WorldWideScience

Sample records for surgical contraception female

  1. Female contraception over 40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    of an unexpected pregnancy are potentially detrimental. No contraceptive method is contraindicated by advanced reproductive age alone; thus there is a need to discuss the effectiveness, risks and non-contraceptive benefits of all family planning methods for women in this age group. METHODS: MEDLINE searches were...... done by topic (epidemiology, age and reproduction, sexual function, delayed childbearing and specific contraceptive methods). The topic summaries were presented to the Workshop Group and omissions or disagreements were resolved by discussion. RESULTS: The decline in fecundity in the fifth decade...... is insufficient for contraceptive purposes. Thus a family planning method is needed. Sterilization is by far the most common method in several countries. Copper intrauterine devices and hormone intrauterine systems have similar effectiveness, with fewer than 1% failures in the first year of typical use. Special...

  2. sexuality, contraception and unintended pregnancy among female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. E. P. Gharoro

    AMONG FEMALE STUDENT NURSES IN CALABAR, NIGERIA ... influence sexual behaviour and contraceptive use among young women. Methods – A ... sexuality, knowledge and use of modern ... unwanted pregnancy is by abortion 9. ... being young adults, majority aged 15- ..... cultural attitudes and the judgmental.

  3. The effects of contraception on female poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Stephanie P; LaLumia, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Poverty rates are particularly high among households headed by single women, and childbirth is often the event preceding these households' poverty spells. This paper examines the relationship between legal access to the birth control pill and female poverty. We rely on exogenous cross-state variation in the year in which oral contraception became legally available to young, single women. Using census data from 1960 to 1990, we find that having legal access to the birth control pill by age 20 significantly reduces the probability that a woman is subsequently in poverty. We estimate that early legal access to oral contraception reduces female poverty by 0.5 percentage points, even when controlling for completed education, employment status, and household composition.

  4. Female pelvic actinomycosis and intrauterine contraceptive devices

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Faustino R Pérez-López1,2, José J Tobajas1,3, Peter Chedraui41Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza; 2Hospital Clínico Lozano Blesa; 3Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet, Zaragoza, Spain; 4Enrique C. Sotomayor Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Guayaquil, EcuadorAbstract: Female genital Actinomyces infection is relatively rare, although strongly related to long-lasting intrauterine contraceptive dev...

  5. Female pelvic actinomycosis and intrauterine contraceptive devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino R Pérez-López

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Faustino R Pérez-López1,2, José J Tobajas1,3, Peter Chedraui41Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza; 2Hospital Clínico Lozano Blesa; 3Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet, Zaragoza, Spain; 4Enrique C. Sotomayor Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Guayaquil, EcuadorAbstract: Female genital Actinomyces infection is relatively rare, although strongly related to long-lasting intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD application. An infective pathway has been postulated extending upward from the female perineum to the vagina and cervix. The traumatic effect of the device and a prior infection may contribute to the Actinomyces infection in the female genitalia. This disease is characterized by local swelling, suppuration, abscess formation, tissue fibrosis, tubal-ovarian mass and fistula formation. The infection spreads by contiguity often mimicking the characteristics of a malignant neoplastic process. Currently there is no consensus regarding diagnosis and screening tests, although there seems to be agreement in relation to IUD type, duration, and sexual behavior as major risk factors.Keywords: contraception, intrauterine contraceptive device, pelvic actinomycosis, sexuality

  6. The future of steroids in female contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djerassi, C

    1987-11-15

    Given the lack of innovative advances in contraceptive research in past decades, steroid ovulation inhibitors are likely to play an even more significant role in female contraception by the year 2000. In developed countries in particular, oral contraceptive (OC) use is likely to increase in the next 15 years. In the US, where OC use has fallen from a high of 10 million users to the current level of 8 million acceptors, the pill's popularity is expected to rise again. This is due to 4 factors: 1) the discovery, through recent epidemiologic studies, of numerous noncontraceptive benefits of OC use that outweigh any deleterious effects; 2) the product litigation phenomenon, which has resulted in the withdrawal of IUDs from the US market, is not affecting the pharmaceutical companies that have an important stake in the OC market; 3) reductions in the daily dosage of the progestational and estrogenic components of OCs have led to less concern about possible longterm side effects; and 4) a political climate favoring restrictions on abortion is likely to increase reliance on highly effective methods of fertility control. In developing countries, long-acting (up to 5 years) subdermal silastic implants of progestogen-releasing devices are likely to find increasing acceptance. The only fundamentally new development in contraceptive technology that has any chance of being available by the year 2000 is use of sex-hormone-binding protein receptors for postcoital fertility control.

  7. Sexual Activity and Contraceptive Use among Female

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adolescents — A Report from Port Harcourt, Nigeria ... rather low level (56%) of knowledge of effective contraceptive methods, and limitation of .... Combined oral contraceptive pills 20.5 .... moted for its dual advantages —— prevention of.

  8. Contraception and Unintended Pregnancy among Unmarried Female University Students: A Cross-sectional Study from China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjing Wang

    Full Text Available This study aims to understand the level of contraceptive knowledge and attitudes towards contraception, and then to explore the association between the contraceptive behavior and unintended pregnancy in unmarried female university students in China. A cross-sectional study was conducted of university students in 49 universities across 7 cities in China from September 2007 to January 2008. We distributed 74,800 questionnaires, of which 69,842 were returned. In this paper, the data from 35,383 unmarried female university students were analyzed. The prevalence of sexual intercourse in unmarried female university students was 10.2%. The prevalence of unintended pregnancy in those sexually active female university students, was 31.8%. Among students with pregnancy, 53.5% experienced two or more pregnancies. 28.3% of the students with sexual intercourse reported that they always adopted contraceptive methods, and of those 82.9% chose to use male condoms. The majority (83.9% of students with unintended pregnancy chose to terminate the latest pregnancy by surgical abortion or medical abortion. The contraceptive knowledge level of students who experienced unintended pregnancy was lower than those who did not. In China, about one third of unmarried female students with sexual intercourse experience unintended pregnancy. A variety of contraceptive methods are adopted, but the frequency of contraceptive use is low. Most of unmarried female students who experienced unintended pregnancy would choose to terminate the pregnancy with surgical or medical abortion. University students, especially the ones who have experienced unintended pregnancy, lack contraceptive and reproductive health knowledge.

  9. Premarital Contraceptives Usage among Male and Female Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornick, Joesph P.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Variables important in predicting female contraception usage were found to be those which involved dyadic commitment, conditions of love, self-esteem, and father's occupation (social class). The best predictors of male contraception usage involved experience in dating and internalization of role models via mother's and father's permissiveness.…

  10. Sexual and Contraceptive Practices among Female Undergraduates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and eighty six (60.8%) students were currently sexually active. ... Contraceptive knowledge was 100%, but consistent use was 34.4%. ... had sex for material rewards and/or under the influence of alcohol and recreational drugs. ... CONCLUSION: There is a high level of sexual activity and low contraceptive use ...

  11. Contraception in HIV-positive female adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananworanich Jintanat

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sexual behavior of HIV-positive youths, whether infected perinatally, through risky behavior or other ways, is not substantially different from that of HIV-uninfected peers. Because of highly active antiretroviral therapy, increasing number of children, infected perinatally, are surviving into adolescence and are becoming sexually active and need reproductive health services. The objective of this article is to review the methods of contraception appropriate for HIV-positive adolescents with a special focus on hormonal contraceptives. Delaying the start of sexual life and the use of two methods thereafter, one of which is the male condom and the other a highly effective contraceptive method such as hormonal contraception or an intrauterine device, is currently the most effective option for those who desire simultaneous protection from both pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. Health care providers should be aware of the possible pharmacokinetic interactions between hormonal contraception and antiretrovirals. There is an urgent need for more information regarding metabolic outcomes of hormonal contraceptives, especially the effect of injectable progestins on bone metabolism, in HIV-positive adolescent girls.

  12. Effects of Administration of Fostamatinib on Blood Concentrations of an Oral Contraceptive in Healthy Female Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    Scientific Terminology Rheumatoid Arthritis, Healthy Female Volunteers, Pharmacokinetics, Oral Contraceptive, Drug-drug Interaction; Laymen Terminology Level of Oral Contraceptive in Blood, Oral Contraceptive, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Drug -Drug Interaction

  13. Contraception in HIV-positive female adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Ananworanich Jintanat; Lakhonphon Sudrak; Kancheva Landolt Nadia T

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Sexual behavior of HIV-positive youths, whether infected perinatally, through risky behavior or other ways, is not substantially different from that of HIV-uninfected peers. Because of highly active antiretroviral therapy, increasing number of children, infected perinatally, are surviving into adolescence and are becoming sexually active and need reproductive health services. The objective of this article is to review the methods of contraception appropriate for HIV-positive adolesce...

  14. Trends in contraceptive use among female adolescents in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Rahman, Lutuf; Marrone, Gaetano; Johansson, Annika

    2011-06-01

    Within the past one and half decades many efforts have been made to improve the availability and access to adolescent sexual and reproductive health services. Despite these efforts, adolescents still face a number of sexual and reproductive health problems. This paper uses data from the 2003 and 2008 Ghana Demographic and Health Surveys to examine changes in contraceptive use among sexually active female adolescents (15-19 years old). The results show that between 2003 and 2008 there was a significant increase in the current use of any contraceptive method (from 23.7% to 35.1%, p = 0.03). It also indicates a shift from modern to traditional contraceptive methods. Traditional methods recorded about 60% (7.8 percentage points) increase as compared to 5.5% (2.6 percentage points) for modern methods. Also ever use of any traditional method recorded a higher increase as compared to any modem method. There was a slight decline 7% (4.4 parentage points) in the number of non-users who intended to use contraceptives in the future. On the whole the findings indicate increasing unmet need for modern contraception due to barriers such as limited access, cost and misconceptions about the effects of contraceptives.

  15. Oral Contraceptives and Bone Health in Female Runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    SUBJECT TERMS bone mass, oral contraceptives, runners, randomized trial, epidemiology, stress fracture, osteoporosis 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...irregularity, and osteopenia/ osteoporosis , is of concern among female athletes. Because of the interrelationships among dietary, exercise, and...Figure 1). Reasons for withdrawing included: geographic relocation, pregnancy , illness, and lack of time. Of the remaining 127 participants, 42 (33

  16. [Do male and female physicians give the same contraception guidance?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, G H; Karlsen, W B; Tollan, A

    1990-11-10

    A questionnaire on their practice regarding ordination of contraceptive methods was answered by 239 (75%) of the general practitioners in the three northern most counties of Norway. The female doctors reported a higher frequency both of female patients and of consultations for birth control, and were more active in these consultations than their male colleagues. Female doctors suggested more methods to their patients, and had a more positive attitude to barrier methods. 61% of the male doctors and 27% of the female doctors had no experience of fitting diaphragms.

  17. Impact of male partner’s awareness and support for contraceptives on female intent to use contraceptives in southeast Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Echezona E Ezeanolue; Iwelunmor, Juliet; Asaolu, Ibitola; Obiefune, Michael C.; Ezeanolue, Chinenye O; Osuji, Alice; Ogidi, Amaka G.; Hunt, Aaron T.; Patel, Dina; Yang, Wei; Ehiri, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the growing body of evidence on use of modern contraceptives among women in sub-Saharan African countries, little is known about the broader context in which female decision-making concerning contraceptive use occurs, particularly the role of their male partners’ awareness and support of modern contraceptives. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 2468 pregnant women and their male partners enrolled in the Healthy Beginning Initiative (HBI), an intervention to in...

  18. Sexual Function, Contraception, Relationship, and Lifestyle in Female Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallwiener, Christian W; Wallwiener, Lisa-Maria; Seeger, Harald; Schönfisch, Birgitt; Mueck, Alfred O; Bitzer, Johannes; Zipfel, Stephan; Brucker, Sara Y; Wallwiener, Stephanie; Taran, Florin-Andrei; Wallwiener, Markus

    2017-02-01

    We undertook to study possible determinants of female sexual dysfunction (FSD) in a large cohort of female medical students from German-speaking countries. We conducted an online questionnaire-based anonymous survey in a cohort of >2600 female medical students enrolled at German-speaking universities. The questionnaire comprised the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) plus additional questions regarding contraception, sexual activity, age, height, weight, lifestyle, activity at work, sexuality and emotional interaction with a steady partner, pregnancy history and plans, health problems, and self-acceptance. Data analysis employed descriptive statistics, univariate and multivariate analyses, and standard nonparametric tests. Of the 2612 respondents aged ≤30 years included in the analysis (mean age [standard deviation], 23.5 [2.5] years), 38.7% of the overall cohort and 33.5% of the sexually active subcohort (91.8% of all students) were at risk for FSD (FSFI score speaking female medical students are at risk for FSD. Contraception, smoking, alcohol, steady relationship, physical fitness, and self-acceptance are significantly associated with the FSFI total score. Being in a steady relationship, better physical fitness, higher activity at work, and subjectively positive self-acceptance, in particular, are associated with higher FSFI total scores, that is, with less risk for sexual dysfunction.

  19. Contraceptive knowledge, sexual behavior, and factors associated with contraceptive use among female undergraduate university students in Kilimanjaro region in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweya, Mussa N; Msuya, Sia E; Mahande, Michael J; Manongi, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that knowledge of contraceptives, especially among the youth in universities, remains limited, and the rate of premarital sexual activity, unwanted pregnancies, and illegal abortions remains higher among university students. This study aimed to assess contraceptive knowledge, sexual behavior, and factors associated with contraceptive use among female undergraduate university students in Kilimanjaro region in Tanzania. Methods A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted from May to June 2015 among undergraduate female students in four universities in Kilimanjaro region. A self-administered questionnaire was given to the participants. Data analysis was performed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. An odds ratio with 95% confidence interval for factors associated with modern contraceptive use was computed using multiple logistic regression models. A P-value of students were involved in the study. Two-thirds (260, 64.8%) of the participants had had sexual intercourse. The majority (93.8%) of the participants had knowledge of contraception. One hundred and seventy-five (43.6%) sexually active women reported that they used contraceptives in the past, while 162 (40.4%) were current contraceptive users. More than half (54.2%) of the sexually active group started sexual activity between the ages of 20–24 years. The most popular methods of contraception used were condoms, withdrawal, and periodic abstinence. The main sources of information about contraception were friends, television, and health care workers (44.8%, 40.3%, and 39.0%, respectively). Conclusion Most of the participants had knowledge of contraception. However, the rate of contraceptive use was low. The majority of the respondents were sexually active and started sexual activity at >18 years of age. Hence, advocacy for adolescent reproductive health education to promote the use of the available

  20. Contraceptive knowledge, sexual behavior, and factors associated with contraceptive use among female undergraduate university students in Kilimanjaro region in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweya, Mussa N; Msuya, Sia E; Mahande, Michael J; Manongi, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that knowledge of contraceptives, especially among the youth in universities, remains limited, and the rate of premarital sexual activity, unwanted pregnancies, and illegal abortions remains higher among university students. This study aimed to assess contraceptive knowledge, sexual behavior, and factors associated with contraceptive use among female undergraduate university students in Kilimanjaro region in Tanzania. A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted from May to June 2015 among undergraduate female students in four universities in Kilimanjaro region. A self-administered questionnaire was given to the participants. Data analysis was performed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. An odds ratio with 95% confidence interval for factors associated with modern contraceptive use was computed using multiple logistic regression models. A P-value of 18 years of age. Hence, advocacy for adolescent reproductive health education to promote the use of the available contraceptive services among university students is needed.

  1. Female contraceptive vaccine possible, but not for years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    Researchers are presently testing 2 types of contraceptive vaccines in animal models. One of these is the sperm antigen vaccine which would cause immunity to sperm within the female reproductive tract. The other works against the zona pellucida (the extracellular membrane surrounding the ovum) which the sperm must bind to and penetrate for fertilization to take place. At this time, researchers do not yet know what vaccine is the best route. The sperm antigen vaccine would inhibit capacitation--that stage where they become capable of fertilizing the ovum. The researchers foresee certain problems with this vaccine, however. For example, it will be difficult to get a vaccine to work properly within just the reproductive tract since most antigen vaccines work within the entire immune system. Further, all the areas of the reproductive tract are biologically different. In addition, researchers must find a vaccine potent enough to affect the millions of sperm that enter the uterus. A potential problem with the zona pellucida vaccine is that it could create ovarian dysfunction permanently. Therefore, researchers realize the importance of finding a zona pellucida vaccine that will induce fertilization but not destroy the ovaries. WHO is in the early stages of working on a vaccine against human chorionic gonadotropin to prevent implantation, but this and any postfertilization vaccine will probably not be produced for the US market because of the present antiabortion sentiment. Additional barriers to production of a contraceptive vaccine is that pharmaceutical companies fear liability in marketing a new contraceptive and their profit margin will be low. Nevertheless, the earliest a contraceptive vaccine would become available in 1999.

  2. Oxidative Stress in Female Athletes Using Combined Oral Contraceptives

    OpenAIRE

    Cauci, S; Buligan, C; Marangone, M; Francescato, Mp.

    2016-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress in female athletes is understudied. We investigated oxidative stress in sportswomen of different disciplines according to combined oral contraceptive (OC) use and lifestyle/alimentary habits. Methods Italian sportswomen (n?=?144; mean age 23.4???4.2?years; body mass index 21.2???2.2?kg?m?2; sport activity 9.2???4.1?h?week?1) were analyzed; 48?% were volleyball players, 12.5?% soccer players, 10.4?% track-and-field sports, and followed by other disciplines? athletes...

  3. Utilization of modern contraceptives among female traders in Jos South LGA of Plateau state, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Envuladu E.A; Agbo H.A; Mohammed A; Chia L; Kigbu J.H; Zoakah A.I

    2012-01-01

    Background: Contraceptive use is seen as pivotal to protecting women’s health and rights, contraception when accepted and used by majority of women in any given community has been shown to reduce unwanted pregnancy, high parity and consequently maternal mortality. Aim: The study aimed at determining the level of awareness, utilization, preferred methods of contraceptives and factors affecting contraceptive use among female traders of Jos south Local government area of Plateau state. Materials...

  4. Do knowledge and cultural perceptions of modern female contraceptives predict male involvement in Ayete, Nigeria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanusi, A; Akinyemi, Oluwaseun O; Onoviran, Oghemetega O

    2014-12-01

    Male involvement is crucial to female contraceptive use. This study examined how male knowledge and cultural perceptions of modern female contraceptives influence involvement in contraceptive use. A cross-sectional survey of 389 men from Ayete, Nigeria was used to regress a continuous male involvement score on demographic variables, knowledge of at least one method of modern female contraception and a scored male perception variable using Ordinary Least Squares regression. Controlling for perception, the knowledge of at least one method of modern female contraception was not significantly associated with a change in male involvement (p=0.264). Increasing positive perception was associated with higher male involvement scores (p=0.001). Higher educated males, those with a current desire to have children and males whose partners were currently using a method had greater male involvement scores (pknowledge of contraceptive methods.

  5. Contraceptive knowledge, sexual behavior, and factors associated with contraceptive use among female undergraduate university students in Kilimanjaro region in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweya MN

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mussa N Sweya,1 Sia E Msuya,2,3 Michael J Mahande,2 Rachel Manongi1,3 1Community Health Department, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Public Health, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University, 3Community Health Department, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre, Moshi, Tanzania Background: Previous studies have shown that knowledge of contraceptives, especially among the youth in universities, remains limited, and the rate of premarital sexual activity, unwanted pregnancies, and illegal abortions remains higher among university students. This study aimed to assess contraceptive knowledge, sexual behavior, and factors associated with contraceptive use among female undergraduate university students in Kilimanjaro region in Tanzania. Methods: A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted from May to June 2015 among undergraduate female students in four universities in Kilimanjaro region. A self-administered questionnaire was given to the participants. Data analysis was performed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. An odds ratio with 95% confidence interval for factors associated with modern contraceptive use was computed using multiple logistic regression models. A P-value of <5% (two-tailed was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 401 students were involved in the study. Two-thirds (260, 64.8% of the participants had had sexual intercourse. The majority (93.8% of the participants had knowledge of contraception. One hundred and seventy-five (43.6% sexually active women reported that they used contraceptives in the past, while 162 (40.4% were current contraceptive users. More than half (54.2% of the sexually active group started sexual activity between the ages of 20–24 years. The most popular methods of contraception used were condoms, withdrawal, and periodic abstinence. The main

  6. A mixed-methods exploration of the contraceptive experiences of female teens with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski, Ruth; Dennis, Amanda

    2014-09-01

    We explored the contraceptive experiences of female teens with epilepsy, including their knowledge and perceptions of interactions between antiepileptic drugs and hormonal contraception and contraceptive decision-making processes. From November 2012 to May 2013, we conducted one online survey (n=114) and 12 online focus group discussions (n=26) with female teens with epilepsy about their contraceptive experiences and unmet needs. Survey data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and focus group transcripts were analyzed thematically using modified grounded theory methods. Both survey and focus group participants reported believing that interactions between epilepsy medications and hormonal contraceptives could lead to reductions in contraceptive efficacy and seizure control. However, their knowledge about these types of medication interactions was often incomplete. Many study participants viewed contraceptive decision making as a difficult process, and some participants reported avoiding hormonal contraceptives because of potential interactions with antiepileptic drugs. Study participants reported relying on health care providers and parents for contraceptive decision-making support. Focus group participants also reported they wanted health care providers to provide more in-depth and comprehensive counseling about contraception, and that they desired peer support with contraceptive decisions. The ability to make informed contraceptive decisions is important for teens with epilepsy as interactions between anti-epileptic drugs and hormonal contraceptives can impact seizure occurrence and lead to an increased risk of unplanned pregnancy. Guidance for providers offering contraceptive care to this population is needed, as well as a contraceptive support tool that empowers teens with epilepsy to advocate for desired health care. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Utilization of modern contraceptives among female traders in Jos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    International Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Research. Volume 1 Issue 3 ... awareness of modern contraceptives was high (93.4%) and the most popular contraceptive methods .... (46.7%) had secondary school education as the highest ...

  8. Hormonal contraceptive use lowers female intrasexual competition in pair-bonded women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobey, Kelly D.; Klipping, Christine; Buunk, Abraham P.

    The purpose of this study was to test the influence of hormonal contraceptive use on levels of female intrasexual competition. Twenty-eight women completed a scale for intrasexual competition on three occasions: when using hormonal contraceptives and when regularly cycling at a fertile and a

  9. Hormonal contraceptive use lowers female intrasexual competition in pair-bonded women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobey, Kelly D.; Klipping, Christine; Buunk, Abraham P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the influence of hormonal contraceptive use on levels of female intrasexual competition. Twenty-eight women completed a scale for intrasexual competition on three occasions: when using hormonal contraceptives and when regularly cycling at a fertile and a non-fer

  10. Condom and Other Contraceptive Use among a Random Sample of Female Adolescents: A Snapshot in Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimley, Diane M.; Lee, Patricia A.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the sexual practices of 235 females aged 15 to 19 years and their readiness to use specific contraceptive methods. Results indicate that, despite the availability of newer contraceptive methods, most sexually active adolescents were least resistant to using condoms, perceiving the male condom as an acceptable preventative both for…

  11. Hormonal contraceptive use lowers female intrasexual competition in pair-bonded women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobey, Kelly D.; Klipping, Christine; Buunk, Abraham P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the influence of hormonal contraceptive use on levels of female intrasexual competition. Twenty-eight women completed a scale for intrasexual competition on three occasions: when using hormonal contraceptives and when regularly cycling at a fertile and a non-fer

  12. International survey to assess women's attitudes regarding choice of daily versus nondaily female hormonal contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour D

    2014-04-01

    education on contraceptive choices may help women to find the method that best suits their needs, thus improving contraceptive compliance. Keywords: female contraception, contraceptive options, hormonal contraceptives, survey, women's attitudes

  13. Chlamydial salpingitis in female guinea pigs receiving oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, A L; Pasley, J N; Rank, R G; White, H J; Mrak, R E

    1988-01-01

    Female guinea pigs were given daily doses of a combination of oral contraceptive (OC) agents, consisting of mestranol and norethynodrel suspended in sesame oil or distilled H2O, and were infected in the genital tract with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). Counts of chlamydial inclusions in cells of vaginal smears collected during infection, showed prolongation and enhancement of infection in OC-treated animals as compared with controls. Appearance of IgG and IgA antibodies to GPIC in genital secretions, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), was also delayed in OC-treated animals as compared with controls. OC-treated infected animals were killed on days 15 and 43, and gross pathological evidence for ascending infection culminating in salpingitis was found in all of five and four of five animals, respectively. On the other hand, among untreated infected controls on each sacrifice day, only one of five animals had any evidence for ascending infection. Chlamydiae were detected by light and electron microscopy in fallopian tube tissue collected on day 15 following OC-treatment but not in tissue from control animals.

  14. Smelling wrong: hormonal contraception in lemurs alters critical female odour cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jeremy Chase; Boulet, Marylène; Drea, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Animals, including humans, use olfaction to assess potential social and sexual partners. Although hormones modulate olfactory cues, we know little about whether contraception affects semiochemical signals and, ultimately, mate choice. We examined the effects of a common contraceptive, medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), on the olfactory cues of female ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), and the behavioural response these cues generated in male conspecifics. The genital odorants of contracepted females were dramatically altered, falling well outside the range of normal female variation: MPA decreased the richness and modified the relative abundances of volatile chemicals expressed in labial secretions. Comparisons between treatment groups revealed several indicator compounds that could reliably signal female reproductive status to conspecifics. MPA also changed a female's individual chemical ‘signature’, while minimizing her chemical distinctiveness relative to other contracepted females. Most remarkably, MPA degraded the chemical patterns that encode honest information about genetic constitution, including individual diversity (heterozygosity) and pairwise relatedness to conspecifics. Lastly, males preferentially investigated the odorants of intact over contracepted females, clearly distinguishing those with immediate reproductive potential. By altering the olfactory cues that signal fertility, individuality, genetic quality and relatedness, contraceptives may disrupt intraspecific interactions in primates, including those relevant to kin recognition and mate choice. PMID:20667870

  15. New frontiers in female contraception (and male condoms): 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Anita L

    2012-05-01

    Contraception made profound contributions to women's health in the twentieth century and has the potential to help achieve each of the eight millennium development goals in the twenty-first. However, contraception has not met its full potential, in large part due to inconsistent use. Choice is uniquely important to contraceptive success, so continued innovation in all aspects of birth control is needed. First, we will review recent advances in the introduction of new methods of birth control. Then we will report recent developments in areas that strongly influence contraceptive use, including non-contraceptive benefits, ways to minimize side effects and practice protocols designed to encourage ready access to various methods. In the second half of the paper we will discuss methods that are in development, but not yet available, as well as new research into non-contraceptive benefits, new approaches to reduce side effects and new ways to provide contraceptives so that users can be more successful. The goal of being planned and prepared for pregnancies is still only an abstract concept. Significant barriers to success from traditional sources (ambivalence, cultural and societal beliefs, the status of women, poverty) persist and are now joined by many other emerging structural problems. The consolidation of pharmaceutical companies reduces competition. The loss of profitability for contraceptives due to short-lasting patents, growing demand for generics and growing challenges from product liability reduce incentives for innovation. Healthcare reform in the US may further discourage new product development. However, new advances may still be possible from small start-up companies, philanthropic foundations and governmental research efforts. Other advances may be made by providing contraception in innovative ways and in the techniques we use to motivate patients to be more successful contraceptors.

  16. Awareness and practice of dual contraception among female tertiary institution students in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bello OO

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Oluwasomidoyin Olukemi Bello,1 Timothy AO Oluwasola,1,2 Folasade Adenike Bello1,2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University College Hospital, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria Purpose: To determine the knowledge, awareness, and factors associated with the practice of dual contraception among female undergraduates in Ibadan, Nigeria.Materials and methods: This is a cross-sectional study using a semi-structured ­self-administered questionnaire to assess the knowledge and practice of dual contraception among female undergraduates in the University of Ibadan and The Polytechnic, Ibadan. A total of 1,200 undergraduate students were interviewed, and data obtained were analyzed with SPSS Version 18.0.Results: The mean age of the respondents was 22.57±3.43 years. Among the respondents, 900 (84.6% were unmarried, 871 (77.9% have been sexually exposed, 793 (70.9% had heard of dual contraception, and 659 (58.9% had knowledge of dual contraception. Majority (66.8% of the participants used effective contraception, of whom 423 (56.3% used condom, while others used other short- or long-term reversible contraception. More than two-thirds (79.2% of the sexually exposed respondents were aware of dual contraception, but only 465 (41.6% had practiced it. The main sources of information about dual contraception were from friends and radio (45.3% and 36.1%, respectively. Those who had multiple sexual partners and early coitarche were more likely to use dual contraception (P<0.05. History of previous sexually transmitted infection (odds ratio =3.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] =2.03–4.62 and unwanted pregnancy (odds ratio =3.53, 95% CI =2.62–4.74 were strongly associated with the use of dual contraception.Conclusion: Uptake of dual contraception among the students was low. Efforts need to be concentrated on determining and addressing the challenges that are responsible for the lower uptake of

  17. Female sexual dysfunction with combined oral contraceptive use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jean Jasmin M L; Tan, Thiam Chye; Ang, Seng Bin

    2017-06-01

    Combined oral contraceptive pills (COCs) remain one of the most popular forms of contraception to prevent unwanted pregnancy in women. While it is known that COCs can cause sexual dysfunction in women, there is currently no recommendation to screen for sexual function before and after initiation of COCs. We propose that, based on the evidence available, assessment of sexual function should be done at initiation of COCs, as well as at regular intervals thereafter. This would allow COC-related sexual dysfunction to be managed early, such as by switching the patient to newer-generation COCs or other forms of contraception. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  18. Achondroplasia in female twins: surgical indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisetti, Walter; Pedretti, Leopoldo; De Bartolomeo, Omar; Verdoni, Fabio; Memeo, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Although in literature achondroplasia has been described profusely, reports on achondroplastic twins are limited. We present two cases of monozygotic female twins with achondroplasia, who underwent limb-lengthening surgical procedure with external fixation in the following five steps: tibia, femur, tibia; femur, homer. Both the cases presented a good limb length and an optimal correction of associated deformities after the treatment, fulfilling the indications. Surgical indications were mostly led by the axial deviations of the lower limbs, and the timing of the limb-lengthening procedures has been the same in both couples showing the importance of this aspect.

  19. Female Migration, Local Context and Contraception Use in Urban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    community with major transport problems has a negative effect. ... As rural- urban migration in Africa and other developing countries is still a significant .... months prior to the survey on the radio, or on the ..... contraceptive use in India.

  20. Oxidative Stress in Female Athletes Using Combined Oral Contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauci, Sabina; Buligan, Cinzia; Marangone, Micaela; Francescato, Maria Pia

    2016-12-01

    Oxidative stress in female athletes is understudied. We investigated oxidative stress in sportswomen of different disciplines according to combined oral contraceptive (OC) use and lifestyle/alimentary habits. Italian sportswomen (n = 144; mean age 23.4 ± 4.2 years; body mass index 21.2 ± 2.2 kg m(-2); sport activity 9.2 ± 4.1 h week(-1)) were analyzed; 48 % were volleyball players, 12.5 % soccer players, 10.4 % track-and-field sports, and followed by other disciplines' athletes. Oxidative stress was evaluated by free oxygen radical test (FORT) assessing blood hydroperoxides and free oxygen radical defense (FORD) assay evaluating antioxidant capacity in OC users (n = 42) compared to non-OC users. Elevated oxidative stress levels (≥310 FORT units) were found in 92.9 % of OC users and in 23.5 % of non-OC users (crude OR = 42, 95 % CI 12-149, p correlated to hydroperoxides. In non-OC users only, hydroperoxide values were positively correlated with weight and BMI and inversely correlated with chocolate and fish consumption. The markedly elevated oxidative stress we revealed in OC-user athletes could be detrimental to physical activity and elevate cardiovascular risk (as thromboembolism). Further research is needed to extend our results, to clarify the biochemical pathways leading to increased hydroperoxides (mainly lipid peroxides) and reduced antioxidant defense, and to elucidate the potential effects on athletic performance. OC use should be considered when developing gender-focused strategies against oxidative stress.

  1. Surgical reconstruction in female genital mutilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gültekin, İsmail Burak; Altınboğa, Orhan; Dur, Rıza; Kara, Osman Fadıl; Küçüközkan, Tuncay

    2016-06-01

    Female genital mutilation (FGM) is an unusual condition for our country. However, an increase in FGM in future days can be predicted with the increasing numbers of exchange students coming from African countries, migration of refugees and socioeconomic relations with the African countries. We want to share our experience of two FGM victims admitted to our clinic with the request of reconstructive vulvar surgery before their marriage. Both women had WHO Type III FGM. Physical examination findings and surgical reconstruction techniques were presented.

  2. The impact of a male or female thrombotic family history on contraceptive counseling : a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vlijmen, E. F. W.; Veeger, N. J. G. M.; Middeldorp, S.; Hamulyak, K.; Prins, M. H.; Kluin-Nelemans, H. C.; Meijer, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Women from thrombophilic families have increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), which increases further during oral contraceptive (COC) use and pregnancy-postpartum. Whether this additional risk differs between relatives of male and female patients, or is different when that femal

  3. Contraceptive methods and risk of HIV acquisition or female-to-male transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Lisa B; Polis, Chelsea B; Sheth, Anandi N; Brown, Jennifer; Kourtis, Athena P; King, Caroline; Chakraborty, Rana; Ofotokun, Igho

    2014-12-01

    Effective family planning with modern contraception is an important intervention to prevent unintended pregnancies which also provides personal, familial, and societal benefits. Contraception is also the most cost-effective strategy to reduce the burden of mother-to-child HIV transmission for women living with HIV who wish to prevent pregnancy. There are concerns, however, that certain contraceptive methods, in particular the injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), may increase a woman's risk of acquiring HIV or transmitting it to uninfected males. These concerns, if confirmed, could potentially have large public health implications. This paper briefly reviews the literature on use of contraception among women living with HIV or at high risk of HIV infection. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations place no restrictions on the use of hormonal contraceptive methods by women with or at high risk of HIV infection, although a clarification recommends that, given uncertainty in the current literature, women at high risk of HIV who choose progestogen-only injectable contraceptives should be informed that it may or may not increase their risk of HIV acquisition and should also be informed about and have access to HIV preventive measures, including male or female condoms.

  4. Emergency Contraception: Awareness, Perception and Practice among Female Undergraduates in Imo State University, Southeastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojiyi, Ec; Anolue, Fc; Ejekunle, Sd; Nzewuihe, Ac; Okeudo, C; Dike, Ei; Ejikem, Ce

    2014-11-01

    Limited knowledge and practice of contraception is a global public health problem. Unintended pregnancies are the primary cause of induced abortion. When safe abortions are not available, as in Nigeria with restricted abortion laws, abortion can contribute significantly to maternal mortality and morbidity. Adequate information on the awareness and the use of emergency contraception is necessary for planning interventions in groups vulnerable to unwanted pregnancy. The aim of the following study is to access the awareness, perception and practice of emergency contraception among female undergraduates in Imo State University, South Eastern Nigeria. A questionnaire based cross-sectional survey using female undergraduates selected randomly from Imo State University, Owerri. A total of 700 students participated in the study. Awareness of emergency contraception was very high (85.1%) (596/700). The awareness was significantly higher amongst students in health related faculties than in the non-health related faculties (P = 0.01). The main sources of information were through friends (43.1%) (317/700) and lectures (22.1%) (192/700). High dose progestogen (postinor-2) was the most commonly known type of emergency contraception (70.8%) (422/596). Only 58.1% (346/596) of those who were aware of emergency contraception approved of their use. The major reasons given by the 41.9% (250/596) who disapproved of their use were religious reasons (50.4%) (126/250) and that they were harmful to health (49.2%) (123/250). Two-third (67%) (46 9/700) of the students were sexually active and only 39.9% (187/469) of them used emergency contraception. High dose progestogen (postinor-2) was again the most commonly used method (70.8%) (422/596). The most common situation in which emergency contraception was used was following unprotected sexual intercourse (45.5%) (85/144). Only 34.6% (206/596) of those who were aware of emergency contraception identified correctly the appropriate time interval

  5. Female Romanian university students' attitudes and perceptions about contraception and motherhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blidaru, Iolanda Elena; Furau, Gheorghe; Socolov, Demetra

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the knowledge, perceptions and attitudes of female Romanian university students, as possible future opinion leaders, about contraception and motherhood, by assessing their level of contraceptive use, opinions and knowledge with regard to combined oral contraceptives (COCs). A knowledge, attitudes and practice questionnaire was conducted among 1105 female university students aged 19 to 30 years. The participants were recruited from six faculties at universities in Iasi and Arad, Romania. The study protocol was approved by the university ethics committees. Statistical analyses included percentages, χ(2) tests and Fisher's exact test. Two-thirds of respondents were in a relationship or married. Average age at first sexual intercourse was 18.6 years. Two out of three (69%) students identified themselves as sexually active. The same percentage showed a positive attitude towards contraception and stated that they used it. The most commonly used contraceptive methods were condoms, COCs and withdrawal. The students' perceptions of the benefits and adverse effects of COCs were analysed. Half of the students had heard about extended COC regimens, but only 24% showed interest in using them regularly. A large proportion of pharmacy and non-medical students appeared to have poor knowledge about contraception and reproductive health, which generated misperceptions and negative attitudes. Two-thirds of the participants considered 25 to 29 years to be the optimal age for starting a family, and 85.5% intended to have children in the future. Medical students, but not pharmacy students, showed higher levels of knowledge. Improvement of students' knowledge, perceptions and attitudes towards general contraceptive use, COCs and childbearing is needed. Evidence-based information is required to address poor knowledge about the physiology of reproduction, misconceptions relating to COCs, and the possibility of menstrual suppression using hormonal

  6. Barrier versus oral contraceptive use: a study of female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, S M; Joffe, A; Gall, M J

    1991-09-01

    Although they provide birth control and are easier to use, oral contraceptives (OCPs) are not the preferred approach to preventing sexually transmitted disease (STD). Do the knowledge, attitudes, and experiences of oral contraceptive users place them at greater risk for STDs than those who employ barrier methods? This study examined differences between sexually active female college students (ie, those who reported ever having had vaginal intercourse) who used OCPs and those who employed barrier methods of contraception at the time of their most recent intercourse. The authors analyzed HIV- and other STD-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors from three consecutive annual health surveys of young women about to begin their first year of college. Findings showed barrier and OCP users to be comparable in knowledge about the effectiveness of various contraceptive methods in protecting them against STDs, perceived personal susceptibility to HIV, and experiences with alcohol before sexual intercourse. Oral contraceptive users, compared with those in the group who used barrier methods, reported a greater number of recent partners (p less than .03) and greater perceived vulnerability to STDs (p less than .03). Student healthcare providers must develop creative educational strategies to encourage simultaneous use of both oral contraceptives and barrier methods to protect students against STDs and pregnancy.

  7. The impact of genetics and hormonal contraceptives on the steroid profile in female athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Erkander Mullen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The steroid module of the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP, the newest innovation in doping testing, is currently being finalized for implementation. Several factors, other than doping, can affect the longitudinal steroid profile. In this study we investigated the effect of hormonal contraceptives as well as the effect of three polymorphisms on female steroid profiles in relation to doping controls.The study population consisted of 79 female elite athletes between the ages of 18 to 45. Hormonal contraceptives were used by 32 % of the subjects. A full urinary steroid profile was obtained using World Anti-Doping Agency accredited methods. In addition all subjects were genotyped for copy number variation of UGT2B17 and SNPs in UGT2B7 and CYP17.Subjects using hormonal contraceptives excreted 40 % less epitestosterone as compared to non-users (p = 0.005 but showed no difference in testosterone excretion. When removing individuals homozygous for the deletion in UGT2B17, the testosterone to epitestosterone (T/E ratio was 29 % higher in the hormonal contraceptives group (p = 0.016. In agreement with previous findings in men, copy number variation of UGT2B17 had significant effect on female urinary testosterone excretion and therefore also the T/E ratio. Subjects homozygous for the T allele of CYP17 showed a lower urinary epitestosterone concentration than the other CYP17 genotypes. It is of great importance that the athlete’s steroidal passport can compensate for all possible normal variability in steroid profiles from women. Therefore, considering the large impact of hormonal contraceptives on female steroid profiles, we suggest that the use of hormonal contraceptives should be a mandatory question on the doping control form.

  8. Promoting contraceptive use among unmarried female migrants in one factory in Shanghai: a pilot workplace intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Xu

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In urban China, more single women are becoming pregnant and resorting to induced abortion, despite the wide availability of temporary methods of contraception. We developed and piloted a workplace-based intervention to promote contraceptive use in unmarried female migrants working in privately owned factories. Methods Quasi-experimental design. In consultation with clients, we developed a workplace based intervention to promote contraception use in unmarried female migrants in a privately owned factory. We then implemented this in one factory, using a controlled before-and-after design. The intervention included lectures, bespoke information leaflets, and support to the factory doctors in providing a contraceptive service. Results 598 women participated: most were under 25, migrants to the city, with high school education. Twenty percent were lost when staff were made redundant, and implementation was logistically complicated. All women attended the initial lecture, and just over half the second lecture. Most reported reading the educational material provided (73%, but very few women reported using the free family planning services offered at the factory clinic (5% or the Family Planning Institute (3%. At baseline, 90% (N = 539 stated that contraceptives were required if having sex before marriage; of those reporting sex in the last three months, the majority reporting using contraceptives (78%, 62/79 but condom use was low (44%, 35/79. Qualitative data showed that the reading material seemed to be popular and young women expressed a need for more specific reproductive health information, particularly on HIV/AIDS. Women wanted services with some privacy and anonymity, and views on the factory service were mixed. Conclusion Implementing a complex intervention with a hard to reach population through a factory in China, using a quasi-experimental design, is not easy. Further research should focus on the specific needs and

  9. Hormonal contraception: Habits and awareness female students of the University of Novi Sad, Vojvodina, Serbia

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    Mijatović Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Despite a large number of modern contraceptive methods available in the market today, numerous studies have shown insufficient awareness of young women about these forms for birth control. The aim of this study was to compare characteristics of common use of contraceptives as well as the awareness of hormonal contraception among female students of the Faculty of Medicine and the Faculty of Technical Sciences in Novi Sad. Materials and Methods. In the study which was conducted in 2012 240 female students of the Faculty of Medicine and the Faculty of Technical Sciences participated. The average age of students of the Faculty of Medicine and the Faculty of Technical Sciences was 24.06 ± 3.24 and 22.72 ± 0.90 years, respectively. They completed an anonymous questionnaire, which consisted of three parts. The first part comprised general questions, the second part included characteristics of the sexual life of students and their contraceptive habits, while in the third part students were asked to evaluate the accuracy of statements about hormonal contraception. The obtained data were statistically processed by using appropriate methods. Results. The average age when the students of the Faculty of Medicine and the Faculty of Technical Sciences had the first sexual intercourse was 18.74 ± 2.61 and 18.75 ± 2.59, respectively. One third of students from both faculties (30.91% from the Faculty of Medicine and 35% from the Faculty of Technical Sciences had only one sexual partner. Modern contraception was used by 83.64% of the medical students and by 80% of those from the Faculty of Technical Sciences. Contraception was used regularly by 54.54% of the medical students and 43% of those from the Faculty of Technical Sciences. The most frequently applied contraceptive method was condom (90% of the medical students and 93% of the Faculty of Technical Sciences students, respectively. Oral contraceptives were used by 24.54% of the medical

  10. Forgettable contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, David A

    2009-12-01

    The term "forgettable contraception" has received less attention in family planning than has "long-acting reversible contraception." Defined here as a method requiring attention no more often than every 3 years, forgettable contraception includes sterilization (female or male), intrauterine devices, and implants. Five principal factors determine contraceptive effectiveness: efficacy, compliance, continuation, fecundity, and the timing of coitus. Of these, compliance and continuation dominate; the key determinants of contraceptive effectiveness are human, not pharmacological. Human nature undermines methods with high theoretical efficacy, such as oral contraceptives and injectable contraceptives. By obviating the need to think about contraception for long intervals, forgettable contraception can help overcome our human fallibility. As a result, all forgettable contraception methods provide first-tier effectiveness (contraceptives today with exclusively first-tier effectiveness is the one that can be started -- and then forgotten for years.

  11. Emergency contraception amongst female college students – knowledge, attitude and practice

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    Wendwosen T. Nibabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unwanted teenage pregnancies have a notable detrimental impact on the learners’ trajectory and have been associated with jeopardising the students’ educational progress and future career prospects. These pregnancies are mostly unplanned and unintended and many are terminated, either legally or illegally.Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the contributory role played by the knowledge, attitude and practices of female college students with respect to the utilisation of emergency contraceptives.Setting: Three tertiary institutions in Dessie, Ethiopia.Methods: Quantitative self-administered questionnaires were used to collect descriptive data from 352 female college students.Results: The study revealed that there was a high percentage (78.3% of unwanted pregnancies amongst those engaging in sex. Significantly, nearly half (43.3% of these unwanted pregnancies resulted in abortion. Only 10% of the students sampled admitted to ever having used emergency contraception. Even though more than half (69.9% of the students knew about emergency contraception, only 27% of them felt confident that they understood when it was most effective.Conclusion: These and other observed findings confirm the need for improvement of female college students’ knowledge and timely utilisation of emergency contraception.

  12. Emergency contraception amongst female college students – knowledge, attitude and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendwosen T. Nibabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unwanted teenage pregnancies have a notable detrimental impact on the learners’ trajectory and have been associated with jeopardising the students’ educational progress and future career prospects. These pregnancies are mostly unplanned and unintended and many are terminated, either legally or illegally.Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the contributory role played by the knowledge, attitude and practices of female college students with respect to the utilisation of emergency contraceptives.Setting: Three tertiary institutions in Dessie, Ethiopia.Methods: Quantitative self-administered questionnaires were used to collect descriptive data from 352 female college students.Results: The study revealed that there was a high percentage (78.3% of unwanted pregnancies amongst those engaging in sex. Significantly, nearly half (43.3% of these unwanted pregnancies resulted in abortion. Only 10% of the students sampled admitted to ever having used emergency contraception. Even though more than half (69.9% of the students knew about emergency contraception, only 27% of them felt confident that they understood when it was most effective.Conclusion: These and other observed findings confirm the need for improvement of female college students’ knowledge and timely utilisation of emergency contraception.

  13. Correlates of women's cancer screening and contraceptive knowledge among female emergency department patients

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    Bock Beth C

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lack of knowledge regarding preventive health services for women might impede campaigns to expand these services in the emergency department setting. For 18–55-year-old English-speaking women visiting an urban emergency department, we aimed to: (1 Ascertain their knowledge regarding the applicability, purpose, and recommended intervals of three women's cancer screening and three contraceptive methods; and (2 Determine if patient age, race/ethnicity, medical insurance status, and current or recent usage of these methods are associated with greater or lesser knowledge about them. Methods Emergency department-based survey on recent or current usage and knowledge about Pap smears, breast self-examinations, mammograms, condoms, birth control, and emergency contraception. Analyses included calculation of summary statistics and creation of multivariable logistic regression models. Results Of 1,100 patients eligible for the study, 69.9% agreed to participate. Most of the participants were Conclusion Although these female ED patients demonstrated strong knowledge on some women's cancer screening and contraceptive methods, there were several areas of knowledge deficit. Women without private medical insurance and those who have not used a particular cancer screening or contraceptive method demonstrated less knowledge. Reduced knowledge about women's cancer screening and contraceptive methods should be considered during clinical encounters and when instituting or evaluating emergency department-based initiatives that assess the need for these methods.

  14. Sexual and Contraceptive Practices among Female Undergraduates in a Nigerian Tertiary Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinsoji, Akintayo Akinyemi; Olufunmilola, Akin-Akintayo Oladunni; Idowu, Adanikin Abiodun; Pius, Ade-Ojo Idowu

    2015-07-01

    The reproductive health of adolescents and young women is integral to the wellbeing of a society. This study was carried out to determine current sexual practices and contraceptive usage among female undergraduate students in a Southwest Nigerian tertiary institution. It was a cross-sectional questionnaire based survey of female university undergraduates. Pre-tested questionnaire was used to elicit information on socio-demographic variables and sexual and contraceptive practices. Frequency tables were generated and univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to determine factors that influenced sexual and contraceptive practices. SPSS software version 16.0 was used for analysis. Of 350 students sampled, 306 completed the questionnaire. One hundred and eighty six (60.8%) students were currently sexually active. The mean age of sexual debut was 19.11 years. Sixty-six (35.5%) had more than one sexual partners. Contraceptive knowledge was 100%, but consistent use was 34.4%. A third of the respondents had sex for material rewards and/or under the influence of alcohol and recreational drugs. Students who were less than 20 years old (Adjusted OR: 3.52; 95%CI=2.10-6.82) were more likely to be sexually active while those from polygamous/separated families (Adjusted OR: 0.32; 95% CI=0.18-0.58) were less likely to be sexually active. There is a high level of sexual activity and low contraceptive use among female undergraduate students in Southwest Nigeria. More reproductive health education and promotion is necessary to safeguard their sexual health.

  15. Factors associated with emergency contraceptive use among Female Preparatory Schools Students Adwa Town, Northern Ethiopia. Across sectional study design, 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebremeskel Miruts

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emergency contraceptives have become almost available in many developing countries. However, poor user awareness and access have hindered adolescents in learning and using Emergency contraceptive. Wider use of Emergency contraceptive could prevent a substantial proportion of the millions of unplanned pregnancies that occur every year. Hence, this study will relevant to explore the utilization and associated factors of emergency contraception by female students at preparatory schools, Adwa Town, Tigray region, Northern Ethiopia. Methods: Using School based cross-sectional study and self-administered structured questionnaire data was collected from 335 systematically selected female students of preparatory schools. After coding and cleaning, data was entered and analyzed by SPSS window version 20. Descriptive statistics was used to see the frequency and percentage of each variable. Bivarite analysis was done to see the association between the dependent and independent variables. Finally multivariate logistic regression was used identify predictor variables. Results: A total of 335 students participate on the study; the majority (90.1% being in the age group of 17-19, and 314 (93.7% were single. Of the total 216(64.48% heard about emergency contraceptives but Only 37(11.04% have history of emergency contraception use. Out of total 57 (17.02% students were sexually active, among this 48 (84.21% had history of unintended pregnancy and 25(52.08% of pregnancies were terminated by induced abortion. Previous use of regular contraceptives (AOR: 0.033 95% CI (0.004-0.281 was significant predictor not to use of emergency contraception. Conclusion: Knowledge of emergency contraceptive is crucial in preventing unwanted pregnancy but this study reviled that the knowledge and use of emergency contraceptive is very low. Therefore IEC on emergency contraceptive should be initiated at school level to improve knowledge and use of Adolescents on

  16. Perception and Practice of Emergency Contraception among Female Undergraduates of the University of Ibadan,Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Folasade Adenike Bello; Oladapo Olayemi; Adeniran Olubukola Fawole; Olayinka Oladunjoye Ogunbode; Tolulope Sobukunola; Olubukola Adeponle Adesina; Christopher Aimakhu; Michael Abiola Okunlola

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess perception and level of proper utilization of emergency contraception (EC)among female undergraduates. Methods Cross-sectional questionnaire study was performed on 383 female under graduates in Nigeria in June 2006.Data analysis was with X-square test and logistic regressions (P<0.05). Results One hundred and five(48.2%)had been sexually exposed.Only 32(30.5%) used regular contraception.Seventy-three(24.3%)female undergraduates were aware of EC.Only 29(7.6%)had used EC before.Most would not use emergency contraceptive drugs in future due to lack of awareness(64.8%).and fear for future fertility and of drugs being injurious to health.Use of EC was associated with awareness of correct interval for use(OR=9.1:95%CI:2.1-39.9). Conclusion There is poor knowledge about EC and poor use,while significant need remains.Most knowledge was acquired from peers and inaccurate.Peer educators are important and professionals'knowledge needs improvement.

  17. Major research findings in 1984. Unmarried female factory workers' knowledge, attitude on sexual and contraceptive behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    The Korea Institute for Population and Health (KIPH) conducted a survey from January 1, 1983, to June 30, 1984, to identify the sociopsychological and demographic characteristics of unmarried female factory workers and to develop a strategy for planning and implementing organized sex and family planning education and service programs for unmarried female workers in the factory setting. The respondents were 918 female factory workers in the industrial areas of Guro, Gumi, and Masan. Their average age was 21 years with a 3.4 year work career. Respondents' knowledge level of sex, pregnancy, and contraceptive methods was low. The female factory workers preferred counselors outside rather than inside the work place. Although there was no question about the need for counseling for sexual problems among the female factory workers, their user rate was low.

  18. Peripheral arterial disease in a female using high-dose combined oral contraceptive pills

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    P Pallavee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between oral contraceptive (OC pills and vascular diseases is well-known, although, the present generation of pills is considered to be relatively safer in this regard. Hormonal treatment for severe abnormal uterine bleeding is usually considered after ruling out malignancy, when such bleeding is resistant to all other forms of treatment. We report a case of severe peripheral arterial disease in a female, who had been on high-dose OC pills for an extended period of time for severe uterine bleeding.

  19. Knowledge, Perception and Practice of Emergency Contraception among Female Adolescent Hawkers in Rigasa Suburban Community of Kaduna State Nigeria

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    Abubakar Attahir

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In Nigeria the rate of contraceptive use among sexually active adolescents is about 30%, considerably lower than the rates reported for developed countries. This study aimed to determine the knowledge, perception and practice of emergency contraception among female adolescent hawkers in Rigasa community, a suburb of Kaduna town.Materials and Methods: A cross sectional descriptive study of 1200 adolescent female hawkers aged 15–29 years was carried out in 2008, using both self and interviewer administered questionnaires. Results: Vast majority of the respondents are divorcees, constituting 92%. About 46% of them have never attended formal school before marriage. Of the 18 participants who were aware of emergency contraception; none correctly identified 72 hours as the time limit for the method’s use. Antibiotics or home remedies such as dye Robin Blue mixed with Coca cola or mixed with lime or lime mixed with potash and salt water were mentioned as unlisted methods of emergency contraception by responders. Conclusion: It is glaring that there exist a yawning gap of information and knowledge on contraception in general and emergency contraception in particular among female adolescent hawkers. The need to inform this target group about reproductive health generally and unwanted pregnancy in particular would not be out of place.  

  20. Assessment of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice among Regular Female Preparatory School Students towards Emergency Contraceptives in Mekelle, Northern Ethiopia

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    Solomon Abrha

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emergency Contraceptive (EC is a type of modern contraception that is indicated after unprotected sexual intercourse or contraceptive failure. Use of EC with in a defined time period could prevent unwanted pregnancy and its damaging consequences like unintended child birth and unsafe abortion. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude and practices of emergency contraceptives among female preparatory students in Mekelle, North Ethiopia. Method: A cross sectional study was conducted among 366 female students at Atse Yohanesse preparatory school from January to May 2013. A stratified random sampling technique was used to select study participants. Data processing and analyzing was done using statistical package for social sciences version 20. Result: In this study, about 90.7% of the respondents had heard about emergency contraceptives. The major sources of information were mass media, club in school and friends. About 277 (75.7% of the students had good knowledge about EC. The older age was significantly associated with the students’ awareness (AOR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.23-4.37. The majority (229(64.9% of respondents had a positive attitude towards EC. Age and ethnic group were significantly associated with the students’ attitude towards EC. Among those respondents who used contraceptives, 60.5% of them responded to use EC. About two-third (67.4% of ever users of EC had good knowledge of the correct time of taking EC after unprotected sexual intercourse. Conclusion: Although the findings of this study showed high prevalence of knowledge and attitude towards EC among respondents, the improvement of female students’ knowledge about specific details of the method and timely utilization of emergency contraception is still required.

  1. Assessing the use of contraceptives by female undergraduate students in a selected higher educational institution in Gauteng

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    Maria H. Coetzee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unplanned pregnancies amongst students at higher education institutions are a major concern worldwide, including South Africa. Apart from various social and psychological challenges, unplanned pregnancies affect students’ objectives of achieving academic success. Research undertaken in the United States of America (USA indicates that around 80% of female students in institutions of higher education between ages 18 and 24 are sexually active.Objectives: To assess and describe the use of contraceptives by undergraduate female students in a selected higher educational institution in Gauteng.Method: A cross-sectional, descriptive, quantitative design was used. A total of 400 female undergraduate students were requested to respond to a self-administered questionnaire. Stratified random sampling was used to select the participants. They were selected systematically from two campuses. Data were entered using an excel sheet at the Department of Statistics, and analysed using the Statistical Analysis Software programme, (SAS version 9.3, of the Department of Statistics’ higher educational institutions.Results: A total of 74%females indicated they were sexually active, 79%of whom reported using contraceptives. The most common used methods were oral contraceptives at 38%, and 25% for male condoms. The most commonly known methods were condoms at 84%, and the oral contraceptive at 68%. The knowledge of condom use to prevent sexually transmitted diseases was high at 91%.Conclusion: Inadequate knowledge and awareness on some contraceptive methods was found. Thus, educational programmes to increase students’ knowledge on the use of all contraceptive methods are urgently needed

  2. [Male contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoulin, A

    1984-04-01

    have not been demonstrated. Among irreversible methods, many workers have sought an active or passive mehtod of immunizing against paregnancy, but no usable results have yet been obtained. Vasectomy is a simple and easy surgical procedure which is well accepted in some countries, although in most countries the responsibility for contraception is assumed by the women. Vasectomy has 1 advantage over female sterilization: sperm may be preserved in a bank for several years.

  3. Prior Victimization and Sexual and Contraceptive Self-Efficacy among Adolescent Females under Child Protective Services Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovsepian, S. Lory; Blais, Martin; Manseau, Helene; Otis, Joanne; Girard, Marie-Eve

    2010-01-01

    Adolescent females under Child Protective Services care in Quebec, Canada (n = 328) completed a questionnaire designed to explore associations between prior victimization (childhood sexual abuse and four forms of dating violence) and four dimensions of sexual and contraceptive self-efficacy. Five MANCOVAs were performed. In each model, a…

  4. VOLUNTARY SURGICAL CONTRACEPTION OF WOMEN OF LATE REPRODUCTIVE AGE SUFFERING FROM PELVIC ORGAN PROLAPSE – FEATURES AND BENEFITS

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    Nigina Nasimova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been a noticeable "rejuvenation" of pelvic organ prolapse. Inconsistency of the pelvic floor muscles, including the omission of sexual organs, is extremely common pathology, observed almost a third of women of reproductive age. The search for effective, convenient methods of contraception for this category of patients is an important problem of modern gynecology.We proposed a method of transvaginal voluntary surgical contraception, produced in conjunction with surgical treatment of descent and prolapse of the vaginal walls. Studied the nearest and long-term results of surgery in 50 women to which, during the surgical treatment of genital prolapse at the same time was performed transvaginal occlusion of the fallopian tubes. Control groups consisted of 30 women to which in the first step before surgical correction of pelvic organ prolapse have been performed minilaparotomy and voluntary surgical sterilization (VSS. Our method consists in penetrating into the abdominal cavity through the anterior vaginal vault, downgrading the fallopian tubes with a hook of Ramathibodi and tubal sterilization by Pomeroy method. Intra - and postoperative complications were not observed. In the late postoperative periods - the effectiveness of the method was 100%. Marked tendency to improve the quality of sexual life tells about the positive impact of elimination of genital prolapse with simultaneous DCA on the quality of life of women.

  5. Voluntary surgical contraception women of late reproductive age suffering from pelvic organ prolapse – features and benefits

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    Nigina Nasinova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed the method of transvaginal Voluntary Surgical Contraception, conducted in conjunction with surgical treatment of descent and prolapse of the vaginal walls. Were studied the early and late results of the surgery in 50 women to which during the surgical treatment of genital prolapse simultaneously was carries out transvaginal occlusion of the fallopian tubes. Control groups consisted of 30 women to which in the first step before surgical correction of pelvic organ prolapse have been performed minilaparotomy and DCA. Our method consists in penetrating into the abdominal cavity through the front vaginal vault, to downgrade the fallopian tubes with a hook Ramatibodi and tubal sterilization method Pomeroy. Intra - and postoperative complications were not recognized. In the long-term period after surgery - the effectiveness of the method was 100%. Marked tendency to improve the quality of sexual life tells about the positive impact of removing the genital prolapse with simultaneous DCA on the quality of life of women.

  6. A Survey on the Sexual and Contraceptive Behaviors in Chinese Female College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To get information in the sexual and contraceptive behaviors in Chinese female college students, a randomized cluster sampling was conducted in colleges and universities in Wuhan Area,China, in terms of types of colleges, subjects (literature, sciences, medicines, art etc), and grades etc.A total number of 2450 questionnaires were distributed, with 2365 questionnaires returned being valid. The return rate of valid questionnaires was 96.6%. The questionnaire investigation was conducted on a multiple-choice and anonymous basis. Data were input into computer and SPSS12.0software package was employed for statistical analysis. Among the female students, 1196 had the experiences of hugging and kissing (50.57%) and 423 (17.89%) had sexual experiences (sexual intercourse). The first sexual intercourse took place at the age of 19.23±1.74 y. There were significant differences in the sexual experiences among the majors of different subjects, with the rate of sexual experiences in art majors (43.17%) and high-grade students (34.31%) being the highest. The causes of the first sexual intercourse included sexual impulse, curiosity, intention to strengthen the relationship or to show loyalty to boyfriend and sometimes violence. While the motives of the sexual intercourse within the past one year before the investigation were to satisfy the sexual needs and to strengthen the relation with their boyfriends. With both first intercourse and sexual experiences within last one year,the partners of the sexual intercourse were mainly their boyfriends (95.7% and 97.3% respectively),but the partners also included acquaintances, "one night stand" partners and customers of sex trade.Some of them had multiple sexual partners, with the highest number of the sexual partners being 11.In the first sexual intercourse of the subjects, 44.0% of them did not take any contraceptive measures;only 16.4 % of them used condoms. In the sexual intercourse within the last one year, only 44.6%took

  7. Barriers and facilitators adolescent females living with HIV face in accessing contraceptive services: a qualitative assessment of providers’ perceptions in western Kenya

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    Jill M Hagey

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Avoiding unintended pregnancies is important for the health of adolescents living with HIV and has the additional benefit of preventing potential vertical HIV transmission. Health facility providers represent an untapped resource in understanding the barriers and facilitators adolescents living with HIV face when accessing contraception. By understanding these barriers and facilitators to contraceptive use among adolescent females living with HIV, this study aimed to understand how best to promote contraception within this marginalized population. Methods: We conducted structured in-depth interviews with 40 providers at 21 Family AIDS Care & Education Services - supported clinics in Homabay, Kisumu and Migori counties in western Kenya from July to August 2014. Our interview guide explored the providers’ perspectives on contraceptive service provision to adolescent females living with HIV with the following specific domains: contraception screening and counselling, service provision, commodity security and clinic structure. Transcripts from the interviews were analyzed using inductive content analysis. Results: According to providers, interpersonal factors dominated the barriers adolescent females living with HIV face in accessing contraception. Providers felt that adolescent females fear disclosing their sexual activity to parents, peers and providers, because of repercussions of perceived promiscuity. Furthermore, providers mentioned that adolescents find seeking contraceptive services without a male partner challenging, because some providers and community members view adolescents unaccompanied by their partners as not being serious about their relationships or having multiple concurrent relationships. On the other hand, providers noted that institutional factors best facilitated contraception for these adolescents. Integration of contraception and HIV care allows easier access to contraceptives by removing the stigma of coming

  8. Barriers and facilitators adolescent females living with HIV face in accessing contraceptive services: a qualitative assessment of providers' perceptions in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagey, Jill M; Akama, Eliud; Ayieko, James; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Cohen, Craig R; Patel, Rena C

    2015-01-01

    Avoiding unintended pregnancies is important for the health of adolescents living with HIV and has the additional benefit of preventing potential vertical HIV transmission. Health facility providers represent an untapped resource in understanding the barriers and facilitators adolescents living with HIV face when accessing contraception. By understanding these barriers and facilitators to contraceptive use among adolescent females living with HIV, this study aimed to understand how best to promote contraception within this marginalized population. We conducted structured in-depth interviews with 40 providers at 21 Family AIDS Care & Education Services - supported clinics in Homabay, Kisumu and Migori counties in western Kenya from July to August 2014. Our interview guide explored the providers' perspectives on contraceptive service provision to adolescent females living with HIV with the following specific domains: contraception screening and counselling, service provision, commodity security and clinic structure. Transcripts from the interviews were analyzed using inductive content analysis. According to providers, interpersonal factors dominated the barriers adolescent females living with HIV face in accessing contraception. Providers felt that adolescent females fear disclosing their sexual activity to parents, peers and providers, because of repercussions of perceived promiscuity. Furthermore, providers mentioned that adolescents find seeking contraceptive services without a male partner challenging, because some providers and community members view adolescents unaccompanied by their partners as not being serious about their relationships or having multiple concurrent relationships. On the other hand, providers noted that institutional factors best facilitated contraception for these adolescents. Integration of contraception and HIV care allows easier access to contraceptives by removing the stigma of coming to a clinic solely for contraceptive services. Youth

  9. Put a label (claim) on it: Getting non-surgical contraceptives approved for use in cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Linda

    2015-09-01

    Non-surgical contraceptives or sterilants need regulatory approval to be sold for that use. This approval process gives veterinarians the information required to assess the benefits and risks of each product, and to provide comprehensive information on the required dose, method and duration of use, safety and effectiveness. This article reviews the information that must be developed and provided to regulatory agencies worldwide, with a focus on the European Union and the United States, in order to achieve regulatory approval. The main components of developing a drug include developing extensive information on the safety and effectiveness of the product, and also the safety to the environment and to humans handling and administering the drug. Most importantly, a robust method of manufacturing both the drug itself and the formulated drug product (pill, liquid implant or injection) must be developed to assure quality and consistency in each batch. This information is then compiled and submitted to regulatory agencies; in the United States, this includes the Food and Drug Administration, the United States Department of Agriculture and the Environmental Protection Agency, and, in Europe, the European Medicines Agency. Because of the unique nature of non-surgical contraceptives for use in cats and dogs, particularly the desire to have these products last over multiple years, there are special challenges to their regulatory approval that are discussed in this review. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Surgical landmarks of the ureter in the cadaveric female pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barksdale, P A; Brody, S P; Garely, A D; Elkins, T E; Nolan, T E; Gasser, R F

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose was to delineate the course of the ureter in the female pelvis in relationship to several important surgical landmarks. Ten female cadavers with undissected pelves were used. The ureter was identified at the pelvic brim and traced inferiorly to the bladder. Sets of measurements (+/- 0.1 cm) that help define the location of the ureter were obtained at the three landmarks; the ischial spine, the obturator canal and the insertion of the arcus tendineus on the pubic bone. The mean distances from the ureter to the pelvic floor were ischial spine, 3.2 +/- 0.1 cm; obturator canal, 3.2 +/- 0.1 cm; and the insertion of the arcus tendineus on the pubic bone, 1.6 +/- 0.1 cm. The mean distances from the arcus tendineus to the pelvic floor were ischial spine, 1.9 +/- 0.1 cm; obturator canal, 2.8 +/- 0.1 cm; and the insertion of the arcus tendineus on the pubic bone, 3.2 +/- 0.1 cm. This study defines the relationship of the ureter to the pelvic floor through measurements taken at three landmarks. The data should be useful to pelvic surgeons and are important for the development of future surgical techniques.

  11. Knowledge, attitude and practice of contraceptive use among female students of Dilla secondary and preparatory school, Dilla town, South Ethiopia, 2014

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    Samuel Kusheta Katama

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Family planning is known not only as a fundamental intervention for improving the health of women but also as a human right. The aim of this study was to assess the current knowledge, attitude and practice of contraceptive use among female students in Dilla secondary and preparatory school, Dilla, South Ethiopia, 2014. A cross sectional study was conducted among 288 female students in Dilla secondary and preparatory school, south Ethiopia, June 19- 29/2014. A simple random sampling technique was used to select the study subjects. The data was collected using a self-administered structured questionnaire. The data was analyzed by SPSS 20. Chi-square test was used to identify associated factors. A total of 263 female students were involved in this study, of which 249 (94.7% had good knowledge about contraception. The three most frequently identified methods were injectable form (83.9%, oral contraceptive pills (72.7% and condom (48.6%. A total of 15.7% respondents ever used contraceptive. Among the users, 56.4% used oral contraceptive pills, and 23.1 and 10.2% used injectable form and condom, respectively. In spite of the fact that most respondents had good knowledge of contraception, their attitude and practice was low. Emphasis needs to be given on disseminating health information concerning the attitude and practice of contraceptive method.

  12. ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, AND PRACTICE TOWARDS EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTIVES AMONG FEMALE COLLEGE STUDENTS AT MEKELLE TOWN, TIGRAY REGION, ETHIOPIA: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY

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    Haftom Gebrehiwot*, Berhane Gebrekidan, Haftu Berhe and Kalayou Kidanu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Death related to unintended pregnancy associated events is a series public health concern in Ethiopia. This is very common in young adolescents for whom life is full of adventure and temptation with very little knowledge about the consequences of their reckless activities. Emergency contraceptives are the only method that can be used within short time after sexual intercourse, offering a second chance to prevent unwanted pregnancy. Objectives: To assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of emergency contraceptives among female college students at Mekelle town, Ethiopia.Methods: An institutional based cross-sectional survey was conducted among 616 female college students at Mekelle town from March to July, 2011. Multistage sampling technique with Probabilities proportional to size was used. Data were analyzed by SPSS window version 16.0 software package and presented using frequencies, percentages. Crude & adjusted odds ratio were used to control the possible confounding variables. Results: Of the total respondents, 393(67.3% of them replied that they have heard about emergency contraceptives. Among those who have ever heard of emergency contraceptives, 224 (57% mentioned pills only, 9 (2.3% mentioned intrauterine contraceptive devices only and 154(39.2% mentioned both pill & IUCDs. 263(45% of the respondents were knowledgeable towards ECs, and about 271(46.4% of the students had positive attitude towards emergency contraceptives. Of the sexually active respondents 70(24.2% only reported that they had used emergency contraceptive methods previously. Whereas, 219(75.8% were not used emergency contraceptives; some of the reasons were lack of knowledge about ECs (42.9%; no desire to use (22.8% and inaccessibility toward emergency contraceptives (16.4%.Conclusion: The study indicated low level of knowledge; very low level of practice and majority showed negative attitude towards emergency contraceptives.

  13. Low Contraceptive Use among Young Females in Uganda: Does Birth History and Age at Birth have an Influence? Analysis of 2011 Demographic and Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabagenyi, Allen; Habaasa, Gilbert; Rutaremwa, Gideon

    2017-01-01

    Background Globally adolescent fertility has been associated with increased risk to maternal and child health morbidity and mortality. The low use of contraception has been associated with high fertility levels, which is remains a public health concern that efforts have been raised to avert this. We examine the influence history of a previous birth and age at first birth would have on young women’s use of contraception. Methods Using the 2011 Uganda Demographic and Health Survey data, we examine the predictors of contraceptive use on a sample of 3692 young females in Uganda. While controlling for education and age of respondents, logistic regression analyses were run to provide the net effect of the examined predictors on contraceptive use. The study variables included age of respondents, marital status, age at first birth, births in past five years, socioeconomic status, residence, region, education level, religion, occupation and whether the last child was wanted. Results The findings show that only 12% of the adolescents were using contraception at the time of the survey. The key predictors of contraceptive use among young women in Uganda were age at first birth, history of previous birth, current age, and place of residence, education and socioeconomic status. Respondents who had a birth in the 5 years prior to the survey had five times (OR = 5.0, 95% CI = 3.7-6.5) the odds of contraceptive use compared to those who had never had a birth. Further, adolescent females with at least a secondary education were more likely to use contraceptives (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.2-2.0) than those with primary education. The odds of contraceptive use were least among adolescents from Northern region (OR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.2-0.6) compared to those from central region of Uganda. Muslim adolescent females were more likely to use contraceptives compared to Catholics (OR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.1-2.3). Conclusion There is great need to address issues that hinder young people from using

  14. [Basic considerations in the choice of contraceptive methods for male and female].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerstein, J

    1984-09-01

    Causes for the widespread divergence in choice of contraceptive methods are outlined in this article. The reasons for this lack of uniformity can be found in differences in historical and cultural development of groups, religious preferences, and socioeconomic phenomena, especially the influence of mass media. It is found that there is little uniformity within countries of the East and West, as well as within ethnic groups of similar social strata and economic development. It is also noted that the choice of individual contraceptive methods depends on considerations related to use, risk factors, acceptability, and such other variables as age, health condition, sexual behavior, educational level, and religious or ideological judgments.

  15. Sexual behaviour, contraceptive knowledge and use among female undergraduates' students of Muhimbili and Dar es Salaam Universities, Tanzania: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somba, Magreat J; Mbonile, Milline; Obure, Joseph; Mahande, Michael J

    2014-08-07

    The rate of premarital sexual activity, unwanted pregnancies and illegal abortions remain higher among university students. This calls for understanding the knowledge on contraceptive use and sexual behaviours among this high risk group if the incidence of unintended pregnancy, illegal abortions and high sexual risky behaviour are to be minimized. This study aimed to assess ssexual behaviour, contraceptive knowledge and use among female undergraduates' students of Muhimbili and Dar es Salaam Universities in Tanzania. A cross-sectional analytic study was conducted among undergraduate female students in the two Universities located in Dar es Salaam region, Tanzania. The study period was from June 2013 to October 2013. A self-administered questionnaire was given to 281 students. Of these, 253 were retrieved, giving a response rate of 90%. Data was analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) for Windows version 17.0. Descriptive statistics were summarized. The chi square test was used to examine relationship between various sociodemographic and sexual behaviours variables with contraceptive use. A P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results showed that majority (70.4%) of the students have had sexual intercourse. All participants had knowledge of contraception. More than half, 148 (58.5%) of sexually active women reported ever used contraception before while 105 (41.5%) were current contraceptive users. Majority (74.7%) of the sexually active group started sexual activity at young age (19-24 years). Condom, 221(24.3%) and pills, 153 (16.8%) were the known contraceptive methods. The most popular method of contraception used were condoms, withdrawal and periodic abstinence. The main sources of information about contraception were from friends, radio and school (39.5%, 36% and 24%) respectively. Forty (15.8%) women had pregnancies. Of these, 11 (27%) have had unwanted pregnancies among which 54.6% have had induced abortion

  16. Sexual behaviour, contraceptive knowledge and use among female undergraduates’ students of Muhimbili and Dar es Salaam Universities, Tanzania: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The rate of premarital sexual activity, unwanted pregnancies and illegal abortions remain higher among university students. This calls for understanding the knowledge on contraceptive use and sexual behaviours among this high risk group if the incidence of unintended pregnancy, illegal abortions and high sexual risky behaviour are to be minimized. This study aimed to assess ssexual behaviour, contraceptive knowledge and use among female undergraduates’ students of Muhimbili and Dar es Salaam Universities in Tanzania. Methods A cross-sectional analytic study was conducted among undergraduate female students in the two Universities located in Dar es Salaam region, Tanzania. The study period was from June 2013 to October 2013. A self-administered questionnaire was given to 281 students. Of these, 253 were retrieved, giving a response rate of 90%. Data was analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) for Windows version 17.0. Descriptive statistics were summarized. The chi square test was used to examine relationship between various sociodemographic and sexual behaviours variables with contraceptive use. A P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Results showed that majority (70.4%) of the students have had sexual intercourse. All participants had knowledge of contraception. More than half, 148 (58.5%) of sexually active women reported ever used contraception before while 105 (41.5%) were current contraceptive users. Majority (74.7%) of the sexually active group started sexual activity at young age (19–24 years). Condom, 221(24.3%) and pills, 153 (16.8%) were the known contraceptive methods. The most popular method of contraception used were condoms, withdrawal and periodic abstinence. The main sources of information about contraception were from friends, radio and school (39.5%, 36% and 24%) respectively. Forty (15.8%) women had pregnancies. Of these, 11 (27%) have had unwanted pregnancies among which

  17. How Australian Female Adolescents Prioritize Pregnancy Protection: A Grounded Theory Study of Contraceptive Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer L.; Skinner, S. Rachel; Fenwick, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Grounded theory principles were systematically employed to reveal key differences in pregnancy risk and underlying disparities in contraceptive use in (a) never-pregnant (b) pregnant-terminated and (c) pregnant-continued teenagers. Analysis of 69 semistructured interviews revealed a bicausal model of pregnancy protection that accounted for…

  18. Emergency Contraception: A Study to Assess Knowledge, Attitude and Practices among Female College Students in Delhi

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    Priya Arora, Ram C Bajpai, Rajat Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Although the awareness about emergency contraceptive pills is quite high but the knowledge regarding the correct timing and usage is poor even among educated women. Apprehensions regarding the side-effects of these pills may limit their use by women. Information should be provided to women about the correct timing, side effects and precautions for using ECP.

  19. The Impact of the Female Marriage Squeeze and the Contraceptive Revolution on Sex Roles and the Women's Liberation Movement in the United States, 1960 to 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, David M.; Grossbard-Shechtman, Amyra

    1981-01-01

    Argues that the Women's Liberation movement was interconnected to contraceptive technology and a shift in the ratio of males to females at marriageable age. These changes influenced the proportion of married women, divorce rate, marital fertility rate, illegitimacy ratio, and male-female differences in education and labor-force participation.…

  20. A Study of Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice of Emergency Contraceptive Pills among Female College Students in Udaipur, Rajasthan

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    Arun Kumar, Keerti, Chandra P Sharma, Chetan K Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emergency contraception is administered after unprotected intercourse to prevent unintended pregnancy. Sexually active young and adolescent women are at greatest risk of unintended pregnancy and thus unsafe abortion related morbidity and mortality. Objective: Purpose of this study was to evaluate knowledge, attitude and experiences on emergency contraceptive pill (ECP by female college students of Udaipur. Study design: Cross-sectional, pre-structured questionnaire based study. Material and methods: Study was conducted among 600 college going female students (arts, science and commerce faculty of two randomly selected girls colleges of Sukhadia University Udaipur. Data were analyzed statistically by simple proportions and test of significance (Chi square test and Mann Whitney U test using SPSS ver.16. Results: Students included in study were of 16-29 years age group (mean age 18.6±3.2 years, 225 (37.5% had adequate knowledge about emergency contraceptive pills, statistically significant difference in knowledge is seen among students who got knowledge from literary sources and health personnel (p<0.05. Majority of the science stream students (50% were having adequate knowledge followed by commerce and arts stream students respectively but statistically significant difference in knowledge is seen among all faculty students(p<0.05. Majority of students (78% know about the correct timing of EC pills administration. Among all the students only 201 (33.5% students shown positive attitude regarding EC pills. No significant association seen between adequate knowledge and positive attitude (p>0.05.Only 3% students had already used EC pills. Conclusion: Awareness of EC pills is low and there is a gap between knowledge and attitude. Appropriate awareness programme needed.

  1. Assessing knowledge, attitude, and practice of emergency contraception: a cross- sectional study among Ethiopian undergraduate female students

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    Ahmed Fatuma A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency contraception (EC is a type of modern contraception which is indicated after unprotected sexual intercourse when regular contraception is not in use. The importance of EC is evident in preventing unintended pregnancies and its ill consequences like unintended child delivery or unsafe abortion, which are the most common causes of maternal mortality. Therefore, EC need to be available and used appropriately as a backup in case regular contraception is not used, misused or failed. Knowing that Ethiopia is one of the countries with highest maternal mortality rate, this study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of EC, and to further elucidate the relationship between these factors and some socioeconomic and demographic characteristics among female undergraduate students of Addis Ababa University (AAU. This information will contribute substantially to interventions intended to combat maternal mortality. Methods A Cross-sectional quantitative study among 368 AAU undergraduate students was conducted using self-administered questionnaire. Study participants were selected by stratified random sampling. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS Version 17. Results were presented using descriptive statistics, cross-tabulation and logistic regression. Results Among the total participants (n = 368, only 23.4% were sexually active. Majority (84.2% had heard of EC; 32.3% had a positive attitude towards it. The main source of information reported by the respondents was Media (69.3%. Among those who were sexually active, about 42% had unprotected sexual intercourse. Among those who had unprotected sexual intercourse, 75% had ever used EC. Sexually active participants had significantly better attitude towards EC than sexually inactive participants (crude OR 0.33(0.15-0.71; even after adjusting for possible confounders such as age, region, religion, ethnicity, marital status, department and family education and income

  2. Improving Sexual and Contraceptive Behaviours of Unmarried Female Youth with First Trimester Induced Abortion in Sichuan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin LUO; Shi-zhong WU; Lun ZHANG; Wei-dong CAI; Su-mei JIANG; Qi-fu FAN; Zhi-qun ZHAO; Liu-zhi ZHOU

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To understand the changes on sexual and contraceptive behaviours of unmarried induced abortion(IA) youth by intervention in Sichuan, China; and to find a way to improve sexual and contraceptive behaviours of unmarried IA youth. Methods Intervention epidemiological surveys (baseline and evaluation) plus qualitative interview were used. During July 2002 and July 2003, 2 484 unmarried female volunteers who aged 15-29 years and come to clinics seeking abortion were recruited by cluster random sampling from the four selected regions of Sichuan, 48 volunteers were interviewed for 8 focusgroup discussions (FGDs) and 16 in-depth interviews equally for each survey. Information, education anol communication(IEC) materials, education sessions, trainings and counseling were given to subjects and service providers during the project implementation. Questionnaires for surveys and guidelines for qualitative interviews were used.Results Comparison of the after with the before intervention: 1) the proportion of respondents having knowledge about sexuality was increased by 13%. Among them,the proportion of respondents got part and most of the knowledge was increased by 43%. Maximum number of sex partners the respondents have decreased from 9 to 4. Respondents' partnerships have gradually changed from more acquaintances/school mates/boy friends to fiancés mainly; 2) respondents' contraceptive use rate was in creased by 20%. Among them, the condom use rate increased rapidly to 80%.Purposes of condom use were changed from only for contraception to for prevention of HIV/AIDS/STDs and pregnancy. And most of respondents stabilised their method use - condoms. Most of respondents suggested condoms was the method most suitable for unmarried IA youth, this proportion was increased by 44%; 3) proportion of respon dents knowing more about consequences of induced abortion was increased by 24%; and 4) proportions of respondents having depression and anxiety symptoms were decreased

  3. Comparing the satisfaction and efficacy of Cyclofem and contraceptive pills among females in Northern Iran: A randomized controlled trial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Bita; Kiapoor, Azade; Firoozbakht, Mozhgan; Kazeminavaei, Fatemeh; Taghlili, Fatemeh

    2014-10-01

    Hormonal contraceptives are the most effective method for birth control, though they may have some default or complications. This research aimed to comparison of the efficacy and satisfaction of Cyclofem with oral contraceptives (OCs) among females. A descriptive-comparative method was conducted on 80 women who were selected through cluster sampling during November 2011-December 2012. The selected subjects start using OCs or Cyclofem for the 1(st) time in their life. They evaluated in 2 times frames, at the beginning of the study and then 3 and 6 months after the contraceptive precautions. The data were collected by questionnaire. The data were analysed using parametric and nonparametric test in SPSS 16 software. The reasons for discontinuation of the methods were varied, in which 50% of the sample group were Cyclofem users who discontinued because of menstrual changes and the desire to use other methods, and 50% were the OC users whose reason was medical problems, and absent-mindedness was the last reason for 35.7% of the cases. The efficacy of the both (OCs and Cyclofem) was high and only one unwanted pregnancy occurred at the end of the 6(th) month among OC users. There was no significant difference in term of satisfaction of two groups at the end of 3-6 months (PV = 0.433). The results indicated that Cyclofem can be well used by those women who desire for an easy and effective method which is not disturbing the sexual activity and does not also need to be used daily, but the users should be consulted before using the method.

  4. Comparing the satisfaction and efficacy of Cyclofem and contraceptive pills among females in Northern Iran: A randomized controlled trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Jamali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormonal contraceptives are the most effective method for birth control, though they may have some default or complications. This research aimed to comparison of the efficacy and satisfaction of Cyclofem with oral contraceptives (OCs among females. A descriptive-comparative method was conducted on 80 women who were selected through cluster sampling during November 2011-December 2012. The selected subjects start using OCs or Cyclofem for the 1 st time in their life. They evaluated in 2 times frames, at the beginning of the study and then 3 and 6 months after the contraceptive precautions. The data were collected by questionnaire. The data were analysed using parametric and nonparametric test in SPSS 16 software. The reasons for discontinuation of the methods were varied, in which 50% of the sample group were Cyclofem users who discontinued because of menstrual changes and the desire to use other methods, and 50% were the OC users whose reason was medical problems, and absent-mindedness was the last reason for 35.7% of the cases. The efficacy of the both (OCs and Cyclofem was high and only one unwanted pregnancy occurred at the end of the 6 th month among OC users. There was no significant difference in term of satisfaction of two groups at the end of 3-6 months (PV = 0.433. The results indicated that Cyclofem can be well used by those women who desire for an easy and effective method which is not disturbing the sexual activity and does not also need to be used daily, but the users should be consulted before using the method.

  5. Current hormonal contraceptive use predicts female extra-pair and dyadic sexual behavior: evidence based on Czech National Survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapilová, Kateřina; Cobey, Kelly D; Wells, Timothy; Roberts, S Craig; Weiss, Petr; Havlíček, Jan

    2014-01-10

    Data from 1155 Czech women (493 using oral contraception, 662 non-users), obtained from the Czech National Survey of Sexual Behavior, were used to investigate evolutionary-based hypotheses concerning the predictive value of current oral contraceptive (OC) use on extra-pair and dyadic (in-pair) sexual behavior of coupled women. Specifically, the aim was to determine whether current OC use was associated with lower extra-pair and higher in-pair sexual interest and behavior, because OC use suppresses cyclical shifts in mating psychology that occur in normally cycling women. Zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) regression and negative binomial models were used to test associations between OC use and these sexual measures, controlling for other relevant predictors (e.g., age, parity, in-pair sexual satisfaction, relationship length). The overall incidence of having had an extra-pair partner or one-night stand in the previous year was not related to current OC use (the majority of the sample had not). However, among the women who had engaged in extra-pair sexual behavior, OC users had fewer one-night stands than non-users, and tended to have fewer partners, than non-users. OC users also had more frequent dyadic intercourse than non-users, potentially indicating higher commitment to their current relationship. These results suggest that suppression of fertility through OC use may alter important aspects of female sexual behavior, with potential implications for relationship functioning and stability.

  6. Current Hormonal Contraceptive Use Predicts Female Extra-Pair and Dyadic Sexual Behavior: Evidence Based on Czech National Survey Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Klapilová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Data from 1155 Czech women (493 using oral contraception, 662 non-users, obtained from the Czech National Survey of Sexual Behavior, were used to investigate evolutionary-based hypotheses concerning the predictive value of current oral contraceptive (OC use on extra-pair and dyadic (in-pair sexual behavior of coupled women. Specifically, the aim was to determine whether current OC use was associated with lower extra-pair and higher in-pair sexual interest and behavior, because OC use suppresses cyclical shifts in mating psychology that occur in normally cycling women. Zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP regression and negative binomial models were used to test associations between OC use and these sexual measures, controlling for other relevant predictors (e.g., age, parity, in-pair sexual satisfaction, relationship length. The overall incidence of having had an extra-pair partner or one-night stand in the previous year was not related to current OC use (the majority of the sample had not. However, among the women who had engaged in extra-pair sexual behavior, OC users had fewer one-night stands than non-users, and tended to have fewer partners, than non-users. OC users also had more frequent dyadic intercourse than non-users, potentially indicating higher commitment to their current relationship. These results suggest that suppression of fertility through OC use may alter important aspects of female sexual behavior, with potential implications for relationship functioning and stability.

  7. Knowledge and opinions of emergency contraceptive pills among female factory workers in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Sandra G; Becker, Davida; de Castro, Marcela Martínez; Paz, Francisco; Olavarrieta, Claudia Díaz; Acevedo-García, Dolores

    2008-09-01

    Workers in Mexico's maquiladoras (assembly plants) are mainly young, single women, many of whom could benefit from emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs). Because ECPs are readily available in Mexico, women who know about the therapy can obtain it easily. Do maquiladora workers know about the method? Could worksite programs help increase awareness? To investigate these questions, we conducted a five-month intervention during which workers in three maquiladoras along the Mexico-United States border could attend educational talks on ECPs, receive pamphlets, and obtain kits containing EC supplies. Among the workers exposed to our intervention, knowledge of ECPs increased. Reported ECP use also increased. Although our intervention apparently increased workers' knowledge and use, the factory proved to be a difficult intervention setting. Problems we experienced included a factory closure and management/staff opposition to certain project elements. Future studies should continue to investigate work-site interventions and other strategies to reach workers.

  8. Contraception - Update and Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabe T

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the future, fertility control will focus on the improvement of existing methods (efficacy, side effects, easy use, duration of action, manufacturing process, costs, on new approaches (mode of action and on new targets for contraception. Counselling of women in view of contraceptive choices based on individual risks (e. g. cardiovascular disease, thrombophilia, family risk of breast cancer, sexually transmitted diseases will gain more and more importance. Only a few companies can afford research in contraception such as Bayer-Schering-Pharma, Wyeth-Ayerst, Ortho-McNeil and Organon. Female contraception: Ovulation inhibition: In the future, a focus will be placed on the preselection of patients to minimize their individual risk, new oral contraceptive (OC regimen, OC with new progestins, OC with estradiol or estradiolesters, new ovulation inhibitors with new progestins and new regimens including long cycles and continuous steroidal contraceptives, new contraceptive patches, vaginal rings, spray-on contraceptives, recently identified genes involved in the ovulation process as new targets for ovulation inhibitors. Fertilisation inhibition: New intrauterine systems will comprise: a smaller Mirena intrauterine system releasing levonorgestrel (LNG and new frameless progestin-releasing intrauterine systems (IUS. Various new contraceptive barriers have been introduced. Research is ongoing on substances acting both as spermicides and as microbicides, reducing the risk of sexually transmitted diseases. New implantables and injectables will feature an improved pharmacokinetic profile, decreased side effects and a safer delivery system. Additionally, there are various new approaches in female sterilisation. Immunocontraception for the female will not be available in the near future. Implantation inhibition: Selective progesterone receptor modulators (SPRMs are tested for postcoital contraception. New targets are analysed for immunocontraceptives. Male

  9. Non-surgical treatment of primary female urethral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard F. Schneider

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary carcinomas of the female urethra are extremely rare, with an annual incidence of less than ten in one million. Currently, there is no consensus regarding management of this malignancy. However, there have been several case reports demonstrating the efficacy of chemoradiation in the treatment of female urethral cancer. In this report we present two cases of female primary urethral adenocar­cinoma that were treated by concomitant chemotherapy and external beam radiother­apy, followed by interstitial brachytherapy.

  10. A randomized, controlled, multicenter contraceptive efifcacy clinical trial of the intravas device, a nonocclusive surgical male sterilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WenHong Lu; XiaoWei Liang; YiQun Gu; WeiXiong Wu; LiWei Bo; TianGui Zheng; ZhenWen Chen

    2014-01-01

    Because of unavoidable complications of vasectomy, this study was undertaken to assess the efifcacy and safety of male sterilization with a nonobstructive intravas device (IVD) implanted into the vas lumen by a mini-surgical method compared with no-scalpel vasectomy (NSV). IVDs were categorized into two types:IVD-B has a tail used for ifxing to the vas deferens (ifxed wing) whereas IVD-A does not. A multicenter prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in China. The study was comprised of 1459 male volunteers seeking vasectomy who were randomly assigned to the IVD-A (n= 487), IVD-B (n= 485) or NSV (n=487) groups and underwent operation. Follow-up included visits at the 3rd-6th and 12th postoperative months. The assessments of the subjects involved regular physical examinations (including general and andrological examinations) and semen analysis. The subjects’ partners also underwent monitoring for pregnancy by monthly interviews regarding menstruation and if necessary, urine tests. There were no signiifcant differences in pregnancy rates (0.65% for IVD-A, 0 for IVD-B and 0.21% for NSV) among the three groups (P>0.05). The cumulative rates of complications at the 12th postoperative month were zero, 0.9%and 1.7%in the three groups, respectively. In conclusion, IVD male sterilization exhibits a low risk of long-term adverse events and was found to be effective as a male sterilization method, similar to the NSV technique. IVD male sterilization is expected to be a novel contraceptive method.

  11. A randomized, controlled, multicenter contraceptive efficacy clinical trial of the intravas device, a nonocclusive surgical male sterilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hong Lu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Because of unavoidable complications of vasectomy, this study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of male sterilization with a nonobstructive intravas device (IVD implanted into the vas lumen by a mini-surgical method compared with no-scalpel vasectomy (NSV. IVDs were categorized into two types: IVD-B has a tail used for fixing to the vas deferens (fixed wing whereas IVD-A does not. A multicenter prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in China. The study was comprised of 1459 male volunteers seeking vasectomy who were randomly assigned to the IVD-A (n = 487, IVD-B (n = 485 or NSV (n = 487 groups and underwent operation. Follow-up included visits at the 3 rd -6 th and 12 th postoperative months. The assessments of the subjects involved regular physical examinations (including general and andrological examinations and semen analysis. The subjects' partners also underwent monitoring for pregnancy by monthly interviews regarding menstruation and if necessary, urine tests. There were no significant differences in pregnancy rates (0.65% for IVD-A, 0 for IVD-B and 0.21% for NSV among the three groups (P > 0.05. The cumulative rates of complications at the 12 th postoperative month were zero, 0.9% and 1.7% in the three groups, respectively. In conclusion, IVD male sterilization exhibits a low risk of long-term adverse events and was found to be effective as a male sterilization method, similar to the NSV technique. IVD male sterilization is expected to be a novel contraceptive method.

  12. Characterization of Ovarian Steroid Patterns in Female African Lions (Panthera leo, and the Effects of Contraception on Reproductive Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah B Putman

    Full Text Available Because of poor reproduction after the lifting of an 8-year breeding moratorium, a biomedical survey of female lions in U.S. zoos was initiated in 2007. Fecal estrogen (FEM, progestagen (FPM and glucocorticoid (FGM metabolites were analyzed in samples collected 3-4 times per wk from 28 lions at 17 facilities (0.9-13.8 yr of age for 4 mo-3.5 yr and body weights were obtained ~monthly from 17 animals at eight facilities (0.0-3.0 yr of age. Based on FEM, estrous cycle length averaged 17.5 ± 0.4 d in duration, with estrus lasting 4.4 ± 0.2 d. All but one female exhibited waves of estrogenic activity indicative of follicular activity; however, not all females expressed estrous behaviors (73%, suggesting silent estrus was common. Female lions experienced puberty earlier than expected; waves of estrogenic activity were observed as young as 1.1 yr of age, which may be related to a faster growth rate of captive vs. wild lions. Mean gestation length was 109.5 ± 1.0 d, whereas the non-pregnant luteal phase was less than half (46.0 ± 1.2 d. Non-mating induced increases in FPM were observed in 33% of females housed without a male, consistent with spontaneous ovulation. A number of study animals had been contracepted, and the return to cyclicity after treatment withdrawal, while variable, was ~4.0 yr and longer than the 1-yr expected efficacy, especially for those implanted with Suprelorin. For FGM, there were no differences in overall, baseline or peak mean concentrations among the age groups or across seasons, nor were there any relationships between reproductive parameters and FGM concentrations. Overall, results suggest that poor reproduction in lions after the breeding moratorium was not related to altered adrenal or ovarian steroid activity, but for some females may have been a consequence of individual institutions' management decisions.

  13. Characterization of Ovarian Steroid Patterns in Female African Lions (Panthera leo), and the Effects of Contraception on Reproductive Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Sarah B; Brown, Janine L; Franklin, Ashley D; Schneider, Emily C; Boisseau, Nicole P; Asa, Cheryl S; Pukazhenthi, Budhan S

    2015-01-01

    Because of poor reproduction after the lifting of an 8-year breeding moratorium, a biomedical survey of female lions in U.S. zoos was initiated in 2007. Fecal estrogen (FEM), progestagen (FPM) and glucocorticoid (FGM) metabolites were analyzed in samples collected 3-4 times per wk from 28 lions at 17 facilities (0.9-13.8 yr of age) for 4 mo-3.5 yr and body weights were obtained ~monthly from 17 animals at eight facilities (0.0-3.0 yr of age). Based on FEM, estrous cycle length averaged 17.5 ± 0.4 d in duration, with estrus lasting 4.4 ± 0.2 d. All but one female exhibited waves of estrogenic activity indicative of follicular activity; however, not all females expressed estrous behaviors (73%), suggesting silent estrus was common. Female lions experienced puberty earlier than expected; waves of estrogenic activity were observed as young as 1.1 yr of age, which may be related to a faster growth rate of captive vs. wild lions. Mean gestation length was 109.5 ± 1.0 d, whereas the non-pregnant luteal phase was less than half (46.0 ± 1.2 d). Non-mating induced increases in FPM were observed in 33% of females housed without a male, consistent with spontaneous ovulation. A number of study animals had been contracepted, and the return to cyclicity after treatment withdrawal, while variable, was ~4.0 yr and longer than the 1-yr expected efficacy, especially for those implanted with Suprelorin. For FGM, there were no differences in overall, baseline or peak mean concentrations among the age groups or across seasons, nor were there any relationships between reproductive parameters and FGM concentrations. Overall, results suggest that poor reproduction in lions after the breeding moratorium was not related to altered adrenal or ovarian steroid activity, but for some females may have been a consequence of individual institutions' management decisions.

  14. Swedish teenager perceptions of teenage pregnancy, abortion, sexual behavior, and contraceptive habits--a focus group study among 17-year-old female high-school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrand, Maria; Larsson, Margareta; Von Essen, Louise; Tydén, Tanja

    2005-10-01

    Sweden has the highest abortion numbers among the Nordic countries. Since 1995, the abortion rate among teenagers has increased by nearly 50%. We therefore undertook a study where the overall aim was to gain a deeper understanding on which factors female teenagers believe may explain the increasing numbers of teenage abortions. Teenagers' perceptions of teenage pregnancy, abortion, sexual behavior, and contraceptive habits were investigated. Six focus group interviews with 17-year-old Swedish girls were conducted. The interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by manifest content analysis. Negative attitudes toward teenage pregnancy and supportive attitudes toward abortion were expressed. Risk-taking behaviors such as negligence in contraceptive use and intercourse under the influence of alcohol were suggested as main reasons behind the increasing numbers of abortions among Swedish teenagers. The contemporary, sexualized, media picture was believed to influence adolescents' sexual behavior, and liberal attitudes toward casual sex were expressed. Girls were perceived as more obliged than boys in taking responsibility for contraceptive compliance and avoidance of pregnancy. The apprehension that hormonal contraceptives cause negative side-effects was widely spread, and the participants were found to have a somewhat limited knowledge of abortion. The majority were unsatisfied with the quality of sexual education provided by the schools. Possible reasons for increased abortion numbers among teenagers in Sweden could be liberal attitudes toward casual sex in combination with negligence in contraceptive use, use of alcohol followed by sexual risk-taking, fear of hormonal contraceptives, and a deterioration of sexual education in the schools.

  15. Contraception and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos-Hesselink, JolienW.; Cornette, Jerome; Sliwa, Karen; Pieper, Petronella G.; Veldtman, Gruschen R.; Johnson, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Contraceptive counselling should begin early in females with heart disease, preferably directly after the start of menstruation. In coming to a decision about the method of contraception, the following issues should be considered: (i) the risk of pregnancy for the mother and the consequences of an

  16. Contraception and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos-Hesselink, JolienW.; Cornette, Jerome; Sliwa, Karen; Pieper, Petronella G.; Veldtman, Gruschen R.; Johnson, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Contraceptive counselling should begin early in females with heart disease, preferably directly after the start of menstruation. In coming to a decision about the method of contraception, the following issues should be considered: (i) the risk of pregnancy for the mother and the consequences of an u

  17. Adolescent Religiosity and Contraceptive Usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Marlena; Thornton, Arland

    1987-01-01

    Examined contraceptive use by never married, sexually experienced female adolescents (N=224). Found birth control pills to be the single most popular method of contraception. Subjects who reported regularly attending religious services were less likely to have used an effective, medical method of contraception than those who rarely attended…

  18. Contraceptive practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, J E; Rao, P S

    1976-08-01

    A family life education program (FLEP) providing contraceptive services within a comprehensive health care organization for low-income, inner-city adolescents is described. Each female patient attending in the July 1-September 30, 1974, period was included in a study undertaken to identify and serve the unmet needs of the teen-age population in the community of East Harlem. Of the 334 females interviewed, almost 1/2 were black, 37% were Hispanic, 12% were white, and 2% were Oriental, totals representative of the surrounding community. The questionnaire included information on demographic and social background, sexual history, reproductive history, and contraceptive experience. Comparisons are made on the answers between groups. Personal contacts and school outreach were the 2 main sources of referral to the clinic. Sexual history was found to be associated with social background rather than physiological factors. More than 1/2 the teen-agers had never used contraception prior to their 1st clinic visit and another 1/4 of the girls were using unreliable methods. The study indicated that teen-agers will use good programs which are designed to meet their needs. For teen-agers, a free-standing clinic offering comprehensive health care is the ideal situation.

  19. Lack of a clinically important pharmacokinetic interaction between sofosbuvir or ledipasvir and hormonal oral contraceptives norgestimate/ethinyl estradiol in HCV-uninfected female subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, P; Moorehead, L; Pang, Phillip; Vimal, M; Mathias, A

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluated the potential for a drug-drug interaction between HCV direct-acting antivirals sofosbuvir or ledipasvir and oral hormonal contraceptive (OC) norgestimate/ethinyl estradiol (norgestimate 0.18/0.215/0.25 mg with ethinyl estradiol 25 μg). This was a 112-day, open-label, fixed-sequence pharmacokinetic (PK) study in healthy female subjects that included a lead-in cycle (OC only; N = 21), cycle 1 (OC only; N = 15), cycle 2 (OC + sofosbuvir; N = 15), and cycle 3 (OC + ledipasvir; N = 15). Administration of sofosbuvir with OC did not alter PK of norelgestromin (primary norgestimate metabolite) or ethinyl estradiol. Small increases in norgestrel (secondary norgestimate metabolite) AUC(tau) (19%) and C(tau) (23%) with sofosbuvir were noted. Ledipasvir did not impact PK of norelgestromin or norgestrel but modestly increased ethinyl estradiol C(max) (40%). Sofosbuvir, GS- 331007 (predominant circulating metabolite of SOF), and ledipasvir PK were similar to historical data. Pharmacodynamic markers luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and progesterone values were generally comparable in all cycles. No loss in contraceptive efficacy is expected upon administration of sofosbuvir or ledipasvir/sofosbuvir with oral contraceptives containing norgestimate and ethinyl estradiol. The use of sofosbuvir or ledipasvir/sofosbuvir FDC with oral contraceptives is permitted.

  20. Surgical treatment of locally advanced anal cancer after male-to-female sex reassignment surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marco Caricato; Fabio Ausania; Giovanni Francesco Marangi; Ilaria Cipollone; Gerardo Flammia; Paolo Persichetti; Lucio Trodella; Roberto Coppola

    2009-01-01

    We present a case of a transsexual patient who underwent a partial pelvectomy and genital reconstruction for anal cancer after chemoradiation. This is the first case in literature reporting on the occurrence of anal cancer after male-to-female sex reassignment surgery. We describe the surgical approach presenting our technique to avoid postoperative complications and preserve the sexual reassignment.

  1. An survey on awareness of contraception in unmarried female doctors in Guangzhou%广州市未婚女医生的避孕知识调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴爱华; 张嵩卉; 田耕; 李丽琴; 凌珊

    2010-01-01

    目的 了解未婚女医生避孕方法选择和避孕知识的来源状况.方法 在广州地区四所综合性医院,采用整群抽样方法,对未婚女医生进行了抽样调查,统计分析.结果 有效调查共有559人,发现未婚女医生对于避孕套、紧急避孕、短效避孕药及安全期避孕等四种避孕方式的认知均极显著高于其它几种方式,但对于上述四种方式的知晓程度不存在显著差异性.而对于避孕针、皮下埋置、阴道喷药及阴道隔膜等避孕方式的认识程度远远低于其它避孕方式.且其不了解程度极显著低于避孕套、紧急避孕、短效避孕药及安全期避孕等四种方式.而对于所有避孕方式的了解程度之间不存在显著差异.在了解知识的渠道方面,主要是通过网络、专业教育、电视和书籍获得,其他较少.83.80%的调查对象认为有必要进行性与生殖健康及避孕知识的宣传教育,认为最可靠的获知途径为专业指导.结论 未婚女医生由于所学专业知识的利用,对各种避孕方式均有一定程度的了解.但生殖健康及避孕知识仍然缺乏,这反映了我们学校及家庭教育在这方面的不足,也体现出当前社会对性与生殖健康和避孕知识的宣传力度欠缺.%Objective To understand the status of the awareness of contraception in unmarried female doctors.Methods A survey was conducted in the unmarried lady doctors from four general hospitals in Guangzhou area by using cluster sampling technique.Results A total number of 559 unmarried female doctors were surveyed.The awareness of condom use,contraceptives,natural family planning,and postcoital contraception was markedly higher than that of other contraceptive methods.But the awareness rate of anticonceptive injections,subcutaneous depot,spermicidal spray,or vaginal diaphragm was significantly lower.The sources of information on reproductive physiology and contraception were mainly from Internet

  2. [Contraception and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobert, M; Pigeyre, M; Gronier, H; Catteau-Jonard, S; Robin, G

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing massively over several decades in industrialized countries. Obese women are sexually active but they use fewer contraceptive methods and are at high risk of unintended pregnancy. In addition, obesity is an important risk factor for venous thromboembolism events and arterial thrombosis (myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke). All of these data are to be considered in choosing a contraceptive method for obese women. Except depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injection, the progestin-only contraceptives (progestin only pills and etonogestrel subdermal implant) and the intra-uterine devices are the preferred contraceptive methods in obese women. The combined estrogen-progestin contraceptives (pill, patch and vaginal ring) may be proposed in very strict conditions (no other associated vascular risk factor). Obesity does not increase the risk of failure of most contraceptive methods. Bariatric surgery is a complex situation. It requires to program a possible pregnancy and contraception is needed for several months. Some bariatric surgical techniques such as by-pass can induce gastrointestinal malabsorption. In this situation, all oral contraceptives are not recommended because of a higher risk of failure.

  3. Contraception - Update and Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabe T

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fertility control in the future will focus on the improvement of existing methods (efficacy, side effects, easy use, duration of action, manufacturing process, costs, on new approaches (mode of action bringing additional health benefits, and on new targets for nonhormonal contraception. Counselling of women in view to contraceptive choices based on the individual risk (e. g. cardiovascular disease, thrombophilia, family risk of breast cancer, sexually transmitted diseases will gain more and more importance. Only a few companies can afford research in contraception such as Bayer-Schering-Pharma, and MSD. Female contraception: Ovulation inhibition: preselection of patients to minimize the individual risk. New oral contraceptive (OC regimen, OC with new progestins, OC with estradiol or estradiol esters, new ovulation inhibitors with new progestins and new regimen including long cycles and continuous delivery of steroidal contraceptives, new contraceptive patches, vaginal rings andsprayon contraceptives. Recently identified genes involved in the ovulation process as new targets for ovulation inhibitors. Fertilisation inhibition: new intrauterine systems have been developed: a smaller Mirena intrauterine system releasing levonorgestrel (LNG and a new frameless progestinreleasing intrauterine systems (IUS. Various new contraceptive barriers have been introduced. Research is ongoing on substances acting both as spermicide and as microbicides as a dualprotection method reducing both the risk of unwanted pregnancy and the risk of sexually transmitted diseases. New implantable systems and improved injectables (with improved pharmacokinetic profile, decreased side effects and a safer delivery system have been made available recently. Various new approaches in female sterilisation include non invasive method of tubal occlusion Immunocontraception for the female will not be available in the near future. Implantation inhibition: selective progesterone

  4. Contraceptive failure in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Duolao

    2002-09-01

    This study examines patterns and differentials of contraceptive failure rates by method and characteristics of users, using the Chinese Two-per-Thousand Fertility Survey data. The results show that contraceptive failure rates for modern methods including sterilization are some of the highest in the world. The first year failure rates are 4.2% for male sterilization, 0.7% for female sterilization, 10.3% for IUD, 14.5% for pill, and 19.0% for condom. There are also some differentials in contraceptive failure rates by users' sociodemographic and fertility characteristics. Contraceptive failure rate declines with women's age for all reversible methods. Rural women have higher sterilization, IUD, and condom contraceptive failure rates than urban women. Women with two or more children have a higher failure rate for sterilization methods but have lower failure rates for other methods.

  5. Comparing female-based contraceptive methods in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and a healthy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalkilic, Ediz; Tufan, Ayse Nur; Oksuz, Mustafa Ferhat; Sahbazlar, Mustafa; Coskun, Belkis Nihan; Seniz, Nihan; Pehlivan, Yavuz; Inanc, Murat

    2014-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease that is 10 times more prevalent in women, particularly those of reproductive age. The varying effects of pregnancy on SLE and the differences between available SLE treatments make pregnancy timing and contraceptive methods significant. We aimed to determine the contraceptive methods used by SLE patients in the north-west part of Turkey, and compared them with those used by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and healthy controls. The study was comprised of 113 SLE patients, and 84 RA patients at the Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic of Uludag University Medical Faculty. Twenty-three (20.3%) out of 113 SLE patients, 18 (21.4%) out of 84 RA patients and 17 (18.6%) out of 92 healthy controls did not use any contraceptive methods. Use of the withdrawal and condom methods was more common among SLE patients, accounting for 61% (withdrawal 32.7%, condom 28.3%). Moreover, 52% of SLE and 50% of RA patients were neither given information about contraceptive methods nor offered a suggested method, compared to 34% in the health control group. The prevalence of oral contraceptive use is low in Turkey; notwithstanding the withdrawal and condom methods, which are frequently used despite their high failure risk. Although pregnancy timing is of great importance for SLE patients, necessary information and recommendations concerning contraceptive methods have been ignored and the use of effective methods is not a priority. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. knowledge, attitude and practice of emergency contraceptives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    BACKGROUND: Unwanted pregnancy followed by unsafe abortion is one of the major ... contraceptives among Adama University female students. Hence behavioral change strategies should be considered ... KEYWORDS: emergency contraceptives, knowledge, attitude, practice, Ethiopia .... Younger than 10 years. 7. 3.6.

  7. Post abortion contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Kopp, Helena Kallner

    2015-11-01

    A safe induced abortion has no impact on future fertility. Ovulation may resume as early as 8 days after the abortion. There is no difference in return to fertility after medical or surgical abortion. Most women resume sexual activity soon after an abortion. Contraceptive counseling and provision should therefore be an integrated part of the abortion services to help women avoid another unintended pregnancy and risk, in many cases an unsafe, abortion. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods that includes implants and intrauterine contraception have been shown to be the most effective contraceptive methods to help women prevent unintended pregnancy following an abortion. However, starting any method is better than starting no method at all. This Special Report will give a short guide to available methods and when they can be started after an induced abortion.

  8. Thrombocyte function in relation to the long term application of medroxyprogesterone acetate as a female contraceptive agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mettler L

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available In two hundred and twenty eight parous women between thirty and forty years o f age, Medroxyprogesterone acetate 150 mg depot injection every three months proved to be a one hundred per cent contraceptive agent. Minimal side effects were noted with some spotting and amenorrhoea. No significant increase in blood coagula-tion and tendency to thrombosis was noted as tested by the platelet aggregation test during medication.

  9. Emergency contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morning-after pill; Postcoital contraception; Birth control - emergency; Plan B; Family planning - emergency contraception ... prevents pregnancy in the same way as regular birth control pills: By preventing or delaying the release of an ...

  10. Communication about Contraception and Knowledge of Oral Contraceptives amongst Norwegian High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thomas; Skjeldestad, Finn Egil

    2003-01-01

    Examines communication about contraception and specific knowledge of oral contraceptives (OCs) in a sample of Norwegian high school students. More females than males discussed contraception at least monthly. Discussions were predominantly held with peers and not adults. Females were far more knowledgeable about OCs than males. The most significant…

  11. Contraceptive Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troen, Philip; And Others

    This report provides an overview of research activities and needs in the area of contraceptive development. In a review of the present state, discussions are offered on the effectiveness and drawbacks of oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices, barrier methods, natural family planning, and sterilization. Methods of contraception that are in the…

  12. Systemic Inflammatory Reaction in Females with Severe Gestosis During Surgical Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Mikhno

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the impact the impact of surgical delivery on the time course of changes in the concentration of tumor necrosis factor-а (TNF-а, interleukin (IL-1/8, y-interferon, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and neopterin in the venous blood of women with severe gestosis and to develop a method for correcting a perioperative systemic inflammatory reaction (SIR.Subjects and methods: 89 females in whom surgical delivery had been performed under spinal anesthesia were examined. A control group comprised 30 females with uncomplicated pregnancy; Group 1 included 29 females with severe gestosis; Group 2 consisted of 30 females with severe gestosis to whom the developed method of perioperative SIR correction with dexametha-sone and pentoxyphylline was applied. Solid-phase enzyme immunoassay was used to determine the peripheral blood level of the cytokines and neopterin. The study was conducted in the following steps: 1 before surgery; 2 during surgery (after aponeurosis suturing, 3, 4, and 5 on days 1, 3, and 5 postoperatively, respectively.Results. In females with uncomplicated pregnancy, surgical delivery was accompanied by increases in the concentrations of IL-1/8 and neopterin. This reaction was limited by the increased synthesis of IL-10. Beginning with the third postoperative day, there was a reduction in the level of proinflammatory cytokines. Significantly elevated venous blood concentrations of y-interferon, IL-1/8, TNF-а, IL-6, and decreased levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10 and IL-4, were detectable in pregnant females with severe gestosis. Against the above background, surgical delivery caused an increase in the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines and neopterin with the high level being within 5 postoperative days. The developed method for correction of perioperative SIR in females with severe gestosis lowered the concentrations of y-interferon, IL-1/8, TNF-а, IL-6, and neopterin and promoted the recovery of cytokine

  13. [Contraception in the future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoui, R; Boukhris, M

    1994-02-01

    In the last decade, global use of contraceptive methods has increased. About 50% of couples of childbearing age use a modern contraceptive method. This evolution and a positive change in attitude towards male contraception has encouraged research in fertility regulation to enlarge and to improve acceptance of the contraceptive mix. Current injectable contraceptives interfere with the menstrual cycle. Research is exploring ways to minimize such secondary effects by reducing the total hormone dose and by changing the way the active product is delivered (e.g., microspheres). An injectable prototype is an analogue of levonorgestrel (HRP 002). A new IUD is made of leather suspended by a nylon suture which has been inserted into the uterine muscle. RU-486, often used to interrupt early pregnancy, is being tested as an oral contraceptive (OC). It inhibits secretion of gonadotropins and ovulation. It holds promise as an OC with no estrogen component. Since it also inhibits endometrial development and thus prevents implantation, it may someday be used for emergency contraception (i.e., postcoital contraception). New contraceptive implants under study include Norplant RII (2 rods of levonorgestrel lasting for 3 years), Implanon (desogestrel), and Capranor (biodegradable implant lasting 2 years). The female condom consists of a flexible polyurethane sheath with a flexible ring at each end. It has the potential to protect against sexually transmitted diseases since it covers the labial lips and is impermeable to HIV. France and Switzerland have both approved its use. It will enter the UK market at the end of the year. Approval for marketing has been sought in the US.

  14. [Post-abortion contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohannessian, A; Jamin, C

    2016-12-01

    To establish guidelines of the French National College of Gynecologists and Obstetricians about post-abortion contraception. A systematic review of the literature about post-abortion contraception was performed on Medline and Cochrane Database between 1978 and March 2016. The guidelines of the French and foreign scientific societies were also consulted. After an abortion, if the woman wishes to use a contraception, it should be started as soon as possible because of the very early ovulation resumption. The contraception choice must be done in accordance with the woman's expectations and lifestyle. The contraindications of each contraception must be respected. The long-acting reversible contraception, intra-uterine device (IUD) and implant, could be preferred (grade C) as the efficacy is not dependent on compliance. Thus, they could better prevent repeat abortion (LE3). In case of surgical abortion, IUD should be proposed and inserted immediately after the procedure (grade A), as well as the implant (grade B). In case of medical abortion, the implant can be inserted from the day of mifépristone, the IUD after an ultrasound examination confirming the success of the abortion (no continuing pregnancy or retained sac) (grade C). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Advances in male hormonal contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantino Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contraception is a basic human right for its role on health, quality of life and wellbeing of the woman and of the society as a whole. Since the introduction of female hormonal contraception the responsibility of family planning has always been with women. Currently there are only a few contraceptive methods available for men, but recently, men have become more interested in supporting their partners actively. Over the last few decades different trials have been performed providing important advances in the development of a safe and effective hormonal contraceptive for men. This paper summarizes some of the most recent trials.

  16. The contraceptive knowledge and contraceptive behavior influence factors of unmarried female with accidental pregnancy%意外妊娠未婚女性避孕知识认知情况及其避孕行为影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑞爱; 卢伟燕; 施玲玲; 梁银萍

    2015-01-01

    目的::探讨意外妊娠未婚女性对避孕知识认知情况及其避孕行为的影响因素分析。方法:选择我站计生科2008年1月~2013年12月就诊的375例意外妊娠的未婚女性为观察对象,采用自编问卷收集意外妊娠未婚女性的临床资料,并分析意外妊娠未婚女性避孕行为的影响因素。结果:意外妊娠的未婚女性避孕知识知晓情况高,但有38.67%的人群未采取避孕措施。回归分析显示文化程度高、很了解人工流产风险和男友积极避孕是意外妊娠未婚女性出现避孕行为的保护因素。结论:意外妊娠的未婚女性避孕知识知晓率较高,避孕知识多通过书刊或媒体等方式获得,多抱有侥幸心理,为了减少女性重复人工流产的发生,必须加强育龄男女青年避孕知识和避孕技巧普及,强调和推动男性参与避孕,减少未婚女性意外妊娠的发生。%Objective:To investigate the contraceptive knowledge and contraceptive behavior influence factors of unmarried female with accidental pregnan-cy. Methods:375 cases unmarried female with accidental pregnancy treated in the family planning department in our family planning station from January 2008 to December 2013 were chosen as the research objects,the clinical data of them were collected by self-made questionnaire. They were analysed by de-scriptive statistics and binary classification logistic regression analysis of SPSS 18. 0 statistical package to find out the contraceptive knowledge and contra-ceptive behavior influence factors of unmarried female with accidental pregnancy. Results:The unmarried female with accidental pregnancy knew less knowl-edge about contraception. Multiariable logistic regression analysis revealed that low degree of culture,know a lot about abortion risk and her boyfriend positive contraception were postoperative factors of contraceptive behavior in unmarried female with accidental pregnancy. Conclusion

  17. Radiographic outcome of surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in males versus females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omidi-Kashani Farzad

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on adolescent idiopathic scoliosis have well documented the differences between natural history of male and female patients. There are also differences in responses to nonoperative treatment, but the results of operative treatment in male patients compared with females have not been widely reported. Only few studies had compared the outcomes of operative treatment between male and female patients with different results. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 150 (112 girls and 38 boys consecutive patients with diagnosis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis who were managed surgically between May 1996 and September 2005. Next, male radiographic parameters were compared with female ones pre- and postoperatively. Then, a subgroup of 38 matched girls was compared regarding the age, curve type, curve magnitude, and the instrumentation we used. Results In comparing male patients with unmatched girls, the boys had greater mean age (17.3 ± 2.3 vs. 16.3 ± 2.9; p = 0.049, greater primary curve (71.4 ± 21.3° vs. 62.7 ± 17.5°; p = 0.013, less flexibility (30.1 ± 13.5% vs. 40.3 ± 17.8%; p = 0.01, and less correction percentage (51.3 ± 12.9% vs. 58.8 ± 16.5%; p = 0/013. The loss of correction was comparable between the two groups. In the matched comparison, the flexibility in boys was less than girls (30.1 ± 13.5% vs. 38.1 ± 17.5%; p = 0.027. Also, the boys had a smaller correction percentage compared to the girls, but this finding was not statistically significant. Conclusion There was similar distribution curve pattern between male and female patients with AIS. Males had more rigid primary curves compared to females but a similar degree of postoperative scoliosis correction. Male AIS patients were older at the time of surgery. These preoperative gender differences, however; did not compromise the radiological outcomes of surgical treatment and the results were comparable between the genders.

  18. Radiographic outcome of surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in males versus females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Ebrahim; Behtash, Hamid; Mobini, Bahram; Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Momeni, Behnam

    2008-09-06

    Studies on adolescent idiopathic scoliosis have well documented the differences between natural history of male and female patients. There are also differences in responses to nonoperative treatment, but the results of operative treatment in male patients compared with females have not been widely reported. Only few studies had compared the outcomes of operative treatment between male and female patients with different results. We retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 150 (112 girls and 38 boys) consecutive patients with diagnosis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis who were managed surgically between May 1996 and September 2005. Next, male radiographic parameters were compared with female ones pre- and postoperatively. Then, a subgroup of 38 matched girls was compared regarding the age, curve type, curve magnitude, and the instrumentation we used. In comparing male patients with unmatched girls, the boys had greater mean age (17.3 +/- 2.3 vs. 16.3 +/- 2.9; p = 0.049), greater primary curve (71.4 +/- 21.3 degrees vs. 62.7 +/- 17.5 degrees ; p = 0.013), less flexibility (30.1 +/- 13.5% vs. 40.3 +/- 17.8%; p = 0.01), and less correction percentage (51.3 +/- 12.9% vs. 58.8 +/- 16.5%; p = 0/013). The loss of correction was comparable between the two groups. In the matched comparison, the flexibility in boys was less than girls (30.1 +/- 13.5% vs. 38.1 +/- 17.5%; p = 0.027). Also, the boys had a smaller correction percentage compared to the girls, but this finding was not statistically significant. There was similar distribution curve pattern between male and female patients with AIS. Males had more rigid primary curves compared to females but a similar degree of postoperative scoliosis correction. Male AIS patients were older at the time of surgery. These preoperative gender differences, however; did not compromise the radiological outcomes of surgical treatment and the results were comparable between the genders.

  19. Contraceptive Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquitt, Charlie W; Martin, Tonya S

    2017-02-01

    The prevention of pregnancy remains an important part of the practice of medicine. Contraception can occur at a number of points in the basic reproductive biological process and through a number of contraceptive product options. Pharmacists are health care providers appropriately positioned to assist patients in suitable contraceptive product selection based on their personal situations and lifestyles. This article provides an overview of available products for prevention of pregnancy and associated risks and benefits. Contraceptive products are categorized by their hormonal content and method of action. Hormonal options include oral contraceptive pills, contraceptive patch, implants, injection, intravaginal, and intrauterine devices. Barrier products prevent pregnancy by creating a physical obstacle to the successful fertilization of an egg by sperm. All products and methods are associated with benefits and potential complications that must be considered as patients, and health care providers select the most satisfactory option.

  20. Contraception and clean needles: feasibility of combining mobile reproductive health and needle exchange services for female exotic dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Eva; Han, Jennifer; Serio-Chapman, Christine; Mobley, Cynthia; Watson, Catherine; Terplan, Mishka

    2012-10-01

    Young women engaged in exotic dancing have a higher need for reproductive health services than women not in this profession, and many also use drugs or exchange sex for money or drugs. Few report receiving reproductive health services. We describe a public health, academic, and community partnership that provided reproductive health services on needle exchange mobile vans in the "red light district" in downtown Baltimore, Maryland. Women made 220 visits to the vans in the first 21 months of the program's operation, and 65% of these visits involved provision of contraception. Programmatic costs were feasible. Joint provision of needle exchange and reproductive health services targeting exotic dancers has the potential to reduce unintended pregnancies and link pregnant, substance-abusing women to reproductive care, and such programs should be implemented more widely.

  1. Effect of oral contraceptive use on the incidence of dry socket in females following impacted mandibular third molar extraction: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J-L; Sun, L; Liu, C; Sun, Z-H; Min, X; Xia, R

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this comprehensive meta-analysis was to provide evidence-based data to test whether oral contraceptive (OC) use can promote the incidence of dry socket (DS) in females following impacted mandibular third molar extraction. PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Elsevier Science Direct databases were searched. The pooled risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated using fixed-effects or random-effects model analysis. Heterogeneity among studies was evaluated with the Cochran test and I(2) statistic. Study quality was assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Of 70 articles identified in the search, 12 reporting 16 clinical controlled trials were included in this study. The incidence of DS was significantly greater in the OC groups than in the control groups (RR 1.80, 95% CI 1.33-2.43). Subgroup analyses showed that the unit assessed (tooth or patient), the region in which the study was conducted, and the intervention were not related to the incidence of DS in females taking OC after impacted mandibular third molar extraction. The sensitivity analysis showed no significant change when any one study was excluded. Publication bias was also not detected. This study suggests that OC use may promote the incidence of DS in females following impacted mandibular third molar extraction.

  2. Condom practices of urban teens using Norplant contraceptive implants, oral contraceptives, and condoms for contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darney, P D; Callegari, L S; Swift, A; Atkinson, E S; Robert, A M

    1999-04-01

    The availability of long-acting hormonal birth control methods has created new contraceptive options for adolescents. The purpose of this study was to determine whether teens initiating these methods use condoms less frequently than teens using oral contraceptive pills or condoms alone and may therefore be at an increased risk of acquiring sexually transmitted infections. To investigate ongoing condom behavior in teens using levonorgestrel (Norplant) contraceptive implants, oral contraceptives, and condoms alone, we examined data from a 2-year prospective cohort study of 399 urban teens. The study consisted of 3 clinic-based cohorts of adolescent female contraceptive users: Norplant contraceptive implants (n = 200), oral contraceptives (n = 100), and condoms alone (n = 99). Data were collected at an admission interview and at 1- and 2-year follow-up from method continuers. Norplant contraceptive implant users were less likely than oral contraceptive or condom users to report condom use at last sex or consistent condom use at 1- and 2-year follow-up. The implant group showed a significant decrease in condom use from admission to 2 years after method initiation. The proportion of implant users self-reporting new sexually transmitted infections at 2-year follow-up, however, was not significantly greater than that of oral contraceptive or condom users. Our findings indicate that teen users of Norplant contraceptive implants are less likely to use condoms than teens who choose oral contraceptives but, probably because of differences in sexual behavior, are no more likely to self-report sexually transmitted infections. Our findings also indicate that teens who choose oral contraceptives and condoms do not use them consistently enough to avoid pregnancies or sexually transmitted infections.

  3. Emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Look, P F; von Hertzen, H

    1993-01-01

    The term 'emergency contraception', as employed in this paper, refers to methods that are used as emergency procedures to prevent pregnancy following unprotected intercourse. Alternative, less appropriate, terms are postcoital and 'morning-after' contraception. References to postcoital preparations can be found as far back as 1500 BC in Egyptian papyri, but it was not until fairly recently that contraceptive research has been able to at least partially fulfill that need. The development of hormonal methods of emergency contraception goes back to the 1960s when the first human trials of postcoitally administered high-dose oestrogens were undertaken. Combined oestrogen- progestogen combination therapy (the so-called Yuzpe regimen) was introduced in the early 1970s, while the postcoital insertion of an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) for emergency contraception was first reported in 1976. Other compounds that have been tested more recently include levonorgestrel, the antiprogestogen mifepristone, and danazol. Although there is some debate about the magnitude of the protective effect, few people question the important role that emergency contraception can play in preventing unwanted pregnancy and hence maternal mortality and morbidity resulting from unsafe abortion. Given that the most often used methods of emergency contraception, namely the Yuzpe regimen and postcoital insertion of an IUD, rely on technology that has been available for some 30 years, family planning programmes that claim to be concerned with improving women's reproductive health, cannot really be excused if they do not provide emergency contraception as part of their routine services.

  4. Contraceptive Methods and Factors Associated with Modern Contraceptive In Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammad Ali Qazi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The world population will likely increase by 2.5 billion over the next 43 years, passing from the current 6.7 billion to 9.2 billion in 2050. Only limited information about the contraceptive practices especially modern contraceptive use is available. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of contraceptive methods and factors associated with modern contraceptive in useMaterials and Methods: A cross sectional study of 288 females selected through consecutive sampling was conducted in Jinnah Post graduate Medical Center family reproductive health care center Karachi, Pakistan from November 2008 to January 2009. Females of reproductive age 16-50 years using any contraceptive measures and giving informed consent were included. Those who with severe debilitating disease, having any physical and mental disability were excluded. Two trained co researchers interviewed the participants for socio demographic reasons. The main outcome variables of the study were comparing modern and traditional contraceptive methods and factors associated with modern contraceptive in use.Results: The results showed mean age of contraceptive users was 29.49 (±6.42 years. Modern contraceptive method was used by 216 (75% and traditional method by 72 (25%. Final multiple logistic regression showed that a few factors have influence on usage rate including: age>30 years [AOR, 0.426 95% CI0.209-0.865], addiction [AOR, 0.381 95% CI0.173-0.839], and means of information like family planning worker (FPW [AOR, 6.315 95% CI 3.057-13.046], Television (TV [AOR, 0.402 95% CI 0.165-0.979] and billboard (BB [AOR, 0.207 95% CI 0.066-0.447].Conclusion: Modern contraceptive method use is very common in our region (75%. The important means of information for modern contraceptive in use were GPs and family planning workers.

  5. Oral Contraceptive Use, Micronutrient Deficiency, and Obesity among Premenopausal Females in Korea: The Necessity of Dietary Supplements and Food Intake Improvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyoung Park

    Full Text Available This study addressed the associations between oral contraceptive (OC use and obesity as measured by recording the body mass index (BMI of premenopausal females, and possible interactions with micronutrient intake were considered. A group of 39,189 premenopausal females aged 35-59 were included in the analysis; they were in the Health Examinee cohort. Participant BMIs were calculated from anthropometric measurements, and females with a BMI≥25kg/m2 were considered obese. Individual OC use, age at first OC use, duration of OC use, nutrient intake, and other covariates were measured with a structured questionnaire. A multivariate logistic regression with an interaction term was applied to identify the odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI between OC use and obesity along with consideration of micronutrient intake interactions. OC use is associated with an increased risk of obesity (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.04-1.20, and females who used OCs for more than 6 months over their lifetimes were more likely to be obese (OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.01-1.32 compared with those who used OCs for <6 months. There were interaction effects between phosphorus, potassium, vitamin A, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, niacin, vitamin C intake and total duration of OC use on being obesity (P-value<0.05. When stratified by micronutrient intake, the associations between total OC use duration and obesity were present only among those with calcium, phosphorus, potassium, vitamin A, B1, B2, C, niacin, and folate intakes below the recommended levels. Efforts to estimate nutrient intake and prevent micronutrient depletion with supplements or food should be considered by clinicians for females who take OC for a long period.

  6. Oral Contraceptive Use, Micronutrient Deficiency, and Obesity among Premenopausal Females in Korea: The Necessity of Dietary Supplements and Food Intake Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Boyoung; Kim, Jeongseon

    2016-01-01

    This study addressed the associations between oral contraceptive (OC) use and obesity as measured by recording the body mass index (BMI) of premenopausal females, and possible interactions with micronutrient intake were considered. A group of 39,189 premenopausal females aged 35-59 were included in the analysis; they were in the Health Examinee cohort. Participant BMIs were calculated from anthropometric measurements, and females with a BMI≥25kg/m2 were considered obese. Individual OC use, age at first OC use, duration of OC use, nutrient intake, and other covariates were measured with a structured questionnaire. A multivariate logistic regression with an interaction term was applied to identify the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) between OC use and obesity along with consideration of micronutrient intake interactions. OC use is associated with an increased risk of obesity (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.04-1.20), and females who used OCs for more than 6 months over their lifetimes were more likely to be obese (OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.01-1.32) compared with those who used OCs for intake and total duration of OC use on being obesity (P-valueintake, the associations between total OC use duration and obesity were present only among those with calcium, phosphorus, potassium, vitamin A, B1, B2, C, niacin, and folate intakes below the recommended levels. Efforts to estimate nutrient intake and prevent micronutrient depletion with supplements or food should be considered by clinicians for females who take OC for a long period.

  7. Population and antenatal-based HIV prevalence estimates in a high contracepting female population in rural South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnighausen Till

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To present and compare population-based and antenatal-care (ANC sentinel surveillance HIV prevalence estimates among women in a rural South African population where both provision of ANC services and family planning is prevalent and fertility is declining. With a need, in such settings, to understand how to appropriately adjust ANC sentinel surveillance estimates to represent HIV prevalence in general populations, and with evidence of possible biases inherent to both surveillance systems, we explore differences between the two systems. There is particular emphasis on unrepresentative selection of ANC clinics and unrepresentative testing in the population. Methods HIV sero-prevalence amongst blood samples collected from women consenting to test during the 2005 annual longitudinal population-based serological survey was compared to anonymous unlinked HIV sero-prevalence amongst women attending antenatal care (ANC first visits in six clinics (January to May 2005. Both surveillance systems were conducted as part of the Africa Centre Demographic Information System. Results Population-based HIV prevalence estimates for all women (25.2% and pregnant women (23.7% were significantly lower than that for ANC attendees (37.7%. A large proportion of women attending urban or peri-urban clinics would be predicted to be resident within rural areas. Although overall estimates remained significantly different, presenting and standardising estimates by age and location (clinic for ANC-based estimates and individual-residence for population-based estimates made some group-specific estimates from the two surveillance systems more predictive of one another. Conclusion It is likely that where ANC coverage and contraceptive use is widespread and fertility is low, population-based surveillance under-estimates HIV prevalence due to unrepresentative testing by age, residence and also probably by HIV status, and that ANC sentinel surveillance over

  8. Adolescent contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, A L

    1996-12-01

    By age 19, the average North American man has had sex with 5.11 people. Almost two thirds of high-school senior-aged women have had sex. While the rates of sexual activity among teens in the US are not substantially different from rates in other developed western countries, adolescent pregnancy rates in the US are several times higher than in most other countries. These high rates of adolescent pregnancy are partly due to the collective reluctance among adults in the US to discuss sexuality issues with adolescents and provide them with contraception. Effective communication is the key to providing contraception to teens. Studies have clearly shown that teens are interested in sexuality and would like to discuss the issue with their physicians. The author notes that any successful program to reduce unwanted pregnancies among teens will understand that teens are often concrete thinkers focused upon their physical appearance and dedicated to taking risks. Oral contraception, long-acting progestin methods, condoms, and other options are discussed. However, emergency contraception with birth control pills is the one most important contraceptive option which can be provided to teens. The approach has recently been approved by the FDA Advisory Board for both safety and efficacy. Recent studies, however, show that less than 10% of US clinicians informed their patients of the availability of emergency contraception. Information on providers of emergency contraception can be obtained by dialing Princeton University's Office of Population Research's toll-free emergency contraception hotline at (800) 584-9911.

  9. Synergistic inhibitory effect of nicotine plus oral contraceptive on mitochondrial complex-IV is mediated by estrogen receptor-β in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Ami P; Dave, Kunjan R; Saul, Isabel; Gonzalez, Gabriel J; Diaz, Francisca

    2012-04-01

    Chronic nicotine and oral contraceptive (NOC) exposure caused significant loss of hippocampal membrane-bound estrogen receptor-beta (ER-β) in female rats compared with exposure to nicotine alone. Mitochondrial ER-β regulates estrogen-mediated mitochondrial structure and function; therefore, investigating the impact of NOC on mitochondrial ER-β and its function could help delineate the harmful synergism between nicotine and OC. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that NOC-induced loss of mitochondrial ER-β alters the oxidative phosphorylation system protein levels and mitochondrial respiratory function. This hypothesis was tested in hippocampal mitochondria isolated from female rats exposed to saline, nicotine, OC or NOC for 16 days. NOC decreased the mitochondrial ER-β protein levels and reduced oxygen consumption and complex IV (CIV) activity by 34% and 26% compared with saline- or nicotine-administered groups, respectively. We also observed significantly low protein levels of all mitochondrial-encoded CIV subunits after NOC as compared with the nicotine or saline groups. Similarly, the silencing of ER-β reduced the phosphorylation of cyclic-AMP response element binding protein, and also reduced levels of CIV mitochondrial-encoded subunits after estrogen stimulation. Overall, these results suggest that mitochondrial ER-β loss is responsible for mitochondrial malfunction after NOC.

  10. The increasing number of surgical procedures for female genital fistula in England: analysis of Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S I M F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the number and trend of surgical procedures for female genital fistula in England. An online search of Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data was carried out. Data were available for the 4-year period from 2002-03 until 2005-06. The total number of surgical procedures carried out for female genital fistula steadily increased by 28.7% from 616 in 2002-03 to 793 in 2005-06. The number of surgical procedures performed for rectovaginal fistula exceeded the total number of surgical procedures carried out for vesicovaginal and urethrovaginal fistula in each year of the study period. This pattern needs to be monitored and investigated further.

  11. Recasting image of contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimon Jg; Kiragu, K

    1993-03-01

    Even though contraceptives are linked to sex which, along with sensuality and peer acceptance, is used to market consumer goods, contraceptives are promoted in a hygienic, clinical way. Glamorous images which divert from adverse health effects are used to sell unhealthy goods, e.g., alcohol and cigarettes, but technical and intimidating promotion techniques centering on risks are used to promote family planning (FP) products and services which actually save the lives of mothers and children and improve their health. Until recently, only the medical system provided FP products and services so consumers identified them with illness and a help-seeking behavior. The image of contraceptives must be remolded to gain people's attention. To avoid instilling mistrust of a method in consumers, even those who believe in birth spacing, it is important for images to be positive and to reflect accurate information. In Indonesia, the Dualima condom has been linked to responsible fatherhood thereby creating a positive image and removing the negative image of a condom being linked to illicit sex. In the US, condom adds show the user in control, especially in reference to AIDS. Prior to promotion of any contraceptive, complete, clear communication and marketing plans are needed to identify and to focus on consumers' perceived needs. A survey in Egypt shows that the most important attributes of a contraceptive are ease of use, healthiness, and effectiveness and that Egyptians considered IUDs to best fit these attributes. Images of contraceptive users often determine whether potential users do choose to use contraceptives. For example, in Cameroon and the Philippines, female users are considered to be smart, rich, educated, confident and in control of their lives. In the Philippines, male users are perceived to be loving, caring, and considerate husbands. The mass medias can improve providers' public image as was the case in Turkey and Egypt.

  12. ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES AS A RISK FACTOR FOR DEVELOPING BREAST CANCER IN BREAST CANCER (BRCA GENE CARRIER FEMALE IN- THE 30-60 YEARS AGE GROUP: A META-ANALYSIS

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    Ghimire S, Shrestha N, BK Baral

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature linking breast cancer with oral contraceptives and BRCA mutation as possible risk factors is equivocal. Hence, to account for these conflicting results in the existing literature and to observe the net effect, this meta-analysis aims to investigate whether oral contraceptives are a risk factor for developing breast cancer in breast cancer (BRCA gene carrier female in the 30-60 years age group. Method: Systematic review of the literature, both published and unpublished, and meta-analysis of relevant data. Results: Meta-analysis of data from five relevant studies, with a total of 6682 BRCA carriers (3,269 BRCA1 carriers and 791 BRCA2 carriers, revealed that use of oral contraceptives is associated with increased risk of breast cancer among BRCA mutation carriers (OR=2.267; 95 % CI= 1.311, 3.919. When the same risk was stratified by mutation type, both BRCA1 and BRCA2 were at increased risk. However, BRCA2 carriers (OR= 3.060; 95% CI=0.951, 9.848 were found to be at elevated risk compared to BRCA1 carriers (OR= 2.347; 95% CI=0.939, 5.865. Conclusions: This meta-analytical finding suggests that oral contraceptives are a risk factor for developing breast cancer in breast cancer (BRCA gene carrier females.

  13. Contraception in perimenopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneepanichskul, Surasak; Dusitsin, Nikorn

    2003-06-01

    Women in their forties are still potentially fertile, and pregnancy in this age group is attended with increased maternal mortality, spontaneous abortion, fetal anomalies and perinatal mortality. Contraception for women in this age group has special risks and benefits; both should be balanced to choose between the different options available. Recent epidemiological and clinical pharmacology studies have indicated the safety of extending the use of combined oral contraceptives (COCs) beyond the age of 35 years and up to menopause. Women who have reasons for avoiding COCs can use progestogen-only contraceptives like pills, depot injectables and implants. Implant combines high efficacy and long-term effect. Both copper-releasing and levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine contraceptive device (LNG-IUD) combine the advantages of high efficacy and long-term effect. The reduced fecundity above the age of forty can allow extending the use beyond the accepted term, and up to one or two years beyond the menopause without the need for replacement. The levonorgestrel IUD has the advantage of reducing the amount of menstrual bleeding. The condom has the added benefit of protection against sexual transmitted diseases (STDs). Male or female sterilization is an excellent contraceptive option, provided that this approach is culturally acceptable and available at reasonable cost and low risk.

  14. Contraceptive implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  15. Emergency Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the pill that contains ulipristal acetate reduces the risk of pregnancy more effectively than pills that contain levonorgestrel.It is important to remember that emergency contraceptive pills will not prevent pregnancy if you have ...

  16. Surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence with the Gynecare TVT Secur™ System – preliminary report

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    Włodzimierz Baranowski

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sling procedures were first introduced over 100 years ago in the treatment of stress urinaryincontinence. Since then they have evolved to become less invasive and safer. The sling procedure using theGynecare TVT Secur™ system is a new therapeutic option for women with stress urinary incontinence.Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Gynecare TVT Secur™ in the surgical treatment of stressurinary incontinence in women. Material and methods: The study comprised consecutive female patients admitted to the Department ofGynaecology and Gynaecological Oncology of the Military Institute of Health Services in Warsaw, Poland, whohad been qualified for surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence on the basis of physical signs and symptomsand the findings of a urodynamic study. The procedure was performed using the Gynecare TVT Secur™system with tapes introduced in an H- or U-shape mode. Results: Between October 2006 and September 2009, 77 sling procedures using the Gynecare TVT Secur™system were performed in women with stress urinary incontinence. Their mean age was 55.1 (30-76 years, meanBMI 28.5 (20.2-43.8 kg/m2. Sixty-nine implants were positioned in H-shape mode, 8 in U-shape mode. Fortyninewomen (63.6% were menopausal, 14 (18.2% previously had three or more natural deliveries, 13 (16.8%had a history of gynaecological surgeries. Thirty-one procedures were performed under general anaesthesia and46 under local anaesthesia. The mean duration of the surgery was 9 (4-42 minutes. It was possible to dischargefifty-seven (74% women on the day of the surgery. Urine retention was observed only in 1 (1.7% woman. Noother complications were recorded. Conclusions: The surgical treatment of urinary incontinence with sling procedures using the Gynecare TVTSecur™ system shows good immediate efficacy and safety. Considering this as well as the short duration ofthe procedure and its good tolerability under local anaesthesia, use

  17. Lower concentrations of chemotactic cytokines and soluble innate factors in the lower female genital tract associated with the use of injectable hormonal contraceptive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngcapu, Sinaye; Masson, Lindi; Sibeko, Sengeziwe; Werner, Lise; McKinnon, Lyle R; Mlisana, Koleka; Shey, Muki; Samsunder, Natasha; Karim, Salim Abdool; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Passmore, Jo-Ann S

    2015-08-01

    Progesterone-based injectable hormonal contraceptives (HCs) potentially modulate genital barrier integrity and regulate the innate immune environment in the female genital tract, thereby enhancing the risk of STIs or HIV infection. We investigated the effects of injectable HC use on concentrations of inflammatory cytokines and other soluble factors associated with genital epithelial repair and integrity. The concentrations of 42 inflammatory, regulatory, adaptive growth factors and hematopoietic cytokines, five matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and four tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) were measured in cervicovaginal lavages (CVLs) from 64 HIV-negative women using injectable HCs and 64 control women not using any HCs, in a matched case-control study. There were no differences between groups in the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV; Nugent score ≥7), or common sexually transmitted infections (STIs). In multivariate analyses adjusting for condom use, sex work status, marital status, BV and STIs, median concentrations of chemokines (eotaxin, MCP-1, MDC), adaptive cytokines (IL-15), growth factors (PDGF-AA) and a metalloproteinase (TIMP-2) were significantly lower in CVLs from women using injectable HCs than controls. In addition, the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12p40 and the chemokine fractalkine were less likely to have detectable levels in women using injectable HCs compared with those not using HCs. We conclude that injectable HC use was broadly associated with an immunosuppressive female genital tract innate immune profile. While the relationship between injectable HC use and STI or HIV risk is yet to be resolved, our data suggest that the effects of injectable HCs were similar in STI-positive and STI-negative participants.

  18. Knowledge, attitude and practice study of HIV in female adolescents presenting for contraceptive services in a rural health district in the north-east of Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Ntumba

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Namibia bears a large burden of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV, and the youth are disproportionately affected. Objectives: To explore the current knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of female adolescents attending family planning to HIV prevention.Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used on a sample 251 unmarried female adolescents aged from 13 years to 19 years accessing primary care services for contraception using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Data were analysed using Epi Info 2002. Crude associations were assessed using cross-tabulations of knowledge, attitude and behaviour scores against demographic variables. Chi-square tests and odds ratios were used to assess associations from the cross-tabulations. All p-values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant.Results: A quarter of sexually active teenagers attending the family-planning services did not have adequate knowledge of HIV prevention strategies. Less than a quarter (23.9% always used a condom. Most respondents (83.3% started sexual intercourse when older than 16 years, but only 38.6% used a condom at their sexual debut. The older the girls were at sexual debut, the more likely they were to use a condom for the event (8% did so at age 13 years and 100% at age 19 years.Conclusions: Knowledge of condom use as an HIV prevention strategy did not translate into consistent condom use. One alternate approach in family-planning facilities may be to encourage condom use as a dual protection method. Delayed onset of sexual activity and consistent use of condoms should be encouraged amongst schoolchildren, in the school setting.

  19. Limited Evidence Suggests a Protective Association Between Oral Contraceptive Pill Use and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Females: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Kathleen; Balk, Ethan M; Sevetson, Erika L; Fleming, Braden C

    2017-10-01

    Female athletes aged 14 to 18 years are at particular risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Hormonal factors are thought to predispose them to this injury. Oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) might reduce ACL injury risk, although the literature appears controversial. To evaluate the association between OCP use and ACL injuries in women. The secondary objective was to determine the rates of ACL injuries in the pre- and postovulatory phases of the menstrual cycle in OCP and non-OCP (NOCP) users. Searches were performed across 4 reference databases (PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane), abstracts from 6 specialty societies, ClinicalTrials.gov , and reference lists of relevant papers. We included studies investigating the association between OCP use and ACL injuries in females of any age or the distribution of ACL injuries across the menstrual cycle in OCP and NOCP users. Systematic review. Level 3. Data regarding study design, population characteristics, OCP details, outcome definitions, analytic methods, and results were extracted from the included studies. The methodological quality of each study was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. The search yielded 1305 citations, of which 7 retrospective observational studies met the inclusion criteria. Two large case-control studies with higher methodological quality suggested that OCP use may reduce the risk of sustaining an ACL injury. Five comparative studies examining injury distribution across the menstrual cycle in OCP and NOCP users had conflicting findings, were heterogeneous, and were limited by low methodological quality. The evidence suggests OCP use may reduce the risk of ACL injury; however, no conclusions can be drawn regarding differences in risk of ACL injuries between OCP and NOCP users across the menstrual cycle. Studies were limited by small sample sizes, heterogeneity, and methodological concerns.

  20. Contraceptive procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Anitra; Schutt-Ainé, Ann

    2013-12-01

    Although most women desire to control the size and spacing of their family, the rate of unintended pregnancy in the United States remains high, with approximately half of all pregnancies being unintended. Reducing unintended pregnancy is a national public health goal, and the increased use of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) (intrauterine devices and implants) can help meet this goal. LARCs are among the most effective forms of contraception available. There are few contraindications to their use, and insertion and removal are straightforward procedures that are well tolerated in the outpatient office setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Students' perceptions of contraceptives in university of ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Nimo Appiah-Agyekum

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to explore University of Ghana Business School diploma student's knowledge of contraceptives, types of contraceptives, attitudes towards contraceptive users, preference for contraceptives, benefits, and side-effects of contraceptives.Data was conducted with three sets of focus group discussions. Participants were systematically sampled from accounting and public administration departments.Findings showed that students had little knowledge of contraceptives. The male and female condoms were the main contraceptive types reported out of the many modern and traditional methods of contraceptives. The main benefits of contraceptives were; ability to protect against STIs, abortions, unwanted pregnancy and psychological trauma. Whilst most respondents preferred future use of pills, side-effects of contraceptives were mostly reported for condoms than other contraceptive methods. Results showed that participants had bad attitudes towards unmarried contraceptive users.Generally, our findings show that detailed knowledge about contraceptives is low. There is a little gap of information on contraception knowledge, timing, and contraceptive types among university diploma students. Reproductive and maternal services should be available and accessible for tertiary students.

  2. Emergency Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It works because the copper prevents sperm from swimming or functioning well. While more expensive than ECPs, an IUD is the most effective type of emergency contraception. It also can prevent future pregnancies for up to 12 years after insertion. How ...

  3. 上海市流动人口中育龄妇女避孕知识及避孕状况调查%Analysis of contraceptive knowledge and practice among female migrants of reproductive age in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武俊青; 陶建国; 高尔生

    2001-01-01

    目的:评价“以现居住地为主”的计划生育综合干预措施对提高上海市外来育龄妇女的避孕知识水平和节育措施选择的效果。方法:选择流动人口相对集中的虹桥和梅陇镇为研究现场,随机将虹桥镇定为实验组,梅陇镇定为对照组。对居住3个月以上,不具有上海户籍的4 679名育龄妇女进行调查。1998年1月完成基线调查后实验组除了原来的计划生育服务外,还进行“以现居住地”为主的计划生育宣传教育干预与计划生育服务干预。对计划生育管理人员及计划生育服务人员进行培训。1998年11~12月对两组对象进行效果评估调查。结果:外来育龄妇女避孕知识贫乏,生殖健康意识薄弱,避孕方法知晓率低。计划生育综合干预措施能提高妇女的避孕知识水平,避孕知识积分实验组由干预前的4.44±3.24分增至干预后的5.53±3.52分,高于对照组(由4.28±3.81降至3.92±3.36)。避孕知识得分受到婚姻状况、受教育年限、是否接受过计划生育宣教等因素的影响。62%的外来已婚妇女使用宫内节育器,19%采用女性绝育避孕措施,9%的妇女未采取任何避孕措施。干预后实验组选择稳定性避孕措施的比例减少而非稳定性避孕措施的比例有所增加,提示开展计划生育综合干预可潜在地提高妇女对避孕方法的知情选择能力。结论:应加强对外来育龄妇女的计划生育宣教力度,多方位多渠道地向她们提供与计划生育、生殖健康有关的信息和服务。%Objective: This paper is to analyze the contraceptive knowledge and practice among female migrants who participated in the project of ‘present-residence based' family planning integrated intervention in Minhang district, Shanghai, during 1998. The aims of the study are to understand the contraceptive knowledge, practice and its determinants among the female migrants, and to

  4. Comparison of Sexual Dysfunction Using the Female Sexual Function Index following Surgical Treatments for Uterine Fibroids

    OpenAIRE

    Allison Ryann Louie; Jennifer Alice Armstrong; Laura Katherine Findeiss; Scott Craig Goodwin

    2012-01-01

    Uterine fibroids are a common problem in women. Statistics showing 20–50% of fibroids produce symptoms and consequently patients seek surgical intervention to improve their quality of life. Treatments for fibroids are typically successful in controlling the fibroid disease, yet sexual function following invasive surgical treatments for fibroids can be jeopardized. The Sexual Function Index (FSFI) is a valid instrument producing quantifiable reproducible results. In this paper three case repor...

  5. Surrey on contraceptive status among married female residents separated from household registration%北京市怀柔山区人户分离已婚育龄妇女避孕节育现状调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭淑英; 刘秀平

    2011-01-01

    目的:了解怀柔山区人户分离已婚育龄妇女避孕节育知识知晓程度和接受避孕节育服务情况,为改善服务质量提供依据.方法:采用随机数字表法,抽取3 900名居住在怀柔区2个街道及城区附近各镇的居(村)、但户籍在本区北部山区5个乡镇(喇叭沟门满族乡、长哨营满族乡、汤口镇、宝山镇、琉璃庙镇)的人户分离已婚育龄妇女为调查对象进行问卷调查.结果:有效问卷3 876份,调查对象在2009年度接受避孕节育知识教育比例89.04%,紧急避孕知晓率85.91%,其中对紧急避孕药的认知度高达95.07%,放置含铜宫内节育器进行紧急避孕的认知度仅为5.95%;避孕措施失败率为6.22%;对在社区可获得避孕药具的知晓率仅5.21%.结论:怀柔区人户分离已婚育龄妇女避孕节育服务参与率较高,但知识和政策知晓率较低.计划生育服务部门应针对人群特点,充分发挥社区卫生服务机构功能,开展避孕节育知识和政策的宣传教育.%Objective: To explore the contraceptive status of married female residents separated from household registration in a mountain area of Huairou District, Beijing. Methods: A total of 3 900 married women of reproductive age were recruited. A questionnaire survey was conducted. Results: A total of 3 876 questionnaires were valid. In 2009, 89.04% of the respondents trained for contraceptive knowledge. The awareness rate of emergency contraception was 85. 91%, and 95. 07% of the women knew emergency contraceptive pills and 5.95% knew cooper intrauterine device. The contraceptive failure rate was 6.22%.Only 5.21% knew that contraceptives could be obtained at community. Conclusion: Married female residents separated from household registration in a mountain area of Huairou District have poor contraceptive knowledge, while most of them involve in contraception. Therefore, the community health service ability should be improved to provide services

  6. 女大学生生殖健康、避孕及乳房保健知识认知调查%Investigation on cognition of female university students to reproductive health, contraception, and breast health care knowledge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张银霞; 王玉; 岳一平

    2012-01-01

    目的:了解女大学生生殖健康、避孕及乳房保健知识认知现状及相关知识需求,提高学校对该方面教育的重视程度.方法:采用整群抽样的方法,以自行设计问卷对930名民族大学女大学生进行匿名调查.结果:民族大学女大学生生殖健康知识欠缺,对避孕方法及流产危害知晓率低,乳房保健自查意识淡薄,但希望学习性卫生相关知识.总体上,汉族和城市生源学生对避孕方法、乳房保健自查知识掌握程度稍好.结论:女大学生应该了解更多生殖健康、避孕及乳房保健方面的知识,减少对自身身体及心理的伤害,相关知识的健康教育有待加强.%Objective; To understand the current situation of cognition of female university students to reproductive health, contraception , and breast health care knowledge and related knowledge and their demands for related knowledge, improve the attention of universities to the aspect. Methods; Cluster sampling method was used to survey 930 female university students of ethnic minorities by a self - designed questionnaire anonymously. Results; The female university students of ethnic minorities lacked reproductive health knowledge, and the awareness rates of contraceptive methods and harmfulness of abortion were low, the consciousness of breast self - examination was weak, but they wanted to learn related knowledge of sex hygiene. Totally, the grasp degrees of university students of Han nationality and urban university students to contraceptive methods and knowledge of breast self - examination were better. Conclusion: The female university students should understand more knowledge about reproductive health, contraception, and breast health care, decrease the harms to their bodies and psychology, health education of related knowledge should be enhanced.

  7. Emergency Contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemzell-Danielsson K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been numerous attempts to control fertility after unprotected sexual intercourse. From very bizarre methods like the vaginal application of Coca Cola to the more serious attempts using calcium antagonists influencing fertility parameters in sperm to hormonal methods or intrauterine devices. So far, hormonal methods preventing or delaying ovulation have proved to be the most popular starting with the combination of ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel, known as the Yuzpe regimen. The first dose had to be taken within 72 hours of unprotected intercourse, a second one 12 hours later. Later on, levonorgestrel alone, at first in a regimen similar to the Yuzpe method (2 × 0.75 mg 12 hours apart showed to be more successful, eventually resulting in the development of a 1.5 mg levonorgestrel pill that combined good efficacy with a high ease of use. It has become the standard method used up to this day in most countries. Since the mid 1970s copper IUDs have been used for emergency contraception, which show a high efficacy. Their disadvantages lie in the fact that emergency contraception is considered an off label use and that they might not be acceptable for every patient. Mifepristone in doses of 10 or 25 mg is being used successfully as an emergency contraceptive in China, but has never received any significant consideration in Western countries. The most recent development is the approval of the selective progesterone receptor modulator ulipristal acetate in the dosage of 30 mg for emergency contraception up to 5 days after unprotected intercourse, combining the safe and easy application of the single dose levonorgestrel pill with an even higher efficacy. Several efficacious and easy to use methods for emergency contraception are available on the market today with the most widely spread being levonorgestrel in a single dose of 1.5 mg (given as one tablet of 1.5 mg or 2 tablets of 0.75 mg each for administration up to 3 days after

  8. [Hormonal contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prilepskaia, V N

    1991-12-01

    Effective contraceptives contribute to the regulation of births, protect the health of women, reduce maternal and perinatal mortality and gynecological diseases, and prevent abortion-related complications. Complications after abortion average 30%, and among primigravidas the rate reaches 45%. Abortion can result in sterility and in the inability to carry out the pregnancy. Oral contraceptives (OCs) are used by 150 million globally. In new preparations ethinyl estradiol (EE) and levonorgestrel (LNG) are the most common components. In the 2-phase and 3-phase preparations Sequilar, Anteovin, and lipid profile safe Triquilar the gestagen component was reduced 40%. Continuin and Famulen are minipills, and Postinor is a postcoital contraceptive. Absolute contraindications of OCs include thromboembolytic diseases, severe cardiovascular system diseases, liver disorders, cirrhosis, cerebral vascular diseases, grave diabetes, jaundice, and malignant tumors of the mammae and sexual organs. Rigevidon, Triquilar, and Trisiston have high steroid content with minimal side effects. The protective effect of OCs are: 2-3 times lower risk of inflammation of the small pelvis, lower risk of malignant and benign ovarian tumors that lasts even after discontinuation, uterine cancer prevention (antiproliferation effect on the endometrium and inhibition of mitotic activity of the myometrium), and reduced risk of benign breast neoplasms. The finding that estrogen-induced risk of breast cancer increases with longterm contraceptive use in young nulliparas has not been persuasively proven. The optimal duration of uninterrupted OC use is 1-1.5 years. Monophasic estrogen-gestagen preparations include Bisecurin, Non-Ovlon, Ovidon, Rigevidon, Minisiston, and Demulen with low dosages of EE, LNG, norethisterone acetate, and diacetate ethonodiol. Norplant is a subdermal silastic capsule with effectiveness for up to 5 years.

  9. [Choosing contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Velez, A C

    1998-06-01

    The development of contraception has allowed women to think about and experience motherhood not as their destiny but as an option. Humans have always been interested in controlling their fertility. Writings unearthed in the 18th century demonstrated the interest of the ancient Egyptians and Greeks in fertility control. The oral contraceptive (OC) pill, developed in the 1950s by Pincus and Rock, has allowed millions of women to avoid unwanted pregnancy. Since 1960, when the oral contraceptive Enovid was first marketed in the US, over 200 million women throughout the world have used OCs. Modern formulations have low hormone doses, which has minimized side effects. OCs now have an effectiveness of 98%. The method is controlled by the woman, permitting autonomous decisions about pregnancy. Currently, in Colombia, 12.9% of women in union use OCs, 25.7% are sterilized, 11.1% each use IUDs and traditional methods, 4.3% use condoms, 2.5% use injectables, 1.4% use vaginal tablets, 0.7% each use Norplant and vasectomy, and 1.8% use other methods. 27.8% use no method. OCs can be used as an emergency method in case of rape, an unexpected sexual encounter, or failure of another method. When used as a postcoital method, OCs must be taken within 72 hours of unprotected sexual intercourse.

  10. Understanding contraceptive failure

    OpenAIRE

    Trussell, James

    2009-01-01

    Contraceptive failure is a major source of unintended pregnancy. This chapter will review sources of data and measurement of contraceptive failure, summarize results from the literature on the risks of contraceptive failure during typical and perfect use for available methods of contraception, provide a tool for communicating risks of contraceptive failure to clients, examine determinants of contraceptive failure, and identify methodological pitfalls in the published literature.

  11. Oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclennan, A H

    1987-12-01

    Over 60 million women use highly efficient and safe modern combined oral contraceptives (OCs) every day. A women who takes the oral contraceptive for 5 years before the age of 30 will actually live 12 days longer, although a woman taking the pill for the 1st time for 5 years after the age of 30 will have her life span reduced on the average by 80 days. OC related morbidity and mortality mostly occur in women over 35 who smoke. Combined low dose OCs are safe for women who do not smoke, at least to 45 years of age and probably to the menopause. The prescription of OCs is also safe to the young adolescent. The pill does not interfere with maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary ovarian axis and does not increase the incidence of amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea or infertility in later life. Patients with contraindications to estrogen therapy are excluded from OC use (history of thromboembolism, major heart disease, liver disease, breast cancer). Low-dose (30-35 mcg estrogen-containing monophasic or triphasic) pills are recommended. Combined oral contraceptives contain either ethinyl estradiol (1.7 to 2 times more potent) or mestranol. After absorption the progestagens, norethisterone acetate, ethynodiol diacetate and lynoestrenol are all metabolized to norethisterone. The progestagen-only pill has about a 2% failure rate and poorer cycle control than the combined pill, but it lacks estrogenic, progestagenic and androgenic side effects. This pill is suitable for the lactating mother, for smokers over 35, for hypertensive patients, and for those with a history of thrombosis. The efficacy of the progestagen-only pill is restored in 3 days of pill taking. Postcoital contraception is an alternative: treatment can be given for at least 72 hours after intercourse. The Yuzpe method calls for the patient to take 2 combined oral contraceptive tablets containing levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol (Eugynon or Ovral) followed by a further 2 tablets 12 hours later. This regimen

  12. Surgical outcomes and complications of reconstructive surgery in the female congenital adrenal hyperplasia patient: What every endocrinologist should know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lily C; Poppas, Dix P

    2017-01-01

    Surgical management of classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) in 46, XX females has evolved significantly. Virilization of the genitalia of 46, XX females with CAH begins prenatally as a result of excess fetal androgen production. Improved understanding of anatomy and surgical outcomes has driven changes in surgical techniques as well as the timing of surgery. For endocrinologists treating these patients, it is important to understand the outcome of genitoplasty, identify patients who need further treatment and direct these patients to experienced surgeons. We performed a literature search on PubMed of publications addressing CAH and genital reconstruction published in the English language from 1990 to the present. In accordance with our institutional review board, we performed a retrospective analysis of clitoroplasty and/or vaginoplasty procedures performed by a single surgeon at our institution from 1996 to 2015. We found that genital reconstruction in 46, XX CAH patients is associated with few immediate post-operative, infectious, and urinary complications. Vaginal stenosis is a common complication of vaginal reconstruction and requires evaluation by an experienced surgeon. Clitoral pain or decreased sensation can be associated with clitoral recession and clitorectomy. Outcomes in sexual satisfaction and gender identity can also be impacted by surgical technique and success. Long term follow up and patient reported feedback are crucial to our understanding and management of this special group of patients. Improved awareness and understanding of the complications of genital surgery will allow endocrinologists to know what to ask patients and be ready to provide them with a resource with the understanding and experience to help them improve their quality of life.

  13. Contraceptive Use Among Nonpregnant and Postpartum Women at Risk for Unintended Pregnancy, and Female High School Students, in the Context of Zika Preparedness - United States, 2011-2013 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Sheree L; D'Angelo, Denise V; Morrow, Brian; Zapata, Lauren; Berry-Bibee, Erin; Rivera, Maria; Ellington, Sascha; Romero, Lisa; Lathrop, Eva; Frey, Meghan; Williams, Tanya; Goldberg, Howard; Warner, Lee; Harrison, Leslie; Cox, Shanna; Pazol, Karen; Barfield, Wanda; Jamieson, Denise J; Honein, Margaret A; Kroelinger, Charlan D

    2016-08-05

    Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause congenital microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1,2). Since 2015, Zika virus has been spreading through much of the World Health Organization's Region of the Americas, including U.S. territories. Zika virus is spread through the bite of Aedes aegypti or Aedes albopictus mosquitoes, by sex with an infected partner, or from a pregnant woman to her fetus during pregnancy.* CDC estimates that 41 states are in the potential range of Aedes aegypti or Aedes albopictus mosquitoes (3), and on July 29, 2016, the Florida Department of Health identified an area in one neighborhood of Miami where Zika virus infections in multiple persons are being spread by bites of local mosquitoes. These are the first known cases of local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission in the continental United States.(†) CDC prevention efforts include mosquito surveillance and control, targeted education about Zika virus and condom use to prevent sexual transmission, and guidance for providers on contraceptive counseling to reduce unintended pregnancy. To estimate the prevalence of contraceptive use among nonpregnant and postpartum women at risk for unintended pregnancy and sexually active female high school students living in the 41 states where mosquito-borne transmission might be possible, CDC used 2011-2013 and 2015 survey data from four state-based surveillance systems: the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS, 2011-2013), which surveys adult women; the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS, 2013) and the Maternal and Infant Health Assessment (MIHA, 2013), which surveys women with a recent live birth; and the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS, 2015), which surveys students in grades 9-12. CDC defines an unintended pregnancy as one that is either unwanted (i.e., the pregnancy occurred when no children, or no more children, were desired) or mistimed (i.e., the pregnancy occurred earlier than desired). The proportion of

  14. The Service Demand Analysis of the Postpartum Contraceptive Education for Floating Females in Guangzhou%广州市流动人口产后避孕宣教需求分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶明; 黄柳; 程曦; 黄洁贞; 杨金英

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To study the status of contraceptive adoption and the service demand of the postpartum reproductive health education for floating females in Guangzhou,to investigate the family planning service model for floating population.Method:The demand for the contraceptive and birth control services and the awareness for the contraceptive and birth control services were investigated through closed-questionnaire surveys in 1000 maternal floating populations.They were selected and hospital deliveried in Guangzhou women and children medical center.Result:In postpartum women, The average age of objects were(28.50±4.00),59.7%of them were office workers and unemployed females,63.3%were graduated from junior or senior high school,28.03%of them had the history of induced abortions.The time of postpartum reproductive health education,which were welcomed during the time for physical examination in postnatal 42 days outpatient department,at infant physical examination or immunization and during postpartum follow-up and physical examination.The sources were primary supplied by networks,science popularization or exhibition,and doctors.They payed closed attention to the merits and demerits of contraceptions,contraception methods and sexually transmitted disease.Conclusion:It is important to carry out postpartum contraception early,the informed choice and health education of contraception should be enhanced by medical workers according to the characteristic and demands of postpartum women.%  目的:调查广州市流动人口避孕节育现状和产后生殖健康服务需求,探索针对流动人口的计划生育服务模式.方法:对广州市妇女儿童医疗中心的流动人口产后妇女进行调查,调查方式为匿名封闭式问卷调查.结果:调查对象平均年龄(28.50±4.00)岁;职业以公司职员和无业人员为主(59.7%);文化程度以初中和高中为主(63.3%);既往有人工流产史的占28.03%.研究对

  15. Comparison of Sexual Dysfunction Using the Female Sexual Function Index following Surgical Treatments for Uterine Fibroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Ryann Louie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uterine fibroids are a common problem in women. Statistics showing 20–50% of fibroids produce symptoms and consequently patients seek surgical intervention to improve their quality of life. Treatments for fibroids are typically successful in controlling the fibroid disease, yet sexual function following invasive surgical treatments for fibroids can be jeopardized. The Sexual Function Index (FSFI is a valid instrument producing quantifiable reproducible results. In this paper three case reports are evaluated by the FSFI and compared between the following treatment groups: hysterectomy, myomectomy, and uterine embolization. Our goal is to illustrate how each of these treatment outcomes can result in sexual dysfunction and therefore decreased quality of life. Effects of invasive fibroid treatments on sexual functioning would be helpful in guiding patient’s ultimate decisions regarding treatment.

  16. Conocimiento y uso de métodos anticonceptivos en mujeres que ejercen la prostitución en Asturias Knowledge and use of contraceptive methods in female sex workers in Asturias [Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Ojer Tsakiridu

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Describir el conocimiento de los métodos contraceptivos y el uso que hacen de ellos las mujeres que ejercen la prostitución en Asturias. Métodos: Estudio transversal mediante cuestionario autoadministrado a 212 mujeres. Resultados: El 61,2% refería tener información suficiente sobre métodos contraceptivos, aunque el conocimiento real es menor. En su última relación comercial en un 2,4% no tuvo una actitud eficaz para prevenir el embarazo y en la última privada, el 20,4%. El método más usado fue el preservativo y el 52,2% de quienes lo usaron en la última relación comercial añadieron otro método eficaz. En caso de rotura, el 40% de las encuestadas no tuvo una actitud eficaz para evitar el embarazo. Conclusiones: El conocimiento contraceptivo en estas mujeres es menor del que cabría esperar por la actividad que realizan. El uso de otro método eficaz asociado al preservativo es escaso para evitar embarazos no deseados. Muchas mujeres no tienen una actitud eficaz para evitarlos en caso de rotura del preservativo.Objective: To describe the knowledge and use of contraceptive methods among female sex workers in Asturias (Spain. Methods: We performed a descriptive cross-sectional study of 212 female sex workers by means of a self-completed questionnaire. Results: 61.2% of the women claimed to have sufficient information about contraceptive methods, although the real knowledge measured was much lower. Effective contraception was not used by 2.4% of the women in their last commercial relationship and by 20.4% in their private relationships. The most commonly employed method was the condom, but only 52.2% of the women who had used one in their previous commercial relationships did so together with another effective method. In the event of breakage, 40% of women did not have an attitude that would be effective in avoiding pregnancy. Conclusions: Knowledge about contraceptive methods among these women is lower than might be

  17. Contraception and Birth Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the NICHD Staff Directory Skip sharing on social media links Rollup Image Home > Health & Research > A-Z Topics > Contraception and Birth Control > About Page Content ​About Contraception and Birth Control Contraception is the prevention of pregnancy. Contraception, or birth control, also allows couples to ...

  18. Vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty for female urethral stricture: A novel modification of surgical technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, Johan; Chee, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To present a novel modification of surgical technique to treat female urethral stricture (FUS) by a vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal urethroplasty. Recurrent FUS represents an uncommon, though difficult clinical scenario to manage definitively. A variety of surgical techniques have been described to date, yet a lack of consensus on the optimal procedure persists. Materials and Methods We present a 51-year-old female with urethral stricture involving the entire urethra. Suspected etiology was iatrogenic from cystoscopy 17 years prior. Since then, the patient had undergone at least 25 formal urethral dilations and periods of self-dilation. In lithotomy position, the urethra was dilated to accommodate forceps, and ventral urethrotomy carried out sharply, exposing a bed of periurethral tissue. Buccal mucosa was harvested, and a ventral inlay technique facilitated by a nasal speculum, was used to place the graft from the proximal urethra/bladder neck to urethral meatus without a vaginal incision. Graft was sutured into place, and urethral Foley catheter inserted. Results The vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty was deemed successful as of last follow-up. Flexible cystoscopy demonstrated patency of the repair at 6 months. At 10 months of follow-up, the patient was voiding well, with no urinary incontinence. No further interventions have been required. Conclusions This case describes a novel modification of surgical technique for performing buccal mucosal urethroplasty for FUS. By avoiding incision of the vaginal mucosa, benefits may include reduced: morbidity, urinary incontinence, and wound complications including urethro-vaginal fistula. PMID:27437540

  19. The treatment of female pattern hair loss and other applications of surgical hair restoration in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Jeffrey S

    2004-05-01

    In the specialty of surgical hair restoration, men comprise more than 90% of the patients treated; however, in the last few years the number of women undergoing the procedure has increased significantly. The reasons for this growth are many and include the increase in public awareness of the efficacy of hair transplantation from such sources as the media,the Internet, advertising and word of mouth. More importantly, advances in technique have significantly improved results, increasing the confidence level in women to undergo the procedure and in hair transplant specialists to offer it.

  20. 护理专业女生避孕和意外妊娠认知状况%Survey on the knowledge of contraception and unintentional pregnancy among nursing female students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏琳; 田玲; 张利; 蒋玉敏; 孙翾

    2012-01-01

    Objective To understand nursing female students' knowledge on contraception and unintentional pregnancy for the purpose of formulating appropriate contraceptive education strategies. Methods A total of 326 female nursing students of Bengbu Medical College, were employed in the survey. Self-administered questionnaire involving personal information, pregnancy, contraception, emergency contraception knowledge, attitude and practice of unintentional pregnancy were analyzed. Results A-bout 91.72% , 76.07% and 76.38% of the students respectively knew the feature, early signs and early diagnosis of pregnancy well. As for contraceptive knowledge including the best time of conceive in the menstrual cycle, occasional sexual intercourse resulting pregnancy and contraceptive methods, the participants did know little. Only 23. 00% of the samples can calculate sexual rhythm, 13.50% accept contraceptive contraception. 83.74% of the students encountered unwanted pregnancy undergo anxiety a-bout unwanted pregnancy resulting abortion (the risk of abortion 48.77% , abortion complications 34.97% ) and more than half of them will prefer terminating an unwanted pregnancy ( artificial abortion 31.90% , medical abortion 23. 62% ). They usually seek to family (41.72%) or schoolmates (26.07%) after encountered unwanted pregnancy. About 71.47% of the students realize rather psychological harm than unwanted pregnancies resulting in long-term effects such as gynecological inflammation and infertility. Conclusion Continued efforts are needed to develop nursing female students' knowledge on contraception and unintentional pregnancy.%目的 了解护理专业女生避孕知识及对意外妊娠的认知情况,为制定有针对性的避孕教育策略提供依据.方法 采用自编问卷,对蚌埠医学院326名护理专业女生进行问卷调查,内容包括个人信息、对妊娠的认识、避孕知识及紧急事后避孕、对意外妊娠的担心和处理意愿等.结果 在326

  1. Direct inguinal hernias and anterior surgical approach are risk factors for female inguinal hernia recurrences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcharth, Jakob; Andresen, Kristoffer; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Bisgaard, Thue; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the risk of recurrence after direct and indirect inguinal hernia operation in a large-scale female population and to establish the relationship between the type of hernia at the primary and recurrent procedure. Using data from the Danish Hernia Database (DHDB), a cohort was generated: all females operated on electively for a primary inguinal hernia by either Lichtenstein’s technique or laparoscopy from 1998 to 2012. Within this prospectively collected cohort, the hernia type at the primary procedure (direct inguinal hernia (DIH), indirect inguinal hernia (IIH), combination hernia), the hernia type at the recurrent procedure (DIH, IIH, combination hernia, femoral hernia), anesthesia type, and time from primary procedure to reoperation were registered. A total of 5,893 females with primary elective inguinal hernia operation on in the study period (61 % IIH, 37 % DIH, 2 % combined hernias) were included with a median follow-up time of 72 months (range 0 to 169). A total of 305 operations for suspected recurrences were registered (61 % inguinal recurrences, 38 % femoral recurrences, 1 % no hernias), which corresponded to an overall reoperation rate of 5.2 %. All femoral recurrences occurred after a previous open anterior operation. The crude reoperation rate after primary DIH operation was 11.0 %, 3.0 % after primary IIH operation and 0.007 % after combined hernia operation (p hernia recurrences exclusively existed after anterior open primary operation.

  2. Age trend of the male to female sex ratio in surgical gastric cancer patients at a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junxiu; He, Yongjun; Guo, Zhen

    2014-08-21

    In previous reports concerning the association between sex disparity and age, gastric cancer (GC) patients were simply divided into younger and older groups by age. We analyzed the age trend of the male to female sex ratio (MFSR) in GC based on patient sequential age in order to observe the changing process of MFSR with age. One thousand seven hundred fifty-one surgical gastric adenocarcinoma patients aged 26 to 85 years were investigated between January 1996 and December 2010. The patients were grouped by age intervals of 5 years. The Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to determine how the MFSR changed with age. The median age of the 1,751 patients with GC was 60 years (26 to 85 years). There were 1,334 male and 417 female patients (MFSR was 3.20). Cochran-Armitage trend test analysis showed that total MFSR increased significantly with age (Z = 5.964, P trend test showed that MFSR increased significantly with age from 26 to 60 years (Z = 7.433, P trend until 60 years of age. The male GC patients showed an increasing tendency, and female GC patients showed a decreasing tendency with age. This trend reached a plateau phase after 60 years of age.

  3. Effect of the hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor faldaprevir on the pharmacokinetics of an oral contraceptive containing ethinylestradiol and levonorgestrel in healthy female volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, John P; Lang, Benjamin; Elgadi, Mabrouk; Huang, Fenglei

    2015-01-01

    Faldaprevir is a potent hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protease inhibitor. Faldaprevir is known to inhibit P-glycoprotein, CYP3A4, and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1. This study evaluated the effect of steady-state 240 mg faldaprevir on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of an oral contraceptive containing ethinylestradiol (EE) and levonorgestrel (LNG) in healthy premenopausal women. In period 1, subjects received EE/LNG once daily (QD) for 14 days. Blood samples were taken on days 1, 11, and 12, with intensive PK blood sampling for EE and LNG on day 13. In period 2, subjects received EE-LNG QD and 240 mg faldaprevir QD on days 14 to 21 (240 mg faldaprevir twice daily on day 14). Blood samples were taken on days 14, 19, and 20, with PK profiling samples obtained for EE and LNG on day 21. A total of 15/16 subjects completed the study. Overall, EE and LNG exposure (assessed by the area under the curve) was approximately 1.4-fold higher when EE and LNG were coadministered with faldaprevir than when administered alone. Median t1/2 (terminal half-life in plasma at steady state) values were prolonged for both EE (2.4 h longer) and LNG (4.7 h longer) when EE and LNG were coadministered with faldaprevir. The mean oral clearance and apparent volume of distribution of both EE and LNG were lower (∼ 30%) when EE and LNG were coadministered with faldaprevir. Coadministration of faldaprevir and an oral contraceptive resulted in a moderate increase in exposure to both EE and LNG. However, this increase was not considered clinically meaningful, and no dose adjustment of oral contraceptives was deemed necessary. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01570244.).

  4. Contraceptive vaccines for the humane control of community cat populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Julie K

    2011-07-01

    Free-roaming unowned stray and feral cats exist throughout the world, creating concerns regarding their welfare as well as their impact on the environment and on public health. Millions of healthy cats are culled each year in an attempt to control their numbers. Surgical sterilization followed by return to the environment is an effective non-lethal population control method but is limited in scope because of expense and logistical impediments. Immunocontraception has the potential to be a more practical and cost-effective method of control. This is a review of current research in immunocontraception in domestic cats. Functional characteristics of an ideal immunocontraceptive for community cats would include a wide margin of safety for target animals and the environment, rapid onset and long duration of activity following a single treatment in males and females of all ages, and sex hormone inhibition. In addition, product characteristics should include stability and ease of use under field conditions, efficient manufacturing process, and low cost to the user. Two reproductive antigens, zona pellucida and GnRH, have been identified as possible targets for fertility control in cats. Zona pellucida, which is used successfully in multiple wildlife species, has achieved little success in cats. In contrast, immunization against GnRH has resulted in long-term contraception in both male and female cats following a single dose. GnRH is an ideal contraceptive target because it regulates pituitary and gonadal hormone responses in both males and females, thus suppressing nuisance behaviors associated with sex hormones in addition to preventing pregnancy. The responsiveness of cats to fertility control via GnRH suppression should encourage researchers and cat control stakeholders to continue efforts to optimize vaccines that induce multiyear contraception following a single dose in a high proportion of treated cats.

  5. Men's perspectives of male hormonal contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison L. Lloyd

    2016-08-01

    Conclusions: This study was successful in its aim, finding that overall MHC would be well received by men and that their perspectives were not that different from attitudes towards female hormone contraception. It also identified potential barriers based on the concerns that men have for themselves and for society were an MHC to become available. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(8.000: 2546-2552

  6. Contraception in diabetic women: an Italian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, A; Colatrella, A; Botta, R; Di Cianni, G; Fresa, R; Gamba, S; Italia, S; Mannino, D; Piva, I; Suraci, C; Tonutti, L; Torlone, E; Tortul, C; Lapolla, A

    2005-03-01

    Over 1 year, a survey on contraception and obstetric history was performed on a cohort of 667 Caucasian fertile diabetic women (446, type 1 and 201, type 2) living in Italy. Of these women, 30.4% used hormonal contraceptives, 12.0% intra-uterine device (IUD), 10.7% declared they used no contraception, 47.0% only utilised barrier and/or natural methods. However, irrespective of their previous contraceptive strategy, 7.2% of all the studied population was surgically sterilized during caesarean section. Of these women, 60.4% was prescribed by a gynaecologist, 11.2% by a diabetologist, 15% by both of them and 13.4% by others. The proportion using oral contraception was similar among types 1 and 2 women (29.4% versus 27.8%, chi(2) = ns). Of women taking hormonal contraception, 30.0% were smokers. University graduates (37.1%), high school leaves (32.2%), secondary school (28.2%) and primary school leaves (15.5%) used oral contraceptives (OC). The mean number of deliveries was 1.14 +/- 1.1, of miscarriages was 1.3 +/- 0.7 and of induced abortions 0.17 +/- 0.5. Planning of at least one pregnancy was reported in 29.4% of patients.

  7. Surgical Treatment After Failed Primary Correction of Urogenital Sinus in Female Patients with Virilizing Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Palma Sircili

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Genital reconstruction in female patients with virilizing congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH is very challenging. Our aim was to evaluate the techniques employed to treat complications after failure of primary urogenital sinus (UGS surgery, as well as the result of these reoperations.Patients and Methods: Twenty girls with virilizing CAH who were previously submitted to genitoplasty in our service and elsewhere had recurrent UGS stenosis and vaginal introitus stenosis that required surgical treatment. The main symptoms were recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI in nine, dyspareunia in six and hematocolpos in three (two associated with sepsis. The anatomical findings were the persistence of UGS with stenosis in 17 patients and vaginal introitus stenosis in three. The mean age at procedure was 15.2 yrs., averaging 13.1 yrs. after the first surgery. The surgical techniques employed were: isolated perineal flap in 17 patients and perineal flap with partial mobilization of UGS in three. The mean follow-up after the procedure was 4.8 years (varying from 1 to 17yrs.Results: Vaginal dilations were performed after surgery in 15 patients. Good functional and anatomical results were obtained in 15 patients, with vaginal introitus amenable to dilators of 3.0 cm in diameter. Five patients with high vaginal insertion had recurrent vaginal stenosis and required a surgical revision. No patients presented menstrual obstruction or UTI after surgery. Eight of the 15 adult patients are sexually active. Conclusion: The reoperation to treat failed primary UGS treatment using Y-V flap and partial mobilization techniques associated to vaginal dilations, promoted good anatomical and functional results with low morbidity in 75% of the patients.□

  8. Outpatient surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence under local anesthesia-sedation with contrasure needleless incision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navalón, V; Navalón, P; Pallás, Y; Ordoño, F; Monllor, E

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the results obtained from out-patient surgical treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) with the use of trans-obturator tape (TOT) of a single Contrasure-Needleless incision (Neomedic-International). We performed an intervention with local anesthesia-sedation in outpatient regime between January 2007 to December 2011 on 96 patients affected by SUI using the placement of Needleless tension-free suburethral sling. Inclusion and discharge criteria and the results obtained as well as satisfaction grade were evaluated by a questionnaire. All the patients underwent a stress test, urodynamic study and quality of life questionnaire (ICIQ-SF) prior to and at least 3 months after the intervention. Tolerance to the procedure was good. Surgical time was less than 10 minutes and stay in the hospital up to discharge less than 2hours. The results obtained are superimposable to those reached with epidural anesthesia and hospitalization, the grade of satisfactions with the treatment received being superior to 90%. Almost all of the patients affected are candidates for inclusion in an outpatient surgery program. This noticeably improves the cost-efficacy ratio, without decreasing the health care or grade of satisfaction. Furthermore, the Contasure-Needleless system fulfills the criteria for minimally invasive surgery, providing better stability of the sling than the third generation "minibands" due to the greater length of the mesh and less post-operative pain regarding the conventional TOT as no cutaneous incisions are required. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Oral steroid contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sech, Laura A; Mishell, Daniel R

    2015-11-01

    Oral steroid contraception is a popular method of family planning worldwide. Over the past several decades, this method of contraception has changed significantly by decreasing the estrogen dose, changing the progestin component, and reducing the hormone free interval. Despite the popularity of oral steroid contraception, there has been much criticism regarding the associated risks of venous thromboembolism and stroke. Despite these established, yet uncommon risks, oral steroid contraception has many important health benefits. This review highlights the available formulations of oral contraceptives along with their evidence-based associated risks and benefits. Highlights regarding future directions for development of novel oral contraceptives are also addressed.

  10. Direct inguinal hernias and anterior surgical approach are risk factors for female inguinal hernia recurrences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Jakob; Andresen, Kristoffer; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2014-01-01

    ), indirect inguinal hernia (IIH), combination hernia), the hernia type at the recurrent procedure (DIH, IIH, combination hernia, femoral hernia), anesthesia type, and time from primary procedure to reoperation were registered. RESULTS: A total of 5,893 females with primary elective inguinal hernia operation...... on in the study period (61 % IIH, 37 % DIH, 2 % combined hernias) were included with a median follow-up time of 72 months (range 0 to 169). A total of 305 operations for suspected recurrences were registered (61 % inguinal recurrences, 38 % femoral recurrences, 1 % no hernias), which corresponded to an overall...... reoperation rate of 5.2 %. All femoral recurrences occurred after a previous open anterior operation. The crude reoperation rate after primary DIH operation was 11.0 %, 3.0 % after primary IIH operation and 0.007 % after combined hernia operation (p 

  11. Contraception and unwanted pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, N E

    1984-01-01

    An overview of research findings in the US on the psychological and social variables associated with unwanted pregnancy and on the consequences of unwanted pregnancy was provided. Studies which examined personality differences between women and adolescent females who practicaed effective contraception and thesse who experienced unwanted pregnancy consistently found that the latter group, compared to the former group, had lower self-esteem, were more passive, tended to engage in more risk taking behavior, and were less achievement and future oriented. Several studies found that those who experienced unwanted pregnancies were often poorly informed about sex and contraception. Sex education, however, did not always lead to an increase in the knowledge and use of contraception. Sex education was unable to overcome the effects of male and female sexual socialization processes in which adolescents were inculcated with a double sex standard and females with a sense of guilt concerning the use of contraception. Numerous studies showed that unperceived or denied motives played a role in the occurence of unwanted pregnancies. Unwanted pregnancies were associated with loss, and these pregnancies probably represented an attempt to replace the loss of a loved person. Women who were in conflict about their work and mothering roles, and women who did not want to work but felt pressured to do so, frequently had inappropriate pregnancies. Teenagers who were not interested in school or in future careers often had unwanted pregnancies. These pregnancies probably represented an attempt to establish a social identity. W.B. Miller identified 8 stages in the reproductive life span when unwanted pregnancies were most likely to occur. These stages were 1) the initial stage of adolescence when the individual may not be fully aware of her fertility, 2) the 1st 6 months following the initiation of sexual activity, 3) at the beginning of a new relationship, 4) during the initial stage of

  12. About Implantable Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a tube was inserted, and get a new contraceptive implant on schedule or switch to another method of ... continue Possible Side Effects Young women who get contraceptive implants might notice such side effects as: irregular or ...

  13. Searching for Ideal Contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djerassi, Carl

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the problem of adolescent pregnancy and focuses on improving contraception as a practical solution. Describes the advantages and disadvantages of existing methods (the condom, the pill, and the contraceptive sponge). Predicts that the development of a fundamentally new contraceptive, such as a monthly menses-inducer pill, will not occur…

  14. Contraception in women with epilepsy: pharmacokinetic interactions, contraceptive options, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Caryn; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Contraceptive counseling is a critical component of the management of the female patient with epilepsy because of the increased risk of pregnancy associated with epilepsy and the multitude of interactions between antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and hormonal contraception. Steroid hormones and many of the AEDs are substrates for the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, in particular, the 3A4 isoenzyme. As a result, concomitant use of hormonal contraceptives and AEDs may pose a risk for unexpected pregnancy, seizures, and drug-related adverse effects. The risk of combined oral contraceptive (COC) failure is slightly increased in the presence of cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme-inducing AEDs. Several AEDs induce the production of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) to which the progestins are tightly bound, resulting in lower concentrations of free progestin that may also lead to COC failure. There is no increase in the risk of COC failure in women taking nonenzyme-inducing AEDs. Oral contraceptives significantly increase the metabolism of lamotrigine, posing a risk of seizures when hormonal agents are initiated and/or toxicity during pill-free weeks. There is no evidence that COCs increase seizures in women with epilepsy. While higher dose COCs are one contraceptive option for women on enzyme-inducing AEDs, a variety of other options are available. Injectable contraception (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate) appears effective with AED use, but the potential for bone mineral density loss is a concern. Intrauterine devices (IUDs) and barrier methods do not rely on hormonal components for contraceptive efficacy, and are therefore appropriate to recommend for use in women using enzyme-inducing medications. This chapter reviews the evidence regarding the pharmacokinetic interaction between AEDs and oral contraceptive hormones, the known or potential interactions with alternative contraceptive methods, and provides practical advice for management of contraceptive needs in reproductive

  15. Partner approval and intention to use contraception among Zanzibari women presenting for post-abortion care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esber, Allahna; Foraker, Randi E; Hemed, Maryam; Norris, Alison

    2014-07-01

    We examined the effect of partner approval of contraception on intention to use contraception among women obtaining post-abortion care in Zanzibar. Our data source was a 2010 survey of 193 women obtaining post-abortion care at a large public hospital in Zanzibar. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis to assess associations between partner approval and intention to use contraception. Overall, 23% of participants had used a contraceptive method in the past, and 66% reported intending to use contraception in the future. We found that partner approval of contraception and ever having used contraception in the past were each associated with intending to use contraception in the future. In the multivariable model, adjusting for past contraception use, partner approval of contraception was associated with 20 times the odds of intending to use contraception (odds ratio, 20.25; 95% confidence interval, 8.45-48.56). We found a strong association between partner approval and intention to use contraception. Efforts to support contraceptive use must include both male and female partners. Public health and educational efforts to increase contraceptive use must include men and be targeted to both male and female partners. Given that male partners are often not present when women obtain health care, creative efforts will be required to meet men in community settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Immune-spaying as an alternative to surgical spaying in Iberian×Duroc females: effect on carcass traits and meat quality characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero-Negrón, Rafael; Sánchez del Pulgar, José; Ventanas, Jesús; García, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of immune-spaying on production traits and meat quality characteristics of fresh loin (longissimus dorsi) by comparing 3 groups of Iberian×Duroc females (N=12 per batch): surgically spayed, immune-spayed and entire females. Carcass traits and physicochemical parameters, including fatty acid profile, were investigated. The only carcass trait significantly affected by castration was the ham fat thickness, where both immune-spayed and surgically spayed females showed higher values against entire females (57±9.5mm, 62±2.5mm and 51±10.1mm, respectively; p<0.05). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in the quality parameters of fresh meat. These results are important regarding animal welfare, since in Europe, there is a plan to voluntarily end the surgical castration of pigs by 2018. Therefore, with an adequate vaccination protocol, immune-spaying might represent a good alternative to surgical spaying. The reliability of immune-spaying over long periods should be evaluated.

  17. 流产后关爱对女性有效避孕的临床运用%The Clinical Use of Post-abortion Care (PAC) of Effective Female Contraception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万金华; 刘爱鸿

    2012-01-01

      Objective:To explore post-abortion care (PAC) effective female contraception clinical use. Method: The study group was given the intervention of PAC service measures,control group stated conventional treatment,observation comparing two groups PAC before and after the intervention of the clinical effect. Result:Intervention after six months the control group to (5.2±0.9) points,the study group,(9.1±0.4) points,with a significant difference,(P<0.05);Study group patients after abortion using the correct contraceptive method 40 Li (accounting for 88.9%),significantly higher in the control group,22 cases (48.9%);Study group again accidental pregnancy in 1 case (2.2%),significantly lower than the control group,12 (26.7%),compared with a significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusion:PAC of effective contraceptive intervention effect in women after abortion obvious, to strive for the protection of women’s reproductive health and physical and mental health.%  目的:探究流产后关爱(PAC)对女性有效避孕的临床运用.方法:研究组给予PAC服务措施的干预,对照组则按常规处理,观察对比两组的临床效果.结果:干预半年后对照组为(5.2±0.9)分,研究组为(9.1±0.4)分,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05);研究组患者流产后使用正确避孕方法40例(占88.9%),明显高于对照组的22例(占48.9%);研究组再次意外妊娠1例(占2.2%),明显低于对照组12例(占26.7%),差异均具有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:PAC对女性流产后有效避孕干预效果明显,为女性生殖健康和身心健康做好保障.

  18. Contraceptive usage patterns in North American medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowen, Tami S; Smith, James F; Eisenberg, Michael L; Breyer, Benjamin N; Drey, Eleanor A; Shindel, Alan W

    2011-05-01

    Previous studies indicate that the sexual beliefs and mores of students in medical professions may influence their capacity to care for patients' sexuality and contraception issues. Students also represent a large sample of reproductive-age individuals. In this study, we examined contraceptive usage patterns in North American medical students. Students using online medical student social and information networks enrolled in allopathic and osteopathic medical schools in North America between February and July of 2008 were invited to participate via email and published announcements in an Internet-based survey consisting of a questionnaire that assessed ethnodemographic factors, year in school and sexual history. We also collected information about current use of contraceptive and barrier methods. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were utilized to analyze responses. Among our 2269 complete responses, at least one form of contraception was being utilized by 71% of men and 76% of women. Condoms were the most popular form of contraceptive, utilized by 1011 respondents (50% of men and 40% of women). Oral contraceptive pills were the contraceptive of choice for 34% of men and 41% of women. Decreased rates of contraception use were associated with being black or Asian, not being in a relationship and having more sexual dysfunction in female respondents. Students who reported comfort discussing sexual issues with patients were more likely to use effective contraceptive methods themselves. Ten percent of this of sexually active medical students was not currently using contraception. There are significant differences in contraceptive use based on demographics, even at the highest education levels. The personal contraception choices of medical students may influence their ability to accurately convey information about contraception to their patients. In addition, medical students may personally benefit from improved knowledge of effective contraceptive practices

  19. Contraceptive choices of women in rural Southeastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigbu, B; Onwere, S; Aluka, C; Kamanu, C; Okoro, O; Feyi-Waboso, P

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the contraceptive choices and usage of women in rural Aba, Southeastern Nigeria, and identify factors influencing their choice and usage of modern contraceptive methods. The records of new and old acceptors of family planning methods between 1 November 2005 and 31 October 2007 at the reproductive health clinic of a primary health care center in Osisioma Ngwa local government area in the suburb ofAba, were reviewed and analyzed. Qualitative data was collected by in-depth interviews (IDIs) of 88 out of 188 clients whose records were analyzed. Majority of the clients (71.8%) accepted injectable hormonal contraceptives followed by the intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) (14.4%). Sub-dermal contraceptive implants were accepted by 6.9% of the women and female sterilization by 3.2%. The oral contraceptive pills and the male condom were the least accepted by the clients. Only 2.1% of the contraceptive acceptors were adolescents. The modal age of the acceptors was 30 years and the average age 33.4 years while the age range was 18-51 years. The average parity was 4.7 while the modal parity was 5. The indication for contraception was child spacing in 30% of the clients and permanent limitation of the family size in 70% of the clients. Attitude of the women to the various methods of contraception was an important factor influencing contraceptive choices of the women interviewed. The study has shown that the most commonly used contraceptive method in rural Southeastern Nigeria is the injectable hormonal contraceptives. Strategies to increase contraceptive use in rural Nigeria must include improving delivery of correct and adequate information about the available contraceptive methods.

  20. Practice of contraception in this modern world: still a myth?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeta Bansiwal

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Practice of contraception is still a myth. There is a great need to strengthen the awareness among people by various programmes and the target group should be both males and females. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(3.000: 674-677

  1. Factors Influencing Contraceptive Behavior of Single College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Joseph W.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    This study investigates the premarital contraceptive behavior of 222 male and female college students. Contraceptive practice was examined in relation to dating patterns, level of emotional involvement with sex partners, types of birth control used, number of different sex partners, and reasons for failure to use birth control. (Author)

  2. College Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors regarding Sex and Contraceptives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toews, Michelle L.; Yazedjian, Ani

    2012-01-01

    This study examined gender differences in college students' knowledge, attitudes, and sexual behaviors of 1,004 predominantly heterosexual students. Results indicated that students had limited knowledge about contraceptives and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Females had a more positive view about contraceptives and males had more…

  3. Contraceptive Patterns of College Students Who Experienced Early Coitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Murray L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A study investigated the coital behavior, contraceptive use, and attitudes of 20-year-old male and female college students who experienced sexual intercourse early in adolescence (at 16 or younger) as contrasted to those who experienced coitus in late adolescence. Results indicate that older adolescents were more likely to use contraceptives and,…

  4. Emergency contraception (post-coital Contraception).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Angie

    2002-06-01

    Emergency Contraception is a post-coital contraceptive for women who have had unprotected intercourse or have reason to believe that their contraceptive method has failed. The article focuses mainly on Emergency Contraceptive Pills (ECPs) because they are the most frequently used form of post-coital contraception. In 1997 the FDA approved the "off-label" use of high dose of oral contraceptives for use as post-coital contraception. Since then, they have been approved for repackaging and marketed solely for use as post-coital emergency contraception. The first dose of ECPs must be administered within 72 hours of the act of unprotected intercourse. The second dose is taken 12 hours later. ECPs are believed to work in one of three ways depending on where the woman is in her menstrual cycle when she seeks treatment. It can delay or prevent ovulation, impair formation of the corpus luteum, or cause histological or biochemical changes within the endometrium, thus preventing implantation. Their effectiveness is approximately 75%, being most effective when administered as quickly as possible after the act of unprotected intercourse. The pills can cause nausea and vomiting, so the pre-administration of an anti-emetic may help alleviate these symptoms. A major issue concerning the ECPs is the lack of knowledge and availability. Very few health-care providers discuss ECPs with their patients. Most people cited the media as the primary source of information. The 72-hour window in which the ECPs must be administered makes it important for women to have easy access to these post-coital contraceptives. However, women who seek treatment will often find that their health-care provider will require a physical exam and/or a pregnancy test before writing a prescription. Yet, studies show that ECPs do not affect an implanted fetus, and there are no emergency contraceptive protocols that require pregnancy tests or physical exams prior to treatment. The AMA is encouraging physicians to

  5. Programme impact on current contraception in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, M A

    1994-03-01

    "This paper analyses the impact of three credit programmes--the Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC), the Bangladesh Rural Development Board's Rural Development-12 (BRDB RD-12), and the Grameen Bank (GB), on current rate of contraception. These programmes are targeted to alleviate poverty by providing group-based credit to the rural poor in creating self employment opportunities. With small credits, these programmes combine family planning activities in terms of consciousness raising, awareness building and motivation. Sample survey data are used to analyse the problem of impact evaluation. The analyses show that the BRAC and the GB programmes have [a] significantly positive impact on the current rate of contraception, while the BRDB RD-12 programme does not have any such impact. It is also found that education, both of female[s] and male[s] separately, and child survivorship have independently positive impact[s] on current contraception."

  6. Multiple Method Contraception Use among African American Adolescents in Four US Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Brown

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on African American adolescents' (N=850; M age = 15.4 contraceptive practices and type of contraception utilized during their last sexual encounter. Respondents completed measures of demographics, contraceptive use, sexual partner type, and ability to select “safe” sexual partners. 40% endorsed use of dual or multiple contraceptive methods; a total of 35 different contraceptive combinations were reported. Perceived ability to select “safe” partners was associated with not using contraception (OR = 1.25, using less effective contraceptive methods (OR = 1.23, or hormonal birth control (OR = 1.50. Female gender predicted hormonal birth control use (OR = 2.33, use of less effective contraceptive methods (e.g., withdrawal; OR = 2.47, and using no contraception (OR = 2.37. Respondents' age and partner type did not predict contraception use. Adolescents used contraceptive methods with limited ability to prevent both unintended pregnancies and STD/HIV. Adolescents who believed their partners posed low risk were more likely to use contraceptive practices other than condoms or no contraception. Reproductive health practitioners are encouraged to help youth negotiate contraceptive use with partners, regardless of the partner's perceived riskiness.

  7. Contraceptive practice in China: 1970-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuntong

    2015-03-01

    Using large-scale data from the national conventional statistics and nationally representative sample surveys, the current study aims to assess the level, mode, and determinants of modern contraceptive use from 1970 to 2004 among married couples aged 20 to 49 years in China. A relatively stable Chinese mode of contraception has been established and maintained since the 1980s, characterized by prominent, long-acting contraceptive use and the highest overall prevalence in the world during the past 3 decades. In recent years, the composition of contraceptive use has changed, characterized by the increasing use of the intrauterine device and short-acting methods and a drastic decrease in male and female sterilization. However, the dominance of the long-acting methods has not undergone substantial change. The results from a multinomial logit model employed in this study indicate that family planning policy and socioeconomic and demographic factors jointly influence contraceptive choice. In particular, contraceptive choice is closely associated with the strength of family planning policy in China.

  8. Racial Differences in the Perception of Contraception Option Attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Robert J.; Gold, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    More than 600 never-married college students completed a questionnaire regarding their attitudes toward 10 contraceptive options. Results were analyzed separately for Blacks and Whites, and then for males and females. Findings are discussed. (MT)

  9. Combined oral contraceptives: health benefits beyond contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, D; Ralli, E; Matteucci, E; Bordi, G; Mallozzi, M; Moscarini, M

    2014-09-01

    It has been recognized for over 50 years that combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are also capable of offering health benefits beyond contraception through the treatment and prevention of several gynaecological and medical disorders. During the last years a constant attention was given to the adverse effects of COCs, whereas their non-contraceptive benefits were underestimated. To date, most women are still unaware of the therapeutic uses of hormonal contraceptives, while on the contrary there is an extensive and constantly increasing of these non-contraceptive health benefits. This review summarizes the conditions of special interest for physicians, including dysmenorrhoea, menorrhagia, hyperandrogenism (acne, hirsutism, polycystic ovary syndrome), functional ovarian cysts, endometriosis, premenstrual syndrome, myomas, pelvic inflammatory disease, bone mineral density, benign breast disease and endometrial/ovarian and colorectal cancer. The benefits of COCs in rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, menstrual migraine and in perimenopause have also been treated for more comprehensive information. Using COCs specifically for non-contraceptive indications is still outside the product licence in the majority of cases. We strongly believe that these aspects are not of minor relevance and they deserve a special consideration by health providers and by the mass media, which have the main responsibility in the diffusion of scientific information. Thus, counseling and education are necessary to help women make well-informed health-care decisions and it is also crucial to increase awareness among general practitioners and gynaecologists.

  10. Contraceptive prevalence in Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, L; Anderson, J E; Monteith, R S; Kriskovich, R; Schoemaker, J; Frutos, O

    1978-01-01

    Contraceptive use, source of contraception, history of abortion, current pregnancy intention, and fertility rates are evaluated for a national sample of women using data from the Paraguay Contraceptive Prevalence Survey, conducted in 1977. The survey found that 15.5 percent of all women aged 15--44 and 23.6 percent of ever-married women were using effective contraceptive methods. The urban/rural difference in contraceptive use paralleled fertility differentials: over 40 percent of ever-married women were using contraception in Greater Asuncion and other urban areas compared with 15 percent in rural areas. Overall, the data indicate that high-parity rural women have the greatest need for family planning services in Paraguay.

  11. The contraceptive vaginal ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwardson, Jill; Jamshidi, Roxanne

    2010-03-01

    The contraceptive vaginal ring offers effective contraception that is self-administered, requires less frequent dosing than many other forms of contraception, and provides low doses of hormones. NuvaRing (Organon, Oss, The Netherlands), the only contraceptive vaginal ring approved for use in the United States, contains etonogestrel and ethinyl estradiol. It is inserted into the vagina for 3 weeks, followed by a 1-week ring-free period, and works by inhibiting ovulation. Most women note a beneficial effect on bleeding profiles and are satisfied with NuvaRing. Commonly reported adverse events include vaginitis, leukorrhea, headaches, and device-related events such as discomfort. Serious adverse events are rare. In Chile and Peru, progesterone-only vaginal contraceptive rings are available for nursing women. Studies are ongoing examining new formulations of vaginal contraceptive rings.

  12. Long-term contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Audrey

    2010-10-01

    To avoid unintended pregnancy, women in the UK need to consistently use reliable contraception for over 30 years. The long-acting reversible contraceptive methods compromise the progestogen-only implant, the progestogen-only injectable contraceptive, the copper-bearing intra-uterine device and the levonorgestrel-releasing intra-uterine system. These methods of contraception are highly reliable in pregnancy prevention, and are amongst the medically safest methods for users. Despite this, these long-acting methods are used by less than 10% of the UK population. National guidance has advised that increasing uptake of these long-acting methods will reduce the unplanned pregnancy rate. In addition, these methods are more cost effective than the oral contraceptive even at 1 year of use. Obstetricians and gynaecologists frequently come into contact with women requiring contraceptive advice, and should have a sound knowledge of the long-acting methods. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Peer-driven contraceptive choices and preferences for contraceptive methods among students of tertiary educational institutions in Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyoke CA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available CA Iyoke,1 FO Ezugwu,2 OL Lawani,3 GO Ugwu,1 LO Ajah,3 SG Mba11Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Enugu; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Nigeria Purpose: To describe the methods preferred for contraception, evaluate preferences and adherence to modern contraceptive methods, and determine the factors associated with contraceptive choices among tertiary students in South East Nigeria.Methods: A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study of sexual habits, knowledge of contraceptive methods, and patterns of contraceptive choices among a pooled sample of unmarried students from the three largest tertiary educational institutions in Enugu city, Nigeria was done. ­Statistical analysis involved descriptive and inferential statistics at the 95% level of confidence.Results: A total of 313 unmarried students were studied (194 males; 119 females. Their mean age was 22.5±5.1 years. Over 98% of males and 85% of females made their contraceptive choices based on information from peers. Preferences for contraceptive methods among female students were 49.2% for traditional methods of contraception, 28% for modern methods, 10% for nonpharmacological agents, and 8% for off-label drugs. Adherence to modern contraceptives among female students was 35%. Among male students, the preference for the male condom was 45.2% and the adherence to condom use was 21.7%. Multivariate analysis showed that receiving information from health personnel/media/workshops (odds ratio 9.54, 95% confidence interval 3.5–26.3, health science-related course of study (odds ratio 3.5, 95% confidence interval 1.3–9.6, and previous sexual exposure prior to university admission (odds ratio 3.48, 95% confidence interval 1.5–8.0 all increased the likelihood of adherence to modern contraceptive methods

  14. FastStats: Contraceptive Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Contraceptive Use Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data ... using long-acting reversible contraception (Intrauterine device or contraceptive implant) 7.2% Percent of women aged 15- ...

  15. [Contraception and adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amate, P; Luton, D; Davitian, C

    2013-06-01

    The mean age of first sexual intercourse is still around 17 in France, but a lot of teenagers are concerned by contraception before, with approximately 25% of sexually active 15-year-old girls. The contraceptive method must take into consideration some typical features of this population, as sporadic and non-planned sexual activity, with several sexual partners in a short period of time. In 2004, the "Haute Autorité de santé" has recommended, as first-line method, combined oral contraceptive (COC) pills, in association with male condoms. Copper-containing intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD) and etonogestrel-containing subcutaneous implant have been suggested but not recommended. However, oral contraceptive pill, as a user-based method, carries an important typical-use failure rate, because remembering taking a daily pill, and dealing with stop periods, may be challenging. Some easier-to-use method should be kept in mind, as 28-day COC packs, transdermal contraceptive patches, and vaginal contraceptive rings. Moreover, American studies have shown that long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC), i.e. IUCD and implant, have many advantages for teenagers: very effective, safe, invisible. They seem well-fitted for this population, with high satisfaction and continuation rates, as long as side effects are well explained. Thus, LARC methods should be proposed more widely to teenagers. Anyway, before prescribing a contraceptive method, it is important to determine the specific situation of every teenager, to let them choose the method that they consider as appropriate in their own case, and to think about the availability of the chosen method. It is necessary to explain how to handle mistakes or misses with user-based contraceptive methods, and emergency contraception can be anticipated and prescribed in advanced provision. The use of male condoms should be encouraged for adolescents, with another effective contraceptive method, in order to reduce the high risk

  16. Oral contraception following abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yan; Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Linan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oral contraceptives (OCs) following induced abortion offer a reliable method to avoid repeated abortion. However, limited data exist supporting the effective use of OCs postabortion. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis in the present study reported immediate administration of OCs or combined OCs postabortion may reduce vaginal bleeding time and amount, shorten the menstruation recovery period, increase endometrial thickness 2 to 3 weeks after abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. A total of 8 major authorized Chinese and English databases were screened from January 1960 to November 2014. Randomized controlled trials in which patients had undergone medical or surgical abortions were included. Chinese studies that met the inclusion criteria were divided into 3 groups: administration of OC postmedical abortion (group I; n = 1712), administration of OC postsurgical abortion (group II; n = 8788), and administration of OC in combination with traditional Chinese medicine postsurgical abortion (group III; n = 19,707). In total, 119 of 6160 publications were included in this analysis. Significant difference was observed in group I for vaginal bleeding time (P = 0.0001), the amount of vaginal bleeding (P = 0.03), and menstruation recovery period (P abortion (P abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. PMID:27399060

  17. Current issues in contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drača Petar D.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The authors analyze contemporary methods of contraception. Regarding oral contraception, they point to agents which decrease the efficacy of oral contraception. They also deal with agents which increase the level of estrogen, thus increasing side effects (paracetamol, vitamin C. Oral contraceptives Oral contraceptives may also have an impact on the efficacy of some medications (anticonvulsants, antidepressants. Health risks of oral contraceptives are also mentioned, as well as WHO's, guidelines for women using contraceptives based on risks and benefits. Other methods of contraception The authors also offer criteria for use of bioactive intrauterine devices (IUD, with recommendations of WHO. Besides men's, there are women's condoms, which are very reliable protection against infections, but their negative side is that they are rather expensive. Bad sides of vaginal wash are also emphasized, although this method is rather widespread in the world. Conclusion. At the end, the authors quote the International Family Planning Fund (IFPF which considers IUD to be the most reliable method of contraception nowadays. .

  18. Arthroscopic Release of Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Sheath in Female Ballet Dancers: Dynamic Pathology, Surgical Technique, and Return to Dancing Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Funasaki, Hiroki; Hayashi, Hiroteru; Sakamoto, Kanako; Tsuruga, Rei; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-01-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon is known as a major overuse lesion in female dancers. We describe arthroscopic surgical techniques in relation to the dynamic pathology of the disease. Crepitus and pain on moving the great toe with the ankle in plantar flexion on preoperative examination confirm the diagnosis of FHL stenosing tenosynovitis even if the os trigonum is not evident. The ankle is approached through standard posterolateral and posteromedial portals...

  19. Self-reported changes in the professional singing voice after surgical intervention treatment for breast cancer: a survey pilot study of female professional singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroody, Margaret M; Barnes-Burroughs, Kathryn; Rodriguez, Michael C; Sataloff, Dahlia M; Sataloff, Robert Thayer

    2013-03-01

    The effects of breast cancer surgical treatment on the professional singing voice are unknown. The purpose of this study was to discover whether there are self-perceived changes in the quality and/or process of singing experienced by professional female singers who have undergone surgical intervention for the treatment of diagnosed breast cancer-including any changes perceived from the use of radiation, chemotherapy, and other drug treatments related to those surgeries. A voluntary subject pool comprised female professional singers who have undergone surgery for breast cancer was recruited from professional singing networks. Participants underwent evaluation through an anonymous online survey, psychometrically vetted for content and instrument reliability/validity before administration. Valid participants (N=56) responded to 45 questions regarding surgical procedures, related therapies, and self-perceived vocal effects. Analysis of results produced a preliminary description of types of voice change, duration of changes, and qualitative self-perceptions. This initial report reveals that there are self-perceived singing voice changes experienced by professional singers treated for breast cancer. However, additional research is needed to determine the degree of vocal impact perceived to be attributable to individual surgical interventions and related therapies. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. KNOWLEDGE OF EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTIVES AMONG WOMEN OF REPRODUCTIVE AGE GROUP

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    Singh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND As per data from WHO, 21.6 million unsafe abortions occurred globally in 2008, out of which 47,000 women died from abortionrelated complications, contributing to 13% of global maternal mortality. (1 Emergency contraceptive can be used after intercourse to prevent pregnancy in case of unprotected intercourse, contraceptive failure or sexual assault. A considerable proportion of these abortions can be prevented by the timely use of emergency contraception. OBJECTIVES To study the knowledge of emergency contraceptives among women of reproductive age group. METHODS This is a government hospital-based prospective study done for a period of 3 months. The study included 500 women of reproductive age group (16 years to 40 years attending OPD of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department of IGMC and RI, Pondicherry. A predesigned questionnaire is provided to women asking about awareness regarding emergency contraceptives. RESULTS Majority of them were between 20 and 30 years of age, 59.6% were from urban background and 86.8% were educated; 66% of them had used regular method of contraception some time in their life, but the awareness level of emergency contraceptives was found to be only 5.4% of which only 2% (n=10 had ever used emergency contraceptives. CONCLUSION Emergency contraceptives is an effective means of preventing unwanted pregnancies, but unfortunately majority of women lack awareness about the emergency methods. Efforts should be focused on providing health education regarding EC among females through media and health professionals.

  1. Emergency Contraception in Women of Slums in Northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Puri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To ascertain the utilization of the emergency contraception and to evaluate the impact of intervention on acceptability and utilization of emergency contraceptive pills. Materials and Methods: This community based cross sectional study was carried out by the department of community medicine in the slums of Chandigarh. The study sample was chosen by two stage systematic sampling. Participants were assessed regarding emergency contraception utilization and its various aspects and was also imparted correct knowledge regarding this mode of contraception. The women were reassessed again after six months to see the impact of the knowledge imparted to them on utilization of emergency contraception. Results: The study comprised of 1448, females and maximum were in the age group 26-35 years i.e. 717 (49.5% followed by those in age group 19-25 yr i.e. 485 (33.5%. Considering their education, 674 (46.5% women were illiterate. Only, 1.4% respondents had ever used emergency contraception. Sources of information so enumerated of emergency contraception were, health workers (0.8%, friends (0.6%, doctors/ health physicians (0.4% media (0.3% and books (0.1%. None of the respondent knew about the correct time span during which they should be used. The increase in utilization of emergency contraception from 1.4% to 4.2% was noticed in reassessment after 6months. Conclusion: Correct knowledge and awareness regarding emergency contraception can increase the utilization of it.

  2. Contraceptive strategies for young women in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruusuvaara, L; Johansson, E D

    1999-12-01

    Safe, effective and affordable contraceptives have been available for a few decades, yet, in many countries, the struggle for reproductive rights continues. Children, still, are forced to give birth to children in many nations. In most industrialized countries, where contraceptive counselling and abortions have been options, fertility rates have reached all time lows. Effective contraception improves health and well-being as well and may be used for conditions other than birth control. Young girls often initially take oral contraceptives primarily to reduce menstrual pain and blood loss; they also welcome a contraceptive that eliminates menstrual bleeding. Women using oral contraceptives and Norplant experience about 50% reduction in menstrual blood; 90% reduction in blood loss is achieved with the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (Mirena). Teenagers and their parents are often misinformed about the side-effects of oral contraceptives and birth control in general, which may adversely affect compliance. Adequate, user-friendly and supportive information about contraception is necessary to ensure proper use of the pill and other birth control methods. In addition, emergency contraceptives should be easily accessible. The mortality and morbidity of young women would be dramatically reduced by the global use of medical abortion as well. Only a combined effort by policy makers, educators, parents and health-care providers can enhance the reproductive (and future!) health of both young females and males.

  3. Adolescents: contraceptive knowledge and use, a Brazilian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Divanise S; Pontes, Ana C P; Cavalcante, Jairo C; Egito, E Sócrates T; Maia, Eulália M C

    2009-01-18

    The purpose of this study was to identify the knowledge and use of contraceptive methods by female adolescent students. The study was cross-sectional and quantitative, using a semi-structured questionnaire that was administered to 12- to 19-year-old female students in Maceió, Brazil. A representative and randomized sample was calculated, taking into account the number of hospital admissions for curettage. This study was approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee, and Epi Info software was used for data and result evaluation using the mean and chi-square statistical test. Our results show that the majority of students know of some contraceptive methods (95.5%), with the barrier/hormonal methods being the most mentioned (72.4%). Abortion and aborting drugs were inaccurately described as contraceptives, and 37.9% of the sexually active girls did not make use of any method. The barrier methods were the most used (35.85%). A significant association was found in the total sample (2,592) between pregnancy and the use of any contraceptive method. This association was not found, however, in the group having an active sexual life (559). The study points to a knowledge of contraceptive methods, especially by teenagers who have already been pregnant, but contraceptives were not adequately used. The low use of chemical methods of contraception brings the risk of pregnancy. Since abortion and aborting drugs were incorrectly cited as contraceptive methods, this implies a nonpreventive attitude towards pregnancy.

  4. Adolescents: Contraceptive Knowledge and Use, a Brazilian Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divanise S. Correia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify the knowledge and use of contraceptive methods by female adolescent students. The study was cross-sectional and quantitative, using a semi-structured questionnaire that was administered to 12- to 19-year-old female students in Maceió, Brazil. A representative and randomized sample was calculated, taking into account the number of hospital admissions for curettage. This study was approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee, and Epi InfoTM software was used for data and result evaluation using the mean and chi-square statistical test. Our results show that the majority of students know of some contraceptive methods (95.5%, with the barrier/hormonal methods being the most mentioned (72.4%. Abortion and aborting drugs were inaccurately described as contraceptives, and 37.9% of the sexually active girls did not make use of any method. The barrier methods were the most used (35.85%. A significant association was found in the total sample (2,592 between pregnancy and the use of any contraceptive method. This association was not found, however, in the group having an active sexual life (559. The study points to a knowledge of contraceptive methods, especially by teenagers who have already been pregnant, but contraceptives were not adequately used. The low use of chemical methods of contraception brings the risk of pregnancy. Since abortion and aborting drugs were incorrectly cited as contraceptive methods, this implies a nonpreventive attitude towards pregnancy.

  5. Current contraceptive status among women aged 15-44: United States, 2011-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Kimberly; Daugherty, Jill; Jones, Jo

    2014-12-01

    Nearly all women use contraception at some point in their lifetimes, although at any given time they may not be using contraception for reasons such as seeking pregnancy, being pregnant, or not being sexually active. Using data from the 2011-2013 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) on contraceptive use in the month of the interview, this report provides a snapshot of current contraceptive status among women aged 15-44 in the United States. In addition to describing use of any method by age, Hispanic origin and race, and educational attainment, patterns of use are described for the four most commonly used contraceptive methods: the oral contraceptive pill, female sterilization, the male condom, and long-acting reversible contraceptives, which include contraceptive implants and intrauterine devices.

  6. Immediate start of hormonal contraceptives for contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Laureen M; Newmann, Sara J; Grimes, David A; Nanda, Kavita; Schulz, Kenneth F

    2012-12-12

    Health care providers often tell women to wait until the next menses to begin hormonal contraception. The intent is to avoid contraceptive use during an undetected pregnancy. An alternative is to start hormonal contraception immediately with back-up birth control for the first seven days. Immediate initiation was introduced with combined oral contraceptives (COCs), and has expanded to other hormonal contraceptives. At the time of the initial review, how immediate start compared to conventional menses-dependent start was unclear regarding effectiveness, continuation, and acceptability. The immediate-start approach may improve women's access to, and continuation of, hormonal contraception. This review examined randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of immediate-start hormonal contraception for differences in effectiveness, continuation, and acceptability. In August 2012, we searched MEDLINE, CENTRAL, POPLINE, LILACS, ClinicalTrials.gov, and ICTRP for trials of immediate-start hormonal contraceptives. We contacted researchers to find other studies. Earlier searches also included EMBASE. We included RCTs that compared immediate start to conventional start of hormonal contraception. Also included were trials that compared immediate start of different hormonal contraceptive methods with each other. Data were abstracted by two authors and entered into RevMan. The Peto odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. Five studies were included. No new eligible studies have been found since the review was initially conducted. Method discontinuation was similar between groups in all trials. Bleeding patterns and side effects were similar in trials that compared immediate with conventional start. In a study of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), immediate start of DMPA showed fewer pregnancies than a 'bridge' method before DMPA (OR 0.36; 95% CI 0.16 to 0.84). Further, more women in the immediate-DMPA group were very satisfied versus those with a 'bridge

  7. Contraception Insurance Coverage and Receipt of Long-Acting Reversible Contraception or Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate on the Day of Abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krashin, Jamie W; Stuart, Gretchen S; Garrett, Joanne; Spector, Hannah; Bryant, Amy G; Charm, Samantha; Morse, Jessica E

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate whether contraceptive insurance coverage for women who present for an abortion is associated with obtaining long-acting reversible contraception or depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) on the day the abortion is completed. We conducted a prospective cohort study of women presenting for medical or surgical abortion at a single health center in North Carolina. Eligible women were 18 years or older and fluent in English or Spanish. Data were from participant questionnaires, medical charts, and financial records. Our main exposure was whether the woman had insurance coverage for contraception at clinic intake. Our primary outcome was receiving DMPA, an intrauterine device, or a contraceptive subdermal implant on the same day of their surgical abortion or at the visit that determined their medication abortion was complete. We used univariable, bivariable, and multivariable analysis to report our findings. Five hundred seventy-five women enrolled in our cohort between September 2015 and April 2016. One hundred twenty-eight (22%) had insurance coverage and 447 (78%) did not. In the group with insurance coverage for contraception, 38% (49/128) received a long-acting reversible contraception method or DMPA compared with 7% (33/447) in the group without insurance coverage for contraception. After adjusting for confounding, women with contraceptive coverage were more than five times as likely to receive immediate postabortion contraception with one of these methods compared with women without coverage (relative risk 5.6, 95% confidence interval 3.8-8.3). Women with contraceptive insurance coverage on the day of their abortion were more likely to leave the abortion clinic with an intrauterine device or implant in place or receive DMPA injection compared with women without coverage.

  8. Knowledge of contraceptive effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, David L; Secura, Gina M; Madden, Tessa E; Allsworth, Jenifer E; Zhao, Qiuhong; Peipert, Jeffrey F

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine women's knowledge of contraceptive effectiveness. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of a contraceptive knowledge questionnaire that had been completed by 4144 women who were enrolled in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project before they received comprehensive contraceptive counseling and chose their method. For each contraceptive method, women were asked "what percentage would get pregnant in a year: 10%, don't know." Overall, 86% of subjects knew that the annual risk of pregnancy is >10% if no contraception is used. More than 45% of women overestimate the effectiveness of depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate, pills, the patch, the ring, and condoms. After adjustment for age, education, and contraceptive history, the data showed that women who chose the intrauterine device (adjusted relative risk, 6.9; 95% confidence interval, 5.6-8.5) or implant (adjusted relative risk, 5.9; 95% confidence interval, 4.7-7.3) were significantly more likely to identify the effectiveness of their method accurately compared with women who chose either the pill, patch, or ring. This cohort demonstrated significant knowledge gaps regarding contraceptive effectiveness and over-estimated the effectiveness of pills, the patch, the ring, depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate, and condoms. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Male Adolescent Contraceptive Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Madelon Lubin; Finkel, David J.

    1978-01-01

    The contraceptive utilization of a sample of sexually active, urban, high school males (Black, Hispanic, and White) was examined by anonymous questionnaire. Contraceptive use was haphazard, but White males tended to be more effective contraceptors than the other two groups. Reasons for nonuse were also studied. (Author/SJL)

  10. [Weariness of contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, V

    1979-07-01

    Mechanical methods of contraception tend nowadays to be considered as unsafe and the "modern" contraceptives are more popular. The advantage of the intrauterine device is that once it has been placed, one can forget about it. However it is necessary for the woman to undergo checkups and have the device replaced regularly. IUD's are not always very well tolerated psychologically. Women are influenced by information, the fear of the risks, the opinion of their friends and families and the media, and they end up getting tired of this method of contraception. Oral contraceptives are 100% safe but only provided one does not forget to take it: it imposes a daily routine which disturbs many women after a certain time. They then tend to relate all their problems to the pill. Women are aware of the risks contained in oral contraceptives, and they refuse to run these risks by themselves. Whichever method of contraception one chooses, it liberates the woman from the fear of unwanted pregnancy. A good contraception should do this, plus separate the idea of procreation from the sexual intercourse. This seems to be going well for a few years, but after a while a weariness appears. The answer may be to find a contraception suitable to both partners, so that they could make their own decision.

  11. Social marketing of contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellstede, W P; Derr, B B

    1986-12-01

    Application of commercial marketing techniques has not only increased awareness, acceptability, and use of modern contraceptives in developing countries, but also overcome logistic problems in service delivery. The ability of contraceptive social marketing to reach large numbers and to treat contraceptives as common consumer products has helped to diminish social and religious constraints associated with family planning. Each contraceptive social marketing program is built around a theme tailored to meet specific cultural, social, and management requirements. The primary target populations are those who cannot afford regular commercial products and those who are not adequately reached by government programs. In countries such as Sri Lanka and Jamaica, profit is not a primary sales objective and retail prices are highly subsidized to make products affordable to low-income people. In contrast, the Colombian and Thai programs use contraceptive social marketing to help offset the operating costs of rural community-based programs and seek profits. The most impressive contraceptive social marketing sales performances have been recorded in Bangladesh, Colombia, Egypt, and Jamaica. The main reason contraceptive social marketing is more cost-efficient than other modes of contraceptive distribution is that the cost of product delivery is assumed by the commercial system. Although there has been some interest in making these programs self-sufficient financially, this step has tended to undermine the purpose of serving lower income groups.

  12. Oral contraceptives and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostardi, R A; Woebkenberg, N R; Jarrett, M T

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory study was undertaken with volunteer females (aged 20-25) to determine the effect of OCs (oral contraceptives) on hematologic and metabolic variables during exercise. 5 of the women studied were naturally cycling and 7 were taking OCs. The women worked at 2 workloads on a bicycle ergometer at 50% and 90% of their maximal aerobic capacity during 3 different phases of their menstrual cycle. There was no better time of the month for doing the 50% or the 90% workload in either group. Heartrate for the OC group was significantly higher at the 50% maximal capacity. Results of the test indicate tha women on OCs have somewhat reduced cardiac efficiency and are ventilating more to carry out a given amount of work when compared to women who are naturally cycling. Possible explanations for the higher heart rate are put forward. The main limitation of the study is that the subject numbers involved are small and the number of cycles studied is also small.

  13. [Community marketing of contraceptives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, J M

    1987-09-01

    The 5-year-old community contraceptive distribution program developed by PROFAMILIA, Colombia's private family planning organization, has given excellent results, but several cost-effectiveness comparisons with social marketing programs have suggested that commercial distribution programs are superior. The community contraceptive distribution program has a high content of information and education activities, which produced significant increases in knowledge and use of contraception in the communities covered. It has been a fundamental support for the social marketing program, creating much of the demand for contraceptive products that the social marketing program has filled. The social marketing program has given good results in terms of volume of sales and in cost-effectiveness since 1976, prompting calls for replacement of the community contraceptive distribution program by the social marketing program in those sectors where knowledge and use of contraception have achieved acceptable levels. An experiment in the Department of Santander in 1984 and 1985 gave very favorable results, suggesting that community contraceptive distribution programs should be replaced by social marketing programs in all more developed markets. But economic problems in 1985 and the decision of manufacturers to decrease the profit margin for PROFAMILIA jeopardized the social marketing program. The community distribution program covered about 20% of the market. Reduced profits in the social marketing program threatened its continued expansion, at the same time that potential demand was growing because of increases in the fertile aged population and increased use of contraception. To meet the need, PROFAMILIA combined the community contraceptive distribution and social marketing programs into a new entity to be called community marketing. The strategy of the community marketing program will be to maintain PROFAMILIA's participation in the market and aid the growth of demand for

  14. The worldwide use of steroidal contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diczfalusy, E

    1989-01-01

    Historically, concerns about rapidly growing populations and resources that could not support them persuaded governments of developing countries to initiate family planning programs. Between the early 1960s and the early 1980s, the number of governments supporting these programs increased from 7 to approximately 120. Today, 52 governments in developing countries provide support to family planning programs because of the demographic rationale, and 65 governments do so because of human rights and health considerations: The effective use of family planning significantly diminishes infant, child, and maternal mortality and morbidity. Forty-five percent of married women of reproductive age worldwide are practicing contraception today; however, 69% do so in East Asia and only 11% in Africa. Female sterilization and use of intrauterine devices are the most popular methods in developing countries, and oral contraceptives and condoms, in developed countries. Of the 400 million women of reproductive age, 140 million (35%) are relying on family planning methods requiring male cooperation and less than 60 million (15%) are using oral contraceptives. More than half of these oral contraceptive users live in four countries: the United States, Brazil, France, and the Federal Republic of Germany. On the other hand, the percentage of currently married women, aged 15 to 19 years, who have never used any form of contraception is as high as 85% to 90% in Bangladesh, Sudan, and Pakistan. In many developing countries, there is a statistically significant correlation between women's use of contraception and years of education. Other important factors influencing contraceptive prevalence include the established or perceived side effects of currently available methods, the status of women, the political climate, and a number of behavioral and social determinants.

  15. Oral contraceptives in the treatment of acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J K; Degreef, H

    2001-02-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) can reduce acne by lowering the production of adrenal and ovarian androgens, by inhibiting 5-alpha-reductase, which in turn, reduces the levels of dihydrotestosterone, and by stimulating sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), thus reducing the levels of free testosterone. In newer OCs, such as Tricyclen and Diane-35, the progestin component is minimally androgenic and anti-androgenic respectively, thereby enhancing the favorable profile of these products in the treatment of hyperandrogenic disorders, including acne. The efficacy of these agents and their long-term safety profile supports their use in various grades of acne in females: * As adjunctive therapy to topical agents for women with mild non-scarring acne desiring oral contraception * As primary therapy for patients with moderate non-scarring acne in combination with topical therapy and systemic antibiotics * As one of two preferred methods of contraception in patients with scarring and severe inflammatory acne being treated with systemic isotretinoin.

  16. The 1998 Canadian Contraception Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William A.; Boroditsky, Richard; Bridges, Martha L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the 1998 Canadian Contraception Study, a mailed survey which asked women about contraceptive practices past, present, and future (including use of oral contraceptives, condoms, and sterilization); familiarity with and opinion about different contraception methods; and general sexual and reproductive health. The paper also examines…

  17. Review of newer contraceptive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, M; Attaran, M

    1999-06-01

    Advances in contraceptive technology have made birth control more effective, convenient, and safe. We review the newer products and some under development, including the latest oral contraceptives, injectable progesterone, subdermal progestin implants, progesterone-releasing IUDs, emergency contraception, and male contraception.

  18. Forgotten intrauterine contraceptive device - A threat to total hip prosthesis: A case report with review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sonam; Sharma, Sansar Chand

    2016-01-01

    Primary total hip replacement has become a routine procedure these days. With improvement in surgical techniques and implant designs, the survival rate of prosthesis has increased significantly but unfortunately, prosthetic infections though uncommon continue to be a threatening complication. We present a detailed review of the literature along with a case report of infected total hip prosthesis in a 36-year-old female who had been operated 6 years back. The causative organism was found to be Actinomyces israelii which was related to an infected intrauterine device used for contraception that had been forgotten after being implanted 8 years earlier.

  19. Gender Differences in Perception of Contraception Alternatives by Never-Married College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Robert J.; Gold, Robert S.

    A study examined the perceptions of college students regarding 10 contraceptive methods, including the condom, douche, oral contraceptive, withdrawal, diaphragm, female sterilization, spermicidal foam, rhythm, male sterilization, and intrauterine device. A total of 285 females and 316 males responded to a questionnaire which had students rank each…

  20. Non-contraceptive benefits of oral contraceptives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhont M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Marc Dhont Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium Abstract: The health benefits of the oral contraceptive (OC pill are numerous and outweigh the risks of OC use. There are unintended but useful preventive side effects and potential therapeutic uses of OCs apart from contraception itself. Unequivocal evidence for the protective influence of combined OCs against ovarian and endometrial cancers, and colon cancer to a lesser extent, has been found. The pill also reduces the incidence of benign breast disease, functional ovarian cysts, pelvic inflammatory disease requiring hospitalization, ectopic pregnancy, and iron-deficiency anemia. The pill can be used for the treatment of several gynecologic disorders such as dysmenorrhea, irregular or excessive bleeding, acne, hirsutism, and endometriosis-associated pain, whether prescribed solely to treat these symptoms or prescribed to treat them in addition to providing contraception. These health benefits are often underestimated, as they get too little attention from the mass media. Keywords: the pill, estrogens, progestogens, safety, contraception

  1. Use of non-emergency contraceptive pills and concoctions as emergency contraception among Nigerian University students: results of a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Anthony Idowu; Nwokocha, Ezebunwa Ethelbert; Akpan, Wilson; Adeniyi, Oladele Vincent

    2016-10-04

    Emergency contraception (EC) can significantly reduce the rate of unintended pregnancies and unsafe abortions especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Despite the increasing awareness of EC among educated young women in Nigeria, the rate of utilisation remains low. This study therefore explores the main barriers to the use of EC among female university students by analysing their knowledge of emergency contraception, methods ever used, perceived efficacy, and its acceptability. This paper brings together the findings from several focus groups (N = 5) and in-depth interviews (N = 20) conducted amongst unmarried female undergraduate students in two Nigerian universities. Participants considered the use of condom and abstinence as the most effective methods of preventing unplanned pregnancy. However, many participants were misinformed about emergency contraception. Generally, participants relied on unconventional and unproven ECs; Ampiclox, "Alabukun", salt water solution, and lime and potash and perceived them to be effective in preventing unplanned pregnancies. Furthermore, respondents' narratives about methods of preventing unwanted pregnancies revealed that inadequate information on emergency contraception, reliance on unproven crude contraceptive methods, and misconception about modern contraception constitute barriers to the use of emergency contraception. The findings suggested that female university students are misinformed about emergency contraception and their reliance on unproven ECs constitutes a barrier to the use of approved EC methods. These barriers have serious implications for prevention of unplanned pregnancies in the cohort. Behavioural interventions targeting the use of unproven emergency contraceptive methods and misperceptions about ECs would be crucial for this cohort in Nigeria.

  2. Advertising of contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-04-01

    It is estimated that 1.7 million fertile and sexually active women in Great Britain do not use any reliable form of contraception. There is a need for better information regarding contraception, a need which could be filled by commercial advertising of family planning in general and specific contraceptive products in particular. Mass media and public advertising of family planning services is permitted in Britain. Funds available for such purposes are inadequate for continued advertising. The law should be changed to allow advertising for specific brands of condoms, spermicides, and pills. IUDs and diaphragms are used in too small numbers to make advertising worthwhile. The objection to contraceptive advertising is that it would be offensive to the public. However, public opinion research confounds this theory.

  3. Contraception during lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badraoui, M H; Hefnawi, F; Bahgat, R; Fawzi, G; El Gaali, O; Ismail, H; Hegab, M

    1982-01-01

    Seven hundred and seventy-two lactating mothers were studied from delivery for 1 year to select the best contraceptive method (oral drug, injected drug, or IUD) which did not affect lactation. Ten groups of mothers were studied, including 234 control subjects. The injectable progestational contraceptives caused an improvement in the amount of milk and its protein concentration, whereas the IUCDs did not influence the lactation pattern. Sulpiride was an ineffective contraceptive but a potent lactation stimulant. The side effects of each method (effects on milk yield, protein content and prolactin concentrations) were also noted; it was concluded that IUCDs are the ideal contraceptive method during lactation, with the use of a lactation stimulant when indicated.

  4. New and emerging contraceptives: a state-of-the-art review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahamondes L

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Luis Bahamondes, M Valeria Bahamondes Human Reproduction Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas and National Institute of Hormones and Women's Health, Campinas, SP, Brazil Background: The first hormonal contraceptive was introduced onto the market in several countries 50 years ago; however, the portfolio of contraceptive methods remains restricted with regards to their steroid composition, their cost, and their ability to satisfy the requirements of millions of women/couples in accordance with their different reproductive intentions, behaviors, cultures, and settings. Methods: A literature review was conducted using Medline, Embase, and Current Contents databases, up to September 1, 2013 to identify publications reporting new contraceptives in development using combinations of the search terms: contraception, contraceptives, oral contraceptives, patch, vaginal ring, implants, intrauterine contraceptives, and emergency contraception (EC. Also, several experts in the field were also consulted to document ongoing projects on contraception development. Additionally, the Clinicaltrial.gov website was searched for ongoing studies on existing contraceptive methods and new and emerging female contraceptives developed over the past 5 years. Information was also obtained from the pharmaceutical industry. Results: Early sexual debut and late menopause means that women may require contraception for up to 30 years. Although oral, injectable, vaginal, transdermal, subdermal, and intrauterine contraceptives are already available, new contraceptives have been developed in an attempt to reduce side effects and avoid early discontinuation, and to fulfill women's different requirements. Research efforts are focused on replacing ethinyl-estradiol with natural estradiol to reduce thrombotic events. In addition, new, less androgenic progestins are being introduced and selective progesterone receptor

  5. [Adolescent contraception. Current trends].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthuber, Sabine

    2005-10-01

    Despite easy availability of contraception, Germany is confronted with the problem of increasing rates of pregnancies and abortions in minors. Prescription of contraceptives that do not rely on compliance and are acceptable to adolescents is required in addition to improved counseling. For that purpose, adherence to the guidelines for the use of contraceptives in minors written by the consortium for legislation in medicine (AG Medizinrecht) is essential. Oral contraceptives are the most commonly prescribed form of birth control, advantages include reversibility as well as a good tolerance and safety profile. New developments are low-dose compounds, novel progestins, prevention of ovulation by pure gestagen pills and the long-term use of low-dose monophasic micro pills. Long-term contraceptives like subdermally implantable depot compounds or hormone-releasing pessaries in utero have been used on a regular basis and seem a convenient alternative for birth control for longer periods, also in adolescents. The easy-to-use intravaginal ring and the birth control patch have expanded the spectrum of hormone-releasing contraceptive systems. Studies show improved compliance and a possible reduction of unintentional pregnancies due to application errors. Amelioration of the range of highly effective birth control products different modes of application will hopefully lead to drop in the rate of unplanned pregnancies, especially in adolescents.

  6. History of oral contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, Marc

    2010-12-01

    On the 50th birthday of the pill, it is appropriate to recall the milestones which have led to its development and evolution during the last five decades. The main contraceptive effect of the pill being inhibition of ovulation, it may be called a small miracle that this drug was developed long before the complex regulation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle was elucidated. Another stumbling block on its way was the hostile climate with regard to contraception that prevailed at the time. Animal experiments on the effect of sex steroids on ovulation, and the synthesis of sex steroids and orally active analogues were the necessary preliminaries. We owe the development of oral contraceptives to a handful of persons: two determined feminists, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick; a biologist, Gregory Pincus; and a gynaecologist, John Rock. Soon after the introduction of the first pills, some nasty and life-threatening side effects emerged, which were due to the high doses of sex steroids. This led to the development of new preparations with reduced oestrogen content, progestins with more specific action, and alternative administration routes. Almost every decade we have witnessed a breakthrough in oral contraception. Social and moral objections to birth control have gradually disappeared and, notwithstanding some pill scares, oral contraceptives are now one of the most used methods of contraception. Finally, all's well that ends well: recent reports have substantiated the multiple noncontraceptive health benefits paving the way for a bright future for this 50-year-old product.

  7. Contraceptive implants: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowlands S

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sam Rowlands,1,2 Stephen Searle3 1Centre of Postgraduate Medical Research and Education, School of Health and Social Care, Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; 2Dorset HealthCare, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; 3Sexual Health Services, Chesterfield, United KingdomAbstract: Progestin-only contraceptive implants are a highly cost-effective form of long-acting reversible contraception. They are the most effective reversible contraceptives and are of a similar effectiveness to sterilization. Pregnancies are rare in women using this method of contraception, and those that do occur must be fully investigated, with an ultrasound scan of the arm and serum etonogestrel level if the implant cannot be located. There are very few contraindications to use of implants, and they have an excellent safety profile. Both acceptability and continuation with the method are high. Noncontraceptive benefits include improvements in dysmenorrhea, ovulatory pain, and endometriosis. Problematic bleeding is a relatively common adverse effect that must be covered in preinsertion information-giving and supported adequately if it occurs. Recognized training for both insertion and removal should be undertaken. Care needs to be taken at both insertion and removal to avoid neurovascular injury. Implants should always be palpable; if they are not, noninsertion should be assumed until disproven. Etonogestrel implants are now radiopaque, which aids localization. Anticipated difficult removals should be performed by specially trained experts. Keywords: contraceptive, subdermal implant, etonogestrel, levonorgestrel, progestin-only, long-acting reversible contraception

  8. Social origin of contraceptive counseling practices by male doctors in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erviti, Joaquina; Sosa Sánchez, Itzel A; Castro, Roberto

    2010-06-01

    Contraceptive counseling by physicians plays a decisive role in the contraceptive choices of their patients. We studied male physicians' contraceptive counseling and preferences in Mexico from a gender perspective. Specifically, through in-depth interviews with 31 male physicians working for public health institutions in Mexico, we examined reproductive health providers' contraceptive practices and perceptions about men's roles and responsibilities in reproduction. Through an interpretative analysis we identified the social processes involved in shaping contraceptive preferences. Of special importance are institutional and professional factors-related to prestige and economic concerns-framed by gender determinants which hinder the incorporation of practices that might contribute to gender equality in reproductive health. Thus, female contraceptive methods are preferred by physicians, and use of male contraceptive methods, especially vasectomy, is discouraged by them.

  9. Contraceptive needs of the adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, Petrus S; Goldstuck, Norman D

    2014-08-01

    The provision of contraception to adolescents requires specific attention. Adolescents require contraceptive methods which are safe, effective and simple to use. While long-acting reversible contraceptive methods are preferable, they should have a choice and not be forced or mandated especially in situations where this may compromise safety. After counselling they should have the ability to choose any method of contraception. Under the appropriate circumstances, each method of contraception may have a place. This chapter will be devoted to evaluating the most current scientific rationale for the indication for use of each method of contraception in adolescents.

  10. Contraceptive Methods Accessed in Volta Region, Ghana, 2009–2014

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    Himiede W. Wilson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In 2016, Volta Region was one of the two regions in Ghana that recorded a high prevalence of teenage pregnancy, accounting for 15.5% of all adolescent pregnancies in the country. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of contraceptive methods accessed by person, place, and time in Volta Region, Ghana, 2009–2014. Method. We carried out a secondary analysis of contraceptive use data derived from the District Health Information Management System (DHIMS 2 for Volta Region, between 2009 and 2014. We calculated proportions and described trends. Results. Over the five-year period, there were 673,409 (75.0% acceptors of family planning out of a total 897, 645 males and females of reproductive age. The proportion of family planning acceptors increased gradually from 18% in 2009 to 23% in 2014. Contraceptive methods were most commonly accessed by male and female between 20 and 29 years. The most common methods of contraceptives accessed were injectables among females accounting for about 70% and condoms accounting for over 90% among males. Conclusion. All the districts in Volta Region did not access contraceptives adequately. The Volta Regional Health Directorate should encourage and support research to ascertain factors influencing uptake of contraceptive methods in all the districts.

  11. Outcome of pyometra in female dogs and predictors of peritonitis and prolonged postoperative hospitalization in surgically treated cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitpean, Supranee; Ström-Holst, Bodil; Emanuelson, Ulf; Höglund, Odd V; Pettersson, Ann; Alneryd-Bull, Caroline; Hagman, Ragnvi

    2014-01-07

    One of the most common diseases in intact bitches is pyometra--a potentially life-threatening disease associated with a variety of clinical and laboratory findings. The aims of the present study were to describe complications of the disease and to investigate clinically useful indicators associated with peritonitis and/or prolonged postoperative hospitalization. A retrospective study was performed using records from 356 bitches diagnosed with pyometra during the years 2006-2007 at the University Animal Hospital, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden. Of the 356 bitches, 315 were surgically treated by ovariohysterectomy, 9 were medically treated and 32 were euthanized without treatment. In the surgically treated bitches, univariable associations between clinical and laboratory data, risk for prolonged hospitalization (≥ 3 days) and/or signs of peritonitis, were analyzed by Chi-square and Fisher's exact test. Logistic regression models were used to assess multivariable associations.The most common complication observed in surgically treated bitches was peritonitis (40 bitches), followed by urinary tract infection (19 bitches), wound infection (8 bitches), uveitis (6 bitches), and cardiac arrhythmia (5 bitches). Leucopenia and fever/hypothermia were associated with increased risk for peritonitis (18-fold and three-fold, respectively). Moderate to severe depression of the general condition, pale mucous membranes and leucopenia were associated with increased risk (seven-fold, three-fold, and over three-point-five-fold, respectively) for prolonged postoperative hospitalization. Several clinically useful indicators were identified. Leucopenia was the most important marker, associated with 18-fold increased risk for peritonitis and an over three-point-five increased risk for prolonged hospitalization. Fever/hypothermia, depression and pale mucous membranes were associated with increased risk for peritonitis and/or prolonged hospitalization. The

  12. Knowledge and factors determining choice of contraception among Singaporean women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosavi, Arundhati; Ma, Yueyun; Wong, Hungchew; Singh, Kuldip

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The study aimed to assess the level of awareness and knowledge of contraception among women in Singapore, and identify the factors that influence contraception choice. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 259 female patients, aged 21–49 years, who attended the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Clinic at National University Hospital, Singapore. An original questionnaire on nine contraceptive methods was used. Respondents who had ≥ 2 correct answers for a method (out of four questions) were considered to have good knowledge of the method. Participants were asked to rate factors known to influence contraceptive choice as important or not important. RESULTS Awareness of the following methods was high: condom (100.0%), oral contraception pill (89.2%), tubal ligation (73.0%) and copper intrauterine device (IUD) (72.2%). The women were least aware of hormonal IUD (24.3%). Women who were parous, had a previous abortion, had completed their family or used contraception previously were more likely to have a higher awareness of contraception. 89.2% of the women had good knowledge of the condom; among those aware of hormonal IUD, only 46.0% had good knowledge of it. Women who had used hormonal IUD and the condom were more likely to have good knowledge of them. Many rated efficacy (90.5%) and a healthcare professional’s advice (90.1%) as important in contraceptive choice. Few considered peer influence (21.0%) and cultural practices (16.3%) to be important. CONCLUSION Women in Singapore have poor awareness and knowledge of contraception, especially long-acting reversible methods. More effective ways are needed to educate women about contraceptive methods. PMID:26762287

  13. 健康信念模式在青少年流产女性避孕行为实施中的应用研究%The application study of Health Belief Model in implementing contraceptive behavior among abortive female adolescent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱静芬; 施榕; 陶怡; 杨永彬

    2015-01-01

    随着经济的迅速发展和社会观念的改变,我国青少年婚前性行为发生率显著增加,非意愿妊娠和人工流产率也急剧上升,对青少年女性的身心健康造成严重危害。非意愿妊娠的发生与不安全的性行为有关。研究表明,采取有效的避孕措施可以避免非意愿妊娠的发生,但避孕行为的实施受到多方面因素的影响和制约。探讨健康信念模式在青少年流产女性避孕行为实施中的应用,可为降低青少年女性人工流产率,促进女性生殖健康寻找有效的途径。%With the rapid development of economic and social change , rates of premarital intercourse and unwanted pregnancy among teenagers are rising significantly .It leads to the increasing rate of induced abortion and makes serious harm in physical and mental health of female teenagers .Researches show that effective contraceptive measures can avoid the occurrence of an unwanted pregnancy but the implementation of contraceptive behavior is affected and restricted by various factors .This paper discusses the application of health belief model in implementing contraceptive behavior among abortive female adolescent to reduce the rate of induced abortion and explore effective ways to promote reproductive health among female adolescent .

  14. European Society of Contraception Statement on Contraception in Obese Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merki-Feld, Gabriele S; Skouby, Sven; Serfaty, David;

    2015-01-01

    and to use contraceptives with a positive ratio of benefits versus risks. The Expert Group on hormonal and molecular contraception of the European Society of Contraception convened to review the existing evidence and propose recommendations to the prescribers in line with most recent studies...

  15. Are modern contraceptives acceptable to people and where do they source them from across Nigeria?

    OpenAIRE

    Onwujekwe Obinna E; Enemuoh Jane C; Ogbonna Chinwe; Mbachu Chinyere; Uzochukwu Benjamin SC; Lawson Agathe; Ndyanabangi Bannet

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Understanding the extent that different modern contraceptives are acceptable to different populations groups and where they get the commodities from will help in developing specific interventions that will help to scale-up the availability of the contraceptives. Methods The study took place in urban and rural sites in six states across Nigeria. Data on acceptability and sources of the contraceptives was collected from at least 770 randomly selected mostly female householde...

  16. Hormonal contraception and venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Milsom, Ian; Geirsson, Reynir Tomas;

    2012-01-01

    New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published.......New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published....

  17. How Effective Is Male Contraception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How effective is male contraception? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Not all contraceptive methods are appropriate for all situations, and individuals ...

  18. Perceptions of nonsurgical permanent contraception among potential users, providers, and influencers in Wardha district and New Delhi, India: Exploratory research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Aengst

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: New permanent contraceptive methods are in development, including nonsurgical permanent contraception (NSPC. Objective: In the present study, perceptions of NSPC in India among married women, married men, mothers-in-law, providers, and health advocates in Eastern Maharashtra (Wardha district and New Delhi were examined. Methods: We conducted semi-structured interviews with 40 married women and 20 mothers-in-law; surveys with 150 married men; and focus group discussions with obstetrics/gynecology providers and advocates. Transcripts were coded and analyzed using a grounded theory approach, where emerging themes are analyzed during the data collection period. Results: The majority of female respondents expressed support of permanent contraception and interest in NSPC, stating the importance of avoiding surgery and minimizing recovery time. They expressed concerns about safety and efficacy; many felt that a confirmation test would be necessary regardless of the failure rate. Most male respondents were supportive of female permanent contraception (PC and preferred NSPC to a surgical method, as long as it was safe and effective. Providers were interested in NSPC yet had specific concerns about safety, efficacy, cost, uptake, and government pressure. They also had concerns that a nonsurgical approach could undermine the inherent seriousness of choosing PC. Advocates were interested in NSPC but had concerns about safety and potential misuse in the Indian context. Conclusion: Although perceptions of NSPC were varied, all study populations indicated interest in NSPC. Concerns about safety, efficacy, appropriate patient counseling, and ethics emerged from the present study and should be considered as NSPC methods continue to be developed.

  19. Contraceptive practice, unwanted pregnancies and induced abortion in Southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omideyi, Adekunbi Kehinde; Akinyemi, Akanni Ibukun; Aina, Olabisi Idowu; Adeyemi, Adebanjo Babalola; Fadeyibi, Opeyemi Abiola; Bamiwuye, Samson Olusina; Akinbami, Catherine Abiola; Anazodo, Amechi

    2011-01-01

    Despite widespread awareness of and access to modern contraception, high rates of unwanted pregnancies and abortions still persist in many parts of the world, even where abortion is legally restricted. This article explores perspectives on contraception and abortion, contraceptive decision-making within relationships, and the management of unplanned pregnancies. It presents findings from an exploratory qualitative study based on 17 in-depth interviews and 6 focus group discussions conducted in 2 locations in Nigeria in 2006. The results suggest that couples do not practice contraception consistently because of perceived side effects and partner objections. Abortion is usually resorted to because pregnancy was unwanted due to incomplete educational attainment, economic hardship, immaturity, close pregnancy interval, and social stigma. Males usually have greater influence in contraceptive-decision making than females. Though induced abortion is negatively viewed in the community, it is still common, and women usually patronise quacks to obtain such services. An abortion experience can change future views and decisions towards contraception. Family planning interventions should include access to and availability of adequate family planning information. Educational campaigns should target males since they play an important role in contraceptive decision-making.

  20. Surgical management of spontaneous ruptured hepatocellular adenoma

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    Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle Ribeiro Junior

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: Spontaneous ruptured hepatocellular adenoma (SRHA is a rare life-threatening condition that may require surgical treatment to control hemorrhaging and also stabilize the patient. We report a series of emergency surgeries performed at our institution for this condition. METHODS: We reviewed medical records and radiology files of 28 patients (from 1989 to 2006 with a proven diagnosis of hepatocellular adenoma (HA. Three (10.7% of 28 patients had spontaneous ruptured hepatocellular adenoma, two of which were associated with intrahepatic hemorrhage while one had intraperitoneal bleeding. Two patients were female and one was male. Both female patients had a background history of oral contraceptive use. Sudden abdominal pain associated with hemodynamic instability occurred in all patients who suffered from spontaneous ruptured hepatocellular adenoma. The mean age was 41.6 years old. The preoperative assessment included liver function tests, ultrasonography and computed tomography. RESULTS: The surgical approaches were as follows: right hemihepatectomy for controlling intraperitoneal bleeding, and right extended hepatectomy and non-anatomic resection of the liver for intrahepatic hemorrhage. There were no deaths, and the postoperative complications were bile leakage and wound infection (re-operation, as well as intraperitoneal abscess (re-operation and pleural effusion. CONCLUSION: Spontaneous ruptured hepatocellular adenoma may be treated by surgery for controlling hemorrhages and stabilizing the patient, and the decision to operate depends upon both the patient's condition and the expertise of the surgical team.

  1. Study of Knowledge, Attitude & Practice Regarding The Various Methods of Contraception in a Rural Setup of Hoskote

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    Yogendra V, Shuaib Ahmed, Sana Jaweriya, Sagorika Mullick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contraception is as old as mankind.In view of increasing population there’s need for awareness regarding the use of various contraceptive methods. Aims and Objectives: To assess the Knowledge, Attitude & Practice regarding the various contraceptive methods in a rural setup of Hoskote. Materials & Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out at MVJ, UHC & PHC of Hoskote Taluk on OPD basis. Data was collected by a pre-designed questionnaire at the OPD. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software. People were simultaneously educated regarding the various contraceptive methods. Results: Total sample size was 150 of which 75 were males and 75 females. Knowledge about contraceptives was seen more in males (93.3% when compared to females (72%. 95.2% of gradates had knowledge regarding the methods of contraception. This suggests that the knowledge about contraception is better perceived and understood among the literate group. Most common method of contraceptive practiced was barrier methods (40%, followed by sterilization procedure (20%, IUCD (18.67%, OCP (12%, coitus interruptus (8.67% and emergency contraception (0.67%. Conclusion: There has been a considerable improvement among the people even in rural setup regarding the contraceptive use, but there still exists lack of awareness and knowledge regarding the use of contraceptive methods in some small groups of people. IEC activities have to be increased especially for females of this rural setup.

  2. Hormonal contraceptives and venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, Berendina Hendrika (Bernardine)

    2013-01-01

    Oral contraceptive use is associated with venous thrombosis. However, the mechanism behind this remains unclear. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate genetic variation in the first-pass metabolism of contraceptives, to identify the clinical implications of hormonal contraceptive use after a

  3. Hormonal contraceptives and venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, Berendina Hendrika (Bernardine)

    2013-01-01

    Oral contraceptive use is associated with venous thrombosis. However, the mechanism behind this remains unclear. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate genetic variation in the first-pass metabolism of contraceptives, to identify the clinical implications of hormonal contraceptive use after a thromb

  4. [Contraception in perimenopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merki-Feld, G S

    2000-10-01

    Perimenopausal women are still potentially fertile and pregnancy is attended with increased maternal and perinatal mortality. Several contraceptive methods can be used therapeutic for the treatment of climacteric symptoms like menstrual irregularities, flushes and vaginal dryness. Low-dose oral contraceptives (OC) prevent climacteric symptoms and additionally protect from perimenopausal bone loss. However, the individual cardiovascular risk increases with age and is even higher in perimenopausal women using OCs. Therefore for women with cardiovascular risk factors sterilization, barrier methods, progestin-only methods and intrauterine devices (IUD) are the better choice. Prolonged and heavy menses can be treated with the levonorgestrel-releasing IUD or injectable progestogens. If estrogen replacement is necessary, a low-dose treatment with natural estrogens can be combined with barrier methods, the levonorgestrel-releasing IUD and injectable progestogens. The variety of contraceptive options available to perimenopausal women allows individual counseling and thus may enhance compliance.

  5. Characteristics of Contraceptive Use in Sao Paulo State, Brazil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elisabeth Meloni Vieira; Rita Badiani; Amaury Léis Dal Fabbro; Antonio Luiz Rodrigues Junior

    2006-01-01

    Objective To know the characteristics of contraceptive use in Sao Paulo State collected by the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) conducted in 1996.Methods Data of Sao Paulo in 1996 were analyzed compared with the previous DHS carried on in 1986focusing on Sao Paulo State. Contraceptive use among married or cohabiting women by age, number of children and schooling was closely examined.Age and timing of female sterilization were also analyzed.Results The results showed that unlike Brazil there was a stability of female sterilization in Sao Paulo State during 1986 and 1996. There was a pattern in Sao Paulo: up to 30years old the pill was the most used contraceptive, after 30 there was a predominance of female sterilization, which increased with the number of children and decreased with schooling. The use of male methods had also increased in the 1986 and 1996period, being greater in Sao Paulo than in Brazil. Sao Paulo also presented more diversity in the use of reversible contraceptives.Conclusions The predominant two contraceptive methods in Brazil and Sao Paulo changed from 1986 to 1996, I.e. From pill to female sterilization.

  6. [Contraception during the perimenopause: indications, security, and non contraceptive benefits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantero Pérez, P; Klingemann, J; Yaron, M; Irion, N Fournet; Streuli, I

    2015-10-28

    Although patients' fertility is diminished in the period of perimenopause, they still need efficient contraception. Thorough knowledge of the physiological changes occuring during this period of transition is essential in order to provide optimal care. Until the age of 50, no contraceptive method is specifically considered unsuitable due to age alone. The choice of contraceptive needs to be adapted to the patient, assessing the individual risk factors and favouring the potential non-contraceptive advantages of the method selected. Long-term contraceptive methods (e.g., the copper intrauterine device (IUD), the Mirena IUD or a subcutaneous implant) offer an excellent solution on both levels.

  7. Knowledge of reproductive physiology and modern contraceptives in rural Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard-Tucker, G

    1989-01-01

    This report is based on fieldwork conducted in a Peruvian community in 1986, which investigated Quechua-speaking Indians' knowledge of the female reproductive organs, perceptions of the way contraceptives work in the body, folk beliefs about conception and menstruation, and opinions about modern contraceptives. The findings reveal that the men have a more accurate knowledge of the female reproductive organs than the women do. However, the women are more knowledgeable about the action of modern contraceptives in the body. Most respondents perceived modern contraceptive methods as the best methods available, but the majority reported using the calendar rhythm method. This preference for rhythm is based on its economic advantage and on its adaptability to folk beliefs about physiology. The men's dominant role in reproductive behavior is related to cultural norms that emphasize traditional gender roles and that prohibit communication about sexual matters between men and women. Educational material, based on the respondents' knowledge of reproduction and taking into account their folk beliefs, might help to decrease the fear of contraceptive side effects and increase understanding of the function of contraceptives.

  8. Contraceptive usage and awareness among postpartum mothers in urban field practice area of a tertiary hospital

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    Tanvir Kaur Sidhu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: To study contraceptive usage and awareness among postpartum mothers. Objective: To assess prevalence of postpartum contraception and factors affecting the usage of contraceptives in Urban area. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out in the Urban Field practice area of Adesh Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, Bathinda. All females who delivered within last one year were included in the study. A pre-structured questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic and other details. A total of 92 females were included. The appropriate statistical analysis was done to present the results. Results: 30.4% females had adopted one or the other postpartum contraceptive measure. Condom was the most common method used. Usage of postpartum contraception was significantly associated with women’s and husband’s education, type of delivery and availing of antenatal and postnatal visits. The main reason for not using postpartum contraception was lack of knowledge and access. 16.3% females had unmet need of postpartum contraception. Conclusions: Overall usage of postpartum contraception was low and mainly related to lack of awareness and knowledge.

  9. Adolescents' Values, Sexuality, and Contraception in a Rural New York County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Naomi; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Examined personal values and sexual and contraceptive experiences of 75 male and 88 female high school students from a rural county of New York. Results suggested that religiosity was unrelated to students' sexual behavior and use of contraceptives. The different groups of high school students exhibited remarkably homogeneous sexual and…

  10. Attitudes of College Students toward Contraceptives: A Consideration of Gender Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Larry M.

    2004-01-01

    There exists a "contraceptive gap" among young people. That is, while a large majority of young males and females become sexually active, there is a time lapse between the onset of sexual activity and the use of contraceptives. As a result of this lack of sexual responsibility, there are over 1,000,000 teenage pregnancies each year in the American…

  11. A Longitudinal Evaluation of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Contraception for College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Janet; Tymchyshyn, Patricia

    1992-01-01

    Assessed changes in contraceptive knowledge of 58 white female undergraduate students following computer-assisted instruction program on contraception. At six-month follow-up, students evidenced knowledge gains on duration of pill use, rationale for triphasics and biphasics, appropriate contingencies for missing two days of pill, danger signs…

  12. Family size, sex composition of children and contraceptive use: a case study of Kerala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchindran, C M; Ramakumar, R; Sathi Devi, K

    1993-01-01

    With the sudden decline of fertility it was particularly interesting to examine the situation in Kerala, regarding parental sex preference in formulating family planning policies for the rest of India with high fertility and son preference. The 1980 Kerala Fertility Survey included nearly 3000 households with about 2700 ever married women in reproductive age. Maternity history and fertility regulation data were collected. Data from 2500 currently married women were used, cross-classified by the number of male and female living children and contraceptive use status. A multiplicative model was used to study various interaction effects and to construct standardized rates of contraceptive use. Measures adjusted for both male and female composition and differential use of contraceptives among male-female combinations were obtained by the model to avoid arbitrariness in choosing rates and to preclude objections raised in previous research on Arnold's index. The model was generalized to facilitate simultaneous effects of the number of male and female children and family size on contraceptive use. Initial analysis showed that the effect of sex preference on contraceptive acceptance was rather negligible. However, there was a significant male-female interaction effect on contraceptive use. Contraception was high when the family size was large, with children of the same sex. With the effect of family size removed, the contraceptive use rate seemed to be in the inverse direction of the number of male or female children. This was possibly the result of two factors: 1) high contraception rate with large families of the same sex, and 2) low use of contraception among large families with a high number of children of both sexes. The Kerala situation partly supports McClelland's theory that couples already having proportionally more daughters may terminate fertility earlier. In Kerala such termination also occurs when couples have proportionally more sons, and family size also

  13. Contraception and endometriosis: challenges, efficacy, and therapeutic importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weisberg E

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Edith Weisberg,1 Ian S Fraser2 1Family Planning NSW, 2School of Women's and Children's Health, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Endometriosis is a benign gynecological condition that is estimated to affect 10% of women in the general population and appears to be increasing in incidence. It is an estrogen-dependent inflammatory disease, and is primarily characterized by dysmenorrhea, deep dyspareunia, chronic pelvic pain, and variable effects on fertility. The symptoms may greatly affect quality of life, and symptom control may be the primary aim of initial management, while contraceptive effect is often secondary. It is estimated that 30%–50% of women with endometriosis have an infertility problem, so a considerable number of endometriosis sufferers will require effective, planned contraception to maximize “protection of fertility” and prevent progression of the endometriotic condition. Ideally, this contraception should also provide symptom relief and improvement of physical, mental, and social well-being. At the present time, long-term progestogens appear to be the most effective choice for meeting all of these requirements, but other options need to be considered. It is becoming increasingly recognized that hormonal contraceptive systems are necessary for prevention of disease recurrence following surgical treatment of endometriosis. The personal preferences of the woman are an integral part of the final contraceptive choice. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the contraceptive options available to women with endometriosis. Keywords: pelvic pain, disease recurrence, progestogens, delivery systems, long-acting

  14. Use of contraceptives among adolescents in Kintampo, Ghana: a cross-sectional study

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    Boamah EA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ellen Abrafi Boamah, Kwaku Poku Asante, Emmanuel Mahama, Grace Manu, Emmanuel Kwesi Ayipah, Elisha Adeniji, Seth Owusu-Agyei Kintampo Health Research Center, Ghana Health Service, Kintampo, Ghana Introduction: The use of contraceptives is essential in preventing unwanted pregnancies, unsafe abortions, and abortion-related complications that expose adolescents to health-related risks such as infertility and sometimes death. Objective: To assess contraceptive use among adolescents as evidence to develop appropriate interventions for adolescent sexual health programs. Methods: A cross-sectional survey using both quantitative and qualitative methods was conducted among 793 male and female adolescents (aged 15–19 years in the Kintampo area of Ghana from October 2010–May 2011. Results: Knowledge of at least one contraceptive method was high (88.9% among adolescents of both sexes (males 92.1% and females 86.6%. Knowledge of male condoms was highest (84.0%, and it was the most common contraceptive method used (82.0%. The use of other methods such as pills (7.9%, injection (0.9%, and foam (0.3%, amongst others, was low. About 22.9% of adolescents used contraceptives consistently. Among adolescents, consistent contraceptive use was significantly associated with discussions of contraceptive use between partners (P<0.01. Adolescents who discussed contraceptive use before their first sexual encounter were more likely to use contraceptives consistently when compared to those who had never discussed contraceptive use (odds ratio =0.06; 95% confidence interval: 0.02–0.17; P<0.01. Among sexually active adolescents, 30.0% had experienced pregnancy, with 34.0% of pregnancies resulting in abortions. Pregnancy was high among adolescents who did not use contraceptives consistently, as compared to those who did (6.4% versus 93.6%; P<0.01. The most common source of contraceptives was the chemical seller's/pharmacy shop (62.1%. Conclusion: Though a high number of

  15. Are modern contraceptives acceptable to people and where do they source them from across Nigeria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onwujekwe Obinna E

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the extent that different modern contraceptives are acceptable to different populations groups and where they get the commodities from will help in developing specific interventions that will help to scale-up the availability of the contraceptives. Methods The study took place in urban and rural sites in six states across Nigeria. Data on acceptability and sources of the contraceptives was collected from at least 770 randomly selected mostly female householders from each state respectively using a questionnaire. Acceptability of the different contraceptives was scored by the respondents on a scale of 1 (lowest to 10 (highest. The relationships between acceptability and sources of the contraceptives with socio-economic status and geographic location of the respondents were examined. Results The use of modern contraceptives in general was acceptable to 87% of the respondents. Male condom was the most acceptable means of contraceptive with an average score of 5.0. It was followed by implants with and oral contraceptive pill with average scores of 4.0, whilst IUD was the least acceptable with an average score of 2.9. The private sector was the major source of contraceptives to different population groups. Both male and female condoms were mostly procured from patent medicine dealers (PMD and pharmacy shops. Intra Uterine Devices (IUDs and implants were mostly sourced from public and private hospitals in the urban areas, whilst injectibles were mostly sourced from private hospitals. Oral contraceptives were mostly sourced from pharmacy shops and patent medicine dealers. There were SES and geographic differences for both acceptability and sources of the contraceptives. Also, the sources of different contraceptives depended on the type of the contraceptive. Conclusion The different contraceptives were acceptable to the respondents and the major source of the contraceptives was the private sector. Hence, public

  16. Are modern contraceptives acceptable to people and where do they source them from across Nigeria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the extent that different modern contraceptives are acceptable to different populations groups and where they get the commodities from will help in developing specific interventions that will help to scale-up the availability of the contraceptives. Methods The study took place in urban and rural sites in six states across Nigeria. Data on acceptability and sources of the contraceptives was collected from at least 770 randomly selected mostly female householders from each state respectively using a questionnaire. Acceptability of the different contraceptives was scored by the respondents on a scale of 1 (lowest) to 10 (highest). The relationships between acceptability and sources of the contraceptives with socio-economic status and geographic location of the respondents were examined. Results The use of modern contraceptives in general was acceptable to 87% of the respondents. Male condom was the most acceptable means of contraceptive with an average score of 5.0. It was followed by implants with and oral contraceptive pill with average scores of 4.0, whilst IUD was the least acceptable with an average score of 2.9. The private sector was the major source of contraceptives to different population groups. Both male and female condoms were mostly procured from patent medicine dealers (PMD) and pharmacy shops. Intra Uterine Devices (IUDs) and implants were mostly sourced from public and private hospitals in the urban areas, whilst injectibles were mostly sourced from private hospitals. Oral contraceptives were mostly sourced from pharmacy shops and patent medicine dealers. There were SES and geographic differences for both acceptability and sources of the contraceptives. Also, the sources of different contraceptives depended on the type of the contraceptive. Conclusion The different contraceptives were acceptable to the respondents and the major source of the contraceptives was the private sector. Hence, public-private partnership arrangements

  17. Obesity and hormonal contraceptive efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jennifer A; Burke, Anne E

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern affecting an increasing proportion of reproductive-aged women. Avoiding unintended pregnancy is of major importance, given the increased risks associated with pregnancy, but obesity may affect the efficacy of hormonal contraceptives by altering how these drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized or eliminated. Limited data suggest that long-acting, reversible contraceptives maintain excellent efficacy in obese women. Some studies demonstrating altered pharmacokinetic parameters and increased failure rates with combined oral contraceptives, the contraceptive patch and emergency contraceptive pills suggest decreased efficacy of these methods. It is unclear whether bariatric surgery affects hormonal contraceptive efficacy. Obese women should be offered the full range of contraceptive options, with counseling that balances the risks and benefits of each method, including the risk of unintended pregnancy.

  18. Elevated Mechanical Loading When Young Provides Lifelong Benefits to Cortical Bone Properties in Female Rats Independent of a Surgically Induced Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galley, Matthew R.; Hurd, Andrea L.; Wallace, Joseph M.; Gallant, Maxime A.; Richard, Jeffrey S.; George, Lydia A.

    2013-01-01

    Exercise that mechanically loads the skeleton is advocated when young to enhance lifelong bone health. Whether the skeletal benefits of elevated loading when young persist into adulthood and after menopause are important questions. This study investigated the influence of a surgically induced menopause in female Sprague-Dawley rats on the lifelong maintenance of the cortical bone benefits of skeletal loading when young. Animals had their right forearm extrinsically loaded 3 d/wk between 4 and 10 weeks of age using the forearm axial compression loading model. Left forearms were internal controls and not loaded. Animals were subsequently detrained (restricted to cage activities) for 94 weeks (until age 2 years), with ovariectomy (OVX) or sham-OVX surgery being performed at 24 weeks of age. Loading enhanced midshaft ulna cortical bone mass, structure, and estimated strength. These benefits persisted lifelong and contributed to loaded ulnas having greater strength after detraining. Loading also had effects on cortical bone quality. The benefits of loading when young were not influenced by a surgically induced menopause because there were no interactions between loading and surgery. However, OVX had independent effects on cortical bone mass, structure, and estimated strength at early postsurgery time points (up to age 58 weeks) and bone quality measures. These data indicate skeletal loading when young had lifelong benefits on cortical bone properties that persisted independent of a surgically induced menopause. This suggests that skeletal loading associated with exercise when young may provide lifelong antifracture benefits by priming the skeleton to offset the cortical bone changes associated with aging and menopause. PMID:23782938

  19. Persistent high fertility in Uganda: young people recount obstacles and enabling factors to use of contraceptives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalwadda Gorrette

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High fertility among young people aged 15-24 years is a public health concern in Uganda. Unwanted pregnancy, unsafe induced abortions and associated high morbidity and mortality among young women may be attributed to low contraceptive use. This study aims at exploring reasons for low contraceptive use among young people. Methods In 16 focus group discussions, the views of young people about obstacles and enabling factors to contraceptive use in Mityana and Mubende districts, Uganda were explored. The groups were homogeneously composed by married and unmarried men and women, between the ages of 15-24. The data obtained was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results Young men and women described multiple obstacles to contraceptive use. The obstacles were categorized as misconceptions and fears related to contraception, gender power relations, socio-cultural expectations and contradictions, short term planning, and health service barriers. Additionally, young people recounted several enabling factors that included female strategies to overcome obstacles, changing perceptions to contraceptive use, and changing attitude towards a small family size. Conclusions Our findings suggest changing perceptions and behavior shift towards contraceptive use and a small family size although obstacles still exist. Personalized strategies to young women and men are needed to motivate and assist young people plan their future families, adopt and sustain use of contraceptives. Reducing obstacles and reinforcing enabling factors through education, culturally sensitive behavior change strategies have the potential to enhance contraceptives use. Alternative models of contraceptive service delivery to young people are proposed.

  20. Utilization and discontinuation of contraceptive methods: the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital (UCTH experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Njoku CO

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contraception has an important role to play in reducing the high rate of maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Objective: The objective is to determine the prevalence rate, methods and reasons for discontinuation of contraceptive methods at UCTH, Calabar. Method: This was a retrospective study of all clients that utilised different forms of contraceptives at UCTH, Calabar from 1st January, 2009 to 31st December, 2013. Results: A total of 5,381 clients used various methods of contraception while 13,492 live births were recorded giving the prevalence rate of 39.9% of total live birth. Common methods were intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD 1,745(32.8% and injectable contraceptives 1,268(23.8%. Most clients 1,876(35.2% were graduates while 81(1.5% had no formal education. A total of 535(10.1% clients discontinued different family planning method commonly due to desire for pregnancy and side effects. IUCD had the highest discontinuation rate. Conclusion: The study revealed low prevalence rate of contraceptive use which was more among teenagers and illiterate women. The main reasons for discontinuation of different methods were desire for pregnancy, side effects and menopause. Creating more contraceptive awareness, improvement in contraceptive counselling and female education will help to improve contraceptive utilisation rate and reduce discontinuation rate.

  1. Non-use of contraception: determinants among Ugandan university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devika Mehra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Uganda, adolescent pregnancy often results in adverse maternal and neonatal health outcomes. In this context, low use of contraception and high rates of maternal mortality rate make preventing unwanted pregnancies critical. Objective: The objective was to determine the relationship between non-use of contraception and sociodemographic factors, alcohol consumption, and types of partner(s among Ugandan university students. Design: In 2010, 1,954 students at Mbarara University of Science and Technology in southwestern Uganda participated in a cross-sectional study whereby a self-administered questionnaire was used to assess sociodemographic factors, alcohol consumption, and sexual behaviour including the use of contraceptives. Multivariable logistic regression was used for the analysis and data were stratified by sex. Results: 1,179 students (60.3% of the study population reported that they were sexually active. Of these, 199 (18.6% did not use contraception in their last sexual encounter. Students currently not in a relationship had higher odds of non-use of contraception (odds ratio 1.8, 95% confidence interval 1.2–2.7. The association remained statistically significant for both males and females after controlling for age, sexual debut, area of growing up, and educational level of the household head. Socio-demographic determinants of age (22 or younger, early sexual debut (at age 16 years or earlier, and a rural background were significant for males but not for females. A synergistic effect between not currently being in a relationship and early sexual debut were also observed to have an effect on the non-use of contraception. Conclusion: Non-use of contraception among Ugandan university students differs for males and females, possibly due to gendered power relations. Sexual and reproductive health policies and programmes should be designed to take these differences into account.

  2. Arthroscopic Release of Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Sheath in Female Ballet Dancers: Dynamic Pathology, Surgical Technique, and Return to Dancing Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funasaki, Hiroki; Hayashi, Hiroteru; Sakamoto, Kanako; Tsuruga, Rei; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-12-01

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon is known as a major overuse lesion in female dancers. We describe arthroscopic surgical techniques in relation to the dynamic pathology of the disease. Crepitus and pain on moving the great toe with the ankle in plantar flexion on preoperative examination confirm the diagnosis of FHL stenosing tenosynovitis even if the os trigonum is not evident. The ankle is approached through standard posterolateral and posteromedial portals. A 4.0-mm-diameter 30° arthroscope is used. Soft tissues around the talus are cleared with a motorized shaver and a radiofrequency device. The posterior aspects of the talus, os trigonum, and FHL tendon surrounded by the tendon sheath are visualized. The dynamic pathology of the FHL tendon is well observed on passive motion of the great toe. The prominent bone fragment of the talus is removed and the tendon sheath is cut with a retrograde knife and a motorized shaver from the superior border down to the entrance of the fibro-osseous tunnel. Arthroscopic release of the FHL tendon sheath is a useful and easy method to directly approach the dynamic pathology of FHL tenosynovitis in female ballet dancers.

  3. Female pattern alopecia: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy LL

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Lauren L Levy, Jason J Emer Department of Dermatology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Hair loss is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice, with men presenting with a distinctive pattern involving hairline recession and vertex balding (Norwood-Hamilton classification and women exhibiting diffuse hair thinning over the crown (increased part width and sparing of the frontal hairline (Ludwig classification. Female pattern hair loss has a strikingly overwhelming psychological effect; thus, successful treatments are necessary. Difficulty lies in successful treatment interventions, as only two medications – minoxidil and finasteride – are approved for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia, and these medications offer mediocre results, lack of a permanent cure, and potential complications. Hair transplantation is the only current successful permanent option, and it requires surgical procedures. Several other medical options, such as antiandrogens (eg, spironolactone, oral contraceptives, cyproterone, flutamide, dutasteride, prostaglandin analogs (eg, bimatoprost, latanoprost, and ketoconazole are reported to be beneficial. Laser and light therapies have also become popular despite the lack of a profound benefit. Management of expectations is crucial, and the aim of therapy, given the current therapeutic options, is to slow or stop disease progression with contentment despite patient expectations of permanent hair regrowth. This article reviews current perspectives on therapeutic options for female pattern hair loss. Keywords: androgenetic alopecia, female pattern hair loss, minoxidil, finasteride, antiandrogens, spironolactone

  4. [Contraception and hepatogastroenterology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaud, J C; Bourliere, M

    1989-05-01

    Complications of oral contraceptives (OCs) affecting the gastrointestinal tract, liver and pancreas are rare but potentially serious. Hepatobiliary complications are by far the most frequent and varied. Hepatic lesions will probably decline in frequency as low-dose OCs replace higher dosed pills. Intrahepatic cholestasis induced by OCs resembles that of pregnancy. There may be a genetic predisposition to both conditions involving a dose-dependent estrogen effect of decreasing bile secretion. Intrahepatic cholestasis appears within 6 cycles of OC use. Symptoms include pruritus with anorexia, asthenia, vomiting, and weight loss without fever, rash or abdominal pain. Termination of OCs clears the condition without sequelae within 1-3 months, sometimes after a temporary aggravation. A moderate and asymptomatic cytolysis may appear when OC treatment is begun. Sinusoidal dilatation has been conclusively linked to OCs although few cases have been published. Clinical manifestations other than hepatomegaly are variable. Abdominal pain and fever are the most common. The condition is not related to duration of use and disappears 5-15 days after OC use is terminated. The relative risk of Budd-Chiari syndrome in OC users is estimated at 2.37. OCs increase the prevalence of hepatic adenomas as a function of duration of treatment. They are usually discovered fortuitously but may be revealed by vague abdominal pains. Hemorrhagic complications are more likely in OC users. It may be difficult to distinguish between adenomas, hepatocellular carcinoma, and focal nodular hyperplasia. A puncture biopsy guided by sonography may aid diagnosis. The natural history of adenomas is poorly understood and treatment remains controversial. OCs do not appear to increase the risk of focal nodular hyperplasia but they increase the size of the tumor and the risk of hemorrhage. OCs should be terminated because of risk of hemorrhage. Surgical resection is not indicated unless there are complication or

  5. Contraception: traditional and religious attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, J G; Rabenou, V

    1993-04-01

    Humans have tried to control fertility for centuries. Primitive, preliterate societies practiced infanticide and abortion. When primitive women understood the advantages of conception control, they tried, when possible, to use contraception. In the 4th century B.C., Plato and Aristotle advocated a one-child family. Greek medical literature reported a hollow tube inserted through the cervix into the uterus and a potion as contraceptives. Islamic physicians had much knowledge about conception control. The attitudes toward contraception. In the 5th century B.C., Saint Augustine condemned contraception, even among married couples. The condom emerged in the early modern period. Yet, they were usually worn to protect against disease, e.g., bilharzia in Egypt and syphilis in Europe. The cervical cap and the diaphragm are examples of occlusive pessaries. By 1880, contraceptives and spermicides were advertised. In 1928, the IUD joined the existing contraceptives. Today we have combined oral contraceptives. Judaic law requires husbands to fulfill their wives sexual needs, separate from their duty to procreate. It also calls men, not women, to procreate and forbids men from masturbating, thus Judaic law does not forbid women from practicing contraception. The Roman Catholic church forbids contraceptive use because it is a sin against nature. Some Protestant denominations have allowed contraceptive use. Islamic law states that children are gifts from Allah. Some Moslems believe that they must have many children, but Allah and the Prophet state that children have rights to education and future security. These rights allow couples to prevent pregnancy. Neither Hinduism nor Buddhism prohibit contraceptive use. Differences in husband-wife communication, sex roles, access to contraceptives, and traditional family values will have more of an effect on contraceptive use and fertility than theological barriers or the social class of religious groups.

  6. Present and future contraception: does discovery of targets lead to new contraceptives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2015-01-01

    Although many highly effective methods of reversible contraception are available, high rates of unintended pregnancy and abortion provide evidence that current methods do not meet the needs of all couples. In recent years, a number of highly specific targets have been identified in key pathways that regulate the development of male and female gametes. Support for development of novel approaches has moved from industry to governmental and foundation funders. Continued public funding will be needed to move promising leads into clinical trials.

  7. Adolescents and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, J S

    1991-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) options for adolescents are provides. Clarification for those desiring a birth control method is necessary and the benefits of decreased acne and dysmenorrhea with low dose OCs should be stressed along with the importance of compliance. A community effort is suggested to communicate the sexual and contraceptive alternatives, including abstinence and outercourse (sexual stimulation to orgasm without intercourse). Attention is given to concerns associated with teenage sexual activity, prevention of adolescent pregnancy, contraceptive options for the adolescent patient, adolescent attitudes toward birth control OCs, management of the adolescent OC user, manipulation of steroid components of OCs to respond to adolescent concerns, and other hormonal contraceptive options such as minipills or abstinence. The text is supplemented with tables: the % of US women by single years of age for 1971, 1976, 1979, and 1982; comparative pregnancy and abortion rates for the US and 5 other countries; federal cost for teen childbearing; adolescent nonhormonal contraceptive methods (advantages, disadvantages, and retail cost); checklist to identify those at risk for noncompliance with OCs; hormonal side effects of OCs; risks from OCs to adolescents; and benefits of OCs. Concern about adolescent pregnancy dates back to Aristotle. A modern profile shows girls form single-parent families are sexually active at an earlier age, adolescent mothers produce offspring who repeat the cycle, victims of sexual abuse are more likely to be sexually active, and teenagers in foster care are 4 times more likely to be sexually active and 8 times more likely to become pregnant. Prevention involves a multifaceted approach. OCs are the most appropriate contraceptive choice for adolescents. Frequency of intercourse is closely associated with OC use after approximately 15 months of unprotected sexual activity. At risk for noncompliance variables are scales of personality development

  8. A natural contraceptive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkie, R

    1982-07-01

    Breastfeeding is a natural contraceptive against another pregnancy. The longer the mother nurses, the longer she delays the return of fertility. A natural mechanism triggered by breastfeeding interrupted Ms. El-Hady's monthly cycle of ovulation and menstruation. Depending on how long and how often she suckles her child, this infertility, termed lactational amenorrhea, could last as long as 2 years. This traditional method of spacing births offers protection against pregnancy to more women than all other methods of contraception combined, according to family planning researchers. With growing trends away from breastfeeding, the traditional practice is losing its impact on fertility. Not many women in Egypt use modern contraceptives. There is little understanding of lactational amenorrhea, but researchers are giving it more attention as they continue to search for effective family planning methods appropriate to the needs and circumstances of the rural population. They know that the effect is only temporary and varies from woman to woman. Ms. El-Hady has been amenorrheic for 15 months, but other women experience much shorter periods of amenorrhea, and some none at all. The secretion of milk is promoted by a hormone called prolactin that the anterior pituitary gland produces in large quantities during pregnancy. The frequency and duration of breastfeeding appear to determine the length of amenorrhea, although the mother's nutrition and any other type of contraceptive used may also play a role. Each month for 2 years, Dr. Olfat Darwish, professor of nutrition at the University of Alexandria's High Institute of Public Health, has visited 260 rural mothers and 290 urban mothers to gather data on diet, breastfeeding practices, state of amenorrhea, and use of contraception. The length of the breastfeeding period was found to affect the duration of amenorrhea. Early weaning brought an earlier return of ovulation and menstruation, and thus of fertility. The nutritional

  9. Contraceptive care for the adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Elizabeth

    2006-06-01

    Despite recent improvements in rates of teen pregnancy, abortion, birth,and contraceptive use, effective contraceptive counseling for adolescents should be a high priority for the primary care provider in the office setting. Adolescent psychosocial risk screening and appropriate counseling about sexual decision-making is necessary. Contraceptive services visits include, relevant history, limited physical examination, provision of information, anticipatory guidance about sexual behaviors, and the provision of contraceptive methods. Teens should always be encouraged to use a male condom during sex to reduce STI risk. A variety of barrier and hormonal contraceptive methods are available for the adolescent population. Education about and provision of EC is effective in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy and abortion in the United States. Contraceptive care for adolescents is a rewarding experience for primary care providers.

  10. Awareness and Practice of Emergency Contraception Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    most common form is the Emergency contraceptive pill. (ECP) sometimes called ... due to their undue advantage and access to contraception education. A pre- ... contraception to adolescents would increase sexual promiscuity among them ...

  11. Blood pressure and contraceptive use

    OpenAIRE

    Khaw, Kay-Tee; Peart, W S

    1982-01-01

    In a survey of 461 women routinely attending family planning clinics those taking oral contraceptives had significantly higher mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures than those using non-hormonal contraception. There appeared to be a dose-response relation of blood pressure to the progestogen component of two oral contraceptives with an identical 30 μg ethinyloestradiol component. This supports the idea that the progestogen as well as the oestrogen component has an aetiological role in t...

  12. Smart RISUG: A potential new contraceptive and its magnetic field-mediated sperm interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhi K Jha

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Rakhi K Jha1,2, Pradeep K Jha1,3, Sujoy K Guha11School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India; 2Toxicology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, ChCS University, Meerut, UP, India; 3Department of Management studies, VIET, UP Tech. Univ., Lucknow, UP, IndiaAbstract: The rationale and technique underlying a novel concept of noninvasive fertility control by a new Cuproferrogel contraceptive drug, iron oxide–copper–styrene maleic anhydride–dimethyl sulphoxide (Fe3O4–Cu–SMA–DMSO composite named ‘Smart RISUG’ (smart reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance in presence of pulsed magnetic field (PMF; 1 mT to 800 mT is explained. It was synthesized by dispersing iron oxide particles and copper particles into SMA-DMSO (male contraceptive RISUG and characterized for particle distribution, particle size measurement and transmittance peaks, etc. Interaction of the RISUG particles as well as Smart RISUG particles with Albino rat sperm cell was studied in presence as well as absence of PMF. To find an explanation to increased reaching of the Smart RISUG drug into sperm under influence of magnetic field, the transport properties were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Smart RISUG could be mobilized into sperm cell membrane at the PMF, 760 mT in about 50 seconds. Adoption of novel drug Smart RISUG involving new technique may open the pathway for non surgical control of drug distribution, detection and restoration of the normal fertility after removal of the contraceptive from the male/female reproductive tube in presence of electromagnetic field.Keywords: smart RISUG, pulsed magnetic field, noninvasive fertility control, drug distribution, sperm cell

  13. [Sexual behavior and contraceptive practices among university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repossi, A; Araneda, J M; Bustos, L; Puente, C; Rojas, C

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the knowledge, opinions and sexual behaviour of a sample of 464 students from the Universidad Austral de Chile. Results show that 78% of male and 41% of female students have had a sexual intercourse and that 78% of males and 72% of females with an active sexual life use contraceptive methods. The principal reasons to avoid the use of these methods are the irregularity of sexual intercourse and the reduction in pleasure. Most students think that these methods are harmful for their health but they should be used. The use of contraceptive methods increase with the frequency of sexual relations and university experience, but first year students use them more frequently than second year students. Most students know several contraceptive methods, but their knowledge about mechanisms of action is inadequate or distorted. Likewise, more than 50% think that it is possible to prevent pregnancy after a sexual intercourse. It is concluded that most sexually active students use contraceptive methods, but inappropriately. Stereotypes, myths and lack of information are influencing their sexual and contraceptive practices, showing incoherence between their knowledge and behavior. A possible explanation could be a scarce influence of high school and religion on their sexual formation.

  14. Level of awareness and knowledge of emergency contraception in patients undergoing induced abortions in a rural part of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh G. Kirane

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: The huge number of patients undergoing MTP in represent increased surgical load on the government medical facilities. Majority of literate patients signifies the potential target area for contraception counselling and will be much ready to accept some form of contraception including ECPs as a backup. Only 7.2 % had ever heard of emergency contraception points to the glaring deficits in knowledge and practice of ECP despite government efforts. Government centres should promote ECP aggressively as was done in case of barriers/ CuT methods along with proper counselling. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(12.000: 4339-4341

  15. [Contraceptive compliance - why is contraceptive failure still so frequent?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzer, Johannes

    2009-02-01

    Contraceptive compliance is defined as the correct use (according to the method specific prescriptions given by a medical professional and/or in written form as patient information leaflet) of a contraceptive method. Non-compliance describes a mismatch between the real behaviour of a user and the correct or ideal behaviour. There are various indicators that in general contraceptive compliance is far from ideal. Many studies report a rate of unintended pregnancies of 50%, half of them terminating in abortion. The abortion rate remains high even in countries with availability of advanced contraceptive technology. Especially with hormonal contraception and barrier methods the gap between correct and real use is large. Discontinuation rates per year reach up to 50%. Reasons for Non Compliance are (a) Lack of motivation to prevent a pregnancy due to ambivalence regarding the wish for a child as well as sexual and relationship issues (b) Cognitive factors (False information, misconceptions, irrational fears) (c) Difficult or lacking access to contraceptive methods (d) Behavioral errors and mistakes (Forgetting, loosing etc.) and (e) Side effects of the methods used. Three strategies to improve compliance can be distinguished: (a) Improving counselling; (b) Developing contraceptive methods which demand a low level of compliant behaviour by the user; (c) Improving quality of life of users by minimizing the negative side effects and maximizing the non contraceptive health benefits.

  16. Knowledge, attitudes and practice of secondary school girls towards contraception in Limpopo Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorah U. Ramathuba

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Unplanned teenage pregnancy constitutes an important health problem, whilst contraceptive services are free throughout South Africa and the number of Termination of Pregnancy (TOP services is increasing. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of secondary school girls towards contraception in Thulamela Municipality of Limpopo Province, South Africa. A quantitative descriptive study design was used and respondents were selected by convenience sampling from a population of secondary school girls, the sample consisting of 273 girls in Grades 10–12. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data and analysed by computing frequencies and percentages using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Findings showed that respondents were aware of different contraceptive methods that can prevent pregnancy. However, most did not have knowledge of the emergency contraceptive, intra-uterine device and female condom. Pressure from male partners, fear of parental reaction to the use of contraceptives, reluctance to use contraceptives, poor contraceptive education and lack of counselling were seen as the main causes of ineffective contraceptive use and non-utilisation. Possible modalities of intervention deal with providing contraceptive counselling and care to empower these school girls to make informed choices on reproductive health. 

  17. Contraceptive Use and Associated Factors among Women Enrolling into HIV Care in Southwestern Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnie Muyindike

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Preventing unintended pregnancies among women living with HIV is an important component of prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT, yet few data exist on contraceptive use among women entering HIV care. Methods. This was a retrospective study of electronic medical records from the initial HIV clinic visits of 826 sexually active, nonpregnant, 18–49-year old women in southwestern Uganda in 2009. We examined whether contraceptive use was associated with HIV status disclosure to one’s spouse. Results. The proportion reporting use of contraception was 27.8%. The most common method used was injectable hormones (51.7%, followed by condoms (29.6%, and oral contraceptives (8.7%. In multivariable analysis, the odds of contraceptive use were significantly higher among women reporting secondary education, higher income, three or more children, and younger age. There were no significant independent associations between contraceptive use and HIV status disclosure to spouse. Discussion. Contraceptive use among HIV-positive females enrolling into HIV care in southwestern Uganda was low. Our results suggest that increased emphasis should be given to increase the contraception uptake for all women especially those with lower education and income. HIV clinics may be prime sites for contraception education and service delivery integration.

  18. Trend in the use of modern contraception in sub-Saharan Africa: Does women's education matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emina, Jacques B O; Chirwa, Tobias; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin

    2014-08-01

    Existing literature revealed positive association between women's education and modern contraceptive use in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Overall modern contraception prevalence (MCP) and proportion of women with formal education have increased in region. However, little is known about how much the change in the prevalence of modern contraceptive methods is relative to the compositional change in population and how much of the change is actually due to increases in the number of women adopting the new behavior. This study aims to (1) describe trends in modern contraception prevalence by female education; and (2) identify the source of changes in modern contraceptive use by educational attainment (changes in structure or in population behavior). This is a cross-sectional study using Demographic and Health Surveys from 27 SSA countries where at least two comparable surveys have been conducted. Overall modern contraception prevalence (MCP) has increased in SSA over the study period. The ongoing increase in the contraceptive use is due to changes in behavior consistent with the ongoing family planning promotion over the past 30 years. By contrast, an increase in the proportion of women with secondary education does not explain the change in MCP in most SSA countries. To achieve universal access to family planning, efforts in promoting female education should be complemented with economic, cultural and geographical access to MCP. Household-based sensitization, general hospitals, mobile family planning clinics, and community-based distributors of modern contraceptive methods are key strategies to improve access to modern contraceptive use. Findings from this study suggest that countries should combine social investments, including health services and education, with family planning programs using reproductive health services, mobile family planning clinics and community-based distributors of modern contraceptive methods. Therefore, governments' legislation measures that

  19. The myth about contraceptives and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibekwe, J

    1993-03-18

    Science and modern medicine accord us many advantages, e.g., contraceptive drugs, but many people still do not use them. Contraceptive drugs include oral contraceptives and injectables. OCs are very effective and are associated with minor side effects (e.g., mood changes, breast tenderness, nausea, and changes in weight, mild headache, and spotting between periods), perhaps explaining why they are one of the most often used contraceptive in essentially every country. Women who smoke; are 35 years old; or either have or have a family history of hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and use OCs are at higher risk of a cardiovascular episode. On the other hand, OCs protect against ovarian and endometrial cancers. Research does not yet confirm or disprove their effect on breast cancer development. OCs appear not to be linked to breast cancer through age 59. Yet, studies of women 45 years old suggest that OCs increases the breast cancer risk in these women who had their first menses before age 13 and used OCs for a long time before their first pregnancy. OCs may facilitate growth of breast tumors that other causes activated, and therefore, do not likely increase the overall risk. Researchers recognize the death of knowledge about breast cancer development, so they call for more research, including basic molecular, cellular, and biochemical studies. In Nigeria, breast cancer is rare, while deaths due to pregnancy and childbirth are common, indicating that OC use can prevent many female deaths. Prolonged breast feeding; later age at first menses; earlier age at menopause; earlier age at first full-term pregnancy larger families; low fat, high fiber diets; and thinness, all of which are common in developing countries, have a protective effect against breast cancer. Further, women in developing countries begin OC use later than women in developed countries.

  20. Vital signs: trends in use of long-acting reversible contraception among teens aged 15-19 years seeking contraceptive services—United States, 2005-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Lisa; Pazol, Karen; Warner, Lee; Gavin, Lorrie; Moskosky, Susan; Besera, Ghenet; Loyola Briceno, Ana Carolina; Jatlaoui, Tara; Barfield, Wanda

    2015-04-10

    Nationally, the use of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), specifically intrauterine devices (IUDs) and implants, by teens remains low, despite their effectiveness, safety, and ease of use. To examine patterns in use of LARC among females aged 15-19 years seeking contraceptive services, CDC and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Population Affairs analyzed 2005-2013 data from the Title X National Family Planning Program. Title X serves approximately 1 million teens each year and provides family planning and related preventive health services for low-income persons. Use of LARC among teens seeking contraceptive services at Title X service sites increased from 0.4% in 2005 to 7.1% in 2013 (p-value for trend contraceptive services in 2013, 17,349 (2.8%) used IUDs, and 26,347 (4.3%) used implants. Use of LARC was higher among teens aged 18-19 years (7.6%) versus 15-17 years (6.5%) (pcontraception at Title X service sites have increased use of these methods. Health centers that provide quality contraceptive services can facilitate use of LARC among teens seeking contraception. Strategies to address provider barriers to offering LARC include: 1) educating providers that LARC is safe for teens; 2) training providers on LARC insertion and a client-centered counseling approach that includes discussing the most effective contraceptive methods first; and 3) providing contraception at reduced or no cost to the client.

  1. Trends of contraception among ladies of local population in Pakistan; why, how, when and what?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, Khaula; Afsheen, Afeera; Naqvi, Syed Abid Hassan; Niazi, Saleem Asif; Ullah Khan, Habib

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze trends of use of methods of contraception along with study of impact of various demographic and social factors on contraception in Peshawar, Pakistan. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study with random purposive sampling was conducted at Combined Military Hospital Peshawar, from Mar 2015-Nov 2015. Self-designed questionnaire with demographic details and questions pertinent to contraceptive practices was utilized as study instrument. Females reporting to concerned hospital for contraceptive advice and prescription were distributed with questionnaire and written informed consent form. Formal approval was taken from ethical committee of hospital. Data was analyzed via descriptive analysis (SPSS-21), qualitative data was expressed as frequencies and percentages; quantitative as mean±standard deviation (SD). Main outcome variable i-e contraceptive device used; was cross-tabulated with independent variables. Results: Response rate was 53.2% (n-426). Usage of contraceptive device was as follows; 51.2% Nil, 9.4% barriers, 22.3% oral/injectable hormones, 13.4% IUCDs, 3.8% sterilization. There was a strong relationship between type of contraceptives used and age (p<0.001), client’s education (p<0.001), husband’s education (p<0.001), number of children (p<0.001), religion (p0.013), socioeconomic class (p<0.001), and religious beliefs about use of contraceptives (p<0.001). More Muslims considered contraception irreligious than non-Muslims (p 0.02). There was no significant impact of husbands’ pressure to not to use contraceptives on type of contraception practised (p 0.114). Conclusion: Contraceptive devices are under-utilized in the study participants. Multidisciplinary approach should be applied to enhance client education, awareness and counseling to utilize these devices more appropriately and regularly. PMID:27375727

  2. Dangerous triplet: Polycystic ovary syndrome, oral contraceptives and Kounis syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nurdan; Erol; Aysu; Turkmen; Karaagac; Nicholas; G; Kounis

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is characterized by ovulatory dysfunction, androgen excess and polycystic ovaries and is associated with hypertension, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular events. Oral contraceptives constitute first-line treatment, particularly when symptomatic hyperandrogenism is present. However, these drugs are associated with cardiovascular events and hypersensitivity reactions that pose problem in differential diagnosis and therapy. We present a 14 year-old female with polycystic ovary syndrome taking oral contraceptive and suffering from recurrent coronary ischemic attacks with increased eosinophils, and troponin levels suggesting Kounis syndrome.

  3. IMAP statement on contraceptive efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Unwanted pregnancy may have serious negative effects upon the health and well-being of individuals and families. The use of effective contraception is therefore important. Efficacy, however, is not the only factor considered by clients when choosing a contraceptive method, so counsellors and service providers should not promote methods on the sole basis of their efficacy, irrespective of client preference. With regard to method efficacy, important considerations which may affect the choice of a method are the availability of emergency contraception and access to safe abortion services in the event of method failure. Biological factors such as age, parity, and whether a woman is breast feeding may affect contraceptive efficacy and should be a consideration when choosing a method. Contraceptive efficacy is usually measured in terms of failure rates calculated from the number of pregnancies which occur during a specified period of contraceptive use. Method failure is that attributable to the method, while user failure is that attributable to incorrect use of the method in addition to method failure. The failure rates for specific methods of contraception reported in the literature vary, sometimes substantially. The article briefly considers the measurement of efficacy and human factors affecting contraceptive efficacy with regard to clients, providers, and managers.

  4. Expanding contraceptive options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    The goals of Family Health International (FHI) have been to introduce a variety of birth control options to people in developing countries, and to provide information to the user on the advantages and disadvantages of each method. FHI has worked with many developing countries in clinical trials of established as well as new contraceptive methods. These trials played an important part in making 2 sterilization procedures, laparoscopy and minilaparotomy popular for women. Further research improved the methods and have made them the most popular in the world, chosen by 130 million users. FHI is doing clinical trials on a new IUD, that is a copper bearing T-shaped device called the TCu380A. they have collected data on over 10,000 women using IUD's and early analysis indicates TCu380A is more effective than others. FHI is also evaluating devices such as Norplant that will prevent pregnancy up to 5 years by implanting the capsules in the arm. More than 8,000 women are being tested to determine the acceptability of implants in different geographical locations. Other research groups are doing work in 10 additional countries: Bangladesh will expand its program to 24,000 women and Nepal to 8,000 women. Trials are also being conducted on progestogen pills, since they do not lesson the volume of milk in breast feeding. FHI has also worked to introduce creative community-based distribution channels. In one case, specially trained health workers delivered contraceptives door-to-door in over 150,000 households. They found that 2 of 3 women accepted the pills and in a follow up survey 90% were still using them. FHI is now focusing on ways to improve moving new contraceptives from clinical testing on everyday use. They will coordinate training programs, educational material, media campaigns, and efforts with other international organizations, government agencies, and family planning groups.

  5. Vaginal contraceptives still evolving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, R M

    1986-01-01

    The effort to develop vaginal contraceptives began in the distant past and is still underway today. 1000 years ago, South American Indians inserted into the vagina bark strips impregnated with quinine. In medieval times women used vaginal inserts of cloth soaked in honey or vinegar. Quinine pessaries were introduced into Europe in the late 1800s, and in the early 1900s investigators began to study the effects of various chemicals on sperm motility. Following World War II, surfactant spermicides which disrupt the sperm membrane were developed and marketed. Many of these preparations contained nonoxynol-9. Currently, the D-isomer of propranolol is being examined as a spermicidal contraceptive, and several bacteriocides, e.g., benzalkonium and chlorhexidine, are being developed as spermicides which reduce the penetrability of cervical mucus. Other chemicals being investigated act by inhibiting the acrosome reaction. Advantages of vaginal contraceptives are that they are inexpensive, reversible, and relatively safe and easy to use. Generally they require no medical intervention or supervision. In addition, spermicides may kill or inhibit the growth of organisms responsible for sexually transmitted diseases. Disadvantages of spermicides are that they are generally less effective than many other methods, some interfere with sexual spontaneity, they may cause local irritations, and some women find them messy to use. Recently, concerns were expressed about the possible teratogenic effects of sperimicides. Most of these concerns proved to be unfounded. Given the many new avenues of research, the major disadvantage of sperimicides, i.e., their high failure rates, may be minimized in the near future.

  6. Gestodene-containing contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, H; Jung-Hoffmann, C; Wiegratz, I

    1995-12-01

    As GSD is the most potent progestogen used in oral contraceptives, the doses of GSD can be lower than those of other progestogen components. The monophasic (30 micrograms EE + 75 micrograms GSD) and the triphasic formulation (30 micrograms EE + 50 micrograms GSD/40 micrograms EE + 70 micrograms GSD/30 micrograms EE + 100 micrograms GSD) suppress gonadotropin release and ovarian function profoundly and inhibit ovulation reliably. The strong anti-estrogenic and progestogenic effectiveness of GSD is based on the high GSD serum concentrations achieved during daily intake. Because of the weak androgenic properties of GSD, both formulations can be characterized as estrogen-dominant with respect to their hepatic effects. Except for the first cycles, both formulations afford good cycle control, and the rate of side effects is similar to that with comparable low-dose oral contraceptives. The levels of total and free androgens and androgen precursors, as well as of peripheral androgen activity, are significantly reduced, resulting in a reduced incidence of acne. The concentrations of SHBG and other serum-binding globulins are elevated considerably, and thyroid function is almost unaffected. The estrogen-dominant effect on hepatic metabolism of both formulations also is reflected by a significant increase in the levels of triglycerides and VLDL, HDL, and some apolipoproteins, while LDL-CH and total CH remain unchanged. Similar to other low-dose oral contraceptives, the GSD-containing preparations cause a slight impairment of glucose tolerance that does not appear to be of clinical relevance. However, a significant increase exists in pro-coagulatory and fibrinolytic activity that leads to a considerable stimulation of fibrin turnover. In predisposed women, this may contribute to an elevated risk of venous and arterial thromboembolic diseases.

  7. Potencies of oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgren, R A; Sturtevant, F M

    1976-08-15

    Oral contraceptives are combinations of estrogens and progestogens or, in the case of the mini-pills, progestogens alone. With specific test procedures in laboratory animals or human subjects, it is possible to assign potency evaluations to the components relative to the progestational, estrogenic, or antiestrogenic activities of the progestogen or to the estrogenic potencies of the estrogenic component. It might even be possible to quantify the synergistic effects of the estrogen on the progestational agent. Unfortunately, however, it is impossible now to amalgamate such assay results into single estimates of the potencies of the combinations (either the combination products per se or the combination tablets of sequential products). For example, an over-all estrogenic potency of a combination preparation would involve the integration of contributions form the estrogen itself plus the estrogenic products of metabolism of the progestogen minus the antagonistic effect of the progestational agent, if any. These factors cannot now be quantified independently, much less merged into a single figure of clinical significance. Further, even if it were possible to produce such an estimate, it is unlikely that the evaluation would be meaningful in relation to any putative side effect or adverse reaction, i.e., the alleged thrombogenic effects of oral contraceptives cannot currently be related directly to any measure of potency that will allow prediction of these clinical conditions from laboratory models. Any evaluation of the potential of a given contraceptive to produce a specific side effect will depend upon data generated with specific regard to that adverse reaction and the individual product in question.

  8. Emergency contraception: different bioethical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergency contraceptives, in this case post-morning pills, are contraceptive methods used to avoid an unwanted pregnancy after an unprotected sexual intercourse. Their use is feeding a strong ethical debate between subjects for and against their prescription and leading some health professionals to conscientious objection. Among people contrary to prescription some oppose to it because of a general refuse of all contraceptive methods, others considering post-morning pills as abortive. Among people supporting prescription, some consider emergency contraception necessary to assure fundamental women’s rights, in particular the right to sexual auto-determination, while others prescribe emergency contraception only to avoid a greater demand for abortion. It is up to the Italian National Health Service warranting a correct balance between the two opposite positions, that can protect women’s right of access to health services.

  9. [Abortion or contraception (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, A; Edelman, D A

    1980-01-01

    The period immediately following an abortion, spontaneous or induced, has been considered favourable to the initiation of high efficicy contraception: sterilization, oral contraceptives, or intrauterine devices. The rate of post-abortal complications associated with these contraceptive methods was evaluated using data drawn from published and unpublished studies. The following conclusions were reached: sterilization is advisable only for women who do not desire additional children, and is obviously not recommended for young nulliparous women. The effective use of oral contraceptives requires a high motivational level and is therefore advisable only in cases where such motivation exists. The insertion of an intrauterine device seems to be the most adequate contraceptive method for women with low motivational level.

  10. [Morality and contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakwaya, D

    1988-08-01

    The conflict of morality and natural law come into focus when contraception and procreation are examined despite the religious pronouncements of Charles de Koninck. Man, having mastered nature, confronts interminable new problems in the pursuit of physical, economic, moral, and material happiness. The population explosion in Rwanda make it indispensable that the prevention of undesired pregnancy is the right of a man and a women choosing the appropriate method. Man's morality allows the violation of natural law in order to pursue one's own goal of survival using counterbalancing means whenever under- or overpopulation may threaten its existence or portend extinction. Natural law could be the guiding principle in man's moral development.

  11. Adolescent pregnancy and contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, Jessica; Hayon, Ronni; Carlson, Jensena

    2014-09-01

    7% of US teen women became pregnant in 2008, totaling 750,000 pregnancies nationwide. For women ages 15 to 19, 82% of pregnancies are unintended. Adolescents have a disproportionate risk of medical complications in pregnancy. Furthermore, adolescent parents and their infants both tend to suffer poor psychosocial outcomes. Preventing unintended and adolescent pregnancies are key public health objectives for Healthy People 2020. Screening for sexual activity and pregnancy risk should be a routine part of all adolescent visits. Proven reductions in unintended pregnancy in teens are attained by providing access to contraception at no cost and promoting the most-effective methods.

  12. 'Without a plan' but 'keeping on track': views on contraception, pregnancy and abortion in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Fatima; Bayer, Angela M

    2011-01-01

    Despite increased use of modern contraception among Mexican women, there has been a significant increase in abortions. Little is known about the experiences behind these trends. This study examines decision-making around contraception, pregnancy, childbearing and abortion. We carried out 26 in-depth interviews with 23- to 35-year-old females and males in Mexico City. Interviewees described reproductive planning 'without a plan' and sporadic contraceptive use. Linking of reproductive preferences and contraceptive use occurred only after raising a child for a few years or after experiencing an abortion. Interviewees described side effects of hormonal contraceptives and the intrauterine device (IUD) and problems with condoms. Only 8% of participants disagreed with abortion completely. Those with mixed views opposed abortion for pregnancies resulting from lack of responsibility or due to personal problems or concerns about one's future. However, these more controversial reasons were the primary motivations for terminating pregnancies. Females and males expressed that females made most decisions related to contraception, pregnancy and abortion. Further research could explore the reasons behind reproductive planning 'without a plan', 'on and off' contraceptive use and abortion beliefs and experiences that are somewhat contradictory.

  13. The influence of partnership on contraceptive use among HIV-infected women accessing antiretroviral therapy in rural Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, Christina I.; Kaida, Angela; Seage, George R.; Kabakyenga, Jerome; Muyindike, Winnie; Boum, Yap; Mocello, A. Rain; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Hunt, Peter W.; Haberer, Jessica E.; Bangsberg, David R.; Matthews, Lynn T

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine individual and dyadic factors associated with effective contraceptive use among HIV-infected women accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART) in rural Uganda. Study Design HIV-infected women enrolled in the Uganda AIDS Rural Treatment Outcomes cohort completed questionnaires (detailing socio-behavioral characteristics, sexual and reproductive history, contraceptive use, fertility desires), and phlebotomy (October 2011–March 2013). We describe prevalence of effective contraceptive use (i.e., consistent condom use, and/or oral contraceptives, injectable hormonal contraception, intrauterine device, female sterilization) in the previous six months among sexually active, non-pregnant women (18–40 years). We assessed covariates of contraceptive use using multivariable logistic regression. Results 362 women (median values: age 30 years, CD4 count 397 cells/mm3, 4.0 years since ART initiation) were included. Among 284 sexually active women, 50% did not desire a(nother) child and 51% had a sero-concordant partner. 45% (n=127) reported effective contraceptive use of whom, 57% (n=72) used condoms, 42% (n=53) injectables, 12% (n=15) oral contraceptives, and 11% (n=14) other effective methods. Dual contraception was reported by 6% (n=8). Only ‘partnership fertility desire’ was independently associated with contraceptive use; women who reported neither partner desired a child had significantly increased odds of contraceptive use (aOR: 2.40, 95% CI: 1.07–5.35) compared with women in partnerships where at least one partner desired a child. Conclusions Less than half of sexually active HIV-infected women accessing ART used effective contraception, of which 44% (n=56) relied exclusively on male condoms, highlighting a continued need to expand access to a wider range of longer acting female-controlled contraceptive methods. Association with partnership fertility desire underscores the need to include men in reproductive health programming. PMID:25983013

  14. Contraceptive behavior in adolescence: a decision-making perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogel, M J; Zuehlke, M E; Petersen, A C; Tobin-richards, M; Shelton, M

    1980-12-01

    Preliminary results of a study of contraceptive behavior among 120 adolescent female clients of 3 clinics at the Michael Reese Hospital and Medical Center in the U. S. were presented. The average age of the respondents was 16.6. 65.5% lived in families supported by welfare and 95% lived in single parent households. 83% were sexually active but the level of sexual activity was low. Most had positive attitudes toward sex and stable relationships with their boyfriends. 75% of the girls were either currently pregnant or were pregnant in the past. 44% became pregnant within 1 year of their 1st intercourse. Among all respondents 33% reported never using a contraceptive and 34% said they always used a contraceptive. 59.6% of the currently pregnant girls reported never using a contraceptive. Major reasons for not using a contraceptive were that they just decided to take a chance, that they were fearful of the side effects of contraceptives, and that they didn't expect to get pregnant. From a cost/benefit point of view the girls tended to feel that the safety risk involved in using the pill outweighed the risks associated with pregnancy. The adolescents had little knowledge of alternative methods of contraception. Most of the currently pregnant respondents felt considerable social pressure to keep their babies. Overall the respondents scored moderately high on self-esteem and reported that they had good relationships with their families. Most planned to complete high school and many planned to get further training. The majority viewed themselves as relatively independent and as active problem solvers. Data on attitudes toward abortion was also provided. Study findings will be used to develop an intervention program.

  15. Patterns of contraceptive use among Mexican-origin women

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kari L.; Potter, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mexican women in the United States (US) have higher rates of fertility compared to other ethnic groups and women in Mexico. Whether variation in women’s access to family planning services or patterns of contraceptive use contributes to this higher fertility has received little attention. OBJECTIVE We explore Mexican women’s contraceptive use, taking into account women’s place in the reproductive life course. METHODS Using nationally representative samples from the US (National Survey of Family Growth) and Mexico (Encuesta National de la Dinámica Demográfica), we compared the parity-specific frequency of contraceptive use and fertility intentions for non-migrant women, foreign-born Mexicans in the US, US-born Mexicans, and whites. RESULTS Mexican women in the US were less likely to use IUDs and more likely to use hormonal contraception than women in Mexico. Female sterilization was the most common method among higher parity women in both the US and Mexico, however, foreign-born Mexicans were less likely to be sterilized, and the least likely to use any permanent contraceptive method. Although foreign-born Mexicans were slightly less likely to report that they did not want more children, differences in method use remained after controlling for women’s fertility intentions. CONCLUSION At all parities, foreign-born Mexicans used less effective methods. These findings suggest that varying access to family planning services may contribute to variation in women’s contraceptive use. COMMENTS Future studies are needed to clarify the extent to which disparities in fertility result from differences in contraceptive access. PMID:26146485

  16. Knowledge, attitude and practice of contraception in rural kashmir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Humera; Khan, Parwez Sajad; Imtiyaz, Bhat; Hayat, Gazala; Hayat, Rehana

    2013-12-01

    Human fertility is determined by many factors such as customs, morals and habits of social groups with regard to marital obligation of life. Acceptance of family planning methods varies within and between societies and there are many factors which are responsible for such variation at community, family and individual level. Socioeconomic environment, culture and education are few of them that play a vital role. Jammu and Kashmir state in general and Kashmir valley in particular is a Muslim-dominated population with traditionally a conservative society. Apart from family customs and influence of the elders, religious background has always been behind the passive resistance, or at the best indifference towards contraception. This study makes an attempt to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of contraception in rural Kashmir. To assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of contraception in rural Kashmir. Community-based Cross-Sectional study. December 2006 to May 2008. 1900 currently married women in the age group of 15-49 years of age. Rural households. 1900 currently married women, aged 15-49 years, selected by multi-stage random sampling technique from three districts of Kashmir valley who were interviewed at home using a pretested oral questionnaire. The assessment of various socioeconomic and other variables made as per the available standard procedures and scales. Percentage, Chi square test and Bivariate analysis. Knowledge of the contraceptive methods was fairly good especially for terminal methods i.e. female sterilization (97.7 %). Main source of information on contraception was obtained from mass media (60.4 %). Contraceptive practice was significantly related to number of living children, literacy, socioeconomic status and type of family. What is needed is to promote and stress contraceptive methods and their advantages using mass media approach and to explore more and more participation of private sector.

  17. Levonorgestrel, not etonogestrel, provides contraception in free-ranging koalas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, E F; Handasyde, K A; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2010-01-01

    Management of high-density koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) populations is essential because of the browsing damage they inflict on their habitat. We have tested two types of gestagen implant, namely levonorgestrel and etonogestrel, as contraceptives for koalas. Free-ranging female koalas were given either a control, levonorgestrel (70 mg) or etonogestrel (34 or 68 mg) implant before the breeding season. Koalas were monitored every 4-12 weeks for births. Plasma progesterone was measured and a cytological smear of the urogenital sinus was taken. Fertility was high in the control group and the two etonogestrel-treated groups, with approximately 90% of females giving birth. In contrast, no levonorgestrel-treated female produced young during the study. Removal of levonorgestrel implants from six females reversed the contraceptive effect in the next breeding season, whereas the eight females in which the levonorgestrel implants were left in remained infertile for six breeding seasons. Vaginal cytology showed evidence of oestrous cycles during the breeding season in all females from all groups and there was no difference seen in the prevalence of cornified epithelial cells in the oestrous smears. This indirectly suggests that levonorgestrel does not prevent follicular development and oestrous cycling. Plasma progesterone in levonorgestrel-treated females remained low all year, but rose in controls concurrent with the onset of the breeding season. This suggests that levonorgestrel prevents pregnancy by blocking ovulation. Etonogestrel had absolutely no contraceptive effect at the two doses delivered and so is not suitable for controlling koala populations. In contrast, levonorgestrel was effective as a long-term, reversible contraceptive in wild koalas.

  18. Sexual and Contraceptive Behaviors among Adolescents Requesting Emergency Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwiak, Carrie; Howard, Brandon; Hsieh, Jennifer; Ricciotti, Nancy; Sucato, Gina S

    2016-12-01

    Unintended pregnancy rates in the United States remain high among adolescents. Emergency contraception (EC) provides the only option for pregnancy prevention after unprotected sex. To better define the population of adolescents who request and use EC pills, we performed a post hoc analysis of an over-the-counter simulation study of EC pills. Teen reproductive health clinics in 5 cities. Adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17 years who requested EC. Single-tablet levonorgestrel 1.5 mg. We calculated the correlations between age and baseline sexual and contraceptive behaviors. χ(2) Tests were used to compare behaviors of first-time and repeat EC users. Overall, the most commonly reported contraceptive methods ever used were condoms, oral contraceptives, none, and withdrawal; the most common method ever used in each age group was no method for 13- to 14-year-olds and condom for 15-, 16-, and 17-year-olds. The percentage of participants who had never used contraception before requesting EC decreased with age (53% [20/28] of 13- to 14-year-olds vs 15% [10/65] of 17-year-olds). First-time EC users were more likely to report no previous contraceptive use compared with repeat EC users (42% [88/208] vs 10% [13/135]; P < .001). Regardless of age, the most commonly reported reason for requesting EC was nonuse of any contraceptive method (ie, "unprotected sex"). Adolescents who requested EC most commonly reported ever-use of contraceptive methods that rely on user adherence or no method at all, with younger adolescents more likely than older adolescents to have used no previous method. The provision of EC presents an opportunity to provide education and access to highly effective, long-term contraceptive methods. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Oral contraception in Denmark 1998-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Nadia M; Laursen, Maja; Lidegaard, Øjvind

    2012-01-01

    Oral contraceptives (OC) are the most popular contraception in Denmark. Overall figures on use are well described, but more detailed use patterns according to type and age need to be updated.......Oral contraceptives (OC) are the most popular contraception in Denmark. Overall figures on use are well described, but more detailed use patterns according to type and age need to be updated....

  20. Abortion and contraceptive failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Persona, marketed by Unipath, is a new method of natural family planning which has been on the market since 1996. It works by measuring the hormone levels in a woman's urine and letting her know when she is not fertile and may have sex without using a barrier method of contraception. The British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS) found that their surveyed clients who reported using Persona had 188 abortions in 3 months and concluded that there was a need for better information and more advice for couples who plan to use the method. The other major non-NHS abortion provider, Marie Stopes International, reported similar findings, with about 60 women per month visiting their clinics for abortions after having used the method. The BPAS survey also showed that 43% of the women who had an abortion after using Persona were aged 24 years or younger even though Persona is intended for use by women aged 25-40 years in stable relationships. A similar proportion also reported having sex on days when the method told them that they were most fertile. These latter women were not asked if they used another method of contraception on fertile days. An additional 13% reported ignoring the instructions to wait for 3 natural periods after terminating pill use before beginning to use Persona.

  1. Contraception in Obese Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merki Feld G

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Today obesity is an epidemic. Within Europe the prevalence of obesity is 20–30% with a tendency to increase further. Obesity is associated with severe complications like diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE and metabolic syndrome. Especially availability of efficient methods which do not further enhance the cardiovascular and thromboembolic risk in obese women is an important point. Using contraception to prevent unwanted pregnancies is recommended to all women whatever their weight, as it reduces the risks of unplanned pregnancy, which is higher in women with overweight. Progestin-only contraceptives and IUDs have no or minimal metabolic effects and are first choices options, also it has to be taken in account that oral progestins and the implant might have lower efficacy in very obese women. CHC are associated with a higher risk for VTE in obese women,but should be used if other methods are not acceptable. A long-cycle or use of preparations with 30 mcg EE can contribute to improve efficacy.

  2. Steroidal contraceptive vaginal rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, N N

    2003-06-01

    The development of steroid-releasing vaginal rings over the past three decades is reviewed to illustrate the role of this device as an effective hormonal contraceptive for women. Vaginal rings are made of polysiloxane rubber or ethylene-vinyl-acetate copolymer with an outer diameter of 54-60 mm and a cross-sectional diameter of 4-9.5 mm and contain progestogen only or a combination of progestogen and oestrogen. The soft flexible combined ring is inserted in the vagina for three weeks and removed for seven days to allow withdrawal bleeding. Progesterone/progestogen-only rings are kept in for varying periods and replaced without a ring-free period. Rings are in various stages of research and development but a few, such as NuvaRing, have reached the market in some countries. Women find this method easy to use, effective, well tolerated and acceptable with no serious side-effects. Though the contraceptive efficacy of these vaginal rings is high, acceptability is yet to be established.

  3. The Mystique of First Intercourse among College Youth: The Role of Partners, Contraceptive Practices, and Psychological Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Carol Anderson; And Others

    1992-01-01

    First sexual intercourse of 94 male and 114 female college undergraduates was studied as it relates to gender differences in sexual behaviors, partner's role, contraceptive use, and sexual guilt and satisfaction. Sexual intercourse initiation is often characterized by contraceptive nonuse, pressure to become sexually involved, guilt, and sexual…

  4. Birth Control Conspiracy Beliefs, Perceived Discrimination, and Contraception among African Americans: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorburn Bird, Sheryl; Bogart, Laura M

    2003-03-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional telephone survey to explore the relationship of birth control conspiracy beliefs and perceived discrimination to contraceptive attitudes and behavior among a sample of African Americans (aged 18-45) in the USA (N = 71). Results indicated that a large percentage of respondents perceived discrimination targeted at African American women and endorsed birth control conspiracy beliefs, and that a significant proportion of female respondents perceived discrimination when getting family planning or contraceptive services. Stronger conspiracy beliefs and greater perceived discrimination were associated with negative attitudes toward contraceptive methods, particularly birth control pills, and with contraceptive behavior and intentions. Our findings suggest that conspiracy beliefs and perceived discrimination may play an important role in African Americans' attitudes toward and use of contraceptive methods.

  5. New and emerging contraceptive options: a focus on transdermal contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Böttcher B

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bettina Böttcher, Ludwig WildtDepartment of Gynecologic Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, AustriaAbstract: Transdermal contraception is a convenient way of hormonal contraception that allows weekly application of a patch for 3 consecutive weeks followed by a patch-free week. Efficacy, side effects, advantages, and disadvantages as well as patient satisfaction with this formulation are discussed in this short review. The first patch, introduced in 2002, contained ethinylestradiol and norelgestromin. Recently, a new patch containing gestodene as the gestagen component has been developed. Early data for this formulation are presented.Keywords: transdermal contraception, skin patch

  6. The vaginal contraceptive sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, D A

    1984-06-01

    The vaginal contraceptive sponge, approved on April 1, 1983 by the US Food Administration (FDA) for sale in the US as a single use, disposable, over-the-counter contraceptive, is made of polyurethane and designed to be biocompatible with the vaginal environment. The sponge is available in a single size, is round, and about 5.5 cm in diameter and 2.5 cm thick. An indentation on 1 side helps to ensure the sponge's correct placement against the cervix. A polyester retrieval loop attached to the sponge facilitates removal. Postcoital tests of the sponge without the spermicide indicated that it was ineffective in preventing sperm from entering the cervical canal. Before insertion, the contraceptive sponge is moistened with tap water to activate the spermicide and is inserted into the vagina with the indentation placed against the cervis. The sponge has been designed to provide continuous protection against pregnancy for at least 24 hours after insertion. Following a successful phase ii clinical trail of the sponge, in 1979 comparative phase iii clinical trials were initiated by Family Health International. The following trials were conducted: sponge versus the diaphragm (arcing-spring) used with a spermicide (nonoxynol-9) at 13 clinics in the US (1439 subjects) and at 2 clinics in Canada and the UK (502 subjects); sponge versus a foaming spermicidal (menfegol) suppository at 5 clinics in Yugoslavia, Taiwan, and Bangladesh (1386) subjects); and sponge versus spermicidal (nonoxynol-9) foam at 2 clinics in Israel and Thailand (366 subjects). In all trials the contraceptive methods were raondomly assigned. Clinics were required to follow up subjects for 1 year. Only the US study has been completed. In the comparative trials of the sponge and diaphragm (both US based and overseas) the pregnancy rates were significantly higher for the sponge. In the comparative trials of the sponge and foaming suppositories or spermicidal foam there were no significant differences between the

  7. Contraception: a questionnaire on knowledge and attitude of adolescents, distributed on Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Lies; Storms, Machteld; Peremans, Lieve; Van Royen, Kathleen; Verhoeven, Veronique

    2016-11-01

    The contraceptive pill is widely used. An accurate knowledge is necessary for correct use. This study sheds light on adolescents' knowledge, attitude and behavior in regard to contraceptive use, in the year 2014. The goal is to provide general practitioners (GP) with information about the potential gaps in knowledge concerning contraceptive use in order to give better counseling and prevent high-risk behavior in adolescents. A quantitative descriptive study was carried out among 14-25-year-old female and male adolescents. Data were collected through a web-based survey using the online survey software Qualtrics (Qualtrics, Provo, UT, USA) and was distributed via the social networking site Facebook. The survey was started by 1185 participants. The most popular contraceptive method among females is the oral contraceptive pill (63.7%). Four out of ten females (42.6%) do not know that when using an emergency pill, they must still take their regular contraceptive pill on the same day. The majority of female respondents (80.0%) go to their general practitioner for a prescription for the pill. Ninety-five percent (95.1%) of the females would feel comfortable asking their GP for extra information about the drug. The sex of the GP does not influence the likelihood of female patients seeking more information. The Internet also seems to serve as an important source of information. We defined a female subgroup, called "vulnerable". The majority of females in the non-vulnerable group (70.4%) protected themselves before their first sexual contact instead of only half of the members in the vulnerable group (51.0%). The level of knowledge among adolescents about contraception is not alarming, but there are a few blind spots. Eliminating these gaps should be the aim of the doctor and pharmacologist.

  8. THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE NIŠ UNIVERSITY STUDENTS ABOUT EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Veljković

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Emergency contraception is a treatment that used as an emergency procedure to prevent unwanted pregnancy after an unprotected sexual intercourse or contraception failure regardless of the point in the menstrual cycle. The most common method is the treatment with sexual steroids and the second-line form is the copper intrauterine device. A considerable number of female students of Nis were informed about the existence of emergency contraception. Younger generations (I/II years of sudy were better informed than older generations (III/IV years of study: 81.6% vs. 57.5%. The difference was statistically significant (χ2 =7.91;p<0.005. The students of medicine were better informed than the students of art and science: 87.9% vs. 78.2% vs. 70.0% but there was not statistical difference. It is expected that adequate usage of emergency contraception will significantly reduce the number of unwanted pregnancies. It is only emergency treatment and is not a substitution for regular contraception. Students are very important in the population of youth and it is expected that they could be optimally informed about this method of fertility control.

  9. Associations between religiosity and sexual and contraceptive behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, M. A.; Sheftel, A. V.; Chiappetta, L.; Young, A. J.; Zuckoff, A.; DiClemente, C. C.; Primack, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objective To determine associations between religiosity and female adolescents' sexual and contraceptive behaviors. Design We conducted a secondary analysis on data from a randomized controlled trial comparing interventions designed to prevent pregnancy and STDs. Multivariable modeling assessed the association between a religiosity index consisting of items related to religious behaviors and impact of religious beliefs on decisions and sexual outcomes. Participants 572 female adolescents aged 13 to 21, recruited via a hospital-based adolescent clinic and community-wide advertisements. Main Outcome Measures Sexual experience, pregnancy, STDs, number of lifetime partners, frequency of sexual activity, previous contraceptive use, and planned contraceptive use. Results Mean participant age was 17.4±2.2 years and 68% had been sexually active. Most (74.1%) had a religious affiliation and over half (52.8%) reported that their religious beliefs impact their decision to have sex at least “somewhat.” Multivariate analyses showed that, compared with those with low religiosity, those with high religiosity were less likely to have had sexual intercourse (OR=0.23, 95% CI=0.14, 0.39). Among sexually active participants, those with high religiosity were less likely to have been pregnant (OR=0.46, 95% CI=0.22, 0.97), to have had an STD (OR=0.42, 95% CI=0.22, 0.81), or to have had multiple (≥4) lifetime partners (OR=0.38, 95% CI=0.21, 0.68) compared to those with low religiosity. Levels of religiosity were not significantly associated with frequency of intercourse, contraception use at last intercourse, or planned contraceptive use. Conclusion In this cohort, religiosity appeared to be a protective factor rather than a risk factor with regard to sexual behavior and was not associated with contraception use. PMID:20493738

  10. Contraception-related venous thromboembolism in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Sarah H

    2014-02-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a rare but serious complication of combined hormonal contraception. While the absolute risk of VTE is low in adolescents, thrombotic events in contraception users younger than the age of 20 years account for 5 to 10% of total contraception-related VTE events in population studies, because of the high frequency of contraception use in adolescents. An increased risk of VTE exists not only with oral contraceptives, but also the contraceptive patch and vaginal ring. Most adolescents who experience contraception-related VTE have additional transient or inherited thrombotic risk factors at the time of VTE. Although the presence of inherited thrombophilia impacts the risk of contraception-related VTE, thrombophilia screening before contraception prescribing should be targeted only to high-risk populations. Pediatric institutions, caregivers, and young women need to be aware of the risk of VTE with estrogen-containing contraception, and maintain a high index of suspicion for this complication in women using these agents.

  11. Conhecimento, consumo e acesso à contracepção de emergência entre mulheres universitárias no sul do Estado de Santa Catarina Awareness, consumption and access to emergency contraception among female university students in the south of the State of Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Modolon Alano

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A contracepção de emergência tem sido utilizada na prevenção da gravidez não planejada. Este estudo objetivou investigar o conhecimento, o consumo e o acesso desse método entre mulheres universitárias do Sul do Estado de Santa Catarina. Trata-se de estudo observacional, transversal, aplicando-se formulário de setembro a outubro de 2008. Participaram 360 mulheres entre 18 e 45 anos, a maioria da classe econômica B2 ou superior (74,2%, onde 79,4% já haviam mantido relação sexual. Destas, 48,6% haviam utilizado a contracepção de emergência, sendo mais frequente quanto menor a idade. O método foi usado em média 2,4 vezes e 87,1% administraram-no até 24 horas após a relação sexual. Foram referidas reações adversas por 20,9% das usuárias, sendo as mais comuns, alterações menstruais (44,8% e náuseas (44,8%. Os principais motivos para o uso do método foram: não uso do preservativo (44,6% e rompimento do mesmo (39,6%. Das entrevistadas, 15,0% não souberam responder ou responderam de modo errado à questão sobre a não prevenção de Doença Sexualmente Transmissível pelo método e 97,8% negaram ter alterado o método utilizado rotineiramente. Apenas 2,9% das mulheres adquiriram o medicamento mediante prescrição médica e 35,3% receberam orientações no momento da compra.The scope of this study was to investigate knowledge about and access to emergency contraception among female university students in the south of the State of Santa Catarina. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted between September and October 2008, in which a questionnaire was given to 360 women aged 18 to 45 years. Most belonged to the B2 economic class or higher (74.2% and 79.4% of them had already had intercourse. Of these, 48.6% had used emergency contraception, though this was more frequent among younger women. Emergency contraception was used 2.4 times, and 87.1% had used contraceptive methods within 24 hours after intercourse

  12. AWARENESS ABOUT EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTIVE PILLS VERSUS CONVENTIONAL CONTRACEPTIVE METHODS AMONG MOTHERS ATTENDING MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH (MCH CLINIC, BAPUJI HOSPITAL, DAVANGERE, KARNATAKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Unwanted pregnancies are a major public health problem for both developing and developed nations, which generally results from ineffective use of contraceptives and end up in induced abortions. Emergency contraception sometimes called “morning after”, “postcoital” or “second chance pills” can be used to prevent pregnancy after an unprotected sex. Attention has been focused on the potential for emergency contraception to reduce the number of unwanted pregnancies and thus abortion rate. OBJECTIVES: 1 . To compare the awareness about emergency contraceptive pills and conventional contraceptive methods among mothers attending MCH clinic, Bapuji Hospital, Davangere. 2. To study the socio - demographic profile of the above group. METHODS: A pre - tested, semi - structured questionnaire was used to know the awareness about emergency contraceptive pills versus conventional contraceptive methods among mothers attending MCH clinic, Bapuji hospital, Davangere from 1 st October 2011 to 31 st December 2011. Data was entered into Excel sheet and was analysed using SPSS software version 17. Data was described as proportions, categorical data using chi square test. RESULTS: A total of 500 mothers were included in the study for duration of 3months. Approximately 80% of the respondents were in the age group of 21 - 30yrs, 72.8% from urban background, 83.4% were Hindus, 55% were from joint family. Approximately 49% belonged to socioeconomic class II and III, 97.2% were literate and 86.6% were housewives. 31.8% had knowledge about emergency contraception which is very less when compared to 84.2% of conventional methods. 6.2% have practiced emergency contraception which is very poor when compared to 47.5% of conventional methods. 77.8% were aware of female sterilization. The most common known temporary method of contrac eption was Cu - T (71% followed by OCP (60.6%. Most common method used by couples was condom (21.8% followed by Cu - T (19

  13. Study of knowledge and contraception practices in low socio-economic women of Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Pandey

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Objective of current study was to assess the knowledge and practice of contraception among the low socio-economic women of reproductive age group in Delhi. Methods: A cross-sectional study was done on 272 low socio-economic women attending a family planning clinic at a Delhi municipal corporation hospital, of which 106 came for Medical Termination of Pregnancy (MTP and 166 came for family planning advice. They were interrogated through a pre-designed structured questionnaire, to evaluate their knowledge and practices towards regular contraceptive methods, Emergency Contraception (EC and medical abortion. They were counselled about the available contraceptive methods and allowed to make choices according to their suitability. Results: All women belonged to low socio-economic group according to the modified Kuppuswamy scale. 22.1% were illiterate. 47.8% were ignorant of contraception. 38.3% women were aware of EC. Only 24.2% knew about medical abortion. The main reasons cited for not using contraception was desire for male child (24.6%, fear of side effects (20%, desire for another child (20%, opposition from family members (15.4%, inaccessibility (4.6% and inconvenience and lack of privacy (5.4%. Conclusions: This study highlights that lack of education, knowledge and awareness led to inadequate usage of regular methods of contraception in reproductive age group women belonging to low socio-economic status. Thus only availability is not sufficient to reach optimum female health. Accessibility need to be increased by educating females and motivating couples to make adequate use of existing family planning methods and resources. In contrast the awareness for emergency contraception is more than regular methods. It mandates need to educate women that emergency contraception should not replace regular methods. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(4.000: 1022-1026

  14. Vas deferens, a site of male contraception: an overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nimal K. Lohiya; B. Manivannan; Pradyumna K. Mishra; Neelam Pathak

    2001-01-01

    The vas deferens is a site which can be exploited for male contraception without undue side effects. The only ef fective technique available for male contraception is vasectomy, being practiced world wide, despite that it is a perma nent surgical procedure and its successful reversal is not assured. Although no-scalpel vasectomy minimizes surgical procedures, the fate of its reversal is akin to that of vasectomy. Several occlusive and non-occlusive vasalprocedures which claim to be reversible without surgical intervention, possess more disadvantages than advantages. Vas occlusion with plug, ‘ Shug' or medical grade silicone rubber, although claimed to produce reversible azoospermia without affect ing spermatogenesis, requires skilled microsurgery for their implantation and later removal. RISUGR, a non-sclerotic polymer styrene maleic anhydride (SMA), could be more advantageous than vasectomy and other vas occlusive proce dures in that it could be a totally non-invasive procedure by "no-scalpel injection" and "non-invasive reversal". It is claimed to offer long-term contraception without adverse side effects and also to be possible as a male spacing method by repeated vas occlusion and non-invasive reversal. The drag is currently under multicentre Phase 1II clinical trial.

  15. Molecular approaches to contraceptive development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Usha Natraj

    2001-11-01

    The next generation of contraceptives will be based on the identification of novel molecules essential for reproductive processes and will rely on the refinement of older as well as newer technologies. Functional analysis of naturally occurring reproductive genetic disorders and creation of mice null for specific genes would greatly assist in the choice of genetic targets for contraceptive development. Structure-based design of drugs as exemplified by the preparation of an orally active non-peptide gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) would revolutionize drug formulation and delivery for a peptide analogue. This review examines some of the molecular targets that may change contraceptive choices in the future.

  16. [Mercilon - the optimal oral contraceptive].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachev, E; Damianov, L; Kolarov, G; Novachkov, V; Ivanov, S

    2000-01-01

    The authors review the effect of the oral contraceptive Mercilon on menstrual cycle, contraceptive efficacy, lipid profile, safety profile and adverse effects in a group of 32 women, included in the survey. The results of the trial show excellent contraceptive effect with Pearl Index of 0.00 and good control over the menstrual cycle. No negative or unfavorable effects were seen on the lipid profile as well as on the liver kidney and coangulant system function. Minor side effects were seen in only 5% of the patients.

  17. Contraceptive counselling and self-prescription of contraceptives of German gynaecologists : Results of a nationwide survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buhling, Kai J.; Klovekorn, Lisa; Daniels, Benita; Studnitz, Friederike S. G.; Eulenburg, Christine; Mueck, Alfred O.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the attitude toward contraceptive methods of gynaecologists who, in Germany, are the sole prescribers of contraceptives. Methods An anonymous questionnaire was sent to 9545 gynaecologists inquiring about factors involved in their prescription of contraceptives, the contraceptiv

  18. Contraceptive counselling and self-prescription of contraceptives of German gynaecologists : Results of a nationwide survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buhling, Kai J.; Klovekorn, Lisa; Daniels, Benita; Studnitz, Friederike S. G.; Eulenburg, Christine; Mueck, Alfred O.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the attitude toward contraceptive methods of gynaecologists who, in Germany, are the sole prescribers of contraceptives. Methods An anonymous questionnaire was sent to 9545 gynaecologists inquiring about factors involved in their prescription of contraceptives, the contraceptiv

  19. [Barrier methods of contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, A; Edelman, D A

    1982-01-01

    Vaginal methods of contraception were the earliest types used and some references to them date back to antiquity. Most of the vaginal contraceptive agents identified by the ancient Greeks, Indians, Japanese, and Chinese have been found in modern laboratory tests to have spermicidal properties, but it is doubtful that the methods were fully reliable or were used by many people. During the 19th century the condom, vaginal spermicides, and diaphragm became available. The development of nonoxynol-9 and other nonirritating but effective spermicidal agents improved vaginal contraceptives greatly by the 1950s, but starting in the 1960s newer methods began to replace the vaginal methods. Interest in barrier methods has been reawakened somewhat by concern about the health effects of hormonal methods. At present all barrier methods leave something to be desired. Failure rates of 3-30% for barrier methods in general have been estimated, but the higher rates are believed due to incorrect or inconsistent use. Theoretical failure rates of condoms and diaphragms have been estimated at 3/100 women-years, but in actual use failure rates may reach 15 for condoms and 13 for diaphragms used with spermicides. Use-effectiveness rates are greatly influenced by motivation. For a variety of reasons, the acceptability of barrier methods is low, especially in developing countries. New developments in spermicidal agents include sperm inhibitors, which impede the fertilizing capacity of sperm rather than attempting a spermicidal effect; a number of such agents have been studied and have proven more effective in animal tests than conventional spermicides. Neosampoon, a new spermicidal foam, has attracted an increasing number of users, especially in developing countries. A new condom, made of thin polymers and containing a standard dose of nonoxynol-9, has been designed to dissolve in the vaginal fluid. Further studies are needed of its acceptability, efficacy, and side effects before it becomes

  20. Temporal Trends and Predictors of Modern Contraceptive Use in Lusaka, Zambia, 2004–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy L. Hancock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although increasing access to family planning has been an important part of the global development agenda, millions of women continue to face unmet need for contraception. Materials and Methods. We analyzed data from a repeated cross-sectional community survey conducted in Lusaka, Zambia, over an eight-year period. We described prevalence of modern contraceptive use, including long-acting reversible contraception (LARC, among female heads of household aged 16–50 years. We also identified predictors of LARC versus short-term contraceptive use among women using modern methods. Results and Discussion. Twelve survey rounds were completed between November 2004 and September 2011. Among 29,476 eligible respondents, 17,605 (60% reported using modern contraception. Oral contraceptive pills remained the most popular method over time, but use of LARC increased significantly, from less than 1% in 2004 to 9% by 2011 (p<0.001. Younger women (OR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.34, 0.61 and women with lower levels of education (OR: 0.70, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.89 were less likely to report LARC use compared to women using short-term modern methods. Conclusions. Population-based assessments of contraceptive use over time can guide programs and policies. To achieve reproductive health equity and reduce unmet contraceptive need, future efforts to increase LARC use should focus on young women and those with less education.

  1. Current status of contraceptive use among rural married women in Anhui Province of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X-J; Wang, G-Y; Shen, Q; Yu, Y-L; Sun, Y-H; Yu, G-B; Zhao, D; Ye, D-Q

    2009-11-01

    This study aims to explore the current status of married women in regard of their use of contraceptive methods (permanent methods versus non-permanent methods) and to find out factors that affect the use of contraceptive methods in rural areas of Anhui Province of China. Survey. Anhui, China. A total of 53,652 married women aged 18-49 years. A multistage probability sampling method was used to identify a representative sample of 53,652 married women aged 18-49 years. All women were asked to provide detailed information by completing detailed questionnaires. Contraceptive prevalence and influence factors. The total birth control rate of the sample was 95.2%. Samples choosing the permanent and nonpermanent contraceptive methods have taken up 46.7 and 48.5% respectively. Female sterilisation was the first choice with a usage rate of 43.6%, followed by intrauterine device (IUD), which was used by 41.1% of samples. Single-variable analysis showed that the choice of contraceptive methods was associated with age, education level, parity, frequency of sex intercourses in a month, contraceptive knowledge, RTI symptom and the gender of the last child of rural married women. A significant increase in contraceptive use of rural married women in Anhui Province of China. Female sterilisation and IUD still play the dominant role. Effective family planning methods should be advocated through adequate counselling on the correct use and proper management, with consideration of the background of custom and belief.

  2. Hormonal contraceptives, menstrual cycle and brain response to faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marecková, Klara; Perrin, Jennifer S; Nawaz Khan, Irum; Lawrence, Claire; Dickie, Erin; McQuiggan, Doug A; Paus, Tomás

    2014-02-01

    Both behavioral and neuroimaging evidence support a female advantage in the perception of human faces. Here we explored the possibility that this relationship may be partially mediated by female sex hormones by investigating the relationship between the brain's response to faces and the use of oral contraceptives, as well as the phase of the menstrual cycle. First, functional magnetic resonance images were acquired in 20 young women [10 freely cycling and 10 taking oral contraception (OC)] during two phases of their cycle: mid-cycle and menstruation. We found stronger neural responses to faces in the right fusiform face area (FFA) in women taking oral contraceptives (vs freely cycling women) and during mid-cycle (vs menstruation) in both groups. Mean blood oxygenation level-dependent response in both left and right FFA increased as function of the duration of OC use. Next, this relationship between the use of OC and FFA response was replicated in an independent sample of 110 adolescent girls. Finally in a parallel behavioral study carried out in another sample of women, we found no evidence of differences in the pattern of eye movements while viewing faces between freely cycling women vs those taking oral contraceptives. The imaging findings might indicate enhanced processing of social cues in women taking OC and women during mid-cycle.

  3. Premarital sexual activity and contraceptive use in Santiago, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, J M; Valenzuela, M S; Morris, L

    1992-01-01

    The Santiago Young Adult Reproductive Health Survey was conducted in 1988 to examine the sexual behavior of and contraceptive use among young adults in Chile. The survey was based on multistage household probability samples of 865 women and 800 men aged 15-24 who were living in Santiago in 1988. Findings show that 35 percent of females and 65 percent of males had had premarital intercourse. Among those who had done so, the median age at first experience was 18.4 years for women and 16.4 years for men. Only 20 percent of females and 19 percent of males used contraceptives at first premarital intercourse. Use of contraceptives increased with age at the time of that event. Fertility data reveal that 70 percent of first births were premaritally conceived, and more than one-third of these were born prior to union. The high rates of premarital and unintended pregnancy among young women and the low prevalence of effective contraceptive use indicate a need for greater emphasis on sex education and family planning services directed at adolescents and unmarried young adults in Santiago.

  4. The role of emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trussell, James; Ellertson, Charlotte; Stewart, Felicia; Raymond, Elizabeth G; Shochet, Tara

    2004-04-01

    Emergency contraception is an underused therapeutic option for women in the event of unprotected sexual intercourse. Available postcoital contraceptives include emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) both with and without estrogen, and copper-bearing intrauterine devices. Each method has its individual efficacy, safety, and side effect profile. Most patients will experience prevention of pregnancy, providing they follow the treatment regimen carefully. There are concerns that women who use ECPs may become lax with their regular birth control methods; however, reported evidence indicates that making ECPs more readily available would ultimately reduce the incidence of unintended pregnancies. In addition, it is typically conscientious contraceptive users who are most likely to seek emergency treatment. Patient education is paramount in the reduction of unintended pregnancies and there are numerous medical resources available to women to assist them in this endeavor. Finally, ECPs are associated with financial and psychologic advantages that benefit both the individual patient and society at large.

  5. Contraception for adolescents with lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner-Weiner Linda

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sexually active adolescents, including young women with lupus, are at high risk for unplanned pregnancy. Unplanned pregnancy among teens with lupus is associated with an elevated risk of poor maternal and fetal outcomes. The provision of effective contraception is a crucial element of care for a sexually-active young woman with lupus. Unfortunately, providers may be hesitant to prescribe contraception to this group due to concerns about increasing the risk of lupus complications. This article reviews the risks and benefits of currently-available contraceptives for young women with lupus. Providers are encouraged to consider long-term, highly-effective contraception, such as implantables and intrauterine devices, for appropriately selected adolescents with lupus.

  6. Study on Contraceptive Knowledge and Related Factors among the Unmarried Adolescents and Youths%未婚青少年避孕知识状况及其影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙峰; 李晓雯; 程艳; 李超华; 高尔生; Laurie S.Zabin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the knowledge level of contraceptive knowledge among unmarried adolescents and youths aged 15-24 in Shanghai and to explore its related factors. Methods: It's a cross-sectional study. A total sample of 6 023 unmarried adolescents and youths aged 15-24 years old in Shanghai was recruited by multiple-stage sampling approach from May 2006 to January 2007. Anonymous CASI (Computer Self-Interview) was adopted in the survey. The questionnaires for the general information were filled in by interviewers while for sensitive information was filled out by respondents themselves. Information on subjects' backgrounds, contraceptive related knowledge were collected in the questionnaires. Results: The top three contraceptive methods knew by male subjects were condoms (85.7%), oral contraceptives (71.3%) and emergency contraception (45.4%), while by female subjects were condoms (88.9%), oral contraceptives (77.9%) and surgical sterilization (49.6%). The top three contraceptive methods that male and female subjects thought were good at preventing pregnancy were condoms (male: 90.9%, female: 82.2%), oral contraceptives (male: 58.9%, female: 57.7%) and surgical sterilization (male:46.5%, female: 49.3%). The contraceptive knowledge score of male subjects (40.9) was higher than that of female subjects (37.3), the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Respondents who had higher level of contraceptive knowledge were those who were older, students, higher educated, had sexual experience, learned contraceptive knowledge from boyfriend/girlfriend, friend/peers, radio/TV, books, intemet, and had more numbers of contraceptive knowledge sources and more effective rank of contraceptive knowledge sources. Conclusion: The level of contraceptive knowledge among the unmarried adolescents and youths in Shanghai should be further improved. Appopriate education of contraceptive knowledge should be provided to them with the increasing

  7. Contraceptive method preferences and provision after termination of pregnancy: a population-based analysis of women obtaining care with the British Pregnancy Advisory Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Ara; Lohr, P A; Aiken, C E; Forsyth, T; Trussell, J

    2017-04-01

    To examine contraceptive choices among women seeking termination of pregnancy (TOP) and the provision of the chosen methods. Population-based study. British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS) clinics in England and Wales. Between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2014, 211 215 women had a TOP at BPAS, were offered contraceptive counselling, and were eligible to obtain contraception at no cost. We examined electronic records from BPAS and assessed the proportions of women who accepted contraceptive counselling and chose a contraceptive method, as well as the distributions of methods chosen, analysed by provider and by TOP type. We calculated the proportions receiving their chosen method and the methods chosen by women using no method at conception. We used logistic regression to examine the factors associated with choice of an intrauterine contraceptive (IUC) or implant. Post-TOP contraceptive method choice. Receipt of chosen method post-TOP. Eighty-five per cent of women accepted contraceptive counselling and 51% chose to obtain a method from BPAS rather than from a GP or contraception and sexual health clinic post-TOP. [correction added on 25 November 2016 after first online publication: 51% has been inserted in the preceding sentence.] Among those who wanted to receive contraception from BPAS, 51% chose an IUC or implant and 19% chose oral contraceptives. Ninety-one per cent of women who obtained contraception from BPAS received their chosen method. Women were more likely to choose an IUC or implant if they obtained contraception from BPAS, had a surgical TOP, were parous, young, white, or had one or more previous TOPs. The standards set for patient-centred TOP care should emphasise the need for a full range of contraceptive options to be offered and provided post-TOP. Uptake targets for long-acting reversible methods do not reflect women's post-TOP contraceptive preferences. © 2016 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  8. Contraceptive considerations in overweight teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneshiro, Bliss; Edelman, Alison

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore the efficacy and safety of contraceptives in overweight adolescents. There are few studies exploring hormonal contraceptive efficacy and safety in overweight and obese adults and almost none addressing these issues in adolescents. Luckily for teens, in terms of safety, many of the comorbidities associated with obesity are yet to transpire and their options for contraception remain relatively unrestricted. Studies of the combined oral contraceptive pill and patch in adults suggest that efficacy may be decreased in overweight adolescents. There is no evidence to suggest that the efficacy of the contraceptive implant or intrauterine device (IUD) is decreased in overweight adolescents. Indeed, these long-acting reversible methods will be the best choice for many adolescents because of their high efficacy. Although the literature is not definitive, there is probably a subset of adolescents who are susceptible to weight gain with use of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate. Although there is little research regarding contraceptive efficacy in overweight adolescents, IUDs and implants will be the best methods for many adolescents because of their high efficacy, reversibility, and safety. (C) 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  9. Preexposure prophylaxis is efficacious for HIV-1 prevention among women using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate for contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffron, Renee; Mugo, Nelly; Were, Edwin; Kiarie, James; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Mujugira, Andrew; Frenkel, Lisa M; Donnell, Deborah; Ronald, Allan; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2014-11-28

    To evaluate preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) efficacy for HIV-1 prevention among women using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) for contraception and men whose HIV-1-infected partners use DMPA. Secondary analysis of data from a randomized placebo-controlled trial of daily oral tenofovir and emtricitabine/tenofovir PrEP among heterosexual Kenyan and Ugandan HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. PrEP efficacy for HIV-1 prevention was compared among HIV-1-uninfected women using DMPA versus no hormonal contraception and among HIV-1 uninfected men whose HIV-1-infected female partners used DMPA versus no hormonal contraception. Of 4747 HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, 901 HIV-1-uninfected women used DMPA at some point during follow-up, 1422 HIV-1-uninfected women used no hormonal contraception, 1568 HIV-1-uninfected men had female partners who used DMPA, and 2626 men had female partners who used no hormonal contraception. PrEP efficacy estimates for HIV-1 prevention, compared with placebo, were similar among women using DMPA and those using no hormonal contraception (64.7 and 75.5%, adjusted interaction P = 0.65). Similarly, for men whose female partners used DMPA, PrEP efficacy did not differ from men whose partners used no hormonal contraception (90.0 versus 81.7%, adjusted interaction P = 0.52). PrEP is efficacious for HIV-1 prevention among women using DMPA and men whose partners use DMPA, suggesting PrEP could mitigate the potential increased HIV-1 acquisition and transmission risks that have been associated with DMPA use. Women at risk for HIV-1 choosing DMPA could maintain this contraceptive method and add PrEP to achieve prevention of unintended pregnancy and HIV-1.

  10. Intrauterine Contraceptive Device Migration Presenting as Abdominal Wall Swelling: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imtiaz Wani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of complications are reported with the use of intrauterine contraceptive devices. These may pursue asymptomatic course or present as an acute abdomen after migration into peritoneal cavity. The authors here are reporting an abdominal wall swelling caused by transuterine migration of a copper intrauterine contraceptive device in a 28-year-old female. An open approach was used, and impacted foreign body was retrieved.

  11. University of Venda’s male students’ attitudes towards contraception and family planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanga R. Raselekoane

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many young men continue to disregard the importance of contraception and family planning in South Africa. The fact that even university students also do not take contraception and family planning seriously poses a serious threat to their own health and well-being.Aim: This paper aims at investigating the attitudes of male students towards contraception and the promotion of female students’ sexual health rights and well-being at the University of Venda.Methods: Quantitative research method is used to determine how attitudes of 60 male students towards contraception can jeopardise the health and well-being of both male and female students.Results: This study reveals that the majority of 60 male students at the University of Venda have a negative attitude towards contraceptives. As a result, male students at the University of Venda are not keen on using contraceptives. Male students’ negative attitude and lack of interest in contraceptives and family planning also limit progress in achieving the Millennium Development Goals on primary health care, especially with regard to sexual and reproductive health and well-being of female students at the University of Venda.Conclusion: The fact that more than half of the male students interviewed did not take contraception and family planning seriously poses a serious threat to health and well-being of students, including violation of female students’ sexual and reproductive health rights in South Africa. This calls for radical health promotion and sexual and reproductive rights programmes which should specifically target male students at the University of Venda.

  12. A Vicarious Experience of the Actions of Contraceptive Devices in Birth Control and Prevention of Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeung Chung

    2002-01-01

    Describes how self-constructed models of the male and female reproductive systems are used to simulate sexual intercourse and the actions of contraceptive devices in preventing conception and sexually transmitted diseases. (Author/YDS)

  13. KNOWLEDGE LEVEL OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS ABOUT EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTIVE USAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Camargo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergency contraception is a hormonal measure adopted to prevent undesired pregnancy after unprotected sexual relation or when it occurs a flaw in the conventional method. The method is inserted in the policy of Sexual and Reproductive Rightsof Brazilian Health Ministry since 1996 with the purpose of preventing undesired pregnancy and consequently reducing the illegal abortion rate and maternal mortality. This study has as objective to seek the degree of knowledge of women, female health care college students of Centro Universitário Padre Anchieta, Jundiaí-SP, who make use of this contraceptive method. To perform the survey a questionnaire was elaborated and approved by the Human Ethics Committee, number 30407014.9.0000.5386. A survey of 11 closed questions and 3 open questions were applied to the volunteers after they had signed the TCLE. Sixty- five (65 women ranging from 18 to 35 years old were interviewed, of those 76,92% have active sexual life and 33,85% are married. The most cited contraceptive method was the hormonal contraceptive (46.15% and 43.08% have used emergency contraceptive. Among the respondents 49.23 % said they did not know the side effects of the EC. The results allowed us to evaluate that this method of contraception is not used by fully satisfactory way with these students that will be future health professionals, this is a worrying fact because many do not know how to use in yourself, which may reflect in the information provided to their future patients.

  14. Moral and policy issues in long-acting contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G F; Moskowitz, E H

    1997-01-01

    The advent of reversible long-acting contraceptives-IUDs, injectables and implants-has provided women throughout the world with valuable new fertility regulation options. These highly effective methods, together with male and female sterilization, have proven to be enormously popular and are now used by the majority of women and men who are currently contracepting worldwide. Despite their remarkable popularity, long-acting contraceptives have engendered considerable controversy. Political, ethical, and safety questions have emerged, stemming from the ways in which these contraceptives have been developed and used over the course of this century. At the heart of the concern is the issue of reproductive rights and freedom. This paper reviews the history of the development of long-acting contraceptives, including the prospect of new methods that will likely emerge from ongoing research and development. It also examines the history, in the United States and in developing countries, of the use and abuse of long-acting methods, including sterilization, in the context of eugenics and population control policies. It then describes a new paradigm of reproductive health and rights that has emerged from the International Conference on Population Development in Cairo, and which offers an enlightened approach to future policies and programs. In light of the wide variety of ways in which long-acting contraceptives have been provided, the paper examines the rights and responsibilities of governments, family planning providers, and individuals. An ethical framework for the use of long-acting methods is discussed, and public policies for the future are proposed.

  15. Coping with contraception: cognitive and behavioral methods with adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, L D; Schinke, S P

    1983-01-01

    Teenagers' sporadic use or nonuse of contraception is 1 explanation for the high rates of unwanted pregnancies in the US. Past efforts have had limited impact as they focused on simply providing adolescents with information and increased access to birth control. The argument here points to specific cognitive and behavioral skills, which adolescents lack, and which are required for effective contraception. Previous research documents an increase in teenagers' use of contraception following a skills-training program presented in intensive small-group format. The present study evaluates cognitive and behavioral skills training methods implemented with large groups (n=120), in the natural environment. The subjects are male and female students of a middle class suburban public high school. Training in this preventive approach stresses verbal and nonverbal components of effective interpersonal communication--approach, refusal and request responses--as important behavioral skills. Cognitive skills training emphasizes the application of facts about reproduction and contraception to make optimal decisions in situations involving sexual activity. Leaders help the subjects relate abstract facts and observable risks to their own life circumstances and choices. Additional skills practice involves the completion of written assignments outside the group setting. At the end of the 2-week training period, the students are evaluated along 4 measures: a knowledge inventory, a contraceptive attitudes and intentions inventory, and a videotaped performance test. Analyses of findings support the feasibility of large-group procedures for helping adolescents cope with sexuality and contraception. Future investigations are needed to replicate the present research as are longitudinal follow-up data to assess the long-term effects of this treatment approach.

  16. Access to contraception by minors in Jamaica: A public health concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tazhmoye V. Crawford

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Access to contraceptive by minors (pre-adolescents and adolescents has spurred policy and legislative debates, part of which is that in an effort to successfully meet government’s objective of a healthy sexual lifestyle among minors. Aims: This study examined factors affecting sexual reproductive health in minors, namely: access to contraceptive advice and treatment, pregnancy, number of sexual partners, sexually transmitted infections (STIs and confidentiality. Materials and Methods: This research involved quantitative and qualitative data. Two hundred and thirty eight sexually active cases were investigated in Jamaica by the researchers, during the period 2006-2007. The age group population was 9-11, 12-14, and 15-17. Results: The study showed that access to contraceptive advice and treatment by minors was more favorable to males than females. The difference in access to contraceptive between male and female was statistically significant (x² = 20.16, p<0.05. Of the 80 male respondents, who are contraceptive users, 11 encountered challenges in legitimately accessing contraceptive methods, while 38 of the 40 female users also encountered challenges. This resulted in unintended pregnancies and impregnation (33.2%, as well as the contracting of STIs (21%. Conclusion: The findings of this study will be important in informing the development of reproductive health services and family life education programs for pre-adolescents and adolescents in Jamaica and other Caribbean countries.

  17. Access to contraception by minors in Jamaica: A public health concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tazhmoye V Crawford

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Access to contraceptive by minors (pre-adolescents and adolescents has spurred policy and legislative debates, part of which is that in an effort to successfully meet government′s objective of a healthy sexual lifestyle among minors. Aims : This study examined factors affecting sexual reproductive health in minors, namely: access to contraceptive advice and treatment, pregnancy, number of sexual partners, sexually transmitted infections (STIs and confidentiality. Materials and Methods: This research involved quantitative and qualitative data. Two hundred and thirty eight sexually active cases were investigated in Jamaica by the researchers, during the period 2006-2007. The age group population was 9-11, 12-14, and 15-17. Results : The study showed that access to contraceptive advice and treatment by minors was more favorable to males than females. The difference in access to contraceptive between male and female was statistically significant (x΂ = 20.16, p<0.05. Of the 80 male respondents, who are contraceptive users, 11 encountered challenges in legitimately accessing contraceptive methods, while 38 of the 40 female users also encountered challenges. This resulted in unintended pregnancies and impregnation (33.2%, as well as the contracting of STIs (21%. Conclusion : The findings of this study will be important in informing the development of reproductive health services and family life education programs for pre-adolescents and adolescents in Jamaica and other Caribbean countries.

  18. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN OVARIAN CANCER RISK AND CONTRACEPTIVE METHODS- AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

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    Bessy Binu Sam

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Ovarian cancer is the most lethal malignancy of the female reproductive system. Risk of ovarian cancer increases with age, but the rate of increase slows after the menopause. Use of contraceptives confers long-term protection against ovarian cancer. This observational study examines the correlation between ovarian cancer risks with different contraceptive methods. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was conducted at Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Government Medical College, Kottayam, Kerala, for a period of one year. Information was collected from 112 women diagnosed with ovarian cancer as treatment group and 336 women without ovarian cancer as control group. The Chi-square test was done to find the association of ovarian cancer risk with different contraceptive methods. RESULTS In the sample of 112 women with ovarian cancer, 53.6% women were using any of the contraceptive methods, whereas in the control group, only 5.1% women were using contraceptive methods. Our study found out a significant association of ovarian cancer risk with oral contraceptives and tubal ligation. There was no significant association of ovarian cancer risk with IUCD, sheath and vasectomy. CONCLUSION Tubal ligation and oral contraceptives reduce the risk of ovarian cancer. The dual benefits of tubal ligation need to be made aware among the public and tubal sterilisation rates have to be enhanced. Oral contraceptive pill use has to be propagated as a temporary contraceptive method due to its added advantage. We recommend future research on the association of ovarian cancer risk and contraceptive methods using large samples comparable to those done in developed countries.

  19. Strategies for communicating contraceptive effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Laureen M; Steiner, Markus; Grimes, David A; Hilgenberg, Deborah; Schulz, Kenneth F

    2013-04-30

    Knowledge of contraceptive effectiveness is crucial to making an informed choice. The consumer has to comprehend the pros and cons of the contraceptive methods being considered. Choice may be influenced by understanding the likelihood of pregnancy with each method and factors that influence effectiveness. To review all randomized controlled trials comparing strategies for communicating to consumers the effectiveness of contraceptives in preventing pregnancy. Through February 2013, we searched the computerized databases of MEDLINE, POPLINE, CENTRAL, PsycINFO and CINAHL, ClinicalTrials.gov, and ICTRP. Previous searches also included EMBASE. We also examined references lists of relevant articles. For the initial review, we wrote to known investigators for information about other published or unpublished trials. We included randomized controlled trials that compared methods for communicating contraceptive effectiveness to consumers. The comparison could be usual practice or an alternative to the experimental intervention.Outcome measures were knowledge of contraceptive effectiveness, attitude about contraception or toward any particular contraceptive, and choice or use of contraceptive method. For the initial review, two authors independently extracted the data. One author entered the data into RevMan, and a second author verified accuracy. For the update, an author and a research associate extracted, entered, and checked the data.For dichotomous variables, we calculated the Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CI). For continuous variables, we computed the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI. Seven trials met the inclusion criteria and had a total of 4526 women. Five were multi-site studies. Four trials were conducted in the USA, while Nigeria and Zambia were represented by one study each, and one trial was done in both Jamaica and India.Two trials provided multiple sessions for participants. In one study that examined contraceptive choice, women in

  20. Changes in contraceptive use in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thang, Nguyen Minh; Huong, Vu Thu

    2003-10-01

    This analysis used data, primarily from the 1997 Vietnamese Demographic and Health Survey (VN-DHS 1997), to determine the changes in contraceptive use in Vietnam. A descriptive analysis of individual, household and community characteristics was made to obtain a general description of contraceptive use. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were also performed on the currently married in (a) a sample of all women and (b) only those women who live in rural areas, to identify the strength of association that each variable has with the use of modern contraceptives. The use of any contraceptive method and the use of modern methods increased from 1988 to 1997. The primary contraceptive method utilized is the IUD and its use has increased substantially from 1988 to 1997. Younger women (aged 15-24) were less likely to use any contraceptive method. Women not desiring additional children were significantly more likely to use contraceptive methods than those desiring more children. Education has a clear impact on both contraceptive knowledge and use by women, with higher educated women being more likely to use a contraceptive method. Illiterate women with no formal education were significantly less likely to use modern methods of contraception. Differentials in contraceptive use exist regarding place of residence. Urban women are more likely than rural women to use contraception, but the difference is not large. Women living in mountainous areas are less likely to use contraception, compared with women living in the lowlands. Living standards, especially the availability of electricity in the community, have a large effect on the methods of contraception adopted by women. Religion is not strongly related to the contraceptive behaviour of women. There were significant differences in the use of contraceptives in communities with good quality of care, with increased contraceptive use corresponding to the increase in availability of family planning workers at communes

  1. Sexual Desire and Hormonal Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozalis, Amanda; Tutlam, Nhial T.; Robbins, Camaryn Chrisman; Peipert, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of hormonal contraception on sexual desire. Materials and Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 1,938 of the 9,256 participants enrolled in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project. This subset included participants enrolled between April and September 2011 who completed a baseline and six-month telephone survey. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between contraceptive method and report of lacking interest in sex, controlling for potential confounding variables. Results More than one in five participants (23.9%) reported lacking interest in sex at 6 months after initiating a new contraceptive method. Of 262 copper IUD users (referent group), 18.3% reported lacking interest in sex. Our primary outcome was more prevalent in women who are young (copper IUD users, participants using depot medroxyprogesterone (ORadj=2.61, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.47-4.61), the vaginal ring (ORadj=2.53, 95% CI=1.37-4.69), and the implant (ORadj=1.60, 95% CI=1.03-2.49) more commonly reported lack of interest in sex. We found no association between use of the hormonal IUD, oral contraceptive pill, and patch and lack of interest in sex. Conclusion CHOICE participants using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, the contraceptive ring, and implant were more likely to report a lack of interest in sex compared to copper IUD users. Future research should confirm these findings and their possible physiological basis. Clinicians should be reassured that most women do not experience reduced sex drive with the use of most contraceptive methods. PMID:26855094

  2. Recent advances in contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkkola, R

    2006-08-01

    The world population is expected to increase by 2.6 billion to 9.1 billion in 2050. This will occur, if fertility decreases from today's 2.6 children to about 2 children per woman. If fertility were to remain at the present level, 34 million persons would be added annually by mid-century and thus the world population would reach 10.6 billion by 2050. The most notable increase in the world population will occur in third world countries. Therefore immense investments are being made to develop safe, reliable and easily used contraceptive methods. It has not proven easy. Further, acceptance of the methods has been called into question. And even their distribution would be very difficult although Population Council and organizations like it have put a lot of effort into that matter also. In addition, the methods should preferably be such that they could to some extent prevent the rapid spread of sexually transmitted infections. So, the task is not easy, but every effort must be made on this question also at governmental and international political levels. It is noteworthy that this kind of approach has been given more currency since the beginning of this millennium.

  3. Dangerous triplet: Polycystic ovary syndrome, oral contraceptives and Kounis syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Erol, Nurdan; Karaagac, Aysu Turkmen; Kounis, Nicholas G.

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is characterized by ovulatory dysfunction, androgen excess and polycystic ovaries and is associated with hypertension, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular events. Oral contraceptives constitute first-line treatment, particularly when symptomatic hyperandrogenism is present. However, these drugs are associated with cardiovascular events and hypersensitivity reactions that pose problem in differential diagnosis and therapy. We present a 14 year-old female wi...

  4. Effects of Contraceptive Education on Adolescent Male Contraceptive Behavior and Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mary E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between contraceptive education and teenage male contraceptive behavior was investigated. Findings indicated that brief or moderately in-depth contraceptive education had little effect on contraceptive behavior. The teenage pregnancy and other sex-related problems may make parents and schools more amenable to comprehensive…

  5. Contraceptive use in women enrolled into preventive HIV vaccine trials: experience from a phase I/II trial in East Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Kibuuka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV vaccine trials generally require that pregnant women are excluded from participation, and contraceptive methods must be used to prevent pregnancy during the trial. However, access to quality services and misconceptions associated with contraceptive methods may impact on their effective use in developing countries. We describe the pattern of contraceptive use in a multi-site phase I/IIa HIV Vaccine trial in East Africa (Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania and factors that may have influenced their use during the trial. METHODS: Pregnancy prevention counseling was provided to female participants during informed consent process and at each study visit. Participants' methods of contraception used were documented. Methods of contraceptives were provided on site. Pregnancy testing was done at designated visits during the trial. Obstacles to contraceptive use were identified and addressed at each visit. RESULTS: Overall, 103 (31.8% of a total of 324 enrolled volunteers were females. Female participants were generally young with a mean age of 29(+/-7.2, married (49.5% and had less than high school education (62.1%. Hormonal contraceptives were the most common method of contraception (58.3% followed by condom use (22.3%. The distribution of methods of contraception among the three sites was similar except for more condom use and less abstinence in Uganda. The majority of women (85.4% reported to contraceptive use prior to screening. The reasons for not using contraception included access to quality services, insufficient knowledge of certain methods, and misconceptions. CONCLUSION: Although hormonal contraceptives were frequently used by females participating in the vaccine trial, misconceptions and their incorrect use might have led to inconsistent use resulting in undesired pregnancies. The study underscores the need for an integrated approach to pregnancy prevention counseling during HIV vaccine trials. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical

  6. Adolescent girls in Denmark use oral contraceptives at an increasingly young age, and with more pauses and shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen; Nielsen, Anne Kristine

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Use of hormonal contraceptives for birth control is commonplace in the Western World. In Europe, there is considerable variety in the frequency of use of hormonal contraceptives and in the age at which these contraceptives are initiated. The purpose of the present study was to descr......INTRODUCTION: Use of hormonal contraceptives for birth control is commonplace in the Western World. In Europe, there is considerable variety in the frequency of use of hormonal contraceptives and in the age at which these contraceptives are initiated. The purpose of the present study...... was to describe the use of hormonal contraceptives among the Danish adolescent female population, focusing on age, period and cohort effects and including types of hormonal contraceptives. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All women aged 14-50 years during the 1995-2012 period were identified through the Central Person...... Register. Furthermore, the National Registry of Medicinal Products Statistics provided information on redeemed prescriptions for hormonal contraceptives characterised by Anatomical-Therapeutic-Chemical (ATC) classification codes. RESULTS: At the age of 17 years, more than 50% of the Danish adolescent...

  7. Determinants of sexual activity, awareness, and use of contraception among Malaysian college students

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    Prachi Renjhen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Young people’s vulnerability to risky or unwanted sex and other unhealthy behaviours is tied to host of individual, family, and community factors and is closely related to economic and educational opportunities. Aims This study aimed to identify factors determining the sexual activity, awareness and use of contraception among college students in Malaysia. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among students aged 17–24 years in four colleges of Malaysia. Data were collected via a self-administered multiple response questionnaire. Data analysis was performed on 552 completed questionnaires. Results The mean age of the participants was 19.7±1.6 years. The majority of the respondents were females, Malays, residing in rented accommodations. Contraceptive awareness, sexual activity and use of contraception increased significantly with age of the respondents and were more in males. Better contraceptive awareness was found in those staying away from parents and those studying in colleges with urban exposure. Almost 40 per cent respondents had indulged in sexual activity but only 37 per cent reported use of contraception. A significantly higher proportion of respondents who did not use contraception were females, those in the age group of 19–20 years old and those who were studying in colleges with rural exposure. Male students were more likely to engage in sexual activity and use contraception compared to females. Conclusion There is a need to impart sexual and reproductive health knowledge during the adolescent period so that young people can make informed choices and be motivated to use of contraceptives effectively.

  8. How close are we in achieving safe, affordable and reversible male contraceptives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsiani, Daulat R P; Abou-Haila, Aïda

    2010-06-01

    The world population, currently estimated to be over six billions, is expected to double in the next forty years. The projected growth will cause severe over crowding that will have an adverse effect on the ecological health of the planet. A recent survey by the United Nations found that a majority of men in many countries are willing to participate in family planning by taking full control of their fertility. However, the available contraceptives for men have either higher failure rates or they are irreversible. Thus, the contraceptive needs of tens of millions of men go unmet every day resulting in millions of unwanted pregnancies, and hundreds of thousands of abortions. Since the introduction of oral contraceptive (pill) for women over five decades ago, there have been numerous collaborative efforts by scientists and pharmaceutical companies to improve the effectiveness and delivery of contraceptives to women who wish to safely regulate their reproductive physiology. However, the contraceptive options available to men have not changed in several decades and are still limited to the use of condoms and timely withdrawal (coitus interruptus) or under going a minor surgical procedure (vasectomy) that prevents the release of spermatozoa during ejaculation. The first two methods have relatively higher typical-use failure rates, whereas the last approach is largely irreversible and not suitable for younger men. Despite non-stop efforts worldwide, we may still be several years away from providing safe, effective and affordable male contraceptives which will allow both men and women to participate fully in family planning. In this article, we will discuss various contraceptives currently available to regulate male fertility. In addition, we will summarize potentially new contraceptives for men that are at various stages of research and development. Finally, our intention is to discuss details of two safe, reversible and affordable male contraceptive approaches that are

  9. Long-acting reversible hormonal contraception

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the advantages of long-acting reversible hormonal contraceptive methods, they are ... common; 9% of women used the pill in 2015, 8% relied on male condoms .... contraception for adolescents and young adults: patient and provider.

  10. Abortion - surgical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion involves dilating the opening to the uterus (cervix) and placing a small suction tube into the uterus. ...

  11. Weight gain, body image and sexual function in young patients treated with contraceptive vaginal ring. A prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morotti, Elena; Casadio, Paolo; Guasina, Francesca; Battaglia, Bruno; Mattioli, Mara; Battaglia, Cesare

    2017-08-01

    Oral contraceptives could induce mood changes. As far as our knowledge, there are no studies in literature that have examined the role of vaginal contraception in self-perceived body image. To evaluate the effects of intravaginal contraception on weight gain and perceived body image in relation with the Beck's Depression Inventory questionnaire (BDI) and the McCoy Female Sexuality Questionnaire (MFSQ). Twenty-one adult (18-35 years old) eumenorrheic (menstrual cycle of 25-35 days), lean (body mass index - BMI - of 19-25 kg/m(2)) women who were referred for hormonal contraception were administered the Stunkard Figure Rating Scale (FRS), BDI and MFSQ. Subjects were studied in basal condition and after 6 months of therapy with vaginal contraception (NuvaRing®; Organon-Schering-Plough Italia, Milan, Italy). BMI, FRS, MFSQ and BDI. After 6 months of therapy with NuvaRing®, both body weight (60.0 ± 8.3; p = 0.050) and BMI (22.1 ± 3.1; p = 0.028) slightly, but statistically, increased. FRS and BDI showed no differences after the vaginal contraception. Hormonal contraception was associated with a significant decrease in the two-factor Italian MFSQ score. Vaginal ring seems a good alternative to other hormonal contraceptive not significantly altering the female sexuality and not influencing the FRS and BDI.

  12. Contraceptive practice in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Contraceptive use increased substantially in the Philippines from 1983 to 1986. Prevalence increased 32.1% in 1983, 45.7% in 1986. Increase in use was among married women in Northern Mindanao, Central Visayas, Southern Tagalog, Bicol, and Western Mindanao. Prevalence remained unchanged in Southern Mindanao. During this period, modern contraceptive methods also increased with more women opting to use the pill, IUD, injectables, and sterilization. In most areas in the Philippines, contraceptive use escalated with the more traditional methods like rhythm and withdrawal. Modern family planning increased most in urban areas such as Northern and Western Mindanao. Age also played a significant part in the study. Women aged 20-24 increased usage between 1983 and 1986. A more substantial increase was noticed in the 25-49 year old group, and the highest increase came from married women aged 30-34, with at least 3-4 children, during 1983. This figure shifted in 1986 with contraceptive use becoming more pronounced among 35-39 year olds. Modern methods declined at the 40-44 age bracket due to low fecundity. Throughout the country, modern contraceptive methods were more widely practiced by working women and was defined occupationally. Women in production, labor, and service occupations displayed a low level of modern usage, while those women in professional, administrative, and technical positions were more likely to use modern methods.

  13. Perceived side effects of oral contraceptives among adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, E S; Goodwin, M S

    1980-11-22

    Knowledge and attitudes of adolescent females regarding the side effects of oral contraceptives were investigated. The data source was a large study of sexual and contraceptive attitudes and experience. The questionnaire responses of 486 single females attending 10 birth control and pregnancy counseling centers in Ontario, Canada were examined. The age range of the subjects was from 13-20; 71% were attending school and 69% were living at home. They were attending the centers in order to obtain contraceptives (55%), to renew OC prescriptions (20%), or to receive pregnancy counseling (25%). 29% of the subjects had used OCs before coming to the clinic, but 91% planned to use OC after their clinic visit. 8% were planning to use an IUD; 1% were planning to use a diaphragm; and less than 1% were planning to have their boyfriend use condoms. 85% of the subjects indicated that they had heard abut side effcts of OCs with weight gain as the best known side effect. Other side effects familiar to many included nausea, circulatory disorders, headaches, emotional changes, menstrual problems and cancer. About 1/2 of the subjects had learned about these side effects from the mass media or female friends, 25% from a school sex education class, 15% from their mothers, and 3% from a physician. Despite knowledge regarding side effects, most of the subjects had positive attitudes toward OCs with 59% believing that the advnatages outweighed any disadvantages.

  14. [Post-abortion contraception: effects of contraception services and reproductive intention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela

    2016-02-01

    Contraceptive counseling and the supply of contraceptive methods are part of post-abortion care and positively influence the subsequent use of contraceptive methods. Studies showing such evidence have been conducted predominantly in countries with no legal restrictions on abortion and with adequate care for women that terminate a pregnancy. However, little is known about contraceptive practices in contexts where abortion is illegal, as in Brazil, in which post-abortion contraceptive care is inadequate. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of contraceptive care on male condom use and oral and injectable contraceptives in the six months post-abortion, considering reproductive intention. The results showed that contraceptive care only has a positive effect on the use of oral contraceptives in the first six months post-abortion, as long as the woman had a medical consultation in the same month in which she received information on contraception. One or the other intervention alone had no significant impact.

  15. Contraceptive practices and awareness of emergency contraception among Muslim women of urban slum of Raichur, Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju D. Ade

    2014-02-01

    Conclusions: Despite 76.8% literacy and 86.5% of awareness of the various methods of contraception, contraceptive practices were low among women. 32 (39.0% women didn’t use any contraceptive till they completed family. There is a gap between awareness and practice. Awareness of emergency contraception is quite low among women (13.4%. Emphasis has to be laid on delaying marriage and first pregnancy and education on planning and spacing children and reproductive contraceptive options, especially emergency contraception since all contraceptive methods can have potential failure; the use of emergency contraceptive of plays an important role in preventing unplanned pregnancies. There is a need to improve women\\'s education about EC. The primary health care providers can play a major role in informing their patients about emergency contraception. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(1.000: 70-74

  16. Utilização de métodos contraceptivos por adolescentes do sexo feminino da Comunidade Restinga e Extremo Sul Utilización de métodos contraceptivos por adolescentes del sexo femenino de la comunidad Restinga y extremo sur Use of contraceptive methods by female adolescents in Restinga and Extremo Sul communities in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Helena S Duarte

    2011-12-01

    de la piel, clase social, estado civil, escolaridad en años de estudio, situación conyugal, actividad remunerada, religión, embarazo no planeado y aborto. RESULTADOS: De las adolescentes entrevistadas, el 51% tenía entre 15 y 19, el 67% eran blancas, el 29% pertenecían a las clases A y B y el 59% a la clase C. La primera relación sexual ocurrió, en promedio, a los 15 años. El uso de algún método contraceptivo fue referido por el 75% de las adolescentes sexualmente activas. La píldora anticonceptiva fue el método más referido (62%, seguido del preservativo masculino (38% y del anticonceptivo hormonal no oral (inyectable o implante, 16%. No hubo asociación significante entre el uso de método contraceptivo y las variables demográficas y socioeconómicas analizadas. CONCLUSIONES: El número de adolescentes sexualmente activas sin uso de contracepción eficaz (25% es preocupante, principalmente al observarse el nivel socioeconómico de esa muestra.OBJECTIVE:To estimate the prevalence of contraceptives use among female adolescents and to describe their demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. METHODS: Cross-sectional study carried out at the Community Management District "Restinga/Extremo Sul", in Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil, from July to December 2009. The sample included 487 adolescents aged ten to 19 years old, who live in this community. The main outcome was the use of contraceptive method alone or in association whit other methods; independent variables were age, skin color, social class, marital status, education level in years, marital situation, job, religion, unplanned pregnancy and abortion. RESULTS: Among the interviewed adolescents, 51% had 15-19 years old, 67% were white, 29% and 59% respectively belonged to A/B and C socio-economical levels. The first sexual intercourse occurred on average at 15 years old. The use of contraceptive methods was reported by 75% of sexually active teens. The pill was the most frequently mentioned method

  17. A multicenter survey of contraceptive knowledge among adolescents in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokkary, Nancy; Mansouri, Roshanak; Yoost, Jennie; Focseneanu, Mariel; Dumont, Tania; Nathwani, Meera; Allen, Lisa; Hertweck, S Paige; Dietrich, Jennifer E

    2013-10-01

    To assess knowledge about contraceptive efficacy and side effects in an adolescent population seen in Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology referral centers. This is a multisite cross-sectional survey study. A 23-question survey assessing knowledge of contraception and demographic information was administered. Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, simple paired t tests, and chi-square analyses using SAS 9.3. Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology clinics in 4 tertiary care centers. The study was conducted in 3 institutions in the United States and 1 institution in Canada. A convenience sample of 354 female patients aged 10-24 y seeking reproductive healthcare at participating institutions. None The percentage of correct answers to questions assessing general knowledge about contraception, familiarity with different contraceptive methods, and comparison of results between study sites. The mean percentage of correct answers among all participants was 55.8% ± 17%. Younger participants (age 10-13 years) scored significantly lower than their older counterparts (49%, 55%, and 60% respectively, P contraceptives scored significantly higher. Of all contraceptive methods, participants were least likely to have heard of etonogestrel implants (18%), rhythm method/natural family planning (28%), and IUDs (32%). Adolescents and young adults performed poorly overall demonstrating both the lack of overall knowledge regarding methods of contraception and misinformation about side effects. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Unsafe abortion in Tanzania and the need for involving men in postabortion contraceptive counseling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke; Lyaruu, Mathias A

    2005-01-01

    Targeting male partners involved in unsafe abortions for contraceptive counseling could be an important strategy for decreasing the incidence of unwanted pregnancies, yet few postabortion-care programs have attempted to involve these men. To assess the need for and determine the content of postab......Targeting male partners involved in unsafe abortions for contraceptive counseling could be an important strategy for decreasing the incidence of unwanted pregnancies, yet few postabortion-care programs have attempted to involve these men. To assess the need for and determine the content...... of postabortion contraceptive counseling for men, this study examined the contraceptive knowledge, attitudes, and practices of male partners of women who have had an unsafe abortion. A survey was administered to 213 men accompanying female partners receiving hospital care after having undergone an unsafe abortion...... their wives and 83 percent accompanying their girlfriends. In general, the men wished to support their partners in practicing contraception, and the majority were willing to participate in contraceptive counseling. These findings suggest that male partners should be included in postabortion contraceptive...

  19. Evaluation of reversible contraceptive potential of Cordia dichotoma leaves extract

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    Plaban Bhattacharya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering the safety-risk ratio of steroidal contraceptives, the present work was carried out to evaluate ethno-contraceptive use of Cordia dichotoma G. Forst., Boraginaceae, leaves (LCD. Preliminary pharmacological screening was performed on post-coital female albino rats. The leaves extract (LD50 5.50 g/kg bw showed 100% anti-implantation activity (n=10 at 800 mg/kg dose level. (2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (BCD was used as bioavailability enhancer to form LCD-BCD complex, characterized by DLS, SEM and XRD analyses. The LCD-BCD complex (1:1, w/w exhibited 100% pregnancy interception (n=20 at the dose level of 250 mg/kg and also showed strong estrogenic potential with a luteal phase defect. Qualitative and quantitative phytochemical analyses were carried out. The LCD extract was standardized by a validated HPTLC method and two contraceptive phytoconstituents, apigenin and luteolin were isolated. A detailed pharmacological analyses followed by chronic toxicity study were performed to predict the reversible nature of the developed phytopharmaceutical. The histological and biochemical estimations detected the reversible contraceptive potential after withdrawal. The observations suggested that the developed phyto-pharmaceutical has potential antifertility activity with safety aspects.

  20. [Contraception and pelvic infection in women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, L; Berger, G S; Brown, E R

    1986-01-01

    Although sexually transmitted diseases are a major public health problem at the international level, the relationship between contraception and pelvic infection is seldom examined. Numerous STDs are more difficult to diagnose, more frequent, and more serious in women than in men. Differential diagnosis between pelvic infection and other intraabdominal syndromes has been a concern for practitioners for years, and many pelvic infections are probably never diagnosed. Lower abdominal pain and sensitivity as well as fever, leucocytosis, accelerated sedimentation rate, inflammatory annexial mass evident on sonography, and microorganisms in the pouch of Douglass and presence of leucocytes in the peritoneal fluid are diagnostic criteria. Apart from errors in treatment resulting from errors in diagnosis, pelvic infections are often inadequately treated, especially in the initial phase before symptoms are confirmed. The exact incidence of pelvic infections in the US is unknown, but pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) accounted for over 200,000 hospitalizations per year between 1970-75. PID carries grave risks of subsequent ectopic pregnancy, chronic pelvic pain, and infertility which is more likely as the number of acute episodes increases. The female genital tract has diverse microenvironments propitious for growth of microorganisms of different types, aerobic and anaerobic. Each anatomic site has specific features conditioning bacterial growth. Histological modifications during the menstrual cycle and pregnancy affect the microbial flora. Except in the case of gonorrhea, it is not known how many female lower genital tract infections spread to the upper tract. Since 1970, several studies have domonstrated a growing diversity of cervical and vaginal flora in asymptomatic subjects. The principal risk factors for PID have been well described in the literature. All contraceptive methods except the IUD provide some degree of protection against PID. Even among IUD users the risk of

  1. Emergency contraception: what teens need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Emergency contraception is contraception used soon after unprotected sexual intercourse. The following types of emergency contraception are currently available in the US: ordinary birth control pills containing estrogen and progestin, birth control pills which contain no estrogen and smaller amounts of progestin, and the copper-T IUD. Each of these forms of contraception require a physician's prescription. A woman may need emergency contraception if her regular contraceptive method has failed, if she did not use contraception, or if she has been sexually assaulted. Young women need to be told that emergency contraception exists and can be used when needed. However, they also need to be warned against using such contraception in lieu of the regular use of non-emergency contraception. Non-emergency contraception should still be used. Were emergency contraception widely used, it could prevent up to 2.3 million unintended pregnancies in America each year, 1 million of which are now terminated by abortion. RU-486 (mifepristone) is not generally available in the US.

  2. Choosing a combined oral contraceptive pill

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The combined oral contraceptive pill is an effective contraceptive method which can also offer other benefits. However, other contraceptive options should be discussed. If the pill is the chosen method, prescribe a pill with the lowest effective dose of oestrogen and progestogen.

  3. American values and contraceptive acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepka, J R

    1979-07-01

    A number of individual personality factors and social norms may be associated with reproductive confusion and/or irresponsibility. More specifically, the values underlying common American social norms may contribute to ineffective birth planning in the following ways: 1) The traditional roles of women in our society seem to encourage parenthood. The rule has been early marriage, closely spaced children, and few alternate sources of satisfaction or self-esteem. 2) Our culture strongly encourages family life. Children are a symbol of normalcy. 3) The importance of sexual enjoyment per se often conflicts with contraceptive use. Conversely, innocence is also valued and also contributes to unprotected sexual activity. 4) Religious reasons or adherence to concepts of natural law are almost always given by people opposed to contraception. 5) Health is important to Americans, and birth control methods negatively affect health in real and imagined ways. Social norms, though changing, remain essentially congruent with former contraceptive technology and former ideologies, customs, and dreams.

  4. Male contraception: an overview of the potential target events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsiani, Daulat R P; Abou-Haila, Aïda

    2008-06-01

    The contraceptive options available to men have not changed in several decades and are still limited to the non-surgical methods of the use of a condom, a timely withdrawal, or a surgical procedure that removes a segment of the vas deferens (vasectomy). The first two approaches have relatively higher failure rates whereas the last approach is largely irreversible and may not be suitable for younger men. Thus, providing a safe, effective and readily available contraception for men has remained an unfulfilled goal. In this article, we intend to review the current status of the research and development on male contraceptives. It is apparent that the scientific community in the past few decades has witnessed impressive progress in understanding the basics of male physiology, the knowledge necessary for developing new contraceptive methods for men. We will highlight various new and improved strategies for the regulation of fertility in males. The diverse approaches that are at various stages of development and/or in clinical trials include: 1) administration of hormones, herbal extracts or chemicals to suppress/arrest sperm production in the testes (spermatogenesis); 2) interference with the delivery of spermatozoa during ejaculation by targeted blockage of vas deferens with plugs or chemicals (polymers) that prevent flow of sperm through the vas duct; 3) active or passive immunization of males with well characterized antigens/antibodies which are intended to block sperm function; and 4) administration of site-directed antagonists to block specific sperm function(s) necessary for normal fertilization. All these approaches do not involve surgery and are reversible. Our intention is to discuss the current status of various approaches which show promising results in clinical trials, particularly in China and India, the world's most populous nations.

  5. Progress with contraceptives and abortifacients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, A

    1992-10-01

    In Canada and most other comparatively rich countries, the total fertility rate (TFR) declined from approximately 2.5 in 1970 to 1.6-1.9 in 1990. The reduction was even greater in some countries such as China, Korea, Singapore, Mauritius, Barbados, Cuba, Guadeloupe, and Puerto Rico. TFR, however, has fallen little, if at all, in many poor countries; it remains at 8.1 in Kenya and has increased from already previously high levels in Somalia, Benin, Malawi, and Rwanda. The use of contraception has been instrumental in reducing fertility. An estimated 70% of married women in rich countries use contraceptives, and a larger proportion in Eastern Asia, but only less than 15% in Africa. Education for women generally increases the level of contraceptive use. Rates, however, depend upon the degree of both acceptance and availability. An estimated 20% of births in developing countries are unwanted, so it would seem that greater availability and variety of contraceptives could lead to reductions in fertility. Research into better contraceptive technology is frustrated by paternalism, most organized religions, concern over possible future legal liability, and fear of adverse health side effects, especially in North America. Depo-Provera and RU-486, for example, have yet to be licensed in Canada for use as contraceptive agents. Research nonetheless moves forward. A vaccine against pregnancy is reportedly being developed which may be available before the turn of the century. Clinical trials have been held, and the vaccine has been found to be effective in most women, lacking in side effects, and reversible. The prototype requires a series of injections. Elsewhere, the Alza Corporation of California is working on a transdermal patch to control fertility, while some success has been reported in trials of testosterone, alone or combined with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone, to suppress sperm production in men.

  6. Levonorgestrel intrauterine contraceptive device in heavy menstrual bleeding: our experience in a tertiary level government hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renuka Malik

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: LNG-IUCD is an effective and acceptable non-surgical alternative to a common problem of HMB. The success rate was 94% in our study with only 3 patients needing hysterectomy due to expulsion. Emphasis on counseling patients of troublesome spotting and correct fundal placement is essential. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(2.000: 327-333

  7. The sexuological impact of hormonal contraceptives based on their route of administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, Maurizio; Di Carlo, Costantino; Troisi, Jacopo; Gallo, Alessandra; Cibarelli, Francesca; Martini, Ellis; Tiranini, Lara; Nappi, Rossella E

    2017-03-01

    Evidence on the effects of hormonal contraceptives on female sexuality is conflicting. We enrolled 556 women, divided into six groups: two composed of subjects using a combined hormonal contraceptive (COC) containing 0.020 ("COC20") and 0.030 ("COC30") mg of ethynyl estradiol (EE), "natural", using COC containing 1.5 mg of estradiol (E2), "ring", using a vaginal ring releasing each day 0.015 mg of EE + 0.120 of etonogestrel, "subcutaneous", using a progestin only subcutaneous contraceptive implant releasing etonogestrel and "controls", using no hormonal contraceptive methods. The subjects were required to answer to the McCoy female sexuality questionnaire and were subjected to a blood test for hormonal evaluation. An ultrasound evaluation of the dorsal clitoral artery was also performed. The higher McCoy sexological value were recorded in the subdermal group; significant differences were recorded among the groups in terms of hormone distribution, with the higher levels of androstenedione in subdermal and control groups. The ultrasound evaluation of dorsal clitoral artery shows a significative correlation between pulsatility and resistance indices and orgasm parameters of McCoy questionnaire. The recorded difference in the sexual and hormonal parameters among the studied hormonal contraceptives may guide toward the personalization of contraceptive choice.

  8. AWARENESS AND ACCEPTANCE OF TEMPORARY METHODS OF CONTRACEPTIVE AMONG PRIMIPAROUS WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cicija Kalloopparamban

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Contraceptive advice is a component of good preventive healthcare. Socioeconomic factors, education are a few of factors that play vital role in family planning acceptance. To provide this, understanding the attitude and knowledge of patient towards contraception is very much necessary. Objective of this study is to assess the awareness and acceptance of temporary methods of contraception in postpartum primiparas during their first visit to Family Planning OPD, MCH, Kottayam. MATERIALS AND METHODS A hospital-based prospective descriptive study was conducted among the primiparas presented in Family Planning OPD for the first time in postpartum at 6 wks. in MCH during the study period. Informed written consent was obtained from the patients. The study subjects were interviewed with questionnaire to assess the awareness and acceptance of temporary contraceptive methods and the level to which each of them will keep compliance. The questionnaire was to elicit information regarding age, educational status, occupation, knowledge and source of contraceptive methods, attitude of female towards contraception. RESULTS In our study, majority include graduates (37%, but most of study population were unemployed (43.2%. Literate people are more conscious about their own health and that of their families and try to limit their families much more effectively than the illiterates do. The awareness of the group about contraception was 80.5%, mostly through health workers, 39.6%. 53.9% of the study population had accepted any of the temporary contraceptive methods; maximum opted being the barrier contraception, 19%. 60.9% had peer group support. 74.5% had antenatal counselling from a healthcare worker regarding the use of temporary contraceptive methods. Acceptance was maximum among the graduated subjects, 66.9%.The type accepted by graduates include mostly barrier. Contraceptives, 23.2%. 48% of the graduates used for the need of spacing. A maximum peer

  9. Contraceptive Use and Consistency in U.S. Teenagers’ Most Recent Sexual Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manlove, Jennifer; Ryan, Suzanne; Franzetta, Kerry

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT Most U.S. teenage pregnancies are unintended, partly because of inconsistent or no use of contraceptives. Understanding the factors associated with contraceptive use in teenagers’ most recent relationships can help identify strategies to prevent unintended pregnancy. METHODS Data on 1,468 participants in Waves 1 and 2 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health who had had two or more sexual relationships were analyzed to assess factors associated with contraceptive use patterns in teenagers’ most recent sexual relationship. Odds ratios were generated through logistic regression. RESULTS Many relationship and partner characteristics were significant for females but nonsignificant for males. For example, females’ odds of ever, rather than never, having used contraception in their most recent relationship increased with the duration of the relationship (odds ratio, 1.1); their odds were reduced if they had not known their partner before dating him (0.2). The odds of consistent use (vs. inconsistent or no use) were higher for females in a “liked” relationship than for those in a romantic relationship (2.6), and for females using a hormonal method instead of condoms (4.5). Females’ odds of consistent use decreased if the relationship involved physical violence (0.5). Among teenagers in romantic or “liked” relationships, the odds of ever-use and of consistent use were elevated among females who had discussed contraception with the partner before their first sex together (2.9 and 2.1, respectively), and the odds increased among males as the number of presexual couple-like activities increased (1.2 for each). CONCLUSIONS Teenagers must use contraception consistently over time and across relationships despite pressure not to. Therefore, they must learn to negotiate sexual and contraceptive decisions in each relationship. PMID:15687085

  10. New developments in oral contraception: clinical utility of estradiol valerate/dienogest (Natazia® for contraception and for treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding: patient considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson AL

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anita L NelsonObstetrics and Gynecology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Harbor UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California, USAAbstract: Natazia® is a new oral contraceptive with estradiol valerate and dienogest in a unique multiphasic formulation that includes a shortened hormone-free interval. This new formulation has been approved for both contraception and also as a treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding in women who desire to use oral contraceptives as their method of birth control. It is marketed in the US as Natazia® and elsewhere as Qlaira®. This article will review the properties of each of the major new features of this pill: estradiol used in place of ethinyl estradiol, dienogest as the progestin, and the unique dosing pattern of this product. It will also summarize the results of the pivotal clinical trials of contraceptive effectiveness, bleeding patterns, safety and tolerability. The lessons learned from the clinical trials about the effectiveness of this formulation in the treatment of excessive menstrual bleeding will be summarized. Also, results of trials comparing this new pill to other popular formulations for "menstrually-related" symptoms and for potential female sexual dysfunction related to use of oral contraceptives will be presented. This review will suggest how all this information might be used to counsel women about how to use this pill most successfully.Keywords: oral contraceptives, estradiol valerate, dienogest, heavy menstrual bleeding, menorrhagia, dynamic dosing

  11. Unsafe abortion in Tanzania and the need for involving men in postabortion contraceptive counseling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke; Lyaruu, Mathias A

    2005-01-01

    Targeting male partners involved in unsafe abortions for contraceptive counseling could be an important strategy for decreasing the incidence of unwanted pregnancies, yet few postabortion-care programs have attempted to involve these men. To assess the need for and determine the content...... of postabortion contraceptive counseling for men, this study examined the contraceptive knowledge, attitudes, and practices of male partners of women who have had an unsafe abortion. A survey was administered to 213 men accompanying female partners receiving hospital care after having undergone an unsafe abortion...... in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and 20 of these men participated in in-depth interviews. Sixteen percent of the men surveyed accompanied an extramarital partner, and of those, only 44 percent reported having practiced contraception in the last six months, compared with 81 percent of the men accompanying...

  12. Unsafe abortion in Tanzania and the need for involving men in postabortion contraceptive counseling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke; Lyaruu, Mathias A

    2005-01-01

    Targeting male partners involved in unsafe abortions for contraceptive counseling could be an important strategy for decreasing the incidence of unwanted pregnancies, yet few postabortion-care programs have attempted to involve these men. To assess the need for and determine the content of postab......Targeting male partners involved in unsafe abortions for contraceptive counseling could be an important strategy for decreasing the incidence of unwanted pregnancies, yet few postabortion-care programs have attempted to involve these men. To assess the need for and determine the content...... of postabortion contraceptive counseling for men, this study examined the contraceptive knowledge, attitudes, and practices of male partners of women who have had an unsafe abortion. A survey was administered to 213 men accompanying female partners receiving hospital care after having undergone an unsafe abortion...

  13. Provision of female sterilization in Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Meloni Vieira

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Forty percent of Brazilian married women from 15 to 49 years of age have undergone surgical sterilization. The 1988 Brazilian Constitution states that all scientifically proven contraceptive methods should be available to all citizens, but it was only in 1997 that specific family planning legislation was approved. This study examines physicians' perceptions and attitudes towards the current provision of female sterilization and its legal implications, as well as women's experience with obtaining and undergoing sterilization. The study design included: (1 an investigation of the hospitals and health professionals and (2 a survey of women sterilized in combination with cesarean delivery in 1998. The survey showed they had a median of 3 living children, 60.0% had been sterilized between 30 and 39 years of age, and 61.0% had paid for the procedure. Many women reported previous method failure and adverse effects with hormonal contraceptives. Women with less schooling and lower socioeconomic status had more children and had begun childbearing and had been sterilized at younger ages than women with more schooling and higher socioeconomic status. Inequalities related to reproduction were strongly associated with teenage pregnancy and inadequate knowledge about contraceptives.

  14. A survey of bonobo (Pan paniscus) oral contraceptive pill use in North American zoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Mary K; Asa, Cheryl S; Clyde, Victoria L; Keller, Dominique L; Meinelt, Audra

    2016-09-01

    Contraception is an essential tool in reproductive management of captive species. The Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Reproductive Management Center (RMC) gathers data on contraception use and provides recommendations. Although apes have been given oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) for at least 30 years, there have been no published reports with basic information on why the pill is administered, formulations and brands used, and effects on physiology and behavior. Here, we report survey results characterizing OCP use in bonobos (Pan paniscus) housed in North American zoos, as well as information accumulated in the RMC's Contraception Database. Of 26 females treated, there have been no failures and nine reversals. The most commonly administered OCP formulation in bonobos contained ethinyl estradiol (EE) 35 μg/norethindrone 1 mg. Few females on combined oral contraceptives (COCs) were given a continuous active pill regimen; a hormone-free interval of at least 5 days was allowed in most. Crushing the pill and mixing with juice or food was common. Females on COCs seldom experienced breakthrough estrus or bleeding, while these conditions were sometimes observed for females on continuous COCs. All females on COCs exhibited some degree of perineal swelling, with a mean score of 3 or 3+ most commonly reported. Behavioral changes included less sexual behavior, dominant females becoming subordinate, and a negative effect on mood. No appreciable change in weight was noted. Taken together, these results indicate that OCPs are an effective and reversible contraceptive option for bonobos that can be used by zoos and sanctuaries to limit reproduction. Zoo Biol. 35:444-453, 2016. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A Snapshot of Urban Adolescent Women's Contraceptive Knowledge at the Onset of a Community Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptive Promotion Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Katherine Blumoff; Jenks, Sara Catherine; Piazza, Nina; Malibiran, Beatriz Ramos; Aligne, C Andrew

    2017-08-01

    To contextualize young women's knowledge and attitudes regarding contraception at the outset of an intervention promoting long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) use for teen pregnancy prevention. Our intervention was on the basis of diffusion of innovation theory, and at the outset we were interested in likely early adopters' existing knowledge and attitudes toward contraception. This mixed methods study consisted of focus groups within positive youth development programs in Rochester, New York; we discussed young women's knowledge and sources of information for all US Food and Drug Administration-approved contraceptive methods. Seven focus groups and 24 female adolescent participants aged 15-19 years. Quantitative ranking of all contraceptive methods; qualitative themes from focus group discussions. Our findings showed a high level of knowledge about a select group of methods, which included LARC methods, and that participants received contraceptive information from peers and family. Participants had more concerns than positive impressions regarding the effectiveness, safety, practicality, and partner reception of the contraceptive methods, with the exception of the condom. Quantitatively, the condom received the highest average rating. The importance of personal anecdotes in our findings supports the use of outreach and information campaigns; providing medically accurate information and spreading positive personal anecdotes will be key to improving young women's impressions of the safety and acceptability of LARC use. This snapshot of contraceptive knowledge indicates that young women can be mature, informed consumers of sexual and reproductive health care, and through diffusion of innovation could be key players in promoting the most effective means of pregnancy prevention. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Contraceptive Coverage and the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschann, Mary; Soon, Reni

    2015-12-01

    A major goal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is reducing healthcare spending by shifting the focus of healthcare toward preventive care. Preventive services, including all FDA-approved contraception, must be provided to patients without cost-sharing under the ACA. No-cost contraception has been shown to increase uptake of highly effective birth control methods and reduce unintended pregnancy and abortion; however, some institutions and corporations argue that providing contraceptive coverage infringes on their religious beliefs. The contraceptive coverage mandate is evolving due to legal challenges, but it has already demonstrated success in reducing costs and improving access to contraception.

  17. The influence of male partners on contraceptive usage in sub-Saharan Africa-Lagos experience

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    Omololu Adegbola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Family planning programs, researches, and studies have focused mainly on women with little attention to men′s role in the contraceptive choices by the couple. Men′s exclusion from these programs has serious implications on the acceptance and use of contraceptives by the couple. Objective: To determine the influence of male partners on contraceptive use of their spouses. Subjects and Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study at a Tertiary Care Centre in Lagos, Nigeria. It was conducted from January 1 to April 30, 2010, where all consecutive consenting pregnant women were given structured questionnaires to give to their partners so as to evaluate the contribution of the male partners to contraceptives use in their spouses as well as assess their awareness and knowledge of contraception. Categorical variables were analyzed using Chi-square test or Fisher′s exact test as appropriate while continuous variables by t-test. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Of the 370 respondents, only 51.9% (192 knew about female contraceptive methods, while 50% (185 were willing to allow their wives to use contraception. Barrier method (17.3% and periodic abstinence (15.7% were the leading preferred choice for their wives. However, bilateral tubal ligation was the least preferred method (1.6%. Previous counseling of male partner significantly influenced their decision to allow their wives to use contraceptives (P = 0.001. Conclusion: Involving the male partner in family planning counseling plays an important role in increasing the acceptance and use of contraceptives by the couple.

  18. A STUDY OF EFFICACY AND SAFETY PROFILE WITH SUB DERMAL SINGLE ROD CONTRACEPTIVE IMPLANT IMPLANON

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    Sapna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The development of sub dermal contraceptive implant has been an important improvement in current contraceptive technology and to a good alternative to offer well established contraceptive method. Hormonal implant must show high efficacy, high acceptabilit y and rapid return of fertility after removal by maintaining a sustained release of progesterone, the contraceptive effect of the implant can be obtained with a much smaller daily dose than when administering the same steroid by an oral or intramuscular ro ute. Sub dermal implant s are also independent of user compliance which remains a determinant factor in the efficacy of most contraceptive methods. In addition after removal of the hormonal implant, fertility returns almost immediately. They contain only pr ogestogen, these implant may also be used by women who cannot tolerate oestrogen or by women for whom oestrogen is contraindicated. The availability of new innovative contraceptive implant system such as implanon is very important to offer couples alternat ive methods to plan size of their family more efficiently. OBJECTIVES: To study efficacy and safety profile of single rod sub dermal contraceptive device implant implanon. To evaluate the vaginal bleeding patterns observed during the use of implanon. To as sess the acceptability of the contraceptive device as indicated by discontinuation rates. MATERIAL AND METHODS: S tudy was carried in OBG department of RMC Kanpur on healthy female volunteers having regular menstruation & at least one living child. RESULT: The result of this study was excellent in terms of contraception with pearl index of 0, almost one third cases were having in frequent bleeding episode. CONCLUSION: The study was conducted on 110 women of age 20 - 35 years with at least one living child and having regular menstrual period, in present study half of cases discontinued implant due to no fix pattern of bleeding and failure was o%, efficacy of this implant

  19. Promoting the female condom to refugees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Papo

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available UNHCR and its partners have been providing male condoms since the late 1990s. However, uptake remains alarmingly low. Will the agency be more successful in promoting the female condom, a female-initiated barrier method of contraception and disease prevention?

  20. Immediate versus delayed postpartum insertion of contraceptive implant for contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sothornwit, Jen; Werawatakul, Yuthapong; Kaewrudee, Srinaree; Lumbiganon, Pisake; Laopaiboon, Malinee

    2017-04-22

    The spacing of pregnancies has a positive impact on maternal and newborn health. The progestin contraceptive implant, which is a long-acting, reversible method of contraception, has a well-established low failure rate that is compatible with tubal sterilization. The standard provision of contraceptive methods on the first postpartum visit may put some women at risk of unintended pregnancy, either due to loss to follow-up or having sexual intercourse prior to receiving contraception. Therefore, the immediate administration of contraception prior to discharge from the hospital that has high efficacy may improve contraceptive prevalence and prevent unintended pregnancy. To compare the initiation rate, effectiveness, and side effects of immediate versus delayed postpartum insertion of implant for contraception. We searched for eligible studies up to 28 October 2016 in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, and POPLINE. We examined review articles and contacted investigators. We also checked registers of ongoing clinical trials, citation lists of included studies, key textbooks, grey literature, and previous systematic reviews for potentially relevant studies. We sought randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared immediate postpartum versus delayed insertion of contraceptive implant for contraception. Two review authors (JS, YW) independently screened titles and abstracts of the search results, and assessed the full-text articles of potentially relevant studies for inclusion. They extracted data from the included studies, assessed risk of bias, compared results, and resolved disagreements by consulting a third review author (PL or SK). We contacted investigators for additional data, where possible. We computed the Mantel-Haenszel risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for binary outcomes and the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI for continuous variables. Three studies that included 410 participants met the

  1. Post-abortion contraception: care and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela; Monteiro, Renata Luciria; Hoga, Luiza Akiko Komura; Fujimori, Elizabeth; Chofakian, Christiane Borges do Nascimento; dos Santos, Osmara Alves

    2014-01-01

    to analyze assistance regarding contraception methods received by women during hospitalization due to abortion, and contraceptive practices the month after this episode. a longitudinal study of women hospitalized due to abortion in a public hospital in the city of São Paulo. Face-to-face interviews (n=170) followed by telephone interviews in the subsequent month (n=147) were conducted between May and December of 2011. a small number of women reported they received guidance on, and prescription for, contraceptive methods at hospital discharge. A trend of statistical significance was identified for prescription of contraceptive methods at discharge and its use in the following month, when adjusted for age. Most women reported sexual intercourse (69.4%) with the use of contraceptive method (82.4%), but no health professional guidance (63.1%). despite the fact that post-abortion contraception assistance was lower than the recommended guidelines by public health policies, women demonstrated willingness to use contraceptive methods.

  2. Contraception and abortion in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B R; Horga, M; Andronache, L

    1993-04-03

    After the downfall of the Ceausescu regime in December, 1989, the new Government of Romania abolished the law that prohibited abortions on request. Subsequently, the rate of legally induced abortions increased significantly while the rate of maternal mortality declined dramatically. Despite the large number of women who request induced abortions, most women and gynaecologists say that they would prefer to prevent unwanted pregnancies through the use of modern contraception. In this paper we examine factors that contribute to the disparity between women's desire to use modern contraception to prevent unwanted pregnancies and their practice of having induced abortions to prevent unwanted births. The results show that women (and suggest that men) need a wide choice of dependably available high-quality contraceptives; they need to be able to obtain information, counselling, and methods from a wide range of sources/health-care providers; both women's and men's perceptions about, and use of, modern contraception could be positively affected through sexual education started in secondary school; and, to reduce repeat abortions, women's post-abortion family-planning needs must not be neglected.

  3. Contraception and the Adolescent Diabetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennoy, Ilene

    1989-01-01

    Data from a study of 11 teenage diabetics suggests that pregnancy among adolescent diabetics is more frequent than among the general population, at a time when diabetic control is poor because of psychosocial factors associated with adolescence. Current recommendations regarding contraception for diabetic women, focusing on barrier methods, are…

  4. Oral Contraceptive Pill and PCOS

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    ... oral contraceptive pill is much more than a birth control pill. Adolescent girls and young women are frequently prescribed the ... Control Pills: General Information Medical Uses of the Birth Control Pill PCOS: All ... Chat with us! Our PCOS chats are safe places for teens and young women who share a common condition ...

  5. Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor-Q.D.® ... only oral contraceptives are safe for use by breast-feeding mothers. If you are fully breastfeeding (not ... 6 weeks after delivery. If you are partially breast-feeding (giving your baby some food or formula), ...

  6. Contraceptive vaginal rings: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brache, Vivian; Faundes, Anibal

    2010-11-01

    Development efforts on contraceptive vaginal rings were initiated over 40 years ago based on two principles: the capacity of the vaginal epithelium to absorb steroids and the capacity of elastomers to release these hormones at a nearly constant rate. Numerous models of contraceptive vaginal rings (CVRs) have been studied, but only two have reached the market: NuvaRing, a combined ring that releases etonogestrel (ENG) and ethinylestradiol (EE), and Progering, a progesterone-releasing ring for use in lactating women. The main advantages of CVRs are their effectiveness (similar to or slightly better than the pill), ease of use without the need of remembering a daily routine, user's ability to control initiation and discontinuation, nearly constant release rate allowing for lower doses, greater bioavailability and good cycle control with the combined ring. The main disadvantages are related to the mode of delivery; CVRs may cause vaginal discharge and complaints, ring expulsion is not uncommon, the ring may be felt during coitus and vaginal insertion may be unpleasant for some women. The studies reviewed in this article provide evidence that CVRs are safe, effective and highly acceptable to women. There is no doubt that CVRs offer a new, effective contraceptive option to women, expanding their available choices of hormonal contraception.

  7. Oral Contraceptives after Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Schlatter

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bariatric surgery offers a highly effective mode of treatment for obese patients. Some procedures such as bypass cause an alteration in normal gastrointestinal tract with possible consequences for the uptake of orally administered drugs. Methods: We assessed the literature to ascertain whether the use of oral drugs and especially oral contraceptives is effective and adequate after bariatric surgery. Results: The bioavailability of drugs could be affected by the solubility and pH of the modified medium after bariatric surgery and by the loss of gastrointestinal transporters. Bariatric surgery could potentially result in a transient change in the absorption of drugs such as analgesics, antibiotics, antiarrhythmics, anticoagulants, psychotropic, and oral contraceptive drugs. Effective contraception is especially critical in the postoperative period, and implants might be representing a safe contraceptive method in women undergoing bariatric surgery. Conclusion: Each drug will have to be evaluated with respect to its site of absorption and its mechanism of absorption, with special attention on parameters influencing the effectiveness of the absorption processes.

  8. Breast-feeding: nature's contraceptive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, R V

    1985-01-01

    Our ancestors achieved the lowest rate of reproduction of any living mammal by the postponement of puberty until well into the 2nd decade of life, a maximal probability of conception of only about 24% per menstrual cycle even when ovulation had commenced, a 4-year birth interval as a result of the contraceptive effects of breastfeeding, and sharply declining fertility during the 4th decade of life, leading to complete sterility at the menopause. This pattern of reproduction was ideally suited to the prevailing lifestyle of the nomadic hunter-gatherer. The postponement of puberty resulted in a prolonged period of childhood dependency, thus enabling parents to transmit their acquired experience to their offspring. Long birth intervals were essential for a woman who had to wander 1000 or more miles each year in search of food, because she could not manage to carry more than 1 child with her at a time. The lifestyle of comparatively recent times of a settled agricultural economy made possible subsequent rural and urban development, but this transition from nomad to city dweller also stimulated fertility. The cultivation of crops and the domestication of animals led to the development of permanent housing, where the mother could leave her baby in a safe place while she worked in the field. The resultant reduction in mother-infant contact coupled with the availability of early weaning foods reduced the suckling frequency, thereby eroding the contraceptive effect of breastfeeding and decreasing the birth interval. The model conquest of disease eventually led to rapid rates of population growth. In the developed countries of Europe and North America, reproduction was subsequently held in check by the use of artificial forms of contraception, but this has yet to take place in the developing countries of Asia, Africa, and South America. For a developing country, contraceptives are expensive, may be culturally unacceptable, and carry health risks. Breastfeeding is 1 form of

  9. Comparison of meat quality parameters in surgical castrated versus vaccinated against gonadotrophin-releasing factor male and female Iberian pigs reared in free-ranging conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Macipe, M; Rodríguez, P; Izquierdo, M; Gispert, M; Manteca, X; Mainau, E; Hernández, F I; Claret, A; Guerrero, L; Dalmau, A

    2016-01-01

    This study compared carcass and meat quality traits between 16 vaccinated (VF), 19 castrated (CF) and 8 entire (EF) female Iberian pigs, and between 21 vaccinated (VM) and 19 castrated (CM) male Iberian pigs reared in free ranging conditions. Vaccination consisted in the application of Improvac® at the age of 11, 12 and 14 months in VF and VM. Pigs were slaughtered at 16 months. In females, carcass and meat quality were found to be very similar regardless of the treatment. In males, VM had a leaner carcass, lower (P free-range conditions in terms of product qualities. Vaccination in females did not alter carcass and meat quality, and specific interests should consider reproductive behavior in free-range conditions.

  10. Increasing access to emergency contraception through online prescription requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averbach, Sarah; Wendt, Jacqueline Moro; Levine, Deborah K; Philip, Susan S; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2010-01-01

    To describe a pilot program, Plan B Online Prescription Access, to provide easy access to prescriptions for emergency contraception via the Internet. We measured electronic prescriptions for Plan B (Duramed Pharmaceuticals, Cincinnati, Ohio) by month over time. Pharmacists faxed patient-generated prescriptions back to the Department of Public Health for confirmation. Despite no marketing, within the first 18 months of the program, 152 electronic prescriptions for Plan B were requested by 128 female San Francisco residents. Seventy-eight prescriptions were filled (51%) by pharmacists. If correctly marketed, online prescriptions for Plan B have the potential to be an effective means of increasing emergency contraception access in both urban and rural settings across the United States. Further user-acceptability studies are warranted.

  11. [Intravesical migration of an intrauterine contraceptive device complicated by stones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joual, Abdenbi; Querfani, Badreddine; Taha, Abellatif; El Mejjad, Amine; Frougui, Younes; Rabii, Redouane; Debbagh, Adil; El Mrini, Mohamed

    2004-06-01

    Transuterine migration of an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) is a rare complication. The authors report a case of IUCD that migrated into the bladder and subsequently became calcified, leading to a false diagnosis of bladder stones. A 38-year-old woman with an IUCD for 3 years presented with haematuria and signs of bladder irritation. Ultrasound and plain abdominal x-rays suggested a diagnosis of bladder stones. The positive diagnosis of migrated and calcified IUCD was only established after surgical extraction of the stone.

  12. Inflammatory Bowel Disease, the Oral Contraceptive Pill and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert N Allan

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes our current knowledge of the role of the oral contraceptive pill in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBO, followed by a review of fertility in women and men. IBD and pregnancy, including the impact on the fetus and the mother with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease, is considered. The safety of drug treatment during pregnancy, the outcome of surgical treatment during pregnancy and the problems that may be encountered during pregnancy in patients with an ileostomy or ileo-anal pouch are discussed, followed by a review of the short and long term prognosis of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease partition.

  13. Is there any association between hormonal contraceptives and cervical neoplasia in a poor Nigerian setting?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajah LO

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Leonard Ogbonna Ajah,1,2 Chibuike Ogwuegbu Chigbu,2 Benjamin Chukwuma Ozumba,2 Theophilus Chimezie Oguanuo,2 Paul Olisaemeka Ezeonu1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Nigeria; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria Background: The association between hormonal contraception and cervical cancer is controversial. These controversies may hamper the uptake of hormonal contraceptives. Objective: To determine the association between hormonal contraceptives and cervical neoplasia. Materials and methods: This was a case-control study in which Pap-smear results of 156 participants on hormonal contraceptives were compared with those of 156 participants on no form of modern contraception. Modern contraception is defined as the use of such contraceptives as condoms, pills, injectables, intrauterine devices, implants, and female or male sterilization. Those found to have abnormal cervical smear cytology results were subjected further to colposcopy. Biopsy specimens for histology were collected from the participants with obvious cervical lesions or those with suspicious lesions on colposcopy. The results were analyzed with descriptive and inferential statistics at a 95% level of confidence. Results: A total of 71 (45.5%, 60 (38.5%, and 25 (16.0% of the participants on hormonal contraceptives were using oral contraceptives, injectable contraceptives, and implants, respectively. Cervical neoplasia was significantly more common among participants who were ≥35 years old (6% versus 1%, P<0.0001, rural dwellers (6% versus 3.5%, P<0.0001, unmarried (7.6% versus 3.5%, P<0.0001, unemployed (6.8% versus 3.5%, P<0.0001, less educated (6% versus 3.8%, P<0.0001, and had high parity (6.8% versus 3.6%, P<0.0001. There was no statistical significant difference in cervical neoplasia between the two groups of participants (7 [4.5%] versus 6 [3.8%], P=1.0. Conclusion

  14. Surgical Assisting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Insert and remove Foley urinary bladder catheter Place pneumatic tourniquet Confirm procedure with surgeon Drape patient within ... Technology and Surgical Assisting (NBSTSA) offers the CertifiedSurgical First Assistant (CSFA) credential, and the National Surgical Assistant ...

  15. Students’ Perceptions of Contraceptives in University of Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Nana Nimo Appiah-Agyekum; Esinam Afi Kayi

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study sought to explore University of Ghana Business School diploma student's knowledge of contraceptives, types of contraceptives, attitudes towards contraceptive users, preference for contraceptives, benefits, and side-effects of contraceptives. Materials and methods Data was conducted with three sets of focus group discussions. Participants were systematically sampled from accounting and public administration departments. Results Findings showed that students had little know...

  16. Complications of female sterilization: immediate and delayed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, G R; Sondheimer, S J

    1984-03-01

    Surgical sterilization in women has changed dramatically over the past 20 years. The development of laparoscopy and minilaparotomy have made the procedure readily available even in developing countries. In the United States, changing social values and changes in hospital regulations have done as much as technology to account for the tremendous increases in the number of women undergoing sterilization. Improved sterilization procedures have resulted in lower costs for sterilization and lowered morbidity and mortality rates. Hysterectomy for sterilization alone carries unacceptable morbidity and mortality rates. Originally, laparoscopic techniques utilized unipolar cautery. However, bowel burns, a rare but serious complication, were reported, and this led to newer techniques. These techniques, using bands, clips, and bipolar cautery, have gained increasing popularity and have eliminated many of the serious complications of female sterilization. Historically, there has been concern that tubal sterilization by any method produces, in significant numbers of patients, the subsequent gynecologic and psychologic problems called "post-tubal ligation syndrome." A review of earlier literature indicates that many of these studies have serious methodologic problems, including recall bias, inappropriate control groups, failure to elicit prior history of gynecologic or psychologic problems, and failure to account for the use of oral contraceptives or IUDs. More recent large prospective epidemiologic studies that have controlled for prior gynecologic problems and contraceptive usage have failed to show increased incidence of gynecologic sequelae in large numbers of women. However, there are some data to support the concept that in certain individuals, sterilization may result in disruption of ovarian blood or nerve supply, producing gynecologic sequelae. Additional data from these ongoing large-scale studies and others should help to elucidate this problem in the future. Pregnancy

  17. [Oral contraceptive pill and thrombotic risk: epidemiological studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruzzetti, F; Perini, D; Spirito, N; Manca, R

    2012-12-01

    The venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a rare event during childbearing age and during the assumption of combined oral contraceptive. The absolute risk of VTE in users of combined oral contraceptives is 20-30 per 100000 women years. A number of case-control studies published in recent years have shown an apparent increase in the risk of VTE among users of oral contraceptives (OCs) containing desogestrel, gestodene, drospirenone and cyproterone, relative to the use of levonorgestrel. The data derived from these recent studies is of borderline statistical significance because any important factors are not considered to evaluate the real correlation between the assumption of OCs and risk of venous thromboembolism. Among the factors that should be considered, there are: EE dose, duration of use, coexistance of other risk factors of venous thromboembolism (age, BMI, familiarity, surgical interventions) and other prescription bias. The lack of these factors is likely to contribute to the increased risk of venous thromboembolism observed in users of third-generation OCs when compared to that in users of second-generation OCs. To date, because of the inadequacy of epidemiological studies, the data about the correlation between OCs and TVE, are not conclusive and it will be necessary to carry out other studies to clarify this debating point, definitively.

  18. What's a Guy To Do?: Contraceptive Responsibility, Confronting Masculinity, and the History of Vasectomy in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shropshire, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing popularity of vasectomy in recent years, historians have largely ignored the history of the procedure. The current article provides a preliminary examination of voluntary male sterilization in Canada and, in so doing, challenges the gendered paradigm scholars have often applied to the history of contraception. State-sponsored Medicare and late decriminalization of contraception are discussed as factors that slowed widespread adoption of vasectomy in Canada while evolving surgical techniques are highlighted for their role in increasing acceptability of the procedure. The article explores how evolving definitions of hegemonic masculinity have both hindered and encouraged acceptance of vasectomy over time.

  19. The role of previous contraception education and moral judgment in contraceptive use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Valerie; Kelly, Patricia J; Cheng, An-Lin; Witt, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge and attitudes that lead to nonuse of contraception are not well understood. The goal of this study was to determine whether an association exists between contraceptive use and specific knowledge and attitudinal factors. We conducted a secondary analysis of data from a nationally representative telephone survey of 897 unmarried women aged 18 to 29 years to examine the relationship between contraceptive use and comprehensive sex education, attitude toward pregnancy prevention, perceived infertility, distrust toward the health care system or contraception, and moral attitude toward contraception. Both ever having made a visit to a physician or clinic for women's health care and ever having used any method of contraception to prevent pregnancy were significantly impacted by more comprehensive sex education and less likelihood to view contraception as morally wrong. Consistent with other research, we found no association between the desire to avoid pregnancy and contraceptive use. We found an association between health system distrust and contraceptive use, but health system distrust did not predict contraceptive use. Our findings show that contraceptive use among a sample of young women is influenced by previous contraceptive education and moral attitudes toward contraception. Clinicians should be cognizant of these realities, which may need to be addressed in both clinical and nonclinical venues. © 2014 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  20. Emergency contraception in Wisconsin: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Laura; Schrager, Sarina

    2006-07-01

    Emergency contraception is used to prevent pregnancy in the event of unprotected sexual intercourse. The most common methods of emergency contraception are combination and progestin-only oral contraceptive pills. They are effective, safe, and have few side effects. Most physicians are aware of emergency contraception, yet it is not widely prescribed or used. The American Medical Association and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend providing information and access to emergency contraceptive pills at routine gynecologic visits. Evidence has shown that women provided with advance supplies of emergency contraceptive pills were more likely to use them. There is no evidence of increased sexual risk-taking behavior or reduction in use of regular birth control methods. It is estimated that with wider use of emergency contraceptive, nearly half of unplanned pregnancies and abortions could be prevented. Access and knowledge of emergency contraception are the biggest barriers to use. Many emergency departments in Wisconsin do not prescribe emergency contraception, making access for women in rural areas difficult. By increasing use of emergency contraceptive pills by improving access and improving patient knowledge, unplanned pregnancies and abortions may be reduced.

  1. How does Intimate Partner Violence Affect Condom and Oral Contraceptive Use in the United States? A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Julie N.; Stockman, Jamila K.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intimate partner violence (IPV) is estimated to affect 25% of adult women in the US alone. IPV directly impacts women’s ability to use contraception, resulting in many of unintended pregnancies and STIs. This review examines the relationship between IPV and condom and oral contraceptive use within the United States at two levels: the female victim’s perspective on barriers to condom and oral contraceptive use, in conjunction with experiencing IPV (Aim 1) and the male perpetrator’s perspective regarding condom and oral contraceptive use (Aim 2). STUDY DESIGN We systematically reviewed and synthesized all publications meeting the study criteria published since 1997. We aimed to categorize the results by emerging themes related to each study aim. RESULTS We identified 42 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We found 37 studies that addressed Aim 1. Within this we identified three themes: violence resulting in reduced condom or oral contraceptive use (n=15); condom or oral contraceptive use negotiation (n=15); which we further categorized as IPV due to condom or oral contraceptive request, perceived violence (or fear) of IPV resulting in decreased condom or oral contraceptive use, and sexual relationship power imbalances decreasing the ability to use condoms or oral contraceptives; and reproductive coercion (n=7). We found 5 studies that addressed Aim 2. Most studies were cross-sectional, limiting the ability to determine causality between IPV and condom or oral contraceptive use; however, most studies did find a positive relationship between IPV and decreased condom or oral contraceptive use. CONCLUSIONS Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research has demonstrated the linkages between female IPV victimization/male IPV perpetration and condom or oral contraceptive use. However, additional qualitative and longitudinal research is needed to improve the understanding of dynamics in relationships with IPV and determine causality between IPV

  2. Safety, efficacy and patient acceptability of the contraceptive and non-contraceptive uses of the LNG-IUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarek, Paula H; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2010-08-09

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs) provide highly effective, long-term, safe, reversible contraception, and are the most widely used reversible contraceptive method worldwide. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) is a T-shaped IUD with a steroid reservoir containing 52 mg of levonorgestrel that is released at an initial rate of 20 μg daily. It is highly effective, with a typical-use first year pregnancy rate of 0.1% - similar to surgical tubal occlusion. It is approved for 5 years of contraceptive use, and there is evidence that it can be effective for up to 7 years of continuous use. After removal, there is rapid return to fertility, with 1-year life-table pregnancy rates of 89 per 100 for women less than 30 years of age. Most users experience a dramatic reduction in menstrual bleeding, and about 15% to 20% of women become amenorrheic 1 year after insertion. The device's strong local effects on the endometrium benefit women with various benign gynecological conditions such as menorrhagia, dysmenorrhea, leiomyomata, adenomyosis, and endometriosis. There is also evidence to support its role in endometrial protection during postmenopausal estrogen replacement therapy, and in the treatment of endometrial hyperplasia.

  3. Physical domestic violence and subsequent contraceptive adoption among women in rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Rob; Jadhav, Apoorva; Hindin, Michelle

    2013-03-01

    This study examines the relationship between male to female physical domestic violence and contraceptive adoption among women in four economically and culturally distinct areas of India. Data from India's 1998-1999 National Family Health Survey-2 and a follow-up survey in 2002-2003 for which the same women in four states were reinterviewed are analyzed. The focus of the analysis is on how baseline exposure to physical domestic violence is associated with the intersurvey adoption of contraception. Women who experience physical violence from their husbands are significantly less likely to adopt contraception in the intersurvey period, although this relationship varies by State. This study builds upon previous work by using an indicator of physical domestic violence exposure that is measured before contraceptive adoption, thus allowing the identification of how exposure to violence shapes the adoption of contraception. The results demonstrate that for women living in Bihar and Jharkhand there is a clear negative relationship between physical domestic violence and a woman's adoption of contraception; this relationship was not found for women in Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu. The results point to the need to include domestic violence screening and referral services into family planning services.

  4. Contraceptive options for women living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sharon; Steyn, Petrus; Temmerman, Marleen

    2014-08-01

    Women living with HIV are often of reproductive age, and many desire effective contraceptive options to delay or prevent pregnancy. We review the safety of various hormonal and non-hormonal contraceptive methods for women living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Additionally, we discuss drug interactions between contraceptive methods and antiretrovirals and the safety of methods with respect to onward transmission to HIV-negative partners for women in sero-discordant partnerships. In general, most methods are safe for most women living with HIV. An understanding of the reproductive goals of each individual patient, as well as her medical condition and medication, should be taken into account when counselling women on their contraceptive options. Further research is needed to understand drug interactions between contraceptives and antiretrovirals better and how to fulfil the contraceptive needs of HIV-positive women.

  5. Nonbarrier contraceptives and vaginitis and vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S

    1991-10-01

    Within the limitations of the available data, it has been reported that oral contraceptive use versus other contraceptive methods is associated with a greater or similar frequency of candidiasis, increased numbers of anaerobic microorganisms, an increased or similar frequency of chlamydia trachomatis, and a reduced frequency of bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis. The impact of contraceptive steroids on cellular and humoral immunologic factors may explain these observations. Intrauterine contraceptive device use is reported to be associated with an increased rate of bacterial vaginosis and anaerobic organism recovery from the vagina regardless of symptoms. Patients having a contraceptive vaginal ring were found to have the same number and types of vaginal organisms as oral contraceptive users. Levonorgestrel-releasing subdermal implant (Norplant, Wyeth-Ayerst, Philadelphia, Pa.) users have been reported to have approximately half the rate of vaginitis and vaginosis compared with that of Copper T-200 intrauterine device users.

  6. Recent innovations in oral contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Miriam; Phan-Weston, Scarlett; Jacobs, Adam

    2010-03-01

    Traditional forms of oral contraception contain 21 days of hormone-containing pills and 7 days of placebo during the hormone-free interval (HFI). Since 2003, the Food and Drug Administration has approved 24/4, 84/7, and 365-day regimens. These regimens shorten the HFI in an attempt to decrease bleeding and menstrual-associated side effects. Safety and efficacy of these regimens is comparable with traditional 21/7 dosing. Extended regimens are associated with high patient satisfaction. Bleeding patterns are similar or shorter in women using extended regimens, along with improvement in menstrual symptoms. One of the new formulations contains the new progestin drospirenone, which has antimineralocorticoid and antiandrogenic properties. This review summarizes the data about new formulations of oral contraception available in the United Sates and also provides a summary of the current literature on drospirenone.

  7. A Survey of Teenagers' Attitudes Toward Moving Oral Contraceptives Over the Counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski, Ruth; Kottke, Melissa

    2015-09-01

    Evidence suggests that over-the-counter access to oral contraceptives may help expand use among adult women. Teenagers may particularly benefit from this approach, as they experience disproportionately high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique challenges accessing contraceptives. However, limited research has explored teenagers' attitudes toward over-the-counter access. In 2014, a sample of 348 females aged 14-17, recruited via Facebook advertisements, participated in an online survey assessing teenagers' attitudes toward over-the-counter access and their understanding of how to use oral contraceptives after reading a prototype over-the-counter product label. Differences by participants' characteristics were assessed in bivariate analyses (Pearson chi-square and Fisher's exact tests for categorical measures, and independent t tests and one-way analyses of variance for continuous measures). Seventy-three percent of participants supported over-the-counter access, and 61% reported that they would likely use oral contraceptives available through this approach. Few subgroup differences were found. Notably, sexually experienced participants were significantly more likely than others both to support this approach (85% vs. 63%) and to be interested in obtaining oral contraceptives this way (77% vs. 48%). Participants understood an average of 7.1 of eight key concepts that the prototype product label was intended to convey; no significant differences were found among subgroups. Over-the-counter access may be a promising approach for providing oral contraceptives to teenagers. Additional research is needed to evaluate whether teenagers can screen themselves for contraindications to oral contraceptive use and correctly use oral contraceptives obtained over the counter. Copyright © 2015 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  8. Progestogen-only injectable contraceptive: Experience of women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    menstrual pattern are a well known side effect of this effective contraceptive method. .... For most teenagers requesting contraceptive, ... Injectables offer the advantage of not requiring ... insertion, and the combined oral contraceptive pills.

  9. Contraceptive choices amongst women in Kano, Nigeria: A five (5 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contraceptive choices amongst women in Kano, Nigeria: A five (5) year review. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... of contraceptive usage the preferred method and the source of information on contraception among the ...

  10. Contraceptive practices adopted by women attending an urban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    couples using contraceptive methods, identify reasons for their adoption & non adoption and to assess unmet needs for contraception. .... emergency contraception, and two traditional methods ..... It Up: The Benefits of Investing in Sexual and.

  11. Pharmacologic development of male hormonal contraceptive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, M Y; Amory, J K

    2011-01-01

    The world population continues to increase dramatically despite the existence of contraceptive technology. The use of male hormonal contraception may help in preventing un intended pregnancies and managing future population growth. Male hormonal contraception relies on the administration of exogenous hormones to suppress spermatogenesis. Clinical trials have tested several regimens using testosterone, alone or in combination with a progestin. These regimens were shown to be >90% effective in preventing conception and were not associated with serious adverse events.

  12. Oral contraceptive compliance during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serfaty, D

    1997-06-17

    A review of the available literature suggests that adolescent lack of compliance with oral contraceptives (OCs) is a multifactorial problem that requires a multifactorial solution. Because of their lack of experience with contraception, higher frequency of intercourse, higher intrinsic fertility, and pattern of frequent stopping or switching of methods, adolescents experience higher OC failure rates than do adult women. Adolescents also are more likely to forget to take the pill or to discontinue due to side effects, without consulting their physician. A survey of European young women identified contraceptive protection without weight gain as the most necessary change in OCs. Adolescents must be counseled not to miss a single pill, observe the pill-free interval, take phasic formulations in the right order, and use a back-up method in case of diarrhea and vomiting or when certain medications (e.g., antibiotics and anti-epileptics) are used concurrently, and be informed of steps to take in the event of side effects and unprotected intercourse. The quality of the counseling appears to be more important to compliance than the quantity of information provided. Pharmacists should complete the counseling initiated by the physician and explain prescription use. The most significant predictor of consistent OC use is the adolescent's motivation.

  13. The use of oral contraception by adolescents for contraception, menstrual cycle problems or acne

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooff, M.H.A. van; Hirasing, R.A.; Kaptein, M.B.M.; Koppenaal, C.; Voorhorst, F.J.; Schoemaker, J.

    1998-01-01

    Background. Oral contraceptives are prescribed as contraception but also as therapy for menstrual cycle disturbances and acne. We studied the prevalence of oral contraceptive (OC) use and the indications to start OC use among adolescents. Methods. A cohort consisting of ninth grade secondary school

  14. The use of oral contraception by adolescents for contraception, menstrual cycle problems or acne

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooff, M.H.A. van; Hirasing, R.A.; Kaptein, M.B.M.; Koppenaal, C.; Voorhorst, F.J.; Schoemaker, J.

    1998-01-01

    Background. Oral contraceptives are prescribed as contraception but also as therapy for menstrual cycle disturbances and acne. We studied the prevalence of oral contraceptive (OC) use and the indications to start OC use among adolescents. Methods. A cohort consisting of ninth grade secondary school

  15. Secondary Vesical Calculus Resulting from Migration of an Intrauterine Contraceptive Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvarna Vagholkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD is the commonest form of contraception used in view of less systemic side effects. However, there are a multitude of local complications caused by it. Of all the local complications described, migration of the device into adjacent organs is the most morbid of all complications. A patient presenting with history of loss or disappearance of the intrauterine contraceptive device accompanied by urinary symptoms should raise the doubt of a migrated device with the formation of a secondary calculus. This prompts further radiological investigations and merits surgical intervention either endourologically or by open surgery depending upon the merits of the case. A case report elucidating this fact is presented.

  16. Community influences on contraceptive use in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cau, Boaventura Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Fertility in sub-Saharan Africa remains the highest in the world. Yet, the average contraceptive prevalence in Africa is the lowest in major world regions and there is limited understanding of the mechanisms through which community context shapes contraceptive use in the region. Using data from the 2011 Mozambique Demographic and Health Survey, we examine the mechanisms through which community context influences women's use of modern methods of contraception in Mozambique. We find that community context influences the use of modern methods of contraception by shaping the environment in which women live.

  17. Contraception in the Developing World: Special Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schivone, Gillian B; Blumenthal, Paul D

    2016-05-01

    The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) estimates that there are 225 million women and girls with unmet contraceptive need yearly. Unmet need for contraception is defined as women who desire a delay in childbearing and are not using a modern method of contraception. It is projected that providing contraception to these women would avert 36 million abortions, 70,000 maternal deaths, and 52 million unintended pregnancies overall. In the past 30 years, there has been an increase both in population and in contraception use in the developing world. As a result, it is estimated that in 2015 there were 500 million contraceptive users in developing countries, which is nearly double the prevalence in 2000. Unfortunately, women and girls in developing nations still face many obstacles in obtaining modern methods of contraception. Particular challenges in the developing world include lack of access due to inadequate number of trained providers, fewer method options, and "stock-outs" of contraceptive supplies. Innovative strategies for decreasing unmet need will have to address these challenges, and will necessarily involve programmatic solutions such as community-based distribution and social marketing campaigns. Additionally, increasing uptake of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods will be essential for achieving the goal of decreasing unmet need.

  18. A gendered study of young adult contraceptive use at one university in KwaZulu-N atal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OA Oyedeji

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explores contraceptive use among young adult male and female students (aged 18-25 who visit the campus clinic at a university in KwaZulu-Natal. Both a descriptive survey and face to face interviews were used for data collection. In this study, it is affirmed that gender stratification, societal attitudes, and misconceptions about contraceptive use play an important role in the attitudes of young adults, male and female towards contraception and its use. Evidence of this is the high use of condoms amongst both male and female students’ compared with other available methods. Among female students this was highly attributed to personal convenience and comfort with condom use as an unmarried young woman. It was clear from the data collected that respondents themselves attached some stigma to being associated with the use of contraceptive pills or having to visit the clinic regularly for injections as young unmarried women. Male respondents affirmed the use of the condom, although this was hardly with the view of taking reproductive/contraceptive responsibility, but rather, it was attributed to the function of the condom as a safe sex method that offered protection against sexually transmitted diseases and infections. Also evident from the study was the fact that male respondents felt more comfortable with their sexual functioning than the female respondents. This was easily attributed to the role of societal gender stratification in an individual’s life.

  19. Contraceptive effect and potential side-effects of deslorelin acetate implants in rats (Rattus norvegicus): preliminary observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosset, Claire; Peters, Stijn; Peron, Franck; Figuéra, Joëlle; Navarro, Christelle

    2012-07-01

    During the last ten years, numerous species have been treated with deslorelin implants to induce contraception. The aims of the study were 1) to assess contraceptive efficacy of 4.7 mg subcutaneous deslorelin implants in rats, 2) to determine the latency of contraceptive effect, and 3) to determine potential side effects. Three experimental females were implanted and their estrous cycle was studied by vaginal smear. Two weeks after implantation, a male whose fertility was previously assessed with a control female, was introduced into their cage. No female conceived during the 4 mo following implantation. Additionally, 38 pet rats were recruited from clients in practice to test for potential side effects, including 6 males and 32 females with a mean age of 14 mo. Local reaction and transient weight gain during the first 2 wk, as well as behavioral changes were recorded. According to this pilot study, deslorelin implant could be used as a contraceptive method in female rats. The latency period is about 2 wk. Nevertheless, it might be possible to refine the treatment further using hormonal measurements. The duration of contraceptive effect is to be determined in an upcoming study.

  20. Diminished nap effects on memory consolidation are seen under oral contraceptive use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genzel, L.; Baurle, A.; Potyka, A.; Wehrle, R.; Adamczyk, M.; Friess, E.; Steiger, A.; Dresler, M.

    2014-01-01

    Many young females take exogenous hormones as oral contraceptive (OC), a condition rarely controlled for in studies on sleep and memory consolidation even though sex hormones influence consolidation. This study investigated the effects of OCs on sleep-related consolidation of a motor and declarative

  1. Purchasing Nonprescription Contraceptives: The Underlying Structure of a Multi-Item Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolis, Chris; Winsor, Robert D.; True, Sheb L.

    1999-01-01

    Developed a multi-item scale for measuring attitudes associated with purchasing nonprescription contraceptives using construct specification and item generation and confirmatory factor analysis. Demonstrated a high degree of invariance across samples of 81 female and 115 male adult consumers. (SLD)

  2. Menarche, oral contraceptives, pregnancy and progression of disability in relapsing onset and progressive onset multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'hooghe, M. B.; Haentjens, P.; Nagels, G.; D'Hooghe, T.; De Keyser, J.

    2012-01-01

    Female gender and hormones have been associated with disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated age at menarche, use of oral contraceptives and pregnancy in relation to progression of disability in relapsing onset and progressive onset MS. We conducted a cross-sectional survey amon

  3. Diminished nap effects on memory consolidation are seen under oral contraceptive use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genzel, L.; Baurle, A.; Potyka, A.; Wehrle, R.; Adamczyk, M.; Friess, E.; Steiger, A.; Dresler, M.

    2014-01-01

    Many young females take exogenous hormones as oral contraceptive (OC), a condition rarely controlled for in studies on sleep and memory consolidation even though sex hormones influence consolidation. This study investigated the effects of OCs on sleep-related consolidation of a motor and declarative

  4. Parents' Behavioral Norms as Predictors of Adolescent Sexual Activity and Contraceptive Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Sharon A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Used clustered sample household survey of 329 males and females aged 14 to 17, and 470 of their parents to examine influence of parental factors on adolescent sexual behavior and contraceptive use. Found parents' reported behavioral norms accounted for 5% of variance in whether adolescents had had intercourse, and for 33% of variance in…

  5. Influence of Parents, Peers, and Partners on the Contraceptive Use of College Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Linda; Spanier, Graham B.

    1978-01-01

    This study investigates the relative influences of parents, peers, and partners on the contraceptive use of college men and women. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by a nonprobability, purposive sample of 434 never-married, sexually active males and females between the ages of 17 and 22 years. (Author)

  6. Uptake of hormonal contraceptives and correlates of uptake in a phase III clinical trial in rural South Western Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaasa, Andrew; Gafos, Mitzy; Anywaine, Zacchaeus; Nunn, Andrew; Crook, Angela; Levin, Jonathan; McCormack, Sheena; Kamali, Anatoli

    2017-03-11

    Use of a reliable contraception method has become an inclusion criterion in prevention trials to minimize time off product. We report on hormonal contraceptive prevalence, uptake, sustained use and correlates of use in the Microbicides Development Programme (MDP 301) trial at the Masaka Centre in Uganda. HIV negative women in sero-discordant relationships were enrolled and followed-up for 52 to 104 weeks from 2005 to 2009. Contraceptive use data was collected through self-report at baseline and dispensing records during follow-up. Hormonal contraceptives were promoted and provided to women that were not using a reliable method at enrolment. Baseline contraceptive prevalence, uptake and sustained use were calculated. Uptake was defined as a participant who reported not using a reliable method at enrolment and started using a hormonal method at any time after. Logistic regression models were fitted to investigate predictors of hormonal contraceptive uptake. A total of 840 women were enrolled of whom 21 aged ≥50 years and 12 without follow-up data were excluded; leaving 807 (median age 31 IQR 26-38) in this analysis. At baseline, 228 (28%) reported using a reliable contraceptive; 197 hormonal, 28 female-sterilisation, two IUCD and one hysterectomy. As such 579 were not using a reliable contraceptive at enrolment, of whom 296 (51%) subsequently started using a hormonal contraceptive method; 253 DMPA, four oral pills, and two norplant. Overall 193 (98%) existing users and 262 (88%) new users sustained use throughout follow-up. Independent correlates of hormonal contraceptive uptake were: younger women ≤30 years, aOR = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.7-3.6 and reporting not using contraceptives at baseline due to lack of access or money, breastfeeding or other reasons, in comparison to women who reported using unreliable method. Promotion and provision of hormonal contraception doubled the proportion of women using a reliable method of contraception. Uptake was pronounced

  7. Contraceptive use and risk of unintended pregnancy in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Diana G; Bley, Julia; Mikanda, John; Induni, Marta; Arons, Abigail; Baumrind, Nikki; Darney, Philip D; Stewart, Felicia

    2004-07-01

    California is home to more than one out of eight American women of reproductive age. Because California has a large, diverse and growing population, national statistics do not necessarily describe the reproductive health of California women. This article presents risk for pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections among women in California based on the California Women's Health Survey. Over 8900 women of reproductive age who participated in this survey between 1998 and 2001 provide estimates of access to care and use of family-planning methods in the state. We find that 49% of the female population aged 18-44 in California is at risk of unintended pregnancy. Nine percent (9%) of women at risk of an unintended pregnancy are not using any method of contraception, primarily for method-related reasons, such as a concern about side effects or a dislike of available contraceptive methods. Among women at risk for unintended pregnancy, we find disparities by race/ethnicity and education in use of contraceptive methods.

  8. Using Propranolol to Block Memory Reconsolidation in Female Veterans with PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    propranolol after a combat memory to both Female Veterans who take a non-active placebo pill after a combat memory and those who take propranolol after a...were taking oral contraceptives . Oral contraceptives were an exclusion criteria of the clinical trial, so we discussed options with our study...our team to establish rapport. Further, the Veterans that have contacted us indicated the use of oral contraceptives , which was one of several

  9. Contraception. Family planning: by whom and for whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemerding, B

    1992-01-01

    Many people consider family planning to be the cure for population growth and its consequences (poverty, child mortality, morbidity, depletion of natural resources, and environmental degradation). International organizations support family planning programs and population-political strategies control their operations. Other key players in family planning are the pharmaceutical industry, the churches, and governments. Women tend not be involved in developing population and family planning policies, however, but instead implement the policies. Population planners are generally not interested in family planning methods which give women control over their own bodies, e.g., female-controlled barrier methods. In fact, they distrust them because the planners consider women to be unreliable. Besides, the low effectiveness of these methods means women need to rely on abortion, which is a problem in many developing countries, e.g., Latin America. Further, family planning programs must meet predetermined goals, so their service is lacking, e.g., limited supply of contraceptives and not enough time to provide information to clients. Family planning revolves around women. For example, they encourage them to talk their partners into approving the women's use of contraception, but this is almost always difficult for women in developing countries. Provision of family planning cannot be successful without society accepting and treating women as full citizens. In addition, society needs to realize that women have a sexuality separate from men. Political will is needed for these changes in attitude. The international women's movement does not agree on the degree which women can control contraceptives themselves. Women's groups are working to improve the position and independence of women and contraception is just 1 factor which can help them achieve this goal. The Women's Sexuality and Health Feminist Collective in Sao Paulo, Brazil, is an example of a coalition of women's health

  10. The Contraceptive CHOICE Project: reducing barriers to long-acting reversible contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secura, Gina M; Allsworth, Jenifer E; Madden, Tessa; Mullersman, Jennifer L; Peipert, Jeffrey F

    2010-08-01

    To introduce and promote the use of long-acting reversible methods of contraception (LARC; intrauterine contraceptives and subdermal implant) by removing financial and knowledge barriers. The Contraceptive CHOICE Project is a prospective cohort study of 10,000 women 14-45 years who want to avoid pregnancy for at least 1 year and are initiating a new form of reversible contraception. Women screened for this study are read a script regarding long-acting reversible methods of contraception to increase awareness of these options. Participants choose their contraceptive method that is provided at no cost. We report the contraceptive choice and baseline characteristics of the first 2500 women enrolled August 2007 through December 2008. Sixty-seven percent of women enrolled (95% confidence interval, 65.3-69.0) chose long-acting methods. Fifty-six percent selected intrauterine contraception and 11% selected the subdermal implant. Once financial barriers were removed and long-acting reversible methods of contraception were introduced to all potential participants as a first-line contraceptive option, two-thirds chose long-acting reversible methods of contraception. Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of Contraception and Attitudes towards Contraceptive Use in Swedish Women--A Nationwide Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Kopp Kallner

    Full Text Available To describe contraceptive use and attitudes towards contraceptive use in Sweden which has the highest abortion rate in Western Europe. Secondary objectives were to investigate knowledge of contraceptive methods and outcomes of unplanned and unwanted pregnancies.Telephone survey.National survey of women living in Sweden.Women between 16 and 49 years.The survey contained 22 questions with free text and multi choice answers on demographics, contraceptive use, knowledge of and attitudes towards contraception, the importance of monthly bleeding and experience of unintended pregnancy.Distribution of use of contraceptive methods and non-use of contraception among Swedish women. Prevalence and outcome of unintended pregnancies.A total of 1001 women participated in the survey. Of all women, 721/1001 (72.1% currently used contraception whereas 268/1001 (26.8% women did not. Long acting reversible contraception, (LARC; implant and intra uterine contraception was used by 24.3% of women. The unmet need of contraception in Sweden was estimated at 8.9% (89/1001 women. A total of 781 (78% women had never experienced an unintended pregnancy whereas 220 (22% women had had at least one unintended pregnancy. Users and non-users alike stated that one of the most important characteristics of a contraceptive method is its effectiveness.Sweden has a large unmet need for contraception. Furthermore, a large proportion of women have experienced at least one unintended pregnancy. Increasing contraceptive use and promotion of LARC is a possible way forward in the effort to reduce the rates of unwanted pregnancies.

  12. Use of Contraception and Attitudes towards Contraceptive Use in Swedish Women - A Nationwide Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp Kallner, Helena; Thunell, Louise; Brynhildsen, Jan; Lindeberg, Mia; Gemzell Danielsson, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe contraceptive use and attitudes towards contraceptive use in Sweden which has the highest abortion rate in Western Europe. Secondary objectives were to investigate knowledge of contraceptive methods and outcomes of unplanned and unwanted pregnancies. Design Telephone survey. Setting National survey of women living in Sweden. Population Women between 16 and 49 years. Methods The survey contained 22 questions with free text and multi choice answers on demographics, contraceptive use, knowledge of and attitudes towards contraception, the importance of monthly bleeding and experience of unintended pregnancy. Main Outcome Measures Distribution of use of contraceptive methods and non-use of contraception among Swedish women. Prevalence and outcome of unintended pregnancies. Results A total of 1001 women participated in the survey. Of all women, 721/1001 (72.1%) currently used contraception whereas 268/1001 (26.8%) women did not. Long acting reversible contraception, (LARC; implant and intra uterine contraception) was used by 24.3% of women. The unmet need of contraception in Sweden was estimated at 8.9% (89/1001 women). A total of 781 (78%) women had never experienced an unintended pregnancy whereas 220 (22%) women had had at least one unintended pregnancy. Users and non-users alike stated that one of the most important characteristics of a contraceptive method is its effectiveness. Conclusions Sweden has a large unmet need for contraception. Furthermore, a large proportion of women have experienced at least one unintended pregnancy. Increasing contraceptive use and promotion of LARC is a possible way forward in the effort to reduce the rates of unwanted pregnancies. PMID:25992901

  13. Use of Contraception and Attitudes towards Contraceptive Use in Swedish Women--A Nationwide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp Kallner, Helena; Thunell, Louise; Brynhildsen, Jan; Lindeberg, Mia; Gemzell Danielsson, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    To describe contraceptive use and attitudes towards contraceptive use in Sweden which has the highest abortion rate in Western Europe. Secondary objectives were to investigate knowledge of contraceptive methods and outcomes of unplanned and unwanted pregnancies. Telephone survey. National survey of women living in Sweden. Women between 16 and 49 years. The survey contained 22 questions with free text and multi choice answers on demographics, contraceptive use, knowledge of and attitudes towards contraception, the importance of monthly bleeding and experience of unintended pregnancy. Distribution of use of contraceptive methods and non-use of contraception among Swedish women. Prevalence and outcome of unintended pregnancies. A total of 1001 women participated in the survey. Of all women, 721/1001 (72.1%) currently used contraception whereas 268/1001 (26.8%) women did not. Long acting reversible contraception, (LARC; implant and intra uterine contraception) was used by 24.3% of women. The unmet need of contraception in Sweden was estimated at 8.9% (89/1001 women). A total of 781 (78%) women had never experienced an unintended pregnancy whereas 220 (22%) women had had at least one unintended pregnancy. Users and non-users alike stated that one of the most important characteristics of a contraceptive method is its effectiveness. Sweden has a large unmet need for contraception. Furthermore, a large proportion of women have experienced at least one unintended pregnancy. Increasing contraceptive use and promotion of LARC is a possible way forward in the effort to reduce the rates of unwanted pregnancies.

  14. Hormonal contraception and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cibula, D; Gompel, A; Mueck, A O

    2010-01-01

    Fear from increased cancer risk is one of the most significant reasons for low acceptance of reliable contraceptive methods and low compliance.......Fear from increased cancer risk is one of the most significant reasons for low acceptance of reliable contraceptive methods and low compliance....

  15. Ultrasound appearances of Implanon implanted contraceptive devices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNeill, G

    2009-09-01

    Subdermal contraceptive devices represent a popular choice of contraception. Whilst often removed without the use of imaging, circumstances exist where imaging is required. Ultrasound is the modality of choice. The optimal technique and typical sonographic appearances are detailed in this article.

  16. Residual ovarian activity during oral contraception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Heusden

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe study objectives in this thesis focus on pituitary-ovarian activity in women using oral contraceptive steroids. Contraceptive steroids influence the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis in order to interfere with normal follicular development and ovulation. Additional effects on the e

  17. Model for Effective Contraceptive Counseling on Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Gloria A.

    1981-01-01

    A study compared the effective v ineffective use of contraceptives at a major university by comparing college women who had experienced birth control failure with those who had not. Factors related to a woman's use of a contraceptive device include: satisfaction with its aesthetic properties; trust in its effectiveness; a feeling of comfort…

  18. Hormonal contraception and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cibula, D.; Gompel, A.; Mueck, A.O.;

    2011-01-01

    Fear from increased cancer risk is one of the most significant reasons for low acceptance of reliable contraceptive methods and low compliance.......Fear from increased cancer risk is one of the most significant reasons for low acceptance of reliable contraceptive methods and low compliance....

  19. Ultrasound appearances of Implanon implanted contraceptive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, G; Ward, E; Halpenny, D; Snow, A; Torreggiani, W

    2009-01-01

    Subdermal contraceptive devices represent a popular choice of contraception. Whilst often removed without the use of imaging, circumstances exist where imaging is required. Ultrasound is the modality of choice. The optimal technique and typical sonographic appearances are detailed in this article.

  20. Prescribing contraceptives for women with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Mary V; Ross, Ruth

    2011-07-01

    Although women with serious mental illness have high rates of lifetime sexual partners, they infrequently use contraception. Consequently, the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections is high in this population. In addition, while the overall rate of pregnancy in women with schizophrenia of child-bearing age is lower than in the general population, the percentage of pregnancies that are unwanted is higher than that in the general population. The objective of this paper is to help clinicians explore knowledge of appropriate methods of contraception for women who suffer from schizophrenia. The authors reviewed recent literature on the use of contraceptive methods by women with schizophrenia treated with antipsychotic and adjunctive medications. Contraceptive counseling to women and their partners is an important part of comprehensive care for women with serious and persistent mental illness. Women with schizophrenia who smoke, are overweight, or have diabetes, migraine, cardiovascular disease, or a family history of breast cancer should be offered non-hormonal contraception. Women with more than one sexual partner should be advised on barrier methods in addition to any other contraceptive measures they are using. Clinicians should be alert for potential interactions among oral hormonal contraceptives, smoking, and therapeutic drugs. Long-lasting contraceptive methods, such as intrauterine devices, progesterone depot injections, or tubal ligation are reasonable options for women having no wish to further expand their families.

  1. Gender and risk assessment in contraceptive technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kammen, van Jessika; Oudshoorn, Nelly

    2002-01-01

    This paper concerns a comparison of risk assessment practices of contraceptives for women and men. Our analysis shows how the evaluation of health risks of contraceptives does not simply reflect the specific effects of chemical compounds in the human body. Rather, we show how side-effects were rated

  2. Factors Influencing Acceptance Of Contraceptive Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Gupta

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Research Problem: What are the factors influencing acceptance of contraceptive methods.Objective: To study the determinants influencing contra­ceptive acceptance.Study design: Population based cross - sectional study.Setting: Rural area of East DelhiParticipants: Married women in the reproductive age group.Sample:Stratified sampling technique was used to draw the sample.Sample Size: 328 married women of reproductive age group.Study Variables: Socio-economic status, Type of contraceptive, Family size, Male child.Outcome Variables: Acceptance of contraceptivesStatistical Analysis: By proportions.Result: Prevalence of use of contraception at the time of data collection was 40.5%. Tubectomy and vasectomy were most commonly used methods. (59.4%, n - 133. Educational status of the women positively influenced the contraceptive acceptance but income did not. Desire for more children was single most important deterrent for accepting contraception.Recommendations:(i             Traditional method of contraception should be given more attention.(ii            Couplesshould be brought in the contraceptive use net at the early stage of marriage.

  3. Managing adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman Barr, Nancy

    2010-12-15

    Adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives usually diminish with continued use of the same method. Often, physi- cians only need to reassure patients that these symptoms will likely resolve within three to five months. Long-acting injectable depot medroxyprogesterone acetate is the only hormonal contraceptive that is consistently associated with weight gain; other hormonal methods are unlikely to increase weight independent of lifestyle choices. Switching com- bined oral contraceptives is not effective in treating headaches, nor is the use of multivitamins or diuretics. There are no significant differences among various combined oral contraceptives in terms of breast tenderness, mood changes, and nausea. Breakthrough bleeding is common in the first months of combined oral contraceptive use. If significant abnormal bleeding persists beyond three months, other methods can be considered, and the patient may need to be evaluated for other causes. Studies of adverse sexual effects in women using hormonal contraceptives are inconsistent, and the pharmacologic basis for these symptoms is unclear. If acne develops or worsens with progestin-only contra- ceptives, the patient should be switched to a combination method if she is medically eligible. There is insufficient evidence of any effect of hormonal contraceptives on breast milk quantity and quality. Patient education should be encouraged to decrease the chance of unanticipated adverse effects. Women can also be assessed for medical eligibility before and during the use of hormonal contraceptives.

  4. Knowledge, attitude and practice of emergency contraceptives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Background: Young and unmarried women constitute a high risk group for unplanned pregnancies and unsafe abortions. It has been estimated that widespread use of emergency contraception (EC) may significantly ... single women, teenagers and students (3). ... contraceptive method and their sexual behavior is rather.

  5. Residual ovarian activity during oral contraception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Heusden

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe study objectives in this thesis focus on pituitary-ovarian activity in women using oral contraceptive steroids. Contraceptive steroids influence the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis in order to interfere with normal follicular development and ovulation. Additional effects on the e

  6. Drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Kavita; Stuart, Gretchen S.; Robinson, Jennifer; Gray, Andrew L.; Tepper, Naomi K.; Gaffield, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To summarize published evidence on drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals. Design: Systematic review of the published literature. Methods: We searched PubMed, POPLINE, and EMBASE for peer-reviewed publications of studies (in any language) from inception to 21 September 2015. We included studies of women using hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals concurrently. Outcomes of interest were effectiveness of either therapy, toxicity, or pharmacokinetics. We used standard abstraction forms to summarize and assess strengths and weaknesses. Results: Fifty reports from 46 studies were included. Most antiretrovirals whether used for therapy or prevention, have limited interactions with hormonal contraceptive methods, with the exception of efavirenz. Although depot medroxyprogesterone acetate is not affected, limited data on implants and combined oral contraceptive pills suggest that efavirenz-containing combination antiretroviral therapy may compromise contraceptive effectiveness of these methods. However, implants remain very effective despite such drug interactions. Antiretroviral plasma concentrations and effectiveness are generally not affected by hormonal contraceptives. Conclusion: Women taking antiretrovirals, for treatment or prevention, should not be denied access to the full range of hormonal contraceptive options, but should be counseled on the expected rates of unplanned pregnancy associated with all contraceptive methods, in order to make their own informed choices. PMID:28060009

  7. Contraceptive use in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindh, Ingela; Skjeldestad, Finn E; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to compare contraceptive use in the Nordic countries and to assess compliance with recommendations from the European Medicines Agency regarding the use of combined oral contraception containing low-dose estrogen and levonorgestrel, norethisterone or norgestimate. MATERIA...

  8. [The difficulties of contraception: conflicts and paradoxes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribier, F

    1988-06-01

    This work uses clinical examples to explore sources of conflict and denial of patients and physicians during contraception consultations. The discovery of oral contraceptives (OCs) and improvements in mechanical contraception raised hopes that couples could achieve total control of their fertility. But continued high abortion rates and the persistence of sexual problems and maladjustments have demonstrated that contraception alone is not a panacea. Conflicts about contraception may be conscious and quickly expressed during a consultation, even if a medical pretext is given. The resentment when 1 partner desires a child and the other does not for example can translate into a conflict about contraception. Some women are fully aware of their own ambivalence about pregnancy and contraception and able to express it openly, but very often the woman's concerns are expressed by questions, fears, and verbal slips. The fear that pills are unnatural or will cause congenital defects can be interpreted as an expression of guilt over the pleasure that pills permit. Sterility is the ultimate fear caused by this unlimited possibility for pleasure. In the majority of cases, physical complaints are the means by which contraception clients address their physicians. In some cases, intolerance to OCs may actually be a hysterical manifestation that is not understood. Such symptoms as nausea, breast swelling, dizziness, vomiting, nervousness, and insomnia may be signs of early pregnancy as well as of intolerance for pills. Intolerance to pills may be caused by intolerance of a sexuality in which all things seem possible but in which the individual feels unrecognized by the partner. The resulting aggression may be turned inward in the form of a morbid symptom or of forgetting or stopping pill use, recourse to abortion, and demand for recognition. Acting out, especially by adolescents, is common in the area of contraception. In some cases the psychological or emotional needs of the patient

  9. Contraception. Slow train gathers speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, N; Kubba, A

    The otherwise slow pace of contraceptive research developments has recently quickened, with new products developed, more on the way, and encouraging new data emerging about existing methods. While the 1995 UK pill scare called attention to a differential in the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) between pills containing levonorgestrel or norethisterone and those containing desogestrel or gestodene, there is only an extremely small level of excess mortality attributable to third-generation progestogens, less than 2 per million women per year. Tentative evidence suggests that pills with less anti-estrogenic progestogens are neutral with regard to coronary artery disease. The pill remains extremely safe for healthy young women, although additional research with larger numbers of participants is warranted. Salient research findings are that the combined oral contraceptive pill may protect against colon cancer, the pill appears to offer no protection against bone fractures, new products contain less estrogen and have a shortened pill-free interval, a WHO paper showed no significant association between cardiovascular disease and the use of oral or injectable progestogens, a UK study showed no correlation between bone density and plasma estrogen concentrations among long-term users of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, and a WHO controlled trial found a progestogen-only method of emergency contraception to be considerably more effective in preventing expected pregnancies than the Yuzpe regimen. The T 380 copper IUD provides very high protection against intrauterine and extrauterine pregnancies for 10 years and is now available in an improved inserting mechanism, the Mirena levonorgestrel-releasing IUD system is now licensed for 5 years, and the GyneFIX IUD implant is a frameless device fixed during insertion to the fundal myometrium.

  10. Preconception counseling and contraception after gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølsted-Pedersen, L; Skouby, S O; Damm, P

    1991-01-01

    a subsequent pregnancy. Therefore, family planning and contraceptive guidance should follow the lines for women with pregestational diabetes. When low-dose hormonal contraceptives containing ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel were given to women with previous GDM, glucose tolerance and lipoprotein levels......-contraceptive compounds appear to be safe for women with previous GDM when administered for limited periods. At the follow-up examination, we found no increased risk of developing diabetes in women with previous GDM who used oral contraception. We consider the intrauterine contraceptives (IUD) a safe and effective......Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) diagnosed in the period 1978-1984 were followed for on average 6 yr after the index pregnancy. Thirty percent had diabetes mellitus at the follow-up examination, and preliminary results indicate that at least another third will develop diabetes during...

  11. The Catholic Bishops vs. the Contraceptive Mandate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie C. Griffin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Roman Catholic bishops of the United States have publicly opposed artificial contraception since they first issued a public statement condemning it in 1919. Thereafter, the bishops were generally unsuccessful in persuading the public that contraceptive access should be restricted. Recently, however, the bishops succeeded in a campaign to restrict access to contraceptives for Catholic and non-Catholic women alike. Their lobbying and public criticism of the contraceptive mandate of the Affordable Care Act (ACA, which requires employer health plans to offer preventive reproductive care coverage, forced Obama administration officials into a series of accommodations that gutted portions of the law intended to provide contraception to employees without copayment or cost sharing. In contrast to their earlier efforts to restrict reproductive freedom, the bishops successfully characterized their efforts against the ACA as a battle for religious freedom rather than against reproductive rights. This successful strategy may lead to future setbacks for women’s reproductive liberty.

  12. Preconception counseling and contraception after gestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølsted-Pedersen, L; Skouby, S O; Damm, P

    1991-01-01

    a subsequent pregnancy. Therefore, family planning and contraceptive guidance should follow the lines for women with pregestational diabetes. When low-dose hormonal contraceptives containing ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel were given to women with previous GDM, glucose tolerance and lipoprotein levels......Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) diagnosed in the period 1978-1984 were followed for on average 6 yr after the index pregnancy. Thirty percent had diabetes mellitus at the follow-up examination, and preliminary results indicate that at least another third will develop diabetes during......-contraceptive compounds appear to be safe for women with previous GDM when administered for limited periods. At the follow-up examination, we found no increased risk of developing diabetes in women with previous GDM who used oral contraception. We consider the intrauterine contraceptives (IUD) a safe and effective...

  13. Advances of Contraception in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖碧莲

    1994-01-01

    Family planning is an important component of reproductive health. Reduction in total fertility rate is closely related to the decrease of maternal and infant mortality rate and the advances in maternal and child health care. In the last two decades the reduction of total fertility rate from 5.6% in the 70s to 2. 5% in average at present occurs along with the decrease in maternal and infant mortality. This achievement should be attributed partly to the success in the development of contraceptive

  14. Marketing contraceptives in rural Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viravaidya, M

    1988-01-01

    It can be difficult to administer and motivate field workers in family planning programs. In the case of social marketing, the last distributors in the chain are small shopkeepers who keep part of the final sale price. Thus contraceptives become part and parcel of their routine business, and the margin becomes both their remuneration and their motivation. In Thailand and most other countries with social marketing programs, part of the selling price also returns to the program, providing some degree of cost recovery. As family planning succeeds and per capita incomes rise, individuals will be able to pay an increasing part of the total cost of family planning. In the interim, international agencies and governments will continue to provide subsidies. In rural countries like Thailand, social marketing programs can be initiated and expanded relatively rapidly because they build on an existing infrastructure; they can also reach the most distant parts of the country. Skills of local advertising agencies are available in practically all Third World countries. Sales are a reliable record of progress and can be used to suggest innovations or practical solutions to problems. Small shopkeepers often feel more comfortable vending contraceptives than many experts would expect and as members of the community, intuitively know what the community's standards are. Individuals handling oral contraceptives often require some training and supervision by full-time staff who can answer questions that arise; local physicians may also be notified of the program for referral of problem cases. If there is a problem with social marketing programs, it is that they are sometimes too successful--leading to large bills for contraceptive commodities. However, if evaluated in terms of cost-effectiveness, they are less expensive than their alternatives. Along with access to voluntary sterilization and community-based distribution programs, social marketing is a keystone in the arch of family

  15. Female Inguinal Hernia:Analysis of 277 Cases Having Surgical Treatment%女性腹股沟疝277例手术治疗分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马校军

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the advantage and safety of different surgeries in the treatment of female inguinal hernia.Methods 277 cases of female inguinal hernia underwent surgery in our hospital from April 2000 to April 2010 were involved into the study.Among the patients, 147 cases were children with indirect hernia and among the adults, 115 cases were indirect hernia (3 cases of sliding hernia), 8 cases were direct hernia and 7 cases were femoral hernia The hernia in children was treated by high ligation together with the round ligament of uterus inside the hernial sac.The hernia in adults was treated by plain film repair in 87 cases, Kugel repair in 37 cases and plug mesh hernia repair in 6 cases.Results The hernia in 147 children did not relapse after surgery.A small amount of fluid was found by B ultrasound in one case one week after surgery, but the fluid was absorbed one month after surgery.Among the 115 female adults with hernia, the 87 cases treated by plain film repair and the 22 cases treated by Kugel repair did not relapse after surgery and did not have any complications.One case showed complications of local bleeding and retroperitoneal hematoma among the 6 cases treated by plug mesh hernia repair.The patients were followed up for two years and no relapse and no postoperative chronic pain were found.Five adults had urinary retention and were cured after indwelling catheter.Conclusion The hernia in 147 children did not relapse after surgery.A small amount of fluid was found by B ultrasound in one case one week after surgery, but the fluid was absorbed one month after surgery.Among the 115 female adults with hernia, the 87 cases treated by plain film repair and the 22 cases treated by Kugel repair did not relapse after surgery and did not have any complications.One case showed complications of local bleeding and retroperitoneal hematoma among the 6 cases treated by plug mesh hernia repair.The patients were followed up for two years and no relapse and no

  16. Oral contraceptives and the prothrombin time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangrazzi, J; Roncaglioni, M C; Donati, M B

    1980-02-02

    Dr. De Teresa and others reported that mean prothrombin time ratio of 12 patients on long-term anticoagulation with warfarin was significantly higher when they were also taking oral contraceptives (OCs). A study of prothrombin complex activity was recently conducted in female rats treated with an estrogen-progestogen combination (lynestrenol 5 mg; mestranol 0.3 mg/kg body weight) which resulted in a 100% infertility in this species. After 1 treatment for only 1 estral cycle, OC-treated rats had a significantly longer Normotest clotting time (37.7+ or-0.5 sec) than control rats (31.0+or-0.4); the difference was even more notable after 10 cycles. Although this finding has not been reported in women on OCs, it may be that the estrogen-induced "lability" of the prothrombin complex occurs in humans only in special conditions, such as anticoagulation. Alternatively, liver dysfunction occurring among women on OCs may be responsible for reduced metabolism of warfarin, contributing to the effectiveness of the anticoagulation. Further pharmacology studies should be done to clarify the interaction between OCs and oral anticoagulants.

  17. Psychobehavioral Effects of Hormonal Contraceptive Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa L. M. Welling

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Although female use of hormonal contraceptives (HCs has been associated with a variety of physical side effects, the psychological and behavioral side effects have received comparatively little attention until recently. Indeed, the long-term impact of HC use on human psychology has been vastly under-researched and has only recently become a focus for mainstream scholars. Women who use HCs report higher rates of depression, reduced sexual functioning, and higher interest in short-term sexual relationships compared to their naturally-cycling counterparts. Also, HC use may alter women's ability to attract a mate, as well as the mate retention behaviors in both users and their romantic partners. Some evidence even suggests that HC use alters mate choice and may negatively affect sexual satisfaction in parous women, with potential effects on future offspring. Interestingly, HCs have become a standard method of population control for captive nonhuman primates, opening up exciting avenues for potential comparative research. Here, the existing literature on the psychobehavioral effects of HCs in humans and nonhuman primates is reviewed and discussed. The potential resulting downstream consequences for the path of human evolution and recommendations for how future research could tease apart the underlying causes of these psychobehavioral effects of HC use are discussed, including suggestions for research involving nonhuman primates.

  18. The association between current low-dose oral contraceptive pills and periodontal health: a matched-case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerian-Ardakani, Ahmad; Moeintaghavi, Amir; Talebi-Ardakani, Mahammadreza Reza; Sohrabi, Keyvan; Bahmani, Shahin; Dargahi, Maede

    2010-05-01

    This study assessed the influence of current oral contraceptive pills on periodontal health in young females. Seventy women ranging in age from 17 to 35 years (mean 24 years) had a comprehensive periodontal examination. Their current and previous oral contraceptive pill use was assessed by a questionnaire. A periodontal assessment was performed that included recording the following: plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, and attachment level at six sites per tooth. The periodontal health of women taking birth control pills for at least two years was compared to that of women not taking an oral contraceptive. The control and test groups were matched for socioeconomic status, age, oral habits, occupation, and educational levels. Although there was no difference in plaque index levels between the two groups, current oral contraceptive pill users had higher levels of gingival inflammation and bleeding on probing. However, no significant differences were found regarding mean probing depths and attachment loss between the two groups. As birth control policies are advocated by most countries, and because oral contraceptives are the most widely used method for birth control, a need exists to assess the effects of oral contraceptives on the periodontal health of young women. Although additional studies are needed to better understand the mechanism of OC-induced gingivitis, female patients should be informed of the oral and periodontal side effects of OCs and the need for meticulous home care and compliance with periodontal maintenance.

  19. Knowledge, attitude and practice regarding emergency contraceptives among married women of urban slum area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek R. Raikar

    2015-08-01

    Results: Out of total 286 females, majority were in the age group of 20-30 yrs, 94.40% were Hindus, majority i.e. 81.74% were homemakers and 59.79% were illiterate, 72.48% belonged to lower social class (class IV and V according to modified B.G. Prasad classification. We found that 56% women had accepted one or other contraceptives. Only 12% women were aware about EC while among literates, 29% were aware about EC out of which only 4.38% had idea about the correct dosage, availability and side effects of the pills. Willingness to use EC was seen among 29% of women out of which majority i.e. 54.78% were literate and 68.32% were employed. Among the study population 3% of the women actually practiced emergency contraceptives. Educational status of females had significant association with awareness about EC pill ( and #967;2=29.46 and positive attitude towards usage of EC pill ( and #967;2=27.32. Conclusion: The awareness as well as the usage of emergency contraceptives is very low in our society. Still we are facing the problem of illiteracy in our country which is predominant in slum areas. More emphasis should be given to female education and empowerment in order to make them capable of taking decisions regarding their own reproductive health. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(4.000: 1008-1011

  20. Young adults' sources of contraceptive information: variations based on demographic characteristics and sexual risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Atika; Bleakley, Amy

    2015-02-01

    Sexual information sources used by young adults can influence their contraceptive knowledge and behaviors, yet little is known about sources most frequently used by young adults, especially by groups with histories of sexual risk involvement. Nationally representative data from 1800 unmarried young adults, aged 18-29 years, were analyzed to (1) examine the sources of contraceptive information most frequently used by young adults and (2) assess variations (if any) in source use based on demographic characteristics and sexual risk history (determined based on past sexual behaviors). "Doctors/nurses" was the most frequently used contraceptive information source reported by young adults. Significant variations existed in source use based on demographic characteristics and sexual risk history. Females were more likely to obtain contraceptive information from health care professionals, whereas males were more likely to report friends, partners, internet and television/radio as their frequently used source. Young adults with a sexual risk history were more likely to rely on doctors/nurses and less likely to report friends and internet as their frequently used source than those without a sexual risk history. Receiving contraceptive information from doctors/nurses was associated with greater accuracy in knowledge about contraceptive use and efficacy as compared to all other sources. Young adults' use of specific contraceptive information sources can vary based on their demographic characteristics and sexual risk involvement. Future research should identify better strategies to connect young adults, especially young males, with sexual risk histories to more reliable sources of information. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Contraception in adolescents over the last 15 years: perspective of a youth service center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Teixeira da Silva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contraceptive counselling is essential in the prevention of pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections in adolescents. Objectives: Evaluate the behaviour of adolescents who recurred to our Youth Assistence Center (YAC in the past 15 years, regarding their sexual and reproductive health and contraceptive choice. Material and Methods: Retrospective study of female adolescents under 18 years, who recurred for the first time to YAC in 1997, 2002, 2007 and 2012 (group 1,2,3 and 4, respectively. Data were analysed using SPSS 21.0 and Microsoft Excel 2007. Results: Most adolescents were sexually active (61.5% in 1997 vs 76.5% in 2012, p = 0.01 and there was an increase, over the years, of adolescents who had already started regular hormonal contraception (8.4% in 1997 vs 21.4% in 2012, p <0.001. In adolescents who did not use Hormonal Contraception (HC and recurred to YAC for its beginning, we found the following results: 1997 - 98.6% started a Combined Oral Contraceptive (COC, 2002 - 100% initiated HC [99, 1% - COC, 0.9% subcutaneous implant], 2007 - 90.9% initiated HC [83% - COC, 16.4% - subcutaneous implant, 0.6% - patch] and 2012 - 97% initiated HC [85.9% - COC, 14.1% - subcutaneous implant]. Conclusion: Over the studied period, there was an increased number of adolescents who were using a hormonal contraceptive at first appointment. The COC remains the contraceptive method of choice in adolescents, although there is a growing adherence to the subcutaneous implant.

  2. [Resistance and compliance to contraception in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichot, F; Dayan-lintzer, M

    1985-10-01

    Although inadequate information on sex and contraception is frequently believed to account for contraceptive failure in adolescents, other factors including resistence to contraception or poor compliance with method requirements have been invoked to explain contraceptive failures in well-informed adolescents. Sexual relations are beginning at ever-younger ages in France; a 1980 survey indicated that 50% had their 1st sexual relations before age 17. Sexual activity is sporadic and irregular but usually occurs with the same partner. At least 50% of 1st sexual relations are unprotected by contraception, and half of adolescent pregnancies occur in the 1st 6th months of sexual activity. 6-12 months pass on average before sexually active adolescents begin to use contraception. Rates of pregnancy and abortion have increased especially among adolescents under 16, and in 1979 almost 20% of all abortions were in women under 20 years old. In 1980, only 20% of adolescents used contraception, with 17.3% using oral contraceptives. Few statistics exist on the complex phenomenon of conscious or subconscious contraceptive resistence in adolescence, and clinical experience serves as a better guide. A frequent attitude among adolescents is that sexual relations should be spontaneous and romantic, traits viewed as incompatible with contraception. "Magical thinking", failure to appreciate the real risk of pregnancy, and dissociation of sex and pregnancy are common. Adolescents who doubt their fecundity may engage in unprotected relations to reassure themselves, while some seeking to assert their femininity may use pills although they have no need for contraception. Guilt and ambivalence may be unconscious motivations for poor contraceptive use. Young girls in cold, uncaring, neglectful, or conflict-ridden homes may seek affection from a sexual partner and wish to have a baby to demonstrate their attachment. Such situations often lead to well-accepted pregnancies and may also

  3. Erythema multiforme limited to the oral mucosa in a teenager on oral contraceptive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawetz, Robert E; Elkin, Avigayil; Michael, Lisa; Jawetz, Sheryl A; Shin, Helen T

    2007-10-01

    Erythema multiforme has been linked to numerous drugs and infectious agents. A link to oral contraceptive use has been reported in the past in the adult population but thus far has not been reported in children or adolescents. We report the case of an 18-yr-old female who developed oral erosions consistent with erythema multiforme two and a half weeks after initiating therapy with an oral contraceptive agent. A thorough examination for other inciting factors was negative, and the lesions slowly resolved over the course of 3 weeks. This case illustrates that erythema multiforme should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adolescents with oral erosions who have been prescribed oral contraceptives.

  4. Name that Contraceptive! A Game for the Human Sexuality Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Martha S.

    2010-01-01

    There are many contraceptive choices available to people today. Learning about them can be dry, but the game "Name that Contraceptive!" can be a fun and interactive way to review, remember, and retain the details about contraceptive options. Name that Contraceptive is a card game in which students "bid" on the number of clues it will take them to…

  5. The Contraceptive Needs for STD Protection among Women in Jail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswalt, Krista; Hale, Galen J.; Cropsey, Karen L.; Villalobos, Gabriella C.; Ivey, Sara E.; Matthews, Catherine A.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the contraceptive needs of women in jails and their sexually transmitted disease (STD) history and risk to determine effective contraceptive methods for this population. A survey of demographics, sexual health, contraceptive use, and preferred method of contraception was completed by participants recruited at jails in a medium-sized…

  6. The Contraceptive Needs for STD Protection among Women in Jail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswalt, Krista; Hale, Galen J.; Cropsey, Karen L.; Villalobos, Gabriella C.; Ivey, Sara E.; Matthews, Catherine A.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the contraceptive needs of women in jails and their sexually transmitted disease (STD) history and risk to determine effective contraceptive methods for this population. A survey of demographics, sexual health, contraceptive use, and preferred method of contraception was completed by participants recruited at jails in a medium-sized…

  7. Males and Morals: Teenage Contraceptive Behavior Amid the Double Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Peter

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews literature on teenage contraceptive behavior and teenage contraceptive decision making. The paper describes the persistence of a sexual double standard in terms of moral motivation to use contraception and in terms of the relative lack of communication about contraception among young partners. (Author)

  8. The Male Role in Contraception: Implications for Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chng, Chwee Lye

    1983-01-01

    Many males still perceive contraception as a woman's responsibility. This paper describes male contraceptives and their effectiveness and draws implications for school and community health education professionals. More equitable sharing of the responsibility for contraception might result in more effective contraception. (PP)

  9. Adolescent women's contraceptive decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, C S; Plichta, S; Nathanson, C A; Chase, G A; Ensminger, M E; Robinson, J C

    1991-06-01

    A modified rational decision model incorporating salient events and social influences (particularly from sexual partners) is used to analyze adolescent women's consistent use of oral contraceptives (OCs) over a six-month period. Data are taken from a panel study of 308 clients of an inner-city family planning clinic. Expected OC use was computed for each subject on the basis of subjective expected utility (SEU) theory, and is found in multivariate analyses to be a significant predictor of actual OC use. In addition, variables representing baseline and follow-up partner influences, the salience of pregnancy for the subject, and positive side effects of OCs during the first months of use are found to predict OC use. Partner's support of OC use during follow-up and positive side effects of OCs are found to predict OC use among subjects for whom OC use was not the expected decision according to baseline SEU. Implications of the findings for models of adolescents' contraceptive behavior and for clinicians are discussed.

  10. Emergency Contraception – An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger C

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to control fertility through the use of effective and safe contraception is essential in preventive medicine. EC offers a second chance to prevent an unwanted pregnancy after the event of an UPSI, contraceptive failure or after rape. Health care providers should routinely and more frequently recognize and inform women about the risk of an unintended pregnancy and EC options to avoid this and women should be provided the correct information about the mechanism of action of various EC options. Lack of knowledge on the mechanisms of action obstructs wide spread access and use globally. Currently, the three most commonly licensed methods of EC are insertion of a Cu-IUD or the hormonal pills UPA 30 mg or LNG 1.5 mg. All EC methods are safe with almost no contraindications and minimal side effects. Considering that ovulation and the fertile window are difficult to assess, it is recommended that EC is administered after an UPSI, regardless of cycle day.br With an extremely low failure rate, the Cu-IUD is an attractive option for EC regardless of the woman’s weight or concomitant medication and has the additional propensity to serve as a long-term contraceptive after insertion including if further acts of UPSI should take place in the same cycle. A Cu-IUD inserted within 5 days after ovulation, or when not known 5 days after UPSI, should be the first method of choice if available and suitable. The additional post-ovulatory effect makes the Cu-IUD a superior EC method.br Of the available hormonal EC treatments, UPA 30 mg should be the first choice being the most effective option with a wider window of effect than LNG. UPA has the ability to delay or inhibit ovulation beyond the life span of sperm even when given at an advanced follicular phase when the risk of pregnancy is high. In comparison, LNG has a narrower window of effect on ovulation with no effect after LH has started to rise, but LNG in a dose of 1.5 mg is recommended where UPA is

  11. The Current Status of Oral Contraceptives: Progress and Recent Innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golobof, Alexandra; Kiley, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    Millions of women in the United States and abroad use oral contraceptive pills. These popular contraceptives are the most common reversible birth control method in the United States, and a wide variety of pills are available for prescription. Oral contraceptives provide safe and effective protection against pregnancy and offer several noncontraceptive benefits. Over the years, advances in the laboratory and knowledge gained through epidemiologic data promoted the development of new contraceptive preparations. Generations of oral contraceptives emerged over time, containing lower doses of estrogens and new and novel progestins. The current review discusses the clinical characteristics of oral contraceptives, with emphasis on basic pharmacology and the evolution of various contraceptive formulations and regimens.

  12. KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICE OF CONTRACEPTIVE USE AMONG THE ELIGIBLE COUPLES IN AN URBAN SLUM OF SAMBALPUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamatarani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In spite of implementation of various programs and policies to curb the population of India, the population growth of India continues to be high in the count of large size of population (58% of total population in the reproductive age group and high fertilit y rate due to unmet need for contraception. OBJECTIVES: To know the knowledge and practice of various contraceptives among the eligible couples. MATERIALS AND METHOD S: A cross sectional study was conducted in the field practice area of UHTC, Gaudapali whic h is an urban slum, Sambalpur. The data was collected by interview of the female partners of the eligible couple by house to house visit using a predesigned questionnaire. RESULTS: Total of 212 marries women of the reproductive age group participated in th e study, most of the couples (96% had knowledge about some contraceptive. Majority of them (69% considered those methods to be quite safe & effective and easy to use. Major source of information (39% was from health care workers. Only 62% of the couples had practiced the contraceptive method. CONCLUSION: The increased use of contraceptive requires IEC activity and continuous motivation among the male partner of the couple

  13. Determination of zinc concentration in female reproductive system by instrumental neutron activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Fernando Ramos de, E-mail: framosc@oi.com.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de, E-mail: heeren@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Ginecologia e Obstetricia; Ferreira, Claudia R.C.; Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto; Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C., E-mail: claudia@medicina.ufmg.b, E-mail: ranf@cdtn.b, E-mail: menezes@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Non-surgical female sterilization through the transcervical insertion of quinacrine pellets was considered a definitive, low-cost, safe and effective contraceptive method. The zinc, present in both uterus and Fallopian tubes, inhibit the quinacrine efficiency. The addition of copper increases the efficacy of quinacrine, reducing the risk of pregnancy due to the failure to obstruct the Fallopian tubes. The copper neutralized the deleterious effect of the zinc and so the treatment efficacy is increased. In order to obtain a mapping to study the zinc content in the female reproductive system, samples of both uterus and Fallopian tubes were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation. The results show that, on average, the obtained zinc concentrations in tubes (89 mug-g{sup -1}) is lower than in the uterus (118 mug-g{sup -1}), confirming results obtained by other authors. These results will support a research project about non-surgical female sterilization of the 'Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais' (Medical School of Federal University of Minas Gerais). The used methodology and obtained results are here reported. (author)

  14. Immediate Intrauterine Device Insertion Following Surgical Abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Eva; Bednarek, Paula H

    2015-12-01

    Placement of an intrauterine device (IUD) immediately after a first or second trimester surgical abortion is safe and convenient and decreases the risk of repeat unintended pregnancy. Immediate postabortion IUD placement is not recommended in the setting of postprocedure hemorrhage, uterine perforation, infection, or hematometra. Otherwise, there are few contraindications to IUD placement following surgical abortion. Sexually transmitted infection screening should follow US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. No additional antibiotics are needed beyond those used for the abortion. Placing immediate postabortion IUDs makes highly-effective long-acting reversible contraception more accessible to women.

  15. Controversies in contraception for women with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev V Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Contraception is an important choice that offers autonomy to women with regard to prevention of unintended pregnancies. There is wide variation in the contraceptive practices between continents, countries, and societies. The medical eligibility for contraception for sexually active women with epilepsy (WWE is determined by the type of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs that they use. Enzyme inducing AEDs such as phenobarbitone, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine increase the metabolism of orally administered estrogen (and progesterone to a lesser extent. Estrogen can increase the metabolism of certain AEDs, such as lamotrigine, leading to cyclical variation in its blood level with resultant adverse effect profile or seizure dyscontrol. AEDs and sex hormones can increase the risk of osteoporosis and fracture in WWE. The potential interactions between AEDs and hormonal contraception need to be discussed with all women in reproductive age-group. The alternate options of oral contraception such as intrauterine copper device, intrauterine levonorgestrel release system, and supplementary protection with barriers need to be presented to them. World Health Organization has recommended to avoid combination contraceptive pills containing estrogen and progesteron in women who desire contraception and in breastfeeding mothers. Care providers need to consider the option of non-enzyme-inducing AEDs while initiating long-term treatment in adolescent and young WWE.

  16. Post-abortion contraception: care and practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Vilela Borges

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze assistance regarding contraception methods received by women during hospitalization due to abortion, and contraceptive practices the month after this episode.METHODS: a longitudinal study of women hospitalized due to abortion in a public hospital in the city of São Paulo. Face-to-face interviews (n=170 followed by telephone interviews in the subsequent month (n=147 were conducted between May and December of 2011.RESULTS: a small number of women reported they received guidance on, and prescription for, contraceptive methods at hospital discharge. A trend of statistical significance was identified for prescription of contraceptive methods at discharge and its use in the following month, when adjusted for age. Most women reported sexual intercourse (69.4% with the use of contraceptive method (82.4%, but no health professional guidance (63.1%.CONCLUSION: despite the fact that post-abortion contraception assistance was lower than the recommended guidelines by public health policies, women demonstrated willingness to use contraceptive methods.

  17. Controversies in contraception for women with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sanjeev V

    2015-01-01

    Contraception is an important choice that offers autonomy to women with regard to prevention of unintended pregnancies. There is wide variation in the contraceptive practices between continents, countries, and societies. The medical eligibility for contraception for sexually active women with epilepsy (WWE) is determined by the type of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) that they use. Enzyme inducing AEDs such as phenobarbitone, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine increase the metabolism of orally administered estrogen (and progesterone to a lesser extent). Estrogen can increase the metabolism of certain AEDs, such as lamotrigine, leading to cyclical variation in its blood level with resultant adverse effect profile or seizure dyscontrol. AEDs and sex hormones can increase the risk of osteoporosis and fracture in WWE. The potential interactions between AEDs and hormonal contraception need to be discussed with all women in reproductive age-group. The alternate options of oral contraception such as intrauterine copper device, intrauterine levonorgestrel release system, and supplementary protection with barriers need to be presented to them. World Health Organization has recommended to avoid combination contraceptive pills containing estrogen and progesteron in women who desire contraception and in breastfeeding mothers. Care providers need to consider the option of non-enzyme-inducing AEDs while initiating long-term treatment in adolescent and young WWE.

  18. 新型PH-20疫苗不同注射方式对雌性豚鼠免疫应答和避孕效果的影响%Immune response and effect of contraception in female guinea pigs injected with PH-20 coupling body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金呈强; 刘仿; 郑碧英; 董海新; 周建伟; 张健

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the immune response and contraceptive effect of guinea pigs injected with the PH-20 coupling body by different method of injection. Methods Sixty female guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups (rectal injection group and intraperitoneal injection group) , then each group was subdivided into three groups (experimental group 1 , experimental group 2 and control group, 10 female guinea pigs in each group). To observe morphology of the coupling by electron microscopy, to test vaginal secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) level by double sandwich ELISA and blood sIgA by radioimmunoassay. PH-20 specific antibody level in blood was detected by competitive ELISA. Results Blood and vaginal secretions slgA and PH-20 antibody levels in rectal injection group and intraperitoneal injection group were both higher than those in control group ( P <0. 05). Blood and vaginal secretions of guinea pig sIgA and PH-20 antibody levels in experimental group 1 (add Freund complete adjuvant) were higher than those in experimental group 2 ( without adding Freund complete adjuvant) (P < 0. 05). The total positive pregnancy rate in rectal injection group was significantly different from intraperitoneal injection group ( P < 0. 05 ). Conclusions The PH-20 coupling body has a high immune activity and can induce significant humoral response, and the rectal injection is superior to the intraperitoneal injection. Freund' s complete adjuvant is able to enhance the effectiveness of two contraceptive injection.%目的 观察以等比方法配制的新型精子表面特异性透明质酸酶(PH-20)疫苗的不同注射方式对豚鼠免疫应答和避孕的影响.方法 60只雌性豚鼠随机分为两大组(直肠注射组和腹腔注射组),每组再分为3个小组(实验1组、实验2组和对照组,每小组各10只),用电镜观察该新型PH -20疫苗的形态,应用双夹心酶联免疫吸附试验( ELISA)检测豚鼠阴道分泌物中分泌型免疫球蛋白A(sIgA)

  19. The mechanism of action of hormonal contraceptives and intrauterine contraceptive devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, R; Yacobson, I; Grimes, D

    1999-11-01

    Modern hormonal contraceptives and intrauterine contraceptive devices have multiple biologic effects. Some of them may be the primary mechanism of contraceptive action, whereas others are secondary. For combined oral contraceptives and progestin-only methods, the main mechanisms are ovulation inhibition and changes in the cervical mucus that inhibit sperm penetration. The hormonal methods, particularly the low-dose progestin-only products and emergency contraceptive pills, have effects on the endometrium that, theoretically, could affect implantation. However, no scientific evidence indicates that prevention of implantation actually results from the use of these methods. Once pregnancy begins, none of these methods has an abortifacient action. The precise mechanism of intrauterine contraceptive devices is unclear. Current evidence indicates they exert their primary effect before fertilization, reducing the opportunity of sperm to fertilize an ovum.

  20. Feminism and the Moral Imperative for Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Eve

    2015-08-01

    This commentary is adapted from the Irvin M. Cushner Memorial Lecture, "Feminism and the Moral Imperative for Contraception," given at 2014 Annual Clinical Meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in Chicago. It provides a brief and simplified historical review of the feminist movement, primarily in the United States, focusing on feminism's association with contraception. This commentary reflects the perspective and opinions of the author. Contraception is fundamental to a woman's ability to achieve equality and realize her full social, economic, and intellectual potential.

  1. Abortion and contraceptive practices in eastern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, L

    1997-07-01

    In countries of the CCEE region (Countries of Central and Eastern Europe) the very high incidence of pregnancy termination is characteristic of family planning and the notion 'contraception instead of abortion' has not yet been achieved. The causes and consequences of this unfortunate situation will be reviewed: the reproductive health indicators in the area; the status of contraceptive use and of abortion; the impact of legislation in the different countries; and the efforts to achieve changes. The conclusions of the 'Szeged Declaration' which led to an increase in contraceptive prevalence will be discussed.

  2. Contraceptive failure in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trussell, James

    2011-05-01

    This review provides an update of previous estimates of first-year probabilities of contraceptive failure for all methods of contraception available in the United States. Estimates are provided of probabilities of failure during typical use (which includes both incorrect and inconsistent use) and during perfect use (correct and consistent use). The difference between these two probabilities reveals the consequences of imperfect use; it depends both on how unforgiving of imperfect use a method is and on how hard it is to use that method perfectly. These revisions reflect new research on contraceptive failure both during perfect use and during typical use.

  3. Contraception for women with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth; Clausen, Tine Dalsgaard

    2005-01-01

    Planned pregnancy is mandatory in women with diabetes, and their need for contraception is essential. Basically, the same methods can be used as in women without diabetes, but a number of specific conditions have to be considered when guiding these women, as we discuss in this review. Unfortunately......, the field is limited in studies in certain areas, especially considering contraception for women with type 1 diabetes and late diabetic complications and women with type 2 diabetes. Thus, in the real clinical world, the choice of contraceptive often will be a kind of compromise, balancing pro and cons...

  4. Clinical Trials in Male Hormonal Contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieschlag E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research has established the principle of hormonal male contraception based on suppression of gonadotropins and spermatogenesis. All hormonal male contraceptives use testosterone, but only in East Asian men can testosterone alone suppress spermatogenesis to a level compatible with contraceptive protection. In Caucasians, additional agents are required of which progestins are favored. Clinical trials concentrate on testosterone combined with norethisterone, desogestrel, etonogestrel or depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate. The first randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial performed by the pharmaceutical industry demonstrated the effectiveness of a combination of testosterone undecanoate and etonogestrel in suppressing spermatogenesis in volunteers.

  5. Contraception for women with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth; Clausen, Tine Dalsgaard

    2005-01-01

    Planned pregnancy is mandatory in women with diabetes, and their need for contraception is essential. Basically, the same methods can be used as in women without diabetes, but a number of specific conditions have to be considered when guiding these women, as we discuss in this review. Unfortunately......, the field is limited in studies in certain areas, especially considering contraception for women with type 1 diabetes and late diabetic complications and women with type 2 diabetes. Thus, in the real clinical world, the choice of contraceptive often will be a kind of compromise, balancing pro and cons...

  6. CONTRACEPTION TECHNOLOGY: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Nath, Anita; Mishell, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Steady progress in contraception research has been achieved over the past 50 years. Hormonal and non-hormonal modern contraceptives have improved women’s lives by reducing different health conditions that contributed to considerable morbidity. However the contraceptives available today are not suitable to all users and the need to expand contraceptive choices still exists. Novel products such as new implants, contraceptive vaginal rings, transdermal patches and newer combinations of oral contraceptives have recently been introduced in family planning programs and hormonal contraception is widely used for spacing and limiting births. Concerns over the adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives have led to research and development of new combinations with improved metabolic profile. Recent developments include use of natural compounds such as estradiol (E2) and estradiol valerate (E2V) with the hope to decrease thrombotic risk, in combination with newer progestins derived from the progesterone structure or from spirolactone, in order to avoid the androgenic effects. Progesterone antagonists and progesterone receptor modulators are highly effective in blocking ovulation and preventing follicular rupture and are undergoing investigations in the form of oral pills and in semi long-acting delivery systems. Future developments also include the combination of a contraceptive with an antiretroviral agent for dual contraception and protection against sexually transmitted diseases, to be used before intercourse or on demand, as well as for continuous use in dual-protection rings. Alhough clinical trials of male contraception have reflected promising results, limited involvement of industry in that area of research has decreased the likelihood of having a male method available in the current decade. Development of non-hormonal methods are still at an early stage of research, with the identification of specific targets within the reproductive system in ovaries and testes, as

  7. The Role of Contraceptive Attributes in Women’s Contraceptive Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Tessa; Secura, Gina M.; Nease, Robert; Politi, Mary; Peipert, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Contraceptive methods have differing attributes. Women’s preferences for these attributes may influence contraceptive decision making. Our objective was to identify women’s contraceptive preferences among women initiating a new contraceptive method. Study Design We conducted a cross-sectional, self-administered survey of women’s contraceptive preferences at the time of enrollment into the Contraceptive CHOICE Project. Participants were asked to rank the importance of 15 contraceptive attributes on a three-point scale (1=”not at all important,” 2=”somewhat important,” and “3=very important”) and then to rank the 3 attributes that were the most important when choosing a contraceptive method. The survey also contained questions about prior contraceptive experience and barriers to contraceptive use. Information about demographic and reproductive characteristics was collected through the CHOICE Project baseline survey. Results There were 2,590 women who completed the survey. Our sample was racially and socioeconomically diverse. Method attributes with the highest importance score were effectiveness (mean score 2.97 [standard deviation 0.18]), safety (2.96 [0.22]), affordability (2.61 [0.61]), whether the method is long-lasting (2.58 [0.61]), and whether the method is “forgettable” (2.54 [0.66]). The attributes most likely to be ranked by respondents among the top three attributes included effectiveness (80.5%), safety (64.8%) and side effects of the method (42.7%). Conclusion Multiple contraceptive attributes influence decision making and no single attribute drives most women’s decisions. Tailoring communication and helping women make complex trade offs between attributes can better support their contraceptive decisions and may assist them in making value-consistent choices. This process could improve continuation and satisfaction. PMID:25644443

  8. Contraceptive vaginal ring (NuvaRing)-a novel, convenient and effective contraceptive option

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Wei-lin; Fan Guang-sheng

    2011-01-01

    Contraceptive vaginal ring (NuvaRing) is a new combined hormonal contraceptive method.Each ring contains 2.7mg ethinyl estradiol (EE) and 11.7mg etonogestrel.The ring is characteristic with its ease of use,lower EE systemic exposure and excellent cycle control.Studies have demonstrated that the efficacy and safety of the ring are equivalent to combined oral contraceptive (COC).The side effects of the ring are fewer and the biocompatibility is good.Recent studies have proved that the NuvaRing is a new,effective hormonal contraceptive option for women.

  9. [Morrhuic acid vaginal contraceptive suppository].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, W Y

    1989-11-01

    Sodium morrhuate started to be used as spermicide in 1982. A follow-up study was conducted in China in 1984 to investigate its effectiveness. Several different tests was conducted using sodium morrhuate solutions of 0.5, 0.25 and 0.123 concentration on semen samples. Ames tests, born marrow chromosome tests, deformation tests, and local toxicological tests were conducted on rats, and rabbits. In addition a post coital and a two-stage clinical study were conducted on humans. 34 women was recruited for the first stage of the study in November 1984; 1746 women aged 20-40, including 1581 parous and 165 newly-married women, were recruited from the second stage clinical study. Semen tests found that a solution of 0.25% concentration could immobilize sperm instantaneously. No deformation or toxic effect was found, and no abnormality was found in post coital tests. The sperm immobilization was statistically significant between the cases and the placebo group, and sperm immobilization was most effective with 20 mg/pill concentration in post-coital tests. Among those who participated in the clinical study, 16073 months of use were observed. The 12 months cumulative method failure rate calculated using the life table method was 4.8% and the use failure rate was 10.1%. The discontinuation rate was 27.3%. The major cause of failure was inconsistent and incorrect use of method. The effectiveness of sodium morrhuate as a spermicide was not significantly different from Neo Sampoon, but it has a higher effectiveness than the contraceptive sponge or the stainless steel single ring which is commonly used in China. Gynecological examination was conducted every 6 months for 2 years on the women who participated in the study. No negative reaction was found in the examinations. It is recommended that this method be used by women of all ages, especially breast-feeding women who can not use other methods of contraception.

  10. Adverse Effects of Hormonal Contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabatini R

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available contraception acceptability, compliance and continuation. Despite the safety profile of current COCs, fears of adverse metabolic and vascular effects caused by estrogen component, and possible neoplastic effects of these formulations remain. Misperceptions and concerns about side-effects, especially those affecting the menstrual cycle and increased body weight, are often given as reason for discontinuation. Besides, severe adverse effects exist; perhaps they are very rare, but it might be that other cases were underestimated or ignored. It is important to take into account that COCs, as all medications, have some contraindications, which is mandatory to consider. The „pill“ could be not for everyone. In any case, also mild or moderate adverse effects of COCs may impair the woman’s quality of life. It is well known that even small increases in frequency of adverse effects, in COCs-users, could have a general critical health impact because of their widespread use, which is currently expanding to potential risk groups. To avoid adverse events by COC use the exclusion of patients with known risk factors including patient history and family history is necessary. Furthermore the patient should be informed about possible side effects and side effects during OC use should be carefully monitored. Finally the risk benefit analysis for oral contraceptive pills which are worldwide used since more than 50 years for healthy patients is positive. Most women will benefit from additional noncontraceptive benefits such as improvement of acne vulgaris, dysmenorrhoea, stabilization of menstrual bleeding pattern, less ovarian cysts and finally a lower risk for ovarian and breast cancer, which persists even after withdrawl of COC for several years.

  11. [Adolescence and choice of contraceptive].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, L

    1986-11-01

    The majority of books, studies, and publications on adolescence are written by adults, whose frequent focus on unbridled adolescent sexuality, adolescents in crisis, or immature adolescents does not seem to correspond to the self-image of adolescents. All authors agree that adolescence is the period between childhood and adulthood beginning at puberty, but opinions differ as to the termination of adolescence and entrance into adulthood. The most significant consensus about adolescence is its tendency to become prolonged. The majority of authors regard adolescence as a preparation for adult life and hence as a natural phase necessary and indispensable to human existence. Ethnographic studies of societies that do not acknowledge adolescence demonstrate, however, that it is not a natural phase. It is also evident that comparatively few roles in modern society require lengthy periods of preparation such as adolescence. It is therefore difficult to regard adolescence as a time of preparation for adult life. From a historic perspective, adolescence emerged with the socioeconomic transformations of industrialization. Mechanization and automation excluded numerous types of workers, especially young workers, from the labor force. Adolescence represents marginalization of young people in response to socioeconomic exigencies rather than a period of preparation for a better adult life. The marginalization is internalized in the consciousness of adults and youth alike and in their hierarchical relations. The marginalization of young people is expressed in the domain of sexuality by the fact that, although physiologically mature, adolescents are not viewed as psychologically mature enough to have children. Adolescents have sexual relations at increasingly young ages, but unlike adults they are not permitted by society the choice of having a child. Contraception, an option for adults, becomes obligatory for sexually active adolescents. The refusal of contraception or failure to

  12. Knowledge and Usage of Emergency Contraceptives Among University Students in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darteh, Eugene Kofuor Maafo; Doku, David Teye

    2016-02-01

    Contraceptive use is an important strategy for the prevention of unwanted pregnancy and avoidance of induced abortion. Of all the contraception methods, emergency contraceptive (EC) offers the last chance to achieve this. However, few studies have documented the use of EC among young people in Ghana. This study explored knowledge and usage of EC as well as the factors associated with it among University of Cape Coast students. Data were obtained on the knowledge and usage of ECs among University of Cape Coast students in 2013. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association between students' socio-demographic characteristics and EC knowledge and use. More male students (72%) than females (59%) were sexually active. Fifty-seven percent of the respondents had ever heard of EC and 36% had ever used EC. Although males were more likely to be sexually active, females were more likely to have knowledge of EC use compared to males. The study underscores the need to increase awareness regarding EC among University students in order to offer them the opportunity that EC provides if other forms of contraceptives are missed.

  13. ERICA: sexual initiation and contraception in Brazilian adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Vilela Borges

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of sexual initiation and contraceptive use at the last sexual intercourse of Brazilian adolescents, according to sociodemographic fea