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Sample records for surgical doctor female

  1. Challenges to the Doctoral Journey: A Case of Female Doctoral Students from Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bireda, Asamenew Demessie

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate some challenges female doctoral students experience in their doctoral journey. The study used a qualitative design and structured interviews. The theoretical framework that guided the study was that of Urie Bronfenbrenner's ecosystemic theory. A purposely selected sample of five female doctoral students from the…

  2. [Gender differences in career motivation: female doctors' ambitions benefit from family friendly work environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, B.R.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.; Doorewaard, J.A.C.M.; Eisinga, R.N.; Peters, P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine gender differences in career motivation and the effect of a family friendly work environment. DESIGN: Cross-sectional pilot investigation. METHOD: A web survey among male and female doctors (n = 107; 72 women and 35 men) in different specialties, including surgical, internal

  3. [Gender differences in career motivation: female doctors' ambitions benefit from family friendly work environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, B.R.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.; Doorewaard, J.A.C.M.; Eisinga, R.N.; Peters, P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine gender differences in career motivation and the effect of a family friendly work environment. DESIGN: Cross-sectional pilot investigation. METHOD: A web survey among male and female doctors (n = 107; 72 women and 35 men) in different specialties, including surgical, internal

  4. Achondroplasia in female twins: surgical indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisetti, Walter; Pedretti, Leopoldo; De Bartolomeo, Omar; Verdoni, Fabio; Memeo, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Although in literature achondroplasia has been described profusely, reports on achondroplastic twins are limited. We present two cases of monozygotic female twins with achondroplasia, who underwent limb-lengthening surgical procedure with external fixation in the following five steps: tibia, femur, tibia; femur, homer. Both the cases presented a good limb length and an optimal correction of associated deformities after the treatment, fulfilling the indications. Surgical indications were mostly led by the axial deviations of the lower limbs, and the timing of the limb-lengthening procedures has been the same in both couples showing the importance of this aspect.

  5. Surgical reconstruction in female genital mutilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gültekin, İsmail Burak; Altınboğa, Orhan; Dur, Rıza; Kara, Osman Fadıl; Küçüközkan, Tuncay

    2016-06-01

    Female genital mutilation (FGM) is an unusual condition for our country. However, an increase in FGM in future days can be predicted with the increasing numbers of exchange students coming from African countries, migration of refugees and socioeconomic relations with the African countries. We want to share our experience of two FGM victims admitted to our clinic with the request of reconstructive vulvar surgery before their marriage. Both women had WHO Type III FGM. Physical examination findings and surgical reconstruction techniques were presented.

  6. DOES GENDER IMPACT ON FEMALE DOCTORS' EXPERIENCES IN THE TRAINING AND PRACTICE OF SURGERY?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoetok, F; van Wyk, J; Madiba, T E

    2017-06-01

    Surgery has been a male-dominated speciality both in South Africa and abroad. This mixed methodology case study collected data from a purposive sample of female surgical registrars enrolled at one institution in South Africa. A self-administered questionnaire was used to explore whether or not female doctors perceived any benefits of being in a male-dominated specialty. It explored problems encountered due to gender, the participants' perceptions of the influence of gender on their surgical training, practice and challenges. Thirty-two female registrars participated in the study. The respondents were mainly South African (91%) and enrolled in seven surgical specialities. Twenty-seven (84%) respondents were satisfied with their practical training and skills development as surgeons. Twenty-four (75%) respondents had identified a mentor from the department and all respondents indicated that the gender of their mentor did not impact on the quality of their training. Seventeen (53%) respondents perceived having received differential treatment due to their gender and 25 (78.2%) thought that the gender of their mentor did not impact on the quality of the guidance in surgery. Challenges included physical threats to them as females from patients and disrespect, emotional threats and defaming statements from male registrars. Other challenges included time-constraints for family and academic work, poor work life balance and being treated differently due to their gender. Seventeen (53%) respondents would consider teaching in the Department of Surgery. Twenty-five respondents (78%) would recommended the specialty to young female students, as they were convinced that surgery had been the right choice for them. Seventeen respondents (53%) were also open to pursuing teaching posts in the Department of Surgery. Generally, females had positive perceptions of their training in Surgery. They expressed concern about finding a worklife balance. The gender of their mentor did not impact

  7. [From bluestocking to vamp; images reflecting the view on female doctors after 1850].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijselhart, J P

    2008-10-01

    The rise of the female doctor can be read as a post-modern sociological story in pictures. Questions about designing medical practice, professional pleasure and combining work with other activities could only emerge after women had fought the right to become doctor in all medical disciplines. Various photographs, drawings and cartoons reflect society's changing perspective on female physicians. However, it is uncertain in what way this long-standing debate will benefit female doctors. The call for change in the medical profession remains undiminished.

  8. A comparison of the effect of work stress on burnout and quality of life between female nurses and female doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Si-Ying; Li, Huang-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Rong; Yang, Shu-Juan; Qiu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect of work stress on job burnout and quality of life between female nurses and doctors in China. The participants were 947 female nurses and 685 female doctors selected from Fujian provinces by using stratified cluster sampling method. The Chinese version of Short Form-36 Health Survey was used to measure quality of life; the Occupation Stress Inventory-Revised Edition was applied for occupational stress; and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey was used to assess job burnout. Occupational stress (indicated by different stressors) played an important role in job burnout and quality of life among female nurses and female doctors when taking into account other potential influencing factors simultaneously. These results show that it is important to adopt different preventive measures to prevent burnout and improve quality of life among the 2 populations according to the different stressors.

  9. Personal values of male and female doctors: gender aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neittaanmäki, L; Gross, E B; Virjo, I; Hyppölä, H; Kumpusalo, E

    1999-02-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the personal values of physicians. It was part of the Physician 93 Study, the purpose of which was to shed light on the life situation, career and future plans of young doctors and their views on medical education. The survey population included all the medical doctors registered during the years 1982-1991 in Finland (N = 4671). In the spring of 1993 a postal questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 2341 doctors. After two reminder letters, 1818 questionnaires (78%) were returned. 59% of the respondents were women. Subjects were asked to rate on a 4-point scale each of a set of 17 potentially important values listed in the questionnaire, five of which were seen by the majority of physicians as very important. These values were: family life, health, close friends, success in work or in studies and children's success. The potentially important values were conceptualized as indicative of eight important dimensions of the values of physicians: close friends, health. self actualization, success, universal values, well-being, family and ideology. Women doctors rated close friends, health, success, universalism and ideology as more important than men doctors.

  10. The mentoring of male and female scientists during their doctoral studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippelli, Laura Ann

    The mentoring relationships of male and female scientists during their doctoral studies were examined. Male and female biologists, chemists, engineers and physicists were compared regarding the importance of doctoral students receiving career enhancing and psychosocial mentoring from their doctoral chairperson and student colleagues. Scientists' satisfaction with their chairperson and colleagues as providers of these mentoring functions was also investigated. In addition, scientists identified individuals other than their chairperson and colleagues who were positive influencers on their professional development as scientists and those who hindered their development. A reliable instrument, "The Survey of Accomplished Scientists' Doctoral Experiences," was developed to assess career enhancing and psychosocial mentoring of doctoral chairpersons and student colleagues based on the review of literature, interviews with scientists and two pilot studies. Surveys were mailed to a total of 400 men and women scientists with earned doctorates, of which 209 were completed and returned. The findings reveal that female scientists considered the doctoral chairperson furnishing career enhancing mentoring more important than did the men, while both were in accordance with the importance of them providing psychosocial mentoring. In addition, female scientists were not as satisfied as men with their chairperson providing most of the career enhancing and psychosocial mentoring functions. For doctoral student colleagues, female scientists, when compared to men, indicated that they considered student colleagues more important in providing career enhancing and psychosocial mentoring. However, male and female scientists were equally satisfied with their colleagues as providers of these mentoring functions. Lastly, the majority of male scientists indicated that professors served as a positive influencer, while women revealed that spouses and friends positively influenced their professional

  11. The female athlete triad: what's a doctor to do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Constance Marie

    2007-12-01

    Sports medicine physicians often encounter athletes with at least one component of the Female Athlete Triad-disordered eating, menstrual dysfunction, and altered bone mineral density. Recognizing these conditions early is critical because prolonged exposure can lead to serious, potentially irreversible, health consequences. Knowledge of the pathophysiology, detection, and treatment of these problems has evolved significantly. This review focuses on the newer scientific findings in this important area of women's health. There remains a distinct lack of prospective epidemiologic data assessing prevalence and causes, and outcome studies on the efficacy of prevention and treatment of the Triad disorders. Nevertheless, the underlying message remains that participation in sports and physical activity benefits the long-term health of girls and women, and should be encouraged.

  12. Black Female Voices: Self-Presentation Strategies in Doctoral Programs at Predominately White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavers, Marjorie C.; Moore, James L., III

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on a larger study, this qualitative investigation uses Black feminist thought as the interpretive lens to investigate perceptions and experiences of African American female doctoral students at predominately White institutions (PWIs). Semistructured interviews were used to gain an understanding of their experiences and how these…

  13. Professional burnout syndrome in doctors of surgical specialties in Ukraine: causes, consequences, labor optimization ways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurupii, Dmytro A; Kholod, Dmytro A; Sonnik, Evgen G

    The professional burnout syndrome (PBS) affects quality of medical care provision for people, which is acquires the special actuality in terms of reforming the health care system. To study ways to improve the efficiency of doctors of surgical specialties based on analyzes of PBS and its consequences. A survey of psychological tests and 62 surgical doctors was carried out. It was found out that the PBS reaches a peak after 11 to 15 years of working experience. Anesthesiologists have high levels of PBS, emotional exhaustion, cynicism, low desire for career growth, frequent misunderstanding with the administration, they prefer 8-hour working day, and relieve stress by sleeping and consuming alcohol. Obstetrician-gynecologists show moderate level of PBS and emotional exhaustion, high degree of cynicism, strong desire for career growth, frequent misunderstandings with patients and their relatives, prefer 8-hour working day, relieve stress by smoking and socializing with family and friends. Traumatic surgeons have moderate level of PBS, emotional exhaustion, high degree of cynicism, strong desire for career growth, frequent misunderstandings with their colleagues of related specialties, prefer the 24-hour working day, and reli eve their stress with alcohol and sports. Surgeons have moderate level of PBS, emotional exhaustion, low degree of cynicism, moderate desire for career growth, frequent misunderstandings with their colleagues of related specialties, prefer the 8-hour working day, and relieve stress by smoking and sleeping. PBS is most expressed in doctors having working experience of 11 to 15 years and in anesthesiologists. They get professional deformations. These features should be considered in course of organization of working process of medical teams.

  14. Surgical landmarks of the ureter in the cadaveric female pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barksdale, P A; Brody, S P; Garely, A D; Elkins, T E; Nolan, T E; Gasser, R F

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose was to delineate the course of the ureter in the female pelvis in relationship to several important surgical landmarks. Ten female cadavers with undissected pelves were used. The ureter was identified at the pelvic brim and traced inferiorly to the bladder. Sets of measurements (+/- 0.1 cm) that help define the location of the ureter were obtained at the three landmarks; the ischial spine, the obturator canal and the insertion of the arcus tendineus on the pubic bone. The mean distances from the ureter to the pelvic floor were ischial spine, 3.2 +/- 0.1 cm; obturator canal, 3.2 +/- 0.1 cm; and the insertion of the arcus tendineus on the pubic bone, 1.6 +/- 0.1 cm. The mean distances from the arcus tendineus to the pelvic floor were ischial spine, 1.9 +/- 0.1 cm; obturator canal, 2.8 +/- 0.1 cm; and the insertion of the arcus tendineus on the pubic bone, 3.2 +/- 0.1 cm. This study defines the relationship of the ureter to the pelvic floor through measurements taken at three landmarks. The data should be useful to pelvic surgeons and are important for the development of future surgical techniques.

  15. Equality or equity in health care access: a qualitative study of doctors' explanations to a longer doctor's delay among female TB patients in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, A; Johansson, E

    2004-04-01

    Earlier studies from Vietnam have highlighted the importance of studying gender aspects of health-seeking and diagnosis of potential tuberculosis patients. A longer doctor's delay to diagnosis among female TB patients has been shown. The objective of the present study was to explore doctors' views about and explanations for the longer doctor's delay. Five focus group discussions and three in-depth interviews were performed in a rural province in Vietnam. Thematic content analysis was used to interpret the data. The doctors suggest that women are lost or delayed within the health care-seeking chain, mainly because of barriers associated with the female gender. These barriers are identified, but yet the patient-doctor encounter seems to be steered by an equality principle. This results in gender blindness since equal treatment is suggested despite needs being different. We argue that gender equity should be the guiding principle for the tuberculosis patient-doctor encounter. An equity principle emphasises that needs vary with factors like gender or context. We suggest more research into the health care-seeking chain in order to identify the specific steps where TB diagnosis of men and women may be delayed. Interventions are needed in order to reduce delay to TB diagnosis especially for women and the current TB control strategy, (DOTS), needs to be examined from an equity perspective.

  16. Non-surgical treatment of primary female urethral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard F. Schneider

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary carcinomas of the female urethra are extremely rare, with an annual incidence of less than ten in one million. Currently, there is no consensus regarding management of this malignancy. However, there have been several case reports demonstrating the efficacy of chemoradiation in the treatment of female urethral cancer. In this report we present two cases of female primary urethral adenocar­cinoma that were treated by concomitant chemotherapy and external beam radiother­apy, followed by interstitial brachytherapy.

  17. Where have they gone? - a discussion on the balancing act of female doctors between work and family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerg-Bretzke, Lucia; Limbrecht, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    The increasing number of vacant positions for doctors increasingly puts the issue of reconciling work and family into the spotlight in companies, hospitals and universities, as increased expectations of a better work-life balance are seen as one of the reasons for these vacancies. Highly qualified professionals are trained, but not available to the labour market. The aim is to summarise what difficulties doctors who want to have a family and their potential employers must face. The following articles show the current state of research and potential starting points for an optimisation of the medical profession from a family-friendly perspective and intend to stimulate debate. Some basic steps towards better work-life balance have already been taken, such as the provision of childcare places and the increasing availability of more flexible working patterns. But it seems that these measures, since they have been implemented neither sufficiently nor universally, do not suffice to secure the next generation of staff. Especially women in leadership positions are still rare to find. Both male and female doctors want better quality of life by achieving a better work-life balance. The expansion of family-friendly services is seen as a necessary step to allow female doctors to successfully combine work and family.

  18. Knowledge, attitude and practice of female genital mutilation among doctors and nurses in Bayelsa state, Niger-Delta of Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Oyeyemi A.S; Ibrahim I.A; Ekine A.A

    2013-01-01

    Background: Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a harmful traditional practice that is deeply rooted in Africa. It has been outlawed in Bayelsa state of Nigeria but there is evidence that its performance by traditional circumcisers and health professionals continues. Aim: The study aimed to determine the knowledge, attitude and practice of FGM among doctors and nurses/midwives practising in public secondary and tertiary hospitals in Bayelsa state. Methods: One hundred and ninety seven (197) s...

  19. Application of 3D Printing in the Surgical Planning of Trimalleolar Fracture and Doctor-Patient Communication

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    Long Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of 3D printing in treating trimalleolar fractures and its roles in physician-patient communication, thirty patients with trimalleolar fractures were randomly divided into the 3D printing assisted-design operation group (Group A and the no-3D printing assisted-design group (Group B. In Group A, 3D printing was used by the surgeons to produce a prototype of the actual fracture to guide the surgical treatment. All patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation. A questionnaire was designed for doctors and patients to verify the verisimilitude and effectiveness of the 3D-printed prototype. Meanwhile, the operation time and the intraoperative blood loss were compared between the two groups. The fracture prototypes were accurately printed, and the average overall score of the verisimilitude and effectiveness of the 3D-printed prototypes was relatively high. Both the operation time and the intraoperative blood loss in Group A were less than those in Group B (P<0.05. Patient satisfaction using the 3D-printed prototype and the communication score were 9.3±0.6 points. A 3D-printed prototype can faithfully reflect the anatomy of the fracture site; it can effectively help the doctors plan the operation and represent an effective tool for physician-patient communication.

  20. Application of 3D Printing in the Surgical Planning of Trimalleolar Fracture and Doctor-Patient Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Long; Shang, Xian-Wen; Fan, Jian-Nan; He, Zhi-Xu; Wang, Jian-Ji; Liu, Miao; Zhuang, Yong; Ye, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of 3D printing in treating trimalleolar fractures and its roles in physician-patient communication, thirty patients with trimalleolar fractures were randomly divided into the 3D printing assisted-design operation group (Group A) and the no-3D printing assisted-design group (Group B). In Group A, 3D printing was used by the surgeons to produce a prototype of the actual fracture to guide the surgical treatment. All patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation. A questionnaire was designed for doctors and patients to verify the verisimilitude and effectiveness of the 3D-printed prototype. Meanwhile, the operation time and the intraoperative blood loss were compared between the two groups. The fracture prototypes were accurately printed, and the average overall score of the verisimilitude and effectiveness of the 3D-printed prototypes was relatively high. Both the operation time and the intraoperative blood loss in Group A were less than those in Group B (P < 0.05). Patient satisfaction using the 3D-printed prototype and the communication score were 9.3 ± 0.6 points. A 3D-printed prototype can faithfully reflect the anatomy of the fracture site; it can effectively help the doctors plan the operation and represent an effective tool for physician-patient communication.

  1. [The happy doctor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Christel M P; van der Graaf, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    Descriptive, questionnaire-based. To study what makes doctors and medical students happy: Descriptive, questionnaire-based. Descriptive, questionnaire-based. For the purposes of this study, doctors and medical students completed an online questionnaire in the summer of 2012. They were presented with questions enquiring into general characteristics and into happiness. We asked them to define happiness, and to describe their happiest moments. The results were interpreted with the aid of simple statistics. 401 doctors, registrars and medical students took part in the study. 41% of the respondents were male and 59% female. Average age was 40 years. Students, GPs, anaesthesiologists and internists were the best represented. On average, the participants gave their 'happiness' a score of 7.6. The younger doctors ( 48 years (7.8), which also explains the relatively low scores for students (7.1). GPs were the happiest, with an average score of 7.9, closely followed by the 'other doctors', with an average score of 7.8, and the medical specialists (7.6). Within the specialties, bearing in mind that the low numbers means that results should be interpreted with some caution, the doctors with 'minority specialties' were the happiest, followed by internists and the supporting specialties. Psychiatrists and surgical colleagues can be found at the bottom of the list. The determinants 'love and relationships' and 'family' contribute the most to feeling happy. Older doctors are happier than younger doctors and GPs are generally happier than medical specialists. The determinants 'love and relationships' and family' are the most important for doctors' happiness.

  2. Factors Associated with Female Chemist Doctoral Career Choice within the Physical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Katherine P.; Tai, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that women are entering the field of physics at a faster rate than the field of chemistry through bachelor's and doctoral degrees. However, STEM studies primarily compare women to men or examine them as a single entity. Therefore, a paucity of research exists that examines what may differentiate women in certain critical and…

  3. The difficulty of professional continuation among female doctors in Japan: a qualitative study of alumnae of 13 medical schools in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kyoko; Yamazaki, Yuka; Gruppen, Larry D; Horie, Saki; Takeuchi, Masumi; Illing, Jan

    2015-03-27

    To investigate the difficulties Japanese female doctors face in continuing professional practice. A qualitative study using the Kawakita Jiro method. A survey conducted in 2011 of 13 private Japanese medical school alumni associations. 359 female doctors. Barriers of balancing work and gender role. The female doctors reported that professional practice was a struggle with long working hours due to a current shortage of doctors in Japan. There was also a severe shortage of childcare facilities in the workplace. Some women appeared to have low confidence in balancing the physician's job and personal life, resulting in low levels of professional pursuit. There appeared to be two types of stereotypical gender roles, including one expected from society, stating that "child rearing is a woman's job", and the other perceived by the women themselves, that some women had a very strong desire to raise their own children. Male doctors and some female doctors who were single or older were perceived to be less enthusiastic about supporting women who worked while raising children because these coworkers feared that they would have to perform additional work as a result of the women taking long periods of leave. Important factors identified for promoting the continuation of professional practice among female doctors in Japan were the need to improve working conditions, including cutting back on long working hours, a solution to the shortage of nurseries, a need for the introduction of educational interventions to clarify professional responsibilities, and redefinition of the gender division of labour for male and female doctors. In addition, we identified a need to modernise current employment practices by introducing temporary posts to cover maternity leave and introducing flexible working hours during specialist training, thus supporting and encouraging more women to continue their medical careers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  4. Broken Wings: Issues Faced By Female Doctors in Pakistan Regarding Career Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Arif

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We often read slogans like "Without women, no development" but are women really advancing? We still need to know 1 whether women’s career paths are as smooth as that of men’s? 2 Can they claim and bargain for their desired compensations and promotions; 3 0rthey can easily relocate themselves easily to some organization or place where they may find all that is desired by them? 4 Can they build and sustain their own power networks; 5 can they organize and run professional bodies and societies on their own? And finally we see women facilitating others everywhere but how often do we see women leading others? This qualitative study aims to identify reasons why women fail to pursue their career as seriously as men. Whatare the social and psychological factors that are pushing women behind? What values and traits are missing in women that they fail to acquire leadership roles in life? What can be done to help and guide the women struggling in their careers towards better decision making. The study comprise of report developed after interpretive analysis of the qualitative survey done with lady doctors working in national hospitals in three districts of Punjab, Pakistan supported by indepthinterviews of doctors working with Pakistan Medical Association and telephonic survey with doctors who did not pursue their career. After triangulation and analysis of the evidence, the researcher reached at an interesting conclusion, that lady doctors must learn to balancebetween their emotional and professional needs to stay in the field and advance in career.

  5. Surgical treatment of locally advanced anal cancer after male-to-female sex reassignment surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marco Caricato; Fabio Ausania; Giovanni Francesco Marangi; Ilaria Cipollone; Gerardo Flammia; Paolo Persichetti; Lucio Trodella; Roberto Coppola

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of a transsexual patient who underwent a partial pelvectomy and genital reconstruction for anal cancer after chemoradiation. This is the first case in literature reporting on the occurrence of anal cancer after male-to-female sex reassignment surgery. We describe the surgical approach presenting our technique to avoid postoperative complications and preserve the sexual reassignment.

  6. Sexual history taking in general practice: managing sexually transmitted infections for female sex workers by doctors and assistant doctors in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Khoi; Minichiello, Victor; Hussain, Rafat; Khan, Asaduzzaman

    2015-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Vietnam have been increasing. Control of STIs among female sex workers (FSWs) is important in controlling the epidemic. Effective STI control requires that physicians are skilful in taking sexual history for FSW patients. Three hundred and seventy-one physicians responded to a survey conducted in three provinces in Vietnam. The respondents were asked whether they asked FSW patients about their sexual history and information asked during sexual history taking. The respondents were also asked about their barriers for taking sexual history. Over one-fourth (27%) respondents always, over half (54%) respondents sometimes and 19% respondents never obtained a sexual history from FSW patients. Multivariable analysis revealed that factors associated with always taking a sexual history were being doctor, training in STIs and working at provincial level facilities. Physician's discomfort was found to be inversely associated with training on communication with patients, seeing 15 or fewer patients a week, working at provincial level facilities. Issues in sexual history taking among FSW patients in general practice in Vietnam were identified. These issues can help STI control for FSW patients and need due attention in order to improve STI management in Vietnam.

  7. Does gender impact on female doctors'experiences in the training and practice of surgery? A single centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoetok, F; Van Wyk, J M; Madiba, T E

    2017-09-01

    Surgery has been identified as a male-dominated specialty in South Africa and abroad. This study explored how female registrars perceived the impact of gender on their training and practice of surgery. A self-administered questionnaire was used to explore whether females perceived any benefits to training in a male-dominated specialty, their choice of mentors and the challenges that they encountered during surgical training. Thirty-two female registrars participated in the study. The respondents were mainly South African (91%) and enrolled in seven surgical specialties. Twenty-seven (84%) respondents were satisfied with their training and skills development. Twenty-four (75%) respondents had a mentor from the department. Seventeen (53%) respondents perceived having received differential treatment due to their gender and 25 (78.2%) thought that the gender of their mentor did not impact on the quality of the guidance received in surgery. Challenges included physical threats to female respondents from patients and disrespect, emotional threats and defaming statements from male registrars. Additional challenges included time-constraints for family and academic work, poor work-life balance and being treated differently due to their gender. Seventeen (53%) respondents would consider teaching in the Department of Surgery. Generally, females had positive perceptions of their training in Surgery. They expressed concern about finding and maintaining a work-life balance. The gender of their mentor did not impact on the quality of the training but 'bullying' from male peers and selected supervisors occurred. Respondents will continue to recommend the specialty as a satisfying career to young female students.

  8. [Doctor and poet as rivals. Sigmund Freud, Alfred von Berger and the narrative of female homosexuality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Starting from a passage in the Dora case history where Freud suggests some differences between a literary and a clinical narrative of female homosexuality, this paper presents examples which he might have had in mind. Besides Balzac's "La fille aux yeux d'or" (1834/35) it is in particular Alfred v. Berger's novella "Die Italienerin [The Italian woman]" (1904) which may have served as a model and counterpoint to the literary strategies used in Freud's case history. Freud had a relationship of long standing with Berger. This newly discovered source may provide a clue for the date at which Freud finalized the Dora manscript which he had held back for years.

  9. The well-being and mental health of male and female hospital doctors in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mache, Stefanie; Klapp, Burghard F; Groneberg, David A

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the associations between subjective well-being and mental health. In addition, gender differences are evaluated. The research was conducted as a cross-sectional online survey using a standardized questionnaire to assess physicians' mental health and well-being. Results have shown moderate scores for mental health and well-being in physicians. In general, male physicians perceive a better well-being and higher mental health score than female physicians. Well-being and mental health should be improved to increase physicians' work ability and subsequently, the quality of treatment and patient satisfaction. Mental health prevention should be more widely implemented in hospitals, and its awareness and early treatment should be encouraged. Mental health interventions might include modifying physicians' daily work schedules, providing curricula on mental health and offering training on the awareness of distress and well-being.

  10. Feminisation of the medical profession: A strategic HRM dilemma? The effects of family-friendly HR practices on female doctors' contracted working hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, B.R.; Peters, P.; Doorewaard, J.A.C.M.; Eisinga, R.N.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Health-care institutions face a strategic HR dilemma. They need to attract female doctors from a tight, feminised labour market by offering family-friendly HR practices (e.g. part-time employment), often based on collective labour agreements, while trying to contain their labour costs by employing

  11. Explaining career motivation among female doctors in the Netherlands: The effects of children, views on motherhood and work-home cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, B.R.; Peters, P.; Eisinga, R.N.; Doorewaard, J.A.C.M.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    The gender imbalance in senior medical positions is often attributed to an alleged lack of motivation on the part of female doctors, especially those with young children. Some researchers argue that an unsupportive work-home culture in the medical workplace also plays a role. This study investigates

  12. Feminisation of the medical profession: A strategic HRM dilemma? The effects of family-friendly HR practices on female doctors' contracted working hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, B.R.; Peters, P.; Doorewaard, J.A.C.M.; Eisinga, R.N.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Health-care institutions face a strategic HR dilemma. They need to attract female doctors from a tight, feminised labour market by offering family-friendly HR practices (e.g. part-time employment), often based on collective labour agreements, while trying to contain their labour costs by employing a

  13. Explaining career motivation among female doctors in the Netherlands: The effects of children, views on motherhood and work-home cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, B.R.; Peters, P.; Eisinga, R.N.; Doorewaard, J.A.C.M.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    The gender imbalance in senior medical positions is often attributed to an alleged lack of motivation on the part of female doctors, especially those with young children. Some researchers argue that an unsupportive work-home culture in the medical workplace also plays a role. This study investigates

  14. Feminisation of the medical profession: A strategic HRM dilemma? The effects of family-friendly HR practices on female doctors' contracted working hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, B.R.; Peters, P.; Doorewaard, J.A.C.M.; Eisinga, R.N.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Health-care institutions face a strategic HR dilemma. They need to attract female doctors from a tight, feminised labour market by offering family-friendly HR practices (e.g. part-time employment), often based on collective labour agreements, while trying to contain their labour costs by employing a

  15. Systemic Inflammatory Reaction in Females with Severe Gestosis During Surgical Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Mikhno

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the impact the impact of surgical delivery on the time course of changes in the concentration of tumor necrosis factor-а (TNF-а, interleukin (IL-1/8, y-interferon, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and neopterin in the venous blood of women with severe gestosis and to develop a method for correcting a perioperative systemic inflammatory reaction (SIR.Subjects and methods: 89 females in whom surgical delivery had been performed under spinal anesthesia were examined. A control group comprised 30 females with uncomplicated pregnancy; Group 1 included 29 females with severe gestosis; Group 2 consisted of 30 females with severe gestosis to whom the developed method of perioperative SIR correction with dexametha-sone and pentoxyphylline was applied. Solid-phase enzyme immunoassay was used to determine the peripheral blood level of the cytokines and neopterin. The study was conducted in the following steps: 1 before surgery; 2 during surgery (after aponeurosis suturing, 3, 4, and 5 on days 1, 3, and 5 postoperatively, respectively.Results. In females with uncomplicated pregnancy, surgical delivery was accompanied by increases in the concentrations of IL-1/8 and neopterin. This reaction was limited by the increased synthesis of IL-10. Beginning with the third postoperative day, there was a reduction in the level of proinflammatory cytokines. Significantly elevated venous blood concentrations of y-interferon, IL-1/8, TNF-а, IL-6, and decreased levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10 and IL-4, were detectable in pregnant females with severe gestosis. Against the above background, surgical delivery caused an increase in the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines and neopterin with the high level being within 5 postoperative days. The developed method for correction of perioperative SIR in females with severe gestosis lowered the concentrations of y-interferon, IL-1/8, TNF-а, IL-6, and neopterin and promoted the recovery of cytokine

  16. Gender role stereotype and poor working condition pose obstacles for female doctors to stay in full-time employment: alumnae survey from two private medical schools in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Miki; Nomura, Kyoko; Higaki, Yuko; Akaishi, Yu; Seki, Masayasu; Kobayashi, Shizuko; Komoda, Takayuki; Otaki, Junji

    2013-03-01

    The shortage of physicians has become a serious problem in Japan. It has been pointed out that an increase in the number of female doctors may contribute to the aggravation of this shortage because it is known that women work fewer hours than male doctors. Here, we investigated how many female doctors had ever resigned from a full-time position, and elucidated the reasons why female doctors find it difficult to stay in full-time employment. An alumnae survey of 2 private medical schools was conducted in 2007. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to 1423 graduates and 711 responded with informed consent (response rate, 50%; mean age, 39 years). Overall, 55% of the respondents had previously resigned from full-time employment, of which 90% resigned within 10 years of graduating from medical school. The difficulty in balancing work, childbirth and child rearing (45%) were the top 2 reasons for resignation, followed by physical problems (12%) and long working hours (8%). Among those who resigned, only 33% returned to full-time employment. Women who had at least 1 child were only 30% of those who had never resigned and 84% of those who had previously resigned. The majority of study subjects, regardless of experience of resignation (88%), agreed that women should continue to work even after childbirth. In conclusion, the results of this study suggested that many female doctors resigned from a full-time position within 10 years of graduating from medical school, largely because of the gender role stereotype and poor working conditions.

  17. Communicating under medical patriarchy: gendered doctor-patient communication between female patients with overactive bladder and male urologists in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Judy Yuen-Man

    2015-05-29

    Gender differences between patients and doctors markedly influence the quality of communication in treatment processes. Previous studies have shown that communication between patients and doctors of the same gender is usually more satisfactory, particularly for female patients. However, in Hong Kong, where urology is a male-dominated specialty, female patients typically require medical care from male doctors for diseases such as overactive bladder (OAB). The literature about gender-related doctor-patient communication predominantly involves people in non-Chinese communities, with few studies conducted with Chinese populations. However, the differences between Western and Chinese cultures are expected to result in different treatment and communication experiences. Furthermore, OAB has received little attention in many Chinese communities; few studies in the literature address the communication quality between OAB patients and their urologists in Chinese communities, particularly regarding female OAB patients' experiences when seeking treatment from male urologists. This study, therefore, investigated the doctor-patient communication between female OAB patients and male urologists in Hong Kong. This study adopted a qualitative research approach by conducting semistructured interviews with 30 female OAB patients on an individual basis from April 2012 to July 2012. The participants were purposively sampled from a patient self-help group for OAB patients in Hong Kong. The participants' communication experiences with male urologists were unpleasant. Embarrassment, feelings of not being treated seriously, not being understood, and not being given the autonomy to choose treatment approaches prevailed among the participants. Furthermore, the perceived lack of empathy from their urologists made the participants' communication experiences unpleasant. The gender and power differential between the participants and their urologists, which was contributed by the social and

  18. Radiographic outcome of surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in males versus females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omidi-Kashani Farzad

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on adolescent idiopathic scoliosis have well documented the differences between natural history of male and female patients. There are also differences in responses to nonoperative treatment, but the results of operative treatment in male patients compared with females have not been widely reported. Only few studies had compared the outcomes of operative treatment between male and female patients with different results. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 150 (112 girls and 38 boys consecutive patients with diagnosis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis who were managed surgically between May 1996 and September 2005. Next, male radiographic parameters were compared with female ones pre- and postoperatively. Then, a subgroup of 38 matched girls was compared regarding the age, curve type, curve magnitude, and the instrumentation we used. Results In comparing male patients with unmatched girls, the boys had greater mean age (17.3 ± 2.3 vs. 16.3 ± 2.9; p = 0.049, greater primary curve (71.4 ± 21.3° vs. 62.7 ± 17.5°; p = 0.013, less flexibility (30.1 ± 13.5% vs. 40.3 ± 17.8%; p = 0.01, and less correction percentage (51.3 ± 12.9% vs. 58.8 ± 16.5%; p = 0/013. The loss of correction was comparable between the two groups. In the matched comparison, the flexibility in boys was less than girls (30.1 ± 13.5% vs. 38.1 ± 17.5%; p = 0.027. Also, the boys had a smaller correction percentage compared to the girls, but this finding was not statistically significant. Conclusion There was similar distribution curve pattern between male and female patients with AIS. Males had more rigid primary curves compared to females but a similar degree of postoperative scoliosis correction. Male AIS patients were older at the time of surgery. These preoperative gender differences, however; did not compromise the radiological outcomes of surgical treatment and the results were comparable between the genders.

  19. Radiographic outcome of surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in males versus females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Ebrahim; Behtash, Hamid; Mobini, Bahram; Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Momeni, Behnam

    2008-09-06

    Studies on adolescent idiopathic scoliosis have well documented the differences between natural history of male and female patients. There are also differences in responses to nonoperative treatment, but the results of operative treatment in male patients compared with females have not been widely reported. Only few studies had compared the outcomes of operative treatment between male and female patients with different results. We retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 150 (112 girls and 38 boys) consecutive patients with diagnosis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis who were managed surgically between May 1996 and September 2005. Next, male radiographic parameters were compared with female ones pre- and postoperatively. Then, a subgroup of 38 matched girls was compared regarding the age, curve type, curve magnitude, and the instrumentation we used. In comparing male patients with unmatched girls, the boys had greater mean age (17.3 +/- 2.3 vs. 16.3 +/- 2.9; p = 0.049), greater primary curve (71.4 +/- 21.3 degrees vs. 62.7 +/- 17.5 degrees ; p = 0.013), less flexibility (30.1 +/- 13.5% vs. 40.3 +/- 17.8%; p = 0.01), and less correction percentage (51.3 +/- 12.9% vs. 58.8 +/- 16.5%; p = 0/013). The loss of correction was comparable between the two groups. In the matched comparison, the flexibility in boys was less than girls (30.1 +/- 13.5% vs. 38.1 +/- 17.5%; p = 0.027). Also, the boys had a smaller correction percentage compared to the girls, but this finding was not statistically significant. There was similar distribution curve pattern between male and female patients with AIS. Males had more rigid primary curves compared to females but a similar degree of postoperative scoliosis correction. Male AIS patients were older at the time of surgery. These preoperative gender differences, however; did not compromise the radiological outcomes of surgical treatment and the results were comparable between the genders.

  20. The increasing number of surgical procedures for female genital fistula in England: analysis of Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S I M F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the number and trend of surgical procedures for female genital fistula in England. An online search of Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data was carried out. Data were available for the 4-year period from 2002-03 until 2005-06. The total number of surgical procedures carried out for female genital fistula steadily increased by 28.7% from 616 in 2002-03 to 793 in 2005-06. The number of surgical procedures performed for rectovaginal fistula exceeded the total number of surgical procedures carried out for vesicovaginal and urethrovaginal fistula in each year of the study period. This pattern needs to be monitored and investigated further.

  1. Surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence with the Gynecare TVT Secur™ System – preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Włodzimierz Baranowski

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sling procedures were first introduced over 100 years ago in the treatment of stress urinaryincontinence. Since then they have evolved to become less invasive and safer. The sling procedure using theGynecare TVT Secur™ system is a new therapeutic option for women with stress urinary incontinence.Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Gynecare TVT Secur™ in the surgical treatment of stressurinary incontinence in women. Material and methods: The study comprised consecutive female patients admitted to the Department ofGynaecology and Gynaecological Oncology of the Military Institute of Health Services in Warsaw, Poland, whohad been qualified for surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence on the basis of physical signs and symptomsand the findings of a urodynamic study. The procedure was performed using the Gynecare TVT Secur™system with tapes introduced in an H- or U-shape mode. Results: Between October 2006 and September 2009, 77 sling procedures using the Gynecare TVT Secur™system were performed in women with stress urinary incontinence. Their mean age was 55.1 (30-76 years, meanBMI 28.5 (20.2-43.8 kg/m2. Sixty-nine implants were positioned in H-shape mode, 8 in U-shape mode. Fortyninewomen (63.6% were menopausal, 14 (18.2% previously had three or more natural deliveries, 13 (16.8%had a history of gynaecological surgeries. Thirty-one procedures were performed under general anaesthesia and46 under local anaesthesia. The mean duration of the surgery was 9 (4-42 minutes. It was possible to dischargefifty-seven (74% women on the day of the surgery. Urine retention was observed only in 1 (1.7% woman. Noother complications were recorded. Conclusions: The surgical treatment of urinary incontinence with sling procedures using the Gynecare TVTSecur™ system shows good immediate efficacy and safety. Considering this as well as the short duration ofthe procedure and its good tolerability under local anaesthesia, use

  2. 医师手术权限管理研究%Preliminary study on classified management of surgical doctors surgery permission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马金红; 姚华; 付玲玲

    2011-01-01

    According to the related requirements of medical technology clinical application management, the specific implementation approaches of surgery physicians surgery permission management were made, including establishing surgery classification project directory library, developing surgery classification management system and the surgery permission declared, and audit program, and investigating to determine the steps of surgery permission owned by surgery physicians currently, and finding problems and solution measures in implementation surgery permission management. To prevent surgical risk, improve the quality of operation, and evaluate surgical doctors scientifically, it provides management experience and references.%依据医疗技术临床应用管理相关要求,提出医师手术分级管理的具体实施办法,包括建立手术分级项目录库、制定手术分级管理制度及手术权限申报、审核程序、调查确定医师目前具有的手术权限的步骤,提出在实施手术权限管理中存在和发现的问题及解决措施,为防范手术风险、提高手术质量、科学评价手术医师,提供管理经验及参考.

  3. Comparison of Sexual Dysfunction Using the Female Sexual Function Index following Surgical Treatments for Uterine Fibroids

    OpenAIRE

    Allison Ryann Louie; Jennifer Alice Armstrong; Laura Katherine Findeiss; Scott Craig Goodwin

    2012-01-01

    Uterine fibroids are a common problem in women. Statistics showing 20–50% of fibroids produce symptoms and consequently patients seek surgical intervention to improve their quality of life. Treatments for fibroids are typically successful in controlling the fibroid disease, yet sexual function following invasive surgical treatments for fibroids can be jeopardized. The Sexual Function Index (FSFI) is a valid instrument producing quantifiable reproducible results. In this paper three case repor...

  4. Surgical outcomes and complications of reconstructive surgery in the female congenital adrenal hyperplasia patient: What every endocrinologist should know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lily C; Poppas, Dix P

    2017-01-01

    Surgical management of classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) in 46, XX females has evolved significantly. Virilization of the genitalia of 46, XX females with CAH begins prenatally as a result of excess fetal androgen production. Improved understanding of anatomy and surgical outcomes has driven changes in surgical techniques as well as the timing of surgery. For endocrinologists treating these patients, it is important to understand the outcome of genitoplasty, identify patients who need further treatment and direct these patients to experienced surgeons. We performed a literature search on PubMed of publications addressing CAH and genital reconstruction published in the English language from 1990 to the present. In accordance with our institutional review board, we performed a retrospective analysis of clitoroplasty and/or vaginoplasty procedures performed by a single surgeon at our institution from 1996 to 2015. We found that genital reconstruction in 46, XX CAH patients is associated with few immediate post-operative, infectious, and urinary complications. Vaginal stenosis is a common complication of vaginal reconstruction and requires evaluation by an experienced surgeon. Clitoral pain or decreased sensation can be associated with clitoral recession and clitorectomy. Outcomes in sexual satisfaction and gender identity can also be impacted by surgical technique and success. Long term follow up and patient reported feedback are crucial to our understanding and management of this special group of patients. Improved awareness and understanding of the complications of genital surgery will allow endocrinologists to know what to ask patients and be ready to provide them with a resource with the understanding and experience to help them improve their quality of life.

  5. An survey on awareness of contraception in unmarried female doctors in Guangzhou%广州市未婚女医生的避孕知识调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴爱华; 张嵩卉; 田耕; 李丽琴; 凌珊

    2010-01-01

    目的 了解未婚女医生避孕方法选择和避孕知识的来源状况.方法 在广州地区四所综合性医院,采用整群抽样方法,对未婚女医生进行了抽样调查,统计分析.结果 有效调查共有559人,发现未婚女医生对于避孕套、紧急避孕、短效避孕药及安全期避孕等四种避孕方式的认知均极显著高于其它几种方式,但对于上述四种方式的知晓程度不存在显著差异性.而对于避孕针、皮下埋置、阴道喷药及阴道隔膜等避孕方式的认识程度远远低于其它避孕方式.且其不了解程度极显著低于避孕套、紧急避孕、短效避孕药及安全期避孕等四种方式.而对于所有避孕方式的了解程度之间不存在显著差异.在了解知识的渠道方面,主要是通过网络、专业教育、电视和书籍获得,其他较少.83.80%的调查对象认为有必要进行性与生殖健康及避孕知识的宣传教育,认为最可靠的获知途径为专业指导.结论 未婚女医生由于所学专业知识的利用,对各种避孕方式均有一定程度的了解.但生殖健康及避孕知识仍然缺乏,这反映了我们学校及家庭教育在这方面的不足,也体现出当前社会对性与生殖健康和避孕知识的宣传力度欠缺.%Objective To understand the status of the awareness of contraception in unmarried female doctors.Methods A survey was conducted in the unmarried lady doctors from four general hospitals in Guangzhou area by using cluster sampling technique.Results A total number of 559 unmarried female doctors were surveyed.The awareness of condom use,contraceptives,natural family planning,and postcoital contraception was markedly higher than that of other contraceptive methods.But the awareness rate of anticonceptive injections,subcutaneous depot,spermicidal spray,or vaginal diaphragm was significantly lower.The sources of information on reproductive physiology and contraception were mainly from Internet

  6. Comparison of Sexual Dysfunction Using the Female Sexual Function Index following Surgical Treatments for Uterine Fibroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Ryann Louie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uterine fibroids are a common problem in women. Statistics showing 20–50% of fibroids produce symptoms and consequently patients seek surgical intervention to improve their quality of life. Treatments for fibroids are typically successful in controlling the fibroid disease, yet sexual function following invasive surgical treatments for fibroids can be jeopardized. The Sexual Function Index (FSFI is a valid instrument producing quantifiable reproducible results. In this paper three case reports are evaluated by the FSFI and compared between the following treatment groups: hysterectomy, myomectomy, and uterine embolization. Our goal is to illustrate how each of these treatment outcomes can result in sexual dysfunction and therefore decreased quality of life. Effects of invasive fibroid treatments on sexual functioning would be helpful in guiding patient’s ultimate decisions regarding treatment.

  7. Vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty for female urethral stricture: A novel modification of surgical technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, Johan; Chee, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To present a novel modification of surgical technique to treat female urethral stricture (FUS) by a vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal urethroplasty. Recurrent FUS represents an uncommon, though difficult clinical scenario to manage definitively. A variety of surgical techniques have been described to date, yet a lack of consensus on the optimal procedure persists. Materials and Methods We present a 51-year-old female with urethral stricture involving the entire urethra. Suspected etiology was iatrogenic from cystoscopy 17 years prior. Since then, the patient had undergone at least 25 formal urethral dilations and periods of self-dilation. In lithotomy position, the urethra was dilated to accommodate forceps, and ventral urethrotomy carried out sharply, exposing a bed of periurethral tissue. Buccal mucosa was harvested, and a ventral inlay technique facilitated by a nasal speculum, was used to place the graft from the proximal urethra/bladder neck to urethral meatus without a vaginal incision. Graft was sutured into place, and urethral Foley catheter inserted. Results The vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty was deemed successful as of last follow-up. Flexible cystoscopy demonstrated patency of the repair at 6 months. At 10 months of follow-up, the patient was voiding well, with no urinary incontinence. No further interventions have been required. Conclusions This case describes a novel modification of surgical technique for performing buccal mucosal urethroplasty for FUS. By avoiding incision of the vaginal mucosa, benefits may include reduced: morbidity, urinary incontinence, and wound complications including urethro-vaginal fistula. PMID:27437540

  8. The treatment of female pattern hair loss and other applications of surgical hair restoration in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Jeffrey S

    2004-05-01

    In the specialty of surgical hair restoration, men comprise more than 90% of the patients treated; however, in the last few years the number of women undergoing the procedure has increased significantly. The reasons for this growth are many and include the increase in public awareness of the efficacy of hair transplantation from such sources as the media,the Internet, advertising and word of mouth. More importantly, advances in technique have significantly improved results, increasing the confidence level in women to undergo the procedure and in hair transplant specialists to offer it.

  9. Direct inguinal hernias and anterior surgical approach are risk factors for female inguinal hernia recurrences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcharth, Jakob; Andresen, Kristoffer; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Bisgaard, Thue; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the risk of recurrence after direct and indirect inguinal hernia operation in a large-scale female population and to establish the relationship between the type of hernia at the primary and recurrent procedure. Using data from the Danish Hernia Database (DHDB), a cohort was generated: all females operated on electively for a primary inguinal hernia by either Lichtenstein’s technique or laparoscopy from 1998 to 2012. Within this prospectively collected cohort, the hernia type at the primary procedure (direct inguinal hernia (DIH), indirect inguinal hernia (IIH), combination hernia), the hernia type at the recurrent procedure (DIH, IIH, combination hernia, femoral hernia), anesthesia type, and time from primary procedure to reoperation were registered. A total of 5,893 females with primary elective inguinal hernia operation on in the study period (61 % IIH, 37 % DIH, 2 % combined hernias) were included with a median follow-up time of 72 months (range 0 to 169). A total of 305 operations for suspected recurrences were registered (61 % inguinal recurrences, 38 % femoral recurrences, 1 % no hernias), which corresponded to an overall reoperation rate of 5.2 %. All femoral recurrences occurred after a previous open anterior operation. The crude reoperation rate after primary DIH operation was 11.0 %, 3.0 % after primary IIH operation and 0.007 % after combined hernia operation (p hernia recurrences exclusively existed after anterior open primary operation.

  10. Age trend of the male to female sex ratio in surgical gastric cancer patients at a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junxiu; He, Yongjun; Guo, Zhen

    2014-08-21

    In previous reports concerning the association between sex disparity and age, gastric cancer (GC) patients were simply divided into younger and older groups by age. We analyzed the age trend of the male to female sex ratio (MFSR) in GC based on patient sequential age in order to observe the changing process of MFSR with age. One thousand seven hundred fifty-one surgical gastric adenocarcinoma patients aged 26 to 85 years were investigated between January 1996 and December 2010. The patients were grouped by age intervals of 5 years. The Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to determine how the MFSR changed with age. The median age of the 1,751 patients with GC was 60 years (26 to 85 years). There were 1,334 male and 417 female patients (MFSR was 3.20). Cochran-Armitage trend test analysis showed that total MFSR increased significantly with age (Z = 5.964, P trend test showed that MFSR increased significantly with age from 26 to 60 years (Z = 7.433, P trend until 60 years of age. The male GC patients showed an increasing tendency, and female GC patients showed a decreasing tendency with age. This trend reached a plateau phase after 60 years of age.

  11. Surgical Treatment After Failed Primary Correction of Urogenital Sinus in Female Patients with Virilizing Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Palma Sircili

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Genital reconstruction in female patients with virilizing congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH is very challenging. Our aim was to evaluate the techniques employed to treat complications after failure of primary urogenital sinus (UGS surgery, as well as the result of these reoperations.Patients and Methods: Twenty girls with virilizing CAH who were previously submitted to genitoplasty in our service and elsewhere had recurrent UGS stenosis and vaginal introitus stenosis that required surgical treatment. The main symptoms were recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI in nine, dyspareunia in six and hematocolpos in three (two associated with sepsis. The anatomical findings were the persistence of UGS with stenosis in 17 patients and vaginal introitus stenosis in three. The mean age at procedure was 15.2 yrs., averaging 13.1 yrs. after the first surgery. The surgical techniques employed were: isolated perineal flap in 17 patients and perineal flap with partial mobilization of UGS in three. The mean follow-up after the procedure was 4.8 years (varying from 1 to 17yrs.Results: Vaginal dilations were performed after surgery in 15 patients. Good functional and anatomical results were obtained in 15 patients, with vaginal introitus amenable to dilators of 3.0 cm in diameter. Five patients with high vaginal insertion had recurrent vaginal stenosis and required a surgical revision. No patients presented menstrual obstruction or UTI after surgery. Eight of the 15 adult patients are sexually active. Conclusion: The reoperation to treat failed primary UGS treatment using Y-V flap and partial mobilization techniques associated to vaginal dilations, promoted good anatomical and functional results with low morbidity in 75% of the patients.□

  12. Outpatient surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence under local anesthesia-sedation with contrasure needleless incision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navalón, V; Navalón, P; Pallás, Y; Ordoño, F; Monllor, E

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the results obtained from out-patient surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with the use of trans-obturator tape (TOT) of a single Contrasure-Needleless incision (Neomedic-International). We performed an intervention with local anesthesia-sedation in outpatient regime between January 2007 to December 2011 on 96 patients affected by SUI using the placement of Needleless tension-free suburethral sling. Inclusion and discharge criteria and the results obtained as well as satisfaction grade were evaluated by a questionnaire. All the patients underwent a stress test, urodynamic study and quality of life questionnaire (ICIQ-SF) prior to and at least 3 months after the intervention. Tolerance to the procedure was good. Surgical time was less than 10 minutes and stay in the hospital up to discharge less than 2hours. The results obtained are superimposable to those reached with epidural anesthesia and hospitalization, the grade of satisfactions with the treatment received being superior to 90%. Almost all of the patients affected are candidates for inclusion in an outpatient surgery program. This noticeably improves the cost-efficacy ratio, without decreasing the health care or grade of satisfaction. Furthermore, the Contasure-Needleless system fulfills the criteria for minimally invasive surgery, providing better stability of the sling than the third generation "minibands" due to the greater length of the mesh and less post-operative pain regarding the conventional TOT as no cutaneous incisions are required. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Direct inguinal hernias and anterior surgical approach are risk factors for female inguinal hernia recurrences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Jakob; Andresen, Kristoffer; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2014-01-01

    ), indirect inguinal hernia (IIH), combination hernia), the hernia type at the recurrent procedure (DIH, IIH, combination hernia, femoral hernia), anesthesia type, and time from primary procedure to reoperation were registered. RESULTS: A total of 5,893 females with primary elective inguinal hernia operation...... on in the study period (61 % IIH, 37 % DIH, 2 % combined hernias) were included with a median follow-up time of 72 months (range 0 to 169). A total of 305 operations for suspected recurrences were registered (61 % inguinal recurrences, 38 % femoral recurrences, 1 % no hernias), which corresponded to an overall...... reoperation rate of 5.2 %. All femoral recurrences occurred after a previous open anterior operation. The crude reoperation rate after primary DIH operation was 11.0 %, 3.0 % after primary IIH operation and 0.007 % after combined hernia operation (p 

  14. Immune-spaying as an alternative to surgical spaying in Iberian×Duroc females: effect on carcass traits and meat quality characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero-Negrón, Rafael; Sánchez del Pulgar, José; Ventanas, Jesús; García, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of immune-spaying on production traits and meat quality characteristics of fresh loin (longissimus dorsi) by comparing 3 groups of Iberian×Duroc females (N=12 per batch): surgically spayed, immune-spayed and entire females. Carcass traits and physicochemical parameters, including fatty acid profile, were investigated. The only carcass trait significantly affected by castration was the ham fat thickness, where both immune-spayed and surgically spayed females showed higher values against entire females (57±9.5mm, 62±2.5mm and 51±10.1mm, respectively; p<0.05). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in the quality parameters of fresh meat. These results are important regarding animal welfare, since in Europe, there is a plan to voluntarily end the surgical castration of pigs by 2018. Therefore, with an adequate vaccination protocol, immune-spaying might represent a good alternative to surgical spaying. The reliability of immune-spaying over long periods should be evaluated.

  15. [Job satisfaction among Norwegian doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylenna, Magne; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw

    2010-05-20

    Doctors' job satisfaction has been discussed internationally in recent years based on reports of increasing professional dissatisfaction. We have studied Norwegian doctors' job satisfaction and their general satisfaction with life. A survey was conducted among a representative sample of practicing Norwegian doctors in 2008. The validated 10-item Job Satisfaction Scale was used to assess job satisfaction. 1,072 (65 %) doctors responded. They reported a mean job satisfaction of 5.3 on a scale from 1 (very dissatisfied) to 7 (very satisfied). Job satisfaction increased with increasing age. Private practice specialists reported the highest level of job satisfaction (5.8), and general practitioners reported higher job satisfaction (5.5) than hospital doctors (5.1). Among specialty groups, community doctors scored highest (5.6) and doctors in surgical disciplines lowest (5.0). While long working hours was negatively correlated with job satisfaction, the perception of being professionally updated and having part-time affiliation(s) in addition to a regular job were positively correlated with job satisfaction. 52.9 % of doctors reported a very high general satisfaction. Norwegian doctors have a high level of job satisfaction. Satisfaction with life in general is also high and at least in line with that in the Norwegian population.

  16. Doctors Today

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2012-03-01

    Doctors’ relationship with patients and their role in society is changing. Until the 1960s doctors concentrated on the welfare of patients with less emphasis placed on patients’ rights1. Over recent decades there has been increasing empowerment of the individual across all facets of society including health care. Doctors continue to be perceived as having expertise and authority over medical science. Patients, however, now hold sway over questions of values or preferences. We all must be aware of this change in the doctor- patient interaction. We need to be more aware of the outcomes that patients view as important. The concept of shared decision-making with the patient is now widely appreciated. The process involves a change in mind set particularly for doctors who trained in an earlier era.

  17. Doctor Shopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Doctor shopping is defined as seeing multiple treatment providers, either during a single illness episode or to procure prescription medications illicitly. According to the available literature, prevalence rates of doctor shopping vary widely, from 6.3 to 56 percent. However, this variability is partially attributable to research methodology, including the study definition of doctor shopping as well as the patient sample. The reasons for doctor shopping are varied. Some patient explanations for this phenomenon relate to clinician factors, such as inconvenient office hours or locations, long waiting times, personal characteristics or qualities of the provider, and/or insufficient communication time between the patient and clinician. Some patient explanations relate to personal factors and include both illness factors (e.g., symptom persistence, lack of understanding or nonacceptance of the diagnosis or treatment) as well as psychological factors (e.g., somatization, prescription drug-seeking). Importantly, not all doctor shopping is driven by suspect motivations. Being aware of these various patient justifications for doctor shopping is important in understanding and managing these challenging patients in the clinical setting, whether they emerge in psychiatric or primary care environments. PMID:23346518

  18. Going to the Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Going to the Doctor KidsHealth > For Kids > Going to the Doctor A ... it's time to meet the doctor. continue Hello, Doctor The doctor will come in and say hello, ...

  19. Evaluation of patients' attitudes to their care during oral and maxillofacial surgical outpatient consultations: the importance of waiting times and quality of interaction between patient and doctor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimovska, E O F; Sharma, S; Trebble, T M

    2016-06-01

    Knowing what patients think about their care is fundamental to the provision of an effective, quality service, and it can help to direct change and reduce costs. Much of the work in oral and maxillofacial departments concerns the treatment of outpatients, but as little is known about what they think about their care, we aimed to find out which aspects were associated with satisfaction. Consecutive patients (n=244) who attended the oral and maxillofacial outpatient department at Southampton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust over a 7-day period were given a questionnaire to complete before and after their consultation. It included questions with Likert scale responses on environmental, procedural, and interactive aspects of the visit, and a 16-point scale to rank their priorities. A total of 187 patients (77%) completed the questionnaires. No association was found between expected (p=0.93) or actual (p=0.41) waiting times, and 90% of patients were satisfied with their visit. Seeing the doctor, having confidence in the treatment plan, being listened to, and the ability of the doctor to recognise their personal needs, were ranked as important. Environmental and procedural aspects were considered the least important. These findings may be of value in the development of services to improve patient-centred care.

  20. Arthroscopic Release of Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Sheath in Female Ballet Dancers: Dynamic Pathology, Surgical Technique, and Return to Dancing Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Funasaki, Hiroki; Hayashi, Hiroteru; Sakamoto, Kanako; Tsuruga, Rei; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-01-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon is known as a major overuse lesion in female dancers. We describe arthroscopic surgical techniques in relation to the dynamic pathology of the disease. Crepitus and pain on moving the great toe with the ankle in plantar flexion on preoperative examination confirm the diagnosis of FHL stenosing tenosynovitis even if the os trigonum is not evident. The ankle is approached through standard posterolateral and posteromedial portals...

  1. Self-reported changes in the professional singing voice after surgical intervention treatment for breast cancer: a survey pilot study of female professional singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroody, Margaret M; Barnes-Burroughs, Kathryn; Rodriguez, Michael C; Sataloff, Dahlia M; Sataloff, Robert Thayer

    2013-03-01

    The effects of breast cancer surgical treatment on the professional singing voice are unknown. The purpose of this study was to discover whether there are self-perceived changes in the quality and/or process of singing experienced by professional female singers who have undergone surgical intervention for the treatment of diagnosed breast cancer-including any changes perceived from the use of radiation, chemotherapy, and other drug treatments related to those surgeries. A voluntary subject pool comprised female professional singers who have undergone surgery for breast cancer was recruited from professional singing networks. Participants underwent evaluation through an anonymous online survey, psychometrically vetted for content and instrument reliability/validity before administration. Valid participants (N=56) responded to 45 questions regarding surgical procedures, related therapies, and self-perceived vocal effects. Analysis of results produced a preliminary description of types of voice change, duration of changes, and qualitative self-perceptions. This initial report reveals that there are self-perceived singing voice changes experienced by professional singers treated for breast cancer. However, additional research is needed to determine the degree of vocal impact perceived to be attributable to individual surgical interventions and related therapies. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. What Disengages Doctoral Students in the Biological and Environmental Sciences from Their Doctoral Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, V.; Taina, J.; Pyhältö, K.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the causes of student disengagement from their doctoral studies in the biological and environmental sciences. The data came from interviews of 40 doctoral students (male = 15, female = 25) and underwent qualitative analysis for content. Our results showed that doctoral studies provide multiple contexts for disengagement, such…

  3. What Disengages Doctoral Students in the Biological and Environmental Sciences from Their Doctoral Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, V.; Taina, J.; Pyhältö, K.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the causes of student disengagement from their doctoral studies in the biological and environmental sciences. The data came from interviews of 40 doctoral students (male = 15, female = 25) and underwent qualitative analysis for content. Our results showed that doctoral studies provide multiple contexts for disengagement, such…

  4. Masculinity in the doctor's office: Masculinity, gendered doctor preference and doctor-patient communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelstein, Mary S; Sanchez, Diana T

    2016-03-01

    Mortality and morbidity data suggest that men have shorter life expectancies than women and outrank women on several leading causes of death. These gendered disparities may be influenced by psychosocial factors like masculinity. Three studies (Total N=546) examined the role of masculinity in men's doctor choices and doctor-patient interactions. In Studies 1 and 2, men completed measures of masculinity, gender bias, and doctor preference. Using structural equation modeling, we tested the direct relationship between masculinity and male doctor preference and the indirect relationship of masculinity on male doctor preference through an association with gendered competence stereotypes. Participants in Study 3 disclosed symptoms in private followed by disclosure to a male or female interviewer in a clinical setting. Using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), we examined the interaction among symptom reporting, masculinity and doctor gender, controlling for participant comfort. In Study 1, results suggested that masculinity encouraged choice of a male doctor directly and indirectly via beliefs that men make more competent doctors than women; Study 2 directly replicated the results of Study 1. In Study 3, independent of participant comfort, an interaction between interviewer gender and masculinity emerged such that men scoring higher on masculinity reported symptoms less consistently to male interviewers (relative to higher scoring men reporting to female interviewers); the reverse was found for men scoring low on masculinity. Taken together these studies suggest that masculinity may affect men's health by encouraging choice of a male doctor with whom doctor-patient communication may be impaired. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Doctoral Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education covers the “third cycle” of degrees following the bachelor’s and the master’s degree. The education of researchers is necessary for developing music therapy as a scientific discipline and calls for a certain research culture that not only brings knowledge on research...... with an integration of science and practice. This leads to a description of the principles of problem-based learning as a social constructive approach, problematization, self-directed learning and learning community. The chapter is concluded with an example of a model of doctoral education, the Aalborg model, where...... the coursework, supervision, and curriculum is based on problem-based learning. About the book: 'International Perspectives in Music Therapy Education and Training: Adapting to a Changing World,' the first anthology of its kind, edited by Professor Karen Goodman, brings noted educators from Brazil, Canada...

  6. Doctoral Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education covers the “third cycle” of degrees following the bachelor’s and the master’s degree. The education of researchers is necessary for developing music therapy as a scientific discipline and calls for a certain research culture that not only brings knowledge on research...... with an integration of science and practice. This leads to a description of the principles of problem-based learning as a social constructive approach, problematization, self-directed learning and learning community. The chapter is concluded with an example of a model of doctoral education, the Aalborg model, where...... the coursework, supervision, and curriculum is based on problem-based learning. About the book: 'International Perspectives in Music Therapy Education and Training: Adapting to a Changing World,' the first anthology of its kind, edited by Professor Karen Goodman, brings noted educators from Brazil, Canada...

  7. Talking to Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Doctor Research Underway Plain Language Talking to Your Doctor Preparing for Your Medical Appointment (4:37) Understanding ... sources of information. How to Talk to your Doctor Talking With Your Doctor , NIH News in Health ...

  8. Women who doctor shop for prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Julie; Thomas, Sandra P

    2014-04-01

    Doctor shopping is a term used to describe a form of diversion of prescription drugs when patients visit numerous prescribers to obtain controlled drugs for illicit use. Gender differences exist in regard to prescription drug abuse and methods of diversion. The purpose of this phenomenological study guided by the existential philosophy of Merleau-Ponty was to understand the lived experience of female doctor shoppers. Interviews were conducted with 14 women, which were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Included in the findings are figural aspects of the participants' experience of doctor shopping related to the existential grounds of world, time, body, and others. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) feeding the addiction, (b) networking with addicts, (c) playing the system, and (d) baiting the doctors. The findings suggest several measures that nurses can take to reduce the incidence of doctor shopping and to provide better care for female doctor shoppers.

  9. Outcome of pyometra in female dogs and predictors of peritonitis and prolonged postoperative hospitalization in surgically treated cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitpean, Supranee; Ström-Holst, Bodil; Emanuelson, Ulf; Höglund, Odd V; Pettersson, Ann; Alneryd-Bull, Caroline; Hagman, Ragnvi

    2014-01-07

    One of the most common diseases in intact bitches is pyometra--a potentially life-threatening disease associated with a variety of clinical and laboratory findings. The aims of the present study were to describe complications of the disease and to investigate clinically useful indicators associated with peritonitis and/or prolonged postoperative hospitalization. A retrospective study was performed using records from 356 bitches diagnosed with pyometra during the years 2006-2007 at the University Animal Hospital, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden. Of the 356 bitches, 315 were surgically treated by ovariohysterectomy, 9 were medically treated and 32 were euthanized without treatment. In the surgically treated bitches, univariable associations between clinical and laboratory data, risk for prolonged hospitalization (≥ 3 days) and/or signs of peritonitis, were analyzed by Chi-square and Fisher's exact test. Logistic regression models were used to assess multivariable associations.The most common complication observed in surgically treated bitches was peritonitis (40 bitches), followed by urinary tract infection (19 bitches), wound infection (8 bitches), uveitis (6 bitches), and cardiac arrhythmia (5 bitches). Leucopenia and fever/hypothermia were associated with increased risk for peritonitis (18-fold and three-fold, respectively). Moderate to severe depression of the general condition, pale mucous membranes and leucopenia were associated with increased risk (seven-fold, three-fold, and over three-point-five-fold, respectively) for prolonged postoperative hospitalization. Several clinically useful indicators were identified. Leucopenia was the most important marker, associated with 18-fold increased risk for peritonitis and an over three-point-five increased risk for prolonged hospitalization. Fever/hypothermia, depression and pale mucous membranes were associated with increased risk for peritonitis and/or prolonged hospitalization. The

  10. Moral distress among Norwegian doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Førde, R; Aasland, O G

    2008-07-01

    Medicine is full of value conflicts. Limited resources and legal regulations may place doctors in difficult ethical dilemmas and cause moral distress. Research on moral distress has so far been mainly studied in nurses. To describe whether Norwegian doctors experience stress related to ethical dilemmas and lack of resources, and to explore whether the doctors feel that they have good strategies for the resolution of ethical dilemmas. Postal survey of a representative sample of 1497 Norwegian doctors in 2004, presenting statements about different ethical dilemmas, values and goals at their workplace. The response rate was 67%. 57% admitted that it is difficult to criticize a colleague for professional misconduct and 51% for ethical misconduct. 51% described sometimes having to act against own conscience as distressing. 66% of the doctors experienced distress related to long waiting lists for treatment and to impaired patient care due to time constraints. 55% reported that time spent on administration and documentation is distressing. Female doctors experienced more stress that their male colleagues. 44% reported that their workplace lacked strategies for dealing with ethical dilemmas. Lack of resources creates moral dilemmas for physicians. Moral distress varies with specialty and gender. Lack of strategies to solve ethical dilemmas and low tolerance for conflict and critique from colleagues may obstruct important and necessary ethical dialogues and lead to suboptimal solutions of difficult ethical problems.

  11. Choosing a Family Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nav nav, .header-9#header-section #main-nav, #overlay-menu nav, #mobile-menu, #one-page-nav li . ... editorial staff Home Your Health Resources Doctor Visit Preparation Choosing a Family Doctor Choosing a Family Doctor ...

  12. Wo sind sie geblieben? – Eine Diskussion über die Positionierung von Medizinerinnen zwischen Karriere, Beruf und Familie [Where have they gone? – A discussion on the balancing act of female doctors between work and family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerg-Bretzke, Lucia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Goals: The increasing number of vacant positions for doctors increasingly puts the issue of reconciling work and family into the spotlight in companies, hospitals and universities, as increased expectations of a better work-life balance are seen as one of the reasons for these vacancies. Highly qualified professionals are trained, but not available to the labour market. The aim is to summarise what difficulties doctors who want to have a family and their potential employers must face.Methods: The following articles show the current state of research and potential starting points for an optimisation of the medical profession from a family-friendly perspective and intend to stimulate debate.Results: Some basic steps towards better work-life balance have already been taken, such as the provision of childcare places and the increasing availability of more flexible working patterns. But it seems that these measures, since they have been implemented neither sufficiently nor universally, do not suffice to secure the next generation of staff. Especially women in leadership positions are still rare to find.Conclusions: Both male and female doctors want better quality of life by achieving a better work-life balance. The expansion of family-friendly services is seen as a necessary step to allow female doctors to successfully combine work and family.[german] Zielsetzung: Die zunehmende Zahl unbesetzter Arztstellen lässt die Vereinbarkeit von Beruf und Familie zunehmend in den Fokus von Unternehmen, Kliniken und Universitäten rücken, da die gestiegenen Erwartungen an Work-Life-Balance als einer der Gründe hierfür anzusehen sind. Hochqualifizierte Fachkräfte werden ausgebildet, stehen dem Arbeitsmarkt aber nicht zur Verfügung. Welchen Schwierigkeiten sich Ärztinnen und Ärzte mit Familienwunsch einerseits und potentielle Arbeitgeber andererseits sich stellen müssen, soll hier zusammengefasst werden.Methodik: Der folgende Artikel ist als

  13. Elevated Mechanical Loading When Young Provides Lifelong Benefits to Cortical Bone Properties in Female Rats Independent of a Surgically Induced Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galley, Matthew R.; Hurd, Andrea L.; Wallace, Joseph M.; Gallant, Maxime A.; Richard, Jeffrey S.; George, Lydia A.

    2013-01-01

    Exercise that mechanically loads the skeleton is advocated when young to enhance lifelong bone health. Whether the skeletal benefits of elevated loading when young persist into adulthood and after menopause are important questions. This study investigated the influence of a surgically induced menopause in female Sprague-Dawley rats on the lifelong maintenance of the cortical bone benefits of skeletal loading when young. Animals had their right forearm extrinsically loaded 3 d/wk between 4 and 10 weeks of age using the forearm axial compression loading model. Left forearms were internal controls and not loaded. Animals were subsequently detrained (restricted to cage activities) for 94 weeks (until age 2 years), with ovariectomy (OVX) or sham-OVX surgery being performed at 24 weeks of age. Loading enhanced midshaft ulna cortical bone mass, structure, and estimated strength. These benefits persisted lifelong and contributed to loaded ulnas having greater strength after detraining. Loading also had effects on cortical bone quality. The benefits of loading when young were not influenced by a surgically induced menopause because there were no interactions between loading and surgery. However, OVX had independent effects on cortical bone mass, structure, and estimated strength at early postsurgery time points (up to age 58 weeks) and bone quality measures. These data indicate skeletal loading when young had lifelong benefits on cortical bone properties that persisted independent of a surgically induced menopause. This suggests that skeletal loading associated with exercise when young may provide lifelong antifracture benefits by priming the skeleton to offset the cortical bone changes associated with aging and menopause. PMID:23782938

  14. How does a doctor study other doctors being doctors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Torsten

    The intension of this presentation is to encourage debate on auto-ethnography in medical systems. The empirical starting point will be my present study of how young doctors learn to make decisions about diagnosis and treatment of the individual patient. The study is an ethnographic field study...... involving participant observation and individual interviews with nine newly graduated doctors for a period of 18 months. The background of the ethnographer who is also the author of the present abstract poses a few interesting challenges to the study. I am a doctor doing fieldwork in my own medical culture......, among other doctors, at departments where I have worked. My parents, my sister and my grandfather are doctors. So reflections and experiences concerning medicine and being a doctor are integrated parts of my personal history and identity. Will I be capable of critical reflection on something...

  15. Arthroscopic Release of Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Sheath in Female Ballet Dancers: Dynamic Pathology, Surgical Technique, and Return to Dancing Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funasaki, Hiroki; Hayashi, Hiroteru; Sakamoto, Kanako; Tsuruga, Rei; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-12-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon is known as a major overuse lesion in female dancers. We describe arthroscopic surgical techniques in relation to the dynamic pathology of the disease. Crepitus and pain on moving the great toe with the ankle in plantar flexion on preoperative examination confirm the diagnosis of FHL stenosing tenosynovitis even if the os trigonum is not evident. The ankle is approached through standard posterolateral and posteromedial portals. A 4.0-mm-diameter 30° arthroscope is used. Soft tissues around the talus are cleared with a motorized shaver and a radiofrequency device. The posterior aspects of the talus, os trigonum, and FHL tendon surrounded by the tendon sheath are visualized. The dynamic pathology of the FHL tendon is well observed on passive motion of the great toe. The prominent bone fragment of the talus is removed and the tendon sheath is cut with a retrograde knife and a motorized shaver from the superior border down to the entrance of the fibro-osseous tunnel. Arthroscopic release of the FHL tendon sheath is a useful and easy method to directly approach the dynamic pathology of FHL tenosynovitis in female ballet dancers.

  16. Doctors' involvement in torture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonntag, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    Doctors from both non-democratic and democratic countries are involved in torture. The majority of doctors involved in torture are doctors at risk. Doctors at risk might compromise their ethical duty towards patients for the following possible reasons: individual factors (such as career, economic...

  17. 2011年中国女医师休闲锻炼和业余静态行为情况分析%Analyzing the situation of leisure-time physical exercise and sedentary behaviors in Chinese female medical doctors during 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓燕; 齐士格; 王临虹

    2013-01-01

    exercise and the time of sedentary behavior were calculated.Results In 5 468 medical female doctors,the mean rate of regular exercise was 20.3% (95%CI:19.2%~21.4%).The mean rates of regular exercise in hospitals and CDC were18.9% and 21.3%,respectively,the mean rates of regular exercise in eastern part,central part and western part of China were 17.7%,19.8% and 23.9%,respectively,the mean rates of regular exercise in <35 years old group,35 ~ years old group and above 45 years old group were 15.3%,20.5% and 27.9%,respectively,there were significant differences (P<0.05 or P<0.01).In hospitals,the mean rates of regular exercise in internal medicine department and surgical departemnt were 15.3% and 17.5 %,which were significantly lower than those in other clinical and supplementary departments (3.7% and 25.9%),and the mean rate of regular exercise in Grade Ⅲ hospitals was 15.4 % which was significantly lower than that (23.6 %) in Grade Ⅱ hospitals (P<0.05).In CDC,there were no significant differences of mean rate of regular exercise among different departments,but the mean rate (26.9%) of regular exercise in municipal CDCs was significantly higher than those (17.7%~19.3%) in national,provincial and county CDCs (P<0.05).The median time of sedentary behaviors in female medical doctors was 4.2 h (P25~P75:3.0~6.3 hours),the median time of sedentary behaviors in hospitals and CDCs were 4.0 and 4.5 h,respectively,the median time of sedentary behaviors in eastern part,central part and western part of China were 4.2,4.5 and 4.0 h,respectively,the median time of sedentary behaviors in <35 years old group,35~ years old group and above 45 years old group were 4.5,4.0 and 4.5 h,there were significant differences (P<0.01).In hospitals,the median time (3.5 h) of sedentary behaviors in surgical department was significantly lower than that (4.0 h) in other department,and the median time of sedentary behaviors in Grade

  18. Cost incentives for doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schottmüller, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    If doctors take the costs of treatment into account when prescribing medication, their objectives differ from their patients' objectives because the patients are insured. This misalignment of interests hampers communication between patient and doctor. Giving cost incentives to doctors increases...... welfare if (i) the doctor's examination technology is sufficiently good or (ii) (marginal) costs of treatment are high enough. If the planner can costlessly choose the extent to which doctors take costs into account, he will opt for less than 100%. Optimal health care systems should implement different...... degrees of cost incentives depending on type of disease and/or doctor....

  19. [Active career management needed for female doctors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, A.H.; Braak, E.W. Ter; Verbon, A.

    2015-01-01

    For more than 15 years two-thirds of medical students have been women. Despite this, they represent a minority (16-25 %) of professors in academic medicine. There is still a major gender gap to the disadvantage of women in leading positions in academia, with women earning only 80% of the salary of

  20. [Active career management needed for female doctors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, A.H.; Braak, E.W. Ter; Verbon, A.

    2015-01-01

    For more than 15 years two-thirds of medical students have been women. Despite this, they represent a minority (16-25 %) of professors in academic medicine. There is still a major gender gap to the disadvantage of women in leading positions in academia, with women earning only 80% of the salary of t

  1. Doctors Told to Guard Against Female Circumcision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白青山

    2001-01-01

    在非洲和中东的许多国家有一种令人毛骨悚然的“文化”:女性阴部的切除,最严重的称之为infibulation(为防止性交而封锁阴部),即使这些人离开故土,来到英国,他们仍然保留这种文化。英国的医生因此也就多了一件事情:protect girls from ethnic minorities(少数民族)against genital mutilation(生殖器的切割)

  2. Find a Cancer Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Find a Cancer Doctor Find a Cancer Doctor Status message Locating you... The Find an Oncologist ... and caregivers. The database includes the names of physicians and other health professionals from certain ASCO membership ...

  3. Coaching doctoral students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students’ sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation......-reported gains from coaching show that doctoral students experience coaching as an effective method to support the doctoral study process. This study also provides preliminary empirical evidence that coaching of doctoral students can facilitate the doctoral study process so that the doctoral students experience...... an enhanced feeling of progress and that they can change their study behaviour in a positive direction. The study discusses the difference between coaching and supervision, for instance power imbalances and contrary to earlier research into coaching of doctoral students this study indicates that coaching can...

  4. Cognition of Acceptance of HPV Vaccine in Female Doctors and Influence Factors Analysis%女性医务人员对 HPV 疫苗认知调查及影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周艳秋; 范爱飞; 杨智敬; 刘志红

    2016-01-01

    目的:研究女性医务人员对 HPV疫苗认知情况及分析HPV疫苗接受度的影响因素。方法2014年11月~2015年1月采用问卷方式对深圳市某三甲医院300名女性医务人员进行调查。结果有效问卷272份,其中91.91%的女性医务人员知道宫颈癌的病因(妇产科医务人员为100%,非妇产科医务人员为87.78%),77.21%知道 H PV疫苗(妇产科医务人员为91.30%,非妇产科医务人员为70.00%),愿意接种 HPV疫苗者占72.79%(妇产科医务人员为84.78%,非妇产科医务人员为66.67%),愿意让其女儿接种 HPV疫苗者占75.79%(妇产科医务人员为75.86%,非妇产科医务人员为75.76%)。医务人员的年龄、所在科室以及亲友有无宫颈癌史是影响接种 HPV疫苗的主要因素(P<0.05)。结论女性医务人员对HPV疫苗认知较高,妇产科女性医务人员对HPV的认知及其疫苗的接受度优于非妇产科医务人员。应着重加强对非妇产科女性医务人员的认知干预。%Objective To study the cognition of acceptance of HPV vaccine in female doctors and analyzed the influence factors .Method From November 2014 to January 2015 ,we applied the questionnaire survey to investigate 300 female doc‐tors of major hospital in Shenzhen .Result Effective questionnaire were 272 ,91 .91% of the female medical personnel know the cause of cervical cancer (obstetrics and gynecology medical personnel is 100% ,the non‐obstetrics and gynecology medical staff is 87 .78% ) .77 .21% know HPV vaccine (obstetrics and gynecology medical personnel is 91 .30% ,the non‐obstetrics and gynecology medical staff is 70 .00% ) .Willing to HPV vaccine accounted for 72 .79% (obstetrics and gynecology depart‐ment was 84 .78% ,the non‐obstetrics and gynecology medical staff is 66 .67% ) .Want to let their daughter get HPV vaccine accounted for 75 .79% (obstetrics and gynecology is 75 .86

  5. Talking to Your Child's Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to 2-Year-Old Talking to Your Child's Doctor KidsHealth > For Parents > Talking to Your Child's Doctor ... an important role in your child's health? The Doctor-Patient Relationship Today, doctors are pressured to see ...

  6. Working with doctors and nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor Working with doctors and nurses Working with doctors and nurses Answering questions, filling out papers, getting ... my ability to pay? What questions will the doctor or nurse ask? top It’s a good idea ...

  7. Doctors in Balzac's work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Balzac wrote his novels during a time of great literary and scientific change. Romanticism gave way to the school of realism, of which Balzac could be considered the founder. It was via realism, where both the positive and negative aspects of life were depicted, that doctors naturally gained a much more active role in novels. In conjunction with this was the development of science and medicine, which fascinated Balzac, also leading to the significant and prevalent role of doctors in his works. His fascination with the sciences led to him to gain many acquaintances and much knowledge in the medical domain, especially in neuropsychiatry and physiology. His fictional doctors, such as Desplein and Bianchon, thus demonstrate considerable knowledge of pathology, physiology, and neuropsychiatry. The doctors in Balzac's novels can be grouped into four categories: provincial doctors, Parisian doctors, country doctors, and military doctors. They were most often fictitious representations of real individuals (e.g. Guillaume Dupuytren), and often symbolize schools of thought which were in vogue at the time. In addition to the accurate scientific depiction of doctors, it must be noted that his doctors not only played an active role in clinically assessing their patients, but also had a sociological role in assessing society; it is through his doctors that Balzac gave his opinion of the world in which he lived.

  8. How does a doctor study other doctors being doctors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Torsten

    The intension of this presentation is to encourage debate on auto-ethnography in medical systems. The empirical starting point will be my present study of how young doctors learn to make decisions about diagnosis and treatment of the individual patient. The study is an ethnographic field study...... that is a part of me? How can I represent the experience and learning of my informants without simply reproducing my own experience? This makes the project both anthropology-at-home and auto-ethnography. I will present an example from the field work to illustrate the many ways in which the auto- part...... involving participant observation and individual interviews with nine newly graduated doctors for a period of 18 months. The background of the ethnographer who is also the author of the present abstract poses a few interesting challenges to the study. I am a doctor doing fieldwork in my own medical culture...

  9. Doctors and pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Roy G

    2009-09-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is seen as seducing doctors by providing expensive gifts, subsidising travel and underwriting practice expenses in return for those doctors prescribing products that otherwise they would not use. This paints doctors in a very negative light; suggests doctors are available to the highest bidder; implies doctors do not adequately act as independent agents; and that doctors are driven more by self-interest than by patient needs. Similar practices, in other industries, are accepted as normal business behaviour but it is automatically assumed to be improper if the pharmaceutical industry supports doctors. Should the pharmaceutical industry withdraw educational grants then there would be: fewer scientific meetings; reduced attendance at conferences; limited post graduate education; and a depreciated level of maintenance of professional standards. To suggest that doctors prescribe inappropriately in return for largesse maligns their integrity but where there is no scientific reason to choose between different treatments then there can be little argument against selecting the product manufactured by a company that has invested in the doctor and the question arises as to whether this represents bad medicine? This paper will examine what constitutes non-professional conduct in response to inducements by the pharmaceutical industry. It will review: conflict of interest; relationships between doctors and pharma and the consequences for patients; and the need for critical appraisal before automatically decrying this relationship while accepting that there remain those who do not practice ethical medicine.

  10. Doctors and romance: not only of interest to Mills and Boon readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Paul; Badkar, Juthika; Didham, Robert

    2009-06-01

    Internationally there is a growing demand for health services. Skilled health workers, including doctors, have a high degree of international mobility and New Zealand (NZ) stands out internationally in terms of the significant flows of doctors in and out of the country. Through changes in training of doctors in NZ and migration flows, there have been major shifts in the composition of the medical workforce in NZ since the mid-1980s. Studies of the changing nature of the medical workforce often focus on gender and migration separately as well as only considering doctors as individuals. The aim of this exploratory study is to examine the living arrangements of doctors, the composition of migrant doctors who are coming to NZ, and to understand the educational and employment status of the partners of doctors. This study is a descriptive analysis primarily using census data from 1986 through to 2006 and immigration data collected by the Department of Labour. Half of the female medical doctors approved for residence through the Skilled/Business stream migrated independently, while for male doctors less than athird came to NZ independently. Male migrant doctors were more likely to be partnered. Census data showed that people with medical backgrounds tend to partner with each other. However, these relationships are changing, as more women become doctors. In 1986 about 14% of male doctors had a nurse or midwife as a partner and nearly 9% had a doctor partner. By 2006 the proportion of partners of male doctors who were also doctors had risen to 16%, higher than the 9% who were nurses. For female doctors the changes are more dramatic. In 1986, 42% of female doctors in relationships had a doctor as a partner. By 2006, female doctors had increased substantially, but the percentage with a doctor partner had dropped to under athird. Well-qualified couples where one or both are doctors, have a greater propensityto live in main urban areas. Through official reports and extensive

  11. On the Development of the Capacity of the Surgical in Doctor-patient Communication%外科实习医生医患沟通能力培养的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘巍; 李冬梅

    2014-01-01

    生物-心理-社会模式已成为当今新的医学模式,新的医学模式决定与之相适应的医患关系,以人为本是最基本的要求,要使医学生具有熟练的沟通技巧以提高其综合素质。目前医患关系紧张已成为社会关注的焦点问题,良好的医患沟通能力是维护稳定的就医环境的基础,实习医生是祖国未来医疗事业的接班人,所以提高实习医生医患沟通能力,建立和谐医患关系,已成为亟待解决的一项重大的课题。%A new medical model based on biology-psychology-sociology has decided the doctor-patient relationship adapting to it with people-orien-ted as the most basic requirements that medical students have fluent communication skills in order to improve their comprehensive quality.At present,the doctor-patient relationship has become nervous,which is the focus of the society,so to improve the intern’s capacity in communication with patient,to establish the harmonious doctor-patient relationship have become essential to solve this major issue.

  12. Abortion - surgical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion involves dilating the opening to the uterus (cervix) and placing a small suction tube into the uterus. ...

  13. Doctor of osteopathic medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Wilkins; 2010. Gevitz N. The "doctor of osteopathy": expanding the scope of practice. J Am Osteopath ... 6):ES28-S38. Moore WJ. The eccentricities of osteopathy. BMJ . 2012;345:e5890. Stark J. A degree ...

  14. Going to the Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... time they go to the doctor, but the truth is that kids don't need many shots ... The Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  15. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications ... Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library ...

  16. Finding the Right Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you meet someone that doesn’t match your communication style, you should switch,” Dr. Krumholz said. Another part ... for looking around: When you feel that the communication style is not matching your own If your doctor ...

  17. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your appointment. Consider bringing a close friend or family member with you. Take notes about what the doctor says, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you. Learn how ...

  18. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Simple Clear Health from NIH Cultural Respect Language Access Talking to Your Doctor Research Underway Plain Language ... to take notes for you. Learn how to access your medical records, so you can keep track ...

  19. University strategy for doctoral training: the Ghent University Doctoral Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracke, N; Moens, L

    2010-01-01

    The Doctoral Schools at Ghent University have a three-fold mission: (1) to provide support to doctoral students during their doctoral research, (2) to foster a quality culture in (doctoral) research, (3) to promote the international and social stature and prestige of the doctorate vis-a-vis potential researchers and the potential labour market. The Doctoral Schools offer top-level specialized courses and transferable skills training to doctoral students as part of their doctoral training programme. They establish mechanisms of quality assurance in doctoral research. The Doctoral Schools initialize and support initiatives of internationalization. They also organize information sessions, promotional events and interaction with the labour market, and as such keep a finger on the pulse of external stakeholders.

  20. Medical thrillers: doctored fiction for future doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpy, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Medical thrillers have been a mainstay of popular fiction since the late 1970s and still attract a wide readership today. This article examines this specialized genre and its core conventions within the context of professionally-based fiction, i.e. the class of thrillers written by professionals or former professionals. The author maps this largely unchartered territory and analyzes the fictional representations of doctors and medicine provided in such novels. He argues that medical thrillers, which are not originally aimed at specialized readers and sometimes project a flawed image of medicine, may be used as a pedagogical tool with non-native learners of medical English.

  1. Comparison of meat quality parameters in surgical castrated versus vaccinated against gonadotrophin-releasing factor male and female Iberian pigs reared in free-ranging conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Macipe, M; Rodríguez, P; Izquierdo, M; Gispert, M; Manteca, X; Mainau, E; Hernández, F I; Claret, A; Guerrero, L; Dalmau, A

    2016-01-01

    This study compared carcass and meat quality traits between 16 vaccinated (VF), 19 castrated (CF) and 8 entire (EF) female Iberian pigs, and between 21 vaccinated (VM) and 19 castrated (CM) male Iberian pigs reared in free ranging conditions. Vaccination consisted in the application of Improvac® at the age of 11, 12 and 14 months in VF and VM. Pigs were slaughtered at 16 months. In females, carcass and meat quality were found to be very similar regardless of the treatment. In males, VM had a leaner carcass, lower (P free-range conditions in terms of product qualities. Vaccination in females did not alter carcass and meat quality, and specific interests should consider reproductive behavior in free-range conditions.

  2. Learning Dynamics in Doctoral Supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie

    This doctoral research explores doctoral supervision within life science research in a Danish university. From one angle it investigates doctoral students’ experiences with strengthening the relationship with their supervisors through a structured meeting with the supervisor, prepared as part...... of an introduction course for new doctoral students. This study showed how the course provides an effective way build supervisee agency and strengthening supervisory relationships through clarification and alignment of expectations and sharing goals about doctoral studies. From the other angle the research...

  3. Surgical Assisting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Insert and remove Foley urinary bladder catheter Place pneumatic tourniquet Confirm procedure with surgeon Drape patient within ... Technology and Surgical Assisting (NBSTSA) offers the CertifiedSurgical First Assistant (CSFA) credential, and the National Surgical Assistant ...

  4. Patient-doctor relationship: the practice orientation of doctors in Kano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiola, T; Udofia, O; Abdullahi, A T

    2014-01-01

    Attitude and orientation of doctors to the doctor-patient relationship has a direct influence on delivery of high quality health- care. No study to the knowledge of these researchers has so far examined the practice orientation of doctors in Nigeria to this phenomenon. The aims of this study were to determine the orientation of Kano doctors to the practice of doctor-patient relationship and physicians' related-factors. Participants were doctors working in four major hospitals (i.e., two federal-owned and two state-owned) servicing Kano State and its environs. The Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale (PPOS) and a socio-demographic questionnaire were completed by the 214 participants. The PPOS has 18 items and measures three parameters of a total score and two dimension of "sharing" and "caring". The mean age of participants was 31.72 years (standard deviation = 0.87), with 22% being females, 40.7% have been practicing for ≥ 6 years and about two-third working in federal-owned health institution. The Cronbach's alpha of total PPOS scores was 0.733 and that of two sub-scale scores of "sharing" and "caring" were 0.659 and 0.546 respectively. Most of the doctors' orientation (92.5%) was towards doctor-centered (i.e., paternalistic) care, majority (75.2%) upheld the view of not sharing much information and control with patients, and showing little interest in psychosocial concerns of patients (i.e., 'caring'=93.0%). Respondents' characteristics that were significantly associated with high doctor 'caring' relationship orientation were being ≥ 30-year-old and practicing for ≥ 6 years. Working in State-owned hospitals was also significantly associated with high doctor "sharing" orientation. This paper demonstrated why patient-centered medical interviewing should be given top priority in medical training in Nigeria, and particularly for federal health institutions saddled with production of new doctors and further training for practicing doctors.

  5. Are doctors altruistic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glannon, W; Ross, L F

    2002-04-01

    There is a growing belief in the US that medicine is an altruistic profession, and that physicians display altruism in their daily work. We argue that one of the most fundamental features of medical professionalism is a fiduciary responsibility to patients, which implies a duty or obligation to act in patients' best medical interests. The term that best captures this sense of obligation is "beneficence", which contrasts with "altruism" because the latter act is supererogatory and is beyond obligation. On the other hand, we offer several examples in which patients act altruistically. If it is patients and not the doctors who are altruistic, then the patients are the gift-bearers and to that extent doctors owe them gratitude and respect for their many contributions to medicine. Recognising this might help us better understand the moral significance of the doctor-patient relationship in modern medicine.

  6. Junior doctors' knowledge of applied clinical anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Yuri; Morgan, Mia; Singh, Annika; Ellis, Harold

    2008-05-01

    This study examines the level of knowledge of applied clinical anatomy among junior doctors. A multiple-choice questionnaire was designed, which covered 15 areas of anatomical knowledge essential to clinical practice, for example, important surface landmarks and interpretation of radiographs. The questionnaire was completed by 128 individuals. They comprised anatomy demonstrators, preregistration house officers (PRHOs), senior house officers (SHOs) and specialist registrars (SpRs) across the range of medical and surgical specialities. Answers were scored and analyzed by group, allowing comparison not only between newly qualified PRHOs and more senior doctors, but also with anatomy demonstrators who had undergone more traditional anatomical training. The results reveal a wide variation of knowledge among junior doctors, with PRHOs scoring an average of 72.1%, SHOs 77.1%, SpRs 82.4%, and demonstrators 82.9%. This progression in knowledge up the clinical hierarchy may reflect clinical experience building upon the foundations laid in medical school, although with demonstrators topping the league table, it seems that intensive academic training is the most beneficial. With junior doctors' training in the UK currently in flux, these results highlight the need for training in clinical anatomy to hold an important place in the development of tomorrow's clinicians.

  7. Women Doctors in 1914

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    THE five women shown here are doctors. Eighty-four years ago, they sat for this photographic portrait. The photo depicts the tasteful combination of East and West. While the photographic studio was decorated in the European style, the women doctors were dressed in traditional Chinese fashion with their hair coiled in Japanese style. We can also see that though the ladies were in vogue for their time, they still displayed shyness facing a male photographer, as most can be observed shifting their eyesight away from the lens.

  8. Surviving the Doctoral Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Kerlin

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available This article probes the implications of neo-conservative public education policies for the future of the academic profession through a detailed examination of critical issues shaping contemporary doctoral education in U.S. and Canadian universities. Institutional and social factors such as financial retrenchment, declining support for affirmative action, downward economic mobility, a weak academic labor market for tenure-track faculty, professional ethics in graduate education, and backlash against women's progress form the backdrop for analysis of the author's survey of current doctoral students' opinions about funding, support, the job market, and quality of learning experiences.

  9. Changing doctor prescribing behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.S.; Mäkelä, M.; Vermeulen, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane Collabora......The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane...

  10. Mandatory notification of impaired doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, R G

    2014-12-01

    Mandatory reporting of impaired doctors is compulsory in Australasia. Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency guidelines for notification claim high benchmark though the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and the Royal Australasian College of Physicians suggest they still obstruct doctors seeking help. Western Australia excludes mandatory reporting of practitioner-patients. This study examines reporting, consequences and international experiences with notification. Depressed doctors avoid diagnosis and treatment, fearing consequences, yet are more prone to marital problems, substance dependence and needing psychotherapy. South African research confirms isolation of impaired doctors and delayed seeking help with definable characteristics of those at risk. New Zealand data acknowledge: errors occur; questionable contribution from mandatory reporting; issues concerning competence assessment; favouring reporting to senior colleagues or self-intervention to compliance with mandatory reporting. UK found an anaesthetist guilty of professional misconduct for not reporting and sanctioned doctors regarding Harold Shipman. Australians are reluctant to report, fearing legalistic intrusion into care. Australian research confirmed definable characteristics for doctors with psychiatric illness or alcohol abuse. Exposure to legal medicine evokes personal disenchantment for doctors involved. Medicine poses barriers for impaired doctors. Spanish and UK doctors do not use general practitioners and may have suboptimal care. US and European doctors self-medicate using samples. US drug-dependent doctors also prescribe for spouses. Junior doctors are losing empathy with the profession. UK doctors favour private care, avoiding public scrutiny. NZ and Brazil created specific services for doctors, which appear effective. Mandatory reporting may be counterproductive requiring reappraisal.

  11. How doctors search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Price, Susan; Delcambre, Lois

    2012-01-01

    to context-specific aspects of the main topic of the documents. We have tested the model in an interactive searching study with family doctors with the purpose to explore doctors’ querying behaviour, how they applied the means for specifying a search, and how these features contributed to the search outcome...

  12. Fourth Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Ingrid Haug

    2016-01-01

    On 10 May, over 130 PhD students and their supervisors, from both CERN and partner universities, gathered for the 4th Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   The assembly was followed by a poster session, at which eighteen doctoral students presented the outcome of their scientific work. The CERN Doctoral Student Programme currently hosts just over 200 students in applied physics, engineering, computing and science communication/education. The programme has been in place since 1985. It enables students to do their research at CERN for a maximum of three years and to work on a PhD thesis, which they defend at their University. The programme is steered by the TSC committee, which holds two selection committees per year, in June and December. The Doctoral Student Assembly was opened by the Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti, who stressed the importance of the programme in the scientific environment at CERN, emphasising that there is no more rewarding activity than lear...

  13. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis B and C in Clinical Staffs (Doctor an

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Mokhayeri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Health care workers who have contact with blood and secretions have an increased occupational risk for blood transmitted infections. The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of Hepatitis B and C infections and evaluation of the level of HBV antibody titer in clinical staffs (doctor and Nurse of the four hospitals in Khorramabad city, Iran. This cross sectional study investigated 462 clinical staffs (doctor and nurse in the government hospitals of Khorramabad city. The history of HB vaccination and contact with blood and secretions and body fluids recorded. 5cc blood was collected from each person and HBSAg and HBSAb and HCVAb were measured by ELISA method. Among 462 participants 381 (82.47% were women and 81 (17.53% were men, 9(1.95% participants were positive for hepatitis, there were 7 (1.52% cases positive for HBs Ag, 2 (0.43% cases for HCV Ab. HCV and HBV prevalence was highest in the age group of 45 to 54 and 30 to 40 years respectively, prevalence rates were higher in females compared to males, from a total of 9 Infected participants, 3 had a history of needle stick injury, 6 had a history of surgery, also, none of these nine hepatitis positive subjects had the experience of blood reception, hepatitis patients have work experience in the surgical ward, operating rooms and emergency. According to the results of this study prevalence of HBV and HCV in clinical staffs (doctor and nurse in hospitals less than other people. The doctors and nurses have the highest rate of knowledgeable about preventive and control methods of hepatitis.

  14. The equestrian sport-related injury workload of a regional doctor-led air ambulance unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleetman, David

    2012-12-01

    The Great Western Ambulance Service Air Support Unit (ASU) was established in July 2007. The helicopter carries a doctor, providing a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) model of care. Equestrian sport-related injuries account for 6.8% of the unit's total attended case load. Horse riding has a higher rate of severe injury than motorcycle racing and 45% of patients admitted with equestrian injuries require surgical intervention. Orthopaedic injuries to the extremities are commonest, superseding head injuries since the introduction of protective headwear. The majority of equestrian sport-related injuries occur in areas inaccessible to land crews. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the ASU mission database from July 2008 to December 2009 (18 months) and identified 29 patients that were attended to by the ASU. The patient cohort had a female majority with an average age of 31.9. 10 Patients (34.5%) were under the age of 20. The ISS ranged from 1 to 75 (mean, 4.8; median, 1) and injuries to the extremities were commonest. The location of the accident was inaccessible to land ambulance in 55.2% of missions. The average mission time was over 2h. Doctors delivered more advanced (medical) interventions in 20.7% of missions. In 41.4% of missions, there were no such interventions performed by the attending doctor and no access to land ambulance. We therefore conclude that a large proportion of ASU dispatches were due to limited access rather than for the delivery of advanced interventions. However, our results support the opinion that horse riding carries some risk of serious injury and when employed appropriately, HEMS doctors on the ASU are a useful resource for a minority of equestrian sport-related injuries.

  15. Penumbra: Doctoral support as drama

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisker, Gina; Robinson, Gill; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2017-01-01

    Much international doctoral learning research focuses on personal, institutional and learning support provided by supervisors, managed relationships,‘nudging’ robust, conceptual, critical, creative work. Other work focuses on stresses experienced in supervisor-student relationships and doctoral j...

  16. [Do male and female physicians give the same contraception guidance?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, G H; Karlsen, W B; Tollan, A

    1990-11-10

    A questionnaire on their practice regarding ordination of contraceptive methods was answered by 239 (75%) of the general practitioners in the three northern most counties of Norway. The female doctors reported a higher frequency both of female patients and of consultations for birth control, and were more active in these consultations than their male colleagues. Female doctors suggested more methods to their patients, and had a more positive attitude to barrier methods. 61% of the male doctors and 27% of the female doctors had no experience of fitting diaphragms.

  17. Reinventing The Doctor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyez Jiwa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available There has been a seismic shift in the lives of people because of technology. People are far better informed than they were in the 1980s and 1990s. Much of this information is available through the media but even more is available and archived on the internet. The forces pushing the internet into health and health care are strong and unstoppable, ensuring that the internet and the choices it offers must be part of the design of our future health care system. We are no longer content to wait in queues as we live at a faster pace than earlier generations — we don’t not have time to wait for appointments months, weeks or even days in advance. The internet offers the prospect of online consultations in the comfort of your own home. The physical examination will change as new devices are developed to allow the necessary sounds and signals emitted by our malfunctioning bodies to be recorded, interpreted and captured at a remote location. Meanwhile, for those who prefer to see a health care practitioner in person the options to consult practitioners other than doctors who can advise on our health is expanding. The reality is we can’t afford to train or pay for all the doctors we need under the current “doctor-knows-best” system of health care. Patients no longer believe the rhetoric and are already voting with their feet. Pharmacists, nurses and other allied health professionals are beginning to play a much greater role in offering relief from symptoms and monitoring of chronic diseases. Of course, the doctor of the future will still need to offer face-to-face consultations to some people most of the time or most people some of the time. The social role doctors play will continue to be important as humans will always need other humans to personally respond to their distress. As doctors reinvent themselves, the internet and the value of time with patients will be the driving forces that move us into a more sustainable future in health care.

  18. Entrepreneurship and UK Doctoral Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooley, Tristram; Bentley, Kieran; Marriott, John

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the experience of UK doctoral graduates in pursuing entrepreneurial careers: there is evidence that this applies to a substantial number--about 10%--of doctoral graduates. The nature of their experience was explored using 37 interviews with doctoral entrepreneurs. The research was funded by Vitae (www.vitae.ac.uk), an…

  19. Doctorateness as a Threshold Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trafford, Vernon; Leshem, Shosh

    2009-01-01

    Achieving a doctorate presents candidates with certain challenges--undertaking the research, writing the thesis and defending both at their viva. Throughout that doctoral journey, candidates are expected to display doctorateness in their thesis via the characteristics of high-quality scholarly research. The blockages that occur and prevent…

  20. Doctorateness as a Threshold Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trafford, Vernon; Leshem, Shosh

    2009-01-01

    Achieving a doctorate presents candidates with certain challenges--undertaking the research, writing the thesis and defending both at their viva. Throughout that doctoral journey, candidates are expected to display doctorateness in their thesis via the characteristics of high-quality scholarly research. The blockages that occur and prevent…

  1. Find a Doctor - American Optometric Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Doctor Login Join Find a Doctor Find a Doctor Search our database of 28,417 Optometrists. 1 ... Guidelines Evidence-based Optometry Marketplace Home > Find a Doctor Basic Search Advanced Search Fine Tune Your Results ...

  2. Doctoral education from a distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effken, Judith A

    2008-12-01

    This article describes the environmental factors that have contributed to the recent rapid growth of nursing doctoral education at a distance. Early and recent efforts to deliver distance doctoral education are discussed, using The University of Arizona College of Nursing experience as the key exemplar. The Community of Inquiry model is introduced as an appropriate model for doctoral education and then used as a framework to evaluate the current state of the art in distance doctoral nursing education. Successes and challenges in delivering doctoral education from a distance are described.

  3. Aspects of computer vision in surgical endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Vincent; Ayache, Alain; Berreni, N.

    1993-09-01

    This work is related to a project of medical robotics applied to surgical endoscopy, led in collaboration with Doctor Berreni from the Saint Roch nursing-home in Perpignan, France). After taking what Doctor Berreni advises, two aspects of endoscopic color image processing have been brought out: (1) The help to the diagnosis by the automatic detection of the sick areas after a learning phase. (2) The 3D reconstruction of the analyzed cavity by using a zoom.

  4. Female Inguinal Hernia:Analysis of 277 Cases Having Surgical Treatment%女性腹股沟疝277例手术治疗分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马校军

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the advantage and safety of different surgeries in the treatment of female inguinal hernia.Methods 277 cases of female inguinal hernia underwent surgery in our hospital from April 2000 to April 2010 were involved into the study.Among the patients, 147 cases were children with indirect hernia and among the adults, 115 cases were indirect hernia (3 cases of sliding hernia), 8 cases were direct hernia and 7 cases were femoral hernia The hernia in children was treated by high ligation together with the round ligament of uterus inside the hernial sac.The hernia in adults was treated by plain film repair in 87 cases, Kugel repair in 37 cases and plug mesh hernia repair in 6 cases.Results The hernia in 147 children did not relapse after surgery.A small amount of fluid was found by B ultrasound in one case one week after surgery, but the fluid was absorbed one month after surgery.Among the 115 female adults with hernia, the 87 cases treated by plain film repair and the 22 cases treated by Kugel repair did not relapse after surgery and did not have any complications.One case showed complications of local bleeding and retroperitoneal hematoma among the 6 cases treated by plug mesh hernia repair.The patients were followed up for two years and no relapse and no postoperative chronic pain were found.Five adults had urinary retention and were cured after indwelling catheter.Conclusion The hernia in 147 children did not relapse after surgery.A small amount of fluid was found by B ultrasound in one case one week after surgery, but the fluid was absorbed one month after surgery.Among the 115 female adults with hernia, the 87 cases treated by plain film repair and the 22 cases treated by Kugel repair did not relapse after surgery and did not have any complications.One case showed complications of local bleeding and retroperitoneal hematoma among the 6 cases treated by plug mesh hernia repair.The patients were followed up for two years and no relapse and no

  5. Doctors' Attitude Towards Euthanasia: A Cross-sectional Study Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subba, Sonu Hangma; Khullar, Varun; Latafat, Yusra; Chawla, Khushboo; Nirmal, Apoorva; Chaudhary, Tanvi

    2016-06-01

    Euthanasia is a controversial issue that puts doctors into a dilemma and can have the capacity to end the patients' sufferings. However, it is never an easy decision; hence, this study was planned to find the attitude of practicing doctors of medical colleges in a South Indian city of Mangalore towards euthanasia. A cross sectional study was conducted in March-April 2010 among the doctors practicing in the four medical colleges of Mangalore city. A pretested semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 220 doctors after their informed consent. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 11.5. Mean age of the doctors was 37.9 years (SD=9. 4), most of them were males and belonging to the Hindu religion. Euthanasia was justified according to 46.8% of the doctors in order to curtail the sufferings of the patients or to ameliorate the emotional and financial burden. Another 41% said it should be legalized and 39% said that they would use it if it was legalized. Nevertheless 84.5% of them were concerned that it may be misused if legalized. More than half of them felt it was not justified in the face of moral obligations and legal complications. Religion and department were independently associated with the doctors feeling that euthanasia was justified with 69.4% of Muslim doctors saying it was justified as compared to 59.2% of Hindu doctors (OR=2.82; p=.001) and 59.3% of doctors from medical specialities said it was justified as opposed to 39.8% of doctors from surgical specialities (OR=2.3; p=.008). Despite the illegality of it, 25% of the doctors had received requests from patients and 22.3% from relatives for euthanasia. Though euthanasia is illegal in the country, there are doctors who feel it is justified in some situations, yet not without reservations. The fact that they had been requested for euthanasia by the patients and relatives show that even the public are being aware and accepting the practice. Yet, the law in our country has not changed and it

  6. Gender and power: Nurses and doctors in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Susan P

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nurse-doctor relationship is historically one of female nurse deference to male physician authority. We investigated the effects of physicians' sex on female nurses' behaviour. Methods Nurses at an urban, university based hospital completed one of two forms of a vignette-based survey in January, 2000. Each survey included four clinical scenarios. In form 1 of the questionnaire the physicians described were female, male, female, and male. In form 2, vignettes were identical but the physician sex was changed to male, female, male, and female. Differences in responses to questions based on the sex of the physician in each vignette were studied Results 199 self-selected nurses completed the survey. The responses of 177 female respondents and 11 respondents who did not specifiy their sex, and were assumed to be female based on the overall sex ratio of respondents, were analysed. Persistent sex-role stereotypes influenced the relationship between female nurses and physicians. Nurses were more willing to serve and defer to male physicians. They approached female physicians on a more egalitarian basis, were more comfortable communicating with them, yet more hostile toward them. Conclusion When nurses and doctors are female, traditional power imbalances in their relationship diminish, suggesting that these imbalances are based as much on gender as on professional hierarchy. The effects of this change on the authority of the medical profession, the role of nurses, and on patient care merit further exploration.

  7. Doctor Alberto Zabaleta Lombana

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    El Doctor Alberto Zabaleta Lombana nació en la población de Turbaco, Bolívar, el nueve de Abril de 1923. Toda su formación intelectual transcurrió en los claustros de la Universidad de Cartagena. En 1936 ingresó a la Facultad de Filosofía y Letras (Bachillerato), luego pasó a la Facultad de Medicina hasta obtener su grado de Médico en 1953. Posteriormente en 1959 inició la Jefatura de Clínica Obstetricia (Residencia como se denominan en el presente) en la Universidad de Cartagena y en la Clín...

  8. Language of the doctorate: Doctorateness as a threshold concept in doctoral literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitzer, Eli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In academia, the definition of literacy has evolved from a focus on reading and writing to encompass more inclusive and expansive perspectives. Such perspectives have come from researchers involved in exploring literacy among diverse populations and across traditional divides such as cultural, political and socioeconomic boundaries. Changing definitions of literacy include usage in expressions such as ‘computer literacy’, ‘civic literacy’, ‘health literacy’, ‘cultural literacy’ and others. Recently, new directions in literacy research were foregrounded by critical questions that seek to discover how literacy functions in doctoral studies and within research communities. For instance, what does it mean to be ‘literate’ as a doctoral member of a research culture, within a field of research, within the academic profession and so on? In addition, doctoral candidates often grapple with what may be termed ‘threshold concepts’. Such concepts include the meaning of the doctorate as a qualification, its aims, its narrative and the level of literacy required to succeed with a doctorate. Against this background the article explores firstly how the concept of being literate has been broadened to include literacy for doctoral learning; secondly, it explains why doctorateness remains a threshold concept for many doctoral candidates and supervisors, and thirdly it provides some evidence from at least five years of working with doctoral education and doctoral supervisor development workshops to support an argument for doctoral literacy. Finally, the article provides some implications which emerged from a better understanding of the language and requirements of doctorateness as an essential literacy requirement for doctoral candidates and their supervisors.

  9. Re-Imagining Doctoral Education: Professional Doctorates and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alison; Brennan, Marie; Green, Bill

    2009-01-01

    Portents of the demise of the Professional Doctorate have emerged in some recent policy and institutional circles in Australia, raising questions about the meaning and relevance of the Professional Doctorate in an era of "league tables" and research assessment in Australia. This article argues that such portents, based largely on narrow…

  10. Enacting Feminist Alliance Principles in a Doctoral Writing Support Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadener, Beth Blue; Peters, Lacey; Eversman, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    This study utilizes a multivocal narrative approach to analyze the dynamics, accomplishments, and challenges of an interdisciplinary doctoral support group consisting primarily of female members. The authors raise issues of power, alliance, troubling expert-novice models of mentoring, and the role of social justice pedagogy in the group.

  11. Patient-doctor communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teutsch, Carol

    2003-09-01

    Communication is an important component of patient care. Traditionally, communication in medical school curricula was incorporated informally as part of rounds and faculty feedback, but without a specific or intense focus on skills of communicating per se. The reliability and consistency of this teaching method left gaps, which are currently getting increased attention from medical schools and accreditation organizations. There is also increased interest in researching patient-doctor communication and recognizing the need to teach and measure this specific clinical skill. In 1999, the Accreditation of Council for Graduate Medical Education implemented a requirement for accreditation for residency programs that focuses on "interpersonal and communications skills that result in effective information exchange and teaming with patients, their families, and other health professionals." The National Board of Medical Examiners, Federation of State Medical Boards. and the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates have proposed an examination between the. third and fourth year of medical school that "requires students to demonstrate they can gather information from patients, perform a physical examination, and communicate their findings to patients and colleagues" using standardized patients. One's efficiency and effectiveness in communication can be improved through training, but it is unlikely that any future advances will negate the need and value of compassionate and empathetic two-way communication between clinician and patient. The published literature also expresses belief in the essential role of communication. "It has long been recognized that difficulties in the effective delivery of health care can arise from problems in communication between patient and provider rather than from any failing in the technical aspects of medical care. Improvements in provider-patient communication can have beneficial effects on health outcomes". A systematic review of

  12. 经闭孔吊带手术治疗女性压力性尿失禁46例临床观察%TOT for surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence in 46 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晨曦; 丁俊; 李国波; 朱旭明; 陈国栋; 陈怡芳

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察经闭孔吊带( transobturator tape ,TOT)尿道中段悬吊术治疗女性压力性尿失禁( stress urinary inconti-nence,SUI)的近期疗效。方法女性SUI患者46例,采取TOT手术治疗,对比手术前后国际尿失禁咨询委员会尿失禁问卷(ICI-Q-SF)评分、1 h尿垫试验和最大尿流率变化,以判定疗效。结果随访6~18个月,治愈33例(71.7%),有效11例(23.9%),无效2例(4.3%)。 ICI-Q-SF评分、1 h尿垫试验显著优于术前,最大尿流率无变化。结论 TOT手术是治疗女性SUI安全、有效的微创手术方法。%Objective To evaluate the recent efficacy of applying outside-in transobturator tape ( TOT) tension-free mid-ure-thral suspension in the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence ( SUI) .Methods A total of 46 female inpatients with SUI were enrolled using Italy Herniamesh sling .Preoperative and postoperative data were recorded and compared , including International Consulta-tion on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICI-Q-SF), 1-hour pad weight test and maximum urinary flow rates (Qmax).Results All patients have been followed up for 6 to 12 months.The cure, improvement and failure rates were 33 patients (71.7%), 11 (23.9%) and 2 (4.3%), respectively.The differences were significant when compared ICI-Q-SF and 1-hour pad weight test (P<0.05).Postop-erative complications included 2 cases of vulva hematoma , 1 case of dyspareunia , 2 cases of groin pain and 1 case of de novo detrusor overactivity .No case recorded with bladder perforation , urine retention and mesh erosion .Conclusion Transobturator tape procedure is an effective minimally invasive method for the surgical treatment of female SUI with low rate of complication and good primary outcome .

  13. The Social Work Practice Doctorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartocollis, Lina; Cnaan, Ram A.; Ledwith, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a systematic review of the emerging practice doctorate in social work. Based on the experience of the first such Doctor of Social Work (DSW) program, we provide information regarding the program origins and rationale, development, current structure, and future direction. Such information will enrich the discussion on the role…

  14. Will Medical Technology Deskill Doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jingyan

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of medical technology on health care in light of the fact that doctors are becoming more reliant on technology for obtaining patient information, making diagnoses and in carrying out treatments. Evidence has shown that technology can negatively affect doctor-patient communications, physical examination skills, and…

  15. Talking to Your Child's Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Better Relationship en español Cómo conversar con el médico de su hijo Your child's doctor can ... don't be afraid to give the doctor feedback about your office visit experience, such as whether ...

  16. [Gender patterns in Spanish otolaryngologic doctoral theses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prim-Espada, María Pilar; De Diego-Sastre, Juan Ignacio; Pérez-Fernández, Elia

    2010-01-01

    In last decades women in Spain have a greater access to postgraduate education. The objective of this study was to perform a gender analysis on the Otolaryngology doctoral theses presented in a 25 year-period. The TESEO data base on doctoral theses was searched for theses on Otorhinolaryngology written between 1981 and 2005. As strategy for the research we employed the terms: 1) Otorrinolaringología (Otorhinolaryngology); 2) Cirugía de garganta, nariz y oídos (Ear, nose and throat surgery); 3) Fisiología de la audición (Physiology of hearing); 4) Fisiología del equilibrio (Physiology of balance); 5) Física de la audición (Physics of hearing); and 6) Bioacústica (Bioacoustics). A total of 450 theses (18.0±8.3 theses/year) were found, of which 129 were written by females (28.6%). There was a gender imbalance among authors, with 5.2±3.4 theses/year for women vs. 12.9±6.6 theses/year for men (p=0.0002). Nevertheless, there was a tendency toward equality in the last 10 years (p=0.001). On the other hand, the PhD student's gender was clearly related to the supervisor's gender (p=0.0001). With respect to the main topics in our area (otology, audiology/vestibular diseases, rhinology and pathology of paranasal sinuses and neck diseases), there were no significant differences between males and females (p=0.231). These results indicate a tendency towards equality in the number of men and women successfully completing doctoral studies in Otolaryngology. However, the PhD student's gender is clearly related to the supervisor's gender. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Dementia - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about dementia; Alzheimer disease - what to ask your doctor; Cognitive impairment - what to ask your doctor ... who is losing or has lost their memory? What type of words should I use? What is ...

  18. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - adult; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - adult; Seizure - what to ask your doctor ... call to find more information about driving and epilepsy? What should I discuss with my boss at ...

  19. Junior doctors and undergraduate teaching: the influence of gender on the provision of medical education.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prichard, David

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: International experience has demonstrated that the medical profession is becoming less dominated by men. This "feminization of medicine" has been a topic of much debate in the medical literature. As the gender ratio in the profession changes, it is likely that a greater proportion of undergraduate education will be provided by women. Whether this shift away from the male-dominated provision of medical education will have an effect on undergraduate education is unknown. PURPOSE: The aim of this research was to clarify whether there are differences between the attitudes and practices of male and female junior doctors regarding the practice of undergraduate teaching. METHOD: A survey methodology among a cohort of nonconsultant hospital doctors in a major Irish teaching hospital was utilized. The overall response rate was 93%. The cohort held a positive attitude toward teaching undergraduates, and the majority were actively engaged in this activity. Doctors of both genders expressed a willingness to undertake teacher training. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the genders regarding the self-reported quantity of teaching provided to undergraduates. Male doctors perceived themselves as more confident educators when compared to female doctors, but this is likely to reflect cohort demographics in which a greater proportion of male doctors were more senior. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that male and female doctors have similar attitudes toward, and practices in, voluntary undergraduate teaching. As a result, any gender shift in medicine is unlikely to result in a significant change in junior doctors\\' attitudes toward undergraduate medical education.

  20. Digital Curation and Doctoral Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Abbott

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article considers digital curation in doctoral study and the role of the doctoral supervisor and institution in facilitating students’ acquisition of digital curation skills, including some of the potentially problematic expectations of the supervisory relationship with regards to digital curation. Research took the form of an analysis of the current digital curation training landscape, focussing on doctoral study and supervision. This was followed by a survey (n=116 investigating attitudes towards importance, expertise, and responsibilities regarding digital curation. This research confirms that digital curation is considered to be very important within doctoral study but that doctoral supervisors and particularly students consider themselves to be largely unskilled at curation tasks. It provides a detailed picture of curation activity within doctoral study and identifies the areas of most concern. A detailed analysis demonstrates that most of the responsibility for curation is thought to lie with students and that institutions are perceived to have very low responsibility and that individuals tend to over-assign responsibility to themselves. Finally, the research identifies which types of support system for curation are most used and makes suggestions for ways in which students, supervisors, institutions, and others can effectively and efficiently address problematic areas and improve digital curation within doctoral study.

  1. Turning Doctors Into Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Anderson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Much of the contentious debate surrounding the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare” concerned its financing and its attempt to guarantee (near universal access to healthcare through the private insurance market.  Aside from sensationalist stories of “death panels,” much less attention went to implications of the bill for the actual provision of healthcare. Methodology: This paper examines the "patient-centered medical home" (PCMH model which has been widely promoted as a means of reviving and improving primary care (i.e. general internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatrics. Argument: The PCMH and many of its components (e.g pay-for-performance, electronic medical records were interventions that were implemented on a massive basis without any evidence of benefit. Recent research has not generally supported clinical benefits with the PCMH model. Instead it seems to designed to de-professionalize (make proletarians of health care workers and enforce corporate models of health. The core values of professional work are undermined while the PCMH does nothing to address the structural marginalization of primary care within US health care. Conclusions: The development of alternative models will require political changes. Both doctors and teachers are in a position of advocate for more progressive systems of care and education.

  2. Edinburgh doctors and their physic gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, D

    2008-12-01

    Edinburgh has had eight physic gardens on different sites since its first one was created by the Incorporation of Barbers and Surgeons in 1656. As the gardens grew in size, they evolved from herb gardens to botanic gardens with small herbaria for the supply of medical herbs. They were intended for the instruction of medical, surgical and apothecary students and, in the case of the physicians, to demonstrate the need for a physicians' college and a pharmacopoeia. Some of the doctors in charge of them were equally famous and influential in botany as in medicine, and while Edinburgh Town Council enjoyed the fame the gardens brought to the city it was parsimonious and slow to support its botanical pioneers. The gardens are celebrated today in the Sibbald Garden within the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh.

  3. Surgical Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azarmehr, Iman; Stokbro, Kasper; Bell, R. Bryan

    2017-01-01

    were identified in the field of traumatology. Treatment of complex orbital fractures was considerably improved by the use of SN compared with traditionally treated control groups. Conclusions: SN seems to be a very promising addition to the surgical toolkit. Planning details of the surgical procedure...... in a 3-dimensional virtual environment and execution with real-time guidance can significantly improve precision. Among factors to be considered are the financial investments necessary and the learning curve....

  4. Doctor, Clinic, and Dental Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Viral Suppression Doctor, Clinical & Dental Visits Treatment Adherence Mental Health Substance Abuse Issues Sexual Health Nutrition & Food Safety Exercise Immunizations Aging with HIV/AIDS Women’s Health Housing ...

  5. Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to MBCN Contact Us Questions to ask your doctor Medical appointments can be stressful. To better deal ... for you. If diagnosed by your primary care physician Where do you send your metastatic patients for ...

  6. APPENDIX:A Doctor's Confession

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Not long ago, Xinhua News Agency reported on a confession by Xiao Qiwei regarding corruption in medicine purchases at a hospital in Sichuan. Excerpts follow: I have been working as a doctor for 35 years. As far as I know, corruption in medicine purchases dates from the 1990s. After 1998, all kinds of medicine salespersons surged into hospitals and talked to doctors face to face, stating clearly that they

  7. Healthy Doctors – Sick Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Gjerløw Aasland

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Doctors are among the healthiest segments of the population in western countries. Nevertheless, they complain strongly of stress and burnout. Their own explanation is deprofessionalisation: The honourable art of doctoring has been replaced by standardised interventions and production lines; professional autonomy has withered. This view is shared by many medical sociologists who have identified a “golden age of medicine,” or “golden age of doctoring,” starting after World War II and declining around 1970. This article looks at some of the central sociological literature on deprofessionalisation, particularly in a perspective of countervailing powers. It also looks into another rise-and-fall model, proposed by the medical profession itself, where the fall in professional power was generated by the notion that there are no more white spots to explore on the map of medicine. Contemporary doctoring is a case of cognitive dissonance, where the traditional doctor role seems incompatible with modern health care.Keywords: deprofessionalisation, professional autonomy, cognitive dissonance, golden age of doctoring

  8. Retained surgical sponge: An enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Retained surgical sponge in the body following a surgery is called "gossypiboma". A 27-year-old female who had undergone lower segment cesarean section 4 months earlier was admitted with complaints of pain abdomen with a palpable mass in left iliac fossa. X-ray, ultrasonography, and CT scan findings were suggestive of retained surgical sponge. Surgical sponge was removed following laparotomy. Surgeons must be aware of the risk factors that lead to gossypiboma, and measures should be taken to prevent it. Besides increasing morbidity and possible mortality, it may result in libel suit for compensation.

  9. The role of the surgical care practitioner within the surgical team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Julie

    Changes to the surgical workforce and the continued development of health policy have perpetuated the requirement for innovative perioperative roles. The surgical care practitioner is a nurse or allied health professional who works within a surgical team and has advanced perioperative skills, including the ability to undertake surgical interventions.With only limited literature evaluating this role, any benefits of their inclusion to a surgical team are largely anecdotal. This article presents the findings of an autoethnographic inquiry that explored the experiences of surgical team members who worked with the nurse researcher in her role as surgical care practitioner. Surgeons identified the provision of a knowledgeable, competent assistant and operator who enhanced patient care, helped maintain surgical services and supported the training of junior doctors. The professional, ethical and legal obligations of advanced perioperative practice were upheld. Interprofessional collaboration was improved, as was service provision. This further enhanced the patient experience. The traditional viewpoint that nurses who undertake tasks previously associated with medicine should be working to the standard of a doctor is challenged but requires further examination.

  10. Gender Differences in the Early Employment Outcomes of STEM Doctorates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberlee A. Shauman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The representation of women among STEM doctorates has grown over the past decades but the underrepresentation of women in the STEM labor force persists. This paper examines the immediate post-degree employment outcomes of nine cohorts of STEM doctorates who attained their degrees between 1995 and 2013. The results reveal both progress toward gender equity and persistent inequities. Contrary to historical gender disparities, a small female advantage has emerged in the attainment of tenure-track faculty positions, women are increasingly less likely than men to enter postdoctoral positions, and the flow of STEM doctorates into business and industry, which was once male dominated, is now gender neutral. Among the doctorates who do not follow the doctorate-to-faculty career path, women are as likely as men to “stay in STEM,” but less likely to attain research-oriented jobs. Gender segregation in occupational attainment and significant gender gaps in earnings, however, continue to be defining characteristics of the STEM labor force. The results show that the labor market disparities vary across STEM fields but are largely not attributable to the gendered impact of parenthood and dual-career marriage.

  11. The doctor-patient relationship in telemedicine and mobile health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Montanari Vergallo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Telemedicine falls under the broader term of eHealth and involves the delivery of health care services, where distance is a critical factor. Thanks to telemedicine patients can access treatments that would otherwise be unavailable. The authors focus on whether doctor-patient relationship exist in telemedicine and mobile health. The answer should be found on a case-by-case basis. There is a doctor-patient relationship when the two are connected, possibly electronically, for purposes related to the prevention, diagnosis or treatment of diseases. But the doctor-patient relationship is absent when the patient downloads apps to self diagnose rather than seeing a doctor. These apps encourage the use of ‘DIY’ medicine, making the doctor superfluous and can often lead to misdiagnosis and misunderstanding. Informed consent to the use of telemedicine should have the same prerequisites as those used in traditional medical practice. However, telemedicine requires some additional information: risks related to the privacy of personal data and precautionary measures to reduce them; further risks involved in the use of technology (for example, quality and efficiency of the telematic tools. With regards to the processing of personal data in mobile health, informed consent should be even more specific than that for medical treatment via telemedicine. In order to respect the requirement of specificity, the app should be structured in a way that allows the user to express consent for each type of data that the app intends to collect. But such a solution presents various difficulties. In conclusion, direct contact between a doctor and their patient should continue to be the preferred practice with which to carry out the relationship. Telemedicine can be used when it is deemed to be in the best interest of the patient, for example when it can offer the possibility of surgical treatment otherwise unavailable, or where contact is not possible.

  12. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGAD 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME, open 24h/24h 748-49-50 Association Of Geneva Doctors Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European EmergencyCall 112 FRANCE EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 04-72-11-69-11 All doctors will...

  13. Doctor for patients or doctor for society? Comparative study of GPs' and psychiatrists' assessments of clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynöe, Niels; Mattsson, Bengt

    2004-12-01

    To study general practitioners' (GPs') inclination to be the advocate of their patients or representatives of the society. The GPs' opinions were compared with those of psychiatrists. A postal questionnaire with two case histories. Loyalty towards the social insurance or towards a patient in distress, and loyalty towards a patient seeking asylum or towards society were posited. The degree of distress and urgency of the patients' situation varied. A random sample of Swedish GPs (n =167) and psychiatrists (n =112). All doctors significantly changed their minds when asked to fake a psychiatric diagnosis compared with a somatic diagnosis. Compared with psychiatrists, general practitioners tend to be more pragmatic (p =0.016) and in addition female doctors in some cases in both groups seem to be more pragmatic (p =0.023). Good clinical practice seems to be of importance in both groups. If the patient's life is threatened doctors are, however, prepared to overrule their own professional interests. The interests of society seem not to have any strong support in either of the two groups or the two cases. GPs as well as psychiatrists find it less improper to fake a psychiatric diagnosis than to fake a somatic. GP tends to be more pragmatic than psychiatrists and female doctors tend to be more pragmatic than male in both groups.

  14. Doctoral research on cadastral development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagdas, Volkan; Stubkjær, Erik

    2009-01-01

    . The article focuses on the methodological aspect of doctoral research by analyzing ten doctoral dissertations. Our analysis is based on a taxonomy of methodological elements and aims at identifying commonalities and differences among the dissertations in the use of concepts and methods. Having completed......The multitude of rights in land and the recording of these rights are addressed by a number of studies, yet a recognized paradigm for such studies seems missing. Rights in land are recorded and managed through either cadastral systems or land administration systems depending on the legal system...... of cadastral development. This research is multi-disciplinary and draws on elements of theories and methodologies from the natural, the social, the behavioral, and the formal sciences. During the last decade or so, doctoral dissertations have come to constitute a substantial part of this research effort...

  15. [The clown doctor: an introduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösner, M

    2010-02-01

    In the literature, increasing numbers of practitioners have reported their experience using clown doctors in geriatric settings. The reports agree on the positive effects on persons with dementia and also on their caregivers. However, empirical studies on its effectiveness are rare. This article presents the field of activity of a clown doctor in geriatric settings as well as an overview of current scientific research on the topic and the effects on persons with dementia and nursing staff. It will be become clear that the clown doctor is a supporting therapeutic intervention. Through the clown representation, it is possible to obtain access to and interact with a person with dementia, thus, maintaining social contact of the patient with his/her environment. This effect leads to an increase of well-being and contributes to a reduction of problematic behavior. In addition to reduced workload and relief for the nursing staff, it has a positive effect on the working atmosphere.

  16. Learning Dynamics in Doctoral Supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie

    This doctoral research explores doctoral supervision within life science research in a Danish university. From one angle it investigates doctoral students’ experiences with strengthening the relationship with their supervisors through a structured meeting with the supervisor, prepared as part...... investigates learning opportunities in supervision with multiple supervisors. This was investigated through observations and recording of supervision, and subsequent analysis of transcripts. The analyses used different perspectives on learning; learning as participation, positioning theory and variation theory....... The research illuminates how learning opportunities are created in the interaction through the scientific discussions. It also shows how multiple supervisors can contribute to supervision by providing new perspectives and opinions that have a potential for creating new understandings. The combination...

  17. Solo doctors and ethical isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R J

    2009-11-01

    This paper uses the case of solo doctors to explore whether working in relative isolation from one's peers may be detrimental to ethical decision-making. Drawing upon the relevance of communication and interaction for ethical decision-making in the ethical theories of Habermas, Mead and Gadamer, it is argued that doctors benefit from ethical discussion with their peers and that solo practice may make this more difficult. The paper identifies a paucity of empirical research related to solo practice and ethics but draws upon more general medical ethics research and a study that identified ethical isolation among community pharmacists to support the theoretical claims made. The paper concludes by using the literary analogy of Soderberg's Doctor Glas to illustrate the issues raised and how ethical decision-making in relative isolation may be problematical.

  18. Female hair restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Robin H

    2013-08-01

    Female hair loss is a devastating issue for women that has only relatively recently been publicly acknowledged as a significant problem. Hair transplant surgery is extremely successful in correcting the most cosmetically problematic areas of alopecia. This article discusses the surgical technique of hair transplantation in women in detail, including pearls to reduce postoperative sequelae and planning strategies to ensure a high degree of patient satisfaction. A brief overview of some of the medical treatments found to be helpful in slowing or reversing female pattern hair loss is included, addressing the available hormonal and topical treatments.

  19. 女性患者慢传输性便秘合并盆底疝手术治疗体会(附12例报告)%Experience of surgical treatment for female patients with slow transportation constipation com-bined with pelvic floor hernia:a report of 12 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈兵; 钱群; 姚磊; 孙亚英; 彭英; 司徒光伟; 付广

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨女性患者慢传输性便秘(slow transit constipation,STC)合并盆底疝的外科治疗疗效。方法12例女性STC合并盆底疝患者行结肠次全切除+逆蠕动盲直吻合+阑尾切除+直肠悬吊+盆底抬高手术治疗。结果通过电话及门诊全部随访,9例临床治愈,3例有显著疗效。结论女性患者尤其是高龄患者,STC多合并出口梗阻型便秘(outlet obstnlctive constipation, OOC),如盆底疝;完善围手术期处理可提高手术的安全性;手术治疗女性STC合并盆底疝患者是有效治疗措施之一。%Objective To investigate the curative effect of surgical therapy for female patients with slow transit constipation(STC)combined with pelvic floor hernia.Methods Twelve female patients with STC combined with pelvic floor hernia were treated with subtotal colectomy,anti-peristaltic cecoproct-ostomy,appendectomy,rectal suspension and surgical elevation of the pelvic floor.Results All patients were followed up through outpatient visit and telephone.Clinical cure is noticed in 9 cases and significant efficacy is noticed in 3 cases.Conclusion STC is usually combined with outlet obstructive constipation (OOC)such as pelvic floor hernia,especially in aged females.Security of the surgery can be enhanced by optimizing perioperative management.Surgical treatment is one of the effective measures for female patients with STC combined with pelvic floor hernia.

  20. Critical Reflection as Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookfield, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter considers how doctoral education, particularly in applied settings such as education, social work, counseling, and health care, could be reimagined if it was organized around the idea and process of critical reflection: of helping students to better understand how power operates in educational environments and how students' sense of…

  1. Industry-Oriented Doctorate Established.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Describes an industry-related program at the University of Texas (Arlington) leading to a Doctorate of Science in Applied Chemistry. The program requires an industrial internship and a dissertation based on research involving both the university's chemistry faculty and chemists in industry. (SK)

  2. Robert Paine Doctor Honoris Causa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Mathiesen

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available Professor Emeritus Dr. Robert Paine was conferred the degree of Doctor Honoris Causa at the University of Tromsø on August 27 1998 as a recognition of his long lasting and continuing influence on the anthropological study of modern society, and in particular his many contributions to the understanding of Sami reindeer husbandry and the Sami culture in general.

  3. Doctoral Students' Conceptions of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Rod

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I report a study of the conceptions of research held by a sample of doctoral students at an Australian research-intensive university. I take a unique approach by using metaphor analysis to study the students' conceptions. The students in this study were recruited for an on-line survey in which they answered questions relating to…

  4. Literature Reviews: Advising Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Brent

    2007-01-01

    The rapid expansion of available information has created new opportunities and challenges for today's research students. Academic and public libraries have developed sophisticated electronic databases to better manage knowledge to make it more accessible to researchers. Literature reviews are a major challenge for doctoral students. The focus of…

  5. Instigating change: trainee doctors' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Nassim; Shahaney, Sumera; Martin, Guy; Ahmad, Ahmir; Moghul, Masood

    2012-09-01

    In the 21st century, the core skills of trainee doctors are evolving as clinicians, leaders and innovators. Leadership skills are an essential tool for all doctors and need to be an integral part of their training and learning as set out in the General Medical Council's Good Medical Practice. It is essential to develop these skills at an early stage and continually improve them. A group of junior doctors participated in a pilot programme for leadership with the aim of executing a quality improvement (QI) project. This article describes our experiences of both the course itself and the project undertaken by our group. As part of the process of implementing change, we faced a number of challenges which contributed to our learning. These have been explored as well as potential ways to overcome them to enable the swift and smooth development of future QI projects. Using an example of a QI project looking at handover, this article demonstrates how a trainee doctor can implement their project for both professional and institutional improvement.

  6. [Surgical education has its price].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, W; Krones, C J

    2012-04-01

    The radical economisation of the German health-care system has caused an increasing cost awareness. Following this trend, medical education has been identified as a possible expense factor. The theoretical and practical training of young doctors needs time and costs money. However, a detailed cost analysis is still not available, since the complex daily work schedule of young professionals only allows the calculation of single cost factors. Investigations in the USA estimate the costs of surgical training at US$ 80 000 per year and per resident. At present in Germany, surgical training is indirectly financed by the DRG flat rates of the health insurance companies. Possible alternatives include the implementation of a "training fond" which is financed by a percentage fee of the DRG's as well as an on-top funding by the federal government. This "training fond" would support only those surgical units that offer a structured and certified training to surgical residents. However, a systematic cost analysis of such a structured curriculum is necessary for any further discussion.

  7. Patient stories about their dialysis experience biases others' choices regardless of doctor's advice: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterbottom, Anna E; Bekker, Hilary L; Conner, Mark; Mooney, Andrew F

    2012-01-01

    Renal services provide resources to support patients in making informed choices about their dialysis modality. Many encourage new patients to talk with those already experiencing dialysis. It is unclear if these stories help or hinder patients' decisions, and few studies have been conducted into their effects. We present two studies comparing the impact of patient and doctor stories on hypothetical dialysis modality choices among an experimental population. In total, 1694 participants viewed online information about haemodialysis and continuous cycling peritoneal dialysis and completed a questionnaire. In Study 1, using actors, treatment information was varied by presenter (Doctor, Patient), order of presenter (Patient first, Doctor first) and mode of delivery (written, video). Information in Study 2 was varied (using actors) by presenter (Doctor, Patient), order of presenter (Patient first, Doctor first), inclusion of a decision table (no table, before story, after story) and sex of the 'patient' (male, female) and 'Doctor' (male, female). Information was controlled to ensure comparable content and comprehensibility. In both studies, participants were more likely to choose the dialysis modality presented by the patient rather than that presented by the doctor. There was no effect for mode of delivery (video versus written) or inclusion of a decision table. As 'new' patients were making choices based on past patient experience of those already on dialysis, we recommend caution to services using patient stories about dialysis to support those new to the dialysis in delivering support to those who are new to the decision making process for dialysis modality.

  8. Variation in duration of hospital stay between hospitals and between doctors within hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westert, Gert P.; Nieboer, Anna P.; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    1993-01-01

    Whether one examines the average length of hospital stay at the level of geographic areas, at the level of hospitals, or at the level of doctors, length-of-stay figures are known to vary widely. Even for hospital admissions for comparable surgical procedures among comparable groups of patients, sign

  9. Variation in duration in hospital stay between hospitals and between doctors within hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westert, G.P.; Nieboer, A.P.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    1993-01-01

    Whether one examines the average length of hospital stay at the level of geographic areas, at the level of hospitals, or at the level of doctors, length-of-stay figures are known to vary widely. Even for hospital admissions for comparable surgical procedures among comparable groups of patients, sign

  10. VARIATION IN DURATION OF HOSPITAL STAY BETWEEN HOSPITALS AND BETWEEN DOCTORS WITHIN HOSPITALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WESTERT, GP; NIEBOER, AP; GROENEWEGEN, PP

    1993-01-01

    Whether one examines the average length of hospital stay at the level of geographic areas, at the level of hospitals, or at the level of doctors, length-of-stay figures are known to vary widely. Even for hospital admissions for comparable surgical procedures among comparable groups of patients, sign

  11. Lyme disease - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about Lyme disease; Lyme borreliosis - questions; Bannwarth syndrome - questions ... I am treated with antibiotics? How can my doctor diagnose me with Lyme disease? Can I be ...

  12. Concussion - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about concussion - child; Mild brain injury - what to ask your doctor - child ... school people I should tell about my child's concussion? Can my child stay for a full day? ...

  13. Cholesterol - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor about cholesterol ... What is my cholesterol level? What should my cholesterol level be? What are HDL ("good") cholesterol and LDL ("bad") cholesterol? Does my cholesterol ...

  14. Stress and burnout in junior doctors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wen discussing stress and burnour with doc- tors, I was ... of perceived stress and burnout in doctors who had recently graduated. ..... management. Poorly functioning doctors ... developing and maintaining human resources. The concepts of ...

  15. Enlarged prostate - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about enlarged prostate; Benign prostatic hypertrophy - what to ask your doctor; BPH - what to ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23234640 . Roehrborn CG. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: Etiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, and natural history. In: Wein ...

  16. From Doctors' Stories to Doctors' Stories, and Back Again.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Marcia Day

    2017-03-01

    Stories have always been central to medicine, but during the twentieth century bioscience all but eclipsed narrative's presence in medical practice. In Doctors' Stories, published in 1991, Kathryn Montgomery excavated medicine's narrative foundations and functions to reveal new possibilities for how to conceive and characterize medicine. Physicians' engagement with stories has since flourished, especially through the narrative medicine movement, although in the twenty-first century this has been challenged by the health care industry's business-minded and data-driven clinical systems. But doctors' stories-and Montgomery's text-remain crucial, schooling clinicians in reflection, ethical awareness, and resilience. Physicians who write even short, 55-word reflective stories can hold to humanistic and ethical understandings of patient care and of themselves as healers even as they practice in systematized settings and employ evidence-based expertise. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Politeness in Doctor-Potient Diolog

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张继媛

    2011-01-01

    In our everyday communication, we often use Euphemism to express our thought indirectly, for example, doctors usually do not tell the patients the truth when treating serious patients. This paper aims at exploring the nature of euphemism in doctor-patient interactions and how do doctors use euphemism to attain the goal of politeness on the basis of the Face Theory and Politeness theory.

  18. An Exploration of Darkness within Doctoral Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2016-01-01

    In doctoral education, the formal structures include the Graduate School system, PhD courses, and supervision contracts, etc. Doctoral education also takes place on informal and tacit levels, where doctoral students learn about the institutional regulations, the research field, academic craftsman...

  19. The Learning Alliance: Ethics in Doctoral Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halse, Christine; Bansel, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the ethics of relationships in doctoral supervision. We give an overview of four paradigms of doctoral supervision that have endured over the past 25 years and elucidate some of their strengths and limitations, contextualise them historically and consider their implications for doctoral supervision in the contemporary…

  20. Asthma - what to ask the doctor - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about asthma - adult ... For what side effects should I call the doctor? How will I know when my inhalers are ... worse and that I need to call the doctor? What should I do when I feel short ...

  1. Asthma - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about asthma - child ... For what side effects should I call the doctor? How will I know when the inhalers are ... worse and that I need to call the doctor? What should I do when my child feels ...

  2. Invisible Roles of Doctoral Program Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Eva Burns; Grady, Marilyn L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of doctoral program specialists in Big Ten universities. Face-to-face interviews with 20 doctoral program specialists employed in institutions in the Big Ten were conducted. Participants were asked to describe their roles within their work place. The doctoral program specialists reported their…

  3. Hybrid Doctoral Program: Innovative Practices and Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvich, Dori; Manning, JoAnn; McCormick, Kathy; Campbell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This paper reflects on how one mid-Atlantic University innovatively incorporated technology into the development of a hybrid doctoral program in educational leadership. The paper describes a hybrid doctoral degree program using a rigorous design; challenges of reworking a traditional syllabus of record to a hybrid doctoral program; the perceptions…

  4. Cost awareness among doctors in an Irish university-affiliated teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H.C. Tiong

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in USA and Canada have found that physicians and physicians in training have a limited understanding of medical care costs. In this study, we set out to survey all grades of doctors in the surgical department, emergency department, and anaesthetic department in a university-affiliated, Irish teaching hospital. Open-ended questionnaires on cost of 25 routinely used items in the hospital were sent to each department. The aims of the study were to assess the present knowledge of cost among the various grades of doctors, and to evaluate the level of professional experience on cost awareness and their confidence in their estimates. We had an overall response rate of 56.8% with 68.5% of doctors admitted to have estimated more than 90% of their responses. Ninety three percent of doctors have no confidence in their estimates on cost of listed items. We found that the lack of cost awareness was universal among doctors of all grades (P = 0.236. The doctors in our study population showed a high level of inaccuracy on their estimates of cost of routinely used items with 84% of the items overestimated. Our results were discouraging and demonstrated that considerable educational activity will be necessary if doctors are to be more cost effective in meeting the national health care budget.

  5. Positioning doctors for convenience medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, M

    1984-01-01

    Faced with an increasingly competitive environment, physicians must learn to organize themselves into group practices positioned to perform as the customer expects. To be successful, these new group practices must recruit the kind of physician who will meet the consumer's demands for quality care: convenience, continuity of care, and confidence in the doctor's competence. This article describes how doctors can become more competitive based on my observations as a former consultant with such healthcare companies as Cigna Healthplan, the largest for-profit HMO, and as the current vice president of Operations Planning and Development with Republic Health Corporation, a Dallas-based hospital management company. These observations should help hospital managers learn how to organize their medical staffs to better serve the patient's needs. By repositioning their physician services, hospitals should become better positioned to compete for new patients.

  6. Doctoral specialization in nursing informatics.

    OpenAIRE

    Gassert, C. A.; Mills, M. E.; Heller, B R

    1991-01-01

    A prototype program of doctoral study has been developed at the University of Maryland School of Nursing to prepare students with nursing expertise in the conceptualization and research of computer based information systems in hospitals, industry and other health care organizations. The graduate will be prepared to design effective nursing information systems; create innovative information technology; conduct research regarding integration of technology with nursing practice, administration, ...

  7. Another successful Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday 2 April, CERN hosted its third Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   CERN PhD students show off their posters in CERN's Main Building. Speaking to a packed house, Director-General Rolf Heuer gave the assembly's opening speech and introduced the poster session that followed. Seventeen CERN PhD students presented posters on their work, and were greeted by their CERN and University supervisors. It was a very successful event!

  8. Mastectomy and breast reconstruction - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastectomy - what to ask your doctor; Breast reconstruction - what to ask your doctor; TRAM flap - what to ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor about mastectomy and breast reconstruction; Breast cancer - mastectomy - what to ...

  9. Assessment of the role of a student-led surgical interest group in surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ran; Buxey, Kenneth; Ashrafi, Akbar; Drummond, Katharine J

    2013-01-01

    We describe the development of a medical student surgical interest group, its initial evaluation, and future plans. The Surgical Students Society of Melbourne was formed in August 2008 by a group of senior medical students from the University of Melbourne. The Surgical Students Society of Melbourne seeks to provide additional surgical teaching and professional development for students interested in a career in surgery. It also aims to provide junior doctors with leadership and teaching opportunities to meet the requirements of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons for application to the Surgical Education and Training program. Its program also addresses contemporary workforce issues, such as women in surgery and rural surgery. The society runs a weekly teaching program during the semester and procedural and careers workshops throughout the year. A survey of students attending the teaching program was conducted by means of written and online questionnaires. The results suggest that the society has been successful in augmenting surgical education and providing opportunities to improve procedural skills, but also highlighted areas of the program that may be improved, including aspects of surgical professional development and role modeling. The Surgical Students Society initiative was generally very well received by students and shows great potential as a means for augmenting surgical education at the medical student level. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Female circumcision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Daia, J M

    2000-10-01

    It is uncertain when female circumcision was first practiced, but it certainly preceded the founding of both Christianity and Islam. A review of past and current historical, popular and professional literature was undertaken, and 4 types of female circumcision were identified. Typically female circumcision is performed by a local village practitioner, lay person or by untrained midwives. Female genital mutilation is not accepted by any religious or medical opinion, and is a violation of human rights against helpless individuals who are unable to provide informed consent and who must therefore be protected through education and legislation. Complications of female circumcision can present after many years. Any medical practitioner (either for adult or pediatric) can be confronted with this issue of female circumcision, even in countries where this custom is not present, thus mandating the understanding of this complex issue.

  11. Female epispadias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Krishna Shetty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolated female epispadias without bladder exstrophy is an extremely rare congenital anomaly. The symptoms of female epispadias are primary urinary incontinence and abnormal anatomical features. A 7-year-old girl presented with partial incontinence of urine. On physical examination, bifid clitoris and labia minora were seen. The vagina and hymen were normal. Voiding cystourethrogram showed no reflux. With the diagnosis of isolated female epispadias, single stage reconstruction of the urethra, labia minora and clitoris was performed.

  12. Burn Care on Cruise Ships-Epidemiology, international regulations, risk situation, disaster management and qualification of the ship's doctor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottomann, C; Hartmann, B; Antonic, V

    2016-09-01

    With the increasing numbers of passengers and crew on board vessels that are becoming larger and larger, the demand for ship's doctors who can adequately treat burns on board has also increased. In the cruise ship industry it is usually those doctor's with internal and general medical training who are recruited from an epidemiological point of view. Training content or recommendations for the treatment of thermal lesions with the limited options available in ship's hospitals and where doctors with no surgical training operate do not yet exist. The guidelines recommended by the Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) regarding medical staff have only included physicians with minor surgical skills until now. With the introduction of the ATLS(®) course developed by the American College of Surgeons, the requirements for the qualification of the ship's doctor on board cruise ships shall change from January 2017. The article discusses the question of whether having completed the ATLS(®) course, the ship's doctor is trained to adequately treat thermal lesions or severe burns persons on-board, and presents the current discussion on the training content for ship's doctors within the International Maritime Health Association (IMHA). It also provides an overview of existing international regulatory frameworks, the risks presented by a fire on board, the problem of treating burns victims out of reach of coastal rescue services, and alternative training concepts for ship's doctors regarding the therapy of thermal lesions on-board.

  13. Towards a doctorate in physics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Greeff, M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available 2009 www.csir.co.za 1990’s and the 21st Century are more likely to be supporting children, spouses, aging parents or extended families [8] [5] D. J. Grayson, A Baseline Study of Women Physics Graduates, Report to DST, 2008 [8] M.A. Hellberg et al... myself and function independently I need to support my family I am not interested in research I want to change my career I will earn more money in industry I am considering relocating to another country Lysko et al., Towards a Doctorate in Physics...

  14. What Makes a Good Doctor?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. Richard Coati

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction In the United States and I suspect in all parts of the world, a good doctor is an individual who, in addition to training in their area of interest, i.e., family practice, internal medicine, or a subspecialty area, has participated actively in the educational programs relating to their training which make them eligible to take examinations in those areas (if they are available) and pass them.All physicians generally like to have some procedural skills,but the most important part of their skills relate to their cognitive knowledge which in the long term insures optimal patient care.

  15. DOCTOR JAIME ANTONIO BARRIOS AMAYA

    OpenAIRE

    Revista Ciencias Biomedicas

    2014-01-01

    El doctor Jaime Antonio Barrios Amaya, nació en Cartagena de Indias, Colombia, el 4 de noviembre de 1935. Realizó estudios de primaria en el colegio Fernández Baena y de secundaria en el Liceo de Bolívar, donde se graduó de Bachiller superior en 1956. Inmediatamente ingresó a la Universidad de Cartagena, adelantando estudios médicos y egresó en 1963 con el título de Médico Cirujano. Poco tiempo después regresó a la Universidad de Cartagena e ...

  16. Surgical Vision: Google Glass and Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Johnny Yau Cheung; Tsui, Lok Yee; Yeung, Keith Siu Kay; Yip, Stefanie Wai Ying; Leung, Gilberto Ka Kit

    2016-08-01

    Google Glass is, in essence, a smartphone in the form of a pair of spectacles. It has a display system, a bone conduction "speaker," video camera, and connectivity via WiFi or Bluetooth technologies. It can also be controlled by voice command. Seizing Google Glass' capabilities as windows of opportunity, surgeons have been the first group of doctors trying to incorporate the technology into their daily practices. Experiences from different groups have demonstrated Google Glass' potential in improving perioperative care, intraoperative communication and documentation, surgical outcome as well as surgical training. On the other hand, the device has technical limitations, notably suboptimal image qualities and a short battery life. Its operational functions also bring forth concerns on the protection of patient privacy. Nonetheless, the technological advances that this device embodies hold promises in surgical innovations. Further studies are required, and surgeons should explore, investigate, and embrace similar technologies with keen and informed anticipation.

  17. [Clothing make the doctor--patients have more confidence in a smartly dressed GP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocks, Janwillem W H; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Berkelmans, P G J Ine

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the influence of the general practitioner's style of clothing on the patient's level of confidence in that doctor; is vanity a functional attribute for the GP? Experimental comparative study. 4 photographic models representing 4 types of GP, namely the older male, younger male, older female and younger female GP, were each photographed dressed in 4 different styles of clothing (business wear, formal, semi-formal and casual). These photos were shown to evaluators with the question 'How much confidence do you have in this doctor?' The level of confidence was allocated a score on a numerical scale from 0 (no confidence) to 10 (complete confidence). There were 2 groups of evaluators: patients aged ≥ 65 years and professionals attending a symposium. The clothing style had a significant impact on the level of confidence in the older and younger male doctor and in the younger female doctor. The assessment by elderly patients (n = 116) differed significantly from the assessment by professionals (n = 59). The professionals had a far more pronounced opinion on style of clothing than the patients did. Business wear and formal clothing generally inspired more confidence than casual clothing. A GP's style of clothing affects the patient's initial level of confidence in that doctor. Vanity therefore seems to be a functional attribute for the GP.

  18. From theater to the world wide web--a new online era for surgical education.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Leary, D Peter

    2012-07-01

    Traditionally, surgical education has been confined to operating and lecture theaters. Access to the World Wide Web and services, such as YouTube and iTunes has expanded enormously. Each week throughout Ireland, nonconsultant hospital doctors work hard to create presentations for surgical teaching. Once presented, these valuable presentations are often never used again.

  19. Perceived Organizational Support Impacts on the Associations of Work-Family Conflict or Family-Work Conflict with Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Junhui; Wang, Jiana; Liu, Li; Wu, Wei; Wu, Hui

    2016-03-16

    As a common mental disorder, depressive symptoms had been studied extensively all over the world. However, positive resources for combating depressive symptoms among Chinese doctors were rarely studied. Our study aimed to investigate the relationships between work-family conflict (WFC) and family-work conflict (FWC) with depressive symptoms among Chinese doctors. Meanwhile, the role of perceived organizational support (POS) in this association was explored at an organizational level. The investigation was conducted between March and April 2014. Questionnaires that measured WFC, FWC, depressive symptoms and POS were distributed to 1200 doctors in Shenyang, China. The final study subjects were 931 doctors (effective response rate: 77.6%). In all analyses, male and female doctors were analyzed separately because of possible gender differences. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to examine the moderating role of POS. Baron and Kenny's technique and asymptotic and resampling strategies were used to explore the mediating role of POS on the associations of WFC or FWC with depressive symptoms. WFC and FWC had positive relations with depressive symptoms among doctors. POS played a partial mediating role on the correlation of FWC with depressive symptoms among male doctors, and POS played a partial mediating role on the correlation of WFC with depressive symptoms among female doctors. POS had a positive moderating effect on the relationship between WFC and depressive symptoms among doctors. WFC and FWC could aggravate doctors' depressive symptoms, and POS, as an organizational resource, could fight against doctors' depressive symptoms. When POS functioned as a mediator, FWC had a negative effect on POS, which could increase male doctors' depressive symptoms, and WFC had a negative effect on POS, which could increase female doctors' depressive symptoms. In the meantime, POS, as a moderator, could enhance the effects of WFC on depressive symptoms.

  20. Doctoral education in a successful ecological niche

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; Lund, Ole

    2014-01-01

    explore the microclimate in an ecological niche of doctoral education. Based on a theoretical definition of microclimate as the emotional atmosphere that ties group members together and affects their actions, we conducted a case study that aimed to describe the key features of the microclimate...... in a successful ecological niche of doctoral education, and the ways in which the microclimate support the doctoral students’ learning. The methods we applied in the case study were based on short-term ethnographic fieldwork. The results reveal four key features of the emotional atmosphere in the microclimate...... successful doctoral education because it: 1) fleshes out the professional attitude that is necessary for becoming a successful researcher in the department, 2) shapes and adapts the doctoral students’ desires to grasp and identify with the department’s practices, and 3) provides the doctoral students...

  1. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    GENEVA PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor  Or SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) Or ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (7H-23H) 022 748-49-50 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest  022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES  30 Bd de la Cluse  022 382-45-55  MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest  022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer  022 382-84-00 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR  Meyrin  022 719-61-11 URGENCES ADULTES  Meyrin  022 719-66-80  URGENCES : AMBULANCE (GENEVE ET VAUD) : 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 767-44-44  FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON 24H/24H  01-251-51-510 APPEL D'URGENCE EUROPEEN 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (ou­or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN  Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie&a...

  2. Urgent Need of a Doctor

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or: SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or: ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 PAEDIATRIC EMERGENCIES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 • HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTS Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCE (GENEVE AND VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 POLICE 117 ANTI POISON CENTRE (24H/24H) 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL  112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04.50-49-65-83 MATERNITY Rue Am&...

  3. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or: SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or: ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES PEDIATRIQUES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTES Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCES (GENEVE ET VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON: 24H/24H 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL: 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-83 MATERNITY rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-66-07 HOPITAL D'ANNEMASSE 17 r...

  4. Urgent need of a doctor

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or : SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or : ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES PEDIATRIQUES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTS Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCES (GENEVE ET VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON 24H/24H: 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL : 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-83 MATERNITY rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-66-07 HOPITAL D'ANNEMASSE 1...

  5. Urgent Need of a Doctor

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or: SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or: ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 PAEDIATRIC EMERGENCIES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 • HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTS Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCE (GENEVE AND VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 POLICE 117 ANTI POISON CENTRE (24H/24H) 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL  112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04.50-49-65-83 MATERNITY Rue Am...

  6. Urgent need of a doctor

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or: SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or: ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 • HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTES Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCES (GENEVE AND VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON (24H/24H): 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL: 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-83 MATERNITY r...

  7. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or : SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or : ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES PEDIATRIQUES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTES Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCES (GENEVE ET VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON: 24H/24H 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL: 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-83 MATERNITY rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-66-07 HOPITAL D'ANNEMASSE 17 rue du Jura, Ambilly 04-50-87-47-47 EMERGENCIES 17 rue...

  8. INGUINAL HERNIA IN FEMALES

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    9 patients of inguinal hernia in females were diagnosed in a total of 50 patients who presented with congenital groin problems, 8 of these were managed surgically. There were 6 small children, 1 young girl and 2 elderly ladies. All children were managed by herniotomy and herniorrhaphy was done in women. 2 patients under one year presented with irreducible hernia, one of them on exploration was found to be having sliding hernia with incarcerated ovary and tube as contents while other one had i...

  9. Female urinary incontinence and sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Renato Lains

    2017-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a common problem among women and it is estimated that between 15 and 55% of them complain of lower urinary symptoms. The most prevalent form of urinary incontinence is associated with stress, followed by mixed urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. It is a symptom with several effects on quality of life of women mainly in their social, familiar and sexual domains. Female reproductive and urinary systems share anatomical structures, which promotes that urinary problems interfere with sexual function in females. This article is a review of both the concepts of female urinary incontinence and its impact on global and sexual quality of life. Nowadays, it is assumed that urinary incontinence, especially urge urinary incontinence, promotes anxiety and several self-esteem damages in women. The odour and the fear of incontinence during sexual intercourse affect female sexual function and this is related with the unpredictability and the chronicity of incontinence, namely urge urinary incontinence. Female urinary incontinence management involves conservative (pelvic floor muscle training), surgical and pharmacological treatment. Both conservative and surgical treatments have been studied about its benefit in urinary incontinence and also the impact among female sexual function. Unfortunately, there are sparse articles that evaluate the benefits of female sexual function with drug management of incontinence.

  10. Female urinary incontinence and sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Renato Lains

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Urinary incontinence is a common problem among women and it is estimated that between 15 and 55% of them complain of lower urinary symptoms. The most prevalent form of urinary incontinence is associated with stress, followed by mixed urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. It is a symptom with several effects on quality of life of women mainly in their social, familiar and sexual domains. Female reproductive and urinary systems share anatomical structures, which promotes that urinary problems interfere with sexual function in females. This article is a review of both the concepts of female urinary incontinence and its impact on global and sexual quality of life. Nowadays, it is assumed that urinary incontinence, especially urge urinary incontinence, promotes anxiety and several self-esteem damages in women. The odour and the fear of incontinence during sexual intercourse affect female sexual function and this is related with the unpredictability and the chronicity of incontinence, namely urge urinary incontinence. Female urinary incontinence management involves conservative (pelvic floor muscle training), surgical and pharmacological treatment. Both conservative and surgical treatments have been studied about its benefit in urinary incontinence and also the impact among female sexual function. Unfortunately, there are sparse articles that evaluate the benefits of female sexual function with drug management of incontinence. PMID:28124522

  11. Psychiatric Prescribers' Experiences With Doctor Shoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Julie; Johnson, Mary; Karnik, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Doctor shopping is a primary method of prescription medication diversion. After opioids, benzodiazepines and stimulants are the next most common prescription medications used nonmedically. Studies have shown that patients who engage in doctor shopping find it fun, exciting, and easy to do. There is a lack of research on the prescriber's perspective on the phenomenon of doctor shopping. This study investigates the experiences of prescribers in psychiatry with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Fifteen prescribers including psychiatrists and psychiatric nurse practitioners working in outpatient psychiatry were interviewed to elicit detailed information about their experiences with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Themes found throughout the interview were that psychiatric prescribers' experience with patients who engage in doctor shopping includes (a) detecting red flags, (b) negative emotional responding, (c) addressing the patient and the problem, and (d) inconsistently implementing precautions. When red flags were detected when prescribing controlled drugs, prescribers in psychiatry experienced both their own negative emotional responses such as disappointment and resentment as well as the negative emotions of the patients such as anger and other extreme emotional responses. Psychiatric prescribers responded to patient's doctor shopping in a variety of ways such as changing their practice, discharging the patients or taking steps to not accept certain patients identified as being at risk for doctor shopping, as well as by talking to the patient and trying to offer them help. Despite experiencing doctor shopping, the prescribers inconsistently implemented precautionary measures such as checking prescription drug monitoring programs.

  12. Do junior doctors take sick leave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkin, M R; Higton, A; Witcomb, M

    2003-09-01

    Nosocomial infections place a heavy burden on overstretched health services. An audit of junior doctors' sick leave behaviour was undertaken in 1993 and again in 2001. The object was to ascertain the level of common infectious illness and to investigate whether junior doctors were remaining at work inappropriately. The doctors were asked if any factors had influenced their decision to take sick leave or not. Between the two audits several initiatives have been introduced to improve the working conditions of junior doctors, including the New Deal to reduce hours of work. Eighty one junior doctors in a large teaching hospital participated in 1993 and 110 in 2001. The number reporting an infectious illness in the previous six months was similar (61.7% in 1993, 68.2% in 2001). There had been a significant increase in the percentage of infectious illness episodes for which the doctors took sick leave (15.1% in 1993, 36.8% in 2001, p work (72% in 1993, 68% in 2001). Consultant pressure was cited by 26% (1993) and 20% (2001). Use of the staff occupational health unit was minimal, with none of the ill doctors contacting the department in 1993 and only three in 2001. Overall, despite the reduction in the number of infectious doctors not taking sick leave, the majority remained at work. Fundamental changes are needed if potentially infected doctors are not to present a risk of iatrogenic infection.

  13. Australia's female military surgeons of World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Susan J

    2013-10-01

    The war service of Lilian Violet Cooper, the first female surgeon of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, is well recognized. Not so well known however, are the other pioneering female doctors who also undertook work as military surgeons during World War I. At least four of the 14 Australian female doctors that undertook overseas war service during World War I were engaged as surgeons and treated Australian, British and Allied casualties. These women operated in London, in Egypt and on the frontlines of the Macedonian campaign. While none of these other women became Fellows of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, their war efforts deserve recognition.

  14. Female Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infertility means not being able to get pregnant after at least one year of trying (or 6 ... woman keeps having miscarriages, it is also called infertility. Female infertility can result from age, physical problems, ...

  15. Cross-Gender Mentorship in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs: An Exploratory Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Sherry L.; Clark, Richard A.; Johnson, W. Brad; Larson, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    The mentorship experiences of recent clinical psychology doctorates reporting a primary mentor in graduate school were assessed by means of a survey. Among 518 responding psychologists, male graduates were significantly more likely to have a same-gender mentor, and female graduates were more likely to report receiving support from mentors of both…

  16. Cross-Gender Mentorship in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs: An Exploratory Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Sherry L.; Clark, Richard A.; Johnson, W. Brad; Larson, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    The mentorship experiences of recent clinical psychology doctorates reporting a primary mentor in graduate school were assessed by means of a survey. Among 518 responding psychologists, male graduates were significantly more likely to have a same-gender mentor, and female graduates were more likely to report receiving support from mentors of both…

  17. Career Calling as a Personal Resource Moderator between Environmental Demands and Burnout in Australian Junior Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, Peter A.; Rogers, Mary E.; Praskova, Anna; Searle, Judy

    2014-01-01

    We surveyed 355 junior doctors (first 4 years of post-university training; 69% female, mean age = 28 years) from multiple hospital and practice locations and used an online questionnaire to assess their training-related demands (academic stress, concern about training debt, and hours worked), academic burnout, and personal resources…

  18. Doctoral Studies in Romania: Admission Procedures, Social, and Legal Aspects of Doctoral Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miclea, Mircea

    2008-01-01

    This contribution presents a concise and up-to-date report of doctoral studies in Romania, with a special emphasis on legal and social aspects. The author also argues that in order to be sustainable, the reform of doctoral studies should be substantiated by the differentiation of universities, reliable post-doctoral programmes, and a substantive…

  19. A Qualitative Examination of Challenges Influencing Doctoral Students in an Online Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate the challenges faced by students in completion of an online doctoral program at the University of Liverpool, Online Doctoral Business Administration program. We analyse the responses of 91 doctoral students in an online DBA program. Based on the exploratory qualitative study themes were developed…

  20. On Doctoral Student Development: Exploring Faculty Mentoring in the Shaping of African American Doctoral Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the influence of faculty mentorship in the shaping of African American doctoral student success. A case analysis framework is used to investigate the belief systems that doctoral students held about their doctoral experience. Data collection involved a one-phase semi-structured interview protocol used to gather information…

  1. Sensitising intern doctors to ethical issues in a doctor-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nilima D; Mehta, Ritambhara Y; Dave, Kamlesh R

    2017-01-01

    There is a felt need in India to influence the ethical behaviour of doctors by giving students formal education in ethics in medical colleges. Since internship is the interface between learning and independent practice, it is important to sensitise intern doctors to ethical issues in a doctor-patient relationship at this stage.

  2. Inequality and Doctoral Education: Exploring the "Rules" of Doctoral Study through Bourdieu's Notion of Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    While studies have examined a myriad of issues in doctoral study, much of this research has not employed the tools of major social and cultural thinkers to the dynamics of doctoral education. This paper explores the use of Bourdieu's notion of field to render visible the practices and contexts of doctoral education that produce inequalities across…

  3. Surgical Approach, Findings, and Eight-Year Follow-Up in a Twenty-Nine Year Old Female With Freeman-Sheldon Syndrome Presenting With Blepharophimosis Causing Near-Complete Visual Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, Augusto L; Poling, Mikaela I; McCormick, Rodger J

    2016-07-01

    The authors describe the surgical approach, findings, and 8-year follow-up in a 29-year-old woman, with severe Freeman-Sheldon syndrome, presenting with congenital blepharophimosis of both upper eyelids resulting in near-complete functional visual obstruction. To avoid possible Freeman-Sheldon syndrome-associated complications of malignant hyperthermia, difficult vascular access, and challenging endotracheal intubation, the surgery was completed under local anesthesia without sedation, and anatomical and functional correction was immediate and remained stable at 8-year follow-up. Unlike many congenital craniofacial syndromes, which frequently involve life-long impairments, important implications exist for plastic surgeons to facilitate opportunities for patients to overcome functional limitations.

  4. [Priest-doctors in Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlan, Hélène; Triaire, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Jean Pierre Frank offers in the early nineteenth century a revolution in medical Russian Empire. Indeed, Russia is in an emergency situation where the lack of practitioners is obvious. The imperial project is inspired by past practices in some European countries. Frank fits these transfers and implements a unique model where the priest-doctor stands out as the solution to overcome the lack of medicalization of the Empire. Even if the attempt was a failure, it remains that the proposals were part of Frank in both an ancient tradition that priests and physicians providing care for souls and bodies, but also showed that called his wishes the advent of "public health" in this country disinherited.

  5. The Doctor and the Charlatan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Stengers

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We all know, in fact we are sure, that our medical practices are very different from those in the times of Molière or of Louis XVI. In one way or another medicine has today become ‘modern’ in the same way as the whole set of knowledges and practices that call themselves rational. This is obvious, but I would like to interrogate this obviousness. Not to debunk it so as to show that beyond these appearances nothing has changed, but in order to focus in a slightly clearer way on ‘what’ has changed. To be even more precise, I would like to focus on ‘what’ has changed for the doctor, the one who practises medicine.

  6. [Patients' rights--doctors' duties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, L; Bertram, E; Grate, S; Mischkowsky, T; Paul, D; Probst, J; Scala, E; Wbllenweber, H D

    2015-06-01

    On 26 February 2013 the new "Law on Patients' Rights" (hereinafter also the "Law") became effective. This Law strengthens patients' rights vis-à-vis the insurdnce company and also regulates patients' rights regarding their relation to the doctor. This has consequences for the laws on medical liability all doctors must consider. The doctor's performance is and remains a service and such service does not hold any guarantee of success. Nevertheless, this Law primarily reads as a "law on the duties of physicians". To duly take into account these duties and to avoid mistakes and misinterpretation of the Law, the Ethics Committee of the Consortium of Osteosynthesis Trauma Germany (AOTRAUMA-D) has drafted comments on the Law. Brief summaries of its effects are to be found at the end of the respective comment under the heading "Consequences for Practice". The text of the law was influenced particularly by case law, as continuously developed by the German Federal Court of Justice ("BGH"). The implementation of the Law on Patients' Rights was effected by the newly inserted sections 630a to 630h of the German Civil Code (the "BGB"), which are analysed below. The following comments are addressed to physicians only and do not deal with the specific requirements and particularities of the other medical professions such as physiotherapy, midwifery and others so on. Special attention should be paid to the comments on the newly inserted Duty to inform, which has to be fullfilled prior to any diagnostic or therapeutic procedure (sec. 630c para 2 sentence 1 BGB). Under certain conditions the doctor also has to inform the patient about the circumstances that lead to the presumed occurance of a therapeutic or diagnostic malpractice (sec. 630c para. 2 sentence 2 BGB), based on the manifestation of an undesired event or an undesired outcome. As before, the patient's valid consent to any procedure (sec. 630d BGB) is directly linked to the comprehensive and timely provision of information

  7. Female Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Astronauts Dr. N. Jan Davis (left) and Dr. Mae C. Jemison (right) were mission specialists on board the STS-47 mission. Born on November 1, 1953 in Cocoa Beach, Florida, Dr. N. Jan Davis received a Master degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1983 followed by a Doctorate in Engineering from the University of Alabama in Huntsville in 1985. In 1979 she joined NASA Marshall Space Flight Center as an aerospace engineer. A veteran of three space flights, Dr. Davis has logged over 678 hours in space since becoming an astronaut in 1987. She flew as a mission specialist on STS-47 in 1992 and STS-60 in 1994, and was the payload commander on STS-85 in 1997. In July 1999, she transferred to the Marshall Space Flight Center, where she became Director of Flight Projects. Dr. Mae C. Jemison, the first African-American woman in space, was born on October 17, 1956 in Decatur, Alabama but considers Chicago, Illinois her hometown. She received a Bachelor degree in Chemical Engineering (and completed the requirements for a Bachelor degree in African and Afro-American studies) at Stanford University in 1977, and a Doctorate degree in medicine from Cornell University in 1981. After receiving her doctorate, she worked as a General Practitioner while attending graduate engineering classes in Los Angeles. She was named an astronaut candidate in 1987, and flew her first flight as a science mission specialists on STS-47, Spacelab-J, in September 1992, logging 190 hours, 30 minutes, 23 seconds in space. In March 1993, Dr. Jemison resigned from NASA, thought she still resides in Houston, Texas. She went on to publish her memoirs, Find Where the Wind Goes: Moments from My Life, in 2001. The astronauts are shown preparing to deploy the lower body negative pressure (LBNP) apparatus in this 35mm frame taken in the science module aboard the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavor. Fellow astronauts Robert L. Gibson (Commander), Curtis L. Brown (Junior Pilot), Mark C. Lee (Payload Commander), Jay Apt

  8. Baccalaureate Origins of Doctorate Recipients in Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alfred E.

    1984-01-01

    Franklin and Marshall College has ranked 867 private undergraduate institutions according to the number of students who received their doctorates between 1920 and 1980. A study of institutions ranked in the top 101 in terms of the number of students who subsequently received a doctorate in chemistry is reported. (MLW)

  9. Doctor of Professional Counseling: The Next Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern, Stephen; Cade, Rochelle; Locke, Don W.

    2012-01-01

    Professional doctorates have been established in the allied health professions by clinicians seeking the highest levels of independent practice. Allied health professional doctorates include nursing practice (DNP), occupational therapy (OTD), psychology (PsyD), social work (DSW), and marriage and family therapy (DMFT). Lessons learned from the…

  10. Diarrhea - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about diarrhea - child; Loose stools - what to ask your doctor - child ... FOODS What foods can make my child's diarrhea worse? How should I prepare the foods for my child? If my child is still breastfeeding or bottle feeding, do I ...

  11. Addressing the Curriculum Problem in Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Bill

    2012-01-01

    How best to understand the curriculum problem in doctoral research education: that is the question that this paper engages. It begins by noting that curriculum as such is little referenced and inadequately theorised in higher education and certainly in doctoral education, and indeed has been described as a "missing term". The paper then reviews a…

  12. The Risky Business of Doctoral Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliam, Erica; Sanderson, Don; Evans, Terry; Lawson, Alan; Taylor, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    Universities are under no less pressure to adopt risk management strategies than other public and private organisations. The risk management of doctoral education is a particularly important issue given that a doctorate is the highest academic qualification a university offers and stakes are high in terms of assuring its quality. However, intense…

  13. Current Issues in Social Work Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of doctoral programs in social work is to prepare research-scientists who contribute to knowledge that guides professional practice and educators competent to teach new cohorts of social work practitioners. In grooming stewards of the profession, doctoral programs also must prepare their graduates to support the larger contemporary…

  14. The Agile Approach with Doctoral Dissertation Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengberg, Lars Göran Wallgren

    2015-01-01

    Several research findings conclude that many doctoral students fail to complete their studies within the allowable time frame, in part because of problems related to the research and supervision process. Surveys show that most doctoral students are generally satisfied with their dissertation supervision. However, these surveys also reveal some…

  15. European Industrial Doctorates: Marie Curie Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    European Commission, 2012

    2012-01-01

    European industrial doctorates are joint doctoral training projects funded by the European Union (EU) and open to all research fields. The project brings together an academic participant (university, research institution, etc.) and a company. They have to be established in two different EU Member States or associated countries. Associated partners…

  16. Richard W. Ziolkowski Receives Honorary Doctorate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Olav

    2012-01-01

    At the annual Commemoration of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) on April 27, 2012, Prof. Richard W. Ziolkowski, University of Arizona (UoA), received DTU's highest academic degree, the Honorary Doctor degree: Doctor Technices Honoris Causa (Figure 1). Prof. Ziolkowski has been a close...

  17. Passionate Scholars: Transformative Learning in Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens-Long, Judith; Schapiro, Steven A.; McClintock, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the relationships among student-centered doctoral study for scholar-practitioners, adult development, and transformative learning. In this research study, the authors describe a project that explores an expanded conceptualization of doctoral education that is grounded in an integrative perspective on adult development and on…

  18. Rethinking the Australian Doctoral Examination Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiley, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    This paper suggests rethinking the doctoral examination process in Australia to enable a closer alignment with the aims of the learning programme. The doctoral examination processes generally aim to assess the candidate's research capability, the quality and originality of the candidate's contribution to knowledge, and to authenticate that the…

  19. THE KNOWLEDGE OF HEALTH CARE WORKERS AND DOCTORS REGARDING HAND SCRUB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Sanjeev Chaudhary

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Hand hygiene practices of health care workers has been shown to be an effective measure in preventing hospital acquired infections. This concept has been aptly used to improve understanding, training, monitoring, and reporting hand hygiene among healthcare workers. We conducted this study to assess the knowledge of doctors and health care workers regarding hand scrub. METHODS A study was conducted among doctors and health care workers in a tertiary care hospital. Knowledge was evaluated by using self-structured questionnaire based on the guidelines of hand hygiene prescribed by WHO. RESULTS The awareness and knowledge of preoperative surgical hand scrubbing was moderate in doctors, but unfortunately poor in HCWs. CONCLUSION Our study highlights the need for introducing measures in order to increase the knowledge of preoperative hand scrub in teaching hospital which may translate into good practices.

  20. Doctors' attitudes about prescribing and knowledge of the costs of common medications.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGuire, C

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Compliance with medical therapy may be compromised because of the affordability of medications. Inadequate physician knowledge of drug costs may unwittingly contribute to this problem. METHODS: We measured attitudes about prescribing and knowledge of medication costs by written survey of medical and surgical non consultant hospital doctors and consultants in two University teaching hospitals (n = 102). Sixty-eight percent felt the cost of medicines was an important consideration in the prescribing decision, however, 88% often felt unaware of the actual costs. Only 33% had easy access to drug cost data, and only 3% had been formally educated about drug costs. Doctors\\' estimates of the cost of a supply of ten commonly used medications were accurate in only 12% of cases, too low for 50%, and too high for 38%. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions are needed to educate doctors about drug costs and provide them with reliable, easily accessible cost information in real-world practice.

  1. DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR AMONGST DOCTORS, MYTH OR REALITY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avtar Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Disruptive behavior in a medical setting is defined as objectionable or offensive interpersonal behavior that leads to disruption of professional activities in the workplace. 1 It has been observed that majority of doctors do not show disruptive behavior in their day today conduct and only few doctors are identified for their disruptive behavior . Special commi ttee on professional conduct and ethics defines disruptive behavior in physicians as aberrant behavior manifested through personal interaction with physicians , hospital personnel , health care professionals , patients , family members or others which interferes with patient care or could reasonably be expected to interfere with the process of delivering quality care. 2 Common forms of disruptive behaviors generally seen amongst young doctors are use of abusive language , yelling or shouting at patients , colleagues and subordinate staff , showing in disciplined behavior and at times indulging in physical abuse. 3 - 4 STUDY DESIGN : Study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital where 614 health care professionals participated which included 108 doctors 432 nurs ing staff and 74 paramedical staff METHOD : Data collection was done by semi structured pretested questionnaire and was entered in Microsoft Excel and analyzed for frequency and percentages . RESULTS : 64 % doctor , 66% nursing staff and 50% of the paramedicals answered that they have seen doctors showing disruptive behavior at one time or the other . Not all the doctors show disruptive behavior but this type of aberrant behavior is seen mainly in2 - 3 percent of doctors only. While answering to the que stion as to the type of disruptive behavior , 57% health care professionals reported that commonest form of disruptive behavior noticed by them amongst doctors was yelling or shouting on junior staff , patients and colleagues . 47% answered that doctors with disruptive behavior do not follow laid down orders or

  2. Factors influencing performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by Foundation Year 1 hospital doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayee, Nicole; McCluskey, David

    2012-01-01

    Foundation Year One (FY1) doctors are often the first medical staff responders at in-hospital cardiac arrests. The study objectives were to assess the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills of FY1 doctors at a Belfast teaching hospital and to highlight factors that influence their performance. A group of FY1 doctors working in a Belfast teaching hospital were asked to participate in this study. These junior doctors were regularly on-call for acute medical emergencies including cardiac arrest. Participants were instructed to perform two, 3 minute sessions of CPR on a skills reporter manikin. Each session was separated by a 5 minute rest period, one session using a compression-to-ventilation ratio of 15:2 and the other using a ratio of 30:2. Performance was gauged both objectively, by measuring the depth of chest compressions, and subjectively by a panel of 5 Advanced Life Support (ALS) instructors who reviewed the tracings of each CPR session. Overall, 85% of medical FY1's working in the hospital participated in the study. Objective results determined that males performed significantly better than their female counterparts using both the 15:2 and 30:2 ratios. The male FY1 doctors performed equally well using both 15:2 and 30:2 ratios, in comparison to female doctors who were noted to be better using the 15:2 ratio. Individuals with a Body mass index (BMI) greater than the mean for the group, performed significantly better than those with a lower BMI when using the 30:2 ratio. BMI was an important factor and correlated with chest compression depth. Females with a low BMI performed less well when using a ratio of 30:2. Overall, expert opinion significantly favoured the 15:2 ratio for the FY1 doctor group. CPR performance can be influenced by factors such as gender and BMI, as such the individual rescuer should take these into account when determining which compression to ventilation ration to perform in order to maximise patient outcome. This study showed that

  3. Burnout and Doctors: Prevalence, Prevention and Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Doctors are exposed to high levels of stress in the course of their profession and are particularly susceptible to experiencing burnout. Burnout has far-reaching implications on doctors; patients and the healthcare system. Doctors experiencing burnout are reported to be at a higher risk of making poor decisions; display hostile attitude toward patients; make more medical errors; and have difficult relationships with co-workers. Burnout among doctors also increases risk of depression; anxiety; sleep disturbances; fatigue; alcohol and drug misuse; marital dysfunction; premature retirement and perhaps most seriously suicide. Sources of stress in medical practice may range from the emotions arising in the context of patient care to the environment in which doctors practice. The extent of burnout may vary depending on the practice setting; speciality and changing work environment. Understanding dynamic risk factors associated with burnout may help us develop strategies for preventing and treating burnout. Some of these strategies will be reviewed in this paper.

  4. Burnout and Doctors: Prevalence, Prevention and Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shailesh

    2016-06-30

    Doctors are exposed to high levels of stress in the course of their profession and are particularly susceptible to experiencing burnout. Burnout has far-reaching implications on doctors; patients and the healthcare system. Doctors experiencing burnout are reported to be at a higher risk of making poor decisions; display hostile attitude toward patients; make more medical errors; and have difficult relationships with co-workers. Burnout among doctors also increases risk of depression; anxiety; sleep disturbances; fatigue; alcohol and drug misuse; marital dysfunction; premature retirement and perhaps most seriously suicide. Sources of stress in medical practice may range from the emotions arising in the context of patient care to the environment in which doctors practice. The extent of burnout may vary depending on the practice setting; speciality and changing work environment. Understanding dynamic risk factors associated with burnout may help us develop strategies for preventing and treating burnout. Some of these strategies will be reviewed in this paper.

  5. A 2016 clinical practice pattern in the management of primary hypothyroidism among doctors from different clinical specialties in New Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surana, Vineet; Aggarwal, Sameer; Khandelwal, Deepak; Singla, Rajiv; Bhattacharya, Saptarshi; Chittawar, Sachin; Kalra, Sanjay; Dutta, Deep

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to document practices in managing hypothyroidism among doctors in New Delhi, with special focus on subclinical hypothyroidism, pregnancy, and old age, and to compare it with global practices. Methods: During an academic program attended by 394 doctors, all participants were given a questionnaire designed based on thyroid practices survey done by Burch et al. to evaluate the practice patterns. Questions were based on evaluating doctor's preferred choices in diagnosis, therapy, and follow-up of hypothyroidism in different scenarios. Results: Responses from 308 questionnaires (general physicians [n = 204], obstetricians [n = 51], pediatricians [n = 27], surgeons [n = 12], endocrinologists [n = 10], and others [n = 4]) were analyzed. In the evaluation of 52-year-old female patient with primary hypothyroidism, 52% doctors would prefer thyroid ultrasonography, comparable to global rates. Nearly 96.1% doctors would have initiated levothyroxine, with a large majority of doctors (83.77%) preferred using branded levothyroxine. About 58.74% doctors preferred gradual restoration of euthyroidism. Levothyroxine dose of 25 mcg was the most preferred increment dose (46.07%) during follow-up, with 6 weekly being the most frequent dose adjustment frequency (41.57%). Most preferred target thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in the 52-year-old female patient was 2.5–4.99 mU/L (63.96%), 25-year-old female patient was 1–2.49 mU/L (53.90%), and in 85-year-old female was 2.5–4.99 mU/L (45.45%). Only 68% of doctors in our study preferred keeping TSH branded levothyroxine, widespread use of age-specific TSH targets, and low threshold for treating mild thyroid failure, a highly variable approach to both rates and means of restoring euthyroidism for overt primary hypothyroidism. There is a need for spreading awareness regarding TSH targets in pregnancy. PMID:28217518

  6. Micro-surgical endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyas, S; Vere, J; Ali, Z; Harris, I

    2014-02-01

    Non-surgical endodontic retreatment is the treatment of choice for endodontically treated teeth with recurrent or residual disease in the majority of cases. In some cases, surgical endodontic treatment is indicated. Successful micro-surgical endodontic treatment depends on the accuracy of diagnosis, appropriate case selection, the quality of the surgical skills, and the application of the most appropriate haemostatic agents and biomaterials. This article describes the armamentarium and technical procedures involved in performing micro-surgical endodontics to a high standard.

  7. Surgical innovation as sui generis surgical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, Mianna

    2013-12-01

    Successful innovative 'leaps' in surgical technique have the potential to contribute exponentially to surgical advancement, and thereby to improved health outcomes for patients. Such innovative leaps often occur relatively spontaneously, without substantial forethought, planning, or preparation. This feature of surgical innovation raises special challenges for ensuring sufficient evaluation and regulatory oversight of new interventions that have not been the subject of controlled investigatory exploration and review. It is this feature in particular that makes early-stage surgical innovation especially resistant to classification as 'research', with all of the attendant methodological and ethical obligations--of planning, regulation, monitoring, reporting, and publication--associated with such a classification. This paper proposes conceptual and ethical grounds for a restricted definition according to which innovation in surgical technique is classified as a form of sui generis surgical 'research', where the explicit goal of adopting such a definition is to bring about needed improvements in knowledge transfer and thereby benefit current and future patients.

  8. A survey of pharmaceutical company representative interactions with doctors in Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alssageer, Mustafa A; Kowalski, Stefan R

    2012-01-01

    To examine the frequency of pharmaceutical company representative (PCR) interactions with doctors in Libya and review possible associations between these interactions and the personal and practice setting characteristics of doctors. An anonymous survey questionnaire was circulated to 1,000 Libyan doctors in selected public and private practice settings in Tripoli, Benghazi and Sebha. A questionnaire return rate of 61% (608 returned questionnaires) was achieved. Most respondents (94%) reported that they had been visited by PCRs at least 'once' in the last year. Fifty per cent of respondents met with PCRs at least once a month, and 20% at least once a week. The following characteristics were significantly associated with meeting with a representative more than once a week: age, gender (male > female), years of practice, being a specialist (other than an anaesthesiologist) or working in private practice. Ninety-one per cent of doctors reported that they had received at least one kind of relationship gift during the last year. Printed materials (79%), simple gifts (73%) and drug samples (69%) were the most common relationship products given to respondents. Reimbursements or sponsored items were reported by 33% of respondents. Physician specialists were more likely to receive drug samples or sponsored items than residents, general practitioners, anaesthesiologists or surgeons (Pgifts or free samples from PCRs than doctors working in the public sector (Ppromotional activities. An agreed code of conduct for pharmaceutical promotion in Libya between doctors and PCRs should be created.

  9. Female genital circumcision/mutilation: implications for female urogynaecological health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, Katharina; Dörfler, Daniela Marianne

    2013-12-01

    "Female genital circumcision" or "female genital mutilation", as it is called more often, is an operation that is primarily carried out in Africa. Owing to migration, physicians are increasingly confronted with this issue in Western countries as well. A range of negative effects may result from this operation and this article aims to address consequences for female pelvic health. Special emphasis is placed on urogynaecological health consequences; in particular, on "voiding difficulties", "recurrent urinary tract infections" and "vesicovaginal fistula". All of these occur mostly in infibulated women, i.e. in women whose genitalia are sealed by the most severe form of circumcision. Some of the problems that may emerge as a result of the operation can be resolved by defibulation (i.e. surgical reopening of the sealed vulva). Female genital circumcision is a sensitive topic even in the area of research and reliable data are therefore scarce.

  10. The prescribing pattern of outpatient polyclinic doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, K H; Yap, K B

    1999-06-01

    This study aims to analyse the prescribing pattern of doctors working in a government outpatient polyclinic in Singapore. Retrospective study of 1 week of prescription scripts in 1996. Number, types and duration of drugs prescribed; combination of drugs; age distribution; bad handwriting. Two thousand six hundred and seventy-nine scripts were analysed. The age of patients ranged from 1 to 93 years with a mean of 43.8 years. There were 44.0% males and 56.0% females. The overall mean of 'total number of drugs prescribed' was 2.8 items. The means of 'number of drug items prescribed for more than 1 week' by age-group were: 60 years = 2.4. One way analysis of variance showed significant difference between the means of each age-group. Post hoc analysis revealed that the oldest age group accounted for most of this significant result. The top 10 drugs prescribed in descending order were: antihistamines, paracetamol, throat medications (eg. lozenges, gargles, etc), nifedipine, beta-blockers, antacids, mist benadryl expectorant, Procodin cough syrup (containing codeine and promethazine), amoxycillin and vitamin B. Nifedipine and beta-blockers were the most commonly prescribed anti-hypertensives. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were usually prescribed with antacids. One hundred and twenty (4.5%) scripts were illegible. This study provides a baseline data for monitoring future prescribing trends. There may be a need to re-evaluate the appropriateness of nifedipine as the first line anti-hypertensive drug and the usefulness of NSAID-antacid and amoxycillin-cloxacillin combinations. The prevalence of illegible handwriting was high.

  11. Preparing Your Child for Visits to the Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Preparing Your Child for Visits to the Doctor KidsHealth > For Parents > Preparing Your Child for Visits ... vital to making an informed diagnosis. Choose a Doctor Who Relates Well to Kids Because your doctor ...

  12. Weight-loss surgery - before - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric bypass - before - what to ask your doctor; Roux-en-Y gastric bypass - before - what to ask your doctor; Gastric banding - before - what to ask your doctor; Vertical sleeve surgery - before - ...

  13. Legal sanctity of consent for surgical procedures in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As surgeons, we are morally committed to respecting the right of self-determination of patients, thus an informed consent is necessary before any operative intervention. Many neurosurgical patients are incapable of giving consent because of impaired consciousness. Moreover, neurosurgical procedures involve high risks and often are time sensitive; therefore obtaining consent is a challenging job. Patients and their family members need immense courage, understanding, and trust before giving consent for a surgical procedure to a doctor. Lawsuits against doctors are on the rise and it is important to understand "what is consent?" in legal parlance.

  14. Best practices in doctoral retention: Mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judie L. Brill

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this critical literature review is to outline best practices in doctoral retention and the successful approach of one university to improve graduation success by providing effective mentorship for faculty and students alike. The focus of this literature review is on distance learning relationships between faculty and doctoral students, regarding retention, persistence, and mentoring models. Key phrases and words used in the search and focusing on mentoring resulted in over 20,000 sources. The search was narrowed to include only doctoral study and mentoring. Research questions of interest were: Why do high attrition rates exist for doctoral students? What are the barriers to retention? What are the benefits of doctoral mentoring? What programs do institutions have in place to reduce attrition? The researchers found a key factor influencing doctoral student retention and success is effective faculty mentorship. In particular, the design of a mentoring and faculty training program to increase retention and provide for success after graduation is important. This research represents a key area of interest in the retention literature, as institutions continue to search for ways to better support students during their doctoral programs and post-graduation. DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v4i2.186

  15. Fever as a predictor of doctor shopping in the paediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariman, Keith W; Lam, Stacey C; Lam, Yvette W S; Luk, Karen H K; Poon, K K; Li, Albert M

    2013-02-01

    To estimate prevalence and assess factors associated with doctor shopping among caregivers of children acutely admitted to a hospital in Hong Kong, and examine the reasons for such behaviour and caregivers' awareness of its possible dangers. Cross-sectional study with face-to-face surveys. A paediatric unit in a teaching hospital in Hong Kong. Caregivers of children admitted to acute paediatric wards between April and July 2011. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES; Socio-demographic characteristics of the interviewee, personal history and clinical data of the patient, presence of doctor shopping (consulting more than one doctor for medical advice without referral) for each episode, the reasons behind such behaviour, and awareness of potential dangers. Data retrieved were analysed to estimate the prevalence and logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with doctor shopping. In all, 649 such patients were admitted into hospital during the study period, of which 336 were recruited, with about a half being absent or given home leave. Thirty-four patients were excluded due to absent caregivers or refusal, and 302 were included in the study. More than half (79.5%) were female and the caregivers' monthly household incomes were between HK$10 001 and HK$15 000 (21.2%), similar to the median household income in Hong Kong. The prevalence of doctor shopping was 53%. The only significant clinical parameter associated with doctor shopping was presence of fever (odds ratio=2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-3.9). Persistence of symptoms was the commonest reason given by interviewees for doctor shopping, and the majority (75.5%) were unaware of the possible dangers of this behaviour. Doctor shopping is highly prevalent among caregivers of children with acute paediatric conditions. Most caregivers do not know the potential complications of this behaviour. Further measures should be taken to educate subjects on the associated dangers of this behaviour and the natural course of

  16. A survey of pharmaceutical company representative interactions with doctors in Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa A. Alssageer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To examine the frequency of pharmaceutical company representative (PCR interactions with doctors in Libya and review possible associations between these interactions and the personal and practice setting characteristics of doctors. Method: An anonymous survey questionnaire was circulated to 1,000 Libyan doctors in selected public and private practice settings in Tripoli, Benghazi and Sebha. Results: A questionnaire return rate of 61% (608 returned questionnaires was achieved. Most respondents (94% reported that they had been visited by PCRs at least ‘once’ in the last year. Fifty per cent of respondents met with PCRs at least once a month, and 20% at least once a week. The following characteristics were significantly associated with meeting with a representative more than once a week: age, gender (male > female, years of practice, being a specialist (other than an anaesthesiologist or working in private practice. Ninety-one per cent of doctors reported that they had received at least one kind of relationship gift during the last year. Printed materials (79%, simple gifts (73% and drug samples (69% were the most common relationship products given to respondents. Reimbursements or sponsored items were reported by 33% of respondents. Physician specialists were more likely to receive drug samples or sponsored items than residents, general practitioners, anaesthesiologists or surgeons (P<0.01. Participants working in private practice alone or in both sectors were more likely to receive printed materials, simple gifts or free samples from PCRs than doctors working in the public sector (P<0.05. Conclusion: Libyan doctors are frequently visited by PCRs. Doctors, working in private practice or specialist practice, are especially targeted by promotional activities. An agreed code of conduct for pharmaceutical promotion in Libya between doctors and PCRs should be created.

  17. Professionalism for future humanistic doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEDIGHEH EBRAHIMI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear editor Clinical environments encounter is an important part of studying medicine (1. Patient contact as an integral part of medical education occurs in various formats in the clinical settings (2, 3. During clinical training, medical students may experience high levels of stress, and some may not deal with it well. The abruptness of students’ transition to the clinical setting generated positive and negative emotions. Due to being a novice, they did not receive adequate training on how to get emotionally prepared for meeting seriously ill people. In such circumstances, the shortage of training will have predictably crucial consequences. Early clinical contact has been suggested to reduce these stresses and help the students adapt effectively to changes in the hospital climate (2. Patient contact creates an environment where each student appreciates cultural diversity and reinforces the development of clinical professional interpersonal skills through social, emotional and cognitive experiences (4, 5. It encourages validating of the relationship between patients and doctors and allows students to experience a more personal relationship with patients and nurture the ability to empathize with them, providing considerable benefits for trainees and patients. In this way, the social emotions that students experience when empathizing with a patient represent a uniquely human achievement. By internalizing their subjective interpretations of patient’s beliefs and feelings, the student’s body, brain and mind come together to produce cognition and emotion . They construct culturally relevant knowledge and make decisions about how to act and think about the patient’s problems as if they were their own. On the other hand, patient interaction in undergraduate education offers students a valuable early insight into the day-to-day role of a doctor and the patients’ perspective on specific conditions. Early experience provides a greater knowledge

  18. A Woman At War: The Life And Times Of Dr Phoebe Chapple MM (1879-1967, An Australian Doctor On The Western Front

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J Neuhaus

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available • Dr Phoebe Chapple was one of 15 Australian women doctors who undertook overseas military service during World War I. • She was the first Australian, and the only female doctor, to receive the Military Medal – awarded for gallantry in the field. • Despite multiple foreign awards, the military service of these women has been largely overlooked by their own country. • The only other Australian female doctor to have been so honoured is Carol Vaughan-­‐Evans who was awarded the Medal for Gallantry following the Rwandan Kibheo massacre in 2005.

  19. Surgical management of bone metastases from urological malignancies: an analysis of 70 cases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Toğral, Güray; Arıkan, Murat; Aktaş, Erdem; Öztürk, Recep; Güven, Oğuz; Eksioğlu, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    ... (blastic, mixed, lytic), type of surgical reconstruction, systemic affections, and visceral organ metastasis for 70 bone metastases from deceased urological malignancies patients (55 male, 15 female...

  20. The doctor(s) in house: an analysis of the evolution of the television doctor-hero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauman, Elena C; Goodier, Bethany C

    2011-03-01

    The medical drama and its central character, the doctor-hero have been a mainstay of popular television. House M.D. offers a new (and problematic) iteration of the doctor-hero. House eschews the generic conventions of the "television doctor" by being neither the idealized television doctor of the past, nor the more recent competent but often fallible physicians in entertainment texts. Instead, his character is a fragmented text which privileges the biomedical over the personal or emotional with the ultimate goal of scientifically uncovering and resolving instances of disease. This article examines the implicit and explicit messages in House M.D. and critically analyzes both the show and its lead character in relation to the traditional medical drama genre that highlights the "doctor-hero" as the central character. While at first House seems to completely violate narrative and generic norms, ultimately the program provides a new form that reinforces the presence of the doctor-hero, but highlights House's character as the central figure who is personally and interpersonally problematic but biomedically effective.

  1. HOMENAJE AL DOCTOR JORGE CAVELIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Rueda Montaña

    1979-06-01

    Full Text Available

    (Palabras del doctor Guillermo Rueda Montaña, durante el entierro del doctor Jorge Cavelier, el 25 de junio de 1978.

    Señores:

    Cuentan viejos relatos indígenas, de la "Tierra de los árboles inmensos", que en los grandes bosques se produce un silencio total de muchas horas, cuando cae uno de esos titanes. Varias veces centenario. Como si la tierra y todas sus criaturas recibieran el impacto y el profundo dolor de la caída de un ser aparentemente inmortal. Así nosotros, absortos y asombrados, presenciamos el derrumbe de este otro gigante que proyectó su sombra sobre el Territorio Nacional, y se constituyó por sus ejecutorias, en figura casi mística en la Medicina Colombiana.

    Pues fue JORGE CAVELIER el hombre - acción. Si hubiera vivido en el Egipto clásico, habría construído una pirámide, si en los tiempos medioevales, habría emprendido una cruzada o levantado una Catedral.
    Tenía una visión muy clara y era capaz de traducirla a fuerza de mandobles si fuere necesario, en una obra de interés común.
    La hercúlea conformación de su raza, mezcla de celtas y vikingos, creadora de marinos, de hombres de acción, de grandes capitanes, lo impulsaba a la ejecución.
    Cuando se fijaba una meta, siempre orientada hacia el progreso de la comunidad, se lanzaba en procura sin que ningún obstáculo pudiera detener el impulso emocional de su voluntad ejecutiva. Así también, con esa misma garra, se enfrentó a la muerte, a rompe y rasga, sin cuartel, sin concesiones, porque quería vivir, para continuar haciendo.

    Esos ojos profundamente azules, que en tantas ocasiones reflejaron la ira, cuando algo o alguien se interponía en el camino de su férrea voluntad, eran también capaces de brillar emocionados cuando se tocaba sus más íntimas fibras de aguda sensibilidad social y
    completa solidaridad humana.
    Fué intemperante y fue soberbio, pero fue grande en sus prop

  2. Cultural initiation of medical doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsinkó-Szabó, Zoltán; Lázár, Imre

    2013-12-01

    Eighteen years experience of teaching medical anthropology at a Hungarian medical school offers insight into the dynamics of interference between the rationalist epistemological tradition of biomedicine as one of the central paradigms of modernism and the cultural relativism of medical anthropology, as cultural anthropology is considered to be one of the generators of postmodern thinking. Tracing back the informal "prehistory" of our Institute, we can reveal its psychosomatic, humanistic commitment and critical basis as having represented a kind of counterculture compared with the technocrats of state-socialist Hungary's health ideology. The historical change and socio-cultural transition in Hungary after 1989 was accompanied by changes in the medical system as well as in philosophy and in the structure of the teaching of social sciences. The developing pluralism in the medical system together with the pluralism of social ideologies allowed the substitution of the dogmatic Marxist-Leninist framework with the more pragmatic and empiricist behavioral sciences including medical sociology and medical anthropology. The conflict between the initiation function of the hard preclinical training of the first two years, and the reflective, relativistic and critical narrative on "biomedicine as culture bound entity" constructed by medical anthropology during the second year of medical training is discussed. We also submit our fieldwork data gained as a result of a two year investigation period focusing on diverse initiation types of "would be" physicians. The main proportion of our data derives from individual semi structured deep interviews together with focus group interviews carried out with medical students of upper years. Finally, the role of medical anthropology in the "rite of passage" of becoming a medical doctor is summarized, paying attention to their field work reports and the risks and gains in this process.

  3. How Do Doctors Diagnose NAFLD and NASH?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... show nodules, or lumps, on your liver. Liver biopsy During a liver biopsy , a doctor will take ... Grants & Grant History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Technology Advancement & Transfer Meetings & Events Health Information Diabetes Digestive ...

  4. Finding a Doctor for Your New Baby

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Finding a Doctor for Your New Baby KidsHealth > For Parents > Finding ... to be board certified in their subspecialty. Family Physicians Family physicians must complete 3 years of residency ...

  5. Doctors, patients and the social media

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A recent article in Ann Intern Med highlights issues relating to the possible dangers of doctor-patient interaction through emails, Facebook and other electronic means. Some of the advice given is worth highlighting.

  6. ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE OF DOCTORS TOWARD ADVERSE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: This was a cross-sectional questionnaire based study involving medical doctors working at the .... Set up pharmacovigilance team in hospital and clinical presentation of ... of functional pharmacovigilance committee in the hospitals.

  7. Advancing the profession through doctoral education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Spolarich, Ann Eshenaur

    2013-01-01

    Doctoral education in dental hygiene is necessary to create a cadre of dental hygiene researchers and scholars, and to develop educators who will expand the body of knowledge for the profession. Dental hygienists with advanced degrees will require skill sets that parallel those of other professionals if they are to function productively as credible, equal members of interprofessional teams. Doctorally-prepared dental hygienists will be working as leaders, administrators and researchers, and will be influential in creating models that increase access to care, developing collaborative health care teams and improving health outcomes. The doctorate of philosophy is the terminal graduate degree for any discipline, and is the pinnacle for the profession. This paper explores the development of doctoral degrees for dental hygiene, and encourages educators to develop models for graduate programs based upon considerations presented here.

  8. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000222.htm Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child To use ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has epilepsy. Children with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is ...

  9. Back pain - when you see the doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007494.htm Back pain - when you see the doctor To use the ... you first see your health care provider for back pain, you will be asked about your back pain, ...

  10. Why doctors do not answer referral letters

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the obvious benefits to patient care, answers to referral letters .... value on brevity and educational value than specialists.9 As brevity is preferred, PHC doctors ... suggested that personal contact plays an important role in the decision.

  11. AMA Physician Select: Online Doctor Finder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Membership | JAMA Network | AMA Store DoctorFinder This online physician Locator helps you find a perfect match for ... with basic professional information on virtually every licensed physician in the United States. This includes more than ...

  12. The Web site your doctor prescribes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues The Web site your doctor prescribes Past Issues / Summer 2008 ... gov® is a free, comprehensive, up-to-date Web site with health information from the world's largest ...

  13. Constipation - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000214.htm Constipation - what to ask your doctor To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Constipation is when you are passing stools less often ...

  14. Female sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, T.S. Sathyanarana; Nagaraj, Anil Kumar M.

    2015-01-01

    Sex is a motive force bringing a man and a woman into intimate contact. Sexuality is a central aspect of being human throughout life and encompasses sex, gender identities and roles, sexual orientation, eroticism, pleasure, intimacy, and reproduction. Sexuality is experienced and expressed in thoughts, fantasies, desires, beliefs, attitudes, values, behaviors, practices, roles and relationships. Though generally, women are sexually active during adolescence, they reach their peak orgasmic frequency in their 30 s, and have a constant level of sexual capacity up to the age of 55 with little evidence that aging affects it in later life. Desire, arousal, and orgasm are the three principle stages of the sexual response cycle. Each stage is associated with unique physiological changes. Females are commonly affected by various disorders in relation to this sexual response cycle. The prevalence is generally as high as 35–40%. There are a wide range of etiological factors like age, relationship with a partner, psychiatric and medical disorders, psychotropic and other medication. Counseling to overcome stigma and enhance awareness on sexuality is an essential step in management. There are several effective psychological and pharmacological therapeutic approaches to treat female sexual disorders. This article is a review of female sexuality. PMID:26330647

  15. Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prosthetics Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants Hernia Surgical Mesh Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... majority of tissue used to produce these mesh implants are from a pig (porcine) or cow (bovine) ...

  16. Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prosthetics Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... majority of tissue used to produce these mesh implants are from a pig (porcine) or cow (bovine). ...

  17. American Pediatric Surgical Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Pediatric Surgical Association Search for: Login Resources + For Members For Professionals For Training Program Directors For Media For ... Surgical Outcomes Surveys & Results Publications Continuing Education + ExPERT Pediatric Surgery NaT Annual Meeting CME MOC Requirements Residents / ...

  18. Optimizing surgical f

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Mohamed Amin

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: In our study both dexmedetomidine and esmolol were effective in reducing MABP, and lowering the heart rate providing dry surgical field and ensured good surgical condition during cochlear implant surgery in pediatric patients.

  19. Abortion - surgical - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000658.htm Abortion - surgical - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. You have had a surgical abortion. This is a procedure that ends pregnancy by ...

  20. Doctors with dyslexia: strategies and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Rachel; Alexander, Gail; Mann, Richard; Kibble, Sharon; Scallan, Samantha

    2016-10-06

    Looking beyond dyslexia as an individual doctor's issue requires adjusting a working environment to better serve the needs of doctors with dyslexia. With an increasing number of doctors disclosing dyslexia at medical school, how can educators best provide this support? Our research looks at the impact of dyslexia on clinical practice and the coping strategies used by doctors to minimise the effect. Qualitative data were collected from 14 doctors with dyslexia using semi-structured interviews and by survey. 'In situ' demonstration interviews were conducted in order to understand how dyslexia is managed in the workplace from first-hand experience. Employers and educators who have responsibility for meeting the needs of this group were also consulted. Even in cases of doctors who had a diagnosis, they often did not disclose their dyslexia to their employer. Study participants reported having developed individual ways of coping and devised useful 'workarounds'. Support from employers comes in the form of 'reasonable adjustments', although from our data we cannot be sure that such adjustments contribute to an 'enabling' work environment. Supportive characteristics included the opportunity to shadow others and the time and space to complete paperwork on a busy ward. How can educators best provide support [for doctors with dyslexia]? Doctors with dyslexia need to be helped to feel comfortable enough to disclose. Educators need to challenge any negative assumptions that exist as well as promote understanding about the elements that contribute to a positive working environment. As a result of the research there is now practice available for educators to identify evidence-based strategies and resources. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  1. Mortality among Norwegian doctors 1960-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hem Erlend

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the mortality pattern of Norwegian doctors, people in human service occupations, other graduates and the general population during the period 1960-2000 by decade, gender and age. The total number of deaths in the study population was 1 583 559. Methods Census data from 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1990 relating to education were linked to data on 14 main causes of death from Statistics Norway, followed up for two five-year periods after census, and analyzed as stratified incidence-rate data. Mortality rate ratios were computed as combined Mantel-Haenzel estimates for each sex, adjusting for both age and period when appropriate. Results The doctors had a lower mortality rate than the general population for all causes of death except suicide. The mortality rate ratios for other graduates and human service occupations were 0.7-0.8 compared with the general population. However, doctors have a higher mortality than other graduates. The lowest estimates of mortality for doctors were for endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases, diseases in the urogenital tract or genitalia, digestive diseases and sudden death, for which the numbers were nearly half of those for the general population. The differences in mortality between doctors and the general population increased during the periods. Conclusions Between 1960 and 2000 mortality for doctors converged towards the mortality for other university graduates and for people in human service occupations. However, there was a parallel increase in the gap between these groups and the rest of the population. The slightly higher mortality for doctors compared with mortality for other university graduates may be explained by the higher suicide rate for doctors.

  2. Doctor-Patient Relationship in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paresh D Lakdawala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the issue of doctor-patient relationship in view of a changing world with special emphasis on mental health professionals. It takes into account transference and counter-transference issues in doctor-patient relationships. It deals with issues pertaining to consent and liabilities, confidentiality and patient protection. Role of a psychiatrist as a leader in the art of communication is touched upon. In the end issues about professional fees and ethics too is dealt with.

  3. Doctor and pharmacy shopping for controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, Gretchen L; Smith, Michael J; Abate, Marie A; Halverson, Joel

    2012-06-01

    Prescription drug abuse is a major health concern nationwide, with West Virginia having one of the highest prescription drug death rates in the United States. Studies are lacking that compare living subjects with persons who died from drug overdose for evidence of doctor and pharmacy shopping for controlled substances. The study objectives were to compare deceased and living subjects in West Virginia for evidence of prior doctor and pharmacy shopping for controlled substances and to identify factors associated with drug-related death. A secondary data study was conducted using controlled substance, Schedule II-IV, prescription data from the West Virginia Controlled Substance Monitoring Program and drug-related death data compiled by the Forensic Drug Database between July 2005 and December 2007. A case-control design compared deceased subjects 18 years and older whose death was drug related with living subjects for prior doctor and pharmacy shopping. Logistic regression identified factors related to the odds of drug-related death. A significantly greater proportion of deceased subjects were doctor shoppers (25.21% vs. 3.58%) and pharmacy shoppers (17.48% vs. 1.30%) than living subjects. Approximately 20.23% of doctor shoppers were also pharmacy shoppers, and 55.60% of pharmacy shoppers were doctor shoppers. Younger age, greater number of prescriptions dispensed, exposure to opioids and benzodiazepines, and doctor and pharmacy shopping were factors with greater odds of drug-related death. Doctor and pharmacy shopping involving controlled substances were identified, and shopping behavior was associated with drug-related death. Prescription monitoring programs may be useful in identifying potential shoppers at the point of care.

  4. Second generation professional doctorates in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Gary; Davies, Ruth

    2009-09-01

    This paper traces the increase in number and diversity of professional doctorates over the last two decades and discusses the evolution from first to second generation doctorates as a response to the rise of the knowledge economy and new understandings of knowledge-production. Distinctions between first and second generation doctorates are interpreted in the light of Gibbons et al. [Gibbons, M., Limoges, C., Nowotny, H., Schwartzman, S., Scott, P., Trow, M., 1994. The New Production of Knowledge: The Dynamics of Science and Research in Contemporary Societies. Sage, London] taxonomy of knowledge-production, and it is argued that second generation doctorates, based on Mode 2 knowledge-production, are not only relevant to the economy but also have the potential to transform practice. However, as this paper highlights, this reconceptualisation of the professional doctorate presents particular challenges to academia and the discipline of nursing, which centre upon the threats posed to the power and authority of the University by the radical nature of Mode 2 knowledge generation and application in the workplace. Implications of these threats are discussed in relation to the current debate about the rigour of professional doctorates and the call by some for a return to the traditional doctorate or PhD. We conclude that the discipline of nursing has much to gain from embracing, rather than retreating from, the challenges posed by second generation professional doctorates, and that these offer an alternative but no less academically sound education in preparing nurses to pay a full and active role at the theory-practice interface.

  5. Best practices in doctoral retention: Mentoring

    OpenAIRE

    Brill, Judie L.; Balcanoff, Karen K.; Denise Land; Maurice Gogarty; Freda Turner

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this critical literature review is to outline best practices in doctoral retention and the successful approach of one university to improve graduation success by providing effective mentorship for faculty and students alike. The focus of this literature review is on distance learning relationships between faculty and doctoral students, regarding retention, persistence, and mentoring models. Key phrases and words used in the search and focusing on mentoring resulted in over 20,000 s...

  6. DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR AMONGST DOCTORS, MYTH OR REALITY?

    OpenAIRE

    Avtar Singh

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Disruptive behavior in a medical setting is defined as objectionable or offensive interpersonal behavior that leads to disruption of professional activities in the workplace. 1 It has been observed that majority of doctors do not show disruptive behavior in their day today conduct and only few doctors are identified for their disruptive behavior . Special commi ttee on professional conduct and ethics defines disruptive behavio...

  7. SAS doctors career progression survey 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroz, Carlos; Sands, Lorna R; Lee, John

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a national survey of Staff, Associate Specialists and Specialty (SAS) doctors working in sexual health clinics in the UK in 2013 in order to explore their career progression. The aim of the survey was to assess SAS doctors' experience in passing through the thresholds and to gather information about the adherence by SAS doctors and employers to the terms and conditions of service laid out by the new 2008 contract. Out of 185 responders, whom the authors estimate comprise 34% of the total workforce, 159 were on the new contract. Of those, most SAS doctors were women (84%), the majority (67%) worked less than nine programmed activities per week; only a few had intentions to join the consultant grade (15%), and a considerable minority (26%) were older than 54 years of age and likely to retire in the next ten years. The survey showed that most participating SAS doctors had undergone appraisal in the previous 15 months (90%), most had a job planning discussion (83%) with their employer and most had some allocated time for supporting professional activities (86%). However, a significant minority had no appraisal (10%), no job planning discussion (17%) and had no allocated supporting professional activities (14%), which allows time for career development in the specialty. Most SAS doctors, who had the opportunity, had progressed through the thresholds automatically (88%); some experienced difficulties in passing (8%) and only a few did not pass (4%). SAS doctors must ensure that they work together with their employer in order to improve adherence to the terms and conditions of service of the contract, which allow for career progression and benefit both the individual doctors and ultimately service provision.

  8. Senior doctors' opinions of rational suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, Stephen; Price, Annabel; Rayner, Lauren; Owen, Gareth S; Hayes, Richard D; Hotopf, Matthew; Lee, William

    2011-12-01

    The attitudes of medical professionals towards physician assisted dying have been widely discussed. Less explored is the level of agreement among physicians on the possibility of 'rational suicide'-a considered suicide act made by a sound mind and a precondition of assisted dying legislation. To assess attitudes towards rational suicide in a representative sample of senior doctors in England and Wales. A postal survey was conducted of 1000 consultants and general practitioners randomly selected from a commercially available database. The main outcome of interest was level of agreement with a statement about rational suicide. The corrected participation rate was 50%; 363 questionnaires were analysed. Overall 72% of doctors agreed with the possibility of rational suicide, 17% disagreed, and 11% were neutral. Doctors who identified themselves as being more religious were more likely to disagree. Some doctors who disagreed with legalisation of physician assisted suicide nevertheless agreed with the concept of rational suicide. Most senior doctors in England and Wales feel that rational suicide is possible. There was no association with specialty. Strong religious belief was associated with disagreement, although levels of agreement were still high in people reporting the strongest religious belief. Most doctors who were opposed to physician assisted suicide believed that rational suicide was possible, suggesting that some medical opposition is best explained by other factors such as concerns of assessment and protection of vulnerable patients.

  9. Is friendship relevant to doctoral pedagogy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2016-01-01

    Today, increased attention is given to how activities and events happening outside the institutional context shape the learning processes of doctoral students. Extra-curricular activities are acknowledged to play a central role in learning outcomes, the quality of the research undertaken, and com......Today, increased attention is given to how activities and events happening outside the institutional context shape the learning processes of doctoral students. Extra-curricular activities are acknowledged to play a central role in learning outcomes, the quality of the research undertaken......, and completion of the doctoral programme. But how do doctoral supervisors understand such extra-curricular elements of the doctoral programme, and do they understand it as the supervisor’s responsibility to relate educationally and pedagogically to such elements? This paper presents the findings from...... a qualitative interview study conducted at the University of Oxford, UK, designed to shed light on how doctoral supervisors understand and reflect on their educational and pedagogical responsibility to the general life-worlds of their students. Based on the findings, this paper discusses the potential of...

  10. Doctor shopping: a phenomenon of many themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2012-11-01

    Doctor shopping is defined as seeing multiple treatment providers, either during a single illness episode or to procure prescription medications illicitly. According to the available literature, prevalence rates of doctor shopping vary widely, from 6.3 to 56 percent. However, this variability is partially attributable to research methodology, including the study definition of doctor shopping as well as the patient sample. The reasons for doctor shopping are varied. Some patient explanations for this phenomenon relate to clinician factors, such as inconvenient office hours or locations, long waiting times, personal characteristics or qualities of the provider, and/or insufficient communication time between the patient and clinician. Some patient explanations relate to personal factors and include both illness factors (e.g., symptom persistence, lack of understanding or nonacceptance of the diagnosis or treatment) as well as psychological factors (e.g., somatization, prescription drug-seeking). Importantly, not all doctor shopping is driven by suspect motivations. Being aware of these various patient justifications for doctor shopping is important in understanding and managing these challenging patients in the clinical setting, whether they emerge in psychiatric or primary care environments.

  11. Doctoral education in the nuclear sector; La formacion de doctores en el sector nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguez, E.

    2013-03-01

    Doctoral aducation is a major priority for European universities. In the context of the Bologna Process the importance of doctoral education as the third cycle of higher education and the first stage of a young researchers career, and thus in linking the European Higher Education and Research Areas, was first highlighted in the 2003 Berlin Report. The core component of doctoral training is the advancement of knowledge through original research. considering the need for structured doctoral programs and the need for transparent supervision and assessment, we note that the normal workload of the third cycle in most countries would correspond 3-4 years full time. This is spirit of the new Spanish Doctoral Law. Then, universities should ensure that their doctoral programmes promote interdisciplinary training and the development of transferable skills, thus meeting the needs of the wider employment market. We need to achieve and overall increase in the numbers of doctoral candidates taking up research careers as early stage researchers and also increase the employability as a normal way as it is the case of other advance countries. In Spain, universities with doctoral nuclear programmes and the CIEMAT, with the sponsorship of the nuclear sector, a doctoral school in nuclear science and engineering should be created to enhance the research careers of Young students for the future of nuclear activities in Spain. (Author)

  12. DETERMINANTS OF SPECIALTY CHOICE OF RESIDENT DOCTORS; CASE STUDY--AMONG RESIDENT DOCTORS IN NIGERIA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Osuoji, Roland I; Adebanji, Atinuke; Abdulsalam, Moruf A; Oludara, Mobolaji A; Abolarinwa, Abimbola A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined medical specialty selection by Nigerian resident doctors using a marketing research approach to determine the selection criteria and the role of perceptions, expected remuneration...

  13. Doctor's attire influences perceived empathy in the patient-doctor relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Heesu; Lee, Hyeyeon; Chang, Dong-Seon; Kim, Ho-Sun; Lee, Hyejung; Park, Hi-Joon; Chae, Younbyoung

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated whether doctors' attire influences the perception of empathy in the patient-doctor relationship during a therapeutic encounter. A total number of 143 patients were divided into four groups when they were consulting a Traditional Korean Medicine doctor. Depending on the group, the same doctor was wearing four different attires--Casual, Suit, Traditional dress, White coat--when having a clinical consultation with the patients. The patients preferred white coat and traditional dress more than other attires, giving highest scores to white coat in competency, trustworthiness and preference of attire and to traditional dress in comfortableness and contentment with the consultation. The "Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE)" score was significantly higher in the "White coat" and "Traditional" groups, compared to the "Casual" and "Suit" groups. The strong association between the patients' preference of doctors' attire and the CARE score indicates that the doctor's attire plays not only an important role for establishing confidence and trustworthiness but also for the perception of empathy in the patient-doctor relationship. The doctor's attire can function as an effective tool of non-verbal communication in order to signal confidence, trust and empathy and establish a good patient-doctor relationship. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Factors influencing surgical career choices and advancement in Ireland and Britain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Corrigan, Mark A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to analyze the factors that influence the advancement and the career choices of doctors and medical students. METHODS: Using the combined databases of the iformix and surgent websites, 450 doctors and medical students were invited to complete an internet-based survey. Surgent (http:\\/\\/www.surgent.ie) and iformix (http:\\/\\/www.iformix.com) are two free internet services administered by the authors. Surgent is a medical educational website, while iformix facilitates the online submission of abstracts to surgical and medical conferences across Britain and Ireland. The combined database of these two websites is approximately 4500 entries. Four hundred and fifty users represented a 10% sample based on an expected 40%-45% response rate. This was anticipated to yield between 180 and 202 respondents, statistically sufficient to analyze the data. A detailed Likert scale assessed the importance of "academic," "clinical," and "lifestyle" factors in determining career choice and progression. Analysis included descriptive statistics and inferential testing. RESULTS: Fifty percent (N = 222) of surveys were returned; 142 men and 78 women. Thirty-seven percent of respondents were Irish, 28% British, and 35% non-European. Fifteen percent were undergraduates, 4% interns, 12% had 2-4 years of clinical experience, while 69% had completed more than 4 years. Fifty-six percent had decided upon a career in general surgery. Overall, the most important factors for career choice were intellectual challenge (95%), academic opportunities (61%), and research opportunities(54%). Doctors with more than 4 years of experience deemed duration of training (p = 0.002), lifestyle during training (p = 0.02), and stress (0.005) as less important factors when considering career choice. Correlation analyses demonstrated that prestige (p = 0.002), patient relationships (p = 0.006), and advice from friends or family (p = 0.01) were more important influencing factors

  15. Interpersonal perception in the context of doctor-patient relationships: a dyadic analysis of doctor-patient communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, David A; Veldhuijzen, Wemke; Weijden, Trudy van der; Leblanc, Annie; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Légaré, France; Campbell, Craig

    2010-03-01

    Doctor-patient communication is an interpersonal process and essential to relationship-centered care. However, in many studies, doctors and patients are studied as if living in separate worlds. This study assessed whether: 1) doctors' perception of their communication skills is congruent with their patients' perception; and 2) patients of a specific doctor agree with each other about their doctor's communication skills. A cross-sectional study was conducted in three provinces in Canada with 91 doctors and their 1749 patients. Doctors and patients independently completed questions on the doctor's communication skills (content and process) after a consultation. Multilevel modeling provided an estimate of the patient and doctor variance components at both the dyad-level and the doctor-level. We computed correlations between patients' and doctors' perceptions at both levels to assess how congruent they were. Consensus among patients of a specific doctor was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The mean score of the rating of doctor's skills according to patients was 4.58, and according to doctors was 4.37. The dyad-level variance for the patient was .38 and for the doctor was .06. The doctor-level variance for the patient ratings was .01 and for the doctor ratings, .18. The correlation between both the patients' and the doctors' skills' ratings scores at the dyad-level was weak. At the doctor-level, the correlation was not statistically significant. The ICC for patients' ratings was .03 and for the doctors' ratings .76. Overall, this study suggests that doctors and their patients have a very different perspective of the doctors' communication skills occurring during routine clinical encounters.

  16. FEMALE PSEUDOHERMAPHRODITISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AL. Bulotta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. 21α-hydroxylase deficiency is the most frequent cause of virilization in patients with female karyotype due to exposure of a female fetus to excess of androgen. We report anatomical and cosmetic results of feminizing genital reconstruction of two related patients (second cousin with XX karyotype born with urogenital sinus anomalies (UGS and not treated at birth. Materials and Metods. Patient 1 is 6-years old with ambiguous genitalia graded as Prader V and never undergone therapy or surgery. Patient 2 is 10-years old, graded as Prader IV and subjected to hormonal therapy and clitoral amputation at the age of 6. Mobilization of urogenital sinus, pull-through of vagina and tubulization of urethra was performed in both after placement of Foley chateters in vagina and bladder by cisto-vaginoscopy. Genitoplasty involved refashioning the tissues to create minora and majora labia and, after removal of corpora, partial clitorectomy was carried in patient 1 and clitoridal reconstruction in patient 2. Result. Vaginal introitus was positioned in the vestibule region below urethral meatus. Foley chateters was removed after two weeks in narcosis and the cosmetic and anatomic result was good. Conclusion. Goals of feminizing genitoplasty are to restore, soon as possible, anatomy achieving a more feminine appareance with a vagina for menstruation, to preserve reproductive capacity and to prevent urological sequelae but it’s also important to contribute in a development of a more stable gender identity. This procedure in two stage, based on an accurate diagnosis, is good to create feminine genital appareance in children with female pseudohermaphroditism expecially if not treated at birth.

  17. Critical and Creative Thinking Nexus: Learning Experiences of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Critical and creative thinking constitute important learning outcomes at doctoral level across the world. While the literature on doctoral education illuminates this matter through the lens of experienced senior researchers, the doctoral students' own perspective is missing. Based upon interviews with 14 doctoral students from four disciplines at…

  18. Critical and Creative Thinking Nexus: Learning Experiences of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Critical and creative thinking constitute important learning outcomes at doctoral level across the world. While the literature on doctoral education illuminates this matter through the lens of experienced senior researchers, the doctoral students' own perspective is missing. Based upon interviews with 14 doctoral students from four disciplines at…

  19. Tuberculosis and female reproductive health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ghosh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is an important cause of mortality and morbidity all over the world and is particularly relevant in developing countries like India where the disease is endemic. Female reproductive system is very vulnerable to this infection and clinical presentation of this disease in female reproductive tract is protean in nature and in a large majority of patients could be completely silent. This disease is an important cause of infertility, menstrual irregularity, pregnancy loss, and in association with pregnancy, morbidity to both the mother and child increases. Some of the effects of TB infection on female genital tract could be remote in nature due to infection elsewhere. Medicines used to treat TB infection can also have adverse effects on contraception and other areas of female reproductive health. HIV coinfection and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB and increased population migration from developed to developing countries have now added a whole new dimension to this infection. Though new, finer diagnostic tools of detection of TB are increasingly available in the form of bacterial cultures and polymerase chain reaction (PCR based diagnostics, suspicion by clinicians remains the main tool for diagnosis of the condition. Hence, doctors need to be properly trained to become "Tuberculosis Minded".

  20. Doctor shopping by overweight and obese patients is associated with increased healthcare utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudzune, Kimberly A; Bleich, Sara N; Richards, Thomas M; Weiner, Jonathan P; Hodges, Krista; Clark, Jeanne M

    2013-07-01

    Negative interactions with healthcare providers may lead patients to switch physicians or "doctor shop." We hypothesized that overweight and obese patients would be more likely to doctor shop, and as a result, have increased rates of emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations as compared to normal weight nonshoppers. We combined claims data from a health plan in one state with information from beneficiaries' health risk assessments. The primary outcome was "doctor shopping," which we defined as having outpatient claims with ≥5 different primary care physicians (PCPs) during a 24-month period. The independent variable was standard NIH categories of weight by BMI. We performed multivariate logistic regression to evaluate the association between weight categories and doctor shopping. We conducted multivariate zero-inflated negative binominal regression to evaluate the association between weight-doctor shopping categories with counts of ED visits and hospitalizations. Of the 20,726 beneficiaries, the mean BMI was 26.3 kg m(-2) (SD 5.1), mean age was 44.4 years (SD 11.1) and 53% were female. As compared to normal weight beneficiaries, overweight beneficiaries had 23% greater adjusted odds of doctor shopping (OR 1.23, 95%CI 1.04-1.46) and obese beneficiaries had 52% greater adjusted odds of doctor shopping (OR 1.52, 95%CI 1.26-1.82). As compared to normal weight non-shoppers, overweight and obese shoppers had higher rates of ED visits (IRR 1.85, 95%CI 1.37-2.45; IRR 1.83, 95%CI 1.34-2.50, respectively), which persisted during within weight group comparisons (Overweight IRR 1.50, 95%CI 1.10-2.03; Obese IRR 1.54, 95%CI 1.12-2.11). Frequently changing PCPs may impair continuity and result in increased healthcare utilization. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  1. Surgical Lasers In Gynecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellhas, Helmut F.; Barnes, Alfonso E.

    1982-12-01

    Multipurpose surgical CO2 lasers marketed in the USA have been developed to be applicable to a variety of surgical procedures in many surgical fields. They are all suited for endoscopic surgical procedures and can be fitted to all standard surgical microscopes. They all can adjust the focal length of the laser beam to the different standard focal lengths of the surgical microscope which for instance in laryngoscopy is 400 mm and in colposcopy 300 mm. One laser instrument can even change the spot size in a given focal distance which is very advantageous for some microsurgical procedures (Merrimack Laboratories 820). All multipurpose surgical CO2 laser systems provide a multi-articulated surgical arm for free-hand surgery. The surgical arms are cumbersome to use but they are adapted to the surgeons needs with ingenuity. The practicality of the multi-articulated surgical arms depends mostly on the distance of the handpiece from the surgical console which now is also overbridged by the laser tube in most surgical laser system. The spot size of the beam is variable in most handpieces by interchangeable lenses which modify the focal distance of the beam and the power density. Another common feature in all systems is a coaxial He-Ne pilot light which provides a red spot which unfortunately becomes invisible in a bleeding surgical field. Most surgical laser systems have a spacial mode of TEM 00 which is essential for incisional surgery. The continuous mode of beam delivery is used for incisional surgery and also for most endoscopic procedures.

  2. Uncommon surgical emergencies in neonatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angotti, R; Bulotta, A L; Ferrara, F; Molinaro, F; Cerchia, E; Meucci, D; Messina, M

    2014-12-30

    Objective. Over the past decade, multiple factors have changed the pattern of neonatal surgical emergencies. An increase in prenatal screenings and the development of neonatal tertiary care centres have changed the clinical approach to these kids. Materials and methods. Between 1995 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed 34 patients with diagnosis of uncommon rare neonatal surgical emergencies at our institute. We analyzed: sex, gestational age, weight at birth, primary pathology, prenatal diagnosis, associated anomalies, age and weight at surgery, clinical presentation, start of oral feeding and hospitalization. The follow-up was performed at 6,12, 24 and 36 months. Results. There were 21 male and 13 female. The gestational age ranged between 28 and 36 weeks. The weight at birth ranged between 700 and 1400 grams. Oral feeding was started between 4th and 10th postoperative day. The average hospitalization was about 70.47 days. To date, all patients have finished the followup. They are healthy. Conclusion. The outcome of the patients with uncommon surgical emergencies is different based on the etiology. Overall survival is generally good but is influenced by the associated anomalies.

  3. Tobacco smoking among doctors in mainland China: a study from Shandong province and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Derek R

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco control represents a key area in which doctors can make a significant positive impact on their patients’ lives. Despite this fact, however, doctors in certain regions of China are known to smoke tobacco at rates similar to or even exceeding those seen within the general population. Objective This study sought to investigate the smoking habits of doctors at a teaching hospital in Shandong province, as well as providing a brief review of smoking research that has been conducted among doctors elsewhere in China. Method An anonymous questionnaire survey was distributed to doctors working at a university teaching hospital in 2008, as part of a larger study of occupational health issues in the healthcare profession. Results The overall smoking prevalence rate of doctors in this study was 36.3% with significant differences observed between the genders (males: 46.7% and females: 5.3%. Age and total career length were also correlated with smoking habit, although no significant associations were found with department of employment. Conclusions Overall, our study suggests that smoking rates among doctors in Shandong province are higher than those documented in many other countries, a finding which is consistent with previous research conducted in some other Chinese provinces. Addressing this issue from an intrinsic cultural perspective will clearly need to form the cornerstone of tobacco control efforts within the Chinese medical community in future years.

  4. The Rise of Professional Doctorates: Case Studies of the Doctorate in Education in China, Iceland and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, Helen; Peden, Sanna; Chan, Karyn

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education is going through a period of transition. This transition is evident in the many varieties of doctoral degrees currently offered in higher education institutions worldwide, from the traditional research-based Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) to the Professional Doctorate and the New Route PhD. This article reports on a study which…

  5. Surgical virtual reality - highlights in developing a high performance surgical haptic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custură-Crăciun, D; Cochior, D; Constantinoiu, S; Neagu, C

    2013-01-01

    Just like simulators are a standard in aviation and aerospace sciences, we expect for surgical simulators to soon become a standard in medical applications. These will correctly instruct future doctors in surgical techniques without there being a need for hands on patient instruction. Using virtual reality by digitally transposing surgical procedures changes surgery in are volutionary manner by offering possibilities for implementing new, much more efficient, learning methods, by allowing the practice of new surgical techniques and by improving surgeon abilities and skills. Perfecting haptic devices has opened the door to a series of opportunities in the fields of research,industry, nuclear science and medicine. Concepts purely theoretical at first, such as telerobotics, telepresence or telerepresentation,have become a practical reality as calculus techniques, telecommunications and haptic devices evolved,virtual reality taking a new leap. In the field of surgery barrier sand controversies still remain, regarding implementation and generalization of surgical virtual simulators. These obstacles remain connected to the high costs of this yet fully sufficiently developed technology, especially in the domain of haptic devices.

  6. The Criminal Justice Doctorate: A Study of Doctoral Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felkenes, George T.

    Graduates of six institutions were surveyed in an effort to develop a profile of doctoral graduates from institutions that have traditionally offered doctoral programs oriented specifically toward the field of criminal justice. A second research objective was to develop an understanding of the attitudes, frustrations, and utilization patterns of…

  7. Non-EEA-doctors in EEA-countries: doctors or cleaners?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herfs, Paul; Kater, L.; Haalboom, J.R.E.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Migration of non-EEA doctors to EEA-countries has become a common phenomenon. As coordination within the EEA has not yet been established, every EEA-country is re-inventing the wheel of assessment of foreign medical degrees and developing additional programmes for non-EEA doctors. There

  8. Doctoral Studies in Spain: Changes to Converge with Europe in the Internationalisation of the Doctorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Magdalena Jiménez

    2016-01-01

    In Spain, the organisation of doctoral studies has been substantially modified to come into line with the changes introduced by the agenda of the Bologna process. These changes have been specified in a number of statements by European Ministers of Education, and have required alterations to Spanish doctoral regulations. The aim of these changes…

  9. Ten Doctors Awarded 2015 Most Beautiful Doctors of China’s Overseas Medical-Aid Missions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Our; Staff; Reporter

    2015-01-01

    A commonweal activity to commend Chinese doctors and medical teams on overseas medical-aid missions that have made prominent contributions to global medical and health services,especially those battling the Ebola epidemic,was launched in January.Dubbed the 2015"Boundless Love—Finding Most Beautiful Doctors of China’s Overseas Medical-Aid Missions",it was

  10. Reexamining the Structure of Hemingway's "The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, James

    2003-01-01

    Considers how Hemingway's "The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife" is a model of Edgar Allan Poe's aesthetic of the short story. Examines this work on many levels. Concludes that great writers, such as Ernest Hemingway, challenge readers to find the clues, to connect the dots, to pay attention to the "little details." (SG)

  11. Reexamining the Structure of Hemingway's "The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, James

    2003-01-01

    Considers how Hemingway's "The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife" is a model of Edgar Allan Poe's aesthetic of the short story. Examines this work on many levels. Concludes that great writers, such as Ernest Hemingway, challenge readers to find the clues, to connect the dots, to pay attention to the "little details." (SG)

  12. Distinction in Doctoral Education: Using Bourdieu's Tools to Assess the Socialization of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This conceptual article uses the tools of Pierre Bourdieu (1977, 1986, 1990) to examine the socialization of doctoral students by suggesting that the processes of doctoral study highlight inequities among students. Using Young's (1990) social justice approach as a framework to complement the ideas of Bourdieu, I demonstrate how aspects of academic…

  13. Child Development and the Coworking of Doctor and Teacher: A Waldorf School Doctor's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnow, Gerald F.

    This paper draws on the nearly 20 years' experiences of a school doctor working with teachers at the Rudolf Steiner School in New York City to describe general principles of assessing child development in relation to educational progress. The paper contrasts the customary role of school doctors (related to conducting physical examinations for…

  14. Distinction in Doctoral Education: Using Bourdieu's Tools to Assess the Socialization of Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This conceptual article uses the tools of Pierre Bourdieu (1977, 1986, 1990) to examine the socialization of doctoral students by suggesting that the processes of doctoral study highlight inequities among students. Using Young's (1990) social justice approach as a framework to complement the ideas of Bourdieu, I demonstrate how aspects of academic…

  15. IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME, open 24h/24h 748-49-50 Association Of Geneva Doctors Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European Emergency Call 112 FRANCE EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 04-72-11-69-11 All doctors ...

  16. Core Competencies of the Certified Pediatric Doctor of Chiropractic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hewitt, Elise; Hestbaek, Lise; Pohlman, Katherine A

    2016-01-01

    An outline of the minimum core competencies expected from a certified pediatric doctor of chiropractic was developed using a Delphi consensus process. The initial set of seed statements and substatements was modeled on competency documents used by organizations that oversee chiropractic and medical...... education. These statements were distributed to the Delphi panel, reaching consensus when 80% of the panelists approved each segment. The panel consisted of 23 specialists in chiropractic pediatrics (14 females) from across the broad spectrum of the chiropractic profession. Sixty-one percent of panelists...... had postgraduate pediatric certifications or degrees, 39% had additional graduate degrees, and 74% were faculty at a chiropractic institution and/or in a postgraduate pediatrics program. The panel were initially given 10 statements with related substatements formulated by the study's steering...

  17. Doctors who considered but did not pursue specific clinical specialties as careers: questionnaire surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldacre, Michael J; Goldacre, Raph; Lambert, Trevor W

    2012-04-01

    To report doctors' rejection of specialties as long-term careers and reasons for rejection. Postal questionnaires. United Kingdom. Graduates of 2002, 2005 and 2008 from all UK medical schools, surveyed one year after qualification. Current specialty choice; any choice that had been seriously considered but not pursued (termed 'rejected' choices) with reasons for rejection. 2573 of 9155 respondents (28%) had seriously considered but then not pursued a specialty choice. By comparison with positive choices, general practice was under-represented among rejected choices: it was the actual choice of 27% of respondents and the rejected choice of only 6% of those who had rejected a specialty. Consideration of 'job content' was important in not pursuing general practice (cited by 78% of those who considered but rejected a career in general practice), psychiatry (72%), radiology (69%) and pathology (68%). The surgical specialties were the current choice of 20% of respondents and had been considered but rejected by 32% of doctors who rejected a specialty. Issues of work-life balance were the single most common factor, particularly for women, in not pursuing the surgical specialties, emergency medicine, the medical hospital specialties, paediatrics, and obstetrics and gynaecology. Competition for posts, difficult examinations, stressful working conditions, and poor training were mentioned but were mainly minority concerns. There is considerable diversity between doctors in their reasons for finding specialties attractive or unattractive. This underlines the importance of recruitment strategies to medical school that recognize diversity of students' interests and aptitudes.

  18. Gender differences in the acquisition of surgical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Amir; Subhi, Yousif; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Females are less attracted than males to surgical specialties, which may be due to differences in the acquisition of skills. The aim of this study was to systematically review studies that investigate gender differences in the acquisition of surgical skills. METHODS: We performed...... a comprehensive database search using relevant search phrases and MeSH terms. We included studies that investigated the role of gender in the acquisition of surgical skills. RESULTS: Our search yielded 247 studies, 18 of which were found to be eligible and were therefore included. These studies included a total...... conditions). Male medical students tended to outperform females, while no gender differences were found among residents. Gaming experience and interest in surgery correlated with better acquisition of surgical skills, regardless of gender. Although initial levels of surgical abilities seemed lower among...

  19. Distribution of Familial Mediterranean Fever mutations in surgical emergencies including nonspecific abdominal pain: Surgical point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Yazici

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF is characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and serositis, resulting in pain in the abdomen, chest, joints and muscles. While patients diagnosed with FMF are under follow-up of the internal medicine doctors, surgeons are rarely responsible the initial diagnosis of FMF. We aimed to investigate the frequency of the FMF in the surgical emergency in those with acute nonspecific abdominal pain. Material and Methods: All patients admitted to emergency service due to acute abdominal pain were evaluated and those resulted with nonspecific pain were enrolled. During six months period, patients consistent with above criteria were examined with abdominal x-ray and ultrasound(US, hematological and biochemical test, and physical examinations. Nine type of FMF mutations were investigated in the patients. All results were comparatively evaluated considering MEFV (+ or MEFV(-. Results: There were 68 patients (35, 51.4% male and 33, 48.5% female with a mean age of 29.5+/-10.1 (range: 17-49 years. All patients displayed mild or severe abdominal pain. Genetic analysis revealed that 19 [MEFV(+] out of 68 patients (27,9% carry mutation either homozygote or heterozygote. The most frequent mutation seen in seven patients was M694V (36.8%. In MEFV(+ patients, fibrinogen, CRP and lactate dehydrogenase levels(LDH were significantly higher (p<0.05. On computed tomography, in six patients in whom US showed decompressed appendix, appendicitis was confirmed and appendectomy was performed. Conclusions: The patients with nonspecific abdominal pain should also be considered for FMF before decision of surgery. High levels of fibrinogen, CRP and LDH in addition to clinical history of similar attacks that arise strong clinical suspicion can help diagnose FMF with genetic analysis. Our results need confirmation in larger prospective studies to confirm these preliminary results. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(4.000: 814-821

  20. [CanMEDS 2015: better doctors?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borleffs, J C C; Mourits, M J E; Scheele, F

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the CanMEDS model, which forms the basis for competency-based learning in both undergraduate and postgraduate training, has been renewed by the introduction of CanMEDS 2015. The most prominent change is the emphasis on leadership skills, which is also reflected by the name change for the role of 'manager' to 'leader'. The addition of milestones provides clearly defined targets for learning and assessment, which facilitates the monitoring of the progression in competence. Furthermore, CanMEDS 2015 strongly focusses on the overall coherence of the separate competencies. CanMEDS, designed as a model that helps to train young doctors to become good doctors, also helps us - the trainers - to become better doctors ourselves.

  1. Profesor Doctor Fernando Sonnet: In Memoriam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto José Figueras

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recuerdo del Profesor Doctor Fernando Sonnet, destacado docente e investigador, en las áreas de economía agraria, economía de empresas y microeconomía, en el Instituto de Economía y Finanzas de la Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba.Palabras Clave: Fernando H. Sonnet; Recuerdo; Universidad Nacional de Córdoba.Código JEL: B32. Professor Doctor Fernando Sonnet: In MemoriamAbstractRemembrance of Professor Doctor Fernando Sonnet, a senior lecturer and researcher in the areas of agricultural economics, business economics and microeconomics at the Institute of Economics and Finance at the Faculty of Economics, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba.Keywords: Fernando H. Sonnet; Memory; Universidad Nacional de CórdobaJEL Classification: B32.

  2. Life satisfaction and frequency of doctor visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric S; Park, Nansook; Sun, Jennifer K; Smith, Jacqui; Peterson, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Identifying positive psychological factors that reduce health care use may lead to innovative efforts that help build a more sustainable and high-quality health care system. Prospective studies indicate that life satisfaction is associated with good health behaviors, enhanced health, and longer life, but little information about the association between life satisfaction and health care use is available. We tested whether higher life satisfaction was prospectively associated with fewer doctor visits. We also examined potential interactions between life satisfaction and health behaviors. Participants were 6379 adults from the Health and Retirement Study, a prospective and nationally representative panel study of American adults older than 50 years. Participants were tracked for 4 years. We analyzed the data using a generalized linear model with a gamma distribution and log link. Higher life satisfaction was associated with fewer doctor visits. On a 6-point life satisfaction scale, each unit increase in life satisfaction was associated with an 11% decrease in doctor visits--after adjusting for sociodemographic factors (relative risk = 0.89, 95% confidence interval = 0.86-0.93). The most satisfied respondents (n = 1121; 17.58%) made 44% fewer doctor visits than did the least satisfied (n = 182; 2.85%). The association between higher life satisfaction and reduced doctor visits remained even after adjusting for baseline health and a wide range of sociodemographic, psychosocial, and health-related covariates (relative risk = 0.96, 95% confidence interval = 0.93-0.99). Higher life satisfaction is associated with fewer doctor visits, which may have important implications for reducing health care costs.

  3. Interpersonal Functions of Doctor-Patient Conversations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王璇

    2013-01-01

    As an indispensable part of medical practice. doctor-patient conversation is drawing more and more attention in the field of sociology, psychology and linguistics. Little attention, however, has been paid to the interpersonal aspect of the conversa⁃tion between doctors and patients, which is regarded as one of the most complex interpersonal relationships. Being dominant in the interaction, doctors’words, mainly in the form of questions, deserve more studies, especially for the interpersonal functions delivered. This study mainly focuses on this aspect.

  4. The Doctor's Dilemma: Oranges or Apples?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman L Jones

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available George Bernard Shaw's famous play, Doctor's Dilemma (1, is one of the attractions at the Shaw Festival this year, and recently we went to see it on a beautiful Niagara summer day, followed by a picnic beside Ball's Falls. Several weeks earlier, I had decided to read the play, with its 80-page "Preface on Doctors", and was prepared for an anticlimactic experience on the day. However, the production was a delight and I gained additional insights from the live performance.

  5. [Appropriateness prescribing and doctor's professional responsibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoni, F; Simeone, C; Luzi, E; Palla, C; Ricci, S

    2012-07-01

    The public health spending has now reached very significant levels, in this sense, the responsibility of the medical doctor assumes a significant importance in medical law. The aim of this paper is to analyze the profile of responsibilities of the medical doctor in the light of recent case law. The appropriateness of prescribing and risk assessment are, according to the authors, the real test on which to test the skill, prudence and diligence which are called prescribers. Guidelines can be a valuable tool for the professional help, knowing, however, limits application of the recommendations where to be reconciling with the prevailing protection of personal rights of the user.

  6. Manual of Surgical Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Lidia Sánchez Sarría

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Surgical instruments are the group of tools used in surgical procedures. They are very expensive and sophisticated. Consequently, a standardized and meticulous care is essential; they should go through the decontamination, cleaning and sterilization process. These instruments are designed in order to provide surgeons with tools that help them to perform a basic surgical procedure; there are multiple variations and the design depends on their function. This paper aims at showing all surgical instruments that can be used in an operating room during surgery and are not generally included in the medical literature.

  7. Did you hear the one about the doctor? An examination of doctor jokes posted on Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew A; Haney, Carol Sue; Weeks, William B; Sirovich, Brenda E; Anthony, Denise L

    2014-02-13

    Social networking sites such as Facebook have become immensely popular in recent years and present a unique opportunity for researchers to eavesdrop on the collective conversation of current societal issues. We sought to explore doctor-related humor by examining doctor jokes posted on Facebook. We performed a cross-sectional study of 33,326 monitored Facebook users, 263 (0.79%) of whom posted a joke that referenced doctors on their Facebook wall during a 6-month observation period (December 15, 2010 to June 16, 2011). We compared characteristics of so-called jokers to nonjokers and identified the characteristics of jokes that predicted joke success measured by having elicited at least one electronic laugh (eg, an LOL or "laughing out loud") as well as the total number of Facebook "likes" the joke received. Jokers told 156 unique doctor jokes and were the same age as nonjokers but had larger social networks (median Facebook friends 227 vs 132, Pdoctors. Jokes at the expense of doctors compared to jokes not at the expense of doctors tended to be more successful in eliciting an electronic laugh (46.5% vs 37.3%), although the association was statistically insignificant. In our adjusted models, jokes that were based on current events received considerably more Facebook likes (rate ratio [RR] 2.36, 95% CI 0.97-5.74). This study provides insight into the use of social networking sites for research pertaining to health and medicine, including the world of doctor-related humor.

  8. Female religious agents in Morocco: Old practices and new perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouguir, A.

    2013-01-01

    This doctoral thesis deals with female religious agents in Morocco’s past and present. More specifically, it investigates historical women saints and their reception today by Moroccan women in general and by Moroccan feminist activists in particular. Despite the fact that women saints impacted their

  9. Understanding doctors' ethical challenges as role virtue conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Rosalind

    2013-01-01

    This paper argues that doctors' ethical challenges can be usefully conceptualised as role virtue conflicts. The hospital environment requires doctors to be simultaneously good doctors, good team members, good learners and good employees. I articulate a possible set of role virtues for each of these four roles, as a basis for a virtue ethics approach to analysing doctors' ethical challenges. Using one junior doctor's story, I argue that understanding doctors' ethical challenges as role virtue conflicts enables recognition of important moral considerations that are overlooked by other approaches to ethical analysis.

  10. Revision Stapedectomy in a Female Patient with Inner Ear Malformation

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Tirth R.; Moberly, Aaron C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We describe an unusual case of surgical management of congenital mixed hearing loss in a female patient with inner ear malformation. This report outlines the role of temporal bone imaging and previous surgical history in evaluating a patient’s risk of perilymph gusher during stapes surgery. Methods. A 68-year-old female patient with a history of profound bilateral mixed hearing loss due to ossicular and cochlear malformation presented to our otology clinic. She had undergone multi...

  11. The doctoral learning penumbra. Darkness, creativity, and meaningful others in doctoral education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Robinson, Gill; Wisker, Gina

    This paper presents our cross-national research into what we term the ‘doctoral learning penumbra’, which covers the diverse, unnoticed, and often unrecognised forms of help and support that doctoral students draw from during their PhD, and which are vital for completion. Our aim is to better...... understand the range of different actors, support systems, and meaningful others, which to a high degree shape and influence doctoral education, but without receiving acknowledgement, and sometimes without awareness even, of the Graduate Schools and research programmes that educate present and future...

  12. Surgical ethics and the challenge of surgical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelos, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Surgical ethics as a specific discipline is relatively new to many. Surgical ethics focuses on the ethical issues that are particularly important to the care of surgical patients. Informed consent for surgical procedures, the level of responsibility that surgeons feel for their patients' outcomes, and the management of surgical innovation are specific issues that are important in surgical ethics and are different from other areas of medicine. The future of surgical progress is dependent on surgical innovation, yet the nature of surgical innovation raises specific concerns that challenge the professionalism of surgeons. These concerns will be considered in the following pages.

  13. Doctors' duty to disclose error: a deontological or Kantian ethical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Mark; Brown, Barry

    2004-05-01

    Medical (surgical) error is being talked about more openly and besides being the subject of retrospective reviews, is now the subject of prospective research. Disclosure of error has been a difficult issue because of fear of embarrassment for doctors in the eyes of their peers, and fear of punitive action by patients, consisting of medicolegal action and/or complaints to doctors' governing bodies. This paper examines physicians' and surgeons' duty to disclose error, from an ethical standpoint; specifically by applying the moral philosophical theory espoused by Immanuel Kant (ie. deontology). The purpose of this discourse is to apply moral philosophical analysis to a delicate but important issue which will be a matter all physicians and surgeons will have to confront, probably numerous times, in their professional careers.

  14. Percutaneous blood exposure among Danish doctors: exposure mechanisms and strategies for prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelsing, S; Nielsen, T L; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the mechanisms of percutaneous blood exposure (PCE) among doctors and discuss rational strategies for prevention. Data were obtained as part of a nation-wide questionnaire survey of occupational blood exposure among hospital employed doctors in Denmark.......5% of all PCE. Use of fingers rather than instruments was a major cause of injury in surgical specialities and was a contributing cause of 36.9% PCE on suture needles. Common contributing causes when fingers were used (n = 199) were poor space in (30.2%) or view of (18.6%) the operation field. It was often...... and 'acute situation' were common, especially in the case of PCE on i.v.-catheter-stylets. It is concluded that the exposure mechanisms of PCE reflect both unsafe routines, difficult working conditions and unsafe devices. Education in safer working routines are needed in all specialties. Introduction...

  15. Incidence and risk factors of occupational blood exposure: a nation-wide survey among Danish doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelsing, S; Nielsen, T L; Brønnum-Hansen, H

    1997-01-01

    Occupational blood exposures involves a risk of transmission of serious infections. We performed a nation-wide survey, to describe the incidence and risk factors of percutaneous (PCE) and mucocutaneous (MCE) blood exposures among hospital employed doctors in Denmark. Of 9,374 questionnaires, 6......). Only 35% adhered to the basic principles of universal precautions (UP) and non-compliance was associated with a considerably increased risk of both MCE and PCE, especially in non-surgical specialties. In conclusion, we found an unacceptably high incidence of occupational blood exposures among Danish...... doctors. Non-compliance with UP was associated with an increased risk of exposure and efforts to improve compliance with UP as well as implementation and evaluation of other preventive measures are needed....

  16. Doctor Pan Cures the Hyperthyroidism and Hypothyroidism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    THE Pan Danian Clinic. located in the Puhui Residential Area in western Beijing, is small but attracts countless patients. It is specific for those suffering from hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Doctor Pan is gentle and refined, and often smiles with closed lips.

  17. Doctoral Dissertations Recently Completed or in Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Louise

    1994-01-01

    Reviews six doctoral dissertations currently in progress or completed during 1993 that may be of interest to those in the school library media field. Topics include technology; information seeking; literacy; the portrayal of African American males in realistic fiction picture books; and the role of youth services librarians. (KRN)

  18. Reasons for doctor migration from South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Original Research: Reasons for doctor migration from South Africa. 211. Vol 51 No 3 ... The aim of the study was to investigate the profile of South African qualified ..... They proposed that giving loans to medical students which could be cancelled by the .... Contagion among Physicians who Care for HIV Patients. Fam Med ...

  19. Identity Development and Mentoring in Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Leigh A.; Burns, Leslie D.

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, Leigh Hall and Leslie Burns use theories of identity to understand mentoring relationships between faculty members and doctoral students who are being prepared as educational researchers. They suggest that becoming a professional researcher requires students to negotiate new identities and reconceptualize themselves both as people…

  20. Hombres: Doctor Luis Ángel Arango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boletín Cultural y Bibliográfico Banco de la República

    1958-02-01

    Full Text Available En el documento se realiza la nota de conmemoración  del fallecimiento del Doctor Luis Ángel Arango  Esta nota tiene como fin realizar un homenaje a tan reputado ciudadano colombiano y mienbro de la comunidad de funcionarios del Banco de la República.

  1. Retrenchment at Doctorate-Granting Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of the College and University Personnel Association, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Data on current retrenchment policies and practices of doctorate-granting institutions are reported and analyzed, including information on the existence of a retrenchment policy, retrenchment between 1974-75 and 1977-78, the retrenchment process, and the impact of retrenchment on affirmative action and employment rights and benefits. (MLW)

  2. Research Methodologies and the Doctoral Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; Miller, Gary A.

    1997-01-01

    Doctoral students often select one of four common research methodologies that are popular in the social sciences and education today: positivist; interpretive; ideological; and pragmatic. But choice of methodology also influences the student's choice of course work, membership of dissertation committee, and the form and structure of the…

  3. Doctoral Education and Transformative Consumer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    This article examines why and how transformative consumer research (TCR) can become a relevant perspective in doctoral programs. The article draws selectively from studies published in consumer behavior, marketing, and marketing education that theoretically or empirically address this topic. It discusses the meaning and background of TCR together…

  4. IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    GENEVA EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME, open 24h/24h 748-49-50 Association Of Geneva Doctors Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European Emergency Call 112 FRANCE EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 04-72-11-69-11 All doctors will come to your home. Cal...

  5. Doctoral Dissertations Recently Completed or in Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Louise

    1994-01-01

    Reviews six doctoral dissertations currently in progress or completed during 1993 that may be of interest to those in the school library media field. Topics include technology; information seeking; literacy; the portrayal of African American males in realistic fiction picture books; and the role of youth services librarians. (KRN)

  6. Research Methodologies and the Doctoral Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; Miller, Gary A.

    1997-01-01

    Doctoral students often select one of four common research methodologies that are popular in the social sciences and education today: positivist; interpretive; ideological; and pragmatic. But choice of methodology also influences the student's choice of course work, membership of dissertation committee, and the form and structure of the…

  7. EXAMINING RESEARCH SPACES IN DOCTORAL PROSPECTUSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazid Basthomi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Genre analyses and contrastive rhetoric studies have dealt with quite a number of genres of writing. However, genre analysts and contrastive rhetoric researchers have not carried out adequate analyses of doctoral prospectuses. This paper will, subsequently, address this issue by analyzing a genre of texts of doctoral prospectuses. The analysis will be focused on the sub-genre of “Background of the Study” of the prospectuses. Limitations of accessibility, however, have led this study to only focus on analyzing fourteen doctoral prospectuses written in English by Indonesian students of EFL accessible from the Graduate Program, State University of Malang, Indonesia. This situation suggests that the present study is preliminary. Preliminary, notwithstanding, the study will contribute to filling the gap of the under-researched issue of doctoral studies in Indonesia, particularly, those pertinent to the area of ELT. The analysis shows a tendency that the texts of Background of the Study do not show research spaces. Relevant to this, the article provides an interpretive explanation of the possible factors attributable to this issue.

  8. Doctoral Students' Experience of Information Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Christine; Stoodley, Ian; Pham, Binh

    2009-01-01

    As part of their journey of learning to research, doctoral candidates need to become members of their research community. In part, this involves coming to be aware of their field in ways that are shared amongst longer-term members of the research community. One aspect of candidates' experience we need to understand, therefore, involves how they…

  9. How Six Sigma Methodology Improved Doctors' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafiropoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Six Sigma methodology was used in a District General Hospital to assess the effect of the introduction of an educational programme to limit unnecessary admissions. The performance of the doctors involved in the programme was assessed. Ishikawa Fishbone and 5 S's were initially used and Pareto analysis of their findings was performed. The results…

  10. Promoting Team Leadership Skills in Doctoral Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Mahmoud; Whetton, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Doctoral programs can serve as an optimal opportunity for candidates to engage in tasks and activities to transform them and their schools. The paradigm shifts in such preparation involve moving from sitting and getting to making and taking. Most importantly, it requires building leadership skills and styles necessary to bring about desired change…

  11. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Updated:Oct 4, ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  12. Becoming Academic: A Reflection on Doctoral Candidacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Higher education policy studies over the last decade have addressed the detrimental effects of neoliberalism, new public managerialism and audit cultures on the nature, organisation, form and meanings of higher education at a macro level. This article addresses the micro-practices through which the author, as doctoral candidate and knowledge…

  13. How can Doctors Improve their Communication Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Piyush; Kumari, Archana; Chakrawarty, Avinash

    2015-03-01

    The process of curing a patient requires a holistic approach which involves considerations beyond treating a disease. It warrants several skills in a doctor along with technical expertise. Studies have shown that good communication skill in a doctor improve patient's compliance and overall satisfaction. There are certain basic principles of practicing good communication. Patient listening, empathy, and paying attention to the paraverbal and non verbal components of the communication are the important ones that are frequently neglected. Proper information about the nature, course and prognosis of the disease is important. Besides, patients and attendants should always be explained about the necessity and yield of expensive investigations and risks/benefits involved in invasive procedures. One should be extremely cautious while managing difficult encounters and breaking bad news. Formal training of the doctors in improving communication skills is necessary and has proven to improve overall outcome. The authors recommend inclusion of formal training in communication skills in medical curriculum and training of practising doctors in the form of CMEs and CPEs.

  14. Response: Training Doctoral Students to Be Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollio, David E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to begin framing doctoral training for a science of social work. This process starts by examining two seemingly simple questions: "What is a social work scientist?" and "How do we train social work scientists?" In answering the first question, some basic assumptions and concepts about what constitutes a "social work…

  15. Research Advice for Today's Online Doctoral Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Brent

    2002-01-01

    Highlights ways for doctoral students to conduct an effective literature review. Discusses the problem formulation stage; conducting an effective literature review and the benefits of a literature review; an example of literature review material; and tips for writing a literature review. (AEF)

  16. How doctor involvement in management affects innovation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, J.D.H. van; Botje, D.; Ilinca, S.; Waa, N.; Veloso Mendes, R.; Plochg, T.

    2012-01-01

    Much is expected from the (re) involvement of doctors in health care management to boost innovation. As clinicians may better understand how health services are organized and function, they may be in a better position to identify innovations. However, a key question is: Whose innovation agenda (i.e.

  17. Doctoral Education and Transformative Consumer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    This article examines why and how transformative consumer research (TCR) can become a relevant perspective in doctoral programs. The article draws selectively from studies published in consumer behavior, marketing, and marketing education that theoretically or empirically address this topic. It discusses the meaning and background of TCR together…

  18. Appraisal of family doctors: an evaluation study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis, M.I.; Elwyn, G.; Wood, F.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Appraisal has evolved to become a key component of workforce management. However, it is not clear from existing proposals for appraisal of doctors whether employers, health authorities or primary care organisations should take responsibility for appraisal processes. AIMS: To evaluate the

  19. Completion Mindsets and Contexts in Doctoral Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Pam; Bowden, John

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Doctoral candidates are now located within a research context of performativity where the push to successfully complete in a timely manner is central. The purpose of this paper is to develop a model of completion mindset within a completion context to assist research students and supervisors. Design/methodology/approach: The research was…

  20. Republished: instigating change: trainee doctors' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Nassim; Shahaney, Sumera; Martin, Guy; Ahmad, Ahmir; Moghul, Masood

    2013-10-01

    In the 21st century, the core skills of trainee doctors are evolving as clinicians, leaders and innovators. Leadership skills are an essential tool for all doctors and need to be an integral part of their training and learning as set out in the General Medical Council's Good Medical Practice. It is essential to develop these skills at an early stage and continually improve them. A group of junior doctors participated in a pilot programme for leadership with the aim of executing a quality improvement (QI) project. This article describes our experiences of both the course itself and the project undertaken by our group. As part of the process of implementing change, we faced a number of challenges which contributed to our learning. These have been explored as well as potential ways to overcome them to enable the swift and smooth development of future QI projects. Using an example of a QI project looking at handover, this article demonstrates how a trainee doctor can implement their project for both professional and institutional improvement.

  1. Adapting and Merging Methodologies in Doctoral Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Ronit Ben-Bassat; Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how research methodologies were modified and integrated during the doctoral research conducted by the first author under the supervision of the second author. The research project concerned trying to understand why teachers do or don't use "Jeliot", a program animation system designed to facilitate teaching and learning of…

  2. Educating Scholars: Doctoral Education in the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Zuckerman, Harriet; Groen, Jeffrey A.; Brucker, Sharon M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the worldwide prestige of America's doctoral programs in the humanities, all is not well in this area of higher education and hasn't been for some time. The content of graduate programs has undergone major changes, while high rates of student attrition, long times to degree, and financial burdens prevail. In response, the Andrew W. Mellon…

  3. The Evolution of Doctoral Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzman, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education in social work is evolving as a major enterprise in American higher education, with more than 80 programs now in place. Committed to providing stewards of the profession, these PhD and DSW programs also are a major impetus for research and are the primary faculty pipeline for the 735 CSWE-accredited professional social work…

  4. Recognizing surgical patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouarfa, L.

    2012-01-01

    In the Netherlands, each year over 1700 patients die from preventable surgical errors. Numerous initiatives to improve surgical practice have had some impact, but problems persist. Despite the introduction of checklists and protocols, patient safety in surgery remains a continuing challenge. This is

  5. Surgical medical record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.

    2008-01-01

    A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15......A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15...

  6. Strains in the nurse-doctor relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmanoff, E D

    1968-03-01

    Many problems and conflicts between nurses and doctors in the hospital stem from the organizational structure of the hospital rather than from the personalities of the individuals involved. Nurses often assert the latter. Understanding these conflicts requires that they be examined in terms of the organizational context within which they occur. To understand the modern American hospital it is useful to view its development. Private practitioners who at one time had cared for patients in their homes shifted the locus of care to the hospital as medical care became more complex in the latter half of the nineteenth century. Three selected aspects of hospital structure that are seen as sources of strain for nurses in their relationship with doctors are: (1) Doctors do not see themselves as full-fledged members of the hospital organization. While nurses, who do, feel bound by the operating rules of the hospital, doctors tend to operate as free agents. There is probably little that nurses can do to reduce this source of strain. (2) The hospital has two lines of authority, administrative and medical, unlike most large-scale organizations which have only one. Nurses are in the former while doctors are in the latter hierarchy. The "influence relationship" between nurses and doctors is largely unarticulated; informally "negotiated" patterns prevail. Nurses can be more aggressive in attempting to develop institutional patterns that are mutually satisfactory to themselves and to doctors and that meet the needs of the hospital as a whole. (3) In the absence of a functioning health team nurses have assumed responsibility, without the requisite authority, for the coordination of patient care. Although this action is for the immediate benefit of patients nurses should realize that it also tends to retard the development of needed organizational changes in the hospital. Nurses generally accept the possibility of changing the personality structure of an individual. They should be

  7. Medical Doctors Perceptions of Genetically Modified Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Savas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Recombinant DNA and with similar technical changes made on genes or transferred isolated gene the living organisms have been named genetically modified organisms (GMOs. Thanks to advances in genetic technology, the advancement of enzyme and fermentation techniques result obtained by the use of GMOs in food industry products of genetically modified (GM foods are named. In this study, GM foods about the possible harmful effects have information and community advice on this matter to be medical doctors on this issue perceptions, knowledge, attitudes and behaviors aimed to measure.Material and Method: The study was made on including 200 medical doctors aged 23-65, 118 men (59%, 82 women (41%. In the statistical analysis based on the responses of medical doctors, against GM food risk perception, knowledge, attitudes and behaviors were assessed. Results: 80.5% of the participants’ think that GM foods are harmful. 22% of the participants were expressed that their knowledge are ‘’good’’ and ‘’very good’’ about GM food. While 38% of the participants use internet and 23.5% of the participants  use media, only 4.5% of the participants use medical schools as a source of sufficient information about GM foods. Discussion: While the risk perception of medical doctors about GM foods is high, the knowledge on this issue is observed low. Though the consumption and the prevelance of GM foods are increasing, medical doctors should have more information about this issue to enlighten and guide the community.

  8. Private medical education--the doctor's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Hamid, A K

    2000-08-01

    The Government's decision to drastically and speedily increase the number of doctors in the country needs to be reviewed. The standard and quality of health care does not depend on the number of doctors, but on the improvement of the health care infrastructure. Increasing the number of government medical schools and increasing the intake of students should be done on a need-to basis, with the above perspective in mind. The selection criteria of candidates must not be compromised and the teaching staff must be adequate and experienced. The number of doctors should be gradually increased over the years in tandem with the development of the health care infrastructure and the deployment of doctors must be directed at providing equitable care to the people at all economic levels and geographic locations. The strength of academic staff in existing government medical schools must be upgraded to provide high level of teaching and research, perhaps reinforced with the recruitment of suitably qualified and experienced foreign teachers. The infrastructure of existing government medical schools must be upgraded to cater for the gradual increasing demand for more doctors as the country develops. The selection of candidates for the government medical schools must be based on merit and without undue emphasis on ethnic considerations, for it is only in the arena of fair competitiveness that excellence can be born. The considerations of merit in selection must include assessment of attitude, self-development, moral ethics and reasoning. If the above perspectives are fully appreciated, then there is really no requirement for private medical colleges in Malaysia.

  9. North Korean refugee doctors' preliminary examination scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Uk Chae

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Although there have been studies emphasizing the re-education of North Korean (NK doctors for post-unification of the Korean Peninsula, study on the content and scope of such re-education has yet to be conducted. Researchers intended to set the content and scope of re-education by a comparative analysis for the scores of the preliminary examination, which is comparable to the Korean Medical Licensing Examination (KMLE. Methods The scores of the first and second preliminary exams were analyzed by subject using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The passing status of the group of NK doctors for KMLE in recent 3 years were investigated. The multiple-choice-question (MCQ items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of South Korean (SK medical students by two times of the standard deviation of the scores of SK medical students were selected to investigate the relevant reasons. Results The average scores of nearly all subjects were improved in the second exam compared with the first exam. The passing rate of the group of NK doctors was 75%. The number of MCQ items of which difficulty indexes of NK doctors were lower than those of SK medical students was 51 (6.38%. NK doctors’ lack of understandings for Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures, Therapeutics, Prenatal Care, and Managed Care Programs was suggested as the possible reason. Conclusion The education of integrated courses focusing on Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures and Therapeutics, and apprenticeship-style training for clinical practice of core subjects are needed. Special lectures on the Preventive Medicine are likely to be required also.

  10. Communication with Your Family and Your Doctor about Your Wishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SUBSCRIBE Be Prepared Share this! Home » Be Prepared Communication With Your Family And Your Doctor About Your ... and address these difficult questions: 1. Why is communication with your family and doctor so important? Talking ...

  11. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Kaposi Sarcoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Kaposi Sarcoma? Kaposi Sarcoma Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Kaposi Sarcoma? As you cope with Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and ...

  12. Weight-loss surgery - after - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric bypass - after - what to ask your doctor; Roux-en-Y gastric bypass - after - what to ask your doctor; Gastric banding - ... stomach? If I am throwing up? What extra vitamins or minerals I will need to take? Will ...

  13. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Thymus Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Thymus Cancer? It’s important to have frank, open discussions ... Ask Your Doctor About Thymus Cancer? More In Thymus Cancer About Thymus Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  14. Although Relatively Few, "Doctor Shoppers" Skew Opioid Prescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Opioid Prescribing Although Relatively Few, “Doctor Shoppers” Skew Opioid Prescribing Email Facebook Twitter May 27, 2014 One ... patterns and alert both physicians and pharmacies. Extreme Opioid Purchasers Figure 1. Prescriber Utilization Distinguishes Likely “Doctor ...

  15. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Stomach Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Stomach Cancer? As you cope with cancer and cancer ... Ask Your Doctor About Stomach Cancer? More In Stomach Cancer About Stomach Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  16. High blood pressure - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about high blood pressure; Hypertension - what to ask your doctor ... problems? What medicines am I taking to treat high blood pressure? Do they have any side effects? What should ...

  17. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding: Questions to Discuss with Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... delivered to your inbox ! When You Visit Your Doctor - Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding Questions to Discuss with Your Doctor: Do you have regular menstrual cycles? When was ...

  18. When You Visit Your Doctor: Irregular Menstrual Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... delivered to your inbox ! When You Visit Your Doctor - Irregular Menstrual Periods Irregular Menstrual Periods Updated: January ... Have you ever had difficulty getting pregnant? Your Doctor Might Examine the Following Body Structures or Functions: ...

  19. Doctors' Decision-Making Tool Could Cut Unnecessary Antibiotic Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Doctors' Decision-Making Tool Could Cut Unnecessary Antibiotic Use A drop of about 10 percent is ... for doctors may help reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics in children with respiratory tract infections and cough, ...

  20. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Ovarian Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Ovarian Cancer? It is important for you to have honest, ... Ask Your Doctor About Ovarian Cancer? More In Ovarian Cancer About Ovarian Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  1. A Doctor's Words Key to Whether Child Gets HPV Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Doctor's Words Key to Whether Child Gets HPV Vaccine Parents most receptive to messages about the shot's ... language doctors use when recommending the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine can influence whether parents will have their children ...

  2. Refractive eye surgery - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about refractive eye surgery; Nearsightedness surgery - what to ask your doctor; LASIK - what to ... Will this surgery help my type of vision problem? Will I still need glasses or contact lenses after the surgery? Will ...

  3. Through doctors' eyes: A qualitative study of hospital doctor perspectives on their working conditions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGowan, Yvonne

    2013-03-11

    BACKGROUND: Hospital doctors face significant challenges in the current health care environment, working with staff shortages and cutbacks to health care expenditure, alongside increased demand for health care and increased public expectations. OBJECTIVE: This article analyses challenges faced by junior hospital doctors, providing insight into the experiences of these frontline staff in delivering health services in recessionary times. DESIGN: A qualitative methodology was chosen. METHODS: Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 doctors from urban Irish hospitals. Interviews were recorded via note taking. Full transcripts were analysed thematically using NVivo software. RESULTS: Dominant themes included the following: (1) unrealistic workloads: characterised by staff shortages, extended working hours, irregular and frequently interrupted breaks; (2) fatigue and its impact: the quality of care provided to patients while doctors were sleep-deprived was questioned; however, little reflection was given to any impact this may have had on junior doctors own health; (3) undervalued and disillusioned: insufficient training, intensive workloads and a perceived lack of power to influence change resulted in a sense of detachment among junior doctors. They appeared immune to their surroundings. CONCLUSION: Respondents ascribed little importance to the impact of current working conditions on their own health. They felt their roles were underappreciated and undervalued by policy makers and hospital management. Respondents were concerned with the lack of time and opportunity for training. This study highlighted several \\'red flags\\

  4. Arab doctors, evolving society and corruption: a medical student's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Yassar

    2015-01-01

    Doctors, especially junior doctors, face immense pressure in their day-to-day work. As a result, the rates of depression and anxiety are particularly high in this demanding profession. The pressure, which is compounded by constantly being under societal scrutiny, can unfortunately drive the doctor to breaking point. However, we can help doctors deal with these pressures in a more meaningful way if we make them aware of their wider environment (within a social paradigm) and the implications of their actions.

  5. Surgical Treatment of Calcaneal Spur.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Sarmiento Sánchez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain in the plantar region of the heel is technically known as talalgia, and it is a very frequent complaint in the orthopaedic service in Guyana. Due to its frequent mortality, the current investigation was carried out. Objectives: To characterize the application of the surgical treatment to a group of patients in Guyana. Method: 70 patients surgically treated were studied presenting rebel talalgia with no responses to the conservative treatment. Age, sex, race, educational level, antibiotic prophylaxis, final outcomes, and patient's satisfaction with the treatment were the set of variables selected. Results: High morbidity of the heel pain syndrome was evidenced in this studied. The most frequent cause was the calcaneal spur. There is predominance in female Indian race. The high influenced of the socio-cultural factor in the genesis of this disease is proved as well as the impossibility of carrying out the conservative treatment due to high cost of medications. Conclusions: The efficacy achieved with combined treatment technique allowed the results obtained. All this contributed to achieve high satisfaction levels.

  6. Consumption of psychiatric drugs by patients of medical and surgical clinics in a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Hiroshi Shirama

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSES: to identify the prevalence of the use of psychiatric drugs among patients admitted to medical and surgical clinics of a general hospital, and also the factors related to the consumption of this type of medication. METHOD: this is a transversal, descriptive, correlational study with quantitative analysis. For the collection of data, there was use of structured interviews and also reference to medical files. RESULTS: there was confirmation of a high prevalence of users of psychiatric drugs, which was associated to the female sex, to people who do not practice Roman Catholicism, and admittance to the clinic not covered by the Single Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS, as well as the presence of common mental disorders. Benzodiazepine drugs were the most commonly used psychiatric drugs. Among the total number of users, there has been the identification of patients who were not aware that they were receiving such medication. Doctors who are not psychiatrists were responsible for most prescriptions of psychiatric drugs. CONCLUSIONS: this signals the need to prepare health professionals to deal with psychological and social problems commonly found in clinical practice, in order to promote the rational use of psychiatric drugs.

  7. Surgical ethics: surgical virtue and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercler, Christian J

    2015-01-01

    The encounter between a patient and her surgeon is unique for several reasons. The surgeon inflicts pain upon a patient for the patient's own good. An operative intervention is irreducibly personal, such that the decisions about and performance of operations are inseparable from the idiosyncrasies of the individual surgeon. Furthermore, there is a chasm of knowledge between the patient and surgeon that is difficult to cross. Hence, training in the discipline of surgery includes the inculcation of certain virtues and practices to safeguard against abuses of this relationship and to make sure that the best interests of the patient are prioritized. The stories in this issue are evidence that in contemporary practice this is not quite enough, as surgeons reflect on instances they felt were ethically challenging. Common themes include the difficulty in communicating surgical uncertainty, patient-surgeon relationships, ethical issues in surgical training, and the impact of the technological imperative on caring for dying patients.

  8. Multiscale Surgical Telerobots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, R R; Seward, K P; Benett, W J; Tendick, F; Bentley, L; Stephan, P L

    2002-01-23

    A project was undertaken to improve robotic surgical tools for telerobotic minimally invasive surgery. The major objectives were to reduce the size of the tools to permit new surgical procedures in confined spaces such as the heart and to improve control of surgical tools by locating positional sensors and actuators at the end effector rather than external to the patient as is currently the state of the technology. A new compact end-effector with wrist-like flexibility was designed. Positional sensors based on MEMS microfabrication techniques were designed.

  9. Barefoot-Doctors. Occasional Paper No. 77-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Joel

    A description of "barefoot doctors" in the People's Republic of China is presented. These peasant doctors are commune workers who have taken basic courses in medical treatment. Because 80% of the population lives in a rural agricultural setting, and because most doctors and medical services are located in cities, there is a serious need…

  10. Who are the job seekers? : Explaining unemployment among doctoral recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yerkes, M.; Van de Schoot, R.; Sonneveld, H.

    2012-01-01

    Despite increased attention for doctoral education in recent years, one particular phenomenon has received little attention—the unemployment of doctoral candidates following graduation. While the unemployment of doctoral recipients is relatively low in comparison to the general popula-tion, the

  11. Going for the Gold Tassel: Getting a Doctoral Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Clark A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to explain the constructs of doctrine and doctorate to the fire service. The methodology applied the Carnegie Foundation review of the doctorate as the basics for explaining what stewards of the fire service discipline will do with a doctoral degree. Although the fire service is an interdisciplinary occupation, the…

  12. Opinion of doctors about unmet needs of rural diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Dixit

    2016-02-01

    Results: All the doctors who were involved in the study had different opinion. MBBS doctors are more aware than BHMS/BAMS/BUMS doctors about the minimum degree required doing a diabetic practice legally in India. Both the group of doctors believed that the needs of diabetic population in rural India are not properly addressed; the reason behind this was lack of qualified doctors (according to majority of BHMS/BAMS/BUMS doctors and lack of awareness among the rural patients (according to MBBS doctors. Both the doctors believe that MBBS doctors with some fellowship courses in diabetes can manage diabetes effectively (except serious complications. Conclusions: Both the doctors believe that MBBS doctors with some fellowship courses in diabetes can manage diabetes effectively (except serious complications. In India only MD (general medicine and endocrinologists are technically qualified to treat diabetes. MCI should come forward and recognize the fellowship courses by regularizing them with proper guidelines and protocol set up for the institution providing such courses and allow those doctors to practice in rural areas, so that diabetics' needs are addressed properly. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(1.000: 116-120

  13. Doctoral Dissertation Defences: Performing Ambiguity between Ceremony and Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, Arjen; Rufas, Alix; Supper, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Dissertation defenses are ambiguous affairs, which mark both the end of a long process of doctoral education and the inauguration of a doctoral candidate into a body of experts. At Maastricht University (and other Dutch universities), the decision to award a doctoral degree is made on the basis of t

  14. Studying Doctoral Education: Using Activity Theory to Shape Methodological Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Catherine; Jazvac-Martek, Marian; McAlpine, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    The study reported here, one part of a larger study on doctoral education, describes a pilot study that used Activity Theory to shape a methodological tool for better understanding the tensions inherent in the doctoral experience. As doctoral students may function within a range of activity systems, we designed data collection protocols based on…

  15. Focusing on Doctoral Students' Experiences of Engagement in Thesis Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekkaila, Jenna; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Lonka, Kirsti

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about what inspires students to be involved in their doctoral process and stay persistent when facing challenges. This study explored the nature of students' engagement in the doctoral work. Altogether, 21 behavioural sciences doctoral students from one top-level research community were interviewed. The interview data were…

  16. One University's Approach to Defining and Supporting Professional Doctorates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    The changing market for doctorally prepared workers led one institution to examine its overall approach to defining and supporting professional doctorates. After a review of existing scholarship and internal practices, a white paper was created to capture the various ways that these degrees can be distinguished from the academic doctorate (PhD) at…

  17. Ear tube surgery - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about ear tube surgery; Tympanostomy - what to ask your doctor; Myringotomy - what to ask your doctor ... Why does my child need ear tubes? Can we try other treatments? What are the risks of the surgery? Is it safe to wait before getting ear ...

  18. Looking Back at Doctoral Education in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Chaya

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a quantitative picture of doctoral education in South Africa up to 2010, from the time the first doctorate was awarded in 1899. It identifies the different institutional profiles and emphases of doctoral graduation in South African universities at various periods of time in the context of economic, political and social…

  19. Prevalence of burnout syndrome in intensivist doctors in five Brazilian capitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tironi, Márcia Oliveira Staffa; Teles, José Mário Meira; Barros, Dalton de Souza; Vieira, Débora Feijó Villas Bôas; Silva Filho, Colbert Martins da; Martins Júnior, Davi Felix; Matos, Marcos Almeida; Nascimento Sobrinho, Carlito Lopes

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the prevalence of burnout in intensivist doctors working in adult, pediatric and neonatal intensive care units in five Brazilian capitals. Descriptive epidemiological study with a random sample stratified by conglomerate with 180 intensivist doctors from five capitals representing the Brazilian geographic regions: Porto Alegre (RS), Sao Paulo (SP), Salvador (BA), Goiania (GO) and Belem (PA). A self-administered questionnaire examining sociodemographic data and the level of burnout was evaluated through the Maslach Burnout Inventory. A total of 180 doctors were evaluated, of which 54.4% were female. The average age was 39 ± 8.1 years, 63.4% had specialization as the highest degree, 55.7% had up to 10 years of work experience in an intensive care unit, and 46.1% had the title intensive care specialist. Most (50.3%) had weekly workloads between 49 and 72 hours, and the most frequent employee type was salaried. High levels of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and inefficacy were found (50.6%, 26.1% and 15.0%, respectively). The prevalence of burnout was 61.7% when considering a high level in at least one dimension and 5% with a high level in three dimensions simultaneously. A high prevalence of burnout syndrome among intensivist doctors was observed. Strategies for the promotion and protection of health in these workers must be discussed and implemented in hospitals.

  20. Prevalence of burnout syndrome in intensivist doctors in five Brazilian capitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tironi, Márcia Oliveira Staffa; Teles, José Mário Meira; Barros, Dalton de Souza; Vieira, Débora Feijó Villas Bôas; da Silva Filho, Colbert Martins; Martins Júnior, Davi Felix; Matos, Marcos Almeida; Nascimento Sobrinho, Carlito Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of burnout in intensivist doctors working in adult, pediatric and neonatal intensive care units in five Brazilian capitals. Methods Descriptive epidemiological study with a random sample stratified by conglomerate with 180 intensivist doctors from five capitals representing the Brazilian geographic regions: Porto Alegre (RS), Sao Paulo (SP), Salvador (BA), Goiania (GO) and Belem (PA). A self-administered questionnaire examining sociodemographic data and the level of burnout was evaluated through the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Results A total of 180 doctors were evaluated, of which 54.4% were female. The average age was 39 ± 8.1 years, 63.4% had specialization as the highest degree, 55.7% had up to 10 years of work experience in an intensive care unit, and 46.1% had the title intensive care specialist. Most (50.3%) had weekly workloads between 49 and 72 hours, and the most frequent employee type was salaried. High levels of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and inefficacy were found (50.6%, 26.1% and 15.0%, respectively). The prevalence of burnout was 61.7% when considering a high level in at least one dimension and 5% with a high level in three dimensions simultaneously. Conclusion A high prevalence of burnout syndrome among intensivist doctors was observed. Strategies for the promotion and protection of health in these workers must be discussed and implemented in hospitals. PMID:27737426

  1. Surgical treatment for complex acetabular fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qiang; WU Dou; LI Ping; HAN Shu-feng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of surgical treatment on complex acetabular fractures.Methods: The data of 46 patients (38 males and 8 females, aged 16-75 years, mean = 38. 5 years ) with complex acetabular fractures, who were admitted to our hospital from January 1998 to December 2005, were analyzed retrospectively in this study. According to Letournel rules, posterior wall and posterior column fractures were found in 11 patients, transverse and posterior wall fractures in 13, T-type fracture in 4, both columns fracture in 10, and anterior column and posterior transverse fracture in 8. The choice of surgical approach was based on the individual fractures, which included ilioinguinal approach in 5 patients, Kocher-Langenbech approach in 7, combined approach in 26, and extended iliofemoral approach in 8.Results: All the patients were followed up for 3.5 years averagely. The clinical outcomes were analyzed with Harris hip score and radiography. In 36 patients (78.3%), the surgical procedure was successful (Harris hip score > 80 points). The rate of excellent and good was about 86 %.Conclusions: The keys to increase the effectiveness of surgical treatment on acetabular fractures are correct preoperative classification of factures and choices of appropriate surgical approach and time.

  2. Importance of Ethics in Surgical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedat Menderes Özçiftçi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The field of ethics, also called moral philosophy, involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong behavior. Ethics is an established system of moral principles that govern the rules of conduct. Medical ethics define what the physician ought to do and how he or she should behave. Some of us may think that ethics are unimportant in surgery, however, we should be aware that surgeons operate daily in the theater of moral choice. Ethical considerations, such as diagnosis and treatment, are essential features of the surgical care for each patient (1. Surgeons working in surgical units increasingly face ethical problems owing to growth in scientific knowledge and technology, and the availability of new diagnostic equipment and treatment opportunities. The applications become more complex and the decisions more difficult as advancing technology provides greater opportunities to save lives and relieve pain and suffering. More and more surgical procedures are now carried out in older patients who have multiple and more serious diseases than ever before (2. Doctors often face with ethical dilemmas related to providing care that maintains patients’ dignity while attending their advanced medical treatment. Organizational and financial constraints in hospitals, and professional relationships with colleagues and other healthcare providers also create ethical problems for surgeons as they try to act appropriately towards patients and relatives (3. Studies have shown, however, that physicians often are in doubt about the best and correct actions to take for the patients in specific situations (2-4. In fact, the majority of surgeons with little or no education in bioethics face many ethical challenges in daily practice. The overall aim of this article was to analyze surgeons’ experiences of living with ethical difficulties in their work, and highlight the importance of ethical requirements in surgical practice.

  3. Guide to Surgical Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have expertise in the following areas of responsibility: neonatal surgery (specialized knowledge in the surgical repair of ... and non-operative management of certain types of pain. Common conditions managed by neurologic surgeons include disorders ...

  4. Surgical Critical Care Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Surgical Critical Care Initiative (SC2i) is a USU research program established in October 2013 to develop, translate, and validate biology-driven critical care....

  5. Ambulatory Surgical Measures - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Ambulatory Surgical Center Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program seeks to make care safer and more efficient through quality reporting. ASCs eligible for this...

  6. Ambulatory Surgical Measures - Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Ambulatory Surgical Center Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program seeks to make care safer and more efficient through quality reporting. ASCs eligible for this...

  7. Surgical site infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and mortality as well as significant financial implications. Worldwide it has ... common nosocomial infection amongst surgical patients with up to 38% .... antibiotics as soon as the sensitivity results are available. ... Breast surgery. Staph Aureus/ ...

  8. The UCLA surgical approach to sphincteric incontinence in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, E S; Ginsberg, D A; Raz, S

    1997-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in the female may be treated by a variety of non-surgical and surgical therapies. However, once the patient has chosen to undergo operative repair the ideal procedure is based on three considerations: the degree of anterior vaginal wall prolapse, the degree of incontinence and associated anatomic abnormalities requiring surgical repair. In the vast majority of cases vaginal wall sling is our procedure of choice for the surgical treatment of SUI in the female. Vaginal wall sling is based on sound anatomic principles, may be performed as an outpatient procedure and is equally efficacious for the treatment of SUI due to anatomic incontinence (urethral hypermobility) and intrinsic sphincter deficiency. Since vaginal wall sling is performed through a transvaginal approach, other associated manifestations of pelvic floor prolapse such as rectocele can be addressed and repaired simultaneously. When necessary the vaginal wall sling can be easily modified to repair large grade cystoceles.

  9. [Evaluation of efficacy of selected antiseptics for hands disinfection before surgical procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leksowski, K; Jasiński, A; Marszałek, A

    2001-08-01

    The most important in surgical hands washing and disinfections is long-term and effective reduction of bacteria number. The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of some antiseptic fluids used for surgical hands disinfection's (AHD 2000, Biotensid, Manopronto and Medi-Scrub PVP Iodine). 62 doctors and surgical nurses were examined. The material for the bacteriological examination was collected before and after hands disinfection's. The bacterial flora reduction have been presented as a percent and a logarithmic reduction ratio. All estimated antiseptic fluids were very potent and provided prolonged efficiency when the operation team complied with orders of hands washing.

  10. Coaching Doctoral Students--A Means to Enhance Progress and Support Self-Organisation in Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godskesen, Mirjam; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students' sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed-methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation of a project on coaching doctoral students. We…

  11. Why family doctors should not advertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, J T

    1988-12-01

    Medical care is a form of production of values, but not of commodities. This article argues that advertising as it is normally understood is not appropriate to general practitioner care. Acceptance of advertising by the medical profession would assist in the commercialization of a currently non-commercial relationship between doctors and patients. We should refuse to take this step and accept our responsibility to devise better futures than the market has so far been able to provide.

  12. Are Danish doctors comfortable teaching in English?

    OpenAIRE

    Nilas, L; Løkkegaard, E. C.; Laursen, J. B.; Kling, J.; Cortes, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background From 2012–2015, the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of Pediatrics at the University of Copenhagen conducted a project, “Internationalization at Home ”, offering clinical teaching in English. The project allowed international students to work with Danish speaking students in a clinical setting. Using semi-quantitative questionnaires to 89 clinicians about use of English and need for training, this paper considers if Danish clinical doctors are prepared to teach in Engli...

  13. The role of the infection control doctor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daschner, F D

    1988-02-01

    The ideal infection control doctor would be a combination of an infectious disease specialist, microbiologist, epidemiologist, social worker, psychologist, teacher, researcher, antibiotic therapy specialist, policeman, priest, supervisor for housekeeping, architect, partner for the infection control nurse, and who should combine the qualities of Mary Poppins, Sherlock Holmes, Francis von Assisi and Margaret Thatcher. A new role is that of a specialist in environmental pollution by detergents, disinfectants and certain disposables.

  14. Family doctors' involvement with families in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lember Margus

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family doctors should care for individuals in the context of their family. Family has a powerful influence on health and illness and family interventions have been shown to improve health outcomes for a variety of health problems. The aim of the study was to investigate the Estonian family doctors' (FD attitudes to the patients' family-related issues in their work: to explore the degree of FDs involvement in family matters, their preparedness for management of family-related issues and their self-assessment of the ability to manage different family-related problems. Methods A random sample (n = 236 of all FDs in Estonia was investigated using a postal questionnaire. Altogether 151 FDs responded to the questionnaire (response rate 64%, while five of them were excluded as they did not actually work as FDs. Results Of the respondents, 90% thought that in managing the health problems of patients FDs should communicate and cooperate with family members. Although most of the family doctors agreed that modifying of the health damaging risk factors (smoking, alcohol and drug abuse of their patients and families is their task, one third of them felt that dealing with these problems is ineffective, or perceived themselves as poorly prepared or having too little time for such activities. Of the respondents, 58% (n = 83 were of the opinion that they could modify also relationship problems. Conclusions Estonian family doctors are favourably disposed to involvement in family-related problems, however, they need some additional training, especially in the field of relationship management.

  15. Woman Doctor Declares War Against Hemophilia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    DANGERS of hereditary diseases are hidden in the complicated process by which life is formed. There are many who work hard to save lives and fight against such misfortune. And Doctor Zhao Cuilan is one such soldier who has chosen hemophilia as her battlefield. Hemophilia is a hereditary disease characterized by the inability of the patient’s blood to clot. When a person lacks the substance that causes blood clotting, he can bleed to death. In the

  16. The Dual Role of NFL Team Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Marvin

    2016-11-01

    Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch, and Christopher Deubert are right in their article "A Proposal to Address NFL Club Doctors' Conflicts of Interest and to Promote Player Trust" that the problem with the medical care rendered to National Football League players is not that the doctors are bad, but that the system in which they provide care is structured badly. We saw some of the problems this system causes last season in what happened to Case Kenum, a quarterback for the Los Angeles Rams who, despite having a possible concussion from a game injury, was allowed to continue to play, with a concussion spotter in the booth and coaches, teammates, seven game officials, and two full training staffs present. From my experience playing in the league from 1989 to 1999, I do not believe that you can eliminate the conflict of interest completely, but I think it can be limited to the point that it does not harm the player. As the structure is now, with the team paying the club doctor, it is impossible to put the players' health and well-being before the team's on-field priorities. © 2016 The Hastings Center.

  17. Doctors and torture: the police surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burges, S H

    1980-09-01

    Much has been written by many distinguished persons about the philosophical, religious and ethical considerations of doctors and their involvement with torture. What follows will not have the erudition or authority of the likes of St Augustine, Mahatma Gandi, Schopenhauer or Thomas Paine. It represents the views of a very ordinary person; a presumption defended by the submission that many very ordinary persons have been, and will be, instruments for effecting, assisting or condoning the physical or mental anguish of others. As practitioners of medicine, we are particularly vulnerable, since our particular knowledge and our privileged position may be so easily abused--to the detriment of others. Those of us who practice clinical forensic medicine have even greater responsibility by virtue of our daily contact with the enforcement of law, criminal procedure, and the machinations of the judiciary. We are thus particularly well placed to monitor, encourage or discourage the occurrence of evil practices within the community. It is imperative, therefore, that the ordinary doctor should be cognisant of, and be party to, a code of conduct formulated by his peers and having reference to his obligations as a citizen, and doctor, and to his ability to manipulate human activity. Forensic physicians have further discretionary powers as arbiters in the marriage of the art and ethics of healing with the principles and practice of justice.

  18. Training Doctors for Person-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Jeannine

    2016-03-01

    Person-centered care, in which an individual patient's goals and preferences are treated as paramount, should be the standard throughout the nation. Achieving this ideal will require a change in the culture of health care, and medical schools can play a vital role in helping achieve it. Lack of communication, uncoordinated services, and dealings with sometimes-aloof clinicians and staff all can increase stress and undermine a person's sense of well-being. In a person-centered system, such experiences would be much less common. The cultural shift starts with the idea of "engaging the consumer" rather than "treating the patient." Such engagement requires honoring individuality. The doctor may have a certain way of doing things. But people vary enormously in their values and priorities. They have different goals, different thresholds of pain, different anxieties, different needs for support, different backgrounds, and different resources to draw on. Individuals should feel empowered, aware of their choices, and connected to their health care providers through meaningful communication and understanding. They deserve to feel that their personal dignity and their wishes are a top priority. They should be made to feel that they, along with their caregivers, are members of the care team. This change will benefit not only patients and families but doctors as well. Doctors will benefit from more insight into the individuals they serve, their interactions with consumers and caregivers will be more positive, and the quality of care will improve.

  19. Why are junior doctors reluctant to consult attending physicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, Otto H

    2010-03-01

    A physician performs two tasks: making diagnoses and determining treatments. To reduce medical error, junior doctors are supposed to consult their supervisors when they face uncommon circumstances. However, recent research shows that junior doctors are reluctant to do so. This paper presents a model that explains (i) which junior doctors shy away from consulting; (ii) when junior doctors are reluctant; (iii) the importance of protocols in the medical sector; and (iv) when consulting is a sign of strength or a sign of weakness. Furthermore, I show that encouraging junior doctors to consult by investigating mishaps leads to another distortion: they will give too much weight to own assessments.

  20. Factors associated with doctors' knowledge on antibiotic use in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yu; Wang, Sijie; Yin, Xiaoxv; Bai, Jigeng; Gong, Yanhong; Lu, Zuxun

    2016-03-24

    Misuse of antibiotics by the medical profession is a global concern. Examining doctors' knowledge about antimicrobials will be important in developing strategies to improve antibiotic use. The aim of the study was to survey Chinese doctors' knowledge on antibiotics and reveal the factors associated with their level of knowledge. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Shanxi in central China. A total of 761 physicians were surveyed using a structured self-administered questionnaire. A generalized linear regression model was used to identify the factors associated with doctors' knowledge on antibiotic. Based on a full score of 10, the average score for doctors' knowledge on antibiotics was 6.29 (SD = 1.79). Generalized linear regression analysis indicated that doctors who either worked in the internal medicine department, who were chief doctors or who received continuing education on antibiotic, had better knowledge of antibiotics. Compared with doctors working in tertiary hospitals, doctors working in secondary hospitals or primary healthcare facilities had poorer knowledge about antibiotics. Chinese doctors have suboptimal knowledge about antimicrobials. Ongoing education is effective to enhance doctors' knowledge, but the effect remains to be further improved. More targeted interventions and education programs should improve knowledge about antimicrobials, especially for doctors working in primary healthcare institutions.

  1. The Application of Conversational Implicature in Doctor-Patient Conversation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chong

    2014-01-01

    The doctor-patient conversation is the major way of communication between doctors and patients. A good conversa-tion helps to construct a harmonious doctor-patient relationship. This paper attempts to analyze the doctor-patient conversation by applying the Theory of Conversational Implicature. The theory is accepted as the cooperative principle consisting of four max-ims:quantity, quality, relation, manner. This paper will analyse how the four maxims work and the violating of the maxims in the doctor-patient conversation. Through linguistic study of the conversation, we try to find out the problems in the doctor-patient conversation and to provide some directive linguistic suggestions to doctors and patients.

  2. Physicians' perceptions of doctor shopping in West Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, E Gail; Moss, Alvin H

    2010-01-01

    Prescription drug abuse and diversion continue to be serious problems in West Virginia and nationwide. Doctor shopping (visiting multiple doctors in a short time frame with the intent to deceive them to obtain controlled substances) is illegal and one way that patients gain access to prescription drugs. We surveyed West Virginia physicians in emergency medicine, family medicine, and internal medicine to determine their experience with and attitudes toward doctor shopping, and to assess attitudes toward proposed legislation to protect physicians who report doctor shoppers to law enforcement officials. Of 452 physicians surveyed, 258 responded (57%). Emergency medicine physicians had the highest response rate (61%) and most frequent encounters (once a week or more often) with doctor shoppers compared to family medicine and internal medicine physicians (88% vs 25% vs 14%, P doctor shoppers. If the law protected them, 85 percent of all physicians reported they would be likely to report doctor shoppers.

  3. The complex thinking and prospect of actions of future doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Segtowich

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at discussing prospects of actions manifested by future doctors in the beginning of their doctoral training. The research started through my involvement in the ambit of doctoral education in the curriculum component Epistemological Basis of Research on Education in Science and Mathematics, offered in the Postgraduate Course in Science and Mathematics Education, at Federal University of Pori (UFPA in 2010 academic year. At these meetings, the teachers trainers requested the doctoral students, in pairs, to elaborate three questions about the following positioning: "HOW DO I SEE MYSELF AS A DOCTOR?" These questions were discussed by all the doctoral students and subsequently reduced to five to be answered by all individually. The responses to this questionnaire provided the data for this research. The answers revealed that doctoral students are not tied to methodologies or unique processes, this positioning being demonstrated through prospects of performance in ways that were diverse and interactive

  4. Contextual dynamics in clinical workplaces: learning from doctor-doctor consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimmer, Christoph; Pachler, Norbert; Genewein, Urs

    2013-05-01

    Some studies have explored the role of learning context in clerkships and in clinical teams. Very little is known, however, about the relationship between context and competence development in more loosely framed, day-to-day practices such as doctor-doctor consultations, although such interactions are frequent and typical in clinical work. To address this gap in the literature, a study was conducted using semi-structured interviews in four different hospitals and participant observation at one site. Inductive content analysis was used to develop a framework. Special reference was made to the principles of situated cognition. The framework illustrates how different situational, personal and organisational factors interact in every learning situation. The interplay manifests in three different roles that doctors assume in highly dynamic ways: doctors learn as 'actors' (being responsible), as 'participants' (being involved) and as 'students' (being taught); contextual influences also impact on the quality of learning within these roles. The findings add to the current literature on clinical workplace learning and to the conceptualisation of context in the field of education. The practical contribution of the research lies in disentangling the complex dynamics of learning in clinical environments and in helping doctors and medical educators to increase their responsiveness to contextual factors. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2013.

  5. Factors associated with less-than-full-time working in medical practice: results of surveys of five cohorts of UK doctors, 10 years after graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachish, Shelly; Svirko, Elena; Goldacre, Michael J; Lambert, Trevor

    2016-10-13

    The greater participation of women in medicine in recent years, and recent trends showing that doctors of both sexes work fewer hours than in the past, present challenges for medical workforce planning. In this study, we provide a detailed analysis of the characteristics of doctors who choose to work less-than-full-time (LTFT). We aimed to determine the influence of these characteristics on the probability of working LTFT. We used data on working patterns obtained from long-term surveys of 10,866 UK-trained doctors. We analysed working patterns at 10 years post-graduation for doctors of five graduating cohorts, 1993, 1996, 1999, 2000 and 2002 (i.e. in the years 2003, 2006, 2009, 2010 and 2012, respectively). We used multivariable binary logistic regression models to examine the influence of a number of personal and professional characteristics on the likelihood of working LTFT in male and female doctors. Across all cohorts, 42 % of women and 7 % of men worked LTFT. For female doctors, having children significantly increased the likelihood of working LTFT, with greater effects observed for greater numbers of children and for female doctors in non-primary care specialties (non-GPs). While >40 % of female GPs with children worked LTFT, only 10 % of female surgeons with children did so. Conversely, the presence of children had no effect on male working patterns. Living with a partner increased the odds of LTFT working in women doctors, but decreased the odds of LTFT working in men (independently of children). Women without children were no more likely to work LTFT than were men (with or without children). For both women and men, the highest rates of LTFT working were observed among GPs (~10 and 6 times greater than non-GPs, respectively), and among those not in training or senior positions. Family circumstances (children and partner status) affect the working patterns of women and men differently, but both sexes respond similarly to the constraints of their

  6. How To Talk to Your Doctor (and Get Your Doctor To Talk to You!). An Educational Workshop on Doctor Patient Communication = Como Hablarle a su Doctor (iY que su doctor le hable a usted!). Un seminario educativo sobre la comunicacion entre el doctor y el paciente.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX.

    This workshop, written in both English and Spanish, focuses on improving communication between physician and patient. In the workshop, the trainers will talk about "building bridges" between patient and doctor by understanding the doctor's role and his/her duty to the patient. According to the workshop, a person's doctor should…

  7. Normal Female Reproductive Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x756 ... Large: 3000x3150 View Download Title: Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the female reproductive system; drawing ...

  8. A UK perspective on smartphone use amongst doctors within the surgical profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikesh K. Patel

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Online resources contribute significantly to clinical activities with the majority of smartphone users willing to use their own device. The information gathered from this study can aid developers to create software dedicated to the smartphone operating systems in greatest use and to potentially increase the use of a bring your own device (BYOD scheme.

  9. Rural doctor recruitment: does medical education in rural districts recruit doctors to rural areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, J H; Tollan, A

    1993-05-01

    The impact of the University of Tromsø Medical School on the distribution of doctors in rural areas in northern Norway was evaluated by a postal questionnaire. The survey covered 11 graduation years (417 doctors), and the response rate was 84.2%. The establishment of a new medical school in northern Norway has clearly had beneficial effects: a total of 56.1% of the graduates stay in these remote areas. Of those who also spent their youth in northern Norway the proportion is 82.0%, compared to graduates who lived in the southern parts of the country while growing up (37.7%). The results clearly demonstrate that one of the main goals for the Medical School at the University in Tromsø, to educate doctors who prefer to work in these rural areas, has been accomplished.

  10. Emotions and identity in the figured world of becoming a doctor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornan, Tim; Pearson, Emma; Carson, Peter; Helmich, Esther; Bundy, Christine

    2015-02-01

    There is little room in clerkship curricula for students to express emotions, particularly those associated with the development of a caring identity. Yet it is recognised that competence, alone, does not make a good doctor. We therefore set out to explore the relationship between emotions and identity in clerkship education. Our exploration was conceptually oriented towards Figured Worlds theory, which is linked to Bakhtin's theory of dialogism. Nine female and one male member of a mixed student cohort kept audio-diaries and participated in both semi-structured and cognitive individual interviews. The researchers identified 43 emotionally salient utterances in the dataset and subjected them to critical discourse analysis. They applied Figured Worlds constructs to within-case and cross-case analyses, supporting one another's reflexivity and openness to different interpretations, and constantly comparing their evolving interpretation against the complete set of transcripts. Students' emotions were closely related to their identity development in the world of medicine. Patients were disempowered by their illnesses. Doctors were powerful because they could treat those illnesses. Students expressed positive emotions when they were granted positions in the world of medicine and were able to identify with the figures of doctors or other health professionals. They identified with doctors who behaved in caring and professionally appropriate ways towards patients and supportively towards students. Students expressed negative emotions when they were unable to develop their identities. Critical discourse analysis has uncovered a link between students' emotions and their identity development in the powerful world of becoming and being a doctor. At present, identity development, emotions and power are mostly tacit in undergraduate clinical curricula. We speculate that helping students to express emotions and exercise power in the most effective ways might help them to develop

  11. 3D Surgical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  12. Anxiety in veterinary surgical students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langebæk, Rikke; Eika, Berit; Jensen, Asger Lundorff

    2012-01-01

    The surgical educational environment is potentially stressful and this can negatively affect students' learning. The aim of this study was to investigate whether veterinary students' level of anxiety is higher in a surgical course than in a non-surgical course and if pre-surgical training...... in a Surgical Skills Lab (SSL) has an anxiety reducing effect. Investigations were carried out as a comparative study and a parallel group study. Potential participants were fourth-year veterinary students who attended a surgical course (Basic Surgical Skills) and a non-surgical course (Clinical Examination...... and 28 students from 2010). Our results show that anxiety levels in veterinary students are significantly higher in a surgical course than in a non-surgical course (p...

  13. Preparing students to be doctors: introduction of a sub-internship program.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Robb, W B

    2011-04-05

    Preparing graduates for the transformation from medical student to doctor provides medical schools with a real challenge. Medical educators advocate a process of graduated delegation of responsibility in the clinical years of medical school. This is best exemplified in the North American system of sub-internship programmes; an educational approach which European medical schools have been slow to adopt. This study reports on the introduction of an intensive two-week surgical sub-internship for final medical year students. "Sub-interns" were asked to complete pre and post sub-internship online questionnaires assessing their readiness to perform clinical and practical skills, attitudes towards the program, and how well it prepared students for internship. Forty-nine students completed a questionnaire pre sub-internship and 47 completed the post-questionnaire. Student confidence towards practical and clinical skills and their first day at work increased over the two weeks. Mean Iikert scores for all 6 practical and clinical skills improved post sub-internship. The introduction of a surgical sub-internship is timely and welcomed by medical students. Its development helps bridge the gap in responsibilities between medical student and doctor.

  14. Perceived need and barriers to continuing professional development among doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenwilo, Divine; Skåtun, Diane

    2014-08-01

    There is growing need for continuing professional development (CPD) among doctors, especially following the recent introduction of compulsory revalidation for all doctors in the United Kingdom (UK). We use unique datasets from two national surveys of non-training grade doctors working in the National Health Service in Scotland to evaluate doctors' perceptions of need and barriers to CPD. We test for differences over time and also examine differences between doctor grades and for other characteristics such as gender, age, contract type and specialty. Doctors expressed the greatest need for CPD in clinical training, management, and information technology. In terms of perceived barriers to CPD, lack of time was expressed as a barrier by the largest proportion of doctors, as was insufficient clinical cover, lack of funding, and remoteness from main education centres. The strength of perceived need for particular CPD activities and the perceived barriers to CPD varied significantly by doctors' job and personal characteristics. An understanding of the perceived needs and barriers to CPD among doctors is an important precursor to developing effective educational and training programmes that cover their professional practice and also in supporting doctors towards successful revalidation.

  15. Surgical bleeding in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M. R.; Billica, R. D.; Johnston, S. L. 3rd

    1993-01-01

    A surgical procedure performed during space flight would occur in a unique microgravity environment. Several experiments performed during weightlessness in parabolic flight were reviewed to ascertain the behavior of surgical bleeding in microgravity. Simulations of bleeding using dyed fluid and citrated bovine blood, as well as actual arterial and venous bleeding in rabbits, were examined. The high surface tension property of blood promotes the formation of large fluid domes, which have a tendency to adhere to the wound. The use of sponges and suction will be adequate to prevent cabin atmosphere contamination with all bleeding, with the exception of temporary arterial droplet streams. The control of the bleeding with standard surgical techniques should not be difficult.

  16. Surgical management of presbyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torricelli AA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available André AM Torricelli, Jackson B Junior, Marcony R Santhiago, Samir J BecharaDivision of Ophthalmology, University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Presbyopia, the gradual loss of accommodation that becomes clinically significant during the fifth decade of life, is a physiologic inevitability. Different technologies are being pursued to achieve surgical correction of this disability; however, a number of limitations have prevented widespread acceptance of surgical presbyopia correction, such as optical and visual distortion, induced corneal ectasia, haze, anisometropy with monovision, regression of effect, decline in uncorrected distance vision, and the inherent risks with invasive techniques, limiting the development of an ideal solution. The correction of the presbyopia and the restoration of accommodation are considered the final frontier of refractive surgery. The purpose of this paper is to provide an update about current procedures available for presbyopia correction, their advantages, and disadvantages.Keywords: presbyopia, surgical correction, treatment

  17. Surgical management of spontaneous ruptured hepatocellular adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle Ribeiro Junior

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: Spontaneous ruptured hepatocellular adenoma (SRHA is a rare life-threatening condition that may require surgical treatment to control hemorrhaging and also stabilize the patient. We report a series of emergency surgeries performed at our institution for this condition. METHODS: We reviewed medical records and radiology files of 28 patients (from 1989 to 2006 with a proven diagnosis of hepatocellular adenoma (HA. Three (10.7% of 28 patients had spontaneous ruptured hepatocellular adenoma, two of which were associated with intrahepatic hemorrhage while one had intraperitoneal bleeding. Two patients were female and one was male. Both female patients had a background history of oral contraceptive use. Sudden abdominal pain associated with hemodynamic instability occurred in all patients who suffered from spontaneous ruptured hepatocellular adenoma. The mean age was 41.6 years old. The preoperative assessment included liver function tests, ultrasonography and computed tomography. RESULTS: The surgical approaches were as follows: right hemihepatectomy for controlling intraperitoneal bleeding, and right extended hepatectomy and non-anatomic resection of the liver for intrahepatic hemorrhage. There were no deaths, and the postoperative complications were bile leakage and wound infection (re-operation, as well as intraperitoneal abscess (re-operation and pleural effusion. CONCLUSION: Spontaneous ruptured hepatocellular adenoma may be treated by surgery for controlling hemorrhages and stabilizing the patient, and the decision to operate depends upon both the patient's condition and the expertise of the surgical team.

  18. 两种闭孔路径尿道中段悬吊术治疗女性压力性尿失禁的Meta分析%Inside-out versus transobturator-tape in the surgical management of female stress urinary incontinence: a meta-analysis of effectiveness and complications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周全; 宋岩峰; 罗龙华; 范水秀; 吴志芬

    2013-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness and safety of " inside-out" (TVT-O) vs." outside-in" transobturator-tape procedures (TOT) in the surgical management of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI).A total of 8 randomized controlled trials were retrieved from the literature and analyzed by metaanalysis with RevMan 5.0 software.Meta-analysis showed that no statistical differences existed in objective cure rate,objective failure,postoperative voiding dysfunction,groin/thigh pain and sling exposure in both procedures (P > 0.05).These preliminary results suggest there is no evidence of significant differences in the efficacy and safety between TVT-O and TOT.%采用RevMan 5.0软件,对1996年11月至2012年5月国内外正式刊载的8篇闭孔路径尿道中段悬吊术治疗女性压力性尿失禁的随机对照研究进行Meta分析,结果显示,“由外向内”闭孔路径吊带手术(TOT)对“由内向外”经闭孔吊带手术(TVT-O)的客观治愈率(RR=1.01,95% CI:0.96 ~ 1.06)、客观失败率(RR=0.99,95%CI:0.46~2.11)、术后排空障碍(RR =0.94,95% CI:0.56 ~ 1.57)、大腿内侧疼痛(RR =0.80,95% CI:0.53 ~ 1.20)及吊带暴露(RR =2.80,95% CI:0.97 ~8.14)发生率差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).提示两种手术治疗压力性尿失禁短期疗效和安全性相当.

  19. Investigating the influence of African American and African Caribbean race on primary care doctors' decision making about depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, A; Vail, L; Buckingham, C D; Kidd, J; Weich, S; Roter, D

    2014-09-01

    This paper explores differences in how primary care doctors process the clinical presentation of depression by African American and African-Caribbean patients compared with white patients in the US and the UK. The aim is to gain a better understanding of possible pathways by which racial disparities arise in depression care. One hundred and eight doctors described their thought processes after viewing video recorded simulated patients presenting with identical symptoms strongly suggestive of depression. These descriptions were analysed using the CliniClass system, which captures information about micro-components of clinical decision making and permits a systematic, structured and detailed analysis of how doctors arrive at diagnostic, intervention and management decisions. Video recordings of actors portraying black (both African American and African-Caribbean) and white (both White American and White British) male and female patients (aged 55 years and 75 years) were presented to doctors randomly selected from the Massachusetts Medical Society list and from Surrey/South West London and West Midlands National Health Service lists, stratified by country (US v.UK), gender, and years of clinical experience (less v. very experienced). Findings demonstrated little evidence of bias affecting doctors' decision making processes, with the exception of less attention being paid to the potential outcomes associated with different treatment options for African American compared with White American patients in the US. Instead, findings suggest greater clinical uncertainty in diagnosing depression amongst black compared with white patients, particularly in the UK. This was evident in more potential diagnoses. There was also a tendency for doctors in both countries to focus more on black patients' physical rather than psychological symptoms and to identify endocrine problems, most often diabetes, as a presenting complaint for them. This suggests that doctors in both countries

  20. Recordando al doctor Alberto Pradilla Ferreira

    OpenAIRE

    Mercedes de Onís; Beatriz Gracia

    2012-01-01

    Brillante, sencillo, reservado, amigo solidario, colega entusiasta, trabajador incansable, maestro. Adjetivos que abrigan el recuerdo de quien dejó un legado importante para la salud pública, la pediatría y la docencia en salud pública, centrado principalmente en la nutrición.Médico y Cirujano de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia (1956), el doctor Alberto Pradilla fue uno de los pocos médicos colombianos que además de su especialidad médica como pediatra, se formó en el área de nutrición.Se...

  1. Recordando al doctor Alberto Pradilla Ferreira

    OpenAIRE

    Mercedes de Onís; Beatriz Gracia

    2012-01-01

    Brillante, sencillo, reservado, amigo solidario, colega entusiasta, trabajador incansable, maestro. Adjetivos que abrigan el recuerdo de quien dejó un legado importante para la salud pública, la pediatría y la docencia en salud pública, centrado principalmente en la nutrición.Médico y Cirujano de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia (1956), el doctor Alberto Pradilla fue uno de los pocos médicos colombianos que además de su especialidad médica como pediatra, se formó en el área de nutrición.Se...

  2. Who Takes the Child to the Doctor?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daly, Moira; Groes, Fane

    2017-01-01

    We document the degree to which Danish mothers are responsible for handling their children’s medical services. Using unique administration data on detailed medical services that were performed on all Danish children from 1992 to 1995, we find that, on average, more than 90% of all children’s medi...... as a consequence of motherhood. Furthermore, the economic variables that should affect a household’s assignment of a task like taking the child to the doctor are shown to explain very little, suggesting that other factors, such as societal norms, are at play....

  3. Doctor Gonzalo Esguerra Gómez

    OpenAIRE

    Academia Nacional de Medicina

    1993-01-01

    Nació en Bogotá (Colombia) el 24 de enero de 1902
    Bachiller de la Escuela Nacional de Comercio (Bogotá), diciembre de 1919.
    Ayudante del Laboratorio de Radiología del Hospital de San Juan de Dios (Facultad de Medicina de Bogotá), 1920-1922.
    Jefe de trabajos del mismo laboratorio (1926-1928).
    Doctor en medicina y cirugía de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia. (Bogotá 19 de noviembre de 1927).<...

  4. Tactical and surgical techniques issues in the surgical treatment of incisional hernias

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Within five years, between 2006 and 2011, a total of 368 incisional hernias have been operated in the Surgery Clinic 1, University Emergency Hospital Bucharest. The study followed the morphological and biological parameters, associated pathology, tactics and surgical technique used and postoperative morbidity. The average age of patients was 61.75 years, female sex was predominant (81.25%), and incisional hernias were large and giant in a percentage of 73.37%. Locations were predomin...

  5. The development of online doctor reviews in China: an analysis of the largest online doctor review website in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Haijing

    2015-06-01

    Since the time of Web 2.0, more and more consumers have used online doctor reviews to rate their doctors or to look for a doctor. This phenomenon has received health care researchers' attention worldwide, and many studies have been conducted on online doctor reviews in the United States and Europe. But no study has yet been done in China. Also, in China, without a mature primary care physician recommendation system, more and more Chinese consumers seek online doctor reviews to look for a good doctor for their health care concerns. This study sought to examine the online doctor review practice in China, including addressing the following questions: (1) How many doctors and specialty areas are available for online review? (2) How many online reviews are there on those doctors? (3) What specialty area doctors are more likely to be reviewed or receive more reviews? (4) Are those reviews positive or negative? This study explores an empirical dataset from Good Doctor website, haodf.com—the earliest and largest online doctor review and online health care community website in China—from 2006 to 2014, to examine the stated research questions by using descriptive statistics, binary logistic regression, and multivariate linear regression. The dataset from the Good Doctor website contained 314,624 doctors across China and among them, 112,873 doctors received 731,543 quantitative reviews and 772,979 qualitative reviews as of April 11, 2014. On average, 37% of the doctors had been reviewed on the Good Doctor website. Gynecology-obstetrics-pediatrics doctors were most likely to be reviewed, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.497 (95% CI 1.461-1.535), and internal medicine doctors were less likely to be reviewed, with an OR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.921-0.960), relative to the combined small specialty areas. Both traditional Chinese medicine doctors and surgeons were more likely to be reviewed than the combined small specialty areas, with an OR of 1.483 (95% CI 1.442-1.525) and an OR of 1

  6. Female pattern hair loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Singal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Female pattern hair loss (FPHL is a common cause of hair loss in women characterized by diffuse reduction in hair density over the crown and frontal scalp with retention of the frontal hairline. Its prevalence increases with advancing age and is associated with significant psychological morbidity. The pathophysiology of FPHL is still not completely understood and seems to be multifactorial. Although androgens have been implicated, the involvement of androgen-independent mechanisms is evident from frequent lack of clinical or biochemical markers of hyperandrogenism in affected women. The role of genetic polymorphisms involving the androgen and estrogen receptors is being increasingly recognized in its causation and predicting treatment response to anti-androgens. There are different clinical patterns and classifications of FPHL, knowledge of which facilitates patient management and research. Chronic telogen effluvium remains as the most important differential diagnosis. Thorough history, clinical examination, and evaluation are essential to confirm diagnosis. Patients with clinical signs of androgen excess require assessment of biochemical parameters and imaging studies. It is prudent to screen the patients for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors. The treatment comprises medical and/or surgical modalities. Medical treatment should be initiated early as it effectively arrests hair loss progression rather than stimulating regrowth. Minoxidil continues to be the first line therapy whereas anti-androgens form the second line of treatment. The progressive nature of FPHL mandates long-term treatment for sustained effect. Medical therapy may be supplemented with cosmetic concealment in those desirous of greater hair density. Surgery may be worthwhile in some carefully selected patients.

  7. Factors influencing the diagnostic accuracy and management in acute surgical patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad; Shafique; Sajid; William; FA; Miles; Thaddeus; Hollingsworth; Mike; Mc; Glue

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy(DA) in acute surgical patients admitted to a District General Hospital.METHODS: The case notes of all acute surgical patients admitted under the surgical team for a period of two weeks were reviewed for the data pertaining to the admission diagnoses, relevant investigations and final diagnoses confirmed by either surgery or various other diagnostic modalities. The diagnostic pathway was recorded from the source of referral [general practitioner(GP), A and E, in-patient] to the correct final diagnosis by the surgical team. RESULTS: Forty-one patients(23 males) with acute surgical admissions during two weeks of study period were evaluated. The mean age of study group was 61.05 ± 23.24 years. There were 111 patient-doctor encounters. Final correct diagnosis was achieved in 85.4% patients. The DA was 46%, 44%, 50%, 33%,61%, 61%, and 75% by GP, A and E, in-patient referral, surgical foundation year-1, surgical senior house officer(SHO), surgical registrar, and surgical consultant respectively. The percentage of clinical consensus diagnosis was 12%. Surgery was performed in 48.8% of patients. Sixty-seven percent of GP-referred patients, 31% of A and E-referred, and 25% of the in-patient referrals underwent surgery. Surgical SHO made the most contributions to the primary diagnostic pathway.CONCLUSION: Approximately 85% of acute surgical patients can be diagnosed accurately along the diagnostic pathway. Patients referred by a GP are more likely to require surgery as compared to other referral sources. Surgical consultant was more likely to make correct surgical diagnosis, however it is the surgical SHO that contributes the most correct diagnoses along the diagnostic pathway.

  8. Career situation of female astronomers in Germany

    CERN Document Server

    Fohlmeister, J; 10.1002/asna.201211656

    2012-01-01

    We survey the job situation of women in astronomy in Germany and of German women abroad and review indicators for their career development. Our sample includes women astronomers from all academic levels from doctoral students to professors, as well as female astronomers who have left the field. We find that networking and human support are among the most important factors for success. Experience shows that students should carefully choose their supervisor and collect practical knowledge abroad. We reflect the private situation of female German astronomers and find that prejudices are abundant, and are perceived as discriminating.We identify reasons why women are more likely than men to quit astronomy after they obtain their PhD degree. We give recommendations to young students on what to pay attention to in order to be on the successful path in astronomy.

  9. Philosophical Issues in Doctoral Education in Social Work: A Survey of Doctoral Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastas, Jeane W.; Congress, Elaine P.

    1999-01-01

    Surveyed 48 social-work doctoral-program directors about the inclusion of philosophical issues in the curriculum. The survey asked about traditional and emergent epistemologies, including heuristics, social constructivism, and other forms of postmodernism. Results suggest that while such content is included in research courses, directors face…

  10. Doctor performance assessment in daily practise: does it help doctors or not? A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, K.; Faber, M.J.; Arah, O.A.; Elwyn, G.; Lombarts, K.M.; Wollersheim, H.C.H.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Continuous assessment of individual performance of doctors is crucial for life-long learning and quality of care. Policy-makers and health educators should have good insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the methods available. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the

  11. Pathways to the Doctorate Degree: A Phenomenological Study of African American Women in Doctorate Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starks, Luciana Janee'

    2010-01-01

    Increasing the number of advanced degree recipients is more than an educational issue; it is also a key social issue. "A college-educated population results in pivotal benefits to society" (The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, 2004, p. 1). Although African Americans have made steady and notable progress in doctorate degree…

  12. Female pattern alopecia: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy LL

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Lauren L Levy, Jason J Emer Department of Dermatology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Hair loss is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice, with men presenting with a distinctive pattern involving hairline recession and vertex balding (Norwood-Hamilton classification and women exhibiting diffuse hair thinning over the crown (increased part width and sparing of the frontal hairline (Ludwig classification. Female pattern hair loss has a strikingly overwhelming psychological effect; thus, successful treatments are necessary. Difficulty lies in successful treatment interventions, as only two medications – minoxidil and finasteride – are approved for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia, and these medications offer mediocre results, lack of a permanent cure, and potential complications. Hair transplantation is the only current successful permanent option, and it requires surgical procedures. Several other medical options, such as antiandrogens (eg, spironolactone, oral contraceptives, cyproterone, flutamide, dutasteride, prostaglandin analogs (eg, bimatoprost, latanoprost, and ketoconazole are reported to be beneficial. Laser and light therapies have also become popular despite the lack of a profound benefit. Management of expectations is crucial, and the aim of therapy, given the current therapeutic options, is to slow or stop disease progression with contentment despite patient expectations of permanent hair regrowth. This article reviews current perspectives on therapeutic options for female pattern hair loss. Keywords: androgenetic alopecia, female pattern hair loss, minoxidil, finasteride, antiandrogens, spironolactone

  13. Melanoma of the female urethra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Ramos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is a malignant tumor that can affect any area of the anatomical economy. Its appearance in the female urethra is extremely rare, with approximately 121 cases in indexed literature since 1966. The subject to be described is an 86-year-old woman who seeks assessment for intermittent macroscopic hematuria with blood clots of 3 months progression. On physical examination, there are no suspicious lesions detected on the surface of the skin. On external genital examination, it is observed a friable lesion at the level of the urethral meatus, with heterogeneous digitations, dark brown to black, and irregular polycyclic borders. No inguinal adenomegalies were palpated. Cystourethroscopy and biopsy of the lesion confirm the diagnosis. Melanoma of the female urethra is an extremely infrequent pathology. Due to lack of published case reports and the absence of prospective randomized trials on treatment outcomes, treatment must be directed using the same anatomical and surgical criteria for female urethral tumors, adding also the concepts of treatment of mucosal melanoma, even though its prognosis is different from the before mentioned.

  14. How far does a doctor's 'duty of care' go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torda, A

    2005-05-01

    It is a long-standing tradition in medicine that doctors have an ethical duty to care for all patients who fall within the scope of their skill base. This duty reflects the value system of many doctors and the type of typical dedication to their craft that has long been expected and given. The modern doctor, however, may have other additional roles -- such as those of parent, researcher, business person and many others. What about the duties that accompany these other activities and what if these duties come into conflict with the duty to care for patients? How does a doctor decide how far the duty to care for patients extends? This article explores this question of duty and discusses how the notion of the traditional doctor's duty to care may need to be amended in light of the kinds of lives that doctors now lead.

  15. [Optimizing surgical hand disinfection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, G; Kramer, A; Rotter, M; Widmer, A

    2006-08-01

    For more than 110 years hands of surgeons have been treated before a surgical procedure in order to reduce the bacterial density. The kind and duration of treatment, however, has changed significantly over time. Recent scientific evidence suggests a few changes with the aim to optimize both the efficacy and the dermal tolerance. Aim of this article is the presentation and discussion of new insights in surgical hand disinfection. A hand wash should be performed before the first disinfection of a day, ideally at least 10 min before the beginning of the disinfection as it has been shown that a 1 min hand wash significantly increases skin hydration for up to 10 min. The application time may be as short as 1.5 min depending on the type of hand rub. Hands and forearms should be kept wet with the hand rub for the recommended application time in any case. A specific rub-in procedure according to EN 12791 has been found to be suitable in order to avoid untreated skin areas. The alcohol-based hand rub should have a proven excellent dermal tolerance in order to ensure appropriate compliance. Considering these elements in clinical practice can have a significant impact to optimize the high quality of surgical hand disinfection for prevention of surgical site infections.

  16. Doctors' strikes and mortality: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Solveig Argeseanu; Mitchell, Kristina; Narayan, K M; Yusuf, Salim

    2008-12-01

    A paradoxical pattern has been suggested in the literature on doctors' strikes: when health workers go on strike, mortality stays level or decreases. We performed a review of the literature during the past forty years to assess this paradox. We used PubMed, EconLit and Jstor to locate all peer-reviewed English-language articles presenting data analysis on mortality associated with doctors' strikes. We identified 156 articles, seven of which met our search criteria. The articles analyzed five strikes around the world, all between 1976 and 2003. The strikes lasted between nine days and seventeen weeks. All reported that mortality either stayed the same or decreased during, and in some cases, after the strike. None found that mortality increased during the weeks of the strikes compared to other time periods. The paradoxical finding that physician strikes are associated with reduced mortality may be explained by several factors. Most importantly, elective surgeries are curtailed during strikes. Further, hospitals often re-assign scarce staff and emergency care was available during all of the strikes. Finally, none of the strikes may have lasted long enough to assess the effects of long-term reduced access to a physician. Nonetheless, the literature suggests that reductions in mortality may result from these strikes.

  17. Labour of love: emotions and identities in doctoral supervision

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Nature and scope of enquiry\\ud \\ud This thesis explores how emotional dimensions of supervising doctoral students are accommodated in supervisory identities. It aims to answer two key questions: What is the nature of the emotional labour involved in doctoral supervision?\\ud \\ud To what extent does an acknowledgement of emotional labour in the supervisory process have implications for the academic development of doctoral supervisors?\\ud \\ud The conceptual framework for the study is developed f...

  18. Medical restrictions to driving: the awareness of patients and doctors

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, R; Warke, T.; Steele, I.

    1999-01-01

    The study was set up to investigate the awareness of elderly patients and medical doctors of medical restrictions to driving. Separate questionnaires were completed by patients and doctors. All were interviewed face-to-face, without prior warning and their immediate answers were recorded. In total, 150 elderly patients from the acute elderly care wards, rehabilitation wards and day hospital, and 50 doctors (including all grades from consultant to junior house officer) were interviewed. The ma...

  19. Exploring the impact of workplace cyberbullying on trainee doctors

    OpenAIRE

    Farley, S; Coyne, I; Sprigg, C.; Axtell, C.; Subramanian, G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Workplace bullying is an occupational hazard for trainee doctors. However, little is known about their experiences of cyberbullying at work. This study examines the impact of cyberbullying among trainee doctors, and how attributions of blame for cyberbullying influence individual and work-related outcomes.\\ud \\ud Methods: Doctors at over 6 months into training were asked to complete an online survey that included measures of cyberbullying, blame attribution, negative emotion, job ...

  20. PERSONAL MARKETING OF DOCTORS IN THE CONTEXT OF SOCIAL NETWORKS

    OpenAIRE

    Corina Anamaria IOAN; Florin-Alexandru LUCA; Constantin SASU

    2014-01-01

    More than ever doctors are beginning to recognize that beyond impeccable professionalism shown to the patient, equally imports became part of communication, and in one century of the Internet, the most effective communication process moves online, in the social networks. It is important for doctors to develop a personal brand because a reputation, passed with internet speed can only have a positive effect. In a century in which patients make the decision to see a particular doctor, ...

  1. [da Vinci surgical system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Gou; Ishikawa, Norihiro

    2014-07-01

    The da Vinci surgical system was developed by Intuitive Surgical Inc. in the United States as an endoscopic surgical device to assist remote control surgeries. In 1998, the Da Vinci system was first used for cardiothoracic procedures. Currently a combination of robot-assisted internal thoracic artery harvest together with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) through a mini-incision (ThoraCAB) or totally endoscopic procedures including anastomoses under robotic assistance (TECAB) are being conducted for the treatment of coronary artery diseases. With the recent advances in catheter interventions, hybrid procedures combining catheter intervention with ThoraCAB or TECAB are anticipated in the future.On the other hand, with the decrease in number of coronary artery bypass surgeries, the share of valvular surgeries is expected to increase in the future. Among them, mitral valvuloplasty for mitral regurgitation is anticipated to be conducted mainly by low-invasive procedures, represented by minimally invasive cardiac surgery( MICS) and robot-assisted surgery. Apart from the intrinsic good surgical view, robotic-assisted systems offer additional advantages of the availability of an amplified view and the easy to observe the mitral valve in the physiological position. Thus, robotic surgical surgeries that make complicated procedures easier are expected to accomplish further developments in the future. Furthermore, while the number of surgeries for atrial septal defects has decreased dramatically following the widespread use of Amplatzer septal occluder, robotic surgery may become a good indication for cases in which the Amplatzer device is not indicated. In Japan, clinical trial of the da Vinci robotic system for heart surgeries has been completed. Statutory approval of the da Vinci system for mitral regurgitation and atrial septal defects is anticipated in the next few years.

  2. First Class of Female Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    From left to right are Shannon W. Lucid, Margaret Rhea Seddon, Kathryn D. Sullivan, Judith A. Resnik, Anna L. Fisher, and Sally K. Ride. NASA selected all six women as their first female astronaut candidates in January 1978, allowing them to enroll in a training program that they completed in August 1979. Shannon W. Lucid was born on January 14, 1943 in Shanghai, China but considers Bethany, Oklahoma to be her hometown. She spent many years at the University of Oklahoma, receiving a Bachelor in chemistry in 1963, a Master in biochemistry in 1970, and a Doctorate in biochemistry in 1973. Dr. Lucid flew on the STS-51G Discovery, STS-34 Atlantis, STS-43 Atlantis, and STS-58 Columbia shuttle missions, setting the record for female astronauts by logging 838 hours and 54 minutes in space. She also currently holds the United States single mission space flight endurance record for her 188 days on the Russian Space Station Mir. From February 2002 to September 2003, she served as chief scientist at NASA Headquarters before returning to JSC to help with the Return to Flight program after the STS-107 accident. Born November 8, 1947, in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, Margaret Rhea Seddon received a Doctorate of Medicine in 1973 from the University of Tennessee. She flew on space missions STS-51 Discovery, STS-40 Columbia, and STS-58 Columbia for a total of over 722 hours in space. Dr. Seddon retired from NASA in November 1997, taking on a position as the Assistant Chief Medical Officer of the Vanderbilt Medical Group in Nashville, Tennessee. Kathryn Sullivan was born October 3, 1951 in Patterson, New Jersey but considers Woodland Hills, California to be her hometown. She received a Bachelor in Earth Sciences from the University of California, Santa Cruz in 1973 and a Doctorate in Geology from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1978. She flew on space missions STS-41G, STS-31, and STS-45 and logged a total of 532 hours in space. Dr. Sullivan left NASA in August 1992 to

  3. [The virtuous doctor in cinema: the final examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Gustavo

    2014-10-01

    The virtuous doctor has subscribed an oath and by subscribing to this solemn promise, he is committed to live in accordance with the purposes, obligations and virtues established in the medical profession. Cinematic art has shown only a superficial interest in complex aspects of medical profession. An exception is Ingmar Bergman's film "Wild Strawberries", where Professor Isak Borg, a widowed 76-year-old physician, is to be awarded the Doctor Jubilaris degree, 50 years after he received his doctorate at Lund University. During the trip, Isak is forced by a nightmare to reevaluate his professional life as not being a virtuous doctor.

  4. PERSONAL MARKETING OF DOCTORS IN THE CONTEXT OF SOCIAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Anamaria IOAN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available More than ever doctors are beginning to recognize that beyond impeccable professionalism shown to the patient, equally imports became part of communication, and in one century of the Internet, the most effective communication process moves online, in the social networks. It is important for doctors to develop a personal brand because a reputation, passed with internet speed can only have a positive effect. In a century in which patients make the decision to see a particular doctor, largely based on recommendations and research the forums online discussions, doctors are beginning realize the importance of a strong presence, constant and reliable environment through online networks social priority.

  5. The quality of doctoral nursing education in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siedine K. Coetzee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The number of doctoral programmes in nursing has multiplied rapidly throughout the world. This has led to widespread concern about nursing doctoral education, specifically with regard to the quality of curricula and faculty, as well as to the availability of appropriate institutional resources. In South Africa, no study of these issues has been conducted at a national level.Objective: To explore and describe the quality of nursing doctoral education in South Africa from the perspectives of deans, faculty, doctoral graduates and students.Method: A cross-sectional survey design was used. All deans (N = 15; n = 12, faculty (N = 50; n = 26, doctoral graduates (N = 43; n = 26 and students (N = 106; n = 63 at South African nursing schools that offer a nursing doctoral programme (N = 16; n = 15 were invited to participate. Data were collected by means of structured email-mediated Quality of Nursing Doctoral Education surveys.Results: Overall, the graduate participants scored their programme quality most positively of all the groups and faculty scored it most negatively. All of the groups rated the quality of their doctoral programmes as good, but certain problems related to the quality of resources, students and faculty were identified.Conclusion: These evaluations, by the people directly involved in the programmes, demonstrated significant differences amongst the groups and thus provide valuable baseline data for building strategies to improve the quality of doctoral nursing education in South Africa.

  6. Power imbalance and consumerism in the doctor-patient relationship: health care providers' experiences of patient encounters in a rural district in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fochsen, Grethe; Deshpande, Kirti; Thorson, Anna

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study is to explore health care providers' experiences and perceptions of their encounters with male and female patients in a rural district in India with special reference to tuberculosis (TB) care. The authors conducted semistructured interviews with 22 health care providers, 17 men and 5 women, from the public and private health care sectors. Findings reveal that doctors adopted an authoritarian as well as a consumerist approach in the medical encounter, indicating that power imbalances in the doctor-patient relationship are negotiable and subject to change. Gender was identified as an influencing factor of the doctor's dominance. A patient-centered approach, acknowledging patients' own experiences and shared decision making, is called for and should be included in TB control activities. This seems to be especially important for female patients, whose voices were not heard in the medical encounter.

  7. Urinary incontinence - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to help with my urinary incontinence? What are Kegel exercises? What can I do when I want ... tape Urinary incontinence - vaginal sling procedures Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Self catheterization - female Self catheterization - ...

  8. [The effect of public defense of a doctoral thesis on the heart rate of the doctoral candidate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiljander, Toni; Toikka, Jyri; Koskenvuo, Juha; Jaakkola, Ilkka

    2011-01-01

    The effect of public defense of a doctoral thesis on the heart rate of the doctoral candidate Most doctoral candidates find the public defense of a doctoral thesis an exciting and stressful experience. In this study, Holter recording during the defense was made for four doctoral candidates of the Faculty of Medicine. Maximum heart rate among the subjects was on the average 172 beats/min with a median heart rate of 116 beats/min. Sympathicotonia and release of stress hormones associated with the defense raise the heart rate to levels that may be very high for several hours. This is a risk factor for a coronary event and should be considered, if the doctoral candidate has coronary heart disease, carries risk factors for coronary heart disease, or is an elderly person.

  9. An audit of generic prescribing in a general surgical department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, M

    2013-01-17

    BACKGROUND: The Health Service Executive introduced a generic prescription policy to reduce costs. Despite this, generic prescription rates remain low. AIM: To audit in-patient prescription practice in a single surgical department and identify potential savings which could be realised by adherence to the generic prescribing policy. METHODS: Surgical in-patient charts were obtained at the point of discharge and their drug prescription information was recorded. RESULTS: 51 % of prescriptions involved a trade-name prescription where an appropriate generic equivalent existed. The cost implications for hospital and community patients were found to be greatly affected by substitution policies that exist at hospital pharmacy level. CONCLUSION: There is a need to promote greater adherence to generic prescribing amongst hospital doctors in line with international best practice. It can have a positive impact in terms of safe prescribing and can have cost implications at both hospital and community level.

  10. Several factors increased job dissatisfaction among medical doctors in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastaman Basuki

    2013-07-01

    23-47 years old, the majority were female (61.4%, married, current/previous work was in health services, government officials and never had stress management training. Job dissatisfaction level related to seven factors, the highest was having lack of support from superiors and the lowest was being required to provide services outside normal working hours. One point of having lack of support from superiors increased job dissatisfaction by 1.26 [regression coeffisient (β = 1.26; P=0.000; one point of being required to provide services outside normal working hours increased job dissatisfaction by 0.61 point (β= 0.6; P=0.001.Conclusion:Lack of superiors’ support and interaction with colleagues, role organization ambiguity, bureaucratic procedures, having to provide services outside normal working hours, and inadequate feedback from patients all increased job dissatisfaction. (Health Science Indones 2013;1:11-6 Keywords: job dissatisfaction, work stressor, medical doctors

  11. Effect of Promotional Strategies of Pharmaceutical Companies on Doctors' Prescription Pattern in South East Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linus Onah

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Drug promotions use multifaceted approaches incorporating hospital and office detailing by marketing representatives. Very few studies exist on their influence on doctors’ prescription pattern in Nigeria. We examined the scope and effects of marketing strategies on the prescription habits of doctors in Enugu, South East Nigeria. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study; 210 self-administered structured questionnaires were distributed among doctors in six major hospitals in Enugu. Ethical approval was obtained from the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Ethics Committee, Enugu. RESULTS: There was 88% response rate, with more males than females (M:F= 2.2: 1. Most were residents-in-training/ house officers (69% while consultants were 7.1% of the group. Stickers, drug presentations/ launches and personal souvenirs were most commonly employed marketing strategies. Most doctors (60% attending a drug presentation felt influenced. While 87.5% appreciated the benefits of marketing strategies, about 70% would consider patients’ socioeconomic status before prescribing. Continuing medical education and stiff competition were reasons adduced for the marketing strategies. CONCLUSION: Pharmaceutical companies in Nigeria adopt varied strategies to influence doctors’ prescriptions. Often this aim is achieved. The practice is accepted by most who nevertheless will consider other factors when deciding on what to prescribe. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(1.000: 1-6

  12. Typical and unusual cases of female genital tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    E. Kulchavenya; S. Dubrovina

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease with myriad presentations and manifestations; it can affect any organ or tissue, excluding only hair and nails. Doctors who are not familiar with extrapulmonary tuberculosis often overlook this disease. Urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB) is the second most common form of TB in countries with severe epidemic situation and the third most common form in regions with low incidence of TB. The term “Urogenital tuberculosis” includes kidney tuberculosis; male and female tubercu...

  13. High-street fashion brand communication amongst female adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Methanuntakul, Kanwipa

    2010-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. The nature of high-street fashion brands amongst female adolescents is a combined set of fast fashion movements and early adopter demands within a compressed timeframe. This research has investigated the need for a communication plan to appropriately deliver the brand message for this sector. There are a number of information barriers for high-street fashion brands to build customer value and...

  14. Theatre and Oral Interpretation: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1980 (Vol. 41 Nos. 1 through 6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 31 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: (1) American drama between the world wars; (2) an emotion theory of stage fright; (3) the female androgyne in tragic drama; (4) creating and directing a musical…

  15. Surgical Treatment for Pulmonary Hamartomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Ižncekara

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, we evaluated the patients operated for hamartoma and treated endobronchially and the diagnostic value of this approach has been examined. Material and Method: 59 patients (24 females, 35 males; mean age 53 years, range 28-78 years which were operated and endobronchial treated for hamartoma in our clinic between January 2003 - January 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Patient age, sex, symptoms, histopathological, surgical procedures and treatment outcomes were evaluated. Results: The most common complaint was shortness of breath, while 25 patients were asymptomatic. Thoracotomy and mass enucleation in 29 patients (%49,15, thoracotomy and wedge resection in 18 patients (%30.5, VATS and wedge resection in 4 patients (%6.77, thoracotomy and upper lobectomy in 4 patients (%6.77, thoracotomy and lower lobectomy in 2 patients (%3.38 and left upper lobe segmentectomy in 1 patient (%1.69 and right upper bronchial sleeve resection in 1 patient were performed. The postoperative pathology of lesions examined and diagnosis were chondroid hamartoma in 28 , pulmonary hamartoma in 20 , hamartoma chondrolypomatous in 11 and the bronchial hamartoma in 2 . No mortality was observed intraoperatively. Discussion: Although hamartomas are benign , diagnosis should be made because it can be confused with lung cancer. Definitive diagnosis and treatment can be performed successfully through VATS in primarily appropriate cases with minimal morbidity or thoracotomy or endobronchial treatment.

  16. [Two-thirds of doctors are female, but ever still behind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaat, J.O.M.; Leeuw, P.W. de; Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2008-01-01

    At present, two-thirds of the medical students in The Netherlands are women. However, the problems of combining a medical education with the responsibilities of motherhood, and the inaccessibility of medical top positions for women, are as serious as they were ten years ago at the 65th anniversary

  17. Do gender differences affect the doctor-patient interaction during consultations in general practice? Results from the INTERMEDE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieber, Anne-Cécile; Delpierre, Cyrille; Lepage, Benoît; Afrite, Anissa; Pascal, Jean; Cases, Chantal; Lombrail, Pierre; Lang, Thierry; Kelly-Irving, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to ascertain whether disagreement between GPs and patients on advice given on nutrition, exercise and weight loss is related to patient-doctor gender discordance. Our hypothesis is that a patient interacting with a physician of the same gender may perceive more social proximity, notably on health care beliefs and may be more inclined to trust them. The analysis used the Intermede project's quantitative data collected via mirrored questionnaires at the end of the consultation. Multilevel logistic regressions were carried out to explore associations between patient-doctor gender discordance and their disagreement on advice given during the consultation adjusted on patients' and physicians' characteristics. The sample consists of 585 eligible patients and 27 GPs. Disagreement on advice given on nutrition was observed less often for female concordant dyads: OR = 0.25 (95% CI = 0.08-0.78), and for female doctors-male patients dyads: OR = 0.24 (95% CI = 0.07-0.84), taking the male concordant dyads as reference. For advice given on exercise, disagreement was found less often for female concordant dyads OR = 0.38 (95% CI = 0.15-0.98) and an interdoctor effect was found (P gender concordance/discordance is associated with their agreement/disagreement on advice given during the consultation. Physicians need to be conscious that their own demographic characteristics and perceptions might influence the quality of prevention counseling delivered to their patients. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  18. Vitiligo- A surgical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Ghia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objective- To describe the spectrum of surgical modalities for stable vitiligo patients Methods- Patients having stable vitiligo since past 2 years with no improvement with medical line of treatment were enrolled for surgery after informed consent. Depending upon the size and location of vitiligo patch different modalities were performed. Suction blister, mini-punch grafting, split thickness skin grafting, trypsinised melanocyte-keratinocyte transfer and non-trypsinised melanocyte- keratinocyte transfer (Jodhpur technique and follicular grafting technique have been described photographically which have been performed at a tertiary care hospital. Conclusion- Vitiligo is often difficult to treat, stable patches resistant to medical line of management do respond to surgical treatment; however it is very important to choose the modality of surgery according location of the patch, size of the lesion and available resources.

  19. Spacecraft surgical scrub system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, M.

    1980-01-01

    Ease of handling and control in zero gravity and minimizing the quantity of water required were prime considerations. The program tasks include the selection of biocidal agent from among the variety used for surgical scrub, formulation of a dispensing system, test, and delivery of flight dispensers. The choice of an iodophore was based on effectiveness on single applications, general familiarity among surgeons, and previous qualification for space use. The delivery system was a choice between the squeeze foamer system and impregnated polyurethane foam pads. The impregnated foam pad was recommended because it is a simpler system since the squeeze foamer requires some applicator to effectively clean the skin surfaces, whereas the form pad is the applicator and agent combined. Testing demonstrated that both systems are effective for use as surgical scrubs.

  20. [Doctor patient communication: which skills are effective?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Philippa; Gómez, Gricelda; Kurtz, Suzanne; Vargas, Alex

    2010-08-01

    Effective Communication Skills form part of what is being a good doctor. There is a solid evidence base that defines the components of effective communication. This article offers a practical conceptual framework to improve physician patient communication to a professional level of competence. There are six goals that physicians and patients work to achieve through their communication with each other. These are to construct a relationship, structure an interview, start the interview, gather information, explain, plan and close the interview. The outcomes that can be improved with an effective communication and the "first principles" of communication are described. A brief look at the historical context that has influenced our thinking about communication in health care is carried out. Finally, the Calgary Cambridge Guide, an approach for delineating and organizing the specific skills required of an effective communication with patients is described. It is clear from the literature that better communication skills improve patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes.

  1. Are Danish doctors comfortable teaching in English?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilas, Lisbeth; Løkkegaard, Ellen Christine Leth; Laursen, Jacob Brink

    2016-01-01

    in a clinical setting. Using semi-quantitative questionnaires to 89 clinicians about use of English and need for training, this paper considers if Danish clinical doctors are prepared to teach in English. Results The majority self-assessed their English proficiency between seven and eight on a 10 unit visual......Background From 2012–2015, the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of Pediatrics at the University of Copenhagen conducted a project, “Internationalization at Home ”, offering clinical teaching in English. The project allowed international students to work with Danish speaking students...... analogue scale, with 10 equivalent to working in Danish, while 15 % rated five or less. However, one-fourth found teaching and writing in English to be twice as difficult than in Danish, and 12 % rated all teaching tasks in English at four or less compared to Danish. The self-assessed need for additional...

  2. Clown doctors: shaman healers of Western medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blerkom, L M

    1995-12-01

    The Big Apple Circus Clown Care Unit, which entertains children in New York City hospitals, is compared with non-Western healers, especially shamans. There is not only superficial resemblance--weird costumes, music, sleight of hand, puppet/spirit helpers, and ventriloquism--but also similarity in the meanings and functions of their performances. Both clown and shaman violate natural and cultural rules in their performances. Both help patient and family deal with illness. Both use suggestion and manipulation of medical symbols in attempting to alleviate their patients' distress. Just as traditional ethnomedical systems have been integrated with Western medicine in other societies, clown doctors can provide complementary therapy that may enhance the efficacy of medical treatment in developed nations, particularly for children.

  3. Health services research doctoral core competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Christopher B; Martin, Diane P; Holve, Erin; Millman, Anne

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript presents an initial description of doctoral level core competencies for health services research (HSR). The competencies were developed by a review of the literature, text analysis of institutional accreditation self-studies submitted to the Council on Education for Public Health, and a consensus conference of HSR educators from US educational institutions. The competencies are described in broad terms which reflect the unique expertise, interests, and preferred learning methods of academic HSR programs. This initial set of core competencies is published to generate further dialogue within and outside of the US about the most important learning objectives and methods for HSR training and to clarify the unique skills of HSR training program graduates. PMID:19555485

  4. Health services research doctoral core competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holve Erin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This manuscript presents an initial description of doctoral level core competencies for health services research (HSR. The competencies were developed by a review of the literature, text analysis of institutional accreditation self-studies submitted to the Council on Education for Public Health, and a consensus conference of HSR educators from US educational institutions. The competencies are described in broad terms which reflect the unique expertise, interests, and preferred learning methods of academic HSR programs. This initial set of core competencies is published to generate further dialogue within and outside of the US about the most important learning objectives and methods for HSR training and to clarify the unique skills of HSR training program graduates.

  5. Are Danish doctors comfortable teaching in English?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilas, L; Løkkegaard, E C; Laursen, J B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: From 2012-2015, the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of Pediatrics at the University of Copenhagen conducted a project, "Internationalization at Home ", offering clinical teaching in English. The project allowed international students to work with Danish speaking students...... in a clinical setting. Using semi-quantitative questionnaires to 89 clinicians about use of English and need for training, this paper considers if Danish clinical doctors are prepared to teach in English. RESULTS: The majority self-assessed their English proficiency between seven and eight on a 10 unit visual...... analogue scale, with 10 equivalent to working in Danish, while 15 % rated five or less. However, one-fourth found teaching and writing in English to be twice as difficult than in Danish, and 12 % rated all teaching tasks in English at four or less compared to Danish. The self-assessed need for additional...

  6. Difficult Doctors, Difficult Patients: Building Empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Patricia F; Wescom, Elise; Carlos, Ruth C

    2016-12-01

    Effective doctor-patient communication facilitates the therapeutic relationship, promotes patient physical and mental health, and improves physician satisfaction. Methods of teaching effective communication use a range of techniques, typically combining didactic instruction with simulated communication encounters and reflective discussion. Rarely are patients and physicians exposed to these instructions as colearners. The evidence for the utility of graphic stories, comics, and cartoons to improve patient comprehension and self-regulation is small but encouraging. The authors describe the use of graphic medicine as a teaching tool for engendering empathy from both the physician and the patient for the other during a shared clinical encounter. This use of educational comics in a colearning experience represents a new use of the medium as a teaching tool. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Thomas Bowdler: censor, philanthropist, and doctor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellineck, E H

    2001-09-29

    A recent biography of the physician William Osler credits him with having generated a verb, to "oslerize", as a synonym for euthanasia. Actually, Osler had been mocking his own impending senescent uselessness at the time of his move from Baltimore to Oxford. That neologism did not last. Two earlier doctors who did make it to the dictionaries in a verbally eponymous way were F A Mesmer and Thomas Bowdler, and Bowdler, at least, would not have liked the recognition. The first use of the verb to "bowdlerise" seems to have been in 1836, with a reference to "names in the writings of the apostles which modern ultrachristians would probably have Bowdlerized". However, Bowdler is better remembered for his cleaning up of the plays of Shakespeare.

  8. Gossypiboma—Retained Surgical Sponge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Shun Sun

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Intra-abdominal retained surgical sponge is an uncommon surgical error. Herein, we report a 92-year-old woman who was brought to the emergency room for acute urinary retention. She had a history of vaginal hysterectomy for uterine prolapse 18 years previously, performed at our hospital. Retained surgical sponge in the pelvic cavity was suspected by abdominal computed tomography. The surgical gauze was removed by laparotomy excision and the final diagnosis was gossypiboma.

  9. Hepatic surgical anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skandalakis, John E; Skandalakis, Lee J; Skandalakis, Panajiotis N; Mirilas, Petros

    2004-04-01

    The liver, the largest organ in the body, has been misunderstood at nearly all levels of organization, and there is a tendency to ignore details that do not fit the preconception. A complete presentation of the surgical anatomy of the liver includes the study of hepatic surfaces, margins, and fissures; the various classifications of lobes and segments; and the vasculature and lymphatics. A brief overview of the intrahepatic biliary tract is also presented.

  10. Doctor and pharmacist - back to the apothecary!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Peterson, Gregory

    2009-05-01

    The Australian National Medicines Policy embodies four tenets: availability, quality, safety and efficacy of medicines; timely access to affordable medicines; quality use of medicines (QUM); and a responsible and viable medicines industry. The promotion of QUM requires a multidisciplinary approach, including contributions from government, the pharmaceutical industry, health professionals, consumers and academia. However, there are significant tensions and unintended effects associated with the multidisciplinary approach, especially with the relationships between prescribers and dispensers of medicines. The general practitioner and the pharmacist share a common ancestor - the apothecary. The separation of dispensing from prescribing, which began in medieval Europe and 19th century England, reframed and confined the patient-doctor relationship to one of diagnosis, prescription and non-drug management. The role of pharmacists was limited to dispensing, though the present trend is for their responsibilities to be widened. Historical antecedents, the contribution of an increasing number of actors to the costs of health care, universal health insurance and an evolving regulatory framework, are among the factors influencing doctor-pharmacist relations. The prescribing and dispensing of medicines must be guided by an ethical clinical governance structure encompassing health professionals, regulators, the pharmaceutical industry and consumers. There must be close monitoring of safety and effectiveness, and promotion of quality use of medicines and improved patient outcomes. Ongoing training and professional development, within and across professional boundaries, is essential to support harmonious and cost-effective inter-professional practice. The approach must be "apothecarial" with complementary roles and responsibilities for the prescriber and dispenser within the patient-clinician therapeutic relationship, and not adversarial.

  11. AME survey-003 A1-part 2: the motivation factors of medical doctors in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J; Káplár, Zoltán; L, Yáo T

    2015-12-01

    The professional moral and job satisfaction of medical profession remain highly disputed in media in China. On the other hand, there is wide disaffection of patients toward doctors in China. This survey aims to obtain a better understanding of the motivation of Chinese medical professionals. An anonymous online cross-sectional survey, AME survey III, was conducted using the platform provided by DXY (www.dxy.cn) during the period of September 10-23, 2015. In total 2,356 DXY users completed the survey, including 1,740 males and 617 females, with a mean age of 31.96±7.03 yrs. The reasons (multiple choices) for career disaffection included poor patient/doctor relationship (88.6%), imbalance between workload and pay (79.5%), could not enter the preferred specialty (14.14%), and working in small clinics with no career progress (11.17%). If given the choice to enter the specialty as well as the hospital grade of their choice, 73.8% dissatisfied respondents replied they would like to be a doctor. For the dis-satisfied respondents, university teacher appeared to be the most popular career choice. The cited high workload was considered to be due to (I) imbalance in geographical allocation of doctors and insufficient training of doctors; (II) many red-tapism formalities; (III) Chinese patients often have unreasonable requests; (IV) over-examination and over-treatment; (V) high pressure to publish papers. One hundred and twelve respondents have their child/children attending university or graduated from university, 25.0% of them are pursuing a career in medicine. Nine hundred and ninety respondents have child/children while did not reach university age yet, among them 23.62% would like their child/children to study medicine. 64.87% of the 2,356 participants favor China to open up medical market to qualified foreign medical organizations to take part in fair competition, and 57.91% favor the government supporting regulated private hospitals. The moral and motivation of medical

  12. Louis Pasteur surgical revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    Louis Pasteur (1822-1895) is considered the most notable medical scientist of his time and perhaps one of the most distinguished of all times in the history of medicine. From Dole in France to Paris, from a student of crystals to "living ferments," and from chemistry to biology and medicine, Pasteur changed the world for the benefit of humanity. The genius of Pasteur dealt with the most pressing issues of his time, basing the germ theory on the effects that microorganisms had on fermentation and putrefaction of organic matter, which gave birth to the science of bacteriology. Many other difficult problems in medicine and biology were tackled by Pasteur, culminating in the spectacular results seen with the treatment of rabies. Surgery was no exception to the scientific conquests of Pasteur. The transformation of the surgical world arose from the antiseptic concepts of Lister that were based on the germ theory of the disease, which had been derived from the germ theory of fermentation and putrefaction discovered by Pasteur. The acceptance of these principles represented the surgical revolution brought on by the science of Pasteur, a revolution that is now accepted in our daily care of surgical patients.

  13. Guideline implementation: Surgical attire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowperthwaite, Liz; Holm, Rebecca L

    2015-02-01

    Surgical attire helps protect patients from microorganisms that may be shed from the hair and skin of perioperative personnel. The updated AORN "Guideline for surgical attire" provides guidance on scrub attire, shoes, head coverings, and masks worn in the semirestricted and restricted areas of the perioperative setting, as well as how to handle personal items (eg, jewelry, backpacks, cell phones) that may be taken into the perioperative suite. This article focuses on key points of the guideline to help perioperative personnel adhere to facility policies and regulatory requirements for attire. The key points address the potential benefits of wearing scrub attire made of antimicrobial fabric, covering the arms when in the restricted area of the surgical suite, removing or confining jewelry when wearing scrub attire, disinfecting personal items that will be taken into the perioperative suite, and sending reusable attire to a health care-accredited laundry facility after use. Perioperative RNs should review the complete guideline for additional information and for guidance when writing and updating policies and procedures.

  14. Surgical navigation with QR codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katanacho Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The presented work is an alternative to established measurement systems in surgical navigation. The system is based on camera based tracking of QR code markers. The application uses a single video camera, integrated in a surgical lamp, that captures the QR markers attached to surgical instruments and to the patient.

  15. Doctor-patient interaction and informed consent in pediatric surgery: theory and reality in the regional practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Luis González López

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Informed consent is a core element in the doctor-patient interaction. With the objective of reviewing the essentials and legal basis of its procedure and relation with pediatric surgery in the regional context we developed a bibliographic review of national and international biomedical publications. It is widely accepted that the recognition of patient´s autonomy and the informed consent process have led to a change in the doctor-patients interaction, which is closely linked to the pediatric surgical practice in the particular Cuban modern environment. In addition to the study of bioethical principles and their enforcement by those who are to provide medical services, it is also necessary to look for useful answers to bioethical questions affecting the legal tools that support the procedure.

  16. Female reproductive disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crain, D Andrew; Janssen, Sarah J; Edwards, Thea M

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the possible role of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) on female reproductive disorders emphasizing developmental plasticity and the complexity of endocrine-dependent ontogeny of reproductive organs. Declining conception rates and the high incidence of female reproductive...

  17. Female Sexual Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Endocrinologist Search Featured Resource Menopause Map™ View Female Sexual Dysfunction February 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors ... Resources Mayo Clinic Cleveland Clinic What is female sexual dysfunction (FSD)? Many women have a low sex ...

  18. Diagnosing the doctors' departure: survey on sources of dissatisfaction among Irish junior doctors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bruce-Brand, R

    2012-01-01

    There has been a significant decline in the number of applications for non-consultant hospital doctor (NCHD) posts in Ireland over the last 18 months. We conducted an online, anonymous survey of Irish NCHDs to establish levels of satisfaction, sources of dissatisfaction and the major reasons for junior doctors seeking work abroad. 522 NCHDs took the survey, including 64 (12.3%) currently working outside of the Republic. 219 (45.8%) were slightly dissatisfied and 142 (29.7%) were extremely dissatisfied with practising medicine in Ireland. Major sources of dissatisfaction included the state of the health care system, staffing cover for leave and illness, the dearth of consultant posts and the need to move around Ireland. The most important reason for NCHDs wishing to leave was to seek better training and career opportunities abroad.

  19. Presentation and Surgical Management of Duodenal Duplication in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline C. Jadlowiec

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal duplications in adults are exceedingly rare and their diagnosis remains difficult as symptoms are largely nonspecific. Clinical presentations include pancreatitis, biliary obstruction, gastrointestinal bleeding from ectopic gastric mucosa, and malignancy. A case of duodenal duplication in a 59-year-old female is presented, and her treatment course is reviewed with description of combined surgical and endoscopic approach to repair, along with a review of historic and current recommendations for management. Traditionally, gastrointestinal duplications have been treated with surgical resection; however, for duodenal duplications, the anatomic proximity to the biliopancreatic ampulla makes surgical management challenging. Recently, advances in endoscopy have improved the clinical success of cystic intraluminal duodenal duplications. Despite these advances, surgical resection is still recommended for extraluminal tubular duplications although combined techniques may be necessary for long tubular duplications. For duodenal duplications, a combined approach of partial excision combined with mucosal stripping may offer advantage.

  20. Peer mentoring in doctor performance assessment: strategies, obstacles and benefits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, K.; Driessen, E.W.; Arah, O.A.; Lombarts, K.M.; Wollersheim, H.C.H.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT: Mentors are increasingly involved in doctor performance assessments. Mentoring seems to be a key determinant in achieving the ultimate goal of those assessments, namely, improving doctor performance. Little is known, however, about how mentors perceive and fulfil this role. OBJECTIVE: The a