular attention to timeliness, individualization, and punitiveness

  13. Quality in-training initiative--a solution to the need for education in quality improvement: results from a survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelz, Rachel R; Sellers, Morgan M; Reinke, Caroline E; Medbery, Rachel L; Morris, Jon; Ko, Clifford

    2013-12-01

    The Next Accreditation System and the Clinical Learning Environment Review Program will emphasize practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice. We present the results of a survey of general surgery program directors to characterize the current state of quality improvement in graduate surgical education and introduce the Quality In-Training Initiative (QITI). In 2012, a 20-item survey was distributed to 118 surgical residency program directors from ACS NSQIP-affiliated hospitals. The survey content was developed in collaboration with the QITI to identify program director opinions regarding education in practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice, to investigate the status of quality improvement education in their respective programs, and to quantify the extent of resident participation in quality improvement. There was a 57% response rate. Eighty-five percent of program directors (n = 57) reported that education in quality improvement is essential to future professional work in the field of surgery. Only 28% (n = 18) of programs reported that at least 50% of their residents track and analyze their patient outcomes, compare them with norms/benchmarks/published standards, and identify opportunities to make practice improvements. Program directors recognize the importance of quality improvement efforts in surgical practice. Subpar participation in basic practice-based learning and improvement activities at the resident level reflects the need for support of these educational goals. The QITI will facilitate programmatic compliance with goals for quality improvement education. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  14. Goal hierarchy: Improving asset data quality by improving motivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unsworth, Kerrie; Adriasola, Elisa; Johnston-Billings, Amber; Dmitrieva, Alina; Hodkiewicz, Melinda

    2011-01-01

    Many have recognized the need for high quality data on assets and the problems in obtaining them, particularly when there is a need for human observation and manual recording. Yet very few have looked at the role of the data collectors themselves in the data quality process. This paper argues that there are benefits to more fully understanding the psychological factors that lay behind data collection and we use goal hierarchy theory to understand these factors. Given the myriad of potential reasons for poor-quality data it has previously proven difficult to identify and successfully deploy employee-driven interventions; however, the goal hierarchy approach looks at all of the goals that an individual has in their life and the connections between them. For instance, does collecting data relate to whether or not they get a promotion? Stay safe? Get a new job? and so on. By eliciting these goals and their connections we can identify commonalities across different groups, sites or organizations that can influence the quality of data collection. Thus, rather than assuming what the data collectors want, a goal hierarchy approach determines that empirically. Practically, this supports the development of customized interventions that will be much more effective and sustainable than previous efforts. - Highlights: → We need to consider psychological aspects of data collectors to improve data quality. → We show how goal hierarchy theory furthers understanding. → Looks at the multiple goals of each individual to determine their behavior.

  15. A Model to Improve the Quality Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan GOKKAYA

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The topic of this paper is to present a solution who can improve product qualityfollowing the idea: “Unlike people who have verbal skills, machines use "sign language"to communicate what hurts or what has invaded their system’. Recognizing the "signs"or symptoms that the machine conveys is a required skill for those who work withmachines and are responsible for their care and feeding. The acoustic behavior of technical products is predominantly defined in the design stage, although the acoustic characteristics of machine structures can be analyze and give a solution for the actual products and create a new generation of products. The paper describes the steps intechnological process for a product and the solution who will reduce the costs with the non-quality of product and improve the management quality.

  16. Improving the ignition quality of fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2017-06-08

    Provided herein are compounds and methods of producing compounds for improving ignition quality and combustion efficiency of fuels, for example fossil fuels. In various aspects we generate highly oxygenated compounds from hydrocarbon feedstocks. The feedstock can be a branched alkane or n-alkane having a chain length greater than or equal to 6, a cycloalkane with a 5 or 6 membered ring structure, or a alkylated cycloalkane with 5 or more carbon atoms. The reactant can be fed in the gas- phase to a partial oxidation reactor (with or without a catalyst), and at a fixed temperature, mixture composition, and residence time. The reactant can be converted to a mixture of products including keto hydroperoxides, diketo hydroperoxides, keto dihydroperoxides, hydroperoxyl cyclic ethers, and alkenyl hydroperoxides. The compounds are inherently unstable and can quickly decompose to highly reactive radical species that can be used to improve the ignition quality of a fuel and advance ignition in an engine.

  17. In Brief: Improving Mississippi River water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2007-10-01

    If water quality in the Mississippi River and the northern Gulf of Mexico is to improve, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) needs to take a stronger leadership role in implementing the federal Clean Water Act, according to a 16 October report from the U.S. National Research Council. The report notes that EPA has failed to use its authority to coordinate and oversee activities along the river. In addition, river states need to be more proactive and cooperative in efforts to monitor and improve water quality, and the river should be monitored and evaluated as a single system, the report indicates. Currently, the 10 states along the river conduct separate and widely varying water quality monitoring programs. ``The limited attention being given to monitoring and managing the Mississippi's water quality does not match the river's significant economic, ecological, and cultural importance,'' said committee chair David A. Dzombak, director of the Steinbrenner Institute for Environmental Education and Research at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pa. The report notes that while measures taken under the Clean Water Act have successfully reduced much point source pollution, nutrient and sediment loads from nonpoint sources continue to be significant problems. For more information, visit the Web site: http://books.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12051.

  18. Quality Improvement in Athletic Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Sauers, Andrea D; Sauers, Eric L; Valier, Alison R Snyder

    2017-11-01

    Quality improvement (QI) is a health care concept that ensures patients receive high-quality (safe, timely, effective, efficient, equitable, patient-centered) and affordable care. Despite its importance, the application of QI in athletic health care has been limited.   To describe the need for and define QI in health care, to describe how to measure quality in health care, and to present a QI case in athletic training.   As the athletic training profession continues to grow, a widespread engagement in QI efforts is necessary to establish the value of athletic training services for the patients that we serve. A review of the importance of QI in health care, historical perspectives of QI, tools to drive QI efforts, and examples of common QI initiatives is presented to assist clinicians in better understanding the value of QI for advancing athletic health care and the profession. Clinical and Research Advantages:  By engaging clinicians in strategies to measure outcomes and improve their patient care services, QI practice can help athletic trainers provide high-quality and affordable care to patients.

  19. Improvement of organic apple quality and storability

    OpenAIRE

    Tahir, Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Improvements in yield and quality by increasing the light distribution and carbohydrate uptake (summer pruning and ground covering), optimizing the physiological state of harvested fruit (cultivar-specific harvesting indices), postharvest fruit protection (treatment with hot water and ethanol, respectively) and optimizing storage conditions (cultivar-specific CA and ULO storage procedures) were investigated in a set of eight organically grown apple cultivars. A combination of summer pruning a...

  20. Bioethanol Quality Improvement of Coffee Fruit Leather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edahwati Luluk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Indonesia’s dependence on petroleum is to be reduced and even eliminated. To overcome the problem of finding the needed alternative materials that can produce ethanol, in this case as a substitute material or a transport fuel mix, boosting the octane number, and gasoline ethanol (gasohol can be conducted. In the red coffee processing (cooking that will produce 65% and 35% of coffee beans, coffee leather waste is a source of organic material with fairly high cellulose content of 46.82%, 3.01% of pectin and 7.68% of lignin. In this case, its existence is abundant in Indonesia and optimally utilized. During the coffee fruit peeling, the peel waste is only used as a mixture of animal feed or simply left to rot. The purpose of this study was to produce and improve the quality of the fruit skin of bioethanol from coffee cellulose. However, to improve the quality of bioethanol, the production of the lignin content in the skin of the coffee fruit should be eliminated or reduced. Hydrolysis process using organosolve method is expected to improve the quality of bioethanol produced. In particular, the use of enzyme Saccharomyces and Zymmomonas will change the resulting sugar into bioethanol. On one hand, by using batch distillation process for 8 hours with Saccharomyces, bioethanol obtains high purity which is 39.79%; on the other hand, by using the same batch distillation process with Zymmomonas, the bioethanol obtains 38.78%.

  1. 42 CFR 423.162 - Quality improvement organization activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quality improvement organization activities. 423... and Quality Improvement Requirements § 423.162 Quality improvement organization activities. (a) General rule. Quality improvement organizations (QIOs) are required to offer providers, practitioners, and...

  2. 42 CFR 422.152 - Quality improvement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quality improvement program. 422.152 Section 422... (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Quality Improvement § 422.152 Quality improvement... those plans, an ongoing quality improvement program that meets applicable requirements of this section...

  3. Longitudinal Assessments of Quality of Life in Endometrial Cancer Patients: Effect of Surgical Approach and Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Tien; Menard, Chantal; Samant, Rajiv; Choan, E.; Hopkins, Laura; Faught, Wylam; Fung-Kee-Fung, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is often considered for endometrial cancer. We studied the effect of RT and surgical treatment on patients' quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: All patients referred to the gynecologic oncology clinics with biopsy findings showing endometrial cancer were recruited. QOL assessments were performed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL questionnaire-C30, version 3. Assessments were obtained at study entry and at regular 3-month intervals for a maximum of 2 years. Open-ended telephone interviews were done every 6 months. Linear mixed regression models were built using QOL domain scores as dependent variables, with the predictors of surgical treatment and adjuvant RT type. Results: A total of 40 patients were recruited; 80% of the surgeries were performed by laparotomy. Significant improvements were seen in most QOL domains with increased time from treatment. Adjuvant RT resulted in significantly more severe bowel symptoms and improvement in insomnia compared with conservative follow-up. No significant adverse effect from adjuvant RT was seen on the overall QOL. Bowel symptoms were significantly increased in patients treated with laparotomy compared with laparoscopy in the patients treated with whole pelvic RT. Qualitatively, about one-half of the patients noted improvements in their overall QOL during follow-up, with easy fatigability the most prevalent. Conclusion: No significant adverse effect was seen on patients' overall QOL with adjuvant pelvic RT after the recovery period. The acute adverse effects on patients' QOL significantly improved with an increasing interval from diagnosis.

  4. Quality of life, pain, anxiety and depression in patients surgically treated with cancer of rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Letácio José Freire; Garcia, João Batista dos Santos; Pacheco, Jairo Sousa; Vieira, Erica Brandão de Morais; Santos, Alcione Miranda dos

    2014-01-01

    The rectum cancer is associated with high rates of complications and morbidities with great impact on the lives of affected individuals. To evaluate quality of life, pain, anxiety and depression in patients treated for medium and lower rectum cancer, submitted to surgical intervention. A descriptive cross-sectional study. Eighty-eight records of patients with medium and lower rectum cancer, submitted to surgical intervention were selected, and enrolled. Forty-seven patients died within the study period, and the other 41 were studied. Question forms EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-CR38 were used to assess quality of life. Pain evaluation was carried out using the Visual Analogical Scale, depression and anxiety were assessed through Depression Inventories and Beck's Anxiety, respectively. The correlation between pain intensity, depression and anxiety was carried out, and between these and the EORTC QLQ-C30 General Scale for Health Status and overall quality of life, as well as the EORTC QLQ-CR38 functional and symptom scales. Of the 41 patients of the study, 52% presented pain, depression in 47%, and anxiety in 39%. There was a marking positive correlation between pain intensity and depression. There was a moderate negative correlation between depression and general health status, and overall quality of life as well as pain intensity with the latter. There was a statistically significant negative correlation between future depression perspective and sexual function, and also a strong positive correlation between depression and sexual impairments. A positive correlation between anxiety and gastro-intestinal problems, both statistically significant, was observed. Evaluation scales showed detriment on quality life evaluation, besides an elevated incidence of pain, depression, and anxiety; a correlation among these, and factors which influence on the quality of life of post-surgical medium and lower rectum cancer patients was observed.

  5. Quality improvement in neurology: AAN Parkinson disease quality measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, E.M.; Tonn, S.; Swain-Eng, R.; Factor, S.A.; Weiner, W.J.; Bever, C.T.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Measuring the quality of health care is a fundamental step toward improving health care and is increasingly used in pay-for-performance initiatives and maintenance of certification requirements. Measure development to date has focused on primary care and common conditions such as diabetes; thus, the number of measures that apply to neurologic care is limited. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) identified the need for neurologists to develop measures of neurologic care and to establish a process to accomplish this. Objective: To adapt and test the feasibility of a process for independent development by the AAN of measures for neurologic conditions for national measurement programs. Methods: A process that has been used nationally for measure development was adapted for use by the AAN. Topics for measure development are chosen based upon national priorities, available evidence base from a systematic literature search, gaps in care, and the potential impact for quality improvement. A panel composed of subject matter and measure development methodology experts oversees the development of the measures. Recommendation statements and their corresponding level of evidence are reviewed and considered for development into draft candidate measures. The candidate measures are refined by the expert panel during a 30-day public comment period and by review by the American Medical Association for Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) II codes. All final AAN measures are approved by the AAN Board of Directors. Results: Parkinson disease (PD) was chosen for measure development. A review of the medical literature identified 258 relevant recommendation statements. A 28-member panel approved 10 quality measures for PD that included full specifications and CPT II codes. Conclusion: The AAN has adapted a measure development process that is suitable for national measurement programs and has demonstrated its capability to independently develop quality measures. GLOSSARY

  6. Increased Mercury Bioaccumulation Follows Water Quality Improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogle, M.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1999-09-15

    Changes in physical and chemical characteristics of aquatic habitats made to reduce or eliminate ecological risks can sometimes have unforeseen consequences. Environmental management activities on the U.S. Dept. of Energy reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee,have succeeded in improving water quality in streams impacted by discharges fi-om industrial facilities and waste disposal sites. The diversity and abundance of pollution-sensitive components of the benthic macroinvertebrate communities of three streams improved after new waste treatment systems or remedial actions reduced inputs of various toxic chemicals. Two of the streams were known to be mercury-contaminated from historical spills and waste disposal practices. Waterborne mercury concentrations in the third were typical of uncontaminated systems. In each case, concentrations of mercury in fish, or the apparent biological availability of mercury increased over the period during which ecological metrics indicated improved water quality. In the system where waterborne mercury concentrations were at background levels, increased mercury bioaccumulation was probably a result of reduced aqueous selenium concentrations; however, the mechanisms for increased mercury accumulation in the other two streams remain under investigation. In each of the three systems, reduced inputs of metals and inorganic anions was followed by improvements in the health of aquatic invertebrate communities. However, this reduction in risk to aquatic invertebrates was accompanied by increased risk to humans and piscivorous wildlife related to increased mercury concentrations in fish.

  7. Increased Mercury Bioaccumulation Follows Water Quality Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogle, M.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    Changes in physical and chemical characteristics of aquatic habitats made to reduce or eliminate ecological risks can sometimes have unforeseen consequences. Environmental management activities on the U.S. Dept. of Energy reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee,have succeeded in improving water quality in streams impacted by discharges fi-om industrial facilities and waste disposal sites. The diversity and abundance of pollution-sensitive components of the benthic macroinvertebrate communities of three streams improved after new waste treatment systems or remedial actions reduced inputs of various toxic chemicals. Two of the streams were known to be mercury-contaminated from historical spills and waste disposal practices. Waterborne mercury concentrations in the third were typical of uncontaminated systems. In each case, concentrations of mercury in fish, or the apparent biological availability of mercury increased over the period during which ecological metrics indicated improved water quality. In the system where waterborne mercury concentrations were at background levels, increased mercury bioaccumulation was probably a result of reduced aqueous selenium concentrations; however, the mechanisms for increased mercury accumulation in the other two streams remain under investigation. In each of the three systems, reduced inputs of metals and inorganic anions was followed by improvements in the health of aquatic invertebrate communities. However, this reduction in risk to aquatic invertebrates was accompanied by increased risk to humans and piscivorous wildlife related to increased mercury concentrations in fish

  8. Auditing of operating room times: a quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Jonathan N; Chiang, Tendy; Ruiz, Amanda G; Prager, Jeremy D

    2014-05-01

    A quality improvement project to evaluate operating room efficiency and utilization and to identify areas for improvement. A retrospective assessment of a single surgeon's surgical cases over a 6-month period at a tertiary children's hospital. Primary outcomes included case timing defined as T1, T2, T3 and T4. (T1)-Patient enters OR-to-procedure start. (T2)-Procedure start-to-procedure end. (T3)-Procedure end-to-patient exits OR. (T4)-Patient exits OR-to-next patient enters OR (turnover). Comparison to existing literature was performed and results were presented to stakeholders. A total of 180 surgical cases were reviewed, 92 adenotonsillectomies (T&A), 33 Bilateral Pressure Equalization Tube Placement (PET) and 55 microlaryngoscopies and bronchoscopies (MLB). All outcomes were calculated by case type, except T4, and compared to available published data. T2 was compared to published benchmarks for otolaryngology demonstrating favorable operative times for T&A and PET. However, T4 was considerably longer at our institution (average 31.09). Overall OR efficiency was 20.58%. The operating room represents one of a hospital's most costly resources. Ensuring that this resource is designed, staffed and utilized efficiently is of major importance to both the quality of patient care and financial productivity. Surgeons are key components of operating room efficiency, utilization and other measurements of institutional performance. How surgeons schedule and perform cases directly impacts, and is impacted by, these measurements of performance. For fields dominated by high volume, short duration procedures such as pediatric otolaryngology, T4 may be the most important variable in determining OR efficiency. By utilizing modern electronic medical records, surgeons can easily track OR time points thereby determining the potential causes of and solutions for OR inefficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Improvement of periodontal parameters in untreated quadrants after surgical periodontal therapy at adjacent quadrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radvar, Mehrdad; Mardani, Nima; Mellati, Ehsan; Habibi, Mehdi

    2009-04-01

    Once full-mouth surgery is planned following the non-surgical phase for a patient with chronic periodontitis, it often does not undergo revision during the surgical period. The aim of this study was to find out whether surgical treatments performed on each quadrant would have any influence on the periodontal status of the untreated quadrants. Twenty patients with chronic periodontitis were selected and received full-mouth scaling and root planing. After 8 weeks, quadrant-wise surgery was performed during four consecutive sessions at 2-week intervals for sites with probing depth (PD) > or = 5 mm and bleeding on probing (BOP). Clinical parameters, including PD, BOP, and clinical attachment level, were recorded at baseline, at each session prior to surgery, and 8 weeks after the last surgical visit. Only the data recorded for the last-treated quadrant are presented in this article. Marked differences were found in the clinical measurements of the last-treated quadrant among all visits. A significant improvement in the clinical parameters of the last-treated quadrant between sessions two and five were mostly related to the treatment of the other three quadrants. The treatment plan made at the time of reassessment of the initial phase of therapy should be considered provisional, and it should be open to revision prior to each surgical visit to reconfirm or modify the treatment plan previously devised for the remaining quadrant(s).

  10. Involvement of a surgical service improves patient satisfaction in patients admitted with small bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmocker, Ryan K; Vang, Xia; Cherney Stafford, Linda M; Leverson, Glen E; Winslow, Emily R

    2015-08-01

    For patients with small bowel obstruction (SBO), surgical care has been associated with improved outcomes; however, it remains unknown how it impacts satisfaction. Patients admitted for SBO who completed the hospital satisfaction survey were eligible. Only those with adhesions or hernias were included. Chart review extracted structural characteristics and outcomes. Forty-seven patients were included; 74% (n = 35) were admitted to a surgical service. Twenty-six percent of the patients (n = 12) were admitted to medicine, and 50% of those (n = 6) had surgical consultation. Patients with surgical involvement as the consulting or primary service (SURG) had higher satisfaction with the hospital than those cared for by the medical service (MED) (80% SURG, 33% MED, P = .015). SURG patients also had higher satisfaction with physicians (74% SURG, 44% MED, P = .015). Surgical involvement during SBO admissions is associated with increased patient satisfaction, and adds further weight to the recommendation that these patients be cared for by surgeons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Health care quality, access, cost, workforce, and surgical education: the ultimate perfect storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Marshall Z

    2012-01-01

    The discussions on health care reform over the past two years have focused on cost containment while trying to maintain quality of care. Focusing on just cost and quality unfortunately does not address other very important factors that impact on our health care delivery system. Availability of a well-trained workforce, maintaining the sophisticated medical/surgical education system, and ultimately access to quality care by the public are critical to maintaining and enhancing our health care delivery system. Unfortunately, all five of these components are under at risk. Thus, we have evolving the ultimate perfect storm affecting our health care delivery system. Although not ideal and given the uniqueness of our population and their expectations, our current delivery system is excellent compared to other countries. However, the cost of our current system is rising at an alarming rate. Currently, health care consumes 17% of our gross domestic product. If our system is not revised this will continue to rise and by 2025 it will consume 48%. The dilemma, given the current state of our overall economy and rising debt, is how to address this major problem. Unfortunately, the Affordable Care Act, which is now law, does not address most of the issues and the cost was initially grossly under estimated. Furthermore, the law does not address the issues of workforce, maintaining our medical education system or ultimately, access. A major revision of our system will be necessary to truly create a system that protects and enhances all five of the components of our health care delivery system. To effectively accomplish this will require addressing those issues that lead to wasteful spending and diversion of our health care dollars to profit instead of care. Improved and efficient delivery systems that reduce complications, reduction of duplication of tertiary and quaternary programs or services within the same markets (i.e. regionalization of care), health insurance reform, and

  12. 42 CFR 441.474 - Quality assurance and improvement plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quality assurance and improvement plan. 441.474... improvement plan. (a) The State must provide a quality assurance and improvement plan that describes the State... pursue opportunities for system improvement. (b) The quality assurance and improvement plan shall also...

  13. Quality of surgical scrub in a heart hospital: Do not take it for granted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Leila; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Jodati, Ahmadreza; Safaie, Naser; Moradi-Joo, Mohammad; Daemi, Amin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The role of scrub in the prevention of post-surgery infections is well-known. This study aimed to investigate the inputs and process of surgical scrub in operating rooms of the largest heart hospital of northwest Iran. Methods: This study took place with a before-after design as a clinical audit in 2014. A check list developed based on national and international standards of surgical hand scrub was used as the study instrument. Checklists were completed by observation of surgical team scrubbing in real situation. Descriptive statistics and graphs were used to describe the results. Results: A compliance degree with the standards for prerequisites, equipment, general items, process and time of scrub was observed as 58%, 55%, 33%, 68% and 22%, respectively. The compliance degree after the intervention was 72%, 66%, 66%, 85% and 61%, respectively. Improvement was observed in all studied aspects of scrub. The total score of compliance with the standards changed from 47% to 70%. The main issues were incorrect order of scrubbing the areas of the hands, incorrect way of scrubbing the arms, insufficient scrubbing the arms (not above elbow), and lack of awareness about hospital's policy on scrub time. Conclusion: The results showed defects in the surgical scrub of the studied hospital and that the compliance with the standards can be improved by simple interventions. Periodical audit and observation of the scrub and then feedback is recommended.

  14. Quality of surgical scrub in a heart hospital: Do not take it for granted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Abdollahi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role of scrub in the prevention of post-surgery infections is well-known. This study aimed to investigate the inputs and process of surgical scrub in operating rooms of the largest heart hospital of northwest Iran. Methods: This study took place with a before-after design as a clinical audit in 2014. A check list developed based on national and international standards of surgical hand scrub was used as the study instrument. Checklists were completed by observation of surgical team scrubbing in real situation. Descriptive statistics and graphs were used to describe the results. Results: A compliance degree with the standards for prerequisites, equipment, general items, process and time of scrub was observed as 58%, 55%, 33%, 68% and 22%, respectively. The compliance degree after the intervention was 72%, 66%, 66%, 85% and 61%, respectively. Improvement was observed in all studied aspects of scrub. The total score of compliance with the standards changed from 47% to 70%. The main issues were incorrect order of scrubbing the areas of the hands, incorrect way of scrubbing the arms, insufficient scrubbing the arms (not above elbow, and lack of awareness about hospital’s policy on scrub time. Conclusion: The results showed defects in the surgical scrub of the studied hospital and that the compliance with the standards can be improved by simple interventions. Periodical audit and observation of the scrub and then feedback is recommended.

  15. Total quality drives nuclear plant improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richey, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    Total quality (TQ) at Carolina Power and Light (CP and L) is fulfilling a 1985 vision of Sherwood H. Smith, Jr., CP and L's chairman, president, and chief executive officer. The TQ concept has provided a way for employees to align their creative energies toward meeting the business needs of the company. Throughout CP and L, TQ has been recognized as the vehicle for reducing operating costs and improving customer satisfaction. Within the nuclear organization, application of the TQ process has helped to improve communications, resolve challenges, and provide more consistent work practices among CP and L's three nuclear plants. Total quality was introduced from the top down, with initial benefits coming from team interactions. Senior management at CP and L defined the corporate expectations and outlined the training requirements for implementing TQ. Management staffs at each organizational level became steering committees for TQ team activities within their departments. Teams of employees most knowledgeable about a given work area were empowered to solve problems or overcome obstacles related to that work area. Employees learned to become better team players and to appreciate the quality of decisions reached through group consensus. Now, formalized methods that started TQ are becoming part of the day-to-day work ethic

  16. New applicator improves waterjet dissection quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschan, Christoph A; Tschan, Konrad; Krauss, Joachim K; Oertel, Joachim

    2010-12-01

    Waterjet dissection is accomplished with Helix Hydro-Jet, but a new device with improved operative handling and potentially superior dissection qualities has been developed. Eighty-four fresh cadaveric pig brains were simultaneously cut with Helix Hydro-Jet and Erbejet 2. A commonly used applicator and a new applicator for the Helix Hydro-Jet were directly compared to the new Erbejet 2. Under standardised conditions, different pressure levels were applied to the brain surface without arachnoids. Technical features, cutting depth, tissue damage and differences of applicators were examined. Microscopic analysis of cutting depth revealed different dissection characteristics of both the devices. With the standard applicators, waterjet cutting depth was shown to be deeper and with more foaming using the Helix Hydro-Jet compared to that of the Erbejet 2. With the new applicators, less foaming and a lower and more linear increased cutting depth were observed with the Helix Hydro-Jet, very similar to the superior qualities shown by the Erbejet 2. The new developed applicator of the Erbejet 2 also improves the intraoperative results of the so far applied Helix Hydro-Jet. The new Erbejet 2 provides some advantages for practicability; but in combination with the new applicator, the Helix Hydro-Jet accomplished almost identical superior dissection qualities of the Erbejet 2.

  17. Improving pain assessment in the NICU: a quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavey, Daphne A; Haney, Barbara M; Atchison, Linda; Anderson, Betsi; Sandritter, Tracy; Pallotto, Eugenia K

    2014-06-01

    Pain assessment documentation was inadequate because of the use of a subjective pain assessment strategy in a tertiary level IV neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The aim of this study was to improve consistency of pain assessment documentation through implementation of a multidimensional neonatal pain and sedation assessment tool. The study was set in a 60-bed level IV NICU within an urban children's hospital. Participants included NICU staff, including registered nurses, neonatal nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, pharmacists, neonatal fellows, and neonatologists. The Plan Do Study Act method of quality improvement was used for this project. Baseline assessment included review of patient medical records 6 months before the intervention. Documentation of pain assessment on admission, routine pain assessment, reassessment of pain after an elevated pain score, discussion of pain in multidisciplinary rounds, and documentation of pain assessment were reviewed. Literature review and listserv query were conducted to identify neonatal pain tools. Survey of staff was conducted to evaluate knowledge of neonatal pain and also to determine current healthcare providers' practice as related to identification and treatment of neonatal pain. A multidimensional neonatal pain tool, the Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale (N-PASS), was chosen by the staff for implementation. Six months and 2 years following education on the use of the N-PASS and implementation in the NICU, a chart review of all hospitalized patients was conducted to evaluate documentation of pain assessment on admission, routine pain assessment, reassessment of pain after an elevated pain score, discussion of pain in multidisciplinary rounds, and documentation of pain assessment in the medical progress note. Documentation of pain scores improved from 60% to 100% at 6 months and remained at 99% 2 years following implementation of the N-PASS. Pain score documentation with ongoing nursing

  18. Improving wind power quality with energy storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Claus Nygaard

    2009-01-01

    The results of simulation of the influence of energy storage on wind power quality are presented. Simulations are done using a mathematical model of energy storage. Results show the relation between storage power and energy, and the obtained increase in minimum available power from the combination...... of wind and storage. The introduction of storage enables smoothening of wind power on a timescale proportional to the storage energy. Storage does not provide availability of wind power at all times, but allows for a certain fraction of average power in a given timeframe to be available with high...... probability. The amount of storage capacity necessary for significant wind power quality improvement in a given period is found to be 20 to 40% of the energy produced in that period. The necessary power is found to be 80 to 100% of the average power of the period....

  19. IMPROVEMENTS IN THE QUALITY OF COURIER DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Karcz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The functioning of courier companies is a vital component of modern trade. E-commerce services are changing the way of shopping. Along with them, also courier services change and become more advance. Customers of courier companies become more aware of quality, which they should expect from supplier of these services. The article presents the result of the research of the effectiveness and the timelines of deliveries realized by one of the terminals of a leading courier operator in Poland. The survey involved 55 courier routes over the course of 10 business days. The author analyses weak points of the supply chain and presents two solutions, which may improve quality of delivery processes.

  20. Improving tomato seed quality- challenges and possibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Santosh

    The thesis investigates the possibility of using single seed near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, multispectral imaging (MSI) and NIR hyperspectral imaging (NIR-HSI) in combination with chemometrics for rapid determination of the tomato seed quality. The results of the PhD study are compiled in four...... manuscripts (MS). These non-destructive methods show the potential of sorting tomato seeds as per their viability and varietal identity. The results are discussed in the context of possible contribution from these methods in the improvement of the seed quality in Nepal. In MS I, potential application of NIR...... spectroscopy in combination with chemometrics for prediction of tomato seed viability is demonstrated. The work in MS I also emphasises on identifying the important NIR spectral regions for the chemometric model that are relevant to the separation of viable and non-viable seeds. The NIR-HIS method was also...

  1. Improving the quality of care for patients with hypertension in Moshupa District, Botswana: Quality improvement cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Kande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there are no prevalence studies on hypertension in Botswana, this condition is thought to be common and the quality of care to be poor.Aim: The aim of this project was to assess and improve the quality of primary care forhypertension.Setting: Moshupa clinic and catchment area, Botswana.Methods: Quality improvement cycle.Results: Two hundred participants were included in the audit. Sixty-eight per cent were women with a mean age of 55 years. In the baseline audit none of the target standards were met. During the re-audit six months later, six out of nine structural target standards, five out of 11 process target standards and one out of two outcome target standards were achieved. Statistically-significant improvement in performance (p < 0.05 was shown in 10 criteria although the target standard was not always met. In the re-audit, the target of achieving blood pressure control (< 140/90 in 70% of patients was achieved.Conclusion: The quality of care for hypertension was suboptimal in our setting. Simple interventions were designed and implemented to improve the quality of care. These interventions led to significant improvement in structural and process criteria. A corresponding significant improvement in the control of blood pressure was also seen.

  2. Using Quality Improvement in Resident Education to Improve Transition Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volertas, Sofija D; Rossi-Foulkes, Rita

    2017-05-01

    The importance of a specific transition process is recognized by many health organizations. Got Transition, a cooperative endeavor aimed at improving the transition from pediatric to adult health care, developed Six Core Elements defining the basic components of health care transition support. In this article, we review the Six Core Elements by presenting a model that combines resident quality improvement and transition care training. In this Internal Medicine-Pediatrics residency program, ambulatory training for residents takes place in a combined adult and pediatric clinic. Aligned with the Six Core Elements, the program has crafted and disseminated a transition policy for the practice, designed a portable health summary template for the electronic medical record (EMR), created EMR tools for assessing transition readiness and setting transition goals, formed a registry of patients, and audited charts. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(5):e203-e206.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. INFLUENCE OF GRADED AEROBIC EXERCISE ON QUALITY OF LIFE IN POST SURGICAL MITRAL VALVE DISEASE INDIVIDUAL A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED OPEN LABEL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanthi C

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post surgical mitral valve disease individual focus their cardiac rehabilitation training on two major goal that is to improve cardiac output response exercises and place an important role in determining exercise tolerance and to improve quality of life. Cardiac rehabilitation programs involve prescribed exercise and education however various other method are being used to improve quality of life. But our study to find out the effectiveness of graded aerobic exercise protocol on ejection fraction and quality of life in post surgical mitral valve disease individuals. Methods: The study design was open label studies total of 100 post surgical mitral valve disease individuals patients from the age group of 20-60 years were recruited from SVIMS hospital. They were randomly divided into two groups. Group I underwent a twelve week structured graded individually tailored exercises. The group II received only none graded (not individualized exercise training. The ejection fraction and quality of life was measured before and after 12 weeks of exercise training for two groups. Results: Repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare mean values of continuous variables between baseline and at the time of discharge and three months after surgery for each parameter. Comparison of means between groups was done by the unpaired student t test. Mean age of the subjects was 40.18±10.29. There was a significant increase in the ejection fraction in the group I(61.34±2.49 to 64.4±3.31 compared to with the group II (61.06±2.51. to 61.62 ±2.37. QOL had improved in group I than group II at p<0.05. Conclusion: A 12 week structured graded aerobic exercise training significantly improved ejection fraction and quality of life in post surgical mitral valve disease individuals.

  4. SU-E-T-776: Use of Quality Metrics for a New Hypo-Fractionated Pre-Surgical Mesothelioma Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, S; Mehta, V [Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The “SMART” (Surgery for Mesothelioma After Radiation Therapy) approach involves hypo-fractionated radiotherapy of the lung pleura to 25Gy over 5 days followed by surgical resection within 7. Early clinical results suggest that this approach is very promising, but also logistically challenging due to the multidisciplinary involvement. Due to the compressed schedule, high dose, and shortened planning time, the delivery of the planned doses were monitored for safety with quality metric software. Methods: Hypo-fractionated IMRT treatment plans were developed for all patients and exported to Quality Reports™ software. Plan quality metrics or PQMs™ were created to calculate an objective scoring function for each plan. This allows for an objective assessment of the quality of the plan and a benchmark for plan improvement for subsequent patients. The priorities of various components were incorporated based on similar hypo-fractionated protocols such as lung SBRT treatments. Results: Five patients have been treated at our institution using this approach. The plans were developed, QA performed, and ready within 5 days of simulation. Plan Quality metrics utilized in scoring included doses to OAR and target coverage. All patients tolerated treatment well and proceeded to surgery as scheduled. Reported toxicity included grade 1 nausea (n=1), grade 1 esophagitis (n=1), grade 2 fatigue (n=3). One patient had recurrent fluid accumulation following surgery. No patients experienced any pulmonary toxicity prior to surgery. Conclusion: An accelerated course of pre-operative high dose radiation for mesothelioma is an innovative and promising new protocol. Without historical data, one must proceed cautiously and monitor the data carefully. The development of quality metrics and scoring functions for these treatments allows us to benchmark our plans and monitor improvement. If subsequent toxicities occur, these will be easy to investigate and incorporate into the

  5. Disparities and quality improvement: federal policy levers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Nicole; Jung, Minna; Lavizzo-Mourey, Risa

    2005-01-01

    Using a quality improvement framework to address racial and ethnic disparities in health care highlights multiple opportunities for federal and state governments to exert policy leverage, particularly through their roles as purchasers and regulators. Under such a framework, federal and state governments can expand their roles in collecting race/ethnicity data; define universal and meaningful race/ethnicity categories; more broadly disseminate standards for cultural competence; and demand the reduction of disparities through leveraging their status as collectively the largest U.S. health care payer.

  6. A Practice Improvement Project to Reduce Cesarean Surgical Site Infection Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Cindra; Foster, Peggy; Ulrich, Deborah; Adkins, Kathryn

    We implemented an evidence-based practice improvement project at a health care facility in the Midwestern United States to address the increasing rate of cesarean surgical site infections. Women who experienced cesarean birth were cared for using a standardized evidence-based protocol including preoperative and postoperative care and education. In addition, a team-created educational video was used by both women and their families during the postoperative period and at home after discharge. This new protocol resulted in a decrease in the rate of cesarean surgical site infections from 1.35% in 2013 to 0.7% in 2014 and 0.36% in 2015. Our interdisciplinary approach to integrate best-practice strategies resulted in decreased infection rates and improved patient satisfaction scores. © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  7. [Effectiveness of an intervention to improve the implementation of a surgical safety check-list in a tertiary hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-González, A; Luque-Ramírez, J M; Del Nozal-Nalda, M; Barroso-Gutierrez, C; Román-Fuentes, M; Vilaplana-Garcia, A

    2016-06-01

    To determine the percentage of verification of a Surgical Safety Checklist and improvements made. Quasi-experimental study in 28 Clinical Management Units with surgical activity in the University Hospital Virgen del Rocio (HUVR) and University Hospital Virgen Macarena (HUVM). A situation analysis was made to estimate the completing of a Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC), after which a new system of completing the SSC was introduced as an element of improvement, which included a reusable vinyl board. Subsequently, the prevalence over two periods was calculated, to assess the effectiveness of the intervention. A total 1,964 SSC were reviewed in the HUVR-HUVM in June (baseline), and in December 2013 and June 2014. A percentage completion of 65.8%, 86.2%, and 88% was obtained in the HUVR, and 70.9%, 77.2%, and 75% in the HUVM, respectively. Of these SSC, 15.1% (baseline) were completed entirely in the HUVR, increasing to 36.6% (P<.001), and 89.8% (P<.001) in the last measurement. In the HUVM, 15.6% (baseline) were fully completed, increasing to 18.3% (P=.323), and 29.4% (P=.001) in the last measurement. The percentage of completion of SSC obtained is around 80%, and is similar to that reported in the literature. The re-design of the SSC procedure, including the use of a vinyl board, the designation of SSC coordinator role, and professional staff training, is effective for improve outcomes in terms of completing the SSC, and quality of the completion. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Healthcare quality improvement -- policy implications and practicalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esain, Ann Elizabeth; Williams, Sharon J; Gakhal, Sandeep; Caley, Lynne; Cooke, Matthew W

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to explore quality improvement (QI) at individual, group and organisational level. It also aims to identify restraining forces using formative evaluation and discuss implications for current UK policy, particularly quality, innovation, productivity and prevention. Learning events combined with work-based projects, focusing on individual and group responses are evaluated. A total of 11 multi-disciplinary groups drawn from NHS England healthcare Trusts (self-governing operational groups) were sampled. These Trusts have different geographic locations and participants were drawn from primary, secondary and commissioning arms. Mixed methods: questionnaires, observations and reflective accounts were used. The paper finds that solution versus problem identification causes confusion and influences success. Time for problem solving to achieve QI was absent. Feedback and learning structures are often not in place or inflexible. Limited focus on patient-centred services may be related to past assumptions regarding organisational design, hence assumptions and models need to be understood and challenged. The authors revise the Plan, Do, Study; Act (PDSA) model by adding an explicit problem identification step and hence avoiding solution-focused habits; demonstrating the need for more formative evaluations to inform managers and policy makers about healthcare QI processes. - Although UK-centric, the quality agenda is a USA and European theme, findings may help those embarking on this journey or those struggling with QI.

  9. 45 CFR 1304.60 - Deficiencies and quality improvement plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deficiencies and quality improvement plans. 1304... must correct the deficiency either immediately or pursuant to a Quality Improvement Plan. (c) An Early... Improvement Plan must submit to the responsible HHS official a Quality Improvement Plan specifying, for each...

  10. 40 CFR 65.116 - Quality improvement program for pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality improvement program for pumps... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Equipment Leaks § 65.116 Quality improvement program for... improvement program starting at performance trials. (d) QIP requirements. The quality improvement program...

  11. 40 CFR 63.176 - Quality improvement program for pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality improvement program for pumps... improvement program starting at performance trials. (d) The quality improvement program shall include the...), for each pump in each process unit (or plant site) subject to the quality improvement program. The...

  12. Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Ph.D., Helen M.; Kelly Ph.D., Andrea; Jewell Ph.D., Scott D.; McShane Ph.D., Lisa M.; Clark M.D., Douglas P.; Greenspan M.D., Renata; Hayes M.D., Daniel F.; Hainaut Ph.D.,, Pierre; Kim, Paula; Mansfield Ph.D., Elizabeth; Potapova Ph.D., Olga; Riegman Ph.D., Peter; Rubinstein Ph.D., Yaffa; Seijo M.S., Edward; Somiari Ph.D., Stella; Watson M.B., Peter; Weier Ph.D., Heinz-Ulrich; Zhu Ph.D., Claire; Vaught Ph.D., Jim

    2011-04-26

    Human biospecimens are subject to a number of different collection, processing, and storage factors that can significantly alter their molecular composition and consistency. These biospecimen preanalytical factors, in turn, influence experimental outcomes and the ability to reproduce scientific results. Currently, the extent and type of information specific to the biospecimen preanalytical conditions reported in scientific publications and regulatory submissions varies widely. To improve the quality of research utilizing human tissues it is critical that information regarding the handling of biospecimens be reported in a thorough, accurate, and standardized manner. The Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ) recommendations outlined herein are intended to apply to any study in which human biospecimens are used. The purpose of reporting these details is to supply others, from researchers to regulators, with more consistent and standardized information to better evaluate, interpret, compare, and reproduce the experimental results. The BRISQ guidelines are proposed as an important and timely resource tool to strengthen communication and publications around biospecimen-related research and help reassure patient contributors and the advocacy community that the contributions are valued and respected.

  13. Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Cancer Institute; Jewell, Ph.D., Scott D.; Seijo, M.S., Edward; Kelly, Ph.D., Andrea; Somiari, Ph.D., Stella; B.Chir., M.B.; McShane, Ph.D., Lisa M.; Clark, M.D., Douglas; Greenspan, M.D., Renata; Hayes, M.D., Daniel F.; Hainaut, Ph.D., M.S., Pierre; Kim, Paula; Mansfield, Ph.D., Elizabeth; Potapova, Ph.D., Olga; Riegman, Ph.D., Peter; Rubinstein, Ph.D., Yaffa; Weier, Ph.D., Heinz-Ulrich; Zhu, Ph.D., Claire; Moore, Ph.D., Helen M.; Vaught, Ph.D., Jim; Watson, Peter

    2010-09-02

    Human biospecimens are subjected to collection, processing, and storage that can significantly alter their molecular composition and consistency. These biospecimen preanalytical factors, in turn, influence experimental outcomes and the ability to reproduce scientific results. Currently, the extent and type of information specific to the biospecimen preanalytical conditions reported in scientific publications and regulatory submissions varies widely. To improve the quality of research that uses human tissues, it is crucial that information on the handling of biospecimens be reported in a thorough, accurate, and standardized manner. The Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ) recommendations outlined herein are intended to apply to any study in which human biospecimens are used. The purpose of reporting these details is to supply others, from researchers to regulators, with more consistent and standardized information to better evaluate, interpret, compare, and reproduce the experimental results. The BRISQ guidelines are proposed as an important and timely resource tool to strengthen communication and publications on biospecimen-related research and to help reassure patient contributors and the advocacy community that their contributions are valued and respected.

  14. Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Ph.D., Helen M.; Kelly, Ph.D., Andrea B.; Jewell, Ph.D., Scott D.; McShane, Ph.D., Lisa M.; Clark, M.D., Douglas P.; Greenspan, M.D., Renata; Hayes, M.D., Daniel F.; Hainaut, Ph.D., Pierre; Kim, Paula; Mansfield, Ph.D., Elizabeth A.; Potapova, Ph.D., Olga; Riegman, Ph.D., Peter; Rubinstein, Ph.D., Yaffa; Seijo, M.S., Edward; Somiari, Ph.D., Stella; Chir., B; Weier, Ph.D., Heinz-Ulrich; Zhu, Ph.D., Claire; Vaught, Ph.D., Jim; Watson,M.B., Peter

    2010-12-27

    Human biospecimens are subjected to collection, processing, and storage that can significantly alter their molecular composition and consistency. These biospecimen preanalytical factors, in turn, influence experimental outcomes and the ability to reproduce scientific results. Currently, the extent and type of information specific to the biospecimen preanalytical conditions reported in scientific publications and regulatory submissions varies widely. To improve the quality of research that uses human tissues, it is crucial that information on the handling of biospecimens be reported in a thorough, accurate, and standardized manner. The Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ) recommendations outlined herein are intended to apply to any study in which human biospecimens are used. The purpose of reporting these details is to supply others, from researchers to regulators, with more consistent and standardized information to better evaluate, interpret, compare, and reproduce the experimental results. The BRISQ guidelines are proposed as an important and timely resource tool to strengthen communication and publications on biospecimen-related research and to help reassure patient contributors and the advocacy community that their contributions are valued and respected.

  15. Moving up the Ladder: How Do States Deliver Quality Improvement Supports within Their Quality Rating and Improvement Systems? Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holod, Aleksandra; Faria, Ann-Marie; Weinberg, Emily; Howard, Eboni

    2015-01-01

    As national attention has increasingly focused on the potential for high-quality early childhood education (ECE) to improve children's school readiness, states have developed quality rating and improvement systems (QRISs) to document the quality of ECE programs, support systematic quality improvement, and provide clear information to families…

  16. Strategy to Support Improvement of Healthcare Quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ing. Andrea Zejdlova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the latest market-based solutions to the rising costs and quality gaps in health care is pay for performance. Pay for performance is the use of financial incentives to promote the delivery of designated standards of care. It is an emerging movement in health insurance (initially in Britain and United States. Providers under this arrangement are rewarded for meeting pre-established targets for delivery of healthcare services. This is a fundamental change from fee for service payment.Also known as "P4P" or “value-based purchasing,” this payment model rewards physicians, hospitals, medical groups, and other healthcare providers for meeting certain performance measures for quality and efficiency. Disincentives, such as eliminating payments for negative consequences of care (medical errors or increased costs, have also been proposed. In the developed nations, the rapidly aging population and rising health care costs have recently brought P4P to the forefront of health policy discussions. Pilot studies underway in several large healthcare systems have shown modest improvements in specific outcomes and increased efficiency, but no cost savings due to added administrative requirements. Statements by professional medical societies generally support incentive programs to increase the quality of health care, but express concern with the validity of quality indicators, patient and physician autonomy and privacy, and increased administrative burdens. This article serves as an introduction to pay for performance. We discuss the goals and structure of pay for performance plans and their limitations and potential consequences in the health care area.

  17. Improved transoral dissection of the tongue base with a next-generation robotic surgical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Michelle M; Orosco, Ryan K; Lim, Gil Chai; Holsinger, F Christopher

    2018-01-01

    To describe the application of a novel, flexible, single-port robotic surgical system for transoral tongue base resection, and compare it to the current multiport, rigid-arm robotic surgical system. Preclinical anatomic study using four human cadavers. Transoral resection of the tongue base using the da Vinci Sp and the Si robotic surgical systems. A standardized operative procedure is outlined, and operative parameters were compared between robotic systems. Successful completion of tongue base resection was achieved in all cadavers using both the Sp and the Si systems. The optimal entry guide and instrument position for the Sp system was with the cannula rotated 180° from the standard position so that the camera was in the most inferior (caudal) channel. In the optimal configuration, no instrument exchanges were needed with the Sp system, but use of the Si system required one instrument exchange. This is the first preclinical anatomic study of robotic tongue base resection that compares a novel single-port robotic system to the current multiarm system. Surgical workflow was more streamlined with the da Vinci Sp system, and the new capabilities of simultaneous dissection, traction, and counter traction allowed for improved dissection and vessel control. NA. Laryngoscope, 128:78-83, 2018. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Quality of life scores improve in women undergoing colpocleisis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeniel, A Özgür; Ergenoglu, A Mete; Askar, Niyazi; Itil, İsmail Mete; Meseri, Reci

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the quality of life and surgical outcomes in women who had undergone colpocleisis. This was a prospective small cohort study conducted between August 2010 and September 2011. Twelve women with pelvic organ prolapse were offered obliterative vaginal surgery and were informed about the surgical procedure. Ten women accepted this operation and were included in the study. Before and after colpocleisis, cases were evaluated by urogynecological examination, and quality of life was assessed by the Turkish language validated prolapse quality of life questionnaire (P-QOL), in which a low total score indicates a good quality of life. The mean age was 74.9±4.5 (range 68-85). The general score of the P-QOL was reduced during the follow-up period, reflecting a significant effect on quality of life and clinical improvement in women with the colpocleisis operation. There was no morbidity due to colpocleisis or recurrent pelvic organ prolapse in follow-up period. In our small cohort including elderly women, colpocleisis provided high levels of surgical outcomes as well as a significant improvement in quality of life without significant morbidity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. How can we recognize continuous quality improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Lisa; Khodyakov, Dmitry; Hempel, Susanne; Danz, Margie; Salem-Schatz, Susanne; Foy, Robbie; O'Neill, Sean; Dalal, Siddhartha; Shekelle, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Continuous quality improvement (CQI) methods are foundational approaches to improving healthcare delivery. Publications using the term CQI, however, are methodologically heterogeneous, and labels other than CQI are used to signify relevant approaches. Standards for identifying the use of CQI based on its key methodological features could enable more effective learning across quality improvement (QI) efforts. The objective was to identify essential methodological features for recognizing CQI. Previous work with a 12-member international expert panel identified reliably abstracted CQI methodological features. We tested which features met rigorous a priori standards as essential features of CQI using a three-phase online modified-Delphi process. Primarily United States and Canada. 119 QI experts randomly assigned into four on-line panels. Participants rated CQI features and discussed their answers using online, anonymous and asynchronous discussion boards. We analyzed ratings quantitatively and discussion threads qualitatively. Main outcome measure(s) Panel consensus on definitional CQI features. /st> Seventy-nine (66%) panelists completed the process. Thirty-three completers self-identified as QI researchers, 18 as QI practitioners and 28 as both equally. The features 'systematic data guided activities,' 'designing with local conditions in mind' and 'iterative development and testing' met a priori standards as essential CQI features. Qualitative analyses showed cross-cutting themes focused on differences between QI and CQI. We found consensus among a broad group of CQI researchers and practitioners on three features as essential for identifying QI work more specifically as 'CQI.' All three features are needed as a minimum standard for recognizing CQI methods.

  20. Expectancy and better quality of life after surgical treatment of nefroblastoma in dog - Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Manoel Luiz Ferreira; Helca Naiara de Souza O’Dwyer; Andrei Ferreira Nicolau da Costa; Sylvia Cristina Silva de Azevedo; Paulo Cesar Silva; Alberto Schanaider

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Ferreira M.L., O’Dwyer H.N.S., Costa A.F.N., Azevedo S.C.S., Silva P.C. & Schanaider A. [Expectancy and better quality of life after surgical treatment of nefroblastoma in dog - Case report.] Expectativa e melhor qualidade de vida após o tratamento cirúrgico de nefroblastoma em um cão - Relato de caso. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 36(4):412-416, 2014. Curso de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Campus Soane Nazaré de Andrade (Salobrinho), Rodov...

  1. Quality improvement in neurology: dementia management quality measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenheimer, Germaine; Borson, Soo; Sanders, Amy E; Swain-Eng, Rebecca J; Kyomen, Helen H; Tierney, Samantha; Gitlin, Laura; Forciea, Mary Ann; Absher, John; Shega, Joseph; Johnson, Jerry

    2014-03-01

    Professional and advocacy organizations have long urged that dementia should be recognized and properly diagnosed. With the passage of the National Alzheimer's Project Act in 2011, an Advisory Council for Alzheimer's Research, Care, and Services was convened to advise the Department of Health and Human Services. In May 2012, the Council produced the first National Plan to address Alzheimer's disease, and prominent in its recommendations is a call for quality measures suitable for evaluating and tracking dementia care in clinical settings. Although other efforts have been made to set dementia care quality standards, such as those pioneered by RAND in its series Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE), practitioners, healthcare systems, and insurers have not widely embraced implementation. This executive summary (full manuscript available at www.neurology.org) reports on a new measurement set for dementia management developed by an interdisciplinary Dementia Measures Work Group (DWG) representing the major national organizations and advocacy organizations concerned with the care of individuals with dementia. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the American Geriatrics Society, the American Medical Directors Association, the American Psychiatric Association, and the American Medical Association-convened Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement led this effort. The ACOVE measures and the measurement set described here apply to individuals whose dementia has already been identified and properly diagnosed. Although similar in concept to ACOVE, the DWG measurement set differs in several important ways; it includes all stages of dementia in a single measure set, calls for the use of functional staging in planning care, prompts the use of validated instruments in patient and caregiver assessment and intervention, highlights the relevance of using palliative care concepts to guide care before the advanced stages of illness, and provides evidence-based support

  2. Quality improvement education to improve performance on ulcerative colitis quality measures and care processes aligned with National Quality Strategy priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Laurence; Moreo, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Studies on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have reported suboptimal approaches to patient care. In the United States, the findings have motivated leading gastroenterology organizations to call for initiatives that support clinicians in aligning their practices with quality measures for IBD and priorities of the National Quality Strategy (NQS). We designed and implemented a quality improvement (QI) education program on ulcerative colitis in which patient charts were audited for 30 gastroenterologists before (n = 300 charts) and after (n = 290 charts) they participated in QI-focused educational activities. Charts were audited for nine measures, selected for their alignment with four NQS priorities: making care safer, ensuring patient engagement, promoting communication, and promoting effective treatment practices. Four of the measures, including guideline-directed vaccinations and assessments of disease type and activity, were part of the CMS Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS). The other five measures involved counseling patients on various topics in ulcerative colitis management, documentation of side effects, assessment of adherence status, and simplification of dosing. The gastroenterologists also completed baseline and post-education surveys designed to assess qualitative outcomes. One of the educational interventions was a private audit feedback session conducted for each gastroenterologist. The sessions were designed to support participants in identifying measures reflecting suboptimal care quality and developing action plans for improvement. In continuous improvement cycles, follow-up interventions included QI tools and educational monographs. Across the nine chart variables, post-education improvements ranged from 0% to 48%, with a mean improvement of 15.9%. Survey findings revealed improvements in self-reported understanding of quality measures and intentions to apply them to practice, and lower rates of perceived significant barriers to high-quality

  3. Quality improvement in neurological surgery graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Scott L; McGirt, Matthew J; Asher, Anthony L; Selden, Nathan R

    2015-04-01

    There has been no formal, standardized curriculum for neurosurgical resident education in quality improvement. There are at least 2 reasons to integrate a formalized quality improvement curriculum into resident education: (1) increased emphasis on the relative quality and value (cost-effectiveness) of health care provided by individual physicians, and (2) quality improvement principles empower broader lifelong learning. An integrated quality improvement curriculum should comprise specific goals and milestones at each level of residency training. This article discusses the role and possible implementation of a national program for quality improvement in neurosurgical resident education. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. SF Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund: Projects and Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund (SFBWQIF) projects listed here are part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  5. Victorian Audit of Surgical Mortality is associated with improved clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiles, C Barry; Retegan, Claudia; Maddern, Guy J

    2015-11-01

    Improved outcomes are desirable results of clinical audit. The aim of this study was to use data from the Victorian Audit of Surgical Mortality (VASM) and the Victorian Admitted Episodes Dataset (VAED) to highlight specific areas of clinical improvement and reduction in mortality over the duration of the audit process. This study used retrospective, observational data from VASM and VAED. VASM data were reported by participating public and private health services, the Coroner and self-reporting surgeons across Victoria. Aggregated VAED data were supplied by the Victorian Department of Health. Assessment of outcomes was performed using chi-squared trend analysis over successive annual audit periods. Because initial collection of data was incomplete in the recruitment phase, statistical analysis was confined to the last 3-year period, 2010-2013. A 20% reduction in surgical mortality over the past 5 years has been identified from the VAED data. Progressive increase in both surgeon and hospital participation, significant reduction in both errors in management as perceived by assessors and increased direct consultant involvement in cases returned to theatre have been documented. The benefits of VASM are reflected in the association with a reduction of mortality and adverse clinical outcomes, which have clinical and financial benefits. It is a purely educational exercise and continued participation in this audit will ensure the highest standards of surgical care in Australia. This also highlights the valuable collaboration between the Victorian Department of Health and the RACS. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  6. A Report Card on Continuous Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, David; Kilo, Charles M.

    1998-01-01

    Efforts to incorporate the principles of continuous quality improvement (CQI) into health care have been underway for about ten years. In order to understand the lessons of this decade of experience, senior organizational leaders and experts in the field of health care were interviewed. This select group agreed that there have been concrete accomplishments: the tactic of assigning blame for mistakes to individuals is gradually giving way to an emphasis on detecting problems with process; there is a new focus on the health care customer; and many valuable projects have been inaugurated. Nevertheless, the interviews underlined the reality that the movement has not yet made a sizable impact on the U.S. health care system. Until there is a profound, organization-wide recognition of the need for change, universal commitment to CQI principles will not be achieved. PMID:9879305

  7. Transferring skills in quality collaboratives focused on improving patient logistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W.M. Weggelaar-Jansen (Anne Marie); J.D.H. van Wijngaarden (Jeroen)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractA quality improvement collaborative, often used by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, is used to educate healthcare professionals and improve healthcare at the same time. Our research focused on quality improvement collaboratives aiming to improve patient logistics and tried to

  8. Improving quality of OE spun yarn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafurov, J. K.; Vassiliadis, S.; Gofurov, K.

    2017-10-01

    During the formation of OE yarns on high frequency spinning rotors, dynamic shocks occur which lead to variations in the yarn tension. It is well known that by increasing the spinning speed the irregularity of yarn also increases. The variation of the yarn tension reduces the quality of the product (yarn). The aim of this research work is to find method to decrease the yarn irregularity without decreasing the spinning speed. In this paper also the way of improving of the quality of OE spun yarn is discussed. The OE yarn irregularity has been decreased by changing the construction of existed OE rotor’s separator (OERS). The yarn passes through the yarn lead-funnel to the yarn lead-out tube. The variation of the yarn tension results in the change of the yarn friction on the yarn lead-out wall of the funnel. Then concentric protrusion formed at the centre on the surface of the base lead-out funnel lets the yarn contact the separator and it presses a spring disposed in a recess formed in the separator. As a result, the spring is deformed (axially) and allows the reciprocation the yarn lead-out funnel and yarn lead-out tube, whereby the vibration leading to changes in the yarn tension are absorbed.

  9. Improving smoked herring quality by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahran, D.A.; Abd El-Wahab, S.A.; Hendy, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    Smoked herring which is a highly purchasable product in Egypt, was exposed to different gamma irradiation doses (1.5,3.0 and 5.0 kGy) and stored at environmental temperature (12± 2 deg C) until spoilage of the control. Microbiological, chemical and sensory analyses were performed throughout storage to monitor the quality attributes. It is worthy to mention that irradiation reduced the population of bacteria and the effect was more pronounced at the highest dose used (5.0 kGy). At the same time 1.5 kGy completely eliminated staphylococcus aureus (coagulase + ve) and coliforms. By chemical analysis, there was significant decrease in average moisture content by different gamma irradiation doses and storage. Although the average thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) increased slightly by γ-irradiation, this increase was highly significant by storage . At the same time there was a significant (p< 0.05)decrease in the average trimethylamine (TMA) value of all irradiated samples compared with unirradiated control, this value increased significantly by storage. interestingly, the average histamine value decreased significantly in all irradiated samples. The sensory analysis revealed a highly significant difference in the average acceptability scores between different irradiation doses used and also by storage. Therefore it could be concluded that the quality of smoked herring during storage at environmental temperature (12 ± 2 deg C) could be improved by using 5.0 kGy γ -irradiation

  10. Coaching for Quality Improvement: Lessons Learned from Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS). Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tout, Kathryn; Isner, Tabitha; Zaslow, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Coaching and other on-site, individualized professional development strategies (consultation, mentoring, and technical assistance) are promising approaches to support the application of new teaching practices and overall quality improvement among practitioners in early care and education settings. This Research Brief summarizes a recent report…

  11. Criteria for the Evaluation of Quality Improvement Programs and the Use of Quality Improvement Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This document provides a set of criteria to be used by psychologists in evaluating quality improvement programs (QIPs) that have been promulgated by health care organizations, government agencies, professional associations, or other entities. These criteria also address the privacy and confidentiality issues evoked by the intended use of patient…

  12. Changes in patient's quality of life comparing conservative and surgical treatment of venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankūnas, Vytautas; Rimdeika, Rytis; Jasenas, Marius; Samsanavicius, Donatas

    2004-01-01

    Leg ulcers of different etiology disable up to 1% of total population, and up to 15% individuals over 70 years old. It is an old disease, which troubles the patients and medical personnel and is hard to cure. It might take several years to cure the ulcer fully. Most of the patients with leg ulcers are being treated at home, not in the outpatient departments or hospitals; therefore there is not much information on how the ulcer affects the patient's everyday life and its quality. The researchers often analyze only the financial part of this disorder forgetting its human part: pain, social isolation, and decreased mobility. There are many questionnaires and methods to analyze the quality of life of the patients with leg ulceration. It is often unclear if we should treat the ulcer conservatively for a long time or if part of resources should be used for operation (skin grafting) and the time of treatment should be shortened. To see the advantage of both methods and the influence of the ulcer treatment to the quality of life we decided to estimate the functionality of surgical and conservative treatment. We have analyzed the case histories and the data of special questionnaires of 44 patients, which were treated in Department of Plastic Surgery and Burns of Kaunas University of Medicine Hospital in the period of 2001 January-2004 February and had large trophic leg ulcers (m=254 cm2) for 6 months or more. Ten patients were treated conservatively and 34 patients were treated by skin grafting. All of them were interviewed after 3-6 months. We found that the pain in the place of the ulcers has decreased for the patients, who were treated surgically. By making the differences of the pain more exact we found out, that the patients have been feeling pain before the operation and when interviewing them the second time they told that they felt discomfort, not pain. The intensity of pain remained the same for the patients treated conservatively. The regression of pain also

  13. How the silent mentor program improves our surgical level and safety and nourishes our spiritual life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mun-Kun Hong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We briefly share our experience of using the silent mentor program in the Medical Simulation Center (MSC of Tzu Chi University (TCU, Hualien, Taiwan, to improve our minimally invasive surgical level and patient's safety. The silent mentor program, established in 2000 by the Department of Anatomy of TCU, is a pioneering clinical skill training program based on unembalmed bodies. This program provides three valuable advantages for surgery. The first is the comprehensive understanding of the deep or rarely observed but crucial structures of the human body, which is normally difficult to achieve in living humans. The second is gaining the first experience of a novel procedure or surgery on silent mentors rather than on living humans, which is essential for young surgeons to begin their careers. The third is evaluating the safety and feasibility of a novel surgical method. In addition to surgical techniques, the most valuable point of the program is the humane ceremonies conducted for silent mentors to nourish our soul. After the workshop, all the incision wounds on every silent mentor were carefully checked and sutured in the same manner as in closing surgical wounds in a patient. Subsequently, encoffining, cremation, and thanksgiving ceremonies were solemnly held, in the hope that the medical students or trainees would imperceptibly understand their responsibility to society and the silent mentor's expectations. The Asia-Pacific Association for Gynecologic Endoscopy and Minimally Invasive Therapy, or the Taiwan Association for Minimally Gynecology Therapy, or both can consider initiating a regular silent mentor program in the MSC of TCU. It is not only intended to improve the skills of surgeons but also to allow them to participate in the interactive ceremony and thus refresh their humanitarian knowledge.

  14. Endoscopic simulator curriculum improves colonoscopy performance in novice surgical interns as demonstrated in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telem, Dana A; Rattner, David W; Gee, Denise W

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether independent virtual endoscopic training accelerates the acquisition of endoscopic skill by novice surgical interns. Nine novice surgical interns participated in a prospective study comparing colonoscopy performance in a swine model before and after an independent simulator curriculum. An independent observer evaluated each intern for the ability to reach the cecum within 20 min and technical ability as determined by Global Assessment of Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Skills--Colonoscopy (GAGES-C) score and performance compared. In addition, at the conclusion of training, a post test of two basic simulated colonoscopy modules was completed and metrics evaluated. As a control, three attending physicians who routinely perform colonoscopy also completed colonoscopy in the swine model. Prior to endoscopic training, one (11 %) intern successfully intubated the cecum in 19.56 min. Following training, six (67 %) interns reached the cecum with mean time of 9.2 min (p curriculum intern times demonstrated the experts to be significantly faster (p curriculum demonstrated significantly improved GI Mentor™ performance in the efficiency (79 vs. 67.1 %, p = 0.05) and time to cecum (3.37 vs. 5.59 min, p = 0.01) metrics. No other significant difference was demonstrated in GAGES-C categories or other simulator parameter. Simulator training on the GI Mentor™ alone significantly improved endoscopic skills in novice surgical interns as demonstrated in a swine model. This study also identified parameters on the GI Mentor™ that could indicate 'clinical readiness'. This study supports the role for endoscopic simulator training in surgical resident education as an adjunct to clinical experience.

  15. 40 CFR 63.175 - Quality improvement program for valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality improvement program for valves... alternative quality improvement programs specified in paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section. The decision to... § 63.168 and § 63.175. (1) If the owner or operator elects to continue the quality improvement program...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1035 - Quality improvement program for pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality improvement program for pumps... owner or operator shall resume the quality improvement program starting at performance trials. (d) QIP requirements. The quality improvement program shall meet the requirements specified in paragraphs (d)(1...

  17. The quick draw approach to quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, N C

    1999-01-01

    In 1996, the North Heart Center, part of North Memorial Health Care in Robbinsdale, Minn., invested over $30,000 in a quality improvement project. Hospital administration put its support behind the effort when results began to show better outcomes, more efficiency, improved patient and provider satisfaction, and cost reduction in the system. The purpose for North Heart Center was to reduce mortality rates by 50 percent. A team of between eight and 12 people met weekly and kept to a focused and aggressive schedule. A fast-paced, action-oriented schedule helped the team maintain, its momentum throughout the process, allowing a steady stream of smaller accomplishments that moved toward the overall goal. The team found that though there was resistance, people ultimately joined when they saw the process worked. A process-flow diagram helped chart every step of any given process. The team found that people focus better on one or two variables rather than attempting to do too much at one time. Examining results to see what works and what doesn't was the next step, followed by summarizing and then redesigning the cycle to try again. Posting data in appropriate areas proved effective in eliciting support throughout the organization. The team worked hard to cultivate trust for the ideas people brought to the table. Completion of North Heart Center's initial project took several years and focuses now on reducing atrial fibrillation in cardiac surgery patients.

  18. Quality-of-care initiative in patients treated surgically for perforated peptic ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten Hylander; Larsson, Heidi Jeanet; Rosenstock, Steffen Jais

    2013-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity are considerable after treatment for perforated peptic ulcer (PPU). Since 2003, a Danish nationwide quality-of-care (QOC) improvement initiative has focused on reducing preoperative delay, and improving perioperative monitoring and care for patients with PPU. The present...

  19. Improving the Quality of Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision through Use of the Continuous Quality Improvement Approach: A Pilot in 30 PEPFAR-Supported Sites in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Byabagambi

    Full Text Available Uganda adopted voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC (also called Safe Male Circumcision in Uganda, as part of its HIV prevention strategy in 2010. Since then, the Ministry of Health (MOH has implemented VMMC mostly with support from the United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR through its partners. In 2012, two PEPFAR-led external quality assessments evaluated compliance of service delivery sites with minimum quality standards. Quality gaps were identified, including lack of standardized forms or registers, lack of documentation of client consent, poor preparedness for emergencies and use of untrained service providers. In response, PEPFAR, through a USAID-supported technical assistance project, provided support in quality improvement to the MOH and implementing partners to improve quality and safety in VMMC services and build capacity of MOH staff to continuously improve VMMC service quality.Sites were supported to identify barriers in achieving national standards, identify possible solutions to overcome the barriers and carry out improvement plans to test these changes, while collecting performance data to objectively measure whether they had bridged gaps. A 53-indicator quality assessment tool was used by teams as a management tool to measure progress; teams also measured client-level indicators through self-assessment of client records. At baseline (February-March 2013, less than 20 percent of sites scored in the "good" range (>80% for supplies and equipment, patient counseling and surgical procedure; by November 2013, the proportion of sites scoring "good" rose to 67 percent, 93 percent and 90 percent, respectively. Significant improvement was noted in post-operative follow-up at 48 hours, sexually transmitted infection assessment, informed consent and use of local anesthesia but not rate of adverse events.Public sector providers can be engaged to address the quality of VMMC using a continuous quality

  20. Improving the Quality of Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision through Use of the Continuous Quality Improvement Approach: A Pilot in 30 PEPFAR-Supported Sites in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byabagambi, John; Marks, Pamela; Megere, Humphrey; Karamagi, Esther; Byakika, Sarah; Opio, Alex; Calnan, Jacqueline; Njeuhmeli, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Uganda adopted voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) (also called Safe Male Circumcision in Uganda), as part of its HIV prevention strategy in 2010. Since then, the Ministry of Health (MOH) has implemented VMMC mostly with support from the United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) through its partners. In 2012, two PEPFAR-led external quality assessments evaluated compliance of service delivery sites with minimum quality standards. Quality gaps were identified, including lack of standardized forms or registers, lack of documentation of client consent, poor preparedness for emergencies and use of untrained service providers. In response, PEPFAR, through a USAID-supported technical assistance project, provided support in quality improvement to the MOH and implementing partners to improve quality and safety in VMMC services and build capacity of MOH staff to continuously improve VMMC service quality. Sites were supported to identify barriers in achieving national standards, identify possible solutions to overcome the barriers and carry out improvement plans to test these changes, while collecting performance data to objectively measure whether they had bridged gaps. A 53-indicator quality assessment tool was used by teams as a management tool to measure progress; teams also measured client-level indicators through self-assessment of client records. At baseline (February-March 2013), less than 20 percent of sites scored in the "good" range (>80%) for supplies and equipment, patient counseling and surgical procedure; by November 2013, the proportion of sites scoring "good" rose to 67 percent, 93 percent and 90 percent, respectively. Significant improvement was noted in post-operative follow-up at 48 hours, sexually transmitted infection assessment, informed consent and use of local anesthesia but not rate of adverse events. Public sector providers can be engaged to address the quality of VMMC using a continuous quality improvement approach.

  1. EXFOR: Improving the quality of international databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, Emmeric

    2014-01-01

    The NEA Data Bank is an international centre of reference for basic nuclear tools used for the analysis and prediction of phenomena in nuclear energy applications. The Data Bank collects, compiles, disseminates and contributes to improving computer codes and associated data. In the area of nuclear data, the Data Bank works in close co-operation with other data centres that contribute to the worldwide compilation of experimental nuclear reaction data in the EXFOR database. EXFOR contains basic nuclear data on low- to medium-energy experiments for incident neutron, photon and various charged particle induced reactions on a wide range of nuclei and compounds. Today, with more than 150 000 data sets from more than 20 000 experiments performed since 1935, EXFOR is by far the most important and complete experimental nuclear reaction database. It is widely used to further improve nuclear reaction models and evaluated nuclear data libraries. The Data Bank supervises the development of the Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion (JEFF) file, which is one of the major evaluated nuclear data libraries used in the field of nuclear science and technology. As part of its mission, the Data Bank works to maintain the highest level of quality in its databases. One method that was proposed to check the mutual consistency of experimental data in EXFOR is to test for outlier measurements more than a few standard deviations from the mean value as, in principle, several measurements of the same reaction quantity should form a continuous distribution. More recently, another method was developed to cross-check evaluated and experimental data in databases in order to detect aberrant values. It was noted that there is no evidence, on the basis of numerical comparisons only, that outliers represent 'bad' data. The fact that such data deviate significantly from other data of the same reaction may, however, be helpful to nuclear data evaluators who focus on one or a few isotopes and may wish to

  2. Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Current Management and Future Development—Improved Outcomes with Surgical Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoji Kishi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, surgical resection is the treatment strategy offering the best long-term outcomes in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Especially for advanced HCC, surgical resection is the only strategy that is potentially curative, and the indications for surgical resection have expanded concomitantly with the technical advances in hepatectomy. A major problem is the high recurrence rate even after curative resection, especially in the remnant liver. Although repeat hepatectomy may prolong survival, the suitability may be limited due to multiple tumor recurrence or background liver cirrhosis. Multimodality approaches combining other local ablation or systemic therapy may help improve the prognosis. On the other hand, minimally invasive, or laparoscopic, hepatectomy has become popular over the last decade. Although the short-term safety and feasibility has been established, the long-term outcomes have not yet been adequately evaluated. Liver transplantation for HCC is also a possible option. Given the current situation of donor shortage, however, other local treatments should be considered as the first choice as long as liver function is maintained. Non-transplant treatment as a bridge to transplantation also helps in decreasing the risk of tumor progression or death during the waiting period. The optimal timing for transplantation after HCC recurrence remains to be investigated.

  3. Reducing post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage rates through a quality improvement project using a Swedish National quality register: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odhagen, Erik; Sunnergren, Ola; Söderman, Anne-Charlotte Hessén; Thor, Johan; Stalfors, Joacim

    2018-03-24

    Tonsillectomy (TE) is one of the most frequently performed ENT surgical procedures. Post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage (PTH) is a potentially life-threatening complication of TE. The National Tonsil Surgery Register in Sweden (NTSRS) has revealed wide variations in PTH rates among Swedish ENT centres. In 2013, the steering committee of the NTSRS, therefore, initiated a quality improvement project (QIP) to decrease the PTH incidence. The aim of the present study was to describe and evaluate the multicentre QIP initiated to decrease PTH rates. Six ENT centres, all with PTH rates above the Swedish average, participated in the 7-month quality improvement project. Each centre developed improvement plans describing the intended changes in clinical practice. The project's primary outcome variable was the PTH rate. Process indicators, such as surgical technique, were also documented. Data from the QIP centres were compared with a control group of 15 surgical centres in Sweden with similarly high PTH rates. Data from both groups for the 12 months prior to the start of the QIP were compared with data for the 12 months after the QIP. The QIP centres reduced the PTH rate from 12.7 to 7.1% from pre-QIP to follow-up; in the control group, the PTH rate remained unchanged. The QIP centres also exhibited positive changes in related key process indicators, i.e., increasing the use of cold techniques for dissection and haemostasis. The rates of PTH can be reduced with a QIP. A national quality register can be used not only to identify areas for improvement but also to evaluate the impact of subsequent improvement efforts and thereby guide professional development and enhance patient outcomes.

  4. Quality of medical care and patient surgical safety: medical error, malpractice and professional liability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Gas, Héctor Gerardo; Zavala-Villavicencio, Jesús Antonio; Hernández-Torres, Francisco; Fajardo-Dolci, Germán

    2010-01-01

    over time, a significant number of definitions and concepts on quality of care have been identified. This study focuses on quality of care from the perspective of medical patients. quality of medical care includes different areas: opportunity, professional qualifications, safety, respect for ethical principles of medical practice and satisfaction with care outcomes. In this regard, at the Conamed (National Commission for Medical Arbitration), 8062 complaints have been followed, analyzed and completed between June 1996 and December 2008: in 16.8% of the complaints there were insufficient data to determine whether or not there was evidence of malpractice; 20.8% of the complaints had evidence of malpractice and in 62.4% of complaints the existence of good practice was determined according to the lex artis. Among the surgical specialties with the highest malpractice cases were the following: general surgery, gynecology, orthopedics, ophthalmology, emergency surgery, urology and traumatology. acknowledgment of the concept of quality of health care provides a starting point to determine the source of errors, malpractice and professional responsibility in order to resolve and prevent them. Conamed offers alternative means for conflict resolution related to physician-patient relationship by means of conciliation and arbitration, favoring patient and family, as well as the medical profession.

  5. A pilot clinical study of Class III surgical patients facilitated by improved accelerated osteogenic orthodontic treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, JiaQi; Jiang, Jiu-Hui; Xu, Li; Liang, Cheng; Bai, YunYang; Zou, Wei

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate if the improved accelerated osteogenic orthodontics (IAOO) procedure could speed Class III surgical patients' preoperative orthodontic treatment duration and, if yes, to what extent. This study was also designed to determine whether or not an IAOO procedure affects the tooth-moving pattern during extraction space closure. The samples in this study consisted of 24 Class III surgical patients. Twelve skeletal Class III surgery patients served as an experimental group (group 1) and the others as a control group (group 2). Before treatment, the maxillary first premolars were removed. For group 1, after the maxillary dental arch was aligned and leveled (T2), IAOO procedures were performed in the maxillary alveolar bone. Except for this IAOO procedure in group 1, all 24 patients experienced similar combined orthodontic and orthognathic treatment. Study casts of the maxillary dentitions were made before orthodontic treatment (T1) and after extraction space closure (T3). All of the casts were laser scanned, and the amount of movement of the maxillary central incisor, canine, and first molar, as well as arch widths, were digitally measured and analyzed by using the three-dimensional model superimposition method. The time durations T3-T2 were significantly reduced in group 1 by 8.65 ± 2.67 months and for T3-T1 were reduced by 6.39 ± 2.00 months (P teeth movement in the sagittal, vertical, and transverse dimensions between the two groups (P > .05). The IAOO can reduce the surgical orthodontic treatment time for the skeletal Class III surgical patient by more than half a year on average. The IAOO procedures do not save anchorage.

  6. Improving the quality of registered nurses' working time use data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antinaho, Tuula; Kivinen, Tuula; Turunen, Hannele; Partanen, Pirjo

    2017-10-01

    To examine the advantages and disadvantages of external observation and self-reporting methods in investigating registered nurses' working time use in order to improve the quality of working time use data. External observation and self-reporting methods are the most widely used approaches for studying nurses' working time use in observational work sampling studies, but there is scarce information of the data collection procedures and results in the same research context and in the same study. A cross-sectional quantitative study with a structured data collection instrument developed for this study. The same instrument was used in both data collections. Data were collected from six inpatient units at two Finnish tertiary hospitals in autumn 2013 over two consecutive weeks. All registered nurses (n = 95) from two internal medical units, two surgical units and two psychiatric units participated in this study. Statistically significantly divergent information was produced by the two data collection methods in the major nursing categories of value-adding care and non-value-adding work as well as in each of the seven nursing subcategories. External observation and self-reporting gave an overall picture of how registered nurses are using their working time, and both methods were useful in examining registered nurses' working time use when taking into account the advantages and disadvantages of these methods. The deviations between the results improved the quality of data because both methods address recognised shortcomings of the other. This research promotes awareness of the divergent study results by investigating registered nurses' working time use with these two different data collection methods. In future, it would be wise to aim for more comparable data by applying external observation and self-reporting techniques simultaneously. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Integration of Value Stream Map and Healthcare Failure Mode and Effect Analysis into Six Sigma Methodology to Improve Process of Surgical Specimen Handling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Hui Hung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Specimen handling is a critical patient safety issue. Problematic handling process, such as misidentification (of patients, surgical site, and specimen counts, specimen loss, or improper specimen preparation can lead to serious patient harms and lawsuits. Value stream map (VSM is a tool used to find out non-value-added works, enhance the quality, and reduce the cost of the studied process. On the other hand, healthcare failure mode and effect analysis (HFMEA is now frequently employed to avoid possible medication errors in healthcare process. Both of them have a goal similar to Six Sigma methodology for process improvement. This study proposes a model that integrates VSM and HFMEA into the framework, which mainly consists of define, measure, analyze, improve, and control (DMAIC, of Six Sigma. A Six Sigma project for improving the process of surgical specimen handling in a hospital was conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  8. Integration of Value Stream Map and Healthcare Failure Mode and Effect Analysis into Six Sigma Methodology to Improve Process of Surgical Specimen Handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Sheng-Hui; Wang, Pa-Chun; Lin, Hung-Chun; Chen, Hung-Ying; Su, Chao-Ton

    2015-01-01

    Specimen handling is a critical patient safety issue. Problematic handling process, such as misidentification (of patients, surgical site, and specimen counts), specimen loss, or improper specimen preparation can lead to serious patient harms and lawsuits. Value stream map (VSM) is a tool used to find out non-value-added works, enhance the quality, and reduce the cost of the studied process. On the other hand, healthcare failure mode and effect analysis (HFMEA) is now frequently employed to avoid possible medication errors in healthcare process. Both of them have a goal similar to Six Sigma methodology for process improvement. This study proposes a model that integrates VSM and HFMEA into the framework, which mainly consists of define, measure, analyze, improve, and control (DMAIC), of Six Sigma. A Six Sigma project for improving the process of surgical specimen handling in a hospital was conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  9. Prevention of respiratory complications of the surgical patient: actionable plan for continued process improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscic, Katarina J; Grabitz, Stephanie D; Rudolph, Maíra I; Eikermann, Matthias

    2017-06-01

    Postoperative respiratory complications (PRCs) increase hospitalization time, 30-day mortality and costs by up to $35 000. These outcomes measures have gained prominence as bundled payments have become more common. Results of recent quantitative effectiveness studies and clinical trials provide a framework that helps develop center-specific treatment guidelines, tailored to minimize the risk of PRCs. The implementation of those protocols should be guided by a local, respected, and visible facilitator who leads proper implementation while inviting center-specific input from surgeons, anesthesiologists, and other perioperative stakeholders. Preoperatively, patients should be risk-stratified for PRCs to individualize intraoperative choices and postoperative pathways. Laparoscopic compared with open surgery improves respiratory outcomes. High-risk patients should be treated by experienced providers based on locally developed bundle-interventions to optimize intraoperative treatment and ICU bed utilization. Intraoperatively, lung-protective ventilation (procedure-specific positive end-expiratory pressure utilization, and low driving pressure) and moderately restrictive fluid therapy should be used. To achieve surgical relaxation, high-dose neuromuscular blocking agents (and reversal agents) as well as high-dose opioids should be avoided; inhaled anesthetics improve surgical conditions while protecting the lungs. Patients should be extubated in reverse Trendelenburg position. Postoperatively, continuous positive airway pressure helps prevent airway collapse and protocolized, early mobilization improves cognitive and respiratory function.

  10. PROCESS VARIABILITY REDUCTION THROUGH STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL FOR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.P. Mahesh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Quality has become one of the most important customer decision factors in the selection among the competing product and services. Consequently, understanding and improving quality is a key factor leading to business success, growth and an enhanced competitive position. Hence quality improvement program should be an integral part of the overall business strategy. According to TQM, the effective way to improve the Quality of the product or service is to improve the process used to build the product. Hence, TQM focuses on process, rather than results as the results are driven by the processes. Many techniques are available for quality improvement. Statistical Process Control (SPC is one such TQM technique which is widely accepted for analyzing quality problems and improving the performance of the production process. This article illustrates the step by step procedure adopted at a soap manufacturing company to improve the Quality by reducing process variability using Statistical Process Control.

  11. Nursing assessment of continuous vital sign surveillance to improve patient safety on the medical/surgical unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Terri; Whisman, Lynn; Booker, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Evaluate continuous vital sign surveillance as a tool to improve patient safety in the medical/surgical unit. Failure-to-rescue is an important measure of hospital quality. Patient deterioration is often preceded by changes in vital signs. However, continuous multi-parameter vital sign monitoring may decrease patient safety with an abundance of unnecessary alarms. Prospective observational study at two geographically disperse hospitals in a single hospital system. A multi-parameter vital sign monitoring system was installed in a medical/surgical unit in Utah and one in Alabama providing continuous display of SpO2, heart rate, blood pressure and respiration rate on a central station. Alarm thresholds and time to alert annunciations were set based on prior analysis of the distribution of each vital sign. At the end of 4 weeks, nurses completed a survey on their experience. An average alert per patient, per day was determined retrospectively from the saved vital signs data and knowledge of the alarm settings. Ninety-two per cent of the nurses agreed that the number of alarms and alerts were appropriate; 54% strongly agreed. On average, both units experienced 10·8 alarms per patient, per day. One hundred per cent agreed the monitor provided valuable patient data that increased patient safety; 79% strongly agreed. Continuous, multi-parameter patient monitoring could be performed on medical/surgical units with a small and appropriate level of alarms. Continuous vital sign assessment may have initiated nursing interventions that prevented failure-to-rescue events. Nurses surveyed unanimously agreed that continuous vital sign surveillance will help enhance patient safety. Nursing response to abnormal vital signs is one of the most important levers in patient safety, by providing timely recognition of early clinical deterioration. This occurs through diligent nursing surveillance, involving assessment, interpretation of data, recognition of a problem and meaningful

  12. Challenges of improving the evidence base in smaller surgical specialties, as highlighted by a systematic review of gastroschisis management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin S R Allin

    Full Text Available To identify methods of improving the evidence base in smaller surgical specialties, using a systematic review of gastroschisis management as an example.Operative primary fascial closure (OPFC, and silo placement with staged reduction and delayed closure (SR are the most commonly used methods of gastroschisis closure. Relative merits of each are unclear.A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed comparing outcomes following OPFC and SR in infants with simple gastroschisis. Primary outcomes of interest were mortality, length of hospitalization and time to full enteral feeding.751 unique articles were identified. Eight met the inclusion criteria. None were randomized controlled trials. 488 infants underwent OPFC and 316 underwent SR. Multiple studies were excluded because they included heterogeneous populations and mixed intervention groups. Length of stay was significantly longer in the SR group (mean difference 8.97 days, 95% CI 2.14-15.80 days, as was number of post-operative days to complete enteral feeding (mean difference 7.19 days, 95%CI 2.01-12.36 days. Mortality was not statistically significantly different, although the odds of death were raised in the SR group (OR 1.96, 95%CI 0.71-5.35.Despite showing some benefit of OPFC over SR, our results are tempered by the low quality of the available studies, which were small and variably reported. Coordinating research through a National Paediatric Surgical Trials Unit could alleviate many of these problems. A similar national approach could be used in other smaller surgical specialties.

  13. Team Learning for Healthcare Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukyan, Narine; Eppstein, Margaret J; Horbar, Jeffrey D

    2013-08-28

    In organized healthcare quality improvement collaboratives (QICs), teams of practitioners from different hospitals exchange information on clinical practices with the aim of improving health outcomes at their own institutions. However, what works in one hospital may not work in others with different local contexts because of nonlinear interactions among various demographics, treatments, and practices. In previous studies of collaborations where the goal is a collective problem solving, teams of diverse individuals have been shown to outperform teams of similar individuals. However, when the purpose of collaboration is knowledge diffusion in complex environments, it is not clear whether team diversity will help or hinder effective learning. In this paper, we first use an agent-based model of QICs to show that teams comprising similar individuals outperform those with more diverse individuals under nearly all conditions, and that this advantage increases with the complexity of the landscape and level of noise in assessing performance. Examination of data from a network of real hospitals provides encouraging evidence of a high degree of similarity in clinical practices, especially within teams of hospitals engaging in QIC teams. However, our model also suggests that groups of similar hospitals could benefit from larger teams and more open sharing of details on clinical outcomes than is currently the norm. To facilitate this, we propose a secure virtual collaboration system that would allow hospitals to efficiently identify potentially better practices in use at other institutions similar to theirs without any institutions having to sacrifice the privacy of their own data. Our results may also have implications for other types of data-driven diffusive learning such as in personalized medicine and evolutionary search in noisy, complex combinatorial optimization problems.

  14. Quality procedure management for improved nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forzano, P.; Castagna, P.

    1995-01-01

    Emergency Operating Procedures and Accident Management Procedures are the next step in the computerization of NPP control rooms. Different improvements are presently conceivable for this operator aid tool, and research activities are in development. Undergoing activities regard especially formal aspects of knowledge representation, Human-Machine interface and procedure life cycle management. These aspects have been investigated deeply by Ansaldo, and partially incorporated in the DIAM prototype. Nuclear Power Plant Procedures can be seen from essentially two viewpoints: the process and the information management. From the first point of view, it is important to supply the knowledge apt to solve problems connected with the control of the process, from the second one the focus of attention is on the knowledge representation, its structure, elicitation and maintenance, and formal quality assurance. These two aspects of procedure representation can be considered and solved separately. In particular, methodological, formal and management issues require long and tedious activities, that in most cases constitute a great barrier for procedures development and upgrade. To solve these problems, Ansaldo is developing DIAM, a wide integrated tool for procedure management to support in procedure writing, updating, usage, and documentation. One of the most challenging features of DIAM is AUTO-LAY, a CASE sub-tool that, in a complete automatical way, structures parts or complete flow diagram. This is the feature that is partial present in some other CASE products, that, anyway, do not allow complex graph handling and isomorphism between video and paper representation. AUTO-LAY has the unique prerogative to draw graphs of any complexity to section them in pages, and to automatically compose a document. This has been recognized in the literature as the most important a second-generation CASE improvement. (Author) 9 Figs., 5 Refs

  15. Team Learning for Healthcare Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppstein, Margaret J.; Horbar, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    In organized healthcare quality improvement collaboratives (QICs), teams of practitioners from different hospitals exchange information on clinical practices with the aim of improving health outcomes at their own institutions. However, what works in one hospital may not work in others with different local contexts because of nonlinear interactions among various demographics, treatments, and practices. In previous studies of collaborations where the goal is a collective problem solving, teams of diverse individuals have been shown to outperform teams of similar individuals. However, when the purpose of collaboration is knowledge diffusion in complex environments, it is not clear whether team diversity will help or hinder effective learning. In this paper, we first use an agent-based model of QICs to show that teams comprising similar individuals outperform those with more diverse individuals under nearly all conditions, and that this advantage increases with the complexity of the landscape and level of noise in assessing performance. Examination of data from a network of real hospitals provides encouraging evidence of a high degree of similarity in clinical practices, especially within teams of hospitals engaging in QIC teams. However, our model also suggests that groups of similar hospitals could benefit from larger teams and more open sharing of details on clinical outcomes than is currently the norm. To facilitate this, we propose a secure virtual collaboration system that would allow hospitals to efficiently identify potentially better practices in use at other institutions similar to theirs without any institutions having to sacrifice the privacy of their own data. Our results may also have implications for other types of data-driven diffusive learning such as in personalized medicine and evolutionary search in noisy, complex combinatorial optimization problems. PMID:25360395

  16. The impact of the alexander technique on improving posture and surgical ergonomics during minimally invasive surgery: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Pramod P; Reddy, Trisha P; Roig-Francoli, Jennifer; Cone, Lois; Sivan, Bezalel; DeFoor, W Robert; Gaitonde, Krishnanath; Noh, Paul H

    2011-10-01

    One of the main ergonomic challenges during surgical procedures is surgeon posture. There have been reports of a high number of work related injuries in laparoscopic surgeons. The Alexander technique is a process of psychophysical reeducation of the body to improve postural balance and coordination, permitting movement with minimal strain and maximum ease. We evaluated the efficacy of the Alexander technique in improving posture and surgical ergonomics during minimally invasive surgery. We performed a prospective cohort study in which subjects served as their own controls. Informed consent was obtained. Before Alexander technique instruction/intervention subjects underwent assessment of postural coordination and basic laparoscopic skills. All subjects were educated about the Alexander technique and underwent post-instruction/intervention assessment of posture and laparoscopic skills. Subjective and objective data obtained before and after instruction/intervention were tabulated and analyzed for statistical significance. All 7 subjects completed the study. Subjects showed improved ergonomics and improved ability to complete FLS™ as well as subjective improvement in overall posture. The Alexander technique training program resulted in a significant improvement in posture. Improved surgical ergonomics, endurance and posture decrease surgical fatigue and the incidence of repetitive stress injuries to laparoscopic surgeons. Further studies of the influence of the Alexander technique on surgical posture, minimally invasive surgery ergonomics and open surgical techniques are warranted to explore and validate the benefits for surgeons. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Applying Triz for Production Quality Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swee Nikalus Shu Luing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to provide a thorough analysis on the application of TRIZ in improving the quality of canned food production. TRIZ tools such as engineering systems analysis, function analysis, cause and effect chain analysis, By-separation model and 40 Inventive Principles are applied in order to discover some feasible and elegant solutions to alleviate the problem. Findings revealed that the rejected canned products on the conveyor belt will be isolated or picked up with other good condition canned products which are lined up very closely to the rejected cans; though the visioning system is able detect the fault printing on the canned product. The main root cause is that the rejected canned product is picked up with other canned products in good condition because all cans are lined up on the belt and are very close to each other or having no gaps between the cans. Conversely, all cans on the conveyor belts are required to be very close to each other to avoid collisions that may damage the cans. The root cause is solved by applying function analysis, By-separation tool and Inventive Principles. Therefore, it can be concluded that TRIZ is a powerful tool in inventive problem solving.

  18. Quality and strength of patient safety climate on medical-surgical units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Linda C; Chang, Yunkyung; Mark, Barbara A

    2012-10-01

    Describing the safety climate in hospitals is an important first step in creating work environments where safety is a priority. Yet, little is known about the patient safety climate on medical-surgical units. Study purposes were to describe quality and strength of the patient safety climate on medical-surgical units and explore hospital and unit characteristics associated with this climate. Data came from a larger organizational study to investigate hospital and unit characteristics associated with organizational, nurse, and patient outcomes. The sample for this study was 3,689 RNs on 286 medical-surgical units in 146 hospitals. Nursing workgroup and managerial commitment to safety were the two most strongly positive attributes of the patient safety climate. However, issues surrounding the balance between job duties and safety compliance and nurses' reluctance to reveal errors continue to be problematic. Nurses in Magnet hospitals were more likely to communicate about errors and participate in error-related problem solving. Nurses on smaller units and units with lower work complexity reported greater safety compliance and were more likely to communicate about and reveal errors. Nurses on smaller units also reported greater commitment to patient safety and participation in error-related problem solving. Nursing workgroup commitment to safety is a valuable resource that can be leveraged to promote a sense of personal responsibility for and shared ownership of patient safety. Managers can capitalize on this commitment by promoting a work environment in which control over nursing practice and active participation in unit decisions are encouraged and by developing channels of communication that increase staff nurse involvement in identifying patient safety issues, prioritizing unit-level safety goals, and resolving day-to-day operational problems the have the potential to jeopardize patient safety.

  19. Does adding clinical data to administrative data improve agreement among hospital quality measures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchate, Amresh D; Stolzmann, Kelly L; Rosen, Amy K; Fink, Aaron S; Shwartz, Michael; Ash, Arlene S; Abdulkerim, Hassen; Pugh, Mary Jo V; Shokeen, Priti; Borzecki, Ann

    2017-09-01

    Hospital performance measures based on patient mortality and readmission have indicated modest rates of agreement. We examined if combining clinical data on laboratory tests and vital signs with administrative data leads to improved agreement with each other, and with other measures of hospital performance in the nation's largest integrated health care system. We used patient-level administrative and clinical data, and hospital-level data on quality indicators, for 2007-2010 from the Veterans Health Administration (VA). For patients admitted for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF) and pneumonia we examined changes in hospital performance on 30-d mortality and 30-d readmission rates as a result of adding clinical data to administrative data. We evaluated whether this enhancement yielded improved measures of hospital quality, based on concordance with other hospital quality indicators. For 30-d mortality, data enhancement improved model performance, and significantly changed hospital performance profiles; for 30-d readmission, the impact was modest. Concordance between enhanced measures of both outcomes, and with other hospital quality measures - including Joint Commission process measures, VA Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP) mortality and morbidity, and case volume - remained poor. Adding laboratory tests and vital signs to measure hospital performance on mortality and readmission did not improve the poor rates of agreement across hospital quality indicators in the VA. Efforts to improve risk adjustment models should continue; however, evidence of validation should precede their use as reliable measures of quality. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Mortality and health-related quality of life in patients surgically treated for spondylodiscitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragsted, Casper; Aagaard, Theis; Ohrt-Nissen, Søren; Gehrchen, Martin; Dahl, Benny

    2017-01-01

    To assess mortality, disability, and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients surgically treated for spondylodiscitis. A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted on all patients surgically treated for spondylodiscitis over a 6-year period at a single tertiary spine center. Indications for surgery, pre- and postoperative neurological impairment, comorbidities, and mortality were recorded. A survey was conducted on all eligible patients with the EuroQol 5-dimension (EQ-5D) questionnaire and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Sixty-five patients were diagnosed with spondylodiscitis not related to recent spine surgery. One-year mortality rate was 6%. In all, 36% and 27% had pre- and postoperative neurological impairment, respectively, with only one patient experiencing deterioration postoperatively. At final follow-up (median 2 years), mean ODI was 31% (SD = 22) and mean EQ-5D time trade-off score was 0.639 (SD = 0.262); this was significantly lower than that in the normal population ( p spondylodiscitis have significantly lower HRQL and more disability than the background population. Neurological impairment prior to index surgery predicts adverse outcome in terms of disability and lower HRQL.

  1. Implementation of a Clinical Documentation Improvement Curriculum Improves Quality Metrics and Hospital Charges in an Academic Surgery Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Cynthia; Greenbaum, Alissa; Porto, Catherine; Russell, John C

    2017-03-01

    Accurate clinical documentation (CD) is necessary for many aspects of modern health care, including excellent communication, quality metrics reporting, and legal documentation. New requirements have mandated adoption of ICD-10-CM coding systems, adding another layer of complexity to CD. A clinical documentation improvement (CDI) and ICD-10 training program was created for health care providers in our academic surgery department. We aimed to assess the impact of our CDI curriculum by comparing quality metrics, coding, and reimbursement before and after implementation of our CDI program. A CDI/ICD-10 training curriculum was instituted in September 2014 for all members of our university surgery department. The curriculum consisted of didactic lectures, 1-on-1 provider training, case reviews, e-learning modules, and CD queries from nurse CDI staff and hospital coders. Outcomes parameters included monthly documentation completion rates, severity of illness (SOI), risk of mortality (ROM), case-mix index (CMI), all-payer refined diagnosis-related groups (APR-DRG), and Surgical Care Improvement Program (SCIP) metrics. Financial gain from responses to CDI queries was determined retrospectively. Surgery department delinquent documentation decreased by 85% after CDI implementation. Compliance with SCIP measures improved from 85% to 97%. Significant increases in surgical SOI, ROM, CMI, and APR-DRG (all p quality measures. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  2. How changing quality management influenced PGME accreditation: a focus on decentralization and quality improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akdemir, Nesibe; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; Paternotte, Emma; Schreuder, Bas; Scheele, Fedde

    2017-01-01

    Background: Evaluating the quality of postgraduate medical education (PGME) programs through accreditation is common practice worldwide. Accreditation is shaped by educational quality and quality management. An appropriate accreditation design is important, as it may drive improvements in training.

  3. Surgical Precision in Clinical Documentation Connects Patient Safety, Quality of Care, and Reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittinger, Benjamin J; Matejicka, Anthony; Mahabir, Raman C

    2016-01-01

    Emphasis on quality of care has become a major focus for healthcare providers and institutions. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has multiple quality-of-care performance programs and initiatives aimed at providing transparency to the public, which provide the ability to directly compare services provided by hospitals and individual physicians. These quality-of-care programs highlight the transition to pay for performance, rewarding physicians and hospitals for high quality of care. To improve the use of pay for performance and analyze quality-of-care outcome measures, the Division of Plastic Surgery at Scott & White Memorial Hospital participated in an inpatient clinical documentation accuracy project (CDAP). Performance and improvement on metrics such as case mix index, severity of illness, risk of mortality, and geometric mean length of stay were assessed after implementation. After implementation of the CDAP, the division of plastic surgery showed increases in case mix index, calculated severity of illness, and calculated risk of mortality and a decrease in length of stay. For academic plastic surgeons, quality of care demands precise documentation of each patient. The CDAP provides one avenue to hone clinical documentation and performance on quality measures.

  4. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy improves indices of metabolic disease in rodent model of surgical menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, William J.; Shirey, Kristin; Spann, Redin A.; Zamarripa, C. Austin; Hosler, Jonathan P.; Grayson, Bernadette E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Though females are the most common recipients of weight loss surgeries for the amelioration of the comorbidities of obesity, few studies have addressed the efficacy of these procedures with specific attention to reproductive stage. Here we ask in a rodent model of vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) whether improvements to metabolic health are realized in females having received surgical menopause. Specifically we were interested in knowing whether rats made menopausal through surgical means would exhibit persistent hepatic steatosis as reported in previously pregnant, freely-cycling female VSG rats or if it is resolved as reported in male VSG rats. Methods All the rats first received ovariectomy (OVX) and then were placed on high fat diet (HFD) prior to either sham or VSG surgery (N = 12, 9) and then were monitored for resolution of obesity-related comorbidities. Results VSG was sufficient to reduce weight and adiposity in OVX females in comparison to Obese rats (P change in insulin sensitivity. Both circulating (P < 0.01) and hepatic triglyceride (P < 0.01) levels were also reduced after VSG. Liver integrity was improved in OVX-VSG in comparison to OVX-Obese as reflected by reduced aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels (P < 0.05). The ability of mitochondria to generate ATP was maintained and an increase in complex IV may decrease the production of mitochondrial ROS. Conclusions Taken together, VSG in ovariectomized animals experience many positive benefits including the resolution of hepatic steatosis that persists in reproductively-intact female rats after VSG. PMID:27801704

  5. Video-Based Surgical Learning: Improving Trainee Education and Preparation for Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Paulo; Carvalho, Nuno; Carvalho-Dias, Emanuel; João Costa, Manuel; Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Lima, Estevão

    2017-10-11

    Since the end of the XIX century, teaching of surgery has remained practically unaltered until now. With the dawn of video-assisted laparoscopy, surgery has faced new technical and learning challenges. Due to technological advances, from Internet access to portable electronic devices, the use of online resources is part of the educational armamentarium. In this respect, videos have already proven to be effective and useful, however the best way to benefit from these tools is still not clearly defined. To assess the importance of video-based learning, using an electronic questionnaire applied to residents and specialists of different surgical fields. Importance of video-based learning was assessed in a sample of 141 subjects, using a questionnaire distributed by a GoogleDoc online form. We found that 98.6% of the respondents have already used videos to prepare for surgery. When comparing video sources by formation status, residents were found to use Youtube significantly more often than specialists (p learning is currently a hallmark of surgical preparation among residents and specialists working in Portugal. Based on these findings we believe that the creation of quality and scientifically accurate videos, and subsequent compilation in available video-libraries appears to be the future landscape for video-based learning. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ambulatory and Hospital-based Quality Improvement Methods in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nava Blum

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review article compares ambulatory and hospital-based quality improvement methods in Israel. Data were collected from: reports of the National Program for Quality Indicators in community, the National Program for Quality Indicators in Hospitals, and from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD Reviews of Health Care Quality.

  7. Good air quality in offices improves productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanger, Povl Ole

    2000-01-01

    Three recent independent studies have documented that the quality of indoor air has a significant and positive influence or? the productivity of office workers. A combined analysis of the results of the three studies shows a significant relationship between productivity and perceived indoor air...... quality. The impact on productivity justifies a much higher indoor air quality than the minimum levels prescribed in present standards and guidelines. One way of providing air of high quality for people to breathe, without involving excessive ventilation rates and energy use, is to provide "personalized...... air" to each individual. The application of this concept is discussed in this paper: (C) 2000 Journal of Mechanical Engineering. All rights reserved....

  8. Good air quality in offices improves productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanger, Povl Ole

    2000-01-01

    Three recent independent studies have documented that the quality of indoor air has a significant and positive influence on the productivity of office workers. A combined analysis of the results of the three studies shows a significant relationship between productivity and perceived indoor air...... quality. The impact on productivity justifies a much higher indoor air quality than the minimum levels prescribed in present standards and guidelines. One way of providing air of high quality for people to breathe, without involving excessive ventilation rates and energy use, is to provide "personalized...... air" to each individual. The application of this concept is discussed....

  9. Effectiveness of a quality-improvement program in improving management of primary care practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szecsenyi, J.; Campbell, S.M.; Broge, B.; Laux, G.; Willms, S.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Goetz, K.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Practice Assessment program provides feedback and outreach visits to primary care practices to facilitate quality improvement in five domains (infrastructure, people, information, finance, and quality and safety). We examined the effectiveness of this program in improving

  10. Obstacles to implementation of an intervention to improve surgical services in an Ethiopian hospital: a qualitative study of an international health partnership project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveling, Emma-Louise; Zegeye, Desalegn Tegabu; Silverman, Michael

    2016-08-17

    Access to safe surgical care represents a critical gap in healthcare delivery and development in many low- and middle-income countries, including Ethiopia. Quality improvement (QI) initiatives at hospital level may contribute to closing this gap. Many such quality improvement initiatives are carried out through international health partnerships. Better understanding of how to optimise quality improvement in low-income settings is needed, including through partnership-based approaches. Drawing on a process evaluation of an intervention to improve surgical services in an Ethiopian hospital, this paper offers lessons to help meet this need. We conducted a qualitative process evaluation of a quality improvement project which aimed to improve access to surgical services in an Ethiopian referral hospital through better management. Data was collected longitudinally and included: 66 in-depth interviews with surgical staff and project team members; observation (135 h) in the surgery department and of project meetings; project-related documentation. Thematic analysis, guided by theoretical constructs, focused on identifying obstacles to implementation. The project largely failed to achieve its goals. Key barriers related to project design, partnership working and the implementation context, and included: confusion over project objectives and project and partner roles and responsibilities; logistical challenges concerning overseas visits; difficulties in communication; gaps between the time and authority team members had and that needed to implement and engage other staff; limited strategies for addressing adaptive-as opposed to technical-challenges; effects of hierarchy and resource scarcity on QI efforts. While many of the obstacles identified are common to diverse settings, our findings highlight ways in which some features of low-income country contexts amplify these common challenges. We identify lessons for optimising the design and planning of quality improvement

  11. The quality of spa services and possibilities of their improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Issentayeva, Alma

    2011-01-01

    This thesis analyzes the quality of the spa services. The aim of this paper is to assess the quality of the services provided in the wellness hotel President and to propose to the hotel management options to improve the services.

  12. A history of industrial statistics and quality and efficiency improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mast, J.; Coleman, S.; Greenfield, T.; Stewardson, D.; Montgomery, D.C.

    2008-01-01

    The twentieth century witnessed incredible increases in product quality, while in the same period product priced dropped dramatically. These important improvements in quality and efficiency in industry were the result of innovations in management and engineering. But these developments were

  13. 40 CFR 64.8 - Quality improvement plan (QIP) requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality improvement plan (QIP... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) COMPLIANCE ASSURANCE MONITORING § 64.8 Quality improvement plan (QIP) requirements. (a.... (iii) Appropriate improvements to control methods. (iv) Other steps appropriate to correct control...

  14. The value of clinical audit to improve cataract quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lindfield

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the easiest ways to start improving quality in a hospital is through clinical audit. Clinical audit is a quality improvement process that seeks to improve patient care and outcomes. It does this through a systematic process of review or evaluation against clearly defined criteria, followed by the implementation of change.

  15. How to conduct a clinical audit and quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limb, Christopher; Fowler, Alex; Gundogan, Buket; Koshy, Kiron; Agha, Riaz

    2017-07-01

    Audits and quality improvement projects are vital aspects of clinical governance and continual service improvement in medicine. In this article we describe the process of clinical audit and quality improvement project. Guidance is also provided on how to design an effective audit and bypass barriers encountered during the process.

  16. Improving Quality Higher Education in Nigeria: The Roles of Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiyai, Romina Ifeoma

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the roles of stakeholders in improving quality of university education in Nigeria. Internal and external stakeholders are identified and the various roles they could play in improving the quality of university education are discussed. The paper contends that continuous and holistic improvement in university education system…

  17. Do farm audits improve milk quality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flores-Miyamoto, A.; Reij, M.W.; Velthuis, A.G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Milk quality is assessed using bulk milk analysis and by farm audits in the Netherlands. However, the extent of the effect that dairy farm audits have on milk quality is unknown. Data from over 13,000 audits performed on 12,855 dairy farms from February 2006 to April 2008 were merged with laboratory

  18. [Quality of life of patients at late terms after surgical treatment of complicated forms of diabetic foot syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, T V; Levchik, E Iu

    2010-01-01

    Quality of life were explored in an open prospective controlled study in 116 patients with complicated diabetic foot syndrome (experimental group) and 30 diabetics without this syndrome (control group) by questioning of quality of life (questionnaires SF-36, Functional Scale of Lower Extremity) in long terms (6-18 months) after surgical treatment. Advantages of foot "saving" resections in surgical treatment of complicated diabetic boot syndrome were detected: patients without amputations had the physical wellbeing score and the Functional Scale of Lower Extremity number, comparable with the group of diabetics without diabetic foot syndrome. The integral mental wellbeing scores were low in all observed groups of patients.

  19. Long-Term Seizure, Quality of Life, Depression, and Verbal Memory Outcomes in a Controlled Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Surgical Series Using Portuguese-Validated Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Luis Augusto; Angelis, Geisa de; Teixeira, Wagner Afonso; Casulari, Luiz Augusto

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate long-term surgical outcomes in patients treated for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy compared with a similar group of patients who underwent a preoperative evaluation. Patient interviews were conducted by an independent neuropsychologist and included a sociodemographic questionnaire and validated versions of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, Adverse Events Profile, Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31, and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test. Seventy-one patients who underwent surgery and 20 who underwent mesial temporal lobe epilepsy preoperative evaluations were interviewed. After an 81-month mean postoperative follow-up, 44% of the surgical patients achieved complete seizure relief according to the Engel classification and 68% according to the International League Against Epilepsy classification. The surgical group had a significantly lower prevalence of depression (P = 0.002) and drug-related adverse effects (P = 0.002). Improvement on unemployment (P = 0.02) was achieved but not on driving or education. Delayed verbal memory recall was impaired in 76% of the surgical and 65% of the control cases (P = 0.32). Regarding the Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31, the operated patients scored higher in their total score (mean, 75.44 vs. mean, 60.08; P life. Our study found that, although surgical treatment was effective, its impact on social indicators was modest. Moreover, the self-reported quality of life relied not only on seizure control but also on depressive symptoms and antiepileptic drug burden. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Quality of life of individuals with cleft lip and palate pre- and post-surgical correction of dentofacial deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beluci, Marli Luiz; Genaro, Katia Flores

    2016-04-01

    To assesses the quality of life and the impact of oral health conditions in the pre- and post-surgical correction of dentofacial deformity of individuals with cleft lip and palate. Quantitative and prospective study in a referral hospital in the period from June 2011 to May 2013. A total of 50 participants responded the questionnaires World Health Organization Quality of Life - Bref (WHOQOL-Bref) and Oral Health Impact Profile - 14 (OHIP-14), approximately 3 days before and 3 to 12 months after surgery. The "t" test for paired samples and Wilcoxon test were used for statistical analysis with a significance level of 5%. After surgery, differences were found in the domains: Physical, Psychological, Environmental and General Questions of the WHOQOL-Bref and domains: Psychological Discomfort, Psychological Disability, Social Disability, Handicap and Overall Score of OHIP-14. Surgical correction of dentofacial deformity improved quality of life and had positive impact of oral health condition. Avaliar a qualidade de vida e o impacto das condições de saúde oral nos períodos pré e pós-correção cirúrgica da deformidade dentofacial de indivíduos com fissura labiopalatina operada. Estudo quantitativo e prospectivo, realizado em um hospital de referência, no período de junho de 2011 a maio de 2013. Participaram 50 indivíduos que responderam aos questionários World Health Organization Quality of Life - Bref (WHOQOL-Bref) e Oral Health Impact Profile - 14 (OHIP-14), aproximadamente 3 dias antes e entre 3 e 12 meses após a cirurgia. Os testes "t" para amostras pareadas e de Wilcoxon foram usados para análise estatística, com nível de significância de 5%. Após a cirurgia, foram encontradas diferenças nos domínios: Físico, Psicológico, Meio Ambiente e nas Questões Gerais do WHOQOL-Bref e nos domínios: Desconforto Psicológico, Limitação Psicológica, Limitação Social, Incapacidade e no Escore Geral do OHIP-14. A correção cirúrgica da deformidade

  1. Decision Dissonance: Evaluating an Approach to Measuring the Quality of Surgical Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Floyd J.; Gallagher, Patricia M.; Drake, Keith M.; Sepucha, Karen R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Good decision making has been increasingly cited as a core component of good medical care, and shared decision making is one means of achieving high decision quality. If it is to be a standard, good measures and protocols are needed for assessing the quality of decisions. Consistency with patient goals and concerns is one defining characteristic of a good decision. A new method for evaluating decision quality for major surgical decisions was examined, and a methodology for collecting the needed data was developed. Methods For a national probability sample of fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who had a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), a lumpectomy or a mastectomy for breast cancer, or surgery for prostate cancer during the last half of 2008, a mail survey of selected patients was carried out about one year after the procedures. Patients’ goals and concerns, knowledge, key aspects of interactions with clinicians, and feelings about the decisions were assessed. A Decision Dissonance Score was created that measured the extent to which patient ratings of goals ran counter to the treatment received. The construct and predictive validity of the Decision Dissonance Score was then assessed. Results When data were averaged across all four procedures, patients with more knowledge and those who reported more involvement reported significantly lower Decision Dissonance Scores. Patients with lower Decision Dissonance Scores also reported more confidence in their decisions and feeling more positively about how the treatment turned out, and they were more likely to say that they would make the same decision again. Conclusions Surveying discharged surgery patients is a feasible way to evaluate decision making, and Decision Dissonance appears to be a promising approach to validly measuring decision quality. PMID:23516764

  2. Quality improvement teaching at medical school: a student perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Pooja; Barai, Ishani; Prasad, Sunila; Gadhvi, Karishma

    2016-01-01

    Pooja Nair, Ishani Barai, Sunila Prasad, Karishma Gadhvi Department of Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: Guidelines in the UK require all doctors to actively take part in quality improvement. To ease future doctors into the process, formal quality improvement teaching can be delivered during medical school. Keywords: quality improvement, medical school, patient safety, patient satisfaction, medical student, clinical audit

  3. Quality improvement teaching at medical school: a student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair P

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pooja Nair, Ishani Barai, Sunila Prasad, Karishma Gadhvi Department of Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: Guidelines in the UK require all doctors to actively take part in quality improvement. To ease future doctors into the process, formal quality improvement teaching can be delivered during medical school. Keywords: quality improvement, medical school, patient safety, patient satisfaction, medical student, clinical audit

  4. How to Sustain Change and Support Continuous Quality Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Silver, Samuel A.; McQuillan, Rory; Harel, Ziv; Weizman, Adam V.; Thomas, Alison; Nesrallah, Gihad; Bell, Chaim M.; Chan, Christopher T.; Chertow, Glenn M.

    2016-01-01

    To achieve sustainable change, quality improvement initiatives must become the new way of working rather than something added on to routine clinical care. However, most organizational change is not maintained. In this next article in this Moving Points in Nephrology feature on quality improvement, we provide health care professionals with strategies to sustain and support quality improvement. Threats to sustainability may be identified both at the beginning of a project and when it is ready f...

  5. PTH(1-34) for Surgical Hypoparathyroidism: A Prospective, Open-Label Investigation of Efficacy and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santonati, Assunta; Palermo, Andrea; Maddaloni, Ernesto; Bosco, Daniela; Spada, Antonio; Grimaldi, Franco; Raggiunti, Bruno; Volpe, Raffaele; Manfrini, Silvia; Vescini, Fabio

    2015-09-01

    Conventional therapy for hypoparathyroidism consists of calcium and calcitriol, but sometimes normal serum calcium cannot be maintained, and/or this approach might lead to nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, or renal insufficiency. The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of 6 months of PTH(1-34) treatment in adult subjects with postoperative hypoparathyroidism and to evaluate quality-of-life changes. This was a 2-year prospective, open-label study. At baseline and after 6 months of PTH(1-34) treatment, calcium and vitamin D supplementation requirements, serum calcium, phosphate, creatinine, alkaline phosphatase, uric acid, and 24-hour urinary calcium excretion were evaluated. Quality of life was evaluated by the Rand 36-Item Short Form Health Survey covering eight domains of physical and mental health. This was an Italian multicentric study. Participants included 42 subjects with surgical hypoparathyroidism (90% females, age range 34-77 y). The intervention included a twice-daily PTH(1-34) 20 μg sc injection. The mean serum calcium levels significantly increased from baseline to 15 days (7.6 ± 0.6 vs 9.1 ± 0.9 mg/dL, P hypoparathyroidism, and it shows that PTH(1-34) may improve the mental and physical health in hypoparathyroid subjects.

  6. Coaching Non-technical Skills Improves Surgical Residents' Performance in a Simulated Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Steven; Parker, Sarah Henrickson; Wilkinson, Jill; McKinley, Aileen; MacDonald, Jamie; Neill, Adrian; McAdam, Tim

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of coaching on non-technical skills and performance during laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a simulated operating room (OR). Non-technical skills (situation awareness, decision making, teamwork, and leadership) underpin technical ability and are critical to the success of operations and the safety of patients in the OR. The rate of developing assessment tools in this area has outpaced development of workable interventions to improve non-technical skills in surgical training and beyond. A randomized trial was conducted with senior surgical residents (n = 16). Participants were randomized to receive either non-technical skills coaching (intervention) or to self-reflect (control) after each of 5 simulated operations. Coaching was based on the Non-Technical Skills For Surgeons (NOTSS) behavior observation system. Surgeon-coaches trained in this method coached participants in the intervention group for 10 minutes after each simulation. Primary outcome measure was non-technical skills, assessed from video by a surgeon using the NOTSS system. Secondary outcomes were time to call for help during bleeding, operative time, and path length of laparoscopic instruments. Non-technical skills improved in the intervention group from scenario 1 to scenario 5 compared with those in the control group (p = 0.04). The intervention group was faster to call for help when faced with unstoppable bleeding in the final scenario (no. 5; p = 0.03). Coaching improved residents' non-technical skills in the simulated OR compared with those in the control group. Important next steps are to implement non-technical skills coaching in the real OR and assess effect on clinically important process measures and patient outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Productivity quality improvement at UNC Geotech

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    The program to improve productivity is presented in a series of view graphs. Key elements of the program are: CEO leadership and commitment; measurable improvements; specific annual goals; system for sharing benefits of improvements; practical training for employees; and intent to institutionalize

  8. Surgical stress induced depressive and anxiety like behavior are improved by dapsone via modulating NADPH oxidase level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Tian, Xiaosheng; Wang, Qiudian; Tong, Yawei; Wang, Hecheng; Li, Zhengqian; Li, Lunxu; Zhou, Ting; Zhan, Rui; Zhao, Lei; Sun, Yang; Fan, Dongsheng; Lu, Lin; Zhang, Jing; Jin, Yinglan; Xiao, Weizhong; Guo, Xiangyang; Chui, Dehua

    2015-01-12

    Surgical stress induced depression and anxiety like behavior are common complications among aged individuals suffering from surgery. Recent studies proposed that accumulation of oxidative stress is involved in the etiology of stress induced depression and anxiety. Dapsone possesses antioxidant properties, however, whether dapsone is effective in modulating surgical stress induced brain oxidative damage remains uncertain. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of dapsone on surgical stress induced depressive and anxiety like behavior, and brain oxidative stress in a well-established surgical stress model. Depressive and anxiety like behavior accompanied by elevated brain oxidative stress were observed in aged mice underwent abdominal surgery. Pretreatment with 5 mg/kg dapsone significantly improved the behavioral disorder and ameliorated brain oxidative stress in this model. Further investigation, revealed that surgical stress increased brain NADPH oxidase level, while pretreatment with dapsone abrogated the elevation of NADPH oxidase triggered by surgical stress. These findings suggest that dapsone is effective in improving surgical stress induced brain oxidative damage via down-regulating NADPH oxidase level in aged mice. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Context in Quality of Care: Improving Teamwork and Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Daniel S; Sexton, John Bryan; Adair, Kathryn C; Kaplan, Heather C; Profit, Jochen

    2017-09-01

    Quality improvement in health care is an ongoing challenge. Consideration of the context of the health care system is of paramount importance. Staff resilience and teamwork climate are key aspects of context that drive quality. Teamwork climate is dynamic, with well-established tools available to improve teamwork for specific tasks or global applications. Similarly, burnout and resilience can be modified with interventions such as cultivating gratitude, positivity, and awe. A growing body of literature has shown that teamwork and burnout relate to quality of care, with improved teamwork and decreased burnout expected to produce improved patient quality and safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Lake Tahoe Water Quality Improvement Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information on the Lake Tahoe watershed, EPA's protection efforts, water quality issues, effects of climate, change, Lake Tahoe Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), EPA-sponsored projects, and list of partner agencies.

  11. The quality improvement attitude survey: Development and preliminary psychometric characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunagan, Pamela B

    2017-12-01

    To report the development of a tool to measure nurse's attitudes about quality improvement in their practice setting and to examine preliminary psychometric characteristics of the Quality Improvement Nursing Attitude Scale. Human factors such as nursing attitudes of complacency have been identified as root causes of sentinel events. Attitudes of nurses concerning use of Quality and Safety Education for nurse's competencies can be most challenging to teach and to change. No tool has been developed measuring attitudes of nurses concerning their role in quality improvement. A descriptive study design with preliminary psychometric evaluation was used to examine the preliminary psychometric characteristics of the Quality Improvement Nursing Attitude Scale. Registered bedside clinical nurses comprised the sample for the study (n = 57). Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and Cronbach's alpha reliability. Total score and individual item statistics were evaluated. Two open-ended items were used to collect statements about nurses' feelings regarding their experience in quality improvement efforts. Strong support for the internal consistency reliability and face validity of the Quality Improvement Nursing Attitude Scale was found. Total scale scores were high indicating nurse participants valued Quality and Safety Education for Nurse competencies in practice. However, item-level statistics indicated nurses felt powerless when other nurses deviate from care standards. Additionally, the sample indicated they did not consistently report patient safety issues and did not have a feeling of value in efforts to improve care. Findings suggested organisational culture fosters nurses' reporting safety issues and feeling valued in efforts to improve care. Participants' narrative comments and item analysis revealed the need to generate new items for the Quality Improvement Nursing Attitude Scale focused on nurses' perception of their importance in quality and

  12. How Quality Improvement Practice Evidence Can Advance the Knowledge Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OʼRourke, Hannah M; Fraser, Kimberly D

    2016-01-01

    Recommendations for the evaluation of quality improvement interventions have been made in order to improve the evidence base of whether, to what extent, and why quality improvement interventions affect chosen outcomes. The purpose of this article is to articulate why these recommendations are appropriate to improve the rigor of quality improvement intervention evaluation as a research endeavor, but inappropriate for the purposes of everyday quality improvement practice. To support our claim, we describe the differences between quality improvement interventions that occur for the purpose of practice as compared to research. We then carefully consider how feasibility, ethics, and the aims of evaluation each impact how quality improvement interventions that occur in practice, as opposed to research, can or should be evaluated. Recommendations that fit the evaluative goals of practice-based quality improvement interventions are needed to support fair appraisal of the distinct evidence they produce. We describe a current debate on the nature of evidence to assist in reenvisioning how quality improvement evidence generated from practice might complement that generated from research, and contribute in a value-added way to the knowledge base.

  13. A model of continuous quality improvement for health service organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornber, M

    1992-01-01

    Continuous Quality Improvement (or Total Quality Management) is an approach to management originally used in manufacturing and now being applied in the health services. This article describes a model of Continuous Quality Improvement which has been used in NSW public and private hospitals. The model consists of Ten Key Elements. The first driving force of this model is 'defining quality in terms of customer expectations' of quality. The second driving force emphasises that 'quality improvement is a leadership issue'. Leaders are required to: coordinate staff participation in work process analysis; train staff in the customer service orientation; lead effective meetings and negotiate with both internal and external service partners. Increased staff motivation, quality improvement and reduction in running costs are seen to be the benefits of CQI for health service organisations.

  14. Abolishment of 24-hour continuous medical call duty in quebec: a quality of life survey of general surgical residents following implementation of the new work-hour restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadani, Fadi T; Deckelbaum, Dan; Sauve, Alexandre; Khwaja, Kosar; Razek, Tarek; Fata, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of work hour restrictions across North America have resulted in decreased levels of self injury and medical errors for Residents. An arbitration ruling in Quebec has led to further curtailment of work hours beyond that proposed by the ACGME. This may threaten Resident quality of life and in turn decrease the educational quality of surgical residency training. We administered a quality of life questionnaire with an integrated education quality assessment tool to all General Surgery residents training at McGill 6 months after the work hour restrictions. Across several strata respondents reveal a decreased sense of educational quality and quality of life. The arbitration argued that work- hour restrictions would be necessary to improve quality of life for trainees and hence improve patient safety. Results from this study demonstrate the exact opposite in a large majority of respondents, who report a poorer quality of life and a self-reported inability on their part to provide continuous and safe patient care. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Associations Between Patient Perceptions of Communication, Cure, and Other Patient-Related Factors Regarding Patient-Reported Quality of Care Following Surgical Resection of Lung and Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejaz, Aslam; Kim, Yuhree; Winner, Megan; Page, Andrew; Tisnado, Diana; Dy, Sydney E Morss; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the current study was to analyze various patient-related factors related to patient-reported quality of overall and surgical care following surgical resection of lung or colorectal cancer. Between 2003 and 2005, 3,954 patients who underwent cancer-directed surgery for newly diagnosed lung (30.3%) or colorectal (69.7%) cancer were identified from a population- and health system-based survey of participants from multiple US regions. Factors associated with patient-perceived quality of overall and surgical care were analyzed with multivariable logistic regression models. Overall, 56.7% of patients reported excellent quality of overall care and 67.9% of patients reported excellent quality of surgical care; there was no difference by cancer type (P > 0.05). Factors associated with lower likelihood to report excellent quality of overall and surgical care included female sex, minority race, and the presence of multiple comorbidities (all odds ratio [OR] communication skills (overall quality: OR 6.49; surgical quality: OR 3.74) as well as patients who perceived their cancer as likely curable (overall quality: OR 1.17; surgical quality: OR 1.11) were more likely to report excellent quality of overall and surgical care (all P communication and patient perception of likelihood of cure. Future studies are needed to more closely examine patient-physician relationships and communication barriers, particularly among minority patients and those with lower income and educational status.

  16. Improving quality: bridging the health sector divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Mike

    2003-12-01

    All too often, quality assurance looks at just one small part of the complex system that is health care. However, evidently each individual patient has one set of experiences and outcomes, often involving a range of health professionals in a number of settings across multiple sectors. In order to solve the problems of this complexity, we need to establish high-quality electronic recording in each of the settings. In the UK, primary care has been leading the way in adopting information technology and can now use databases for individual clinical care, for quality assurance using significant event and conventional auditing, and for research. Before we can understand and quality-assure the whole health care system, we need electronic patient records in all settings and good communication to build a summary electronic health record for each patient. Such an electronic health record will be under the control of the patient concerned, will be shared with the explicit consent of the patient, and will form the vehicle for quality assurance across all sectors of the health service.

  17. Longitudinal improvement and stability of the SNOT-22 survey in the evaluation of surgical management of chronic rhinosinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeConde, Adam S.; Mace, Jess C.; Alt, Jeremiah A.; Rudmik, Luke; Soler, Zachary M.; Smith, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic rhinosinustis (CRS) have significant quality-of-life (QOL) improvements following endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). These improvements remain stable and persist between 6-months and 20-months as measured by the Rhinosinusitis Disability Index and the Chronic Sinusitis Survey. There has yet to be an evaluation of the longitudinal stability of the Sinonasal Outcome Test-22 (SNOT-22) after ESS in patients with CRS. Methods Adults with medically recalcitrant CRS who were considered surgical candidates were enrolled in a prospective, multi-center, observational cohort study from February 2011 to February 2013. Baseline evaluation of subjects included assessment of clinical characteristics, measures of CRS-specific disease severity, and QOL evaluation using the SNOT-22. Subjects were then re-evaluated at approximately 6-month, 12-month, and 18-month intervals postoperatively. Data was analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA with Bonferroni corrections for matched pairwise comparisons. Results 110 patients completed baseline evaluations and follow-up for all three postoperative time points. Significant improvement in SNOT-22 scores was seen between baseline and 6-months across both SNOT-22 total and subdomain scores (p<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between the 6-month, 12-month, and 18-month time points in the total SNOT-22 score or its domains (p≥0.125) for both the entire cohort or subgroups (p≥0.077). Conclusions Postoperative improvement in CRS-specific QOL and symptom severity, as measured by the SNOT-22, suggest stability and durability between 6-months and 18-months. Further study on the longitudinal stability of the SNOT-22 past the 18-month timeframe will help further refine clinical study of CRS and provide further understanding of temporal improvements following ESS. PMID:25511442

  18. Evaluation of a Quality Improvement Resource for Public Health Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porterfield, Deborah S; Marcial, Laura H; Brown, Stephen; Throop, Cynthia; Pina, Jamie

    Quality improvement is a critical mechanism to manage public health agency performance and to strengthen accountability for public funds. The objective of this study was to evaluate a relatively new quality improvement resource, the Public Health Quality Improvement Exchange (PHQIX), a free online communication platform dedicated to making public health quality improvement information accessible to practitioners. We conducted an internet-based survey of registered PHQIX users (n = 536 respondents) in 2013 and key informant interviews with PHQIX frequent users (n = 21) in 2014, in the United States. We assessed use of the PHQIX website, user engagement and satisfaction, communication and knowledge exchange, use of information, and impact on quality improvement capacity and accreditation readiness. Of 462 respondents, 369 (79.9%) browsed quality improvement initiatives, making it the most commonly used site feature, and respondents described PHQIX as a near-unique source for real-world quality improvement examples. Respondents were satisfied with the quality and breadth of topics and relevance to their settings (average satisfaction scores, 3.9-4.1 [where 5 was the most satisfied]). Of 407 respondents, 237 (58.2%) said that they had put into practice information learned on PHQIX, and 209 of 405 (51.6%) said that PHQIX had helped to improve quality improvement capacity. Fewer than half of respondents used the commenting function, the Community Forum, and the Ask an Expert feature. Findings suggest that PHQIX, particularly descriptions of the quality improvement initiatives, is a valued resource for public health practitioners. Users reported sharing information with colleagues and applying what they learned to their own work. These findings may relate to other efforts to disseminate quality improvement knowledge.

  19. Effect of gender (gilt and surgically and immunocastrated male) and ractopamine hydrochloride supplementation on growth performance, carcass, and pork quality characteristics of finishing pigs under commercial conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braña, D V; Rojo-Gómez, G A; Ellis, M; Cuaron, J A

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of gender and feeding of ractopamine on growth performance, carcass, and meat quality characteristics of pigs reared under commercial conditions. The study was performed as a randomized complete block design (blocking factor date of start on test) with a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments: 1) gender [gilt vs. surgical castrate vs. intact males immunocastrated] and 2) ractopamine level (0 vs. 5 g/ton). The study was conducted out over a fixed duration (126 d) from 1 wk after weaning (28 d of age; 8.04 ± 1.31 kg BW) to 154 d of age (111.44 ± 4.67 kg BW) in 3 growth periods: nursery (d 0 to 35 of the study), growing (d 35 to 70), and finishing (d 70 to 126). Ractopamine was fed for the final 28 d of the study (d 98 to 126). Pigs were kept in groups of 10 or 11 in the nursery phase and then moved to the growing-finishing facility where they were kept in groups of 22 to the end of the study. At the end of the growth study, pigs were harvested and carcass and pork quality were evaluated, including consumer evaluation of eating quality. During the nursery, there was no effect of gender (P > 0.05) on G:F, but surgical castrates grew faster (P 0.05) on ADG in the growing period; however, immunocastrated males had lower ADFI than surgical castrates and greater G:F than surgical castrates and gilts. In finishing, immunocastrated males and surgical castrates had similar ADG but grew faster than gilts; G:F was greater for immunocastrated males than the other genders. Feeding 5 compared to 0 g/ton ractopamine increased ADG and G:F but had no effect (P > 0.05) on carcass yield or fresh meat quality. Carcass yield was lower but percentage lean cut yield was greater for immunocastrated males than for surgical castrates. Longissimus muscle drip loss was greater (P = 0.05) for immunocastrated males than surgical castrates. Gender had no effect (P > 0.05) on consumer panel evaluation. Feeding ractopamine had no effect on pork flavor and

  20. Quality of colonoscopy performance among gastroenterology and surgical trainees: a need for common training standards for all trainees?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leyden, J E

    2011-11-01

    Cecal intubation and polyp detection rates are objective measures of colonoscopy performance. Minimum cecal intubation rates greater than 90% have been endorsed by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) and the Joint Advisory Group (JAG) UK. Performance data for medical and surgical trainee endoscopists are limited, and we used endoscopy quality parameters to compare these two groups.

  1. Health related quality of life six months following surgical treatment for secondary peritonitis - using the EQ-5D questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Kimberly R.; van Ruler, Oddeke; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Mahler, Cecilia W.; Opmeer, Brent C.; Reuland, E. Ascelijn; Gooszen, Hein G.; de Graaf, Peter W.; Hesselink, Eric J.; Gerhards, Michael F.; Steller, E. Philip; Sprangers, Mirjam A.; Boermeester, Marja A.; de Borgie, Corianne A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: To compare health related quality of life (HR-QoL) in patients surgically treated for secondary peritonitis to that of a healthy population. And to prospectively identify factors associated with poorer (lower) HR-QoL. Design: A prospective cohort of secondary peritonitis patients was

  2. The relative importance of quality of care information when choosing a hospital for surgical treatment: A hospital choice experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marang-van de Mheen, P.J.; Dijs-Elsinga, J.; Otten, W.; Versluijs, M.; Smeets, H.J.; Vree, R.; Made, W.J. van der; Kievit, J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of quality of care and other hospital information on patients' choices between hospitals. Methods: 665 former surgical patients were invited to respond to an Internet-based questionnaire including a choice-based conjoint analysis. Each patient was presented with 12

  3. Quality of life of diabetic patients with medical or surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, S; Neugehauer, E A M

    2013-03-01

    In general, most of the studies agree in that the quality of life (QoL) of patients with diabetes is worse than that of the general population. Furthermore, these same studies have also described very positive effects on quality of life after bariatric surgery. The aim of this study was to analyze whether the impact on quality of life of diabetic patients after being submitted to bariatric surgery is the one supposed to be. We prospectively analyzed our data on 524 diabetic patients submitted to bariatric surgery between 2001 and 2005. All the patients filled up three QoL questionnaires before the surgery and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the surgery. The answers were gathered from an annual database. All patients were submitted to adjustable gastric band surgery, Y-Roux gastric bypass, or BPD-Scopinaro. We obtained complete data on 89 patients that were included into the study. One year after the surgery, the QoL had significantly improved independent of disease remission and weight loss. Diabetes got improved in all the cases. The improvement on the quality of life was higher in the patients with total remission of the disease than in those only improving their health status, although it was lower than that of those patients without diabetes before the surgery. After a literature review and with our own prospective data, we may conclude that the benefits obtained by diabetic patients from bariatric surgery are mainly due to improvement of their diabetes, irrespective of their initial BMI and the BMI decrease after the intervention. Further studies are needed to investigate the results of the QoL test in diabetics with low BMI after bariatric surgery and in the long run. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  4. Data quality improvement in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, H. J.; Bindels, P. J. E.; Weert, H. C.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The importance of routine data generated by GPs has grown extensively in the last decade. These data have found many applications other than patient care. More attention has therefore been given to the issue of data quality. Several systematic reviews have detected ample space for

  5. Does Automated Feedback Improve Writing Quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Joshua; Olinghouse, Natalie G.; Andrada, Gilbert N.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines data from students in grades 4-8 who participated in a statewide computer-based benchmark writing assessment that featured automated essay scoring and automated feedback. We examined whether the use of automated feedback was associated with gains in writing quality across revisions to an essay, and with transfer effects…

  6. From sensor output to improved product quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertog, M.L.A.T.M.; Vollebregt, Martijntje; Unzueta, I.; Hoofman, R.J.O.M.; Lammertyn, J.

    2015-01-01

    The research conducted in the European PASTEUR project focussed on perishables monitoring through smart tracking of lifetime and quality. The aim was to develop a wireless sensor platform to monitor the environmental conditions of perishable goods in the supply chain between producer and

  7. Compost improves urban soil and water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Construction in urban zones compacts the soil, which hinders root growth and infiltration and may increase erosion, which may degrade water quality. The purpose of our study was to determine the whether planting prairie grasses and adding compost to urban soils can mitigate these concerns. We simula...

  8. Quality Improvement in Virtual Higher Education: A Grounded Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdiuon, Rouhollah; Masoumi, Davoud; Farasatkhah, Maghsoud

    2017-01-01

    The article aims to explore the attributes of quality and quality improvement including the process and specific actions associated with these attributes--that contribute enhancing quality in Iranian Virtual Higher Education (VHE) institutions. A total of 16 interviews were conducted with experts and key actors in Iranian virtual higher education.…

  9. Mobile task management tool that improves workflow of an acute general surgical service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Elizabeth; McDonald, Rod; Savage, Earle; Floyd, Richard; Butler, Anthony; Rumball-Smith, Alistair; Connor, Saxon

    2015-10-01

    Understanding and being able to measure constraints within a health system is crucial if outcomes are to be improved. Current systems lack the ability to capture decision making with regard to tasks performed within a patient journey. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a mobile task management tool on clinical workflow within an acute general surgical service by analysing data capture and usability of the application tool. The Cortex iOS application was developed to digitize patient flow and provide real-time visibility over clinical decision making and task performance. Study outcomes measured were workflow data capture for patient and staff events. Usability was assessed using an electronic survey. There were 449 unique patient journeys tracked with a total of 3072 patient events recorded. The results repository was accessed 7792 times. The participants reported that the application sped up decision making, reduced redundancy of work and improved team communication. The mode of the estimated time the application saved participants was 5-9 min/h of work. Of the 14 respondents, nine discarded their analogue methods of tracking tasks by the end of the study period. The introduction of a mobile task management system improved the working efficiency of junior clinical staff. The application allowed capture of data not previously available to hospital systems. In the future, such data will contribute to the accurate mapping of patient journeys through the health system. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  10. Using Quality Tools and Methodologies to Improve a Hospital's Quality Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Daniel; Wicks, Angela M; Visich, John K

    2017-01-01

    The authors identify the quality tools and methodologies most frequently used by quality-positioned hospitals versus nonquality hospitals. Northeastern U.S. hospitals in both groups received a brief, 12-question survey. The authors found that 93.75% of the quality hospitals and 81.25% of the nonquality hospitals used some form of process improvement methodologies. However, there were significant differences between the groups regarding the impact of quality improvement initiatives on patients. The findings indicate that in quality hospitals the use of quality improvement initiatives had a significantly greater positive impact on patient satisfaction and patient outcomes when compared to nonquality hospitals.

  11. A Comparison of Quality Improvement Methods in Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Farah Bakhsh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : Quality improvement is defined as improving process performance and maintaining improved results. Improvement methods and quality tools are two important factors of CQI projects. This study was carried out to compare various improvement methods. Material and Methods :  This study was conducted to compare quality improvement methods. By using Google with specific key words and names of different models, their flowcharts were developed to determine the steps for each method. Results :  Thirty quality improvement methods were found. These models had 4-14 steps. Five methods such as FOCUS PDCA, TQIS, IHI, JCAHO and IMADIM were invented in health system. Conclusion :  In accordance with staff skills and experiences, they could use short or long models. The skilled teams could use short and simple methods. The critical success factor is selecting and training only one method in entire the organization.

  12. Does the EUA Institutional Evaluation Programme Contribute to Quality Improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Diana Amado; Rosa, Maria Joao; Amaral, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to reflect on the relevance of the Institutional Evaluation Programme (IEP) of the European University Association (EUA) to universities' quality improvement. It aims to analyse IEP follow-up reports to determine whether the programme contributes to the development of a quality improvement culture.…

  13. The Role of Staff in Quality Improvement in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Margaret; Waniganayake, Manjula

    2015-01-01

    There is international recognition of the importance of high quality services for young children with a consensus that three pillars contribute to quality improvement: adult: child ratios, staff qualifications and group size. In Australia over the past 5 years, early childhood policy has attempted to drive improvements in early childhood service…

  14. Nationwide quality improvement of cholecystectomy: results from a national database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Kirstine M; Bardram, Linda

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate whether quality improvements in the performance of cholecystectomy have been achieved in Denmark since 2006, after revision of the Danish National Guidelines for treatment of gallstones.......To evaluate whether quality improvements in the performance of cholecystectomy have been achieved in Denmark since 2006, after revision of the Danish National Guidelines for treatment of gallstones....

  15. International Accreditations as Drivers of Business School Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Business schools are under pressure to implement continuous improvement and quality assurance processes to remain competitive in a globalized higher education market. Drivers for quality improvement include external, environmental pressures, regulatory bodies such as governments, and, increasingly, voluntary accreditation agencies such as AACSB…

  16. Economic implications of neonatal intensive care unit collaborative quality improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogowski, JA; Horbar, JD; Plsek, PE; Baker, LS; Deterding, J; Edwards, WH; Hocker, J; Kantak, AD; Lewallen, P; Lewis, W; Lewit, E; McCarroll, CJ; Mujsce, D; Payne, NR; Shiono, P; Soll, RF; Leahy, K

    Objective. To make measurable improvements in the quality and cost of neonatal intensive care using a multidisciplinary collaborative quality improvement model. Design. Interventional study. Data on treatment costs were collected for infants with birth weight 501 to 1500 g for the period of January

  17. Implications of Continuous Quality Improvement for Program Evaluation and Evaluators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Melvin M.; Pines, Edward

    1995-01-01

    Explores the implications that continuous quality improvement (CQI) programs are likely to have for evaluation. CQI, often known as total quality management, offers a structured approach to the analysis of an organization's processes and improvement that should provide advantages to evaluators once they have gained experience with the approach.…

  18. Households willingness to pay for improved water quality and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This survey investigated the willingness to pay for an improved water quality and reliability in Chobe ward in Maun. On average, 54% of the households are willing to pay for improved water quality. It is therefore apparent that Chobe Ward, Maun residents in general regard water as an economic good as they are willing to ...

  19. Strategies to Improve the Quality of Health Care - Learning from ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Strategies to Improve the Quality of Health Care - Learning from Experiences in Uruguay and Chile. Improving access to primary health care and the quality of services in Latin American countries is urgently needed to address high health inequities in the region. Lessons learned from two successful campaigns promoting ...

  20. Accelerating the spread of laboratory quality improvement efforts in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelebeletse O. Mokobela

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: SLMTA facilitated improvements in laboratory quality management systems,yielding immediate and measurable results. This study suggests that pairing the SLMTA programme with additional training and mentorship activities may lead to further increases in laboratory performance; and that SLMTA is a practical approach to extending quality improvement to MOH laboratories.

  1. Technical report for effective estimation and improvement of quality system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwan Hyun

    2000-06-01

    This technical report provides the methods on how to improve the Quality System, in R and D part. This report applies on the quality assurance(QA) programmes of the design, fabrication in nuclear projects. The organization having overall responsibility for the nuclear power item design, preservation, fabrication shall be described in this report in each stage of improvement of QA systems

  2. Improved power quality based high brightness LED lamp driver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper deals with a power factor corrected (PFC) improved power quality based LED lamp driver. The proposed driver consists of a PFC Cuk DC-DC converter which operates in continuous conduction mode (CCM) to improve the power quality at input AC mains. The design, modeling and simulation of an 18W LED (six ...

  3. Caring, learning, improving quality and doing research: Different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: The consultation, action learning, problem-based learning, quality improvement, participatory action research. ABSTRACT. The aim of this article is to describe the similarities between the consultation process, the quality improvement. (QI) process, action- and problem-based learning and participatory action ...

  4. Sleep Quality Improvement During Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsawh, Holly J; Bomyea, Jessica; Stein, Murray B; Cissell, Shadha H; Lang, Ariel J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of sleep complaints among individuals with anxiety disorders, few prior studies have examined whether sleep quality improves during anxiety treatment. The current study examined pre- to posttreatment sleep quality improvement during cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for panic disorder (PD; n = 26) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n = 24). Among sleep quality indices, only global sleep quality and sleep latency improved significantly (but modestly) during CBT. Sleep quality improvement was greater for treatment responders, but did not vary by diagnosis. Additionally, poor baseline sleep quality was independently associated with worse anxiety treatment outcome, as measured by higher intolerance of uncertainty. Additional intervention targeting sleep prior to or during CBT for anxiety may be beneficial for poor sleepers.

  5. Sleep Quality Improvement During Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsawh, Holly J.; Bomyea, Jessica; Stein, Murray B.; Cissell, Shadha H.; Lang, Ariel J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of sleep complaints among individuals with anxiety disorders, few prior studies have examined whether sleep quality improves during anxiety treatment. The current study examined pre- to post-treatment sleep quality improvement during cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for panic disorder (PD; n = 26) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n = 24). Among sleep quality indices, only global sleep quality and sleep latency improved significantly (but modestly) during CBT. Sleep quality improvement was greater for treatment responders, but did not vary by diagnosis. Additionally, poor baseline sleep quality was independently associated with worse anxiety treatment outcome, as measured by higher intolerance of uncertainty. Additional intervention targeting sleep prior to or during CBT for anxiety may be beneficial for poor sleepers. PMID:26244485

  6. [Improvement of medical processes with Six Sigma - practicable zero-defect quality in preparation for surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobottka, Stephan B; Töpfer, Armin; Eberlein-Gonska, Maria; Schackert, Gabriele; Albrecht, D Michael

    2010-01-01

    Six Sigma is an innovative management- approach to reach practicable zero- defect quality in medical service processes. The Six Sigma principle utilizes strategies, which are based on quantitative measurements and which seek to optimize processes, limit deviations or dispersion from the target process. Hence, Six Sigma aims to eliminate errors or quality problems of all kinds. A pilot project to optimize the preparation for neurosurgery could now show that the Six Sigma method enhanced patient safety in medical care, while at the same time disturbances in the hospital processes and failure costs could be avoided. All six defined safety relevant quality indicators were significantly improved by changes in the workflow by using a standardized process- and patient- oriented approach. Certain defined quality standards such as a 100% complete surgical preparation at start of surgery and the required initial contact of the surgeon with the patient/ surgical record on the eve of surgery could be fulfilled within the range of practical zero- defect quality. Likewise, the degree of completion of the surgical record by 4 p.m. on the eve of surgery and their quality could be improved by a factor of 170 and 16, respectively, at sigma values of 4.43 and 4.38. The other two safety quality indicators "non-communicated changes in the OR- schedule" and the "completeness of the OR- schedule by 12:30 a.m. on the day before surgery" also show an impressive improvement by a factor of 2.8 and 7.7, respectively, corresponding with sigma values of 3.34 and 3.51. The results of this pilot project demonstrate that the Six Sigma method is eminently suitable for improving quality of medical processes. In our experience this methodology is suitable, even for complex clinical processes with a variety of stakeholders. In particular, in processes in which patient safety plays a key role, the objective of achieving a zero- defect quality is reasonable and should definitely be aspirated. Copyright

  7. QUALITY IMPROVEMENT MODEL AT THE MANUFACTURING PROCESS PREPARATION LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusko Pavletic

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper expresses base for an operational quality improvement model at the manufacturing process preparation level. A numerous appropriate related quality assurance and improvement methods and tools are identified. Main manufacturing process principles are investigated in order to scrutinize one general model of manufacturing process and to define a manufacturing process preparation level. Development and introduction of the operational quality improvement model is based on a research conducted and results of methods and tools application possibilities in real manufacturing processes shipbuilding and automotive industry. Basic model structure is described and presented by appropriate general algorithm. Operational quality improvement model developed lays down main guidelines for practical and systematic application of quality improvements methods and tools.

  8. Improvement of teamwork and safety climate following implementation of the WHO surgical safety checklist at a university hospital in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Takashi; Taniwaki, Miki; Ogata, Kimiyo; Sakamoto, Miwa; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2014-06-01

    With the aim to optimize surgical safety, the World Health Organization (WHO) introduced the Surgical Safety Checklist (SSCL) in 2008. The SSCL has been piloted in many countries worldwide and shown to improve both safety attitudes within surgical teams and patient outcomes. In the study reported here we investigated whether implementation of the SSCL improved the teamwork and safety climate at a single university hospital in Japan. All surgical teams at the hospital implemented the SSCL in all surgical procedures with strict adherence to the SSCL implementation manual developed by WHO. Changes in safety attitudes were evaluated using the modified operating-room version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). A before and after design was used, with the questionnaire administered before and 3 months after SSCL implementation. Our analysis revealed that the mean scores on the SAQ had significantly improved 3 months after implementation of the SSCL compared to those before implementation. This finding implies that effective implementation of the SSCL could improve patient outcomes in Japan, similar to the findings of the WHO pilot study.

  9. Survey on Microgrid: Power Quality Improvement Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Natesan, Chitra; Ajithan, Senthil Kumar; Palani, Priyadharshini; Kandhasamy, Prabaakaran

    2014-01-01

    Microgrid became one of the key spot in research on distributed energy systems. Since the definition of the microgrid is paradigm of the first time, investigation in this area is growing continuously and there are numerous research projects in this moment all over the world. The increased infiltration of nonlinear loads and power electronic interfaced distribution generation system creates power quality issues in the distributed power system. In this paper, a comprehensive survey on microgrid...

  10. Improving wind power quality with energy storage

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Claus Nygaard

    2009-01-01

    The results of simulation of the influence of energy storage on wind power quality are presented. Simulations are done using a mathematical model of energy storage. Results show the relation between storage power and energy, and the obtained increase in minimum available power from the combination of wind and storage. The introduction of storage enables smoothening of wind power on a timescale proportional to the storage energy. Storage does not provide availability of wind power at all times...

  11. Music improves sleep quality in students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmat, László; Takács, Johanna; Bódizs, Róbert

    2008-05-01

    This paper is a report of a study to investigate the effects of music on sleep quality in young participants with poor sleep. Sleep disorders may result in fatigue, tiredness, depression and problems in daytime functioning. Music can reduce sympathetic nervous system activity, decrease anxiety, blood pressure, heart and respiratory rate and may have positive effects on sleep via muscle relaxation and distraction from thoughts. Control groups have not been used in most previous studies. We used a three-group repeated measures design. Ninety-four students (aged between 19 and 28 years) with sleep complaints were studied in 2006. Participants listened for 45 minutes either to relaxing classical music (Group 1) or an audiobook (Group 2) at bedtime for 3 weeks. The control group (Group 3) received no intervention. Sleep quality was measured using the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index before the study and weekly during the intervention. Depressive symptoms in experimental group participants were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory. Repeated measures anova revealed a main effect of TIME (P audiobook and the control group. Depressive symptoms decreased statistically significantly in the music group (P audiobooks. Relaxing classical music is an effective intervention in reducing sleeping problems. Nurses could use this safe, cheap and easy to learn method to treat insomnia.

  12. Surgical Audit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-06

    Jan 6, 2010 ... A good way to describe the first surgical audits is that they were 'polite, restrained discussions'. This was the situation before the development of quality assurance in the business world. As this slowly infiltrated into the medical profession the discussions changed to more cri- teria based surgical audits.

  13. Improving room layouts for venepuncture, cannulation and ABG equipment on surgical wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedley, Ryan; Whitehouse, Anna; Hammond, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The Productive Ward series has effectively helped to standardise the storage of equipment in hospital ward treatment rooms; however, in our organisation equipment for venepunture and cannulation had been excluded. This resulted in clinicians having to navigate several unfamiliar environments while on-call and hence waste valuable time searching for basic equipment. We aimed to make it easier to locate and identify the basic equipment used for cannulation, venepuncture, and arterial blood gas sampling and more efficient to collect. We examined the initial layout of equipment on four surgical wards in a large teaching hospital. The time taken for junior doctors, nurses, health care assistants, and physician assistants to gather equipment on these wards was recorded along with a process map of steps involved. Our intervention was to relocate the equipment into adjacent storage and make it easily identifiable by the use of a 'red dot'. Following these changes we repeated the measurements. There was an overall reduction in the mean time taken to gather the equipment required to insert a venous cannula on an unfamiliar ward from 2 min 41 s pre-intervention (range 52 s to 6 mins 58 s, n = 23) to 26 s post-intervention (range 8 s to 1 min 20 s, n = 51). Additionally, the number of steps involved in the process was reduced from 16 to five. All of the 32 junior doctors surveyed felt that faster identification improved patient safety. A significant reduction in the time wasted by clinicians searching for venepuncture equipment on surgical wards has been achieved by simplifying the storage, layout, and identification of this kit. The accumulated benefit includes increased productivity, familiarity, and safety, which is paramount when attending unwell patients on unfamiliar wards.

  14. A paradigm for achieving successful pediatric trauma verification in the absence of pediatric surgical specialists while ensuring quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Richard A; Milliken, William J; Bensard, Denis D; Haas, Lynn; Daugherty, Margot; Gray, Lisa; Tuggle, David W; Garcia, Victor F

    2016-03-01

    Pediatric trauma centers (PTCs) are concentrated in urban areas, leaving large areas where children do not have access. Although adult trauma centers (ATCs) often serve to fill the gap, disparities exist. Given the limited workforce in pediatric subspecialties, many adult centers that are called upon to care for children cannot sufficiently staff their program to meet the requirements of verification as a PTC. We hypothesized that ATCs in collaboration with a PTC could achieve successful American College of Surgeons (ACS) verification as a PTC with measurable improvements in care. This article serves to provide an initial description of this collaborative approach. Beginning in 2008, a Level I PTC partnered with three ATC seeking ACS-PTC verification. The centers adopted a plan for education, simulation training, guidelines, and performance improvement support. Results of ACS verification, patient volumes, need to transfer patients, and impact on solid organ injury management were evaluated. Following partnership, each of the ATCs has achieved Level II PTC verification. As part of each review, the collaborative was noted to be a significant strength. Total pediatric patient volume increased from 128.1 to 162.1 a year (p = 0.031), and transfers out decreased from 3.8% to 2.4% (p = 0.032) from prepartnership to postpartnership periods. At the initial ATC partner site, 10.7 children per year with solid organ injury were treated before the partnership and 11.8 children per year after the partnership. Following partnership, we found significant reductions in length of stay, number of images, and laboratory draws among this limited population. The collaborative has resulted in ACS Level II PTC verification in the absence of on-site pediatric surgical specialists. In addition, more patients were safely cared for in their community without the need for transfer with improved quality of care. This paradigm may serve to advance the care of injured children at sites without

  15. Association Between State Medical Malpractice Environment and Surgical Quality and Cost in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilimoria, Karl Y; Sohn, Min-Woong; Chung, Jeanette W; Minami, Christina A; Oh, Elissa H; Pavey, Emily S; Holl, Jane L; Black, Bernard S; Mello, Michelle M; Bentrem, David J

    2016-06-01

    The US medical malpractice system is designed to deter negligence and encourage quality of care through threat of liability. To examine whether state-level malpractice environment is associated with outcomes and costs of colorectal surgery. Observational study of 116,977 Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries who underwent colorectal surgery using administrative claims data. State-level malpractice risk was measured using mean general surgery malpractice insurance premiums; paid claims per surgeon; state tort reforms; and a composite measure. Associations between malpractice environment and postoperative outcomes and price-standardized Medicare payments were estimated using hierarchical logistic regression and generalized linear models. thirty-day postoperative mortality; complications (pneumonia, myocardial infarction, venous thromboembolism, acute renal failure, surgical site infection, postoperative sepsis, any complication); readmission; total price-standardized Medicare payments for index hospitalization and 30-day postdischarge episode-of-care. Few associations between measures of state malpractice risk environment and outcomes were identified. However, analyses using the composite measure showed that patients treated in states with greatest malpractice risk were more likely than those in lowest risk states to experience any complication (OR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1.22-1.41), pneumonia (OR: 1.36; 95%: CI, 1.16-1.60), myocardial infarction (OR: 1.44; 95% CI: 1.22-1.70), venous thromboembolism (OR:2.11; 95% CI: 1.70-2.61), acute renal failure (OR: 1.34; 95% CI; 1.22-1.47), and sepsis (OR: 1.38; 95% CI: 1.24-1.53; all P malpractice environment and Medicare payments. There were no consistent associations between state-level malpractice risk and higher quality of care or Medicare payments for colorectal surgery.

  16. Improving data quality in the linked open data: a survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadhiatma, A.

    2018-03-01

    The Linked Open Data (LOD) is “web of data”, a different paradigm from “web of document” commonly used today. However, the huge LOD still suffers from data quality problems such as completeness, consistency, and accuracy. Data quality problems relate to designing effective methods both to manage and to retrieve information at various data quality levels. Based on review from papers and journals, addressing data quality requires some standards functioning to (1) identification of data quality problems, (2) assessment of data quality for a given context, and (3) correction of data quality problems. However, mostly the methods and strategies dealing with the LOD data quality were not as an integrative approach. Hence, based on those standards and an integrative approach, there are opportunities to improve the LOD data quality in the term of incompleteness, inaccuracy and inconsistency, considering to its schema and ontology, namely ontology refinement. Moreover, the term of the ontology refinement means that it copes not only to improve data quality but also to enrich the LOD. Therefore, it needs (1) a standard for data quality assessment and evaluation which is more appropriate to the LOD; (2) a framework of methods based on statistical relational learning that can improve the correction of data quality problems as well as enrich the LOD.

  17. Quality improvement "201": context-relevant quality improvement leadership training for the busy clinician-educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stille, Christopher J; Savageau, Judith A; McBride, Jeanne; Alper, Eric J

    2012-01-01

    Development of quality improvement (QI) skills and leadership for busy clinician-educators in academic medical centers is increasingly necessary, although it is challenging given limited resources. In response, the authors developed the Quality Scholars program for primary care teaching faculty. They conducted a needs assessment, evaluated existing internal and national resources, and developed a 9-month, 20-session project-based curriculum that combines didactic and hands-on techniques with facilitated project discussion. They also conducted pre-post tests of knowledge and attitudes, and evaluations of each session, scholars' projects, and program sustainability and costs. In all, 10 scholars from all 3 generalist disciplines comprised the first class. A wide spectrum of previous experiences enhanced collaboration. QI knowledge increased slightly, and reported self-readiness to lead QI projects increased markedly. Protected time for project work and group discussion of QI topics was seen as essential. All 10 scholars completed projects and presented results. Institutional leadership agreed to sustain the program using institutional funds.

  18. Physician peer review surveys: a management tool for improving quality of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombeski, W R; Day, J R; Fay, G W; Lowery, M C

    1992-06-01

    An increasing number of patients are presenting multiple medical problems requiring the collaboration of two or more physician specialists or subspecialists for effective treatment. The quality of care delivered to multiple-problem patients depends greatly on how well the physician specialists interact with one another. The Cleveland Clinic Foundation (CCF) has developed and implemented a physician peer review survey that enables physicians to receive anonymous feedback on the service they provide to their colleagues. The survey has been implemented in both medical and surgical departments. Colleagues have identified areas for improvement to increase collaboration and enhance effectiveness in treating multiproblem patients. The data have led to a variety of specific service-related improvements and changes in physician behavior. Though originally conceived as a quality improvement technique, the physician review survey has become an internal marketing and management tool for physician managers.

  19. Prior experience in micro-surgery may improve the surgeon's performance in robotic surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Manuela; Perrenot, Cyril; Tran, Nguyen; Hossu, Gabriela; Felblinger, Jacques; Hubert, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    Robotic surgery has witnessed a huge expansion. Robotic simulators have proved to be of major interest in training. Some authors have suggested that prior experience in micro-surgery could improve robotic surgery training. To test micro-surgery as a new approach in training, we proposed a prospective study comparing the surgical performance of micro-surgeons with that of general surgeons on a robotic simulator. 49 surgeons were enrolled; 11 in the micro-surgery group (MSG); 38 n the control group (CG). Performance was evaluated based on five dV-Trainer® exercises. MSG achieved better results for all exercises including exercises requiring visual evaluation of force feed-back, economy of motion, instrument force and position. These results show that experience in micro-surgery could significantly improve surgeons' abilities and their performance in robotic training. So, as micro-surgery practice is relatively cheap, it could be easily included in basic robotic surgery training. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Improving system quality through software evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, James G

    2002-05-01

    The role of evaluation is examined with respect to quality of software in healthcare. Of particular note is the failure of the Therac-25 radiation therapy machine. This example provides evidence of several types of defect which could have been detected and corrected using appropriate evaluation procedures. The field of software engineering has developed metrics and guidelines to assist in software evaluation but this example indicates that software evaluation must be extended beyond the formally defined interfaces of the software to its real-life operating context.

  1. Transformational, transactional, and passive-avoidant leadership characteristics of a surgical resident cohort: analysis using the multifactor leadership questionnaire and implications for improving surgical education curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Irwin B; Horwitz, Sujin K; Daram, Pallavi; Brandt, Mary L; Brunicardi, F Charles; Awad, Samir S

    2008-07-01

    The need for leadership training has become recognized as being highly important to improving medical care, and should be included in surgical resident education curriculums. Surgical residents (n = 65) completed the 5x-short version of the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire as a means of identifying leadership areas most in need of training among medical residents. The leadership styles of the residents were measured on 12 leadership scales. Comparisons between gender and postgraduate year (PGY) and comparisons to national norms were conducted. Of 12 leadership scales, the residents as a whole had significantly higher management by exception active and passive scores than those of the national norm (t = 6.6, P leadership factors with eigenvalues over 1.0. Hierarchical regression found evidence of an augmentation effect for transformational leadership. Areas of resident leadership strengths and weaknesses were identified. The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire was demonstrated to be a valuable tool for identifying specific areas where leadership training would be most beneficial in the educational curriculum. The future use of this instrument could prove valuable to surgical education training programs.

  2. Quality improvement in Vignoles through clonal selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our goal is to select an improved, loose-clustered clone of Vignoles that will contribute to an integrated approach to disease control. Clonal selection has historically proven useful in reducing cluster compactness through a variety of mechanisms, including decreased berry size, lengthening of the ...

  3. It Pays to Improve School Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanushek, Eric A.; Ruhose, Jens; Woessmann, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Congress passed the Every Student Succeeds Act, supplanting No Child Left Behind and placing responsibility for public school improvement squarely upon each of the 50 states. With the federal government's role in school accountability sharply diminished, it now falls to state and local governments to take decisive action. Even though most…

  4. Barley Breeding for Quality Improvement in Tunisia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TOSHIBA

    2012-11-06

    Deghais, 1991; El Felah, 1998). The consistent difficulties observed in the ... Atlas 46 (As46), improved material Arrivat (Avt) and Athenaïs. (Aths). It's now a widely grown variety (more than 40% of total barley cultivated areas in ...

  5. Which postoperative complications matter most after bariatric surgery? Prioritizing quality improvement efforts to improve national outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Christopher R; Brethauer, Stacy A; Tu, Chao; Petrick, Anthony T; Morton, John M; Schauer, Philip R; Aminian, Ali

    2018-01-12

    National quality programs have been implemented to decrease the burden of adverse events on key outcomes in bariatric surgery. However, it is not well understood which complications have the most impact on patient health. To quantify the impact of specific bariatric surgery complications on key clinical outcomes. The Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program (MBSAQIP) database. Data from patients who underwent primary bariatric procedures were retrieved from the MBSAQIP 2015 participant use file. The impact of 8 specific complications (bleeding, venous thromboembolism [VTE], leak, wound infection, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, myocardial infarction, and stroke) on 5 main 30-day outcomes (end-organ dysfunction, reoperation, intensive care unit admission, readmission, and mortality) was estimated using risk-adjusted population attributable fractions. The population attributable fraction is a calculated measure taking into account the prevalence and severity of each complication. The population attributable fractions represents the percentage reduction in a given outcome that would occur if that complication were eliminated. In total, 135,413 patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy (67%), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (29%), adjustable gastric banding (3%), and duodenal switch (1%) were included. The most common complications were bleeding (.7%), wound infection (.5%), urinary tract infection (.3%), VTE (.3%), and leak (.2%). Bleeding and leak were the largest contributors to 3 of 5 examined outcomes. VTE had the greatest effect on readmission and mortality. This study quantifies the impact of specific complications on key surgical outcomes after bariatric surgery. Bleeding and leak were the complications with the largest overall effect on end-organ dysfunction, reoperation, and intensive care unit admission after bariatric surgery. Furthermore, our findings suggest that an initiative targeting reduction of post-bariatric surgery

  6. Perioperative Care and the Importance of Continuous Quality Improvement--A Controlled Intervention Study in Three Tanzanian Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Goetz; Abels, Wiltrud; Mtatifikolo, Ferdinand; Ngoli, Baltazar; Neuner, Bruno; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Spies, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Surgical services are increasingly seen to reduce death and disability in Sub-Saharan Africa, where hospital-based mortality remains alarmingly high. This study explores two implementation approaches to improve the quality of perioperative care in a Tanzanian hospital. Effects were compared to a control group of two other hospitals in the region without intervention. All hospitals conducted quality assessments with a Hospital Performance Assessment Tool. Changes in immediate outcome indicators after one and two years were compared to final outcome indicators such as Anaesthetic Complication Rate and Surgical Case Fatality Rate. Immediate outcome indicators for Preoperative Care in the intervention hospital improved (52.5% in 2009; 84.2% in 2011, pcontrol group, preoperative care declined from 50.8% (2009) to 32.8% (2011, p hospital declined (1.89% before intervention; 0.96% after intervention, p = 0.006). Surgical Case Fatality Rate in the intervention hospital declined from 5.67% before intervention to 2.93% after intervention (pcontrol group was 4% before intervention and 3.8% after intervention (p = 0.411). Anaesthetic Complication Rate in the control group was not available. Immediate outcome indicators initially improved, while at the same time final outcome declined (Surgical Case Fatality, Anaesthetic Complication Rate). Compared to the control group, final outcome improved more in the intervention hospital, although the effect was not significant over the whole study period. Documentation of final outcome indicators seemed inconsistent. Immediate outcome indicators seem more helpful to steer the Continuous Quality Improvement program. Specific interventions as part of Continuous Quality Improvement might lead to sustainable improvement of the quality of care, if embedded in a multi-faceted approach.

  7. Quality of Life in Individuals Surgically Treated for Congenital Hydrocephalus During Infancy: A Single-Institution Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saad Akhtar; Khan, Muhammad Faheem; Bakhshi, Saqib Kamran; Irfan, Omar; Khan, Hamza Abdur Rahim; Abbas, Asad; Awan, Safia; Bari, Muhammad Ehsan

    2017-05-01

    Congenital hydrocephalus (CH) is a frequently encountered birth anomaly that can hinder long-term neurologic maturity and social well-being of affected children. This study was undertaken to assess quality of life (QOL) 10-15 years after surgical treatment for primary CH during infancy at a tertiary care hospital in a developing country. This retrospective cohort study included individuals who presented to Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, between 1995 and 2005 at Hydrocephalus Outcome Questionnaire was used to assess outcomes with respect to QOL. Of 118 patients, 90 patients participated in the study. Mean age at first admission was 6.2 months. Mean length of follow-up was 5.4 years. Of these, 28 patients had died after surgery. Shunt infection (P = 0.012) and delayed milestones (P = 0.003) were found to be statistically significant factors affecting mortality in the patients who died. The mean overall health score was 0.67 ± 0.30. Age Hydrocephalus Outcome Questionnaire (P = 0.039). In our analysis, we assessed the QOL associated with CH. We hope that these results will provide insight for future prospective work with the ultimate goal of improving long-term QOL in children with CH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Using complaints to enhance quality improvement: developing an analytical tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Sophie Yahui

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to construct an instrument for identifying certain attributes or capabilities that might enable healthcare staff to use complaints to improve service quality. PubMed and ProQuest were searched, which in turn expanded access to other literature. Three paramount dimensions emerged for healthcare quality management systems: managerial, operational, and technical (MOT). The paper reveals that the managerial dimension relates to quality improvement program infrastructure. It contains strategy, structure, leadership, people and culture. The operational dimension relates to implementation processes: organizational changes and barriers when using complaints to enhance quality. The technical dimension emphasizes the skills, techniques or information systems required to achieve successfully continuous quality improvement. The MOT model was developed by drawing from the relevant literature. However, individuals have different training, interests and experiences and, therefore, there will be variance between researchers when generating the MOT model. The MOT components can be the guidelines for examining whether patient complaints are used to improve service quality. However, the model needs testing and validating by conducting further research before becoming a theory. Empirical studies on patient complaints did not identify any analytical tool that could be used to explore how complaints can drive quality improvement. This study developed an instrument for identifying certain attributes or capabilities that might enable healthcare professionals to use complaints and improve service quality.

  9. How to Sustain Change and Support Continuous Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Samuel A; McQuillan, Rory; Harel, Ziv; Weizman, Adam V; Thomas, Alison; Nesrallah, Gihad; Bell, Chaim M; Chan, Christopher T; Chertow, Glenn M

    2016-05-06

    To achieve sustainable change, quality improvement initiatives must become the new way of working rather than something added on to routine clinical care. However, most organizational change is not maintained. In this next article in this Moving Points in Nephrology feature on quality improvement, we provide health care professionals with strategies to sustain and support quality improvement. Threats to sustainability may be identified both at the beginning of a project and when it is ready for implementation. The National Health Service Sustainability Model is reviewed as one example to help identify issues that affect long-term success of quality improvement projects. Tools to help sustain improvement include process control boards, performance boards, standard work, and improvement huddles. Process control and performance boards are methods to communicate improvement results to staff and leadership. Standard work is a written or visual outline of current best practices for a task and provides a framework to ensure that changes that have improved patient care are consistently and reliably applied to every patient encounter. Improvement huddles are short, regular meetings among staff to anticipate problems, review performance, and support a culture of improvement. Many of these tools rely on principles of visual management, which are systems transparent and simple so that every staff member can rapidly distinguish normal from abnormal working conditions. Even when quality improvement methods are properly applied, the success of a project still depends on contextual factors. Context refers to aspects of the local setting in which the project operates. Context affects resources, leadership support, data infrastructure, team motivation, and team performance. For these reasons, the same project may thrive in a supportive context and fail in a different context. To demonstrate the practical applications of these quality improvement principles, these principles are

  10. Improving the quality of nursing documentation in a palliative care setting: a quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kate; Doody, Owen; Bailey, Maria; Moran, Sue

    2017-12-02

    This paper reports on a quality-improvement project to develop nursing documentation that reflects holistic care within a specialist palliative centre. The World Health Organization definition of palliative care includes impeccable assessment and management of pain and other symptoms. However, existing nursing documentation focuses mainly on the management of physical symptoms, with other aspects of nursing less frequently documented. Supported by a project team and expert panel, cycles of review, action and reflection were used to develop a new palliative nursing documentation. The project was divided into three phases: audits of existing nursing documentation, development of a new palliative nursing care document and audit tool, and pilot implementation and audit of the new nursing documentation. The new palliative nursing care document demonstrated a higher level of compliance in relation to nursing assessments and a more concise, accurate and comprehensive approach to documenting holistic nursing care and recording of patients' perspective. This project has enabled the consistent documentation of holistic nursing care and patients' perspectives; however, continuous education is necessary in order to sustain positive results and ensure that documentation does not become a 'tick box' exercise. Organisational support is required in order to improve documentation systems.

  11. IMPROVEMENT OF QUALITY ASSURANCE SYSTEM ACTIVITIES OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. M. Sultalieva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the article is the improvement of quality assessment system of higher education institutions in the aspect of management. The problems of quality improvement are revealed and classified. The analysis of criteria assessment sets used to define the efficiency of higher education institutions activity is carried out. The components of quality of higher education institutions activity are specified. The structural model of quality assessment system of higher education institutions activity is offered. The analysis of macro environment of a university based on the method of strategic management is carried out, i.e. PEST analysis. As a result of the research a new model of macro criteria model of quality assessment system of higher education institutions, characterizing quality management as an approach to university efficiency is offered, moreover, this system can define the level of its competitiveness in the aspect of quality management. 

  12. There is need for improvement of Quality Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Søren Valgreen; Laursen, Henrik Vitus Bering; Mainz, Jan

    published QI studies are conducted according to key principles of the PDSA method. Method A systematic literature search was performed in the PubMed, Embase and CINAHL databases for PDSA-based studies, published in English in peer-reviewed journals in 2015-2016. Empirical studies using PDSA to improve......-scale, incremental testing. Detailed results will be presented. Conclusion In spite of a substantial growth in QI studies in recent years, it does not seem like authors report in a consistent and thorough way in accordance with the method. This variation may compromise the internal and external validity of the PDSA...

  13. Key interventions and quality indicators for quality improvement of STEMI care: a RAND Delphi survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeyels, Daan; Sinnaeve, Peter R; Claeys, Marc J; Gevaert, Sofie; Schoors, Danny; Sermeus, Walter; Panella, Massimiliano; Coeckelberghs, Ellen; Bruyneel, Luk; Vanhaecht, Kris

    2017-12-13

    Identification, selection and validation of key interventions and quality indicators for improvement of in hospital quality of care for ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients. A structured literature review was followed by a RAND Delphi Survey. A purposively selected multidisciplinary expert panel of cardiologists, nurse managers and quality managers selected and validated key interventions and quality indicators prior for quality improvement for STEMI. First, 34 experts (76% response rate) individually assessed the appropriateness of items to quality improvement on a nine point Likert scale. Twenty-seven key interventions, 16 quality indicators at patient level and 27 quality indicators at STEMI care programme level were selected. Eighteen additional items were suggested. Experts received personal feedback, benchmarking their score with group results (response rate, mean, median and content validity index). Consequently, 32 experts (71% response rate) openly discussed items with an item-content validity index above 75%. By consensus, the expert panel validated a final set of 25 key interventions, 13 quality indicators at patient level and 20 quality indicators at care programme level prior for improvement of in hospital care for STEMI. A structured literature review and multidisciplinary expertise was combined to validate a set of key interventions and quality indicators prior for improvement of care for STEMI. The results allow researchers and hospital staff to evaluate and support quality improvement interventions in a large cohort within the context of a health care system.

  14. Improvement of power quality using distributed generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Munoz, A.; Lopez-Rodriguez, M.A.; Flores-Arias, J.M.; Bellido-Outerino, F.J. [Universidad de Cordoba, Departamento A.C., Electronica y T.E., Escuela Politecnica Superior, Campus de Rabanales, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain); de-la-Rosa, J.J.G. [Universidad de Cadiz, Area de Electronica, Dpto. ISA, TE y Electronica, Escuela Politecnica Superior Avda, Ramon Puyol, S/N, E-11202-Algeciras-Cadiz (Spain); Ruiz-de-Adana, M. [Universidad de Cordoba, Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Termodinamica Aplicada, Campus de Rabanales, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    This paper addresses how Distributed Generation (DG), particularly when configured in Combined Heat and Power (CHP) mode, can become a powerful reliability solution in highlight automated factories, especially when integrated with complimentary Power Quality (PQ) measures. The paper presents results from the PQ audit conducted at a highly automated plant over last year. It was found that the main problems for the equipment installed were voltage sags. Among all categories of electrical disturbances, the voltage sag (dip) and momentary interruption are the nemeses of the automated industrial process. The paper analyzes the capabilities of modern electronic power supplies and the convenience of embedded solution. Finally it is addressed the role of the DG/CHP on the reliability of digital factories. (author)

  15. Quality Improvement of Liver Ultrasound Images Using Fuzzy Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayani, Azadeh; Langarizadeh, Mostafa; Radmard, Amir Reza; Nejad, Ahmadreza Farzaneh

    2016-12-01

    Liver ultrasound images are so common and are applied so often to diagnose diffuse liver diseases like fatty liver. However, the low quality of such images makes it difficult to analyze them and diagnose diseases. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to improve the contrast and quality of liver ultrasound images. In this study, a number of image contrast enhancement algorithms which are based on fuzzy logic were applied to liver ultrasound images - in which the view of kidney is observable - using Matlab2013b to improve the image contrast and quality which has a fuzzy definition; just like image contrast improvement algorithms using a fuzzy intensification operator, contrast improvement algorithms applying fuzzy image histogram hyperbolization, and contrast improvement algorithms by fuzzy IF-THEN rules. With the measurement of Mean Squared Error and Peak Signal to Noise Ratio obtained from different images, fuzzy methods provided better results, and their implementation - compared with histogram equalization method - led both to the improvement of contrast and visual quality of images and to the improvement of liver segmentation algorithms results in images. Comparison of the four algorithms revealed the power of fuzzy logic in improving image contrast compared with traditional image processing algorithms. Moreover, contrast improvement algorithm based on a fuzzy intensification operator was selected as the strongest algorithm considering the measured indicators. This method can also be used in future studies on other ultrasound images for quality improvement and other image processing and analysis applications.

  16. Standardization of D2 lymphadenectomy and surgical quality control (KLASS-02-QC): a prospective, observational, multicenter study [NCT01283893

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyoung-Il; Hur, Hoon; Kim, Youn Nam; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Kim, Min-Chan; Han, Sang-Uk; Hyung, Woo Jin

    2014-01-01

    Extended systemic lymphadenectomy (D2) is standard procedure for surgical treatment of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) although less extensive lymphadenectomy (D1) can be applied to early gastric cancer. Complete D2 lymphadenectomy is the mandatory procedure for studies that evaluate surgical treatment results of AGC. However, the actual extent of D2 lymphadenectomy varies among surgeons because of a lacking consensus on the anatomical definition of each lymph node station. This study is aimed to develop a consensus for D2 lymphadenectomy and also to qualify surgeons that can perform both laparoscopic and open D2 gastrectomy. This (KLASS-02-QC) is a prospective, observational, multicenter study to qualify the surgeons that will participate in the KLASS-02-RCT, which is a prospective, randomized, clinical trial comparing laparoscopic and open gastrectomy for AGC. Surgeons and reviewers participating in the study will be required to complete a questionnaire detailing their professional experience and specific gastrectomy surgical background/training, and the gastrectomy metrics of their primary hospitals. All surgeons must submit three laparoscopic and three open D2 gastrectomy videos, respectively. Each video will be allocated to five peer reviewers; thus each surgeon’s operations will be assessed by a total of 30 reviews. Based on blinded assessment of unedited videos by experts’ review, a separate review evaluation committee will decide whether or not the evaluated surgeon will participate in the KLASS-02-RCT. The primary outcome measure is each surgeon’s proficiency, as assessed by the reviewers based on evaluation criteria for completeness of D2 lymphadenectomy. We believe that our study for standardization of D2 lymphadenectomy and surgical quality control (KLASS-02-QC) will guarantee successful implementation of the subsequent KLASS-02-RCT study. After making consensus on D2 lymphadenectomy, we developed evaluation criteria for completeness of D2

  17. Systematic Quality Improvement in Medicine: Everyone Can Do It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L. Zeidel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this brief review, written from the perspective of a physician-leader who has fostered the development of comprehensive quality improvement efforts at two academic medical centers, I review the need for improvement, some conceptual barriers that must be overcome, the goals of a comprehensive quality improvement (QI effort, some of the results we have obtained, and some observations on how to develop a culture of continuous improvement in an academic medical center. The mandate for quality improvement is clear; current healthcare is wasteful and error-prone, leading to excessive morbidity and mortality and unsustainably high costs. Successful quality improvement requires the abandonment of two paradigms: the craft model of medical practice and the notion that many forms of harm to patients are not preventable. I will describe how dramatic improvement has been achieved in reducing, by up to 10-fold, rates of central line infections, ventilator-associated pneumonias, peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients, and mortality due to cardiac arrest in hospital. I will describe as well how these methods can improve access to out-patient clinics dramatically and enhance the reliability and safety of hand-offs between covering physicians. To develop and maintain systematic quality improvement in all phases of medical care we must articulate a culture in which: everyone working at the medical center makes improvements every day; front-line staff, who know best how the work is done, are empowered to improve the processes of care; and multidisciplinary teams create the protocols that reduce variation that is due to physician preference, leaving only the variation required by the individual needs of patients. I will review as well the crucial elements of education of trainees and faculty members needed to guide and sustain a culture of quality. Finally, I will add some observations on how oversight boards and medical center leaders can help create

  18. Systematic quality improvement in medicine: everyone can do it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidel, Mark L

    2011-07-01

    In this brief review, written from the perspective of a physician-leader who has fostered the development of comprehensive quality improvement efforts at two academic medical centers, I review the need for improvement, some conceptual barriers that must be overcome, the goals of a comprehensive quality improvement (QI) effort, some of the results we have obtained, and some observations on how to develop a culture of continuous improvement in an academic medical center. The mandate for quality improvement is clear; current healthcare is wasteful and error-prone, leading to excessive morbidity and mortality and unsustainably high costs. Successful quality improvement requires the abandonment of two paradigms: the craft model of medical practice and the notion that many forms of harm to patients are not preventable. I will describe how dramatic improvement has been achieved in reducing, by up to 10-fold, rates of central line infections, ventilator-associated pneumonias, peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients, and mortality due to cardiac arrest in hospital. I will describe as well how these methods can improve access to out-patient clinics dramatically and enhance the reliability and safety of hand-offs between covering physicians. To develop and maintain systematic quality improvement in all phases of medical care we must articulate a culture in which: everyone working at the medical center makes improvements every day; front-line staff, who know best how the work is done, are empowered to improve the processes of care; and multidisciplinary teams create the protocols that reduce variation that is due to physician preference, leaving only the variation required by the individual needs of patients. I will review as well the crucial elements of education of trainees and faculty members needed to guide and sustain a culture of quality. Finally, I will add some observations on how oversight boards and medical center leaders can help create systematic quality

  19. Quality Improvement Cycles that Reduced Waiting Times at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was decided to undertake quality improvement (QI) cycles to analyse and improve the situation, using waiting time as a measure of improvement. Methods: A QI team was chosen to conduct two QI cycles. The allocated time for QI cycle 1 was from May to August 2006 and for QI cycle 2 from September to December 2006.

  20. Nigerian electric power supply quality improvement | Ibe | Scientia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improving the quality of the Nigeria electric power supply means improving voltage, transient and frequency stabilities. Power system voltages are controlled by the reactive power component of the power supply; hence voltage and transient stabilities can be improved by using reactive power compensators to either supply ...

  1. Transferring skills in quality collaboratives focused on improving patient logistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W.M. Weggelaar-Jansen (Anne Marie); J.D.H. van Wijngaarden (Jeroen)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractBackground: A quality improvement collaborative, often used by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, is used to educate healthcare professionals and improve healthcare at the same time. However, no prior research has been done on the knowledge and skills healthcare professionals need

  2. Evidence-Based Practice and Quality Improvement in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakas, Karen; Smith, Joan R

    2016-01-01

    For more than a decade, nursing education has experienced several significant changes in response to challenges faced by healthcare organizations. Accrediting organizations have called for improved quality and safety in care, and the Institute of Medicine has identified evidence-based practice and quality improvement as 2 core competencies to include in the curricula for all healthcare professionals. However, the application of these competencies reaches far beyond the classroom setting. For nurses to possess the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to apply evidence-based practice and quality improvement to the real-world setting, academic-clinical institution partnerships are vital.

  3. Quality Improvement Policies in a Supply Chain with Stackelberg Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We first analyze quality and price decisions in a supply chain with two Stackelberg games: Manufacturer’s Stackelberg (MS and Supplier’s Stackelberg (SS. Then, we investigate how equilibrium solutions are influenced by proposed quality improvement policies: coordination and manufacturer’s involvement. Also, we derive the conditions under which the policies can be implemented in both MS and SS strategies. Numerical experiments illustrate the problems and several related issues are discussed. The results suggest that proposed quality improvement policies can realize Pareto improvement for the supply chain performance.

  4. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves sleep quality in chronic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Xavier; Diaz-Piedra, Carolina; Ries, Andrew L

    2013-04-01

    Sleep-related disorders are common in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and, possibily, other lung disorders. Exercise has been shown to improve sleep disturbances. In patients with COPD, pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) produces important health benefits with improvement in symptoms, exercise tolerance, and quality of life. However, the effect of PR on sleep quality remains unknown. The aim of this observational study was to evaluate sleep quality in patients with chronic lung disease and the role of PR as a non-pharmacologic treatment to improve sleep. Sixty-four patients with chronic lung disease enrolled in an 8-week comprehensive PR program, and completed the study (48% male; obstructive [72%], restrictive [20%], mixed [8%]; 44% on supplemental oxygen). Baseline spirometry [mean (SD)]: FEV1% pred = 48.9 (17.4), FVC% pred = 72.5 (18.1), and FEV1/FVC% = 53.1 (18.9). Exercise tolerance and questionnaires related to symptoms, health-related quality of life (HRQL), and sleep quality using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were obtained before and after PR. 58% reported poor sleep quality (PSQI > 5) at baseline. Sleep quality improved by 19% (p = 0.017) after PR, along with significant improvements in dyspnea, exercise tolerance, self-efficacy, and HRQL. Sleep quality in patients with chronic lung disease was poor. In addition to expected improvements in symptoms, exercise tolerance, and HRQL after PR, the subgroup of patients with COPD had a significant improvement in sleep quality. These findings suggest that PR may be an effective, non-pharmacologic treatment option for sleep problems in patients with COPD.

  5. Software Quality Improvement in the OMC Team

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, Viktor

    Physicists use self-written software as a tool to fulfill their tasks and often the developed software is used for several years or even decades. If a software product lives for a long time, it has to be changed and adapted to external influences. This implies that the source code has to be read, understood and modified. The same applies to the software of the Optics Measurements and Corrections (OMC) team at CERN. Their task is to track, analyze and correct the beams in the LHC and other accelerators. To solve this task, they revert to a self-written software base with more than 150,000 physical lines of code. The base is subject to continuous changes as well. Their software does its job and is effective, but runs regrettably not efficient because some parts of the source code are in a bad shape and has a low quality. The implementation could be faster and more memory efficient. In addition it is difficult to read and understand the code. Source code files and functions are too big and identifiers do not rev...

  6. Improving organizational climate for quality and quality of care: does membership in a collaborative help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nembhard, Ingrid M; Northrup, Veronika; Shaller, Dale; Cleary, Paul D

    2012-11-01

    The lack of quality-oriented organizational climates is partly responsible for deficiencies in patient-centered care and poor quality more broadly. To improve their quality-oriented climates, several organizations have joined quality improvement collaboratives. The effectiveness of this approach is unknown. To evaluate the impact of collaborative membership on organizational climate for quality and service quality. Twenty-one clinics, 4 of which participated in a collaborative sponsored by the Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement. Pre-post design. Preassessments occurred 2 months before the collaborative began in January 2009. Postassessments of service quality and climate occurred about 6 months and 1 year, respectively, after the collaborative ended in January 2010. We surveyed clinic employees (eg, physicians, nurses, receptionists, etc.) about the organizational climate and patients about service quality. Prioritization of quality care, high-quality staff relationships, and open communication as indicators of quality-oriented climate and timeliness of care, staff helpfulness, doctor-patient communication, rating of doctor, and willingness to recommend doctor's office as indicators of service quality. There was no significant effect of collaborative membership on quality-oriented climate and mixed effects on service quality. Doctors' ratings improved significantly more in intervention clinics than in control clinics, staff helpfulness improved less, and timeliness of care declined more. Ratings of doctor-patient communication and willingness to recommend doctor were not significantly different between intervention and comparison clinics. Membership in the collaborative provided no significant advantage for improving quality-oriented climate and had equivocal effects on service quality.

  7. Radiation technology of improved quality materials production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajkin, Yu.A.; Nadirov, N.K.; Zajkina, R.F.

    1997-01-01

    The technology of materials production from metals and alloys with high operational properties is developed. The technology is based on use of radiation methods in powder metallurgy. Use of radiation processing allows to improve technological conditions of sintering. It is established, that in certain regimes the sintering temperature is decreasing from 1200 deg C up to 950 deg C in the result of radiation processing of stainless steel powders . According to the processing regimes it is possible load reduction by powder pressing on 15-20 % and sintering time in to 1,5 - 2 times . The radiation methods give possibility to produce high qualitative goods from cheap powder materials without use energy-intensive processes and prolonged processing of finished products

  8. From intermittent antibiotic point prevalence surveys to quality improvement: experience in Scottish hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm William

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2008, the Scottish Antimicrobial Prescribing Group (SAPG was established to coordinate a national antimicrobial stewardship programme. In 2009 SAPG led participation in a European point prevalence survey (PPS of hospital antibiotic use. We describe how SAPG used this baseline PPS as the foundation for implementation of measures for improvement in antibiotic prescribing. Methods In 2009 data for the baseline PPS were collected in accordance with the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption [ESAC] protocol. This informed the development of two quality prescribing indicators: compliance with antibiotic policy in acute admission units and duration of surgical prophylaxis. From December 2009 clinicians collected these data on a monthly basis. The prescribing indicators were reviewed and further modified in March 2011. Data for the follow up PPS in September 2011 were collected as part of a national PPS of healthcare associated infection and antimicrobial use developed using ECDC protocols. Results In the baseline PPS data were collected in 22 (56% acute hospitals. The frequency of recording the reason for treatment in medical notes was similar in Scotland (75.9% and Europe (75.7%. Compliance with policy (81.0% was also similar to Europe (82.5% but duration of surgical prophylaxis Conclusions The baseline PPS identified priorities for quality improvement. SAPG has demonstrated that implementation of regularly reviewed national prescribing indicators, acceptable to clinicians, implemented through regular systematic measurement can drive improvement in quality of antibiotic use in key clinical areas. However, our data also show that the ESAC PPS method may underestimate the proportion of surgical prophylaxis with duration

  9. Improve strategic supplier performance using DMAIC to develop a Quality Improvement Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim, Kevin P.

    Supplier performance that meets the requirements of the customer has long plagued quality professionals. Despite the vast efforts by organizations to improve supplier performance, little has been done to standardize the plan to improve performance. This project presents a guideline and problem-solving strategy using a Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control (DMAIC) structured tool that will assist in the management and improvement of supplier performance. An analysis of benchmarked Quality Improvement Plans indicated that this topic needs more focus on how to accomplish improved supplier performance. This project is part of a growing body of supplier continuous improvement efforts. With the input of Zodiac Aerospace quality professionals this project's results provide a solution to Quality Improvement Plans and show objective evidence of its benefits. This project contributes to the future research on similar topics.

  10. Process safety improvement-Quality and target zero

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Scyoc, Karl

    2008-01-01

    Process safety practitioners have adopted quality management principles in design of process safety management systems with positive effect, yet achieving safety objectives sometimes remain a distant target. Companies regularly apply tools and methods which have roots in quality and productivity improvement. The 'plan, do, check, act' improvement loop, statistical analysis of incidents (non-conformities), and performance trending popularized by Dr. Deming are now commonly used in the context of process safety. Significant advancements in HSE performance are reported after applying methods viewed as fundamental for quality management. In pursuit of continual process safety improvement, the paper examines various quality improvement methods, and explores how methods intended for product quality can be additionally applied to continual improvement of process safety. Methods such as Kaizen, Poke yoke, and TRIZ, while long established for quality improvement, are quite unfamiliar in the process safety arena. These methods are discussed for application in improving both process safety leadership and field work team performance. Practical ways to advance process safety, based on the methods, are given

  11. Process safety improvement-Quality and target zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Scyoc, Karl [Det Norske Veritas (U.S.A.) Inc., DNV Energy Solutions, 16340 Park Ten Place, Suite 100, Houston, TX 77084 (United States)], E-mail: karl.van.scyoc@dnv.com

    2008-11-15

    Process safety practitioners have adopted quality management principles in design of process safety management systems with positive effect, yet achieving safety objectives sometimes remain a distant target. Companies regularly apply tools and methods which have roots in quality and productivity improvement. The 'plan, do, check, act' improvement loop, statistical analysis of incidents (non-conformities), and performance trending popularized by Dr. Deming are now commonly used in the context of process safety. Significant advancements in HSE performance are reported after applying methods viewed as fundamental for quality management. In pursuit of continual process safety improvement, the paper examines various quality improvement methods, and explores how methods intended for product quality can be additionally applied to continual improvement of process safety. Methods such as Kaizen, Poke yoke, and TRIZ, while long established for quality improvement, are quite unfamiliar in the process safety arena. These methods are discussed for application in improving both process safety leadership and field work team performance. Practical ways to advance process safety, based on the methods, are given.

  12. Process safety improvement--quality and target zero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Scyoc, Karl

    2008-11-15

    Process safety practitioners have adopted quality management principles in design of process safety management systems with positive effect, yet achieving safety objectives sometimes remain a distant target. Companies regularly apply tools and methods which have roots in quality and productivity improvement. The "plan, do, check, act" improvement loop, statistical analysis of incidents (non-conformities), and performance trending popularized by Dr. Deming are now commonly used in the context of process safety. Significant advancements in HSE performance are reported after applying methods viewed as fundamental for quality management. In pursuit of continual process safety improvement, the paper examines various quality improvement methods, and explores how methods intended for product quality can be additionally applied to continual improvement of process safety. Methods such as Kaizen, Poke yoke, and TRIZ, while long established for quality improvement, are quite unfamiliar in the process safety arena. These methods are discussed for application in improving both process safety leadership and field work team performance. Practical ways to advance process safety, based on the methods, are given.

  13. The microsecond 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser as an adjunct to improving surgical scars following Mohs micrographic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezra, Navid; Arshanapalli, Ashish; Bednarek, Robert; Akaishi, Satoshi; Somani, Ally-Khan

    2016-08-01

    Scarring following skin surgery is an unavoidable certainty. Scars resulting from Mohs Micrographic Surgery (MMS) can cause both cosmetic and functional problems. Various lasers have been used to treat scars, but the role of the microsecond pulsed 1064 nanometer neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (1064 nm Nd:YAG) in treating surgical scars is not well-defined. We aim to examine the clinical application of the 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser in improving surgical scars. Ten patients who were unhappy with cosmetic or functional outcomes of their surgical scars following MMS were treated with 1-3 sessions of the 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser to improve their scars. Therapy completion was determined by patient satisfaction with the appearance of their scars and/or resolution of any contractures that formed following surgery. All ten patients were pleased with the improved appearance of their scars. Four patients saw complete resolution of an ectropion or eclabium that formed secondary to scar contractures from MMS. The side effects of laser treatments were limited to 1-2 hours of erythema, and there were no incidences of adverse effects or recurrence of contractures. Our clinical experience with the 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser provides promising data on improving appearance of and functionality from post-surgical scars.

  14. An observational study on surgically treated adult idiopathic scoliosis patients' quality of life outcomes at 1- and 2-year follow-ups and comparison to controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis, Jennifer C; Grauers, Anna; Diarbakerli, Elias; Savvides, Panayiotis; Abbott, Allan; Gerdhem, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Prospective data on health-related quality of life in patients with idiopathic scoliosis treated surgically as adults is needed. We compared preoperative and 1- and 2-year follow-up data in surgically treated adults with idiopathic scoliosis with juvenile or adolescent onset. Results were compared to untreated adults with scoliosis and population normative data. A comparison of preoperative and 1- and 2-year follow-up data of 75 adults surgically treated for idiopathic scoliosis at a mean age of 28 years (range 18 to 69) from a prospective national register study, as well as a comparison with age- and sex-matched data from 75 untreated adults with less severe scoliosis and 75 adults without scoliosis, was made. Outcome measures were EuroQol-5 dimensions (EQ-5D) and Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-22r questionnaire. In the surgically treated, EQ-5D and SRS-22r scores had statistically significant improvements at both 1- and 2-year follow-ups (all p   up was large ( r  = -0.54) and small-medium ( r  = -0.20) at 2-year follow-up. The effect size of surgery on SRS-22r outcomes was medium-large at 1- and 2-year follow-ups ( r  = -0.43 and r  = -0.42 respectively). At the 2-year follow-up, the EQ-5D score and the SRS-22r subscore were similar to the untreated scoliosis group ( p  = 0.56 and p  = 0.91 respectively), but lower than those in the adults without scoliosis ( p  up, approaching the health-related quality of life of untreated individuals with less severe scoliosis, but remain lower than normative population data.

  15. Design and control of a DSTATCOM for power quality improvement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Distribution Static Compensator) and its control algorithm based on correlation and cross correlation function approach for power quality improvement under linear/ nonlinear loads in a distribution system. In this approach, an extraction of fundamental ...

  16. USE OF ICT TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zaporozhchenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the main changes in the education system in recent years; reflectes the new educational opportunities for children with disabilities; identifies the possible ways of use of ICT to improve the quality of inclusive education.

  17. The quality infrastructure measuring, analyzing, and improving library services

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Sarah Anne

    2013-01-01

    Summarizing specific tools for measuring service quality alongside tips for using these tools most effectively, this book helps libraries of all kinds take a programmatic approach to measuring, analyzing, and improving library services.

  18. Unlocking the "black box" of practice improvement strategies to implement surgical safety checklists: a process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Hamilton, Kyra; Ball, Dianne; Lavin, Joanne; Gardiner, Therese; Withers, Teresa K; Marshall, Andrea P

    2017-01-01

    Compliance with surgical safety checklists (SSCs) has been associated with improvements in clinical processes such as antibiotic use, correct site marking, and overall safety processes. Yet, proper execution has been difficult to achieve. The objective of this study was to undertake a process evaluation of four knowledge translation (KT) strategies used to implement the Pass the Baton (PTB) intervention which was designed to improve utilization of the SSC. As part of the process evaluation, a logic model was generated to explain which KT strategies worked well (or less well) in the operating rooms of a tertiary referral hospital in Queensland, Australia. The KT strategies implemented included change champions/opinion leaders, education, audit and feedback, and reminders. In evaluating the implementation of these strategies, this study considered context, intervention and underpinning assumptions, implementation, and mechanism of impact. Observational and interview data were collected to assess implementation of the KT strategies relative to fidelity, feasibility, and acceptability. Findings from 35 structured observations and 15 interviews with 96 intervention participants suggest that all of the KT strategies were consistently implemented. Of the 220 staff working in the department, that is, nurses, anesthetists, and surgeons, 160 (72.7%) knew about the PTB strategies. Qualitative analysis revealed that implementation was generally feasible and acceptable. A barrier to feasibility was physician engagement. An impediment to acceptability was participants' skepticism about the ability of the KT strategies to effect behavioral change. Overall, results of this evaluation suggest that success of implementation was moderate. Given the probable impact of contextual factors, that is, team culture and the characteristics of participants, the KT strategies may need modification prior to widespread implementation.

  19. Guideline Implementation: Surgical Smoke Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fencl, Jennifer L

    2017-05-01

    Research conducted during the past four decades has demonstrated that surgical smoke generated from the use of energy-generating devices in surgery contains toxic and biohazardous substances that present risks to perioperative team members and patients. Despite the increase in information available, however, perioperative personnel continue to demonstrate a lack of knowledge of these hazards and lack of compliance with recommendations for evacuating smoke during surgical procedures. The new AORN "Guideline for surgical smoke safety" provides guidance on surgical smoke management. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel promote smoke-free work environments; evacuate surgical smoke; and develop education programs and competency verification tools, policies and procedures, and quality improvement initiatives related to controlling surgical smoke. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures. Copyright © 2017 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. From quality assurance to total quality management: how can quality assurance result in continuous improvement in health professions education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmans, D H J M; Wolfhagen, H A P; Scherpbier, A J J A

    2003-07-01

    Quality assurance is a hot topic in many institutes for higher education. Quality assurance is a cyclic process, consisting of three steps: measuring, judging and improving. Many institutes in higher education collect data about the quality of their educational programme on a regular basis and with proper frequency, but these evaluative data are not always used to improve the quality of the programme. The aim of this article is to demonstrate which conditions need to be fulfilled to ensure that quality assurance is a cyclic process resulting in continuous improvement. Quality assurance can only be successful, i.e. result in continuous improvement, if three conditions are met: the evaluation activities are carried out in (1). a systematic and (2). structural fashion and (3). are integrated in the organization's regular work patterns. Parts of the system for quality assurance at the Maastricht Medical School are presented to demonstrate how the three conditions can be realized in practice.

  1. Water availability at hospitals in low- and middle-income countries: implications for improving access to safe surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Sagar S; Gupta, Shailvi; Onchiri, Frankline M; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Kushner, Adam L; Stewart, Barclay T

    2016-09-01

    Although two billion people now have access to clean water, many hospitals in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) do not. Lack of water availability at hospitals hinders safe surgical care. We aimed to review the surgical capacity literature and document the availability of water at health facilities and develop a predictive model of water availability at health facilities globally to inform targeted capacity improvements. Using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, a systematic search for surgical capacity assessments in LMICs in MEDLINE, PubMed, and World Health Organization Global Health Library was performed. Data regarding water availability were extracted. Data from these assessments and national indicator data from the World Bank (e.g., gross domestic product, total health expenditure, and percent of population with improved access to water) were used to create a predictive model for water availability in LMICs globally. Of the 72 records identified, 19 reported water availability representing 430 hospitals. A total of 66% of hospitals assessed had water availability (283 of 430 hospitals). Using these data, estimated percent of water availability in LMICs more broadly ranged from under 20% (Liberia) to over 90% (Bangladesh, Ghana). Less than two-thirds of hospitals providing surgical care in 19 LMICs had a reliable water source. Governments and nongovernmental organizations should increase efforts to improve water infrastructure at hospitals, which might aid in the provision of safe essential surgical care. Future research is needed to measure the effect of water availability on surgical care and patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Improving quality of maternal health care for indigenous women in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Improving quality of maternal health care for indigenous women in Argentina, Mexico, and Peru. Latin America is home to the greatest inequities in the world, including inequality in access to quality health services. Indigenous peoples have the poorest health in the region, due to such factors as geographic isolation, limited ...

  3. Soil quality improvement through conversion to sprinkler irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conversion from furrow to sprinkler irrigation is a recommended conservation practice for improved water use efficiency (and/or erosion control), but effects on soil quality indicators were unknown. Several soil quality indicators were therefore quantified within a northwestern U.S. Conservation Eff...

  4. servicom policy intervention: improving service quality in nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    SERVICOM policy, in which we examine descriptively the nature and implementation process of the policy, against a theoretical background depicting the nature of public services, quality and quality improvement, problems in the. Nigerian public sector, earlier policy prescriptions for an efficiently functioning service, and an.

  5. Effects of Quality Improvement System for Child Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Kavanaugh, Amy; Lu, Xuejin; Brandi, Karen; Goodman, Jeff; Till, Lance; Watson, Grace

    2011-01-01

    Using multiple years of data collected from about 100 child care centers in Palm Beach County, Florida, the authors studied whether the Quality Improvement System (QIS) made a significant impact on quality of child care centers. Based on a pre- and postresearch design spanning a period of 13 months, QIS appeared to be effective in improving…

  6. Effective interventions on service quality improvement in a physiotherapy clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibi, Farid; Tabrizi, JafarSadegh; Eteraf Oskouei, MirAli; AsghariJafarabadi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Service quality is considered as a main domain of quality associ-ated with non-clinical aspect of healthcare. This study aimed to survey and im-proves service quality of delivered care in the Physiotherapy Clinic affiliated with the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. A quasi experimental interventional study was conducted in the Physiotherapy Clinic, 2010-2011. Data were collected using a validated and reli-able researcher made questionnaire with participation of 324 patients and their coadjutors. The study questionnaire consisted of 7 questions about demographic factors and 38 questions for eleven aspects of service quality. Data were then analyzed using paired samples t-test by SPSS16. In the pre intervention phase, six aspects of service quality including choice of provider, safety, prevention and early detection, dignity, autonomy and availability achieved non-acceptable scores. Following interventions, all aspects of the service quality improved and also total service quality score improved from 8.58 to 9.83 (PService quality can be improved by problem implementation of appropriate interventions. The acquired results can be used in health system fields to create respectful environments for healthcare customers.

  7. Sand-Filtration System For Improving Water Quality For Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sand-Filtration System For Improving Water Quality For Rural Community Water Supply. AY Karikari, JA Ampofo. Abstract. The performance of a pilot sand filtration plant for a small town water supply was monitored over a seven month period to evaluate the physico-chemical and bacteriological quality of the filtered water ...

  8. Diagnosing and reporting of occupational diseases: a quality improvement study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreeuwers, D.; de Boer, A. G. E. M.; Verbeek, J. H. A. M.; van Beurden, M. M.; van Dijk, F. J. H.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess the need for quality improvement of diagnosing and reporting of noise-induced occupational hearing loss and occupational adjustment disorder. METHODS: Performance indicators and criteria for the quality of diagnosing and reporting were developed. Self-assessment questionnaires were

  9. User Charges for Quality Improvement in Public Health Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are concerns on whether user fees in public health services are the appropriate means of improving both quality of the services and accessibility to the same. As a follow-up research, we set out a study to bring out the impact of fees on quality and attendance in health facilities in Tanzania. The study examined ...

  10. Improving the Quality of Freeze Dried Rice: Initial Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Division Defence Science and Technology Organisation DSTO-TN-1434 ABSTRACT The focus of the work reported here is to evaluate a selection of...Defence Science and Technology Organisation 506 Lorimer St Fishermans Bend, Victoria 3207 Australia Telephone: 1300 333 362 Fax: (03) 9626...conditions, structure, physical characteristics, rehydration behaviour and sensory quality would facilitate efforts to improve the quality of FD rice

  11. Quality Rating and Improvement Systems and Children's Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Lieny; Buettner, Cynthia K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing enriched learning environments is important to stimulating children's development in early childhood. Early child-care policymakers in many states in the US have adopted Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) as a way to verify quality of child care and to support children's school readiness. Objective: The purpose of…

  12. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves subjective sleep quality in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chou-Chin; Huang, Hui-Chuan; Yang, Mei-Chen; Lee, Chih-Hsin; Huang, Chun-Yao; Wu, Yao-Kuang

    2014-10-01

    Poor sleep quality is often reported among patients with COPD. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is beneficial in improving exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). However, its benefit in terms of sleep quality in patients with COPD remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of PR on sleep quality of patients with COPD. Thirty-four subjects with COPD were studied. All subjects participated in a 12-week (2 sessions/week) hospital-based out-patient PR study. Baseline and post-PR status were evaluated by spirometry, a sleep questionnaire (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]), a disease-specific questionnaire of HRQOL (St George Respiratory Questionnaire [SGRQ]), cardiopulmonary exercise testing, respiratory muscle strength, and the Borg dyspnea scale. Mean FEV1/FVC in the subjects was 0.49 ± 0.13, and the mean FEV1 was 1.06 ± 0.49 L/min (49.7 ± 18.0% of predicted). After PR, the PSQI score decreased from 9.41 ± 4.33 to 7.82 ± 3.90 (P 5 also decreased (85.3-64.7%, P = .006). There were significant improvements in HRQOL (SGRQ, P = .003), exercise capacity (peak oxygen uptake, P improvement in sleep quality, along with concurrent improvements in HRQOL and exercise capacity. PR is an effective nonpharmacologic treatment to improve sleep quality in patients with COPD and should be part of their clinical management. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  13. Comparative quality of life study between endoscopic sphincterotomy and surgical choledochotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Bai, Xue; Duan, Guang-Feng; Tian, Wen-Hua; Li, Zhao-Shen; Song, Bin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine quality of life improvement in choledocholithiasis patients who underwent endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) versus open choledochotomy (OCT). METHODS: Eligible choledocholithiasis patients (n = 216) hospitalized in the Changhai Hospital between May 2010 and January 2011 were enrolled into a prospective study using cluster sampling. Patients underwent EST (n = 135) or OCT (n = 81) depending on the patient’s wishes. Patients were followed-up with a field survey and by correspondence. Patients were also given the self-administered Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI) to measure patient quality of life before surgery, and at two and six weeks after the procedures. RESULTS: With respect to baseline patient characteristics, the EST and OCT groups were comparable. After the procedure, gallstones were completely eliminated in all patients. Among 216 eligible patients, 191 patients (88.4%) completed all three surveys, including 118 patients who underwent EST (118/135; 87.4%) and 73 patients who underwent OCT (73/81; 90.1%). EST was associated with a significantly shorter hospital stay than OCT (8.8 ± 6.5 vs 13.9 ± 6.7 d; P choledocholithiasis. PMID:25009398

  14. Quality Improvement Processes in Obesity Surgery Lead to Higher Quality and Value, Lower Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brousseau, Holli; Pohl, Dieter

    2017-03-01

    In the era of changes in the evaluation of medical services and performance, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has determined that the key components are quality, value, and clinical practice improvement (MACRA). Weight Loss Surgery, also called Bariatric or Obesity Surgery, has been at the forefront of quality improvement and quality reporting through the Center of Excellence Program since 2005. As a result, weight loss surgery is now as safe as gallbladder surgery.1 Even within this culture of quality and safety, improvements are still possible, as described in this article. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-03.asp].

  15. Appendectomy: Surgical Removal of the Appendix

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the center of somewhere beautiful. Feel the beauty surrounding you and your emotions coming back to ... of surgery; it was founded to raise the standards of surgical practice and to improve the quality ...

  16. Quality Function Deployment Application for Improving Quality of Education in Business Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagnak, Muhittin; Ada, Nesrin; Kazancoglu, Yigit; Tayaksi, Cansu

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing competition between universities globally to attract students. At this point, to compete, it is imperative for the universities to improve the quality of education provided for their stakeholders, including students, parents, and employers. For improving the quality of education, first of all, the universities should make…

  17. Continuous quality improvement in a Maltese hospital using logical framework analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttigieg, Sandra C; Gauci, Dorothy; Dey, Prasanta

    2016-10-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present the application of logical framework analysis (LFA) for implementing continuous quality improvement (CQI) across multiple settings in a tertiary care hospital. Design/methodology/approach This study adopts a multiple case study approach. LFA is implemented within three diverse settings, namely, intensive care unit, surgical ward, and acute in-patient psychiatric ward. First, problem trees are developed in order to determine the root causes of quality issues, specific to the three settings. Second, objective trees are formed suggesting solutions to the quality issues. Third, project plan template using logical framework (LOGFRAME) is created for each setting. Findings This study shows substantial improvement in quality across the three settings. LFA proved to be effective to analyse quality issues and suggest improvement measures objectively. Research limitations/implications This paper applies LFA in specific, albeit, diverse settings in one hospital. For validation purposes, it would be ideal to analyse in other settings within the same hospital, as well as in several hospitals. It also adopts a bottom-up approach when this can be triangulated with other sources of data. Practical implications LFA enables top management to obtain an integrated view of performance. It also provides a basis for further quantitative research on quality management through the identification of key performance indicators and facilitates the development of a business case for improvement. Originality/value LFA is a novel approach for the implementation of CQI programs. Although LFA has been used extensively for project development to source funds from development banks, its application in quality improvement within healthcare projects is scant.

  18. EFFECTS OF AROMATHERAPY MASSAGE ON THE SLEEP QUALITY AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF PATIENTS IN A SURGICAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özlü, Zeynep Karaman; Bilican, Pınar

    2017-01-01

    Surgical pain is experienced by inpatients with clinical, disease-related concerns, unknown encounters after surgery, quality of sleep, restrictions in position after surgery is known to be serious. The study was conducted to determine the effect of aromatherapy massage on quality of sleep and physiological parameters in surgical intensive care patients. This is an experimental study. The sample of this study consisted of 60 patients who were divided into two groups as experimental group and control group including 30 patients in each one. The participants were postoperative patients, absent complications, who were unconscious and extubated. A data collection form on personal characteristics of the patients, a registration form on their physical parameters and the Richards-Campbell Sleep Scale (RCSQ) were used to collect the data of the study. The Richards-Campbell Sleep Scale indicated that while the experimental group had a mean score of 53.80 ± 13.20, the control group had a mean score of 29.08 ± 9.71 and there was a statistically significant difference between mean scores of the groups. In a comparison of physiologic parameters, only diastolic blood pressure measuring between parameters in favor of an assembly as a statistically significant difference was detected. Results of the study showed that aromatherapy massage enhanced the sleep quality of patients in a surgical intensive care unit and resulted in some positive changes in their physiological parameters.

  19. Can Quality Improvement System Improve Childcare Site Performance in School Readiness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Lu, Xuejin; Brandi, Karen; Goodman, Jeff; Watson, Grace

    2013-01-01

    The authors evaluated the effectiveness of the Quality Improvement System (QIS) developed and implemented by Children's Services Council of Palm Beach County (Florida) as a voluntary initiative to improve the quality of childcare and education. They adopted a growth model approach to investigate whether childcare sites that participated in QIS…

  20. Assessment and improvement of sound quality in cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Meredith T; Jiam, Nicole T; Limb, Charles J

    2017-06-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) have successfully provided speech perception to individuals with sensorineural hearing loss. Recent research has focused on more challenging acoustic stimuli such as music and voice emotion. The purpose of this review is to evaluate and describe sound quality in CI users with the purposes of summarizing novel findings and crucial information about how CI users experience complex sounds. Here we review the existing literature on PubMed and Scopus to present what is known about perceptual sound quality in CI users, discuss existing measures of sound quality, explore how sound quality may be effectively studied, and examine potential strategies of improving sound quality in the CI population. Sound quality, defined here as the perceived richness of an auditory stimulus, is an attribute of implant-mediated listening that remains poorly studied. Sound quality is distinct from appraisal, which is generally defined as the subjective likability or pleasantness of a sound. Existing studies suggest that sound quality perception in the CI population is limited by a range of factors, most notably pitch distortion and dynamic range compression. Although there are currently very few objective measures of sound quality, the CI-MUSHRA has been used as a means of evaluating sound quality. There exist a number of promising strategies to improve sound quality perception in the CI population including apical cochlear stimulation, pitch tuning, and noise reduction processing strategies. In the published literature, sound quality perception is severely limited among CI users. Future research should focus on developing systematic, objective, and quantitative sound quality metrics and designing therapies to mitigate poor sound quality perception in CI users. NA.

  1. Concept Evaluation Using the PDSA Cycle for Continuous Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverentz, Delois Meyer; Kumm, Sharon

    As concept-based nursing education gains popularity, there is little literature on how to sustain quality after initiation of the curriculum. Critical appraisal of concepts in a university program revealed varying definitions, attributes, and exemplars resulting in student confusion. The Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) cycle for continuous quality improvement was used for concept evaluation. The goals of the evaluation project were: 1) to develop common definition and attributes for concepts and 2) to develop horizontal and vertical leveling of exemplars to build on prior student learning. The continuous quality improvement process can be used to prevent "concept creep" and ensure internal consistency of concept definitions, attributes, and exemplars.

  2. Systematic Assessment and Targeted Improvement of Services Following Yearlong Surgical Outcomes Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-25

    Heart Attack; Cardiac Arrest; Congestive Heart Failure; Atrial Fibrillation; Angina; Deep Vein Thrombosis; Pulmonary Embolism; Respiratory Arrest; Respiratory Failure; Pneumonia; Gastrointestinal Bleed; Stomach Ulcer; Delirium; Stroke; Nerve Injury; Surgical Wound Infection

  3. Ethical oversight in quality improvement and quality improvement research: new approaches to promote a learning health care system

    OpenAIRE

    Fiscella, Kevin; Tobin, Jonathan N.; Carroll, Jennifer K.; He, Hua; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2015-01-01

    Background Institutional review boards (IRBs) distinguish health care quality improvement (QI) and health care quality improvement research (QIR) based primarily on the rigor of the methods used and the purported generalizability of the knowledge gained. Neither of these criteria holds up upon scrutiny. Rather, this apparently false dichotomy may foster under-protection of participants in QI projects and over-protection of participants within QIR. Discussion Minimal risk projects should entai...

  4. Current concept review: quality and process improvement in orthopedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinney SJ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Stephen J Pinney,1 Alexandra E Page,2 David S Jevsevar,3 Kevin J Bozic4 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, St Mary's Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USA; 2Orthopaedic Surgery, AAOS Health Care Systems Committee, San Diego, CA, USA; 3Department of Orthopaedics, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth University, Hanover, NH, USA; 4Department of Surgery and Perioperative Care, Dell Medical School at the University of Texas, Austin, TX, USAAbstract: Multiple health care stakeholders are increasingly scrutinizing musculoskeletal care to optimize quality and cost efficiency. This has led to greater emphasis on quality and process improvement. There is a robust set of business strategies that are increasingly being applied to health care delivery. These quality and process improvement tools (QPITs have specific applications to segments of, or the entire episode of, patient care. In the rapidly changing health care world, it will behoove all orthopedic surgeons to have an understanding of the manner in which care delivery processes can be evaluated and improved. Many of the commonly used QPITs, including checklist initiatives, standardized clinical care pathways, lean methodology, six sigma strategies, and total quality management, embrace basic principles of quality improvement. These principles include focusing on outcomes, optimizing communication among health care team members, increasing process standardization, and decreasing process variation. This review summarizes the common QPITs, including how and when they might be employed to improve care delivery. Keywords: clinical care pathway, musculoskeletal care, outcomes, quality management, six sigma, lean thinking

  5. Correlation of general and oral health-related quality of life in malocclusion patients treated with a combined orthodontic and maxillofacial surgical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamme, Johannes Alexander; Rohnen, Michael; Gaßling, Volker; Ciesielski, Robert; Fischer-Brandies, Helge; Wiltfang, Jörg; Koos, Bernd

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study was to collect information abo