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Sample records for surgical procedures operative

  1. Surgical site infections in paediatric otolaryngology operative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifeacho, S N; Bajaj, Y; Jephson, C G; Albert, D M

    2012-07-01

    An assessment of the rate of surgical site infections associated with elective paediatric otolaryngology surgical procedures. Prospective data was collected for a 3-week period for all children undergoing surgery where either mucosa or skin was breached. The parents of the children were requested to complete a questionnaire at 30 days after the operation. Data was collected on 80 consecutive cases. The majority of cases were admitted on the day of the procedure. The procedures included adenotonsillectomy (24), grommets (12), cochlear implantation (6), bone-anchored hearing aid (2), submandibular gland excision (1), branchial sinus excision (1), cystic hygroma excision (3), nasal glioma excision (1), microlaryngobronchoscopy (13), tracheostomy (3) and other procedures (14). Nearly half the cases had more than one operation done at the same time. 26/80 (32.5%) patients had a temporary or permanent implant inserted at the time of operation (grommet, bone-anchored hearing aid, cochlear implant). 25/80 (31%) operative fields were classed as clean and 55/80 (68.7%) as clean contaminated operations. The duration of the operation varied from 6 min to 142 min. Hospital antibiotic protocol was adhered to in 69/80 (86.3%) cases but not in 11/80 cases. In our series, 3/80 (3.7%) patients had an infection in the postoperative period. Surgical site infections do occur at an appreciable rate in paediatric otolaryngology. With the potential for serious consequences, reduction in the risk of surgical site infections is important. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effective and efficient learning in the operating theater with intraoperative video-enhanced surgical procedure training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Det, M.J.; Meijerink, W.J.; Hoff, C.; Middel, B.; Pierie, J.P.

    INtraoperative Video Enhanced Surgical procedure Training (INVEST) is a new training method designed to improve the transition from basic skills training in a skills lab to procedural training in the operating theater. Traditionally, the master-apprentice model (MAM) is used for procedural training

  3. Short Operative Duration and Surgical Site Infection Risk in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicks, Kristen V; Baker, Arthur W; Durkin, Michael J; Anderson, Deverick J; Moehring, Rebekah W; Chen, Luke F; Sexton, Daniel J; Weber, David J; Lewis, Sarah S

    2015-12-01

    To determine the association (1) between shorter operative duration and surgical site infection (SSI) and (2) between surgeon median operative duration and SSI risk among first-time hip and knee arthroplasties. Retrospective cohort study A total of 43 community hospitals located in the southeastern United States. Adults who developed SSIs according to National Healthcare Safety Network criteria within 365 days of first-time knee or hip arthroplasties performed between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012. Log-binomial regression models estimated the association (1) between operative duration and SSI outcome and (2) between surgeon median operative duration and SSI outcome. Hip and knee arthroplasties were evaluated in separate models. Each model was adjusted for American Society of Anesthesiology score and patient age. A total of 25,531 hip arthroplasties and 42,187 knee arthroplasties were included in the study. The risk of SSI in knee arthroplasties with an operative duration shorter than the 25th percentile was 0.40 times the risk of SSI in knee arthroplasties with an operative duration between the 25th and 75th percentile (risk ratio [RR], 0.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38-0.56; Poperative duration did not demonstrate significant association with SSI for hip arthroplasties (RR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.79-1.37; P=.36). Knee arthroplasty surgeons with shorter median operative durations had a lower risk of SSI than surgeons with typical median operative durations (RR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.43-0.64; Poperative durations were not associated with a higher SSI risk for knee or hip arthroplasty procedures in our analysis.

  4. A standard operating procedure for the surgical implantation of transmitters in juvenile salmonids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, T.L.; Beeman, J.W.; Gee, L.P.

    2012-01-01

    Biotelemetry is a useful tool to monitor the movements of animals and is widely applied in fisheries research. Radio or acoustic technology can be used, depending on the study design and the environmental conditions in the study area. A broad definition of telemetry also includes the use of Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags, either separately or with a radio or acoustic transmitter. To use telemetry, fish must be equipped with a transmitter. Although there are several attachment procedures available, surgical implantation of transmitters in the abdominal cavity is recognized as the best technique for long-term telemetry studies in general (Stasko and Pincock, 1977; Winter, 1996; Jepsen, 2003), and specifically for juvenile salmonids, Oncorhynchus spp. (Adams and others, 1998a, 1998b; Martinelli and others, 1998; Hall and others, 2009). Studies that use telemetry assume that the processes by which the animals are captured, handled, and tagged, as well as the act of carrying the transmitter, will have minimal effect on their behavior and performance. This assumption, commonly stated as a lack of transmitter effects, must be valid if telemetry studies are to describe accurately the movements and behavior of an entire population of interest, rather than the subset of that population that carries transmitters. This document describes a standard operating procedure (SOP) for surgical implantation of radio or acoustic transmitters in juvenile salmonids. The procedures were developed from a broad base of published information, laboratory experiments, and practical experience in tagging thousands of fish for numerous studies of juvenile salmon movements near Columbia River and Snake River hydroelectric dams. Staff from the Western Fisheries Research Center's Columbia River Research Laboratory (CRRL) frequently have used telemetry studies to evaluate new structures or operations at hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin, and these evaluations typically

  5. [Importance of displacement ventilation for operations and small surgical procedures from the infection preventive point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, A; Külpmann, R; Wille, F; Christiansen, B; Exner, M; Kohlmann, T; Heidecke, C D; Lippert, H; Oldhafer, K; Schilling, M; Below, H; Harnoss, J C; Assadian, O

    2010-02-01

    Surgical teams need to breathe air that is conducive to their health. An adequate exchange of air ensures oxygen supply, the ventilation of humidity, smells, toxic substances, especially narcotic gases and surgical smoke, pathogens and particles. With regard to the infection risk, DIN 1946 / 4 -differentiates between operation theaters with the highest demand for clean air (operation room class I a), operation theatres with a high demand (operation room class I b) and rooms within the operation theatres without special requirements, meaning that the microbial load in the air is close to or equal to that of normal in-room air quality (room class II). For an operation room class I a, ventilation that displaces the used air is necessary, while a regular ventilation is sufficient for operation room class I b. Because of ambiguous -results in previous studies, the necessity to define a -class I a for operation rooms is being questioned. Therefore, this review focuses on the analysis of the existing publications with respect to this -question. The result of this analysis indicates that so far there is only one surgical procedure, the -implantation of hip endoprosthetics, for which a preventive effect on SSI of a class I a ventilation (displacement of the used air) is documented. One recent study, reviewed critically here, -showed opposite results, but lacks methodological clarity. Thus, it is concluded that evidence for the requirement of operation room classes can only be derived from risk assessment (infection risk by surgical intervention, extent of possible damages), but not from epidemiological studies. Risk assessment must be based on the following criteria: size and depth of the operation field, -duration of the procedure, vascular perfusion of the wound, implantation of alloplastic material and general risk of the patient for an infection. From an infection preventive point of view, no class I a "displacement ventilation" is necessary for small surgical

  6. The risk of post-operative complications in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis patients on biologic therapy undergoing surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkour, W; Purssell, H; Chinoy, H; Griffiths, C E M; Warren, R B

    2016-01-01

    There is limited evidence as to whether biologic therapy should be stopped or continued in patients with psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who are undergoing surgical procedures. Current guidelines of care recommend a planned break from biologic therapy in those undergoing major surgical procedures. To audit current practice of managing biologic therapy peri-operatively in a tertiary referral psoriasis clinic against guidelines of care and to investigate the effects of continuing/stopping biologic therapy in psoriasis and PsA patients. A retrospective audit of psoriasis and PsA patients who had a surgical procedure whilst on biologic therapy. A proforma was used to collect information on the biologics used, whether they were stopped peri-operatively and whether patients developed post-operative complications and/or disease flare. A total of 42 patients who had 77 procedures were identified. Procedures ranged from skin surgery to orthopaedic and cardiothoracic surgery. Biologic therapy was continued in the majority of procedures (76%). There was no significant difference in post-operative risk of infection and delayed wound healing between those patients who continued and those who stopped biologic therapy, including those undergoing major surgery. Interrupting biologic therapy peri-operatively was associated with a significant (P = 0.003) risk of flare of psoriasis or PsA. Continuing biologic therapy in psoriasis and PsA patients peri-operatively did not increase the risk of post-operative complications. Interrupting biologic therapy peri-operatively significantly increased the risk of disease flare. This study is limited by cohort size and requires replication, ideally in a prospective randomized controlled manner. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  7. Improving International Standards in Surgical and Procedural Training through Comparative Operative Log Growth Charts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vannipa Vathanophas, M.D.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To use these growth charts to critically assess sufficiency of cases and parity of cases between residents, and to compare these growth charts to available international standards for minimum case numbers. Methods: Operative Log Growth Charts were developed for key indicator procedures for graduating otolaryngology residents in 2012-2014 at a large teaching hospital in the capital city of a newly industrialized country. Comparisons were made between years of training and required minimum case numbers published by the ACGME RRC for Otolaryngology. Results: Data was available to create 7 key indicator operative log growth charts to include all available data from 2012-2014 residents. These growth charts were used to assess growth in operative procedures for residents in the program compared to historical norms in the program. Graduating residents surpassed ACGME minimum case numbers in Bronchoscopy only and were below the minimum numbers for the other key indicators tested. Conclusion: There is significant heterogeneity in the standards for otolaryngology training between countries. It is possible to develop program-specific and country-specific operative log growth charts.

  8. Scheduling Operative Surgical Services to Recover CHAMPUS Surgical Procedures at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, Fort Campbell, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    number of deliveries and cesarean sections. Similarly, the number of circumcisions performed under CHAMPUS 50 attributable to the urology service...for accurate scheduling: case length and physician history . More in depth information is needed about the duration of each procedure. Currently, all...4,050.30 $2,025.15 89 TOT AVE CODE PROCEDURE CASES COST COST 7359 OTH MANUALLY ASSISTED DELIVERY 49 $150,376.79 $3,068.91 736 EPISIOTOMY 36 $96,595.63

  9. Routine pre-operative focused ultrasonography by anesthesiologists in patients undergoing urgent surgical procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtker, M T; Vang, M L; Grøfte, T

    2014-01-01

    Background Unexpected cardiopulmonary complications are well described during surgery and anesthesia. Pre-operative evaluation by focused cardiopulmonary ultrasonography may prevent such mishaps. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of unexpected cardiopulmonary pathology...

  10. Tattoo preservation during surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenna S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stefania Tenna, Pietro Francesco Delle Femmine, Alfonso Luca Pendolino, Beniamino Brunetti, Paolo Persichetti Plastic Surgery Unit, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, University of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: In recent years, the number of people getting tattoos has continued to increase. Tattoos are much more than cultural fads and cosmetic complements, and nowadays often represent events that express the patient's personality without words. The presence of a tattoo in the surgical field may be a problem for both the patient and the surgeon. However, the relevant literature is mostly based on complications related to application of tattoos or methods used to remove them. To date, few reports have focused on the importance of preserving a tattoo during a surgical procedure, and no organized studies could be found. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the range of solutions that surgeons can use to preserve tattoos during surgery. A PubMed database search was done to assess other surgeons' experience. The terms "tattoo" in combination with "incision", "surgery", "surgical", or "operative" were used as key words. Following a review of the literature, photographs of patients presenting with a tattoo in the last 5 years at University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome were identified in order to determine the frequency of patients presenting with tattoos in our department. The patients were classified according to sex, age, type of surgery, number of tattoos, and tattoo location. Specific requests to preserve tattoos were recorded. Finally, an algorithm of treatment according to tattoo dimension and location is proposed. Knowledge of all the strategies available for saving tattoos is important for plastic and cosmetic surgeons. If a tattooed area needs to be operated on, surgeons should attempt, when possible, to avoid altering the tattoo in order to maximize the final cosmetic result. Keywords: tattoo incision, body contouring, surgery

  11. Surgical procedures for voice restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawka, Tadeus; Hosemann, Werner

    2005-01-01

    Surgical procedures for voice restoration serve to improve oral communication by better vocal function. They comprise of phonomicrosurgery, with direct and indirect access to the larynx; laryngoplasty; laryngeal injections; and surgical laryngeal reinnervation. The basis for modern surgical techniques for voice disorders is the knowledge about the ultrastructure of the vocal folds and the increasing experience of surgeons in voice surgery, while facing high social and professional demands on the voice. Vocal activity limitation and participation restriction has become more important in the artistic and social areas. A number of surgical methods that have been developed worldwide for this reason, are presented in this article. Functional oriented surgery has to meet high standards. The diagnostics of vocal function has to be multi-dimensional in order to determine the indication and the appropriate surgical intervention. PMID:22073062

  12. ANAESTHESIA FOR OPHTHALMIC SURGICAL PROCEDURES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for ophthalmic surgical procedures (1-7). Regional anaesthetic techniques eliminate the need for some routine investigations like chest X-ray, ECG,as well as risk associated with general anaesthesia (8) they are more tolerable for elderly patients, ill patients, they are cheaper and generally more useful for ambulatory ...

  13. Cosmetic Surgical Procedures for the Aging Face

    OpenAIRE

    Owsley, John Q.

    1982-01-01

    In the past decade there has been a remarkable increase in the number of patients having cosmetic operations to achieve a more youthful appearance. Demographic, social and economic factors in our society have contributed to this phenomenon, along with an increase in the number of trained plastic surgeons. Moreover, there recently have been major technical advances in aesthetic surgical procedures, including innovations in anesthetic techniques. The newer procedures for forehead-plasty, blepha...

  14. Compliance with clothing regulations and traffic flow in the operating room: a multi-centre study of staff discipline during surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loison, G; Troughton, R; Raymond, F; Lepelletier, D; Lucet, J-C; Avril, C; Birgand, G

    2017-07-01

    This multi-centre study assessed operating room (OR) staff compliance with clothing regulations and traffic flow during surgical procedures. Of 1615 surgical attires audited, 56% respected the eight clothing measures. Lack of compliance was mainly due to inappropriate wearing of jewellery (26%) and head coverage (25%). In 212 procedures observed, a median of five people [interquartile range (IQR) 4-6] were present at the time of incision. The median frequency of entries to/exits from the OR was 10.6/h (IQR 6-29) (range 0-93). Reasons for entries to/exits from the OR were mainly to obtain materials required in the OR (N=364, 44.5%). ORs with low compliance with clothing regulations tended to have higher traffic flows, although the difference was not significant (P=0.12). Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of surgical procedures on prostate tumor gene expression profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Yin, Chang-Jun; Pavlovich, Christian; Luo, Jun; Getzenberg, Robert; Zhang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Current surgical treatment of prostate cancer is typically accomplished by either open radical prostatectomy (ORP) or robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP). Intra-operative procedural differences between the two surgical approaches may alter the molecular composition of resected surgical specimens, which are indispensable for molecular analysis and biomarker evaluation. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of different surgical procedures on RNA quali...

  16. Anaesthesia for Ophthalmic Surgical Procedures | Onakpoya | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    General anaesthesia was indicated in seven (41.2%) of emergency ophthalmic surgical procedures as compared to 16 (5.9%) of elective ophthalmic procedures P<0.0001. Conclusion: General anaesthesia was more commonly employed in children, eye wall repairs and emergency ophthalmic surgical procedures.

  17. [Check-list "Patient Safety" in the operating room: one year experience of 40,000 surgical procedures at the university hospital of Nice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rateau, F; Levraut, L; Colombel, A-L; Bernard, J-L; Quaranta, J-F; Cabarrot, P; Raucoules-Aimé, M

    2011-06-01

    The implementation of the check-list "Safe surgery saves live" (CL) has proven effective to reduce morbidity and perioperative mortality. Since 1st January 2010 it is a requirement of the HAS as part of the process of certification of hospitals. The CL has been established on all the operating rooms of our hospital after the onset of a near accident. The CL has been computerized to facilitate its adoption by professionals. An internal benchmarking was immediately implemented to allow each surgical specialty to benchmark themselves with other teams. We conducted an audit concerning the CL and periodic assessments in order to learn more precisely concerning the expectations and feelings of medical and nursing teams. Nearly 40 000 CL were collected in the patient record. The completeness of information of some items seems to reflect the difficulty for professionals to realize the difference between traceability and information sharing within the team on the implementation of a protocol. This audit has confirmed the difficulty in sharing information orally. The CL is involved in developing a safety culture in the operating room and led to the establishment of a risk mapping in the operating room and the recovery room and participation in the program error prevention procedure and surgical site through international program "High 5s" whose purpose is to improve the safety of care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. What is the safety of nonemergent operative procedures performed at night? A study of 10,426 operations at an academic tertiary care hospital using the American College of Surgeons national surgical quality program improvement database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrentine, Florence E; Wang, Hongkun; Young, Jeffrey S; Calland, James Forrest

    2010-08-01

    Ever-increasing numbers of in-house acute care surgeons and competition for operating room time during normal daytime business hours have led to an increased frequency of nonemergent general and vascular surgery procedures occurring at night when there are fewer residents, consultants, nurses, and support staff available for assistance. This investigation tests the hypothesis that patients undergoing such procedures after hours are at increased risk for postoperative morbidity and mortality. Clinical data for 10,426 operative procedures performed over a 5-year period at a single academic tertiary care hospital were obtained from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database. The prevalence of preoperative comorbid conditions, postoperative length of stay, morbidity, and mortality was compared between two cohorts of patients: one who underwent nonemergent operative procedures at night and other who underwent similar procedures during the day. Subsequent statistical comparisons utilized chi tests for comparisons of categorical variables and F-tests for continuous variables. Patients undergoing procedures at night had a greater prevalence of serious preoperative comorbid conditions. Procedure complexity as measured by relative value unit did not differ between groups, but length of stay was longer after night procedures (7.8 days vs. 4.3 days, p operating rooms.

  19. Surgical Site Infections and Associated Operative Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, Paul K; Zuckerbraun, Brian S

    Surgical site infection (SSI) contributes significantly to surgical morbidity. Patient factors and operative factors contribute to the risk of development of SSI. This review focuses on understanding operative characteristics that are associated with an increased risk of SSI. Much attention has been given to protocol care to reduce SSI, such as hair removal, skin preparation, and pre-operative antibiotic agents. Even with this, the appropriate antibiotic and re-dosing regimens often remain a challenge. Other operative factors such as blood loss/transfusion, emergency/urgent cases, duration of the operation, type of anesthesia, and resident involvement are also potentially modifiable to reduce the risk of SSI. Data are reviewed to highlight the increased risk associated with such factors. Strategies to reduce risk, such as operative care bundles, have significant promise to reduce the incidence of SSI for any given procedure.

  20. Elective plastic surgical procedures in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Mary H; Schooler, Wesley G

    2004-10-01

    Adolescent patients are seeking plastic surgery to correct deformities or perceived deformities in increasing numbers. It is essential for the physician to understand the influence of perceived body image irregularity that motivates patients of all ages to request plastic surgery. The increased demand for plastic surgical procedures among young patients is caused partially to increased media exposure to the available procedures offered by plastic surgeons. A successful aesthetic procedure can have a positive influence on a mature, well-motivated teenager, while surgery on a psychologically unstable adolescent can be damaging to the patient. The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery has developed guidelines for the appropriate selection of teenagers for aesthetic plastic surgery [26]. First, the physician must "assess physical maturity, because operating on a feature that has not yet fully developed could interfere with growth or negate the benefits of surgery in later years." Second, the physician should explore emotional maturity and expectations of the teenager. The teenager should understand the goals and limitations of the proposed surgery and have realistic expectations. Third, only board certified plastic surgeons who operate in accredited facilities should perform these procedures, to ensure the safety of the teenager and the quality of the procedure. Finally, teenagers and their parents should understand the risks of surgery, postoperative restrictions on activity, and typical recovery times. The referring physician and surgeon must be aware of the positive or negative effects that plastic surgery can have on the life of a teenager and be able to select patients who have the motivation, maturity, psychosocial, and emotional attributes that will lead to patient satisfaction.

  1. Tattoo preservation during surgical procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Tenna S; Delle Femmine PF; Pendolino AL; Brunetti B; Persichetti P

    2014-01-01

    Stefania Tenna, Pietro Francesco Delle Femmine, Alfonso Luca Pendolino, Beniamino Brunetti, Paolo Persichetti Plastic Surgery Unit, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, University of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: In recent years, the number of people getting tattoos has continued to increase. Tattoos are much more than cultural fads and cosmetic complements, and nowadays often represent events that express the patient's personality without words. The presence of a tattoo in the surgic...

  2. Surgical site infection rates following laparoscopic urological procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Arvin K; Srinivasan, Arun K; Cho, Jane; Sadek, Mostafa A; Kavoussi, Louis R

    2011-04-01

    Surgical site infections have been categorized by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as "never events". The incidence of surgical site infection following laparoscopic urological surgery and its risk factors are poorly defined. We evaluated surgical site infection following urological laparoscopic surgery and identified possible factors that may influence occurrence. Patients who underwent transperitoneal laparoscopic procedures during a 4-year period by a single laparoscopic surgeon were retrospectively reviewed. Surgical site infections were identified postoperatively and defined using the Centers for Disease Control criteria. Clinical parameters, comorbidities, smoking history, preoperative urinalysis and culture results as well as operative data were analyzed. Nonparametric testing using the Mann-Whitney U test, multivariable logistic regression and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. In 556 patients undergoing urological laparoscopic procedures 14 surgical site infections (2.5%) were identified at mean postoperative day 21.5. Of the 14 surgical site infections 10 (71.4%) were located at a specimen extraction site. Operative time, procedure type and increasing body mass index were significantly associated with the occurrence of surgical site infections (p = 0.007, p = 0.019, p = 0.038, respectively), whereas history of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.071) and intraoperative transfusion (p = 0.053) were found to trend toward significance. Age, gender, positive urine culture, steroid use, procedure type and smoking history were not significantly associated with surgical site infection. Body mass index and operative time remained significant predictors of surgical site infection on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Surgical site infection is an infrequent complication following laparoscopic surgery with the majority occurring at the specimen extraction site. Infection is associated with prolonged operative time and

  3. Automated emergency operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Ramirez, G.; Nelson, P.F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a training tool for the symptom oriented emergency operating procedures used at the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant. EOPs and operator training are intended to assist the operator for managing accident situations. A prototype expert system based on the EOPs has been developed for operator training. The demonstration expert system was developed using a commercial shell. The knowledge base consists of two parts. The specific operator actions to be executed for 5 selected accident sequences and the EOPs steps for the reactor pressure vessel control of the water level, pressure, and power. The knowledge is expressed in the form of IF-THEN production rules. A typical training session will display a set of conditions and will prompt the trainee to indicate the appropriate step to perform. This mode will guide the trainee through selected accident sequences. A second mode of the expert system will prompt the trainee for the current plant conditions and the expert system will respond with the EOPs which are required to be performed under these conditions. This allows the trainee to study What if situations

  4. Sepsis and Critical Illness Research Center investigators: protocols and standard operating procedures for a prospective cohort study of sepsis in critically ill surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Tyler J; Mira, Juan C; Ozrazgat-Baslanti, Tezcan; Ghita, Gabriella L; Wang, Zhongkai; Stortz, Julie A; Brumback, Babette A; Bihorac, Azra; Segal, Mark S; Anton, Stephen D; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Mohr, Alicia M; Efron, Philip A; Moldawer, Lyle L; Moore, Frederick A; Brakenridge, Scott C

    2017-08-01

    Sepsis is a common, costly and morbid cause of critical illness in trauma and surgical patients. Ongoing advances in sepsis resuscitation and critical care support strategies have led to improved in-hospital mortality. However, these patients now survive to enter state of chronic critical illness (CCI), persistent low-grade organ dysfunction and poor long-term outcomes driven by the persistent inflammation, immunosuppression and catabolism syndrome (PICS). The Sepsis and Critical Illness Research Center (SCIRC) was created to provide a platform by which the prevalence and pathogenesis of CCI and PICS may be understood at a mechanistic level across multiple medical disciplines, leading to the development of novel management strategies and targeted therapies. Here, we describe the design, study cohort and standard operating procedures used in the prospective study of human sepsis at a level 1 trauma centre and tertiary care hospital providing care for over 2600 critically ill patients annually. These procedures include implementation of an automated sepsis surveillance initiative, augmentation of clinical decisions with a computerised sepsis protocol, strategies for direct exportation of quality-filtered data from the electronic medical record to a research database and robust long-term follow-up. This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, approved by the University of Florida Institutional Review Board and is actively enrolling subjects. Dissemination of results is forthcoming. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Surgical procedures in pinniped and cetacean species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Jennifer L; Hendrickson, Dean A

    2013-12-01

    Significant advances in veterinary diagnostic and surgical techniques have been made over the past several decades. Many of these advances, however, have not reached the field of marine mammal medicine. A number of limitations exist: risks of anesthesia, anatomical challenges, difficulties with wound closure, environmental constraints, equipment limitations, and perceived risks. Despite these limitations, surgical treatments have been successfully utilized in marine mammals. While surgery is performed in pinnipeds more frequently than in cetaceans, studies conducted in the 1960s and 1970s on dolphin sleep and hearing demonstrated that general anesthesia can be successfully induced in cetaceans. Since this pioneering work, a small number of successful surgeries have been performed in dolphins under both general anesthesia and heavy sedation. While these surgical procedures in pinnipeds and cetaceans have typically been limited to wound management, dentistry, ophthalmic procedures, fracture repair, and superficial biopsy, a number of abdominal surgeries have also been performed. Recently there have been pioneering successes in the application of minimally invasive surgery in marine mammals. Many of the anatomical challenges that almost prohibit traditional laparotomies in cetacean species and present challenges in pinnipeds can be overcome through the use of laparoscopic techniques. Due to the limited number of pinnipeds and cetaceans in captivity and, thus, the limited case load for veterinarians serving marine mammal species, it is vital for knowledge of surgical procedures to be shared among those in the field. This paper reviews case reports of surgical procedures, both traditional and laparoscopic, in pinnipeds and cetaceans. Limitations to performing surgical procedures in marine mammals are discussed and surgical case reports analyzed in an effort to determine challenges that must be overcome in order to make surgery a more feasible diagnostic and treatment

  6. Characterization of aerosols produced by surgical procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, H.C.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Lundgren, D.L.; Guilmette, R.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Jones, R.K. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, R.S. [Lovelace Health Systems, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-07-01

    In many surgeries, especially orthopedic procedures, power tools such as saws and drills are used. These tools may produce aerosolized blood and other biological material from bone and soft tissues. Surgical lasers and electrocautery tools can also produce aerosols when tissues are vaporized and condensed. Studies have been reported in the literature concerning production of aerosols during surgery, and some of these aerosols may contain infectious material. Garden et al. (1988) reported the presence of papilloma virus DNA in the fumes produced from laser surgery, but the infectivity of the aerosol was not assessed. Moon and Nininger (1989) measured the size distribution and production rate of emissions from laser surgery and found that particles were generally less than 0.5 {mu}m diameter. More recently there has been concern expressed over the production of aerosolized blood during surgical procedures that require power tools. In an in vitro study, the production of an aerosol containing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was reported when power tools were used to cut tissues with blood infected with HIV. Another study measured the size distribution of blood aerosols produced by surgical power tools and found blood-containing particles in a number of size ranges. Health care workers are anxious and concerned about whether surgically produced aerosols are inspirable and can contain viable pathogens such as HIV. Other pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) are also of concern. The Occupational Safety and Health funded a project at the National Institute for Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute to assess the extent of aerosolization of blood and other tissues during surgical procedures. This document reports details of the experimental and sampling approach, methods, analyses, and results on potential production of blood-associated aerosols from surgical procedures in the laboratory and in the hospital surgical suite.

  7. Immersive Learning Experiences for Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Young-Woon; Dou, Mingsong; Chabra, Rohan; Menozzi, Federico; State, Andrei; Wallen, Eric; Fuchs, Henry

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a computer-based system that is designed to record a surgical procedure with multiple depth cameras and reconstruct in three dimensions the dynamic geometry of the actions and events that occur during the procedure. The resulting 3D-plus-time data takes the form of dynamic, textured geometry and can be immersively examined at a later time; equipped with a Virtual Reality headset such as Oculus Rift DK2, a user can walk around the reconstruction of the procedure room while controlling playback of the recorded surgical procedure with simple VCR-like controls (play, pause, rewind, fast forward). The reconstruction can be annotated in space and time to provide more information of the scene to users. We expect such a system to be useful in applications such as training of medical students and nurses.

  8. [Choice of bariatric and metabolic surgical procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui; Lin, Shibo; Guan, Wei

    2017-04-25

    Bariatric and metabolic surgery has become the clinical hot topic of the treatment of metabolic syndromes including obesity and diabetes mellitus, but how to choose the appropriate surgical procedure remains the difficult problem in clinical practice. Clinical guidelines of American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery(ASMBS)(version 2013) introduced the procedures of bariatric and metabolic surgery mainly including biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch(BPD-DS), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy(LSG). To choose the appropriate bariatric and metabolic procedure, the surgeons should firstly understand the indications and the contraindications of each procedure. Procedure choice should also consider personal condition (body mass index, comorbidities and severity of diabetes), family and socioeconomic status (postoperative follow-up attendance, understanding of potential surgical risk of gastrectomy and patient's will), family and disease history (patients with high risk of gastric cancer should avoid LRYGB; patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease should avoid LSG) and associated personal factors of surgeons. With the practice of bariatric and metabolic surgery, the defects, especially long-term complications, of different procedures were found. For example, LRYGB resulted in higher incidence of postoperative anemia and marginal ulcer, high risk of gastric cancer as well as the requirement of vitamin supplementation and regular follow-up. Though LSG has lower surgical risk, its efficacy of diabetes mellitus remission and long-term weight loss are inferior to the LRYGB. These results pose challenges to the surgeons to balance the benefits and risks of the bariatric procedures. A lot of factors can affect the choice of bariatric and metabolic procedure. Surgeons should choose the procedure according to patient's condition with the consideration of the

  9. Soil Sampling Operating Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Region 4 Science and Ecosystem Support Division (SESD) document that describes general and specific procedures, methods, and considerations when collecting soil samples for field screening or laboratory analysis.

  10. Veterinary students' recollection methods for surgical procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langebæk, Rikke; Tanggaard, Lene; Berendt, Mette

    2016-01-01

    When veterinary students face their first live animal surgeries, their level of anxiety is generally high and this can affect their ability to recall the procedure they are about to undertake. Multimodal teaching methods have previously been shown to enhance learning and facilitate recall; however...... commonly used. This is relevant information in the current educational situation, which uses an array of educational tools, and it stresses the importance of supporting the traditional surgical teaching methods with high-quality instructional videos....

  11. Surgical Instrument Sets for Special Operations Expeditionary Surgical Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Diane F; Sexton, Justin C; Benavides, Linda C; Benavides, Jerry M; Lundy, Jonathan B

    The deployment of surgical assets has been driven by mission demands throughout years of military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. The transition to the highly expeditious Golden Hour Offset Surgical Transport Team (GHOST- T) now offers highly mobile surgical assets in nontraditional operating rooms; the content of the surgical instrument sets has also transformed to accommodate this change. The 102nd Forward Surgical Team (FST) was attached to Special Operations assigned to southern Afghanistan from June 2015 to March 2016. The focus was to decrease overall size and weight of FST instrument sets without decreasing surgical capability of the GHOST-T. Each instrument set was evaluated and modified to include essential instruments to perform damage control surgery. The overall number of main instrument sets was decreased from eight to four; simplified augmentation sets have been added, which expand the capabilities of any main set. The overall size was decreased by 40% and overall weight decreased by 58%. The cardiothoracic, thoracotomy, and emergency thoracotomy trays were condensed to thoracic set. The orthopedic and amputation sets were replaced with an augmentation set of a prepackaged orthopedic external fixator set). An augmentation set to the major or minor basic sets, specifically for vascular injuries, was created. Through the reorganization of conventional FST surgical instrument sets to maintain damage control capabilities and mobility, the 102nd GHOST-T reduced surgical equipment volume and weight, providing a lesson learned for future surgical teams operating in austere environments. 2017.

  12. Combat surgical workload in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom: The definitive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Caryn A; Stockinger, Zsolt T; Gurney, Jennifer M

    2017-07-01

    Relatively few publications exist on surgical workload in the deployed military setting. This study analyzes US military combat surgical workload in Iraq and Afghanistan to gain a more thorough understanding of surgical training gaps and personnel requirements. A retrospective analysis of the Department of Defense Trauma Registry was performed for all Role 2 (R2) and Role 3 (R3) military treatment facilities from January 2001 to May 2016. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes were grouped into 18 categories based on functional surgical skill sets. The 189,167 surgical procedures identified were stratified by role of care, month, and year. Percentiles were calculated for the number of procedures for each skill set. A literature search was performed for publications documenting combat surgical workload during the same period. A total of 23,548 surgical procedures were performed at R2 facilities, while 165,619 surgical procedures were performed at R3 facilities. The most common surgical procedures performed overall were soft tissue (37.5%), orthopedic (13.84%), abdominal (13.01%), and vascular (6.53%). The least common surgical procedures performed overall were cardiac (0.23%), peripheral nervous system (0.53%), and spine (0.34%).Mean surgical workload at any point in time clearly underrepresented those units in highly kinetic areas, at times by an order of magnitude or more. The published literature always demonstrated workloads well in excess of the 50th percentile for the relevant time period. The published literature on combat surgical workload represents the high end of the spectrum of deployed surgical experience. These trends in surgical workload provide vital information that can be used to determine the manpower needs of future conflicts in ever-changing operational tempo environments. Our findings provide surgical types and surgical workload requirements that will be useful in surgical training and

  13. Effects of Frequent Glove Change on Outcomes of Orthopaedic Surgical Procedures - A Multicenter Study on Surgical Gloves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishit Palo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intact surgical gloves are a barrier to microorganisms migration between surgical team members and the patient. The surgical gloves are changed at various junctures but the effects of changing gloves during surgical procedures on various surgical parameters or clinical outcomes are not established. Aim: To determine rationale of glove change during orthopaedic procedures, differences amongst surgical parameters with and without changing the surgical gloves and whether frequent glove change affected surgical parameters or clinical outcomes. Materials and Methods: A prospective multicenter study conducted at three centers from January 2014 to January 2016. A 250 patients were divided into 2 groups (n=125 each in Group 1, surgical team operated with regular changing of gloves. In Group 2, only 1 set of double gloves were worn throughout the procedure. Surgical parameters or clinical outcomes were assessed for both the groups. Statistical analyses included the median, mode, range, Interquartile Range (IQR and sample standard deviation (s and independent-samples t-test. Bacterial counts were expressed as median with (IQR. Results: Surgical Timing Difference was 10 (S.D.- 4.2 minutes more in Group-1 (<0.05, Surgical Cost was higher in Group-1 by Rs.150-450 (<0.05. Outer glove micro-perforation rate was 5.85% and 8.15% in group-1 and 2 respectively with no inner glove perforation or Surgical Site Infections. Outer glove micro perforations were proportional to duration of surgery; operations lasting 120-210 and 61-120 minutes had 66.6% and 37.2% micro perforation rates respectively (p<0.05. Conclusion: Under standard operating conditions, procedures performed without glove change are shorter and cost effective than procedures performed with regular glove change with similar surgical and functional results. Judicious use of surgical gloves is a patient and environment friendly option, thereby reducing the hospital’s biomedical waste load.

  14. Does preoperative breast MRI significantly impact on initial surgical procedure and re-operation rates in patients with screen-detected invasive lobular carcinoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, K.; Sakellariou, S.; Dawson, N.; Litherland, J.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes the management of patients with screen-detected invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). Materials and methods: A retrospective, controlled, single-centre analysis of 138 cases of screen-detected ILC was performed. All patients were assessed by a single multidisciplinary team as to whether preoperative MRI altered the initial management decision or reduced re-operation rates. Results: Forty-three percent of patients had preoperative MRI. MRI guided surgical management in 40.7% patients. Primary mastectomy rates were not significantly different between the MRI and non-MRI groups (32% and 30% respectively, p=0.71). The MRI group had a lower secondary surgery rate (6.8% versus 15.2%); however, the results did not reach statistical significance, and there were no unnecessary mastectomies. Conclusion: MRI can be used appropriately to guide primary surgery in screen-detected ILC cases and affects the initial management decision in 40.7% of patients. It does not significantly affect the overall mastectomy rate or re-operation rates, but reduces the likelihood of the latter. As a result of this review, the authors' local policy for the use of MRI in screen-detected ILC patients has been modified. For patients undergoing mastectomy for ILC, MRI is no longer performed routinely to search for contralateral malignancy as this has no proven added benefit. - Highlights: • Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows more accurate tumour assessment and detects additional foci of disease in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). • Over the study's 3 year time frame, MRI guided surgical management of 40.7% screen-detected ILC patients scanned. • No statistically significant difference in mastectomy rates between MRI and non MRI groups. • Observed lower re-operation rate (6.8%-v-15.2%) in MRI group not statistically significant. • No MRI benefit for contralateral disease detection in ILC patients for

  15. Video content analysis of surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, Constantinos

    2018-02-01

    In addition to its therapeutic benefits, minimally invasive surgery offers the potential for video recording of the operation. The videos may be archived and used later for reasons such as cognitive training, skills assessment, and workflow analysis. Methods from the major field of video content analysis and representation are increasingly applied in the surgical domain. In this paper, we review recent developments and analyze future directions in the field of content-based video analysis of surgical operations. The review was obtained from PubMed and Google Scholar search on combinations of the following keywords: 'surgery', 'video', 'phase', 'task', 'skills', 'event', 'shot', 'analysis', 'retrieval', 'detection', 'classification', and 'recognition'. The collected articles were categorized and reviewed based on the technical goal sought, type of surgery performed, and structure of the operation. A total of 81 articles were included. The publication activity is constantly increasing; more than 50% of these articles were published in the last 3 years. Significant research has been performed for video task detection and retrieval in eye surgery. In endoscopic surgery, the research activity is more diverse: gesture/task classification, skills assessment, tool type recognition, shot/event detection and retrieval. Recent works employ deep neural networks for phase and tool recognition as well as shot detection. Content-based video analysis of surgical operations is a rapidly expanding field. Several future prospects for research exist including, inter alia, shot boundary detection, keyframe extraction, video summarization, pattern discovery, and video annotation. The development of publicly available benchmark datasets to evaluate and compare task-specific algorithms is essential.

  16. Preoperative surgical rehearsal using cadaveric fresh tissue surgical simulation increases resident operative confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Erin L; Leland, Hyuma A; Azadgoli, Beina; Minneti, Michael; Carey, Joseph N

    2017-08-01

    Rehearsal is an essential part of mastering any technical skill. The efficacy of surgical rehearsal is currently limited by low fidelity simulation models. Fresh cadaver models, however, offer maximal surgical simulation. We hypothesize that preoperative surgical rehearsal using fresh tissue surgical simulation will improve resident confidence and serve as an important adjunct to current training methods. Preoperative rehearsal of surgical procedures was performed by plastic surgery residents using fresh cadavers in a simulated operative environment. Rehearsal was designed to mimic the clinical operation, complete with a surgical technician to assist. A retrospective, web-based survey was used to assess resident perception of pre- and post-procedure confidence, preparation, technique, speed, safety, and anatomical knowledge on a 5-point scale (1= not confident, 5= very confident). Twenty-six rehearsals were performed by 9 residents (PGY 1-7) an average of 4.7±2.1 days prior to performance of the scheduled operation. Surveys demonstrated a median pre-simulation confidence score of 2 and a post-rehearsal score of 4 (Psafety, and anatomical knowledge improved as a result of simulation. Fresh tissue-based preoperative surgical rehearsal was effectively implemented in the residency program. Resident confidence and perception of technique improved. Survey results suggest that cadaveric simulation is beneficial for all levels of residents. We believe that implementation of preoperative surgical rehearsal is an effective adjunct to surgical training at all skill levels in the current environment of decreased work hours.

  17. Effect of surgical procedures on prostate tumor gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Yin, Chang-Jun; Pavlovich, Christian; Luo, Jun; Getzenberg, Robert; Zhang, Wei

    2012-09-01

    Current surgical treatment of prostate cancer is typically accomplished by either open radical prostatectomy (ORP) or robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP). Intra-operative procedural differences between the two surgical approaches may alter the molecular composition of resected surgical specimens, which are indispensable for molecular analysis and biomarker evaluation. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of different surgical procedures on RNA quality and genome-wide expression signature. RNA integrity number (RIN) values were compared between total RNA samples extracted from consecutive LRP (n=11) and ORP (n=24) prostate specimens. Expression profiling was performed using the Agilent human whole-genome expression microarrays. Expression differences by surgical type were analyzed by Volcano plot analysis and gene ontology analysis. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used for expression validation in an independent set of LRP (n=8) and ORP (n=8) samples. The LRP procedure did not compromise RNA integrity. Differential gene expression by surgery types was limited to a small subset of genes, the number of which was smaller than that expected by chance. Unexpectedly, this small subset of differentially expressed genes was enriched for those encoding transcription factors, oxygen transporters and other previously reported surgery-induced stress-response genes, and demonstrated unidirectional reduction in LRP specimens in comparison to ORP specimens. The effect of the LRP procedure on RNA quality and genome-wide transcript levels is negligible, supporting the suitability of LRP surgical specimens for routine molecular analysis. Blunted in vivo stress response in LRP specimens, likely mediated by CO(2) insufflation but not by longer ischemia time, is manifested in the reduced expression of stress-response genes in these specimens.

  18. Legal sanctity of consent for surgical procedures in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As surgeons, we are morally committed to respecting the right of self-determination of patients, thus an informed consent is necessary before any operative intervention. Many neurosurgical patients are incapable of giving consent because of impaired consciousness. Moreover, neurosurgical procedures involve high risks and often are time sensitive; therefore obtaining consent is a challenging job. Patients and their family members need immense courage, understanding, and trust before giving consent for a surgical procedure to a doctor. Lawsuits against doctors are on the rise and it is important to understand "what is consent?" in legal parlance.

  19. A new surgical procedure for hallux limitus treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, José; Moreno, Manuel; Gallart, José; González, David; Salcini, Jose L.; Gordillo, Luis; Deus, Javier; Lahoz, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the new Double-V osteotomy of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (1stMPJ) in patients with hallux limitus (HL). A study of 66 patients was performed, 33 patients were treated Cheilectomy and 33 were treated Double-V. All patients underwent an assessment of the passive mobility of the 1stMPJ before the procedure, reevaluated 12 months later evaluating dorsiflexion, plantarflexion, and patients status using both the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) for Hallux Metatarsophalangeal–Interphalangeal Scale. In comparing the improvement achieved regarding the increase of mobility obtained with surgical treatment, the feet operated with procedure Double-V gained significant degrees of movement increased in all analyzed parameters (P < .05). We achieved 13.33° more than average in dorsiflexion motion and 2.12° more than average in plantarflexion with regard to the feet that were operated with Cheilectomy procedure. Double-V scores on the AOFAS scale improved significantly (P = .000) 91.48 points postoperative, while with the following Cheilectomy only 79.30 points. This new surgical technique, easy to perform and with low complexity in surgical execution and a minimum of complications, produces better clinical and functional results that Cheilectomy alone. PMID:28953644

  20. Exposure to key surgical procedures during specialist general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The logged experience of specialist general surgical trainees has made it possible to analyse their surgical procedural exposure. Objective. To evaluate the exposure to key surgical procedures of South African (SA) trainees in general surgery from logbooks submitted to the Colleges of Medicine of South Africa ...

  1. Electronic Procedures for Medical Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Electronic procedures are replacing text-based documents for recording the steps in performing medical operations aboard the International Space Station. S&K Aerospace, LLC, has developed a content-based electronic system-based on the Extensible Markup Language (XML) standard-that separates text from formatting standards and tags items contained in procedures so they can be recognized by other electronic systems. For example, to change a standard format, electronic procedures are changed in a single batch process, and the entire body of procedures will have the new format. Procedures can be quickly searched to determine which are affected by software and hardware changes. Similarly, procedures are easily shared with other electronic systems. The system also enables real-time data capture and automatic bookmarking of current procedure steps. In Phase II of the project, S&K Aerospace developed a Procedure Representation Language (PRL) and tools to support the creation and maintenance of electronic procedures for medical operations. The goal is to develop these tools in such a way that new advances can be inserted easily, leading to an eventual medical decision support system.

  2. A new surgical procedure for the very severe inverted nipple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, S; Sakai, Y; Izawa, H

    1999-01-01

    Severe cases of inverted nipple usually cannot be corrected by a simple procedure, especially if the nipple cannot be pulled out above the areolar level by manipulation. We describe a new method for these cases and we classify the inverted nipple into 3 grades following the choice of their required operative procedure. Our classification for inverted nipple is as follows. Grade I: The inversion is corrected simply by manipulation; the nipple protrusion is long-lasting. Grade II: The inversion can be corrected by manipulation, but recurrence of the inversion is frequent. Grade III: The inversion cannot be corrected without a surgical procedure. Cases of Grades I and II can be corrected by conventional simple surgical procedures. But some cases of Grade II and almost all of Grade III cannot be corrected by conventional methods, in spite of the high frequency of relapse. Cutting of the lactiferous duct, such as the Pitanguy and Broadbent methods, can correct the very severely inverted nipple. But if we want to maintain the lactiferous function after correction, we had better not cut the lactiferous ducts. Our new procedure for correcting very severe cases can keep the lactiferous function after correction without any relapse. In order to avoid the recurrence of nipple retraction and to maintain the lactiferous function, the new surgical procedure that we performed makes an incision deeply and vertically on the nipple to free the lactiferous ducts from the contracted tissues surrounding them. After extension or resection of the restricting tissues, the nipple is raised easily. This procedure will preserve the feeding function and prevent the recurrence of nipple inversion. For very severe cases, using a dermal flap inserted into the base of the nipple may be necessary due to its role of interposing tissue to prevent reverting to inversion.

  3. Meconium Ileus–Is a Single Surgical Procedure Adequate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagith Nagar

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Meconium ileus is one of the gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF, and affects 15% of neonates. The condition results from the accumulation of sticky inspissated meconium. Both nonoperative and operative therapies may be effective in relieving obstruction. The treatment of choice for uncomplicated meconium ileus is the use of enteral N-acetylcysteine or Gastrografin enemata. Once such therapy fails, surgery is indicated. A number of operative procedures are in use, including Bishop-Koop enterostomy, T-tube irrigation, resection and primary anastomosis, and enterotomy with irrigation and primary closure. During the period 1991-2003, five newborns required surgical intervention for uncomplicated meconium ileus. None responded to conservative management. All were males, including one set of twins. All underwent laparotomy, enterotomy, appendectomy, irrigation and closure of enterotomy. None required a second surgical procedure. CF was confirmed in all, and in each case, both parents were found to be genetic carriers of a mutational form of CF. A single surgical intervention is preferable in these patients, in view of the high rate of pulmonary involvement in CF patients. Enterotomy, irrigation and primary closure are the treatment of choice for uncomplicated meconium ileus.

  4. Operating procedures and safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnino, A.

    1993-01-01

    The development of new technologies in recent years has led to a tremendous increase in the information to be mastered by operators in industrial processes. The information at operators disposal both in routine situations and accidental ones needs to be well prepared and organized to ensure reliability and safety. The man-machine interface should give operators all the necessary and clear indications on the process status and evolution so that the operators can operate the installation through adequate procedures. Procedures represent the real interface and mode of action of the operators on the machine, and they are of prime importance. Although they are by essence quite different, the routine, accident, and emergency procedures have in common one attribute: They all require a good safety culture both in their development and their implementation. From the definition given by the members of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG), open-quotes Safety culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance,close quotes one can see that two aspects are embedded, a collective attitude that in fact is reflected in the managerial framework and an individual one that is linked to personnel behavior and work practices

  5. Computer managed emergency operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamun, I.; Mavko, B.; Stritar, A.

    1994-01-01

    New computer technology is a very effective tool for developing a new design of nuclear power plant control room. It allows designer possibility to create a tool for managing with large database of power plant parameters and displaying them in different graphic forms and possibility of automated execution of well known task. The structure of Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP) is very suitable for programming and for creating expert system. The Computerized Emergency Operating Procedures (CEOP) described in this paper can be considered as an upgrading of standard EOP approach. EmDiSY (Emergency Display System - computer code name for CEOP) main purpose is to supply the operator with necessary information, to document all operator actions and to execute well known tasks. It is a function oriented CEOP that gives operator guidance on how to verify the critical safety functions and how to restore and maintain these functions where they are degraded. All knowledge is coded and stored in database files. The knowledge base consists from stepping order for verifying plant parameters, desired values of parameters, conditions for comparison and links between procedures and actions. Graphical shell allows users to read database, to follow instruction and to find out correct task. The desired information is concentrated in one screen and allows users to focus on a task. User is supported in two ways: desired parameter values are displayed on the process picture and automated monitoring critical safety function status trees are all time in progress and available to the user. (author). 4 refs, 4 figs

  6. Operative Duration and Risk of Surgical Site Infection in Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Coy, Shannon; Simmons, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    The association of surgical duration with the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has not been quantified in neurosurgery. We investigated the association of operative duration in neurosurgical procedures with the incidence of SSI. We performed a retrospective cohort study involving patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures from 2005 to 2012 and were registered in the American College of Surgeons National Quality Improvement Project registry. To control for confounding, we used multivariable regression models and propensity score conditioning. During the study period there were 94,744 patients who underwent a neurosurgical procedure and met the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 4.1% developed a postoperative SSI within 30 days. Multivariable logistic regression showed an association between longer operative duration with higher incidence of SSI (odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.20). Compared with procedures of moderate duration (third quintile, 40th-60th percentile), patients undergoing the longest procedures (>80th percentile) had higher odds (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.86-2.31) of developing SSI. The shortest procedures (operative duration was associated with increased incidence of SSI for neurosurgical procedures. These results can be used by neurosurgeons to inform operative management and to stratify patients with regard to SSI risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Image-guidance for surgical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Terry M.

    2006-07-01

    Contemporary imaging modalities can now provide the surgeon with high quality three- and four-dimensional images depicting not only normal anatomy and pathology, but also vascularity and function. A key component of image-guided surgery (IGS) is the ability to register multi-modal pre-operative images to each other and to the patient. The other important component of IGS is the ability to track instruments in real time during the procedure and to display them as part of a realistic model of the operative volume. Stereoscopic, virtual- and augmented-reality techniques have been implemented to enhance the visualization and guidance process. For the most part, IGS relies on the assumption that the pre-operatively acquired images used to guide the surgery accurately represent the morphology of the tissue during the procedure. This assumption may not necessarily be valid, and so intra-operative real-time imaging using interventional MRI, ultrasound, video and electrophysiological recordings are often employed to ameliorate this situation. Although IGS is now in extensive routine clinical use in neurosurgery and is gaining ground in other surgical disciplines, there remain many drawbacks that must be overcome before it can be employed in more general minimally-invasive procedures. This review overviews the roots of IGS in neurosurgery, provides examples of its use outside the brain, discusses the infrastructure required for successful implementation of IGS approaches and outlines the challenges that must be overcome for IGS to advance further.

  8. Magnitude of non-operative surgical emergency admissions; service implications for surgical and radiological practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, R M; Reynolds, I; Ryan, R S; Khan, I; Khan, W; Waldron, R; Barry, K

    2017-02-01

    Financial sustainability is an area of sharp ongoing focus across the broad spectrum of the Irish Health Service. Recent attention has been drawn to the financial implications of non-operative surgical admissions, suggesting that some of these may be unnecessary. In this study, we aim to determine the volume of emergency surgical admissions to Mayo University Hospital (MUH), in particular, to identify the scale of non-operative admissions and to assess the wider inherent implications for acute hospital services. An electronic handover system for emergency surgical admissions was introduced in MUH in September 2014. All surgical admissions from September 1st 2014 to August 31st 2015 were identified from this prospectively maintained database. HIPE (Hospital Inpatient Enquiry) data were not used in this study. Theatre logbooks confirmed those patients who required operative intervention. 1466 patients were admitted as emergencies during the study period. 58 % (850) were male and median age was 48 years (0-100). Average length of stay was 5 days (range 1-125). 327 patients (22.3 %) required operative intervention. The most commonly performed procedure was appendicectomy (52.5 %). 48 (3.3 %) patients were transferred to other hospitals. 131 (8.9 %) admissions related to the acute urological conditions. Of the 1466 admissions, 546 underwent a CT scan, while 342 patients proceeded to ultrasound. Almost 80 % of all surgical emergency admissions were discharged without undergoing a formal operative procedure while generating a significant workload for the radiology department. Changes in working practices and hospital network structures will be required to reduce the burden of non-operative emergency admissions.

  9. Surgical conditions and requested procedures for ruminants and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical conditions and requested procedures for ruminants and small animals handled at the College of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture clinic, Debre Zeit, Ethiopia: A retrospective study 1999-2007.

  10. Utilization of banked blood in pediatric surgical procedures in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... quantities of blood but utilizing only little is tantamount to inadequate use and delays surgical intervention. Indirectly, it increases cost of surgery. There is need to rationalize our blood ordering habits without causing harm to patients. Key words: Banked Blood, Calabar – Nigeria, pediatrics, surgical procedures, utilization ...

  11. FFTF operations procedures preparation guide. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    The Guide is intended to provide guidelines for the initial preparation of FFTF Operating Procedures. The Procedures Preparation Guide was developed from the plan presented and approved in the FFTF Reactor Plant Procedures Plan, PC-1, Revision 3

  12. Body Mass Index and Operating Times in Vascular Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Durup-Dickenson

    Full Text Available : Introduction: The influence of body mass index (BMI on operating times in central and peripheral vascular surgical procedures was investigated. Report: A national cohort of Danish patients who underwent a vascular procedure between 1983 and 2012 was used for analysis. Data were analysed with pairwise comparisons of BMI groups for operating times using the independent samples Kruskall–Wallis test. Discussion: A total of 3,255 carotid endarterectomies; 6,885 central vascular procedures; and 4,488 peripheral bypasses were included for the analysis. Median operating times for carotid endarterectomy and central vascular procedures were, respectively, 5 and 15 minutes longer in obese patients than in normal weight patients. This represents a 7% and 10% increase in median operating times, respectively. Linear and multi-adjusted linear regressions were conducted adjusting for confounders, showing a significant correlation between BMI and operating time. Obesity significantly increased the operating times in carotid endarterectomy and central vascular procedures. These may have ramifications for the individual operative stress but not necessarily on logistical operation planning. Keywords: Body mass index (BMI, Obesity, Operating time, Surgery, Vascular surgical procedures

  13. Surgical procedures in liver transplant patients: A monocentric retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommacale, Daniele; Nagarajan, Ganesh; Lhuaire, Martin; Dondero, Federica; Pessaux, Patrick; Piardi, Tullio; Sauvanet, Alain; Kianmanesh, Reza; Belghiti, Jacques

    2017-05-01

    Pre-existing chronic liver diseases and the complexity of the transplant surgery procedures lead to a greater risk of further surgery in transplanted patients compared to the general population. The aim of this monocentric retrospective cohort study was to assess the epidemiology of surgical complications in liver transplanted patients who require further surgical procedures and to characterize their post-operative risk of complications to enhance their medical care. From January 1997 to December 2011, 1211 patients underwent orthotropic liver transplantation in our center. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was performed considering patients who underwent surgical procedures more than three months after transplantation. We recorded liver transplantation technique, type of surgery, post-operative complications, time since the liver transplant and immunosuppressive regimens. Among these, 161 patients (15%) underwent a further 183 surgical procedures for conditions both related and unrelated to the transplant. The most common surgical procedure was for an incisional hernia repair (n = 101), followed by bilioenteric anastomosis (n = 44), intestinal surgery (n = 23), liver surgery (n = 8) and other surgical procedures (n = 7). Emergency surgery was required in 19 procedures (10%), while 162 procedures (90%) were performed electively. Post-operative mortality and morbidity were 1% and 30%, respectively. According to the Dindo-Clavien classification, the most common grade of morbidity was grade III (46%), followed by grade II (40%). Surgical procedures on liver transplanted patients are associated with a significantly high risk of complications, irrespective of the time elapsed since transplantation. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of hydrocolloid with conventional gauze dressing in prevention of wound infection after clean surgical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalique, M.S.; Shukr, I.; Khalique, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    To compare hydrocolloid with conventional gauze dressing in prevention of infections after clean surgical procedures. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Surgery, CMH Rawalpindi from 22 Jan 2010 to 22 Aug 2010. Patients and Methods: A total of 400 patients undergoing clean surgical procedures were randomly allocated in two equal groups, A and B by lottery method. In group A. simple gauze dressing was applied after clean surgical procedures while in group B hydrocolloid dressing was used. On 7th post operative day, patients were observed for presence of infection. Results: Mean age of sample was 42.08 +-11.112 years. In group A out of 200 Patients, 14 (7.0%) while in group B 10 (5%) developed infection postoperatively (p=0.709). Conclusion: There is no difference in the rate of infection when using a gauze dressing or a hydrocolloid dressing after clean surgical procedure. (author)

  15. Infection Risk in Sterile Operative Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacconelli, Evelina; Müller, Niklas F; Lemmen, Sebastian; Mutters, Nico T; Hagel, Stefan; Meyer, Elisabeth

    2016-04-22

    The main objective of hospital hygiene and infection prevention is to protect patients from preventable nosocomial infections. It was recently stated that the proper goal should be for zero infection rates in sterile surgical procedures. In this article, we attempt to determine whether this demand is supported by the available literature. We systematically searched the Medline and EMBASE databases for studies published in the last 10 years on the efficacy of infection control measures and carried out a meta-analysis according to the PRISMA tool. We used the following search terms: "aseptic surgery," "intervention," "surgical site infection," "nosocomial infection," "intervention," and "prevention." 2277 articles were retrieved, of which 204 were acquired in full text and analyzed. The quantitative analysis included 7 prospective cohort studies on the reduction of nosocomial infection rates after aseptic surgery. The measures used included training sessions, antibiotic prophylaxis, and operative-site disinfection and cleaning techniques. These interventions succeeded in reducing postoperative wound infections (relative risk (RR] 0.99 [0.98; 1.00]). Subgroup analyses on antibiotic prophylaxis (RR 0.99 [0.98; 1.01]) and noncontrolled trials (RR 0.97 [0.92; 1.02]) revealed small, insignificant effects. A multimodal approach with the participation of specialists from various disciplines can further reduce the rate of postoperative infection. A reduction to zero is not realistic and is not supported by available evidence.

  16. Distribution of isodose curves in urological surgical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanfredi, M.P.; Dias, J.H.; Ravazio, R.C.; Anés, M.; Bacelar, A.; Lykawka, R.

    2017-01-01

    During urological surgical procedures with fluoroscopy, the doses of the care team may be significant. However, the knowledge of the occupational exposure of these professionals is still very incipient in the national surgical centers. The objective of the study is to determine the isodose curves of the urological surgical procedures, in order to estimate the exposure of the personnel involved. The equipment used was a Arco-C BV Philips Bracelet. Patients with thicknesses of 20 and 28 cm were simulated using acrylic plates. The dose rates were measured with RaySafe i2 Unfors dosimeters positioned in a 50 x 50 cm mesh at three different heights of the floor: 95, 125 and 165 centimeters respectively corresponding to the gonadal, thoracic and crystalline regions of a typical adult . The isodose curves applied to the distribution of the surgical team suggest that the exposures are in the following descending order of intensity: primary physician, auxiliary physician, scrub nurse, anesthetist and nurse

  17. Wound classification in pediatric surgical procedures: Measured and found wanting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyetunji, Tolulope A; Gonzalez, Dani O; Gonzalez, Katherine W; Nwomeh, Benedict C; St Peter, Shawn D

    2016-06-01

    Surgical wound classification has emerged as a measure of surgical quality of care, but scant data exist in the era of minimally invasive procedures, especially in children. The aim of this study is to examine the surgical site infection (SSI) rate by wound classification during common pediatric surgical procedures. A retrospective analysis of the 2013 Pediatric-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (Peds-NSQIP) dataset was conducted. Patients undergoing pyloromyotomy, cholecystectomy, ostomy reversal, and appendectomy were included. Wound classification, SSI rate, reoperation, and readmission were analyzed. A total of 10,424 records were included. Pyloromyotomy, a clean case, had a 0.7% SSI rate, while ostomy reversal, a clean contaminated case, had an SSI in 6.9% of cases. Appendectomy for nonperforated acute appendicitis and laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholecystitis, both contaminated cases, had SSI rates of 2.1% and 40% for dirty cases. Reoperations and readmission rates ranged from wound classifications systems do not reflect surgical risk in children and remain questionable tools for benchmarking surgical care in children. Role of readmissions and reoperations as quality of care indices needs further investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Operant Variability: Procedures and Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Armando; Tonneau, Francois

    2012-01-01

    Barba's (2012) article deftly weaves three main themes in one argument about operant variability. From general theoretical considerations on operant behavior (Catania, 1973), Barba derives methodological guidelines about response differentiation and applies them to the study of operant variability. In the process, he uncovers unnoticed features of…

  19. Soil Gas Sampling Operating Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Region 4 Science and Ecosystem Support Division (SESD) document that describes general and specific procedures, methods, and considerations when collecting soil gas samples for field screening or laboratory analysis.

  20. Reported analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing experimental surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach Matthew C

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has become widely accepted that whenever animals are used in scientific procedures, the 3Rs principle of replacement, reduction and refinement described by William Russell and Rex Burch should be adhered to. Animals should be replaced with non-sentient alternatives if possible, the number of animals used should be reduced and experimental procedures should be refined to minimise pain, suffering and distress. Administration of analgesic agents to animals undergoing surgical procedures is a refinement used to alleviate pain. In this study, a structured literature review was carried out to examine current trends in analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing experimental surgical procedures. Results 128 papers from 51 peer-reviewed journals were selected for inclusion in this review. Reporting administration of systemic analgesia to rabbits in peer-reviewed scientific papers increased significantly from 16% to 50% between 1995-1997 and 2005-2007 (P P Conclusions Although this review provides evidence that systemic analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing surgical procedures is increasing, rabbits do not always receive analgesia when they undergo experimental surgery. Other practices in rabbit perioperative care that could be improved, highlighted by this survey include: 1 changing the timing of analgesic administration by giving systemic analgesics pre- or perioperatively rather than only postoperatively, 2 using multimodal analgesia when pain is likely to be moderate to severe and 3 increasing the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and use of other techniques such as epidural analgesia particularly for orthopaedic procedures.

  1. Developing, adopting and adapting operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabouhams, J.

    1986-01-01

    This lecture specifies all the dispositions which have been taken by EDF Nuclear and Fossil Generation Department - according to the fact that availability and safety largely depend on the quality of the procedures and their easy handling - in order to develop, adopt and adapt the operating procedures. The following points are treated: General organization of procedures for plant operation during normal and abnormal conditions; Personnel and extend of responsibility involved into the development of procedures (research center, training center, specialized services, nuclear station, etc.); Validation of the procedures by means of full-scope simulators; Modifications of the procedures taking into account operation experience in material and human fields; Development of simulation softs in order to perform the procedures in abnormal situations; Evolution of operating technics and future skills. (orig.)

  2. Blood utilization in elective surgical procedures in Ilorin | Olawumi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood utilization was evaluated in elective surgical procedures over a period of 6 months using different indices such as crossmatch to transfusion ratio(C/T ratio), transfusion probability (%T), and transfusion index (TI). Out of 436 units of blood crossmatched for 207 patients, only 132 were transfused with no utilization of ...

  3. Ophthalmic surgical procedures in children at the University of Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The second commonest indication for surgery was cataract (23.0%), while eyeball removal (9% of cases) due to tumours or infection was the third commonest surgical procedure. Strabismus and pterygium surgery were infrequently performed (0.9%). Late presentation for eye surgery was the pattern in most of the cases.

  4. [Surgical procedures involved in claims for alleged defects in praxis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimany-Manso, Josep; Benet-Travé, J; Bruguera-Cortada, M; Torné-Escasany, R; Klamburg-Pujol, J; Gómez-Durán, Esperanza L

    2014-03-01

    Medical professional liability and adverse events in health care are major concerns worldwide and the analysis of claims for alleged defects in praxis is a potential source of knowledge. High rates of adverse events and complaints have been reported in surgical procedures. This article analyzes the claims registered by the Council of Medical Colleges in Catalonia between 1986 and 2012, and explores surgical procedures claimed (ICD- 9-CM coding), as well as the final outcome of the claim. Among the 5,419 records identified on surgical procedures, the interventions of the musculoskeletal system and skin and integument showed the highest frequencies. Interventions related to "non-curative" medicine should be emphasized because of their higher rates of economical agreement or condemnation outcomes, which were significantly higher for mastopexia. The results underscore the importance of the surgical area in medical professional liability and the high risk of payouts among those procedures belonging to the so-called "non-curative" medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Referencing orbital measures for surgical and cosmetic procedures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Orbital morphometry is an important consideration during surgical procedures such as reconstruction of the face and cranium. These are done to restore lost functional capacity or to improve cosmetic appearance. Periorbital and intraorbital neurovascular structures risk relative damage during these maneuvers. A thorough ...

  6. Cancellation of elective surgical procedures in the university ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cancellation of elective surgical procedures in the university teaching hospital centre Yalgado Ouedraogo in Burkina Faso: incidence, reasons and proposals for improvement pital ls for. In total, 63.1% (n = 65) had their scheduled surgery as planned. The scheduled surgery and cancellations are shown according to.

  7. Operating manual for the High Flux Isotope Reactor: operating procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-11-01

    Procedures are presented for reactor operation; instrumentation and control; reactor components; research facilities; cooling systems; containment heating, venting, and air conditioning; emergency procedures; waste systems; on-site utilities; records and data accumulation; auxiliary equipment; and technical specification requirements.

  8. Surgical Procedures Needed to Eradicate Infection in Knee Septic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Omkar H; Patel, Karan A; Andersen, Clark R; Carmichael, Kelly D

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the knee is encountered on a regular basis by orthopedists and nonorthopedists. No established therapeutic algorithm exists for septic arthritis of the knee, and there is much variability in management. This study assessed the number of surgical procedures, arthroscopic or open, required to eradicate infection. The study was a retrospective analysis of 79 patients who were treated for septic knee arthritis from 1995 to 2011. Patients who were included in the study had native septic knee arthritis that had resolved with treatment consisting of irrigation and debridement, either open or arthroscopic. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore the relation between the interval between onset of symptoms and index surgery and the use of arthroscopy and the need for multiple procedures. Fifty-two patients met the inclusion criteria, and 53% were male, with average follow-up of 7.2 years (range, 1-16.2 years). Arthroscopic irrigation and debridement was performed in 70% of cases. On average, successful treatment required 1.3 procedures (SD, 0.6; range, 1-4 procedures). A significant relation (P=.012) was found between time from presentation to surgery and the need for multiple procedures. With arthroscopic irrigation and debridement, most patients with septic knee arthritis require only 1 surgical procedure to eradicate infection. The need for multiple procedures increases with time from onset of symptoms to surgery. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Post-operative Complications Following Emergency Operations Performed by Trainee Surgeons: A Retrospective Analysis of Surgical Deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrah, Noha; Stephan, Karen; Lovell, Janaka; Ibrahim, Joseph; Beiles, Barry

    2018-01-23

    Adequate surgical care of patients and concurrent training of residents is achieved in elective procedures through careful case selection and adequate supervision. Whether this applies when trainees are involved in emergency operations remains equivocal. The aim of this study was therefore to compare the risk of post-operative complications following emergency procedures performed by senior operators compared with supervised trainees. This is a retrospective cohort study examining in-hospital deaths of patients across all surgical specialties who underwent emergency surgery in Australian public hospitals reported to the national surgical mortality audit between 2009 and 2015. Multivariable logistic regression was used to explore whether there was an association between the level of operator experience (senior operator vs trainee) and the occurrence of post-operative surgical complications following an emergency procedure. Our population consisted of 6920 patients. There were notable differences between the trainees and senior operator groups; trainees more often operated on patients aged over 80 years, with cardiovascular and neurological risk factors. Senior operators more often operated on very young and obese patients with advanced malignancy and hepatic disease. Supervised trainees had a lower rate of post-operative complications compared with senior operators; 18% (n = 396) and 25% (n = 1210), respectively (p emergency operations, provided that cases are judiciously selected.

  10. Impact of Residency Training Level on the Surgical Quality Following General Surgery Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiero, Dominik; Slankamenac, Maja; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Slankamenac, Ksenija

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the safety of surgical performance by residents of different training level performing common general surgical procedures. Data were consecutively collected from all patients undergoing general surgical procedures such as laparoscopic cholecystectomy, laparoscopic appendectomy, inguinal, femoral and umbilical hernia repair from 2005 to 2011 at the Department of Surgery of the University Hospital of Zurich, Switzerland. The operating surgeons were grouped into junior residents, senior residents and consultants. The comprehensive complication index (CCI) representing the overall number and severity of all postoperative complications served as primary safety endpoint. A multivariable linear regression analysis was used to analyze differences between groups. Additionally, we focused on the impact of senior residents assisting junior residents on postoperative outcome comparing to consultants. During the observed time, 2715 patients underwent a general surgical procedure. In 1114 times, a senior resident operated and in 669 procedures junior residents performed the surgery. The overall postoperative morbidity quantified by the CCI was for consultants 5.0 (SD 10.7), for senior residents 3.5 (8.2) and for junior residents 3.6 (8.3). After adjusting for possible confounders, no difference between groups concerning the postoperative complications was detected. There is also no difference in postoperative complications detectable if junior residents were assisted by consultants then if assisted by senior residents. Patient safety is ensured in general surgery when performed by surgical junior residents. Senior residents are able to adopt the role of the teaching surgeon in charge without compromising patients' safety.

  11. Impact of procedures on operator performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozinsky, E.J.

    1983-01-01

    In our control room simulator research, procedures seem to be a powerful performance shaping factor effecting control room operator performance. Error probability is greatly increased by poor procedures. Narrative style procedures containing several actions cause omissions approaching 100% of later actions in a step. Listed steps which are inconsistent in format can be omitted more than 10% of the time. Wording is critical; a mismatch between procedure and control panel labeling can cause omission rates up to 33%. With procedures having such dramatic impact, the current emphasis on control panel revision and safety displays is misplaced. More risk reduction per dollar can be achieved, and more rapidly, by cleaning up the procedures

  12. Surgical Cost Disclosure May Reduce Operating Room Expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Luke S; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Ong, Alvin C; Lombardi, Nicholas J; Wowkanech, Charles D; Mehnert, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    Health care expenditures are rising in the United States. Recent policy changes are attempting to reduce spending through the development of value-based payment systems that rely heavily on cost transparency. This study was conducted to investigate whether cost disclosure influences surgeons to reduce operating room expenditures. Beginning in 2012, surgeon scorecards were distributed at a regional health care system. The scorecard reported the actual direct supply cost per case for a specific procedure and compared each surgeon's data with those of other surgeons in the same subspecialty. Rotator cuff repair was chosen for analysis. Actual direct supply cost per case was calculated quarterly and collected over a 2-year period. Surgeons were given a questionnaire to determine their interest in the scorecard. Actual direct supply cost per rotator cuff repair procedure decreased by $269 during the study period. A strong correlation (R 2 =0.77) between introduction of the scorecards and cost containment was observed. During the study period, a total of $39,831 was saved. Of the surgeons who were queried, 89% were interested in the scorecard and 56% altered their practice as a result. Disclosure of surgical costs may be an effective way to control operating room spending. The findings suggest that providing physicians with knowledge about their surgical charges can alter per-case expenditures. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e269-e274.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Virtual reality surgical simulation for lower urinary tract endoscopy and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyak, Michael J; Santangelo, Kristin; Hahn, James; Kaufman, Roger; Carleton, Thurston; Hua, Xing Cheng; Walsh, Raymond J

    2002-04-01

    To provide a realistic experience of lower urinary tract endoscopic procedures, we have developed and continue to expand a computer-based surgical simulator that incorporates a surgical tool interface with anatomic detail and haptic feedback. Surface-based geometric data for the lower urinary tract were generated from the National Library of Medicine Visible Human dataset. The three-dimensional texture map of the surface geometry was developed from recorded endoscopic video procedures. Geometry and associated texture maps were rendered in real time using the Silicon Graphics Extreme Impacts program. The surgical interface device incorporated all normal ranges of motion and resistance that occur within an actual operative environment. The hands-on endoscopic device attached to the interface device was provided by Circon-ACMI, Inc. Urologic residents evaluated the program for correlation with actual endoscopic procedures. Texture-mapped digitized images provided a close anatomic similarity to actual videoendoscopic images. Virtual endoscopy of the lower urinary tract was reproducible and closely simulated actual visual and tactile endoscopic experience. Virtual reality surgical simulation is feasible for a variety of lower urinary tract procedures. This system coordinates visual perception with appropriate haptic feedback in both longitudinal and rotational axes. These types of procedures may be incorporated into future educational experiences for urologists to introduce new techniques and to provide documentation of surgical experience.

  14. A medical platform for simulation of surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurfjell, L; Lundin, A; McLaughlin, J

    2001-01-01

    Surgery simulation is a promising technique for training of surgical procedures. The overall goal for any surgical simulator is to allow for efficient training of the skills required and to improve learning by giving the user proper feedback. This goal is easier achieved if the training is performed in a realistic environment. Therefore functionality such as soft tissue deformation, tearing and cutting, penetration of soft tissue etc. is necessary. Furthermore, a realistic simulator must provide haptic feedback so that all senses match, that is, there should be a correspondence between what you see and what you feel with your hands. In this paper we describe a medical platform that provides all this functionality. It is based on the Reachln Magma API, which has been extended for surgery simulation. We describe the development of the platform and illustrate the use of it for the development of two different types of surgical simulators, both of which represents work in progress.

  15. Reported analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing experimental surgical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background It has become widely accepted that whenever animals are used in scientific procedures, the 3Rs principle of replacement, reduction and refinement described by William Russell and Rex Burch should be adhered to. Animals should be replaced with non-sentient alternatives if possible, the number of animals used should be reduced and experimental procedures should be refined to minimise pain, suffering and distress. Administration of analgesic agents to animals undergoing surgical procedures is a refinement used to alleviate pain. In this study, a structured literature review was carried out to examine current trends in analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing experimental surgical procedures. Results 128 papers from 51 peer-reviewed journals were selected for inclusion in this review. Reporting administration of systemic analgesia to rabbits in peer-reviewed scientific papers increased significantly from 16% to 50% between 1995-1997 and 2005-2007 (P buprenorphine was the most frequently used agent and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were used less frequently than opioids in both time periods. Conclusions Although this review provides evidence that systemic analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing surgical procedures is increasing, rabbits do not always receive analgesia when they undergo experimental surgery. Other practices in rabbit perioperative care that could be improved, highlighted by this survey include: 1) changing the timing of analgesic administration by giving systemic analgesics pre- or perioperatively rather than only postoperatively, 2) using multimodal analgesia when pain is likely to be moderate to severe and 3) increasing the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and use of other techniques such as epidural analgesia particularly for orthopaedic procedures. PMID:21338514

  16. Non-surgical cosmetic procedures: older women's perceptions and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd Clarke, Laura; Repta, Robin; Griffin, Meridith

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyzes findings from in-depth interviews with 44 women aged 50-70 regarding their perceptions of and experiences with non-surgical cosmetic procedures such as Botox injections, laser hair removal, chemical peels, microdermabrasion, and injectable fillers. While 21 of the women had used a range of non-surgical cosmetic procedures, 23 women had not. The data are discussed in light of feminist theorizing on cosmetic surgery which has tended to ignore the experiences of older women and has been divided in terms of the portrayal of cosmetic surgery as either oppressive or liberating. We found that some of the women used the procedures to increase their physical attractiveness and self-esteem, others viewed the procedures as excessively risky, and still others argued that the procedures stemmed from the social devaluation of later life. Treatments that involved the alteration of the surface of the body tended to be viewed as less risky than the injection of foreign substances into the body.

  17. The effect of economic downturn on the volume of surgical procedures: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Nasa; Lark, Meghan E; Fujihara, Yuki; Chung, Kevin C

    2017-08-01

    Economic downturn can have a wide range of effects on medicine at both individual and national levels. We aim to describe these effects in relation to surgical volume to guide future planning for physician specialization, patient expectations in the face of economic crises, or estimating healthcare expenditure. We hypothesized that because of high out-of-pocket costs, cosmetic procedure volumes would be most affected by economic decline. A systematic review was conducted using MEDLINE, Embase, and ABI/INFORMS. The main search terms were "economic recession" and "surgical procedures, operative". Studies were included if surgical volumes were measured and economic indicators were used as predictors of economic conditions. Twelve studies were included, and the most common subject was cosmetic (n = 5), followed by orthopedic (n = 2) and cardiac surgeries (n = 2). The majority of studies found that in periods of economic downturn, surgical volume decreased. Among the eight studies using Pearson's correlation analysis, there were no significant differences between cosmetic procedures and other elective procedures, indicating that cosmetic procedures may display trends similar to those of non-cosmetic elective procedures in periods of economic downturn. Surgical volume generally decreased when economic indicators declined, observed for both elective and non-elective surgery fields. However, a few specific procedure volumes such as vasectomy and caesarean section for male babies increased during the economic downturn. Knowledge of these trends can be useful for future surgical planning and distribution of healthcare resources. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pediatric abdominal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: diagnosis through surgical and non-surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Arthur Almeida; Lima, Luciana Cavalvanti; Araújo, Cláudia Corrêa de; Gallindo, Rodrigo Melo

    2017-12-29

    To describe the success rate and the complications after procedures to diagnose abdominal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in children and adolescents. A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted with a population consisting of children and adolescents with abdominal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma diagnosed between September 1994 and December 2012. The sample comprised of 100 patients who underwent 113 diagnostic procedures, including urgent surgery (n=21), elective surgery (n=36), and non-surgical diagnosis (n=56). The most frequent procedures were laparotomy (46.9%) and ultrasound-guided core biopsy (25.6%). The rate of diagnostic success was 95.2% for urgent surgeries; 100% for elective surgeries and 82.1% for non-surgical procedures (pHodgkin's lymphoma are an effective option with low morbidity rate, allowing an earlier resumption of a full diet and chemotherapy initiation. Furthermore, non-surgical procedures should also be considered for obtaining tumor samples from patients with extensive disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  19. Do changes in surgical procedures for breast cancer have consequences for hospital mean length of stay? A study of women operated on for breast cancer in Sweden, 1980-95

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindqvist, Rikard; Möller, Torgil R; Stenbeck, Magnus

    2002-01-01

    period, the mean length of stay for surgical curative breast cancer treatment in Sweden decreased by 56%. In 1980, the proportion of women receiving conservative surgery was 7%. At the end of the period, this share had increased to 51%. Breast-conserving surgery had an approximately 30% shorter mean......BACKGROUND: Between 1986 and 1996, the overall mean overnight length of stay for all diagnoses in Sweden decreased from 20.8 to 7.1 days. OBJECTIVES: The study describes changes in surgical technique, from mastectomy to breast-conserving surgery, in treatment of female breast cancer...... length of stay compared with mastectomy. The gap was remarkably stable during the study period. The shift from mastectomy to breast-conserving surgery had a limited effect on the share of patients that went through lymph node dissection. Neither age nor the number of operations per woman could, to any...

  20. Electronic Procedures for Medical Operations, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Electronic procedures are currently being used to document the steps in performing medical operations for the Space Shuttle and/or the International Space Station...

  1. Caustic addition system operability test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parazin, R.E.

    1994-11-01

    This test procedure provides instructions for performing operational testing of the major components of the 241-AN-107 Caustic Addition System by WHC and Kaiser personnel at the Rotating Equipment Shop run-in pit (Bldg. 272E)

  2. Surgical resident involvement is safe for common elective general surgery procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Warren H; Jin, Leah; Canter, Robert J; Martinez, Steve R; Khatri, Vijay P; Gauvin, Jeffrey; Bold, Richard J; Wisner, David; Taylor, Sandra; Chen, Steven L

    2011-07-01

    Outcomes of surgical resident training are under scrutiny with the changing milieu of surgical education. Few have investigated the effect of surgical resident involvement (SRI) on operative parameters. Examining 7 common general surgery procedures, we evaluated the effect of SRI on perioperative morbidity and mortality and operative time (OpT). The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database (2005 to 2007) was used to identify 7 cases of nonemergent operations. Cases with simultaneous procedures were excluded. Logistic regression was performed across all procedures and within each procedure incorporating SRI, OpT, and risk-stratifying American College of Surgery National Surgical Quality Improvement Program morbidity and mortality probability scores, which incorporate multiple prognostic individual patient factors. Procedure-specific, SRI-stratified OpTs were compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. A total of 71.3% of the 37,907 cases had SRI. Absolute 30-day morbidity for all cases with SRI and without SRI were 3.0% and 1.0%, respectively (p < 0.001); absolute 30-day mortality for all cases with SRI and without SRI were 0.1% and 0.08%, respectively (p < 0.001). After multivariate analysis by specific procedure, SRI was not associated with increased morbidity but was associated with decreased mortality during open right colectomy (odds ratio 0.32; p = 0.01). Across all procedures, SRI was associated with increased morbidity (odds ratio 1.14; p = 0.048) but decreased mortality (odds ratio 0.42; p < 0.001). Mean OpT for all procedures was consistently lower for cases without SRI. SRI has a measurable impact on both 30-day morbidity and mortality and OpT. These data have implications to the impact associated with surgical graduate medical education. Further studies to identify causes of patient morbidity and prevention strategies in surgical teaching environments are warranted. Copyright © 2011 American College of Surgeons

  3. Surgical Skill in Bariatric Surgery: Does Skill in One Procedure Predict Outcomes for Another?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varban, Oliver A.; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Schram, Jon; Ghaferi, Amir A.; Thumma, Joythi R.; Carlin, Arthur M.; Dimick, Justin B.

    2016-01-01

    STRUCTURED ABSTRACT Background Recent data establishes a strong link between peer video ratings of surgical skill and clinical outcomes with laparoscopic gastric bypass. Whether skill for one bariatric procedure can predict outcomes for another, related procedure is unknown. Methods Twenty surgeons voluntarily submitted videos of a standard laparoscopic gastric bypass procedure, which was blindly rated by 10 or more peers using a modified version of the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS). Surgeons were divided into quartiles for skill in performing gastric bypass and their outcomes within 30 days after sleeve gastrectomy were compared. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was utilized to adjust for patient risk factors. Results Surgeons with skill ratings in the top (n=5), middle (n=10, middle two combined), and bottom (n=5) quartiles for laparoscopic gastric bypass had similar rates of surgical and medical complications following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (top 5.7%, middle 6.4%, bottom 5.5%, p=0.13). Furthermore, surgeon skill ratings did not correlate with rates of reoperation, readmission and emergency department visits. Top rated surgeons had significantly faster operating room times for sleeve gastrectomy (top 76 min, middle 90 min, bottom 88 min; plaparoscopic gastric bypass do not predict outcomes with laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. Evaluation of surgical skill with one procedure may not apply to other related procedures and may require independent assessment of surgical technical proficiency. PMID:27324569

  4. Economic analyses of stress urinary incontinence surgical procedures in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, Tanner; Zimmern, Philippe E

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the quality of economic analysis (EA) of surgical procedures for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women. A MEDLINE search on EA for SUI surgical procedures for the years 2000-2014 included the MeSH terms "tension-free vaginal tape," "TVT," "trans-obturator tape," "TOT," "Burch colposuspension" (BC), "stress urinary incontinence," "economic analysis," and "cost-effectiveness analysis." Important criteria for evaluating articles were selected from panels that set out criteria to evaluate EA [Scales CD, Jr., Christopher SS, American Urological Association 32:121-128, 2013], [Hsieh MH, Maxwell MV, J Urol 178 1867-1874, 2007], [Wu JM, Catherine CM, Conover MM, et al., Obstet Gynecol 123 1201-1206, 2014]. Thirteen articles were identified: TVT compared to BC (6), to other surgical procedures for SUI (1), to TOT (3) and to the mini-sling (1); open BC compared to laparoscopic BC (1), and analysis of various slings and meshes for various types of incontinence (1). Articles originated from: United States (3), Europe (4), United Kingdom (4), and Canada (2). Eight described cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA), two cost-utility analysis, and three cost comparison. Follow-up time for patients ranged from 6 to 24 months in eight articles, with four having a minimum of 24 months follow-up. Studies mostly adhered to the criteria, however indirect costs, sensitivity analysis, and efficacy parameters varied. Long-term synthetic sling-related complications were not included. Although CEA for SUI surgery is a burgeoning field, study comparisons remain difficult due to some variability, including health care delivery systems. As women live longer, long-term data will become critical as complications and reoperations can affect the real cost of SUI corrective procedures. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:1040-1045, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A master surgical scheduling approach for cyclic scheduling in operating room departments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrum, Jeroen M.; van Houdenhoven, M.; Hurink, Johann L.; Hans, Elias W.; Wullink, Gerhard; Kazemier, G.

    This paper addresses the problem of operating room (OR) scheduling at the tactical level of hospital planning and control. Hospitals repetitively construct operating room schedules, which is a time-consuming, tedious, and complex task. The stochasticity of the durations of surgical procedures

  6. A model for generating master surgical schedules to allow cyclic scheduling in operating room departments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrum, J.M.; van Houdenhoven, M.; Hurink, Johann L.; Hans, Elias W.; Wullink, Gerhard; Kazemier, G.

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of operating room scheduling at the tactical level of hospital planning and control. Hospitals repetitively construct operating room schedules, which is a time consuming tedious and complex task. The stochasticity of the durations of surgical procedures complicates

  7. Major mandibular surgical procedures as an indication for intraoperative imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlenz, Philipp; Blessmann, Marco; Blake, Felix; Gbara, Ali; Schmelzle, Rainer; Heiland, Max

    2008-02-01

    This study investigated 3-dimensional (3D) imaging with intraoperative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in major mandibular reconstruction procedures. The study group was comprised of 125 patients (83 males, 42 females) admitted for surgical treatment of the mandible. The patients ranged in age from 3 months to 91 years (average age, 40.72 +/- 22.843 years). Surgical procedures of the mandible were subdivided into repair of body fractures (17 patients), angle fractures (21 patients), condylar fractures (14 patients), and multiple fractures (30 patient). In addition, the study group included 21 patients undergoing orthognatic surgery and 22 undergoing reconstructive surgery on the mandible. Intraoperatively, 3D images were generated with a mobile CBCT scanner (Arcadis Orbic 3D; Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany). During open reduction of mandibular fractures, not all fracture sites can be readily exposed for direct visual control. For example, the lingual cortical bone of the mandible is difficult to assess intraoperatively. This structure and others can be effectively visualized using the 3D mode of CBCT. Furthermore, screw placement can be evaluated, specifically in insertions near the alveolar nerve. The intraoperative acquisition of the data sets is uncomplicated, and the image quality is sufficient to allow evaluation of the postoperative result in all cases. Intraoperative CBCT has proven to be a reliable imaging technique for providing visual control during major mandibular procedures.

  8. Nitrousoxide as a conscious sedative in minor oral surgical procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N 2 O is the most commonly used inhalation anesthetic in dentistry and is commonly used in emergency centers and ambulatory surgery centers as well. When used alone, it is incapable of producing general anesthesia reliably. However, as a single agent, it has an impressive safety and is excellent for providing minimal and moderate sedation for apprehensive minor oral surgical procedure. In this article, action of N 2 O in overcoming the anxiety and pain of the patient during the minor oral surgery and its advantages and disadvantages, have been reviewed.

  9. Guidelines on the facilities required for minor surgical procedures and minimal access interventions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2012-02-01

    There have been many changes in healthcare provision in recent years, including the delivery of some surgical services in primary care or in day surgery centres, which were previously provided by acute hospitals. Developments in the fields of interventional radiology and cardiology have further expanded the range and complexity of procedures undertaken in these settings. In the face of these changes there is a need to define from an infection prevention and control perspective the basic physical requirements for facilities in which such surgical procedures may be carried out. Under the auspices of the Healthcare Infection Society, we have developed the following recommendations for those designing new facilities or upgrading existing facilities. These draw upon best practice, available evidence, other guidelines where appropriate, and expert consensus to provide sensible and feasible advice. An attempt is also made to define minimal access interventions and minor surgical procedures. For minimal access interventions, including interventional radiology, new facilities should be mechanically ventilated to achieve 15 air changes per hour but natural ventilation is satisfactory for minor procedures. All procedures should involve a checklist and operators should be appropriately trained. There is also a need for prospective surveillance to accurately determine the post-procedure infection rate. Finally, there is a requirement for appropriate applied research to develop the evidence base required to support subsequent iterations of this guidance.

  10. Pneumatic-type surgical robot end-effector for laparoscopic surgical-operation-by-wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chiwon; Park, Woo Jung; Kim, Myungjoon; Noh, Seungwoo; Yoon, Chiyul; Lee, Choonghee; Kim, Youdan; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Kim, Hee Chan; Kim, Sungwan

    2014-09-05

    Although minimally invasive surgery (MIS) affords several advantages compared to conventional open surgery, robotic MIS systems still have many limitations. One of the limitations is the non-uniform gripping force due to mechanical strings of the existing systems. To overcome this limitation, a surgical instrument with a pneumatic gripping system consisting of a compressor, catheter balloon, micro motor, and other parts is developed. This study aims to implement a surgical instrument with a pneumatic gripping system and pitching/yawing joints using micro motors and without mechanical strings based on the surgical-operation-by-wire (SOBW) concept. A 6-axis external arm for increasing degrees of freedom (DOFs) is integrated with the surgical instrument using LabVIEW® for laparoscopic procedures. The gripping force is measured over a wide range of pressures and compared with the simulated ideal step function. Furthermore, a kinematic analysis is conducted. To validate and evaluate the system's clinical applicability, a simple peg task experiment and workspace identification experiment are performed with five novice volunteers using the fundamentals of laparoscopic surgery (FLS) board kit. The master interface of the proposed system employs the hands-on-throttle-and-stick (HOTAS) controller used in aerospace engineering. To develop an improved HOTAS (iHOTAS) controller, 6-axis force/torque sensor was integrated in the special housing. The mean gripping force (after 1,000 repetitions) at a pressure of 0.3 MPa was measured to be 5.8 N. The reaction time was found to be 0.4 s, which is almost real-time. All novice volunteers could complete the simple peg task within a mean time of 176 s, and none of them exceeded the 300 s cut-off time. The system's workspace was calculated to be 11,157.0 cm3. The proposed pneumatic gripping system provides a force consistent with that of other robotic MIS systems. It provides near real-time control. It is more durable than the

  11. Preoperative testing before low-risk surgical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Kyle R.; Wijeysundera, Duminda N.; Pendrith, Ciara; Ng, Ryan; Tu, Jack V.; Laupacis, Andreas; Schull, Michael J.; Levinson, Wendy; Bhatia, R. Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is concern about increasing utilization of low-value health care services, including preoperative testing for low-risk surgical procedures. We investigated temporal trends, explanatory factors, and institutional and regional variation in the utilization of testing before low-risk procedures. Methods: For this retrospective cohort study, we accessed linked population-based administrative databases from Ontario, Canada. A cohort of 1 546 223 patients 18 years or older underwent a total of 2 224 070 low-risk procedures, including endoscopy and ophthalmologic surgery, from Apr. 1, 2008, to Mar. 31, 2013, at 137 institutions in 14 health regions. We used hierarchical logistic regression models to assess patient- and institution-level factors associated with electrocardiography (ECG), transthoracic echocardiography, cardiac stress test or chest radiography within 60 days before the procedure. Results: Endoscopy, ophthalmologic surgery and other low-risk procedures accounted for 40.1%, 34.2% and 25.7% of procedures, respectively. ECG and chest radiography were conducted before 31.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 30.9%–31.1%) and 10.8% (95% CI 10.8%–10.8%) of procedures, respectively, whereas the rates of preoperative echocardiography and stress testing were 2.9% (95% CI 2.9%–2.9%) and 2.1% (95% CI 2.1%–2.1%), respectively. Significant variation was present across institutions, with the frequency of preoperative ECG ranging from 3.4% to 88.8%. Receipt of preoperative ECG and radiography were associated with older age (among patients 66–75 years of age, for ECG, adjusted odds ratio [OR] 18.3, 95% CI 17.6–19.0; for radiography, adjusted OR 2.9, 95% CI 2.8–3.0), preoperative anesthesia consultation (for ECG, adjusted OR 8.7, 95% CI 8.5–8.8; for radiography, adjusted OR 2.2, 95% CI 2.1–2.2) and preoperative medical consultation (for ECG, adjusted OR 6.8, 95% CI 6.7–6.9; for radiography, adjusted OR 3.6, 95% CI 3.5–3.6). The median ORs

  12. Magnetic fusion energy. Disaster operation procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    In a major disaster such as an earthquake, toxic chemical release, or fire, these Disaster Operations Procedures can be used, in combination with good judgment, to minimize the risk of injury to personnel and of property damage in our laboratory, shop, and office areas. These emergency procedures apply to all personnel working within MFE/Zone-11 area including visitors, program contract personnel, and construction contract personnel

  13. 7 CFR 51.59 - Operations and operating procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Operations and operating procedures. 51.59 Section 51.59 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL...

  14. [Mammary prosthesis: considerations about a choreography of the surgical procedure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grolleau, J-L; Gangloff, D; Garrido, I; Chavoin, J-P

    2005-10-01

    Breast augmentation offers a high rate of satisfaction but the local complications remain frequent. These are mainly capsular contracture, malpositions of implant, acute or infraclinical infections. The causes of these complications are multifactorials. The goal of this chapter is to determine the effect of the surgical technique on the result. We think that if no routine procedure can be proposed, a reflexion on the objectives of the breast augmentation and the adaptation of the surgical technique is necessary for each surgeon. We identify twelve aims and discuss them: rigorous preoperative planning, determination of the position of the implant, creation of an adapted implant pocket, as much atraumatic as possible dissection, no bacterial contamination, no foreign particles, respect of the implant, drainage or not, efficient suture, pain and discomfort control, need for contension and clear postoperative advices. These objectives being precised, we integrate them in a chronological surgical process under the form of questions. Each surgeon can then choose his answers by evaluating the arguments, which led to his choices.

  15. Surgical management of hepatocellular carcinoma after Fontan procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Steve; Scovel, Lauren; Yeh, Matthew; Dorsey, David; Dembo, Gregory; Krieger, Eric V; Bakthavatsalam, Ramassmy; Park, James O; Riggle, Kevin M; Riehle, Kimberly J; Yeung, Raymond S

    2015-06-01

    The Fontan operation has successfully prolonged the lives of patients born with single-ventricle physiology. A long-term consequence of post-Fontan elevation in systemic venous pressure and low cardiac output is chronic liver inflammation and cirrhosis, which lead to an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Surgical management of patients with post-Fontan physiology and HCC is challenging, as the requirement for adequate preload in order to sustain cardiac output conflicts with the low central venous pressure (CVP) that minimizes blood loss during hepatectomy. Consequently, liver resection is rarely performed, and most reports describe nonsurgical treatments for locoregional control of the tumors in these patients. Here, we present a multidisciplinary approach to a successful surgical resection of a HCC in a patient with Fontan physiology.

  16. EVALUATION OF OUTCOME OF VARIOUS SURGICAL PROCEDURES FOR UPPER EYELID PTOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraju

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: There are various procedures available for ptosis correction. Successful outcome not only depends on correct technique but also choosing appropriate procedure for each patient. Selection of procedure is based on available levator function and also other factors like etiology, severity, Bell’s phenomenon etc. If such varied procedure s are performed in a group of patients based on standard criteria and results are evaluated systematically we can determine what works best for a given patient . AIM : Evaluation of outcome of various surgical procedures for upper eyelid ptosis . METHODOLOGY : 25 eyelids of 20 patients who presented to a tertiary centre in south India with complaint of drooping of upper lid were considered. All subjects underwent complete ocular examination corrected visual acuity and detailed ptosis evaluation with particular emphasis on measurement of levator muscle function, MRD1 (margin reflex distance - 1, palpebral fissure width in different gazes and margin crease distance. The effect of various factors like MRD1, MCD, levator function were assessed, the amount of correction required and appropriate surgical procedure was chosen. Surgical procedure of Levator resection, frontalis sling operation, anterior levator aponeurosis advancement, o r other ptosis correction procedures under appropriate anaesthesia were performed. Post - operative evaluation in terms of visual acuity, MRD, Interpalpebral fissure height, lid symmetry, lagophthalmos and complications (if any was done. RESULTS : Levator muscle resection was done in 28% of eyelids, frontal sling surgery in 60% of eyelids, Levator muscle plication in 8% eyelids and levator muscle disinsertion with frontal sling surgery in 4% eyes. Undercorrection was seen in about 44% of eyelids in varying degrees. 56% of the eyes had optimal correction. Symmetric correction was achieved in 76% of eyelids. CONCLUSION: The influence of various preoperative factors on the

  17. The impact of different surgical procedures on hypoparathyroidism after thyroidectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Chen; Iqbal, Usman; Nguyen, Phung-Anh; Hsu, Chung-Huei; Huang, Chen-Ling; Hsu, Yi-Hsin Elsa; Atique, Suleman; Islam, Md. Mohaimenul; Li, Yu-Chuan (Jack); Jian, Wen-Shan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The main objective of this study is to investigate the outcome between surgical procedures and the risk of development of hypoparathyroidism followed by surgical procedure in patients with thyroid disorders. We analyzed the data acquired from Taiwan's Bureau of National Health Insurance (BNHI) research database from 1998 to 2011 and found 9316 patients with thyroid surgery. Cox regression model was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR). A count of 314 cases (3.4%) of hypoparathyroidism was identified. The 9 years cumulated incidence of hypoparathyroidism was the highest in patient undergone bilateral total thyroidectomy (13.5%) and the lowest in the patient with unilateral subtotal thyroidectomy (1.2%). However, in the patients who had undergone unilateral subtotal, the risk was the highest in bilateral total (HR: 11.86), followed by radical thyroidectomy with unilateral neck lymph node dissection (HR: 8.56), unilateral total (HR, 4.39), and one side total and another side subtotal (HR: 2.80). The extent of thyroid resection determined the risk of development of hypoparathyroidism. It is suggested that the association of these factors is investigated in future studies. PMID:29068988

  18. Operator use of procedures during simulated emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.M.; Mumaw, R.J.; Lewis, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an empirical study of nuclear power plant operator performance in cognitively demanding simulated emergencies. During emergencies operators follow highly prescriptive written procedures. The objectives of the study were to understand and document what role higher-level cognitive activities such as diagnosis, or more generally ' situation assessment,' play in guiding operator performance, given that operators utilize procedures in responding to the events. The study examined crew performance in variants of two simulated emergencies: (1) an Interfacing System Loss of Coolant Accident and (2) a Loss of Heat Sink scenario. Data on operator performance were collected using training simulators at two plant sites. Up to 11 crews from each plant participated in each of two simulated emergencies for a total of 38 cases analyzed. Crew performance was videotaped and partial transcripts were produced and analyzed. The results revealed a number of instances where higher-level cognitive activities such as situation assessment and response planning enabled operators to handle aspects of the situation that were not fully addressed by the procedures. The paper summarizes these cases and their implications for the development and evaluation of training and control room aids, as well as for human reliability analyses. The full report of the study is published as NUREG/CR-6208

  19. Operating procedure and operator's decision-making process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieci, A.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents some new views on the field of the creation of efficiently usable operating procedures. In addition to some rather traditional analyses of job type or task-analysis used up to now in instruction assembly there is cognitive-tasks analysis presented. Using the last mentioned approach such operator's recognitive activity requirements are investigated, which apply in the situations where operator's decision problems are solved. It is known that man's recognitive activity has its own rules. Therefore we attempted to propose such operating procedures which are able with respect to its form and contents to help an operator to recognize a failing situation correctly and to solve it regularly. The expert systems technology has appeared to be necessary for implementation of such support system. (author). 5 refs, 5 figs

  20. Marijuana use and mortality following orthopedic surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Andrew S; Smith, Walter; Mullen, Sawyer; Ponce, Brent A; McGwin, Gerald; Shah, Ashish; Naranje, Sameer M

    2018-03-20

    The association between marijuana use and surgical procedures is a matter of increasing societal relevance that has not been well studied in the literature. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between marijuana use and in-hospital mortality, as well as to assess associated comorbidities in patients undergoing commonly billed orthopedic surgeries. The National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2010 to 2014 was used to determine the odds ratios for the associations between marijuana use and in-hospital mortality, heart failure (HF), stroke, and cardiac disease (CD) in patients undergoing five common orthopedic procedures: hip (THA), knee (TKA), and shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), spinal fusion, and traumatic femur fracture fixation. Of 9,561,963 patients who underwent one of the five selected procedures in the four-year period, 26,416 (0.28%) were identified with a diagnosis of marijuana use disorder. In hip and knee arthroplasty patients, marijuana use was associated with decreased odds of mortality compared to no marijuana use (p<0.0001), and increased odds of HF (p = 0.018), stroke (p = 0.0068), and CD (p = 0.0123). Traumatic femur fixation patients had the highest prevalence of marijuana use (0.70%), which was associated with decreased odds of mortality (p = 0.0483), HF (p = 0.0076), and CD (p = 0.0003). For spinal fusions, marijuana use was associated with increased odds of stroke (p<0.0001) and CD (p<0.0001). Marijuana use in patients undergoing shoulder arthroplasty was associated with decreased odds of mortality (p<0.001) and stroke (p<0.001). In this study, marijuana use was associated with decreased mortality in patients undergoing THA, TKA, TSA and traumatic femur fixation, although the significance of these findings remains unclear. More research is needed to provide insight into these associations in a growing surgical population.

  1. Identifying gaps in the surgical training curriculum in Rwanda through evaluation of operative activity at a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Jennifer L; Ntakiyiruta, Georges; Chu, Kathryn M

    2015-01-01

    To define the operations performed by surgical residents at a tertiary referral hospital in Rwanda to help guide development of the residency program. Cross-sectional study of all patients operated by surgical residents from October 2012 to September 2013. University Teaching Hospital of Kigali (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Kigali [CHUK]), a public, tertiary referral hospital in Kigali, Rwanda. All patient data were entered into the operative database by surgical residents at CHUK. A total of 2833 cases were entered into the surgical database. Of them, 53 cases were excluded from further analysis because no surgical resident was listed as the primary or assistant surgeon, leaving 2780 cases for analysis. There were 2780 operations involving surgical residents. Of them, 51% of procedures were classified under general surgery, 38% orthopedics, 7% neurosurgery, and 4% urology. Emergency operations accounted for 64% of the procedures, with 56% of those being general surgery and 35% orthopedic. Further, 50% of all operations were trauma, with 71% of those orthopedic and 21% general surgery. Surgical faculty were involved in 45% of operations as either the primary or the assistant surgeons, while the remainder of operations did not involve surgical faculty. Residents were primary surgeons in 68% of procedures and assistant surgeons in 84% of procedures. The operative experience of surgery residents at CHUK primarily involves emergency and trauma procedures. Although this likely reflects the demographics of surgical care within Rwanda, more focus should be placed on elective procedures to ensure that surgical residents are broadly trained. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of symptoms-oriented operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colquhoun, R.

    1984-01-01

    Until recently, the formal treatment of control room procedures for upset conditions in nuclear power plants has been event-oriented. This orientation was not so much a reflection of power plant operating practice as it was a reflection of design-oriented thinking - design-basis events, therefore event-oriented procedures. Event orientation is not common in other professions. In the medical profession, for example, the stabilization of vital functions through a symptoms-oriented approach has priority over diagnosis and prognosis. The American nuclear power industry has initiated programs for the development and application of a symptoms-oriented approach for handling upset conditions. Canadian programs have independently paralleled the US programs. This article describes the rationale and current applications of the Canadian programs and identifies the relevance of a generic symptoms-based emergency procedure to current operating practices

  3. Surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis using Frey's procedure: a Brazilian 16-year single-centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestic, Martinho Antonio; Callejas-Neto, Francisco; Chaim, Elinton Adami; Utrini, Murillo Pimentel; Cazzo, Everton; Pareja, Jose Carlos

    2011-04-01

    Surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis is indicated for intractable pain. Frey's procedure is an accepted treatment for this disease. The aim of the present study was to describe a single-centre experience in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis using Frey's procedure. A retrospective analysis of 73 patients who underwent a Frey's procedure between 1991 to 2007 and had at least 1 year of follow-up. Demographics, indication for surgery, peri-operative complications and late outcomes were analysed. The median age was 39.9 years. Seventy out of the 73 (95.8%) patients were male. The median pre-operative body mass index (BMI) was 19.1 kg/m(2). All patients had abdominal pain, 34 (46.6%) of them daily and 13 (17.8%) weekly, with moderate or severe intensity in 98.6% (n= 72). The aetiology was secondary to alcohol in 70 patients (95.9%), with a median consumption of 278 g per day. The surgical morbidity rate was 28.7%; there were no deaths. Median post-operative follow-up was 77.0 months; 64 patients (91.4%) had complete pain relief and post-operative BMI was 22.4 kg/m(2) (P<0.001). All patients with pre-operative endocrine and exocrine insufficiencies showed no reversal of the situation. New onset insufficiencies appeared late. Frey's procedure was a safe and effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with intractable pain caused by chronic pancreatitis. © 2011 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  4. Operative strategies for patients with failed primary bariatric procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhmann, Helena; Vines, Larissa; Schiesser, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapy to treat obesity and its sequelae. With the increasing incidence of obesity, the number of bariatric procedures has dramatically increased in recent years. The perioperative morbidity reached a very low level, and nearly all revisional bariatric procedures are primarily minimally invasive today. About 10-25% of the patients undergoing bariatric surgery require a revision at some point after their initial operation. Consequently, revisional bariatric surgery has emerged as a distinct practice, performed mainly at tertiary centers, to resolve complications caused by the primary operation and to provide satisfactory weight loss. In this review, our personal experience with revisional bariatric surgery is discussed against the background of the available literature. We further attempt to define major indications for revisional bariatric surgery and balance them with perioperative and long-term morbidity as well as the surgical outcome.

  5. [E-learning in surgical procedure manuals and blogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape-Köhler, C; Chmelik, C; Heiss, M M; Jauch, K W

    2010-01-01

    E-learning is the constant companion for every surgeon in the initial years of training. Later they will be mostly used as reliable reference works. With the spread of computers and the possibilities of the World Wide Web there is an increasingly large selection of electronic learning options on the market. In this review the most important current surgical e-learning options will be presented. Inclusion criteria were determined according to a defined term which must be fulfilled for e-learning in operation techniques. Options were identified by an online search and analyzed using a criteria catalogue. This catalogue contained a total of 31 criteria for the fields of "content presentation", "infrastructure" and "evaluation". A differentiation was made between online and offline options. A total of five online and five offline options which fulfilled the inclusion criteria could be identified. None of the options currently encompass a similarly high number of operations compared to those offered in conventional operation textbooks. The use and combination of media, such as video and animation, are limited to online options and are available in various forms and combinations. The use of options is mostly free of charge and at most registration is necessary. Some of the options are multilingual. The range of e-learning options for general and visceral surgical operations is at present still limited and reduced to a few platforms. The scientific content and validity of the contents are not always guaranteed. It remains to be seen how the options presented here will develop further and what the results of the necessary scientific evaluation will be.

  6. Bariatric surgery for morbid obesity: pre-operative assessment, surgical techniques and post-operative monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breznikar, Brane; Dinevski, D

    2009-01-01

    This observational clinical analysis included 246 patients who underwent surgery for adjustable gastric banding (AGB), laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), or gastric bypass (GBP) between May 2005 and December 2008. The most frequent surgical procedure was for AGB (73.2% of patients). A thorough psychological evaluation of the patients was carried out, and pre- and post-operative psychological and dietary support was offered. A total of 111/120 (92.5%) AGB patients, 21/30 (70.0%) LSG patients and 8/36 (22.2%) GBP patients have been monitored for at least 1 year, and their mean weight losses (percentage excess weight loss) were 24.7 kg (52.4%), 46.0 kg (57.9%) and 40.5 kg (77.9%), respectively. The AGB procedure was associated with the fewest complications but is not appropriate for all patients. Good pre-operative psychological evaluation has been shown to be necessary for successful outcomes and, in the super-obese, we prefer to use LSG. Surgeons should learn the skills needed to perform laparoscopic Roux-en-Y GBP as it is likely to become the standard-of-care for the surgical treatment of obesity. The best outcomes following bariatric surgery are achieved with a multidisciplinary approach, including participation in a support group guided by a psychologist.

  7. Post-operative urinary retention in a general surgical population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreijer, Bjørn; Møller, Morten H; Bartholdy, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Post-operative urine retention is a frequent and serious complication. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of post-operative urinary retention in a general surgical population and to identify the perioperative risk factors for developing this condition.......Post-operative urine retention is a frequent and serious complication. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of post-operative urinary retention in a general surgical population and to identify the perioperative risk factors for developing this condition....

  8. Exposure of the surgical team to ionizing radiation during orthopedic surgical procedures,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Pereira Palácio

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: the aim of this study was to assess the degree of exposure of the orthopedic surgical team to fluoroscopic ionizing radiation.METHODS: the ionizing radiation to which the orthopedic surgical team (R1, R2 and R3 was exposed was assayed using thermoluminescent dosimeters that were distributed in target anatomical regions (regions with and without protection using a lead apron. This was done during 45 hip osteosynthesis procedures to treat transtrochanteric fractures that were classified as 31-A2.1 (AO.RESULTS: the radioactive dose received by R3 was 6.33 mSv, R2 4.51 mSv and R3 1.99 mSv (p = 0.33. The thyroid region received 0.86 mSv of radiation, the thoracic region 1.24 mSv and the gonadal region 2.15 mSv (p = 0.25. There was no record of radiation at the dosimeters located below the biosafety protectors or on the team members' backs.CONCLUSIONS: the members of the surgical team who were located closest to the fluoroscope received greater radiation doses than those located further away. The anatomical regions located below the waistline were the ones that received most ionizing radiation. These results emphasize the importance of using biosafety devices, since these are effective in preventing radiation from reaching the vital organs of the medical team.

  9. Application of a Compact High-Definition Exoscope for Illumination and Magnification in High-Precision Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Kartik G; Schöller, Karsten; Uhl, Eberhard

    2017-01-01

    The basic necessities for surgical procedures are illumination, exposure, and magnification. These have undergone transformation in par with technology. One of the recent developments is the compact magnifying exoscope system. In this report, we describe the application of this system for surgical operations and discuss its advantages and pitfalls. We used the ViTOM exoscope mounted on the mechanical holding arm. The following surgical procedures were conducted: lumbar and cervical spinal canal decompression (n = 5); laminotomy and removal of lumbar migrated disk herniations (n = 4); anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (n = 1); removal of intraneural schwannomas (n = 2); removal of an acute cerebellar hemorrhage (n = 1); removal of a parafalcine atypical cerebral hematoma caused by a dural arteriovenous fistula (n = 1); and microsutures and anastomoses of a nerve (n = 1), an artery (n = 1), and veins (n = 2). The exoscope offered excellent, magnified, and brilliantly illuminated high-definition images of the surgical field. All surgical operations were successfully completed. The main disadvantage was the adjustment and refocusing using the mechanical holding arm. The time required for the surgical operation under the exoscope was slightly longer than the times required for a similar procedure performed using an operating microscope. The magnifying exoscope is an effective and nonbulky tool for surgical procedures. In visualization around the corners, the exoscope has better potential than a microscope. With technical and technologic modifications, the exoscope might become the next generation in illumination, visualization, exposure, and magnification for high-precision surgical procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Can the ACS-NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator Predict Post-Operative Complications in Patients Undergoing Flap Reconstruction Following Soft Tissue Sarcoma Resection?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slump, Jelena; Ferguson, Peter C.; Wunder, Jay S.; Griffin, Anthony; Hoekstra, Harald J.; Bagher, Shaghayegh; Zhong, Toni; Hofer, Stefan O. P.; O'Neill, Anne C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The ACS-NSQIP surgical risk calculator is an open-access on-line tool that estimates the risk of adverse post-operative outcomes for a wide range of surgical procedures. Wide surgical resection of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) often requires complex reconstructive procedures that can be

  11. Operating room waste: disposable supply utilization in neurosurgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygourakis, Corinna C; Yoon, Seungwon; Valencia, Victoria; Boscardin, Christy; Moriates, Christopher; Gonzales, Ralph; Lawton, Michael T

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Disposable supplies constitute a large portion of operating room (OR) costs and are often left over at the end of a surgical case. Despite financial and environmental implications of such waste, there has been little evaluation of OR supply utilization. The goal of this study was to quantify the utilization of disposable supplies and the costs associated with opened but unused items (i.e., "waste") in neurosurgical procedures. METHODS Every disposable supply that was unused at the end of surgery was quantified through direct observation of 58 neurosurgical cases at the University of California, San Francisco, in August 2015. Item costs (in US dollars) were determined from the authors' supply catalog, and statistical analyses were performed. RESULTS Across 58 procedures (36 cranial, 22 spinal), the average cost of unused supplies was $653 (range $89-$3640, median $448, interquartile range $230-$810), or 13.1% of total surgical supply cost. Univariate analyses revealed that case type (cranial versus spinal), case category (vascular, tumor, functional, instrumented, and noninstrumented spine), and surgeon were important predictors of the percentage of unused surgical supply cost. Case length and years of surgical training did not affect the percentage of unused supply cost. Accounting for the different case distribution in the 58 selected cases, the authors estimate approximately $968 of OR waste per case, $242,968 per month, and $2.9 million per year, for their neurosurgical department. CONCLUSIONS This study shows a large variation and significant magnitude of OR waste in neurosurgical procedures. At the authors' institution, they recommend price transparency, education about OR waste to surgeons and nurses, preference card reviews, and clarification of supplies that should be opened versus available as needed to reduce waste.

  12. Comparing the operators' behavior in conducting emergency operating procedures with the complexity of procedural steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dea

    2003-01-01

    Many kinds of procedures have been used to reduce the operators' workload throughout various industries. However, significant portion of accidents or incidents was caused by procedure related human errors that are originated from non-compliance of procedures. According to related studies, several important factors for non-compliance behavior have been identified, and one if them is the complexity of procedures. This means that comparing the change of the operators' behavior with the complexity of procedures may be meaningful for investigating plausible reasons for the operators' non-compliance behavior. In this study, emergency training records were collected using a full scope simulator in order to obtain data related to the operators' non-compliance behavior. And then, collected data are compared with the complexity of procedural steps. As the result, two remarkable relationships are found, which indicate that the operators' behavior could be reasonably characterized by the complexity of procedural steps. Thus, these relationships can be used as meaningful clues not only to scrutinize the reason of non-compliance behavior but also to suggest appropriate remedies for the reduction of non-compliance behavior that can result in procedure related human errors

  13. Energy conservation aircraft design and operational procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poisson-Quinton, P.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reviews studies associated with improved fuel efficiency. Several aircraft design concepts are described including: (1) increases in aerodynamic efficiency through decreased friction drag, parasitic drag, and drag due to lift, (2) structural efficiency and the implementation of composite materials, (3) active control technology, (4) the optimization of airframe-engine integration, and (5) VTOL and STOL concepts. Consideration is also given to operational procedures associated with flight management, terminal-area operations, and the influence of environmental noise constraints on fuel economy.

  14. Death within 48 h--adverse events after general surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Russell; Scollay, John M; Hecht, Garry; McPhillips, Gillian; Thompson, Alastair M

    2012-02-01

    Comorbidity and emergency intervention are established risk factors for post-operative mortality. This study sought to identify adverse events associated with death within 48 h of general surgical procedures. All general surgical patients who died within 48 h of operative intervention from 2002-2006 in Scotland underwent retrospective peer review using established Scottish Audit of Surgical Mortality (SASM) methodologies (www.SASM.org). During the 5 years, 1299 patients died within 48 h of surgery, 1134 (87.3%) admitted as an emergency, with a mean age of 71 years; 898 patients (69.1%) were ASA grade 3, 4 or 5; 727 (56.0%) patients had cardiovascular, 398 (30.6%) respiratory and 191 (14.7%) renal comorbidity. Over time exploratory laparotomy (443, 34.1%) was carried out less often (p = 0.004) prior to death due to cardiovascular disease (435, 33.5%), mesenteric ischaemia (264, 20.3%) or multi-organ failure (255, 19.6%). The decision to operate by consultant surgeons rose significantly (p surgery are usually elderly, emergency admissions with significant comorbidities who die of cardiovascular events. Timely, appropriate surgery and high quality peri-operative care delivered by consultant staff may prevent early post-operative mortality. Copyright © 2011 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Braking, Wheeled Vehicles. Test Operations Procedure (TOP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-20

    are as follows: a. Micrometer calipers (inside, outside, and dial types). b. Surface finish gauges. c. Torque wrench. d. Brake shoe...HAZARDOUS CONDITION • The power assist unit fails to operate. 10. Front Drum Brakes Procedure: Equipment needed: Steel scale or Vernier ... Micrometer and dial indicator. Reject the vehicle if: • Rotors are broken or damaged, or cracks on the surface extend to the outer edges. • Two grooves

  16. Surgical procedure "simplified retrosigmoid approach" for C-P angle lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashima, Tetsumori; Lee, Joung H; Tobias, Samuel; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Chang, Jong Hee; Kwon, Jeong-Taik

    2004-02-01

    Previously, we reported surgical results of the simplified retrosigmoid approach for vestibular nerve sectioning in the cases with intractable vertigo. Here, we introduce in details surgical procedures of the simplified retrosigmoid (also called "subasterional" here for simplification) approach developed by one of the authors (J.H.L.). This approach is to operate cerebello-pontine (C-P) angle lesions through a small upper lateral window below the transverse-sigmoid junction. The retroauricular 4-5 cm skin incision, triangular craniectomy 2 cm in width, dural opening and closure, special considerations, and reconstruction of the skull defect were outlined. The bony landmarks for triangle craniectomy below asterion were described in detail. The C-P angle was appropriately approached for microvascular decompression, removal of C-P angle tumors, and vestibular nerve resection. This subasterional approach was characterized by short operation time of 1-3 h and less postoperative discomforts compared to the conventional retrosigmoid approach.

  17. Safety and efficacy of immediate postoperative feeding and bowel stimulation to prevent ileus after major gynecologic surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, James; Hojat, Rod

    2011-08-01

    Postoperative ileus is a major complication of abdominal surgical procedures To evaluate the incidence of ileus and gastrointestinal morbidity in patients who received immediate postoperative feeding and bowel stimulation after undergoing major gynecologic surgical procedures. During a 5-year period, the authors tracked demographic, surgical outcome, and follow-up information for 707 patients who underwent major gynecologic operations. All patients received the same postoperative orders, including immediate feeding of a diet of choice and bowel stimulation with 30 mL of magnesium hydroxide (milk of magnesia) twice daily until bowel movements occurred. Of 707 patients, 6 (<1%) had postoperative ileus. No patients experienced postoperative bowel obstruction and 2 patients (0.3%) had postoperative intestinal leak. No serious adverse effects associated with bowel stimulation were reported. Immediate postoperative feeding and bowel stimulation is a safe and effective approach to preventing ileus in patients who undergo major gynecologic surgical procedures.

  18. Effects of Surgical Assistant's Level of Resident Training on Surgical Treatment of Intermittent Exotropia: Operation Time and Surgical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moo Hyun; Chung, Hyunuk; Kim, Won Jae; Kim, Myung Mi

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of the surgical assistant's level of resident training on operation time and surgical outcome in the surgical treatment of intermittent exotropia. This study included 456 patients with intermittent exotropia who underwent lateral rectus recession and medial rectus resection and were followed up for 24 months after surgery. The patients were divided into two groups according to the surgical assistant's level of resident training: group F (surgery assisted by a first-year resident [n = 198]) and group S (surgery assisted by a second-, third-, or fourth-year resident [n = 258]). The operation time and surgical outcomes (postoperative exodeviation and the number of patients who underwent a second operation) were compared between the two groups. The average operation times in groups F and S were 36.54 ± 7.4 and 37.34 ± 9.94 minutes, respectively (p = 0.33). Immediate postoperative exodeviation was higher in group F (0.79 ± 3.82 prism diopters) than in group S (0.38 ± 3.75 prism diopters). However, repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed no significant difference in exodeviation between the two groups during the 24-month follow-up period (p = 0.45). A second operation was performed in 29.3% (58 / 198) of the patients in group F, and in 32.2% (83 / 258) of those in group S (p = 0.51). No significant difference in operation time was observed when we compared the effects of the level of resident training in the surgical treatment of intermittent exotropia. Although the immediate postoperative exodeviation was higher in patients who had undergone surgery assisted by a first-year resident, the surgical outcome during the 24-month follow-up was not significantly different.

  19. Capturing intra-operative safety information using surgical wikis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael; Agha, Riaz; Coughlan, Jane

    2013-03-01

    Expert surgeons use a mass of intra-operative information, as well as pre- and post-operative information to complete operations safely. Trainees acquired this intra-operative knowledge at the operating table, now largely diminished by the working time directive. Wikis offer unexplored approaches to capturing and disseminating expert knowledge to further promote safer surgery for the trainee. Grafting an abdominal aortic aneurysm represents a potentially high-risk operation demanding extreme safety measures. Operative details, presented on a surgical wiki in the form of a script and content analysed to classify types of safety information. The intra-operative part of the script contained 2,743 items of essential surgical information, comprising 21 sections, 405 steps and 2,317 items of back-up information; 155 (5.7%) of them were also specific intra-operative safety checks. Best case scenarios consisted of 1,077 items of intra-operative information, 69 of which were safety checks. Worse case and rare scenarios required a further 1,666 items of information, including 86 safety checks. Wikis are relevant to surgical practice specifically as a platform for knowledge sharing and optimising the available operating time of trainees, as a very large amount of minutely detailed information essential for a safe major operation can be captured.

  20. Surgical operations in elderly patients | Njeze | Orient Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were 12 deaths recorded in the major category, and none in the minor operations. Haemorrhage, infection and cancer were responsible for the deaths. Conclusion: Most of the patients who underwent these surgical operations derived benefits both for improved quality of life and increased life expectancy. The elderly ...

  1. Post-surgical infections and perioperative antibiotics usage in pediatric genitourinary procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellett, Justin; Prasad, Michaella M; Purves, J Todd; Stec, Andrew A

    2015-12-01

    Post-surgical infections (PSIs) are a source of preventable perioperative morbidity. No guidelines exist for the use of perioperative antibiotics in pediatric urologic procedures. This study reports the rate of PSIs in non-endoscopic pediatric genitourinary procedures at our institution. Secondary aims evaluate the association of PSI with other perioperative variables, including wound class (WC) and perioperative antibiotic administration. Data from consecutive non-endoscopic pediatric urologic procedures performed between August 2011 and April 2014 were examined retrospectively. The primary outcome was the rate of PSIs. PSIs were classified as superficial skin (SS) and deep/organ site (D/OS) according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, and urinary tract infection (UTI). PSIs were further stratified by WC1 and WC2 and perioperative antibiotic usage. A relative risk and chi-square analysis compared PSI rates between WC1 and WC2 procedures. A total of 1185 unique patients with 1384 surgical sites were reviewed; 1192 surgical sites had follow-up for inclusion into the study. Ten total PSIs were identified, for an overall infection rate of 0.83%. Of these, six were SS, one was D/OS, and three were UTIs. The PSI rate for WC1 (885 sites) and WC2 (307 sites) procedures was 0.34% and 2.28%, respectively, p antibiotics (0.35% vs. 0.33%). All WC2 procedures received antibiotics. Post-surgical infections are associated with significant perioperative morbidity. In some studies, PSI can double hospital costs, and contribute to hospital length of stay, admission to intensive care units, and impact patient mortality. Our study demonstrates that the rate of PSI in WC1 operations is low, irrespective of whether the patient received perioperative antibiotics (0.35%) or no antibiotics (0.33%). WC2 operations were the larger source of morbidity with an infection rate of 2.28% and a 6.7 fold higher increase in relative risk. WC1 procedures have a rate of

  2. RTOD-photo operations and procedures manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1966-03-15

    This document presents a survey of the EG&G NRDS photographic operation in four major sections and includes the work scope, procedures, some technical backgrounding and operational information. Two sections, Instrumentation and Photo Systems, include the areas of direct responsibilities while a section on Film Handling and Coordination and a section covering special information, pertinent to the project, are included to adequately complete this survey. The photographic group is housed in two trailers within the control point area at NRDS and from these trailers provides photographic support at a number of locations. Four camera bunkers, three camera towers, a kinescope system, a microfilm system and remote camera controls comprise the facilities that the group maintains and operates outside these trailers. The work load includes major items such as: motion picture coverage of the nuclear rocket engine tests, data record microfilming, kinescope recording, and documentary coverage of the company related operational responsibilities. In addition, a number of minor photographic services are extended, when required. The nature of the work, because of its importance within the research and development efforts at NRDS, requires optimum quality and efficiency throughout. The many procedures outlined here have been designed to satisfy these requirements.

  3. Operating-procedure system at Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tope, C.W.

    1981-05-01

    Three types of procedures are widely used at SRP: Du Pont Savannah Operating Logsheet, Du Pont Savannah Operating Procedure, and Plant Manual. This document briefly reviews originating of the procedures, their preparation, control, and indexing

  4. The effect of Surgical Care Improvement Project measures on national trends on surgical site infections in open vascular procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Anahita; Desai, Sapan S; Seabrook, Gary R; Brown, Kellie R; Lewis, Brian D; Rossi, Peter J; Edmiston, Charles E; Lee, Cheong J

    2014-12-01

    The Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) is a national initiative to reduce surgical complications, including postoperative surgical site infection (SSI), through protocol-driven antibiotic usage. This study aimed to determine the effect SCIP guidelines have had on in-hospital SSIs after open vascular procedures. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) was retrospectively analyzed using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, diagnosis codes to capture SSIs in hospital patients who underwent elective carotid endarterectomy, elective open repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), and peripheral bypass. The pre-SCIP era was defined as 2000 to 2005 and post-SCIP was defined as 2007 to 2010. The year 2006 was excluded because this was the transition year in which the SCIP guidelines were implemented. Analysis of variance and χ(2) testing were used for statistical analysis. The rate of SSI in the pre-SCIP era was 2.2% compared with 2.3% for carotid endarterectomy (P = .06). For peripheral bypass, both in the pre- and post-SCIP era, infection rates were 0.1% (P = .22). For open, elective AAA, the rate of infection in the post-SCIP era increased significantly to 1.4% from 1.0% in the pre-SCIP era (P < .001). Demographics and in-hospital mortality did not differ significantly between the groups. Implementation of SCIP guidelines has made no significant effect on the incidence of in-hospital SSIs in open vascular operations; rather, an increase in SSI rates in open AAA repairs was observed. Patient-centered, bundled approaches to care, rather than current SCIP practices, may further decrease SSI rates in vascular patients undergoing open procedures. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of gastrectomy procedural complexity on surgical outcomes and hospital comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sanjay; Paruch, Jennifer; Bilimoria, Karl Y; Cohen, Mark; Strong, Vivian E; Weber, Sharon M

    2015-08-01

    Most risk adjustment approaches adjust for patient comorbidities and the primary procedure. However, procedures done at the same time as the index case may increase operative risk and merit inclusion in adjustment models for fair hospital comparisons. Our objectives were to evaluate the impact of surgical complexity on postoperative outcomes and hospital comparisons in gastric cancer surgery. Patients who underwent gastric resection for cancer were identified from a large clinical dataset. Procedure complexity was characterized using secondary procedure CPT codes and work relative value units (RVUs). Regression models were developed to evaluate the association between complexity variables and outcomes. The impact of complexity adjustment on model performance and hospital comparisons was examined. Among 3,467 patients who underwent gastrectomy for adenocarcinoma, 2,171 operations were distal and 1,296 total. A secondary procedure was reported for 33% of distal gastrectomies and 59% of total gastrectomies. Six of 10 secondary procedures were associated with adverse outcomes. For example, patients who underwent a synchronous bowel resection had a higher risk of mortality (odds ratio [OR], 2.14; 95% CI, 1.07-4.29) and reoperation (OR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.26-3.47). Model performance was slightly better for nearly all outcomes with complexity adjustment (mortality c-statistics: standard model, 0.853; secondary procedure model, 0.858; RVU model, 0.855). Hospital ranking did not change substantially after complexity adjustment. Surgical complexity variables are associated with adverse outcomes in gastrectomy, but complexity adjustment does not affect hospital rankings appreciably. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Changing trends in abdominal surgical complications following cardiac surgery in an era of advanced procedures. A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashfaq, Awais; Johnson, Daniel J; Chapital, Alyssa B; Lanza, Louis A; DeValeria, Patrick A; Arabia, Francisco A

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal complications following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) procedures may have mortality rates as high as 25%. Advanced procedures such as ventricular assist devices, artificial hearts and cardiac transplantation are being increasingly employed, changing the complexity of interventions. This study was undertaken to examine the changing trends in complications and the impact of cardiac surgery on emergency general surgery (EGS) coverage. A retrospective review was conducted of all CPB procedures admitted to our ICU between Jan. 2007 and Mar. 2010. The procedures included coronary bypass (CABG), valve, combination (including adult congenital) and advanced heart failure (AHF) procedures. The records were reviewed to obtain demographics, need for EGS consult/procedure and outcomes. Mean age of the patients was 66 ± 8.5 years, 71% were male. There were 945 CPB procedures performed on 914 patients during this study period. Over 39 months, 23 EGS consults were obtained, resulting in 10 operations and one hospital death (10% operative mortality). CABG and valve procedures had minimal impact on EGS workload while complex cardiac and AHF procedures accounted for significantly more EGS consultations (p surgery, advanced technology has increased the volume of complex CPB procedures increasing the EGS workload. Emergency general surgeons working in institutions that perform advanced procedures should be aware of the potential for general surgical complications perioperatively and the resultant nuances that are associated with operative management in this patient population. Copyright © 2015 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Neonatal mandibular distraction osteogenesis: converting virtual surgical planning into an operative reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doscher, Matthew E; Garfein, Evan S; Bent, John; Tepper, Oren M

    2014-02-01

    Mandibular distraction osteogenesis (DO) has become an accepted method to manage severe cases of micrognathia-induced airway obstruction in neonates. Current imaging used to plan these procedures aids in surgical planning, but offers only a rough guide for the operating room. To our knowledge the following report offers the first description of virtual surgery used to guide DO in the mandible of a neonate. The plan provided a valuable link between the simulated procedure and the actual operative steps. Such technology can serve an important role in DO and offers objective guidance in device selection, vector planning and operative guide positioning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Surgical teams: role perspectives and role dynamics in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Linda Searle; Myrtle, Robert C; Weaver, Fred A

    2011-05-01

    Observations of surgical teams in the operating room (OR) and interviews with surgeons, circulating registered nurses (RNs), anaesthesiologists and surgical technicians reveal the importance of leadership, team member competencies and an enacted environment that encourages feelings of competence and cooperation. Surgical teams are more loosely coupled than intact and bounded. Team members tend to rely on expected role behaviours to bridge lack of familiarity. While members of the surgical team identified technical competence and preparation as critical factors affecting team performance, they had differing views over the role behaviours of other members of the surgical team that lead to surgical team performance. Observations revealed that the work climate in the OR can shape interpersonal relations and begins to be established when the room is being set up for the surgical case, and evolves as the surgical procedure progresses. The leadership and supervisory competencies of the circulating RNs establish the initial work environment. Both influenced the degree of cooperation and support that was observed, which had an effect on the interactions and relationships between other members of the surgical team. As the surgery unfolds, the surgeon's behaviours and interpersonal relations modify this environment and ultimately influence the degree of team work, team satisfaction and team performance.

  9. Prolonged Operative Duration Increases Risk of Surgical Site Infections: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hang; Chen, Brian Po-Han; Soleas, Ireena M; Ferko, Nicole C; Cameron, Chris G; Hinoul, Piet

    The incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) across surgical procedures, specialties, and conditions is reported to vary from 0.1% to 50%. Operative duration is often cited as an independent and potentially modifiable risk factor for SSI. The objective of this systematic review was to provide an in-depth understanding of the relation between operating time and SSI. This review included 81 prospective and retrospective studies. Along with study design, likelihood of SSI, mean operative times, time thresholds, effect measures, confidence intervals, and p values were extracted. Three meta-analyses were conducted, whereby odds ratios were pooled by hourly operative time thresholds, increments of increasing operative time, and surgical specialty. Pooled analyses demonstrated that the association between extended operative time and SSI typically remained statistically significant, with close to twice the likelihood of SSI observed across various time thresholds. The likelihood of SSI increased with increasing time increments; for example, a 13%, 17%, and 37% increased likelihood for every 15 min, 30 min, and 60 min of surgery, respectively. On average, across various procedures, the mean operative time was approximately 30 min longer in patients with SSIs compared with those patients without. Prolonged operative time can increase the risk of SSI. Given the importance of SSIs on patient outcomes and health care economics, hospitals should focus efforts to reduce operative time.

  10. Soft Tissue Surgical Procedures for Optimizing Anterior Implant Esthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas L. Ioannou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Implant dentistry has been established as a predictable treatment with excellent clinical success to replace missing or nonrestorable teeth. A successful esthetic implant reconstruction is predicated on two fundamental components: the reproduction of the natural tooth characteristics on the implant crown and the establishment of soft tissue housing that will simulate a healthy periodontium. In order for an implant to optimally rehabilitate esthetics, the peri-implant soft tissues must be preserved and/or augmented by means of periodontal surgical procedures. Clinicians who practice implant dentistry should strive to achieve an esthetically successful outcome beyond just osseointegration. Knowledge of a variety of available techniques and proper treatment planning enables the clinician to meet the ever-increasing esthetic demands as requested by patients. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the implant surgeon’s rationale and techniques beyond that of simply placing a functional restoration in an edentulous site to a level whereby an implant-supported restoration is placed in reconstructed soft tissue, so the site is indiscernible from a natural tooth.

  11. Surgical outcomes of isolated tricuspid valve procedures: repair versus replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejiofor, Julius I; Neely, Robert C; Yammine, Maroun; McGurk, Siobhan; Kaneko, Tsuyoshi; Leacche, Marzia; Cohn, Lawrence H; Shekar, Prem S

    2017-05-01

    Isolated tricuspid valve (ITV) operations are infrequent and the decision to operate is controversial. We report a series of ITV operations to outline the current disease status requiring this uncommon procedure with an emphasis on the results of tricuspid valve repair (TVr) versus replacement (TVR). Using our prospective cardiac surgery database, 57 patients who underwent ITV operations between 01/02-03/14 were identified. Median follow up time was 3.5 years [interquartile range (IQR), 0.8-6.7 years]. Fifty-seven patients underwent ITV surgery with a mean age of 54.4±14.9 yrs and 61% were women. Baseline characteristics were similar between patients who underwent TVr (n=18) or TVR (n=39). The etiologies of TV dysfunction were: ITV endocarditis 14/57 (25%), persistent TV regurgitation after left-sided valve surgery in 12/57 (21%), traumatic biopsies and iatrogenic injury from pacing leads in 11/57 (19%), orthotopic heart transplant 9/57 (16%), carcinoid syndrome 3/57 (5%), congenital 2/57 (5%) and idiopathic 5/57 (9%). Overall, 32/57 (56%) patients had prior heart surgery; of which 10/32 (31%) were TV procedures. Bioprosthetic prostheses were used in 34/39 (87%) patients. Of those who had repair, 11/18 (61%) had ring annuloplasty, 3/18 (17%) bicuspidization, and 3/18 (17%) De Vega annuloplasty and one had vegetectomy. Operative mortality was 5.1% (n=2) and 16.7% (n=3) for TVR and TVr groups, respectively (P=0.32), with an overall mortality rate of 8.6%. Postoperative complications included new onset renal failure in 6/39 (15%) of TVr and 2/18 (11%) of TVR (P=0.71) and there were no strokes. Overall survival rates and degree of residual RV dysfunction were similar for the two groups (both P=0.3). Five-year survival was 77% and 84% for TVr and TVR respectively (P=0.52). There was no difference in rates of recurrent tricuspid regurgitation for TVr and TVR (35.7% vs. 23.5%, respectively, P=0.4). ITV surgery is associated with improved but still relatively high

  12. Assessment of the efficiency of language interpreter services in a busy surgical and procedural practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkle, Christopher M; Anderson, Kathleen A; Xiong, YaPa; Guerra, Andrea E; Tschida-Reuter, Daniel A

    2017-07-04

    Surgical and procedural patient care settings require efficient patient flow. The primary goal of this study was to assess use and efficiency of language services for our limited English proficiency (LEP) patients undergoing surgical and outpatient procedures. Patient language services needs were recorded from our operating room and procedural locations over a two and a half month period in 2016. Time from in-person interpreter request to arrival was recorded. Frequency of language service modality used and reason for telephone and professional video remote interpreting (VRI) rather than in person professional services was queried. Mean time from in-person interpreter request until arrival was 19 min. Variation was high. No cases were cancelled due to lack of available interpretive services and no LEP patient underwent a procedure without requested interpretative service assistance. Time for in person professional interpreter assistance was short but highly variable. Access to telephone interpretive services and VRI services ensured assistance when in person interpreters were immediately unavailable. With the numbers of LEP patients increasing over time along with any new mandates for providing language assistance, the stress on hospital patient service units and the financial implications for many health care facilities will likely continue as challenges.

  13. Three-dimensional computer graphics for surgical procedure learning: Web three-dimensional application for cleft lip repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro; Nakajima, Tatsuo; Mori, Ayako; Tanaka, Daigo; Fujino, Toyomi; Chiyokura, Hiroaki

    2006-05-01

    In surgical procedures for cleft lip, surgeons attempt to use various skin incisions and small flaps to achieve a better and more natural shape postoperatively. They must understand the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the lips. However, they may have difficulty learning the surgical procedures precisely from normal textbooks with two-dimensional illustrations. Recent developments in 3D computed tomography (3D-CT) and laser stereolithography have enabled surgeons to visualize the structures of cleft lips from desired viewpoints. However, this method cannot reflect the advantages offered by specific surgical procedures. To solve this problem, we used the benefits offered by 3D computer graphics (3D-CG) and 3D animation. By using scanning 3D-CT image data of patients with cleft lips, 3D-CG models of the cleft lips were created. Several animations for surgical procedures such as incision designs, rotation of small skin flaps, and sutures were made. This system can recognize the details of an operation procedure clearly from any viewpoint, which cannot be acquired from the usual textbook illustrations. This animation system can be used for developing new skin-flap design, understanding the operational procedure, and using tools in case presentations. The 3D animations can also be uploaded to the World Wide Web for use in teleconferencing.

  14. The Role of Pre-Operative and Post-Operative Glucose Control in Surgical-Site Infections and Mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Christie Y.; Furuya, E. Yoko; Berman, Mitchell F.; Larson, Elaine L.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective The impact of glucose control on surgical-site infection (SSI) and death remains unclear. We examined how pre- and post-operative glucose levels and their variability are associated with the risk of SSI or in-hospital death. Methods This retrospective cohort study employed data on 13,800 hospitalized patients who underwent a surgical procedure at a large referral hospital in New York between 2006 and 2008. Over 20 different sources of electronic data were used to anal...

  15. Advance pre-operative chlorhexidine reduces the incidence of surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zywiel, Michael G; Daley, Jacqueline A; Delanois, Ronald E; Naziri, Qais; Johnson, Aaron J; Mont, Michael A

    2011-07-01

    Surgical site infections following elective knee arthroplasties occur most commonly as a result of colonisation by the patient's native skin flora. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of deep surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty patients who used an advance cutaneous disinfection protocol and who were compared to patients who had peri-operative preparation only. All adult reconstruction surgeons at a single institution were approached to voluntarily provide patients with chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths and a printed sheet instructing their use the night before and morning of surgery. Records for all knee arthroplasties performed between January 2007 and December 2008 were reviewed to determine the incidence of deep incisional and periprosthetic surgical site infections. Overall, the advance pre-operative protocol was used in 136 of 912 total knee arthroplasties (15%). A lower incidence of surgical site infection was found in patients who used the advance cutaneous preparation protocol as compared to patients who used the in-hospital protocol alone. These findings were maintained when patients were stratified by surgical infection risk category. No surgical site infections occurred in the 136 patients who completed the protocol as compared to 21 infections in 711 procedures (3.0%) performed in patients who did not. Patient-directed skin disinfection using chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths the evening before, and the morning of, elective knee arthroplasty appeared to effectively reduce the incidence of surgical site infection when compared to patients who underwent in-hospital skin preparation only.

  16. Operative wound classification: an inaccurate measure of pediatric surgical morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Katherine W; Dalton, Brian G; Kurtz, Brendan; Keirsey, Michael C; Oyetunji, Tolulope A; St Peter, Shawn D

    2016-11-01

    Wound classification has catapulted to the forefront of surgical literature and quality care discussions. However, it has not been validated in laparoscopy or children. We analyzed pediatric infection rates based on wound classification and reviewed the most common noninfectious complications which could be a more appropriate measure for quality assessment. We performed a retrospective review of 800 patients from 2011 to 2014 undergoing common procedures at a tertiary pediatric hospital. Demographics, procedure, wound classification and complications were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Infection rates were in the expected low range for clean procedures. However, 5% of pyloromyotomy patients required readmission and 10% of circumcision patients developed penile adhesions; 2% required reoperation. Ostomy reversal, a clean contaminated case, had 17% wound infections, whereas acute appendicitis, a contaminated case had only a 4% infection rate. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (clean-contaminated or contaminated depending on inflammation) had 2% postoperative infections. Perforated appendicitis, a dirty procedure had an 18% infection rate, below the expected >27% for dirty cases in adults. Current wound classifications do not accurately approximate the risk of surgical site infections in children, particularly for laparoscopic procedures. It would be more appropriate to grade hospitals based on disease and procedure specific complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Safety and accuracy of surgical procedures: case law evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougé-Maillart, C; Gaudin, A; Lermite, E; Arnaud, J-P; Penneau, M

    2008-01-01

    Surgeons, like other doctors, practice their profession within a framework of contractual liability defined by statute in 1936. This established that the doctor was subject to a contractual obligation to provide appropriate and diligent care. Care and technical acts should conform to those which would have been provided by a prudent doctor within the standards of knowledge and practice of his field; care which deviates from this standard would be considered medical error or fault. This standard of care is referred to as "sound professional conduct". However, while not calling this basic principle into question, civil jurisdictions have progressively held surgeons liable whenever injury has occurred following surgical acts, without considering whether care deviates from sound professional conduct. Since 2000, judges have begun to attribute a requirement for absolute safety of results in cases where the surgeon had injured an organ unrelated to the planned operation. However it seems that the rare judgments given on this topic in the last 2-3 years have become less frequent. The creation of a compensation regime for medical accidents, via the law dated March 4, 2002, has contributed to this evolution. It is to be hoped that the flaws described in this system do not encourage jurisdictions to reconsider previous case law decisions.

  18. 46 CFR 130.480 - Test procedure and operations manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Test procedure and operations manual. 130.480 Section....480 Test procedure and operations manual. (a) A procedure for tests to be conducted on automated... detailed operations manual that describes the operation and indicates the location of each system installed...

  19. Gynaecological surgical training in the operating room : an exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Houwen, Clasien; Boor, Klarke; Essed, Gerard G. M.; Boendermaker, Peter M.; Scherpbier, Albert A. J. J. A.; Scheele, Fedde

    Objective: One of the challenging goals of gynaecological education is preparing trainees for independent practice of surgery. Research, however, on how to acquire surgical skills in the operating room safely, effectively and efficiently is scarce. We performed this study to explore trainers' and

  20. The Kiricuta procedure in reconstructive surgical treatment of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J.F.; Bouchet, Y.; Dupre, A.

    1990-01-01

    A series of 50 patients with carcinoma of the breast underwent omental transposition. This palliative procedure is indicated for recurrences after conservative treatment, radiation necrosis and Stage III or IV ulcerated tumors. The operative technique is described in detail. Omentoplasties were performed upon 33 right and 17 left mammary areas. Forty-five right pedicled flaps and only four left areas were used. One patient died on the fourth postoperative day because of massive pulmonary embolus. Local repair was satisfactory in 76 per cent of the patients. Four patients presented with herniation of the abdominal wall at the site of omental tunneling. In three, the treatment consisted of sectioning the vascular pedicle and reinforcing the parietal closure with Dacron (polyester fiber) mesh

  1. Risk Factors and Predictive Model Development of Thirty-Day Post-Operative Surgical Site Infection in the Veterans Administration Surgical Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinli; Nylander, William; Smith, Tracy; Han, Soonhee; Gunnar, William

    2018-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) complicates approximately 2% of surgeries in the Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals. Surgical site infections are responsible for increased morbidity, length of hospital stay, cost, and mortality. Surgical site infection can be minimized by modifying risk factors. In this study, we identified risk factors and developed accurate predictive surgical specialty-specific SSI risk prediction models for the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) surgery population. In a retrospective observation study, surgical patients who underwent surgery from October 2013 to September 2016 from 136 VA hospitals were included. The Veteran Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP) database was used for the pre-operative demographic and clinical characteristics, intra-operative characteristics, and 30-day post-operative outcomes. The study population represents 11 surgical specialties: neurosurgery, urology, podiatry, otolaryngology, general, orthopedic, plastic, thoracic, vascular, cardiac coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), and cardiac valve/other surgery. Multivariable logistic regression models were developed for the 30-day post-operative SSIs. Among 354,528 surgical procedures, 6,538 (1.8%) had SSIs within 30 days. Surgical site infection rates varied among surgical specialty (0.7%-3.0%). Surgical site infection rates were higher in emergency procedures, procedures with long operative duration, greater complexity, and higher relative value units. Other factors associated with increased SSI risk were high level of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification (level 4 and 5), dyspnea, open wound/infection, wound classification, ascites, bleeding disorder, chemotherapy, smoking, history of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), radiotherapy, steroid use for chronic conditions, and weight loss. Each surgical specialty had a distinct combination of risk factors. Accurate SSI risk-predictive surgery specialty

  2. Large Variability in the Diversity of Physiologically Complex Surgical Procedures Exists Nationwide Among All Hospitals Including Among Large Teaching Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H; Thenuwara, Kokila; Lubarsky, David A

    2017-11-22

    Multiple previous studies have shown that having a large diversity of procedures has a substantial impact on quality management of hospital surgical suites. At hospitals with substantial diversity, unless sophisticated statistical methods suitable for rare events are used, anesthesiologists working in surgical suites will have inaccurate predictions of surgical blood usage, case durations, cost accounting and price transparency, times remaining in late running cases, and use of intraoperative equipment. What is unknown is whether large diversity is a feature of only a few very unique set of hospitals nationwide (eg, the largest hospitals in each state or province). The 2013 United States Nationwide Readmissions Database was used to study heterogeneity among 1981 hospitals in their diversities of physiologically complex surgical procedures (ie, the procedure codes). The diversity of surgical procedures performed at each hospital was quantified using a summary measure, the number of different physiologically complex surgical procedures commonly performed at the hospital (ie, 1/Herfindahl). A total of 53.9% of all hospitals commonly performed complex procedures (lower 99% confidence limit [CL], 51.3%). A total of 14.2% (lower 99% CL, 12.4%) of hospitals had >3-fold larger diversity (ie, >30 commonly performed physiologically complex procedures). Larger hospitals had greater diversity than the small- and medium-sized hospitals (P 30 procedures (lower 99% CL, 71.9% of hospitals). However, there was considerable variability among the large teaching hospitals in their diversity (interquartile range of the numbers of commonly performed physiologically complex procedures = 19.3; lower 99% CL, 12.8 procedures). The diversity of procedures represents a substantive differentiator among hospitals. Thus, the usefulness of statistical methods for operating room management should be expected to be heterogeneous among hospitals. Our results also show that "large teaching hospital

  3. Post-operative intensive care admission of paediatric surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty-seven general paediatric surgical patients were admitted with a male to female ratio of 1.4:1. There were 32 (47.8%) infants, 6(9%) pre-school children and 29(43.3%) older children. There were 57(85.1%) emergency procedures. Of the 40 patients who had documented indications for admission, 25(62.5%) had ...

  4. Patient safety in surgical oncology: perspective from the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue-Yung; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2012-07-01

    Despite knowledge that most surgical adverse events occur in the operating room (OR), understanding of the intraoperative phase of care is incomplete; most studies measure surgical safety in terms of preoperative risk or postoperative morbidity and mortality. Because of the OR's complexity, human factors engineering provides an ideal methodology for studies of intraoperative safety. This article reviews models of error and resilience as delineated by human factors experts, correlating them to OR performance. Existing methodologies for studying intraoperative safety are then outlined, focusing on video-based observational research. Finally, specific human and system factors examined in the OR are detailed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bilateral Pulmonary Endarterectomy and Bentall Procedure Completed in One Surgical Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Davide; Cavozza, Corrado; Scoti, Peppino; Mercogliano, Domenico; Minzioni, Gaetano; Medici, Dante

    2012-01-01

    We describe the performance, in one surgical session, of bilateral pulmonary endarterectomy and a button-technique Bentall operation in a 68-year-old man. The patient had chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and an ascending aortic aneurysm with moderate aortic regurgitation. The procedures were concurrently completed during short periods of systemic circulatory arrest, with antegrade cerebral perfusion maintained through the brachiocephalic artery at a flow rate of 10 mL/min/kg. The patient's cerebral perfusion was monitored with use of near-infrared spectroscopy, to prevent symmetric bilateral values from falling below 20% of the base value. The patient experienced no multiorgan failure or neurologic sequelae and, by the 6th postoperative day, improved from New York Heart Association functional class IV to class I. The reliable maintenance of continuous antegrade cerebral perfusion made the lengthy combined operation feasible, with low risk. The use of near-infrared spectroscopy enabled real-time monitoring of the patient's cerebral blood flow. Our experience shows the possibility of safely performing lengthy or multiple procedures in one surgical session. PMID:23109784

  6. Guideline for the preparation of safe operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinnett, L.; Carroll, M.M.; Crooks, D.L.; Doyle, J.R.; Jeblick, H.G.; Kessel, D.S.; Tippy, M.W.; Stuckey, J.M.

    1981-03-01

    These procedures are written for activities that involve the use of explosives, dangerous chemicals, radioactive materials, hazardous sytems, and for certain types of operational facilities which present hazards. This guideline presents a suggested Safe Operating Procedures format

  7. Characterizing the Relationship Between Surgical Resident and Faculty Perceptions of Autonomy in the Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Katelyn A; Lane, Samantha M; Widger, John E; Neuhaus, Nina M; Dove, James T; Fluck, Marcus; Hunsinger, Marie A; Blansfield, Joseph A; Shabahang, Mohsen M

    Characterize the concordance among faculty and resident perceptions of surgical case complexity, resident technical performance, and autonomy in a diverse sample of general surgery procedures using case-specific evaluations. A prospective study was conducted in which a faculty surgeon and surgical resident independently completed a postoperative assessment examining case complexity, resident operative performance (Milestone assessment) and autonomy (Zwisch model). Pearson correlation coefficients (r) reaching statistical significance (p autonomy demonstrated a moderate correlation (r = 0.56, p autonomy and operative performance, respectively. General surgery residents generally demonstrated high correlations with faculty perceptions of case complexity, technical performance, and operative autonomy. This generalized accord supports the use of the Milestone and Zwisch assessments in residency programs. However, discordance among perceptions of midlevel resident autonomy and chief resident operative performance suggests that these trainees may need more direct communication from the faculty. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 21 CFR 120.6 - Sanitation standard operating procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sanitation standard operating procedures. 120.6... Provisions § 120.6 Sanitation standard operating procedures. (a) Sanitation controls. Each processor shall have and implement a sanitation standard operating procedure (SSOP) that addresses sanitation...

  9. Surgical and procedural skills training at medical school - a national review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher R; Toll, Edward C; Bates, Anthony S; Cole, Matthew D; Smith, Frank C T

    2014-01-01

    This national study quantifies procedural and surgical skills training at medical schools in the United Kingdom (UK), a stipulated requirement of all graduates by the General Medical Council (GMC). A questionnaire recorded basic procedural and surgical skills training provided by medical schools and surgical societies in the UK. Skills were extracted from (1) GMC Tomorrows Doctors and (2) The Royal College of Surgeons Intercollegiate Basic Surgical Skills (BSS) course. Data from medical school curricula and extra-curricular student surgical societies were compared against the national GMC guidelines and BSS course content. Data were analysed using Mann-Whitney U tests. Representatives from 23 medical schools completed the survey (71.9% response). Thirty one skills extracted from the BSS course were split into 5 categories, with skills content cross referenced against GMC documentation. Training of surgical skills by medical schools was as follows: Gowning and gloving (72.8%), handling instruments (29.4%), knot tying (17.4%), suturing (24.7%), other surgical techniques (4.3%). Surgical societies provided significantly more training of knot tying (64.4%, P = 0.0013) and suturing (64.5%, P = 0.0325) than medical schools. Medical schools provide minimal basic surgical skills training, partially supplemented by extracurricular student surgical societies. Our findings suggest senior medical students do not possess simple surgical and procedural skills. Newly qualified doctors are at risk of being unable to safely perform practical procedures, contradicting GMC Guidelines. We propose a National Undergraduate Curriculum in Surgery and Surgical Skills to equip newly qualified doctors with basic procedural skills to maximise patient safety. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Operating Room Clinicians' Attitudes and Perceptions of a Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist at 1 Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Elizabeth K; Singer, Sara J; Sparks, William; Ozonoff, Al; Baxter, Jessica; Rangel, Shawn

    2016-03-01

    Despite mounting evidence that use of surgical checklists improves patient morbidity and mortality, compliance among surgical teams in executing required elements of checklists has been low. Recognizing that clinicians' receptivity is a major determinant of checklist use, we conducted a survey to investigate how mandated use of a surgical checklist impacts its operating room clinicians' attitudes about and perceptions of operating room safety, efficiency, teamwork, and prevention of medical errors. Operating room clinicians at 1 pediatric hospital were surveyed on their attitudes and perception of the novel Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist and the impact the checklist had on efficiency, teamwork, and prevention of medical errors 1 year after its implementation. The survey responses were compared and classified by multidisciplinary perioperative clinical staff. Most responses reflected positive attitudes toward checklist use. The respondents felt that the checklist reduced complications and errors and improved patient safety, communication among team members, teamwork in complex procedures, and efficiency in the operating room. Many operating room staff also reported that checklist use had prevented or averted an error or a complication. Perceptions varied according to perioperative clinical discipline, reflecting differences in perspectives. For example, the nurses perceived a higher rate of consent-related errors and site marking errors than did the physicians; the surgeons reported more antibiotic timing and equipment errors than did others. The surgical staff at 1 pediatric hospital who responded viewed the novel Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist as potentially beneficial to operative patient safety by improving teamwork and communication, reducing errors, and improving efficiency. Responses varied by discipline, indicating that team members view the checklist from different perspectives.

  11. Electronic Procedures for Medical Operations, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose an alternative to using Microsoft Word for representing medical procedures that will make the procedures easier to construct and maintain, particularly...

  12. Pre-operative and early post-operative factors associated with surgical site infection after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tovar, Jaime; Oller, Inmaculada; Llavero, Carolina; Arroyo, Antonio; Muñoz, Jose Luis; Calero, Alicia; Diez, María; Zubiaga, Lorea; Calpena, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Surgical procedures on obese patients are expected to have a high incidence of surgical site infection (SSI). The identification of pre-operative or early post-operative risk factors for SSI may help the surgeon to identify subjects in risk and adequately optimize their status. We conducted a study of the association of comorbidities and pre- and post-operative analytical variables with SSI following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for the treatment of morbid obesity. We performed a prospective study of all morbidly obese patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy as a bariatric procedure between 2007 and 2011. An association of clinical and analytical variables with SSI was investigated. The study included 40 patients with a mean pre-operative body mass index (BMI) of 51.2±7.9 kg/m(2). Surgical site infections appeared in three patients (7.5%), of whom two had an intra-abdominal abscess located in the left hypochondrium and the third had a superficial incisional SSI. Pre-operatively, a BMI >45 kg/m(2) (OR 8.7; p=0.008), restrictive disorders identified by pulmonary function tests (OR 10.0; p=0.012), a serum total protein concentration 30 mcg/dL (OR 13.0; p=0.003), and a mean corpuscular volume (MCV) operative SSI. Post-operatively, a serum glucose >128 mg/dL (OR 4.7; p=0.012) and hemoglobin operative anemia and hyperglycemia as risk factors for SSI. In these situations, the surgeon must be aware of and seek to control these risk factors.

  13. Managing Operating Procedures in Distributed Collaborative Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hool, A.; Beuzelin Ollivier, M.-G.; Roubert, F.

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, large distributed collaborative projects have become very prominent in scientific research, allowing exchanges between laboratories located in different institutions and countries and between various domains of competence. Particularly the work on nanotoxicity - a field which has only been under investigation for a few years and is still lacking regulatory framework - highlighted the need for well-controlled methods, as well as rules for the handling and disposal of used materials. To obtain comparable and reproducible results of experiments conducted in a distributed context, the standardisation and proper documentation of the applied methods is crucial. The European project NanoDiaRA, whose aim is to develop nanoparticles and biomarkers for the early diagnosis of inflammatory disease, faces this situation as it involves 15 European partners and brings together different scientific cultures and professional backgrounds. Protocols especially developed for Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and a management system were designed and implemented within the NanoDiaRA project to fulfil those needs. The main goals were the establishment of standardised Standard Operating Procedures assuring transparency and reproducibility and the provision of access to these protocols to every project partner, as well as their clear allocation to carry out precise measurements and production steps.

  14. Managing Operating Procedures in Distributed Collaborative Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hool, A; Ollivier, M-G Beuzelin; Roubert, F

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, large distributed collaborative projects have become very prominent in scientific research, allowing exchanges between laboratories located in different institutions and countries and between various domains of competence. Particularly the work on nanotoxicity – a field which has only been under investigation for a few years and is still lacking regulatory framework – highlighted the need for well-controlled methods, as well as rules for the handling and disposal of used materials. To obtain comparable and reproducible results of experiments conducted in a distributed context, the standardisation and proper documentation of the applied methods is crucial. The European project NanoDiaRA, whose aim is to develop nanoparticles and biomarkers for the early diagnosis of inflammatory disease, faces this situation as it involves 15 European partners and brings together different scientific cultures and professional backgrounds. Protocols especially developed for Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and a management system were designed and implemented within the NanoDiaRA project to fulfil those needs. The main goals were the establishment of standardised Standard Operating Procedures assuring transparency and reproducibility and the provision of access to these protocols to every project partner, as well as their clear allocation to carry out precise measurements and production steps.

  15. Creation of an emergency surgery service concentrates resident training in general surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hesham M; Gale, Stephen C; Tinti, Meredith S; Shiroff, Adam M; Macias, Aitor C; Rhodes, Stancie C; Defreese, Marissa A; Gracias, Vicente H

    2012-09-01

    Emergency general surgery (EGS) is increasingly being provided by academic trauma surgeons in an acute care surgery model. Our tertiary care hospital recently changed from a model where all staff surgeons (private, subspecialty academic, and trauma academic) were assigned EGS call to one in which an emergency surgery service (ESS), staffed by academic trauma faculty, cares for all EGS patients. In the previous model, many surgeries were "not covered" by residents because of work-hour restrictions, conflicting needs, or private surgeon preference. The ESS was separate from the trauma service. We hypothesize that by creating a separate ESS, residents can accumulate needed and concentrated operative experience in a well-supervised academic environment. A prospectively accrued EGS database was retrospectively queried for the 18-month period: July 2010 to June 2011. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) databases were queried for operative numbers for our residency program and for national resident data for 2 years before and after creating the ESS. The ACGME operative requirements were tabulated from online sources. ACGME requirements were compared with surgical cases performed. During the 18-month period, 816 ESS operations were performed. Of these, 307 (38%) were laparoscopy. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy and appendectomy were most common (138 and 145, respectively) plus 24 additional laparoscopic surgeries. Each resident performed, on average, 34 basic laparoscopic cases during their 2-month rotation, which is 56% of their ACGME basic laparoscopic requirement. A diverse mixture of 70 other general surgical operations was recorded for the remaining 509 surgical cases, including reoperative surgery, complex laparoscopy, multispecialty procedures, and seldom-performed operations such as surgery for perforated ulcer disease. Before the ESS, the classes of 2008 and 2009 reported that only 48% and 50% of cases were performed at the main academic

  16. SOFI, a symptom-oriented, fully integrated emergency operating procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobel, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper builds on a previous look at decision-tree emergency operating procedures to describe the symptom-oriented fully integrated (SOFI) process and what has been accomplished. The SOFI emergency operating procedures process results in one emergency operation procedure, thus eliminating the confusion and resultant jumping into and out of the wrong procedure (or the right ones if the operator misdiagnoses the event combination). The SOFI process results in emergency operating procedures that have a simple single-entry condition. The SOFI process results in emergency operating procedures that, once entered, require the operator to, by evaluating symptoms, determine the state of the plant and then provide the operator with the steps necessary to put the plant into a safer state. The full paper describes how, by the SOFI process, the typical boiling water reactor (BWR) plant, pre-TMI emergency procedures inventory (in some cases, abnormal procedures are included) is broken down to provide the steps to be integrated with the BWR Owners Group Emergency Procedures Guidelines into the SOFI emergency operating procedures. In summary, the paper provides a point-by-point comparison of the SOFI emergency operating procedures solution to the procedural problems identified in the post-TMI reviews

  17. Emergency operation procedure navigation to avoid commission errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofuku, Akio; Ito, Koji

    2004-01-01

    New types of operation control system equipped with a large screen and CRT-based operation panels have been installed in newly constructed nuclear power plants. The operators can share important information of plant conditions by the large screen. The operation control system can know the operations by operators through the computers connected to the operation panels. The software switches placed in the CRT-based operation panels have a problem such that operators may make an error to manipulate an irrelevant software switch with their current operation. This study develops an operation procedure navigation technique to avoid this kind of commission errors. The system lies between CRT-based operation panels and plant control systems and checks an operation by operators if it follows the operation procedure of operation manuals. When the operation is a right one, the operation is executed as if the operation command is directly transmitted to control systems. If the operation does not follow the operation procedure, the system warns the commission error to operators. This paper describes the operation navigation technique, format of base operation model, and a proto-type operation navigation system for a three loop pressurized water reactor plant. The validity of the proto-type system is demonstrated by the operation procedure navigation for a steam generator tube rupture accident. (author)

  18. Immediate Surgical Skills Feedback in the Operating Room Using "SurF" Cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, AnnaMarie; Hansen, Darci; Schuler, Kevin; Galvin, Shelley L; Wolfe, Honor

    2014-12-01

    Ensuring residents develop operative skills requires application of the principles of guided learning, deliberate practice, and directed feedback. We sought to create and implement a tool to promote procedural "key" step review and immediate feedback on surgical skills, and examined faculty and resident satisfaction with surgical skills feedback. We created surgical skills feedback (SurF) cards for 8 gynecologic procedures. Faculty/fellows and residents completed prestudy surveys querying frequency of preoperative key step review and satisfaction with surgical skill feedback, a SurF card each time 1 of 8 procedures was performed, and poststudy surveys to evaluate for changes. Prestudy surveys were completed by 31 faculty/fellows and 20 residents, with 55% (17 of 31) of the faculty/fellows and 5% (1 of 20) of the residents reporting key step review before surgery. All reported low satisfaction rates with feedback frequency, quality, and timeliness. After implementation of SurF cards, preoperative key step review occurred in 78% (82 of 105) of the procedures. Twenty-one faculty/fellows (68%) and 16 residents (80%) completed our poststudy survey. Faculty/fellows reported statistically similar key step review (n  =  15 [71%], P  =  .23), while residents reported that key step review had significantly improved (n  =  6 [38%], P  =  .01). Resident satisfaction with feedback frequency (5% to 50%, P  =  .002) and quality (15% to 50%, P  =  .02) increased significantly. The SurF cards we developed facilitated procedural key step review, were associated with significantly improved resident satisfaction with surgical feedback, and could prove helpful with outcomes assessments, such as Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-required documentation of Milestone attainment.

  19. Immediate Surgical Skills Feedback in the Operating Room Using “SurF” Cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, AnnaMarie; Hansen, Darci; Schuler, Kevin; Galvin, Shelley L.; Wolfe, Honor

    2014-01-01

    Background Ensuring residents develop operative skills requires application of the principles of guided learning, deliberate practice, and directed feedback. Objective We sought to create and implement a tool to promote procedural “key” step review and immediate feedback on surgical skills, and examined faculty and resident satisfaction with surgical skills feedback. Methods We created surgical skills feedback (SurF) cards for 8 gynecologic procedures. Faculty/fellows and residents completed prestudy surveys querying frequency of preoperative key step review and satisfaction with surgical skill feedback, a SurF card each time 1 of 8 procedures was performed, and poststudy surveys to evaluate for changes. Results Prestudy surveys were completed by 31 faculty/fellows and 20 residents, with 55% (17 of 31) of the faculty/fellows and 5% (1 of 20) of the residents reporting key step review before surgery. All reported low satisfaction rates with feedback frequency, quality, and timeliness. After implementation of SurF cards, preoperative key step review occurred in 78% (82 of 105) of the procedures. Twenty-one faculty/fellows (68%) and 16 residents (80%) completed our poststudy survey. Faculty/fellows reported statistically similar key step review (n  =  15 [71%], P  =  .23), while residents reported that key step review had significantly improved (n  =  6 [38%], P  =  .01). Resident satisfaction with feedback frequency (5% to 50%, P  =  .002) and quality (15% to 50%, P  =  .02) increased significantly. Conclusions The SurF cards we developed facilitated procedural key step review, were associated with significantly improved resident satisfaction with surgical feedback, and could prove helpful with outcomes assessments, such as Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education–required documentation of Milestone attainment. PMID:25512804

  20. [Neuropsychological and psychopathologic changes following cardiac surgical procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walzer, T A; Herrmann, M

    1998-02-01

    Neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric disorders following open heart surgery are estimated to occur in as many as 80 per cent of all patients. They have been recognised from the very beginning of modern heart surgery. Despite a huge amount of scientific literature, data concerning incidence, the phenomenology and duration of symptoms diverge. This finding may be explained by heterogeneous aetiopathogenetic concepts and methodological and terminological problems associated with the investigation of postoperative delirium or neuropsychological and psychopathological sequelae of cardiac surgery. Nowadays, most authors agree in respect of a multifactorial pathogenesis of cognitive deficits following cardiac surgery. Factors influencing the psychopathological and neuropsychological outcome of cardiac surgery can be divided into pre-, intra- and postoperative variables. Advanced age, degree of cardiovascular impairment and other case histories, as well as history of drug abuse, are those preoperative variables that may be responsible for a postoperative cognitive decline. The predictive value of personality traits (depression and/or anxiety), however, is most controversial. Among the intraoperative variables related to the postoperative cognitive state, are e.g. the type of operation and technical procedure (micro-/macroembolism due to the way of oxygenation, pulsatile/-non-pulsatile flow) and duration of extracorporeal circulation. In the postoperative period, the duration of intubation or ICU stay and related variables (like sleep or sensory deprivation/hyperstimulation) were identified as significant predictors of neuropsychological and psychopathological alterations. Modern research focusses on neurobiochemical markers of brain injury which may serve as early predictors of a postoperative cognitive decrease. These parameters may indicate an early postoperative diagnosis and neuroprotective treatment in patients at risk.

  1. The surgical care improvement project and prevention of post-operative infection, including surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Laura H; Politano, Amani D; Sawyer, Robert G

    2011-06-01

    In response to inconsistent compliance with infection prevention measures, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services collaborated with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the Surgical Infection Prevention (SIP) project, introduced in 2002. Quality improvement measures were developed to standardize processes to increase compliance. In 2006, the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) developed out of the SIP project and its process measures. These initiatives, published in the Specifications Manual for National Inpatient Quality Measures, outline process and outcome measures. This continually evolving manual is intended to provide standard quality measures to unify documentation and track standards of care. Seven of the SCIP initiatives apply to the peri-operative period: Prophylactic antibiotics should be received within 1 h prior to surgical incision (1), be selected for activity against the most probable antimicrobial contaminants (2), and be discontinued within 24 h after the surgery end-time (3); (4) euglycemia should be maintained, with well-controlled morning blood glucose concentrations on the first two post-operative days, especially in cardiac surgery patients; (6) hair at the surgical site should be removed with clippers or by depilatory methods, not with a blade; (9) urinary catheters are to be removed within the first two post-operative days; and (10) normothermia should be maintained peri-operatively. There is strong evidence that implementation of protocols that standardize practices reduce the risk of surgical infection. The SCIP initiative targets complications that account for a significant portion of preventable morbidity as well as cost. One of the goals of the SCIP guidelines was a 25% reduction in the incidence of surgical site infections from implementation through 2010. Process measures are becoming routine, and as we practice more evidence-based medicine, it falls to us, the surgeons and scientists, to be active

  2. Post-operative serious adverse events in a mixed surgical population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M S; Petersen, E E; Dahl, J B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The number of surgical procedures is increasing, and knowledge of surgical risk factors, post-operative mortality and serious adverse events (SAE) is essential. The aim with our study was to determine the risk of a composite outcome of post-operative: death; myocardial infarction.......9% (5.4-6.5), respectively. Mortality within longest follow-up as well as 90 and 180 days post-operatively was 3.6% (3.1-4.0), 1.7% (1.4-2.0), and 2.2% (1.9-2.6), respectively. CONCLUSION: We found a risk of one or more events in the composite outcome within 342 days after inclusion of the last patients...

  3. Activity analysis: measurement of the effectiveness of surgical training and operative technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J. P.; Brickley, M.

    1992-01-01

    All surgical procedures are characterised by a sequence of steps and instrument changes. Although surgical efficiency and training in operative technique closely relate to this process, few studies have attempted to analyse it quantitatively. Because efficiency is particularly important in day surgery and lower third molar removal is a high-volume procedure, the need for which is responsible for particularly long waiting-lists in almost all UK health regions, this operation was selected for evaluation. A series of 80 consecutive procedures, carried out for 43 day-stay patients under general anaesthesia by seven junior staff (senior house officers and registrars: 39 procedures) and four senior staff (senior registrars and consultants: 41 procedures) were analysed. Median operating time for procedures which required retraction of periosteum was 9.5 min (range 2.7-23.3 min). Where these steps were necessary, median time for incision was 25 s (range 10-90 s); for retraction of periosteum, 79 s (range 5-340 s); for bone removal, 118 s (range 10-380 s); for tooth excision, 131 s (range 10-900 s); for debridement, 74 s (range 5-270 s); and for suture, 144 s (range 25-320 s). Junior surgeons could be differentiated from senior surgeons on the basis of omission, repetition and duration of these steps. Juniors omitted retraction of periosteum in 10% of procedures (seniors 23%) and suture in 13% (seniors 32%). Juniors repeated steps in 47% of operations; seniors, 14%. Junior surgeons took significantly more time than senior surgeons for incision, bone removal and tooth excision.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 PMID:1471840

  4. Effect of a 19-item surgical safety checklist during urgent operations in a global patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Thomas G; Haynes, Alex B; Dziekan, Gerald; Berry, William R; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Gawande, Atul A

    2010-05-01

    To assess whether implementation of a 19-item World Health Organization (WHO) Surgical Safety Checklist in urgent surgical cases would improve compliance with basic standards of care and reduce rates of deaths and complications. Use of the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist has been shown to be associated with significant reductions in complications and deaths. Before evaluation of this safety tool, concern was raised about whether its use would be practical or beneficial during urgent surgical procedures. We prospectively collected clinical process and outcome data for 1750 consecutively enrolled patients 16 years of age or older undergoing urgent noncardiac surgery before and after introduction of the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist in 8 diverse hospitals around the world; 842 underwent urgent surgery-defined as an operation required within 24 hours of assessment to be beneficial-before introduction of the checklist and 908 after introduction of the checklist. The primary end point was the rate of complications, including death, during hospitalization up to 30 days following surgery. The complication rate was 18.4% (n=151) at baseline and 11.7% (n=102) after the checklist was introduced (P=0.0001). Death rates dropped from 3.7% to 1.4% following checklist introduction (P=0.0067). Adherence to 6 measured safety steps improved from 18.6% to 50.7% (PSafety Checklist in urgent operations is feasible and should be considered.

  5. Review Reviewing the values of a stabdard operating procedure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The review further discusses shortcomings related to nonexistence of standard operating procedure including inconsistent quality of service; performance variation; procedural mix-ups; and misinterpretation or miscommunication of information. In conclusion, standard operating procedure, if realized and materialized as a ...

  6. Surgical treatment of spinal ependymoma and post-operative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.T.; Gromelski, E.B.; Green, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    With the advances in microsurgical and monitoring techniques, spinal ependymomas are gross totally resected more frequently. The use of adjuvant radiotherapy has become questionable with gross total resection and its role for residual neoplasm need to be redefined. A retrospective analysis of a series of patients was carried out to investigate our clinical outcome and selected use of postoperative radiotherapy. Clinical materials and methods Between July 1990 and May 1995, nineteen patients [M : F = 12 : 7; age range: 21 to 71 years] with a spinal ependymoma were treated at University of Miami by the senior author. (BAG). Pre-operative MRI diagnosed the intraspinal tumor, and pathology reports demonstrated that each patient had a histologically confirmed ependymoma. At the time of diagnosis, the most common symptoms presented were pain (in 16 patients = 84.2%). The pattern of progression of clinical symptoms was directly related to the location of the tumor. Each patient had an MRI immediately after surgery, approximately 6 months post-operatively, and then annually. Results: All 19 patients underwent intradural microsurgical exploration with an attempted gross total resection (achieved in 16 patients = 79%) of the ependymoma through a posterior approach. Direct neural tissue stimulation halted further resection in 2 patients with questionable tumor margins. Radiation therapy was employed as a surgical adjunct in 3 patients (15.8%) because of possible residual tumor. All patients were followed up postoperatively for an average of 50.6 months (range 6 months to 6 years). All patients are surviving to date. Surgical resection of these tumors led to significant alleviation of pre-operative symptoms. There has been no radiographic evidence of tumor recurrence or growth in any patient to date. Conclusion: Surgical resection of spinal ependymoma leads to significant improvement of pre-operative symptom. Surgical removal alone, with an attempt to grossly resect the tumor

  7. Chronic subdural hematoma : a systematic review and meta-analysis of surgical procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Weiming; Bakker, Nicolaas A.; Groen, Rob J. M.

    Object. In this paper the authors systematically evaluate the results of different surgical procedures for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Methods. The MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and other databases were scrutinized according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting

  8. Influence of perioperative administration of amino acids on thermoregulation response in patients underwent colorectal surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeba Snježana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypothermia in the surgical patients can be the consequence of long duration of surgical intervention, general anesthesia and low temperature in operating room. Postoperative hypothermia contributes to a number of postoperative complications such as arrhythmia, myocardial ischemia, hypertension, bleeding, wound infection, coagulopathy, prolonged effect of muscle relaxants. External heating procedures are used to prevent this condition, but some investigations reported that infusion of aminoacids during surgery can induce thermogenesis and prevent postoperative hypothermia. Case report. We reported two males who underwent major colorectal surgery for rectal carcinoma. One patient received Aminosol 15% solution, 125 ml/h, while the other did not. The esophageal temperatures in both cases were measured every 30 minutes during the operation and 60 minutes after in Intensive Care Unit. We were monitoring blood pressure, heart rate, ECG, and shivering. Patient who received aminoacids showed ameliorated postoperative hypothermia without hypertension, arrhythmia, or shivering, while the other showed all symptoms mentioned above. Conclusion. According to literature data, as well as our findings, we can conclude that intraoperative intravenous treatment with amino acid solution ameliorates postoperative hypothermia along with its complications. .

  9. Cost-consequence analysis of different active flowable hemostatic matrices in cardiac surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, D; Rock, M; Xiong, Y; Epstein, J D; Arnold, M R; Lattouf, O M; Calcaterra, D

    2017-06-01

    A recent retrospective comparative effectiveness study found that use of the FLOSEAL Hemostatic Matrix in cardiac surgery was associated with significantly lower risks of complications, blood transfusions, surgical revisions, and shorter length of surgery than use of SURGIFLO Hemostatic Matrix. These outcome improvements in cardiac surgery procedures may translate to economic savings for hospitals and payers. The objective of this study was to estimate the cost-consequence of two flowable hemostatic matrices (FLOSEAL or SURGIFLO) in cardiac surgeries for US hospitals. A cost-consequence model was constructed using clinical outcomes from a previously published retrospective comparative effectiveness study of FLOSEAL vs SURGIFLO in adult cardiac surgeries. The model accounted for the reported differences between these products in length of surgery, rates of major and minor complications, surgical revisions, and blood product transfusions. Costs were derived from Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's National Inpatient Sample (NIS) 2012 database and converted to 2015 US dollars. Savings were modeled for a hospital performing 245 cardiac surgeries annually, as identified as the average for hospitals in the NIS dataset. One-way sensitivity analysis and probabilistic sensitivity analysis were performed to test model robustness. The results suggest that if FLOSEAL is utilized in a hospital that performs 245 mixed cardiac surgery procedures annually, 11 major complications, 31 minor complications, nine surgical revisions, 79 blood product transfusions, and 260.3 h of cumulative operating time could be avoided. These improved outcomes correspond to a net annualized saving of $1,532,896. Cost savings remained consistent between $1.3m and $1.8m and between $911k and $2.4m, even after accounting for the uncertainty around clinical and cost inputs, in a one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analysis, respectively. Outcome differences associated with FLOSEAL vs SURGIFLO

  10. Novel surgical procedures in glaucoma: advances in penetrating glaucoma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippopoulos, Theodoros; Rhee, Douglas J

    2008-03-01

    Despite late modifications and enhancements, traditional penetrating glaucoma surgery is not without complications and is reserved for patients in whom pharmacologic treatment and/or laser trabeculoplasty do not suffice to control the intraocular pressure. This article critically reviews recent advances in penetrating glaucoma surgery with particular attention paid to two novel surgical approaches: ab interno trabeculectomy with the Trabectome and implantation of the Ex-PRESS shunt. Ab interno trabeculectomy (Trabectome) achieves a sustained 30% reduction in intraocular pressure by focally ablating and cauterizing the trabecular meshwork/inner wall of Schlemm's canal. It has a remarkable safety profile with respect to early hypotonous or infectious complications as it does not generate a bleb, but it can be associated with early postoperative intraocular pressure spikes that may necessitate additional glaucoma surgery. The Ex-PRESS shunt is more commonly implanted under a partial thickness scleral flap, and appears to have similar efficacy to standard trabeculectomy offering some advantages with respect to the rate of early complications related to hypotony. Penetrating glaucoma surgery will continue to evolve. As prospective randomized clinical trials become available, we will determine the exact role of these surgical techniques in the glaucoma surgical armamentarium.

  11. New application of procedures computer to normal operating procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medrano Carbajo, J.; Mendez Salguero, J.

    2012-07-01

    Currently, existing technologies in the operating power plants accused increasingly more problems of obsolescence and replacement of equipment supply. For this reason are spreading, to a greater or lesser extent, the projects of migration from analogue to digital technology systems. These systems, in line with the current situation of the industry, provide solutions to such problems and other advantages.

  12. Reported analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing experimental surgical procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Leach Matthew C; Flecknell Paul A; Coulter Claire A; Richardson Claire A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background It has become widely accepted that whenever animals are used in scientific procedures, the 3Rs principle of replacement, reduction and refinement described by William Russell and Rex Burch should be adhered to. Animals should be replaced with non-sentient alternatives if possible, the number of animals used should be reduced and experimental procedures should be refined to minimise pain, suffering and distress. Administration of analgesic agents to animals undergoing surgi...

  13. Catheter for Cleaning Surgical Optics During Surgical Procedures: A Possible Solution for Residue Buildup and Fogging in Video Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Igor Renato Louro Bruno; Abrão, Fernando Conrado; Silva, Alessandra Rodrigues; Corrêa, Larissa Teresa Cirera; Younes, Riad Nain

    2015-05-01

    Currently, there is a tendency to perform surgical procedures via laparoscopic or thoracoscopic access. However, even with the impressive technological advancement in surgical materials, such as improvement in quality of monitors, light sources, and optical fibers, surgeons have to face simple problems that can greatly hinder surgery by video. One is the formation of "fog" or residue buildup on the lens, causing decreased visibility. Intracavitary techniques for cleaning surgical optics and preventing fog formation have been described; however, some of these techniques employ the use of expensive and complex devices designed solely for this purpose. Moreover, these techniques allow the cleaning of surgical optics when they becomes dirty, which does not prevent the accumulation of residue in the optics. To solve this problem we have designed a device that allows cleaning the optics with no surgical stops and prevents the fogging and residue accumulation. The objective of this study is to evaluate through experimental testing the effectiveness of a simple device that prevents the accumulation of residue and fogging of optics used in surgical procedures performed through thoracoscopic or laparoscopic access. Ex-vivo experiments were performed simulating the conditions of residue presence in surgical optics during a video surgery. The experiment consists in immersing the optics and catheter set connected to the IV line with crystalloid solution in three types of materials: blood, blood plus fat solution, and 200 mL of distilled water and 1 vial of methylene blue. The optics coupled to the device were immersed in 200 mL of each type of residue, repeating each immersion 10 times for each distinct residue for both thirty and zero degrees optics, totaling 420 experiments. A success rate of 98.1% was observed after the experiments, in these cases the device was able to clean and prevent the residue accumulation in the optics.

  14. [The 'Surgical Deck': a new generation of integrated operational rooms for ENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, G; Gollnick, I; Neumuth, T; Meixensberger, J; Lueth, T C

    2013-02-01

    Existing operating room concepts do not meet modern technological opportunities anymore. The "Surgical Deck" is supposed to represent a prototype for a new operating room generation. The objective of the project is to achieve a better integration of functions and to develop an innovative concept for a highly developed surgical workstation. 3 working areas are defined: Surgical, Airway and Technical Cockpit. The evaluation was conducted on 284 surgeries carried out from 01.08. 2011 to 31.01. 2012. The evaluation team consisted of 6 surgeons, 3 surgery nurses, 3 anesthesiologists and 4 anesthesia nurses. Within a detailed analysis, the data of 50 FESS surgeries were compared to those of a control group. Within the FESS group, the average slot time was reduced by 13%. 88.2% of those questioned assessed ergonomics as being better than in the conventional OR. 71.5% stated that the Surgical Deck provided an added value with regard to the surgical procedure. 91.3% confirmed that the system control required additional training. 79.3% described the cost-benefit-ratio as appropriate. For 96% of the surgeries, respondents said that they were feeling adequately supported by the technology. The results show a clear advantage of the system architecture. The Surgical Deck may present a solid foundation with regard to the transfer of the system into the clinical practice. This is relevant for new assistance functions such as process control software or navigation-based collision warning systems. It is to be expected that the project will significantly contribute to further develop the future surgical workstation and its standardization. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Single-use surgical clothing system for reduction of airborne bacteria in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammelin, A; Ljungqvist, B; Reinmüller, B

    2013-07-01

    It is desirable to maintain a low bacterial count in the operating room air to prevent surgical site infection. This can be achieved by ventilation or by all staff in the operating room wearing clothes made from low-permeable material (i.e. clean air suits). We investigated whether there was a difference in protective efficacy between a single-use clothing system made of polypropylene and a reusable clothing system made of a mixed material (cotton/polyester) by testing both in a dispersal chamber and during surgical procedures. Counts of colony-forming units (cfu)/m(3) air were significantly lower when using the single-use clothing system in both settings. Copyright © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of full-field digital mammography on pre-operative diagnosis and surgical treatment of mammographic microcalcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundred, S M; Zhou, J; Whiteside, S; Morris, J; Wilson, M; Hurley, E; Bundred, N

    2014-01-01

    Accurate pre-operative diagnosis of impalpable breast lesions correlates closely with the number of surgical procedures required for treatment. Correct diagnosis of mammographic microcalcification (MM) as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive breast cancer is important because lesions upgraded to malignant diagnosis at surgery require repeat surgical procedures in 44 % of cases. Despite correct pre-operative diagnosis of MM, 26 % require second therapeutic operations to achieve surgical clearance. Theoretically, improved conspicuity of malignant MM using digital mammography could improve diagnostic work-up and improve surgical outcomes for MM. To determine the impact of full-field digital mammography (FFDM) on the diagnostic accuracy and positive predictive value (PPV) of biopsy of MM and surgical management of MM, screening and symptomatic cases with MM (n = 1,479) were reviewed for women imaged between August 2007 and March 2010 using screen-film mammography (SFM) (n = 711), and using FFDM, imaged between April 2010 to March 2012 (n = 768). Demographic information including pre and postoperative diagnosis, and number and types of surgical procedures were recorded. Overall, 302 (128 invasive) and 251 (110 invasive) malignant lesions were diagnosed using SFM and FFDM, respectively. Reduction in PPV of biopsy was observed (SFM 42.5 %; FFDM 32.7 %, p cancers over two centimetres. This will increase concerns about treatment of lesions detected in the screening programme with widespread use of digital mammography.

  17. Radiation dose to the operator during fluoroscopically guided spine procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roccatagliata, Luca; Pravata, Emanuele; Cianfoni, Alessandro [Department of Neuroradiology, Neurocenter of Southern Switzerland, Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Lugano (Switzerland); Presilla, Stefano [Unita di Fisica Medica, Ente Ospedaliero Cantonale (EOC), Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2017-09-15

    Fluoroscopy is widely used to guide diagnostic and therapeutic spine procedures. The purpose of this study was to quantify radiation incident on the operator (operator Air Kerma) during a wide range of fluoroscopy-guided spine procedures and its correlation with the amount of radiation incident on the patient (Kerma Area Product - KAP). We retrospectively included 57 consecutive fluoroscopically guided spine procedures. KAP [Gy cm{sup 2}] and total fluoroscopy time were recorded for each procedure. An electronic dosimeter recorded the operator Air Kerma [μGy] for each procedure. Operator Air Kerma for each procedure, correlation between KAP and operator Air Kerma, and between KAP and fluoroscopy time was obtained. Operator Air Kerma was widely variable across procedures, with median value of 6.4 μGy per procedure. Median fluoroscopy time and median KAP per procedure were 2.6 min and 4.7 Gy cm{sup 2}, respectively. There was correlation between operator Air Kerma and KAP (r{sup 2} = 0.60), with a slope of 1.6 μGy Air Kerma per unit Gy cm{sup 2} KAP incident on the patient and between fluoroscopy time and KAP (r{sup 2} = 0.63). Operator Air Kerma during individual fluoroscopy-guided spine procedures can be approximated from the commonly and readily available information of the total amount of radiation incident on the patient, measured as KAP. (orig.)

  18. Surgical procedure to improve on continence in children | Archibong ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Operational repair of anorectal malformations frequently present with, faecal soilage as the dominant complication. Series of operations have been attempted but none fully satisfies the criteria for continence. A child that present with faecal soilage is a societal problem especially when he is away from the home environment.

  19. Research on Operating Procedure Development in View of RCM Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, J.

    2015-01-01

    The operation of NPPs (nuclear power plants) is closely related to SSCs (Structure, System and Component) function implementations and failure recoveries, and strictly follows operating procedure. The philosophy of RCM (Reliability Centered Maintenance) which is a widely-used systematic engineering approach in industry focusing on likewise facility functions and effectiveness of maintenance is accepted in relative analysis of NPPs operation in this paper. Based on the theory of RCM, the paper will discuss general logic of operating procedure development and framework optimization as well combining NPPs engineering design. Since the quality of operating procedures has a significant impact on the safe and reliable operation of NPPs, the paper provides a proposed operating procedure development logic diagramme for reference for the procedure optimization task ahead. (author)

  20. The role of pre-operative and post-operative glucose control in surgical-site infections and mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie Y Jeon

    Full Text Available The impact of glucose control on surgical-site infection (SSI and death remains unclear. We examined how pre- and post-operative glucose levels and their variability are associated with the risk of SSI or in-hospital death.This retrospective cohort study employed data on 13,800 hospitalized patients who underwent a surgical procedure at a large referral hospital in New York between 2006 and 2008. Over 20 different sources of electronic data were used to analyze how thirty-day risk of SSI and in-hospital death varies by glucose levels and variability. Maximum pre- and post-operative glucose levels were determined for 72 hours before and after the operation and glucose variability was defined as the coefficient of variation of the glucose measurements. We employed logistic regression to model the risk of SSI or death against glucose variables and the following potential confounders: age, sex, body mass index, duration of operation, diabetes status, procedure classification, physical status, emergency status, and blood transfusion.While association of pre- and post-operative hyperglycemia with SSI were apparent in the crude analysis, multivariate results showed that SSI risk did not vary significantly with glucose levels. On the other hand, in-hospital deaths were associated with pre-operative hypoglycemia (OR = 5.09, 95% CI (1.80, 14.4 and glucose variability (OR = 1.14, 95% CI (1.03, 1.27 for 10% increase in coefficient of variation.In-hospital deaths occurred more often among those with pre-operative hypoglycemia and higher glucose variability. These findings warrant further investigation to determine whether stabilization of glucose and prevention of hypoglycemia could reduce post-operative deaths.

  1. The role of pre-operative and post-operative glucose control in surgical-site infections and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Christie Y; Furuya, E Yoko; Berman, Mitchell F; Larson, Elaine L

    2012-01-01

    The impact of glucose control on surgical-site infection (SSI) and death remains unclear. We examined how pre- and post-operative glucose levels and their variability are associated with the risk of SSI or in-hospital death. This retrospective cohort study employed data on 13,800 hospitalized patients who underwent a surgical procedure at a large referral hospital in New York between 2006 and 2008. Over 20 different sources of electronic data were used to analyze how thirty-day risk of SSI and in-hospital death varies by glucose levels and variability. Maximum pre- and post-operative glucose levels were determined for 72 hours before and after the operation and glucose variability was defined as the coefficient of variation of the glucose measurements. We employed logistic regression to model the risk of SSI or death against glucose variables and the following potential confounders: age, sex, body mass index, duration of operation, diabetes status, procedure classification, physical status, emergency status, and blood transfusion. While association of pre- and post-operative hyperglycemia with SSI were apparent in the crude analysis, multivariate results showed that SSI risk did not vary significantly with glucose levels. On the other hand, in-hospital deaths were associated with pre-operative hypoglycemia (OR = 5.09, 95% CI (1.80, 14.4)) and glucose variability (OR = 1.14, 95% CI (1.03, 1.27) for 10% increase in coefficient of variation). In-hospital deaths occurred more often among those with pre-operative hypoglycemia and higher glucose variability. These findings warrant further investigation to determine whether stabilization of glucose and prevention of hypoglycemia could reduce post-operative deaths.

  2. Safety of the surgeon: 'Double-gloving' during surgical procedures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The surgeon and the first assistant double-gloved in all the 1 050 procedures performed between 2009 and 2013, and ... physician's hands.[1]. Recently, the protection of physicians and other medical personnel from the percutaneous transmission of HIV, hepatitis-B virus and other pathogens by direct contact with infected ...

  3. Developing control room operator selection procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosshardt, M.J.; Bownas, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    PDRI is performing a two-year study to identify the tasks performed and attributes required in electric power generating plant operating jobs, and focusing on the control room operator position. Approximately 65 investor-owned utilities are participating in the study

  4. Guideline for the preparation of safe operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinnett, L.; Armbrust, E.F.; Christy, V.W.; Doyle, J.R.; Kesinger, J.H.

    1977-03-01

    Sandia Laboratories Safe Operating Procedures (SOP) are written for activities which involve the use of explosives, dangerous chemicals, radioactive materials, hazardous systems, and certain types of operational facilities which present hazards. This guideline presents a suggested SOP format

  5. Technical and surgical aspects of the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) microstimulator insertion procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assaf, A T; Hillerup, S; Rostgaard, J

    2016-01-01

    procedure. Perioperative surgical sequelae included sensory disturbances, pain, and swelling. Follow-up procedures included placement of a second microstimulator on the opposite side (n=2), adjustment of the microstimulator lead location (n=13), re-placement after initial unsuccessful placement (n=1...

  6. Procedures of Operation at Cranbrook Central Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranbrook Institutions, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Central Library.

    This manual outlines the ordering, cataloging and classification, and processing procedures for books, periodicals, government documents, and non-book materials for a central library serving three schools--a co-ed elementary school and separate junior-senior high schools for boys and girls--and four special libraries--a fine and rare books…

  7. Surveillance of Environmental and Procedural Measures of Infection Control in the Operating Theatre Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallolio, Laura; Raggi, Alessandra; Sanna, Tiziana; Mazzetti, Magda; Orsi, Alessandra; Zanni, Angela; Farruggia, Patrizia; Leoni, Erica

    2017-12-28

    The microbiological contamination of operating theatres and the lack of adherence to best practices by surgical staff represent some of the factors affecting Surgical Site Infections (SSIs). The aim of the present study was to assess the microbiological quality of operating settings and the staff compliance to the SSI evidence-based control measures. Ten operating rooms were examined for microbiological contamination of air and surfaces, after cleaning procedures, in "at rest" conditions. Furthermore, 10 surgical operations were monitored to assess staff compliance to the recommended practices. None of the air samples exceeded microbiological reference standards and only six of the 200 surface samples (3.0%) were slightly above recommended levels. Potentially pathogenic bacteria and moulds were never detected. Staff compliance to best practices varied depending on the type of behaviour investigated and the role of the operator. The major not compliant behaviours were: pre-operative skin antisepsis, crowding of the operating room and hand hygiene of the anaesthetist. The good environmental microbiological quality observed is indicative of the efficacy of the cleaning-sanitization procedures adopted. The major critical point was staff compliance to recommended practices. Awareness campaigns are therefore necessary, aimed at improving the organisation of work so as to facilitate compliance to operative protocols.

  8. Surveillance of Environmental and Procedural Measures of Infection Control in the Operating Theatre Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Dallolio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The microbiological contamination of operating theatres and the lack of adherence to best practices by surgical staff represent some of the factors affecting Surgical Site Infections (SSIs. The aim of the present study was to assess the microbiological quality of operating settings and the staff compliance to the SSI evidence-based control measures. Ten operating rooms were examined for microbiological contamination of air and surfaces, after cleaning procedures, in “at rest” conditions. Furthermore, 10 surgical operations were monitored to assess staff compliance to the recommended practices. None of the air samples exceeded microbiological reference standards and only six of the 200 surface samples (3.0% were slightly above recommended levels. Potentially pathogenic bacteria and moulds were never detected. Staff compliance to best practices varied depending on the type of behaviour investigated and the role of the operator. The major not compliant behaviours were: pre-operative skin antisepsis, crowding of the operating room and hand hygiene of the anaesthetist. The good environmental microbiological quality observed is indicative of the efficacy of the cleaning-sanitization procedures adopted. The major critical point was staff compliance to recommended practices. Awareness campaigns are therefore necessary, aimed at improving the organisation of work so as to facilitate compliance to operative protocols.

  9. [The surgical procedure in the Mallory-Weiss syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudanov, I P; Sharshavitskiĭ, G A; Mezhenin, A M; Chekulaeva, G P; Libiiaĭnen, E M; Andreev, Iu V; Bogdanets, A A; Morozov, O D

    1998-01-01

    The authors dealt with treatment of 112 patients aged 27-70 years with the Mallory-Weiss syndrome. The diagnosis was confirmed by esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Diathermocoagulation was used in order to arrest bleeding. In profuse bleeding the margins of the mucosa fissures were first infiltrated with a solution of adrenaline. The Blakemore [correction of Bleikmorr] probe compression method was also used. Organ-saving operations were performed for continuing and recurrent bleedings. Two elderly patients with severe coexistent disease died. The authors consider that patients with the Mallory-Weiss syndrome must be treated by conservative methods. Operations for disruptions of the esophagus mucosa and acute blood loss will entail great risk.

  10. Operating experience and procedures at the tritium systems test assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.V.; Binning, K.E.; Cole, S.P.; Jenkins, E.M.; Wilhelm, R.C.; Cole, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    Operating procedures are important for the safe and efficient operation of the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA). TSTA has been operating for four years with tritium in a safe and efficient manner. The inventory of tritium in the process loop is 100 grams and several milestone runs have been completed. This paper describes the methods used to operate TSTA. 3 refs., 1 fig

  11. A new surgical procedure for hallux limitus treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Valero, José; Moreno, Manuel; Gallart, José; González, David; Salcini, Jose L.; Gordillo, Luis; Deus, Javier; Lahoz, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the new Double-V osteotomy of the first metatarsophalangeal joint (1stMPJ) in patients with hallux limitus (HL). A study of 66 patients was performed, 33 patients were treated Cheilectomy and 33 were treated Double-V. All patients underwent an assessment of the passive mobility of the 1stMPJ before the procedure, reevaluated 12 months later evaluating dorsiflexion, plantarflexion, and patients status using both the Americ...

  12. Assessment of the Operational Procedure of the Traditional Credit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the operational procedure of the traditional credit and savings associations in Imo State. It is aimed at identifying the associations whose operational procedure and organizational structure make linkage with the formal credit market possible without the associations losing their distinctive relevance to ...

  13. A Comparative Evaluation for Biologic Width following Surgical Crown Lengthening Using Gingivectomy and Ostectomy Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Kumar Ganji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical crown lengthening has been proposed as a means of facilitating restorative procedures and preventing injuries in teeth with structurally inadequate clinical crown or exposing tooth structure in the presence of deep, subgingival pathologies which may hamper the access for proper restorative measures. Histological studies utilizing animal models have shown that postoperative crestal resorption allowed reestablishment of the biologic width. However, very little has been done in humans. Aims. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential changes in the periodontal tissues, particularly the biologic width, following surgical crown lengthening by two surgical procedures before and after crown placement. Methods and Material. Twenty (20 patients who needed surgical crown lengthening to gain retention necessary for prosthetic treatment and/or to access caries, tooth fracture, or previous prosthetic margins entered the study. The following parameters were obtained from line angles of treated teeth (teeth requiring surgical crown lengthening and adjacent sites: Plaque and Gingival Indices (PI & (GI, Position of Gingival Margin from reference Stent (PGMRS, Probing depth (PD, and Biologic Width (BW. Statistical Analysis Used. Student “t” Test. Results. Initial baseline values of biologic width were 2.55 mm (Gingivectomy procedure B1 Group and 1.95 mm (Ostectomy procedure B2 Group and after surgical procedure the values were 1.15 mm and 1.25 mm. Conclusions. Within the limitations of the study the biologic width, at treated sites, was re-established to its original vertical dimension by 3 months. Ostectomy with apically positioned flap can be considered as a more effective procedure than Gingivectomy for Surgical Crown Lengthening.

  14. Operating procedures: Fusion Experiments Analysis Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, R.A.; Carey, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Fusion Experiments Analysis Facility (FEAF) is a computer facility based on a DEC VAX 11/780 computer. It became operational in late 1982. At that time two manuals were written to aid users and staff in their interactions with the facility. This manual is designed as a reference to assist the FEAF staff in carrying out their responsibilities. It is meant to supplement equipment and software manuals supplied by the vendors. Also this manual provides the FEAF staff with a set of consistent, written guidelines for the daily operation of the facility

  15. Management of antithrombotic therapy in patients with coronary artery disease or atrial fibrillation who underwent abdominal surgical operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schizas, Dimitrios; Kariori, Maria; Boudoulas, Konstantinos Dean; Siasos, Gerasimos; Patelis, Nikolaos; Kalantzis, Charalampos; Carmen-Maria, Moldovan; Vavuranakis, Manolis

    2018-04-02

    Patients treated with antithrombotic therapy that require abdominal surgical procedures has progressively increased overtime. The management of antithrombotics during both the peri- and post- operative period is of crucial importance. The goal of this review is to present current data concerning the management of antiplatelets in patients with coronary artery disease and of anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation who had to undergo abdominal surgical operations. For this purpose, incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and risk of antithrombotic use during surgical procedures, as well as the recommendations based on recent guidelines were reported. A thorough search of PubMed, Scopus and the Cochrane Databases was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials, observational studies, novel current reviews, and ESC and ACC/AHA guidelines on the subject. Antithrombotic use in daily clinical practice results to two different pathways: reduction of thromboembolic risk, but a simultaneous increase of bleeding risk. This may cause a therapeutic dilemma during the perioperative period. Nevertheless, careless cessation of antithrombotics can increase MACE and thromboembolic events, however, maintenance of antithrombotic therapy may increase bleeding complications. Studies and current guidelines can assist clinicians in making decisions for the treatment of patients that undergo abdominal surgical operations while on antithrombotic therapy. Aspirin should not be stopped perioperatively in the majority of surgical operations. Determining whether to discontinue the use of anticoagulants before surgery depends on the surgical procedure. In surgical operations with a low risk for bleeding, oral anticoagulants should not be discontinued. Bridging therapy should only be considered in patients with a high risk of thromboembolism. Finally, patients with an intermediate risk for thromboembolism, management should be individualized according to patient

  16. Operational limits and conditions and operating procedures for research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This publication provides practical guidance on all important aspects of developing, formulating and presenting the operational limits and conditions as well as the operating procedures for research reactors. It covers the concept of operational limits and conditions, their content, and the responsibilities of the operating organization with respect to their establishment, modification, documentation and compliance. The guidance also covers the training of operating personnel on performing periodic testing, established by the operational limits and conditions, and operating procedures

  17. Local Anesthesia for Surgical Procedures of the Upper Eyelid Using Filling Cannula: Our Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Trapasso, MD

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Sometimes, after local anesthetic injection for surgical procedures of the upper eyelid, it is possible to observe superficial preseptal hematomas or excessive lid swelling that may distort the tissues and obscure surgical landmarks. We present a technique to perform local anesthesia of the upper eyelids, using a 27-gauge needle and a 26-gauge filling cannula, that may decrease the incidence of hematomas and bruising.

  18. Prevalence of Neoplastic Diseases in Pet Birds Referred for Surgical Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia F. Castro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoplastic disease is common in pet birds, particularly in psittacines, and treatment should be primarily aimed at tumor eradication. Nineteen cases of pet birds submitted to diagnostic and/or therapeutic surgical procedures due to neoplastic disease characterized by the presence of visible masses were retrospectively analyzed; affected species, types of neoplasms and respective locations, and outcomes of surgical procedures were determined. All birds undergoing surgery belonged to the order Psittaciformes; the Blue-fronted parrot (Amazona aestiva was the prevalent species. Lipoma was the most frequent neoplasm in the sample studied. Most neoplasms affected the integumentary system, particularly the pericloacal area. Tumor resection was the most common surgical procedure performed, with high resolution and low recurrence rates.

  19. Prevalence of Neoplastic Diseases in Pet Birds Referred for Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Patrícia F; Fantoni, Denise T; Miranda, Bruna C; Matera, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Neoplastic disease is common in pet birds, particularly in psittacines, and treatment should be primarily aimed at tumor eradication. Nineteen cases of pet birds submitted to diagnostic and/or therapeutic surgical procedures due to neoplastic disease characterized by the presence of visible masses were retrospectively analyzed; affected species, types of neoplasms and respective locations, and outcomes of surgical procedures were determined. All birds undergoing surgery belonged to the order Psittaciformes; the Blue-fronted parrot (Amazona aestiva) was the prevalent species. Lipoma was the most frequent neoplasm in the sample studied. Most neoplasms affected the integumentary system, particularly the pericloacal area. Tumor resection was the most common surgical procedure performed, with high resolution and low recurrence rates.

  20. [Difficulties in implementing a surgical check list in operating theatres].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Aledo, Víctor; Da Silva, ZeNewton Andre; Saturno, Pedro J; Grau-Polan, Marina; Carrillo-Alcaraz, Andrés

    2012-03-01

    To assess the level of implementation and the factors associated with the compliance to the surgical check list (SCL) proposed by the WHO, in surgery departments in public hospitals in the Murcia Region of Spain. A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted using a random, non-proportional, and stratified sample in each hospital. The sample size was established as 10 cases per centre, with a total of 90 surgical operations. The data analysis included the percentage of compliance of the variables of interest (presence of an SCL and the compliance to it, complete, by sections and by items) at regional level, according to hospital, hospital groups, depending on the size; the type of anaesthesia (local, regional or general); the work shift (morning or afternoon); as well as the age and sex of the surgery patients. The check list was found in the medical records in 75 cases (83.33%; confidence interval [CI]: 78.7% - 87.5%), and complied with in full in 25 cases (27.8%; 95% CI: 18.5% - 37.0%). The percentage of items complied with was 70.1% (95% CI: 67.9%-72.2%). The percentage compliance varied by hospital, from 35.8% to 98.9%. The logistic regression analysis showed significance in the variables such as, the size of the hospital (the list was more likely to be complied with in small and medium hospitals) and operations with local anaesthetic as a negative predictive factor of compliance. The SCL is used, but is not always complied with, and not homogeneously in all its sections. There is also significant variation between the public hospitals in the Murcia Region of Spain. Copyright © 2011 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Pain intensity on the first day after surgery: a prospective cohort study comparing 179 surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbershagen, Hans J; Aduckathil, Sanjay; van Wijck, Albert J M; Peelen, Linda M; Kalkman, Cor J; Meissner, Winfried

    2013-04-01

    Severe pain after surgery remains a major problem, occurring in 20-40% of patients. Despite numerous published studies, the degree of pain following many types of surgery in everyday clinical practice is unknown. To improve postoperative pain therapy and develop procedure-specific, optimized pain-treatment protocols, types of surgery that may result in severe postoperative pain in everyday practice must first be identified. This study considered 115,775 patients from 578 surgical wards in 105 German hospitals. A total of 70,764 patients met the inclusion criteria. On the first postoperative day, patients were asked to rate their worst pain intensity since surgery (numeric rating scale, 0-10). All surgical procedures were assigned to 529 well-defined groups. When a group contained fewer than 20 patients, the data were excluded from analysis. Finally, 50,523 patients from 179 surgical groups were compared. The 40 procedures with the highest pain scores (median numeric rating scale, 6-7) included 22 orthopedic/trauma procedures on the extremities. Patients reported high pain scores after many "minor" surgical procedures, including appendectomy, cholecystectomy, hemorrhoidectomy, and tonsillectomy, which ranked among the 25 procedures with highest pain intensities. A number of "major" abdominal surgeries resulted in comparatively low pain scores, often because of sufficient epidural analgesia. Several common minor- to medium-level surgical procedures, including some with laparoscopic approaches, resulted in unexpectedly high levels of postoperative pain. To reduce the number of patients suffering from severe pain, patients undergoing so-called minor surgery should be monitored more closely, and postsurgical pain treatment needs to comply with existing procedure-specific pain-treatment recommendations.

  2. Locally advanced rectal cancer: a cooperative surgical approach to a complex surgical procedure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owens, P

    2015-01-01

    Single stage en bloc abdominoperineal resection and sacrectomy, with a myocutaneous flap closure is a relatively uncommon procedure. Our case study of a 77 year old man with a locally invasive rectal adenocarcinoma highlights the complex intraoperative management of such a patient.

  3. Use of 0.5% bupivacaine with buprenorphine in minor oral surgical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Varun; Kaur, Tejinder; Kapila, Sarika; Bhullar, Ramandeep Singh; Dhawan, Amit; Kaur, Yashmeet

    2017-01-01

    Background: Minor oral surgical procedures are the most commonly performed procedures by oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Performance of painless surgical procedure is highly appreciated by the patients and is possible through the use of local anesthesia, conscious sedation or general anesthesia. Postoperative pain can also be controlled by the use of opioids, as opioid receptors exist in the peripheral nervous system and offers the possibility of providing postoperative analgesia in the surgical patient. The present study compares the efficacy of 0.5% bupivacaine versus 0.5% bupivacaine with 0.3 mg buprenorphine in minor oral surgical procedures. Patients and Methods: The present study was conducted in 50 patients who required minor oral surgical procedures under local anesthesia. Two types of local anesthetic solutions were used- 0.5% bupivacaine with 1:200000 epinephrine in group I and a mixture of 39 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine with epinephrine 1:200000 and 1 ml of 300 μg buprenorphine (3 μg/kg)in group II. Intraoperative and postoperative evaluation was carried out for both the anesthetic solutions. Results: The mean duration of postoperative analgesia in bupivacaine group (508.92 ± 63.30 minutes) was quite less than the buprenorphine combination group (1840.84 ± 819.51 minutes). The mean dose of postoperative analgesic medication in bupivacaine group (1.64 ± 0.99 tablets) was higher than buprenorphine combination group (0.80 ± 1.08 tablets). There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the onset of action of the anesthetic effect and duration of anesthesia. Conclusion: Buprenorphine can be used in combination with bupivacaine for patients undergoing minor oral surgical procedures to provide postoperative analgesia for a longer duration. PMID:29386814

  4. Operating Procedures to Identify Wastes of Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatea, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of sites in Iraq which have been used for nuclear activities and which contain potentially significant amounts of radioactive material. Many of these sites suffered substantial physical damage during the Gulf Wars as well as the challenging of the difficult security situation in the country.The destruction of the former nuclear facilities during the 1991 Gulf war aggravated the problem. As a result of these events, many of these nuclear facilities have lost their containment of the radioactive material and it now has an increased potential to be dispersed into the environment.Iraqi Decommissioning Directorate (IDD) is one of the Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST) formations. It deals with decommissioning of former Iraqi nuclear sites. It considers a producer of radioactive waste.Therefore, waste management represents the vital requirement to work accomplishment.The work carries out on-site waste pretreatment which considers as a minimization of waste management.W M is necessary to: Segregate 'at source' as much materials as possible to minimize quantities of radioactive waste, clear or exempt as much materials as possible and decontaminate and recycle as much radioactive waste as possible. And in more general terms: to control and account for radioactive waste to protect human health and the environment, to make sure we do not leave unnecessary burdens for future generations, to concentrate, contain and isolate the waste from the environment therefore, this make any releases to the environment to be restricted and subject to regulatory control.This procedure applies on-site waste pretreatment which comprises segregating, characterizing, minimizing, classifying, packaging and relocating of generated wastes during decommissioning of destroyed nuclear facilities. The stationary waste treatment activities are the responsibility of RWTD/MoST.The (RPC/MoE) is the national regulatory body during the whole radioactive waste management

  5. General surgery residents' perception of robot-assisted procedures during surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farivar, Behzad S; Flannagan, Molly; Leitman, I Michael

    2015-01-01

    With the continued expansion of robotically assisted procedures, general surgery residents continue to receive more exposure to this new technology as part of their training. There are currently no guidelines or standardized training requirements for robot-assisted procedures during general surgical residency. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of this new technology on general surgery training from the residents' perspective. An anonymous, national, web-based survey was conducted on residents enrolled in general surgery training in 2013. The survey was sent to 240 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved general surgery training programs. Overall, 64% of the responding residents were men and had an average age of 29 years. Half of the responses were from postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) and PGY2 residents, and the remainder was from the PGY3 level and above. Overall, 50% of the responses were from university training programs, 32% from university-affiliated programs, and 18% from community-based programs. More than 96% of residents noted the availability of the surgical robot system at their training institution. Overall, 63% of residents indicated that they had participated in robotic surgical cases. Most responded that they had assisted in 10 or fewer robotic cases with the most frequent activities being assisting with robotic trocar placement and docking and undocking the robot. Only 18% reported experience with operating the robotic console. More senior residents (PGY3 and above) were involved in robotic cases compared with junior residents (78% vs 48%, p robotic case. Approximately 64% of residents reported that formal training in robotic surgery was important in residency training and 46% of residents indicated that robotic-assisted cases interfered with resident learning. Only 11% felt that robotic-assisted cases would replace conventional laparoscopic surgery in the future. This study illustrates that although the most residents

  6. Operator coil monitoring Acceptance Test Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software's ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY-101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations is correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ''ENABLE'' and ''DISABLE'' controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords

  7. Operating procedure automation to enhance safety of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husseiny, A.A.; Sabri, Z.A.; Adams, S.K.; Rodriguez, R.J.; Packer, D.; Holmes, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Use of logic statements and computer assist are explored as means for automation and improvement on design of operating procedures including those employed in abnormal and emergency situations. Operating procedures for downpower and loss of forced circulation are used for demonstration. Human-factors analysis is performed on generic emergency operating procedures for three strategies of control; manual, semi-automatic and automatic, using standard emergency operating procedures. Such preliminary analysis shows that automation of procedures is feasible provided that fault-tolerant software and hardware become available for design of the controllers. Recommendations are provided for tests to substantiate the promise of enhancement of plant safety. Adequate design of operating procedures through automation may alleviate several major operational problems of nuclear power plants. Also, automation of procedures is necessary for partial or overall automatic control of plants. Fully automatic operations are needed for space applications while supervised automation of land-based and offshore plants may become the thrust of new generation of nulcear power plants. (orig.)

  8. Operational Control Procedures for the Activated Sludge Process, Part III-A: Calculation Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Alfred W.

    This is the second in a series of documents developed by the National Training and Operational Technology Center describing operational control procedures for the activated sludge process used in wastewater treatment. This document deals exclusively with the calculation procedures, including simplified mixing formulas, aeration tank…

  9. “Reality Surgery” — A Research Ethics Perspective on the Live Broadcast of Surgical Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Judson B.; Mathews, Robin; D'Amico, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the live broadcasting of medical and surgical procedures has gained worldwide popularity. While the practice has appropriately been met with concerns for patient safety and privacy, many physicians tout the merits of real time viewing as a form of investigation, accelerating the process leading to adoption or abolition of newer techniques or technologies. This view introduces a new series of ethical considerations that need to be addressed. As such, this article considers, from a research ethics perspective, the use of live surgical procedure broadcast for investigative purposes. PMID:21292217

  10. Intra-Operative Surgical Irrigation of the Surgical Incision: What Does the Future Hold-Saline, Antibiotic Agents, or Antiseptic Agents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmiston, Charles E; Leaper, David J

    2016-12-01

    Intra-operative surgical site irrigation (lavage) is common practice in surgical procedures in general, with all disciplines advocating some form of irrigation before incision closure. This practice, however, has been neither standardized nor is there compelling evidence that it effectively reduces the risk of surgical site infection (SSI). This narrative review addresses the laboratory and clinical evidence that is available to support the practice of irrigation of the abdominal cavity and superficial/deep incisional tissues, using specific irrigation solutions at the end of an operative procedure to reduce the microbial burden at wound closure. Review of PubMed and OVID for pertinent, scientific, and clinical publications in the English language was performed. Incision irrigation was found to afford a three-fold benefit: First, to hydrate the bed; second, to assist in allowing better examination of the area immediately before closure; and finally, by removing superficial and deep incisional contamination and lowering the bioburden, expedite the healing process. The clinical practice of intra-operative peritoneal lavage is highly variable and is dependent solely on surgeon preference. By contrast, intra-operative irrigation after device-related procedures has become a standard of care for the prophylaxis of acute peri-prosthetic infection. The clinical evidence that supports the use of antibiotic irrigation is limited and based on retrospective analysis and few acceptable randomized controlled trials. The results of laboratory and animal studies using aqueous 0.05% chlorhexidine gluconate are favorable, suggesting that further studies are justified to determine its clinical efficacy. The adoption of appropriate and standardized intra-operative irrigation practices into peri-operative care bundles, which include other evidence-based strategies (weight-based antimicrobial prophylaxis, antimicrobial sutures, maintenance of normothermia, and glycemic control), offers

  11. Minimally invasive surgical procedures for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raspe, Heiner

    2005-11-01

    as an intermediate therapeutical option between conservative and operative management of small lumbar disc herniations or protrusions causing sciatica. Two RCT comparing transforaminal endoscopic procedures with microdiscectomy in patients with sciatica and small non-sequestered disc herniations show comparable short and medium term overall success rates. Concerning speed of recovery and return to work a trend towards more favourable results for the endoscopic procedures is noted. It is doubtful though, whether these results from the eleven and five years old studies are still valid for the more advanced procedures used today. The only RCT comparing the results of automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy to those of microdiscectomy showed clearly superior results of microdiscectomy. Furthermore, success rates of automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy reported in the RCT (29% differ extremely from success rates reported in case series (between 56% and 92%. The literature search retrieves no controlled trials to assess efficacy and/or effectiveness of laser-discectomy, percutaneous manual discectomy or endoscopic procedures using a posterior approach in comparison to the standard procedures. Results from recent case series permit no assessment of efficacy, especially not in comparison to standard procedures. Due to highly selected patients, modi-fications of operative procedures, highly specialised surgical units and poorly standardised outcome assessment results of case series are highly variable, their generalisability is low. The results of the five economical analyses are, due to conceptual and methodological problems, of no value for decision-making in the context of the German health care system. Discussion: Aside from low methodological study quality three conceptual problems complicate the interpretation of results. 1. Continuous further development of technologies leads to a diversity of procedures in use which prohibits generalisation of study results

  12. Duration and predictors of emergency surgical operations - basis for medical management of mass casualty incidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber-Wagner S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospitals have a critically important role in the management of mass causality incidents (MCI, yet there is little information to assist emergency planners. A significantly limiting factor of a hospital's capability to treat those affected is its surgical capacity. We therefore intended to provide data about the duration and predictors of life saving operations. Methods The data of 20,815 predominantly blunt trauma patients recorded in the Trauma Registry of the German-Trauma-Society was retrospectively analyzed to calculate the duration of life-saving operations as well as their predictors. Inclusion criteria were an ISS ≥ 16 and the performance of relevant ICPM-coded procedures within 6 h of admission. Results From 1,228 patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria 1,793 operations could be identified as life-saving operations. Acute injuries to the abdomen accounted for 54.1% followed by head injuries (26.3%, pelvic injuries (11.5%, thoracic injuries (5.0% and major amputations (3.1%. The mean cut to suture time was 130 min (IQR 65-165 min. Logistic regression revealed 8 variables associated with an emergency operation: AIS of abdomen ≥ 3 (OR 4,00, ISS ≥ 35 (OR 2,94, hemoglobin level ≤ 8 mg/dL (OR 1,40, pulse rate on hospital admission 120/min (OR 1,39, blood pressure on hospital admission Conclusions The mean operation time of 130 min calculated for emergency life-saving surgical operations provides a realistic guideline for the prospective treatment capacity which can be estimated and projected into an actual incident admission capacity. Knowledge of predictive factors for life-saving emergency operations helps to identify those patients that need most urgent operative treatment in case of blunt MCI.

  13. Risk of Venous Thromboembolism and Operative Duration in Patients Undergoing Neurosurgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Labropoulos, Nicos; Coy, Shannon

    2017-05-01

    The association of operative duration with the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has not been quantified in neurosurgery. To investigate the association of surgical duration for several neurosurgical procedures and the incidence of VTE. We performed a retrospective cohort study involving patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures from 2005 to 2012 and were registered in the American College of Surgeons National Quality Improvement Project registry. In order to control for confounding, we used multivariable regression models, and propensity score conditioning. During the study period, there were 94 747 patients, who underwent neurosurgical procedures, and met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 1358 (1.0%) developed VTE within 30 days postoperatively. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated an association of longer operative duration with higher 30-day incidence of VTE (odds ratio [OR], 1.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19-1.25). Compared with procedures of moderate duration (third quintile, 40-60th percentile), patients undergoing the longest procedures (>80th percentile) had higher odds (OR, 3.15; 95% CI, 2.49-3.99) of developing VTE. The shortest procedures (<20th percentile) were associated with a decreased incidence of VTE (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.27-0.76) in comparison to those of moderate duration. The same associations were present in propensity score-adjusted models, and models stratified by subgroups of cranial, spinal, peripheral nerve, and carotid procedures. In a cohort of patients from a national prospective surgical registry, increased operative duration was associated with increased incidence of VTE for neurosurgical procedures. These results can be used by neurosurgeons to inform operative management, and to stratify patients with regard to VTE risk. Copyright © 2016 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  14. PREVENTION OF COMPLICATIONS CAUSED BY MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA-REPERFUSION IN NONCARDIAC SURGICAL PROCEDURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kozlov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the next 20 years, the aging population will be a major factor affecting the characteristics of perioperative anesthesia tactics. Domestic researchers have reported that the incidence of cardiac complications after general surgical procedures in patients with middle and old age is 9.1%, and mortality in these complications reached 45.5%. Analyzed current data on myocardial ischemia-reperfusion, the etiopathogenesis of perioperative cardiac complications, recurrence of their development and the possible consequences. It is concluded that prevention and timely treatment of complications resulting from ischemia-reperfusion of the myocardium, with noncardiac surgical interventions is an important tactical (prevention of perioperative myocardial infarction, arrhythmias, cardiac death and policy (prevention of cardiac remodeling and post-hospital disability of patients anaesthesiological tasks. Research carried out in the Nrgovsky Research Institute of General Reanimatology showed that in the real practice Detsky index, Lee index and echocardiographic left ventricular ejection fraction did not provide high accuracy prediction of cardiac events. More informative proved preoperative determination of blood N-terminal part of the pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP. In assessing the predictive ability of NT-proBNP area under the ROC-curve achieved 0.86. NT-proBNP value 358 pg/ml and above provided 77% sensitivity and 85% specificity. The comparative assessment and recommendations on the use to reduce the risk of cardiac complications of β-blockers, statins, calcium channel blockers, nitrates, clonidine, dexmedetomidine, levosimendan and phosphocreatine. Phosphocreatine, introduced in practice domestic cardiac surgery and transplantology more than 20 years ago, continues to be studied and used at the moment. Recently demonstrated that perioperative phosphocreatine usage appointment in older oncological patients with a high risk of cardiac

  15. Utilization and outcome of laparoscopic versus robotic general and bariatric surgical procedures at Academic Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamere, James; Gebhart, Alana; Vu, Stephen; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2015-07-01

    Robotic-assisted general and bariatric surgery is gaining popularity among surgeons. The aim of this study was to analyze the utilization and outcome of laparoscopic versus robotic-assisted laparoscopic techniques for common elective general and bariatric surgical procedures performed at Academic Medical Centers. We analyzed data from University HealthSystem Consortium clinical database from October 2010 to February 2014 for all patients who underwent laparoscopic versus robotic techniques for eight common elective general and bariatric surgical procedures: gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, gastric band, antireflux surgery, Heller myotomy (HM), cholecystectomy (LC), colectomy, rectal resection (RR). Utilization and outcome measures including demographics, in-hospital mortality, major complications, 30-day readmission, length of stay (LOS), and costs were compared between techniques. 96,694 laparoscopic and robotic procedures were analyzed. Utilization of the robotic approach was the highest for RR (21.4%), followed by HM (9.1%). There was no significant difference in in-hospital mortality or major complications between laparoscopic versus robotic techniques for all procedures. Only two procedures had improved outcome associated with the robotic approach: robotic HM and robotic LC had a shorter LOS compared to the laparoscopic approach (2.8 ± 3.6 vs. 2.3 ± 2.1; respectively, p bariatric surgical procedures with the highest utilization for rectal resection. Compared to conventional laparoscopy, there were no observed clinical benefits associated with the robotic approach, but there was a consistently higher cost.

  16. Creating an animation-enhanced video library of hepato-pancreato-biliary and transplantation surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Albert; Kelly, Paul; Tait, Gordon; Greig, Paul D; McGilvray, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    The potential for integrating real-time surgical video and state-of-the art animation techniques has not been widely applied to surgical education. This paper describes the use of new technology for creating videos of liver, pancreas and transplant surgery, annotating them with 3D animations, resulting in a freely-accessible online resource: The Toronto Video Atlas of Liver, Pancreas and Transplant Surgery ( http://tvasurg.ca ). The atlas complements the teaching provided to trainees in the operating room, and the techniques described in this study can be readily adapted by other surgical training programmes.

  17. Surgical treatment of gingival recessions using Emdogain gel : Clinical procedure and case reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, F; Wennstrom, J; Van der Weijden, F; Schneiders, T; Van der Velden, U

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the clinical procedure and outcome of surgical treatment of gingival recessions with the adjunctive use of Emdogain gel, an enamel matrix derivative bioactive material for periodontal reconstructive surgery. Six cases with gingival recession on maxillary canines are presented

  18. A New Surgical Procedure "Dumbbell-Form Resection" for Selected Hilar Cholangiocarcinomas With Severe Jaundice: Comparison With Hemihepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuguang; Tian, Feng; Zhao, Xin; Li, Dajiang; He, Yu; Li, Zhihua; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the therapeutic effect of a new surgical procedure, dumbbell-form resection (DFR), for hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HCCA) with severe jaundice. In DFR, liver segments I, IVb, and partial V above the right hepatic pedicle are resected.Hemihepatectomy is recognized as the preferred procedure; however, its application is limited in HCCAs with severe jaundice.Thirty-eight HCCA patients with severe jaundice receiving DFR and 70 receiving hemihepatectomy from January 2008 to January 2013 were included. Perioperative parameters, operation-related morbidity and mortality, and post-operative survival were analyzed.A total of 21.1% patients (8/38) in the DFR group received percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD), which was significantly jaundice. However, its indications should be restricted.

  19. The operational procedure of an electron beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Cheol; Choi, Hwa Lim; Yang, Ki Ho; Han, Young Hwan; Kim, Sung Chan

    2008-12-01

    The KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy of Research Institute) high-power electron beam irradiation facility, operating at the energies between 0.3 MeV and 10 MeV, has provided irradiation services to users in industries, universities, and institute in various fields. This manual is for the operation of an electron beam which is established in KAERI, and describes elementary operation procedures of electron beam between 0.3 Mev and 10 MeV. KAERI Electron Accelerator facility(Daejeon, Korea) consists of two irradiators: one is a low-energy electron beam irradiator operated by normal conducting RF accelerator, the other is medium-energy irradiator operated by superconducting RF accelerator. We explain the check points of prior to operation, operation procedure of this facility and the essential parts of electron beam accelerator

  20. Is Teaching Simple Surgical Skills Using an Operant Learning Program More Effective Than Teaching by Demonstration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, I Martin; Pryor, Karen W; McKeon, Theresa R

    2016-04-01

    A surgical procedure is a complex behavior that can be constructed from foundation or component behaviors. Both the component and the composite behaviors built from them are much more likely to recur if it they are reinforced (operant learning). Behaviors in humans have been successfully reinforced using the acoustic stimulus from a mechanical clicker, where the clicker serves as a conditioned reinforcer that communicates in a way that is language- and judgment-free; however, to our knowledge, the use of operant-learning principles has not been formally evaluated for acquisition of surgical skills. Two surgical tasks were taught and compared using two teaching strategies: (1) an operant learning methodology using a conditioned, acoustic reinforcer (a clicker) for positive reinforcement; and (2) a more classical approach using demonstration alone. Our goal was to determine whether a group that is taught a surgical skill using an operant learning procedure would more precisely perform that skill than a group that is taught by demonstration alone. Two specific behaviors, "tying the locking, sliding knot" and "making a low-angle drill hole," were taught to the 2014 Postgraduate Year (PGY)-1 class and first- and second-year medical students, using an operant learning procedure incorporating precise scripts along with acoustic feedback. The control groups, composed of PGY-1 and -2 nonorthopaedic surgical residents and first- and second-year medical students, were taught using demonstration alone. The precision and speed of each behavior was recorded for each individual by a single experienced surgeon, skilled in operant learning. The groups were then compared. The operant learning group achieved better precision tying the locking, sliding knot than did the control group. Twelve of the 12 test group learners tied the knot and precisely performed all six component steps, whereas only four of the 12 control group learners tied the knot and correctly performed all six

  1. A prototype expert system for advising operational procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohi, T.; Saiki, A.; Terashita, N.; Sasaki, K.

    1990-01-01

    Development of an operator support system has come to be an important subject for Nuclear Power Plants. An expert system for advising operational procedures for nuclear power plants was developed to provide operators with adequate operation plans. The system consists of two parts. One is the operation interpretation module that uses the knowledge base of operational procudures represented in the form of an extended Petri net model. The other is the operation consultation module that uses a hierarchical qualitative model of a nuclear power plant. The structure of each knowledge base and the method of inference to generate adequate operations plan were investigated. The availability of our concept has been confirmed by the protorype system for CVCS (Chemical and Volume Control System) of PWR. This concept can be applied to the operator support system to supply operation guidance under anomalous plant conditions

  2. Hospitals with greater diversities of physiologically complex procedures do not achieve greater surgical growth in a market with stable numbers of such procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H; Lubarsky, David A

    2018-01-30

    Although having a large diversity of types of procedures has a substantial operational impact on the surgical suites of hospitals, the strategic importance is unknown. In the current study, we used longitudinal data for all hospitals and patient ages in the State of Florida to evaluate whether hospitals with greater diversity of types of physiologically complex major therapeutic procedures (PCMTP) also had greater rates of surgical growth. Observational cohort study. 1479 combinations of hospitals in the State of Florida and fiscal years, 2008-2015. The types of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) procedures studied were PCMT, defined as: a) major therapeutic procedure; b) >7 American Society of Anesthesiologists base units; and c) performed during a hospitalization with a Diagnosis Related Group with a mean length of stay ≥4.0days. The number of procedures of each type of PCMTP commonly performed at each hospital was calculated by taking 1/Herfindahl index (i.e., sum of the squares of the proportions of all procedures of each type of PCMTP). Over the 8 successive years studied, there was no change in the number of PCMTP being performed (Kendall's τ b =-0.014±0.017 [standard error], P=0.44; N=1479 hospital×years). Busier and larger hospitals commonly performed more types of PCMTP, respectively categorized based on performed PCMTP (τ=0.606±0.017, Pmarket, the unique contributions of each large teaching hospital performing many different types of PCMTP needs to be considered relative to the combined capabilities of other hospitals in its region. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Operational test procedure for SY tank farm replacement exhauster unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClees, J.

    1995-01-01

    This operational test procedure will verify that the remaining functions not tested per WHC-SD-WM-ATP-080, or components disturbed during final installation, as well as interfaces with other tank farm equipment and remote monitoring stations are operating correctly

  4. Operational Control Procedures for the Activated Sludge Process: Appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Alfred W.

    This document is the appendix for a series of documents developed by the National Training and Operational Technology Center describing operational control procedures for the activated sludge process used in wastewater treatment. Categories discussed include: control test data, trend charts, moving averages, semi-logarithmic plots, probability…

  5. Teaching surgery takes time: the impact of surgical education on time in the operating room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinden, Christopher; Malthaner, Richard; McGee, Jacob; McClure, J. Andrew; Winick-Ng, Jennifer; Liu, Kuan; Nash, Danielle M.; Welk, Blayne; Dubois, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Background It is generally accepted that surgical training is associated with increased surgical duration. The purpose of this study was to determine the magnitude of this increase for common surgical procedures by comparing surgery duration in teaching and nonteaching hospitals. Methods This retrospective population-based cohort study included all adult residents of Ontario, Canada, who underwent 1 of 14 surgical procedures between 2002 and 2012. We used several linked administrative databases to identify the study cohort in addition to patient-, surgeon- and procedure-related variables. We determined surgery duration using anesthesiology billing records. Negative binomial regression was used to model the association between teaching versus nonteaching hospital status and surgery duration. Results Of the 713 573 surgical cases included in this study, 20.8% were performed in a teaching hospital. For each procedure, the mean surgery duration was significantly longer for teaching hospitals, with differences ranging from 5 to 62 minutes across individual procedures in unadjusted analyses (all p surgery duration, adjusting for patient-, surgeon- and procedure-related variables as well as the clustering of patients within surgeons and hospitals. Conclusion Our results show that a wide range of surgical procedures require significantly more time to perform in teaching than nonteaching hospitals. Given the magnitude of this difference, the impact of surgical training on health care costs and clinical outcomes should be a priority for future studies. PMID:27007088

  6. Comparative analyses of postoperative complications and prognosis of different surgical procedures in stage II endometrial carcinoma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin H

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hongmei Yin,1 Ting Gui2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Binzhou Medical University Hospital, Binzhou Medical University, Binzhou, Shandong, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Objective: To investigate the impact of surgical resection extent on the postoperative complications and the prognosis in patients with stage II endometrial cancer. Methods: A total of 54 patients were retrospectively reviewed, 35 patients underwent subradical hysterectomy and 19 patients received radical hysterectomy, both with simultaneous bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and pelvic and paraaortic lymphadenectomy. Results: Comparing the surgical outcomes in subradical hysterectomy group vs radical hysterectomy group, there were no significant differences in operative time, estimated blood loss, and hospital stay. After surgery, 37.1% vs 36.8% patients received postoperative radiotherapy in the subradical hyster­ectomy group vs radical hysterectomy group, without statistically significant difference. As for postoperative complications, the early postoperative complication rate in patients who underwent subradical hysterectomy was 14.3%, significantly lower than that in patients submitted to radical hysterectomy (14.3% vs 42.1%, with P=0.043. However, there was no significant difference in late postoperative complication rate between the two surgical procedures. Regarding the clinical prognosis, patients receiving the subradical hysterectomy showed similar survival to their counterparts undergoing the radical procedures. The relapse rate was 5.71% vs 5.26%, respectively, without significant difference. There were no deaths in both surgical groups. Conclusion: For stage II endometrial carcinoma, subradical hysterectomy presented with less early postoperative complications and similar survival duration and recurrence

  7. Reliability of a CT reconstruction for preoperative surgical planning in the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Alexandre; Loriaut, Philippe; Granger, Benjamin; Neffati, Ahmed; Massein, Audrey; Casabianca, Laurent; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues; Gerometta, Antoine

    2018-01-01

    The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure has provided reliable results in the treatment of anterior shoulder instability. However, this procedure remains technically challenging and is related to several complications. The morphology of the coracoid and the glenoid are inconsistent. Inadequate coracoid and glenoid preparing may lead to mismatching between their surfaces. Inadequate screws lengthening and orientation are a major concern. Too long screws can lead to suprascapular nerve injuries or hardware irritation, whereas too short screws can lead to nonunions, fibrous unions or migration of the bone block. The purpose of the study was to investigate the application of virtual surgical planning and digital technology in preoperative assessment and planning of the Latarjet procedure. Twelve patients planned for an arthroscopic Latarjet had a CT scan evaluation with multi-two-dimensional reconstruction performed before surgery. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability were evaluated. The shape of the anterior rim of the glenoid and the undersurface of the coracoid were classified. Coracoid height was measured, respectively, at 5 mm (C1) and 10 mm (C2) from the tip of the coracoid process, corresponding to the drilling zone. Measurements of the glenoid width were then taken in the axial view at 25 % (G1) and 50 % (G2) of the glenoid height with various α angles (5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, 25°, 30°) 7 mm from the anterior glenoid rim. Shapes of the undersurface of the coracoid and the anterior rim of the glenoid were noted during the surgical procedure. Post-operative measurements included the α angle. Concerning coracoid height measurements, there was an almost perfect to substantial intra- and inter-reliability, with values ranging from ICC = 0.75-0.97. For the shape of the coracoid, concordances were, respectively, perfect (ICC = 1) and almost perfect (0.87 [0.33; 1]) for the intra- and interobserver reliabilities. Concerning the glenoid, concordance was

  8. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 7, Safety operation procedure for hot cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This volume contains the interim change notice for the safety operation procedure for hot cell. It covers the master-slave manipulators, dry waste removal, cell transfers, hoists, cask handling, liquid waste system, and physical characterization of fluids.

  9. Supporting plant operation through computer-based procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Victor; Medrano, Javier; Mendez, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Digital Systems are becoming more important in controlling and monitoring nuclear power plant operations. The capabilities of these systems provide additional functions as well as support operators in making decisions and avoiding errors. Regarding Operation Support Systems, an important way of taking advantage of these features is using computer-based procedures (CBPs) tools that enhance the plant operation. Integrating digital systems in analogue controls at nuclear power plants in operation becomes an extra challenge, in contrast to the integration of Digital Control Systems in new nuclear power plants. Considering the potential advantages of using this technology, Tecnatom has designed and developed a CBP platform taking currently operating nuclear power plants as its design basis. The result is a powerful tool which combines the advantages of CBPs and the conventional analogue control systems minimizing negative effects during plant operation and integrating operation aid-systems to support operators. (authors)

  10. Stratification of surgical site infection by operative factors and comparison of infection rates after hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Margaret A; Nickel, Katelin B; Wallace, Anna E; Mines, Daniel; Fraser, Victoria J; Warren, David K

    2015-03-01

    To investigate whether operative factors are associated with risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after hernia repair. Retrospective cohort study. Patients Commercially insured enrollees aged 6 months-64 years with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure or Current Procedural Terminology, fourth edition, codes for inguinal/femoral, umbilical, and incisional/ventral hernia repair procedures from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2010. SSIs within 90 days after hernia repair were identified by diagnosis codes. The χ2 and Fisher exact tests were used to compare SSI incidence by operative factors. A total of 119,973 hernia repair procedures were analyzed. The incidence of SSI differed significantly by anatomic site, with rates of 0.45% (352/77,666) for inguinal/femoral, 1.16% (288/24,917) for umbilical, and 4.11% (715/17,390) for incisional/ventral hernia repair. Within anatomic sites, the incidence of SSI was significantly higher for open versus laparoscopic inguinal/femoral (0.48% [295/61,142] vs 0.34% [57/16,524], P=.020) and incisional/ventral (4.20% [701/16,699] vs 2.03% [14/691], P=.005) hernia repairs. The rate of SSI was higher following procedures with bowel obstruction/necrosis than procedures without obstruction/necrosis for open inguinal/femoral (0.89% [48/5,422] vs 0.44% [247/55,720], Poperative factors may facilitate accurate comparison of SSI rates between facilities.

  11. Surgical reconstruction of pressure ulcer defects: a single- or two-stage procedure?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Laing, Tereze A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The surgical management of pressure ulcers traditionally involved staged procedures, with initial debridement of necrotic or infected material followed by reconstruction at a later date when the wound was deemed viable and free of gross infection. However, over the past decade, it has been suggested that a single-stage procedure, combining initial debridement and definitive reconstruction, may provide advantages over staged surgery. We present our experience with the staged approach and review the current evidence for both methods. SUBJECTS AND SETTINGS: : We reviewed medical records of all patients referred to our service for pressure ulcer management between October 2001 and October 2007. The National Rehabilitation Hospital is the national center in Ireland for primary rehabilitation of adults and children suffering from spinal and brain injury, serving patients locally and from around the country. METHODS: All subjects who were managed surgically underwent a 2-stage procedure, with initial debridement and subsequent reconstruction. The main outcome measures were length of hospital stay, postoperative morbidity and mortality, and time to complete ulcer healing. RESULTS: Forty-one of 108 patients with 58 pressure ulcers were managed surgically. All patients underwent initial surgical debridement and 20 patients underwent subsequent pressure ulcer reconstruction. Postreconstructive complications occurred in 5 patients (20%). The mean time to complete ulcer healing was 17.4 weeks. Partial flap necrosis occurred in 3 patients, but there were no episodes of flap failure. CONCLUSIONS: We achieved favorable results with a 2-stage reconstruction technique and suggest that the paucity of evidence related to single-stage procedures does not support a change in surgical management.

  12. Impact of procedure on the post-operative infection risk of patients after elective colon surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitzer, David N; Davis, John M; Ahmed, Nasim; Kuo, Yen-Hong; Kuo, Yen-Liang

    2014-12-01

    Post-operative infection impacts the quality of patient care, prolongs the length of hospital stay, and utilizes more health care resources. The purpose of this study was to compare the rates of surgical site infection among three major surgical procedures for treating patients with colon pathology. The location of colon resection impacts the post-operative infection rate. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by using the 2006 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Adult patients (age ≥18 yr) with colon diseases are the population of interest. The disease status and procedures were categorized according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM). Patients with a primary diagnosis of diverticulosis of the colon without hemorrhage (ICD-9-CM codes: 562.11 and 562.12) or malignant neoplasm of the colon (ICD-9-CM codes: 153.x, where x represents the possible digits within this ICD-9-CM code category), with procedures of open and other right hemicolectomy (ORH; ICD-9-CM code: 45.73) or open and other left hemicolectomy (OLH; ICD-9-CM code: 45.75), or open and other sigmoidectomy (OS; ICD-9-CM code: 45.76) were included for this study. The primary measured outcome for the study was surgical site infection. There were an estimated 26,381 ORH procedures, 9,558 OLH procedures, and 31,656 OS procedures performed in 2006. There was a significant difference among procedures with respect to their age distributions (mean [standard error]: ORH vs. OLH vs. OS=70.5 [0.2] vs. 63.8 [0.3] vs. 59.5 [0.2] yr, pinfection rates: ORH vs. OLH vs. OS=2.9% vs. 5.6% vs. 4.9%, pinfection for OLH (AOR [95% CI]: 1.31 [1.04-1.64], p=0.02) compared with OS. Different sites of colon operations were associated with different risks of surgical site infections. Accordingly, appropriate pre-operative measures should address these differences.

  13. [Tension-free procedures in the surgical treatment of groin hernias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milić, Dragan J; Pejić, Miljko A

    2003-01-01

    Hernia repair is one of the most common surgical procedures performed in the United States, with 700,000 operations performed each year. Improvements in surgical technique, together with the development of new prosthetic materials and a better understanding of how to use them, have significantly improved outcomes for many patients. These improvements have occurred most notably in centers specializing in hernia surgery, with some institutions reporting failure rates of less than 1%. In contrast, failure rates for general surgeons, who perform most hernia repairs, remain significantly higher. This has important socioeconomic implications, adding an estimated $28 billion or more to the cost of treating the condition, based on calculations utilizing conservative estimates of failure rates and the average cost of a hernia repair. Success of groin hernia repair is measured primarily by the permanence of the operation, fewest complications, minimal costs, and earliest return to normal activities. This success depends largely on the surgeon's understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the surgical area as well as a knowledge of how to use most effectively the currently available techniques and materials. The most important advance in hernia surgery has been the development of tension-free repairs. In 1958, Usher described a hernia repair using Marlex mesh. The benefit of that repair he described as being "tension-eliminating" or what we now call "tension-free". Usher opened the posterior wall and sutured a swatch of Marlex mesh to the undersurface of the medial margin of the defect and to the shelving edge of the inguinal ligament. He created tails from the mesh that encircled the spermatic cord and secured them to the inguinal ligament. Every type of tension-free repair requires a mesh, whether it is done through an open anterior, open posterior, or laparoscopic route. The most common prosthetic open repairs done today are the Lichtenstein onlay patch repair, the Per

  14. Application of a real-time three-dimensional navigation system to various oral and maxillofacial surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Seigo; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Ishimaru, Kyoko; Awara, Kousuke; Sano, Kazuo

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to confirm the effectiveness of a real-time three-dimensional navigation system for use during various oral and maxillofacial surgeries. Five surgeries were performed with this real-time three-dimensional navigation system. For mandibular surgery, patients wore acrylic surgical splints when they underwent computed tomography examinations and the operation to maintain the mandibular position. The incidence of complications during and after surgery was assessed. No connection with the nasal cavity or maxillary sinus was observed at the maxilla during the operation. The inferior alveolar nerve was not injured directly, and any paresthesia around the lower lip and mental region had disappeared within several days after the surgery. In both maxillary and mandibular cases, there was no abnormal hemorrhage during or after the operation. Real-time three-dimensional computer-navigated surgery allows minimally invasive, safe procedures to be performed with precision. It results in minimal complications and early recovery.

  15. Hemostasis and Post-operative Care of Oral Surgical Wounds by Hemcon Dental Dressing in Patients on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Split Mouth Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K R Ashok; Kumar, Jambukeshwar; Sarvagna, Jagadesh; Gadde, Praveen; Chikkaboriah, Shwetha

    2016-09-01

    Hemostasis is a fundamental management issue post-operatively in minor oral surgical procedures. To ensure safety and therapeutic efficacy in patients, under oral anti coagulant therapy, is complicated by necessity for frequent determination of prothrombin time or international normalised ratio. The aim of the study was to determine whether early hemostasis achieved by using Hemcon Dental Dressing (HDD) will affect post-operative care and surgical healing outcome in minor oral surgical procedures. A total of 30 patients, aged 18 years to 90 years, except those allergic to seafood, who consented to participate, were enrolled into this study. Patients were required to have two or more surgical sites so that they would have both surgical and control sites. All patients taking Oral Anticoagulation Therapy (OAT) were included for treatment in the study without altering the anticoagulant regimens. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained for the same. The collected data was subjected to statistical analysis using unpaired t-test. All HDD surgically treated sites achieved hemostasis in 1.49 minutes and control wounds in 4.06 minutes (p oral surgery wounds achieved statistically significant improved healing both at 1 st and 3 rd post-operative days (p oral surgical procedures under local anaesthesia, including those patients taking OAT. Patients receiving the HDD had improved surgical wound healing as compared to controls.

  16. Influence of surgical and minimally invasive facial cosmetic procedures on psychosocial outcomes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imadojemu, Sotonye; Sarwer, David B; Percec, Ivona; Sonnad, Seema S; Goldsack, Jennifer E; Berman, Morgan; Sobanko, Joseph F

    2013-11-01

    Millions of surgical and minimally invasive cosmetic procedures of the face are performed each year, but objective clinical measures that evaluate surgical procedures, such as complication rates, have limited utility when applied to cosmetic procedures. While there may be subjective improvements in appearance, it is important to determine if these interventions have an impact on patients in other realms such as psychosocial functioning. This is particularly important in light of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and its emphasis on patient-centered outcomes and effectiveness. To review the literature investigating the impact of facial cosmetic surgery and minimally invasive procedures on relevant psychological variables to guide clinical practice and set norms for clinical performance. English-language randomized clinical trials and prospective cohort studies that preoperatively and postoperatively assessed psychological variables in at least 10 patients seeking surgical or minimally invasive cosmetic procedures of the face. Only 1 study investigating minimally invasive procedures was identified. Most studies reported modest improvement in psychosocial functioning, which included quality of life, self-esteem, and body image. Unfortunately, the overall quality of evidence is limited owing to an absence of control groups, short follow-up periods, or loss to follow-up. The current literature suggests that a number of psychosocial domains may improve following facial cosmetic surgery, although the quality of this evidence is limited (grade of recommendation 2A). Despite the dramatic rise in nonsurgical cosmetic procedures, there is a paucity of information regarding the impact of chemodenervation and soft-tissue augmentation on psychosocial functioning.

  17. Post-operative Salmonella surgical site infection in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Marc; Boozer, Lindsay; Glass, Eric N; Sanchez, Susan; Platt, Simon R; Freeman, Lisa M

    2017-09-01

    Following decompressive surgery for degenerative lumbosacral stenosis, a 6-year-old German shepherd dog developed a subcutaneous infection at the surgical site and discospondylitis at the lumbosacral intervertebral disc. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, serotype Dublin was recovered from the surgical site. Salmonella of a different serovar was isolated from a sample of the raw meat-based diet that the owner fed the dog.

  18. FIRST METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT OSTEOARTHRITIS: PERCUTANEOUS SURGERY, CHOICE OF A SURGICAL PROCEDURE, CLINICAL AND RADIOGRAPHIC CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Berezhnoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hallux rigidus is observed in approximately 2.5% of the adult population. Until now neither a unified classification of hallux rigidus appears to exist nor any clear principles to choose the surgical method. The variety of clinical and radiological signs explains the difficulties in establishing a comprehensive classification system and in selection of the criteria for surgical procedure. There are few published reports about hallux rigidus percutaneous surgical treatment. Existing papers are dedicated to a limited number of percutaneous techniques.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous techniques for surgical treatment of the first metatarsophalangeal joint osteoarthritis; to specify factors determining the choice of procedure; to develop a grading system of the hallux rigidus severity which will help in selection of surgery. Materials and methods. Based on 156 surgeries (107 patients the author demonstrated the possibilities of percutaneous techniques in the surgical treatment of hallux rigidus of different stages as well as provided a brief description of used surgical techniques.Results. The mean age of patients was 48.8 years (ranged from 18 to 73. The mean follow-up was 7 months (ranged from 3 to 54. At the specified time the treatment outcomes of 103 patients (150 feet were analyzed. Mean hospital stay was 0.78 days (ranged from 0 to 1. No infectious or wound-healing problems were observed. Overall, the patients were completely satisfied with the outcomes of 89 surgical treatment, qualified satisfaction was reported with patients in respect of outcomes of 57 surgeries. Four unsatisfactory outcomes were observed. The role of the relatively long first metatarsal in the development of hallux rigidus was confirmed. Conclusion. Percutaneous techniques provide successful treatment for all stages of hallux rigidus. The choice of a specific surgical technique may be challenging and requires

  19. Operational test procedure for Bldg 241-A-701 air compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desantis, G.N.

    1995-01-01

    This document is an Operability Test Procedure (OTP) which will verify and record that the 241-A-701 air compressor and associated equipment operates within their intended design parameters. The activities defined in this OTP will be performed to ensure the daily operation of the new compressed air system can be reliable and efficient. The Compressed Air System (CAS) for 241-A-701 supplies process and instrument air to the A, AX, AY, and AZ tank farms. The primary use of the CAS is for tank farms instrumentation, air operated valves, and air lift circulators

  20. The use of multimedia consent programs for surgical procedures: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehme, Jean; El-Khani, Ussamah; Chow, Andre; Hakky, Sherif; Ahmed, Ahmed R; Purkayastha, Sanjay

    2013-02-01

    To compare multimedia and standard consent, in respect to patient comprehension, anxiety, and satisfaction, for various surgical/interventional procedures. Electronic searches of PubMed, MEDLINE, Ovid, Embase, and Google Scholar were performed. Relevant articles were assessed by 2 independent reviewers. Comparative (randomized and nonrandomized control trials) studies of multimedia and standard consent for a variety of surgical/interventional procedures were included. Studies had to report on at least one of the outcome measures. Studies were reviewed by 2 independent investigators. The first investigator extracted all relevant data, and consensus of each extraction was performed by a second investigator to verify the data. Overall, this review suggests that the use of multimedia as an adjunct to conventional consent appears to improve patient comprehension. Multimedia leads to high patient satisfaction in terms of feasibility, ease of use, and availability of information. There is no conclusive evidence demonstrating a significant reduction in preoperative anxiety.

  1. [Extra-hippocampal temporal lesions inducing symptomatic drug-resistant epilepsies. Which surgical procedure?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penchet, G; Marchal, C; Loiseau, H; Rougier, A

    2005-05-01

    In partial symptomatic epilepsy due to discrete brain lesion, total removal of the epileptogenic lesion generally yields major reduction of seizures, achieved in 85% of the patients. However, prognosis is worse in patients with symptomatic temporal lobe epilepsy. Implication of the temporo-mesial structures in the seizures genesis is generally considered. Careful electroclinical and radiological analysis can provide useful but insufficient information. In order to evaluate the criteria we used to guide our surgical strategy, we analyzed retrospectively a series of 47 patients with drug-resistant symptomatic extra hipocampic temporal epilepsy surgically treated either by isolated lesionectomy (group 1, n=17) or by resection of temporo-mesial structures and associated lesionectomy (group 2, n=30). Patients with extrahippocampal lesions and hippocampal sclerosis (dual pathology) were excluded from this study. With a mean follow-up of 72 months, overall results showed that 84% of group 2 patients (Engel's grade Ia) were seizure-free compared with only 47% of group 1 patients. Statistical analysis showed that the type of surgical procedure was the main prognostic factor. In conclusion, the optimal surgical procedure cannot be defined only with the criteria usually retained for temporo-mesial involvement in seizure genesis. Taking into account the prognostic value of such implication, although complex, is of paramount importance. Our results could be explained by the presence of an acquired dual functional pathology.

  2. Operative Exposure of a Surgical Trainee at a Tertiary Hospital in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kinyuru Ojuka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Psychomotor domain training requires repetitive exposure in order to develop proficiency in skills. This depends on many training factors in any training institution. Objective. This study sought to look at the operative exposure of surgical trainees in a tertiary hospital in a developing country. Design and Setting. This was a six-month retrospective study performed in one surgical firm at Kenyatta National Hospital. Patients and Methods. The files of all patients admitted to the unit at that time were retrieved. The demographics, diagnosis at admission, need for surgery, and cadre of operating surgeon among others were recorded. Scientific Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 17.0 was used for data entry and analysis. Results. The study cohort was 402 patients of the 757 patients admitted in the study period. The average age was 36.7 years, a female to male ratio of 1 : 2.5. The majority (69.7% of patients required surgery. Trauma was the most common reason for admission (44.5%. Year 2 residents received the most clinical exposure. Consultant was available in only 34.5% of the cases. Conclusion. The junior residents performed the vast majority of procedures with an unsatisfactory amount of supervision from the senior residents and faculty.

  3. Partial fingertip necrosis following a digital surgical procedure in a patient with primary Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uygur, Safak; Tuncer, Serhan

    2014-12-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a common clinical disorder consisting of recurrent, long-lasting and episodic vasospasm of the fingers and toes often associated with exposure to cold. In this article, we present a case of partial fingertip necrosis following digital surgical procedure in a patient with primary Raynaud's phenomenon. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Hypnosis as a Valuable Tool for Surgical Procedures in the Oral and Maxillofacial Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Gil; Alves, Luiza; Zaninotto, Ana Luiza; Falcão, Denise Pinheiro; de Amorim, Rivadávio Fernandes Batista

    2017-04-01

    Hypnosis is a valuable tool in the management of patients who undergo surgical procedures in the maxillofacial complex, particularly in reducing and eliminating pain during surgery and aiding patients who have dental fear and are allergic to anesthesia. This case report demonstrates the efficacy of hypnosis in mitigating anxiety, bleeding, and pain during dental surgery without anesthesia during implant placement of tooth 14, the upper left first molar.

  5. Phaeochromocytoma Crisis: Two Cases of Undiagnosed Phaeochromocytoma Presenting after Elective Nonrelated Surgical Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Johnston

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phaeochromocytoma is a catecholamine producing tumour and an uncommon cause of hypertension. We present two cases of relatively asymptomatic individuals, in which previously undiagnosed phaeochromocytoma was unmasked by elective nonadrenal surgical procedures, manifesting as postoperative hypertensive crisis and subsequent cardiogenic shock. The initial management in intensive care is discussed, in addition to the clinical and biochemical diagnostic challenges present. Successful adrenalectomy was performed in each case.

  6. Mandatory Change From Surgical Skull Caps to Bouffant Caps Among Operating Room Personnel Does Not Reduce Surgical Site Infections in Class I Surgical Cases: A Single-Center Experience With More Than 15 000 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shallwani, Hussain; Shakir, Hakeem J; Aldridge, Ashley M; Donovan, Maureen T; Levy, Elad I; Gibbons, Kevin J

    2017-05-10

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are noteworthy and costly complications. New recommendations from a national organization have urged the elimination of traditional surgeon's caps (surgical skull caps) and mandated the use of bouffant caps to prevent SSIs. To report SSI rates for >15 000 class I (clean) surgical procedures 13 mo before and 13 mo after surgical skull caps were banned at a single site with 25 operating rooms. SSI data were acquired from hospital infection control monthly summary reports from January 2014 to March 2016. Based on a change in hospital policy mandating obligatory use of bouffant caps since February 2015, data were categorized into nonbouffant and bouffant groups. Monthly and cumulative infection rates for 13 mo before (7513 patients) and 13 mo after (8446 patients) the policy implementation were collected and analyzed for the groups, respectively. An overall increase of 0.07% (0.77%-0.84%) in the cumulative rate of SSI in all class I operating room cases and of 0.03% (0.79%-0.82%) in the cumulative rate of SSI in all spinal procedures was noted. However, neither increase reached statistical significance ( P > .05). The cumulative rate of SSI in neurosurgery craniotomy/craniectomy cases decreased from 0.95% to 0.75%; this was also not statistically significant ( P = 1.00). National efforts at improving healthcare performance are laudable but need to be evidence based. Guidelines, especially when applied in a mandatory fashion, should be assessed for effectiveness. In this large, single-center series of patients undergoing class I surgical procedures, elimination of the traditional surgeon's cap did not reduce infection rates. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  7. Control of bleeding in surgical procedures: critical appraisal of HEMOPATCH (Sealing Hemostat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis KM

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Kevin Michael Lewis,1 Carl Erik Kuntze,2 Heinz Gulle3 1Preclinical Safety and Efficacy, Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Deerfield, IL, USA; 2Medical Affairs, Baxter Healthcare SA, Zurich, Switzerland; 3Surgical Sciences and Engineering, Baxter Medical Products GmbH, Vienna, Austria Abstract: The need for advanced hemostatic agents increases with the complexity of surgical procedures and use of anticoagulation and antiplatelet treatments. HEMOPATCH (Sealing Hemostat is a novel, advanced hemostatic pad that is composed of a synthetic, protein-reactive monomer and a collagen backing. The active side is covered with a protein-reactive monomer: N-hydroxysuccinimide functionalized polyethylene glycol (NHS-PEG. NHS-PEG rapidly affixes the collagen pad to tissue to promote and maintain hemostasis. The combined action of the NHS-PEG and collagen is demonstrated to have benefit relative to other hemostatic agents in surgery and preclinical surgical models. This paper reviews the published investigations and case reports of the hemostatic efficacy of HEMOPATCH, wherein HEMOPATCH is demonstrated to be an effective, easy-to-use hemostatic agent in open and minimally invasive surgery of patients with thrombin- or platelet-induced coagulopathies. Keywords: HEMOPATCH, hemostasis, surgical hemostasis, sealing, surgical sealant

  8. Shift and Duty Scheduling of Surgical Technicians in Naval Hospitals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nurse, Nigel

    2004-01-01

    Surgical technicians at Naval hospitals provide a host of services related to surgical procedures that include handing instruments to surgeons, assisting operating room nurses, prepping and cleaning...

  9. ARM Operations and Engineering Procedure Mobile Facility Site Startup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, Jimmy W

    2015-05-01

    This procedure exists to define the key milestones, necessary steps, and process rules required to commission and operate an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF), with a specific focus toward on-time product delivery to the ARM Data Archive. The overall objective is to have the physical infrastructure, networking and communications, and instrument calibration, grooming, and alignment (CG&A) completed with data products available from the ARM Data Archive by the Operational Start Date milestone.

  10. Symptom-based emergency operating procedures development for Ignalina NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruglov, Y.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper and lecture are presented: (1) Introduction; (2) EOP project work stages and documentation; (3) Selection and justification of accident management strategy; (4) Content of EOP package; (5) Development of EOP package; (6) EOP package verification; (7) EOP package validation; (8) EOP training; (9) EOP implementation; (10) Conditions of symptom-based emergency operating producers package application and its interconnection with event-based emergency operating procedures; (11) Rules of EOP application; EOP maintenance

  11. Operating Policies and Procedures of Computer Data-Base Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David O.

    Speaking on the operating policies and procedures of computer data bases containing information on students, the author divides his remarks into three parts: content decisions, data base security, and user access. He offers nine recommended practices that should increase the data base's usefulness to the user community: (1) the cost of developing…

  12. OPERANT PROCEDURES IN REMEDIAL SPEECH AND LANGUAGE TRAINING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MACAULAY, BARBARA D., ED.; SLOANE, HOWARD N., JR., ED.

    INTENDED FOR SPEECH THERAPISTS, THEACHERS OF THE MENTALLY RETARDED, AND OTHERS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION, THE COLLECTION CONTAINS REPORTS BY VARIOUS AUTHORS ON SPEECH AND LANGUAGE MODIFICATION ATTEMPTS THAT HAVE UTILIZED OPERANT CONDITIONING PROCEDURES, AS WELL AS SEVERAL PAPERS ON BACKGROUND TOPICS. BACKGROUND PAPERS ON TEACHING TREAT ENVIRONMENTAL…

  13. 21 CFR 58.81 - Standard operating procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... following: (1) Animal room preparation. (2) Animal care. (3) Receipt, identification, storage, handling... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standard operating procedures. 58.81 Section 58.81 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD...

  14. Prophylactic Use Of Antibiotics In Operative Procedures | Aluka ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Febrile morbidity appears to be an inevitable sequel to operative obstetric procedures in about 10-15% of patients. Apart from endometritis, serious infections such as pelvic abscess, septic shock and septic pelvic vein thrombophlebitis may occur. Patients at risk include those in prolonged labour with ruptured membranes.

  15. 10 CFR 39.63 - Operating and emergency procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... monitoring and the use of personnel monitoring equipment; (g) Transportation of licensed materials to field... follow written operating and emergency procedures that cover— (a) The handling and use of licensed materials including the use of sealed sources in wells without surface casing for protecting fresh water...

  16. 42 CFR 35.15 - Consent to operative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Consent to operative procedures. 35.15 Section 35.15 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND... or refusal of consent shall be made a part of the clinical record. ...

  17. IMPACT ON CONTRIBUTIONS FUMES FROM WELDING PROCEDURES WELDER HEALTH OPERATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe AMZA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a series of investigations undertaken to establish the impact of gas welding results in fusion welding procedures and welders health operators who work in departments making welded construction. Are the main gases that occur in fusion welding and main effects of short-term and long on the human body.

  18. Trends in Hospital Admission and Surgical Procedures Following ED visits for Diverticulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood-Ericksen, Margaret B; Havens, Joaquim M; Ma, Jiemin; Weissman, Joel S; Schuur, Jeremiah D

    2016-07-01

    Diverticulitis is a common diagnosis in the emergency department (ED). Outpatient management of diverticulitis is safe in selected patients, yet the rates of admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis are unknown, as are the predictive patient characteristics. Our goal is to describe trends in admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis, and to determine which patient characteristics predict admission. : We performed a cross-sectional descriptive analysis using data on ED visits from 2006-2011 to determine change in admission and surgical patterns over time. The Nationwide Emergency Department Sample database, a nationally representative administrative claims dataset, was used to analyze ED visits for diverticulitis. We included patients with a principal diagnosis of diverticulitis (ICD-9 codes 562.11, 562.13). We analyzed the rate of admission and surgery in all admitted patients and in low-risk patients, defined as age diverticulitis. Fryom 2006 to 2011 ED visits for diverticulitis increased by 21.3% from 238,248 to 302,612, while the admission rate decreased from 55.7% to 48.5% (-7.2%, 95% CI [-7.78 to -6.62]; pdiverticulitis was independently associated with male gender, comorbid illnesses, higher income and commercial health insurance. The surgical rate decreased from 6.5% in 2006 to 4.7% in 2011 (-1.8%, 95% CI [-2.1 to -1.5]; pdiverticulitis increased, while ED admission rates and surgical rates declined, with comorbidity, sociodemographic factors predicting hospitalization. Future work should focus on determining if these differences reflect increased disease prevalence, increased diagnosis, or changes in management.

  19. Doctors' perspectives of informed consent for non-emergency surgical procedures: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Fiona; Martin, Sean Michael; Carson-Stevens, Andrew; Elwyn, Glyn; Precious, Elizabeth; Kinnersley, Paul

    2016-06-01

    The need to involve patients more in decisions about their care, the ethical imperative and concerns about ligation and complaints has highlighted the issue of informed consent and how it is obtained. In order for a patient to make an informed decision about their treatment, they need appropriate discussion of the risks and benefits of the treatment. To explore doctors' perspectives of gaining informed consent for routine surgical procedures. Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews selected by purposive sampling. Data were analysed thematically. Twenty doctors in two teaching hospitals in the UK. Doctors described that while consent could be taken over a series of consultations, it was common for consent to be taken immediately prior to surgery. Juniors were often taking consent when they were unfamiliar with the procedure. Doctors used a range of communication techniques to inform patients about the procedure and its risks including quantifying risks, personalizing risk, simplification of language and use of drawings. Barriers to effective consent taking were reported to be shortage of time, clinician inexperience and patients' reluctance to be involved. Current consent processes do not appear to be ideal for many doctors. In particular, junior doctors are often not confident taking consent for surgical procedures and require more support to undertake this task. This might include written information for junior staff, observation by senior colleagues when undertaking the task and ward-based communication skills teaching on consent taking. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Cost-effectiveness analyses of elective orthopaedic surgical procedures in patients with inflammatory arthropathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osnes-Ringen, H.; Kvamme, M. K.; Sønbø Kristiansen, Ivar

    2011-01-01

    . The health benefit from surgery was subsequently translated into QALYs. The direct treatment costs in the first year were, for each patient, derived from the hospital's cost per patient accounting system (KOSPA). The costs per QALY were estimated and future costs and benefits were discounted at 4%. Results......: Improvement in utility at 1-year follow-up was 0.10 with EQ-5D and 0.03 with SF-6D (p procedures. The 5-year cost per QALY was EUR 17...... 800 for non-replacement surgical procedures measured by EQ-5D (SF-6D: EUR 67 500). Conclusions: Elective orthopaedic surgery in patients with inflammatory arthropathies was cost-effective when measured with EQ-5D, and some procedures were also cost-effective when SF-6D was used in the economic...

  1. Mortality of induced abortion, other outpatient surgical procedures and common activities in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Elizabeth G; Grossman, Daniel; Weaver, Mark A; Toti, Stephanie; Winikoff, Beverly

    2014-11-01

    The recent surge of new legislation regulating induced abortion in the United States is ostensibly motivated by the desire to protect women's health. To provide context for interpreting the risk of abortion, we compared abortion-related mortality to mortality associated with other outpatient surgical procedures and selected nonmedical activities. We calculated the abortion-related mortality rate during 2000-2009 using national data. We searched PubMed and other sources for contemporaneous data on mortality associated with other outpatient procedures commonly performed on healthy young women, marathon running, bicycling and driving. The abortion-related mortality rate in 2000-2009 in the United States was 0.7 per 100,000 abortions. Studies in approximately the same years found mortality rates of 0.8-1.7 deaths per 100,000 plastic surgery procedures, 0-1.7deaths per 100,000 dental procedures, 0.6-1.2 deaths per 100,000 marathons run and at least 4 deaths among 100,000 cyclists in a large annual bicycling event. The traffic fatality rate per 758 vehicle miles traveled by passenger cars in the United States in 2007-2011 was about equal to the abortion-related mortality rate. The safety of induced abortion as practiced in the United States for the past decade met or exceeded expectations for outpatient surgical procedures and compared favorably to that of two common nonmedical voluntary activities. The new legislation restricting abortion is unnecessary; indeed, by reducing the geographic distribution of abortion providers and requiring women to travel farther for the procedure, these laws are potentially detrimental to women's health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnesium Lowers the Incidence of Postoperative Junctional Ectopic Tachycardia in Congenital Heart Surgical Patients: Is There a Relationship to Surgical Procedure Complexity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dingchao; Sznycer-Taub, Nathaniel; Cheng, Yao; McCarter, Robert; Jonas, Richard A.; Hanumanthaiah, Sridhar; Moak, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium sulfate was given to pediatric cardiac surgical patients during cardiopulmonary bypass period in an attempt to reduce the occurrence of postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia (PO JET). We reviewed our data to evaluate the effect of magnesium on the occurrence of JET and assess a possible relationship between PO JET and procedure complexity. A total of 1088 congenital heart surgeries (CHS), performed from 2005 to 2010, were reviewed. A total of 750 cases did not receive magnesium, and 338 cases received magnesium (25 mg/kg). All procedures were classified according to Aristotle score from 1 to 4. Overall, there was a statistically significant decrease in PO JET occurrence between the two groups regardless of the Aristotle score, 15.3 % (115/750) in non-magnesium group versus 7.1 % (24/338) in magnesium group, P Aristotle score, P = 0.01. Following magnesium administration and controlling for body weight, surgical and aortic cross-clamp times in the analyses, reduction in adjusted risk of JET was significantly greater with increasing Aristotle level of complexity (JET in non-magnesium vs. magnesium group, Aristotle level 1: 9.8 vs. 14.3 %, level 4: 11.5 vs. 3.2 %; odds ratio 0.54, 95 % CI 0.31–0.94, P = 0.028). Our data confirmed that intra-operative usage of magnesium reduced the occurrence of PO JET in a larger number and more diverse group of CHS patients than has previously been reported. Further, our data suggest that magnesium’s effect on PO JET occurrence seemed more effective in CHS with higher levels of Aristotle complexity. PMID:25762470

  3. Operator behaviors observed in following emergency operating procedure under a simulated emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Yeong; Park, Jin Kyun

    2012-01-01

    A symptom-based procedure with a critical safety function monitoring system has been established to reduce the operator's diagnosis and cognitive burden since the Three-Mile Island (TMI) accident. However, it has been reported that a symptom-based procedure also requires an operator's cognitive efforts to cope with off-normal events. This can be caused by mismatches between a static model, an emergency operating procedure (EOP), and a dynamic process, the nature of an ongoing situation. The purpose of this study is to share the evidence of mismatches that may result in an excessive cognitive burden in conducting EOPs. For this purpose, we analyzed simulated emergency operation records and observed some operator behaviors during the EOP operation: continuous steps, improper description, parameter check at a fixed time, decision by information previously obtained, execution complexity, operation by the operator's knowledge, notes and cautions, and a foldout page. Since observations in this study are comparable to the results of an existing study, it is expected that the operational behaviors observed in this study are generic features of operators who have to cope with a dynamic situation using a static procedure.

  4. Defining Optimal Length of Opioid Pain Medication Prescription After Common Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Rebecca E; Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Jiang, Wei; Lipsitz, Stuart; Chaudhary, Muhammad Ali; Learn, Peter A; Koehlmoos, Tracey; Haider, Adil H; Nguyen, Louis L

    2018-01-01

    The overprescription of pain medications has been implicated as a driver of the burgeoning opioid epidemic; however, few guidelines exist regarding the appropriateness of opioid pain medication prescriptions after surgery. To describe patterns of opioid pain medication prescriptions after common surgical procedures and determine the appropriateness of the prescription as indicated by the rate of refills. The Department of Defense Military Health System Data Repository was used to identify opioid-naive individuals 18 to 64 years of age who had undergone 1 of 8 common surgical procedures between January 1, 2005, and September 30, 2014. The adjusted risk of refilling an opioid prescription based on the number of days of initial prescription was modeled using a generalized additive model with spline smoothing. Length of initial prescription for opioid pain medication. Need for an additional subsequent prescription for opioid pain medication, or a refill. Of the 215 140 individuals (107 588 women and 107 552 men; mean [SD] age, 40.1 [12.8] years) who underwent a procedure within the study time frame and received and filled at least 1 prescription for opioid pain medication within 14 days of their index procedure, 41 107 (19.1%) received at least 1 refill prescription. The median prescription lengths were 4 days (interquartile range [IQR], 3-5 days) for appendectomy and cholecystectomy, 5 days (IQR, 3-6 days) for inguinal hernia repair, 4 days (IQR, 3-5 days) for hysterectomy, 5 days (IQR, 3-6 days) for mastectomy, 5 days (IQR, 4-8 days) for anterior cruciate ligament repair and rotator cuff repair, and 7 days (IQR, 5-10 days) for discectomy. The early nadir in the probability of refill was at an initial prescription of 9 days for general surgery procedures (probability of refill, 10.7%), 13 days for women's health procedures (probability of refill, 16.8%), and 15 days for musculoskeletal procedures (probability of refill, 32.5%). Ideally, opioid prescriptions

  5. Infirmity and injury complexity are risk factors for surgical-site infection after operative fracture care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachoura, Abdo; Guitton, Thierry G; Smith, R Malcolm; Vrahas, Mark S; Zurakowski, David; Ring, David

    2011-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgical-site infections prolong hospital stays, double rehospitalization rates, and increase healthcare costs. Additionally, patients with orthopaedic surgical-site infections (SSI) have substantially greater physical limitations and reductions in their health-related quality of life. However, the risk factors for SSI after operative fracture care are unclear. We determined the incidence and quantified modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors for SSIs in patients with orthopaedic trauma undergoing surgery. We retrospectively indentified, from our prospective trauma database and billing records, 1611 patients who underwent 1783 trauma-related procedures between 2006 and 2008. Medical records were reviewed and demographics, surgery-specific data, and whether the patients had an SSI were recorded. We determined which if any variables predicted SSI. Six factors independently predicted SSI: (1) the use of a drain, OR 2.3, 95% CI (1.3-3.8); (2) number of operations OR 3.4, 95% CI (2.0-6.0); (3) diabetes, OR 2.1, 95% CI (1.2-3.8); (4) congestive heart failure (CHF), OR 2.8, 95% CI (1.3-6.5); (5) site of injury tibial shaft/plateau, OR 2.3, 95% CI (1.3-4.2); and (6) site of injury, elbow, OR 2.2, 95% CI (1.1-4.7). The risk factors for SSIs after skeletal trauma are most strongly determined by nonmodifiable factors: patient infirmity (diabetes and heart failure) and injury complexity (site of injury, number of operations, use of a drain). Level II, prognostic study. See the Guideline for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  6. 21 CFR 878.5070 - Air-handling apparatus for a surgical operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Air-handling apparatus for a surgical operating room. 878.5070 Section 878.5070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 878.5070 Air-handling apparatus for a surgical...

  7. Impact of an electronic health record operating room management system in ophthalmology on documentation time, surgical volume, and staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, David S; Read-Brown, Sarah; Tu, Daniel C; Lambert, William E; Choi, Dongseok; Almario, Bella M; Yackel, Thomas R; Brown, Anna S; Chiang, Michael F

    2014-05-01

    Although electronic health record (EHR) systems have potential benefits, such as improved safety and quality of care, most ophthalmology practices in the United States have not adopted these systems. Concerns persist regarding potential negative impacts on clinical workflow. In particular, the impact of EHR operating room (OR) management systems on clinical efficiency in the ophthalmic surgery setting is unknown. To determine the impact of an EHR OR management system on intraoperative nursing documentation time, surgical volume, and staffing requirements. For documentation time and circulating nurses per procedure, a prospective cohort design was used between January 10, 2012, and January 10, 2013. For surgical volume and overall staffing requirements, a case series design was used between January 29, 2011, and January 28, 2013. This study involved ophthalmic OR nurses (n = 13) and surgeons (n = 25) at an academic medical center. Electronic health record OR management system implementation. (1) Documentation time (percentage of operating time documenting [POTD], absolute documentation time in minutes), (2) surgical volume (procedures/time), and (3) staffing requirements (full-time equivalents, circulating nurses/procedure). Outcomes were measured during a baseline period when paper documentation was used and during the early (first 3 months) and late (4-12 months) periods after EHR implementation. There was a worsening in total POTD in the early EHR period (83%) vs paper baseline (41%) (P system implementation was associated with worsening of intraoperative nursing documentation time especially in shorter procedures. However, it is possible to implement an EHR OR management system without serious negative impacts on surgical volume and staffing requirements.

  8. Hybrid procedure for total laryngectomy with a flexible robot-assisted surgical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Patrick J; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Veit, Johannes A; Rotter, Nicole; Friedrich, Daniel T; Greve, Jens; Scheithauer, Marc O

    2017-06-01

    Total laryngectomy is a standard procedure in head-and-neck surgery for the treatment of cancer patients. Recent clinical experiences have indicated a clinical benefit for patients undergoing transoral robot-assisted total laryngectomy (TORS-TL) with commercially available systems. Here, a new hybrid procedure for total laryngectomy is presented. TORS-TL was performed in human cadavers (n = 3) using a transoral-transcervical hybrid procedure. The transoral approach was performed with a robotic flexible robot-assisted surgical system (Flex®) and compatible flexible instruments. Transoral access and visualization of anatomical landmarks were studied in detail. Total laryngectomy is feasible with a combined transoral-transcervical approach using the flexible robot-assisted surgical system. Transoral visualization of all anatomical structures is sufficient. The flexible design of the robot is advantageous for transoral surgery of the laryngeal structures. Transoral robot assisted surgery has the potential to reduce morbidity, hospital time and fistula rates in a selected group of patients. Initial clinical studies and further development of supplemental tools are in progress. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Isokinetic muscle assessment after treatment of pectoralis major muscle rupture using surgical or non-surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Fleury

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rupture of the pectoralis major muscle appears to be increasing in athletes. However, the optimal treatment strategy has not yet been established. OBJECTIVES: To compare the isokinetic shoulder performance after surgical treatment to that after non-surgical treatment for pectoralis major muscle rupture. METHODS: We assessed 33 pectoralis major muscle ruptures (18 treated non-surgically and 15 treated surgically. Horizontal abduction and adduction as well as external and internal rotation at 60 and 120 degrees/s were tested in both upper limbs. Peak torque, total work, contralateral deficiency, and the peak torque agonist-to-antagonist ratio were measured. RESULTS: Contralateral muscular deficiency did not differ between the surgical and non-surgical treatment modalities. However, the surgical group presented twice the number of athletes with clinically acceptable contralateral deficiency (<20% for internal rotators compared to the non-surgical group. The peak torque ratio between the external and internal rotator muscles revealed a similar deficit of the external rotation in both groups and on both sides (surgical, 61.60% and 57.80% and non-surgical, 62.06% and 54.06%, for the dominant and non-dominant sides, respectively. The peak torque ratio revealed that the horizontal adduction muscles on the injured side showed similar weakness in both groups (surgical, 86.27%; non-surgical, 98.61%. CONCLUSIONS: This study included the largest single series of athletes reported to date for this type of injury. A comparative analysis of muscular strength and balance showed no differences between the treatment modalities for pectoralis major muscle rupture. However, the number of significant clinical deficiencies was lower in the surgical group than in the non-surgical group, and both treatment modalities require greater attention to the rehabilitation process, especially for the recovery of muscle strength and balance.

  10. The operating theatre as classroom: a qualitative study of learning and teaching surgical competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieu, Violet; Stroud, Leanne; Huang, Paul; Smith, Mitchell; Spychal, Robert; Hunter-Smith, David; Nestel, Debra

    2015-01-01

    There has been a worldwide movement toward competency-based medical education and training. However, this is the first qualitative study to analyze the perceptions of surgical trainees and surgeons toward competency-based education in the operating theatre. We aim to examine views toward the specific learning and teaching of the nine competencies of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) and to explore perceived ideal conditions and challenges for learning and teaching these competencies in the operating theatre. Individual semi-structured interviews with surgical trainees and surgeons in the specialty of General Surgery. Ten surgical trainees and surgeons who worked together were purposively sampled, for maximum variation, from an outer metropolitan public hospital in Melbourne, Australia, to identify emergent themes relating to learning and teaching surgical competencies in the operating theatre. Five themes were identified as: (1) Learning and teaching specific surgical competencies is through relationship based mentoring and experiential learning; (2) Ideal conditions and challenges in the operating theatre are availability of time and personal attitude; (3) Level of pre-operative briefing was variable; (4) Intra-operative teaching is perceived as structured; and, (5) Post-operative debriefing is recognized as ideal but not consistently performed. Professional relationships are important to both surgical trainees and surgeons in the process of learning and teaching competencies. Ad hoc apprenticeship style learning is perceived to remain prominent in the operating theatre. Sufficient time for training is valued by both groups. The surgical competencies are inherently different to each other. Some appear more difficult to learn and teach in the operating theatre, with technical expertise most readily identified and health advocacy least so. Elements of guided discovery learning and other educational models are described. Further emphasis on structured

  11. Operability test procedure [Tank] 241-SY-101 equipment removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mast, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    The 241-SY-101 equipment removal system (ERS) consists of components, equipment, instrumentation and procedures that will provide the means to disconnect, retrieve, contain, load and transport the Mitigation Pump Assembly (MPA) from waste Tank 241-SY-101 to the Central Waste Complex (CWC). The Operability Test Procedure (OTP) will test the interfaces between ERS components and will rehearse the procedure for MPA removal and transportation to the extent they can be mocked-up at the CTF (Cold Test Facility). At the conclusion of the OTP, the ERS components and equipment will be removed from the CTF, entered into the Component Based Recall System (CBRS), and stored until needed for actual MPA removal and transportation

  12. The European Stroke Organisation Guidelines: a standard operating procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ntaios, George; Bornstein, Natan M; Caso, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the recently founded European Stroke Organisation published its guidelines for the management of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. This highly cited document was translated in several languages and was updated in 2009. Since then, the European Stroke Organisation has published...... pace with this progress and driven by the strong determination of the European Stroke Organisation to further promote stroke management, education, and research, the European Stroke Organisation decided to delineate a detailed standard operating procedure for its guidelines. There are two important...... cornerstones in this standard operating procedure: The first is the implementation of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology for the development of its Guideline Documents. The second one is the decision of the European Stroke Organisation to move from the classical...

  13. The increasing number of surgical procedures for female genital fistula in England: analysis of Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S I M F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the number and trend of surgical procedures for female genital fistula in England. An online search of Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data was carried out. Data were available for the 4-year period from 2002-03 until 2005-06. The total number of surgical procedures carried out for female genital fistula steadily increased by 28.7% from 616 in 2002-03 to 793 in 2005-06. The number of surgical procedures performed for rectovaginal fistula exceeded the total number of surgical procedures carried out for vesicovaginal and urethrovaginal fistula in each year of the study period. This pattern needs to be monitored and investigated further.

  14. The surgical procedure is the most important factor affecting continence recovery after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungsoo; Yoon, Chang Jin; Park, Hyun Jun; Lee, Jeong Zoo; Ha, Hong Koo

    2013-08-01

    We analyzed factors associated with early recovery of continence after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Among 467 patients treated with laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer between 2007 and 2012, 249 patients who underwent a preoperative urodynamic study were enrolled. The patients' age, prostate volume, preoperative serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, pathologic stage, and preoperative urodynamic parameters were recorded. The preoperative membranous and prostatic urethral length on magnetic resonance image, nerve sparing technique, and type of surgical procedure (extrafascial and intrafascial) were analyzed. Patients were considered to have early recovery of continence when they needed no pad in 3 months or less after surgery. Ninety-two patients were in the early recovery group and 157 were in the late recovery group. The membranous urethral lengths were 12.06±2.56 and 11.81±2.87 mm, and prostatic urethral lengths were 36.39±6.15 and 37.45±7.55 mm in each group, respectively. The membranous-posterior urethral length ratios were 0.25±0.06 and 0.24±0.06, and prostatic-posterior urethral length ratios were 0.75±0.06 and 0.76±0.06, respectively. In and of themselves, the membranous and prostatic urethral lengths were not associated with recovery duration however, the membranous-total and prostatic-total urethral length ratios were related (p=0.024 and 0.024, respectively). None of the urodynamic parameters correlated with continence recovery time. In the multivariate analysis, the type of surgical procedure (odds ratio [OR], 7.032; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.660 to 18.590; precovery of continence. The current intrafascial surgical procedure is the most important factor affecting early recovery of continence after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

  15. Quality assurance: Importance of systems and standard operating procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Kishu Manghani

    2011-01-01

    It is mandatory for sponsors of clinical trials and contract research organizations alike to establish, manage and monitor their quality control and quality assurance systems and their integral standard operating procedures and other quality documents to provide high-quality products and services to fully satisfy customer needs and expectations. Quality control and quality assurance systems together constitute the key quality systems. Quality control and quality assurance are parts of quality...

  16. Some aspects of licensing procedures for NPP operation in USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaev, A.N.

    2002-01-01

    Structure of the Code of Federal Regulations of USA is reviewed, aspects of licensing for NPP operation in USA associated with licensing procedures for service of NPP, prolongation of license as well as introduction of changes in prevailing licenses using risk-informed decisionmaking method are outlined. Fundamental stages of decision making with risk assessment for the particular station as well as values of acceptability for the frequency evaluation of reactor core disruption and large early discharges are presented [ru

  17. The Effect of Resident Involvement on Surgical Outcomes for Common Urologic Procedures: A Case Study of Uni- and Bilateral Hydrocele Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löppenberg, Björn; Cheng, Philip J; Speed, Jacqueline M; Cole, Alexander P; Vetterlein, Malte W; Kibel, Adam S; Noldus, Joachim; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Meyer, Christian P

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have investigated the effect of resident involvement (RI) on surgical complications in minimally invasive and complex surgical cases. This study evaluates the effect of surgical education on outcomes in a simple general urologic procedure, unilateral and bilateral hydrocele repair, in a large prospectively collected multi-institutional database. Relying on the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Participant User files (2005-2013), we extracted patients who underwent unilateral or bilateral hydrocele repair using Current Procedural Terminology codes 55040, 55041, and 55060. Cases with missing information on RI were excluded. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the impact of RI on perioperative outcomes. A prolonged operative time (pOT) was defined as operative time >75th percentile. Overall, 1378 cases were available for final analyses. The overall complication, readmission, and reoperation rates were 2.3% (32/1378), 0.5% (7/1378), and 1.4% (19/1378), respectively. A pOT was more frequently observed in bilateral procedures (35.2% vs 21.3%, P hydrocele repairs leads to higher odds of pOT, it does not affect patient safety, as evidenced by similar complication rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An operational procedure for rapid flood risk assessment in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dottori, Francesco; Kalas, Milan; Salamon, Peter; Bianchi, Alessandra; Alfieri, Lorenzo; Feyen, Luc

    2017-07-01

    The development of methods for rapid flood mapping and risk assessment is a key step to increase the usefulness of flood early warning systems and is crucial for effective emergency response and flood impact mitigation. Currently, flood early warning systems rarely include real-time components to assess potential impacts generated by forecasted flood events. To overcome this limitation, this study describes the benchmarking of an operational procedure for rapid flood risk assessment based on predictions issued by the European Flood Awareness System (EFAS). Daily streamflow forecasts produced for major European river networks are translated into event-based flood hazard maps using a large map catalogue derived from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations. Flood hazard maps are then combined with exposure and vulnerability information, and the impacts of the forecasted flood events are evaluated in terms of flood-prone areas, economic damage and affected population, infrastructures and cities.An extensive testing of the operational procedure has been carried out by analysing the catastrophic floods of May 2014 in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia. The reliability of the flood mapping methodology is tested against satellite-based and report-based flood extent data, while modelled estimates of economic damage and affected population are compared against ground-based estimations. Finally, we evaluate the skill of risk estimates derived from EFAS flood forecasts with different lead times and combinations of probabilistic forecasts. Results highlight the potential of the real-time operational procedure in helping emergency response and management.

  19. Lornoxicam versus tramadol for post-operative pain relief in patients undergoing ENT procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf A Abdelhalim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain following ear-nose and throat surgery is one of the most important complaints for which, several drugs are used. This prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled trial was designed to compare the analgesic effect of tramadol versus lornoxicam for post-operative pain relief in patients undergoing ENT surgical procedures. Methods: One hundred and twenty patients of ASA class I-II, who had undergone elective ENT surgical procedures under general anesthesia, were assigned in a randomized manner into three equal groups. Group L received lornoxicam8 mg IV, Group T received tramadol 1 mg/kg IV and Group C received IV saline after induction of anesthesia before the start of the surgery. Post-operative pain was assessed using the visual analogue scale (VAS and sedation level was evaluated during stay in the post-anesthesia care unit with a four-point sedation scale. Intraoperative blood loss was estimated using the Five-Point Scale. Adverse events in the first 24 h post-operative were recorded. Results: The VAS pain scores were significantly higher in Group C as compared with those in Groups L and T at 30 min and 1, 2, 4and 6 h post-operatively, with no significant difference between Group L and Group T. The amount of morphine consumption post-operatively was significantly lower in Group L (5.2 ± 2.5 mg and Group T (5.0 ± 2.0 mg as compared with that in Group C (7.4 ± 2.3 mg (P = 0.001. The time for the first analgesic requirement was significantly less in Group L (92.62 ± 24.23 min and Group T (88 ± 21.43 min as compared with that in Group C (42.82 ± 25.61 min, with no significant difference between the other two groups. Estimated intraoperative blood loss score by the surgeons showed no significant difference between the three groups. The most frequent side-effects in the three groups were nausea and vomiting, and their incidence was significantly higher in the placebo group as compared with the other two groups. Conclusion

  20. Pre-operative antibiotic use reduces surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Asad Ali; Farooka, Muhammad Waris; Ayyaz, Mahmood; Sarwar, Hassan; Malik, Awais Amjad; Shabbir, Faisal

    2015-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of World Health Organisation Surgical Safety Checklist as a simple, reliable and effective tool to ensure appropriate administration of intravenous antibiotics. The prospective interventional study was conducted in three phases at Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from May 2011 to January 2012. The first phase comprised baseline data collection, followed by implementation of World Health Organisation Surgical Safety Checklist, and finally post-implementation data collection. The duration of each phase was 3 months. Primary end points were discharge from hospital, 30 days or death of the patient. Of the 613 patients in the study, 303(49.4%) were in the pre-implementation phase and 310(50.5%) in post-implementation phase. Adherence of optimal administration of antibiotic increased from 114(37.6%) to 282(91%) (poperative infection fell from 99(32.7%) to 47(15.2%) (psite infection by more than half. Hospital stay was shortened by 1.3 days on average which results in considerable reduction in morbidity, mortality and costs.

  1. Optimum Operating Room Environment for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Sara; Luo, James N; Gilbert, Jack; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C

    Surgical site infections (SSI), whether they be incisional or deep, can entail major morbidity and death to patients and additional cost to the healthcare system. A significant amount of effort has gone into optimizing the surgical patient and the operating room environment to reduce SSI. Relevant guidelines and literature were reviewed. The modern practice of surgical antisepsis involves the employment of strict sterile techniques inside the operating room. Extensive guidelines are available regarding the proper operating room antisepsis as well as pre-operative preparation. The use of pre-operative antimicrobial prophylaxis has become increasingly prevalent, which also presents the challenge of opportunistic and nosocomial infections. Ongoing investigative efforts have brought about a greater appreciation of the surgical patient's endogenous microflora, use of non-bactericidal small molecules, and pre-operative microbial screening. Systematic protocols exist for optimizing the surgical sterility of the operating room to prevent SSIs. Ongoing research efforts aim to improve the precision of peri-operative antisepsis measures and personalize these measures to tailor the patient's unique microbial environment.

  2. Methods for implementing revisions to emergency operating procedures. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, L.B.; Bell, A.J.

    1984-05-01

    In response to the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has published the TMI Action Plan. The TMI Action Plan Item I.C.1 called for the upgrading of Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) at nuclear power plants. The program developed from this Action Plan item has resulted in utility efforts to: (1) revise EOPs; (2) train personnel in the use of the EOPs; and (3) implement the revised EOPs. The NRC supported the study presented in this report to identify factors which influence the effectiveness of training and implementation of revised EOPs. The NRC's major concern was the possible effects of negative transfer of training. The report includes a summary of existing methods for implementing revisions to procedures based on interviews of plant personnel, a review of the training literature applicable to the effect of previously learned procedures on the learning of and performance with revised procedures (i.e., negative transfer) and recommendations of methods and schedules for implementing revised EOPs. While the study found that the concern over negative transfer of training was not as great as anticipated, several recommendations were made. These include: (1) overtraining of operators to reduce the effect of observed negative transfer; and (2) implementation of the revised EOPs as soon as possible after training to minimize the time operators must rely upon the old EOPs after having been trained on the revised EOPs. The results of the study should be useful both to the utilities and the NRC in the development and review of EOP implementation programs

  3. Trends in Hospital Admission and Surgical Procedures Following ED visits for Diverticulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret B. Greenwood-Ericksen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diverticulitis is a common diagnosis in the emergency department (ED. Outpatient management of diverticulitis is safe in selected patients, yet the rates of admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis are unknown, as are the predictive patient characteristics. Our goal is to describe trends in admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis, and to determine which patient characteristics predict admission. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional descriptive analysis using data on ED visits from 2006-2011 to determine change in admission and surgical patterns over time. The Nationwide Emergency Department Sample database, a nationally representative administrative claims dataset, was used to analyze ED visits for diverticulitis. We included patients with a principal diagnosis of diverticulitis (ICD-9 codes 562.11, 562.13. We analyzed the rate of admission and surgery in all admitted patients and in low-risk patients, defined as age <50 with no comorbidities (Elixhauser. We used hierarchical multivariate logistic regression to identify patient characteristics associated with admission for diverticulitis. Results: From 2006 to 2011 ED visits for diverticulitis increased by 21.3% from 238,248 to 302,612, while the admission rate decreased from 55.7% to 48.5% (-7.2%, 95% CI [–7.78 to -6.62]; p<0.001 for trend. The admission rate among low-risk patients decreased from 35.2% in 2006 to 26.8% in 2011 (-8.4%, 95% CI [–9.6 to –7.2]; p<0.001 for trend. Admission for diverticulitis was independently associated with male gender, comorbid illnesses, higher income and commercial health insurance. The surgical rate decreased from 6.5% in 2006 to 4.7% in 2011 (-1.8%, 95% CI [–2.1 to –1.5]; p<0.001 for trend, and among low-risk patients decreased from 4.0% to 2.2% (- 1.8%, 95% CI [–4.5 to –1.7]; p<0.001 for trend. Conclusion: From 2006 to 2011 ED visits for diverticulitis increased

  4. A pilot study to determine medical laser generated air contaminant emission rates for a simulated surgical procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Julia F; Lacey, Steven E; Lopez, Ramon; Franke, John; Conroy, Lorraine; Breskey, John; Esmen, Nurtan; Liu, Li

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that half a million health-care workers are exposed to laser surgical smoke each year. The purpose of this study was to establish a methodology to (1) estimate emission rates of laser-generated air contaminants (LGACs) using an emission chamber, and to (2) perform a screening study to differentiate the effects of three laser operational parameters. An emission chamber was designed, fabricated, and assessed for performance to estimate the emission rates of gases and particles associated with LGACs during a simulated surgical procedure. Two medical lasers (Holmium Yttrium Aluminum Garnet [Ho:YAG] and carbon dioxide [CO2]) were set to a range of plausible medical laser operational parameters in a simulated surgery to pyrolyze porcine skin generating plume in the emission chamber. Power, pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and beam diameter were evaluated to determine the effect of each operational parameter on emission rate using a fractional factorial design. The plume was sampled for particulate matter and seven gas phase combustion byproduct contaminants (benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, formaldehyde, hydrogen cyanide, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide): the gas phase emission results are presented here. Most of the measured concentrations of gas phase contaminants were below their limit of detection (LOD), but detectable measurements enabled us to determine laser operation parameter influence on CO2 emissions. Confined to the experimental conditions of this screening study, results indicated that beam diameter was statistically significantly influential and power was marginally statistically significant to emission rates of CO2 when using the Ho:YAG laser but not with the carbon dioxide laser; PRF was not influential vis-a-vis emission rates of these gas phase contaminants.

  5. Impact of operative indication and surgical complexity on outcomes after thoracic endovascular aortic repair at National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Bryan A; Durham, Christopher A; Parker, Frank M; Bogey, William M; Powell, Charles S; Stoner, Michael C

    2011-12-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) devices are increasingly being utilized to treat aortic pathologies outside of the original Food & Drug Administration (FDA) approval for nonruptured descending thoracic aorta aneurysms (DTAs). The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of patients undergoing TEVAR, elucidating the role of surgical and pathologic variables on morbidity and mortality. National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) data were reviewed for all patients undergoing endovascular thoracic aorta repair from 2005 to 2007. The patients' operative indication and surgical complexity were used to divide them into study and control populations. Comorbid profiles were assessed utilizing a modified Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Thirty-day occurrences of mortality and serious adverse events (SAEs) were used as study endpoints. Univariate and multivariate models were created using demographic and clinical variables to assess for significant differences in endpoints (P ≤ .05). A total of 440 patients undergoing TEVAR were identified. When evaluating patients based on operative indication, the ruptured population had increased mortality and SAE rates compared to the nonruptured DTA population (22.6% vs 6.2%;P < .01 and 35.5% vs 9.1%;P < .01, respectively). Further analysis by surgical complexity revealed increased mortality and SAE rates when comparing the brachiocephalic aortic debranching population to the noncovered left subclavian artery population (23.1% vs 6.5%; P = .02 and 30.8% vs 9.1%; P < .01, respectively). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that operative indication was not a correlate of mortality or SAEs (odds ratio [OR], 0.95; P = .92 and OR, 1.42; P = .39, respectively); however, brachiocephalic aortic debranching exhibited a deleterious effect on mortality (OR, 8.75; P < .01) and SAE rate (OR, 6.67; P = .01). The operative indication for a TEVAR procedure was not found to be a predictor of poor patient outcome

  6. Assessment of operative times of multiple surgical specialties in a public university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Altair da Silva

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the indicators duration of anesthesia, operative time and time patients stay in the operating rooms of different surgical specialties at a public university hospital. It was done by a descriptive cross-sectional study based on the operating room database. The following stages were measured: duration of anesthesia, procedure time and patient length of stay in the room of the various specialties. We included surgeries carried out in sequence in the same room, between 7:00 a.m. and 5 p.m., either elective or emergency. We calculated the 80th percentile of the stages, where 80% of procedures were below this value. The study measured 8,337 operations of 12 surgical specialties performed within one year. The overall mean duration of anesthesia of all specialties was 178.12±110.46 minutes, and the 80th percentile was 252 minutes. The mean operative time was 130.45±97.23 minutes, and the 80th percentile was 195 minutes. The mean total time of the patient in the operating room was 197.30±113.71 minutes, and the 80th percentile was 285 minutes. Thus, the variation of the overall mean compared to the 80th percentile was 41% for anesthesia, 49% for surgeries and 44% for operating room time. In average, anesthesia took up 88% of the operating room period, and surgery, 61%. This study identified patterns in the duration of surgery stages. The mean values of the specialties can assist with operating room planning and reduce delays. Avaliar os indicadores de tempo da anestesia, da operação e da permanência do paciente em sala de diversas especialidades do centro cirúrgico de um hospital universitário. Foi realizado em estudo descritivo transversal a partir da base de dados do centro cirúrgico e mensuradas as seguintes etapas: duração de anestesia, tempo do procedimento e tempo de permanência do paciente em sala das diversas especialidades. Foram incluídas as operações realizadas em sequência na mesma sala, das 7h às 17h, eletivas ou de urg

  7. [Influence of postoperative pelvic floor function on different surgical procedures of hysterectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, A L; Hong, L; Zhao, Y Z; Jiang, L

    2017-05-25

    Objective: To compare the influence of postoperative pelvic floor function after different surgical procedures of hysterectomy. Methods: A total of 260 patients who underwent hysterectomy in Renmin hospital of Wuhan University from January 2012 to January 2014 were enrolled in the study, and divided into 5 groups by different surgical procedures, which were total abdominal hysterectomy (A-TH; 46 cases), total laparoscopic hysterectomy (L-TH; 59 cases), total vaginal hysterectomy (V-TH; 42 cases), abdominal intrafascial hysterectomy (A-CISH; 78 cases), laparoscopic intrafascial hysterectomy (L-CISH; 35 cases). Pelvic examination, pelvic organ prolapse quantitation (POP-Q), test of pelvic muscle strength, pelvic floor distress inventory-short form 20 (PFDI-20) and the female sexual function index (FSFI) questionnaire were measured after 6 months and 12 months. Results: The differences of pelvic organ prolapse incidence after 6 months, A-TH and A-CISH [7% (3/46) versus 3% (2/78)], A-TH and L-CISH [7% (3/46) versus 3% (1/35)] were statistically significance (all P CISH was statistically different in degree ( P CISH [59% (27/46) versus 29% (23/78)], A-TH and L-CISH [59% (27/46) versus 26% (9/35)] were statistically significant (all P CISH [61% (36/59) versus 29%(23/78)] was statistically different ( P CISH [53% (31/59) verus 24% (19/78)], V-TH and A-CISH [60% (25/42) verus 24% (19/78)], V-TH and L-CISH [60% (25/42) verus 23% (8/35)] were statistically significant (all P CISH [57% (24/42) versus 26%(20/78)] was statistically significant ( P 0.05), PFDI-20 total score was not statistically significant ( P >0.05). FSFI total score after 6 months and 12 months in A-TH and A-CISH, L-TH and A-CISH, A-CISH and L-CISH were statistically significant (all P <0.05). Conclusion: The influences of different surgical procedures to pelvic floor function are no statistical difference; as to the surgical resection of hysterectomy, intrafascia hysterectomy compared with extrafascia

  8. Evolution of operative interventions by two university-based surgical teams in Haiti during the first month following the earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarani, Babak; Mehta, Samir; Ashburn, Michael; Gupta, Rajan; Dombroski, Derek; Raymonville, Maxi; Schwab, C William

    2011-06-01

    The earthquake that struck Haiti on 10 January 2010, killed 200,000 persons and injured thousands more. Working with Partners in Health, a non-governmental organization already present in Haiti, Dartmouth College, and the University of Pennsylvania sent multidisciplinary surgical teams to hospitals in the villages of Hinche and Cange. The purpose of this report is to describe the injuries seen and evolution of treatments rendered at these two outlying regional hospitals during the first month following the earthquake. A retrospective review of the database maintained by each team was performed. In addition to a list of equipment taken to Haiti, information collected included patient age, American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) physical status, injuries sustained, procedures performed, wound management strategy, antibiotic therapy, and early outcomes. A total of 113 surgical procedures were performed in 15 days by both teams. The average patient age was 25 years and average ASA score was 1.4. The majority of injuries involved large soft tissue wounds and closed fractures, although 21-40% of the patients at each hospital had either an open fracture or amputation wound. Initially, wound debridement was the most common procedure performed, but after two weeks, skin grafting, fracture fixation, and amputation revision were the more commonly needed operations. Academic surgical teams can ameliorate the morbidity and mortality following disasters caused by natural hazards by partnering with organizations that already have a presence in the affected region. A multidisciplinary team of surgeons and nurses can improve both mortality and morbidity following a disaster.

  9. Loss on Ignition Furnace Acceptance and Operability Test Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JOHNSTON, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure and Operability Test Procedure (ATP/OTP)is to verify the operability of newly installed Loss on Ignition (LOI) equipment, including a model 1608FL CMTM Furnace, a dessicator, and balance. The operability of the furnace will be verified. The arrangement of the equipment placed in Glovebox 157-3/4 to perform LOI testing on samples supplied from the Thermal Stabilization line will be verified. In addition to verifying proper operation of the furnace, this ATP/OTP will also verify the air flow through the filters, verify a damper setting to establish and maintain the required differential pressure between the glovebox and the room pressure, and test the integrity of the newly installed HEPA filter. In order to provide objective evidence of proper performance of the furnace, the furnace must heat 15 crucibles, mounted on a crucible rack, to 1000 C, according to a program entered into the furnace controller located outside the glovebox. The glovebox differential pressure will be set to provide the 0.5 to 2.0 inches of water (gauge) negative pressure inside the glovebox with an expected airflow of 100 to 125 cubic feet per minute (cfm) through the inlet filter. The glovebox inlet G1 filter will be flow tested to ensure the integrity of the filter connections and the efficiency of the filter medium. The newly installed windows and glovebox extension, as well as all disturbed joints, will be sonically tested via ultra probe to verify no leaks are present. The procedure for DOS testing of the filter is found in Appendix A

  10. Lessons learned from operating experience, maintenance procedures and training measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttner, K.; Gronau, D.

    2003-01-01

    Training programmes for nuclear facility personnel as a result of the developing phase of SAT have to be approved in the subsequent implementation and evaluation phases with the consequence of several feedback activities in the whole training process. The effectiveness of this procedure has to be evaluated especially with respect to an improvement of safety culture, shorter outage times or better plant performance, resulting in a smaller number of incidents due to human failures. The first two arguments are directly connected with all types of maintenance work in a nuclear power plant and the related preparatory training measures. The reduction of incidents due to human failures is the result of different influences, i.e. training of the operational as well as of the maintenance personnel together with changes of the operating procedures or system design. Though an evaluation of the training process should always be based on a clear definition of criteria by which the fulfilment of the learning objectives can be measured directly, the real effectiveness of training is proven by the behaviour and attitude of the personnel which can only be taken from indirect indicators. This is discussed in more detail for some examples being partly related to the above mentioned arguments. An excellent plant performance, representing a general objective of all activities, can be analysed by the changed number and reasons of incidents in a plant during its operation time. Two further examples are taken from the reactor service field where there is a tendency to reduce the individual dose rates by changed devices and/or procedures as an output from training experience with mockups. Finally the rationalisation of refresher training for operational personnel by the use of interactive teaching programs (Computer Based Training - CBT) is presented which integrate learning objectives together with a test module. (author)

  11. Loss on Ignition Furnace Acceptance and Operability Test Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHNSON, D.C.

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure and Operability Test Procedure (ATP/OTP)is to verify the operability of newly installed LOI equipment, including a model 1608FL CM{trademark} Furnace, a dessicator, and balance. The operability of the furnace will be verified. The arrangement of the equipment placed in Glovebox 157-3/4 to perform Loss on Ignition (LOI) testing on samples supplied from the Thermal Stabilization line will be verified. In addition to verifying proper operation of the furnace, this ATP/OTP will also verify the air flow through the filters, verify a damper setting to establish and maintain the required differential pressure between the glovebox and the room pressure, and test the integrity of the newly installed HEPA filter. In order to provide objective evidence of proper performance of the furnace, the furnace must heat 15 crucibles, mounted on a crucible rack, to 1000 C, according to a program entered into the furnace controller located outside the glovebox. The glovebox differential pressure will be set to provide the 0.5 to 2.0 inches of water (gauge) negative pressure inside the glovebox with an airflow of 100 to 125 cubic feet per minute (cfm) through the inlet filter. The glovebox inlet Glfilter will he flow tested to ensure the integrity of the filter connections and the efficiency of the filter medium. The newly installed windows and glovebox extension, as well as all disturbed joints, will be sonically tested via ultra probe to verify no leaks are present. The procedure for DOS testing of the filter is found in Appendix A.

  12. Surgical efficiencies and quality in the performance of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC procedures in Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dino Rech

    Full Text Available This analysis explores the association between elements of surgical efficiency in voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC, quality of surgical technique, and the amount of time required to conduct VMMC procedures in actual field settings. Efficiency outcomes are defined in terms of the primary provider's time with the client (PPTC and total elapsed operating time (TEOT.Two serial cross-sectional surveys of VMMC sites were conducted in Kenya, Republic of South Africa, Tanzania and Zimbabwe in 2011 and 2012. Trained clinicians observed quality of surgical technique and timed 9 steps in the VMMC procedure. Four elements of efficiency (task-shifting, task-sharing [of suturing], rotation among multiple surgical beds, and use of electrocautery and quality of surgical technique were assessed as explanatory variables. Mann Whitney and Kruskal Wallis tests were used in the bivariate analysis and linear regression models for the multivariate analyses to test the relationship between these five explanatory variables and two outcomes: PPTC and TEOT. The VMMC procedure TEOT and PPTC averaged 23-25 minutes and 6-15 minutes, respectively, across the four countries and two years. The data showed time savings from task-sharing in suturing and use of electrocautery in South Africa and Zimbabwe (where task-shifting is not authorized. After adjusting for confounders, results demonstrated that having a secondary provider complete suturing and use of electrocautery reduced PPTC. Factors related to TEOT varied by country and year, but task-sharing of suturing and/or electrocautery were significant in two countries. Quality of surgical technique was not significantly related to PPTC or TEOT, except for South Africa in 2012 where higher quality was associated with lower TEOT.SYMMACS data confirm the efficiency benefits of task-sharing of suturing and use of electrocautery for decreasing TEOT. Reduced TEOT and PPTC in high volume setting did not result in decreased

  13. The impact of different surgical procedures on hypoparathyroidism after thyroidectomy: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Chen; Iqbal, Usman; Nguyen, Phung-Anh; Hsu, Chung-Huei; Huang, Chen-Ling; Hsu, Yi-Hsin Elsa; Atique, Suleman; Islam, Md Mohaimenul; Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Jian, Wen-Shan

    2017-10-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the outcome between surgical procedures and the risk of development of hypoparathyroidism followed by surgical procedure in patients with thyroid disorders.We analyzed the data acquired from Taiwan's Bureau of National Health Insurance (BNHI) research database from 1998 to 2011 and found 9316 patients with thyroid surgery. Cox regression model was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR).A count of 314 cases (3.4%) of hypoparathyroidism was identified. The 9 years cumulated incidence of hypoparathyroidism was the highest in patient undergone bilateral total thyroidectomy (13.5%) and the lowest in the patient with unilateral subtotal thyroidectomy (1.2%). However, in the patients who had undergone unilateral subtotal, the risk was the highest in bilateral total (HR: 11.86), followed by radical thyroidectomy with unilateral neck lymph node dissection (HR: 8.56), unilateral total (HR, 4.39), and one side total and another side subtotal (HR: 2.80).The extent of thyroid resection determined the risk of development of hypoparathyroidism. It is suggested that the association of these factors is investigated in future studies.

  14. Pulmonary CO2 elimination during surgical procedures using intra- or extraperitoneal CO2 insufflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullett, C E; Viale, J P; Sagnard, P E; Miellet, C C; Ruynat, L G; Counioux, H C; Motin, J P; Boulez, J P; Dargent, D M; Annat, G J

    1993-03-01

    We examined end-tidal CO2 tension (PETCO2) and pulmonary CO2 elimination of CO2 (VECO2) during CO2 insufflation under general anesthesia for three surgical procedures: gynecologic laparoscopy (intraperitoneal CO2 insufflation for 43 +/- 4 min), laparoscopic cholecystectomy (intraperitoneal CO2 insufflation for 125 +/- 14 min), and pelviscopy (extraperitoneal CO2 insufflation for 45 +/- 3 min). All patients (10 in each group) underwent controlled mechanical ventilation. Oxygen consumption (VO2) and VECO2 were measured at 2-min intervals by a system using a mass spectrometer. For the three surgical procedures, VO2 remained stable, whereas VECO2 and PETCO2 increased in parallel from the 8th to the 10th min after the start of CO2 insufflation. A plateau was reached 10 min later in patients having intraperitoneal insufflation, whereas VECO2 and PETCO2 continued to increase slowly throughout CO2 insufflation during pelviscopy. During pelviscopy, the maximum increase in VECO2 and PETCO2 (76 +/- 5% and 71 +/- 7%) was significantly more pronounced than that observed during cholecystectomy (25 +/- 4% and 25 +/- 4%) and gynecologic laparoscopy (15 +/- 3% and 12 +/- 2%). The authors conclude that CO2 diffusion into the body is more marked during extraperitoneal than during intraperitoneal CO2 insufflation but is not influenced markedly by the duration of intraperitoneal insufflation.

  15. Standard operating procedures for serum and plasma collection: early detection research network consensus statement standard operating procedure integration working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Melissa K; Chan, Daniel W; Chia, David; Godwin, Andrew K; Grizzle, William E; Krueger, Karl E; Rom, William; Sanda, Martin; Sorbara, Lynn; Stass, Sanford; Wang, Wendy; Brenner, Dean E

    2009-01-01

    Specimen collection is an integral component of clinical research. Specimens from subjects with various stages of cancers or other conditions, as well as those without disease, are critical tools in the hunt for biomarkers, predictors, or tests that will detect serious diseases earlier or more readily than currently possible. Analytic methodologies evolve quickly. Access to high-quality specimens, collected and handled in standardized ways that minimize potential bias or confounding factors, is key to the "bench to bedside" aim of translational research. It is essential that standard operating procedures, "the how" of creating the repositories, be defined prospectively when designing clinical trials. Small differences in the processing or handling of a specimen can have dramatic effects in analytical reliability and reproducibility, especially when multiplex methods are used. A representative working group, Standard Operating Procedures Internal Working Group (SOPIWG), comprised of members from across Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) was formed to develop standard operating procedures (SOPs) for various types of specimens collected and managed for our biomarker discovery and validation work. This report presents our consensus on SOPs for the collection, processing, handling, and storage of serum and plasma for biomarker discovery and validation.

  16. Current Techniques of Teaching and Learning in Bariatric Surgical Procedures: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaijser, Mirjam; van Ramshorst, Gabrielle; van Wagensveld, Bart; Pierie, Jean-Pierre

    2017-10-12

    The gastric sleeve resection and gastric bypass are the 2 most commonly performed bariatric procedures. This article provides an overview of current teaching and learning methods of those techniques in resident and fellow training. A database search was performed on Pubmed, Embase, and the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) to identify the methods used to provide training in bariatric surgery worldwide. After exclusion based on titles and abstracts, full texts of the selected articles were assessed. Included articles were reviewed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. In total, 2442 titles were identified and 14 full text articles met inclusion criteria. Four publications described an ex vivo training course, and 6 focused on at least 1 step of the gastric bypass procedure. Two randomized controlled trials (RCT) provided high-quality evidence on training aspects. Surgical coaching caused significant improvement of Bariatric Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (BOSATS) scores (3.60 vs. 3.90, p = 0.017) and reduction of technical errors (18 vs. 10, p = 0.003). A preoperative warm-up increased global rating scales (GRS) scores on depth perception (p = 0.02), bimanual dexterity (p = 0.01), and efficiency of movements (p = 0.03). Stepwise education, surgical coaching, warming up, Internet-based knowledge modules, and ex vivo training courses are effective in relation to bariatric surgical training of residents and fellows, possibly shortening their learning curves. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Patient safety recommendations for out of operating room procedure sedation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal Velasco, D; Romero García, E; Martínez Palli, G; Muñoz Corsini, L; Rey Martínez, M; Postigo Morales, S

    There is an increasing and more complex demand for sedation for procedures out of the operating room. For different reasons, nowadays the administration of sedation varies considerably. We believe that a patient safety approach rather an approach out of corporate or economic interests is desirable. We created a working group of experts within the Spanish Anaesthesia and Reanimation Incident Reporting System (SENSAR) to prepare a series of recommendations through a non-systematic review. These recommendations were validated by an expert panel of 31 anaesthesiologists through two rounds of an adaptation of the Delphi Method where more than 70% agreement was required. The resulting recommendations include previous evaluation, material and staffing needs for sedation for procedures, post-sedation recommendations and activity and quality control advice. We present patient centred recommendations for the safe use of sedation for out of the operating room procedures from the point of view of the professionals with the most experience in its administration. We believe that these can be used as a guide to reduce variability and increase patient safety in the organisation of healthcare. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Patient safety recommendations for out of operating room procedure sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal Velasco, D; Romero García, E; Martínez Palli, G; Muñoz Corsini, L; Rey Martínez, M; Postigo Morales, S

    2016-12-01

    There is an increasing and more complex demand for sedation for procedures out of the operating room. For different reasons, nowadays the administration of sedation varies considerably. We believe that a patient safety approach rather an approach out of corporate or economic interests is desirable. We created a working group of experts within the Spanish Anaesthesia and Reanimation Incident Reporting System (SENSAR) to prepare a series of recommendations through a non-systematic review. These recommendations were validated by an expert panel of 31 anaesthesiologists through two rounds of an adaptation of the Delphi Method where more than 70% agreement was required. The resulting recommendations include previous evaluation, material and staffing needs for sedation for procedures, post-sedation recommendations and activity and quality control advice. We present patient centred recommendations for the safe use of sedation for out of the operating room procedures from the point of view of the professionals with the most experience in its administration. We believe that these can be used as a guide to reduce variability and increase patient safety in the organisation of healthcare. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Current US Military Operations and Implications for Military Surgical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    capture resident experience with diaphragm repair, identification and treatment of rectal injury, and retroper- itoneal hematoma exploration. There are...include genitourinary trauma, intracranial pathology, and skeletal extremity trauma. However, these injuries and proce- dures may fall under the purview...resident) Bowel repair/resection 42 80.1 Negative/procedure not described 30.5 22.8 Retroperitoneal hematoma exploration 15.4 NR Splenectomy 12.8 4.8

  20. Innovative procedure for computer-assisted genioplasty: three-dimensional cephalometry, rapid-prototyping model and surgical splint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, R; Tranduy, K; Reychler, H

    2010-07-01

    The authors present a new procedure of computer-assisted genioplasty. They determined the anterior, posterior and inferior limits of the chin in relation to the skull and face with the newly developed and validated three-dimensional cephalometric planar analysis (ACRO 3D). Virtual planning of the osteotomy lines was carried out with Mimics (Materialize) software. The authors built a three-dimensional rapid-prototyping multi-position model of the chin area from a medical low-dose CT scan. The transfer of virtual information to the operating room consisted of two elements. First, the titanium plates on the 3D RP model were pre-bent. Second, a surgical guide for the transfer of the osteotomy lines and the positions of the screws to the operating room was manufactured. The authors present the first case of the use of this model on a patient. The postoperative results are promising, and the technique is fast and easy-to-use. More patients are needed for a definitive clinical validation of this procedure. Copyright 2010 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Environmental Sciences Division Toxicology Laboratory standard operating procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kszos, L.A.; Stewart, A.J.; Wicker, L.F.; Logsdon, G.M.

    1989-09-01

    This document was developed to provide the personnel working in the Environmental Sciences Division's Toxicology Laboratory with documented methods for conducting toxicity tests. The document consists of two parts. The first part includes the standard operating procedures (SOPs) that are used by the laboratory in conducting toxicity tests. The second part includes reference procedures from the US Environmental Protection Agency document entitled Short-Term Methods for Estimating the Chronic Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater Organisms, upon which the Toxicology Laboratory's SOPs are based. Five of the SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia survival and reproduction test. These SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia food (SOP-3), maintaining Ceriodaphnia cultures (SOP-4), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-13), analyzing the test data (SOP-13), and conducting a Ceriodaphnia reference test (SOP-15). Five additional SOPs relate specifically to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larval survival and growth test: methods for preparing fathead minnow larvae food (SOP-5), maintaining fathead minnow cultures (SOP-6), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-9), analyzing the test data (SOP-12), and conducting a fathead minnow reference test (DOP-14). The six remaining SOPs describe methods that are used with either or both tests: preparation of control/dilution water (SOP-1), washing of glassware (SOP-2), collection and handling of samples (SOP-7), preparation of samples (SOP-8), performance of chemical analyses (SOP-11), and data logging and care of technical notebooks (SOP-16).

  2. "They Have to Adapt to Learn": Surgeons' Perspectives on the Role of Procedural Variation in Surgical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apramian, Tavis; Cristancho, Sayra; Watling, Chris; Ott, Michael; Lingard, Lorelei

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research increasingly acknowledges the existence of significant procedural variation in surgical practice. This study explored surgeons' perspectives regarding the influence of intersurgeon procedural variation on the teaching and learning of surgical residents. This qualitative study used a grounded theory-based analysis of observational and interview data. Observational data were collected in 3 tertiary care teaching hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Semistructured interviews explored potential procedural variations arising during the observations and prompts from an iteratively refined guide. Ongoing data analysis refined the theoretical framework and informed data collection strategies, as prescribed by the iterative nature of grounded theory research. Our sample included 99 hours of observation across 45 cases with 14 surgeons. Semistructured, audio-recorded interviews (n = 14) occurred immediately following observational periods. Surgeons endorsed the use of intersurgeon procedural variations to teach residents about adapting to the complexity of surgical practice and the norms of surgical culture. Surgeons suggested that residents' efforts to identify thresholds of principle and preference are crucial to professional development. Principles that emerged from the study included the following: (1) knowing what comes next, (2) choosing the right plane, (3) handling tissue appropriately, (4) recognizing the abnormal, and (5) making safe progress. Surgeons suggested that learning to follow these principles while maintaining key aspects of surgical culture, like autonomy and individuality, are important social processes in surgical education. Acknowledging intersurgeon variation has important implications for curriculum development and workplace-based assessment in surgical education. Adapting to intersurgeon procedural variations may foster versatility in surgical residents. However, the existence of procedural variations and their active use in surgeons

  3. Comparative rate and risk factors of recurrent urethral stricture during different surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective – to identify the major risk factors leading to worse results of surgical treatment in patients with urethral stricture.Subjects and methods. Two hundred and forty-eight patients with urethral stricture underwent different surgical interventions: internal optical urethrotomy (IOU for strictures of different portions of the urethra in 157 patients (the operation was made once in 121 patients, twice in 24 patients, and thrice or more in 12; replacement urethroplasty using a buccal mucosa graft for strictures of the anterior urethra in 46 patients; Turner-Warwick’s anastomotic urethroplasty modified by Webster for strictures (distraction defects of the posterior urethra in 45 patients. The results of surgical treatment were studied using urethrography, uroflowmetry, urethrocystoscopy, the international prostate symptom score, quality of life (QoL questionnaire, and the international index of erectile function (IIEF questionnaire. The role of risk factors for postoperative recurrent urethral stricture was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses.Results. The rate of recurrent urethral stricture after IOU was 66.9 % (59.5, 87.5, and 100 % after the first, second, third or more subsequent operations, respectively; 12.1 % after all types of urethroplasty, 15.2 % after augmentation urethroplasty, and 8.9 % after anastomotic urethroplasty. The major risk factors of recurrent urethral stricture after IOU were recognized to be the location of urethral stricture in the penile or bulbomembranous portions, a urethral stricture length of > 1 cm, severe urethral lumen narrowing, and performance of 2 or more operations; those after augmentation urethroplasty were previous ineffective treatment, a stricture length of > 4 cm, lichen sclerosus, and smoking; those after anastomotic urethroplasty were previous ineffective treatment, smoking, and a stricture length of > 4 cm.Conclusion. The results of the investigation have shown that only

  4. Comparative rate and risk factors of recurrent urethral stricture during different surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective – to identify the major risk factors leading to worse results of surgical treatment in patients with urethral stricture.Subjects and methods. Two hundred and forty-eight patients with urethral stricture underwent different surgical interventions: internal optical urethrotomy (IOU for strictures of different portions of the urethra in 157 patients (the operation was made once in 121 patients, twice in 24 patients, and thrice or more in 12; replacement urethroplasty using a buccal mucosa graft for strictures of the anterior urethra in 46 patients; Turner-Warwick’s anastomotic urethroplasty modified by Webster for strictures (distraction defects of the posterior urethra in 45 patients. The results of surgical treatment were studied using urethrography, uroflowmetry, urethrocystoscopy, the international prostate symptom score, quality of life (QoL questionnaire, and the international index of erectile function (IIEF questionnaire. The role of risk factors for postoperative recurrent urethral stricture was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses.Results. The rate of recurrent urethral stricture after IOU was 66.9 % (59.5, 87.5, and 100 % after the first, second, third or more subsequent operations, respectively; 12.1 % after all types of urethroplasty, 15.2 % after augmentation urethroplasty, and 8.9 % after anastomotic urethroplasty. The major risk factors of recurrent urethral stricture after IOU were recognized to be the location of urethral stricture in the penile or bulbomembranous portions, a urethral stricture length of > 1 cm, severe urethral lumen narrowing, and performance of 2 or more operations; those after augmentation urethroplasty were previous ineffective treatment, a stricture length of > 4 cm, lichen sclerosus, and smoking; those after anastomotic urethroplasty were previous ineffective treatment, smoking, and a stricture length of > 4 cm.Conclusion. The results of the investigation have shown that only

  5. VERTEBROPLASTY – NEW OPERATIVE PROCEDURE FOR OSTEOPOROTIC VERTEBRAL FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Vengust

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Vertebroplasty is a new minimally invasive operative method used for treatment of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. The aim of vertebroplasty is to diminish pain and to gain the mechanical stability of fractured vertebra.Methods and results. From June to November 2001 vertebroplasty was performed on eleven vertebrae in seven patients. The mean age of patients at the operation was 49 years (24 to 63 years. The mean time interval from injury to operation was 13 days (1 to 30 days. Preoperatively the mean level of pain according to visual analogue scale was 6 (4 to 9, 24 hours after operation the mean pain level was 0 (0 do 1 and three months after the operation 0 (od 0 do 1. In one patient minor leak of bone cement occured into the spinal canal during the procedure. No consequent nevrologic deficit was noted.Conclusions. In all our patients vertebroplasty was followed by total resolution of pain inside the first 24 hours. In the hands of experienced spinal surgeon vertebroplasty proved to be a safe method which enables the patient to proceed with an active lifestyle despite osteoporotic fractures of vertebrae.

  6. TVT-Exact and midurethral sling (SLING-IUFT) operative procedures: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniuliene, Rosita; Aniulis, Povilas; Skaudickas, Darijus

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to compare results, effectiveness and complications of TVT exact and midurethral sling (SLING-IUFT) operations in the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI). A single center nonblind, randomized study of women with SUI who were randomized to TVT-Exact and SLING-IUFT was performed by one surgeon from April 2009 to April 2011. SUI was diagnosed on coughing and Valsalva test and urodynamics (cystometry and uroflowmetry) were assessed before operation and 1 year after surgery. This was a prospective randomized study. The follow up period was 12 months. 76 patients were operated using the TVT-Exact operation and 78 patients - using the SLING-IUFT operation. There was no statistically significant differences between groups for BMI, parity, menopausal status and prolapsed stage (no patients had cystocele greater than stage II). Mean operative time was significantly shorter in the SLING-IUFT group (19 ± 5.6 min.) compared with the TVT-Exact group (27 ± 7.1 min.). There were statistically significant differences in the effectiveness of both procedures: TVT-Exact - at 94.5% and SLING-IUFT - at 61.2% after one year. Hospital stay was statistically significantly shorter in the SLING-IUFT group (1. 2 ± 0.5 days) compared with the TVT-Exact group (3.5 ± 1.5 days). Statistically significantly fewer complications occurred in the SLING-IUFT group. the TVT-Exact and SLING-IUFT operations are both effective for surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence. The SLING-IUFT involved a shorter operation time and lower complications rate., the TVT-Exact procedure had statistically significantly more complications than the SLING-IUFT operation, but a higher effectiveness.

  7. Bleeding control measures during oral and maxillofacial surgical procedures: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini R Akolkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical bleeding can be associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality across all surgical areas. Thus, to avoid complications related to excessive bleeding, numerous products have been developed to achieve hemostasis. The thorough knowledge of these hemostatic measures is required for good results. The aim of the study is to compare the different methods to control bleeding in oral and maxillofacial surgery. An extensive systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, Google search using combination of keywords such as bleeding, bleeding control methods, oral surgery, Gelfoam, vasoconstrictors, Chitosan, Floseal, haemcoagulase, Gelatin Sponge, Suturing, and Cautery. The inclusion criteria for the study were articles in English, articles published between January 1, 1990 to June 30, 2016, studies that provide information about bleeding control procedures, complications during head, neck, and face surgery procedures and hemostatic agent and articles based on observational studies and original articles. Exclusion criteria for the study were studies that provided inadequate information, systemic review, research papers, case reports, letters to editor and studies based on animals other than human beings. Total 11 articles were selected for the analysis which included head, face, and neck procedures with/without using bleeding control measures such as pressure application, suturing, cautery, ligation of blood vessel, application of Ankaferd blood stopper, chitosan, Floseal®, thrombin–gelatin matrix (Tissel®/fibrin glue, Gelfoam, and tranexamic acid. Conventional methods are insufficient to control extensive bleeding. However, newer methods or combinations of these methods are required to achieve adequate hemostasis. All hemostatic measures were not covered in this review.

  8. Work-related operating theatre accidents among surgical residents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information concerning the most recent occupational injury inside the operating theatre revealed that 31(86.1%) of the residents sustained work-related accident in the 6 months preceding the survey, 8(25.8%) of which involved a high risk patient. All of the 8 (100%) of the recent high risk injuries and 22(95.6%) of the ...

  9. Bacteriology of post–operative wound infections in the surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 248 swab specimens from post-operative wounds suspected to be infected were bacteriologically evaluated. Of these, bacterial growth was recorded in 204 specimens (82.3%) while 44 specimens (17.7%) yielded no growth. The bacteria isolated from the samples in decreasing order of prevalence were: ...

  10. The Patterns Of Surgical Thyroid Diseases And Operative Treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Girmaye T. M.D. Assistant professor of surgery,. Mensur 0. M.D. Assistant professor of surgery,. Sentayehu T. M.D. General practitioner,. Sissay B. M.D. Assistant professor of surgery,. Department of surgery, Gondar College .... We would like to acknowledge all surgeons, physicians, interns, nurses and the operation theatre ...

  11. The patterns of surgical thyroid diseases and operative treatment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Goitre is defiied as enlargement of the thyroid gland that normally weighs 25-30g. Methods: This was a retrospective review aimed at determining the incidence, pattern, pathology, ostoperative complications of 137 cases of goitre operated at the Gondar College of Medical sciences, Ethiopia, over a period of ...

  12. The European Stroke Organisation Guidelines: a standard operating procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntaios, George; Bornstein, Natan M; Caso, Valeria; Christensen, Hanne; De Keyser, Jacques; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Diez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Ferro, Jose M; Ford, Gary A; Grau, Armin; Keller, Emanuella; Leys, Didier; Russell, David; Toni, Danilo; Turc, Guillaume; Van der Worp, Bart; Wahlgren, Nils; Steiner, Thorsten

    2015-10-01

    In 2008, the recently founded European Stroke Organisation published its guidelines for the management of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. This highly cited document was translated in several languages and was updated in 2009. Since then, the European Stroke Organisation has published guidelines for the management of intracranial aneurysms and subarachnoidal hemorrhage, for the establishment of stroke units and stroke centers, and recently for the management of intracerebral hemorrhage. In recent years, the methodology for the development of guidelines has evolved significantly. To keep pace with this progress and driven by the strong determination of the European Stroke Organisation to further promote stroke management, education, and research, the European Stroke Organisation decided to delineate a detailed standard operating procedure for its guidelines. There are two important cornerstones in this standard operating procedure: The first is the implementation of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology for the development of its Guideline Documents. The second one is the decision of the European Stroke Organisation to move from the classical model of a single Guideline Document about a major topic (e.g. management of ischemic stroke) to focused modules (i.e. subdivisions of a major topic). This will enable the European Stroke Organisation to react faster when new developments in a specific stroke field occur and update its recommendations on the related module rather swiftly; with the previous approach of a single large Guideline Document, its entire revision had to be completed before an updated publication, delaying the production of up-to-date guidelines. After discussion within the European Stroke Organisation Guidelines Committee and significant input from European Stroke Organisation members as well as methodologists and analysts, this document presents the official standard operating procedure for

  13. An operational procedure for rapid flood risk assessment in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dottori

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of methods for rapid flood mapping and risk assessment is a key step to increase the usefulness of flood early warning systems and is crucial for effective emergency response and flood impact mitigation. Currently, flood early warning systems rarely include real-time components to assess potential impacts generated by forecasted flood events. To overcome this limitation, this study describes the benchmarking of an operational procedure for rapid flood risk assessment based on predictions issued by the European Flood Awareness System (EFAS. Daily streamflow forecasts produced for major European river networks are translated into event-based flood hazard maps using a large map catalogue derived from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations. Flood hazard maps are then combined with exposure and vulnerability information, and the impacts of the forecasted flood events are evaluated in terms of flood-prone areas, economic damage and affected population, infrastructures and cities.An extensive testing of the operational procedure has been carried out by analysing the catastrophic floods of May 2014 in Bosnia–Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia. The reliability of the flood mapping methodology is tested against satellite-based and report-based flood extent data, while modelled estimates of economic damage and affected population are compared against ground-based estimations. Finally, we evaluate the skill of risk estimates derived from EFAS flood forecasts with different lead times and combinations of probabilistic forecasts. Results highlight the potential of the real-time operational procedure in helping emergency response and management.

  14. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis: Case-series of two different surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Shirani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introducation: The long-term outcome and clinical results of gaparthroplasty used for the treatment of condylar ankylosis of the mandible in children with application of postoperative activator appliances and costochondral rib graft are evaluated and compared. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of gap arthroplasty and costochondral graft methods on reankylosis, a mount of mouth opening and growth. Materials and Methods: A non-randomized, retrospective clinical study of l0 cases (5-12 years old of condylar ankylosis of the mandible, surgically treated during a 10 year period from 2002 to 2012 was performed. Four patients were treated by condylectomy and interpositional flap, whereas six were treated by condylectomy and immediate costachondral rib grafts. The first group underwent long-term postoperative therapy using removable activator appliances. Casts, radiographs, photographs, and computed tomography (CT were used post surgically to evaluate rib graft, condylar growth and function, occlusion, facial, and condylar symmetry. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16 statistical software using Mann-Whitney, Paired T-test and Chi-square tests. Results: Children with long-standing condylar ankylosis of the mandible treated by condylectomy and interpositional flap showed more favorably when activators were used post-surgically. Conclusions: Gaparthroplasty with functional activator post-operatively can be considering for TMJ ankylosis.

  15. Intra-operative blood transfusion among adult surgical patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This retrospective study was designed to audit the pattern of intra-operative whole blood transfusion among adult surgical patients over a two-year period. Data were collected on the rate of intra-operative transfusion, estimated blood loss, units of donor blood transfused, pattern of use of autologous blood and circumstances ...

  16. An audit of the quality of surgical operation notes in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Operation note records are important tools for ensuring patients' continuity of care, for research purposes and medico-legal reasons. They can effectively serve these purposes only if well documented. The main objective of this study was to assess the practice of recording the operation notes among surgical ...

  17. Is there an increased risk of post-operative surgical site infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is dilemma as to whether patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) requiring implant orthopaedic surgery are at an increased risk for post-operative surgical site infection (SSI). We conducted a systematic review to determine the effect of HIV on the risk of post-operative SSI and ...

  18. Operability test procedure for PFP wastewater sampling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Document provides instructions for performing the Operability Test of the 225-WC Wastewater Sampling Station which monitors the discharge to the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility from the Plutonium Finishing Plant. This Operability Test Procedure (OTP) has been prepared to verify correct configuration and performance of the PFP Wastewater sampling system installed in Building 225-WC located outside the perimeter fence southeast of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The objective of this test is to ensure the equipment in the sampling facility operates in a safe and reliable manner. The sampler consists of two Manning Model S-5000 units which are rate controlled by the Milltronics Ultrasonic flowmeter at manhole No.C4 and from a pH measuring system with the sensor in the stream adjacent to the sample point. The intent of the dual sampling system is to utilize one unit to sample continuously at a rate proportional to the wastewater flow rate so that the aggregate tests are related to the overall flow and thereby eliminate isolated analyses. The second unit will only operate during a high or low pH excursion of the stream (hence the need for a pH control). The major items in this OTP include testing of the Manning Sampler System and associated equipment including the pH measuring and control system, the conductivity monitor, and the flow meter

  19. Health risks associated with exposure to surgical smoke for surgeons and operation room personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoshi, Kae; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi; Kinoshita, Koichi; Tomizawa, Yasuko; Hasegawa, Suguru; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2015-08-01

    Although surgical smoke contains potentially hazardous substances, such as cellular material, blood fragments, microorganisms, toxic gases and vapors, many operating rooms (ORs) do not provide protection from exposure to it. This article reviews the hazards of surgical smoke and the means of protecting OR personnel. Our objectives are to promote surgeons' acceptance to adopt measures to minimize the hazards. Depending on its components, surgical smoke can increase the risk of acute and chronic pulmonary conditions, cause acute headaches; irritation and soreness of the eyes, nose and throat; dermatitis and colic. Transmission of infectious disease may occur if bacterial or viral fragments present in the smoke are inhaled. The presence of carcinogens in surgical smoke and their mutagenic effects are also of concern. This review summarizes previously published reports and data regarding the toxic components of surgical smoke, the possible adverse effects on the health of operating room personnel and measures that can be used to minimize exposure to prevent respiratory problems. To reduce the hazards, surgical smoke should be removed by an evacuation system. Surgeons should assess the potential dangers of surgical smoke and encourage the use of evacuation devices to minimize potential health hazards to both themselves and other OR personnel.

  20. Operational procedure standard for occurrences involving radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piekarz, Leonardo, E-mail: leonardopbm@yahoo.com.br [Academia de Bombeiros Militar de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rezende, Talita C.; Pinheiro, Christiano J.G., E-mail: talitacolombi@yahoo.com, E-mail: christrieste@yahoo.it [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (CCA/UFES), Alegre, ES (Brazil). Programa de Pós-Graduação em Engenharia Química

    2017-07-01

    This study has as objective to analyze more deeply the actions of response to emergencies involving radioactive materials, in the intent to establish a pattern to the actions performed by the military fire fighters of the Military Fire Brigade of Minas Gerais. To met these goals, it has been attempted to analyze the procedures utilized and recommended, nowadays, for the military fire fighters of CBMMG, and through directed studies, to suggest new actions possible to be executed in the local of the emergency in a way that will not expose the garrison to doses of ionizing radiation that may prejudice them. It is a study of bibliographic, exploratory, and also descriptive nature, realized through a qualitative approach. The techniques used for the research were the analysis of institutional documents, norms and other literature produced by renamed entities in the radiologic and biosafety areas. It was then concluded that CBMMG, through simple actions of response, can provide higher quality and safety in the operations involving radiologic accidents, standing out that the implemented actions nowadays are very beneath the capacity of the corporation, due to the lack of knowledge of the matter by the fire fighters. It was proposed, then, that new actions be implemented and instituted as operational procedures to be used on those emergencies, with the objective of provide a higher safety and professionalism in the attendance to emergencies involving radioactive materials. (author)

  1. Operational procedure standard for occurrences involving radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piekarz, Leonardo; Rezende, Talita C.; Pinheiro, Christiano J.G.

    2017-01-01

    This study has as objective to analyze more deeply the actions of response to emergencies involving radioactive materials, in the intent to establish a pattern to the actions performed by the military fire fighters of the Military Fire Brigade of Minas Gerais. To met these goals, it has been attempted to analyze the procedures utilized and recommended, nowadays, for the military fire fighters of CBMMG, and through directed studies, to suggest new actions possible to be executed in the local of the emergency in a way that will not expose the garrison to doses of ionizing radiation that may prejudice them. It is a study of bibliographic, exploratory, and also descriptive nature, realized through a qualitative approach. The techniques used for the research were the analysis of institutional documents, norms and other literature produced by renamed entities in the radiologic and biosafety areas. It was then concluded that CBMMG, through simple actions of response, can provide higher quality and safety in the operations involving radiologic accidents, standing out that the implemented actions nowadays are very beneath the capacity of the corporation, due to the lack of knowledge of the matter by the fire fighters. It was proposed, then, that new actions be implemented and instituted as operational procedures to be used on those emergencies, with the objective of provide a higher safety and professionalism in the attendance to emergencies involving radioactive materials. (author)

  2. Reduction of operative mortality after implementation of Surgical Outcomes Monitoring and Improvement Programme by Hong Kong Hospital Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, W C; Wong, K; Cheung, Y S; Lai, P Bs

    2018-04-01

    Since 2008, the Hong Kong Hospital Authority has implemented a Surgical Outcomes Monitoring and Improvement Programme (SOMIP) at 17 public hospitals with surgical departments. This study aimed to assess the change in operative mortality rate after implementation of SOMIP. The SOMIP included all Hospital Authority patients undergoing major/ultra-major procedures in general surgery, urology, plastic surgery, and paediatric surgery. Patients undergoing liver or renal transplantation or who had multiple trauma or massive bowel ischaemia were excluded. In SOMIP, data retrieval from the Hospital Authority patient database was performed by six full-time nurse reviewers following a set of precise data definitions. A total of 230 variables were collected for each patient, on demographics, preoperative and operative variables, laboratory test results, and postoperative complications up to 30 days after surgery. In this study, we used SOMIP cumulative 5-year data to generate risk-adjusted 30-day mortality models by hierarchical logistic regression for both emergency and elective operations. The models expressed overall performance as an annual observed-to-expected mortality ratio. From 2009/2010 to 2015/2016, the overall crude mortality rate decreased from 10.8% to 5.6% for emergency procedures and from 0.9% to 0.4% for elective procedures. From 2011/2012 to 2015/2016, the risk-adjusted observed-to-expected mortality ratios showed a significant downward trend for both emergency and elective operations: from 1.126 to 0.796 and from 1.150 to 0.859, respectively (Mann- Kendall statistic = -0.8; PAuthority's overall crude mortality rates and risk-adjusted observed-to-expected mortality ratios for emergency and elective operations significantly declined after SOMIP was implemented.

  3. ProSeal laryngeal mask airway: An alternative to endotracheal intubation in paediatric patients for short duration surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Lalwani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The laryngeal mask airway (LMA is a supraglottic airway management device. The LMA is preferred for airway management in paediatric patients for short duration surgical procedures. The recently introduced ProSeal (PLMA, a modification of Classic LMA, has a gastric drainage tube placed lateral to main airway tube which allows the regurgitated gastric contents to bypass the glottis and prevents the pulmonary aspiration. This study was done to compare the efficacy of ProSeal LMA with an endotracheal tube in paediatric patients with respect to number of attempts for placement of devices, haemodynamic responses and perioperative respiratory complications. Sixty children, ASA I and II, weighing 10-20 kg between 2 and 8 years of age group of either sex undergoing elective ophthalmological and lower abdominal surgeries of 30-60 min duration, randomly divided into two groups of 30 patients each were studied. The number of attempts for endotracheal intubation was less than the placement of PLMA. Haemodynamic responses were significantly higher (P<0.05 after endotracheal intubation as compared to the placement of PLMA. There were no significant differences in mean SpO 2 (% and EtCO 2 levels recorded at different time intervals between the two groups. The incidence of post-operative respiratory complications cough and bronchospasm was higher after extubation than after removal of PLMA. The incidence of soft tissue trauma was noted to be higher for PLMA after its removal. There were no incidences of aspiration and hoarseness/sore throat in either group. It is concluded that ProSeal LMA can be safely considered as a suitable and effective alternative to endotracheal intubation in paediatric patients for short duration surgical procedures.

  4. A virtual reality interface for pre-planning of surgical operations based on a customized model of the patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Lenar, Janusz; Sitnik, Robert; Verdonschot, Nico

    2012-03-01

    We present a human-computer interface that enables the operator to plan a surgical procedure on the musculoskeletal (MS) model of the patient's lower limbs, send the modified model to the bio-mechanical analysis module, and export the scenario parameters to the surgical navigation system. The interface provides the operator with tools for: importing customized MS model of the patient, cutting bones and manipulating/removal of bony fragments, repositioning muscle insertion points, muscle removal and placing implants. After planning the operator exports the modified MS model for bio-mechanical analysis of the functional outcome. If the simulation result is satisfactory the exported scenario data may be directly used during the actual surgery. The advantages of the developed interface are the possibility of installing it in various hardware configurations and coherent operation regardless of the devices used. The hardware configurations proposed to be used with the interface are: (a) a standard computer keyboard and mouse, and a 2-D display, (b) a touch screen as a single device for both input and output, or (c) a 3-D display and a haptic device for natural manipulation of 3-D objects. The interface may be utilized in two main fields. Experienced surgeons may use it to simulate their intervention plans and prepare input data for a surgical navigation system while student or novice surgeons can use it for simulating results of their hypothetical procedure. The interface has been developed in the TLEMsafe project (www.tlemsafe.eu) funded by the European Commission FP7 program.

  5. Application of laparoscopy in the combined surgical procedures of gynecological and digestive disorders in obese women: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Zhou, Ailing; Fan, Min; Li, Ping; Qi, Shengwei; Gao, Licai; Li, Xiujuan; Zhao, Jinrong

    2015-04-01

    Laparoscopy surgery has been widely used for many decades and combined laparoscopic procedures have become favorable choices for concomitant pathologies in the abdomen. However, the type of combination procedures and their safety in obese women have not been well elucidated in obese women. Here we retrospectively reported 147 obese women underwent combined laparoscopic gynecological surgery and cholecystectomy/appendicectomy in our hospital from January 2003 to December 2011. Of the total number of patients (n = 147), various laparoscopic gynecological surgeries were combined with laparoscopic cholecystectomy in 93 patients, and were combined with laparoscopic appendectomy in the rest 54 patients. Patients' ages ranged from 24 to 55 years with an average of 33 years. Our results showed that combined procedures caused various operative time and blood loss, with no difference considering the time to resume oral intake and length of hospital stay. Intraoperative complications occurred in a total of 7 patients (4.8%). None of the patients suffered from major complications after laparoscopic surgery, and minor postoperative complications occurred in 30 patients (20.4%). The follow-up period ranged from 6 to 24 months (average, 18.5 months). None of the patients developed complications during follow-up, except that one patient suffered from colporrhagia. Our results further suggest that the combined abdominal laparoscopic procedures of gynecologic and general surgery are safe and economic choices for obese women, and benefit patients in many ways including lesser pain, shorter hospital stays and earlier recovery. Copyright © 2015 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Applicability of the Clavien-Dindo classification to emergency surgical procedures: a retrospective cohort study on 444 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentula, Panu J; Leppäniemi, Ari K

    2014-01-01

    Patients undergoing emergency surgery have a high risk for surgical complications and death. The Clavien-Dindo classification has been developed and validated in elective general surgical patients, but has not been validated in emergency surgical patients. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications in emergency surgical patients and to study preoperative factors for risk stratification that should be included into a database of surgical complications. A cohort of 444 consecutive patients having emergency general surgery during a three-month period was retrospectively analyzed. Surgical complications were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Preoperative risk factors for complications were studied using logistic regression analysis. Preoperatively 37 (8.3%) patients had organ dysfunctions. Emergency surgical patients required a new definition for Grade IV complications (organ dysfunctions). Only new onset organ dysfunctions or complications that significantly contributed to worsening of pre-operative organ dysfunctions were classified as grade IV complications. Postoperative complications developed in 115 (25.9%) patients, and 14 (3.2%) patients developed grade IV complication. Charlson comorbidity index, preoperative organ dysfunction and the type of surgery predicted postoperative complications. The Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications can be used in emergency surgical patients but preoperative organ dysfunctions should be taken into account when defining postoperative grade IV complications. For risk stratification patients' comorbidities, preoperative organ dysfunctions and the type of surgery should be taken into consideration.

  7. A comparative study on the efficacy of a commercial fibrin adhesive (Tisseel® vis-à-vis silk suture on wound closure following periodontal surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manimegalai A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of fibrin adhesive sealant (Tisseel® , a human biological tissue adhesive, as compared to conventional suture placement in pocket elimination and mucogingival surgical procedures. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 25 patients (10 male and 15 female patients, in the age group of 25-40 years, with localized periodontitis in relation to the anterior region of the maxilla and mandible. They were divided into three surgical groups: Group I, Group II and Group III. Each of these groups was further divided into control and experimental groups. In all the control groups, the flaps/grafts were approximated with 4-0 black braided silk. In the experimental groups, the flaps/grafts were approximated with fibrin adhesive sealant (Tisseel; . Clinical parameters were taken pre-operatively.operatively and post-operatively on the 1 st , 2 nd , 3 rd , 7 th , and 10 th , day. Results: The Fibrin Adhesive System (FAS showed superior results in all the parameters measured, i.e., hemostasis, fixation of tissues, reduction in plaque and gingival index and probing depth postoperatively. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that periodontal surgery using FAS enhances various periodontal regenerative surgical procedures.

  8. Early and Late Results of the Nuss Procedure in Surgical Treatment of Pectus Excavatum in Different Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Krystian; Gąsiorowski, Łukasz; Gabryel, Piotr; Gałęcki, Bartłomiej; Zieliński, Paweł; Dyszkiewicz, Wojciech

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was a comparison of early and late results in surgical treatment of funnel chest using the Nuss method in patients in various age groups to find the optimal age to perform the corrective procedure. Six hundred eighty patients operated on from June 2002 to October 2012 were included in the retrospective analysis. Patients were divided into 3 different age groups: group A = 156 patients from 7 to 14 years, group B = 328 patients aged 15 to 20 years, and group C = 196 patients older than 20 years of age. The mean follow-up was 33 months. Early non-life-threatening complications developed in 238 (35.0%) patients and frequency increased with age (group A, 24.3%; group B, 37.8%; group C, 38.8%; p = 0.0063). Good and very good corrective effects were achieved in 97.7 % of the entire patient population. Recurrence of the deformity was observed more often in younger patients (group A, 3.2 %) than in the other patients (group B, 1.2%; group C, 1.5%), although the difference between the studied groups was not significant (p = 0.3251). Good cosmetic results obtained with the use of the Nuss operation were not related to the age of the patients. The high incidence of minor complications in older patients seems to be an acceptable cost of a good cosmetic outcome and stable correction. Surgical morbidity is lowest in younger patients; however, the frequency of the recurrence of deformation is higher than in other groups. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Distribution of emergency operations and trauma in a Swedish hospital: need for reorganisation of acute surgical care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    al-Ayoubi Fawzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subspecialisation within general surgery has today reached further than ever. However, on-call time, an unchanged need for broad surgical skills are required to meet the demands of acute surgical disease and trauma. The introduction of a new subspecialty in North America that deals solely with acute care surgery and trauma is an attempt to offer properly trained surgeons also during on-call time. To find out whether such a subspecialty could be helpful in Sweden we analyzed our workload for emergency surgery and trauma. Methods Linköping University Hospital serves a population of 257 000. Data from 2010 for all patients, diagnoses, times and types of operations, surgeons involved, duration of stay, types of injury and deaths regarding emergency procedures were extracted from a prospectively-collected database and analyzed. Results There were 2362 admissions, 1559 emergency interventions; 835 were mainly abdominal operations, and 724 diagnostic or therapeutic endoscopies. Of the 1559 emergency interventions, 641 (41.1% were made outside office hours, and of 453 minor or intermediate procedures (including appendicectomy, cholecystectomy, or proctological procedures 276 (60.9% were done during the evenings or at night. Two hundred and fifty-four patients were admitted with trauma and 29 (11.4% required operation, of whom general surgeons operated on eight (3.1%. Thirteen consultants and 11 senior registrars were involved in 138 bowel resections and 164 cholecystectomies chosen as index operations for standard emergency surgery. The median (range number of such operations done by each consultant was 6 (3–17 and 6 (1–22. Corresponding figures for senior registrars were 7 (0–11 and 8 (1–39. Conclusion There was an uneven distribution of exposure to acute surgical problems and trauma among general surgeons. Some were exposed to only a few standard emergency interventions and most surgeons did not operate on a single patient

  10. Distribution of emergency operations and trauma in a Swedish hospital: need for reorganisation of acute surgical care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Ayoubi, Fawzi; Eriksson, Helen; Myrelid, Pär; Wallon, Conny; Andersson, Peter

    2012-09-17

    Subspecialisation within general surgery has today reached further than ever. However, on-call time, an unchanged need for broad surgical skills are required to meet the demands of acute surgical disease and trauma. The introduction of a new subspecialty in North America that deals solely with acute care surgery and trauma is an attempt to offer properly trained surgeons also during on-call time. To find out whether such a subspecialty could be helpful in Sweden we analyzed our workload for emergency surgery and trauma. Linköping University Hospital serves a population of 257 000. Data from 2010 for all patients, diagnoses, times and types of operations, surgeons involved, duration of stay, types of injury and deaths regarding emergency procedures were extracted from a prospectively-collected database and analyzed. There were 2362 admissions, 1559 emergency interventions; 835 were mainly abdominal operations, and 724 diagnostic or therapeutic endoscopies. Of the 1559 emergency interventions, 641 (41.1%) were made outside office hours, and of 453 minor or intermediate procedures (including appendicectomy, cholecystectomy, or proctological procedures) 276 (60.9%) were done during the evenings or at night. Two hundred and fifty-four patients were admitted with trauma and 29 (11.4%) required operation, of whom general surgeons operated on eight (3.1%). Thirteen consultants and 11 senior registrars were involved in 138 bowel resections and 164 cholecystectomies chosen as index operations for standard emergency surgery. The median (range) number of such operations done by each consultant was 6 (3-17) and 6 (1-22). Corresponding figures for senior registrars were 7 (0-11) and 8 (1-39). There was an uneven distribution of exposure to acute surgical problems and trauma among general surgeons. Some were exposed to only a few standard emergency interventions and most surgeons did not operate on a single patient with trauma. Further centralization of trauma care, long

  11. Visual spatial ability for surgical trainees: implications for learning endoscopic, laparoscopic surgery and other image-guided procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Patrick; Gallagher, Anthony G; Nugent, Emmeline; Seymour, Neal E; Haluck, Randy S; Hseino, Hazem; Traynor, Oscar; Neary, Paul C

    2018-02-12

    In image-guided procedures, a high level of visual spatial ability may be an advantage for surgical trainees. We assessed the visual spatial ability of surgical trainees. Two hundred and thirty-nine surgical trainees and 61 controls were tested on visual spatial ability using 3 standardised tests, the Card Rotation, Cube Comparison and Map-Planning Tests. Two hundred and twenty-one, 236 and 236 surgical trainees and 61 controls completed the Card Rotation test, Cube Comparison test and Map-Planning test, respectively. Two percent of surgical trainees performed statistically significantly worse than their peers on card rotation and map-planning test, > 1% on Cube Comparison test. Surgical trainees performed statistically significantly better than controls on all tests. Two percent of surgical trainees performed statistically significantly worse than their peers on visual spatial ability. The implication of this finding is unclear, further research is required that can look at the learning and educational portfolios of these trainees who perform poorly on visual spatial ability, and ascertain if they are struggling to learn skills for image-guided procedures.

  12. [Implementation of a post-discharge surgical site infection system in herniorrhaphy and mastectomy procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Juan Sanz, Isabel; Díaz-Agero-Pérez, Cristina; Robustillo-Rodela, Ana; Pita López, María José; Oliva Iñiguez, Lourdes; Monge-Jodrá, Vicente

    2014-10-01

    Monitoring surgical site infection (SSI) performed during hospitalization can underestimate its rates due to the shortening in hospital stay. The aim of this study was to determine the actual rates of SSI using a post-discharge monitoring system. All patients who underwent herniorraphy or mastectomy in the Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal from 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2011 were included. SSI data were collected prospectively according to the continuous quality improvement indicators (Indicadores Clinicos de Mejora Continua de la Calidad [INCLIMECC]) monitoring system. Post-discharge follow-up was conducted by telephone survey. A total of 409patients were included in the study, of whom 299 underwent a herniorraphy procedure, and 110 underwent a mastectomy procedure. For herniorrhaphy, the SSI rate increased from 6.02% to 7.6% (the post-discharge survey detected 21.7% of SSI). For mastectomy, the SSI rate increased from 1.8% to 3.6% (the post-discharge survey detected 50% of SSI). Post-discharge monitoring showed an increased detection of SSI incidence. Post-discharge monitoring is useful to analyze the real trend of SSI, and evaluate improvement actions. Post-discharge follow-up methods need to standardised. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  13. Autologous fibrin sealant (Vivostat®) in the neurosurgical practice: Part I: Intracranial surgical procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Francesca; Certo, Francesco; Basile, Luigi; Maugeri, Rosario; Grasso, Giovanni; Meccio, Flavia; Ganau, Mario; Iacopino, Domenico G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hemorrhages, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula and infections are the most challenging postoperative complications in Neurosurgery. In this study, we report our preliminary results using a fully autologous fibrin sealant agent, the Vivostat® system, in achieving hemostasis and CSF leakage repair during cranio-cerebral procedures. Methods: From January 2012 to March 2014, 77 patients were studied prospectively and data were collected and analyzed. Autologous fibrin sealant, taken from patient's blood, was prepared with the Vivostat® system and applied on the resection bed or above the dura mater to achieve hemostasis and dural sealing. The surgical technique, time to bleeding control and associated complications were recorded. Results: A total of 79 neurosurgical procedures have been performed on 77 patients. In the majority of cases (98%) the same autologous fibrin glue provided rapid hemostasis and dural sealing. No patient developed allergic reactions or systemic complications in association with its application. There were no cases of cerebral hematoma, swelling, infection, or epileptic seizures after surgery whether in the immediate or in late period follow-up. Conclusions: In this preliminary study, the easy and direct application of autologous fibrin sealant agent helped in controlling cerebral bleeding and in providing prompt and efficient dural sealing with resolution of CSF leaks. Although the use of autologous fibrin glue seems to be safe, easy, and effective, further investigations are strongly recommended to quantify real advantages and potential limitations. PMID:25984391

  14. Standard Operating Procedures for Female Genital Sexual Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugl-Meyer, Kerstin S; Bohm-Starke, Nina; Damsted Petersen, Christina

    2012-01-01

    and psychological disorders are highlighted, and different somatic and psychological assessment and treatment modalities are discussed. Methods.  The Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) committee was composed of a chair and five additional experts. No corporate funding or remuneration was received. The authors...... therapeutic interventions. However, this international expert group will recommend guidelines for management of female GSP. Conclusions.  GSP disorders are complex. It is recommended that their evaluation and treatment are performed through comprehensive somato-psychological multidisciplinary approach. Fugl......Introduction.  Female genital sexual pain (GSP) is a common, distressing complaint in women of all ages that is underrecognized and undertreated. Definitions and terminology for female GSP are currently being debated. While some authors have suggested that GSP is not per se a sexual dysfunction...

  15. Quality assurance: Importance of systems and standard operating procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghani, Kishu

    2011-01-01

    It is mandatory for sponsors of clinical trials and contract research organizations alike to establish, manage and monitor their quality control and quality assurance systems and their integral standard operating procedures and other quality documents to provide high-quality products and services to fully satisfy customer needs and expectations. Quality control and quality assurance systems together constitute the key quality systems. Quality control and quality assurance are parts of quality management. Quality control is focused on fulfilling quality requirements, whereas quality assurance is focused on providing confidence that quality requirements are fulfilled. The quality systems must be commensurate with the Company business objectives and business model. Top management commitment and its active involvement are critical in order to ensure at all times the adequacy, suitability, effectiveness and efficiency of the quality systems. Effective and efficient quality systems can promote timely registration of drugs by eliminating waste and the need for rework with overall financial and social benefits to the Company.

  16. Post-operative pain and anxiety related to dental procedures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, O; Parekh, S; Ashley, P; Anand, P

    2013-12-01

    To determine post-operative pain in children following treatment in the dental chair and its relation to dental anxiety. A group of 125 children, aged 5 to 18 years, attending for dental treatment had their pain recorded post-operatively using the revised version of the Faces Pain Scale (FPS-R) and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Baseline anxiety scores were also recorded using the Modified Child Dental Anxiety Scale (faces) (MCDASf). The mean MCDASf score was 20.1. Post-operative pain was reported in 62% of children at 2 hours, 51% at 4, and 47% at 6 hours. The surgical subgroup reported the most pain (79%), whereas the conservative treatment for primary teeth group reported the least pain (37%). Anxious patients (MCDASf > = 17) were more likely to report pain than less anxious patients at 2 (p=0.02) and 6 (p=0.03) hours post-operatively. Dental procedures are associated with post-operative pain in children. Anxious patients are more likely to report pain.

  17. Clinical experience with interactive teleconsultation and teleassistance in craniomaxillofacial surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A; Millesi, W; Watzinger, F; Truppe, M; Rasse, M; Enislidis, G; Kermer, C; Ewers, R

    1999-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical value and feasibility of surgical telenavigation and teleassistance technology in the field of craniomaxillofacial surgery. The technology is based on the principles of augmented reality environment technology and remote stereotactic visualization. A consultant surgeon in a remote location receives video, audio, and stereotactic navigation data from the operation site almost in real-time and, using a head-mounted display, is emerged in the surgical augmented reality environment. By telepresence or teleconsultation, the composite images and superimposed graphics (instruments, target structures, landmarks, contours) can be seen and discussed in connected clinics with the possibility of interactive manipulation and assistance. Interactive teleassistance was used in 27 cases of various types craniomaxillofacial surgery. The principles of computer-aided telenavigation were applied successfully. Technical problems in 6 cases did not cause a breakdown of overall system performance. Teleconsultation with remote experts is a useful tool, although some shortcomings exist. The financial and personal effort involved is considerable.

  18. Three-dimensional patient-specific cardiac model for surgical planning in Nikaidoh procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Israel; Gomez, Gorka; Gonzalez, Antonio; Suarez-Mejias, Cristina; Adsuar, Alejandro; Coserria, Jose Felix; Uribe, Sergio; Gomez-Cia, Tomas; Hosseinpour, Amir Reza

    2015-04-01

    To explore the use of three-dimensional patient-specific cardiovascular models using rapid prototyping techniques (fused deposition modelling) to improve surgical planning in patients with complex congenital heart disease. Rapid prototyping techniques are used to print accurate three-dimensional replicas of patients' cardiovascular anatomy based on magnetic resonance images using computer-aided design systems. Models are printed using a translucent polylactic acid polymer. As a proof of concept, a model of the heart of a 1.5-year-old boy with transposition of the great arteries, ventricular septal defect and pulmonary stenosis was constructed to help planning the surgical correction. The cardiac model allowed the surgeon to evaluate the location and dimensions of the ventricular septal defect as well as its relationship with the aorta and pulmonary artery. Cardiovascular models constructed by rapid prototyping techniques are extremely helpful for planning corrective surgery in patients with complex congenital malformations. Therefore they may potentially reduce operative time and morbi-mortality.

  19. Operating Room Efficiency before and after Entrance in a Benchmarking Program for Surgical Process Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedron, Sara; Winter, Vera; Oppel, Eva-Maria

    2017-01-01

    Operating room (OR) efficiency continues to be a high priority for hospitals. In this context the concept of benchmarking has gained increasing importance as a means to improve OR performance. The aim of this study was to investigate whether and how participation in a benchmarking and reporting...... program for surgical process data was associated with a change in OR efficiency, measured through raw utilization, turnover times, and first-case tardiness. The main analysis is based on panel data from 202 surgical departments in German hospitals, which were derived from the largest database for surgical...... process data in Germany. Panel regression modelling was applied. Results revealed no clear and univocal trend of participation in a benchmarking and reporting program for surgical process data. The largest trend was observed for first-case tardiness. In contrast to expectations, turnover times showed...

  20. Unsupervised procedures by surgical trainees: a windfall for private insurance at the expense of graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Ara J; Deckelbaum, Dan L; Madan, Atul K; McKenney, Mark G

    2011-01-01

    Surgical faculty cannot always be present while trainees perform minor procedures. Fees are not obtained for these unsupervised services because Medicare rules do not allow residents and fellows to bill. Medicare already supplements hospitals via medical education funds and thus reimbursement for trainee services would constitute double billing. Private insurance companies, however, do not supplement trainees' salaries and thus benefit when they are not charged for these procedures. The objective is to determine whether significant revenue is lost to private insurers for unsupervised procedures performed by surgical trainees. We retrospectively evaluated a prospective database of procedures performed by residents and fellows from March 1998 through 2007. All procedures were entered by the trainees into a computerized electronic note system. Unsupervised procedures were not billed to insurance carriers. During the study period, 14,497 minor procedures were performed without attending supervision, of which 13,343 had valid current procedural terminology codes. Total charges for these procedures would have been $10,096,931. For patients with private insurance companies (PICs), $6,876,000 could have been billed. Using our historic collection ratios, $2,269,083 in revenue was lost, or $232,726 annually. Trainees perform a significant number of unsupervised procedures on patients with private insurance without charge. This pro bono service represents a significant amount of lost income for teaching institutions. Private insurance companies benefit financially from Medicare billing regulations without contributing to education. Billing for these services might help offset the costs of graduate medical education.

  1. Surgical Procedures for External Auditory Canal Carcinoma and the Preservation of Postoperative Hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Hoshikawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma of the external auditory canal (EAC is an unusual head and neck malignancy. The pathophysiology of these tumors is different from other skin lesions because of their anatomical and functional characteristics. Early-stage carcinoma of the EAC can be generally cured by surgical treatment, and reconstruction of the EAC with a tympanoplasty can help to retain hearing, thus improving the patients’ quality of life. In this study, we present two cases of early-stage carcinoma of the EAC treated by canal reconstruction using skin grafts after lateral temporal bone resection. A rolled-up skin graft with a temporal muscle flap was useful for keeping the form and maintaining the postoperative hearing. An adequate size of the skin graft and blood supply to the graft bed are important for achieving a successful operation.

  2. Operational limits and conditions and operating procedures for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the Agency's programme for establishing safety standards relating to nuclear power plants. The present Safety Guide supersedes the IAEA Safety Guide on Operational Limits and Conditions for Nuclear Power Plants which was issued in 1979 as Safety Series No. 50-SG-O3. For a nuclear power plant to be operated in a safe manner, the provisions made in the final design and subsequent modifications shall be reflected in limitations on plant operating parameters and in the requirements on plant equipment and personnel. Under the responsibility of the operating organization, these shall be developed during the design safety evaluation as a set of operational limits and conditions (OLCs). A major contribution to compliance with the OLCs is made by the development and utilization of operating procedures (OPs) that are consistent with and fully implement the OLCs. The requirements for the OLCs and OPs are established in Section 5 of the IAEA Safety Requirements publication Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, which this Safety Guide supplements. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance on the development, content and implementation of OLCs and OPs. The Safety Guide is directed at both regulators and owners/operators. This Safety Guide covers the concept of OLCs, their content as applicable to land based stationary power plants with thermal neutron reactors, and the responsibilities of the operating organization regarding their establishment, modification, compliance and documentation. The OPs to support the implementation of the OLCs and to ensure their observance are also within the scope of this Safety Guide. The particular aspects of the procedures for maintenance, surveillance, in-service inspection and other safety related activities in connection with the safe operation of nuclear power plants are outside the scope of this Safety Guide but can be found in other IAEA Safety Guides. Section 2 indicates the

  3. Operational limits and conditions and operating procedures for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the Agency's programme for establishing safety standards relating to nuclear power plants. The present Safety Guide supersedes the IAEA Safety Guide on Operational Limits and Conditions for Nuclear Power Plants which was issued in 1979 as Safety Series No. 50-SG-O3. For a nuclear power plant to be operated in a safe manner, the provisions made in the final design and subsequent modifications shall be reflected in limitations on plant operating parameters and in the requirements on plant equipment and personnel. Under the responsibility of the operating organization, these shall be developed during the design safety evaluation as a set of operational limits and conditions (OLCs). A major contribution to compliance with the OLCs is made by the development and utilization of operating procedures (OPs) that are consistent with and fully implement the OLCs. The requirements for the OLCs and OPs are established in Section 5 of the IAEA Safety Requirements publication Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, which this Safety Guide supplements. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance on the development, content and implementation of OLCs and OPs. The Safety Guide is directed at both regulators and owners/operators. This Safety Guide covers the concept of OLCs, their content as applicable to land based stationary power plants with thermal neutron reactors, and the responsibilities of the operating organization regarding their establishment, modification, compliance and documentation. The OPs to support the implementation of the OLCs and to ensure their observance are also within the scope of this Safety Guide. The particular aspects of the procedures for maintenance, surveillance, in-service inspection and other safety related activities in connection with the safe operation of nuclear power plants are outside the scope of this Safety Guide but can be found in other IAEA Safety Guides. Section 2 indicates the

  4. Surgical offloading procedures for diabetic foot ulcers compared to best non-surgical treatment: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finestone, Aharon S; Tamir, Eran; Ron, Guy; Wiser, Itay; Agar, Gabriel

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are frequently related to elevated pressure under a bony prominence. Conservative treatment includes offloading with orthopaedic shoes and custom made orthotics or plaster casts. While casting in plaster is usually effective in achieving primary closure of foot ulcers, recurrence rates are high. Minimally invasive surgical offloading that includes correction of foot deformities has good short and long term results. The surgery alleviates the pressure under the bony prominence, thus enabling prompt ulcer healing, negating the patient's dependence on expensive shoes and orthotics, with a lower chance of recurrence. The purpose of this protocol is to compare offloading surgery (percutaneous flexor tenotomy, mini-invasive floating metatarsal osteotomy or Keller arthroplasty) to non-surgical treatment for patients with diabetic foot ulcers in a semi-crossover designed RCT. One hundred patients with diabetic neuropathy related foot ulcers (tip of toe ulcers, ulcers under metatarsal heads and ulcers under the hallux interphalangeal joint) will be randomized (2:3) to a surgical offloading procedure or best available non-surgical treatment. Group 1 (surgery) will have surgery within 1 week. Group 2 (controls) will be prescribed an offloading cast applied for up to 12 weeks (based on clinical considerations). Following successful offloading treatment (ulcer closure with complete epithelization) patients will be prescribed orthopaedic shoes and custom made orthotics. If offloading by cast for at least 6 weeks fails, or the ulcer recurs, patients will be offered surgical offloading. Follow-up will take place till 2 years following randomization. Outcome criteria will be time to healing of the primary ulcer (complete epithelization), time to healing of surgical wound, recurrence of ulcer, time to recurrence and complications. The high recurrence rate of foot ulcers and their dire consequences justify attempts to find better solutions than the non-surgical

  5. Risk factors for surgical site infection following operative ankle fracture fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, E G; Cashman, J P; Groarke, P J; Morris, S F

    2013-09-01

    Ankle fracture is a common injury and there is an increasingly greater emphasis on operative fixation. The purpose of the study was to determine the complication rate in this cohort of patients and, in doing so, determine risk factors which predispose to surgical site infection. A prospective cohort study was performed at a tertiary referral trauma center examining risk factors for surgical site infection in operatively treated ankle fractures. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed. Female gender and advancing age were determined to be the risk factors in univariate analysis. Drain usage and peri-operative pyrexia were found to be significant for infection in multivariate analysis. This study allows surgeons to identify those at increased risk of infection and counsel them appropriately. It also allows for a high level of vigilance with regard to soft tissue handling intra-operatively in this higher risk group.

  6. is there an increased risk of post-operative surgical site infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-06

    Sep 6, 2012 ... ABSTRACT. Background:There is dilemma as to whether patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) requiring implant orthopaedic surgery are at an increased risk for post-operative surgical site infection (SSI). We conducted a systematic review to determine the effect of HIV on the risk ...

  7. Chronic subdural hematoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis of surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiming; Bakker, Nicolaas A; Groen, Rob J M

    2014-09-01

    In this paper the authors systematically evaluate the results of different surgical procedures for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). The MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and other databases were scrutinized according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis) statement, after which only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs were included. At least 2 different neurosurgical procedures in the management of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) had to be evaluated. Included studies were assessed for the risk of bias. Recurrence rates, complications, and outcome including mortality were taken as outcome measures. Statistical heterogeneity in each meta-analysis was assessed using the T(2) (tau-squared), I(2), and chi-square tests. The DerSimonian-Laird method was used to calculate the summary estimates using the fixed-effect model in meta-analysis. Of the 297 studies identified, 19 RCTs were included. Of them, 7 studies evaluated the use of postoperative drainage, of which the meta-analysis showed a pooled OR of 0.36 (95% CI 0.21-0.60; p < 0.001) in favor of drainage. Four studies compared twist drill and bur hole procedures. No significant differences between the 2 methods were present, but heterogeneity was considered to be significant. Three studies directly compared the use of irrigation before drainage. A fixed-effects meta-analysis showed a pooled OR of 0.49 (95% CI 0.21-1.14; p = 0.10) in favor of irrigation. Two studies evaluated postoperative posture. The available data did not reveal a significant advantage in favor of the postoperative supine posture. Regarding positioning of the catheter used for drainage, it was shown that a frontal catheter led to a better outcome. One study compared duration of drainage, showing that 48 hours of drainage was as effective as 96 hours of drainage. Postoperative drainage has the advantage of reducing recurrence without increasing complications

  8. Aortic root reimplantation procedure: a new milestone in aortic valve-sparing operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Чернявский

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Emphasis in this study was placed on clinical and functional assessment of a modified "Florida Sleeve" procedure during surgical correction of ascending aorta aneurysms with concomitant aortic insufficiency.Methods: 32 patients with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta and aortic insufficiency underwent a modified "Florida Sleeve" procedure. The average follow-up was 17 (0-60 months. The average age of patients was 57±13 (23-73 years 56±13 years.Results: The expected 4-year cumulative survival rate was 84.3%. Overall freedom from aortic insufficiency in the late period was 88.9%. Median aortic regurgitation was 1+ (1; 2. Long-term follow-up revealed no valve-associated complications.Conclusion: The aortic root reimplantation procedure enables optimal correction of the existing lesions of the aortic root without performing aortic valve replacement and demonstrates stable clinical and functional outcomes in the long-term period.Key words: aortic aneurysm; aortic valve; valve-sparing operations.FundingThe study had no sponsorship.Conflict of interestThe authors declare no conflict of interest.

  9. Compact teleoperated laparoendoscopic single-site robotic surgical system: Kinematics, control, and operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac-Lowry, Oran Jacob; Okamoto, Steele; Pedram, Sahba Aghajani; Woo, Russell; Berkelman, Peter

    2017-12-01

    To date a variety of teleoperated surgical robotic systems have been developed to improve a surgeon's ability to perform demanding single-port procedures. However typical large systems are bulky, expensive, and afford limited angular motion, while smaller designs suffer complications arising from limited motion range, speed, and force generation. This work was to develop and validate a simple, compact, low cost single site teleoperated laparoendoscopic surgical robotic system, with demonstrated capability to carry out basic surgical procedures. This system builds upon previous work done at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and includes instrument and endoscope manipulators as well as compact articulated instruments designed to overcome single incision geometry complications. A robotic endoscope holder was used for the base, with an added support frame for teleoperated manipulators and instruments fabricated mostly from 3D printed parts. Kinematics and control methods were formulated for the novel manipulator configuration. Trajectory following results from an optical motion tracker and sample task performance results are presented. Results indicate that the system has successfully met the goal of basic surgical functionality while minimizing physical size, complexity, and cost. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Assessing the surgical skills of trainees in the operating theatre: a prospective observational study of the methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, J D; Marriott, J; Purdie, H; Crossley, J

    2011-01-01

    To compare user satisfaction and acceptability, reliability and validity of three different methods of assessing the surgical skills of trainees by direct observation in the operating theatre across a range of different surgical specialties and index procedures. A 2-year prospective, observational study in the operating theatres of three teaching hospitals in Sheffield. The assessment methods were procedure-based assessment (PBA), Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) and Non-technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS). The specialties were obstetrics and gynaecology (O&G) and upper gastrointestinal, colorectal, cardiac, vascular and orthopaedic surgery. Two to four typical index procedures were selected from each specialty. Surgical trainees were directly observed performing typical index procedures and assessed using a combination of two of the three methods (OSATS or PBA and NOTSS for O&G, PBA and NOTSS for the other specialties) by the consultant clinical supervisor for the case and the anaesthetist and/or scrub nurse, as well as one or more independent assessors from the research team. Information on user satisfaction and acceptability of each assessment method from both assessor and trainee perspectives was obtained from structured questionnaires. The reliability of each method was measured using generalisability theory. Aspects of validity included the internal structure of each tool and correlation between tools, construct validity, predictive validity, interprocedural differences, the effect of assessor designation and the effect of assessment on performance. Of the 558 patients who were consented, a total of 437 (78%) cases were included in the study: 51 consultant clinical supervisors, 56 anaesthetists, 39 nurses, 2 surgical care practitioners and 4 independent assessors provided 1635 assessments on 85 trainees undertaking the 437 cases. A total of 749 PBAs, 695 NOTSS and 191 OSATSs were performed. Non-O&G clinical supervisors and

  11. Influence of usage history, instrument complexity, and different cleaning procedures on the cleanliness of blood-contaminated dental surgical instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, G.; Yu, X.F.

    2009-01-01

    Our study assessed the factors that influence the resistance of blood residues on dental surgical instruments to washer‐disinfector-based cleaning procedures in a clinical setting. The use of 2 additional cleaning methods—presoaking and scrubbing by hand—and the use of newer and/or less structurally

  12. A Review of the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Implant and Comparison with Other Surgical Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Ivano; Roberti, Gloria; Katsanos, Andreas; Oddone, Francesco; Quaranta, Luciano

    2017-04-01

    The Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) is a popular glaucoma drainage implant used for the control of intraocular pressure in patients with glaucoma. While in the past AGV implantation was reserved for glaucoma patients poorly controlled after one or more filtration procedures, mounting evidence has recently encouraged its use as a primary surgery in selected cases. AGV has been demonstrated to be safe and effective in reducing intraocular pressure in patients with primary or secondary refractory glaucoma. Compared to other glaucoma surgeries, AGV implantation has shown favorable efficacy and safety. The aim of this article is to review the results of studies directly comparing AGV with other surgical procedures in patients with glaucoma.

  13. Influence of Peri-Operative Hypothermia on Surgical Site Infection in Prolonged Gastroenterological Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Toshie; Takesue, Yoshio; Ichiki, Kaoru; Uede, Takashi; Nakajima, Kazuhiko; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Uchino, Motoi

    2016-10-01

    There have been several recent studies on the correlation between intra-operative hypothermia and the occurrence of surgical site infection (SSI). Differences in the depth and timing of hypothermia and the surgical procedure may have led to conflicting results. Patients undergoing gastroenterologic surgery with a duration of >3 h were analyzed. Hypothermia was defined as a core temperature <36°C and was classified as mild (35.5-35.9°C), moderate (35.0-35.4°C), or severe (<35.0°C). Hypothermia also was classified as early-nadir (<36°C within two h of anesthesia induction) and late-nadir (after that time). Risk factors for SSIs were analyzed according to these classifications. Among 1,409 patients, 528 (37.5%) had hypothermia, which was classified as mild in 358, moderate in 137, and severe in 33. Early-nadir and late-nadir hypothermia was found in 23.7% and 13.8%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the incidence of SSIs between patients with and without hypothermia (relative risk 1.00; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80-1.25; p = 0.997). However, there was a significantly greater incidence of SSIs in patients with severe hypothermia (33.3%) than in those with normothermia (19.2%; p = 0.045) or mild hypothermia (17.0%; p = 0.021). The incidence of SSIs also was significantly greater in patients with late-nadir than in those with early-nadir hypothermia (23.7% vs. 16.5%; p = 0.041). The incidence of organ/space SSIs was significantly greater in patients with late-nadir hypothermia (19.6%) than in patients with normothermia (12.7%; p = 0.012). In multivariable analysis, neither severe hypothermia (odds ratio 1.24; 95% CI 0.56-2.77] nor late-nadir hypothermia (OR 0.71; 95% CI 0.46-1.01) was an independent risk factor for SSIs. Severe and late-nadir hypothermia were associated with a greater incidence of SSIs and organ/space SSIs. However, neither of these patterns was identified as an independent risk factor for SSIs, possibly

  14. Accuracy of a Wrist-Worn Heart Rate Sensing Device during Elective Pediatric Surgical Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Pelizzo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of wearable photoplethysmography (PPG sensors to measure heart rate (HR in hospitalized patients has only been demonstrated in adults. We evaluated the accuracy of HR monitoring with a personal fitness tracker (PFT in children undergoing surgery. HR monitoring was performed using a wrist-worn PFT (Fitbit Charge HR in 30 children (8.21 ± 3.09 years undergoing laparoscopy (n = 8 or open surgery (n = 22. HR values were analyzed preoperatively and during surgery. The accuracy of HR recordings was compared with measurements recorded during continuous electrocardiographic (cECG monitoring; HRs derived from continuous monitoring with pulse oximetry (SpO2R were used as a positive control. PFT-derived HR values were in agreement with those recorded during cECG (r = 0.99 and SpO2R (r = 0.99 monitoring. PFT performance remained high in children < 8 years (r = 0.99, with a weight < 30 kg (r = 0.99 and when the HR was < 70 beats per minute (bpm (r = 0.91 or > 140 bpm (r = 0.99. PFT accuracy was similar during laparoscopy and open surgery, as well as preoperatively and during the intervention (r > 0.9. PFT–derived HR showed excellent accuracy compared with HRs measured by cECG and SpO2R during pediatric surgical procedures. Further clinical evaluation is needed to define whether PFTs can be used in different health care settings.

  15. Accuracy of a Wrist-Worn Heart Rate Sensing Device during Elective Pediatric Surgical Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizzo, Gloria; Guddo, Anna; Puglisi, Aurora; Comparato, Calogero; Valenza, Mario; Bordonaro, Emanuele; Calcaterra, Valeria

    2018-01-01

    The reliability of wearable photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors to measure heart rate (HR) in hospitalized patients has only been demonstrated in adults. We evaluated the accuracy of HR monitoring with a personal fitness tracker (PFT) in children undergoing surgery. HR monitoring was performed using a wrist-worn PFT (Fitbit Charge HR) in 30 children (8.21 ± 3.09 years) undergoing laparoscopy (n = 8) or open surgery (n = 22). HR values were analyzed preoperatively and during surgery. The accuracy of HR recordings was compared with measurements recorded during continuous electrocardiographic (cECG) monitoring; HRs derived from continuous monitoring with pulse oximetry (SpO2R) were used as a positive control. PFT-derived HR values were in agreement with those recorded during cECG (r = 0.99) and SpO2R (r = 0.99) monitoring. PFT performance remained high in children 140 bpm (r = 0.99). PFT accuracy was similar during laparoscopy and open surgery, as well as preoperatively and during the intervention (r > 0.9). PFT–derived HR showed excellent accuracy compared with HRs measured by cECG and SpO2R during pediatric surgical procedures. Further clinical evaluation is needed to define whether PFTs can be used in different health care settings. PMID:29518020

  16. A Novel Murine Model of Arteriovenous Fistula Failure: The Surgical Procedure in Detail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chun Yu; de Vries, Margreet R; Wang, Yang; van der Vorst, Joost R; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L; van Zonneveld, Anton-Jan; Hamming, Jaap F; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Rabelink, Ton J; Quax, Paul H A; Rotmans, Joris I

    2016-02-03

    The arteriovenous fistula (AVF) still suffers from a high number of failures caused by insufficient remodeling and intimal hyperplasia from which the exact pathophysiology remains unknown. In order to unravel the pathophysiology a murine model of AVF-failure was developed in which the configuration of the anastomosis resembles the preferred situation in the clinical setting. A model was described in which an AVF is created by connecting the venous end of the branch of the external jugular vein to the side of the common carotid artery using interrupted sutures. At a histological level, we observed progressive stenotic intimal lesions in the venous outflow tract that is also seen in failed human AVFs. Although this procedure can be technically challenging due to the small dimensions of the animal, we were able to achieve a surgical success rate of 97% after sufficient training. The key advantage of a murine model is the availability of transgenic animals. In view of the different proposed mechanisms that are responsible for AVF failure, disabling genes that might play a role in vascular remodeling can help us to unravel the complex pathophysiology of AVF failure.

  17. A Novel Murine Model of Arteriovenous Fistula Failure: The Surgical Procedure in Detail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chun Yu; de Vries, Margreet R.; Wang, Yang; van der Vorst, Joost R.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; van Zonneveld, Anton-Jan; Hamming, Jaap F.; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Rabelink, Ton J.; Quax, Paul H. A.; Rotmans, Joris I.

    2016-01-01

    The arteriovenous fistula (AVF) still suffers from a high number of failures caused by insufficient remodeling and intimal hyperplasia from which the exact pathophysiology remains unknown. In order to unravel the pathophysiology a murine model of AVF-failure was developed in which the configuration of the anastomosis resembles the preferred situation in the clinical setting. A model was described in which an AVF is created by connecting the venous end of the branch of the external jugular vein to the side of the common carotid artery using interrupted sutures. At a histological level, we observed progressive stenotic intimal lesions in the venous outflow tract that is also seen in failed human AVFs. Although this procedure can be technically challenging due to the small dimensions of the animal, we were able to achieve a surgical success rate of 97% after sufficient training. The key advantage of a murine model is the availability of transgenic animals. In view of the different proposed mechanisms that are responsible for AVF failure, disabling genes that might play a role in vascular remodeling can help us to unravel the complex pathophysiology of AVF failure. PMID:26863177

  18. Accuracy of a Wrist-Worn Heart Rate Sensing Device during Elective Pediatric Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizzo, Gloria; Guddo, Anna; Puglisi, Aurora; De Silvestri, Annalisa; Comparato, Calogero; Valenza, Mario; Bordonaro, Emanuele; Calcaterra, Valeria

    2018-03-08

    The reliability of wearable photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors to measure heart rate (HR) in hospitalized patients has only been demonstrated in adults. We evaluated the accuracy of HR monitoring with a personal fitness tracker (PFT) in children undergoing surgery. HR monitoring was performed using a wrist-worn PFT (Fitbit Charge HR) in 30 children (8.21 ± 3.09 years) undergoing laparoscopy ( n = 8) or open surgery ( n = 22). HR values were analyzed preoperatively and during surgery. The accuracy of HR recordings was compared with measurements recorded during continuous electrocardiographic (cECG) monitoring; HRs derived from continuous monitoring with pulse oximetry (SpO2R) were used as a positive control. PFT-derived HR values were in agreement with those recorded during cECG ( r = 0.99) and SpO2R ( r = 0.99) monitoring. PFT performance remained high in children r = 0.99), with a weight r = 0.99) and when the HR was r = 0.91) or > 140 bpm ( r = 0.99). PFT accuracy was similar during laparoscopy and open surgery, as well as preoperatively and during the intervention ( r > 0.9). PFT-derived HR showed excellent accuracy compared with HRs measured by cECG and SpO2R during pediatric surgical procedures. Further clinical evaluation is needed to define whether PFTs can be used in different health care settings.

  19. Surgical Site Infection following Cesarean Delivery: Patient, Provider, and Procedure-Specific Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shree, Raj; Park, Seo Young; Beigi, Richard H; Dunn, Shannon L; Krans, Elizabeth E

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to identify risk factors for cesarean delivery (CD) surgical site infection (SSI). study design: Retrospective analysis of 2,739 CDs performed at the University of Pittsburgh in 2011. CD SSIs were defined using National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) criteria. Chi-square test and t-test were used for bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression was used to identify SSI risk factors. Of 2,739 CDs, 178 (6.5%) were complicated by SSI. Patients with a SSI were more likely to have Medicaid, have resident physicians perform the CD, an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class of ≥ 3, chorioamnionitis, tobacco use, and labor before CD. In multivariable analysis, labor (odds ratio [OR], 2.35; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.65-3.38), chorioamnionitis (OR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.25-3.83), resident teaching service (OR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.54-3.00), tobacco use (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.04-2.70), ASA class ≥ 3 (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.06-2.39), and CDs performed for nonreassuring fetal status (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.26-0.67) were significantly associated with CD SSI. Multiple patient, provider, and procedure-specific risk factors contribute to CD SSI risk which may be targeted in infection-control efforts. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. New Procedure for Account Operations at the CERN Service Desk

    CERN Multimedia

    The Computer Security Team

    2011-01-01

    Who can activate your computing account? Who can unblock it? And who can reset your password if you've forgotten it? Until recently, users who addressed such problems to the Service Desk were asked a set of questions...   The corresponding answers were designed to properly verify the requestor’s identity such that only the real owner could activate/unblock/reset his computing account. However, it turned out that the answers were easily obtainable (and that there is no better set of questions to ask). Therefore, in order to ensure optimal protection of your account, this procedure will be replaced on 28 November 2011. From that date on, users will be asked to produce a physical ID when requesting the Service Desk to perform operations like computer account activation, account unblocking or password resets. This physical ID can either be a passport/ID card or the CERN access card. If you need to activate/unblock/reset your computing account, you will either have to produ...

  1. The insertion device magnetic measurement facility: Prototype and operational procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkel, L.; Dejus, R.; Maines, J.; O'Brien, J.; Vasserman, I.; Pfleuger, J.

    1993-03-01

    This report is a description of the current status of the magnetic measurement facility and is a basic instructional manual for the operation of the facility and its components. Please refer to the appendices for more detailed information about specific components and procedures. The purpose of the magnetic measurement facility is to take accurate measurements of the magnetic field in the gay of the IDs in order to determine the effect of the ID on the stored particle beam and the emitted radiation. The facility will also play an important role when evaluating new ideas, novel devices, and inhouse prototypes as part of the ongoing research and development program at the APS. The measurements will be performed with both moving search coils and moving Hall probes. The IDs will be evaluated by computer modeling of the emitted radiation for any given (measured) magnetic field map. The quality of the magnetic field will be described in terms of integrated multipoles for the effect on Storage Ring performance and in terms of the derived trajectories for the emitted radiation. Before being installed on the Storage Ring, every device will be measured and characterized to assure that it is compatible with Storage Ring requirements and radiation specifications. The accuracy that the APS needs to achieve for magnetic measurements will be based on these specifications

  2. A Multiscale Enrichment Procedure for Nonlinear Monotone Operators

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.

    2014-03-11

    In this paper, multiscale finite element methods (MsFEMs) and domain decomposition techniques are developed for a class of nonlinear elliptic problems with high-contrast coefficients. In the process, existing work on linear problems [Y. Efendiev, J. Galvis, R. Lazarov, S. Margenov and J. Ren, Robust two-level domain decomposition preconditioners for high-contrast anisotropic flows in multiscale media. Submitted.; Y. Efendiev, J. Galvis and X. Wu, J. Comput. Phys. 230 (2011) 937–955; J. Galvis and Y. Efendiev, SIAM Multiscale Model. Simul. 8 (2010) 1461–1483.] is extended to treat a class of nonlinear elliptic operators. The proposed method requires the solutions of (small dimension and local) nonlinear eigenvalue problems in order to systematically enrich the coarse solution space. Convergence of the method is shown to relate to the dimension of the coarse space (due to the enrichment procedure) as well as the coarse mesh size. In addition, it is shown that the coarse mesh spaces can be effectively used in two-level domain decomposition preconditioners. A number of numerical results are presented to complement the analysis.

  3. NEPTUNIX 2: Operating on computers network - Catalogued procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, Pierre.

    1982-06-01

    NEPTUNIX 2 is a package which carries out the simulation of complex processes described by numerous non linear algebro-differential equations. Main features are: non linear or time dependent parameters, implicit form, stiff systems, dynamic change of equations leading to discontinuities on some variables. Thus the mathematical model is built with an equations set F(x,x',1,t), where t is the independent variable, x' the derivative of x and 1 an ''algebrized'' logical variable. The NEPTUNIX 2 package is divided into two successive major steps: a non numerical step and a numerical step. The numerical step, using results from a picture of the model translated in FORTRAN language, in a form fitted for the executive computer, carries out the simulmations; in this way, NEPTUNIX 2 numerical step is portable. On the opposite, the non numerical step must be executed on a series 370 IBM computer or on a compatible computer. The present manual describes NEPTUNIX 2 operating procedures when the two steps are executed on the same computer and also when the numerical step is executed on an other computer connected or not on the same computing network [fr

  4. Quality assurance: Importance of systems and standard operating procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishu Manghani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is mandatory for sponsors of clinical trials and contract research organizations alike to establish, manage and monitor their quality control and quality assurance systems and their integral standard operating procedures and other quality documents to provide high-quality products and services to fully satisfy customer needs and expectations. Quality control and quality assurance systems together constitute the key quality systems. Quality control and quality assurance are parts of quality management. Quality control is focused on fulfilling quality requirements, whereas quality assurance is focused on providing confidence that quality requirements are fulfilled. The quality systems must be commensurate with the Company business objectives and business model. Top management commitment and its active involvement are critical in order to ensure at all times the adequacy, suitability, effectiveness and efficiency of the quality systems. Effective and efficient quality systems can promote timely registration of drugs by eliminating waste and the need for rework with overall financial and social benefits to the Company.

  5. Manual of Standard Operating Procedures for Veterinary Drug Residue Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Laboratories are crucial to national veterinary drug residue monitoring programmes. However, one of the main challenges laboratories encounter is obtaining access to relevant methods of analysis. Thus, in addition to training, providing technical advice and transferring technology, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture has resolved to develop clear and practical manuals to support Member State laboratories. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Radiometric and Allied Analytical Methods to Strengthen Residue Control Programs for Antibiotic and Anthelmintic Veterinary Drug Residues has developed a number of analytical methods as standard operating procedures (SOPs), which are now compiled here. This publication contains SOPs on chromatographic and spectrometric techniques, as well as radioimmunoassay and associated screening techniques, for various anthelmintic and antimicrobial veterinary drug residue analysis. Some analytical method validation protocols are also included. The publication is primarily aimed at food and environmental safety laboratories involved in testing veterinary drug residues, including under organized national residue monitoring programmes. It is expected to enhance laboratory capacity building and competence through the use of radiometric and complementary tools and techniques. The publication is also relevant for applied research on residues of veterinary drugs in food and environmental samples

  6. Surgical PACS for the digital operating room. Systems engineering and specification of user requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, Werner; Bohn, Stefan; Burgert, Oliver; Dietz, Andreas; Jacobs, Stephan; Falk, Volkmar; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Strauss, Gero; Trantakis, Christos; Lemke, Heinz U

    2006-01-01

    For better integration of surgical assist systems into the operating room, a common communication and processing plattform that is based on the users needs is needed. The development of such a system, a Surgical Picture Aquisition and Communication System (S-PACS), according the systems engineering cycle is oulined in this paper. The first two steps (concept and specification) for the engineering of the S-PACS are discussed.A method for the systematic integration of the users needs', the Quality Function Deployment (QFD), is presented. The properties of QFD for the underlying problem and first results are discussed. Finally, this leads to a first definition of an S-PACS system.

  7. The surgical management of facial trauma in British soldiers during combat operations in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wordsworth, Matthew; Thomas, Rachael; Breeze, John; Evriviades, Demetrius; Baden, James; Hettiaratchy, Shehan

    2017-01-01

    The recent Afghanistan conflict caused a higher proportion of casualties with facial injuries due to both the increasing effectiveness of combat body armour and the insurgent use of the improvised explosive device (IED). The aim of this study was to describe all injuries to the face sustained by UK service personnel from blast or gunshot wounds during the highest intensity period of combat operations in Afghanistan. Hospital records and Joint Theatre Trauma Registry data were collected for all UK service personnel killed or wounded by blast and gunshot wounds in Afghanistan between 01 April 2006 and 01 March 2013. 566 casualties were identified, 504 from blast and 52 from gunshot injuries. 75% of blast injury casualties survived and the IED was the most common mechanism of injury with the mid-face the most commonly affected facial region. In blast injuries a facial fracture was a significant marker for increased total injury severity score. A facial gunshot wound was fatal in 53% of cases. The majority of survivors required a single surgical procedure for the facial injury but further reconstruction was required in 156 of the 375 of survivors aero medically evacuated to the UK. The presence and pattern of facial fractures was significantly different in survivors and fatalities, which may reflect the power of the blast that these cohorts were exposed to. The Anatomical Injury Scoring of the Injury Severity Scale was inadequate for determining the extent of soft tissue facial injuries and did not predict morbidity of the injury. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Assessment of open operative vascular surgical experience among general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafcik, Brianna M; Sachs, Teviah E; Farber, Alik; Eslami, Mohammad H; Kalish, Jeffrey A; Shah, Nishant K; Peacock, Matthew R; Siracuse, Jeffrey J

    2016-04-01

    General surgeons have traditionally performed open vascular operations. However, endovascular interventions, vascular residencies, and work-hour limitations may have had an impact on open vascular surgery training among general surgery residents. We evaluated the temporal trend of open vascular operations performed by general surgery residents to assess any changes that have occurred. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's database was used to evaluate graduating general surgery residents' cases from 1999 to 2013. Mean and median case volumes were analyzed for carotid endarterectomy, open aortoiliac aneurysm repair, and lower extremity bypass. Significance of temporal trends were identified using the R(2) test. The average number of carotid endarterectomies performed by general surgery residents decreased from 23.1 ± 14 (11.6 ± 9 chief, 11.4 + 10 junior) cases per resident in 1999 to 10.7 ± 9 (3.4 ± 5 chief, 7.3 ± 6 junior) in 2012 (R(2) = 0.98). Similarly, elective open aortoiliac aneurysm repairs decreased from 7.4 ± 5 (4 ± 4 chief, 3.4 ± 4 junior) in 1999 to 1.3 ± 2 (0.4 ± 1 chief, 0.8 ± 1 junior) in 2012 (R(2) = 0.98). The number of lower extremity bypasses decreased from 21 ± 12 (9.5 ± 7 chief, 11.8 ± 9 junior) in 1999 to 7.6 ± 2.6 (2.4 ± 1.3 chief, 5.2 + 1.8 junior) in 2012 (R(2) = 0.94). Infrapopliteal bypasses decreased from 8.1 ± 3.8 (3.5 ± 2.2 chief, 4.5 ± 2.9 junior) in 2001 to 3 ± 2.2 (1 ± 1.6 chief, 2 ± 1.6 junior) in 2012 (R(2) = 0.94). General surgery resident exposure to open vascular surgery has significantly decreased. Current and future graduates may not have adequate exposure to open vascular operations to be safely credentialed to perform these procedures in future practice without advanced vascular surgical training. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Philosophy, policies, and procedures - The three P's of flight-deck operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degani, Asaf; Wiener, Earl L.

    1991-01-01

    Standard operating procedures are drafted and provided to flightcrews to dictate the manner in which tasks are carried out. Failure to conform to Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) is frequently listed as the cause of violations, incidents, and accidents. However, procedures are often designed piecemeal, rather than being based on a sound philosophy of operations and policies that follow from such a philosophy. A framework of philosophy, policies, and procedures is proposed.

  10. State Token Petri Net modeling method for formal verification of computerized procedure including operator's interruptions of procedure execution flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yun Goo; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2012-01-01

    The Computerized Procedure System (CPS) is one of the primary operating support systems in the digital Main Control Room. The CPS displays procedure on the computer screen in the form of a flow chart, and displays plant operating information along with procedure instructions. It also supports operator decision making by providing a system decision. A procedure flow should be correct and reliable, as an error would lead to operator misjudgement and inadequate control. In this paper we present a modeling for the CPS that enables formal verification based on Petri nets. The proposed State Token Petri Nets (STPN) also support modeling of a procedure flow that has various interruptions by the operator, according to the plant condition. STPN modeling is compared with Coloured Petri net when they are applied to Emergency Operating Computerized Procedure. A converting program for Computerized Procedure (CP) to STPN has been also developed. The formal verification and validation methods of CP with STPN increase the safety of a nuclear power plant and provide digital quality assurance means that are needed when the role and function of the CPS is increasing.

  11. Use of the QR Reader to Provide Real-Time Evaluation of Residents' Skills Following Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Kellin; Barnhill, Danny; Sias, Jamie; Young, Amy; Polite, Florencia Greer

    2014-12-01

    A portable electronic method of providing instructional feedback and recording an evaluation of resident competency immediately following surgical procedures has not previously been documented in obstetrics and gynecology. This report presents a unique electronic format that documents resident competency and encourages verbal communication between faculty and residents immediately following operative procedures. The Microsoft Tag system and SurveyMonkey platform were linked by a 2-D QR code using Microsoft QR code generator. Each resident was given a unique code (TAG) embedded onto an ID card. An evaluation form was attached to each resident's file in SurveyMonkey. Postoperatively, supervising faculty scanned the resident's TAG with a smartphone and completed the brief evaluation using the phone's screen. The evaluation was reviewed with the resident and automatically submitted to the resident's educational file. The evaluation system was quickly accepted by residents and faculty. Of 43 residents and faculty in the study, 38 (88%) responded to a survey 8 weeks after institution of the electronic evaluation system. Thirty (79%) of the 38 indicated it was superior to the previously used handwritten format. The electronic system demonstrated improved utilization compared with paper evaluations, with a mean of 23 electronic evaluations submitted per resident during a 6-month period versus 14 paper assessments per resident during an earlier period of 6 months. This streamlined portable electronic evaluation is an effective tool for direct, formative feedback for residents, and it creates a longitudinal record of resident progress. Satisfaction with, and use of, this evaluation system was high.

  12. COMPARISON OF GLYCEMIC EFFECT OF ADRENALIN CONTAINING LOCAL ANESTHETIC IN DIABETIC AND NON-DIABETIC PATIENTS UNDERGOING MINOR ORAL SURGICAL PROCEDURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM To compare the changes in blood glucose level associated with administration of adrenaline containing local anesthetic in diabetic and non-diabetic patients undergoing minor oral surgical procedures. METHODS AND MATERIAL The study included 150 well controlled diabetic patients and 150 non-diabetic healthy patients in age group of 40-60 years who underwent minor oral surgical procedures (trans alveolar extractions, alveoplasty and flap surgeries. Patients in both the group were administered 1.8ml of local anesthetic agent containing 1:100,000 adrenaline for inferior alveolar nerve block and 0.2 ml of anesthetic agent for long buccal nerve block. Blood glucose levels were assessed and compared during pre-operative and one hour post-operative period. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS The comparison of the random blood sugar levels preop and postop in both the groups were compared using paired t test and RBS levels between two groups were analysed using unpaired t test. P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS No statistically significant change in post-operative blood glucose level was noted between the diabetic and non-diabetic patients. CONCLUSION The study concluded that it is safe to administer local anesthetic containing 1:100,000 adrenaline in smaller volumes to well controlled diabetic patients.

  13. Minimally invasive surgery for endometrial cancer: does operative start time impact surgical and oncologic outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Katrina N; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Nick, Alpa M; Fleming, Nicole D; dos Reis, Ricardo; Munsell, Mark F; Westin, Shannon N; Soliman, Pamela T; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2014-08-01

    Recent literature in ovarian cancer suggests differences in surgical outcomes depending on operative start time. We sought to examine the effects of operative start time on surgical outcomes for patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery for endometrial cancer. A retrospective review was conducted of patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery for endometrial cancer at a single institution between 2000 and 2011. Surgical and oncologic outcomes were compared between patients with an operative start time before noon and those with a surgical start time after noon. A total of 380 patients were included in the study (245 with start times before noon and 135 with start times after noon). There was no difference in age (p=0.57), number of prior surgeries (p=0.28), medical comorbidities (p=0.19), or surgical complexity of the case (p=0.43). Patients with surgery starting before noon had lower median BMI than those beginning after noon, 31.2 vs. 35.3 respectively (p=0.01). No significant differences were observed for intraoperative complications (4.4% of patients after noon vs. 3.7% of patients before noon, p=0.79), estimated blood loss (median 100 cc vs. 100 cc, p=0.75), blood transfusion rates (7.4% vs. 8.2%, p=0.85), and conversion to laparotomy (12.6% vs. 7.4%, p=0.10). There was no difference in operative times between the two groups (198 min vs. 216.5 min, p=0.10). There was no association between operative start time and postoperative non-infectious complications (11.9% vs. 11.0%, p=0.87), or postoperative infections (17.8% vs. 12.3%, p=0.78). Length of hospital stay was longer for surgeries starting after noon (median 2 days vs. 1 day, p=0.005). No differences were observed in rates of cancer recurrence (12.6% vs. 8.8%, p=0.39), recurrence-free survival (p=0.97), or overall survival (p=0.94). Our results indicate equivalent surgical outcomes and no increased risk of postoperative complications regardless of operative start time in minimally invasive

  14. Complications after Surgical Procedures in Patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Devices: Results of a Prospective Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Katia Regina da; Albertini, Caio Marcos de Moraes; Crevelari, Elizabeth Sartori; Carvalho, Eduardo Infante Januzzi de; Fiorelli, Alfredo Inácio; Martinelli, Martino; Costa, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Complications after surgical procedures in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) are an emerging problem due to an increasing number of such procedures and aging of the population, which consequently increases the frequency of comorbidities. To identify the rates of postoperative complications, mortality, and hospital readmissions, and evaluate the risk factors for the occurrence of these events. Prospective and unicentric study that included all individuals undergoing CIED surgical procedures from February to August 2011. The patients were distributed by type of procedure into the following groups: initial implantations (cohort 1), generator exchange (cohort 2), and lead-related procedures (cohort 3). The outcomes were evaluated by an independent committee. Univariate and multivariate analyses assessed the risk factors, and the Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. A total of 713 patients were included in the study and distributed as follows: 333 in cohort 1, 304 in cohort 2, and 76 in cohort 3. Postoperative complications were detected in 7.5%, 1.6%, and 11.8% of the patients in cohorts 1, 2, and 3, respectively (p = 0.014). During a 6-month follow-up, there were 58 (8.1%) deaths and 75 (10.5%) hospital readmissions. Predictors of hospital readmission included the use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (odds ratio [OR] = 4.2), functional class III--IV (OR = 1.8), and warfarin administration (OR = 1.9). Predictors of mortality included age over 80 years (OR = 2.4), ventricular dysfunction (OR = 2.2), functional class III-IV (OR = 3.3), and warfarin administration (OR = 2.3). Postoperative complications, hospital readmissions, and deaths occurred frequently and were strongly related to the type of procedure performed, type of CIED, and severity of the patient's underlying heart disease. Complicações após procedimentos cirúrgicos em portadores de dispositivos cardíacos eletrônicos implantáveis (DCEI) são um

  15. Beliefs and Values about Intra-Operative Teaching and Learning: A Case Study of Surgical Teachers and Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Caroline C.; Dodds, Agnes; Nestel, Debra

    2016-01-01

    Surgeons require advanced psychomotor skills, critical decision-making and teamwork skills. Much of surgical skills training involve progressive trainee participation in supervised operations where case variability, operating team interaction and environment affect learning, while surgical teachers face the key challenge of ensuring patient…

  16. Supportive psychotherapy or client education alongside surgical procedures to correct complications of female genital mutilation: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abayomi, Olukayode; Chibuzor, Moriam T; Okusanya, Babasola O; Esu, Ekpereonne; Odey, Edward; Meremikwu, Martin M

    2017-02-01

    Supportive psychotherapy, in individual or group settings, may help improve surgical outcomes for women and girls living with female genital mutilation (FGM). To assess whether supportive psychotherapy given alongside surgical procedures to correct complications of FGM improves clinical outcomes. We searched major databases including CENTRAL, Medline, African Index Medicus, SCOPUS, PsycINFO, and others. There were no language restrictions. We checked the reference lists of retrieved studies for additional reports of relevant studies. We included studies of girls and women living with any type of FGM who received supportive psychotherapy or client education sessions alongside any surgical procedure to correct health complications from FGM. Two team members independently screened studies for eligibility. There were no eligible studies identified. There is no direct evidence for the benefits or harms of supportive psychotherapy alongside surgical procedures for women and girls living with FGM. Research evidence is urgently needed to guide clinical practice. 42015024639. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. The World Health Organization retains copyright and all other rights in the manuscript of this article as submitted for publication.

  17. Analysing the operative experience of basic surgical trainees in Ireland using a web-based logbook

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lonergan, Peter E

    2011-09-25

    Abstract Background There is concern about the adequacy of operative exposure in surgical training programmes, in the context of changing work practices. We aimed to quantify the operative exposure of all trainees on the National Basic Surgical Training (BST) programme in Ireland and compare the results with arbitrary training targets. Methods Retrospective analysis of data obtained from a web-based logbook (http:\\/\\/www.elogbook.org) for all general surgery and orthopaedic training posts between July 2007 and June 2009. Results 104 trainees recorded 23,918 operations between two 6-month general surgery posts. The most common general surgery operation performed was simple skin excision with trainees performing an average of 19.7 (± 9.9) over the 2-year training programme. Trainees most frequently assisted with cholecystectomy with an average of 16.0 (± 11.0) per trainee. Comparison of trainee operative experience to arbitrary training targets found that 2-38% of trainees achieved the targets for 9 emergency index operations and 24-90% of trainees achieved the targets for 8 index elective operations. 72 trainees also completed a 6-month post in orthopaedics and recorded 7,551 operations. The most common orthopaedic operation that trainees performed was removal of metal, with an average of 2.90 (± 3.27) per trainee. The most common orthopaedic operation that trainees assisted with was total hip replacement, with an average of 10.46 (± 6.21) per trainee. Conclusions A centralised web-based logbook provides valuable data to analyse training programme performance. Analysis of logbooks raises concerns about operative experience at junior trainee level. The provision of adequate operative exposure for trainees should be a key performance indicator for training programmes.

  18. [Surgical safety cheklist at the management of the hybrid operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkashin, M A; Berezina, N A; Kuplevatsky, V I; Serov, A V; Mefodovsky, A A

    2016-01-01

    An essential aspect of the work of the operating room is the provision of safety of both the patient and staff. The organization of the activity of the surgical service requires serious elaboration of each of its stage, as well as standardization in using various validated instruments. When speaking of a hybrid operating room with the use of intraoperative magnetic resonance tomography, such an approach becomes not merely a recommendation but rather forced and justified necessity. Simultaneous use of various technologies of imaging and treatment with the engagement of physicians of various specialties requires especially thorough control. A generally accepted international standard of the work of the operating block is the use of checklists, and since 2008 the initiative of the World Health Organization "Safe Surgery Saves Lives" has globally been working to promote implementation of the WHO Surgical Safety Checklists (SSCL) to the real clinical practice. The intraoperative MR-diagnostic stage dictates rigid requirements for proper inventory of ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic surgical tools, verified logistics, and routing of the patient in the conditions of high and extremely high (1.5-3.0 T) magnetic field. A separate and not less important problem is anaesthesiological support during MRT. In order to optimise the patient's movements and adequate monitoring of his/her safety inside the operating department, the authors have modified the standard WHO Surgical Safety Checklist. Implementation of the modified checklist for the MRT-equipped hybrid operating room should improve the control over the processes, as well as increase safety of both the patient and personnel.

  19. FFTF fuel pin design procedure verification for transient operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baars, R.E.

    1975-05-01

    The FFTF design procedures for evaluating fuel pin transient performance are briefly reviewed, and data where available are compared with design procedure predictions. Specifically, burst conditions derived from Fuel Cladding Transient Tester (FCTT) tests and from ANL loss-of-flow tests are compared with burst pressures computed using the design procedure upon which the cladding integrity limit was based. Failure times are predicted using the design procedure for evaluation of rapid reactivity insertion accidents, for five unterminated TREAT experiments in which well characterized fuel failures were deliberately incurred. (U.S.)

  20. Orthognathic positioning system: intraoperative system to transfer virtual surgical plan to operating field during orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polley, John W; Figueroa, Alvaro A

    2013-05-01

    To introduce the concept and use of an occlusal-based "orthognathic positioning system" (OPS) to be used during orthognathic surgery. The OPS consists of intraoperative occlusal-based devices that transfer virtual surgical planning to the operating field for repositioning of the osteotomized dentoskeletal segments. The system uses detachable guides connected to an occlusal splint. An initial drilling guide is used to establish stable references or landmarks. These are drilled on the bone that will not be repositioned adjacent to the osteotomy line. After mobilization of the skeletal segment, a final positioning guide, referenced to the drilled landmarks, is used to transfer the skeletal segment according to the virtual surgical planning. The OPS is digitally designed using 3-dimensional computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology and manufactured with stereolithographic techniques. Virtual surgical planning has improved the preoperative assessment and, in conjunction with the OPS, the execution of orthognathic surgery. The OPS has the possibility to eliminate the inaccuracies commonly associated with traditional orthognathic surgery planning and to simplify the execution by eliminating surgical steps such as intraoperative measuring, determining the condylar position, the use of bulky intermediate splints, and the use of intermaxillary wire fixation. The OPS attempts precise translation of the virtual plan to the operating field, bridging the gap between virtual and actual surgery. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Consecutive operative procedures in patients with Marfan syndrome up to 28 years after initial aortic root surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puluca, Nazan; Burri, Melchior; Cleuziou, Julie; Krane, Markus; Lange, Rüdiger

    2018-02-28

    Most patients (75%) with Marfan syndrome present with aortic root dilatation that may require surgical intervention. However, associated cardiovascular disorders are not limited to the aortic root. These patients frequently require consecutive operations on the remaining thoracic aorta or the heart valves. Our intent was to characterize the spectrum of such procedures. Data from all patients with Marfan syndrome undergoing aortic root surgery at our centre between 1988 and 2016 were analysed retrospectively. Overall, 73 patients (26 women) were selected for the study. The median age at 1st operation was 30 years (3-68 years). Indications for aortic root surgery were aneurysm (78%) and dissection (22%). Initially, 33 Bentall procedures and 40 valve-sparing root replacement procedures were performed, with a 97% rate of follow-up completion. The median follow up was 8 years (0-28 years). Survival at 1, 10 and 15 years was 100%, 85% and 82%, respectively. During follow-up monitoring, 48 subsequent procedures were performed in 33 patients (aorta, 23; aortic valve, 11; mitral valve, 7 and combined procedures, 7). The 30-day mortality rate after subsequent procedures was 4.2%. Freedom from subsequent operation and death (combined end-point) after 5, 10 and 15 years was 70%, 53% and 34%, respectively. After the initial surgery, subsequent procedures required in the setting of Marfan syndrome most often involve the remaining native aorta, followed by the aortic and mitral valves. The continued need for additional operative procedures remains high, even decades after the initial surgeries are undertaken. Therefore, long-term patient monitoring at specialized centres is imperative.

  2. Analysis of Adverse Events Associated With Adult Moderate Procedural Sedation Outside the Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamnov, Sergey; Sarkisian, Natalia; Grammer, Rebecca; Gross, Wendy L; Urman, Richard D

    2017-09-01

    Moderate sedation outside the operating room is performed for a variety of medical and surgical procedures. It involves the administration of different drug combinations by nonanesthesia professionals. Few data exist on risk stratification and patient outcomes in the adult population. Current literature suggests that sedation can be associated with significant adverse outcomes. The aims of this study were to evaluate the nature of adverse events associated with moderate sedation and to examine their relation to patient characteristics and outcomes. In this retrospective review, 52 cases with moderate sedation safety incidents were identified out of approximately 143,000 cases during an 8-year period at a tertiary care medical center. We describe types of adverse events and the severity of associated harm. We used bivariate and multivariate analyses to examine the links between event types and both patient and procedure characteristics. The most common adverse event and unplanned intervention were oversedation leading to apnea (57.7% of cases) and the use of reversal agents (55.8%), respectively. Oversedation, hypoxemia, reversal agent use, and prolonged bag-mask ventilation were most common in cardiology (84.6%, 53.9%, 84.6%, and 38.5% of cases, respectively) and gastroenterology (87.5%, 75%, 87.5%, and 50%) suites. Miscommunication was reported most frequently in the emergency department (83.3%) and on the inpatient floor (69.2%). Higher body mass index was associated with increased rates of hypoxemia and intubation but lower rates of hypotension. Advanced age boosted the rates of oversedation, hypoxemia, and reversal agent use. Women were more likely than men to experience oversedation, hypotension, prolonged bag-mask ventilation, and reversal agent use. Patient harm was associated with age, body mass index, comorbidities, female sex, and procedures in the gastroenterology suite. Providers should take into account patient characteristics and procedure types when

  3. The procedure execution manager and its application to Advanced Photon Source operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borland, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Procedure Execution Manager (PEM) combines a complete scripting environment for coding accelerator operation procedures with a manager application for executing and monitoring the procedures. PEM is based on Tcl/Tk, a supporting widget library, and the dp-tcl extension for distributed processing. The scripting environment provides support for distributed, parallel execution of procedures along with join and abort operations. Nesting of procedures is supported, permitting the same code to run as a top-level procedure under operator control or as a subroutine under control of another procedure. The manager application allows an operator to execute one or more procedures in automatic, semi-automatic, or manual modes. It also provides a standard way for operators to interact with procedures. A number of successful applications of PEM to accelerator operations have been made to date. These include start-up, shutdown, and other control of the positron accumulator ring (PAR), low-energy transport (LET) lines, and the booster rf systems. The PAR/LET procedures make nested use of PEM's ability to run parallel procedures. There are also a number of procedures to guide and assist tune-up operations, to make accelerator physics measurements, and to diagnose equipment. Because of the success of the existing procedures, expanded use of PEM is planned

  4. A risk-benefit assessment of aprotinin in cardiac surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobkowski, W B; Murkin, J M

    1998-01-01

    Aprotinin, a naturally occurring serine protease inhibitor, has found widespread application during cardiac surgical procedures as a consequence of its ability to decrease blood loss and transfusion requirements. While its efficacy in a variety of clinical situations associated with increased risk of blood loss has been well established, at the same time, various complications including anaphylaxis, renal insufficiency, graft closure and arterial thromboses have been reported in association with aprotinin administration. In order to more fully evaluate the risks and benefits associated with aprotinin usage, this review first of all examines the hazards associated with transfusion of blood and blood products. Consideration is then given to various alternatives to allogeneic transfusion, including autologous predonation, acute normovolemic hemodilution, perioperative cell salvage and intraoperative plasma sequestration. A critique of other available pharmacological therapies, specifically desmopressin, aminocaproic acid and tranexamic acid, reviewing their modes of action, efficacy and associated complications, is then made. The role of aprotinin in cardiac surgery is then discussed and its pharmacology, including consideration of its antifibrinolytic, platelet preserving and anti-inflammatory effects is reviewed. Finally, an analysis of potential complications associated with aprotinin administration is undertaken. Issues involving its influence on specific measures of anticoagulation, namely partial thromboplastin time and activated clotting time, and issues relating to graft patency, hypothermic circulatory arrest, renal function, and allergic reactions are analysed and interpreted. In summary, this review concludes that most of the risks associated with aprotinin administration primarily involve inadequate anticoagulation and those of developing an allergic reaction, particularly upon aproptinin re-exposure. The benefits of aproptinin to decrease blood loss and

  5. 47 CFR 1.957 - Procedure with respect to amateur radio operator license.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedure with respect to amateur radio... Procedures § 1.957 Procedure with respect to amateur radio operator license. Each candidate for an amateur... certificate for sucessful completion of an amateur radio operator examination. The VEC will forward the...

  6. Surgical site infections following craniotomy focusing on possible post-operative acquisition of infection: prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneh-Arbib, O; Shiferstein, A; Dagan, N; Fein, S; Telem, L; Muchtar, E; Eliakim-Raz, N; Rubinovitch, B; Rubin, G; Rappaport, Z H; Paul, M

    2013-12-01

    Neurosurgery is characterized by a prolonged risk period for surgical site infection (SSI), mainly related to the presence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains. We aimed to examine factors associated with post-neurosurgical SSIs, focusing on post-operative factors. A prospective cohort study was conducted in a single center over a period of 18 months in Israel. Included were adult patients undergoing clean or clean-contaminated craniotomy, including craniotomies with external CSF drainage or shunts. SSIs were defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria for healthcare-associated infections. All patients were followed up for 90 days and those with foreign body insertion for 1 year. We compared patients with and without SSI. A multivariable regression analysis for SSI was conducted including uncorrelated variables significantly associated with SSI. A total of 502 patients were included, with 138 (27.5%) undergoing emergent or urgent craniotomy. The overall SSI rate was 5.6% (28 patients), of which 3.2% (16 patients) were intracerebral. Non-elective surgery, external CSF drainage/monitoring devices, re-operation, and post-operative respiratory failure were independently associated with subsequent SSI. External CSF devices was the only significant risk factor for intracerebral SSIs (p operative infection acquisition through external CSF devices. Standard operating procedures for their maintenance are necessary.

  7. Effectiveness of minimally invasive surgical procedures in the acceleration of tooth movement: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfawal, Alaa M H; Hajeer, Mohammad Y; Ajaj, Mowaffak A; Hamadah, Omar; Brad, Bassel

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess systematically the available scientific evidence relating the efficiency of minimally invasive surgical procedures in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement and the adverse effects associated with these procedures. Electronic search of these databases CENTRAL, EMBASE, Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, Google Scholar Beta, Trip, OpenGrey and PQDT OPEN was performed (last updated January 2016). The reference lists of the included studies were hand searched. Unpublished literature and ongoing studies were also checked electronically through ClinicalTrials.gov and (ICTRP). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with patients who received minimally invasive surgical procedures combined with fixed orthodontic appliances compared with conventional treatment were included. Cochrane's risk of bias tool was used to assess risk of bias. Four RCTs (61 patients) and nine ongoing protocols were included in this review. Only three RCTs were suitable for quantitative synthesis. Higher tooth movement rate was found with the minimally invasive surgical procedures by a weighted mean difference of 0.65 mm for 1 month of canine retraction (WMD = 0.65: 95 % CI (0.54, 0.76), p accelerated orthodontics (MISAO). Although the current review indicated that MISAO can help in accelerating canine retraction, further research in this domain should be performed before it can be recommended in everyday clinical practice.

  8. Fontan procedure: imaging of normal post-surgical anatomy and the spectrum of cardiac and extracardiac complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro-Aguilar, V.; Flors, L.; Calvillo, P.; Merlos, P.; Buendía, F.; Igual, B.; Melero-Ferrer, J.; Soriano, J. Rueda; Leiva-Salinas, C.

    2015-01-01

    Univentricular congenital heart diseases include a range of entities that result in a functionally single ventricular chamber. Although the only curative therapy is cardiac transplantation, there are several palliative surgical techniques that prevent ventricular volume overload, diverting part or all the systemic venous circulation into the pulmonary arteries. The modern Fontan procedure, which consists of anastomosing both the superior (SVC) and inferior vena cava (IVC) to the right pulmonary artery (RPA), is nowadays the last step before transplantation. The importance of imaging in these entities lies not only in the understanding of the new circuit established after surgical correction, but also in the early detection of the wide spectrum of cardiac and extracardiac complications that can occur due to the new physiological condition. Due to the increased survival of these patients, long-term complications are becoming more common. The main cardiac complications are atrial enlargement, ventricular dysfunction, and stenosis or thrombosis of the conduit. Pulmonary artery stenosis, pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae (PAVF), systemic-pulmonary veno venous shunts (VVS), hepatic congestion, cardiac cirrhosis, and protein-losing enteropathy are potential extracardiac complications. - Highlights: • Fontan procedure is the main palliative surgical procedure for univentricular heart correction. • Fontan procedure entails the anastomosis of SVC and IVC to the RPA. • Complications are becoming more common due to the increased survival of patients with Fontan

  9. Does surgically fixation of pubic fracture increase the stability of the operated posterior pelvis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzay, Tamás; Sztrinkai, Gergely; Pajor, Sándor; Gál, Tamás; Jónás, Zoltán; Erdös, Péter; Váradi, Károly

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether surgical treatment of pubic rami fractures increases the stability of the posterior pelvis. A finite element pelvic model with improved geometric and material characteristics was analyzed. By imitating a standing position, a type I Denis sacrum fracture and a unilateral pubis fracture, we measured the differences in tension and displacement. The posterior injury was treated with a direct plate synthesis or transsacral plate synthesis, while the pubis fracture was left without fixation or fixed with either a retrograde pubic screw or plate synthesis. The operative fixation of pubic rami fractures decreased the movement in the fracture gap not only at the site of the pubis fracture, but also at the site of the fixed sacrum fracture. The plate synthesis provided greater stability of the anterior fracture than the retrograde screw. The tensions in the implants were below the allowed values. We concluded that surgically fixation of pubic fracture increases the stability of the operated posterior pelvis.

  10. Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation in Elderly Patients with the Cox Maze Procedure Concurrently with Other Cardiac Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ja Hong Kuh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In elderly patients who have atrial fibrillation (AF, surgical ablation of the arrhythmia during cardiac surgery may be challenging. Despite the reported advantages of ablating AF with the Cox maze procedure (CMP, the addition of the CMP may complicate other cardiac operations. We evaluated the effect of the CMP in elderly patients concurrent with other cardiac operations. Methods: From October 2007 to December 2015, we enrolled 27 patients aged >70 years who had AF and who underwent the CMP concurrently with other cardiac operations. The mean preoperative additive European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation score was 8±11 (high risk. Results: Only 1 hospital death occurred (4%. The Kaplan-Meier method showed a high 5‐year cumulative survival rate (92%. At mean follow‐up of 51 months, 23 patients (89% had sinus rhythm conversion. The postoperative left atrial dimensions did not significantly differ between the 8 patients who had reduction plasty for giant left atrium (53.4±7.5 cm and the 19 patients who did not have reduction plasty (48.7±5.7 cm. Conclusion: In patients aged >70 years, concurrent CMP may be associated with a high rate of sinus rhythm conversion without increased surgical risk, despite the added complexity of the main cardiac procedure.

  11. Effectiveness of minimally invasive surgical procedures in the acceleration of tooth movement: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa M. H. Alfawal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The objective of this study was to assess systematically the available scientific evidence relating the efficiency of minimally invasive surgical procedures in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement and the adverse effects associated with these procedures. Methods Electronic search of these databases CENTRAL, EMBASE, Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, Google Scholar Beta, Trip, OpenGrey and PQDT OPEN was performed (last updated January 2016. The reference lists of the included studies were hand searched. Unpublished literature and ongoing studies were also checked electronically through ClinicalTrials.gov and (ICTRP. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs with patients who received minimally invasive surgical procedures combined with fixed orthodontic appliances compared with conventional treatment were included. Cochrane’s risk of bias tool was used to assess risk of bias. Results Four RCTs (61 patients and nine ongoing protocols were included in this review. Only three RCTs were suitable for quantitative synthesis. Higher tooth movement rate was found with the minimally invasive surgical procedures by a weighted mean difference of 0.65 mm for 1 month of canine retraction (WMD = 0.65: 95 % CI (0.54, 0.76, p < 0.001 and by a weighted mean difference 1.41 mm for 2 months (WMD = 1.41: 95 % CI (0.81, 2.01, p < 0.001. No adverse effects associated with these procedures were reported. Conclusions There is limited available evidence about the effectiveness of minimally invasive surgically accelerated orthodontics (MISAO. Although the current review indicated that MISAO can help in accelerating canine retraction, further research in this domain should be performed before it can be recommended in everyday clinical practice.

  12. How operating room efficiency is understood in a surgical team: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakelian, Erebouni; Gunningberg, Lena; Larsson, Jan

    2011-02-01

    Building surgical teams is one attempt to ensure the health-care system becomes more efficient, but how is 'efficiency' understood or interpreted? The aim was to study how organized surgical team members and their leaders understood operating room efficiency. Qualitative study. A 1100-bed Swedish university hospital. Eleven participants, nine team members from the same team and their two leaders were interviewed. The analysis was performed according to phenomenography, a research approach that aims to discover variations in peoples' understanding of a phenomenon. Seven ways of understanding operating room efficiency were identified: doing one's best from one's prerequisites, enjoying work and adjusting it to the situation, interacting group performing parallel tasks, working with minimal resources to produce desired results, fast work with preserved quality, long-term effects for patient care and a relative concept. When talking about the quality and benefits of delivered care, most team members invoked the patient as the central focus. Despite seven ways of understanding efficiency between the team members, they described their team as efficient. The nurses and assistant nurses were involved in the production and discussed working in a timely manner more than the leaders. The seven ways of understanding operating room efficiency appear to represent both organization-oriented and individual-oriented understanding of that concept in surgical teams. The patient is in focus and efficiency is understood as maintaining quality of care and measuring benefits of care for the patients.

  13. A Neural Networks Based Operation Guidance System for Procedure Presentation and Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seung, Kun Mo; Lee, Seung Jun; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a neural network based operator support system is proposed to reduce operator's errors in abnormal situations in nuclear power plants (NPPs). There are many complicated situations, in which regular and suitable operations should be done by operators accordingly. In order to regulate and validate operators' operations, it is necessary to develop an operator support system which includes computer based procedures with the functions for operation validation. Many computerized procedures systems (CPS) have been recently developed. Focusing on the human machine interface (HMI) design and procedures' computerization, most of CPSs used various methodologies to enhance system's convenience, reliability and accessibility. Other than only showing procedures, the proposed system integrates a simple CPS and an operation validation system (OVS) by using artificial neural network (ANN) for operational permission and quantitative evaluation

  14. Thinking in three's: changing surgical patient safety practices in the complex modern operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Verna C

    2012-12-14

    The three surgical patient safety events, wrong site surgery, retained surgical items (RSI) and surgical fires are rare occurrences and thus their effects on the complex modern operating room (OR) are difficult to study. The likelihood of occurrence and the magnitude of risk for each of these surgical safety events are undefined. Many providers may never have a personal experience with one of these events and training and education on these topics are sparse. These circumstances lead to faulty thinking that a provider won't ever have an event or if one does occur the provider will intuitively know what to do. Surgeons are not preoccupied with failure and tend to usually consider good outcomes, which leads them to ignore or diminish the importance of implementing and following simple safety practices. These circumstances contribute to the persistent low level occurrence of these three events and to the difficulty in generating sufficient interest to resource solutions. Individual facilities rarely have the time or talent to understand these events and develop lasting solutions. More often than not, even the most well meaning internal review results in a new line to a policy and some rigorous enforcement mandate. This approach routinely fails and is another reason why these problems are so persistent. Vigilance actions alone have been unsuccessful so hospitals now have to take a systematic approach to implementing safer processes and providing the resources for surgeons and other stakeholders to optimize the OR environment. This article discusses standardized processes of care for mitigation of injury or outright prevention of wrong site surgery, RSI and surgical fires in an action-oriented framework illustrating the strategic elements important in each event and focusing on the responsibilities for each of the three major OR agents-anesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses. A Surgical Patient Safety Checklist is discussed that incorporates the necessary elements to

  15. Sedation for procedures outside the operating room in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina Rodriguez, Ericka

    2014-01-01

    Sedation is defined in the pediatric population. An adequate preoperative assessment is established in patients subjected to a sedation. Fundamental characteristics of drugs used during a sedation are determined. Recommendations about surveillance and monitoring are established in a patient sedated. Principal characteristics of sedation are defined in patients exposed to radiological diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Considerations in sedation are identified for procedures in the laboratory of digestive endoscopy. Alternatives of sedation are mentioned for oncological patients subjected to invasive procedures. Working conditions and specifications of anesthesia are determined in the cardiac catheterization room [es

  16. Quality of operation notes following orthopaedic procedures in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clarity of documentation is essential for good record keeping, audit, follow-up and medico-legal defense. ... Conclusions: We conclude that a clearly written standard protocol for writing operation notes or electronic recording of operative notes in developing countries will prevent such glaring lapses in operation notes and ...

  17. 7 CFR 70.110 - Requirements for sanitation, facilities, and operating procedures in official plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for sanitation, facilities, and operating... Requirements for sanitation, facilities, and operating procedures in official plants. (a) The requirements for sanitation, facilities, and operating procedures in official plants shall be the applicable provisions stated...

  18. Manual for the GAW Precipitation Chemistry Programme: Guidelines, Data Quality Objectives and Standard Operating Procedures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allan, Mary A

    2004-01-01

    This is a manual for the Global Atmosphere Watch Precipitation Chemistry (GAW-PC) Programme. Where possible, it describes standard operating procedures and otherwise provides guidance on methods and procedures...

  19. Smart surgical needle actuated by shape memory alloys for percutaneous procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konh, Bardia

    Background: Majority of cancer interventions today are performed percutaneously using needle-based procedures, i.e. through the skin and soft tissue. Insufficient accuracy using conventional surgical needles motivated researchers to provide actuation forces to the needle's body for compensating the possible errors of surgeons/physicians. Therefore, active needles were proposed recently where actuation forces provided by shape memory alloys (SMAs) are utilized to assist the maneuverability and accuracy of surgical needles. This work also aims to introduce a novel needle insertion simulation to predict the deflection of a bevel tip needle inside the tissue. Methods: In this work first, the actuation capability of a single SMA wire was studied. The complex response of SMAs was investigated via a MATLAB implementation of the Brinson model and verified via experimental tests. The material characteristics of SMAs were simulated by defining multilinear elastic isothermal stress-strain curves. Rigorous experiments with SMA wires were performed to determine the material properties as well as to show the capability of the code to predict a stabilized SMA transformation behavior with sufficient accuracy. The isothermal stress-strain curves of SMAs were simulated and defined as a material model for the Finite Element Analysis of the active needle. In the second part of this work, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model of the active steerable needle was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of using SMA wires as actuators to bend the surgical needle. In the FE model, birth and death method of defining boundary conditions, available in ANSYS, was used to achieve the pre-strain condition on SMA wire prior to actuation. This numerical model was validated with needle deflection experiments with developed prototypes of the active needle. The third part of this work describes the design optimization of the active using genetic algorithm aiming for its maximum flexibility

  20. Standard operating procedure for combustion of 14C - samples with OX-500 biological material oxidizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashriyah Mat.

    1995-01-01

    This procedure is for the purpose of safe operation of OX-500 biological material oxidizer. For ease of operation, the operation flow chart (including testing the system and sample combustion) and end of day maintenance flow chart were simplified. The front view, diagrams and switches are duly copied from operating manual. Steps on sample preparation are also included for biotic and a biotic samples. This operating procedure is subjected to future reviews

  1. 76 FR 17367 - National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program; Operating Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... procedures were published to ensure their consistency with certain international standards and guidance... the phrase ``other means.'' As a signatory to the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation... Chief Counsel for Advocacy, Small Business Administration, under the provisions of the Regulatory...

  2. Improving the Prediction of Total Surgical Procedure Time Using Linear Regression Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R. Edelman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available For efficient utilization of operating rooms (ORs, accurate schedules of assigned block time and sequences of patient cases need to be made. The quality of these planning tools is dependent on the accurate prediction of total procedure time (TPT per case. In this paper, we attempt to improve the accuracy of TPT predictions by using linear regression models based on estimated surgeon-controlled time (eSCT and other variables relevant to TPT. We extracted data from a Dutch benchmarking database of all surgeries performed in six academic hospitals in The Netherlands from 2012 till 2016. The final dataset consisted of 79,983 records, describing 199,772 h of total OR time. Potential predictors of TPT that were included in the subsequent analysis were eSCT, patient age, type of operation, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA physical status classification, and type of anesthesia used. First, we computed the predicted TPT based on a previously described fixed ratio model for each record, multiplying eSCT by 1.33. This number is based on the research performed by van Veen-Berkx et al., which showed that 33% of SCT is generally a good approximation of anesthesia-controlled time (ACT. We then systematically tested all possible linear regression models to predict TPT using eSCT in combination with the other available independent variables. In addition, all regression models were again tested without eSCT as a predictor to predict ACT separately (which leads to TPT by adding SCT. TPT was most accurately predicted using a linear regression model based on the independent variables eSCT, type of operation, ASA classification, and type of anesthesia. This model performed significantly better than the fixed ratio model and the method of predicting ACT separately. Making use of these more accurate predictions in planning and sequencing algorithms may enable an increase in utilization of ORs, leading to significant financial and productivity related

  3. Improving the Prediction of Total Surgical Procedure Time Using Linear Regression Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Eric R; van Kuijk, Sander M J; Hamaekers, Ankie E W; de Korte, Marcel J M; van Merode, Godefridus G; Buhre, Wolfgang F F A

    2017-01-01

    For efficient utilization of operating rooms (ORs), accurate schedules of assigned block time and sequences of patient cases need to be made. The quality of these planning tools is dependent on the accurate prediction of total procedure time (TPT) per case. In this paper, we attempt to improve the accuracy of TPT predictions by using linear regression models based on estimated surgeon-controlled time (eSCT) and other variables relevant to TPT. We extracted data from a Dutch benchmarking database of all surgeries performed in six academic hospitals in The Netherlands from 2012 till 2016. The final dataset consisted of 79,983 records, describing 199,772 h of total OR time. Potential predictors of TPT that were included in the subsequent analysis were eSCT, patient age, type of operation, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification, and type of anesthesia used. First, we computed the predicted TPT based on a previously described fixed ratio model for each record, multiplying eSCT by 1.33. This number is based on the research performed by van Veen-Berkx et al., which showed that 33% of SCT is generally a good approximation of anesthesia-controlled time (ACT). We then systematically tested all possible linear regression models to predict TPT using eSCT in combination with the other available independent variables. In addition, all regression models were again tested without eSCT as a predictor to predict ACT separately (which leads to TPT by adding SCT). TPT was most accurately predicted using a linear regression model based on the independent variables eSCT, type of operation, ASA classification, and type of anesthesia. This model performed significantly better than the fixed ratio model and the method of predicting ACT separately. Making use of these more accurate predictions in planning and sequencing algorithms may enable an increase in utilization of ORs, leading to significant financial and productivity related benefits.

  4. Necrotizing fasciitis – a rare complication following common obstetric operative procedures: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhi R

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Robin Medhi, Suditi Rai, Arpana Das, Mansur Ahmed, Banani Das Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Silchar Medical College and Hospital, Silchar, Assam, India Abstract: Necrotizing fasciitis, a near-fatal soft-tissue infection complicating obstetric operative wounds, is a rare entity in obstetrics. Herein, we report two cases of necrotizing fasciitis in severely undernourished and anemic women following obstetric operative procedures. Both undernourishment and anemia compounded the already existing immune-suppressed state in pregnancy and may have lead to life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis. One of the patients developed necrotizing fasciitis following episiotomy and the other following cesarean section. Both the cases were diagnosed clinically. Management was done by total parenteral nutrition, prompt correction of anemia, and surgical debridement under broad-spectrum antibiotic coverage. The raw areas were later reconstructed by split skin grafting in the first case, whereas, in the second case, due to the patient’s refusal of skin grafting, the wound was allowed to heal by secondary intention. Both patients survived, although with morbidity. Our study aims to emphasize prompt correction of comorbidities along with aggressive management of necrotizing fasciitis for better outcomes in the obstetric population. Prompt correction of nutritional status improves the survival rate. Keywords: anemia, undernourishment, total parenteral nutrition 

  5. Impact of intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy on organ/space surgical site infection in patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Duan, X; Xu, J; Jin, Q; Chen, F; Wang, P; Yang, Y; Tang, X

    2015-11-01

    Various risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) have been identified such as age, overweight, duration of surgery, blood loss, etc. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy during surgery is a common procedure in patients with gastric cancer, yet its impact on SSI has not been evaluated. To evaluate whether intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy is a key risk factor for organ/space SSI in patients with gastric cancer. All patients with gastric cancer who underwent surgery at the Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery between January 2008 and December 2013 were studied. The organ/space SSI rates were compared between patients who received intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy and patients who did not receive intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy, and the risk factors for organ/space SSI were analysed by univariate and multi-variate regression analyses. The microbial causes of organ/space SSI were also identified. Of the eligible 845 patients, 356 received intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy, and the organ/space SSI rate was higher in these patients compared with patients who did not receive intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (9.01% vs 3.88%; P = 0.002). Univariate analysis confirmed the significance of this finding (odds ratio 2.443; P = 0.003). As a result, hospital stay was increased in patients who received intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy {mean 20.91 days [95% confidence interval (CI) 19.76-22.06] vs 29.72 days (95% CI 25.46-33.99); P = 0.000}. The results also suggested that intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy may be associated with more Gram-negative bacterial infections. Intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy is a significant risk factor for organ/space SSI in patients with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Association between Pre-Operative Cefazolin Dose and Surgical Site Infection in Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppard, William J; Eberle, David G; Kugler, Nathan W; Mabrey, Danielle M; Weigelt, John A

    A fixed dose of cefazolin results in serum concentrations that decrease as body mass increases. Current national guidelines suggest a pre-operative cefazolin dose of two grams may be insufficient for patients ≥120 kg; thus a three gram dose is recommended. These recommendations, however, are based on pharmacokinetic rather than outcome data. We evaluate the efficacy of pre-operative cefazolin two gram and three gram doses as measured by the rate of surgical site infection (SSI). We conducted a retrospective review of adult patients ≥100 kg who were prescribed cefazolin as surgical prophylaxis between September 1, 2012 and May 31, 2013 at an academic medical center. Patients were excluded if cefazolin was prescribed but not administered, had a known infection at the site of surgery, or inappropriately received cefazolin prophylaxis based on surgical indication. The SSIs were identified by documentation of SSI in the medical record or findings consistent with the standard Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition. Inpatient and outpatient records up to 90 days post-operative were reviewed for delayed SSI. Four hundred eighty-three surgical cases were identified in which pre-operative cefazolin was prescribed. Forty-seven patients were excluded leaving a total of 436 patients for final analysis: 152 in the cefazolin two gram group and 284 in the three gram group. Baseline demographics were similar between groups with a mean follow-up duration of 77 days for both groups. Unadjusted SSI rates were 7.2% and 7.4% (odds ratio [OR] 0.98, p = 0.95), for the two gram and three gram groups, respectively. When differences in follow-up between groups were considered and logistic regression was adjusted with propensity score, there remained no difference in SSI rates (OR 0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.36-2.06, p = 0.77). In otherwise similar obese surgical patients weighing ≥100 kg, the administration of a pre-operative cefazolin two gram dose is

  7. LED surgical lighting system with multiple free-form surfaces for highly sterile operating theater application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yaqin; Zheng, Zhenrong; Li, Haifeng; Liu, Xu

    2014-06-01

    Although the ventilation system is widely employed in the operating theater, a strictly sterile surgical environment still cannot be ensured because of laminar disturbance, which is mainly caused by the surgical lighting system. Abandoning traditional products, we propose an LED surgical lighting system, which can alleviate the laminar disturbance and provide an appropriate lighting condition for surgery. It contains a certain amount of LED lens units, which are embedded in the ceiling and arranged around the air supply smallpox. The LED lens unit integrated with an LED light source and a free-form lens is required to produce a uniform circular illumination with a large tolerance to the change of lighting distance. To achieve such a dedicated lens, two free-form refractive surfaces, which are converted into two ordinary differential equations by the design method presented in this paper, are used to deflect the rays. The results show that the LED surgical lighting system can provide an excellent illumination environment for surgery, and, apparently, the laminar disturbance also can be relieved.

  8. Common Operative Procedural Errors and Clinical Factors Associated with Root Canal Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Estrela, Carlos; Pécora, Jesus Djalma; Estrela, Cyntia R.A.; Guedes, Orlando A.; Silva, Brunno S.F.; Soares, Carlos José; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Operative procedural errors must be well analyzed in order to avoid influence negatively the root canal treatment (RCT) prognosis. The successful RCT prevents tooth loss and avoids pain and apical periodontitis. This review aimed to categorize common operative procedure errors and clinical factors associated with RCT. Based on this, will be approached common errors of procedures within the clinical operative sequence: endodontic treatment planning, pulp and periapical disease diagnos...

  9. Developing operating procedures for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, A.A.; Miner, G.L.; Grahn, K.F.; Pollard, C.G.

    1993-10-01

    This document is intended to assist persons who are developing operating and emergency procedures for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. It provides 25 procedures that are considered to be relatively independent of the characteristics of a disposal facility site, the facility design, and operations at the facility. These generic procedures should form a good starting point for final procedures on their subjects for the disposal facility. In addition, this document provides 55 annotated outlines of other procedures that are common to disposal facilities. The annotated outlines are meant as checklists to assist the developer of new procedures

  10. Developing operating procedures for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, A.A.; Miner, G.L.; Grahn, K.F.; Pollard, C.G. [Rogers and Associates Engineering Corp., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This document is intended to assist persons who are developing operating and emergency procedures for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. It provides 25 procedures that are considered to be relatively independent of the characteristics of a disposal facility site, the facility design, and operations at the facility. These generic procedures should form a good starting point for final procedures on their subjects for the disposal facility. In addition, this document provides 55 annotated outlines of other procedures that are common to disposal facilities. The annotated outlines are meant as checklists to assist the developer of new procedures.

  11. Risk of angioedema following invasive or surgical procedures in HAE type I and II – the natural history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygören-Pürsün, E; Martinez Saguer, I; Kreuz, W; Klingebiel, T; Schwabe, D

    2013-01-01

    Background Hereditary angioedema (HAE), caused by deficiency in C1-inhibitor (C1-INH), leads to unpredictable edema of subcutaneous tissues with potentially fatal complications. As surgery can be a trigger for edema episodes, current guidelines recommend preoperative prophylaxis with C1-INH or attenuated androgens in patients with HAE undergoing surgery. However, the risk of an HAE attack in patients without prophylaxis has not been quantified. Objectives This analysis examined rates of perioperative edema in patients with HAE not receiving prophylaxis. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of records of randomly selected patients with HAE type I or II treated at the Frankfurt Comprehensive Care Centre. These were examined for information about surgical procedures and the presence of perioperative angioedema. Results A total of 331 patients were included; 247 underwent 700 invasive procedures. Of these procedures, 335 were conducted in 144 patients who had not received prophylaxis at the time of surgery. Categories representing significant numbers of procedures were abdominal (n = 113), ENT (n = 71), and gynecological (n = 58) procedures. The rate of documented angioedema without prophylaxis across all procedures was 5.7%; in 24.8% of procedures, the presence of perioperative angioedema could not be excluded, leading to a maximum potential risk of 30.5%. Predictors of perioperative angioedema could not be identified. Conclusion The risk of perioperative angioedema in patients with HAE type I or II without prophylaxis undergoing surgical procedures ranged from 5.7% to 30.5% (CI 3.5–35.7%). The unpredictability of HAE episodes supports current international treatment recommendations to consider short-term prophylaxis for all HAE patients undergoing surgery. PMID:23968383

  12. Integrating standard operating procedures with spacecraft automation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft automation has the potential to assist crew members and spacecraft operators in managing spacecraft systems during extended space missions. Automation can...

  13. Evaluation of emergency operating procedures for nuclear power plants. Final report Feb 80-Mar 81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, F.; Engelschall, J.; Imlay, G.

    1981-04-01

    The report documents the first of two tasks performed for the NRC relative to emergency operating procedures for nuclear power plants with special emphasis on LOCA procedures. Emergency procedures from nine plants have been evaluated. The recommendations regarding each plant's emergency procedures were made in separate reports. In this report, an analysis is made of problems common to emergency procedures in all nine plants. Recommendations are advanced for improvement in presentation style, level of detail, and administrative control

  14. Clinical evaluation of preoperative arterial infusion chemotherapy and surgical operation for colorectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jianhua; Zhao Zhongsheng; Deng Gaoli; Hu Tingyang; Yu Wenqiang; Chen Fanghong; Luo Zuyan; Ru Guoqing; Dong Quanjin; Tu Shiliang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical values of preoperative arterial infusion chemotherapy and surgical operation for colorectal carcinoma. Methods: 66 patients with colorectal carcinoma were subjected to percutaneous femoral artery catheterization by Seldinger's technique with infusion of anti-cancer drugs. The resection was performed 5-30 days after the arterial infusion (mean 12 days). In 50 surgical specimens of the 66 cases, histological findings were evaluated including the density and distribution of the apoptosis cells under the observation by DNA nick end labelling technique. Of which 22 specimens before arterial infusion chemotherapy (got from biopsy of preoperation) and 25 normal mucosa (got from normal surgical specimens) were used as controls. Results: The total histological response rate was 100% with grade I in 20 cases, grade II in 21 cases, grade III in 9 cases. The densities of the apoptosis cells were 31.47 ± 5.58 before arterial infusion chemotherapy, 76.69 ± 17.12 after arterial infusion chemotherapy and 8.01 ± 3.39 in normal mucosa. The density of the apoptosis cells after arterial infusion chemotherapy was significantly higher than that before arterial infusion chemotherapy (P 2 =4.696, P>0.30). There were no significant differences in the apoptosis of adenocarcinoma during different pathological stages (F=0.001376, P>0.05). Conclusions: Peroperative transcatheter arterial infusion chemotherapy resulting in apoptosis of adenocarcinoma, can raise the radical operation rate, and prolong survival rate for colorectal carcinoma patients

  15. Effects of live music therapy sessions on quality of life indicators, medications administered and hospital length of stay for patients undergoing elective surgical procedures for brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walworth, Darcy; Rumana, Christopher S; Nguyen, Judy; Jarred, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The physiological and psychological stress that brain tumor patients undergo during the entire surgical experience can considerably affect several aspects of their hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of live music therapy on quality of life indicators, amount of medications administered and length of stay for persons receiving elective surgical procedures of the brain. Subjects (N = 27) were patients admitted for some type of surgical procedure of the brain. Subjects were randomly assigned to either the control group receiving no music intervention (n = 13) or the experimental group receiving pre and postoperative live music therapy sessions (n = 14). Anxiety, mood, pain, perception of hospitalization or procedure, relaxation, and stress were measured using a self-report Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for each of the variables. The documented administration of postoperative pain medications; the frequency, dosage, type, and how it was given was also compared between groups. Experimental subjects live and interactive music therapy sessions, including a pre-operative session and continuing with daily sessions until the patient was discharged home. Control subjects received routine hospital care without any music therapy intervention. Differences in experimental pretest and posttest scores were analyzed using a Wilcoxon Matched-Pairs Signed-Rank test. Results indicated statistically significant differences for 4 of the 6 quality of life measures: anxiety (p = .03), perception of hospitalization (p = .03), relaxation (p = .001), and stress (p = .001). No statistically significant differences were found for mood (p > .05) or pain (p > .05) levels. Administration amounts of nausea and pain medications were compared with a Two-Way ANOVA with One Repeated Measure resulting in no significant differences between groups and medications, F(1, 51) = 0.03; p > .05. Results indicate no significant differences between groups for length of stay (t = .97

  16. Intuitive operability evaluation of surgical robot using brain activity measurement to determine immersive reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Yo; Kawamura, Kazuya; Seki, Masatoshi; Nakashima, Yasutaka; Noguchi, Takehiko; Kasuya, Masahiro; Yokoo, Yuki; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2012-01-01

    Surgical robots have improved considerably in recent years, but intuitive operability, which represents user inter-operability, has not been quantitatively evaluated. Therefore, for design of a robot with intuitive operability, we propose a method to measure brain activity to determine intuitive operability. The objective of this paper is to determine the master configuration against the monitor that allows users to perceive the manipulator as part of their own body. We assume that the master configuration produces an immersive reality experience for the user of putting his own arm into the monitor. In our experiments, as subjects controlled the hand controller to position the tip of the virtual slave manipulator on a target in a surgical simulator, we measured brain activity through brain-imaging devices. We performed our experiments for a variety of master manipulator configurations with the monitor position fixed. For all test subjects, we found that brain activity was stimulated significantly when the master manipulator was located behind the monitor. We conclude that this master configuration produces immersive reality through the body image, which is related to visual and somatic sense feedback.

  17. Trends in operating room-based glaucoma procedures in France from 2005 to 2014: a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bron, Alain M; Mariet, Anne-Sophie; Benzenine, Eric; Arnould, Louis; Daien, Vincent; Korobelnik, Jean François; Quantin, Catherine; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine

    2017-11-01

    To report the trends in operating room-based glaucoma procedures from 2005 to 2014 in France. We identified operating room-based glaucoma procedures (trabeculectomies, deep sclerectomies, aqueous shunts and ciliary body destructions) performed in France from 2005 to 2014 by means of billing codes from a national database. The annual rates and incidence of these procedures per 100 000 inhabitants were analysed globally and in three age groups: 0-14 years, 15-59 years and over 60 years. The annual rate of trabeculectomies decreased slightly during the study period, while the rate for other surgical techniques (deep sclerectomies, aqueous drainage procedures and ciliary body destructions) increased. The overall rate of glaucoma surgeries was higher in areas with populations of African descent than in areas predominantly composed of Caucasian populations: 1.60 (95% CI 1.51 to 1.70, pFrance from 2005 to 2014. Other modalities such as deep sclerectomies, aqueous drainage procedures and ciliary body destruction gained greater acceptance among French ophthalmologists during this 10-year period. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Operability test procedure for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling System Exhausters 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WSaldo, E.J.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a procedure for performing operability testing of the Rotary Mode Core Sampling System Exhausters 3 ampersand 4. Upon completion of testing activities an operability testing report will be issued

  19. 21 CFR 606.100 - Standard operating procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... blood and blood components for transfusion and further manufacturing purposes. Such procedures shall be... the site of phlebotomy to give maximum assurance of a sterile container of blood. (4) Method of... precautions taken to measure accurately the quantity of blood removed from the donor. (6) Methods of component...

  20. Operability test procedure for the TK-900 effluent monitoring station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissenfels, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    This procedure will verify that the 221-B liquid effluent monitoring system, installed near the east end of the 6-in. chemical sewer header, functions as intended by design. TK-900B was installed near stairwell 3 in the 221-B electrical gallery by Project W-007H. The system is part of BAT/AKART for the BCE liquid effluent system

  1. Creating Royal Australian Navy Standard Operating Procedures using Flow Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    set it is important to determine writing and approval responsibilities, storage methods and publishing details before SOPs are written. This...5 4.1.1 Brainstorming ...managed accordingly. Key activities include scoping the set of SOPs, creating a team, developing a plan, writing , reviewing and approving procedures, and

  2. Validation of Virtual Environments Incorporating Virtual Operators for Procedural Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Head Mounted Display HTA Hierarchical Task Analysis ICS Internal Communication System IMC Instrument Meteorological Conditions IOS Instructor...on the actual console as their attention is usually directed out of the Howdah, viewing the helicopter and ship. Figure 3. LSO subject wearing...were created in the Integrated Performance Modelling Environment (IPME) using a Hierarchical Task Analysis ( HTA ) framework in a procedural, but

  3. 40 CFR 240.209-3 - Recommended procedures: Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Occupational Respiratory Disease, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, W. Va. (c) Training in first aid practices and emergency procedures should be given all personnel. (d) Personal safety devices such as hard hats, gloves, safety glasses, and footwear should be provided for facility employees...

  4. Reduction in surgical fog with a warm humidified gas management protocol significantly shortens procedure time in pediatric robot-assisted laparoscopic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenakshi-Sundaram, B; Furr, J R; Malm-Buatsi, E; Boklage, B; Nguyen, E; Frimberger, D; Palmer, B W

    2017-10-01

    The adoption of robot-assisted laparoscopic (RAL) procedures in the field of urology has occurred rapidly, but is, to date, without pediatric-specific instrumentation. Surgical fog is a significant barrier to safe and efficient laparoscopy. This appears to be a significant challenge when adapting three-dimensional 8.5-mm scopes to use in pediatric RAL surgery. The objective of the present study was to compare matched controls from a prospectively collected database to procedures that were performed utilizing special equipment and a protocol to minimize surgical fog in pediatric RAL procedures. A prospectively collected database of all patients who underwent RAL pediatric urology procedures was used to compare: procedure, age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, weight, console time, number of times the camera was removed to clean the lens during a procedure, length of hospital stay, and morphine equivalents required in the postoperative period. A uniquely developed protocol was used, it consisted of humidified (95% relative humidity) and warmed CO 2 gas (95 °F) insufflation via Insuflow® on a working trocar, with active smoke evacuation via PneuVIEW®XE on the opposite working trocar with a gas pass through of 3.5-5 l/min. The outcomes were compared with matched controls (Summary Fig). The novel gas protocol was utilized in 13 procedures (five pyeloplasties, two revision pyeloplasties, three ureteroureterostomies (UU), three nephrectomies) and compared with 13 procedures (six pyeloplasties, one revision pyeloplasty, three UU, three nephrectomies) prior to the protocol development. There was no statistical difference in age (P = 0.78), sex (P = 0.11), ASA score (P = 1.00) or weight (P = 0.69). There were no open conversions, ≥Grade 2 Clavien complications, or readmissions within 30 days in either group. This novel gas protocol yielded a statistically significant reduction in procedure time, by decreasing the number of times the camera was

  5. Incorporation of Procedure-specific Risk Into the ACS-NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator Improves the Prediction of Morbidity and Mortality After Pancreatoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Matthew T; Allegrini, Valentina; Asbun, Horacio J; Ball, Chad G; Bassi, Claudio; Beane, Joal D; Behrman, Stephen W; Berger, Adam C; Bloomston, Mark; Callery, Mark P; Christein, John D; Dickson, Euan; Dixon, Elijah; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos; Fisher, William E; Fong, Zhi Ven; Haverick, Ericka; Hollis, Robert H; House, Michael G; Hughes, Steven J; Jamieson, Nigel B; Kent, Tara S; Kowalsky, Stacy J; Kunstman, John W; Malleo, Giuseppe; McElhany, Amy L; Salem, Ronald R; Soares, Kevin C; Sprys, Michael H; Valero, Vicente; Watkins, Ammara A; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Zureikat, Amer H; Vollmer, Charles M

    2017-05-01

    This multicenter study sought to evaluate the accuracy of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program's (ACS-NSQIP) surgical risk calculator for predicting outcomes after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) and to determine whether incorporating other factors improves its predictive capacity. The ACS-NSQIP surgical risk calculator has been proposed as a decision-support tool to predict complication risk after various operations. Although it considers 21 preoperative factors, it does not include procedure-specific variables, which have demonstrated a strong predictive capacity for the most common and morbid complication after PD - clinically relevant pancreatic fistula (CR-POPF). The validated Fistula Risk Score (FRS) intraoperatively predicts the occurrence of CR-POPF and serious complications after PD. This study of 1480 PDs involved 47 surgeons at 17 high-volume institutions. Patient complication risk was calculated using both the universal calculator and a procedure-specific model that incorporated the FRS and surgeon/institutional factors. The performance of each model was compared using the c-statistic and Brier score. The FRS was significantly associated with 30-day mortality, 90-day mortality, serious complications, and reoperation (all P calculator for 30-day mortality (c-statistic: 0.79 vs 0.68; Brier score: 0.020 vs 0.021), 90-day mortality, serious complications, and reoperation. Neither surgeon experience nor institutional volume significantly predicted mortality; however, surgeons with a career PD volume >450 were less likely to have serious complications (P < 0.001) or perform reoperations (P < 0.001). Procedure-specific complication risk influences outcomes after pancreatoduodenectomy; therefore, risk adjustment for performance assessment and comparative research should consider these preoperative and intraoperative factors along with conventional ACS-NSQIP preoperative variables.

  6. Reporting surgical site infections following total hip and knee arthroplasty: impact of limiting surveillance to the operative hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Avery, Taliser R; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S

    2013-11-01

    Public reporting of surgical site infections (SSIs) by hospitals is largely limited to infections detected during surgical hospitalizations or readmissions to the same facility. SSI rates may be underestimated if patients with SSIs are readmitted to other hospitals. We assessed the impact of readmissions to other facilities on hospitals' SSI rates following primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients who underwent primary THA or TKA at California hospitals between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2009. SSIs were identified using ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes predictive of SSI assigned at any California hospital within 365 days of surgery using a statewide repository of hospital data that allowed tracking of patients between facilities. We used statewide data to estimate the fraction of each hospital's THA and TKA SSIs identified at the operative hospital versus other hospitals. A total of 91 121 THA and 121 640 TKA procedures were identified. Based on diagnosis codes, SSIs developed following 2214 (2.3%) THAs and 2465 (2.0%) TKAs. Seventeen percent of SSIs would have been missed by operative hospital surveillance alone. The proportion of hospitals' SSIs detected at nonoperative hospitals ranged from 0% to 100%. Including SSIs detected at nonoperative hospitals resulted in better relative ranking for 61% of THA hospitals and 61% of TKA hospitals. Limiting SSI surveillance to the operative hospital caused varying degrees of SSI underestimation and substantially impacted hospitals' relative rankings, suggesting that alternative methods for comprehensive postdischarge surveillance are needed for accurate benchmarking.

  7. Operability test procedure for 244-U DCRT. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    This OPT will insure the operability of various systems and their general equipment, used in the operation of the 244-U DCRT. Systems that will be tested include the following: Leak Detection Systems; Heat Trace System; Vessel Temperature Measurement System; Dip Tube Water System; Weight Factor and Specific Gravity System; Instrument Air System; Vessel Liquid Level System; Vessel Liquid Transfer System; and Exhauster Differential Pressure Indicating Controller System. The tests will cover checks on equipment operation and electrical interlocks, but will not cover checks on associated annunciator alarms which are covered in a separate OTP

  8. A Journey to Zero: Reduction of Post-Operative Cesarean Surgical Site Infections over a Five-Year Period

    OpenAIRE

    Hickson, Evelyn; Harris, Jeanette; Brett, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) are a substantial concern for cesarean deliveries in which a surgical site complication is most unwelcome for a mother with a new infant. Steps taken pre- and post-operatively to reduce the number of complications may be of substantial benefit clinically, economically, and psychologically.

  9. Frailty and post-operative outcomes in older surgical patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Shan; Watts, J N; Peel, N M; Hubbard, R E

    2016-08-31

    As the population ages, increasing numbers of older adults are undergoing surgery. Frailty is prevalent in older adults and may be a better predictor of post-operative morbidity and mortality than chronological age. The aim of this review was to examine the impact of frailty on adverse outcomes in the 'older old' and 'oldest old' surgical patients. A systematic review was undertaken. Electronic databases from 2010 to 2015 were searched to identify articles which evaluated the relationship between frailty and post-operative outcomes in surgical populations with a mean age of 75 and older. Articles were excluded if they were in non-English languages or if frailty was measured using a single marker only. Demographic data, type of surgery performed, frailty measure and impact of frailty on adverse outcomes were extracted from the selected studies. Quality of the studies and risk of bias was assessed by the Epidemiological Appraisal Instrument. Twenty-three studies were selected for the review and they were assessed as medium to high quality. The mean age ranged from 75 to 87 years, and included patients undergoing cardiac, oncological, general, vascular and hip fracture surgeries. There were 21 different instruments used to measure frailty. Regardless of how frailty was measured, the strongest evidence in terms of numbers of studies, consistency of results and study quality was for associations between frailty and increased mortality at 30 days, 90 days and one year follow-up, post-operative complications and length of stay. A small number of studies reported on discharge to institutional care, functional decline and lower quality of life after surgery, and also found a significant association with frailty. There was strong evidence that frailty in older-old and oldest-old surgical patients predicts post-operative mortality, complications, and prolonged length of stay. Frailty assessment may be a valuable tool in peri-operative assessment. It is possible that

  10. Procedures and practices for day-to-day operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distler, K.

    1986-01-01

    This lecture deals with problems of safe plant operation under day-to-day conditions. Operation, maintenance and surveillance have to be organized in a preventive manner. It will be shown that nearly all expected jobs and proceedings can be done rule-based. The connection of documentation and work preparation will be lined out. Moreover, the need for control and quality assurance for nearly all proceedings will be pointed out. The question of communication and scheduling will be touched. (orig.)

  11. Standard Operating Procedure for Accelerated Corrosion Testing at ARL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    to scribe nonferrous materials so as to prevent contamination of the substrate during the process. The "X" scribe is made by scribing 2 intersecting...may include GMW14872 Cyclic Corrosion Testing (typically Exterior, Exposure C), ASTM B117 Neutral Salt Fog Testing, ASTM G50 Atmospheric Corrosion...using the same cleaning procedures, contamination of the substrate is minimized during the scribe process. All partners adhering to guidelines and

  12. Surgical Procedures and Clinical Considerations for Impacted Canines: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Torkzaban

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Impaction of canine teeth is a clinical problem whose treatment usually requires an interdisciplinary approach. After the maxillary third molar, the maxillary canine is the second-most commonly impacted tooth, with an incidence of 1% - 2.5%. Maxillary canines are more common in females than males. This study reviews the surgical treatments and orthodontic considerations for impacted canines exposure reported in previous studies. The clinician should be aware of variations in the surgical management of labially and palatally impacted canines, as well as the most common methods of canine in orthodontic application, and the implications of canine extraction. The different factors that affect these decisions are discussed.

  13. Classifying breast cancer surgery: a novel, complexity-based system for oncological, oncoplastic and reconstructive procedures, and proof of principle by analysis of 1225 operations in 1166 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Jürgen; Wallwiener, Diethelm

    2009-04-08

    One of the basic prerequisites for generating evidence-based data is the availability of classification systems. Attempts to date to classify breast cancer operations have focussed on specific problems, e.g. the avoidance of secondary corrective surgery for surgical defects, rather than taking a generic approach. Starting from an existing, simpler empirical scheme based on the complexity of breast surgical procedures, which was used in-house primarily in operative report-writing, a novel classification of ablative and breast-conserving procedures initially needed to be developed and elaborated systematically. To obtain proof of principle, a prospectively planned analysis of patient records for all major breast cancer-related operations performed at our breast centre in 2005 and 2006 was conducted using the new classification. Data were analysed using basic descriptive statistics such as frequency tables. A novel two-type, six-tier classification system comprising 12 main categories, 13 subcategories and 39 sub-subcategories of oncological, oncoplastic and reconstructive breast cancer-related surgery was successfully developed. Our system permitted unequivocal classification, without exception, of all 1225 procedures performed in 1166 breast cancer patients in 2005 and 2006. Breast cancer-related surgical procedures can be generically classified according to their surgical complexity. Analysis of all major procedures performed at our breast centre during the study period provides proof of principle for this novel classification system. We envisage various applications for this classification, including uses in randomised clinical trials, guideline development, specialist surgical training, continuing professional development as well as quality of care and public health research.

  14. Classifying breast cancer surgery: a novel, complexity-based system for oncological, oncoplastic and reconstructive procedures, and proof of principle by analysis of 1225 operations in 1166 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallwiener Diethelm

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the basic prerequisites for generating evidence-based data is the availability of classification systems. Attempts to date to classify breast cancer operations have focussed on specific problems, e.g. the avoidance of secondary corrective surgery for surgical defects, rather than taking a generic approach. Methods Starting from an existing, simpler empirical scheme based on the complexity of breast surgical procedures, which was used in-house primarily in operative report-writing, a novel classification of ablative and breast-conserving procedures initially needed to be developed and elaborated systematically. To obtain proof of principle, a prospectively planned analysis of patient records for all major breast cancer-related operations performed at our breast centre in 2005 and 2006 was conducted using the new classification. Data were analysed using basic descriptive statistics such as frequency tables. Results A novel two-type, six-tier classification system comprising 12 main categories, 13 subcategories and 39 sub-subcategories of oncological, oncoplastic and reconstructive breast cancer-related surgery was successfully developed. Our system permitted unequivocal classification, without exception, of all 1225 procedures performed in 1166 breast cancer patients in 2005 and 2006. Conclusion Breast cancer-related surgical procedures can be generically classified according to their surgical complexity. Analysis of all major procedures performed at our breast centre during the study period provides proof of principle for this novel classification system. We envisage various applications for this classification, including uses in randomised clinical trials, guideline development, specialist surgical training, continuing professional development as well as quality of care and public health research.

  15. 49 CFR 195.402 - Procedural manual for operations, maintenance, and emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedural manual for operations, maintenance, and emergencies. 195.402 Section 195.402 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.402 Procedural...

  16. 9 CFR 354.210 - Minimum standards for sanitation, facilities, and operating procedures in official plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum standards for sanitation, facilities, and operating procedures in official plants. 354.210 Section 354.210 Animals and Animal Products... sanitation, facilities, and operating procedures in official plants. The provisions of §§ 354.210 to 354.247...

  17. The Pajarito Site operating procedures for the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1991-12-01

    Operating procedures consistent with DOE Order 5480.6, and the American National Standard Safety Guide for the Performance of Critical Experiments are defined for the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. These operating procedures supersede and update those previously published in 1983 and apply to any criticality experiment performed at the facility. 11 refs

  18. A triangulating operating platform enhances bimanual performance and reduces surgical workload in single-incision laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Erwin; Martinec, Danny V; Cassera, Maria A; Goers, Trudie A; Dunst, Christy M; Swanstrom, Lee L

    2011-03-01

    Single-site laparoscopy (SSL) attempts to further reduce the surgical impact of minimally invasive surgery. However, crossed instruments and the proximity of the endoscope to the operating instruments placed through one single site leads to inevitable instrument or trocar collision. We hypothesized that a novel, single-port, triangulating surgical platform (SPSP) might enhance performance by improving bimanual coordination and decreasing the surgeon's mental workload. Fourteen participants, proficient in basic laparoscopic skills, were tested on their ability to perform a validated intracorporeal suturing task by either an SSL approach with crossed articulated instruments or a novel SPSP, providing true-right and true-left manipulation. Standard laparoscopic (SL) access served as control. Sutures were evaluated using validated scoring methods and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index was used to rate mental workload. All participants proficiently performed intracorporeal knots by SL (mean score 99.0; 95% CI 97.0 to 100.9). Performance decreased significantly (more than 50%, p mental workload when using true-right and true-left manipulation. This study objectively assessed SSL performance and current attempts for instrumentation improvement in single-site access. While SSL significantly impairs basic laparoscopic skills, surgical platforms providing true-left and true-right maneuvering of instruments appear to be more intuitive and address some of the current challenges of SSL that may otherwise limit its widespread acceptance. Copyright © 2011 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The bilateral bispectral and the composite variability indexes during anesthesia for unilateral surgical procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Lopes-Pimentel

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Our results indicate that the large interindividual variability of BIS and CVI limits their usefulness. We found differences between the left and right measurements in a right-handed series of patients during surgical stimuli though they were not clinically relevant.

  20. Trends in Urodynamic Procedures, Surgical Procedures, and Overall Health Resource Utilization in the Adult Taiwanese Population With Urinary Incontinence: A Secondary Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Lan-Fang; Chang, Ling-Yin; Liao, Yuan-Mei; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Tsai, Pei-Shan

    2017-12-04

    The prevalence and incidence of the main risk factors for urinary incontinence (UI) have both increased over time. In addition, official statistics indicate that Taiwan is on course to evolve from an aging society into an aged society within the next decade. However, most of the studies in the literature that address the natural history of UI target Western and other non-Asian populations. Taiwan lacks knowledge of the natural history of UI. The aims of this research were to study the trends in the use of urodynamic and surgical procedures for various subtypes of UI and to investigate the relationship between UI and healthcare resource utilization. The data on 1 million, randomly selected people who were enrolled in the Taiwan National Health Insurance program between 2000 and 2008 were extracted from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database. The population and all procedures were identified based on the International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Annual incidence of UI was calculated on an annual basis, and trend analysis was performed using logistic regression models. The association between UI and healthcare utilization was examined using generalized linear models in a gamma distribution with a log link function. Overall, the trend in the annual incidence for all types of UI increased significantly (p use of urodynamic procedures over time were observed for mixed and other types of UI (p < .01). In addition, a significantly increasing trend was observed in the annual rates of surgical procedures that were received by patients with urge or stress UI (p < .05). Patients with UI showed significantly higher healthcare resource utilization, including number of ambulatory visits, number of hospitalizations, average ambulatory care expenditures, and average days of hospitalization, than those without UI. However, limited information is available on the conservative treatment of UI in the database. UI symptoms may lead to

  1. Surgical procedures and non-surgical devices for the management of non-apnoeic snoring: a systematic review of clinical effects and associated treatment costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, C; Liu, Z; Welch, K; Weiner, G; Jones, S Q; Stein, K

    2009-01-01

    To review the evidence on the clinical effects and associated treatment costs of surgical procedures and non-surgical devices for the management of non-apnoeic snoring. Major electronic databases were searched for relevant studies published between 1980 and 2007. All treatment costs were estimated based on data from NHS reference costs, device manufacturers and clinical opinion. Studies were screened, data extracted and quality assessed according to standard methods. Results were broadly grouped according to the intervention and comparator when applicable, and further subgrouped according to the specific intervention type and study design. Results were combined using a narrative synthesis with relevant quantitative results tabulated. Differences between studies assessing the same intervention were explored narratively by examining differences in the intervention, study duration and study quality. The systematic review included 27 studies (three randomised controlled trials, two controlled clinical trials and 22 pre-post studies) reported in 30 publications assessing uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UP3) versus laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP), UP3 alone, LAUP alone, palatal stiffening techniques (Pillar implants and injection snoreplasty), radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the soft palate or tongue base, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) devices and mandibular advancement splints (MAS). Studies were generally of a low methodological quality with small sample sizes. A total of 1191 patients was included. Both UP3 and LAUP reduced the number of snores per hour and produced a modest reduction in snoring loudness. UP3 was effective in reducing a number of subjectively reported snoring indices, but results on objective measures were equivocal. Limited evidence indicates that subjectively assessed snoring is improved after LAUP; no objective measures were assessed. RFA was associated with a reduction in partner-assessed snoring intensity, though evidence for an

  2. The design of Advanced Generation of event-base Emergency Operating Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Yuji; Hollnagel, E.

    2000-01-01

    The system that can convert from the knowledge model (called semantic model) of operators in nuclear power plants to the intermediate database for the computerised presentation for emergency operating procedure is designed. This system is called Advanced Generation of Emergency Operating Procedure (AGEOP). The primary AGEOP system has been installed. In principle, once users specify a goal to be attained, then the system searches all paths of tasks to the specified goal. It converts the syntactical model automatically. Furthermore, considering the maintenance of emergency operating procedures that is the main purpose of developing of the system, the principle design of the Integrated Computerised Procedure Presentation (ICPP) system has been also implemented that consists of five utilities and the kernel; it means the KERNEL function of advanced generation of emergency operating procedure. The ICPP system works of highly advanced EOP maintenance. (author)

  3. [The effectiveness of a system using re-useable linens to reduce the expense of surgical operations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Kazuko; Morita, Saori; Shinoda, Maiko; Kawana, Yuki; Satou, Yuu; Yokozuka, Makito

    2013-10-01

    We introduced a system that uses re-useable linens for surgical operations in 2008. After 3 years from introduction we were able to reduce the expense of about yen 4,340,000 per year and CO2 production of 9,548 kg CO2 x m(-2) per year. We were convinced of the effect on reducing the expense of surgical operations and of decreasing the level of CO2 production that leads to global warming.

  4. 40 CFR 240.208-3 - Recommended procedures: Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the quality of the bottom ash at least twice per shift and record in the operating log the estimated percentage of unburned combustibles. (b) If residue or fly ash is collected in a wet condition, it should be drained of free moisture. Transportation of residue and fly ash should be by means that prevent the loads...

  5. Evaluating the performance of survey-based operational management procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomarede, M.; Hillary, R.; Ibaibarriaga, L.; Bogaards, J.A.; Apostolaki, P.

    2010-01-01

    The design and evaluation of survey-based management strategies is addressed in this article, using three case-study fisheries: North Sea herring, Bay of Biscay anchovy and North Sea cod, with a brief history and the main management issues with each fishery outlined. A range of operational

  6. Measuring surgical outcomes in neurosurgery: implementation, analysis, and auditing a prospective series of more than 5000 procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodosopoulos, Philip V; Ringer, Andrew J; McPherson, Christopher M; Warnick, Ronald E; Kuntz, Charles; Zuccarello, Mario; Tew, John M

    2012-11-01

    Health care reform debate includes discussions regarding outcomes of surgical interventions. Yet quality of medical care, when judged as a health outcome, is difficult to define because of impediments affecting accuracy in data collection, analysis, and reporting. In this prospective study, the authors report the outcomes for neurosurgical treatment based on point-of-care interactions recorded in the electronic medical record (EMR). The authors' neurosurgery practice collected outcome data for 19 physicians and ancillary personnel using the EMR. Data were analyzed for 5361 consecutive surgical cases, either elective or emergency procedures, performed during 2009 at multiple hospitals, offices, and an ambulatory spine surgery center. Main outcomes included complications, length of stay (LOS), and discharge disposition for all patients and for certain frequently performed procedures. Physicians, nurses, and other medical staff used validated scales to record the hospital LOS, complications, disposition at discharge, and return to work. Of the 5361 surgical procedures performed, two-thirds were spinal procedures and one-third were cranial procedures. Organization-wide compliance with reporting rates of major complications improved throughout the year, from 80.7% in the first quarter to 90.3% in the fourth quarter. Auditing showed that rates of unreported complications decreased from 11% in the first quarter to 4% in the fourth quarter. Complication data were available for 4593 procedures (85.7%); of these, no complications were reported in 4367 (95.1%). Discharge dispositions reported were home in 86.2%, rehabilitation center in 8.9%, and nursing home in 2.5%. Major complications included culture-proven infection in 0.61%, CSF leak in 0.89%, reoperation within the same hospitalization in 0.38%, and new neurological deficits in 0.77%. For the commonly performed procedures, the median hospital LOS was 3 days for craniotomy for aneurysm or intraaxial tumor and less than

  7. Review and meta-analysis of prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing laparo-endoscopic single site and multiport laparoscopy in gynecologic operative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontis, Alessandro; Sedda, Federica; Mereu, Liliana; Podda, Mauro; Melis, Gian Benedetto; Pisanu, Adolfo; Angioni, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    To critically appraise published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing laparo-endoscopic single site (LESS) and multi-port laparoscopic (MPL) in gynecologic operative surgery; the aim was to assess feasibility, safety, and potential benefits of LESS in comparison to MPL. A systematic review and meta-analysis of eleven RCTs. Women undergoing operative LESS and MPL gynecologic procedure (hysterectomy, cystectomy, salpingectomy, salpingo-oophorectomy, myomectomy). Outcomes evaluated were as follows: postoperative overall morbidity, postoperative pain evaluation at 6, 12, 24 and 48 h, cosmetic patient satisfaction, conversion rate, body mass index (BMI), operative time, blood loss, hemoglobin drop, postoperative hospital stay. Eleven RCTs comprising 956 women with gynecologic surgical disease randomized to either LESS (477) or MPL procedures (479) were analyzed systematically. The LESS approach is a surgical procedure with longer operative and better cosmetic results time than MPL but without statistical significance. Operative outcomes, postoperative recovery, postoperative morbidity and patient satisfaction are similar in LESS and MPL. LESS may be considered an alternative to MPL with comparable feasibility and safety in gynecologic operative procedures. However, it does not offer the expected advantages in terms of postoperative pain and cosmetic satisfaction.

  8. Comparison of drugs use according to surgical procedures as instrument for budgeting and improvement of prescription efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closon, M C

    1999-08-01

    Making an effort to control health expenditure's escalation, especially in hospital, the Belgian government is planning and experimenting with prospective budgeting. A research financed by the Ministry of Public Health allows us to point out the structure of the pathologies treated as well as other variables included in the medical MBDS like urgency, number of diseased systems, ... and explains a high percentage of the variance (62%) in drugs expenditures of the surgical cases. These variables have to be used in order to calibrate hospital drugs budgets. The Interdisciplinary Centre in Health Economics has developed tools to compare drugs prescriptions by type of surgical procedures in order to help hospitals to evaluate their performance should such drugs budgets be progressively introduced.

  9. Do Additional Cardiac Surgical Procedures Increase the Surgical Risk in Patients 80 Years of age or Older Undergoing Coronary Bypass Gragting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korhan Erkanlı

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In association with increasing life expectancy, the number of elderly individuals undergoing coronary bypass grafting (CABG and additional cardiac surgical procedures are increasing. In this study, we evaluated the effects of additional cardiac procedures and preoperative risk factors for postoperative mortality and morbidity in patients 80 years of age and older. Methods: The records of 29 patients aged 80 years and older (82.86±2.91 who had undergone coronary bypass surgery in the department of cardiac surgery between September 2009 and June 2012, were retrospectively reviewed. The subjects were divided into two groups: group 1 included the patients who had undergone CABG, group 2 consisted of those who had undergone CABG and additional cardiac procedures. Results: The mean age of the patients [14 male (48.3% 15 female (51.7%] was 82.86±2.91 years. The left internal thoracic artery was harvested for all patients. The mean number of graft per patient was 3.07±0.95. Carotid endarterectomy was performed in 3 patients before CABG. CABG and aortic valve replacement were performed in 1 patient. CABG, mitral valve replacement ant tricuspid plasty were performed in another patient. Furthermore, in one patient, abdominal aortic graft replacement due to ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and CABG was performed at the same session. The mean EuroSCORE was 5.06±5.16. Postoperative 30 days mortality was 6.8%, and the mean length of stay in hospital was 10.45±8.18 days. Conclusion: Coronary bypass surgery is an acceptable treatment method in patients 80 years of age and older. Although additional cardiac procedures may increase sugical risks, they can be successfully performed. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 14-8

  10. Presentation of automated procedural guidance in surgical simulation: results of two randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijewickrema, S; Zhou, Y; Ioannou, I; Copson, B; Piromchai, P; Yu, C; Briggs, R; Bailey, J; Kennedy, G; O'Leary, S

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the effectiveness and usability of automated procedural guidance during virtual temporal bone surgery. Two randomised controlled trials were performed to evaluate the effectiveness, for medical students, of two presentation modalities of automated real-time procedural guidance in virtual reality simulation: full and step-by-step visual presentation of drillable areas. Presentation modality effectiveness was determined through a comparison of participants' dissection quality, evaluated by a blinded otologist, using a validated assessment scale. While the provision of automated guidance on procedure improved performance (full presentation, p = 0.03; step-by-step presentation, p presentation modalities was vastly different (full presentation, 3.73 per cent; step-by-step presentation, 60.40 per cent). Automated procedural guidance in virtual temporal bone surgery is effective in improving trainee performance. Step-by-step presentation of procedural guidance was engaging, and therefore more likely to be used by the participants.

  11. Risk factors for unplanned readmission within 30 days after pediatric neurosurgery: a nationwide analysis of 9799 procedures from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Brandon A; Johnston, James M; Rocque, Brandon G

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Hospital readmission rate is increasingly used as a quality outcome measure after surgery. The purpose of this study was to establish, using a national database, the baseline readmission rates and risk factors for patient readmission after pediatric neurosurgical procedures. METHODS The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric database was queried for pediatric patients treated by a neurosurgeon between 2012 and 2013. Procedures were categorized by current procedural terminology (CPT) code. Patient demographics, comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, operative variables, and postoperative complications were analyzed via univariate and multivariate techniques to find associations with unplanned readmissions within 30 days of the primary procedure. RESULTS A total of 9799 cases met the inclusion criteria, 1098 (11.2%) of which had an unplanned readmission within 30 days. Readmission occurred 14.0 ± 7.7 days postoperatively (mean ± standard deviation). The 4 procedures with the highest unplanned readmission rates were CSF shunt revision (17.3%; CPT codes 62225 and 62230), repair of myelomeningocele > 5 cm in diameter (15.4%), CSF shunt creation (14.1%), and craniectomy for infratentorial tumor excision (13.9%). The lowest unplanned readmission rates were for spine (6.5%), craniotomy for craniosynostosis (2.1%), and skin lesion (1.0%) procedures. On multivariate regression analysis, the odds of readmission were greatest in patients experiencing postoperative surgical site infection (SSI; deep, organ/space, superficial SSI, and wound disruption: OR > 12 and p 10 days (OR 1.411, p = 0.010), oxygen supplementation (OR 1.645, p = 0.010), nutritional support (OR 1.403, p = 0.009), seizure disorder (OR 1.250, p = 0.021), and longer operative time (per hour increase, OR 1.059, p = 0.029). CONCLUSIONS This study may aid in identifying patients at risk for unplanned readmission following pediatric neurosurgery

  12. Toward feasible, valid, and reliable video-based assessments of technical surgical skills in the operating room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggarwal, R.; Grantcharov, T.; Moorthy, K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine the feasibility, validity, inter-rater, and intertest reliability of 4 previously published video-based rating scales, for technical skills assessment on a benchmark laparoscopic procedure. Summary Background Data: Assessment of technical skills is crucial...... patients within 2 Academic Surgical Departments. All patients had a diagnosis of biliary colic. Surgical technical skills were rated posthoc in a blinded manner by 2 experienced observers on 4 video-based rating scales. The different scales used had been developed to assess generic or procedure......-specific technical skills in a global manner, or on a procedure-specific checklist. Results: Six of 53 procedures were excluded on the basis of intraoperative difficulty. Of the remaining 47 procedures, 14 were performed by 6 novice surgeons and 33 by the 13 experienced surgeons. There were statistically significant...

  13. Study of operating procedures in nuclear power plants: Practices and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, M.H.; Barnes, V.E.; McGuire, M.V.; Radford, L.R.; Wheeler, W.A.

    1987-02-01

    This report describes the project activities, findings, and recommendations of a project entitled ''Program Plan for Assessing and Upgrading Operating Procedures for Nuclear Power Plants.'' The project was performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and Battelle Human Affairs Research Centers for the Division of Human Factors Technology, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The project team analyzed and evaluated samples of normal and abnormal operating procedures from 31 commercial nuclear power plant sites operating in the United States. The project team also visited nine nuclear power plants in the United States to obtain information on the development, use, and control of operating procedures. A peer review group was convened to advise the project team on the conduct of the project and to review and comment on the project report. The report contains findings on the usability of operating procedures and on practices concerning the development, use, an control of operating procedures in nuclear power plants. The report includes recommendations to the NRC on the need to upgrade the quality of operating procedures. The report also discusses an approach to a program plan to assess and upgrade operating procedures

  14. Pesamosca osteoplasty: surgical procedure for the spatial correction of cubitus varus or valgus post malunited supracondylar fractures of the humerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnei, G; Gavriliu, Ş; Nepaliuc, I; Vlad, C; Drăgoescu, M; Georgescu, I; Ghita, R A; Muntean, L; Pârvan, A A; Dughilă, C; Ţiripa, I; Hamei, Ş; Klinaku, I

    2014-01-01

    Supracondylar fractures of the humerus represent a current concern in the child's and adolescent's osteo-articular pathology. Even though orthopedic reductions are made correctly, fractures can become displaced when managed only by cast immobilization and complications may arise. The most frequent complications encountered in "Prof. Dr. Alexandru Pesamosca" Clinique, Bucharest, Romania, due to supracondylar humeral fractures, are valgus or varus deviations with angles that can sometimes exceed 40 degrees as a result of malunion. Varus or valgus deformations were rarely encountered after surgical treatment. The goal of this study is to present an alternative surgical technique to correct varus and valgus deformations as well as malrotation. The study is a retrospective analysis of a 96 children study group surgically managed during 1985 and 2013. In the first period, various surgical techniques have been performed: cuneiform resections, step-cut osteotomies, open wedge osteotomies with external fixation, epiphysiodesis, hemichondrodiatasis and Pesamosca metaphyseal diaphyseal osteoplasty. Starting with 2005, all the cases that presented such complications--28 out of 96 (29.1%)--were managed with the Pesamosca procedure. Due to the malunion of supracondylar humeral fractures only varus or valgus deformities were admitted in the study. The malunion due to the pathologic fractures encountered in osteogenesis imperfecta or fibrous dysplasia was precluded. The experience accumulated with the other surgical techniques used in 68 out of 96 patients (70.9%) determined us to exclusively use the Pesamosca osteoplasty following the year 2005, seeing the simplicity and the efficiency of this procedure. The outcome was very good. In 5 cases out of the 28 (17%) an apparent residual elbow was encountered and one case of relapse (3%) was noted due to inadequate term of cast immobilization. The elbow's mobility was completely recovered, the thoracic member's axis was appropriate and

  15. Manpower development for safe operation of nuclear power plant. China. Emergency operating procedures. Activity: 5.1.4-Task-11. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, L.A.

    1994-01-01

    This report covers the period of engagement from July 11, 1994 through July 22, 1994. The events and topics of discussion are as follows: History of Emergency Operating Procedure EOP Development; Emergency Operating Procedures (Event Based, Critical Safe Function Status Trees and Functional Recovery Response Procedures); Transition from Emergency Operating Procedures to Severe Accident Management Guidelines

  16. [The use of somatosensory evoked potentials for cortical localization during surgical operations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recuero, E

    Identification of the cortical areas of Roland, by means of anatomical references seen on craniotomy, with a view to their conservation during surgical operations, is found to be associated with a high rate of error which may reach 50% with experienced surgeons. Somatosensory evoked potentials (PESS) following stimulation of the median nerve may easily be recorded using electrodes situated directly over the cerebral cortex of patients under general anaesthesia. To obtain this recording, a bipolar set-up of a series of between 6 and 10 electrodes in line one centimetre apart allows identification, by means of phase opposition, of the cortical zones, usually the parietal zone adjacent to the sulcus of Roland, where these potentials are generated. Identification of motor sites (area 4) can be obtained by electrical stimulation of the cerebral cortex, although we have rejected this type of exploration because of its technical difficulty and possible undesirable effects. We consider that, when at surgical operation the cortical area corresponding to the median nerve is identified, and care taken not to damage the cortex 2 cm rostrally, excellent results may be obtained, reducing the sequelae which may occur with this type of surgery.

  17. Mitral implant of the Inovare transcatheter heart valve in failed surgical bioprostheses: a novel alternative for valve-in-valve procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaia, Diego Felipe; Braz, Ademir Massarico; Simonato, Matheus; Dvir, Danny; Breda, João Roberto; Ribeiro, Gustavo Calado; Ferreira, Carolina Baeta; Souza, José Augusto Marcondes; Buffolo, Enio; Palma, José Honório

    2017-04-01

    Reoperative procedure for the treatment of a failed mitral bioprosthesis is associated with considerable risk. In some cases, mortality is high and might contraindicate the benefit of the procedure. The minimally invasive valve-in-valve (ViV) transcatheter mitral valve implant offers an alternative less-invasive approach, reducing morbidity and mortality. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the mitral ViV approach using the Braile Inovare prosthesis. The transcatheter balloon-expandable Braile Inovare prosthesis was used in 12 cases. Procedures were performed in a hybrid operating room, under fluoroscopic and echocardiographic control. Through left minithoracotomy, the prostheses were implanted through the cardiac apex. Serial echocardiographic and clinical examinations were performed. Follow-up varied from 1 to 30 months. A total of 12 transapical mitral ViV procedures were performed. Patients had a mean age of 61.6 ± 9.9 years and 92% were women. Mean logistic EuroSCORE was 20.1%. Successful valve implantation was possible in all cases. In one case, a right lateral thoracotomy was performed for the removal of an embolized prosthesis. There was no operative mortality. Thirty-day mortality was 8.3%. Ejection fraction was preserved after the implant (66.7%; 64.8%; P  = 0.3). The mitral gradient showed a significant reduction (11 mmHg; 6 mmHg; P  < 0.001). Residual mitral regurgitation was not present. There was no left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. The mitral ViV implant in a failed bioprosthesis is an effective procedure. This possibility might alter prosthesis selection in the future initial surgical prosthesis selection, favouring bioprostheses. Further large trials should explore its safety. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  18. Comprehensive evaluation of occupational radiation exposure to intraoperative and perioperative personnel from 18F-FDG radioguided surgical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.; Sarikaya, Ismet; Hall, Nathan C.; Knopp, Michael V.; White, William C.; Marsh, Steven G.; Hinkle, George H.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to comprehensively evaluate occupational radiation exposure to all intraoperative and perioperative personnel involved in radioguided surgical procedures utilizing 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG). Radiation exposure to surgeon, anesthetist, scrub technologist, circulating nurse, preoperative nurse, and postoperative nurse, using aluminum oxide dosimeters read by optically stimulated luminescence technology, was evaluated during ten actual radioguided surgical procedures involving administration of 18 F-FDG. Mean patient dosage of 18 F-FDG was 699 ± 181 MBq (range 451-984). Mean time from 18 F-FDG injection to initial exposure of personnel to the patient was shortest for the preoperative nurse (75 ± 63 min, range 0-182) followed by the circulating nurse, anesthetist, scrub technologist, surgeon, and postoperative nurse. Mean total time of exposure of the personnel to the patient was longest for the anesthetist (250 ± 128 min, range 69-492) followed by the circulating nurse, scrub technologist, surgeon, postoperative nurse, and preoperative nurse. Largest deep dose equivalent per case was received by the surgeon (164 ± 135 μSv, range 10-580) followed by the anesthetist, scrub technologist, postoperative nurse, circulating nurse, and preoperative nurse. Largest deep dose equivalent per hour of exposure was received by the preoperative nurse (83 ± 134 μSv/h, range 0-400) followed by the surgeon, anesthetist, postoperative nurse, scrub technologist, and circulating nurse. On a per case basis, occupational radiation exposure to intraoperative and perioperative personnel involved in 18 F-FDG radioguided surgical procedures is relatively small. Development of guidelines for monitoring occupational radiation exposure in 18 F-FDG cases will provide reassurance and afford a safe work environment for such personnel. (orig.)

  19. Coaching Non-technical Skills Improves Surgical Residents' Performance in a Simulated Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Steven; Parker, Sarah Henrickson; Wilkinson, Jill; McKinley, Aileen; MacDonald, Jamie; Neill, Adrian; McAdam, Tim

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of coaching on non-technical skills and performance during laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a simulated operating room (OR). Non-technical skills (situation awareness, decision making, teamwork, and leadership) underpin technical ability and are critical to the success of operations and the safety of patients in the OR. The rate of developing assessment tools in this area has outpaced development of workable interventions to improve non-technical skills in surgical training and beyond. A randomized trial was conducted with senior surgical residents (n = 16). Participants were randomized to receive either non-technical skills coaching (intervention) or to self-reflect (control) after each of 5 simulated operations. Coaching was based on the Non-Technical Skills For Surgeons (NOTSS) behavior observation system. Surgeon-coaches trained in this method coached participants in the intervention group for 10 minutes after each simulation. Primary outcome measure was non-technical skills, assessed from video by a surgeon using the NOTSS system. Secondary outcomes were time to call for help during bleeding, operative time, and path length of laparoscopic instruments. Non-technical skills improved in the intervention group from scenario 1 to scenario 5 compared with those in the control group (p = 0.04). The intervention group was faster to call for help when faced with unstoppable bleeding in the final scenario (no. 5; p = 0.03). Coaching improved residents' non-technical skills in the simulated OR compared with those in the control group. Important next steps are to implement non-technical skills coaching in the real OR and assess effect on clinically important process measures and patient outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Medical tongue piercing – development and evaluation of a surgical protocol and the perception of procedural discomfort of the participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background A system providing disabled persons with control of various assistive devices with the tongue has been developed at Aalborg University in Denmark. The system requires an activation unit attached to the tongue with a small piercing. The aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a safe and tolerable procedure for medical tongue piercing and to evaluate the expected and perceived procedural discomfort. Methods Four tetraplegic subjects volunteered for the study. A surgical protocol for a safe insertion of a tongue barbell piercing was presented using sterilized instruments and piercing parts. Moreover, post-procedural observations of participant complications such as bleeding, edema, and infection were recorded. Finally, procedural discomforts were monitored by VAS scores of pain, changes in taste and speech as well as problems related to hitting the teeth. Results The piercings were all successfully inserted in less than 5 min and the pain level was moderate compared with oral injections. No bleeding, infection, embedding of the piercing, or tooth/gingival injuries were encountered; a moderate edema was found in one case without affecting the speech. In two cases the piercing rod later had to be replaced by a shorter rod, because participants complained that the rod hit their teeth. The replacements prevented further problems. Moreover, loosening of balls was encountered, which could be prevented with the addition of dental glue. No cases of swallowing or aspiration of the piercing parts were recorded. Conclusions The procedure proved simple, fast, and safe for insertion of tongue piercings for tetraplegic subjects in a clinical setting. The procedure represented several precautions in order to avoid risks in these susceptible participants with possible co-morbidity. No serious complications were encountered, and the procedure was found tolerable to the participants. The procedure may be used in future studies with tongue piercings being a

  1. 50 CFR 260.103 - Operations and operating procedures shall be in accordance with an effective sanitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... be in accordance with an effective sanitation program. 260.103 Section 260.103 Wildlife and Fisheries... Operations and operating procedures shall be in accordance with an effective sanitation program. (a) All..., choppers, and containers which fail to meet appropriate and adequate sanitation requirements will be...

  2. Guidelines for the presentation of emergency operating procedures using advanced information technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.; Hollnagel, E.; Niwa, Yuji

    1994-01-01

    New methods of information presentation and interface design are changing the conditions for work in the modern NPP control room. One area receiving considerable attention is that of Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP). Conventionally such procedures are presented using hard copy manuals; however, development in IT means that there are new opportunities for the computerization of such procedures. This paper reports on the development of human factors guidelines for the computerized presentation of EOPs. After identifying the principle stages in the transition from procedures as documents to fully automated procedures, computerised procedure presentation is briefly discussed. Guidelines for the presentation of such procedures are outlined starting with the high level goals for guidelines themselves. Such goals also constitute the criteria against which the computerized procedures are measured during implementation. Six dimensions describing computerized procedure presentation are presented and two are explore in more detail by identifying points along each dimension that characterize different levels of IT sophistication. (author). 8 refs, 1 tab

  3. Operability test procedure for TRUSAF assayer software upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cejka, C.C.

    1995-01-01

    This OTP is to be used to ensure the operability of the Transuranic Waste Assay System (TRUWAS). The system was upgraded and requires a retest to assure satisfactory operation. The upgrade consists of an AST 486 computer to replace the IBM-PC/XT, and a software upgrade (CNEUT). The software calculations are performed in the same manner as in the previous system (NEUT), however, the new software is written in C Assembly Language. CNEUT is easier to use and far more powerful than the previous program. The TRUWAS is used to verify the TRU content of waste packages sent for storage in the Transuranic Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF). The TRUSAF is part of Westinghouse Hanford's certification program for waste to be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. The Transuranic Waste Assayer uses a combination passive-active neutron interrogation system to determine the TRU content of 55-gallon waste drums. The system consists of a shielded assay chamber; Deuterium-Tritium neutron generator; Helium-3 proportional counters; drum handling system; electronics including preamplifier, amplifier, and discriminator for each of the counter packages; and an AST 486 computer/printer system for data acquisition and analysis. The system can detect down to TRU levels of 10 nCi/g in the waste matrix. The equipment to be tested is: Assay Chamber Door Drum Turntable and Automatic Loading Platform Interlocks Assayer Software; and IBM computer/printer software. The objective of the test is to verify that the system is operational with the AST 486 computer, the software used in the new computer system correctly calculates TRU levels, and the new computer system is capable of storing and retrieving data

  4. Project W-320, operational test procedure OTP-320-003 test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevins, R.R.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents and summarizes the results of OTP-320-003 Project W-320 Operational Testing of the WRSS Supernate Transfer System. Project W-320 Operational Test OTP-320-003 was performed to verify components of the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS) supernate transfer system functioned as designed following construction completion and turnover to operations. All equipment operation was performed by Tank Farms Operations personnel following the operational test procedure and referenced operating procedures. Supernate Transfer line Flushing System Testing was completed over the course of approximately 4 weeks as tank farm conditions and configuration, equipment availability, and operations resources allowed. All testing was performed with the 702-AZ ventilation system and the 296-P-16 ventilation systems in operation. Test procedure OTP-320-003 required two revisions during testing to incorporate Procedure Changes Authorizations (PCAs) necessary to facilitate testing. Various sections of testing are documented on each procedure revision. The completed test procedure is included as Attachment A. Exception Reports generated during the course of testing are included as Attachment B

  5. Project W-320, operational test procedure OTP-320-003 test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevins, R.R.

    1998-07-23

    This report documents and summarizes the results of OTP-320-003 Project W-320 Operational Testing of the WRSS Supernate Transfer System. Project W-320 Operational Test OTP-320-003 was performed to verify components of the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS) supernate transfer system functioned as designed following construction completion and turnover to operations. All equipment operation was performed by Tank Farms Operations personnel following the operational test procedure and referenced operating procedures. Supernate Transfer line Flushing System Testing was completed over the course of approximately 4 weeks as tank farm conditions and configuration, equipment availability, and operations resources allowed. All testing was performed with the 702-AZ ventilation system and the 296-P-16 ventilation systems in operation. Test procedure OTP-320-003 required two revisions during testing to incorporate Procedure Changes Authorizations (PCAs) necessary to facilitate testing. Various sections of testing are documented on each procedure revision. The completed test procedure is included as Attachment A. Exception Reports generated during the course of testing are included as Attachment B.

  6. A pre-operative nomogram for decision making in oncological surgical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Frédéric; Mazouni, Chafika; Bitsakou, Georgina; Morice, Philippe; Goéré, Diane; Honoré, Charles; Elias, Dominique

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to propose a clinical decision-making tool for predicting mortality in patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery with a palliative intent in the oncology setting. Identification of all emergency surgical procedures performed in a Department of Oncologic Surgery in a Comprehensive Cancer Center between January 2008 and January 2013. Multivariate logistic and Cox regression models were used to identify factors predicitve of mortality at 3 months and survival probabilities. Models were internally validated using bootstrapping and calibration. The mortality rates were 30% at 1 month, 46.7% at 3 months and 83.3% at the end of the study. One model based on the albumin level and the P-POSSUM score (AUC: 0.725) adequately predicted mortality at 3 months. A survival nomogram predicted mortality with a concordance index (CI) of 0.718, using the following factors: WHO performance status (P = 0.02), albumin level (P surgical decision making should be based on the use of these tools. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. [Hepato-pancreato-biliary (HPB) surgery and abdominal organ transplantation, a defined subspecialty, integrated within the surgical division: professional, operative and educational aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Haim, Menahem; Nakache, Richard; Klausner, Joseph M

    2009-04-01

    EstabLishment of hepato-pancreato-biliary (HPB) surgery and abdominal organ transplantation as defined subspecialties of general surgery has been boosted over the Last decade. However, the affiliation (independent service vs. integration within the division of surgery), the training course (transplantation vs. surgical oncology) and the referral patterns are still controversial. Dedicated HPB and transplantation units were defined within the surgical division of the Tel Aviv Medical Center. The principles of operation included muttidisciplinary expert teams, unified and standard treatment protocols, exposure and involvement of all residents and attending surgeons of the division to patients, decision-making and perioperative care, peer review and periodic publication of clinical results. Between the years 2003-2007, 870 major HPB procedures were performed: 70 Liver transplants (9 from live donors), 100 organ procurements, 165 kidney and kidney-pancreas transplants (30% from Live donors), 250 hepatic resections of various types and indications, 35 complex biliary reconstructions and 250 pancreatectomies. The short- (morbidity and mortality) and long-term (survival and disease free survival) rates are compatible with the reported results from Centers of Excellence around the world. Operating HPB and transplantation surgery by trained experts and defined professional units, but within an academic surgical division, promotes the achievement of high volume and excellent results together with optimal exposure, education and training of the surgical residents.

  8. The TVT-obturator surgical procedure for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence: a clinical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltregny, David; de Leval, Jean

    2009-03-01

    Six years ago, the inside-out transobturator tape TVT-O procedure was developed for the surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with the aim of minimizing the risk of urethra and bladder injuries and ensuring minimal tissue dissection. Initial feasibility and efficacy studies suggested that the TVT-O procedure is associated with high SUI cure rates and low morbidity at short term. A recent analysis of medium-term results indicated that the TVT-O procedure is efficient, with maintenance, after a 3-year minimum follow-up, of cure rates comparing favorably with those reported for TVT. No late complications were observed. As of July 2008, more than 35 clinical papers, including ten randomized trials and two national registries, have been published on the outcome of the TVT-O surgery. Results from these studies have confirmed that the TVT-O procedure is safe and as efficient as the TVT procedure, at least in the short/medium term.

  9. Comparison of surgical outcomes after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: does the intra-operative use of a microscope improve surgical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adogwa, Owoicho; Elsamadicy, Aladine; Reiser, Elizabeth; Ziegler, Cole; Freischlag, Kyle; Cheng, Joseph; Bagley, Carlos A

    2016-03-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess and compare the complications profile as well as long-term clinical outcomes between patients undergoing an Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF) procedure with and without the use of an intra-operative microscope. One hundred and forty adult patients (non-microscope cohort: 81; microscope cohort: 59) undergoing ACDF at a major academic medical center were included in this study. Enrollment criteria included available demographic, surgical and clinical outcome data. All patients had prospectively collected patient-reported outcomes measures and a minimum 2-year follow-up. Patients completed the neck disability index (NDI), short-form 12 (SF-12) and visual analog pain scale (VAS) before surgery, then at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Clinical outcomes and complication rates were compared between both patient cohorts. Baseline characteristics were similar between both cohorts. The mean ± standard deviation duration of surgery was longer in the microscope cohort (microscope: 169±34 minutes vs. non-microscope: 98±42 minutes, Pmicroscope and non-microscope cohorts demonstrated similar improvement from base line in NDI (microscope: 13.52±25.77 vs. non-microscope: 19.51±27.47, Pmicroscope: 4.15±26.39 vs. non-microscope: 11.98±22.96, Pmicroscope: 9.47±32.38 vs. non-microscope: 16.19±30.44, Pmicroscope: 2.22±4.00 vs. non-microscope: 3.69±3.61, Pmicroscope does not improve overall surgery-related outcomes, nor does it lead to superior long-term outcomes in pain and functional disability, 2 years after index surgery.

  10. Risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative treatment of ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovaska, Mikko T; Mäkinen, Tatu J; Madanat, Rami; Huotari, Kaisa; Vahlberg, Tero; Hirvensalo, Eero; Lindahl, Jan

    2013-02-20

    Surgical site infection is one of the most common complications following ankle fracture surgery. These infections are associated with substantial morbidity and lead to increased resource utilization. Identification of risk factors is crucial for developing strategies to prevent these complications. We performed an age and sex-matched case-control study to identify patient and surgery-related risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative ankle fracture treatment. We identified 1923 ankle fracture operations performed in 1915 patients from 2006 through 2009. A total of 131 patients with deep infection were identified and compared with an equal number of uninfected control patients. Risk factors for infection were determined with use of conditional logistic regression analysis. The incidence of deep infection was 6.8%. Univariate analysis showed diabetes (odds ratio [OR] = 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0, 4.9), alcohol abuse (OR = 3.8, 95% CI = 1.6, 9.4), fracture-dislocation (OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.2, 3.5), and soft-tissue injury (a Tscherne grade of ≥1) (OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.3, 5.3) to be significant patient-related risk factors for infection. Surgery-related risk factors were suboptimal timing of prophylactic antibiotics (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0, 3.4), difficulties encountered during surgery, (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.1, 4.0), wound complications (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.6, 14.0), and fracture malreduction (OR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.3, 9.2). Independent risk factors for infection identified by multivariable analyses were tobacco use (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.6, 8.5) and a duration of surgery of more than ninety minutes (OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.1, 5.7). Cast application in the operating room was independently associated with a decreased infection rate (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2, 0.8). We identified several modifiable risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative treatment of ankle fractures.

  11. Is Office-Based Surgery Safe? Comparing Outcomes of 183,914 Aesthetic Surgical Procedures Across Different Types of Accredited Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Varun; Parikh, Rikesh; Nguyen, Lyly; Afshari, Ashkan; Shack, R Bruce; Grotting, James C; Higdon, K Kye

    2017-02-01

    There has been a dramatic rise in office-based surgery. However, due to wide variations in regulatory standards, the safety of office-based aesthetic surgery has been questioned. This study compares complication rates of cosmetic surgery performed at office-based surgical suites (OBSS) to ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) and hospitals. A prospective cohort of patients undergoing cosmetic surgery between 2008 and 2013 were identified from the CosmetAssure database (Birmingham, AL). Patients were grouped by type of accredited facility where the surgery was performed: OBSS, ASC, or hospital. The primary outcome was the incidence of major complication(s) requiring emergency room visit, hospital admission, or reoperation within 30 days postoperatively. Potential risk factors including age, gender, body mass index (BMI), smoking, diabetes, type of procedure, and combined procedures were reviewed. Of the 129,007 patients (183,914 procedures) in the dataset, the majority underwent the procedure at ASCs (57.4%), followed by hospitals (26.7%) and OBSS (15.9%). Patients operated in OBSS were less likely to undergo combined procedures (30.3%) compared to ASCs (31.8%) and hospitals (35.3%, P risk of developing a complication in an OBSS compared to an ASC (RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.59-0.77, P cosmetic procedures. Plastic surgeons should continue to triage their patients carefully based on other significant comorbidities that were not measured in this present study. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 3. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Effectiveness of facilitated introduction of a standard operating procedure into routine processes in the operating theatre: a controlled interrupted time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lauren; New, Steve; Robertson, Eleanor; Collins, Gary; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Catchpole, Ken; Pickering, Sharon P; Hadi, Mohammed; Griffin, Damian; McCulloch, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Standard operating procedures (SOPs) should improve safety in the operating theatre, but controlled studies evaluating the effect of staff-led implementation are needed. In a controlled interrupted time series, we evaluated three team process measures (compliance with WHO surgical safety checklist, non-technical skills and technical performance) and three clinical outcome measures (length of hospital stay, complications and readmissions) before and after a 3-month staff-led development of SOPs. Process measures were evaluated by direct observation, using Oxford Non-Technical Skills II for non-technical skills and the 'glitch count' for technical performance. All staff in two orthopaedic operating theatres were trained in the principles of SOPs and then assisted to develop standardised procedures. Staff in a control operating theatre underwent the same observations but received no training. The change in difference between active and control groups was compared before and after the intervention using repeated measures analysis of variance. We observed 50 operations before and 55 after the intervention and analysed clinical data on 1022 and 861 operations, respectively. The staff chose to structure their efforts around revising the 'whiteboard' which documented and prompted tasks, rather than directly addressing specific task problems. Although staff preferred and sustained the new system, we found no significant differences in process or outcome measures before/after intervention in the active versus the control group. There was a secular trend towards worse outcomes in the postintervention period, seen in both active and control theatres. SOPs when developed and introduced by frontline staff do not necessarily improve operative processes or outcomes. The inherent tension in improvement work between giving staff ownership of improvement and maintaining control of direction needs to be managed, to ensure staff are engaged but invest energy in appropriate change

  13. Procedures for self-assessment of operational safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    Self-assessment processes have been continuously developed by nuclear organizations, including nuclear power plants. Currently, the nuclear industry and governmental organizations are showing an increasing interest in the implementation of this process as an effective way for improving safety performance. Self-assessment involves the use of different types of tools and mechanisms to assist the organizations in assessing their own safety performance against given standards. This helps to enhance the understanding of the need for improvements, the feeling of ownership in achieving them and and the safety culture as a whole. The concepts developed in this report present the basic approach to self-assessment taking into consideration experience gained during Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) missions, from organizations and utilities which have successfully implemented parts of a self-assessment programme and from meetings organized to discuss the subject

  14. Experimental studies of computerized procedures and team size in nuclear power plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.-H.; Hwang, S.-L.

    2009-01-01

    The operation of a nuclear power plant is so complex that it requires teamwork. To support team performance, a system need to provide all team members integrated information displays as well as decision aids (e.g., computerized procedures). Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of computerized procedures and team size on operating performance. Forty-five participants were involved in the experiments. Each participant executed decision and action tasks to deal with alarm signals, while detecting occasional system errors in the interface. Results showed that effects of computerized procedures were significant on various performance indicators, such as operation time, operation errors, and learning effect, and that two operators would be a satisfactory size in the teamwork system providing computerized procedures

  15. Intra-operative removal of chest tube in video-assisted thoracoscopic procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa M. El-Badry

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Intra-operative removal of chest tube during VATS procedures was a safe technique in well selected patients with an intra-operative successful air-leak test with radiological and clinical follow-up. This technique provided lesser post-operative pain with shorter hospital stay.

  16. A development of assistant surgical robot system based on surgical-operation-by-wire and hands-on-throttle-and-stick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myungjoon; Lee, Chiwon; Park, Woo Jung; Suh, Yun Suhk; Yang, Han Kwang; Kim, H Jin; Kim, Sungwan

    2016-05-20

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery offers several advantages compared with open surgery and conventional minimally invasive surgery. However, one issue that needs to be resolved is a collision between the robot arm and the assistant instrument. This is mostly caused by miscommunication between the surgeon and the assistant. To resolve this limitation, an assistant surgical robot system that can be simultaneously manipulated via a wireless controller is proposed to allow the surgeon to control the assistant instrument. The system comprises tw