WorldWideScience

Sample records for surgical care delivery

  1. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Program Implementation in 2 Surgical Populations in an Integrated Health Care Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Vincent X; Rosas, Efren; Hwang, Judith; Cain, Eric; Foss-Durant, Anne; Clopp, Molly; Huang, Mengfei; Lee, Derrick C; Mustille, Alex; Kipnis, Patricia; Parodi, Stephen

    2017-07-19

    Novel approaches to perioperative surgical care focus on optimizing nutrition, mobility, and pain management to minimize adverse events after surgical procedures. To evaluate the outcomes of an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program among 2 target populations: patients undergoing elective colorectal resection and patients undergoing emergency hip fracture repair. A pre-post difference-in-differences study before and after ERAS implementation in the target populations compared with contemporaneous surgical comparator groups (patients undergoing elective gastrointestinal surgery and emergency orthopedic surgery). Implementation began in February and March 2014 and concluded by the end of 2014 at 20 medical centers within the Kaiser Permanente Northern California integrated health care delivery system. A multifaceted ERAS program designed with a particular focus on perioperative pain management, mobility, nutrition, and patient engagement. The primary outcome was hospital length of stay. Secondary outcomes included hospital mortality, home discharge, 30-day readmission rates, and complication rates. The study included a total of 3768 patients undergoing elective colorectal resection (mean [SD] age, 62.7 [14.1] years; 1812 [48.1%] male) and 5002 patients undergoing emergency hip fracture repair (mean [SD] age, 79.5 [11.8] years; 1586 [31.7%] male). Comparator surgical patients included 5556 patients undergoing elective gastrointestinal surgery and 1523 patients undergoing emergency orthopedic surgery. Most process metrics had significantly greater changes in the ERAS target populations after implementation compared with comparator surgical populations, including those for ambulation, nutrition, and opioid use. Hospital length of stay and postoperative complication rates were also significantly lower among ERAS target populations after implementation. The rate ratios for postoperative complications were 0.68 (95% CI, 0.46-0.99; P = .04) for patients

  2. Surgical Critical Care Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Surgical Critical Care Initiative (SC2i) is a USU research program established in October 2013 to develop, translate, and validate biology-driven critical care....

  3. An Evaluation of Preparedness, Delivery and Impact of Surgical and Anesthesia Care in Madagascar: A Framework for a National Surgical Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Emily; White, Michelle C; Baxter, Linden S; Ravelojaona, Vaonandianina Agnès; Rakotoarison, Hasiniaina Narindria; Andriamanjato, Hery Harimanitra; Close, Kristin L; Herbert, Alison; Raykar, Nakul; Saluja, Saurabh; Shrime, Mark G

    2017-05-01

    The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery (LCoGS) described the lack of access to safe, affordable, timely surgical, and anesthesia care. It proposed a series of 6 indicators to measure surgery, accompanied by time-bound targets and a template for national surgical planning. To date, no sub-Saharan African country has completed and published a nationwide evaluation of its surgical system within this framework. Mercy Ships, in partnership with Harvard Medical School and the Madagascar Ministry of Health, collected data on the 6 indicators from 22 referral hospitals in 16 out of 22 regions of Madagascar. Data collection was by semi-structured interviews with ministerial, medical, laboratory, pharmacy, and administrative representatives in each region. Microsimulation modeling was used to calculate values for financial indicators. In Madagascar, 29% of the population can access a surgical facility within 2 h. Surgical workforce density is 0.78 providers per 100,000 and annual surgical volume is 135-191 procedures per 100,000 with a perioperative mortality rate of 2.5-3.3%. Patients requiring surgery have a 77.4-86.3 and 78.8-95.1% risk of incurring impoverishing and catastrophic expenditure, respectively. Of the six LCoGS indicator targets, Madagascar meets one, the reporting of perioperative mortality rate. Compared to the LCoGS targets, Madagascar has deficits in surgical access, workforce, volume, and the ability to offer financial risk protection to surgical patients. Its perioperative mortality rate, however, appears better than in comparable countries. The government is committed to improvement, and key stakeholder meetings to create a national surgical plan have begun.

  4. Health care delivery systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, F.; Zee, J. van der

    2007-01-01

    A health care delivery system is the organized response of a society to the health problems of its inhabitants. Societies choose from alternative health care delivery models and, in doing so, they organize and set goals and priorities in such a way that the actions of different actors are effective,

  5. Health Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starfield, Barbara

    1987-01-01

    The article reviews emerging health care delivery options for handicapped children. Cost structures, quality of care, and future prospects are considered for Health Maintenance Organizations, Preferred Provider Organizations, Tax Supported Direct Service Programs, Hospital-Based Services, and Ambulatory Care Organizations. (Author/DB)

  6. Access to Specialized Surgical Care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ANNALS of AFRICAN SURGERY. January 2016 Volume 13 Issue 1 1. EDITORIAL. Access to Specialized Surgical Care. Saidi H. University of Nairobi. Correspondence to: Prof Hassan Saidi, P.O Box 30196-00100, Nairobi. Email: hsaid2ke@yahoo.com. Ann Afr Surg. 2016;13(1):1-2. The narrative of surgical disease in ...

  7. Seeking optimal renal replacement therapy delivery in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocjan, Marinka; Brunet, Fabrice P

    2010-01-01

    Globally, critical care environments within health care organizations strive to provide optimal quality renal replacement therapy (RRT), an artificial replacement for lost kidney function. Examination of RRT delivery model literature and a case study review of the multidisciplinary-mixed RRT delivery model utilized within a closed medical surgical intensive care unit illustrates the organizational and clinical management of specialized resource and multidisciplinary roles. The successful utilization of a specific RRT delivery model is dependent upon resource availability.

  8. Family-centred care delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo-Bruinsma, Liesha; Hogg, William; Taljaard, Monica; Dahrouge, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether models of primary care service delivery differ in their provision of family-centred care (FCC) and to identify practice characteristics associated with FCC. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Primary care practices in Ontario (ie, 35 salaried community health centres, 35 fee-for-service practices, 32 capitation-based health service organizations, and 35 blended remuneration family health networks) that belong to 4 models of primary care service delivery. Participants A total of 137 practices, 363 providers, and 5144 patients. Main outcome measures Measures of FCC in patient and provider surveys were based on the Primary Care Assessment Tool. Statistical analyses were conducted using linear mixed regression models and generalized estimating equations. Results Patient-reported FCC scores were high and did not vary significantly by primary care model. Larger panel size in a practice was associated with lower odds of patients reporting FCC. Provider-reported FCC scores were significantly higher in community health centres than in family health networks (P = .035). A larger number of nurse practitioners and clinical services on-site were both associated with higher FCC scores, while scores decreased as the number of family physicians in a practice increased and if practices were more rural. Conclusion Based on provider and patient reports, primary care reform strategies that encourage larger practices and more patients per family physician might compromise the provision of FCC, while strategies that encourage multidisciplinary practices and a range of services might increase FCC. PMID:24235195

  9. Innovation in Health Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Alok D; Schroeder, Gregory D; West, Michael E; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-02-01

    As reimbursement transitions from a volume-based to a value-based system, innovation in health care delivery will be needed. The process of innovation begins with framing the problem that needs to be solved along with the strategic vision that has to be achieved. Similar to scientific testing, a hypothesis is generated for a new solution to a problem. Innovation requires conducting a disciplined form of experimentation and then learning from the process. This manuscript will discuss the different types of innovation, and the key steps necessary for successful innovation in the health care field.

  10. Optimisation of surgical care for rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borstlap, W.A.A.

    2017-01-01

    Optimisation of surgical care means weighing the risk of treatment related morbidity against the patients’ potential benefits of a surgical intervention. The first part of this thesis focusses on the anaemic patient undergoing colorectal surgery. Hypothesizing that a more profound haemoglobin

  11. Surgical care in the isolated military hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukish, J R; Gill, G G; McCoy, T R

    2001-01-01

    To maintain the health of service members and their families throughout the world, the Department of Defense has established several isolated military hospitals (IHs). The operational environment of IHs is such that illness and traumatic injury requiring surgical intervention is common. This study sought to examine the general and orthopedic surgical experience at an IH to determine whether surgical care could be provided in an effective and safe manner. All patients evaluated by the general and orthopedic surgeon at Guantanamo Bay Naval Hospital from October 1, 1998, to April 1, 1999, were included in this study. The following data were retrospectively reviewed: patient demographic data, diagnosis, initial and follow-up care, medical evacuation data, operative procedures, and complications. There were 336 patients who presented for surgical evaluation, resulting in 660 follow-up appointments during the study period. There were 31 medical evacuations (3 emergent). The surgical services performed 122 major operative procedures. There were 58 inpatient admissions. There was 1 death, and surgical complications occurred in 2 patients, for an overall morbidity and mortality of 1.4% and 0.7%, respectively. Our data show that an IH is capable of providing surgical care, including care for traumatic injuries, in a safe manner. This is the first study that provides objective evidence that general and orthopedic surgery at an IH can be provided within the standard of care.

  12. Providing surgical care in Somalia: A model of task shifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kathryn M; Ford, Nathan P; Trelles, Miguel

    2011-07-15

    Somalia is one of the most political unstable countries in the world. Ongoing insecurity has forced an inconsistent medical response by the international community, with little data collection. This paper describes the "remote" model of surgical care by Medecins Sans Frontieres, in Guri-El, Somalia. The challenges of providing the necessary prerequisites for safe surgery are discussed as well as the successes and limitations of task shifting in this resource-limited context. In January 2006, MSF opened a project in Guri-El located between Mogadishu and Galcayo. The objectives were to reduce mortality due to complications of pregnancy and childbirth and from violent and non-violent trauma. At the start of the program, expatriate surgeons and anesthesiologists established safe surgical practices and performed surgical procedures. After January 2008, expatriates were evacuated due to insecurity and surgical care has been provided by local Somalian doctors and nurses with periodic supervisory visits from expatriate staff. Between October 2006 and December 2009, 2086 operations were performed on 1602 patients. The majority (1049, 65%) were male and the median age was 22 (interquartile range, 17-30). 1460 (70%) of interventions were emergent. Trauma accounted for 76% (1585) of all surgical pathology; gunshot wounds accounted for 89% (584) of violent injuries. Operative mortality (0.5% of all surgical interventions) was not higher when Somalian staff provided care compared to when expatriate surgeons and anesthesiologists. The delivery of surgical care in any conflict-settings is difficult, but in situations where international support is limited, the challenges are more extreme. In this model, task shifting, or the provision of services by less trained cadres, was utilized and peri-operative mortality remained low demonstrating that safe surgical practices can be accomplished even without the presence of fully trained surgeon and anesthesiologists. If security improves

  13. Simulation for ward processes of surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucher, Philip H; Darzi, Ara; Aggarwal, Rajesh

    2013-07-01

    The role of simulation in surgical education, initially confined to technical skills and procedural tasks, increasingly includes training nontechnical skills including communication, crisis management, and teamwork. Research suggests that many preventable adverse events can be attributed to nontechnical error occurring within a ward context. Ward rounds represent the primary point of interaction between patient and physician but take place without formalized training or assessment. The simulated ward should provide an environment in which processes of perioperative care can be performed safely and realistically, allowing multidisciplinary assessment and training of full ward rounds. We review existing literature and describe our experience in setting up our ward simulator. We examine the facilities, equipment, cost, and personnel required for establishing a surgical ward simulator and consider the scenario development, assessment, and feedback tools necessary to integrate it into a surgical curriculum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Value innovation: an important aspect of global surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Michael; Henry, Jaymie Ang; Hasek, Lauren

    2014-01-06

    Limited resources in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) drive tremendous innovation in medicine, as well as in other fields. It is not often recognized that several important surgical tools and methods, widely used in high-income countries, have their origins in LMICs. Surgical care around the world stands much to gain from these innovations. In this paper, we provide a short review of some of these successful innovations and their origins that have had an important impact in healthcare delivery worldwide. Examples of LMIC innovations that have been adapted in high-income countries include the Bogotá bag for temporary abdominal wound closure, the orthopaedic external fixator for complex fractures, a hydrocephalus fluid valve for normal pressure hydrocephalus, and intra-ocular lens and manual small incision cataract surgery. LMIC innovations that have had tremendous potential global impact include mosquito net mesh for inguinal hernia repair, and a flutter valve for intercostal drainage of pneumothorax. Surgical innovations from LMICs have been shown to have comparable outcomes at a fraction of the cost of tools used in high-income countries. These innovations have the potential to revolutionize global surgical care. Advocates should actively seek out these innovations, campaign for the financial gains from these innovations to benefit their originators and their countries, and find ways to develop and distribute them locally as well as globally.

  15. Optimizing Cancer Care Delivery through Implementation Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather B Neuman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2013 Institute of Medicine report investigating cancer care concluded that the cancer care delivery system is in crisis due to an increased demand for care, increasing complexity of treatment, decreasing work force and rising costs. Engaging patients and incorporating evidence-based care into routine clinical practice are essential components of a high quality cancer delivery system. However, a gap currently exists between the identification of beneficial research findings and application in clinical practice. Implementation research strives to address this gap. In this review, we discuss key components of high quality implementation research. We then apply these concepts to a current cancer care delivery challenge in women’s health, specifically the implementation of a surgery decision aid for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer.

  16. Regional Multiteam Systems in Cancer Care Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, John R.T.; Rizvi, Irfan; Savastano, Ann; Green, James S.A.; Sevdalis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Teamwork is essential for addressing many of the challenges that arise in the coordination and delivery of cancer care, especially for the problems that are presented by patients who cross geographic boundaries and enter and exit multiple health care systems at various times during their cancer care journeys. The problem of coordinating the care of patients with cancer is further complicated by the growing number of treatment options and modalities, incompatibilities among the vast variety of technology platforms that have recently been adopted by the health care industry, and competing and misaligned incentives for providers and systems. Here we examine the issue of regional care coordination in cancer through the prism of a real patient journey. This article will synthesize and elaborate on existing knowledge about coordination approaches for complex systems, in particular, in general and cancer care multidisciplinary teams; define elements of coordination derived from organizational psychology and human factors research that are applicable to team-based cancer care delivery; and suggest approaches for improving multidisciplinary team coordination in regional cancer care delivery and avenues for future research. The phenomenon of the mobile, multisystem patient represents a growing challenge in cancer care. Paradoxically, development of high-quality, high-volume centers of excellence and the ease of virtual communication and data sharing by using electronic medical records have introduced significant barriers to effective team-based cancer care. These challenges urgently require solutions. PMID:27650833

  17. The delivery of general paediatric surgery in Ireland: a survey of higher surgical trainees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, E

    2012-12-01

    The delivery of general paediatric surgery is changing in Ireland. Fewer paediatric surgical procedures are being performed by newly appointed consultant general surgeons, resulting in increased referrals to the specialist paediatric surgeons of uncomplicated general paediatric surgical problems. We surveyed current higher surgical trainees about their views on provision of paediatric surgical services.

  18. Models of care and delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens

    2014-01-01

    with community clinics for injecting drug-dependent persons is also being implemented. Shared care models require oversight to ensure that primary responsibility is defined for the persons overall health situation, for screening of co-morbidities, defining indication to treat comorbidities, prescription of non......Marked regional differences in HIV-related clinical outcomes exist across Europe. Models of outpatient HIV care, including HIV testing, linkage and retention for positive persons, also differ across the continent, including examples of sub-optimal care. Even in settings with reasonably good...... outcomes, existing models are scrutinized for simplification and/or reduced cost. Outpatient HIV care models across Europe may be centralized to specialized clinics only, primarily handled by general practitioners (GP), or a mixture of the two, depending on the setting. Key factors explaining...

  19. Improving the delivery of preventive care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Dorothy Y

    2007-05-01

    Performance of preventive services is an important indicator of high-quality health care, but many recommended services are not regularly offered in primary care practices. Health risk assessments, counseling, and referral to community-based programs help address risk behaviors, many of which are leading causes of preventable death and disability in the United States. This study examined various influences on the delivery of preventive services designed to address smoking, excessive consumption of alcohol, unhealthy diets, and sedentary lifestyles. More than 300 health care providers in 52 practices nationwide have contributed data to this study. Staff participation in quality improvement enhanced work relationships and also diminished the effect of practice size on the performance of preventive care. The use of nurse practitioners, allied health professionals, clinician reminders, and patient registries were positively associated with care delivery.

  20. Palliative care and pediatric surgical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inserra, Alessandro; Narciso, Alessandra; Paolantonio, Guglielmo; Messina, Raffaella; Crocoli, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    Survival rate for childhood cancer has increased in recent years, reaching as high as 70% in developed countries compared with 54% for all cancers diagnosed in the 1980s. In the remaining 30%, progression or metastatic disease leads to death and in this framework palliative care has an outstanding role though not well settled in all its facets. In this landscape, surgery has a supportive actor role integrated with other welfare aspects from which are not severable. The definition of surgical palliation has moved from the ancient definition of noncurative surgery to a group of practices performed not to cure but to alleviate an organ dysfunction offering the best quality of life possible in all the aspects of life (pain, dysfunctions, caregivers, psychosocial, etc.). To emphasize this aspect a more modern definition has been introduced: palliative therapy in whose context is comprised not only the care assistance but also the plans of care since the onset of illness, teaching the matter to surgeons in training and share paths. Literature is very poor regarding surgical aspects specifically dedicated and all researches (PubMed, Google Scholar, and Cochrane) with various meshing terms result in a more oncologic and psychosocial effort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The delivery of primary care services.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, A.; Windak, A.; Oleszczyk, M.; Wilm, S.; Hasvold, T.; Kringos, D.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter will be devoted to the dimensions which have been grouped in the framework as “process” and that focus on essential features of service delivery in primary care. In addition to the breadth of services delivered, a comparative overview will be provided of variation in access to services,

  2. Redesigning ambulatory care business processes supporting clinical care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, C; Sinkewich, M; Short, J; Callas, E

    1997-04-01

    The first step in redesigning the health care delivery process for ambulatory care begins with the patient and the business processes that support the patient. Patient-related business processes include patient access, service documentation, billing, follow-up, collection, and payment. Access is the portal to the clinical delivery and care management process. Service documentation, charge capture, and payment and collection are supporting processes to care delivery. Realigned provider networks now demand realigned patient business services to provide their members/customers/patients with improved service delivery at less cost. Purchaser mandates for cost containment, health maintenance, and enhanced quality of care have created an environment where every aspect of the delivery system, especially ambulatory care, is being judged. Business processes supporting the outpatient are therefore being reexamined for better efficiency and customer satisfaction. Many health care systems have made major investments in their ambulatory care environment, but have pursued traditional supporting business practices--such as multiple access points, lack of integrated patient appointment scheduling and registration, and multiple patient bills. These are areas that are appropriate for redesign efforts--all with the customer's needs and convenience in mind. Similarly, setting unrealistic expectations, underestimating the effort required, and ignoring the human elements of a patient-focused business service redesign effort can sabotage the very sound reasons for executing such an endeavor. Pitfalls can be avoided if a structured methodology, coupled with a change management process, are employed. Deloitte & Touche Consulting Group has been involved in several major efforts, all with ambulatory care settings to assist with the redesign of their business practices to consider the patient as the driver, instead of the institution providing the care.

  3. Feasibility of Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems in Surgical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Margaret; Leischow, Scott; Croghan, Ivana; Kadimpati, Sandeep; Hanson, Andrew; Schroeder, Darrell; Warner, David O

    2016-08-01

    Cigarette smoking is a known risk factor for postoperative complications. Quitting or cutting down on cigarettes around the time of surgery may reduce these risks. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of using electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) to help patients achieve this goal, regardless of their intent to attempt long-term abstinence. An open-label observational study was performed of cigarette smoking adults scheduled for elective surgery at Mayo Clinic Rochester and seen in the pre-operative evaluation clinic between December 2014 and June 2015. Subjects were given a supply of ENDS to use prior to and 2 weeks after surgery. They were encouraged to use them whenever they craved a cigarette. Daily use of ENDS was recorded, and patients were asked about smoking behavior and ENDS use at baseline, 14 days and 30 days. Of the 105 patients approached, 80 (76%) agreed to participate; five of these were later excluded. Among the 75, 67 (87%) tried ENDS during the study period. At 30-day follow-up, 34 (51%) who had used ENDS planned to continue using them. Average cigarette consumption decreased from 15.6 per person/d to 7.6 over the study period (P < .001). At 30 days, 11/67 (17%) reported abstinence from cigarettes. ENDS use is feasible in adult smokers scheduled for elective surgery and is associated with a reduction in perioperative cigarette consumption. These results support further exploration of ENDS as a means to help surgical patients reduce or eliminate their cigarette consumption around the time of surgery. Smoking in the perioperative period increases patients' risk for surgical complications and healing difficulties, but new strategies are needed to help patients quit or cut down during this stressful time. These pilot data suggest that ENDS use is feasible and well-accepted in surgical patients, and worthy of exploration as a harm reduction strategy in these patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  4. Providing care for critically ill surgical patients: challenges and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisherman, Samuel A; Kaplan, Lewis; Gracias, Vicente H; Beilman, Gregory J; Toevs, Christine; Byrnes, Matthew C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-07-01

    Providing optimal care for critically ill and injured surgical patients will become more challenging with staff shortages for surgeons and intensivists. This white paper addresses the historical issues behind the present situation, the need for all intensivists to engage in dedicated critical care per the intensivist model, and the recognition that intensivists from all specialties can provide optimal care for the critically ill surgical patient, particularly with continuing involvement by the surgeon of record. The new acute care surgery training paradigm (including trauma, surgical critical care, and emergency general surgery) has been developed to increase interest in trauma and surgical critical care, but the number of interested trainees remains too few. Recommendations are made for broadening the multidisciplinary training and practice opportunities in surgical critical care for intensivists from all base specialties and for maintaining the intensivist model within acute care surgery practice. Support from academic and administrative leadership, as well as national organizations, will be needed.

  5. ACO model should encourage efficient care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, John; Krueger, David; Shortell, Stephen M; Milstein, Arnold; Cutler, David M

    2015-09-01

    The independent Office of the Actuary for CMS certified that the Pioneer ACO model has met the stringent criteria for expansion to a larger population. Significant savings have accrued and quality targets have been met, so the program as a whole appears to be working. Ironically, 13 of the initial 32 enrollees have left. We attribute this to the design of the ACO models which inadequately support efficient care delivery. Using Bellin-ThedaCare Healthcare Partners as an example, we will focus on correctible flaws in four core elements of the ACO payment model: finance spending and targets, attribution, and quality performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Beyond the horizon of health-care delivery - medical marketing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, M; Großterlinden, L G; Rueger, J M; Ruecker, A H

    2014-12-01

    The progress in medical health care and demographic changes cause increasing financial expenses. The rising competitive environment on health-care delivery level calls for economisation and implementation of a professional marketing set-up in order to ensure long-term commercial success. The survey is based on a questionnaire-analysis of 100 patients admitted to a trauma department at a university hospital in Germany. Patients were admitted either for emergency treatment or planned surgical procedures. Competence and localisation represent basic criteria determing hospital choice with a varying focus in each collective. Both collectives realise a trend toward economisation, possibly influencing medical care decision-making. Patients admitted for planned surgical treatment are well informed about their disease, treatment options and specialised centres. The main source of information is the internet. Both collectives claim amenities during their in-hospital stay. Increasing economisation trends call for a sound and distinct marketing strategy. The marketing has to be focused on the stakeholders needs. Concomitant factors are patient satisfaction, the establishment of cooperation networks and maintenance/improvement of medical health-care quality. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Initiatives to Enhance Primary Care Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan L. Losby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Increasing demands on primary care providers have created a need for systems-level initiatives to improve primary care delivery. The purpose of this article is to describe and present outcomes for 2 such initiatives: the Pennsylvania Academy of Family Physicians’ Residency Program Collaborative (RPC and the St Johnsbury Vermont Community Health Team (CHT. Methods: Researchers conducted case studies of the initiatives using mixed methods, including secondary analysis of program and electronic health record data, systematic document review, and interviews. Results: The RPC is a learning collaborative that teaches quality improvement and patient centeredness to primary care providers, residents, clinical support staff, and administrative staff in residency programs. Results show that participation in a higher number of live learning sessions resulted in a significant increase in patient-centered medical home recognition attainment and significant improvements in performance in diabetic process measures including eye examinations (14.3%, P = .004, eye referrals (13.82%, P = .013, foot examinations (15.73%, P = .003, smoking cessation (15.83%, P = .012, and self-management goals (25.45%, P = .001. As a community-clinical linkages model, CHT involves primary care practices, community health workers (CHWs, and community partners. Results suggest that CHT members successfully work together to coordinate comprehensive care for the individuals they serve. Further, individuals exposed to CHWs experienced increased stability in access to health insurance ( P = .001 and prescription drugs ( P = .000 and the need for health education counseling ( P = .000. Conclusion: Findings from this study indicate that these 2 system-level strategies have the promise to improve primary care delivery. Additional research can determine the extent to which these strategies can improve other health outcomes.

  8. Factors influencing incident reporting in surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreckler, S; Catchpole, K; McCulloch, P; Handa, A

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the process of incident reporting in a surgical setting. In particular: the influence of event outcome on reporting behaviour; staff perception of surgical complications as reportable events. Anonymous web-based questionnaire survey. General Surgical Department in a UK teaching hospital. Of 203 eligible staff, 55 (76.4%) doctors and 82 (62.6%) nurses participated. Knowledge and use of local reporting system; propensity to report incidents which vary by outcome (harm, no harm, harm prevented); propensity to report surgical complications; practical and psychological barriers to reporting. Nurses were significantly more likely to know of the local reporting system and to have recently completed a report than doctors. The level of harm (F(1.8,246) = 254.2, pvs 53%, z = 4.633, psystems.

  9. Emerging trends in the outsourcing of medical and surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jennifer B; McGrath, Mary H; Maa, John

    2011-01-01

    As total health care expenditures are expected to constitute an increasing portion of the US gross domestic product during the coming years, the US health care system is anticipating a historic spike in the need for care. Outsourcing medical and surgical care to other nations has expanded rapidly, and several ethical, legal, and financial considerations require careful evaluation. Ultimately, the balance between cost savings, quality, and patient satisfaction will be the key determinant in the future of medical outsourcing.

  10. Guidelines for Psychological Practice in Health Care Delivery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Psychologists practice in an increasingly diverse range of health care delivery systems. The following guidelines are intended to assist psychologists, other health care providers, administrators in health care delivery systems, and the public to conceptualize the roles and responsibilities of psychologists in these diverse contexts. These…

  11. Challenges faced by hospitals in providing surgical care and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    essential surgical staff, inadequate funding, poor state of ... individuals interested in surgical care in the developing world has been ... 5.69 per 100,000 in the United States . ... categorical variables e.g gender, the percentage of the ... lack of materials and supplies to be used, inability to pay ... Confirming a big gap in.

  12. Family-centred care delivery: comparing models of primary care service delivery in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo-Bruinsma, Liesha; Hogg, William; Taljaard, Monica; Dahrouge, Simone

    2013-11-01

    To determine whether models of primary care service delivery differ in their provision of family-centred care (FCC) and to identify practice characteristics associated with FCC. Cross-sectional study. Primary care practices in Ontario (ie, 35 salaried community health centres, 35 fee-for-service practices, 32 capitation-based health service organizations, and 35 blended remuneration family health networks) that belong to 4 models of primary care service delivery. A total of 137 practices, 363 providers, and 5144 patients. Measures of FCC in patient and provider surveys were based on the Primary Care Assessment Tool. Statistical analyses were conducted using linear mixed regression models and generalized estimating equations. Patient-reported FCC scores were high and did not vary significantly by primary care model. Larger panel size in a practice was associated with lower odds of patients reporting FCC. Provider-reported FCC scores were significantly higher in community health centres than in family health networks (P = .035). A larger number of nurse practitioners and clinical services on-site were both associated with higher FCC scores, while scores decreased as the number of family physicians in a practice increased and if practices were more rural. Based on provider and patient reports, primary care reform strategies that encourage larger practices and more patients per family physician might compromise the provision of FCC, while strategies that encourage multidisciplinary practices and a range of services might increase FCC.

  13. Effect of delivery care user fee exemption policy on institutional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: To improve access to skilled attendance at delivery and thereby reduce maternal mortality, the Government of Ghana introduced a policy exempting all women attending health facilities from paying delivery care fees. Objective: To examine the effect of the exemption policy on delivery-related maternal mortality.

  14. Patient satisfaction and quality of surgical care in US hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Thomas C; Orav, E John; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between patient satisfaction and surgical quality is unclear for US hospitals. Using national data, we examined if hospitals with high patient satisfaction have lower levels of performance on accepted measures of the quality and efficiency of surgical care. Federal policymakers have made patient satisfaction a core measure for the way hospitals are evaluated and paid through the value-based purchasing program. There is broad concern that performance on patient satisfaction may have little or even a negative correlation with the quality of surgical care, leading to potential trade-offs in efforts to improve patient experience with other surgical quality measures. We used the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey data from 2010 and 2011 to assess performance on patient experience. We used national Medicare data on 6 common surgical procedures to calculate measures of surgical efficiency and quality: risk-adjusted length of stay, process score, risk-adjusted mortality rate, risk-adjusted readmission rate, and a composite z score across all 4 metrics. Multivariate models adjusting for hospital characteristics were used to assess the independent relationships between patient satisfaction and measures of surgical efficiency and quality. Of the 2953 US hospitals that perform one of these 6 procedures, the median patient satisfaction score was 69.5% (interquartile range, 63%-75.5%). Length of stay was shorter in hospitals with the highest levels of patient satisfaction (7.1 days vs 7.7 days, P patient satisfaction had the higher process of care performance (96.5 vs 95.5, P patient satisfaction also had a higher composite score for quality across all measures (P patient satisfaction provided more efficient care and were associated with higher surgical quality. Our findings suggest there need not be a trade-off between good quality of care for surgical patients and ensuring a positive patient experience.

  15. Breastfeeding: guidance received in prenatal care, delivery and postpartum care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Caroline Barbieri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze the guidelines considering breastfeeding given by health professionals to women during prenatal care, delivery and postpartum care. Quantitative and descriptive work developed at Regional Pinheiros, Maringá-PR, from the registry in SisPreNatal, from May to August 2009. Data were collected through interviews conducted with parents at home, using a structured instrument. Participants were 36 mothers, most of whom received counseling for breastfeeding during prenatal (58.3%, maternity (87.6% and in nursing visits to newborn (84.6%. The prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding was 37.5%, even with the end of maternity leave. The rate is still below the recommended by the World Health Organization for exclusive breastfeeding. The present results may contribute to the monitoring of health actions and development of new strategies in the maintenance of exclusive breastfeeding.

  16. Critical care admission of South African (SA surgical patients: Results of the SA Surgical Outcomes Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lee Skinner

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Appropriate critical care admissions are an important component of surgical care. However, there are few data describing postoperative critical care admission in resource-limited low- and middle-income countries. Objective. To describe the demographics, organ failures, organ support and outcomes of non-cardiac surgical patients admitted to critical care units in South Africa (SA. Methods. The SA Surgical Outcomes Study (SASOS was a 7-day national, multicentre, prospective, observational cohort study of all patients ≥16 years of age undergoing inpatient non-cardiac surgery between 19 and 26 May 2014 at 50 government-funded hospitals. All patients admitted to critical care units during this study were included for analysis. Results. Of the 3 927 SASOS patients, 255 (6.5% were admitted to critical care units; of these admissions, 144 (56.5% were planned, and 111 (43.5% unplanned. The incidence of confirmed or strongly suspected infection at the time of admission was 35.4%, with a significantly higher incidence in unplanned admissions (49.1 v. 24.8%, p<0.001. Unplanned admission cases were more frequently hypovolaemic, had septic shock, and required significantly more inotropic, ventilatory and renal support in the first 48 hours after admission. Overall mortality was 22.4%, with unplanned admissions having a significantly longer critical care length of stay and overall mortality (33.3 v. 13.9%, p<0.001. Conclusion. The outcome of patients admitted to public sector critical care units in SA is strongly associated with unplanned admissions. Adequate ‘high care-dependency units’ for postoperative care of elective surgical patients could potentially decrease the burden on critical care resources in SA by 23%. This study was registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02141867.

  17. Critical care admission of South African (SA) surgical patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Critical care admission of South African (SA) surgical patients: Results of the SA Surgical Outcomes Study. D.L. Skinner, K de Vasconcellos, R Wise, T.M. Esterhuizen, C Fourie, A Goolam Mahomed, P.D. Gopalan, I Joubert, H Kluyts, L.R. Mathivha, B Mrara, J.P. Pretorius, G Richards, O Smith, M.G.L. Spruyt, R.M. Pearse, ...

  18. Hypothermia in a surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelha, Fernando J; Castro, Maria A; Neves, Aida M; Landeiro, Nuno M; Santos, Cristina C

    2005-06-06

    Inadvertent hypothermia is not uncommon in the immediate postoperative period and it is associated with impairment and abnormalities in various organs and systems that can lead to adverse outcomes. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence, the predictive factors and outcome of core hypothermia on admission to a surgical ICU. All consecutive 185 adult patients who underwent scheduled or emergency noncardiac surgery admitted to a surgical ICU between April and July 2004 were admitted to the study. Tympanic membrane core temperature (Tc) was measured before surgery, on arrival at ICU and every two hours until 6 hours after admission. The following variables were also recorded: age, sex, body weight and height, ASA physical status, type of surgery, magnitude of surgical procedure, anesthesia technique, amount of intravenous fluids administered during anesthesia, use of temperature monitoring and warming techniques, duration of the anesthesia, ICU length of stay, hospital length of stay and SAPS II score. Patients were classified as either hypothermic (Tc 35 degrees C). Univariate analysis and multiple regression binary logistic with an odds ratio (OR) and its 95% Confidence Interval (95%CI) were used to compare the two groups of patients and assess the relationship between each clinical predictor and hypothermia. Outcome measured as ICU length of stay and mortality was also assessed. Prevalence of hypothermia on ICU admission was 57.8%. In univariate analysis temperature monitoring, use of warming techniques and higher previous body temperature were significant protective factors against core hypothermia. In this analysis independent predictors of hypothermia on admission to ICU were: magnitude of surgery, use of general anesthesia or combined epidural and general anesthesia, total intravenous crystalloids administrated and total packed erythrocytes administrated, anesthesia longer than 3 hours and SAPS II scores. In multiple logistic regression analysis

  19. Hypothermia in a surgical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landeiro Nuno M

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadvertent hypothermia is not uncommon in the immediate postoperative period and it is associated with impairment and abnormalities in various organs and systems that can lead to adverse outcomes. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence, the predictive factors and outcome of core hypothermia on admission to a surgical ICU. Methods All consecutive 185 adult patients who underwent scheduled or emergency noncardiac surgery admitted to a surgical ICU between April and July 2004 were admitted to the study. Tympanic membrane core temperature (Tc was measured before surgery, on arrival at ICU and every two hours until 6 hours after admission. The following variables were also recorded: age, sex, body weight and height, ASA physical status, type of surgery, magnitude of surgical procedure, anesthesia technique, amount of intravenous fluids administered during anesthesia, use of temperature monitoring and warming techniques, duration of the anesthesia, ICU length of stay, hospital length of stay and SAPS II score. Patients were classified as either hypothermic (Tc ≤ 35°C or normothermic (Tc> 35°C. Univariate analysis and multiple regression binary logistic with an odds ratio (OR and its 95% Confidence Interval (95%CI were used to compare the two groups of patients and assess the relationship between each clinical predictor and hypothermia. Outcome measured as ICU length of stay and mortality was also assessed. Results Prevalence of hypothermia on ICU admission was 57.8%. In univariate analysis temperature monitoring, use of warming techniques and higher previous body temperature were significant protective factors against core hypothermia. In this analysis independent predictors of hypothermia on admission to ICU were: magnitude of surgery, use of general anesthesia or combined epidural and general anesthesia, total intravenous crystalloids administrated and total packed erythrocytes administrated, anesthesia longer

  20. Health care quality, access, cost, workforce, and surgical education: the ultimate perfect storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Marshall Z

    2012-01-01

    The discussions on health care reform over the past two years have focused on cost containment while trying to maintain quality of care. Focusing on just cost and quality unfortunately does not address other very important factors that impact on our health care delivery system. Availability of a well-trained workforce, maintaining the sophisticated medical/surgical education system, and ultimately access to quality care by the public are critical to maintaining and enhancing our health care delivery system. Unfortunately, all five of these components are under at risk. Thus, we have evolving the ultimate perfect storm affecting our health care delivery system. Although not ideal and given the uniqueness of our population and their expectations, our current delivery system is excellent compared to other countries. However, the cost of our current system is rising at an alarming rate. Currently, health care consumes 17% of our gross domestic product. If our system is not revised this will continue to rise and by 2025 it will consume 48%. The dilemma, given the current state of our overall economy and rising debt, is how to address this major problem. Unfortunately, the Affordable Care Act, which is now law, does not address most of the issues and the cost was initially grossly under estimated. Furthermore, the law does not address the issues of workforce, maintaining our medical education system or ultimately, access. A major revision of our system will be necessary to truly create a system that protects and enhances all five of the components of our health care delivery system. To effectively accomplish this will require addressing those issues that lead to wasteful spending and diversion of our health care dollars to profit instead of care. Improved and efficient delivery systems that reduce complications, reduction of duplication of tertiary and quaternary programs or services within the same markets (i.e. regionalization of care), health insurance reform, and

  1. Portable Video Media Versus Standard Verbal Communication in Surgical Information Delivery to Nurses: A Prospective Multicenter, Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Jonathan; Ainsworth, Hannah; Handmer, Marcus; Louie-Johnsun, Mark; Winter, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    Continuing education of health professionals is important for delivery of quality health care. Surgical nurses are often required to understand surgical procedures. Nurses need to be aware of the expected outcomes and recognize potential complications of such procedures during their daily work. Traditional educational methods, such as conferences and tutorials or informal education at the bedside, have many drawbacks for delivery of this information in a universal, standardized, and timely manner. The rapid uptake of portable media devices makes portable video media (PVM) a potential alternative to current educational methods. To compare PVM to standard verbal communication (SVC) for surgical information delivery and educational training for nurses and evaluate its impact on knowledge acquisition and participant satisfaction. Prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled crossover trial. Two hospitals: Gosford District Hospital and Wyong Hospital. Seventy-two nursing staff (36 at each site). Information delivery via PVM--7-minute video compared to information delivered via SVC. Knowledge acquisition was measured by a 32-point questionnaire, and satisfaction with the method of education delivery was measured using the validated Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ-8). Knowledge acquisition was higher via PVM compared to SVC 25.9 (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.2-26.6) versus 24.3 (95% CI 23.5-25.1), p = .004. Participant satisfaction was higher with PVM 29.5 (95% CI 28.3-30.7) versus 26.5 (95% CI 25.1-27.9), p = .003. Following information delivery via SVC, participants had a 6% increase in knowledge scores, 24.3 (95% CI 23.5-25.1) versus 25.7 (95% CI 24.9-26.5) p = .001, and a 13% increase in satisfaction scores, 26.5 (95% CI 25.1-27.9) versus 29.9 (95% CI 28.8-31.0) p < .001, when they crossed-over to information delivery via PVM. PVM provides a novel method for providing education to nurses that improves knowledge retention and satisfaction with the

  2. Emergency obstetric care in a rural district of Burundi: What are the surgical needs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E De Plecker

    Full Text Available In a rural district hospital in Burundi offering Emergency Obstetric care-(EmOC, we assessed the a characteristics of women at risk of, or with an obstetric complication and their types b the number and type of obstetric surgical procedures and anaesthesia performed c human resource cadres who performed surgery and anaesthesia and d hospital exit outcomes.A retrospective analysis of EmOC data (2011 and 2012.A total of 6084 women were referred for EmOC of whom 2534(42% underwent a major surgical procedure while 1345(22% required a minor procedure (36% women did not require any surgical procedure. All cases with uterine rupture(73 and extra-uterine pregnancy(10 and the majority with pre-uterine rupture and foetal distress required major surgery. The two most prevalent conditions requiring a minor surgical procedure were abortions (61% and normal delivery (34%. A total of 2544 major procedures were performed on 2534 admitted individuals. Of these, 1650(65% required spinal and 578(23% required general anaesthesia; 2341(92% procedures were performed by 'general practitioners with surgical skills' and in 2451(96% cases, anaesthesia was provided by nurses. Of 2534 hospital admissions related to major procedures, 2467(97% were discharged, 21(0.8% were referred to tertiary care and 2(0.1% died.Overall, the obstetric surgical volume in rural Burundi is high with nearly six out of ten referrals requiring surgical intervention. Nonetheless, good quality care could be achieved by trained, non-specialist staff. The post-2015 development agenda needs to take this into consideration if it is to make progress towards reducing maternal mortality in Africa.

  3. Caring for Surgical Patients With Piercings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2016-06-01

    Body piercing, a type of body modification that is practiced in many cultures, creates an unnatural tract through tissue that is then held open by artificial means. Today, professional body piercing is often performed in piercing establishments that are subject to dissimilar forms of regulation. The most frequently reported medical complication of body piercing and similar body modifications, such as dermal implantation, is infection. Patients with piercings who undergo surgery may have additional risks for infection, electrical burns, trauma, or airway obstruction. The published research literature on piercing prevalence, complications, regulations, education, and nursing care is outdated. The purpose of this article is to educate nurses on topics related to nursing care for patients with piercings and similar body modifications, including the history, prevalence, motivations for, and perceptions of body piercings as well as possible complications, devices used, locations, healing times, regulations, patient education, and other health concerns. Copyright © 2016 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Drivers of prenatal care quality and uptake of supervised delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In spite of the introduction of free maternal healthcare in Ghana, utilization of supervised delivery services continues to be low due partly to poor quality of antenatal care (ANC). Aim: The study sought to identify the determinants of perceived quality of ANC and uptake of skilled delivery services. Subjects and ...

  5. Prenatal care and socioeconomic status: effect on cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milcent, Carine; Zbiri, Saad

    2018-03-10

    Cesarean deliveries are widely used in many high- and middle-income countries. This overuse both increases costs and lowers quality of care and is thus a major concern in the healthcare industry. The study first examines the impact of prenatal care utilization on cesarean delivery rates. It then determines whether socioeconomic status affects the use of prenatal care and thereby influences the cesarean delivery decision. Using exclusive French delivery data over the 2008-2014 period, with multilevel logit models, and controlling for relevant patient and hospital characteristics, we show that women who do not participate in prenatal education have an increased probability of a cesarean delivery compared to those who do. The study further indicates that attendance at prenatal education varies according to socioeconomic status. Low socioeconomic women are more likely to have cesarean deliveries and less likely to participate in prenatal education. This result emphasizes the importance of focusing on pregnancy health education, particularly for low-income women, as a potential way to limit unnecessary cesarean deliveries. Future studies would ideally investigate the effect of interventions promoting such as care participation on cesarean delivery rates.

  6. Health care delivery in Malaysia: changes, challenges and champions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Susan; Beh, LooSee; Nordin, Rusli Bin

    2011-01-01

    Since 1957, there has been major reorganization of health care services in Malaysia. This article assesses the changes and challenges in health care delivery in Malaysia and how the management in health care processes has evolved over the years including equitable health care and health care financing. The health care service in Malaysia is changing towards wellness service as opposed to illness service. The Malaysian Ministry of Health (MOH), being the main provider of health services, may need to manage and mobilize better health care services by providing better health care financing mechanisms. It is recommended that partnership between public and private sectors with the extension of traditional medicine complementing western medicine in medical therapy continues in the delivery of health care. PMID:28299064

  7. General surgical admissions in the intensive care unit in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives:The Intensive Care Unit (ICU) has improved patient outcome in complex surgeries while the costs of maintaining services are high. ICU services in developing countries are often inadequate due to lack of funds. This study reviews the pattern and outcomes of General Surgical patients admitted to the ICU of our ...

  8. Understanding the reasons for delay to definitive surgical care of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Acute appendicitis in rural South Africa is associated with significant morbidity due to prolonged delays before definitive surgical care. Objective. This audit aimed to quantify the delay in our healthcare system. Methods. From September 2010 to September 2012, all patients with confirmed acute appendicitis ...

  9. Understanding the reasons for delay to definitive surgical care of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Understanding the reasons for delay to definitive surgical care of patients with acute appendicitis in rural South Africa. V Y Kong,1 MB ChB; C Aldous,2 PhD; D L Clarke,1 FCS ... Acute appendicitis in rural South Africa is associated with significant morbidity due to prolonged delays before definitive .... telemedicine support.

  10. A study of factors influencing surgical cesarean delivery times in an academic tertiary center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Fiol, A; Meng, M-L; Danhakl, V; Kim, M; Miller, R; Smiley, R

    2018-05-01

    Knowledge of hospital-specific average cesarean delivery operative times, and factors influencing length of surgery, can serve as a guide for anesthesiologists when choosing the optimal anesthetic technique. The aim of this study was to determine operative times and the factors influencing those times for cesarean delivery. We conducted a retrospective review of all 1348 cesarean deliveries performed at an academic hospital in 2011. The primary outcome was mean operative time for first, second, third and fourth or more cesarean deliveries. The secondary goal was to identify factors influencing operative time. Variables included age, body mass index, previous surgery, gestational age, urgency of cesarean delivery, anesthesia type, surgeon's seniority, layers closed, and performance of tubal ligation. Mean (standard deviation) operative times for first (n=857), second (n=353), third (n=108) and fourth or more (n=30) cesarean deliveries were 56 (19), 60 (19), 69 (28) and 82 (31) minutes, respectively (P cesarean delivery or the presence of other factors that could increase operative time may warrant catheter-based anesthetic techniques or the addition of adjunctive medications to prolong spinal anesthetic block. Institutional and individual surgeon factors may play an even more important role in determining surgical time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Equitable access to comprehensive surgical care: the potential of indigenous private philanthropy in low-income settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Lubna; Iqbal, Mehreen; Tariq, Ahson; Shahzad, Wasif; Khan, Aamir J

    2015-01-01

    Equitable access to surgical care is necessary for improving global health. We report on the performance, financial sustainability, and policy impact of a free-of-cost multispecialty surgical delivery program in Karachi, Pakistan built upon local private philanthropy. We evaluated trends in surgical service delivery, expenditures, and philanthropic donations from Indus Hospital's first 5 years of operation (2007-2012), projected these over the hospital's current expansion phase, compared these to publicly accessible records of other philanthropic hospitals providing surgical care, and documented the government's evolving policies toward this model. Between 2007 and 2012, Indus Hospital treated 40,012 in-patients free of cost, 33,606 (84 %) of them for surgical procedures. Surgical procedures increased fivefold to 9,478 during 2011-2012 from 1,838 during 2007-2008. Bed occupancy increased to 91 % from 65 % over the same period. External surgical missions accounted for less than 0.5 % of patients served. Ninety-eight percent (98 %) of all philanthropic donations--totaling USD 26.6 million over 2007-2012--were locally generated. Zakat (obligatory annual religious alms in the Islamic faith) constituted 34 % of all donations, followed by unrestricted funds (24 %) and donations-in-kind (24 %), buildings (12 %), grants (5 %), and return on investments (1 %). Overall, donations received between 2007 and 2012 increased sevenfold, with Zakat increasing 12-fold. During 2013-2014, the Government of Pakistan provided land lease and annual operational grants totaling USD 9 million. Local philanthropy can sustain and grow the provision of free, high-quality surgical care in low-income settings, and encourage the development of hybrid government-philanthropic models of surgical care.

  12. You pray to your God: A qualitative analysis of challenges in the provision of safe, timely, and affordable surgical care in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albutt, Katherine; Yorlets, Rachel R; Punchak, Maria; Kayima, Peter; Namanya, Didacus B; Anderson, Geoffrey A; Shrime, Mark G

    2018-01-01

    Five billion people lack access to safe, affordable, and timely surgical and anesthesia care. Significant challenges remain in the provision of surgical care in low-resource settings. Uganda is no exception. From September to November 2016, we conducted a mixed-methods countrywide surgical capacity assessment at 17 randomly selected public hospitals in Uganda. Researchers conducted 35 semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders to understand factors related to the provision of surgical care. The framework approach was used for thematic and explanatory data analysis. The Ugandan public health care sector continues to face significant challenges in the provision of safe, timely, and affordable surgical care. These challenges can be broadly grouped into preparedness and policy, service delivery, and the financial burden of surgical care. Hospital staff reported challenges including: (1) significant delays in accessing surgical care, compounded by a malfunctioning referral system; (2) critical workforce shortages; (3) operative capacity that is limited by inadequate infrastructure and overwhelmed by emergency and obstetric volume; (4) supply chain difficulties pertaining to provision of essential medications, equipment, supplies, and blood; (5) significant, variable, and sometimes catastrophic expenditures for surgical patients and their families; and (6) a lack of surgery-specific policies and priorities. Despite these challenges, innovative strategies are being used in the public to provide surgical care to those most in need. Barriers to the provision of surgical care are cross-cutting and involve constraints in infrastructure, service delivery, workforce, and financing. Understanding current strengths and shortfalls of Uganda's surgical system is a critical first step in developing effective, targeted policy and programming that will build and strengthen its surgical capacity.

  13. Patients' experiences of postoperative intermediate care and standard surgical ward care after emergency abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Vester-Andersen, Morten; Nielsen, Martin Vedel

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how patie......, intermediate care patients felt hindered in doing so by continuous monitoring of vital signs. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Intermediate care may increase patient perceptions of quality and safety of care.......AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how...... patients experience postoperative care. The patient population is generally older with multiple comorbidities, and the short-term postoperative mortality rate is 15-20%. Thus, vigilant surgeon and nursing attention is essential. The present study is a qualitative sub-study of a randomised trial evaluating...

  14. Development of surgical CW Nd:YAG laser with optical fiber delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Kim, Jeong Mook; Jung, Chin Mann; Kim, Kwang Suk; Kim, Min Suk; Cho, Jae Wan; Kim, Duk Hyun

    1992-06-01

    We developed a surgical CW Nd:YAG laser with optical fiber delivery system. Several commercial models have been investigated in design and performance. We improved its quality to the level of commercial Nd:YAG laser by an endurance test for each parts of laser system. The maximum power of our surgical laser was 150 W and the laser pulse width could be controlled to 99 sec continuously by 0.1 sec. Many optical parts were localized and lowered much in cost. Only few parts were imported and almost 90% in cost were localized. Also, to find out the maintenance problem of this surgical laser, it was applicated to the production line of our joint company. (Author)

  15. Technological Advances in Nursing Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Debra Henline

    2015-12-01

    Technology is rapidly changing the way nurses deliver patient care. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 encourages health care providers to implement electronic health records for meaningful use of patient information. This development has opened the door to many technologies that use this information to streamline patient care. This article explores current and new technologies that nurses will be working with either now or in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Surgical methods for delivery in modern obstetrics and their influence on maternal and infant health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokhanevych, Ie V; Mitsoda, R M; Konoplianko, T V; Konoplianko, V V

    2000-03-01

    The article addresses issues of comparative characterization of deliveries involving surgery and impact thereof on the health of the mother and her child. Risk factors are identified that the mother and her child run in sectio cesarea, in application of obstetrical forceps, and in vacuum-extraction of the fetus. Cesarean section was found out to be the most acceptable mode of delivery in origination of organic and functional nervous system involvement in children but the most ill-chosen and unpropitious one in the mother, especially so in those groups at risk for bleeding, septic complications, and genital endometriosis. Among those surgical methods of delivery being the least traumatic to the mother are obstetrical forceps and vacuum-extraction of the fetus.

  17. Surgical care of the pediatric Crohn's disease patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Dylan

    2017-12-01

    Despite the significant advances in the medical management of inflammatory bowel disease over the last decade, surgery continues to play a major role in the management of pediatric Crohn's disease (CD). While adult and pediatric Crohn's disease may share many clinical characteristics, pediatric Crohn's patients often have a more aggressive phenotype, and the operative care given by the pediatric surgeon to the newly diagnosed Crohn's patient is very different in nature to the surgical needs of adult patients after decades of disease progression. Children also have the unique surgical indication of growth failure to consider in the overall clinical decision making. While surgery is never curative in CD, it has the ability to transform the disease process in children, and appropriately timed operations may have tremendous impact on a child's physical and mental maturation. This monograph aims to address the surgical care of Crohn's disease in general, with a specific emphasis on the surgical treatment of small intestinal and ileocecal involvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nursing theory and the delivery of compassionate care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Louisa

    2016-02-10

    Compassionate care is a priority in current healthcare policy. However, its definition is amorphous, leading to difficulties standardising it in practice. This article discusses how nursing theory is central to the delivery of compassionate care. It emphasises the need to develop a theoretical framework that reflects the eclectic and pragmatic nature of nursing practice, and the importance of using patient feedback as an indicator of the quality of care and as a basis for adapting theoretical hypotheses.

  19. Controlled drug delivery systems towards new frontiers in patient care

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Filippo; Masi, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a state-of-the-art overview of controlled drug delivery systems, covering the most important innovative applications. The principles of controlled drug release and the mechanisms involved in controlled release are clearly explained. The various existing polymeric drug delivery systems are reviewed, and new frontiers in material design are examined in detail, covering a wide range of polymer modification techniques. The concluding chapter is a case study focusing on use of a drug-eluting stent. The book is designed to provide the reader with a complete understanding of the mechanisms and design of controlled drug delivery systems, and to this end includes numerous step-by-step tutorials. It illustrates how chemical engineers can advance medical care by designing polymeric delivery systems that achieve either temporal or spatial control of drug delivery and thus ensure more effective therapy that eliminates the potential for both under-and overdosing.

  20. Healthcare information technology and medical-surgical nurses: the emergence of a new care partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, An'Nita; Fisher, Kathleen

    2012-03-01

    Healthcare information technology in US hospitals and ambulatory care centers continues to expand, and nurses are expected to effectively and efficiently utilize this technology. Researchers suggest that clinical information systems have expanded the realm of nursing to integrate technology as an element as important in nursing practice as the patient or population being served. This study sought to explore how medical surgical nurses make use of healthcare information technology in their current clinical practice and to examine the influence of healthcare information technology on nurses' clinical decision making. A total of eight medical surgical nurses participated in the study, four novice and four experienced. A conventional content analysis was utilized that allowed for a thematic interpretation of participant data. Five themes emerged: (1) healthcare information technology as a care coordination partner, (2) healthcare information technology as a change agent in the care delivery environment, (3) healthcare information technology-unable to meet all the needs, of all the people, all the time, (4) curiosity about healthcare information technology-what other bells and whistles exist, and (5) Big Brother is watching. The results of this study indicate that a new care partnership has emerged as the provision of nursing care is no longer supplied by a single practitioner but rather by a paired team, consisting of nurses and technology, working collaboratively in an interdependent relationship to achieve established goals.

  1. Health care delivery: strength in numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, R A

    1978-03-16

    The number and types of multi-institutional arrangements among health care facilities are on the increase, and the days of the completely autonomous, independent hospital are coming to a close. Although by themselves hospital systems are no panacea in dealing with the challenges facing hospitals today, many such arrangements offer more opportunities than problems in coping with the rapid changes currently facing the health care industry. The pros and cons of seven arrangements are discussed in detail.

  2. Efficiency performance of China's health care delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luyu; Cheng, Gang; Song, Suhang; Yuan, Beibei; Zhu, Weiming; He, Li; Ma, Xiaochen; Meng, Qingyue

    2017-07-01

    Improving efficiency performance of the health care delivery system has been on the agenda for the health system reform that China initiated in 2009. This study examines the changes in efficiency performance and determinants of efficiency after the reform to provide evidence to assess the progress of the reform from the perspective of efficiency. Descriptive analysis, Data Envelopment Analysis, the Malmquist Index, and multilevel regressions are used with data from multiple sources, including the World Bank, the China Health Statistical Yearbook, and routine reports. The results indicate that over the last decade, health outcomes compared with health investment were relatively higher in China than in most other countries worldwide, and the trend was stable. The overall efficiency and total factor productivity increased after the reform, indicating that the reform was likely to have had a positive impact on the efficiency performance of the health care delivery system. However, the health care delivery structure showed low system efficiency, mainly attributed to the weakened primary health care system. Strengthening the primary health care system is central to enhancing the future performance of China's health care delivery system. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Harnessing the privatisation of China's fragmented health-care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Winnie; Hsiao, William

    2014-08-30

    Although China's 2009 health-care reform has made impressive progress in expansion of insurance coverage, much work remains to improve its wasteful health-care delivery. Particularly, the Chinese health-care system faces substantial challenges in its transformation from a profit-driven public hospital-centred system to an integrated primary care-based delivery system that is cost effective and of better quality to respond to the changing population needs. An additional challenge is the government's latest strategy to promote private investment for hospitals. In this Review, we discuss how China's health-care system would perform if hospital privatisation combined with hospital-centred fragmented delivery were to prevail--population health outcomes would suffer; health-care expenditures would escalate, with patients bearing increasing costs; and a two-tiered system would emerge in which access and quality of care are decided by ability to pay. We then propose an alternative pathway that includes the reform of public hospitals to pursue the public interest and be more accountable, with public hospitals as the benchmarks against which private hospitals would have to compete, with performance-based purchasing, and with population-based capitation payment to catalyse coordinated care. Any decision to further expand the for-profit private hospital market should not be made without objective assessment of its effect on China's health-policy goals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cancer - the delivery of nursing care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, S.; Wark, E.

    1978-01-01

    This and the preceding article (Nursing Mirror, Sept. 1, 1978) form a slightly shortened version of Chap. 5 from Vol. 2 of the book 'Oncology for Nurses and Health Care Professionals', ed. R. Tiffany, (Allen and Unwin, Oct. 1978). Teletherapy was dealt with in part 1. Part 2 is concerned with radiotherapy using radioisotope implants and applicators and unsealed sources, and with surgery and chemotherapy, including side effects of anti-tumour drugs. The physical and psychological effects on the patient of these forms of treatment are discussed, and nursing care and radiological safety precautions for both patients and nursing staff are described. (author)

  5. The surgical care improvement project and prevention of post-operative infection, including surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Laura H; Politano, Amani D; Sawyer, Robert G

    2011-06-01

    In response to inconsistent compliance with infection prevention measures, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services collaborated with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the Surgical Infection Prevention (SIP) project, introduced in 2002. Quality improvement measures were developed to standardize processes to increase compliance. In 2006, the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) developed out of the SIP project and its process measures. These initiatives, published in the Specifications Manual for National Inpatient Quality Measures, outline process and outcome measures. This continually evolving manual is intended to provide standard quality measures to unify documentation and track standards of care. Seven of the SCIP initiatives apply to the peri-operative period: Prophylactic antibiotics should be received within 1 h prior to surgical incision (1), be selected for activity against the most probable antimicrobial contaminants (2), and be discontinued within 24 h after the surgery end-time (3); (4) euglycemia should be maintained, with well-controlled morning blood glucose concentrations on the first two post-operative days, especially in cardiac surgery patients; (6) hair at the surgical site should be removed with clippers or by depilatory methods, not with a blade; (9) urinary catheters are to be removed within the first two post-operative days; and (10) normothermia should be maintained peri-operatively. There is strong evidence that implementation of protocols that standardize practices reduce the risk of surgical infection. The SCIP initiative targets complications that account for a significant portion of preventable morbidity as well as cost. One of the goals of the SCIP guidelines was a 25% reduction in the incidence of surgical site infections from implementation through 2010. Process measures are becoming routine, and as we practice more evidence-based medicine, it falls to us, the surgeons and scientists, to be active

  6. A global health delivery framework approach to epilepsy care in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Maggie F; Berkowitz, Aaron L

    2015-11-15

    The Global Health Delivery (GHD) framework (Farmer, Kim, and Porter, Lancet 2013;382:1060-69) allows for the analysis of health care delivery systems along four axes: a care delivery value chain that incorporates prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of a medical condition; shared delivery infrastructure that integrates care within existing healthcare delivery systems; alignment of care delivery with local context; and generation of economic growth and social development through the health care delivery system. Here, we apply the GHD framework to epilepsy care in rural regions of low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) where there are few or no neurologists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Global surgery: current evidence for improving surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Jennifer C; Shaye, David A

    2017-08-01

    The field of global surgery is undergoing rapid transformation, owing to several recent prominent reports positioning it as a cost-effective means of relieving global disease burden. The purpose of this article is to review the recent advances in the field of global surgery. Efforts to grow the global surgical workforce and procedural capacity have focused on innovative methods to increase surgeon training, enhance international collaboration, leverage technology, optimize existing health systems, and safely implement task-sharing. Computer modeling offers a novel means of informing policy to optimize timely access to care, equitably promote health and financial protection, and efficiently grow infrastructure. Tools and checklists have recently been developed to enhance data collection and ensure methodologically rigorous publications to inform planning, benchmark surgical systems, promote accurate modeling, track key health indicators, and promote safety. Creation of institutional partnerships and trainee exchanges can enrich training, stimulate commitment to humanitarian work, and promote the equal exchange of ideas and expertise. The recent body of work creates a strong foundation upon which work toward the goal of universal access to safe, affordable surgical care can be built; however, further collection and analysis of country-specific data is necessary for accurate modeling and outcomes research into the efficacy of policies such as task-sharing is greatly needed.

  8. 'It's a matter of patient safety': understanding challenges in everyday clinical practice for achieving good care on the surgical ward - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangland, Eva; Nyberg, Berit; Yngman-Uhlin, Pia

    2017-06-01

    Surgical care plays an important role in the acute hospital's delivery of safe, high-quality patient care. Although demands for effectiveness are high in surgical wards quality of care and patient safety must also be secured. It is therefore necessary to identify the challenges and barriers linked to quality of care and patient safety with a focus on this specific setting. To explore situations and processes that support or hinder good safe patient care on the surgical ward. This qualitative study was based on a strategic sample of 10 department and ward leaders in three hospitals and six surgical wards in Sweden. Repeated reflective interviews were analysed using systematic text condensation. Four themes described the leaders' view of a complex healthcare setting that demands effectiveness and efficiency in moving patients quickly through the healthcare system. Quality of care and patient safety were often hampered factors such as a shift of care level, with critically ill patients cared for without reorganisation of nurses' competencies on the surgical ward. There is a gap between what is described in written documents and what is or can be performed in clinical practice to achieve good care and safe care on the surgical ward. A shift in levels of care on the surgical ward without reallocation of the necessary competencies at the patient's bedside show consequences for quality of care and patient safety. This means that surgical wards should consider reviewing their organisation and implementing more advanced nursing roles in direct patient care on all shifts. The ethical issues and the moral stress on nurses who lack the resources and competence to deliver good care according to professional values need to be made more explicit as a part of the patient safety agenda in the surgical ward. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. Lower Costs, Better Care- Reforming Our Health Care Delivery

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Affordable Care Act includes tools to improve the quality of health care that can also lower costs for taxpayers and patients. This means avoiding costly...

  10. Medical capsule robots: A renaissance for diagnostics, drug delivery and surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapara, Sanyat S; Patravale, Vandana B

    2017-09-10

    The advancements in electronics and the progress in nanotechnology have resulted in path breaking development that will transform the way diagnosis and treatment are carried out currently. This development is Medical Capsule Robots, which has emerged from the science fiction idea of robots travelling inside the body to diagnose and cure disorders. The first marketed capsule robot was a capsule endoscope developed to capture images of the gastrointestinal tract. Today, varieties of capsule endoscopes are available in the market. They are slightly larger than regular oral capsules, made up of a biocompatible case and have electronic circuitry and mechanisms to capture and transmit images. In addition, robots with diagnostic features such as in vivo body temperature detection and pH monitoring have also been launched in the market. However, a multi-functional unit that will diagnose and cure diseases inside the body has not yet been realized. A remote controlled capsule that will undertake drug delivery and surgical treatment has not been successfully launched in the market. High cost, inadequate power supply, lack of control over drug release, limited space for drug storage on the capsule, inadequate safety and no mechanisms for active locomotion and anchoring have prevented their entry in the market. The capsule robots can revolutionize the current way of diagnosis and treatment. This paper discusses in detail the applications of medical capsule robots in diagnostics, drug delivery and surgical treatment. In diagnostics, detailed analysis has been presented on wireless capsule endoscopes, issues associated with the marketed versions and their corresponding solutions in literature. Moreover, an assessment has been made of the existing state of remote controlled capsules for targeted drug delivery and surgical treatment and their future impact is predicted. Besides the need for multi-functional capsule robots and the areas for further research have also been

  11. Oral Health Care Delivery Within the Accountable Care Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Christine; Riggs, Sheila

    2016-06-01

    The accountable care organization (ACO) provides an opportunity to strategically design a comprehensive health system in which oral health works within primary care. A dental hygienist/therapist within the ACO represents value-based health care in action. Inspired by health care reform efforts in Minnesota, a vision of an accountable care organization that integrates oral health into primary health care was developed. Dental hygienists and dental therapists can help accelerate the integration of oral health into primary care, particularly in light of the compelling evidence confirming the cost-effectiveness of care delivered by an allied workforce. A dental insurance Chief Operating Officer and a dental hygiene educator used their unique perspectives and experience to describe the potential of an interdisciplinary team-based approach to individual and population health, including oral health, via an accountable care community. The principles of the patient-centered medical home and the vision for accountable care communities present a paradigm shift from a curative system of care to a prevention-based system that encompasses the behavioral, social, nutritional, economic, and environmental factors that impact health and well-being. Oral health measures embedded in the spectrum of general health care have the potential to ensure a truly comprehensive healthcare system. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Reducing Bottlenecks to Improve the Efficiency of the Lung Cancer Care Delivery Process: A Process Engineering Modeling Approach to Patient-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Feng; Lee, Hyo Kyung; Yu, Xinhua; Faris, Nicholas R; Rugless, Fedoria; Jiang, Shan; Li, Jingshan; Osarogiagbon, Raymond U

    2017-12-01

    The process of lung cancer care from initial lesion detection to treatment is complex, involving multiple steps, each introducing the potential for substantial delays. Identifying the steps with the greatest delays enables a focused effort to improve the timeliness of care-delivery, without sacrificing quality. We retrospectively reviewed clinical events from initial detection, through histologic diagnosis, radiologic and invasive staging, and medical clearance, to surgery for all patients who had an attempted resection of a suspected lung cancer in a community healthcare system. We used a computer process modeling approach to evaluate delays in care delivery, in order to identify potential 'bottlenecks' in waiting time, the reduction of which could produce greater care efficiency. We also conducted 'what-if' analyses to predict the relative impact of simulated changes in the care delivery process to determine the most efficient pathways to surgery. The waiting time between radiologic lesion detection and diagnostic biopsy, and the waiting time from radiologic staging to surgery were the two most critical bottlenecks impeding efficient care delivery (more than 3 times larger compared to reducing other waiting times). Additionally, instituting surgical consultation prior to cardiac consultation for medical clearance and decreasing the waiting time between CT scans and diagnostic biopsies, were potentially the most impactful measures to reduce care delays before surgery. Rigorous computer simulation modeling, using clinical data, can provide useful information to identify areas for improving the efficiency of care delivery by process engineering, for patients who receive surgery for lung cancer.

  13. Health care delivery in the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnar, R

    1983-01-01

    India's health care system, despite several significant achievements, suffers from some weaknesses and deficiencies. There has been a preoccupation with the promotion of curative and clinical services through city based hospitals which have essentially catered to certain sections of the urban population. The concept of health in its totality, with preventive and promotive health care services in addition to the curative, has yet to be made operational. There has been an overdependence on the states for health care measures and voluntary and local effort has not been able to accept responsibility in any significant way. The involvement of the people in solving their health problems has been almost nonexistent. Health needs to be viewed as part of the strategy of human resources development. Horizontal and vertical linkages must be obtained among all the interrelated programs--protected water supply environmental sanitation and hygiene, nutrition, education, family planning, and maternal and child welfare. Only with such linkages can the benefits of the various programs be optimized. An attack on the problems of diseases cannot be completely successful unless it is accompanied by an attack on poverty. For this reason the 6th plan assigns a high priority to programs of promotion, or gainful employment, eradication of poverty, population control, and meeting the basic human needs of the population. The Alma Alta Declaration of 1977 has become the accepted health policy of India, simplified into the slogan "health for all by 2000." To realize this goaL, the Planning Commission recommends in the 6th 5-Year Plan a restructing and reorientation of the country's health services. The proposed alternative scheme is more decentralized and provides for many more people to be trained at the grassroots level. People would be involved in tackling their health problems and community participation would be encouraged. Finally, the alternative strongly urges the screening of patients

  14. The entrepreneurial revolution in health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, A D

    1987-06-01

    The rapid changes in the health marketplace have opened the door for entrepreneurs. The author shows how entrepreneurs seek previously unthought of solutions to problems and through a team effort increase corporate value. According to the author, there is a specific profile of the successful entrepreneur. The qualities of the entrepreneur and the managers that work with them, therefore, are discussed in detail. Finally, several examples of problems in health care that present entrepreneurial opportunities are presented. The author includes scenarios for taking advantage of these opportunities.

  15. Endocrine surgery as a model for value-based health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Amer G; Ituarte, Philip H G; Wiggins, Randi; Teisberg, Elizabeth O; Harari, Avital; Yeh, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    Experts advocate restructuring health care in the United States into a value-based system that maximizes positive health outcomes achieved per dollar spent. We describe how a value-based system implemented by the University of California, Los Angeles UCLA Section of Endocrine Surgery (SES) has optimized both quality and costs while increasing patient volume. Two SES clinical pathways were studied, one allocating patients to the most appropriate surgical care setting based on clinical complexity, and another standardizing initial management of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The mean cost per endocrine case performed from 2005 to 2010 was determined at each of three care settings: A tertiary care inpatient facility, a community inpatient facility, and an ambulatory facility. Blood tumor marker levels (thyroglobulin, Tg) and reoperation rates were compared between PTC patients who underwent routine central neck dissection (CND) and those who did not. Surgical patient volume and regional market share were analyzed over time. The cost of care was substantially lower in both the community inpatient facility (14% cost savings) and the ambulatory facility (58% cost savings) in comparison with the tertiary care inpatient facility. Patients who underwent CND had lower Tg levels (6.6 vs 15.0 ng/mL; P = 0.024) and a reduced need for re-operation (1.5 vs 6.1%; P = 0.004) compared with those who did not undergo CND. UCLA maintained its position as the market leader in endocrine procedures while expanding its market share by 151% from 4.9% in 2003 to 7.4% in 2010. A value-driven health care delivery system can deliver improved clinical outcomes while reducing costs within a subspecialty surgical service. Broader application of these principles may contribute to resolving current dilemmas in the provision of care nationally.

  16. Defining and measuring integrated patient care: promoting the next frontier in health care delivery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singer, S.J.; Burgers, J.S.; Friedberg, M.; Rosenthal, M.B.; Leape, L.; Schneider, E.

    2011-01-01

    Integration of care is emerging as a central challenge of health care delivery, particularly for patients with multiple, complex chronic conditions. The authors argue that the concept of "integrated patient care" would benefit from further clarification regarding (a) the object of integration and

  17. Fatigue and the delivery of medical care

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2011-01-01

    Lack of sleep has well established effects on physiological, cognitive and behavioural functionality. Sleep deprivation can adversely affect clinical performance as severely as alcohol according to some sources. Sleep deficiency may be due to loss of one night’s sleep or repeated interruptions of sleep. Chronic sleep degrades the ability to recognise one’s ability to recognise the impairments induced by sleep loss. The problem of sleep deprivation has vexed acute medical practice for decades. Improvement has been painfully slow. The problem is that all 168 hours throughout every week of every year have to be covered and there are a finite number of doctors to shoulder the burden. There are many strongly held views about how best to provide night-time and week-end care. Constructive innovations are thin on the ground. The biggest gap is between administration and doctors with financial considerations being the limiting factor. It is, however, generally accepted on all sides that sleep loss and fatigue can have adverse effects on both patients and doctors.

  18. Health care expenditure for hospital-based delivery care in Lao PDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douangvichit Daovieng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delivery by a skilled birth attendant (SBA in a hospital is advocated to improve maternal health; however, hospital expenses for delivery care services are a concern for women and their families, particularly for women who pay out-of-pocket. Although health insurance is now implemented in Lao PDR, it is not universal throughout the country. The objectives of this study are to estimate the total health care expenses for vaginal delivery and caesarean section, to determine the association between health insurance and family income with health care expenditure and assess the effect of health insurance from the perspectives of the women and the skilled birth attendants (SBAs in Lao PDR. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in two provincial hospitals in Lao PDR, from June to October 2010. Face to face interviews of 581 women who gave birth in hospital and 27 SBAs was carried out. Both medical and non-medical expenses were considered. A linear regression model was used to assess influencing factors on health care expenditure and trends of medical and non-medical expenditure by monthly family income stratified by mode of delivery were assessed. Results Of 581 women, 25% had health care insurance. Health care expenses for delivery care services were significantly higher for caesarean section (270 USD than for vaginal delivery (59 USD. After adjusting for the effect of hospital, family income was significantly associated with all types of expenditure in caesarean section, while it was associated with non-medical and total expenditures in vaginal delivery. Both delivering women and health providers thought that health insurance increased the utilisation of delivery care. Conclusions Substantially higher delivery care expenses were incurred for caesarean section compared to vaginal delivery. Three-fourths of the women who were not insured needed to be responsible for their own health care payment. Women who had higher family

  19. Practices in delivery and birth care from mothers’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Apolinário

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to highlight the practices of delivery and birth care in a maternity ward from mothers’ perspective. Methods: descriptive cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach carried out in a maternity hospital of usual risk, with 100 regular postpartum mothers. It was used a semi-structured questionnaire as recommended by the World Health Organization. Results: among the practices that should be encouraged from birth care, stands out: women’s privacy; participation of the companion of their choice; the use of non-pharmacological methods for pain relief. Among the practices that should be eliminated: the transfer to the delivery room at the second stage and the lithotomy position. Conclusion: women are still passive in the birth process despite attempts to change the model of care during labor and birth.

  20. Scalable, sustainable cost-effective surgical care: a model for safety and quality in the developing world, part III: impact and sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alex; Restrepo, Carolina; Mackay, Don; Sherman, Randy; Varma, Ajit; Ayala, Ruben; Sarma, Hiteswar; Deshpande, Gaurav; Magee, William

    2014-09-01

    The Guwahati Comprehensive Cleft Care Center (GCCCC) utilizes a high-volume, subspecialized institution to provide safe, quality, and comprehensive and cost-effective surgical care to a highly vulnerable patient population. The GCCCC utilized a diagonal model of surgical care delivery, with vertical inputs of mission-based care transitioning to investments in infrastructure and human capital to create a sustainable, local care delivery system. Over the first 2.5 years of service (May 2011-November 2013), the GCCCC made significant advances in numerous areas. Progress was meticulously documented to evaluate performance and provide transparency to stakeholders including donors, government officials, medical oversight bodies, employees, and patients. During this time period, the GCCCC provided free operations to 7,034 patients, with improved safety, outcomes, and multidisciplinary services while dramatically decreasing costs and increasing investments in the local community. The center has become a regional referral cleft center, and governments of surrounding states have contracted the GCCCC to provide care for their citizens with cleft lip and cleft palate. Additional regional and global impact is anticipated through continued investments into education and training, comprehensive services, and research and outcomes. The success of this public private partnership demonstrates the value of this model of surgical care in the developing world, and offers a blueprint for reproduction. The GCCCC experience has been consistent with previous studies demonstrating a positive volume-outcomes relationship, and provides evidence for the value of the specialty hospital model for surgical delivery in the developing world.

  1. Inadequate environment, resources and values lead to missed nursing care: A focused ethnographic study on the surgical ward using the Fundamentals of Care framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangland, Eva; Teodorsson, Therese; Molander, Karin; Muntlin Athlin, Åsa

    2018-06-01

    To explore the delivery of care from the perspective of patients with acute abdominal pain focusing on the contextual factors at system level using the Fundamentals of Care framework. The Fundamentals of Care framework describes several contextual and systemic factors that can impact the delivery of care. To deliver high-quality, person-centred care, it is important to understand how these factors affect patients' experiences and care needs. A focused ethnographic approach. A total of 20 observations were performed on two surgical wards at a Swedish university hospital. Data were collected using participant observation and informal interviews and analysed using deductive content analysis. The findings, presented in four categories, reflect the value patients place on the caring relationship and a friendly atmosphere on the ward. Patients had concerns about the environment, particularly the high-tempo culture on the ward and its impact on their integrity, rest and sleep, access to information and planning, and need for support in addressing their existential thoughts. The observers also noted that missed nursing care had serious consequences for patient safety. Patients with acute abdominal pain were cared for in the high-tempo culture of a surgical ward with limited resources, unclear leadership and challenges to patients' safety. The findings highlight the crucial importance of prioritising and valuing the patients' fundamental care needs for recovery. Nursing leaders and nurses need to take the lead to reconceptualise the value of fundamental care in the acute care setting. To improve clinical practice, the value of fundamentals of care must be addressed regardless of patient's clinical condition. Providing a caring relationship is paramount to ensure a positive impact on patient's well-being and recovery. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. CHALLENGING ISSUES OF SPECIALIZED CARE DELIVERY TO VICTIMS OF BURNS IN THE KRASNODAR REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Porkhanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND. The number of burn victims in Russia is growing annually. However, combustiology remains one of the few medical specialties in the country, which has no accepted procedure for the care delivery.MATERIAL AND METHODS. The article presents an analysis of high-tech medical assistance delivery to victims of burns in the Krasnodar Region. We also consider challenging issues on combustiology services organization in Russia and economic aspects for patients with burn injury under the compulsory medical insurance.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION. Up to 3,000 patients requiring hospital treatment are registered in the Krasnodar Region. Of 2,200 operations, 2,000 surgeries are performed in the regional burn center. Implementation of regional system of “early surgical treatment” allowed to reach some of the lowest mortality rates in Russia (in the Region: total 2.43%, adults 4.69%, children 0.16%.

  3. Pediatric Surgical Care in a Dutch Military Hospital in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idenburg, Floris J; van Dongen, Thijs T C F; Tan, Edward C T H; Hamming, Jaap H; Leenen, Luke P H; Hoencamp, Rigo

    2015-10-01

    From August 2006-August 2010, as part of the ISAF mission, the Armed Forces of the Netherlands deployed a role 2 enhanced Medical Treatment Facility (R2E-MTF) to Uruzgan province, Afghanistan. Although from the principle doctrine not considered a primary task, care was delivered to civilians, including many children. Humanitarian aid accounted for a substantial part of the workload, necessitating medical, infrastructural, and logistical adaptations. Particularly pediatric care demanded specific expertise and equipment. In our pre-deployment preparations this aspect had been undervalued. Because these experiences could be influential in future mission planning, we analyzed our data and compared them with international reports. This is a retrospective, descriptive study. Using the hospital's electronic database, all pediatric cases, defined as patients Afghanistan were analyzed. Of the 2736 admissions, 415 (15.2 %) were pediatric. The majority (80.9 %, 336/415) of these admissions were for surgical, often trauma-related, pathology and required 610 surgical procedures, being 26 % of all procedures. Mean length of stay was 3.1 days. The male to female ratio was 70:30. Girls were significantly younger of age than boys. In-hospital mortality was 5.3 %. Pediatric patients made up a considerable part of the workload at the Dutch R2E-MTF in Uruzgan, Afghanistan. This is in line with other reports from the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, but used definitions in reported series are inconsistent, making comparisons difficult. Our findings stress the need for a comprehensive, prospective, and coalition-wide patient registry with uniformly applied criteria. Civilian disaster and military operational planners should incorporate reported patient statistics in manning documents, future courses, training manuals, logistic planning, and doctrines, because pediatric care is a reality that cannot be ignored.

  4. A clinician-driven home care delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    August, D A; Faubion, W C; Ryan, M L; Haggerty, R H; Wesley, J R

    1993-12-01

    The financial, entrepreneurial, administrative, and legal forces acting within the home care arena make it difficult for clinicians to develop and operate home care initiatives within an academic setting. HomeMed is a clinician-initiated and -directed home care delivery system wholly owned by the University of Michigan. The advantages of a clinician-directed system include: Assurance that clinical and patient-based factors are the primary determinants of strategic and procedural decisions; Responsiveness of the system to clinician needs; Maintenance of an important role for the referring physician in home care; Economical clinical research by facilitation of protocol therapy in ambulatory and home settings; Reduction of lengths of hospital stays through clinician initiatives; Incorporation of outcome analysis and other research programs into the mission of the system; Clinician commitment to success of the system; and Clinician input on revenue use. Potential disadvantages of a clinician-based system include: Entrepreneurial, financial, and legal naivete; Disconnection from institutional administrative and data management resources; and Inadequate clinician interest and commitment. The University of Michigan HomeMed experience demonstrates a model of clinician-initiated and -directed home care delivery that has been innovative, profitable, and clinically excellent, has engendered broad physician, nurse, pharmacist, and social worker enthusiasm, and has supported individual investigator clinical protocols as well as broad outcomes research initiatives. It is concluded that a clinician-initiated and -directed home care program is feasible and effective, and in some settings may be optimal.

  5. Using the Statecharts paradigm for simulation of patient flow in surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, Boris; Harel, David; Vasilakis, Christos; Levy, Adrian

    2008-03-01

    Computer simulation of patient flow has been used extensively to assess the impacts of changes in the management of surgical care. However, little research is available on the utility of existing modeling techniques. The purpose of this paper is to examine the capacity of Statecharts, a system of graphical specification, for constructing a discrete-event simulation model of the perioperative process. The Statecharts specification paradigm was originally developed for representing reactive systems by extending the formalism of finite-state machines through notions of hierarchy, parallelism, and event broadcasting. Hierarchy permits subordination between states so that one state may contain other states. Parallelism permits more than one state to be active at any given time. Broadcasting of events allows one state to detect changes in another state. In the context of the peri-operative process, hierarchy provides the means to describe steps within activities and to cluster related activities, parallelism provides the means to specify concurrent activities, and event broadcasting provides the means to trigger a series of actions in one activity according to transitions that occur in another activity. Combined with hierarchy and parallelism, event broadcasting offers a convenient way to describe the interaction of concurrent activities. We applied the Statecharts formalism to describe the progress of individual patients through surgical care as a series of asynchronous updates in patient records generated in reaction to events produced by parallel finite-state machines representing concurrent clinical and managerial activities. We conclude that Statecharts capture successfully the behavioral aspects of surgical care delivery by specifying permissible chronology of events, conditions, and actions.

  6. Infection control in delivery care units, Gujarat state, India: A needs assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramani KV

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasingly, women in India attend health facilities for childbirth, partly due to incentives paid under government programs. Increased use of health facilities can alleviate the risks of infections contracted in unhygienic home deliveries, but poor infection control practices in labour and delivery units also cause puerperal sepsis and other infections of childbirth. A needs assessment was conducted to provide information on procedures and practices related to infection control in labour and delivery units in Gujarat state, India. Methods Twenty health care facilities, including private and public primary health centres and referral hospitals, were sampled from two districts in Gujarat state, India. Three pre-tested tools for interviewing and for observation were used. Data collection was based on existing infection control guidelines for clean practices, clean equipment, clean environment and availability of diagnostics and treatment. The study was carried out from April to May 2009. Results Seventy percent of respondents said that standard infection control procedures were followed, but a written procedure was only available in 5% of facilities. Alcohol rubs were not used for hand cleaning and surgical gloves were reused in over 70% of facilities, especially for vaginal examinations in the labour room. Most types of equipment and supplies were available but a third of facilities did not have wash basins with "hands-free" taps. Only 15% of facilities reported that wiping of surfaces was done immediately after each delivery in labour rooms. Blood culture services were available in 25% of facilities and antibiotics are widely given to women after normal delivery. A few facilities had data on infections and reported rates of 3% to 5%. Conclusions This study of current infection control procedures and practices during labour and delivery in health facilities in Gujarat revealed a need for improved information systems

  7. Defining and measuring integrated patient care: promoting the next frontier in health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara J; Burgers, Jako; Friedberg, Mark; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Leape, Lucian; Schneider, Eric

    2011-02-01

    Integration of care is emerging as a central challenge of health care delivery, particularly for patients with multiple, complex chronic conditions. The authors argue that the concept of "integrated patient care" would benefit from further clarification regarding (a) the object of integration and (b) its essential components, particularly when constructing measures.To address these issues, the authors propose a definition of integrated patient care that distinguishes it from integrated delivery organizations, acknowledging that integrated organizational structures and processes may fail to produce integrated patient care. The definition emphasizes patients' central role as active participants in managing their own health by including patient centeredness as a key element of integrated patient care. Measures based on the proposed definition will enable empirical assessment of the potential relationships between the integration of organizations, the integration of patient care, and patient outcomes, providing valuable guidance to health systems reformers.

  8. Surgical Education and Health Care Reform: Defining the Role and Value of Trainees in an Evolving Medical Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayanju, Oluwadamilola M; Aggarwal, Reena; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Ferrone, Cristina R; Massaro, David; Terhune, Kyla P

    2017-03-01

    Health care reform and surgical education are often separated functionally. However, especially in surgery, where resident trainees often spend twice as much time in residency and fellowship than in undergraduate medical education, one must consider their contributions to health care. In this short commentary, we briefly review the status of health care in the United States as well as some of the recent and current changes in graduate medical education that pertain to surgical trainees. This is a perspective piece that draws on the interests and varied background of the multiinstitutional and international group of authors. The authors propose 3 main areas of focus for research and practice- (1) accurately quantifying the care provided currently by trainees, (2) determining impact to trainees and hospital systems of training parameters, focusing on long-term outcomes rather than short-term outcomes, and (3) determining practice models of education that work best for both health care delivery and trainees. The authors propose that surgical education must align itself with rather than separate itself from overall health care reform measures and even individual hospital financial pressures. This should not be seen as additional burden of service, but rather practical education in training as to the pressures trainees will face as future employees. Rethinking the contributions and training of residents and fellows may also synergistically work to impress to hospital administrators that providing better, more focused and applicable education to residents and fellows may have long-term, strategic, positive impacts on institutions.

  9. Availability of cardiac surgical care in surgical correction of acquired heart defects in patients of older age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubatbek S. Urmanbetov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A study of accessibility of surgical care to elderly patients (aged 60 and above with valvular heart disease has been conducted at the BSCCS "Bakulev Scientific Center of Cardiovascular Surgery» of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation. Methods: A retrospective analysis of structure of hospitalizations of 1726 patients, that were hospitalized between 2009 and 2010 at the BSCCS for surgical correction of valvular heart disease was performed. Results: Our study demonstrated that age, on one hand, is not the most significant barrier in the geographical accessibility of cardiac surgical care. On the other hand, it can influence the availability in general, taking into account other factors (urban / rural areas, the presence of cardiac surgical clinics, and clinical status. Provision of cardiac surgical care for patients with heart defects at the BSCCS per 1 million population varies considerably in the context of federal districts and is 0.4 for the Siberian Federal District 30 for the Central Federal District (the highest is 42 for the Moscow Region. Conclusion: Thus, our study demonstrated accessibility of surgical care for elderly patients is the highest for the urban areas with specialized cardiac surgery centers, where patients referred from rural regions

  10. Ventilator-associated pneumonia in surgical emergency intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertugrul, Bulent M; Yildirim, Ayse; Ay, Pinar; Oncu, Serkan; Cagatay, Atahan; Cakar, Nahit; Ertekin, Cemalettin; Ozsut, Halit; Eraksoy, Haluk; Calangu, Semra

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the incidence, risk factors and the etiology of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in surgical emergency intensive care unit (ICU) patients. We conducted this prospective cohort study in the surgical emergency ICU of Istanbul Medical Faculty between December 1999 and May 2001. We included 100 mechanically ventilated patients in this study. We diagnosed VAP according to the current diagnostic criteria. We identified the etiology of VAP cases by both quantitative cultures of endotracheal aspiration and blood cultures. To analyze the predisposing factors for the development of VAP, we recorded the following variables: age, gender, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II score, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score, serum albumin level, duration of mechanical ventilation (MV) prior to the development of VAP, and underlying diseases. We determined the VAP incidence rate as 28%. We found the APACHE II score and the duration of MV to be statistically significant variables for the development of VAP. There were no significant differences regarding age, gender, GCS, SOFA score, albumin level, or underlying diseases for the development of VAP. The isolated bacteria among VAP cases were as follows: Staphylococcus aureus (n=12, 43%), Acinetobacter spp. (n=6, 21%), coagulase-negative Staphylococci (n=4, 15%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=3, 10.7%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=3, 10.7%). Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a common infection, and certain interventions might affect the incidence of VAP. The ICU clinicians should be aware of the risk factors for VAP, which could prove useful in identifying patients at high risk for VAP, and modifying patient care to minimize the risk of VAP.

  11. Frank Gilbreth and health care delivery method study driven learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towill, Denis R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to look at method study, as devised by the Gilbreths at the beginning of the twentieth century, which found early application in hospital quality assurance and surgical "best practice". It has since become a core activity in all modern methods, as applied to healthcare delivery improvement programmes. The article traces the origin of what is now currently and variously called "business process re-engineering", "business process improvement" and "lean healthcare" etc., by different management gurus back to the century-old pioneering work of Frank Gilbreth. The outcome is a consistent framework involving "width", "length" and "depth" dimensions within which healthcare delivery systems can be analysed, designed and successfully implemented to achieve better and more consistent performance. Healthcare method (saving time plus saving motion) study is best practised as co-joint action learning activity "owned" by all "players" involved in the re-engineering process. However, although process mapping is a key step forward, in itself it is no guarantee of effective re-engineering. It is not even the beginning of the end of the change challenge, although it should be the end of the beginning. What is needed is innovative exploitation of method study within a healthcare organisational learning culture accelerated via the Gilbreth Knowledge Flywheel. It is shown that effective healthcare delivery pipeline improvement is anchored into a team approach involving all "players" in the system especially physicians. A comprehensive process study, constructive dialogue, proper and highly professional re-engineering plus managed implementation are essential components. Experience suggests "learning" is thereby achieved via "natural groups" actively involved in healthcare processes. The article provides a proven method for exploiting Gilbreths' outputs and their many successors in enabling more productive evidence-based healthcare delivery as summarised

  12. Surgical Care Required for Populations Affected by Climate-related Natural Disasters: A Global Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eugenia E; Stewart, Barclay; Zha, Yuanting A; Groen, Thomas A; Burkle, Frederick M; Kushner, Adam L

    2016-08-10

    Climate extremes will increase the frequency and severity of natural disasters worldwide.  Climate-related natural disasters were anticipated to affect 375 million people in 2015, more than 50% greater than the yearly average in the previous decade. To inform surgical assistance preparedness, we estimated the number of surgical procedures needed.   The numbers of people affected by climate-related disasters from 2004 to 2014 were obtained from the Centre for Research of the Epidemiology of Disasters database. Using 5,000 procedures per 100,000 persons as the minimum, baseline estimates were calculated. A linear regression of the number of surgical procedures performed annually and the estimated number of surgical procedures required for climate-related natural disasters was performed. Approximately 140 million people were affected by climate-related natural disasters annually requiring 7.0 million surgical procedures. The greatest need for surgical care was in the People's Republic of China, India, and the Philippines. Linear regression demonstrated a poor relationship between national surgical capacity and estimated need for surgical care resulting from natural disaster, but countries with the least surgical capacity will have the greatest need for surgical care for persons affected by climate-related natural disasters. As climate extremes increase the frequency and severity of natural disasters, millions will need surgical care beyond baseline needs. Countries with insufficient surgical capacity will have the most need for surgical care for persons affected by climate-related natural disasters. Estimates of surgical are particularly important for countries least equipped to meet surgical care demands given critical human and physical resource deficiencies.

  13. Changes in Quality of Health Care Delivery after Vertical Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Caroline S; Dowd, Bryan; Feldman, Roger

    2015-08-01

    To fill an empirical gap in the literature by examining changes in quality of care measures occurring when multispecialty clinic systems were acquired by hospital-owned, vertically integrated health care delivery systems in the Twin Cities area. Administrative data for health plan enrollees attributed to treatment and control clinic systems, merged with U.S. Census data. We compared changes in quality measures for health plan enrollees in the acquired clinics to enrollees in nine control groups using a differences-in-differences model. Our dataset spans 2 years prior to and 4 years after the acquisitions. We estimated probit models with errors clustered within enrollees. Data were assembled by the health plan's informatics team. Vertical integration is associated with increased rates of colorectal and cervical cancer screening and more appropriate emergency department use. The probability of ambulatory care-sensitive admissions increased when the acquisition caused disruption in admitting patterns. Moving a clinic system into a vertically integrated delivery system resulted in limited increases in quality of care indicators. Caution is warranted when the acquisition causes disruption in referral patterns. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  14. The Oral Health Care Delivery System in 2040: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailit, Howard L

    2017-09-01

    This executive summary for Section 4 of the "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century" project examines the projected oral health care delivery system in 2040 and the likely impact of system changes on dental education. Dental care is at an early stage of major changes with the decline in solo practice and increase in large group practices. These groups are not consolidated at the state level, but further consolidation is expected as they try to increase their negotiating leverage with dental insurers. At this time, there is limited integration of medical and dental care in terms of financing, regulation, education, and delivery. This pattern may change as health maintenance organizations and integrated medical systems begin to offer dental care to their members. By 2040, it is expected that many dentists will be employed in large group practices and working with allied dental staff with expanded duties and other health professionals, and more dental graduates will seek formal postdoctoral training to obtain better positions in group practices.

  15. Five focus strategies to organize health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltokorpi, Antti; Linna, Miika; Malmström, Tomi; Torkki, Paulus; Lillrank, Paul Martin

    2016-01-01

    The focused factory is one of the concepts that decision-makers have adopted for improving health care delivery. However, disorganized definitions of focus have led to findings that cannot be utilized systematically. The purpose of this paper is to discuss strategic options to focus health care operations. First the literature on focus in health care is reviewed revealing conceptual challenges. Second, a definition of focus in terms of demand and requisite variety is defined, and the mechanisms of focus are explicated. A classification of five focus strategies that follow the original idea to reduce variety in products and markets is presented. Finally, the paper examines managerial possibilities linked to the focus strategies. The paper proposes a framework of five customer-oriented focus strategies which aim at reducing variety in different characteristics of care pathways: population; urgency and severity; illnesses and symptoms; care practices and processes; and care outcomes. Empirical research is needed to evaluate the costs and benefits of the five strategies and about system-level effects of focused units on competition and coordination. Focus is an enabling condition that needs to be exploited using specific demand and supply management practices. It is essential to understand how focus mechanisms differ between strategies, and to select focus that fits with organization's strategy and key performance indicators. Compared to previous more resource-oriented approaches, this study provides theoretically solid and practically relevant customer-oriented framework for focusing in health care.

  16. Using matrix organization to manage health care delivery organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allcorn, S

    1990-01-01

    Matrix organization can provide health care organization managers enhanced information processing, faster response times, and more flexibility to cope with greater organization complexity and rapidly changing operating environments. A review of the literature informed by work experience reveals that the use of matrix organization creates hard-to-manage ambiguity and balances of power in addition to providing positive benefits for health care organization managers. Solutions to matrix operating problems generally rely on the use of superior information and decision support systems and extensive staff training to develop attitudes and behavior consistent with the more collegial matrix organization culture. Further improvement in understanding the suitability of matrix organization for managing health care delivery organizations will involve appreciating the impact of partial implementation of matrix organization, temporary versus permanent uses of matrix organization, and the impact of the ambiguity created by dual lines of authority upon the exercise of power and authority.

  17. Factors Affecting Husband Participation in Antenatal Care Attendance and Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumaseuw, R.; Berliana, S. M.; Nursalam, N.; Efendi, F.; Pradanie, R.; Rachmawati, P. D.; Aurizki, G. E.

    2018-02-01

    The government has implemented several programs to prevent and reduce a mother’s mortality rate by enhancing active role of the family. The most responsible family member on maintaining the pregnancy and delivery process is the husband. The husband must be active to take care of his wife. Active participation of the husband in accompanying his wife during pregnancy and the delivery process is one of the substantial factors, which helps the husband to take decisions related to the health of his wife. This study aimed to identify variables and its trends, which significantly affect a husband’s participation in accompanying his wife during pregnancy and the delivery process. The data used in this study was from an Indonesian Demographic Health Survey 2012. The study used binary logistic regression as the analysis method. The result showed as many as 8,237 husbands accompanied their wife in antenatal care and the delivery process. The significant variables affecting the husband participation are the age of the wife, the education of wife, the education of the husband, the occupational status of the wife and the husband, the number of children, pregnancy status, and residency region. The possibility for a husband to accompany his wife is larger in several factors, such as the wife being between the ages of 21 - 35 years old, a husband who minimally graduated from junior high school, a working husband, as well as a wife, and the number of children less than and equal to two and the expected pregnancy. The government should consider those factors to create policy related women’s health and integrate the factors into various sectors.

  18. Understanding Emergency Care Delivery Through Computer Simulation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laker, Lauren F; Torabi, Elham; France, Daniel J; Froehle, Craig M; Goldlust, Eric J; Hoot, Nathan R; Kasaie, Parastu; Lyons, Michael S; Barg-Walkow, Laura H; Ward, Michael J; Wears, Robert L

    2018-02-01

    In 2017, Academic Emergency Medicine convened a consensus conference entitled, "Catalyzing System Change through Health Care Simulation: Systems, Competency, and Outcomes." This article, a product of the breakout session on "understanding complex interactions through systems modeling," explores the role that computer simulation modeling can and should play in research and development of emergency care delivery systems. This article discusses areas central to the use of computer simulation modeling in emergency care research. The four central approaches to computer simulation modeling are described (Monte Carlo simulation, system dynamics modeling, discrete-event simulation, and agent-based simulation), along with problems amenable to their use and relevant examples to emergency care. Also discussed is an introduction to available software modeling platforms and how to explore their use for research, along with a research agenda for computer simulation modeling. Through this article, our goal is to enhance adoption of computer simulation, a set of methods that hold great promise in addressing emergency care organization and design challenges. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  19. Improving Staff Communication and Transitions of Care Between Obstetric Triage and Labor and Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Kathleen; Teel, Joseph; Nicholls, Erika; Lee, Daniel D; Colwill, Alyssa Covelli; Srinivas, Sindhu K

    2018-03-01

    To improve staff perception of the quality of the patient admission process from obstetric triage to the labor and delivery unit through standardization. Preassessment and postassessment online surveys. A 13-bed labor and delivery unit in a quaternary care, Magnet Recognition Program, academic medical center in Pennsylvania. Preintervention (n = 100), postintervention (n = 52), and 6-month follow-up survey respondents (n = 75) represented secretaries, registered nurses, surgical technicians, certified nurse-midwives, nurse practitioners, maternal-fetal medicine fellows, anesthesiologists, and obstetric and family medicine attending and resident physicians from triage and labor and delivery units. We educated staff and implemented interventions, an admission huddle and safety time-out whiteboard, to standardize the admission process. Participants were evaluated with the use of preintervention, postintervention, and 6-month follow-up surveys about their perceptions regarding the admission process. Data tracked through the electronic medical record were used to determine compliance with the admission huddle and whiteboards. A 77% reduction (decrease of 49%) occurred in the perception of incomplete patient admission processes from baseline to 6-month follow-up after the intervention. Postintervention and 6-month follow-up survey results indicated that 100% of respondents responded strongly agree/agree/neutral that the new admission process improved communication surrounding care for patients. Data in the electronic medical record indicated that compliance with use of admission huddles and whiteboards increased from 50% to 80% by 6 months. The new patient admission process, including a huddle and safety time-out board, improved staff perception of the quality of admission from obstetric triage to the labor and delivery unit. Copyright © 2018 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Harnessing hospital purchase power to design safe care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebben, Steven F; Gieras, Izabella A; Gosbee, Laura Lin

    2008-01-01

    Since the Institute of Medicine's well-publicized 1999 report To Err is Human, the healthcare patient safety movement has grown at an exponential pace. However, much more can be done to advance patient safety from a care process design vantage point-improving safety through effective care processes and technology integration. While progress is being made, the chasm between technology developers and caregivers remains a profound void. Why hasn't more been done to expand our view of patient safety to include technology design? Healthcare organizations have not consolidated their purchasing power to expect improved designs. This article will (1) provide an assessment of the present state of healthcare technology management and (2) provide recommendations for collaborative design of safe healthcare delivery systems.

  1. Effect of a provincial system of stroke care delivery on stroke care and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapral, Moira K.; Fang, Jiming; Silver, Frank L.; Hall, Ruth; Stamplecoski, Melissa; O’Callaghan, Christina; Tu, Jack V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Systems of stroke care delivery have been promoted as a means of improving the quality of stroke care, but little is known about their effectiveness. We assessed the effect of the Ontario Stroke System, a province-wide strategy of regionalized stroke care delivery, on stroke care and outcomes in Ontario, Canada. Methods: We used population-based provincial administrative databases to identify all emergency department visits and hospital admissions for acute stroke and transient ischemic attack from Jan. 1, 2001, to Dec. 31, 2010. Using piecewise regression analyses, we assessed the effect of the full implementation of the Ontario Stroke System in 2005 on the proportion of patients who received care at stroke centres, and on rates of discharge to long-term care facilities and 30-day mortality after stroke. Results: We included 243 287 visits by patients with acute stroke or transient ischemic attack. The full implementation of the Ontario Stroke System in 2005 was associated with an increase in rates of care at stroke centres (before implementation: 40.0%; after implementation: 46.5%), decreased rates of discharge to long-term care facilities (before implementation: 16.9%; after implementation: 14.8%) and decreased 30-day mortality for hemorrhagic (before implementation: 38.3%; after implementation: 34.4%) and ischemic stroke (before implementation: 16.3%; after implementation: 15.7%). The system’s implementation was also associated with marked increases in the proportion of patients who received neuroimaging, thrombolytic therapy, care in a stroke unit and antithrombotic therapy. Interpretation: The implementation of an organized system of stroke care delivery was associated with improved processes of care and outcomes after stroke. PMID:23713072

  2. Quality of life after stay in surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelha, Fernando J; Santos, Cristina C; Maia, Paula C; Castro, Maria A; Barros, Henrique

    2007-07-24

    In addition to mortality, Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) has increasingly been claimed as an important outcome variable. The aim of this study was to assess HRQOL and independence in activities of daily living (ADL) six months after discharge from an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), and to study its determinants. All post-operative adult patients admitted to a surgical ICU between October 2004 and July 2005, were eligible for the study. The following variables were recorded on admission: age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status (ASA-PS), type and magnitude of surgical procedure, ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS), mortality and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II). Six months after discharge, a Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36) and a questionnaire to assess dependency in ADL were sent to all survivors. Descriptive statistics was used to summarize data. Patient groups were compared using non-parametric tests. A logistic regression analysis was performed to identify covariate effects of each variable on dependency in personal and instrumental ADL, and for the change-in-health question of SF-36. Out of 333 hospital survivors, 226 completed the questionnaires. Fifty-nine percent reported that their general level of health was better on the day they answered the questionnaire than 12 months earlier. Patients with greater co-morbidities (ASA-PS III/IV), had lower SF-36 scores in all domains and were more frequently dependent in instrumental and personal ADL. Logistic regression showed that SAPS II was associated with changes in general level of health (OR 1.06, 95%CI, 1.01-1.11, p = 0,016). Six months after ICU discharge, 60% and 34% of patients, respectively, were dependent in at least one activity in instrumental ADL (ADLI) and personal ADL (ADLP). ASA-PS (OR 3.00, 95%CI 1.31-6.87, p = 0.009) and age (OR 2.36, 95%CI, 1.04-5.34, p = 0.04) were associated with dependency in ADLI. For ADLP, only ASA-PS (OR 4.58, 95%CI, 1

  3. Influence of implant properties and local delivery systems on the outcome in operative fracture care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metsemakers, W-J; Moriarty, T F; Nijs, S; Pape, H C; Richards, R G

    2016-03-01

    Fracture fixation devices are implanted into a growing number of patients each year. This may be attributed to an increase in the popularity of operative fracture care and the development of ever more sophisticated implants, which may be used in even the most difficult clinical cases. Furthermore, as the general population ages, fragility fractures become more frequent. With the increase in number of surgical interventions, the absolute number of complications of these surgical treatments will inevitably rise. Implant-related infection and compromised fracture healing remain the most challenging and prevalent complications in operative fracture care. Any strategy that can help to reduce these complications will not only lead to a faster and more complete resumption of activities, but will also help to reduce the socio-economic impact. In this review we describe the influence of implant design and material choice on complication rates in trauma patients. Furthermore, we discuss the importance of local delivery systems, such as implant coatings and bone cement, and how these systems may have an impact on the prevalence, prevention and treatment outcome of these complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Redesigning Care Delivery with Patient Support Personnel: Learning from Accountable Care Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbenko, Ksenia O.; Fraze, Taressa; Lewis, Valerie A.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are a value-based payment model in the United States rooted in holding groups of healthcare providers financially accountable for the quality and total cost of care of their attributed population. To succeed in reaching their quality and efficiency goals, ACOs implement a variety of care delivery changes, including workforce redesign. Patient support personnel (PSP)—non-physician staff such as care coordinators, community health workers, and others—are critical to restructuring care delivery. Little is known about how ACOs are redesigning their patient support personnel in terms of responsibilities, location, and evaluation. METHODS We conducted semi-structured one-hour interviews with 25 executives at 16 distinct ACOs. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes, using a qualitative coding and analysis process. RESULTS ACOs deployed PSP to perform four clusters of responsibilities: care provision, care coordination, logistical help with transportation, and social and emotional support. ACOs deployed these personnel strategically across settings (primary care, inpatient services, emergency department, home care and community) depending on their population needs. Most ACOs used personnel with the same level of training across settings. Few ACOs planned to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of their PSP to optimize their value. DISCUSSION ACO strategies in workforce redesign indicate a shift from a physician-centered to a team-based approach. Employing personnel with varying levels of clinical training to perform different tasks can help further optimize care delivery. More robust evaluation of the deployment of PSP and their performance is needed to demonstrate cost-saving benefits of workforce redesign. PMID:28217305

  5. Making surgical missions a joint operation: NGO experiences of visiting surgical teams and the formal health care system in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Stephanie; Hall-Clifford, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Each year, thousands of Guatemalans receive non-emergent surgical care from short-term medical missions (STMMs) hosted by local non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and staffed by foreign visiting medical teams (VMTs). The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of individuals based in NGOs involved in the coordination of surgical missions to better understand how these missions articulate with the larger Guatemalan health care system. During the summers of 2011 and 2013, in-depth interviews were conducted with 25 representatives from 11 different Guatemalan NGOs with experience with surgical missions. Transcripts were analysed for major themes using an inductive qualitative data analysis process. NGOs made use of the formal health care system but were limited by several factors, including cost, issues of trust and current ministry of health policy. Participants viewed the government health care system as a potential resource and expressed a desire for more collaboration. The current practices of STMMs are not conducive to health system strengthening. The role of STMMs must be defined and widely understood by all stakeholders in order to improve patient safety and effectively utilise health resources. Priority should be placed on aligning the work of VMTs with that of the larger health care system.

  6. Women's self-perception and self-care practice: implications for health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendias, E P; Clark, M C; Guevara, E B

    2001-01-01

    Mexican American women experience unique health care needs related to integration of Mexican and American cultures. To learn how to better promote self-care practices and service utilization in women of Mexican origin living in Texas, researchers used a qualitative approach to interview a convenience sample of 11 low-income women attending a health clinic. Researchers collected narrative data about the women's perceptions of health, wellness, and self-care. Using the matrix approach described by Miles and Huberman, we organized findings around women's roles, including participants' descriptions of themselves, their health and wellness awareness, self-care practices for health/illness and wellness/nonwellness, barriers to self-care, origin of self-care practices, and perceptions of life control. Implications for health planning and service delivery are presented.

  7. ValuedCare program: a population health model for the delivery of evidence-based care across care continuum for hip fracture patients in Eastern Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Chikul; Lee, Hsien Chieh Daniel; Goh, Kiat Sern; Lau, Cheng Kiang Adrian; Tay, Leeanna; Siau, Chuin; Loh, Yik Hin; Goh, Teck Kheng Edward; Sandi, Chit Lwin; Lee, Chien Earn

    2018-05-30

    To test a population health program which could, through the application of process redesign, implement multiple evidence-based practices across the continuum of care in a functionally integrated health delivery system and deliver highly reliable and consistent evidence-based surgical care for patients with fragility hip fractures in an acute tertiary general hospital. The ValuedCare (VC) program was developed in three distinct phases as an ongoing collaboration between the Geisinger Health System (GHS), USA, and Changi General Hospital (CGH), Singapore, modelled after the GHS ProvenCare® Fragile Hip Fracture Program. Clinical outcome data on consecutive hip fracture patients seen in 12 months pre-intervention were then compared with the post-intervention group. Both pre- and post-intervention groups were followed up across the continuum of care for a period of 12 months. VC patients showed significant improvement in median time to surgery (97 to 50.5 h), as well as proportion of patients operated within 48 h from hospital admission (48% from 18.8%) as compared to baseline pre-intervention data. These patients also had significant reduction (p value based care for hip fracture patients at Changi General Hospital. This has also reflected successful change management and interdisciplinary collaboration within the organization through the program. There is potential for testing this methodology as a quality improvement framework replicable to other disease groups in a functionally integrated healthcare system.

  8. Science of health care delivery milestones for undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havyer, Rachel D; Norby, Suzanne M; Leep Hunderfund, Andrea N; Starr, Stephanie R; Lang, Tara R; Wolanskyj, Alexandra P; Reed, Darcy A

    2017-08-25

    The changing healthcare landscape requires physicians to develop new knowledge and skills such as high-value care, systems improvement, population health, and team-based care, which together may be referred to as the Science of Health Care Delivery (SHCD). To engender public trust and confidence, educators must be able to meaningfully assess physicians' abilities in SHCD. We aimed to develop a novel set of SHCD milestones based on published Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) milestones that can be used by medical schools to assess medical students' competence in SHCD. We reviewed all ACGME milestones for 25 specialties available in September 2013. We used an iterative, qualitative process to group the ACGME milestones into SHCD content domains, from which SHCD milestones were derived. The SHCD milestones were categorized within the current ACGME core competencies and were also mapped to Association of American Medical Colleges' Entrustable Professional Activities (AAMC EPAs). Fifteen SHCD sub-competencies and corresponding milestones are provided, grouped within ACGME core competencies and mapped to multiple AAMC EPAs. This novel set of milestones, grounded within the existing ACGME competencies, defines fundamental expectations within SHCD that can be used and adapted by medical schools in the assessment of medical students in this emerging curricular area. These milestones provide a blueprint for SHCD content and assessment as ongoing revisions to milestones and curricula occur.

  9. Critical care admission of South African (SA) surgical patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods. The SA Surgical Outcomes Study (SASOS) was a 7-day national, multicentre, prospective, ...... L R Math ivha, T R Mokoena, S Monokoane, R Moreno, D F Morrell, ... stone Hospital: L Friedman, D Schmidt*, S Venter; Nelson Mandela.

  10. Grantee Spotlight: Marvella Ford, Ph.D. - Reducing Barriers to Surgical Cancer Care among African Am

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drs. Marvella E. Ford and Nestor F. Esnaola were awarded a five-year NIH/NIMHD R01 grant to evaluate a patient navigation intervention to reduce barriers to surgical cancer care and improving surgical resection rates in African Americans with lung cancer.

  11. Influence of Teamwork on Health Care Workers' Perceptions About Care Delivery and Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, Sherry; Stahlke, Sarah; Coatsworth-Puspoky, Robin

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the nature of teamwork in care facilities and its impact on the effectiveness of care delivery to older adults and job satisfaction among health care workers. A focused ethnography was conducted at two care facilities where older adults reside. Analysis of interviews with 22 participants revealed perceptions of teamwork and understandings about facilitators of and barriers to effective teamwork. Participants indicated that team relationships impacted care provided and job satisfaction. Participants also identified trust and reciprocity, communication, and sharing a common goal as critical factors in effective teamwork. In addition, participants identified the role of management as important in setting the tone for teamwork. Future research is needed to understand the complexity of supporting teamwork in residential settings given the challenges of culture, diversity, and individuals working multiple jobs. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 44(4), 37-44.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Assessing the contribution of the dental care delivery system to oral health care disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourat, Nadereh; Andersen, Ronald M; Marcus, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Existing studies of disparities in access to oral health care for underserved populations often focus on supply measures such as number of dentists. This approach overlooks the importance of other aspects of the dental care delivery system, such as personal and practice characteristics of dentists, that determine the capacity to provide care. This study aims to assess the role of such characteristics in access to care of underserved populations. We merged data from the 2003 California Health Interview Survey and a 2003 survey of California dentists in their Medical Study Service Areas (MSSAs). We examined the role of overall supply and other characteristics of dentists in income and racial/ethnic disparities in access, which was measured by annual dental visits and unmet need for dental care due to costs. We found that some characteristics of MSSAs, including higher proportions of dentists who were older, white, busy or overworked, and did not accept public insurance or discounted fees, inhibited access for low-income and minority populations. These findings highlight the importance of monitoring characteristics of dentists in addition to traditional measures of supply such as licensed-dentist-to-population ratios. The findings identify specific aspects of the delivery system such as dentists' participation in Medicaid, provision of discounted care, busyness, age, race/ethnicity, and gender that should be regularly monitored. These data will provide a better understanding of how the dental care delivery system is organized and how this knowledge can be used to develop more narrowly targeted policies to alleviate disparities. © 2014 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  13. Safe delivery care practices in western Nepal: Does women’s autonomy influence the utilization of skilled care at birth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutty, V. Raman; Sarma, P. Sankara; Dangal, Ganesh

    2017-01-01

    Despite various efforts to increase the utilization of skilled birth attendants (SBA), nearly two-thirds of deliveries take place at home without the assistance of SBAs in Nepal. We hypothesized that the ability of women to take decisions about their own lives—women’s autonomy—plays an important part in birth choices. To know this, we conducted a community-based cross-sectional study for assessing women’s autonomy and utilization of safe delivery care service in Kapilvastu district of Nepal from June to October 2014. We used multivariate modeling to associate socioeconomic factors and women’s autonomy with the utilization of safe delivery care services. Just over one-third of women sought institutional delivery care during the birth of their last child. Out of the total deliveries at health facilities, nearly 58% women visited health facility for self-reported emergency obstructive care. Only 6.2% home deliveries were handled by health workers and 14.7% women used the safe delivery kit for home delivery care. Higher levels of women’s education had a strong positive association (odds ratio = 24.11, CI = 9.43–61.64) with institutional delivery care. Stratified analysis showed that when the husband is educated, women’s education seems to work partly through their autonomy in decision making. Educational status of women emerged as one of the key predictors of the utilization of delivery care services in Kapilvastu district. Economic status of household and husband’s education are other dominant predictors of the utilization of safe delivery care services. Improving the economic and educational status may be the way out for improving the proportion of institutional deliveries. Women’s autonomy may be an important mediating factor in this pathway. PMID:28771579

  14. Safe delivery care practices in western Nepal: Does women's autonomy influence the utilization of skilled care at birth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Tulsi Ram; Kutty, V Raman; Sarma, P Sankara; Dangal, Ganesh

    2017-01-01

    Despite various efforts to increase the utilization of skilled birth attendants (SBA), nearly two-thirds of deliveries take place at home without the assistance of SBAs in Nepal. We hypothesized that the ability of women to take decisions about their own lives-women's autonomy-plays an important part in birth choices. To know this, we conducted a community-based cross-sectional study for assessing women's autonomy and utilization of safe delivery care service in Kapilvastu district of Nepal from June to October 2014. We used multivariate modeling to associate socioeconomic factors and women's autonomy with the utilization of safe delivery care services. Just over one-third of women sought institutional delivery care during the birth of their last child. Out of the total deliveries at health facilities, nearly 58% women visited health facility for self-reported emergency obstructive care. Only 6.2% home deliveries were handled by health workers and 14.7% women used the safe delivery kit for home delivery care. Higher levels of women's education had a strong positive association (odds ratio = 24.11, CI = 9.43-61.64) with institutional delivery care. Stratified analysis showed that when the husband is educated, women's education seems to work partly through their autonomy in decision making. Educational status of women emerged as one of the key predictors of the utilization of delivery care services in Kapilvastu district. Economic status of household and husband's education are other dominant predictors of the utilization of safe delivery care services. Improving the economic and educational status may be the way out for improving the proportion of institutional deliveries. Women's autonomy may be an important mediating factor in this pathway.

  15. Point-of-care technology: integration for improved delivery of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Debbie; Buckner, Martha

    2014-01-01

    The growing complexity of technology, equipment, and devices involved in patient care delivery can be staggering and overwhelming. Technology is intended to be a tool to help clinicians, but it can also be a frustrating hindrance if not thoughtfully planned and strategically aligned. Critical care nurses are key partners in the collaborations needed to improve safety and quality through health information technology (IT). Nurses must advocate for systems that are interoperable and adapted to the context of care experiences. The involvement and collaboration between clinicians, information technology specialists, biomedical engineers, and vendors has never been more relevant and applicable. Working together strategically with a shared vision can effectively provide a seamless clinical workflow, maximize technology investments, and ultimately improve patient care delivery and outcomes. Developing a strategic integrated clinical and IT roadmap is a critical component of today's health care environment. How can technology strategy be aligned from the executive suite to the bedside caregiver? What is the model for using clinical workflows to drive technology adoption? How can the voice of the critical care nurse strengthen this process? How can success be assured from the initial assessment and selection of technology to a sustainable support model? What is the vendor's role as a strategic partner and "co-caregiver"?

  16. Changing the model of care delivery: nurses' perceptions of job satisfaction and care effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Judith; Manuel, Madonna; Cunning, Glenda

    2011-09-01

    To examine nurses' perceptions of job satisfaction, empowerment, and care effectiveness following a change from team to a modified total patient care (TPC) delivery model. Empirical data related to TPC is limited and inconclusive. Similarly, evidence demonstrating nurses' experience with change and restructuring is limited. A mixed method, longitudinal, descriptive design was used. Registered nurses and licenced practical nurses in two acute-care nursing units completed quantitative and qualitative surveys. Lewin's change theory provided the framework for the study. No significant change in job satisfaction was observed; however, it was less than optimal at all three time-periods. Nurses were committed to their jobs but relatively dissatisfied with their input into the goals and processes of the organization. Client care was perceived to be more effective under TPC. Job satisfaction remained consistent following the transition to TPC. However, nurses perceived that client care within the modified TPC model was more effective than in the previous model. Nursing administration must work collaboratively with nurses to improve processes in nursing practice that could enhance nurses' job satisfaction and improve client care delivery. 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Impact Of Health Care Delivery System Innovations On Total Cost Of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kevin W; Bir, Anupa; Freeman, Nikki L B; Koethe, Benjamin C; Cohen, Julia; Day, Timothy J

    2017-03-01

    Using delivery system innovations to advance health care reform continues to be of widespread interest. However, it is difficult to generalize about the success of specific types of innovations, since they have been examined in only a few studies. To gain a broader perspective, we analyzed the results of forty-three ambulatory care programs funded by the first round of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation's Health Care Innovations Awards. The innovations' impacts on total cost of care were estimated by independent evaluators using multivariable difference-in-differences models. Through the first two years, most of the innovations did not show a significant effect on total cost of care. Using meta-regression, we assessed the effects on costs of five common components of these innovations. Innovations that used health information technology or community health workers achieved the greatest cost savings. Savings were also relatively large in programs that targeted clinically fragile patients-clinically complex populations at risk for disease progression. While the magnitude of these effects was often substantial, none achieved conventional levels of significance in our analyses. Meta-analyses of a larger number of delivery system innovations are needed to more clearly establish their potential for patient care cost savings. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  18. DOH to integrate reproductive health in health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    According to a Department of Health (DOH) official speaking at the recent Reproductive Health Advocacy Forum in Zamboanga City, the concept of reproductive health (RH) is now on the way to being fully integrated into the Philippines' primary health care system. The DOH is also developing integrated information, education, and communication material for an intensified advocacy campaign on RH among target groups in communities. The forum was held to enhance the knowledge and practice of RH among health, population and development program managers, field workers, and local government units. In this new RH framework, family planning becomes just one of many concerns of the RH package of services which includes maternal and child health, sexuality education, the prevention and treatment of abortion complications, prevention of violence against women, and the treatment of reproductive tract infections. Of concern, however, the Asian economic crisis has led the Philippine government to reduce funding, jeopardizing the public sector delivery of basic services, including reproductive health care. The crisis has also forced other governments in the region to reassess their priorities and redirect their available resources into projects which are practical and sustainable.

  19. Community mental health nursing: keeping pace with care delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Julie; Willis, Eileen; Walter, Bonnie; Toffoli, Luisa

    2008-06-01

    The National Mental Health Strategy has been associated with the movement of service delivery into the community, creating greater demand for community services. The literature suggests that the closure of psychiatric beds and earlier discharge from inpatient services, have contributed to an intensification of the workload of community mental health nurses. This paper reports findings from the first stage of an action research project to develop a workload equalization tool for community mental health nurses. The study presents data from focus groups conducted with South Australian community mental health nurses to identify issues that impact upon their workload. Four themes were identified, relating to staffing and workforce issues, clients' characteristics or needs, regional issues, and the impact of the health-care system. The data show that the workload of community mental health nurses is increased by the greater complexity of needs of community mental health clients. Service change has also resulted in poor integration between inpatient and community services and tension between generic case management and specialist roles resulting in nurses undertaking tasks for other case managers. These issues, along with difficulties in recruiting and retaining staff, have led to the intensification of community mental health work and a crisis response to care with less time for targeted interventions.

  20. Standardising fast-track surgical nursing care in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjort Jakobsen, Dorthe; Rud, Kirsten; Kehlet, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    guidelines based on the principles of fast-track surgery-i.e. patient information, surgical stress reduction, effective analgesia, early mobilisation and rapid return to normal eating. Fast-track surgery was introduced systematically in Denmark by the establishment of the Unit of Perioperative Nursing (UPN...

  1. Structure, Organization, and Delivery of Critical Care in Asian ICUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Yaseen M; Phua, Jason; Koh, Younsuck; Du, Bin; Faruq, Mohammad Omar; Nishimura, Masaji; Fang, Wen-Feng; Gomersall, Charles; Al Rahma, Hussain N; Tamim, Hani; Al-Dorzi, Hasan M; Al-Hameed, Fahad M; Adhikari, Neill K J; Sadat, Musharaf

    2016-10-01

    Despite being the epicenter of recent pandemics, little is known about critical care in Asia. Our objective was to describe the structure, organization, and delivery in Asian ICUs. A web-based survey with the following domains: hospital organizational characteristics, ICU organizational characteristics, staffing, procedures and therapies available in the ICU and written protocols and policies. ICUs from 20 Asian countries from April 2013 to January 2014. Countries were divided into low-, middle-, and high-income based on the 2011 World Bank Classification. ICU directors or representatives. Of 672 representatives, 335 (50%) responded. The average number of hospital beds was 973 (SE of the mean [SEM], 271) with 9% (SEM, 3%) being ICU beds. In the index ICUs, the average number of beds was 21 (SEM, 3), of single rooms 8 (SEM, 2), of negative-pressure rooms 3 (SEM, 1), and of board-certified intensivists 7 (SEM, 3). Most ICUs (65%) functioned as closed units. The nurse-to-patient ratio was 1:1 or 1:2 in most ICUs (84%). On multivariable analysis, single rooms were less likely in low-income countries (p = 0.01) and nonreferral hospitals (p = 0.01); negative-pressure rooms were less likely in private hospitals (p = 0.03) and low-income countries (p = 0.005); 1:1 nurse-to-patient ratio was lower in private hospitals (p = 0.005); board-certified intensivists were less common in low-income countries (p structure, organization, and delivery in Asia, which was related to hospital funding source and size, and country income. The lack of single and negative-pressure rooms in many Asian ICUs should be addressed before any future pandemic of severe respiratory illness.

  2. Cost and utilisation of hospital based delivery care in Empowered Action Group (EAG) states of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Srivastava, Akanksha

    2013-10-01

    Large scale investment in the National Rural Health Mission is expected to increase the utilization and reduce the cost of maternal care in public health centres in India. The objective of this paper is to examine recent trends in the utilization and cost of hospital based delivery care in the Empowered Action Group (EAG) states of India. The unit data from the District Level Household Survey 3, 2007-2008 is used in the analyses. The coverage and the cost of hospital based delivery at constant price is analyzed for five consecutive years preceding the survey. Descriptive and multivariate analyses are used to understand the socio-economic differentials in cost and utilization of delivery care. During 2004-2008, the utilization of delivery care from public health centres has increased in all the eight EAG states. Adjusting for inflation, the household cost of delivery care has declined for the poor, less educated and in public health centres in the EAG states. The cost of delivery care in private health centres has not shown any significant changes across the states. Results of the multivariate analyses suggest that time, state, place of residence, economic status; educational attainment and delivery characteristics of mother are significant predictors of hospital based delivery care in India. The study demonstrates the utility of public spending on health care and provides a thrust to the ongoing debate on universal health coverage in India.

  3. POSSUM--a model for surgical outcome audit in quality care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, K J; Yii, M K

    2003-10-01

    Comparative surgical audit to monitor quality of care should be performed with a risk-adjusted scoring system rather than using crude morbidity and mortality rates. A validated and widely applied risk adjusted scoring system, P-POSSUM (Portsmouth-Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality) methodology, was applied to a prospective series of predominantly general surgical patients at the Sarawak General Hospital, Kuching over a six months period. The patients were grouped into four risk groups. The observed mortality rates were not significantly different from predicted rates, showing that the quality of surgical care was at par with typical western series. The simplicity and advantages of this scoring system over other auditing tools are discussed. The P-POSSUM methodology could form the basis of local comparative surgical audit for assessment and maintenance of quality care.

  4. Firsts surgical care of Mexican children in the nineteenth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Bacab, Manuel Antonio

    2018-01-01

    Here, two papers are presented, which constitute the first reports of surgical procedures in Mexican children performed at the 19 th century. The two publications refer to surgical operations for the extraction of bladder stones. At that time, there was no anesthesia, so part of the description alludes to the suffering of the patients and the operative difficulties. The first case, is referred to as a lithotomy in a 17-year-old girl, performed by surgeon José Victoriano Guerrero in Guadalajara in 1822. The publication is not an academic report, but a pamphlet written as a gift to Emperor Augustin I to celebrate his ascension to the throne. The second work, is a lateral lithotomy in a 5-year-old boy, published by Dr. Luis Jecker in the first issue of the Periódico de la Academia de Medicina de Mégico in 1836. Copyright: © 2018 Permanyer.

  5. Care practices of older people with dementia in the surgical ward: A questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Hynninen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study was to describe the care practices of nursing staff caring older people with dementia in a surgical ward. Methods: The data were collected from nursing staff (n = 191 working in surgical wards in one district area in Finland during October to November 2015. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and analyzed statistically. The instrument consists of a total number of 141 items and four dimensions. The dimensions were as follows: background information (12 of items, specific characteristics of older people with dementia in a surgical ward (24 of items, specific characteristics of their care in a surgical ward (66 of items and use of physical restraints and alternative models for use of restraints for people with dementia (39 of items. Results: The questions which measure the nursing staff’s own assessment of care practices when caring for people with dementia in surgical wards were selected: counseling people with dementia, reaction when a surgical patient with dementia displays challenging behavior and use of alternative approach instead of physical restraints. Most commonly the nursing staff pay attention to patient’s state of alertness before counseling older people with dementia. Instead of using restraints, nursing staff gave painkillers for the patient and tried to draw patients’ attention elsewhere. The nursing staff with longer work experience estimate that they can handle the patients’ challenging behavior. They react by doing nothing more often than others. They pretend not to hear, see or notice anything. Conclusion: The findings of this study can be applied in nursing practice and in future studies focusing on the care practices among older people with dementia in acute care environment. The results can be used while developing patient treatments process in surgical ward to meet future needs.

  6. Surgical nurses' perceptions of ethical dilemmas, moral distress and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKeyser Ganz, Freda; Berkovitz, Keren

    2012-07-01

    To describe surgical nurses' perceived levels of ethical dilemmas, moral distress and perceived quality of care and the associations among them. Nurses are committed to providing quality care. They can experience ethical dilemmas and moral distress while providing patient care. Little research has focused on the effect of moral distress or ethical dilemmas on perceived quality of care. Descriptive, cross-sectional study. After administration and institutional Research Ethics Committee approval, a researcher requested 119 surgical nurses working in two Israeli hospitals to fill out three questionnaires (personal background characteristics; Ethical Dilemmas in Nursing and Quality of Nursing Care). Data collection took place from August 2007 to January 2008. Participant mean age was 39·7 years. The sample consisted mostly of women, Jewish and married staff nurses. The majority of nurses reported low to moderate levels of ethical dilemma frequency but intermediate levels of ethical dilemma intensity. Frequency of ethical dilemmas was negatively correlated with level of nursing skill, meeting patient's needs and total quality of care. No important correlations were found between intensity of ethical dilemmas and quality of care. Levels of ethical dilemma frequency were higher than intensity. Nurses tended to be satisfied with their level of quality of care. Increased frequency of ethical dilemmas was associated with some aspects of perceived quality of care. Quality of care is related to ethical dilemmas and moral distress among surgical nurses. Therefore, efforts should be made to decrease the frequency of these feelings to improve the quality of patient care. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. [Rendering surgical care to wounded with neck wounds in an armed conflict].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhvalov, I M; Zavrazhnov, A A; Fakhrutdinov, A M; Sychev, M I

    2001-10-01

    The results of rendering of the medical care (the first aid, qualified and specialized) obtained in 172 servicemen with neck injuries who stayed in Republic of Chechnya during the period from 09.08.1999 to 28.07.2000 were analyzed. Basing on the results of analysis and experience of casualties' treatment the authors discuss the problems of sequence and volume of surgical care in this group of casualties with reference to available medical evacuation system, surgical tactics at the stage of specialized care. They also consider the peculiarities of operative treatment of the casualties with neck injuries.

  8. Surgical care for the aged: a retrospective cross-sectional study of a national surgical mortality audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jennifer; North, John B; Ware, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It is assumed that increased age signifies increased surgical care. Few surgical studies describe the differences in care provided to older patients compared with younger patients. We aimed to examine the relationships between increasing age, preoperative factors and markers of postoperative care in adults who died in-hospital after surgery in Australia. Design This retrospective cross-sectional study extracted data from a national surgical mortality audit—an independent, peer-reviewed process. Setting From January 2009 to December 2012, 111 public and 61 private Australian hospitals notified the audit of in-hospital deaths after general anaesthetic surgery or if the patient was admitted under a surgeon. Participants Notified deaths totalled 19 723. We excluded deaths if patients were brain dead, younger than 17 years or never had an operation (n=11 376). From this baseline population, we divided 11 201 deaths into three patient age groups: youngest (17–64 years), medium (65–79 years) and oldest (≥80 years). Outcome measures Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses determined the relationships between increasing age and the measured preoperative factors and postoperative variables. Results The baseline population's median age was 78 years (IQR 66–85), 43.7% (4892/11 201) were 80 years or older and 83.4% (9319/11 173) had emergency admissions. The oldest group had increased trauma and emergency admissions than the medium and youngest age groups. Seven of the eight measured markers of postoperative care demonstrate strong and significant relationships with increasing age. The oldest group compared with the medium group had decreased rates of: unplanned returns to theatre (11.2% (526/4709) vs 20.2% (726/3586)), unplanned intensive care admissions (16.3% (545/3350) vs 24.0% (601/2504)) and treatment in intensive care units (59.7% (2689/4507) vs 76.7% (2754/3590)). Conclusions The oldest patients received

  9. Policy challenges for the pediatric rheumatology workforce: Part II. Health care system delivery and workforce supply

    OpenAIRE

    Henrickson Michael

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The United States pediatric population with chronic health conditions is expanding. Currently, this demographic comprises 12-18% of the American child and youth population. Affected children often receive fragmented, uncoordinated care. Overall, the American health care delivery system produces modest outcomes for this population. Poor, uninsured and minority children may be at increased risk for inferior coordination of services. Further, the United States health care delivery syste...

  10. The Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care Immediately after Delivery on Mother-infant Attachment 3 Months after Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Zahra Karimi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background  The aim of this study was determine the effect of kangaroo mother care (KMC immediately after delivery on mother-infant attachment 3-month after delivery. Materials and Methods: In this RCT study, 72 mother-infant pairs were randomly divided in to kangaroo mother care and routine care groups.The intervention group received kangaroo mother care (KMC in the first two hours post birth. The control group just received routine hospital care. Mothers in the intervention group were encouraged to keep the baby in KMC as much as possible during the day and night throughout the neonatal period. Participants were followed up for three months after birth. The Main outcome measure was mother-infant attachment at 3 months postpartum and maternal anxiety about the baby at the same time. The data was collected by questionnaire (demographic information of parents and neonates and maternal attachment scale. Analysis was performed using SPSS software (version 14. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding their baseline data. Mean maternal attachment score in the KMC group and in the routine care group at three months after delivery was 52.40±3.30 and 49.86±4.18 respectively, which was significantly higher in the KMC group (P

  11. Communication and Culture in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit: Boundary Production and the Improvement of Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Lesley Gotlib; Haas, Barbara; Cuthbertson, Brian H; Amaral, Andre C; Coburn, Natalie; Nathens, Avery B

    2016-06-01

    This ethnography explores communication around critically ill surgical patients in three surgical intensive care units (ICUs) in Canada. A boundary framework is used to articulate how surgeons', intensivists', and nurses' communication practices shape and are shaped by their respective disciplinary perspectives and experiences. Through 50 hours of observations and 43 interviews, these health care providers are found to engage in seven communication behaviors that either mitigate or magnify three contested symbolic boundaries: expertise, patient ownership, and decisional authority. Where these boundaries are successfully mitigated, experiences of collaborative, high-quality patient care are produced; by contrast, boundary magnification produces conflict and perceptions of unsafe patient care. Findings reveal that high quality and safe patient care are produced through complex social and cultural interactions among surgeons, intensivists, and nurses that are also expressions of knowledge and power. This enhances our understanding of why current quality improvement efforts targeting communication may be ineffective. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Closing the delivery gaps in pediatric HIV care in Togo, West Africa: using the care delivery value chain framework to direct quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Kevin; Schechter, Jennifer; Dey, Monica; Braganza, Sandra; Rhatigan, Joseph; Houndenou, Spero; Gbeleou, Christophe; Palerbo, Emmanuel; Tchangani, Elfamozo; Lopez, Andrew; Bensen, Emily; Hirschhorn, Lisa R

    2016-03-01

    Providing quality care for all children living with HIV/AIDS remains a global challenge and requires the development of new healthcare delivery strategies. The care delivery value chain (CDVC) is a framework that maps activities required to provide effective and responsive care for a patient with a particular disease across the continuum of care. By mapping activities along a value chain, the CDVC enables managers to better allocate resources, improve communication, and coordinate activities. We report on the successful application of the CDVC as a strategy to optimize care delivery and inform quality improvement (QI) efforts with the overall aim of improving care for Pediatric HIV patients in Togo, West Africa. Over the course of 12 months, 13 distinct QI activities in Pediatric HIV/AIDS care delivery were monitored, and 11 of those activities met or exceeded established targets. Examples included: increase in infants receiving routine polymerase chain reaction testing at 2 months (39-95%), increase in HIV exposed children receiving confirmatory HIV testing at 18 months (67-100%), and increase in patients receiving initial CD4 testing within 3 months of HIV diagnosis (67-100%). The CDVC was an effective approach for evaluating existing systems and prioritizing gaps in delivery for QI over the full cycle of Pediatric HIV/AIDS care in three specific ways: (1) facilitating the first comprehensive mapping of Pediatric HIV/AIDS services, (2) identifying gaps in available services, and (3) catalyzing the creation of a responsive QI plan. The CDVC provided a framework to drive meaningful, strategic action to improve Pediatric HIV care in Togo.

  13. Determinants of antenatal care, institutional delivery and postnatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Improving utilization of these three MCH indicators will require targeting women in the rural areas and those with low level of education as well as creating demand for health facility delivery. Improving ANC use by making it available and accessible will have a multiplier effect of improving facility delivery which ...

  14. Health Care Delivery Meets Hospitality: A Pilot Study in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph Rodgers; Jones, A Kyle; Clarke, Ryan K; Shoemaker, Stowe

    2015-06-01

    The patient experience has moved to the forefront of health care-delivery research. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Department of Diagnostic Radiology began collaborating in 2011 with the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management, and in 2013 with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration, to explore the application of service science to improving the patient experience. A collaborative pilot study was undertaken by these 3 institutions to identify and rank the specific needs and expectations of patients undergoing imaging procedures in the MD Anderson Department of Diagnostic Radiology. We first conducted interviews with patients, providers, and staff to identify factors perceived to affect the patient experience. Next, to confirm these factors and determine their relative importance, we surveyed more than 6,000 patients by e-mail. All factors considered important in the interviews were confirmed as important in the surveys. The surveys showed that the most important factors were acknowledgment of the patient's concerns, being treated with respect, and being treated like a person, not a "number"; these factors were more important than privacy, short waiting times, being able to meet with a radiologist, and being approached by a staff member versus having one's name called out in the waiting room. Our work shows that it is possible to identify and rank factors affecting patient satisfaction using techniques employed by the hospitality industry. Such factors can be used to measure and improve the patient experience. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Measuring the Burden of Surgical Disease Averted by Emergency and Essential Surgical Care in a District Hospital in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Matthew A R; Guest, Glenn D; Mamadi, Perista; Seta, Westin; Yaubihi, Noel; Karawiga, Grace; Naidi, Billy; Watters, David A K

    2017-03-01

    Timely access to emergency and essential surgical care (EESC) and anaesthesia in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) prevents premature death, minimises lifelong disability and reduces their economic impact on families and communities. Papua New Guinea is one of the poorest countries in the Pacific region, and provides much of its surgical care at a district hospital level. We aimed to evaluate the surgical capacity of a district hospital in PNG and estimate the effectiveness of surgical interventions provided. We performed a prospective study to calculate the number of DALYs averted for 465 patients treated with surgical care over a 3-month period (Sep-Nov 2013) in Alotau Hospital, Milne Bay Province, PNG (pop 210,000). Data were also collected on infrastructure, workforce, interventions provided and equipment available using the World Health Organization's Integrated Management of Emergency and Essential Surgical Care Toolkit, a survey to assess EESC and surgical capacity. We also performed a retrospective one-year audit of surgical, obstetric and anaesthetic care to provide context with regards to annual disease burden treated and surgical activity. EESC was provided by 11 Surgeons/Anaesthetists/Obstetricians (SAO) providers, equating to 5.7 per 100,000 population (including 4 nurse anaesthetists). They performed 783/100,000 procedures annually. Over the 3-month prospective study period, 4954 DALYs were averted by 465 surgical interventions, 52 % of which were elective. This equates to 18,330 DALYs averted annually or, approximately 18 % of the published but estimated disease burden in the Province in the 2013 Global Burden of Disease Study. The overall peri-operative mortality rate was 1.29 %, with 0.41 % for elective procedures and 2.25 % for emergencies. Much of the burden of surgical disease in Papua New Guinea presenting to Alotau General Hospital serving Milne Bay Province can be effectively treated by a small team providing emergency and

  16. [Surgical intensive care medicine. Current therapy concepts for septic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederbichler, A D; Ipaktchi, K; Jokuszies, A; Hirsch, T; Altintas, M A; Handschin, A E; Busch, K H; Gellert, M; Steinau, H-U; Vogt, P M; Steinsträsser, L

    2009-10-01

    The clinical appearance of septic disorders is characterized by an enormous dynamic. The sepsis-induced dysbalance of the immune system necessitates immediate and aggressive therapeutic interventions to prevent further damage progression of the disease to septic shock and multiple organ failure. This includes supportive therapy to normalize and maintain organ and tissue perfusion as well as the identification of the infection focus. In cases where an infectious focus is identified, surgical source control frequently is a key element of the treatment strategy besides pharmacologic and supportive measures. The integrative approach of the management of septic patients requires rapid communication between the involved medical disciplines and the nursing personnel. Therefore, this article outlines current therapeutic concepts of septic diseases as well as central nursing aspects.

  17. Specialty pharmaceuticals care management in an integrated health care delivery system with electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, C Douglas; Chin, Karen Y

    2013-05-01

    The specialty pharmaceuticals market is expanding more rapidly than the traditional pharmaceuticals market. Specialty pharmacy operations have evolved to deliver selected medications and associated clinical services. The growing role of specialty drugs requires new approaches to managing the use of these drugs. The focus, expectations, and emphasis in specialty drug management in an integrated health care delivery system such as Kaiser Permanente (KP) can vary as compared with more conventional health care systems. The KP Specialty Pharmacy (KP-SP) serves KP members across the United States. This descriptive account addresses the impetus for specialty drug management within KP, the use of tools such as an electronic health record (EHR) system and process management software, the KP-SP approach for specialty pharmacy services, and the emphasis on quality measurement of services provided. Kaiser Permanente's integrated system enables KP-SP pharmacists to coordinate the provision of specialty drugs while monitoring laboratory values, physician visits, and most other relevant elements of the patient's therapy. Process management software facilitates the counseling of patients, promotion of adherence, and interventions to resolve clinical, logistic, or pharmacy benefit issues. The integrated EHR affords KP-SP pharmacists advantages for care management that should become available to more health care systems with broadened adoption of EHRs. The KP-SP experience may help to establish models for clinical pharmacy services as health care systems and information systems become more integrated.

  18. Integrated Payment and Delivery Models Offer Opportunities and Challenges for Residential Care Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Grabowski, David C.; Caudry, Daryl J.; Dean, Katie M.; Stevenson, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Under health care reform, a series of new financing and delivery models are being piloted to integrate health and long-term care services for older adults. To date, these programs have not encompassed residential care facilities, with most programs focusing on long-term care recipients in the community or the nursing home. Our analyses indicate that individuals living in residential care facilities have similarly high rates of chronic illness and Medicare utilization when compared with simila...

  19. [Qualified and emergency specialized surgical care for those with wounds to the extremities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurkevich, V V; Fidarov, E Z; Bauér, V A

    1997-06-01

    Experience of organization of the surgical care in the military hospital to 438 wounded in extremities during armed conflict in Republic of Chechnya is generalized. Maximum reduction of stages of medical evacuation of the wounded in extremities, approaching of the qualified and urgent specialized surgical care directly to the region of battle actions, use of opportunities for it one-moment rendering corresponded to principles of the modern military-medical doctrine. Due to realization of the requirements of the doctrine life of many wounded ++ was saved, terms of treatment, medical and social rehabilitation are reduced. Besides lethality, treatment cost and numbers of transferring to the reserve from the Armed Forces were reduced.

  20. Care for a Patient With Cancer As a Project: Management of Complex Task Interdependence in Cancer Care Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Trosman, Julia R.; Carlos, Ruth C.; Simon, Melissa A.; Madden, Debra L.; Gradishar, William J.; Benson, Al B.; Rapkin, Bruce D.; Weiss, Elisa S.; Gareen, Ilana F.; Wagner, Lynne I.; Khan, Seema A.; Bunce, Mikele M.; Small, Art; Weldon, Christine B.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer care is highly complex and suffers from fragmentation and lack of coordination across provider specialties and clinical domains. As a result, patients often find that they must coordinate care on their own. Coordinated delivery teams may address these challenges and improve quality of cancer care. Task interdependence is a core principle of rigorous teamwork and is essential to addressing the complexity of cancer care, which is highly interdependent across specialties and modalities. W...

  1. How to achieve optimal organization of primary care service delivery at system level: lessons from Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelone, Ferruccio; Kringos, Dionne S.; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; de Belvis, Antonio G.; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    2013-01-01

    To measure the relative efficiency of primary care (PC) in turning their structures into services delivery and turning their services delivery into quality outcomes. Cross-sectional study based on the dataset of the Primary Healthcare Activity Monitor for Europe project. Two Data Envelopment

  2. How to achieve optimal organization of primary care service delivery at system level: Lessons from Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelone, F.; Kringos, D.S.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; de Belvis, A.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the relative efficiency of primary care (PC) in turning their structures into services delivery and turning their services delivery into quality outcomes. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study based on the dataset of the Primary Healthcare Activity Monitor for Europe project. Two Data

  3. How to achieve optimal organization of primary care service delivery at system level: lessons from Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelone, F.; Kringos, D.S.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Belvis, A.G. de; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To measure the relative efficiency of primary care (PC) in turning their structures into services delivery and turning their services delivery into quality outcomes. Design: Cross-sectional study based on the dataset of the Primary Healthcare Activity Monitor for Europe project. Two Data

  4. Medical surgical nurses describe missed nursing care tasks-Evaluating our work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsett, Rebecca P; Rottet, Kendra; Schmitt, Abby; Wathen, Ellen; Wilson, Debra

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the nurse work environment by evaluating the self-report of missed nursing care and the reasons for the missed care. A convenience sample of medical surgical nurses from four hospitals was invited to complete the survey for this descriptive study. The sample included 168 nurses. The MISSCARE survey assessed the frequency and reason of 24 routine nursing care elements. The most frequently reported missed care was ambulation as ordered, medications given within a 30 minute window, and mouth care. Moderate or significant reasons reported for the missed care were: unexpected rise in volume/acuity, heavy admissions/discharges, inadequate assistants, inadequate staff, meds not available when needed, and urgent situations. Identifying missed nursing care and reasons for missed care provides an opportunity for exploring strategies to reduce interruptions, develop unit cohesiveness, improve the nurse work environment, and ultimately leading to improved patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Caring Science: Transforming the Ethic of Caring-Healing Practice, Environment, and Culture within an Integrated Care Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Anne Foss; McDermott, Shawna; Kinney, Gwendolyn; Triner, Trudy

    2015-01-01

    In early 2010, leaders within Kaiser Permanente (KP) Northern California’s Patient Care Services division embarked on a journey to embrace and embed core tenets of Caring Science into the practice, environment, and culture of the organization. Caring Science is based on the philosophy of Human Caring, a theory articulated by Jean Watson, PhD, RN, AHN-BC, FAAN, as a foundational covenant to guide nursing as a discipline and a profession. Since 2010, Caring Science has enabled KP Northern California to demonstrate its commitment to being an authentic person- and family-centric organization that promotes and advocates for total health. This commitment empowers KP caregivers to balance the art and science of clinical judgment by considering the needs of the whole person, honoring the unique perception of health and healing that each member or patient holds, and engaging with them to make decisions that nurture their well-being. The intent of this article is two-fold: 1) to provide context and background on how a professional practice framework was used to transform the ethic of caring-healing practice, environment, and culture across multiple hospitals within an integrated delivery system; and 2) to provide evidence on how integration of Caring Science across administrative, operational, and clinical areas appears to contribute to meaningful patient quality and health outcomes. PMID:26828076

  6. Caring Science: Transforming the Ethic of Caring-Healing Practice, Environment, and Culture within an Integrated Care Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss Durant, Anne; McDermott, Shawna; Kinney, Gwendolyn; Triner, Trudy

    2015-01-01

    In early 2010, leaders within Kaiser Permanente (KP) Northern California's Patient Care Services division embarked on a journey to embrace and embed core tenets of Caring Science into the practice, environment, and culture of the organization. Caring Science is based on the philosophy of Human Caring, a theory articulated by Jean Watson, PhD, RN, AHN-BC, FAAN, as a foundational covenant to guide nursing as a discipline and a profession. Since 2010, Caring Science has enabled KP Northern California to demonstrate its commitment to being an authentic person- and family-centric organization that promotes and advocates for total health. This commitment empowers KP caregivers to balance the art and science of clinical judgment by considering the needs of the whole person, honoring the unique perception of health and healing that each member or patient holds, and engaging with them to make decisions that nurture their well-being. The intent of this article is two-fold: 1) to provide context and background on how a professional practice framework was used to transform the ethic of caring-healing practice, environment, and culture across multiple hospitals within an integrated delivery system; and 2) to provide evidence on how integration of Caring Science across administrative, operational, and clinical areas appears to contribute to meaningful patient quality and health outcomes.

  7. Continuity of care of emergency surgical admissions: impact on SpR training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledwidge, S F C; Bryden, E; Halestrap, P; Galland, R B

    2008-06-01

    Continuity of patient care is an important component of surgical education. This study assesses continuity of care in the current working climate. Data were collected prospectively on consecutive emergency general surgical admissions during one month. Our SpR rota is a partial shift 24 hour on call with the SpR's own consultant. The SpR is free of commitments the next day following post-take work. The on call general surgery SpR was designated the 'assessor'. Data were analysed according to involvement of the 'assessor' at subsequent stages of the admission--consent, operation, review during admission and review on discharge. Data were also collected defining whether the 'assessor' and operator followed-up the patient. There were 200 admissions; 108 female and 92 male. Overall 23% admissions had the same 'assessor' for all stages of patient care. The 'assessor' dealt with an aspect of patient care in 11% of admissions who underwent an operation and 29% of admissions who were conservatively managed. SpR follow-up of admissions on whom they operated was 70% but only 41% of admissions who were conservatively managed were followed-up by the assessing SpR. Complete in-hospital continuity of care was poor, although SpR follow-up of patients on whom they had operated was better. Introduction of shift patterns has reduced continuity of patient care. This will have a negative impact on both surgical training and patient care.

  8. COPD care delivery pathways in five European Union countries: mapping and health care professionals’ perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayyali R

    2016-11-01

    studied care pathways. General practitioners/family doctors are responsible for liaising between different teams/services, except in Greece where this is done through pulmonologists. Ireland and the UK are the only countries with services for patients at home to shorten unnecessary hospital stay. HCPs emphasized lack of communication, limited resources, and poor patient engagement as issues in the current pathways. Furthermore, no specified role exists for pharmacists and informal carers.Conclusion: Service and professional integration between care settings using a unified system targeting COPD and comorbidities is a priority. Better communication between health care providers, establishing a clear role for informal carers, and enhancing patients’ engagement could optimize current care pathways resulting in a better integrated system. Keywords: COPD, comorbidities, care delivery pathway, comparative analysis

  9. Nurse-perceived barriers to effective communication regarding prognosis and optimal end-of-life care for surgical ICU patients: a qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslakson, Rebecca A; Wyskiel, Rhonda; Thornton, Imani; Copley, Christina; Shaffer, Dauryne; Zyra, Marylou; Nelson, Judith; Pronovost, Peter J

    2012-08-01

    Integration of palliative care for intensive care unit (ICU) patients is important but often challenging, especially in surgical ICUs (SICUs), in part because many surgeons equate palliative care with terminal care and failure of restorative care. SICU nurses, who are key front-line clinicians, can provide insights into barriers for delivery of optimal palliative care in their setting. We developed a focus group guide to identify barriers to two key components of palliative care-optimal communication regarding prognosis and optimal end-of-life care-and used the tool to conduct focus groups of nurses providing bedside care in three SICUs at a tertiary care, academic, inner city hospital. Using content analysis technique, responses were organized into thematic domains that were validated by independent observers and a subset of participating nurses. Four focus groups included a total of 32 SICU nurses. They identified 34 barriers to optimal communication regarding prognosis, which were summarized into four domains: logistics, clinician discomfort with discussing prognosis, inadequate skill and training, and fear of conflict. For optimal end-of-life care, the groups identified 24 barriers in four domains: logistics, inability to acknowledge an end-of-life situation, inadequate skill and training, and cultural differences relating to end-of-life care. Nurses providing bedside care in SICUs identify barriers in several domains that may impede optimal discussions of prognoses and end-of-life care for patients with surgical critical illness. Consideration of these perceived barriers and the underlying SICU culture is relevant for designing interventions to improve palliative care in this setting.

  10. Managed care and the delivery of primary care to the elderly and the chronically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wholey, D R; Burns, L R; Lavizzo-Mourey, R

    1998-06-01

    To analyze primary care staffing in HMOs and to review the literature on primary care organization and performance in managed care organizations, with an emphasis on the delivery of primary care to the elderly and chronically ill. Analysis of primary care staffing: InterStudy HMO census data on primary care (n = 1,956) and specialist (n = 1,777) physician staffing levels from 1991 through 1995. Primary care organization and performance for the chronically ill and elderly were analyzed using a review of published research. For the staffing-level models, the number of primary care and specialist physicians per 100,000 enrollees was regressed on HMO characteristics (HMO type [group, staff, network, mixed], HMO enrollment, federal qualification, profit status, national affiliation) and community characteristics (per capita income, population density, service area size, HMO competition). For the review of organization and performance, literature published was summarized in a tabular format. The analysis of physician staffing shows that group and staff HMOs have fewer primary care and specialist physicians per 100,000 enrollees than do network and mixed HMOs, which have fewer than IPAs. Larger HMOs use fewer physicians per 100,000 enrollees than smaller HMOs. Federally qualified HMOs have fewer primary care and specialist physicians per 100,000 enrollees. For-profit, nationally affiliated, and Blue Cross HMOs have more primary care and specialist physicians than do local HMOs. HMOs in areas with high per capita income have more PCPs per 100,000 and a greater proportion of PCPs in the panel. HMO penetration decreases the use of specialists, but the number of HMOs increases the use of primary care and specialist physicians in highly competitive markets. Under very competitive conditions, HMOs appear to compete by increasing access to both PCPs and specialists, with a greater emphasis on access to specialists. The review of research on HMO performance suggests that access

  11. Delirium as a complication of the surgical intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacek R

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rostislav Horacek,1 Barbora Krnacova,2 Jan Prasko,2 Klara Latalova2 1Department of Central Intensive Care Unit for Surgery, 2Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University Hospital Olomouc, Palacky University Olomouc, Czech Republic Background: The aim of this study was to examine the impact of somatic illnesses, electrolyte imbalance, red blood cell count, hypotension, and antipsychotic and opioid treatment on the duration of delirium in Central Intensive Care Unit for Surgery.Patients and methods: Patients who were admitted to the Department of Central Intensive Care Unit for Surgery in the University Hospital Olomouc from February 2004 to November 2008 were evaluated using Riker sedation–agitation scale. Their blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and peripheral blood oxygen saturation were measured continually, and body temperature was monitored once in an hour. The laboratory blood tests including sodium, potassium, chlorides, phosphorus, urea and creatinine, hemoglobin, hematocrit, red and white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein, albumin levels and laboratory markers of renal and liver dysfunction were done every day. All measurements were made at least for ten consecutive days or longer until the delirium resolved.Results: The sample consisted of 140 consecutive delirious patients with a mean age of 68.21±12.07 years. Delirium was diagnosed in 140 of 5,642 patients (2.48% admitted in CICUS in the last 5 years. The median duration of delirium was 48 hours with a range of 12–240 hours. Statistical analysis showed that hyperactive subtype of delirium and treatment with antipsychotics were associated with prolonged delirium duration (hyperactive 76.15±40.53 hours, hypoactive 54.46±28.44 hours, mixed 61.22±37.86 hours; Kruskal–Wallis test: 8.022; P<0.05. The duration of delirium was significantly correlated also with blood potassium levels (Pearson’s r=0.2189, P<0.05, hypotension

  12. Nanocarrier-mediated delivery of α-mangostin for non-surgical castration of male animals

    OpenAIRE

    Yostawonkul, Jakarwan; Surassmo, Suvimol; Namdee, Katawut; Khongkow, Mattaka; Boonthum, Chatwalee; Pagseesing, Sasithon; Saengkrit, Nattika; Ruktanonchai, Uracha Rungsardthong; Chatdarong, Kaywalee; Ponglowhapan, Suppawiwat; Yata, Teerapong

    2017-01-01

    The overpopulation of abandoned and stray companion animals has become a global crisis. The main purpose of this study was to develop a novel nanomedicine-based antifertility compound for non-surgical castration of male animals. Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L) pericarp extract has been shown to exhibit anti-fertility property. α-mangostin (AM)-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier (AM-NLC) was developed to improve male germ cell apoptosis. This study was conducted to investigate physicochemi...

  13. Accelerating delivery of trauma-sensitive care: Using multilevel stakeholder engagement to improve care for women veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Elizabeth M; Hamilton, Alison B

    2017-09-01

    Engaging women Veterans with trauma histories in the design of innovations for their own care in partnership with providers and staff and other multilevel stakeholders holds promise for accelerating delivery of trauma-sensitive care. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Surgical membranes as directional delivery devices to generate tissue: testing in an ovine critical sized defect model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L Knothe Tate

    Full Text Available Pluripotent cells residing in the periosteum, a bi-layered membrane enveloping all bones, exhibit a remarkable regenerative capacity to fill in critical sized defects of the ovine femur within two weeks of treatment. Harnessing the regenerative power of the periosteum appears to be limited only by the amount of healthy periosteum available. Here we use a substitute periosteum, a delivery device cum implant, to test the hypothesis that directional delivery of endogenous periosteal factors enhances bone defect healing.Newly adapted surgical protocols were used to create critical sized, middiaphyseal femur defects in four groups of five skeletally mature Swiss alpine sheep. Each group was treated using a periosteum substitute for the controlled addition of periosteal factors including the presence of collagen in the periosteum (Group 1, periosteum derived cells (Group 2, and autogenic periosteal strips (Group 3. Control group animals were treated with an isotropic elastomer membrane alone. We hypothesized that periosteal substitute membranes incorporating the most periosteal factors would show superior defect infilling compared to substitute membranes integrating fewer factors (i.e. Group 3>Group 2>Group 1>Control.Based on micro-computed tomography data, bone defects enveloped by substitute periosteum enabling directional delivery of periosteal factors exhibit superior bony bridging compared to those sheathed with isotropic membrane controls (Group 3>Group 2>Group 1, Control. Quantitative histological analysis shows significantly increased de novo tissue generation with delivery of periosteal factors, compared to the substitute periosteum containing a collagen membrane alone (Group 1 as well as compared to the isotropic control membrane. Greatest tissue generation and maximal defect bridging was observed when autologous periosteal transplant strips were included in the periosteum substitute.Periosteum-derived cells as well as other factors

  15. Randomized clinical trial comparing two options for postoperative incisional care to prevent poststernotomy surgical site infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, Patrique; de Jong, Antonius P.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Ubbink, Dirk T.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains an important complication of cardiac surgery. Prevention is important, as SSI is associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. Incisional care is an important daily issue for surgeons. However, there is still scant scientific evidence on which guidelines

  16. Evaluating Disparities in Inpatient Surgical Cancer Care Among American Indian/Alaska Native Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simianu, Vlad V.; Morris, Arden M.; Varghese, Thomas K.; Porter, Michael P.; Henderson, Jeffrey A.; Buchwald, Dedra S.; Flum, David R.; Javid, Sara H.

    2016-01-01

    Background American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) patients with cancer have the lowest survival rates of all racial and ethnic groups, possibly because they are less likely to receive “best practice” surgical care than patients of other races. Methods Prospective cohort study comparing adherence to generic and cancer-specific guidelines on processes of surgical care between AI/AN and non-Hispanic white (NHW) patients in Washington State (2010–2014). Results 156 AI/AN and 6,030 NHW patients underwent operations for 10 different cancers, and had similar mean adherence to generic surgical guidelines (91.5% vs 91.9%, p=0.57). AI/AN patients with breast cancer less frequently received preoperative diagnostic core-needle biopsy (81% versus 94%, p=0.004). AI/AN patients also less frequently received care adherent to prostate cancer-specific guidelines (74% versus 92%,p=0.001). Conclusions While AI/ANs undergoing cancer operations in Washington receive similar overall best practice surgical cancer care to NHW patients, there remain important, modifiable disparities that may contribute to their lower survival. PMID:26846176

  17. Health care delivery to personnel of nuclear power plants in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalek, V.; Kubat, M.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is presented of the system of health care delivery to the personnel of nuclear power plants in Temelin and Dukovany, Czechoslovakia. The system of curative and preventivd care is described in detail, including preventive examinations, rehabilitation and spa treatment. The organisational structure is also described of health care institutions and the tasks are outlined of the works health care centres. (L.O.)

  18. Medical Education and Health Care Delivery: A Call to Better Align Goals and Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklar, David P; Hemmer, Paul A; Durning, Steven J

    2018-03-01

    The transformation of the U.S. health care system is under way, driven by the needs of an aging population, rising health care spending, and the availability of health information. However, the speed and effectiveness of the transformation of health care delivery will depend, in large part, upon engagement of the health professions community and changes in clinicians' practice behaviors. Current efforts to influence practice behaviors emphasize changes in the health payment system with incentives to move from fee-for-service to alternative payment models.The authors describe the potential of medical education to augment payment incentives to make changes in clinical practice and the importance of aligning the purpose and goals of medical education with those of the health care delivery system. The authors discuss how curricular and assessment changes and faculty development can align medical education with the transformative trends in the health care delivery system. They also explain how the theory of situated cognition offers a shared conceptual framework that could help address the misalignment of education and clinical care. They provide examples of how quality improvement, health care innovation, population care management, and payment alignment could create bridges for joining health care delivery and medical education to meet the health care reform goals of a high-performing health care delivery system while controlling health care spending. Finally, the authors illustrate how current payment incentives such as bundled payments, value-based purchasing, and population-based payments can work synergistically with medical education to provide high-value care.

  19. The urban transition and the evolution of the medical care delivery system in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, P L; Bohland, J; Shumsky, N L

    1983-01-01

    This essay traces the evolution of the American urban medical care delivery system and examines the implications in terms of social and spatial variations in accessibility to medical care. It is suggested that the foundations of the present medical care delivery system were laid during the urban transformation which took place in the latter part of the nineteenth century, when changes in the division of labor, specialization, the role of the family, urban transportation technology and attitudes to social protectionism interacted with changes in science, medical technology and professional organization to produce radical changes in both the settings used to provide medical care and their relative accessibility to different sub-groups of the population. The medical care delivery system is thus interpreted largely as a product of the overall dynamic of urbanization rather than of scientific discovery, medical technology and the influence of key medical practitioners and professional organizations.

  20. Access to Orthopaedic Surgical Care in Northern Tanzania: A Modelling Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, Ajay; Ying, Xiaohan; Mack Hardaker, W; Massawe, Honest H; Mshahaba, David J; Mandari, Faiton; Pallangyo, Anthony; Temu, Rogers; Masenga, Gileard; Spiegel, David A; Sheth, Neil P

    2018-04-25

    The global burden of musculoskeletal disease and resulting disability is enormous and is expected to increase over the next few decades. In the world's poorest regions, the paucity of information defining and quantifying the current state of access to orthopaedic surgical care is a major problem in developing effective solutions. This study estimates the number of individuals in Northern Tanzania without adequate access to orthopaedic surgical services. A chance tree was created to model the probability of access to orthopaedic surgical services in the Northern Tanzanian regions of Arusha, Kilimanjaro, Tanga, Singida, and Manyara, with respect to four dimensions: timeliness, surgical capacity, safety, and affordability. Timeliness was estimated by the proportion of people living within a 4-h driving distance from a hospital with an orthopaedic surgeon, capacity by comparing number of surgeries performed to the number of surgeries indicated, safety by applying WHO Emergency and Essential Surgical Care infrastructure and equipment checklists, and affordability by approximating the proportion of the population protected from catastrophic out-of-pocket healthcare expenditure. We accounted for uncertainty in our model with one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Data sources included the Tanzanian National Bureau of Statistics and Ministry of Finance, World Bank, World Health Organization, New Zealand Ministry of Health, Google Corporation, NASA population estimator, and 2015 hospital records from Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center, Machame Hospital, Nkoroanga Hospital, Mt. Meru Hospital, and Arusha Lutheran Medical Center. Under the most conservative assumptions, more than 90% of the Northern Tanzanian population does not have access to orthopaedic surgical services. There is a near absence of access to orthopaedic surgical care in Northern Tanzania. These findings utilize more precise country and region-specific data and are consistent with prior published

  1. Reframing HIV care: putting people at the centre of antiretroviral delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncombe, Chris; Rosenblum, Scott; Hellmann, Nicholas; Holmes, Charles; Wilkinson, Lynne; Biot, Marc; Bygrave, Helen; Hoos, David; Garnett, Geoff

    2015-04-01

    The delivery of HIV care in the initial rapid scale-up of HIV care and treatment was based on existing clinic-based models, which are common in highly resourced settings and largely undifferentiated for individual needs. A new framework for treatment based on variable intensities of care tailored to the specific needs of different groups of individuals across the cascade of care is proposed here. Service intensity is characterised by four delivery components: (i) types of services delivered, (ii) location of service delivery, (iii) provider of health services and (iv) frequency of health services. How these components are developed into a service delivery framework will vary across countries and populations, with the intention being to improve acceptability and care outcomes. The goal of getting more people on treatment before they become ill will necessitate innovative models of delivering both testing and care. As HIV programmes expand treatment eligibility, many people entering care will not be 'patients' but healthy, active and productive members of society. To take the framework to scale, it will be important to: (i) define which individuals can be served by an alternative delivery framework; (ii) strengthen health systems that support decentralisation, integration and task shifting; (iii) make the supply chain more robust; and (iv) invest in data systems for patient tracking and for programme monitoring and evaluation. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Current surgical practices in cleft care: cleft palate repair techniques and postoperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzel, Evan B; Basile, Patrick; Koltz, Peter F; Marcus, Jeffrey R; Girotto, John A

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to objectively report practices commonly used in cleft palate repair in the United States. This study investigates current surgical techniques, postoperative care, and complication rates for cleft palate repair surgery. All 803 surgeon members of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association were sent online and/or paper surveys inquiring about their management of cleft palate patients. Three-hundred six surveys were received, a 38 percent response rate. This represented responses of surgeons from 100 percent of American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association registered cleft teams. Ninety-six percent of respondents perform a one-stage repair. Eighty-five percent of surgeons perform palate surgery when the patient is between 6 and 12 months of age. The most common one-stage repair techniques are the Bardach style (two flaps) with intravelar veloplasty and the Furlow palatoplasty. After surgery, 39 percent of surgeons discharge patients within 24 hours. Another 43 percent discharge patients within 48 hours. During postoperative management, 92 percent of respondents implement feeding restrictions. Eighty-five percent of physicians use arm restraints. Surgeons' self-reported complications rates are minimal: 54 percent report a fistula in less than 5 percent of cases. The reported need for secondary speech surgery varies widely. The majority of respondents repair clefts in one stage. The most frequently used repair techniques are the Furlow palatoplasty and the Bardach style with intravelar veloplasty. After surgery, the majority of surgeons discharge patients in 1 or 2 days, and nearly all surgeons implement feeding restrictions and the use of arm restraints. The varying feeding protocols are reviewed in this article.

  3. Does case-mix based reimbursement stimulate the development of process-oriented care delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Leti; Dückers, Michel L A; Wagner, Cordula; van Merode, Godefridus G

    2010-11-01

    Reimbursement based on the total care of a patient during an acute episode of illness is believed to stimulate management and clinicians to reduce quality problems like waiting times and poor coordination of care delivery. Although many studies already show that this kind of case-mix based reimbursement leads to more efficiency, it remains unclear whether care coordination improved as well. This study aims to explore whether case-mix based reimbursement stimulates development of care coordination by the use of care programmes, and a process-oriented way of working. Data for this study were gathered during the winter of 2007/2008 in a survey involving all Dutch hospitals. Descriptive and structural equation modelling (SEM) analyses were conducted. SEM reveals that adoption of the case-mix reimbursement within hospitals' budgeting processes stimulates hospitals to establish care programmes by the use of process-oriented performance measures. However, the implementation of care programmes is not (yet) accompanied by a change in focus from function (the delivery of independent care activities) to process (the delivery of care activities as being connected to a chain of interdependent care activities). This study demonstrates that hospital management can stimulate the development of care programmes by the adoption of case-mix reimbursement within hospitals' budgeting processes. Future research is recommended to confirm this finding and to determine whether the establishment of care programmes will in time indeed lead to a more process-oriented view of professionals. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identifying Variability in Mental Models Within and Between Disciplines Caring for the Cardiac Surgical Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Evans K H; Harder, Kathleen A; Apostolidou, Ioanna; Wahr, Joyce A; Shook, Douglas C; Farivar, R Saeid; Perry, Tjorvi E; Konia, Mojca R

    2017-07-01

    The cardiac operating room is a complex environment requiring efficient and effective communication between multiple disciplines. The objectives of this study were to identify and rank critical time points during the perioperative care of cardiac surgical patients, and to assess variability in responses, as a correlate of a shared mental model, regarding the importance of these time points between and within disciplines. Using Delphi technique methodology, panelists from 3 institutions were tasked with developing a list of critical time points, which were subsequently assigned to pause point (PP) categories. Panelists then rated these PPs on a 100-point visual analog scale. Descriptive statistics were expressed as percentages, medians, and interquartile ranges (IQRs). We defined low response variability between panelists as an IQR ≤ 20, moderate response variability as an IQR > 20 and ≤ 40, and high response variability as an IQR > 40. Panelists identified a total of 12 PPs. The PPs identified by the highest number of panelists were (1) before surgical incision, (2) before aortic cannulation, (3) before cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) initiation, (4) before CPB separation, and (5) at time of transfer of care from operating room (OR) to intensive care unit (ICU) staff. There was low variability among panelists' ratings of the PP "before surgical incision," moderate response variability for the PPs "before separation from CPB," "before transfer from OR table to bed," and "at time of transfer of care from OR to ICU staff," and high response variability for the remaining 8 PPs. In addition, the perceived importance of each of these PPs varies between disciplines and between institutions. Cardiac surgical providers recognize distinct critical time points during cardiac surgery. However, there is a high degree of variability within and between disciplines as to the importance of these times, suggesting an absence of a shared mental model among disciplines caring for

  5. Refining and validating a conceptual model of Clinical Nurse Leader integrated care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Miriam; Williams, Marjory; Su, Wei; Hites, Lisle

    2017-02-01

    To empirically validate a conceptual model of Clinical Nurse Leader integrated care delivery. There is limited evidence of frontline care delivery models that consistently achieve quality patient outcomes. Clinical Nurse Leader integrated care delivery is a promising nursing model with a growing record of success. However, theoretical clarity is necessary to generate causal evidence of effectiveness. Sequential mixed methods. A preliminary Clinical Nurse Leader practice model was refined and survey items developed to correspond with model domains, using focus groups and a Delphi process with a multi-professional expert panel. The survey was administered in 2015 to clinicians and administrators involved in Clinical Nurse Leader initiatives. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling were used to validate the measurement and model structure. Final sample n = 518. The model incorporates 13 components organized into five conceptual domains: 'Readiness for Clinical Nurse Leader integrated care delivery'; 'Structuring Clinical Nurse Leader integrated care delivery'; 'Clinical Nurse Leader Practice: Continuous Clinical Leadership'; 'Outcomes of Clinical Nurse Leader integrated care delivery'; and 'Value'. Sample data had good fit with specified model and two-level measurement structure. All hypothesized pathways were significant, with strong coefficients suggesting good fit between theorized and observed path relationships. The validated model articulates an explanatory pathway of Clinical Nurse Leader integrated care delivery, including Clinical Nurse Leader practices that result in improved care dynamics and patient outcomes. The validated model provides a basis for testing in practice to generate evidence that can be deployed across the healthcare spectrum. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. An Implantable MEMS Drug Delivery Device for Rapid Delivery in Ambulatory Emergency Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    controlled devices provide advantages over passive release devices, as the drug delivery process can be controlled actively after implantation and...mm, 5 μm, 100 Å, Alltech Associates, USA), with methanol and 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in water. The gradient used was 2 % TFA/min, starting

  7. Validation of Surgical Intensive Care-Infection Registry: a medical informatics system for intensive care unit research, quality of care improvement, and daily patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golob, Joseph F; Fadlalla, Adam M A; Kan, Justin A; Patel, Nilam P; Yowler, Charles J; Claridge, Jeffrey A

    2008-08-01

    We developed a prototype electronic clinical information system called the Surgical Intensive Care-Infection Registry (SIC-IR) to prospectively study infectious complications and monitor quality of care improvement programs in the surgical and trauma intensive care unit. The objective of this study was to validate SIC-IR as a successful health information technology with an accurate clinical data repository. Using the DeLone and McLean Model of Information Systems Success as a framework, we evaluated SIC-IR in a 3-month prospective crossover study of physician use in one of our two surgical and trauma intensive care units (SIC-IR unit versus non SIC-IR unit). Three simultaneous research methodologies were used: a user survey study, a pair of time-motion studies, and an accuracy study of SIC-IR's clinical data repository. The SIC-IR user survey results were positive for system reliability, graphic user interface, efficiency, and overall benefit to patient care. There was a significant decrease in prerounding time of nearly 4 minutes per patient on the SIC-IR unit compared with the non SIC-IR unit. The SIC-IR documentation and data archiving was accurate 74% to 100% of the time depending on the data entry method used. This accuracy was significantly improved compared with normal hand-written documentation on the non SIC-IR unit. SIC-IR proved to be a useful application both at individual user and organizational levels and will serve as an accurate tool to conduct prospective research and monitor quality of care improvement programs.

  8. Drivers of Prenatal Care Quality and Uptake of Supervised Delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    towards improving maternal health include barriers of access to healthcare ... for non-utilization of supervised delivery services in Ghana is the provision of poor .... information relating to the womens socio-demographic characteristics-age ..... Adjei S, Graham W. The skilled attendance index: Proposal for a new measure.

  9. Patterns of Daily Costs Differ for Medical and Surgical Intensive Care Unit Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Garland, Allan; Gong, Michelle N

    2015-12-01

    Published studies suggest hospital costs on Day 1 in the intensive care unit (ICU) far exceed those of subsequent days, when costs are relatively stable. Yet, no study stratified patients by ICU type. To determine whether daily cost patterns differ by ICU type. We performed a retrospective study of adults admitted to five ICUs (two surgical: quaternary surgical ICU [SICU quat] and quaternary cardiac surgical ICU [CSICU quat]; two medical: tertiary medical ICU [MICU tertiary] and quaternary medical ICU [MICU quat]; one general: community medical surgical ICU [MSICU comm]) at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, New York during 2013. After excluding costs clearly accrued outside the ICU, daily hospital costs were merged with clinical data. Patterns of daily unadjusted costs were evaluated in each ICU using median regression. Generalized estimating equations with first-order autocorrelation were used to identify factors independently associated with daily costs. Unadjusted daily costs were higher on Day 1 than on subsequent days only for surgical ICUs-SICU quat (median [interquartile range], $2,636 [$1,834-$4,282] on Day 1 vs. $1,840 [$1,501-$2,332] on Day 2; P cost from Days 1 to 2. After multivariate adjustment, there remained a significant decrease in cost from ICU Day 1 to 2 in surgical units with statistically similar Day 1 and 2 costs for other ICUs. Higher Day 1 costs are not seen in patients admitted to medical/nonsurgical ICUs.

  10. Access to emergency and surgical care in sub-Saharan Africa: the infrastructure gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Renee Y; Mbembati, Naboth A; Macfarlane, Sarah; Kruk, Margaret E

    2012-05-01

    The effort to increase access to emergency and surgical care in low-income countries has received global attention. While most of the literature on this issue focuses on workforce challenges, it is critical to recognize infrastructure gaps that hinder the ability of health systems to make emergency and surgical care a reality. This study reviews key barriers to the provision of emergency and surgical care in sub-Saharan Africa using aggregate data from the Service Provision Assessments and Demographic and Health Surveys of five countries: Ghana, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. For hospitals and health centres, competency was assessed in six areas: basic infrastructure, equipment, medicine storage, infection control, education and quality control. Percentage of compliant facilities in each country was calculated for each of the six areas to facilitate comparison of hospitals and health centres across the five countries. The percentage of hospitals with dependable running water and electricity ranged from 22% to 46%. In countries analysed, only 19-50% of hospitals had the ability to provide 24-hour emergency care. For storage of medication, only 18% to 41% of facilities had unexpired drugs and current inventories. Availability of supplies to control infection and safely dispose of hazardous waste was generally poor (less than 50%) across all facilities. As few as 14% of hospitals (and as high as 76%) among those surveyed had training and supervision in place. No surveyed hospital had enough infrastructure to follow minimum standards and practices that the World Health Organization has deemed essential for the provision of emergency and surgical care. The countries where these hospitals are located may be representative of other low-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Thus, the results suggest that increased attention to building up the infrastructure within struggling health systems is necessary for improvements in global access to medical care.

  11. Delayed Prenatal Care and the Risk of Low Birth Weight Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueston, William J.; Gilbert, Gregory E.; Davis, Lucy; Sturgill, Vanessa

    2003-01-01

    Assessed whether the timing of prenatal care related to low birth weight delivery, adjusting for sociodemographic and behavioral risk factors. Data on births to white and African American women showed no benefits for early initiation of prenatal care in reducing the risk of low birth weight.(SM)

  12. Does case-mix based reimbursement stimulate the development of process-oriented care delivery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, L.; Dückers, M.L.A.; Wagner, C.; Merode, G.G. van

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Reimbursement based on the total care of a patient during an acute episode of illness is believed to stimulate management and clinicians to reduce quality problems like waiting times and poor coordination of care delivery. Although many studies already show that this kind of case-mix

  13. Material Resources For Eye Care Delivery In Urban South-Eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the availability and distribution of material resources for primary and secondary level eye care delivery in Enugu-North Local Government Area (LGA) of Enugu State. Methods: A survey of Public (State and Local Government administered) health care facilities in Enugu North LGA was done.

  14. Transforming Health Care Service Delivery and Provider Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Reiner, Bruce I.

    2011-01-01

    Commoditization pressures in medicine have risked transforming service provider selection from “survival of the fittest” to “survival of the cheapest.” Quality- and safety-oriented mandates by the Institute of Medicine have led to the creation of a number of data-driven quality-centric initiatives including Pay for Performance and Evidence-Based Medicine. A synergistic approach to creating quantitative accountability in medical service delivery is through the creation of consumer-oriented per...

  15. Satisfaction with health facility delivery care services and ssociated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proportion satisfied varied in different aspects of care ranging from 30% reporting to be satisfied with management of labour pains to 96% reporting to be satisfied with care of the newborn. Only age of the mother showed significant association with satisfaction. Women with formal education and those delivering for the first ...

  16. Depression and diabetes: Treatment and health-care delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrak, Frank; Baumeister, Harald; Skinner, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Despite research efforts in the past 20 years, scientific evidence about screening and treatment for depression in diabetes remains incomplete and is mostly focused on North American and European health-care systems. Validated instruments to detect depression in diabetes......, which are often implemented through collaborative care and stepped-care approaches. The evidence for improved glycaemic control in the treatment of depression by use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or psychological approaches is conflicting; only some analyses show small to moderate...... improvements in glycaemic control. More research is needed to evaluate treatment of different depression subtypes in people with diabetes, the cost-effectiveness of treatments, the use of health-care resources, the need to account for cultural differences and different health-care systems, and new treatment...

  17. Deploying Team Science Principles to Optimize Interdisciplinary Lung Cancer Care Delivery: Avoiding the Long and Winding Road to Optimal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osarogiagbon, Raymond U; Rodriguez, Hector P; Hicks, Danielle; Signore, Raymond S; Roark, Kristi; Kedia, Satish K; Ward, Kenneth D; Lathan, Christopher; Santarella, Scott; Gould, Michael K; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-11-01

    The complexity of lung cancer care mandates interaction between clinicians with different skill sets and practice cultures in the routine delivery of care. Using team science principles and a case-based approach, we exemplify the need for the development of real care teams for patients with lung cancer to foster coordination among the multiple specialists and staff engaged in routine care delivery. Achieving coordinated lung cancer care is a high-priority public health challenge because of the volume of patients, lethality of disease, and well-described disparities in quality and outcomes of care. Coordinating mechanisms need to be cultivated among different types of specialist physicians and care teams, with differing technical expertise and practice cultures, who have traditionally functioned more as coactively working groups than as real teams. Coordinating mechanisms, including shared mental models, high-quality communication, mutual trust, and mutual performance monitoring, highlight the challenge of achieving well-coordinated care and illustrate how team science principles can be used to improve quality and outcomes of lung cancer care. To develop the evidence base to support coordinated lung cancer care, research comparing the effectiveness of a diverse range of multidisciplinary care team approaches and interorganizational coordinating mechanisms should be promoted.

  18. The Surgical Care Improvement Project Antibiotic Guidelines: Should We Expect More Than Good Intentions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonberger, Robert B; Barash, Paul G; Lagasse, Robert S

    2015-08-01

    Since 2006, the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) has promoted 3 perioperative antibiotic recommendations designed to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections. Despite good evidence for the efficacy of these recommendations, the efforts of SCIP have not measurably improved the rates of surgical site infections. We offer 3 arguments as to why SCIP has fallen short of expectations. We then suggest a reorientation of quality improvement efforts to focus less on reporting, and incentivizing adherence to imperfect metrics, and more on creating local and regional quality collaboratives to educate clinicians about how to improve practice. Ultimately, successful quality improvement projects are behavioral interventions that will only succeed to the degree that they motivate individual clinicians, practicing within a particular context, to do the difficult work of identifying failures and iteratively working toward excellence.

  19. Choosing Wisely: Opportunities for Improving Value in Cancer Care Delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocque, Gabrielle B; Williams, Courtney P; Jackson, Bradford E; Wallace, Audrey S; Halilova, Karina I; Kenzik, Kelly M; Partridge, Edward E; Pisu, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Patients, providers, and payers are striving to identify where value in cancer care can be increased. As part of the Choosing Wisely (CW) campaign, ASCO and the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology have recommended against specific, yet commonly performed, treatments and procedures. We conducted a retrospective analysis of Medicare claims data to examine concordance with CW recommendations across 12 cancer centers in the southeastern United States. Variability for each measure was evaluated on the basis of patient characteristics and site of care. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to examine differences in average costs per patient by concordance status. Potential cost savings were estimated on the basis of a potential 95% adherence rate and average cost difference. The analysis included 37,686 patients with cancer with Fee-for-Service Medicare insurance. Concordance varied by CW recommendation from 39% to 94%. Patient characteristics were similar for patients receiving concordant and nonconcordant care. Significant variability was noted across centers for all recommendations, with as much as an 89% difference. Nonconcordance was associated with higher costs for every measure. If concordance were to increase to 95% for all measures, we would estimate a $19 million difference in total cost of care per quarter. These results demonstrate ample room for reduction of low-value care and corresponding costs associated with the CW recommendations. Because variability in concordance was driven primarily by site of care, rather than by patient factors, continued education about these low-value services is needed to improve the value of cancer care.

  20. The Perioperative Surgical Home: Improving the Value and Quality of Care in Total Joint Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimento, George F; Thomas, Leslie C

    2017-09-01

    The perioperative surgical home (PSH) is a patient-centered, physician-led, multidisciplinary care pathway developed to deliver value-based care based on shared decision-making. Physician and hospital reimbursement will be tied to providing quality care at lower cost, and the PSH model has been used in providing care to patients undergoing lower extremity arthroplasty. The purpose of this review is to discuss the rationale, definition, development, current state, and future direction of the PSH. The PSH model guides the patient throughout the pre and perioperative process and into the postoperative phase. It has been shown in multiple studies to decrease length of stay, improve functional outcomes, allow more home discharges, and lower costs. There is no increase in complications or readmission rates. The PSH pathway is a safe and effective method of providing value-based care to patients undergoing hip and knee arthroplasty.

  1. Use of Multiple Operatories in Dental Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    Treatment 1.8 36 03400 Periapical Treatment 03410 Apicoectomy 3.3 03420 Retrograde Filling 0.9 03470 Surgical Fenestration 1.0 03480 Pneumatization 1.6 03900...07442 Excision, Malignant Tumor 5.3 07452 Removal of Odontogenic Cyst or Tumor 2.5 07462 Removal of Non-Odontogenic Cyst or Tumor 1.2 07465...Removal of Non-Odontogenic Cyst or Tumor 300.00 07465 Destruction of lesions 200.00 07470 Removal of Exostoses 200.00 07480 Partial Resection, Maxilla or

  2. Impact of managed care on healthcare delivery practices: the perception of healthcare administrators and clinical practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietze, Mari F

    2003-01-01

    Managed care has introduced changes, such as cost effectiveness, access to care, and quality of care, to many components of the U.S. healthcare delivery system. These changes have affected how healthcare administrators and clinical practitioners perceive the impact of managed care on healthcare delivery practices. A survey was initiated to explore whether the perceptions of administrators differed from those of practitioners and to discover which organizational variables could explain the difference. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey design was used for the target population of administrators and practitioners in high, moderate, and low managed-care-penetration markets. Two investigator-developed instruments--the Managed Care Perceptions Inventory (MCPI) and the MCPI-Demographic--and an intact centralization of decision-making assessment subscale were used for data collection. Administrators had a statistically significant, more positive perception of the impact of managed care on healthcare delivery than did practitioners. When the distinction between administrator and practitioner was not used as a grouping factor, managed care market penetration, nonprofit status, and years in current employment position were factors that had statistically significant associations with a more positive perception of managed care. Based on these findings, both administrators and practitioners have a role in maintaining awareness regarding their perceptions and should work collaboratively to address issues of concern. Similarly, promoting trust and commitment at the organizational level is important. Recommendations for further research are also provided.

  3. Moral distress among nurses in medical, surgical and intensive-care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusignani, Maura; Giannì, Maria Lorella; Re, Luca Giuseppe; Buffon, Maria Luisa

    2017-09-01

    To assess the frequency, intensity and level of moral distress perceived by nurses working in medical, surgical and intensive care units. Moral distress among nurses compromises their ability to provide optimal patient care and may cause them to leave their job. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of 283 registered nurses was conducted to evaluate the frequency, intensity and levels of moral distress. A revised version of the Moral Distress Scale (MDS-R) was used. The highest level of moral distress was associated with the provision of treatments and aggressive care that were not expected to benefit the patients and the competency of the health-care providers. Multivariate regression showed that nurses working in medical settings, nurses with lower levels of experience working in medical, surgical or intensive care settings, and nurses who intend to leave their job experienced the highest levels of moral distress. The present study indicates that nurses experience an overall moderate level of moral distress. Gaining further insight into the issue of moral distress among nurses and the clinical situations that most frequently cause this distress will enable development of strategies to reduce moral distress and to improve nurse satisfaction and, consequently, patient care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Implementation of an acute care emergency surgical service: a cost analysis from the surgeon's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantha, Ram Venkatesh; Parry, Neil; Vogt, Kelly; Jain, Vipan; Crawford, Silvie; Leslie, Ken

    2014-04-01

    Acute care surgical services provide comprehensive emergency general surgical care while potentially using health care resources more efficiently. We assessed the volume and distribution of emergency general surgery (EGS) procedures before and after the implementation of the Acute Care and Emergency Surgery Service (ACCESS) at a Canadian tertiary care hospital and its effect on surgeon billings. This single-centre retrospective case-control study compared adult patients who underwent EGS procedures between July and December 2009 (pre-ACCESS), to those who had surgery between July and December 2010 (post-ACCESS). Case distribution was compared between day (7 am to 3 pm), evening (3 pm to 11 pm) and night (11 pm to 7 am). Frequencies were compared using the χ(2) test. Pre-ACCESS, 366 EGS procedures were performed: 24% during the day, 55% in the evening and 21% at night. Post-ACCESS, 463 operations were performed: 55% during the day, 36% in the evening and 9% at night. Reductions in night-time and evening EGS were 57% and 36% respectively (p cost-modelling analysis, post-ACCESS surgeon billing for appendectomies, segmental colectomies, laparotomies and cholecystectomies all declined by $67 190, $125 215, $66 362, and $84 913, respectively (p Cost-modelling analysis demonstrates that these services have cost-savings potential for the health care system without reducing overall surgeon billing.

  5. [Experience of the surgical management of the esophageal achalasia in a tertiary care hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas-Fregoso, Elpidio Manuel; Romero-Hernández, Teodoro; Sánchez-Fernández, Patricio Rogelio; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; González-Ojeda, Alejandro; Macías-Amezcua, Michel Dassaejv

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is a primary esophageal motor disorder. The most common symptoms are: dysphagia, chest pain, reflux and weight loss. The esophageal manometry is the standard for diagnosis. The aim of this paper is to determine the effectiveness of the surgical management in patients with achalasia in a tertiary care hospital. A case series consisting of achalasia patients, treated surgically between January and December of 2011. Clinical charts were reviewed to obtain data and registries of the type of surgical procedure, morbidity and mortality. Fourteen patients were identified, with an average age of 49.1 years. The most common symptoms were: dysphagia, vomiting, weight loss and pyrosis. Eight open approaches were performed and six by laparoscopy, with an average length of cardiomyotomy of 9.4 cm. Eleven patients received an antireflux procedure. The effectiveness of procedures performed was 85.7 %. Surgical management offered at this tertiary care hospital does not differ from that reported in other case series, giving effectiveness and safety for patients with achalasia.

  6. Proposal of a service delivery integration index of home care for older persons: application in several European cities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henrard, J.C.; Ankri, J.; Frijters, D.; Carpenter, I.; Topinkova, E.; Garms-Homolova, V.; Finne-Soveri, H.; Wergeland Sorbye, L.; Jonsson, P.V.; Ljunggren, G.; Schroll, M.; Wagner, C.; Bernabei, R.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To propose an integration index of home care delivery to older persons, to study its validity and to apply it to home care services of European cities. THEORY: Home care delivery integration was based on two dimensions referring to process-centred integration and organisational structure

  7. Care for a Patient With Cancer As a Project: Management of Complex Task Interdependence in Cancer Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosman, Julia R; Carlos, Ruth C; Simon, Melissa A; Madden, Debra L; Gradishar, William J; Benson, Al B; Rapkin, Bruce D; Weiss, Elisa S; Gareen, Ilana F; Wagner, Lynne I; Khan, Seema A; Bunce, Mikele M; Small, Art; Weldon, Christine B

    2016-11-01

    Cancer care is highly complex and suffers from fragmentation and lack of coordination across provider specialties and clinical domains. As a result, patients often find that they must coordinate care on their own. Coordinated delivery teams may address these challenges and improve quality of cancer care. Task interdependence is a core principle of rigorous teamwork and is essential to addressing the complexity of cancer care, which is highly interdependent across specialties and modalities. We examined challenges faced by a patient with early-stage breast cancer that resulted from difficulties in understanding and managing task interdependence across clinical domains involved in this patient's care. We used team science supported by the project management discipline to discuss how various task interdependence aspects can be recognized, deliberately designed, and systematically managed to prevent care breakdowns. This case highlights how effective task interdependence management facilitated by project management methods could markedly improve the course of a patient's care. This work informs efforts of cancer centers and practices to redesign cancer care delivery through innovative, practical, and patient-centered approaches to management of task interdependence in cancer care. Future patient-reported outcomes research will help to determine optimal ways to engage patients, including those who are medically underserved, in managing task interdependence in their own care.

  8. Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Podgorny, Kelly; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Greene, Linda; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Saiman, Lisa; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previously published guidelines are available that provide comprehensive recommendations for detecting and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The intent of this document is to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing their surgical site infection (SSI) prevention efforts. This document updates “Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals,”1 published in 2008. This expert guidance document is sponsored by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and is the product of a collaborative effort led by SHEA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise. The list of endorsing and supporting organizations is presented in the introduction to the 2014 updates.2 PMID:24799638

  9. Can branding by health care provider organizations drive the delivery of higher technical and service quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snihurowych, Roman R; Cornelius, Felix; Amelung, Volker Eric

    2009-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of branding in nearly all other major industries, most health care service delivery organizations have not fully embraced the practices and processes of branding. Facilitating the increased and appropriate use of branding among health care delivery organizations may improve service and technical quality for patients. This article introduces the concepts of branding, as well as making the case that the use of branding may improve the quality and financial performance of organizations. The concepts of branding are reviewed, with examples from the literature used to demonstrate their potential application within health care service delivery. The role of branding for individual organizations is framed by broader implications for health care markets. Branding strategies may have a number of positive effects on health care service delivery, including improved technical and service quality. This may be achieved through more transparent and efficient consumer choice, reduced costs related to improved patient retention, and improved communication and appropriateness of care. Patient satisfaction may be directly increased as a result of branding. More research into branding could result in significant quality improvements for individual organizations, while benefiting patients and the health system as a whole.

  10. [Contributions of hospital psicology to the care of the surgical patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, Ricardo Werner; Maia, Eulália Maria Chaves

    2005-01-01

    The present article show some contributions to the Health Psychology at the chirurgical patient attention, with the interdisciplinary intervention propose, under the biopsychosocial paradigm. Show some points about the relationships above the chirurgeon, health team and patient and presents some psychological and psychopathologic answers to the patient under the trinomial illness-hospitalization-care in the period a long the diagnosis and chirurgical indication at the rehabilitation proceedings. Psicologist must conquist, by knowledge and dedication, his space in surgical teams.

  11. Anesthesia and critical-care delivery in weightlessness: A challenge for research in parabolic flight analogue space surgery studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Chad G.; Keaney, Marilyn A.; Chun, Rosaleen; Groleau, Michelle; Tyssen, Michelle; Keyte, Jennifer; Broderick, Timothy J.; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.

    2010-03-01

    BackgroundMultiple nations are actively pursuing manned exploration of space beyond low-earth orbit. The responsibility to improve surgical care for spaceflight is substantial. Although the use of parabolic flight as a terrestrial analogue to study surgery in weightlessness (0 g) is well described, minimal data is available to guide the appropriate delivery of anesthesia. After studying anesthetized pigs in a 0 g parabolic flight environment, our group developed a comprehensive protocol describing prolonged anesthesia in a parabolic flight analogue space surgery study (PFASSS). Novel challenges included a physically remote vivarium, prolonged (>10 h) anesthetic requirements, and the provision of veterinary operating room/intensive care unit (ICU) equivalency on-board an aircraft with physical dimensions of ethical approval, multiple ground laboratory sessions were conducted with combinations of anesthetic, pre-medication, and induction protocols on Yorkshire-cross specific pathogen-free (SPF) pigs. Several constant rate infusion (CRI) intravenous anesthetic combinations were tested. In each regimen, opioids were administered to ensure analgesia. Ventilation was supported mechanically with blended gradients of oxygen. The best performing terrestrial 1 g regime was flight tested in parabolic flight for its effectiveness in sustaining optimal and prolonged anesthesia, analgesia, and maintaining hemodynamic stability. Each flight day, a fully anesthetized, ventilated, and surgically instrumented pig was transported to the Flight Research Laboratory (FRL) in a temperature-controlled animal ambulance. A modular on-board surgical/ICU suite with appropriate anesthesia/ICU and surgical support capabilities was employed. ResultsThe mean duration of anesthesia (per flight day) was 10.28 h over four consecutive days. A barbiturate and ketamine-based CRI anesthetic regimen supplemented with narcotic analgesia by bolus administration offered the greatest prolonged hemodynamic

  12. Prevalence of graduated compression stocking-associated pressure injuries in surgical intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Deborah B; Chang, Tracy Y; Aboagye, Jonathan K; Lau, Brandyn D; Shihab, Hasan M; Fisher, Betsy; Young, Samantha; Sujeta, Nancy; Shaffer, Dauryne L; Popoola, Victor O; Kraus, Peggy S; Knorr, Gina; Farrow, Norma E; Streiff, Michael B; Haut, Elliott R

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of static graduated compression stocking (sGCS)-associated pressure injury among patients in surgical intensive care units (ICUs). We retrospectively reviewed data from wound care rounds between April 2011 and June 2012 at 3 surgical ICUs at an urban, tertiary care hospital. Patients with sGCS-associated pressure injury were identified and descriptive analysis was performed on their demographic, perioperative, and postoperative characteristics. We examined 1787 individual patients during 2391 patient encounters. A total of 129 (7.2%) of patients developed pressure injuries. Forty patients (2.2%) developed sGCS-associated pressure injury. Static GCS-associated pressure injury accounted for 31% (40/129) of all pressure injuries and 74% (40/54) of all medical device-related pressure injury. Eighteen (45%) and 6 (15%) developed stage 1 and 2 pressure injury, respectively, and 16 (40%) developed deep tissue injuries. The mean age of our patients was 64.7 years, about half (47.5%) were male, and their mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 18.8. Many had comorbid conditions, including obesity (44.5%) and diabetes (42.5%), and required mechanical ventilation (45%). Pressure injuries are a notable complication of sGCS in surgical ICU patients. Appropriate measures are required to help avoid this potentially preventable harm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Patients' views of patient-centred care: a phenomenological case study in one surgical unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Amy; Kitson, Alison; Zeitz, Kathryn

    2012-12-01

    To report a study of patients' views of patient-centred care. The study aimed to explore patients' understanding and conceptualization of patient-centred care and link it to existing literature on the topic. Patient-centred care currently lacks a widely accepted definition, with much of the literature based on definitions formulated by health professionals and researchers. Qualitative research study grounded in phenomenology. Interpersonal interviews were conducted with ten participants who were patients in a surgical ward in a large metropolitan hospital in South Australia in 2010. Participants were unfamiliar with the concept of patient-centred care, but despite this, were able to describe what the term meant to them and what they wanted from their care. Patients equated the type and quality of care they received with the staff that provided it and themes of connectedness, involvement and attentiveness were prevalent in their descriptions of what they wanted from their care. Ensuring that patients have a voice in the definition and conceptualization of patient-centred care is essential and further and regular consultation with patients about their needs and priorities will ensure an integrated approach to patient-centred care. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Optimizing nursing care delivery systems in the Army: back to basics with care teams and peer feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prue-Owens, Kathy; Watkins, Miko; Wolgast, Kelly A

    2011-01-01

    The Patient CaringTouch System emerged from a comprehensive assessment and gap analysis of clinical nursing capabilities in the Army. The Patient CaringTouch System now provides the framework and set of standards by which we drive excellence in quality nursing care for our patients and excellence in quality of life for our nurses in Army Medicine. As part of this enterprise transformation, we placed particular emphasis on the delivery of nursing care at the bedside as well as the integration of a formal professional peer feedback process in support of individual nurse practice enhancement. The Warrior Care Imperative Action Team was chartered to define and establish the standards for care teams in the clinical settings and the process by which we established formal peer feedback for our professional nurses. This back-to-basics approach is a cornerstone of the Patient CaringTouch System implementation and sustainment.

  15. Cancer - the delivery of nursing care. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, S [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton (UK); Wark, E

    1978-09-07

    This and the preceding article (Nursing Mirror, Sept. 1, 1978) form a slightly shortened version of Chap. 5 from Vol. 2 of the book 'Oncology for Nurses and Health Care Professionals', ed. R. Tiffany, (Allen and Unwin, Oct. 1978). Teletherapy was dealt with in part 1. Part 2 is concerned with radiotherapy using radioisotope implants and applicators and unsealed sources, and with surgery and chemotherapy, including side effects of anti-tumour drugs. The physical and psychological effects on the patient of these forms of treatment are discussed, and nursing care and radiological safety precautions for both patients and nursing staff are described.

  16. Preconception healthcare delivery at a population level: construction of public health models of preconception care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Geordan D; Alberg, Corinna; Nacul, Luis; Pashayan, Nora

    2014-08-01

    A key challenge of preconception healthcare is identifying how it can best be delivered at a population level. To review current strategies of preconception healthcare, explore methods of preconception healthcare delivery, and develop public health models which reflect different preconception healthcare pathways. Preconception care strategies, programmes and evaluations were identified through a review of Medline and Embase databases. Search terms included: preconception, pre-pregnancy, intervention, primary care, healthcare, model, delivery, program, prevention, trial, effectiveness, congenital disorders OR abnormalities, evaluation, assessment, impact. Inclusion criteria for review articles were: (1) English, (2) human subjects, (3) women of childbearing age, (4) 1980–current data, (5) all countries, (6) both high risk and universal approaches, (7) guidelines or recommendations, (8) opinion articles, (9) experimental studies. Exclusion criteria were: (1) non-human subjects, (2) non-English, (3) outside of the specified timeframe, (4) articles on male healthcare. The results of the literature review were synthesised into public health models of care: (1) primary care; (2) hospital-based and inter-conception care; (3) specific preconception care clinics; and, (4) community outreach. Fifteen evaluations of preconception care were identified. Community programmes demonstrated a significant impact on substance use, folic acid supplementation, diabetes optimization, and hyperphenylalaninemia. An ideal preconception visits entail risk screening, education, and intervention if indicated. Subsequently, four public health models were developed synthesizing preconception care delivery at a population level. Heterogeneity of risk factors, health systems and strategies of care reflect the lack of consensus about the best way to deliver preconception care. The proposed models aim to reflect differing aspects of preconception healthcare delivery.

  17. Patient care and administrative activities of nurses in clinical/surgical units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Moura Luvisotto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify the administrative and nursing care activities most performed by nurses in clinical/surgical units and to determine which are most and least pleasant to them. Methods: A descriptive-exploratory field study, with a quantitative approach and with a sample made up of 40 nurses working in clinical/surgical units who answered a three-part questionnaire composed of identification data and characterization of the professional; a list of nursing and administrative activities for the nurse to grade according to the numbers: “0 = I do not perform it”, “1 = I perform it occasionally”, “2 = I perform it often”, “3 = I perform it daily”; two open-ended questions, in which the nurse listed the activities he/she enjoyed the most and the least. Results: The administrative activities most performed by the nurses were: changing work shifts, preparing employee daily task charts and managing tests; the most performed nursing care activities were related to the stages of the Nursing Care Systematization and the interaction with the multi-professional team; the most enjoyable activities were direct patient care, patient evaluation and implementation of the systematization; the least enjoyable activities were administrative and bureaucratic routines, justification of complaints/problem-solving and preparation of employee task charts. Conclusion: Compared to administrative activities, nursing activities were performed most during the daily routine of the nurse, and the most enjoyable activities were those related to patient care, according to the opinions of the professionals.

  18. Retail and Real Estate: The Changing Landscape of Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    By its nature, retail medicine is founded in real estate. That retail medicine has expanded so dramatically in a relatively short period of time has taken people by surprise. This rapid growth of integrating healthcare services into retail real estate begs the question of whether real estate will eventually take on the importance in healthcare delivery that it has in retail. This article advances the view that it will. In the end, what retail and healthcare have in common is that they both reflect the attributes of demanding consumers as part of an experience-based economy, where products and services are sought based on how they fit with their lifestyles and how they make them feel (Pine and Gilmore 1998). Changing the selection process for healthcare services to be more like retail is already expanding how and where healthcare services are delivered.

  19. Point of Care Testing Services Delivery: Policy Analysis using a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Biomedical Sciences ... The service providers (hospital management) and the testing personnel are faced with the task of trying to explain these problems. Objective of the study: To critically do a policy analysis of the problems of point of care testing with the aim of identifying the causes of these problems and ...

  20. Commentary to Adam Oliver's 'Incentivising improvements in health care delivery'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrangbaek, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    The commentary discusses key issues for assessment of performance management within health care. It supports the ambition to develop more realistic understandings of performance management based on insights from behavioral economics as suggested by Adam Oliver. However, it also points to several ...

  1. Parental perspectives on the awareness and delivery of preconception care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, M; Koster, M P H; Franx, A; van Stel, H F

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The attention for Preconception Care (PCC) has grown substantially in recent years, yet the implementation of PCC appears challenging as uptake rates remain low. The objective of this study was to assess parental perspectives on how PCC should be provided. METHODS: Recruitment of

  2. A retrospective study of end-of-life care decisions in the critically Ill in a surgical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lin Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Progress in medical care and technology has led to patients with more advanced illnesses being admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU. The practice of approaching end-of-life (EOL care decisions and limiting care is well documented in Western literature but unknown in Singapore. We performed a retrospective cohort study to describe the practice of EOL care in patients dying in a Singapore surgical ICU (SICU. The surgical critical care population was chosen as it is unique because surgeons are frequently involved in the EOL process. Methods: All consecutive patients aged 21 and above admitted to the SICU from July 2011 to March 2012, and who passed away in the ICU or within 7 days of discharge from the ICU (to account for transferred patients out of the ICU after end-of life care decisions were made and subsequently passed away were included in the study. Results: There were 473 SICU admissions during this period, out of which 53 were included with a mean age of 67.2 ± 11.1 years. EOL discussions were held in 81.1% of patients with a median time from admission to first discussion at 1 day (IQR 0–2.75 and a median number of ICU discussion of 1 (IQR 1–2. As most patients lacked decision-making capacity (inability to retain and process information secondary to the underlying disease pathology or sedative use, a surrogate was involved: group decision in 27.9%, child in 25.6% and an unclear family nominated member in 20.9%. 28.3% of patients were managed as for full active with resuscitation, 39.6% nonescalation of care, and 32.1% for withdrawal. The main reasons for conservative management (nonescalation and withdrawal of care were certain death in 52.3%, medical futility with minimal response to maximal care (27.3%, and the presence of underlying malignancy (18.2%. There was no significant difference between race or religion among patients for active or conservative management. Conclusion: 71.7% of patients who passed away in the ICU or

  3. Cost analysis of magnetically controlled growing rods compared with traditional growing rods for early-onset scoliosis in the US: an integrated health care delivery system perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polly, David W; Ackerman, Stacey J; Schneider, Karen; Pawelek, Jeff B; Akbarnia, Behrooz A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Traditional growing rod (TGR) for early-onset scoliosis (EOS) is effective but requires repeated invasive surgical lengthenings under general anesthesia. Magnetically controlled growing rod (MCGR) is lengthened noninvasively using a hand-held magnetic external remote controller in a physician office; however, the MCGR implant is expensive, and the cumulative cost savings have not been well studied. We compared direct medical costs of MCGR and TGR for EOS from the US integrated health care delivery system perspective. We hypothesized that over time, the MCGR implant cost will be offset by eliminating repeated TGR surgical lengthenings. Methods For both TGR and MCGR, the economic model estimated the cumulative costs for initial implantation, lengthenings, revisions due to device failure, surgical-site infections, device exchanges (at 3.8 years), and final fusion, over a 6-year episode of care. Model parameters were estimated from published literature, a multicenter EOS database of US institutions, and interviews. Costs were discounted at 3.0% annually and represent 2015 US dollars. Results Of 1,000 simulated patients over 6 years, MCGR was associated with an estimated 270 fewer deep surgical-site infections and 197 fewer revisions due to device failure compared with TGR. MCGR was projected to cost an additional $61 per patient over the 6-year episode of care compared with TGR. Sensitivity analyses indicated that the results were sensitive to changes in the percentage of MCGR dual rod use, months between TGR lengthenings, percentage of hospital inpatient (vs outpatient) TGR lengthenings, and MCGR implant cost. Conclusion Cost neutrality of MCGR to TGR was achieved over the 6-year episode of care by eliminating repeated TGR surgical lengthenings. To our knowledge, this is the first cost analysis comparing MCGR to TGR – from the US provider perspective – which demonstrates the efficient provision of care with MCGR. PMID:27695352

  4. Prevalence of Recognised and Unrecognised Depression among Medical and Surgical Patients in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A. S.; Jamal, Q.; Riaz, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the prevalence of recognised and unrecognised depression among in-patients. Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted from June 2012 to May 2013 at a tertiary care hospital in Karachi, and comprised patients admitted in the Medicine and Surgical departments at the time. Patients with known history of depression or on anti-depressants or on anti-psychotics, or with suicidal attempt were excluded. The prevalence of unrecognised depression was then perceived using Patient Health Qurstionnaire-9. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 20. Results: Of the 1180 patients, 432(36.6 percent) either had history of depression or on were on anti-depressants. The study sample, as such, comprised 748(65 percent), and of them 399(53 percent) were from the Medicine and 349(47 percent) patients were from Surgery department. Prevalence of recognised depression was 36.6 percent; 48 percent in Medical and 14 percent in Surgical patients. Unrecognised depression was 51.2 percent; 45.3 percent in Medical and 53.6 in Surgical patients. Overall prevalence was 87.9 percent; 93.4 percent in Medical and 53 percent in Surgical patients. Gender was not found to be significantly associated with depression in Medical (p= 0.367) and Surgical (p=0.606) patients. No depression was found in 48(12 percent) Medical patients and 131(37.5 percent) Surgical patients. Conclusion: More than one-third of in-patients had co-morbid depression diagnoses, mostly unrecognised by their clinicians. (author)

  5. Improving the Quality of Ward-based Surgical Care With a Human Factors Intervention Bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Maximilian J; Arora, Sonal; King, Dominic; Darzi, Ara

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the impact of a human factors intervention bundle on the quality of ward-based surgical care in a UK hospital. Improving the culture of a surgical team is a difficult task. Engagement with stakeholders before intervention is key. Studies have shown that appropriate supervision can enhance surgical ward safety. A pre-post intervention study was conducted. The intervention bundle consisted of twice-daily attending ward rounds, a "chief resident of the week" available at all times on the ward, an escalation of care protocol and team contact cards. Twenty-seven junior and senior surgeons completed validated questionnaires assessing supervision, escalation of care, and safety culture pre and post-intervention along with interviews to further explore the impact of the intervention. Patient outcomes pre and postintervention were also analyzed. Questionnaires revealed significant improvements in supervision postintervention (senior median pre 5 vs post 7, P = 0.002 and junior 4 vs 6, P = 0.039) and senior surgeon approachability (junior 5 vs 6, P = 0.047). Both groups agreed that they would feel safer as a patient in their hospital postintervention (senior 3 vs 4.5, P = 0.021 and junior 3 vs 4, P = 0.034). The interviews confirmed that the safety culture of the department had improved. There were no differences in inpatient mortality, cardiac arrest, reoperation, or readmission rates pre and postintervention. Improving supervision and introducing clear protocols can improve safety culture on the surgical ward. Future work should evaluate the effect these measures have on patient outcomes in multiple institutions.

  6. Inspiring senior nurses to lead the delivery of compassionate care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Abigail; Robb, Elizabeth; Gough, Pippa; Machell, Sue

    2014-09-01

    The enabling compassionate care in practice programme was an innovative development programme for bands 6 and 7 nurses working with older people in all settings. It was commissioned by the Department of Health from the Florence Nightingale Foundation. A total of 117 nurses participated. They included experienced and newly appointed clinical leaders from medicine, surgery, acute specialties, community services, mental health, emergency departments, hospices and care homes. All participants reported increases in their knowledge, understanding and practical application of the 6Cs; courage and confidence to lead; and ability to change practice. Participants also reported feeling reinvigorated and being brought back in touch with why they entered nursing. At the close of the programme most participants had already made small but significant changes in their areas for the benefit of frail older people.

  7. Patient satisfaction with pharmaceutical care delivery in community pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassam R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Rosemin Kassam1, John B Collins2, Jonathan Berkowitz31School of Population and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, 2Department of Educational Studies, Faculty of Education, 3Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaBackground: The purpose of this study was to validate previously published satisfaction scales in larger and more diversified patient populations; to expand the number of community pharmacies represented; to test the robustness of satisfaction measures across a broader demographic spectrum and a variety of health conditions; to confirm the three-factor scale structure; to test the relationships between satisfaction and consultation practices involving pharmacists and pharmacy students; and to examine service gaps and establish plausible norms.Methods: Patients completed a 15-question survey about their expectations regarding pharmaceutical care-related activities while shopping in any pharmacy and a parallel 15 questions about their experiences while shopping in this particular pharmacy. The survey also collected information regarding pharmaceutical care consultation received by the patients and brief demographic data.Results: A total of 628 patients from 55 pharmacies completed the survey. The pilot study’s three-factor satisfaction structure was confirmed. Overall, satisfaction measures did not differ by demographics or medical condition, but there were strong and significant store-to-store differences and consultation practice advantages when pharmacists or pharmacists-plus-students participated, but not for consultations with students alone.Conclusion: Patient satisfaction can be reliably measured by surveys structured around pharmaceutical care activities. The introduction of pharmaceutical care in pharmacies improves patient satisfaction. Service gap details indicated that pharmacy managers need to pay closer attention to various consultative activities involving patients

  8. Translation, adaptation and psychometric validation of the Good Perioperative Nursing Care Scale (GPNCS) with surgical patients in perioperative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel-Joergensen, Michala; Abrahamsen, Charlotte; Jensen, Carsten

    2018-01-01

    patients were screened for eligibility; 215 were included. The full-scale model fit estimates were moderate. Factor loadings typically ranged from 0.65 to 0.97, except for the questions concerning Technical Skills (0.38-0.63) and Nursing Process (0.28). The Cronbach's alpha value for the total scale score......AIM: To test the psychometric validity of the Good Perioperative Nursing Care Scale (GPNCS), a self-administered questionnaire, following translation and adaptation. INTRODUCTION: Patients' satisfaction with and experience of nursing care in orthopaedic or perioperative settings are currently...... was 0.92, with subfactors ranging from 0.72 to 0.87. CONCLUSION: Providing evidence for quality, or lack thereof, the Danish version of the GPNCS is a valid tool for measuring surgical patients' experiences with perioperative nursing care. The electronic version proved practical. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL...

  9. The transplant center and business unit as a model for specialized care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, A Osama; Schwartz, Roberta L; Bernard, David P; Zylicz, Susan

    2013-12-01

    Transplant centers are valuable assets to a transplantation hospital and essential to organize the delivery of patient care. A transplant center defined around physicians and activities of caring for patients with organ failure creates a team better equipped to manage care across the continuum of the diseases treated by transplantation. Through monitoring of clinical and financial outcomes, the transplant center can better respond to the changing regulatory and financial landscape of health care. This article seeks to explain the major organizational challenges facing the transplant center and how a transplant center can best serve its patients and parent organization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of psychologists in health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahass, Saeed H

    2005-05-01

    Advances in the biomedical and the behavioral sciences have paved the way for the integration of medical practice towards the biopsychosocial approach. Therefore, dealing with health and illness overtakes looking for the presence or absence of the disease and infirmity (the biomedical paradigm) to the biopsychosocial paradigm in which health means a state of complete physical, psychological and social well-being. Psychology as a behavioral health discipline is the key to the biopsychosocial practice, and plays a major role in understanding the concept of health and illness. The clinical role of psychologists as health providers is diverse with the varying areas of care giving (primary, secondary and tertiary care) and a variety of subspecialties. Overall, psychologists assess, diagnose, and treat the psychological problems and the behavioral dysfunctions resulting from, or related to physical and mental health. In addition, they play a major role in the promotion of healthy behavior, preventing diseases and improving patients' quality of life. They perform their clinical roles according to rigorous ethical principles and code of conduct. This article describes and discusses the significant role of clinical health psychology in the provision of health care, following a biopsychosocial perspective of health and illness. Professional and educational issues have also been discussed.

  11. Opinions of women towards cesarean delivery and priority issues of care in the postpartum period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisa, Sezer; Zeyneloğlu, Simge

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted, in order to determine the opinions of women who had a cesarean delivery and the problems that they faced in the postpartum period. This descriptive study was conducted with 337 women who delivered babies by cesarean section. The data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. The results of the study showed that 53.4% of women underwent cesarean delivery for the first time, and 83.1% said that it was the obstetrician's decision to have a cesarean delivery. More than half of the women (61.1%) had a negative experience with cesarean delivery due to postpartum pain (44.7%) and inability to care for their infant (35.9%). The most common problems associated with cesarean delivery were postpartum pain (96.1%), back pain (68.2%), problems passing gas (62.0%), bleeding (56.1%), breastfeeding problems (49.6%) and limitation of movement (43.6%) respectively. Understanding the the opinions and problems of women towards cesarean delivery assists healthcare professionals in identifying better ways to provide appropriate care and support. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Surgical adverse outcomes and patients' evaluation of quality of care: inherent risk or reduced quality of care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; van Duijn-Bakker, Nanny; Kievit, Job

    2007-12-01

    Previous research has shown that sicker patients are less satisfied with their healthcare, but specific effects of adverse health outcomes have not been investigated. The present study aimed to assess whether patients who experience adverse outcomes, in hospital or after discharge, differ in their evaluation of quality of care compared with patients without adverse outcomes. In hospital adverse outcomes were prospectively recorded by surgeons and surgical residents as part of routine care. Four weeks after discharge, patients were interviewed by telephone about the occurrence of post-discharge adverse outcomes, and their overall evaluation of quality of hospital care and specific suggestions for improvements in the healthcare provided. Of 2145 surgical patients admitted to the Leiden University Medical Center in 2003, 1876 (88%) agreed to be interviewed. Overall evaluation was less favourable by patients who experienced post-discharge adverse outcomes only (average 19% lower). These patients were also more often dissatisfied (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.24 to 3.31) than patients without adverse outcomes, and they more often suggested that improvements were needed in medical care (OR 2.07, 1.45 to 2.95) and that patients were discharged too early (OR 3.26, 1.72 to 6.20). The effect of in hospital adverse outcomes alone was not statistically significant. Patients with both in hospital and post-discharge adverse outcomes also found the quality of care to be lower (on average 33% lower) than patients without adverse outcomes. Post-discharge adverse outcomes negatively influence patients' overall evaluation of quality of care and are perceived as being discharged too early, suggesting that patients need better information at discharge.

  13. Assessment of surgical and obstetrical care at 10 district hospitals in Ghana using on-site interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Fizan; Choo, Shelly; Hesse, Afua A J; Abantanga, Francis; Sory, Elias; Osen, Hayley; Ng, Julie; McCord, Colin W; Cherian, Meena; Fleischer-Djoleto, Charles; Perry, Henry

    2011-12-01

    For most of the population in Africa, district hospitals represent the first level of access for emergency and essential surgical services. The present study documents the number and availability of surgical and obstetrical care providers as well as the types of surgical and obstetrical procedures being performed at 10 first-referral district hospitals in Ghana. After institutional review board and governmental approval, a study team composed of Ghanaian and American surgeons performed on-site surveys at 10 district hospitals in 10 different regions of Ghana in August 2009. Face-to-face interviews were conducted documenting the numbers and availability of surgical and obstetrical personnel as well as gathering data relating to the number and types of procedures being performed at the facilities. A total of 68 surgical and obstetrical providers were interviewed. Surgical and obstetrical care providers consisted of Medical Officers (8.5%), nurse anesthetists (6%), theatre nurses (33%), midwives (50.7%), and others (4.5%). Major surgical cases represented 37% of overall case volumes with cesarean section as the most common type of major surgical procedure performed. The most common minor surgical procedures performed were suturing of lacerations or episiotomies. The present study demonstrates that there is a substantial shortage of adequately trained surgeons who can perform surgical and obstetrical procedures at first-referral facilities. Addressing human resource needs and further defining practice constraints at the district hospital level are important facets of future planning and policy implementation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The anxious production of beauty: Unruly bodies, surgical anxiety and invisible care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, So Yeon

    2016-02-01

    This study is based on ethnographic fieldwork at a plastic surgery clinic in Seoul, South Korea. Examining the three phases of plastic--consultation, operation and recovery--I show how surgeons work to shape not only patients' bodies but also expectations and satisfaction. Surgeons do so in part to assuage their own anxieties, which arise from the possibility of misaligned beauty standards and unforeseen anatomies, as well as the possible dissatisfaction of the patient. I offer the concept of 'surgical anxiety', which occurs in relation to inherently unruly patient bodies in which worries, fear, frustration, self-pity, cynicism, anger and even loneliness are symptomatic. The unpredictability and uncontrollability of patients' bodies, which generates anxiety for both patients and surgeons, work to constrain the power of plastic surgery and making it inherently vulnerable. This study also pays attention to the invisible work of taking care of surgical anxiety, as practised by female staff members, and surgeons' dependence on these workers. My focus on anxiety is a kind of remedy for the predominant concern with 'ambivalence' in constructivist science and technology studies; rather than continue to highlight the power differentials between experts/practitioners and lay people/patients, this study illuminates surgical anxiety as their shared vulnerability. Thus, this study proposes a new politics of care in technoscience and medicine, which begins with anxiety.

  15. Achieving Better Integration in Trauma Care Delivery in India: Insights from a Patient Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim; Chaudhuri, Atanu; Venkataramanaiah, S

    2018-01-01

    impact on patient health. But, there is limited understanding about how coordination takes place across and within the different health care service providers and how this influence hospital transfer time and length of stay. This article addresses this gap in literature by studying trauma care delivery......Interdependencies among health care providers result in complex health care supply chains with fragmented health care processes characterized by coordination failure and incentive misalignment. In developing countries where resources are scarce such coordination failures can have potentially severe...... in India using a patient survey (n=104). The Indian healthcare system is particularly interesting as India has to provide low cost care to large populations living in geographically big areas, at the same time when the health care infrastructure is struggling to meet increasing demands. The findings...

  16. Value-Based Health Care Delivery, Preventive Medicine and the Medicalization of Public Health

    OpenAIRE

    Vilhelmsson, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The?real paradigm shift for healthcare is often stated to include a transition from accentuating health care production and instead emphasize patient value by moving to a??value-based health care delivery?. In this transition, personalized medicine is sometimes referred to as almost a panacea in solving the current and future health challenges.?In theory, the progress of precision medicine sounds uncontroversial and most welcomed with its promise of?a better healthcare for all, with real bene...

  17. Valuing the delivery of dental care: Heterogeneity in patients' preferences and willingness-to-pay for dental care attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, Ivan; Verbič, Miroslav; Sever, Eva Klaric

    2018-02-01

    To examine the amount of heterogeneity in patients' preferences for dental care, what factors affect their preferences, and how much they would be willing to pay for improvement in specific dental care attributes. A discrete choice experiment (DCE) was used to elicit patients' preferences. Three alternative dental care services that differed in the type of care provider, treatment explanation, dental staff behavior, waiting time and treatment cost were described to patients. Patients (n=265) were asked to choose their preferred alternative. The study was conducted at a public dental clinic of the School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb. Mixed logit and latent class models were used for analysis. On average, the patients would be willing to pay €45 for getting a detailed explanation of treatment over no explanation. This was the most valued attribute of dental care, followed by dental staff behavior with marginal willingness-to-pay (WTP) of €28. Dental care provided by the faculty members and private dental care were valued similarly, while student-provided care was valued €23 less. Patients also disliked longer waiting time in the office, but this was the least important attribute. Four classes of patients with distinct preferences for dental care were identified. Older and/or more educated patients tended to give relatively less importance to treatment explanation. Higher education was also associated with a higher propensity to substitute faculty dental care with the private care providers. Large heterogeneity in patients' preferences was detected. Understanding their preferences may improve the delivery of dental care. Dental care providers should pay particular attention to providing a detailed treatment explanation to their patients. Dental care for older and/or more educated patients should be more attentive to interpersonal characteristics. Faculty dental care provided by faculty members could be price competitive to private care, and student

  18. Activity-based costing of health-care delivery, Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Ryan K; Jerome, Gregory; Leandre, Fernet; Browning, Micaela; Warsh, Jonathan; Shah, Mahek; Mistry, Bipin; Faure, Peterson Abnis I; Pierre, Claire; Fang, Anna P; Mugunga, Jean Claude; Gottlieb, Gary; Rhatigan, Joseph; Kaplan, Robert

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the implementation of a time-driven activity-based costing analysis at five community health facilities in Haiti. Together with stakeholders, the project team decided that health-care providers should enter start and end times of the patient encounter in every fifth patient's medical dossier. We trained one data collector per facility, who manually entered the time recordings and patient characteristics in a database and submitted the data to a cloud-based data warehouse each week. We calculated the capacity cost per minute for each resource used. An automated web-based platform multiplied reported time with capacity cost rate and provided the information to health-facilities administrators. Between March 2014 and June 2015, the project tracked the clinical services for 7162 outpatients. The cost of care for specific conditions varied widely across the five facilities, due to heterogeneity in staffing and resources. For example, the average cost of a first antenatal-care visit ranged from 6.87 United States dollars (US$) at a low-level facility to US$ 25.06 at a high-level facility. Within facilities, we observed similarly variation in costs, due to factors such as patient comorbidities, patient arrival time, stocking of supplies at facilities and type of visit. Time-driven activity-based costing can be implemented in low-resource settings to guide resource allocation decisions. However, the extent to which this information will drive observable changes at patient, provider and institutional levels depends on several contextual factors, including budget constraints, management, policies and the political economy in which the health system is situated.

  19. Care delivery and self management strategies for children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleeman, Nigel; Bradley, Peter M; Lindsay, Bruce

    2015-12-23

    Epilepsy care for children has been criticised for its lack of impact. Various service models and strategies have been developed in response to perceived inadequacies in care provision for children and their families. To compare the effectiveness of any specialised or dedicated intervention for the care of children with epilepsy and their families to the effectiveness of usual care. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (9 December 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2013,Issue 11), MEDLINE (1946 to June week 2, 2013), EMBASE (1988 to week 25, 2013), PsycINFO (1887 to 11 December 2013) and CINAHL Plus (1937 to 11 December 2013). In addition, we contacted experts in the field to seek information on unpublished and ongoing studies, checked the websites of epilepsy organisations and checked the reference lists of included studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled or matched trials, cohort studies or other prospective studies with a control group (controlled before-and-after studies), or time series studies. Each review author independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed the quality of included studies. We included five interventions reported in seven study reports (of which only four studies of three interventions were designed as RCTs) in this review. They reported on different education and counselling programmes for children, children and parents, teenagers and parents, or children, adolescents and their parents. Each programme showed some benefits for the well-being of children with epilepsy, but each study had methodological flaws (e.g. in one of the studies designed as an RCT, randomisation failed) and no single programme was independently evaluated by more than one study. While each of the programmes in this review showed some benefit to children with epilepsy, their impacts were extremely variable. No programme showed benefits across the full

  20. A qualitative study exploring contextual challenges to surgical care provision in 21 LMICs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykar, Nakul P; Yorlets, Rachel R; Liu, Charles; Greenberg, Sarah L M; Kotagal, Meera; Goldman, Roberta; Roy, Nobhojit; Meara, John G; Gillies, Rowan D

    2015-04-27

    Billions of people worldwide are without access to safe, affordable, and timely surgical care. The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery (LCoGS) conducted a qualitative study to understand the contextual challenges to surgical care provision in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs), and how providers overcome them. A semi-structured interview was administered to 143 care providers in 21 LMICs using stratified purposive sampling to include both urban and rural areas and reputational case selection to identify individual providers. Interviews were conducted in Argentina (n=5), Botswana (3), Brazil (10), Cape Verde (4), China (14), Colombia (4), Ecuador (6), Ethiopia (10), India (15), Indonesia (1), Mexico (9), Mongolia (4), Namibia (2), Pakistan (13), Peru (5), Philippines (1), Sierra Leone (11), Tanzania (5), Thailand (2), Uganda (9), and Zimbabwe (15). Local collaborators of LCoGS conducted interviews using a standardised implementation manual and interview guide. Questions revolved around challenges or barriers in the area of access to care for patients; challenges or barriers in the area of in-hospital care for patients; and challenges or barriers in the area of governance or health policy. De-identified interviews were coded and interpreted by an independent analyst. Providers across continent and context noted significant geographical, financial, and educational barriers to access. Surgical care provision in the rural hospital setting was hindered by a paucity of trained workforce, and inadequacies in basic infrastructure, equipment, supplies, and access to banked blood. In urban areas, providers face high patient volumes combined with staff shortages, minimal administrative support, and poor interhospital care coordination. At a policy level, providers identified regulations that were inconsistent with the realities of low-resource care provision (eg, a requirement to provide 'free' care to certain populations but without any guarantee for funding

  1. The tension between person centred and task focused care in an acute surgical setting: A critical ethnography

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, Sandra.; Mcallister, Margaret.; Broadbent, Mark.

    2017-01-01

    Problem: Person centred care is a key indicator of quality care and a policy direction in many hospitals yet some patients experience care that falls short of this standard.Background: Health services worldwide are prioritising the delivery of person centred in order to address historical concerns over patient safety and quality care and to improve workplace morale. Workplaceculture is known to affect nurses’ care giving.Question: This research aimed to uncover the cultural factors that hinde...

  2. Integrated Payment And Delivery Models Offer Opportunities And Challenges For Residential Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, David C; Caudry, Daryl J; Dean, Katie M; Stevenson, David G

    2015-10-01

    Under health care reform, new financing and delivery models are being piloted to integrate health and long-term care services for older adults. Programs using these models generally have not included residential care facilities. Instead, most of them have focused on long-term care recipients in the community or the nursing home. Our analyses indicate that individuals living in residential care facilities have similarly high rates of chronic illness and Medicare utilization when compared with matched individuals in the community and nursing home, and rates of functional dependency that fall between those of their counterparts in the other two settings. These results suggest that the residential care facility population could benefit greatly from models that coordinated health and long-term care services. However, few providers have invested in the infrastructure needed to support integrated delivery models. Challenges to greater care integration include the private-pay basis for residential care facility services, which precludes shared savings from reduced Medicare costs, and residents' preference for living in a home-like, noninstitutional environment. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  3. Surgical care for the direct and indirect victims of violence in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford Nathan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The provision of surgical assistance in conflict is often associated with care for victims of violence. However, there is an increasing appreciation that surgical care is needed for non-traumatic morbidities. In this paper we report on surgical interventions carried out by Médecins sans Frontières in Masisi, North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo to contribute to the scarce evidence base on surgical needs in conflict. Methods We analysed data on all surgical interventions done at Masisi district hospital between September 2007 and December 2009. Types of interventions are described, and logistic regression used to model associations with violence-related injury. Results 2869 operations were performed on 2441 patients. Obstetric emergencies accounted for over half (675, 57% of all surgical pathology and infections for another quarter (160, 14%. Trauma-related injuries accounted for only one quarter (681, 24% of all interventions; among these, 363 (13% were violence-related. Male gender (adjusted odds ratio (AOR = 20.0, p Conclusions In this study, most surgical interventions were unrelated to violent trauma and rather reflected the general surgical needs of a low-income tropical country. Programs in conflict zones in low-income countries need to be prepared to treat both the war-wounded and non-trauma related life-threatening surgical needs of the general population. Given the limited surgical workforce in these areas, training of local staff and task shifting is recommended to support broad availability of essential surgical care. Further studies into the surgical needs of the population are warranted, including population-based surveys, to improve program planning and resource allocation and the effectiveness of the humanitarian response.

  4. Surgical care for the direct and indirect victims of violence in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kathryn; Havet, Philippe; Ford, Nathan; Trelles, Miguel

    2010-04-14

    The provision of surgical assistance in conflict is often associated with care for victims of violence. However, there is an increasing appreciation that surgical care is needed for non-traumatic morbidities. In this paper we report on surgical interventions carried out by Médecins sans Frontières in Masisi, North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo to contribute to the scarce evidence base on surgical needs in conflict. We analysed data on all surgical interventions done at Masisi district hospital between September 2007 and December 2009. Types of interventions are described, and logistic regression used to model associations with violence-related injury. 2869 operations were performed on 2441 patients. Obstetric emergencies accounted for over half (675, 57%) of all surgical pathology and infections for another quarter (160, 14%). Trauma-related injuries accounted for only one quarter (681, 24%) of all interventions; among these, 363 (13%) were violence-related. Male gender (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 20.0, p violence-related injury. Immediate peri-operative mortality was 0.2%. In this study, most surgical interventions were unrelated to violent trauma and rather reflected the general surgical needs of a low-income tropical country. Programs in conflict zones in low-income countries need to be prepared to treat both the war-wounded and non-trauma related life-threatening surgical needs of the general population. Given the limited surgical workforce in these areas, training of local staff and task shifting is recommended to support broad availability of essential surgical care. Further studies into the surgical needs of the population are warranted, including population-based surveys, to improve program planning and resource allocation and the effectiveness of the humanitarian response.

  5. Generic project definitions for improvement of health care delivery: A case-base approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemeijer, G.C.; Does, R.J.M.M.; de Mast, J.; Trip, A.; van den Heuvel, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this article is to create actionable knowledge, making the definition of process improvement projects in health care delivery more effective. Methods: This study is a retrospective analysis of process improvement projects in hospitals, facilitating a case-based reasoning

  6. Delivery Care in Tanzania: A Comparative Analysis of Use and Preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijsbergen, B.J. van; D'Exelle, B.S.H.

    2013-01-01

    Maternal mortality remains high because of low use of skilled delivery care. While governments try to lower access barriers, little is known about women’s preferences. This study combines data from a survey and a choice experiment in Tanzania to compare women’s preferences with real choices of

  7. Perceptions of complementary therapies among Swedish registered professions in surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerså, Kristofer; Forsberg, Anna; Fagevik Olsén, Monika

    2011-02-01

    There is increasing interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among healthcare professions. However, no studies have been conducted in Sweden or in a surgical context. The aim of this study is to describe different perceptions of complementary therapies among registered healthcare professions in Swedish surgical care. Sixteen interviews were conducted with registered physicians, nurses, physiotherapists and clinical dieticians at a Swedish university hospital. Analysis was made with a phenomenographic research approach. The findings showed variations in perceptions of the definition of complementary therapies. A constructive approach toward use was observed, but there was a conflict in matters of indications and contraindications, and also criticism over a lack of knowledge. There was seen to be a need for education to be able to act professionally. Scepticism over high costs of treatment was highlighted. In conclusion, a need for policies on management, education and research in the field of CAM should be addressed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Individual and Area Level Factors Associated with Prenatal, Delivery, and Postnatal Care in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhwani, Henna; Hearld, Kristine Ria; Harbison, Hanne

    2015-10-01

    This research examines individual and area level factors associated with maternal health care utilization in Pakistan. The 2012-2013 Pakistan Demographic and Health Surveys data was used to model five outcomes: prenatal care within the first trimester, four plus prenatal visits, birth attendance by a skilled attendant, birth in a medical facility, and receipt of postnatal care. Less than half of births were to mothers receiving prenatal care in the first trimester, and approximately 57 % had trained personnel at delivery. Over half were born to mothers who received postnatal care. Evidence was found to support the positive effect of individual level variables, education and wealth, on the utilization of maternal health care across all five measures. Although, this study did not find unilateral differences between women residing in rural and urban settings, rural women were found to have lower odds of utilizing prenatal services as compared to mothers in urban environments. Additionally, women who cited distance as a barrier, had lower odds of receiving postnatal health care, but still engaged in prenatal services and often had a skilled attendant present at delivery. The odds of utilizing prenatal care increased when women resided in an area where prenatal utilization was high, and this variability was found across measures across provinces. The results found in this paper highlight the uneven progress made around improving prenatal, delivery, and postnatal care in Pakistan; disparities persist which may be attributed to factors both at the individual and community level, but may be addressed through a consorted effort to change national policy around women's health which should include the promotion of evidence based interventions such as incentivizing health care workers, promoting girls' education, and improving transportation options for pregnant women and recent mothers with the intent of ultimately lowering the Maternal Mortality Rate as recommended in the U

  9. The Surgical Nosology In Primary-care Settings (SNIPS): a simple bridging classification for the interface between primary and specialist care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Russell L; Knox, Stephanie; Britt, Helena; Bailie, Ross S

    2004-01-01

    Background The interface between primary care and specialist medical services is an important domain for health services research and policy. Of particular concern is optimising specialist services and the organisation of the specialist workforce to meet the needs and demands for specialist care, particularly those generated by referral from primary care. However, differences in the disease classification and reporting of the work of primary and specialist surgical sectors hamper such research. This paper describes the development of a bridging classification for use in the study of potential surgical problems in primary care settings, and for classifying referrals to surgical specialties. Methods A three stage process was undertaken, which involved: (1) defining the categories of surgical disorders from a specialist perspective that were relevant to the specialist-primary care interface; (2) classifying the 'terms' in the International Classification of Primary Care Version 2-Plus (ICPC-2 Plus) to the surgical categories; and (3) using referral data from 303,000 patient encounters in the BEACH study of general practice activity in Australia to define a core set of surgical conditions. Inclusion of terms was based on the probability of specialist referral of patients with such problems, and specialists' perception that they constitute part of normal surgical practice. Results A four-level hierarchy was developed, containing 8, 27 and 79 categories in the first, second and third levels, respectively. These categories classified 2050 ICPC-2 Plus terms that constituted the fourth level, and which covered the spectrum of problems that were managed in primary care and referred to surgical specialists. Conclusion Our method of classifying terms from a primary care classification system to categories delineated by specialists should be applicable to research addressing the interface between primary and specialist care. By describing the process and putting the bridging

  10. Design for Collaboration in Health Care: Experiences from Highly Specialized Surgical Care in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Schroll, Jeremiah; Groth, Kristina

    Medical Information Systems often need to be custom designed to fit the organization where they will be implemented. Participatory Design (PD) is a well known method for eliciting the user input that is necessary during this process. Recently it has been suggested that PD as it is often practiced...... will better meet these evolving needs. In this paper we present a case study of design as it is practiced at a gastro-surgical department at a University hospital in Sweden. The experiences of the department are used as a framework for discussing this issue and its implications for the CSCW/HCI community....

  11. Care delivery for Filipino Americans using the Neuman systems model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angosta, Alona D; Ceria-Ulep, Clementina D; Tse, Alice M

    2014-04-01

    Filipino Americans are at risk of coronary heart disease due to the presence of multiple cardiometabolic factors. Selecting a framework that addresses the factors leading to coronary heart disease is vital when providing care for this population. The Neuman systems model is a comprehensive and wholistic framework that offers an innovative method of viewing clients, their families, and the healthcare system across multiple dimensions. Using the Neuman systems model, advanced practice nurses can develop and implement interventions that will help reduce the potential cardiovascular problems of clients with multiple risk factors. The authors in this article provides insight into the cardiovascular health of Filipino Americans and has implications for nurses and other healthcare providers working with various Southeast Asian groups in the United States.

  12. Sublingual misoprostol versus standard surgical care for treatment of incomplete abortion in five sub-Saharan African countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shochet Tara

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In low-resource settings, where abortion is highly restricted and self-induced abortions are common, access to post-abortion care (PAC services, especially treatment of incomplete terminations, is a priority. Standard post-abortion care has involved surgical intervention but can be hard to access in these areas. Misoprostol provides an alternative to surgical intervention that could increase access to abortion care. We sought to gather additional evidence regarding the efficacy of 400 mcg of sublingual misoprostol vs. standard surgical care for treatment of incomplete abortion in the environments where need for economical non-surgical treatments may be most useful. Methods A total of 860 women received either sublingual misoprostol or standard surgical care for treatment of incomplete abortion in a multi-site randomized trial. Women with confirmed incomplete abortion, defined as past or present history of vaginal bleeding during pregnancy and an open cervical os, were eligible to participate. Participants returned for follow-up one week later to confirm clinical status. If abortion was incomplete at that time, women were offered an additional follow-up visit or immediate surgical evacuation. Results Both misoprostol and surgical evacuation are highly effective treatments for incomplete abortion (misoprostol: 94.4%, surgical: 100.0%. Misoprostol treatment resulted in a somewhat lower chance of success than standard surgical practice (RR = 0.90; 95% CI: 0.89-0.92. Both tolerability of side effects and women’s satisfaction were similar in the two study arms. Conclusion Misoprostol, much easier to provide than surgery in low-resource environments, can be used safely, successfully, and satisfactorily for treatment of incomplete abortion. Focus should shift to program implementation, including task-shifting the provision of post-abortion care to mid- and low- level providers, training and assurance of drug availability. Trial

  13. Parental perspectives on the awareness and delivery of preconception care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poels, M; Koster, M P H; Franx, A; van Stel, H F

    2017-09-26

    The attention for Preconception Care (PCC) has grown substantially in recent years, yet the implementation of PCC appears challenging as uptake rates remain low. The objective of this study was to assess parental perspectives on how PCC should be provided. Recruitment of participants took place among couples who received antenatal care at a Dutch community midwifery practice. Between June and September 2014, five focus group sessions were held with 29 women and one focus group session with 5 men. Thematic analysis was conducted using NVivo 10 software. Participants were generally unfamiliar with the concept of PCC. It was proposed to raise awareness by means of a promotional campaign, stipulating that PCC is suited for every couple with a (future) child wish. Suggestions were made to display marketing materials in both formal and informal (local community) settings. Addressing existing social networks and raising social dialogue was expected to be most efficient. It was recommended to make PCC more accessible by offering multiple forms and to involve male partners. Opportunistic offering PCC by healthcare providers was considered more acceptable when the subject was deliberately raised, for example while discussing contraceptives, lifestyle risks or drug prescriptions. GP's or midwifes were regarded the most suitable PCC providers, however provider characteristics such as experience, empathy and communication skills were considered more important. This study showed that from the parental perspective it is recommended to address every couple with a (future) child wish by means of enlarging the awareness and accessibility of PCC. In order to enlarge the awareness, it is recommended to address social networks, to raise the social dialogue and to conduct promotional campaigns regarding PCC. In order to improve the accessibility of PCC, it was suggested to simultaneously offer multiple forms: group sessions, individual consultations, walk-in-hours and online sessions

  14. Determining the quality and effectiveness of surgical spine care: patient satisfaction is not a valid proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godil, Saniya S; Parker, Scott L; Zuckerman, Scott L; Mendenhall, Stephen K; Devin, Clinton J; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J

    2013-09-01

    Given the unsustainable costs of the US health-care system, health-care purchasers, payers, and hospital systems are adopting the concept of value-based purchasing by shifting care away from low-quality providers or hospitals. Legislation now allows public reporting of these quality rankings. True measures of quality, such as surgical morbidity and validated questionnaires of effectiveness, are burdensome and costly to collect. Hence, patients' satisfaction with care has emerged as a commonly used metric as a proxy for quality because of its feasibility of collection. However, patient satisfaction metrics have yet to be validated as a measure of overall quality of surgical spine care. We set out to determine whether patient satisfaction is a valid measure of safety and effectiveness of care in a prospective longitudinal spine registry. Prospective longitudinal cohort study. All patients undergoing elective spine surgery for degenerative conditions over a 6-month period at a single medical center. Patient-reported outcome instruments (numeric rating scale [NRS], Oswestry disability index [ODI], neck disability index [NDI], short-form 12-item survey [SF-12], Euro-Qol-5D [EQ-5D], Zung depression scale, and Modified Somatic Perception Questionnaire [MSPQ] anxiety scale), return to work, patient satisfaction with outcome, and patient satisfaction with provider care. All patients undergoing elective spine surgery for degenerative conditions over a 6-month period at a single medical center were enrolled into a prospective longitudinal registry. Data collected on all patients included demographics, disease characteristics, treatment variables, readmissions/reoperations, and all 90-day surgical morbidity. Patient-reported outcome instruments (NRS, ODI, NDI, SF-12, EQ-5D, Zung depression scale, and MSPQ anxiety scale), return to work, patient satisfaction with outcome, and patient satisfaction with provider care were recorded at baseline and 3 months after treatment

  15. Globalization of health care delivery in the United States through medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sameer; Breuing, Richard; Chahal, Rajneet

    2012-01-01

    This study highlights some of the inefficiencies in the U.S. health care system and determines what effect medical tourism has had on the U.S. and global health care supply chains. This study also calls attention to insufficient health communication efforts to inform uninsured or underinsured medical tourists about the benefits and risks and determines the managerial and cost implications of various surgical procedures on the global health care system into the future. This study evaluated 3 years (2005, 2007, and 2011) of actual and projected surgical cost data. The authors selected 3 countries for analysis: the United States, India, and Thailand. The surgeries chosen for evaluation were total knee replacement (knee arthroplasty), hip replacement (hip arthroplasty), and heart bypass (coronary artery bypass graft). Comparisons of costs were made using Monte Carlo simulation with variability encapsulated by triangular distributions. The results are staggering. In 2005, the amount of money lost to India and Thailand on just these 3 surgeries because of cost inefficiencies in the U.S. health care system was between 1.3 to 2 billion dollars. In 2011, because many more Americans are expected to travel overseas for health care, this amount is anticipated to rise to between 20 and 30.2 billion dollars. Therefore, more attention should be paid to health communication efforts that truly illustrate the benefits/risks of medical travel. The challenge of finding reliable data for surgeries performed and associated surgical cost estimates was mitigated by the use of a Monte Carlo simulation of triangular distributions. The implications from this study are clear: If the U.S. health care industry is unable to eliminate waste and inefficiency and thus curb rising costs, it will continue to lose surgical revenue to foreign health providers. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  16. Clinical staff perceptions of palliative care-related quality of care, service access, education and training needs and delivery confidence in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Rosemary; Gott, Merryn; Raphael, Deborah; O'Callaghan, Anne; Robinson, Jackie; Boyd, Michal; Laking, George; Manson, Leigh; Snow, Barry

    2014-12-01

    Central to appropriate palliative care management in hospital settings is ensuring an adequately trained workforce. In order to achieve optimum palliative care delivery, it is first necessary to create a baseline understanding of the level of palliative care education and support needs among all clinical staff (not just palliative care specialists) within the acute hospital setting. The objectives of the study were to explore clinical staff: perceptions concerning the quality of palliative care delivery and support service accessibility, previous experience and education in palliative care delivery, perceptions of their own need for formal palliative care education, confidence in palliative care delivery and the impact of formal palliative care training on perceived confidence. A purposive sample of clinical staff members (598) in a 710-bed hospital were surveyed regarding their experiences of palliative care delivery and their education needs. On average, the clinical staff rated the quality of care provided to people who die in the hospital as 'good' (x̄=4.17, SD=0.91). Respondents also reported that 19.3% of their time was spent caring for end-of-life patients. However, only 19% of the 598 respondents reported having received formal palliative care training. In contrast, 73.7% answered that they would like formal training. Perceived confidence in palliative care delivery was significantly greater for those clinical staff with formal palliative care training. Formal training in palliative care increases clinical staff perceptions of confidence, which evidence suggests impacts on the quality of palliative care provided to patients. The results of the study should be used to shape the design and delivery of palliative care education programmes within the acute hospital setting to successfully meet the needs of all clinical staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Comparison of stress and burnout among anesthesia and surgical residents in a tertiary care teaching hospital in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, K; Sahni, N; Padhy, S K; Mathew, P J

    2017-10-23

    The residents undergoing training at hospitals in our country face challenges in terms of infrastructure and high workload with undefined working hours. The aim of the study was to compare the stress and burnout levels in trainee doctors doing residency in surgical fields and anesthesia at a tertiary care academic center in North India. A comparative, observational study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital in North India. After Ethics Committee approval, 200 residents (100 each from surgical branches and anesthesia) were required to fill a questionnaire with information about age, sex, year of residency, marital status, and the Perceived Stress Scale-10, and Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire-12. Burnout and perceived stress were compared between residents of anesthesia and surgical specialties. Residents of both surgical and anesthesia branches scored high in perceived stress, namely 21 and 18, respectively. The score was significantly higher in surgical residents (P = 0.03) and increased progressively with the year of residency. The majority of residents (90% surgical, 80% anesthesia) felt that they were being overloaded with work. However, only 20%-30% of respondents felt that there was lack of development of individual skills and still fewer (<10%) reported giving up in view of difficulties. There is high level of stress and overload dimension of burnout among the residents of anesthesia and surgical branches at our tertiary care academic institution and the surgical residents score marginally higher than anesthesia residents.

  18. Attitudes of surgical residents toward trauma care: a Canadian-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotti, M J; Leslie, K; Chinnick, B; Butcher, C; Holliday, R L

    1994-01-01

    Surgical residents (n = 330) registered in training programs in the province of Ontario, Canada were surveyed about their attitudes toward trauma care related issues. Questionnaires were returned by 48%. Overall, 84% felt that their clinical exposure to trauma was adequate; 78% noted that the emphasis placed on trauma topics in their educational programs was appropriate; 50% spend > 10% of their current clinical time in trauma care. Orthopedic residents (n = 43) were different; 79% devoted > 10% and 29% > or = 30% of their time to trauma. Future clinical activity in trauma as practicing surgeons was expressed by 83% of the trainees: 31% intended 30% of their future practices to be related to trauma. The major positive factors of trauma were the scope and excitement of trauma care. The major negative factors were the night/weekend activity and the time away from family. We are encouraged by the results of this survey in that a significant number of residents perceive trauma as a clinical endeavor to be incorporated into their future surgical practices.

  19. Care interaction adding challenges to old patients’ well-being during surgical hospital treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbeth Uhrenfeldt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Today, hospitals offer surgical treatment within a short hospital admission. This brief interaction may challenge the well-being of old patients. The aim of this study was to explore how the well-being of old hospitalized patients was affected by the interaction with staff during a fast-track surgical treatment and hospital admission for colon cancer. We used an ethnographic methodology with field observations and unstructured interviews focusing on one patient at a time (n=9 during a full day; the hours ranging from 7:45 a.m. to 8 p.m. Participants were between 74 and 85 years of age and of both sexes. The study was reported to the Danish Data Protection Agency with reference number (2007-58-0010. The encounter between old patients and the staff was a main theme in our findings elucidating a number of care challenges. The identified care challenges illustrated “well-being as a matter of different perspectives,” “vulnerability in contrast to well-being,” and “staff mix influencing the care encounter.” The experience of well-being in old cancer patients during hospital admission was absent or challenged when staff did not acknowledge their individual vulnerability and needs.

  20. The Role of Team Climate in Improving the Quality of Chronic Care Delivery: A Longitudinal Study among Professionals Working with Chronically Ill Adolescents in Transitional Care Programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); M.M.H. Strating (Mathilde); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Objectives:This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of implementing transition programmes inimproving the quality of chronic care delivery and(2) identify the predictive role of (changes in) teamclimate on the quality of chronic care delivery over time.

  1. Association between the safe delivery app and quality of care and perinatal survival in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Stine; Boas, Ida Marie; Bedesa, Tariku

    2016-01-01

    the health care workers' knowledge and skills in neonatal resuscitation as long as 12 months after introduction. Perinatal mortality was nonsignificantly reduced after the intervention. The results are highly relevant in low-income countries, where quality of care is challenged by a lack of continuing......Importance: Health apps in low-income countries are emerging tools with the potential to improve quality of health care services, but few apps undergo rigorous scientific evaluation. Objective: To determine the effects of the safe delivery app (SDA) on perinatal survival and on health care workers......' knowledge and skills in neonatal resuscitation. Design, setting, and participants: In a cluster-randomized clinical trial in 5 rural districts of Ethiopia, 73 health care facilities were randomized to the mobile phone intervention or to standard care (control). From September 1, 2013, to February 1, 2015...

  2. Intensive medical student involvement in short-term surgical trips provides safe and effective patient care: a case review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macleod Jana B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hierarchical nature of medical education has been thought necessary for the safe care of patients. In this setting, medical students in particular have limited opportunities for experiential learning. We report on a student-faculty collaboration that has successfully operated an annual, short-term surgical intervention in Haiti for the last three years. Medical students were responsible for logistics and were overseen by faculty members for patient care. Substantial planning with local partners ensured that trip activities supplemented existing surgical services. A case review was performed hypothesizing that such trips could provide effective surgical care while also providing a suitable educational experience. Findings Over three week-long trips, 64 cases were performed without any reported complications, and no immediate perioperative morbidity or mortality. A plurality of cases were complex urological procedures that required surgical skills that were locally unavailable (43%. Surgical productivity was twice that of comparable peer institutions in the region. Student roles in patient care were greatly expanded in comparison to those at U.S. academic medical centers and appropriate supervision was maintained. Discussion This demonstration project suggests that a properly designed surgical trip model can effectively balance the surgical needs of the community with an opportunity to expose young trainees to a clinical and cross-cultural experience rarely provided at this early stage of medical education. Few formalized programs currently exist although the experience above suggests the rewarding potential for broad-based adoption.

  3. The Syrian civil war: The experience of the Surgical Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdogan, Hatice Kaya; Karateke, Faruk; Ozdogan, Mehmet; Cetinalp, Sibel; Ozyazici, Sefa; Gezercan, Yurdal; Okten, Ali Ihsan; Celik, Muge; Satar, Salim

    2016-01-01

    Since the civilian war in Syria began, thousands of seriously injured trauma patients from Syria were brought to Turkey for emergency operations and/or postoperative intensive care. The aim of this study was to present the demographics and clinical features of the wounded patients in Syrian civil war admitted to the surgical intensive care units in a tertiary care centre. The records of 80 trauma patients admitted to the Anaesthesia, General Surgery and Neurosurgery ICUs between June 1, 2012 and July 15, 2014 were included in the study. The data were reviewed regarding the demographics, time of presentation, place of reference, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score and Injury Severity Score (ISS), surgical procedures, complications, length of stay and mortality. A total of 80 wounded patients (70 males and 10 females) with a mean age of 28.7 years were admitted to surgical ICUs. The most frequent cause of injury was gunshot injury. The mean time interval between the occurrence of injury and time of admission was 2.87 days. Mean ISS score on admission was 21, and mean APACHE II score was 15.7. APACHE II scores of non-survivors were significantly increased compared with those of survivors (P=0.001). No significant differences was found in the age, ISS, time interval before admission, length of stay in ICU, rate of surgery before or after admission. The most important factor affecting mortality in this particular trauma-ICU patient population from Syrian civil war was the physiological condition of patients on admission. Rapid transport and effective initial and on-road resuscitation are critical in decreasing the mortality rate in civil wars and military conflicts.

  4. Exploration of the administrative aspects of the delivery of home health care services: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, Hooman; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Almasian, Mohammad; Heydari, Heshmatolah; Hazini, Abdolrahim

    2018-01-01

    Because of the variety of services and resources offered in the delivery of home health care, its management is a challenging and difficult task. The purpose of this study was to explore the administrative aspects of the delivery of home health care services. This qualitative study was conducted based on the traditional content analysis approach in 2015 in Iran. The participants were selected using the purposeful sampling method and data were collected through in-depth semi-structured personal interviews and from discussions in a focus group. The collected data were analyzed using the Lundman and Graneheim method. 23 individuals participated in individual interviews, and the collected data were categorized into the two main themes of policymaking and infrastructures, each of which consisted of some subcategories. Health policymakers could utilize the results of this study as baseline information in making decisions about the delivery of home health care services, taking into account the contextual dimensions of home care services, leading to improvements in home health care services.

  5. Quality audit--a review of the literature concerning delivery of continence care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaffield, J

    1995-09-01

    This paper outlines the role of quality audit within the framework of quality assurance, presenting the concurrent and retrospective approaches available. The literature survey provides a review of the limited audit tools available and their application to continence services and care delivery, as well as attempts to produce tools from national and local standard setting. Audit is part of a process; it can involve staff, patients and their relatives and the team of professionals providing care, as well as focusing on organizational and management levels. In an era of market delivery of services there is a need to justify why audit is important to continence advisors and managers. Effectiveness, efficiency and economics may drive the National Health Service, but quality assurance, which includes standards and audit tools, offers the means to ensure the quality of continence services and care to patients and auditing is also required in the purchaser/provider contracts for patient services. An overview and progress to date of published and other a projects in auditing continence care and service is presented. By outlining and highlighting the audit of continence service delivery and care as a basis on which to build quality assurance programmes, it is hoped that this knowledge will be shared through the setting up of a central auditing clearing project.

  6. Learning to Learn: towards a Relational and Transformational Model of Learning for Improved Integrated Care Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Diamond

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Health and social care systems are implementing fundamental changes to organizational structures and work practices in an effort to achieve integrated care. While some integration initiatives have produced positive outcomes, many have not. We reframe the concept of integration as a learning process fueled by knowledge exchange across diverse professional and organizational communities. We thus focus on the cognitive and social dynamics of learning in complex adaptive systems, and on learning behaviours and conditions that foster collective learning and improved collaboration. We suggest that the capacity to learn how to learn shapes the extent to which diverse professional groups effectively exchange knowledge and self-organize for integrated care delivery.

  7. Disruptive innovation in health care delivery: a framework for business-model innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jason; Christensen, Clayton M

    2008-01-01

    Disruptive innovation has brought affordability and convenience to customers in a variety of industries. However, health care remains expensive and inaccessible to many because of the lack of business-model innovation. This paper explains the theory of disruptive innovation and describes how disruptive technologies must be matched with innovative business models. The authors present a framework for categorizing and developing business models in health care, followed by a discussion of some of the reasons why disruptive innovation in health care delivery has been slow.

  8. Redesigning models of patient care delivery and organisation: building collegial generosity in response to workplace challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarella, E Mary

    2007-04-01

    This case study describes the New South Wales Nursing and Midwifery Office (NaMO) Models of Care Project, a project designed to identify, encourage and disseminate innovations in nursing care organisation and delivery. The project is a 4-year action research project, using a range of interactive engagements including workshops, seminars, questionnaires and websites to achieve the goals. This case study briefly describes the main stimuli for review and redesign of models of care identified through analysis of the clinicians' presentations, and explores the range of responses to the workplace challenges.

  9. Review series: Examples of chronic care model: the home-based chronic care model: redesigning home health for high quality care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Paula; Hennessey, Beth; Florez, Donna; Newton Suter, W

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) face significant challenges due to frequent distressing dyspnea and deficits related to activities of daily living. Individuals with COPD are often hospitalized frequently for disease exacerbations, negatively impacting quality of life and healthcare expenditure burden. The home-based chronic care model (HBCCM) was designed to address the needs of patients with chronic diseases. This model facilitates the re-design of chronic care delivery within the home health sector by ensuring patient-centered evidence-based care. This HBCCM foundation is Dr. Edward Wagner s chronic care model and has four additional areas of focus: high touch delivery, theory-based self management, specialist oversight and the use of technology. This article will describe this model in detail and outline how model use for patients with COPD can bring value to stakeholders across the health care continuum.

  10. How to achieve optimal organization of primary care service delivery at system level: lessons from Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelone, Ferruccio; Kringos, Dionne S; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; De Belvis, Antonio G; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2013-09-01

    To measure the relative efficiency of primary care (PC) in turning their structures into services delivery and turning their services delivery into quality outcomes. Cross-sectional study based on the dataset of the Primary Healthcare Activity Monitor for Europe project. Two Data Envelopment models were run to compare the relative technical efficiency. A sensitivity analysis of the resulting efficiency scores was performed. PC systems in 22 European countries in 2009/2010. Model 1 included data on PC governance, workforce development and economic conditions as inputs and access, coordination, continuity and comprehensiveness of care as outputs. Model 2 included the previous process dimensions as inputs and quality indicators as outputs. There is relatively reasonable efficiency in all countries at delivering as many as possible PC processes at a given level of PC structure. It is particularly important to invest in economic conditions to achieve an efficient structure-process balance. Only five countries have fully efficient PC systems in turning their services delivery into high quality outcomes, using a similar combination of access, continuity and comprehensiveness, although they differ on the adoption of coordination of services. There is a large variation in efficiency levels obtained by countries with inefficient PC in turning their services delivery into quality outcomes. Maximizing the individual functions of PC without taking into account the coherence within the health-care system is not sufficient from a policymaker's point of view when aiming to achieve efficiency.

  11. Perspectives regarding antenatal care, delivery and breast feeding practices of women from Baluchistan, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoso, A.; Khan, A.Z.; Sayed, S.A.; Rafique, G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antenatal Care is one of the fundamental rights for women to safeguard their health. Neonatal mortality rates have remained relatively static, compared to the decline in infant and under 5 mortality rates, adverse practices regarding breast feeding and pre-lacteal feeds being the important factors responsible. This study aimed to explore the Antenatal Care, delivery and breast feeding practices in three districts of Blotchiness. Methods: It was a qualitative phenomenological design using Constrictive approach. The study was conducted in three districts of Baluchistan province, Gwadar, Quetta, Qila Saifullah. There were a total of 14 Focus Group Discussions with women regarding Antenatal Care, delivery and Breast feeding practices, followed by audio taping, transcription as verbatim and analysis through Nvivo version 2. A process was deployed for identification and reporting of the components in order to ensure quality and validity of the qualitative findings. Results: Across the sites, women attended ANC at least once. However, their descriptions of ANC often varied. The women preferred Dais instead of doctors, due to the affordability, customs and availability. A lack of trained doctors and long distances to get a check-up lead to home deliveries in the study setting. Colostrum was discarded by majority of the mothers, while prelacteal feed was a common practice. Conclusion: This paper has explored factors affecting ANC attendance, delivery and breast feeding practices across three settings. Both the demand and supply side factors have an important influence on practices. (author)

  12. Examining fiscal federalism, regionalization and community-based initiatives in Canada's health care delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Pierre-Gerlier; Palley, Howard A

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on the ability of Canadian provinces to shape in different ways the development of various provincial health delivery systems within the constraints of the mandates of the federal Canada Health Act of 1984 and the fiscal revenues that the provinces receive if they comply with these mandates. In so doing, it will examine the operation of Canadian federalism with respect to various provincial health systems. This study applies a comparative analysis framework developed by Heisler and Peters to facilitate an understanding of the dimensionality of provincial health delivery systems as applied to the case of provincial regionalization and community-based initiatives. The three sets of relationships touched upon are: first, the levels of government and the nature of their involvement in public policy concerning the provincial health care delivery systems; and secondly, understanding of the factors influencing provincial governments' political dispositions to act in various directions. A third dimension that is taken are the factors influencing the "timing" of particular decisions. A fourth area noted by Heisler and Peters and other comparative analysts is the nature and characteristics of public and private sector activities in health care and other social policy areas. While the evolving nature of public and private sector health care delivery activities within Canada's provincial and territorial systems is a significant policy matter in the Canadian context, due to the space limitations of this article, they are not discussed herein.

  13. Surgical Technical Evidence Review for Elective Total Joint Replacement Conducted for the AHRQ Safety Program for Improving Surgical Care and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siletz, Anaar E.; Singer, Emily S.; Faltermeier, Claire; Hu, Q. Lina; Ko, Clifford Y.; Golladay, Gregory J.; Kates, Stephen L.; Wick, Elizabeth C.; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda

    2018-01-01

    Background: Use of enhanced recovery pathways (ERPs) can improve patient outcomes, yet national implementation of these pathways remains low. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ; funder), the American College of Surgeons, and the Johns Hopkins Medicine Armstrong Institute for Patent Safety and Quality have developed the Safety Program for Improving Surgical Care and Recovery—a national effort to catalyze implementation of practices to improve perioperative care and enhance recovery of surgical patients. This review synthesizes evidence that can be used to develop a protocol for elective total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA). Study Design: This review focuses on potential components of the protocol relevant to surgeons; anesthesia components are reported separately. Components were identified through review of existing pathways and from consultation with technical experts. For each, a structured review of MEDLINE identified systematic reviews, randomized trials, and observational studies that reported on these components in patients undergoing elective TKA/THA. This primary evidence review was combined with existing clinical guidelines in a narrative format. Results: Sixteen components were reviewed. Of the 10 preoperative components, most were focused on risk factor assessment including anemia, diabetes mellitus, tobacco use, obesity, nutrition, immune-modulating therapy, and opiates. Preoperative education, venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis, and bathing/Staphylococcus aureus decolonization were also included. The routine use of drains was the only intraoperative component evaluated. The 5 postoperative components included early mobilization, continuous passive motion, extended duration VTE prophylaxis, early oral alimentation, and discharge planning. Conclusion: This review synthesizes the evidence supporting potential surgical components of an ERP for elective TKA/THA. The AHRQ Safety Program for Improving

  14. Surgical Technical Evidence Review for Elective Total Joint Replacement Conducted for the AHRQ Safety Program for Improving Surgical Care and Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Christopher P; Siletz, Anaar E; Singer, Emily S; Faltermeier, Claire; Hu, Q Lina; Ko, Clifford Y; Golladay, Gregory J; Kates, Stephen L; Wick, Elizabeth C; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda

    2018-01-01

    Use of enhanced recovery pathways (ERPs) can improve patient outcomes, yet national implementation of these pathways remains low. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ; funder), the American College of Surgeons, and the Johns Hopkins Medicine Armstrong Institute for Patent Safety and Quality have developed the Safety Program for Improving Surgical Care and Recovery-a national effort to catalyze implementation of practices to improve perioperative care and enhance recovery of surgical patients. This review synthesizes evidence that can be used to develop a protocol for elective total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA). This review focuses on potential components of the protocol relevant to surgeons; anesthesia components are reported separately. Components were identified through review of existing pathways and from consultation with technical experts. For each, a structured review of MEDLINE identified systematic reviews, randomized trials, and observational studies that reported on these components in patients undergoing elective TKA/THA. This primary evidence review was combined with existing clinical guidelines in a narrative format. Sixteen components were reviewed. Of the 10 preoperative components, most were focused on risk factor assessment including anemia, diabetes mellitus, tobacco use, obesity, nutrition, immune-modulating therapy, and opiates. Preoperative education, venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis, and bathing/ Staphylococcus aureus decolonization were also included. The routine use of drains was the only intraoperative component evaluated. The 5 postoperative components included early mobilization, continuous passive motion, extended duration VTE prophylaxis, early oral alimentation, and discharge planning. This review synthesizes the evidence supporting potential surgical components of an ERP for elective TKA/THA. The AHRQ Safety Program for Improving Surgical Care and Recovery aims to guide hospitals and

  15. Operationalising emergency care delivery in sub-Saharan Africa: consensus-based recommendations for healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvello, Emilie J B; Tenner, Andrea G; Broccoli, Morgan C; Skog, Alexander P; Muck, Andrew E; Tupesis, Janis P; Brysiewicz, Petra; Teklu, Sisay; Wallis, Lee; Reynolds, Teri

    2016-08-01

    A major barrier to successful integration of acute care into health systems is the lack of consensus on the essential components of emergency care within resource-limited environments. The 2013 African Federation of Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference was convened to address the growing need for practical solutions to further implementation of emergency care in sub-Saharan Africa. Over 40 participants from 15 countries participated in the working group that focused on emergency care delivery at health facilities. Using the well-established approach developed in the WHO's Monitoring Emergency Obstetric Care, the workgroup identified the essential services delivered-signal functions-associated with each emergency care sentinel condition. Levels of emergency care were assigned based on the expected capacity of the facility to perform signal functions, and the necessary human, equipment and infrastructure resources identified. These consensus-based recommendations provide the foundation for objective facility capacity assessment in developing emergency health systems that can bolster strategic planning as well as facilitate monitoring and evaluation of service delivery. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Community health workers and health care delivery: evaluation of a women's reproductive health care project in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajid, Abdul; White, Franklin; Karim, Mehtab S

    2013-01-01

    As part of the mid-term evaluation of a Women's Health Care Project, a study was conducted to compare the utilization of maternal and neonatal health (MNH) services in two areas with different levels of service in Punjab, Pakistan. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to interview Married Women of Reproductive Age (MWRA). Information was collected on MWRA knowledge regarding danger signs during pregnancy, delivery, postnatal periods, and MNH care seeking behavior. After comparing MNH service utilization, the two areas were compared using a logistic regression model, to identify the association of different factors with the intervention after controlling for socio-demographic, economic factors and distance of the MWRA residence to a health care facility. The demographic characteristics of women in the two areas were similar, although socioeconomic status as indicated by level of education and better household amenities, was higher in the intervention area. Consequently, on univariate analysis, utilization of MNH services: antenatal care, TT vaccination, institutional delivery and use of modern contraceptives were higher in the intervention than control area. Nonetheless, multivariable analysis controlling for confounders such as socioeconomic status revealed that utilization of antenatal care services at health centers and TT vaccination during pregnancy are significantly associated with the intervention. Our findings suggest positive changes in health care seeking behavior of women and families with respect to MNH. Some aspects of care still require attention, such as knowledge about danger signs and neonatal care, especially umbilical cord care. Despite overall success achieved so far in response to the Millennium Development Goals, over the past two decades decreases in maternal mortality are far from the 2015 target. This report identifies some of the key factors to improving MNH and serves as an interim measure of a national and global challenge that remains

  17. Community health workers and health care delivery: evaluation of a women's reproductive health care project in a developing country.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Wajid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As part of the mid-term evaluation of a Women's Health Care Project, a study was conducted to compare the utilization of maternal and neonatal health (MNH services in two areas with different levels of service in Punjab, Pakistan. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted to interview Married Women of Reproductive Age (MWRA. Information was collected on MWRA knowledge regarding danger signs during pregnancy, delivery, postnatal periods, and MNH care seeking behavior. After comparing MNH service utilization, the two areas were compared using a logistic regression model, to identify the association of different factors with the intervention after controlling for socio-demographic, economic factors and distance of the MWRA residence to a health care facility. RESULTS: The demographic characteristics of women in the two areas were similar, although socioeconomic status as indicated by level of education and better household amenities, was higher in the intervention area. Consequently, on univariate analysis, utilization of MNH services: antenatal care, TT vaccination, institutional delivery and use of modern contraceptives were higher in the intervention than control area. Nonetheless, multivariable analysis controlling for confounders such as socioeconomic status revealed that utilization of antenatal care services at health centers and TT vaccination during pregnancy are significantly associated with the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest positive changes in health care seeking behavior of women and families with respect to MNH. Some aspects of care still require attention, such as knowledge about danger signs and neonatal care, especially umbilical cord care. Despite overall success achieved so far in response to the Millennium Development Goals, over the past two decades decreases in maternal mortality are far from the 2015 target. This report identifies some of the key factors to improving MNH and serves as an

  18. Prioritizing Surgical Care on National Health Agendas: A Qualitative Case Study of Papua New Guinea, Uganda, and Sierra Leone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna J Dare

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the social and political factors that influence priority setting for different health services in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs, yet these factors are integral to understanding how national health agendas are established. We investigated factors that facilitate or prevent surgical care from being prioritized in LMICs.We undertook country case studies in Papua New Guinea, Uganda, and Sierra Leone, using a qualitative process-tracing method. We conducted 74 semi-structured interviews with stakeholders involved in health agenda setting and surgical care in these countries. Interviews were triangulated with published academic literature, country reports, national health plans, and policies. Data were analyzed using a conceptual framework based on four components (actor power, ideas, political contexts, issue characteristics to assess national factors influencing priority for surgery. Political priority for surgical care in the three countries varies. Priority was highest in Papua New Guinea, where surgical care is firmly embedded within national health plans and receives significant domestic and international resources, and much lower in Uganda and Sierra Leone. Factors influencing whether surgical care was prioritized were the degree of sustained and effective domestic advocacy by the local surgical community, the national political and economic environment in which health policy setting occurs, and the influence of international actors, particularly donors, on national agenda setting. The results from Papua New Guinea show that a strong surgical community can generate priority from the ground up, even where other factors are unfavorable.National health agenda setting is a complex social and political process. To embed surgical care within national health policy, sustained advocacy efforts, effective framing of the problem and solutions, and country-specific data are required. Political, technical, and financial

  19. Prioritizing Surgical Care on National Health Agendas: A Qualitative Case Study of Papua New Guinea, Uganda, and Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Anna J; Lee, Katherine C; Bleicher, Josh; Elobu, Alex E; Kamara, Thaim B; Liko, Osborne; Luboga, Samuel; Danlop, Akule; Kune, Gabriel; Hagander, Lars; Leather, Andrew J M; Yamey, Gavin

    2016-05-01

    Little is known about the social and political factors that influence priority setting for different health services in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), yet these factors are integral to understanding how national health agendas are established. We investigated factors that facilitate or prevent surgical care from being prioritized in LMICs. We undertook country case studies in Papua New Guinea, Uganda, and Sierra Leone, using a qualitative process-tracing method. We conducted 74 semi-structured interviews with stakeholders involved in health agenda setting and surgical care in these countries. Interviews were triangulated with published academic literature, country reports, national health plans, and policies. Data were analyzed using a conceptual framework based on four components (actor power, ideas, political contexts, issue characteristics) to assess national factors influencing priority for surgery. Political priority for surgical care in the three countries varies. Priority was highest in Papua New Guinea, where surgical care is firmly embedded within national health plans and receives significant domestic and international resources, and much lower in Uganda and Sierra Leone. Factors influencing whether surgical care was prioritized were the degree of sustained and effective domestic advocacy by the local surgical community, the national political and economic environment in which health policy setting occurs, and the influence of international actors, particularly donors, on national agenda setting. The results from Papua New Guinea show that a strong surgical community can generate priority from the ground up, even where other factors are unfavorable. National health agenda setting is a complex social and political process. To embed surgical care within national health policy, sustained advocacy efforts, effective framing of the problem and solutions, and country-specific data are required. Political, technical, and financial support from

  20. Prioritizing Surgical Care on National Health Agendas: A Qualitative Case Study of Papua New Guinea, Uganda, and Sierra Leone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Anna J.; Lee, Katherine C.; Bleicher, Josh; Elobu, Alex E.; Kamara, Thaim B.; Liko, Osborne; Luboga, Samuel; Danlop, Akule; Kune, Gabriel; Hagander, Lars; Leather, Andrew J. M.; Yamey, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the social and political factors that influence priority setting for different health services in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), yet these factors are integral to understanding how national health agendas are established. We investigated factors that facilitate or prevent surgical care from being prioritized in LMICs. Methods and Findings We undertook country case studies in Papua New Guinea, Uganda, and Sierra Leone, using a qualitative process-tracing method. We conducted 74 semi-structured interviews with stakeholders involved in health agenda setting and surgical care in these countries. Interviews were triangulated with published academic literature, country reports, national health plans, and policies. Data were analyzed using a conceptual framework based on four components (actor power, ideas, political contexts, issue characteristics) to assess national factors influencing priority for surgery. Political priority for surgical care in the three countries varies. Priority was highest in Papua New Guinea, where surgical care is firmly embedded within national health plans and receives significant domestic and international resources, and much lower in Uganda and Sierra Leone. Factors influencing whether surgical care was prioritized were the degree of sustained and effective domestic advocacy by the local surgical community, the national political and economic environment in which health policy setting occurs, and the influence of international actors, particularly donors, on national agenda setting. The results from Papua New Guinea show that a strong surgical community can generate priority from the ground up, even where other factors are unfavorable. Conclusions National health agenda setting is a complex social and political process. To embed surgical care within national health policy, sustained advocacy efforts, effective framing of the problem and solutions, and country-specific data are required. Political

  1. Policy challenges for the pediatric rheumatology workforce: Part II. Health care system delivery and workforce supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The United States pediatric population with chronic health conditions is expanding. Currently, this demographic comprises 12-18% of the American child and youth population. Affected children often receive fragmented, uncoordinated care. Overall, the American health care delivery system produces modest outcomes for this population. Poor, uninsured and minority children may be at increased risk for inferior coordination of services. Further, the United States health care delivery system is primarily organized for the diagnosis and treatment of acute conditions. For pediatric patients with chronic health conditions, the typical acute problem-oriented visit actually serves as a barrier to care. The biomedical model of patient education prevails, characterized by unilateral transfer of medical information. However, the evidence basis for improvement in disease outcomes supports the use of the chronic care model, initially proposed by Dr. Edward Wagner. Six inter-related elements distinguish the success of the chronic care model, which include self-management support and care coordination by a prepared, proactive team. United States health care lacks a coherent policy direction for the management of high cost chronic conditions, including rheumatic diseases. A fundamental restructure of United States health care delivery must urgently occur which places the patient at the center of care. For the pediatric rheumatology workforce, reimbursement policies and the actions of health plans and insurers are consistent barriers to chronic disease improvement. United States reimbursement policy and overall fragmentation of health care services pose specific challenges for widespread implementation of the chronic care model. Team-based multidisciplinary care, care coordination and self-management are integral to improve outcomes. Pediatric rheumatology demand in the United States far exceeds available workforce supply. This article reviews the career choice decision-making process

  2. Policy challenges for the pediatric rheumatology workforce: Part II. Health care system delivery and workforce supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrickson Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The United States pediatric population with chronic health conditions is expanding. Currently, this demographic comprises 12-18% of the American child and youth population. Affected children often receive fragmented, uncoordinated care. Overall, the American health care delivery system produces modest outcomes for this population. Poor, uninsured and minority children may be at increased risk for inferior coordination of services. Further, the United States health care delivery system is primarily organized for the diagnosis and treatment of acute conditions. For pediatric patients with chronic health conditions, the typical acute problem-oriented visit actually serves as a barrier to care. The biomedical model of patient education prevails, characterized by unilateral transfer of medical information. However, the evidence basis for improvement in disease outcomes supports the use of the chronic care model, initially proposed by Dr. Edward Wagner. Six inter-related elements distinguish the success of the chronic care model, which include self-management support and care coordination by a prepared, proactive team. United States health care lacks a coherent policy direction for the management of high cost chronic conditions, including rheumatic diseases. A fundamental restructure of United States health care delivery must urgently occur which places the patient at the center of care. For the pediatric rheumatology workforce, reimbursement policies and the actions of health plans and insurers are consistent barriers to chronic disease improvement. United States reimbursement policy and overall fragmentation of health care services pose specific challenges for widespread implementation of the chronic care model. Team-based multidisciplinary care, care coordination and self-management are integral to improve outcomes. Pediatric rheumatology demand in the United States far exceeds available workforce supply. This article reviews the career

  3. US Health Care Reform and Transplantation, Part II: impact on the public sector and novel health care delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, D A; Millman, D; Abecassis, M M

    2010-10-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act passed in 2010 will result in dramatic expansion of publically funded health insurance coverage for low-income individuals. It is estimated that of the 32 million newly insured, 16 million will obtain coverage through expansion of the Medicaid Program, and the remaining 16 million will purchase coverage through their employer or newly legislated insurance exchanges. While the Act contains numerous provisions to improve access to private insurance as discussed in Part I of this analysis, public sector coverage will significantly be affected. The cost of health care reform will be borne disproportionately by Medicare, which faces nearly $500 billion in cuts to be identified by a new independent board. Transplant centers should be concerned about the impact of the reform on the financial aspects of transplantation. In addition, this legislation also utilizes the Medicare Program to drive reform of the health care delivery system, by encouraging the development of integrated Accountable Care Organizations, experimentation with new 'models' of healthcare delivery, and expanded support for Comparative Effectiveness Research. Transplant providers, including transplant centers and physicians/surgeons need to lead this movement, drawing on our experience providing comprehensive multidisciplinary care under global budgets with publically reported outcomes.

  4. Surgical procedures performed in the neonatal intensive care unit on critically ill neonates: feasibility and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallick, M.S.; Jado, A.M.; Al-Bassam, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    Transferring unstable, ill neonates to and from the operating rooms carries significant risks and can lead to morbidity. We report on our experience in performing certain procedures in critically ill neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). We examined the feasibility and safety for such an approach. All surgical procedures performed in the NICU between January 1999 and December 2005 were analyzed in terms of demographic data, diagnosis, preoperative stability of the patient, procedures performed, complications and outcome. Operations were performed at beside in the NICU in critically ill, unstable neonates who needed emergency surgery, in neonates of low birth weight (<1000 gm) and in neonates on special equipments like higher frequency ventilators and nitrous oxide. Thirty-seven surgical procedures were performed including 12 laparotomies, bowel resection and stomies, 7 repairs of congenital diaphragmatic hernias, 4 ligations of patent ductus arteriosus and various others. Birth weights ranged between 850 gm and 3500 gm (mean 2000 gm). Gestational age ranged between 25 to 42 weeks (mean, 33 weeks). Age at surgery was between 1 to 30 days (mean, 30 days). Preoperatively, 19 patients (51.3%) were on inotropic support and all were intubated and mechanically ventilated. There was no mortality related to surgical procedures. Postoperatively, one patient developed wound infection and disruption. Performing major surgical procedures in the NICU is both feasible and safe. It is useful in very low birth weight, critically ill neonates who have definite risk attached to transfer to the operating room. No special area is needed in the NICU to perform complication-free surgery, but designing an operating room within the NICU will be ideal. (author)

  5. Distress among women taking part in surgical continuity of care for breast cancer - a mixed methods study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lone

    during breast cancer trajectory. Overall, distress has been linked to suffering, and lower quality of life, increased admission rates, and greater health care costs. This thesis uses mixed methods to investigate the prevalence of distress among women taking part in surgical continuity of care at time...

  6. Consumer assessment of healthcare providers and systems surgical care survey: benefits and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kristine A; Rhee, John S; Brereton, Jean M; Zema, Carla L; Witsell, David L

    2012-10-01

    To describe the feasibility and initial results of the implementation of a continuous quality improvement project using the newly available Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Surgical Care Survey (S-CAHPS), in a small cohort of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery practices. Prospective observational study using a newly validated health care consumer survey. Two community-based and 2 university-based otolaryngology-head and neck surgery outpatient clinic practices. Fourteen board-certified otolaryngology, head and neck surgeons from 4 practice sites voluntarily participated in this project. All adult patients scheduled for surgery during a 12-month period were asked to complete the S-CAHPS survey through an electronic data capture (EDC) system 7 to 28 days after surgery. The surgeons were not directly involved in administration or collection of survey data. Three sites successfully implemented the S-CAHPS project. A 39.9% response rate was achieved for the cohort of surgical patients entered into the EDC system. While most patients rated their surgeons very high (mean of 9.5 or greater out of 10), subanalysis revealed there is variability among sites and surgeons in communication practices. From these data, a potential surgeon Quality Improvement report was developed that highlights priority areas to improve surgeon-patient rapport. The S-CAHPS survey can be successfully implemented in most otolaryngology practices, and our initial work holds promise for how the survey can be best deployed and analyzed for the betterment of both the surgeon and the patient.

  7. Service quality of delivered care from the perception of women with caesarean section and normal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Jafar S; Askari, Samira; Fardiazar, Zahra; Koshavar, Hossein; Gholipour, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the service quality of delivered care for people with Caesarean Section and Normal Delivery. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 200 people who had caesarean section and normal delivery in Al-Zahra Teaching Hospital in Tabriz, north western Iran. Service quality was calculated using: Service Quality = 10 - (Importance × Performance) based on importance and performance of service quality aspects from the postpartum women's perspective.A hierarchical regression analysis was applied in two steps using the enter method to examine the associations between demographics and SQ scores. Data were analysed using the SPSS-17 software. "Confidentiality", "autonomy", "choice of care provider" and "communication" achieved scores at the highest level of quality; and "support group", "prompt attention", "prevention and early detection", "continuity of care", "dignity", "safety", "accessibility and "basic amenities" got service quality score less than eight. Statistically significant relationship was found between service quality score and continuity of care (P=0.008). A notable gap between the participants‟ expectations and what they have actually received in most aspects of provided care. So, there is an opportunityto improve the quality of delivered care.

  8. SUPPORTIVE SUPERVISION AS A TECHNOLOGY OF IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF HOSPITAL CARE DELIVERY

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    Svetlana A. Mukhortova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the quality of medical care is a priority in countries with developed and developing health care system. There are various approaches to improve the quality and safety of patient’s care, as well as various strategies to encourage hospitals to achieve this goal. The purpose of the presented literature review was to analyze existing experience of the implementation of technology of supportive supervision in health care facilities to improve the quality of hospital care delivery. The data sources for publication were obtained from the following medical databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Medscape, e-library, and books on the topic of the review written by experts. The article discusses the results of the research studies demonstrating the successes and failures of supportive supervision technology application. Implementation of supportive supervision in medical facilities based on generalized experience of different countries is a promising direction in improving the quality of medical care delivery. This technology opens up opportunities to improve skills and work quality of the staff at pediatric hospitals in the Russian Federation.

  9. Making pragmatic choices: women’s experiences of delivery care in Northern Ethiopia

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    Gebrehiwot Tesfay

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003, the Ethiopian Ministry of Health launched the Health Extension Programme (HEP, which was intended to increase access to reproductive health care. Despite enormous effort, utilization of maternal health services remains limited, and the reasons for the low utilization of the services offered through the HEP previously have not been explored in depth. This study explores women’s experiences and perceptions regarding delivery care in Tigray, a northern region of Ethiopia, and enables us to make suggestions for better implementation of maternal health care services in this setting. Methods We used six focus group discussions with 51 women to explore perceptions and experiences regarding delivery care. The data were analysed by means of grounded theory. Results One core category emerged, ‘making pragmatic choices’, which connected the categories ‘aiming for safer deliveries’, ‘embedded in tradition’, and ‘medical knowledge under constrained circumstances’. In this setting, women – aiming for safer deliveries – made choices pragmatically between the two available models of childbirth. On the one hand, choice of home delivery, represented by the category ‘embedded in tradition’, was related to their faith, the ascendancy of elderly women, the advantages of staying at home and the custom of traditional birth attendants (TBAs. On the other, institutional delivery, represented by the category ‘medical knowledge under constrained circumstances’, and linked to how women appreciated medical resources and the support of health extension workers (HEWs but were uncertain about the quality of care, emphasized the barriers to transportation. In Tigray women made choices pragmatically and seemed to not feel any conflict between the two available models, being supported by traditional birth attendants, HEWs and husbands in their decision-making. Representatives of the two models were not as open to

  10. Characteristics of Indigenous primary health care service delivery models: a systematic scoping review.

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    Harfield, Stephen G; Davy, Carol; McArthur, Alexa; Munn, Zachary; Brown, Alex; Brown, Ngiare

    2018-01-25

    Indigenous populations have poorer health outcomes compared to their non-Indigenous counterparts. The evolution of Indigenous primary health care services arose from mainstream health services being unable to adequately meet the needs of Indigenous communities and Indigenous peoples often being excluded and marginalised from mainstream health services. Part of the solution has been to establish Indigenous specific primary health care services, for and managed by Indigenous peoples. There are a number of reasons why Indigenous primary health care services are more likely than mainstream services to improve the health of Indigenous communities. Their success is partly due to the fact that they often provide comprehensive programs that incorporate treatment and management, prevention and health promotion, as well as addressing the social determinants of health. However, there are gaps in the evidence base including the characteristics that contribute to the success of Indigenous primary health care services in providing comprehensive primary health care. This systematic scoping review aims to identify the characteristics of Indigenous primary health care service delivery models. This systematic scoping review was led by an Aboriginal researcher, using the Joanna Briggs Institute Scoping Review Methodology. All published peer-reviewed and grey literature indexed in PubMed, EBSCO CINAHL, Embase, Informit, Mednar, and Trove databases from September 1978 to May 2015 were reviewed for inclusion. Studies were included if they describe the characteristics of service delivery models implemented within an Indigenous primary health care service. Sixty-two studies met the inclusion criteria. Data were extracted and then thematically analysed to identify the characteristics of Indigenous PHC service delivery models. Culture was the most prominent characteristic underpinning all of the other seven characteristics which were identified - accessible health services, community

  11. Leadership Perspectives on Operationalizing the Learning Health Care System in an Integrated Delivery System.

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    Psek, Wayne; Davis, F Daniel; Gerrity, Gloria; Stametz, Rebecca; Bailey-Davis, Lisa; Henninger, Debra; Sellers, Dorothy; Darer, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare leaders need operational strategies that support organizational learning for continued improvement and value generation. The learning health system (LHS) model may provide leaders with such strategies; however, little is known about leaders' perspectives on the value and application of system-wide operationalization of the LHS model. The objective of this project was to solicit and analyze senior health system leaders' perspectives on the LHS and learning activities in an integrated delivery system. A series of interviews were conducted with 41 system leaders from a broad range of clinical and administrative areas across an integrated delivery system. Leaders' responses were categorized into themes. Ten major themes emerged from our conversations with leaders. While leaders generally expressed support for the concept of the LHS and enhanced system-wide learning, their concerns and suggestions for operationalization where strongly aligned with their functional area and strategic goals. Our findings suggests that leaders tend to adopt a very pragmatic approach to learning. Leaders expressed a dichotomy between the operational imperative to execute operational objectives efficiently and the need for rigorous evaluation. Alignment of learning activities with system-wide strategic and operational priorities is important to gain leadership support and resources. Practical approaches to addressing opportunities and challenges identified in the themes are discussed. Continuous learning is an ongoing, multi-disciplinary function of a health care delivery system. Findings from this and other research may be used to inform and prioritize system-wide learning objectives and strategies which support reliable, high value care delivery.

  12. Factors influencing the delivery of the fundamentals of care: Perceptions of nurses, nursing leaders and healthcare consumers.

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    Conroy, Tiffany

    2017-11-17

    To explore the factors described by nurses and consumer representatives influencing the delivery of the fundamentals of care. An ongoing challenge facing nursing is ensuring the "basics" or fundamentals of care are delivered optimally. The way nurses and patients perceive the delivery of the fundamentals of care had not been explored. Once identified, the factors that promote the delivery of the fundamentals of care may be facilitated. Inductive content analysis of scenario based focus groups. A qualitative approach was taken using three stages, including direct observation, focus groups and interviews. This paper reports the second stage. Focus groups discussed four patient care scenarios derived from the observational data. Focus groups were conducted separately for registered nurses, nurses in leadership roles and consumer representatives. Content analysis was used. The analysis of the focus group data resulted in three themes: Organisational factors; Individual nurse or patient factors; and Interpersonal factors. Organisational factors include nursing leadership, the context of care delivery and the availability of time. Individual nurse and patient factors include the specific care needs of the patient and the individual nurse and patient characteristics. Interpersonal factors include the nurse-patient relationship; involving the patient in their care, ensuring understanding and respecting choices; communication; and setting care priorities. Seeking the perspective of the people involved in delivering and receiving the fundamentals of care showed a shared understanding of the factors influencing the delivery of the fundamentals of care. The influence of nursing leadership and the quality of the nurse-patient relationship were perceived as important factors. Nurses and consumers share a common perspective of the factors influencing the delivery of the fundamentals of care and both value a therapeutic nurse-patient relationship. Clinical nursing leaders must

  13. Impact of Psychosocial Risk Factors on Prenatal Care Delivery: A National Provider Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krans, Elizabeth E.; Moloci, Nicholas M.; Housey, Michelle T.; Davis, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate providers’ perspectives regarding the delivery of prenatal care to women with psychosocial risk factors. Methods A random, national sample of 2095 prenatal care providers (853 obstetricians and gynecologists (Ob/Gyns), 270 family medicine (FM) physicians and 972 midwives) completed a mailed survey. We measured respondents’ practice and referral patterns regarding six psychosocial risk factors: adolescence (age ≤ 19), unstable housing, lack of paternal involvement and social support, late prenatal care (> 13 weeks gestation), domestic violence and drug or alcohol use. Chi-square and logistic regression analyses assessed the association between prenatal care provider characteristics and prenatal care utilization patterns. Results Approximately 60% of Ob/Gyns, 48.4% of midwives and 32.2% of FM physicians referred patients with psychosocial risk factors to clinicians outside of their practice. In all three specialties, providers were more likely to increase prenatal care visits with alternative clinicians (social workers, nurses, psychologists/psychiatrists) compared to themselves for all six psychosocial risk factors. Drug or alcohol use and intimate partner violence were the risk factors that most often prompted an increase in utilization. In multivariate analyses, Ob/Gyns who recently completed clinical training were significantly more likely to increase prenatal care utilization with either themselves (OR=2.15; 95% CI 1.14–4.05) or an alternative clinician (2.27; 1.00–4.67) for women with high psychosocial risk pregnancies. Conclusions Prenatal care providers frequently involve alternative clinicians such as social workers, nurses and psychologists or psychiatrists in the delivery of prenatal care to women with psychosocial risk factors. PMID:24740719

  14. Aligning health information technologies with effective service delivery models to improve chronic disease care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Amy M; Thielke, Stephen M; Katon, Wayne; Unützer, Jürgen; Areán, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    Healthcare reforms in the United States, including the Affordable Care and HITECH Acts, and the NCQA criteria for the Patient Centered Medical Home have promoted health information technology (HIT) and the integration of general medical and mental health services. These developments, which aim to improve chronic disease care, have largely occurred in parallel, with little attention to the need for coordination. In this article, the fundamental connections between HIT and improvements in chronic disease management are explored. We use the evidence-based collaborative care model as an example, with attention to health literacy improvement for supporting patient engagement in care. A review of the literature was conducted to identify how HIT and collaborative care, an evidence-based model of chronic disease care, support each other. Five key principles of effective collaborative care are outlined: care is patient-centered, evidence-based, measurement-based, population-based, and accountable. The potential role of HIT in implementing each principle is discussed. Key features of the mobile health paradigm are described, including how they can extend evidence-based treatment beyond traditional clinical settings. HIT, and particularly mobile health, can enhance collaborative care interventions, and thus improve the health of individuals and populations when deployed in integrated delivery systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Transforming health care delivery through consumer engagement, health data transparency, and patient-generated health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, D Z; Wald, J S

    2014-08-15

    Address current topics in consumer health informatics. Literature review. Current health care delivery systems need to be more effective in the management of chronic conditions as the population turns older and experiences escalating chronic illness that threatens to consume more health care resources than countries can afford. Most health care systems are positioned poorly to accommodate this. Meanwhile, the availability of ever more powerful and cheaper information and communication technology, both for professionals and consumers, has raised the capacity to gather and process information, communicate more effectively, and monitor the quality of care processes. Adapting health care systems to serve current and future needs requires new streams of data to enable better self-management, improve shared decision making, and provide more virtual care. Changes in reimbursement for health care services, increased adoption of relevant technologies, patient engagement, and calls for data transparency raise the importance of patient-generated health information, remote monitoring, non-visit based care, and other innovative care approaches that foster more frequent contact with patients and better management of chronic conditions.

  16. Recommendations to support nurses and improve the delivery of oncology and palliative care in India

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    Virginia T LeBaron

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Nurses in India often practice in resource-constrained settings and care for cancer patients with high symptom burden yet receive little oncology or palliative care training. Aim: The aim of this study is to explore challenges encountered by nurses in India and offer recommendations to improve the delivery of oncology and palliative care. Methods: Qualitative ethnography. Setting: The study was conducted at a government cancer hospital in urban South India. Sample: Thirty-seven oncology/palliative care nurses and 22 others (physicians, social workers, pharmacists, patients/family members who interact closely with nurses were included in the study. Data Collection: Data were collected over 9 months (September 2011– June 2012. Key data sources included over 400 hours of participant observation and 54 audio-recorded semi-structured interviews. Analysis: Systematic qualitative analysis of field notes and interview transcripts identified key themes and patterns. Results: Key concerns of nurses included safety related to chemotherapy administration, workload and clerical responsibilities, patients who died on the wards, monitoring family attendants, and lack of supplies. Many participants verbalized distress that they received no formal oncology training. Conclusions: Recommendations to support nurses in India include: prioritize safety, optimize role of the nurse and explore innovative models of care delivery, empower staff nurses, strengthen nurse leadership, offer relevant educational programs, enhance teamwork, improve cancer pain management, and engage in research and quality improvement projects. Strong institutional commitment and leadership are required to implement interventions to support nurses. Successful interventions must account for existing cultural and professional norms and first address safety needs of nurses. Positive aspects from existing models of care delivery can be adapted and integrated into general nursing

  17. [The results of delivering surgical care to the wounded and sick in military medical establishments and impending tasks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briusov, P G; Efimenko, N A

    1997-07-01

    In article results of activity of the military surgeons on rendering of the surgical care to wounded and sick in 1996 are analyzed. During combat actions in Chechnya despite of severe forms of wounds and significant increase of combined battle traumas lethality among heavy wounded was reduced in 2 times. At common lethality rate in 1.3%, in hospitals from wounds 1.5% of wounded died, from traumas--0.7%, burns--2.9%, frostbitten--0.5%. As to peace time surgery, the analysis of main parameters of surgical work in military medical establishments, structure of diseases of servicemen, surgical activity, average terms of treatment, lethality after operations, defects in rendering of the surgical care is given. In conclusions the authors say about problems, that the military surgeons have today.

  18. Regionalization of surgical services in central Florida: the next step in acute care surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Ernest F J; Rudloff, Beth; Noon, Charles; Behn, Bruce

    2010-09-01

    There is a national loss of access to surgeons for emergencies. Contributing factors include reduced numbers of practicing general surgeons, superspecialization, reimbursement issues, emphasis on work and life balance, and medical liability. Regionalizing acute care surgery (ACS), as exists for trauma care, represents a potential solution. The purpose of this study is to assess the financial and resources impact of transferring all nontrauma ACS cases from a community hospital (CH) to a trauma center (TC). We performed a case mix and financial analysis of patient records with ACS for a rural CH located near an urban Level I TC. ACS patients were analyzed for diagnosis, insurance status, procedures, and length of stay. We estimated physician reimbursement based on evaluation and management codes and procedural CPT codes. Hospital revenues were based on regional diagnosis-related group rates. All third-party remuneration was set at published Medicare rates; self-pay was set at nil. Nine hundred ninety patients were treated in the CH emergency department with 188 potential surgical diseases. ACS was necessary in 62 cases; 25.4% were uninsured. Extrapolated to 12 months, 248 patients would generate new TC physician revenue of >$155,000 and hospital profits of >$1.5 million. CH savings for call pay and other variable costs are >$100,000. TC operating room volume would only increase by 1%. Regionalization of ACS to TCs is a viable option from a business perspective. Access to care is preserved during an approaching crisis in emergency general surgical coverage. The referring hospital is relieved of an unfavorable payer mix and surgeon call problems. The TC receives a new revenue stream with limited impact on resources by absorbing these patients under its fixed costs, saving the CH variable costs.

  19. Program Director Perceptions of Surgical Resident Training and Patient Care under Flexible Duty Hour Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Lily V; Dahlke, Allison R; Rajaram, Ravi; Kreutzer, Lindsey; Love, Remi; Odell, David D; Bilimoria, Karl Y; Yang, Anthony D

    2016-06-01

    The Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) trial was a national, cluster-randomized, pragmatic, noninferiority trial of 117 general surgery programs, comparing standard ACGME resident duty hour requirements ("Standard Policy") to flexible, less-restrictive policies ("Flexible Policy"). Participating program directors (PDs) were surveyed to assess their perceptions of patient care, resident education, and resident well-being during the study period. A survey was sent to all PDs of the general surgery residency programs participating in the FIRST trial (N = 117 [100% response rate]) in June and July 2015. The survey compared PDs' perceptions of the duty hour requirements in their arm of the FIRST trial during the study period from July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015. One hundred percent of PDs in the Flexible Policy arm indicated that residents used their additional flexibility in duty hours to complete operations they started or to stabilize a critically ill patient. Compared with the Standard Policy arm, PDs in the Flexible Policy arm perceived a more positive effect of duty hours on the safety of patient care (68.9% vs 0%; p care (98.3% vs 0%; p care (71.8%), continuity of care (94.0%), quality of resident education (83.8%), and resident well-being (55.6%) would be improved with a hypothetical permanent adoption of more flexible duty hours. Program directors involved in the FIRST trial perceived improvements in patient safety, continuity of care, and multiple aspects of resident education and well-being with flexible duty hours. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Monitoring the delivery of cancer care: Commission on Cancer and National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richelle T; Stewart, Andrew K; Winchester, David P

    2012-07-01

    The primary objective of the Commission on Cancer (CoC) is to ensure the delivery of comprehensive, high-quality care that improves survival while maintaining quality of life for patients with cancer. This article examines the initiatives of the CoC toward achieving this goal, utilizing data from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) to monitor treatment patterns and outcomes, to develop quality measures, and to benchmark hospital performance. The article also highlights how these initiatives align with the Institute of Medicine's recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care and briefly explores future projects of the CoC and NCDB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Exploring information systems outsourcing in U.S. hospital-based health care delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Mark L

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the factors associated with outsourcing of information systems (IS) in hospital-based health care delivery systems, and to determine if there is a difference in IS outsourcing activity based on the strategic value of the outsourced functions. IS sourcing behavior is conceptualized as a case of vertical integration. A synthesis of strategic management theory (SMT) and transaction cost economics (TCE) serves as the theoretical framework. The sample consists of 1,365 hospital-based health care delivery systems that own 3,452 hospitals operating in 2004. The findings indicate that neither TCE nor SMT predicted outsourcing better than the other did. The findings also suggest that health care delivery system managers may not be considering significant factors when making sourcing decisions, including the relative strategic value of the functions they are outsourcing. It is consistent with previous literature to suggest that the high cost of IS may be the main factor driving the outsourcing decision.

  2. Determinants of antenatal and delivery care utilization in Tigray region, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsegay, Yalem; Gebrehiwot, Tesfay; Goicolea, Isabel; Edin, Kerstin; Lemma, Hailemariam; Sebastian, Miguel San

    2013-05-14

    Despite the international emphasis in the last few years on the need to address the unmet health needs of pregnant women and children, progress in reducing maternal mortality has been slow. This is particularly worrying in sub-Saharan Africa where over 162,000 women still die each year during pregnancy and childbirth, most of them because of the lack of access to skilled delivery attendance and emergency care. With a maternal mortality ratio of 673 per 100,000 live births and 19,000 maternal deaths annually, Ethiopia is a major contributor to the worldwide death toll of mothers. While some studies have looked at different risk factors for antenatal care (ANC) and delivery service utilisation in the country, information coming from community-based studies related to the Health Extension Programme (HEP) in rural areas is limited. This study aims to determine the prevalence of maternal health care utilisation and explore its determinants among rural women aged 15-49 years in Tigray, Ethiopia. The study was a community-based cross-sectional survey using a structured questionnaire. A cluster sampling technique was used to select women who had given birth at least once in the five years prior to the survey period. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were carried out to elicit the impact of each factor on ANC and institutional delivery service utilisation. The response rate was 99% (n=1113). The mean age of the participants was 30.4 years. The proportion of women who received ANC for their recent births was 54%; only 46 (4.1%) of women gave birth at a health facility. Factors associated with ANC utilisation were marital status, education, proximity of health facility to the village, and husband's occupation, while use of institutional delivery was mainly associated with parity, education, having received ANC advice, a history of difficult/prolonged labour, and husbands' occupation. A relatively acceptable utilisation of ANC services but extremely

  3. Service Quality of Delivered Care from the Perception of Women with Caesarean Section and Normal Delivery

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    Jafar S. Tabrizi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Our aim was to determine the service quality of delivered care for people with Caesarean Section and Normal Delivery. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 200 people who had caesarean section and normal delivery in Al-Zahra Teaching Hospital in Tabriz, north western Iran. Service quality was calculated using: Service Quality = 10 – (Importance × Performance based on importance and performance of service quality aspects from the postpartum women‟s perspective.A hierarchical regression analysis was applied in two steps using the enter method to examine the associations between demographics and SQ scores. Data were analysed using the SPSS-17 software. Results: “Confidentiality”, “autonomy”, “choice of care provider” and “communication” achieved scores at the highest level of quality; and “support group”, “prompt attention”, “prevention and early detection”, “continuity of care”, “dignity”, “safety”, “accessibility and “basic amenities” got service quality score less than eight. Statistically significant relationship was found between service quality score and continuity of care (P=0.008. Conclusion: A notable gap between the participants‟ expectations and what they have actually received in most aspects of provided care. So, there is an opportunityto improve the quality of delivered care.

  4. Proposal of a service delivery integration index of home care for older persons: application in several European cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Henrard

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To propose an integration index of home care delivery to older persons, to study its validity and to apply it to home care services of European cities. Theory: Home care delivery integration was based on two dimensions referring to process-centred integration and organisational structure approach. Method: Items considered as part of both dimensions according to an expert consensus (face validity were extracted from a standardised questionnaire used in “Aged in Home care” (AdHoc study to capture basic characteristics of home care services. Their summation leads to a services' delivery integration index. This index was applied to AdHoc services. A factor analysis was computed in order to empirically test the validity of the theoretical constructs. The plot of the settings was performed. Results: Application of the index ranks home care services in four groups according to their score. Factor analysis identifies a first factor which opposes working arrangement within service to organisational structure bringing together provisions for social care. A second factor corresponds to basic nursing care and therapies. Internal consistency for those three domains ranges from 0.78 to 0.93. When plotting the different settings different models of service delivery appear. Conclusion: The proposed index shows that behind a total score several models of care delivery are hidden. Comparison of service delivery integration should take into account this heterogeneity.

  5. Sensitizing health-care workers and trainees to create a nondiscriminatory health-care environment for surgical care of HIV-Infected patients

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    Deeptiman James

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV transmission creates barriers in the surgical health care of patients with HIV infection. Poor awareness, prevalent misconceptions, and associated stigma lead to discrimination against HIV-infected patients. This study was carried out to assess effectiveness of a “HIV awareness program” (HAP to educate and motivate health-care workers to provide equitable and ethical health care to HIV-infected patients. Methodology: An interventional study was conducted at a secondary level mission hospital in Central India from April 2014 to August 2015. Change in knowledge, awareness, and attitude following a multimedia “HAP” was analyzed with a “pre- and posttest design.” Seventy-four staffs and trainees participated in the program. Z-test and t-test were used to check the statistical significance of the data. Results: The mean pretest score was 19.31 (standard deviation [SD]: 6.0, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 17.923–20.697 and the mean posttest score was 30.84 (SD: 4.8, 95% CI: 29.714–31.966. This difference was statistically significant at the 5% level with P < 0.001. Conclusions: “HAP” was effective in changing the knowledge, awareness, and attitude of the staffs and trainees of the secondary hospital toward surgical care of HIV-infected patients.

  6. Out-of-office hours' elective surgical intensive care admissions and their associated complications.

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    Morgan, David J R; Ho, Kwok Ming; Ong, Yang Jian; Kolybaba, Marlene L

    2017-11-01

    The 'weekend' effect is a controversial theory that links reduced staffing levels, staffing seniority and supportive services at hospitals during 'out-of-office hours' time periods with worsening patient outcomes. It is uncertain whether admitting elective surgery patients to intensive care units (ICU) during 'out-of-office hours' time periods mitigates this affect through higher staffing ratios and seniority. Over a 3-year period in Western Australia's largest private hospital, this retrospective nested-cohort study compared all elective surgical patients admitted to the ICU based on whether their admission occurred 'in-office hours' (Monday-Friday 08.00-18.00 hours) or 'out-of-office hours' (all other times). The main outcomes were surgical complications using the Dindo-Clavien classification and length-of-stay data. Of the total 4363 ICU admissions, 3584 ICU admissions were planned following elective surgery resulting in 2515 (70.2%) in-office hours and 1069 (29.8%) out-of-office hours elective ICU surgical admissions. Out-of-office hours ICU admissions following elective surgery were associated with an increased risk of infection (P = 0.029), blood transfusion (P = 0.020), total parental nutrition (P office hours ICU admissions were also associated with an increased hospital length-of-stay, with (1.74 days longer, P office hours ICU admissions following elective surgery is common and associated with serious post-operative complications culminating in significantly longer hospital length-of-stays and greater transfers with important patient and health economic implications. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  7. [Mortality and length of stay in a surgical intensive care unit.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelha, Fernando José; Castro, Maria Ana; Landeiro, Nuno Miguel; Neves, Aida Maria; Santos, Cristina Costa

    2006-02-01

    Outcome in intensive care can be categorized as mortality related or morbidity related. Mortality is an insufficient measure of ICU outcome when measured alone and length of stay may be seen as an indirect measure of morbidity related outcome. The aim of the present study was to estimate the incidence and predictive factors for intrahospitalar outcome measured by mortality and LOS in patients admitted to a surgical ICU. In this prospective study all 185 patients, who underwent scheduled or emergency surgery admitted to a surgical ICU in a large tertiary university medical center performed during April and July 2004, were eligible to the study. The following variables were recorded: age, sex, body weight and height, core temperature (Tc), ASA physical status, emergency or scheduled surgery, magnitude of surgical procedure, anesthesia technique, amount of fluids during anesthesia, use of temperature monitoring and warming techniques, duration of the anesthesia, length of stay in ICU and in the hospital and SAPS II score. The mean length of stay in the ICU was 4.09 +/- 10.23 days. Significant risk factors for staying longer in ICU were SAPS II, ASA physical status, amount of colloids, fresh frozen plasma units and packed erythrocytes units used during surgery. Fourteen (7.60%) patients died in ICU and 29 (15.70%) died during their hospitalization. Statistically significant independent risk factors for mortality were emergency surgery, major surgery, high SAPS II scores, longer stay in ICU and in the hospital. Statistically significant protective factors against the probability of dying in the hospital were low body weight and low BMI. In conclusion, prolonged ICU stay is more frequent in more severely ill patients at admission and it is associated with higher hospital mortality. Hospital mortality is also more frequent in patients submitted to emergent and major surgery.

  8. Prospective analysis of skin findings in surgical critically Ill patients intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Demir Pektas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intensive Care Units (ICUs are places where critically ill patients are managed. Aim: We aimed to investigate skin disorders that developed in critically ill surgical patients during their stay in the ICU. Methods: The prevalence of dermatological disorders and factors affecting their clinical features was prospectively analyzed in surgical ICU patients. We recorded age, sex, type of ICU, comorbidities, skin disorders, time to consultation, duration of ICU stay, and mortality rate. Results: Our study included 605 patients (mean age of 60.1 ± 20.2 years; 56.4% males. Seventy-three (12.1% patients were consulted with the Dermatology Department, among which 28.8% had infectious dermatological lesions, 26% dermatoses, and 45.2% drug reactions. The most common infectious dermatological disorder was wound infection (55.6%, the most common drug reaction was maculopapular drug eruption (75.8%, and the most common dermatosis was frictional blisters (47.4%. Multiple comorbidities, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, Parkinson disease, and stroke increased dermatological disorders (P < 0.05. The consulted patients had a median ICU stay of 7 days (range 2–53 days; consultation was significantly more common when it exceeded 10 days (74% vs. 26%, P < 0.05. The consulted patients died more commonly (P < 0.05. Infectious dermatological disorders and dermatoses were more common in patients older and younger than 50 years, respectively (P < 0.05. Dermatoses were more common among women (P < 0.05. The median time to consultation was 6 (2–30 days; it was longest for dermatological infections and shortest for dermatoses (P < 0.05. Infectious dermatological disorders were significantly more common among the deceased patients (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Multiple factors including multiple comorbidities, duration of ICU stay, time to consultation, and mortality increase dermatological disorders among surgical ICU patients.

  9. Toward a Learning Health-care System - Knowledge Delivery at the Point of Care Empowered by Big Data and NLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaggal, Vinod C; Elayavilli, Ravikumar Komandur; Mehrabi, Saeed; Pankratz, Joshua J; Sohn, Sunghwan; Wang, Yanshan; Li, Dingcheng; Rastegar, Majid Mojarad; Murphy, Sean P; Ross, Jason L; Chaudhry, Rajeev; Buntrock, James D; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    The concept of optimizing health care by understanding and generating knowledge from previous evidence, ie, the Learning Health-care System (LHS), has gained momentum and now has national prominence. Meanwhile, the rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) enables the data collection required to form the basis for facilitating LHS. A prerequisite for using EHR data within the LHS is an infrastructure that enables access to EHR data longitudinally for health-care analytics and real time for knowledge delivery. Additionally, significant clinical information is embedded in the free text, making natural language processing (NLP) an essential component in implementing an LHS. Herein, we share our institutional implementation of a big data-empowered clinical NLP infrastructure, which not only enables health-care analytics but also has real-time NLP processing capability. The infrastructure has been utilized for multiple institutional projects including the MayoExpertAdvisor, an individualized care recommendation solution for clinical care. We compared the advantages of big data over two other environments. Big data infrastructure significantly outperformed other infrastructure in terms of computing speed, demonstrating its value in making the LHS a possibility in the near future.

  10. Surgical Process Improvement: Impact of a Standardized Care Model With Electronic Decision Support to Improve Compliance With SCIP Inf-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David J; Thompson, Jeffrey E; Suri, Rakesh; Prinsen, Sharon K

    2014-01-01

    The absence of standardization in surgical care process, exemplified in a "solution shop" model, can lead to unwarranted variation, increased cost, and reduced quality. A comprehensive effort was undertaken to improve quality of care around indwelling bladder catheter use following surgery by creating a "focused factory" model within the cardiac surgical practice. Baseline compliance with Surgical Care Improvement Inf-9, removal of urinary catheter by the end of surgical postoperative day 2, was determined. Comparison of baseline data to postintervention results showed clinically important reductions in the duration of indwelling bladder catheters as well as marked reduction in practice variation. Following the intervention, Surgical Care Improvement Inf-9 guidelines were met in 97% of patients. Although clinical quality improvement was notable, the process to accomplish this-identification of patients suitable for standardized pathways, protocol application, and electronic systems to support the standardized practice model-has potentially greater relevance than the specific clinical results. © 2013 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  11. Health Care Resource Utilization for Outpatient Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Care Delivery Among Advanced Practice Providers and Physician Providers in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virani, Salim S; Akeroyd, Julia M; Ramsey, David J; Deswal, Anita; Nasir, Khurram; Rajan, Suja S; Ballantyne, Christie M; Petersen, Laura A

    2017-10-10

    Although effectiveness of diabetes or cardiovascular disease (CVD) care delivery between physicians and advanced practice providers (APPs) has been shown to be comparable, health care resource utilization between these 2 provider types in primary care is unknown. This study compared health care resource utilization between patients with diabetes or CVD receiving care from APPs or physicians. Diabetes (n = 1,022,588) or CVD (n = 1,187,035) patients with a primary care visit between October 2013 and September 2014 in 130 Veterans Affairs facilities were identified. Using hierarchical regression adjusting for covariates including patient illness burden, the authors compared number of primary or specialty care visits and number of lipid panels and hemoglobinA1c (HbA1c) tests among diabetes patients, and number of primary or specialty care visits and number of lipid panels and cardiac stress tests among CVD patients receiving care from physicians and APPs. Physicians had significantly larger patient panels compared with APPs. In adjusted analyses, diabetes patients receiving care from APPs received fewer primary and specialty care visits and a greater number of lipid panels and HbA1c tests compared with patients receiving care from physicians. CVD patients receiving care from APPs received more frequent lipid testing and fewer primary and specialty care visits compared with those receiving care from physicians, with no differences in the number of stress tests. Most of these differences, although statistically significant, were numerically small. Health care resource utilization among diabetes or CVD patients receiving care from APPs or physicians appears comparable, although physicians work with larger patient panels.

  12. Combined enteral feeding and total parenteral nutritional support improves outcome in surgical intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Min-Hui; Yu, Ying E; Tsai, Yueh-Miao; Lee, Hui-Chen; Huang, Ying-Che; Hsu, Han-Shui

    2012-09-01

    For intensive care unit (ICU) patients with gastrointestinal dysfunction and in need of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) support, the benefit of additional enteral feeding is not clear. This study aimed to investigate whether combined TPN with enteral feeding is associated with better outcomes in surgical intensive care unit (SICU) patients. Clinical data of 88 patients in SICU were retrospectively collected. Variables used for analysis included route and percentage of nutritional support, total caloric intake, age, gender, body weight, body mass index, admission diagnosis, surgical procedure, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, comorbidities, length of hospital stay, postoperative complications, blood glucose values and hospital mortality. Wound dehiscence and central catheter infection were observed more frequently in the group of patients receiving TPN calories less than 90% of total calorie intake (p = 0.004 and 0.043, respectively). APACHE II scores were higher in nonsurvivors than in survivors (p = 0.001). More nonsurvivors received TPN calories exceeding 90% of total calorie intake and were in need of dialysis during ICU admission (p = 0.005 and 0.013, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that the percentage of TPN calories over total calories and APACHE II scores were independent predictors of ICU mortality in patients receiving supplementary TPN after surgery. In SICU patients receiving TPN, patients who could be fed enterally more than 10% of total calories had better clinical outcomes than patients receiving less than 10% of total calorie intake from enteral feeding. Enteral feeding should be given whenever possible in severely ill patients. 2012 Published by Elsevier B.V

  13. From home deliveries to health care facilities: establishing a traditional birth attendant referral program in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomedi, Angelo; Stroud, Sophia R; Maya, Tania Ruiz; Plaman, Christopher R; Mwanthi, Mutuku A

    2015-07-16

    To assess the effectiveness of a traditional birth attendant (TBA) referral program on increasing the number of deliveries overseen by skilled birth attendants (SBA) in rural Kenyan health facilities before and after the implementation of a free maternity care policy. In a rural region of Kenya, TBAs were recruited to educate pregnant women about the importance of delivering in healthcare facilities and were offered a stipend for every pregnant woman whom they brought to the healthcare facility. We evaluated the percentage of prenatal care (PNC) patients who delivered at the intervention site compared with the percentage of PNC patients who delivered at rural control facilities, before and after the referral program was implemented, and before and after the Kenya government implemented a policy of free maternity care. The window period of the study was from July of 2011 through September 2013, with a TBA referral intervention conducted from March to September 2013. The absolute increases from the pre-intervention period to the TBA referral intervention period in SBA deliveries were 5.7 and 24.0% in the control and intervention groups, respectively (p facility significantly increased compared to control health facilities when TBAs educated women about the need to deliver with a SBA and when TBAs received a stipend for bringing women to local health facilities to deliver. Furthermore, this TBA referral program proved to be far more effective in the target region of Kenya than a policy change to provide free obstetric care.

  14. PRIVATE SECTOR IN HEALTH CARE DELIVERY: A REALITY AND A CHALLENGE IN PAKISTAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Babar Tasneem

    2015-01-01

    Under performance of the public sector health care system in Pakistan has created a room for private sector to grow and become popular in health service delivery, despite its questionable quality, high cost and dubious ethics of medical practice. Private sector is no doubt a reality; and is functioning to plug many weaknesses and gaps in health care delivery to the poor people of Pakistan. Yet, it is largely unregulated and unchecked due to the absence of writ of the state. In spite of its inherent trait of profit making, the private sector has played a significant and innovative role both in preventive and curative service provision. Private sector has demonstrated great deal of responsiveness, hence creating a relation of trust with the consumers of health in Pakistan, majority of who spend out of their pocket to buy 'health'. There is definitely a potential to engage and involve private and non-state entities in the health care system building their capacities and instituting regulatory frameworks, to protect the poor's access to health care system.

  15. Neuro-Ophthalmology: Transitioning From Old to New Models of Health Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohman, Larry P

    2017-06-01

    In contradiction to fundamental laws of supply and demand, 2 decades of payment policies have led to some medical specialties experiencing declines in both manpower and reimbursement. This paradox has resulted in increasingly long wait times to see some specialists, some specialties becoming less attractive to potential trainees, and a dearth of new trainees entering these fields. Evolving models of health care delivery hold the promise of increasing patient access to most providers and may diminish costs and improve outcomes for most patients/conditions. However, patients who need care in understaffed fields may, in the future, be unable to quickly access a specialist with the requisite expertise. Impeding the sickest and most complex patients from seeing physicians with appropriate expertise may lead to increased costs and deleterious outcomes-consequences contrary to the goals of health care reform. To ensure appropriate access for these patients requires 2 conditions: 1. Compensation models that do not discourage trainees from pursuing nonprocedural specialties, and 2. A care delivery model that expediently identifies and routes these patients to the appropriate specialist.

  16. Zorg rond zwangerschap, bevalling en kraambed in Wageningen 1979 [Care for pregnancy, delivery, childbed in city of Wageningen 1979

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, M.

    1981-01-01

    Description of situation concerning care of pregnancy, childbirth and childbed in Wageningen, the Netherlands. Diagnosis of pregnancy / supervision of pregnancy ( zwangerschapsbegeleiding ) / place of delivery / maternity home / controls of pregnancy / gymnastics course for parents / evaluation of

  17. Delivery of maternal health care in Indigenous primary care services: baseline data for an ongoing quality improvement initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwedza Ru K

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous populations have disproportionately high rates of adverse perinatal outcomes relative to other Australians. Poorer access to good quality maternal health care is a key driver of this disparity. The aim of this study was to describe patterns of delivery of maternity care and service gaps in primary care services in Australian Indigenous communities. Methods We undertook a cross-sectional baseline audit for a quality improvement intervention. Medical records of 535 women from 34 Indigenous community health centres in five regions (Top End of Northern Territory 13, Central Australia 2, Far West New South Wales 6, Western Australia 9, and North Queensland 4 were audited. The main outcome measures included: adherence to recommended protocols and procedures in the antenatal and postnatal periods including: clinical, laboratory and ultrasound investigations; screening for gestational diabetes and Group B Streptococcus; brief intervention/advice on health-related behaviours and risks; and follow up of identified health problems. Results The proportion of women presenting for their first antenatal visit in the first trimester ranged from 34% to 49% between regions; consequently, documentation of care early in pregnancy was poor. Overall, documentation of routine antenatal investigations and brief interventions/advice regarding health behaviours varied, and generally indicated that these services were underutilised. For example, 46% of known smokers received smoking cessation advice/counselling; 52% of all women received antenatal education and 51% had investigation for gestational diabetes. Overall, there was relatively good documentation of follow up of identified problems related to hypertension or diabetes, with over 70% of identified women being referred to a GP/Obstetrician. Conclusion Participating services had both strengths and weaknesses in the delivery of maternal

  18. Tibetan women's perspectives and satisfaction with delivery care in a rural birth center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Jessica D; Gyaltsen, Kunchok; Gyal, Lhusham; Kyi, Tsering; Hicks, Andrew L; Pebley, Anne R

    2015-06-01

    To identify sociodemographic characteristics and factors involved in Tibetan women's decisions to deliver at the Tibetan Birth and Training Center (TBTC) in rural western China. In the present mixed-methods study, a random sample of married women who delivered at the TBTC between June 2011 and June 2012 were surveyed. Additionally, four focus group discussions were conducted among married women living in the TBTC catchment area. Descriptive analyses were conducted, and dominant themes were identified. In focus group discussions, women (n=33) reported that improved roads and transportation meant that access to health facilities was easier than in the past. Although some of the 114 survey participants voiced negative perceptions of healthcare facilities and providers, 99 (86.8%) indicated that they chose to deliver at the TBTC because they preferred to have a doctor present. Most women (75 [65.8%]) said their mother/mother-in-law made the final decision about delivery location. Women valued logistic and cultural aspects of the TBTC, and 108 (94.7%) said that they would recommend the TBTC to a friend. Study participants preferred delivery care that combines safety and comfort. The findings highlight avenues for further promotion of facility delivery among populations with lower rates of skilled deliveries. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The LIFEspan model of transitional rehabilitative care for youth with disabilities: healthcare professionals' perspectives on service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdani, Yani; Proulx, Meghann; Kingsnorth, Shauna; Lindsay, Sally; Maxwell, Joanne; Colantonio, Angela; Macarthur, Colin; Bayley, Mark

    2014-01-01

    LIFEspan is a service delivery model of continuous coordinated care developed and implemented by a cross-organization partnership between a pediatric and an adult rehabilitation hospital. Previous work explored enablers and barriers to establishing the partnership service. This paper examines healthcare professionals' (HCPs') experiences of 'real world' service delivery aimed at supporting transitional rehabilitative care for youth with disabilities. This qualitative study - part of an ongoing mixed method longitudinal study - elicited HCPs' perspectives on their experiences of LIFEspan service delivery through in-depth interviews. Data were categorized into themes of service delivery activities, then interpreted from the lens of a service integration/coordination framework. Five main service delivery themes were identified: 1) addressing youth's transition readiness and capacities; 2) shifting responsibility for healthcare management from parents to youth; 3) determining services based on organizational resources; 4) linking between pediatric and adult rehabilitation services; and, 5) linking with multi-sector services. LIFEspan contributed to service delivery activities that coordinated care for youth and families and integrated inter-hospital services. However, gaps in service integration with primary care, education, social, and community services limited coordinated care to the rehabilitation sector. Recommendations are made to enhance service delivery using a systems/sector-based approach.

  20. Non-communicable diseases and HIV care and treatment: models of integrated service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Malia; Ojikutu, Bisola; Andrian, Soa; Sohng, Elaine; Minior, Thomas; Hirschhorn, Lisa R

    2017-08-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are a growing cause of morbidity in low-income countries including in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Integration of NCD and HIV services can build upon experience with chronic care models from HIV programmes. We describe models of NCD and HIV integration, challenges and lessons learned. A literature review of published articles on integrated NCD and HIV programs in low-income countries and key informant interviews were conducted with leaders of identified integrated NCD and HIV programs. Information was synthesised to identify models of NCD and HIV service delivery integration. Three models of integration were identified as follows: NCD services integrated into centres originally providing HIV care; HIV care integrated into primary health care (PHC) already offering NCD services; and simultaneous introduction of integrated HIV and NCD services. Major challenges identified included NCD supply chain, human resources, referral systems, patient education, stigma, patient records and monitoring and evaluation. The range of HIV and NCD services varied widely within and across models. Regardless of model of integration, leveraging experience from HIV care models and adapting existing systems and tools is a feasible method to provide efficient care and treatment for the growing numbers of patients with NCDs. Operational research should be conducted to further study how successful models of HIV and NCD integration can be expanded in scope and scaled-up by managers and policymakers seeking to address all the chronic care needs of their patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Utilizing leadership to achieve high reliability in the delivery of perinatal care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parrotta C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Carmen Parrotta,1 William Riley,1 Les Meredith21School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 2Premier Insurance Management Services Inc, Charlotte, NC, USAAbstract: Highly reliable care requires standardization of clinical practices and is a prerequisite for patient safety. However, standardization in complex hospital settings is extremely difficult to attain and health care leaders are challenged to create care delivery processes that ensure patient safety. Moreover, once high reliability is achieved in a hospital unit, it must be maintained to avoid process deterioration. This case study examines an intervention to implement care bundles (a collection of evidence-based practices in four hospitals to achieve standardized care in perinatal units. The results show different patterns in the rate and magnitude of change within the hospitals to achieve high reliability. The study is part of a larger nationwide study of 16 hospitals to improve perinatal safety. Based on the findings, we discuss the role of leadership for implementing and sustaining high reliability to ensure freedom from unintended injury.Keywords: care bundles, evidence-based practice, standardized care, process improvement

  2. Computer versus paper system for recognition and management of sepsis in surgical intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Chasen A; Moore, Frederick A; Efron, Philip A; Marker, Peggy S; Gabrielli, Andrea; Westhoff, Lynn S; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Jordan, Janeen; Klink, Victoria; Sailors, R Matthew; McKinley, Bruce A

    2014-02-01

    A system to provide surveillance, diagnosis, and protocolized management of surgical intensive care unit (SICU) sepsis was undertaken as a performance improvement project. A system for sepsis management was implemented for SICU patients using paper followed by a computerized system. The hypothesis was that the computerized system would be associated with improved process and outcomes. A system was designed to provide early recognition and guide patient-specific management of sepsis including (1) modified early warning signs-sepsis recognition score (MEWS-SRS; summative point score of ranges of vital signs, mental status, white blood cell count; after every 4 hours) by bedside nurse; (2) suspected site assessment (vascular access, lung, abdomen, urinary tract, soft tissue, other) at bedside by physician or extender; (3) sepsis management protocol (replicable, point-of-care decisions) at bedside by nurse, physician, and extender. The system was implemented first using paper and then a computerized system. Sepsis severity was defined using standard criteria. In January to May 2012, a paper system was used to manage 77 consecutive sepsis encounters (3.9 ± 0.5 cases per week) in 65 patients (77% male; age, 53 ± 2 years). In June to December 2012, a computerized system was used to manage 132 consecutive sepsis encounters (4.4 ± 0.4 cases per week) in 119 patients (63% male; age, 58 ± 2 years). MEWS-SRS elicited 683 site assessments, and 201 had sepsis diagnosis and protocol management. The predominant site of infection was abdomen (paper, 58%; computer, 53%). Recognition of early sepsis tended to occur more using the computerized system (paper, 23%; computer, 35%). Hospital mortality rate for surgical ICU sepsis (paper, 20%; computer, 14%) was less with the computerized system. A computerized sepsis management system improves care process and outcome. Early sepsis is recognized and managed with greater frequency compared with severe sepsis or septic shock. The system

  3. Multidisciplinary training in perineal care during labor and delivery for the reduction of anal sphincter injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Jonathan; Gundry, Rowan; Young, Helen; Naguib, Adel

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether the introduction of a multidisciplinary intrapartum perineal-care training program reduced the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries in patients undergoing vaginal deliveries. A prospective observational cohort study enrolled women undergoing vaginal deliveries at a district general hospital maternity unit in the United Kingdom between April 1, 2012 and March 31, 2014. All women experiencing obstetric anal sphincter injuries during the study period were identified and the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries before (2012-2013) a multidisciplinary training program was implemented was compared with the rate after (2013-2014) implementation using logistic regression analysis. The study enrolled 4920 patients. Following the implementation of the training program, the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries decreased from 4.8% to 3.1% of vaginal deliveries (odds ratio 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.493-0.899; P = 0.008). The integration of intrapartum perineal-care training into mandatory annual staff training was associated with a statistically and clinically significant reduction in the rate of obstetric anal sphincter injuries. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Characteristics of Indigenous primary health care models of service delivery: a scoping review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfield, Stephen; Davy, Carol; Kite, Elaine; McArthur, Alexa; Munn, Zachary; Brown, Ngiare; Brown, Alex

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the scoping review is to identify and describe within the existing literature the characteristics (values, principles, components and suggest practical applications) of primary health care models of service delivery for Indigenous people. More specifically, the review question is:What are the characteristics (values, principles, components and suggested practical applications) of primary health care models of service delivery for Indigenous people?Findings from this scoping review will inform two systematic reviews. One of these will explore the acceptability and the other the effectiveness of identified characteristics. The scoping review will follow the JBI Scoping Review methodology as outlined in the 2015 Joanna Briggs Institute Reviewers' Manual. Indigenous populations in colonized countries experience worse health outcomes relative to their non-Indigenous counterparts. In Australia, in the period 2010 to 2012 the estimated gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians compared to non-Indigenous Australians was 10 years Similar gaps in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous have been demonstrated in other countries, such as New Zealand, Canada and the United StatesThe gap in life expectancy and the health disadvantage experienced by Indigenous people is in part the result of mainstream health services not adequately meeting the health needs of Indigenous people and Indigenous people's inability to access mainstream services Part of the solution has been the establishment of primary health care services for and in many cases run by Indigenous people. Indigenous primary health services have been developed to provide culturally appropriate services that meet the needs of local Indigenous communities.In Australia, the first Aboriginal medical service was established in 1971 in Redfern, New South Wales, by "community activists in response to ongoing discrimination against Aboriginal people within

  5. Predictors of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Infections in Surgical Intensive Care Patients: A Retrospective Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Camkıran

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MRAB is an important cause of hospital acquired infection and leads to an increasing morbidity and mortality in intensive care units (ICU. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictors of MRAB infection in surgical ICU patients. Material and Method: The charts of the patients who were admitted to the ICU between January 2008 and August 2010 were reviewed to identify patients with MRAB infection. Recorded data were as follows: age, sex, medical history, underlying surgical pathology, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (APACHE II and Glasgow Coma Score on ICU admission,presence of invasive procedures (intubation, arterial, central venous lines, urinary catheters, and renal replacement therapy, days in ICU and white blood cells (WBC and lactate count on infection day, infection site, complications (such as organ/system failure, length of stay (LOS in the ICU and hospital, and final outcome. Results: During the study period 25 patients with MRAB infection were identified. When compared with their matched control group (n=25, patients with MRAB infection had a significantly higher mean APACHE II score (p=0.001 and more frequently had an open wound (p=0.002 or required mechanical ventilation (p=0.005, with respiratory system disease (p=0.03, arterial catheterization (p=0.006, and central venous catheterization (p=0.004. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that APACHE II score (OR,1.155; CI, 1.008-1.324; p= 0.038 and open wound (OR, 27.77; CI, 2.020-333.333; p=0.018 were predictors of MRAB infection in these patients. Compared to their controls, patients with MRAB infection hand a longer LOS in ICU (36.44±30.44 days vs 7.80±8.13 days, p<0.000 and hospital (55.12±40.81 days vs 19.04±13.44 days, p<0.000. In hospital mortality rates for patients with MRAB infection and their controls were 56% and 32%, respectively (p=0.154. Conclusion: Our results indicate

  6. Why do some women still prefer traditional birth attendants and home delivery?: a qualitative study on delivery care services in West Java Province, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titaley, Christiana R; Hunter, Cynthia L; Dibley, Michael J; Heywood, Peter

    2010-08-11

    Trained birth attendants at delivery are important for preventing both maternal and newborn deaths. West Java is one of the provinces on Java Island, Indonesia, where many women still deliver at home and without the assistance of trained birth attendants. This study aims to explore the perspectives of community members and health workers about the use of delivery care services in six villages of West Java Province. A qualitative study using focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews was conducted in six villages of three districts in West Java Province from March to July 2009. Twenty FGDs and 165 in-depth interviews were conducted involving a total of 295 participants representing mothers, fathers, health care providers, traditional birth attendants and community leaders. The FGD and in-depth interview guidelines included reasons for using a trained or a traditional birth attendant and reasons for having a home or an institutional delivery. The use of traditional birth attendants and home delivery were preferable for some community members despite the availability of the village midwife in the village. Physical distance and financial limitations were two major constraints that prevented community members from accessing and using trained attendants and institutional deliveries. A number of respondents reported that trained delivery attendants or an institutional delivery were only aimed at women who experienced obstetric complications. The limited availability of health care providers was reported by residents in remote areas. In these settings the village midwife, who was sometimes the only health care provider, frequently travelled out of the village. The community perceived the role of both village midwives and traditional birth attendants as essential for providing maternal and health care services. A comprehensive strategy to increase the availability, accessibility, and affordability of delivery care services should be considered in these West Java

  7. Why do some women still prefer traditional birth attendants and home delivery?: a qualitative study on delivery care services in West Java Province, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titaley Christiana R

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trained birth attendants at delivery are important for preventing both maternal and newborn deaths. West Java is one of the provinces on Java Island, Indonesia, where many women still deliver at home and without the assistance of trained birth attendants. This study aims to explore the perspectives of community members and health workers about the use of delivery care services in six villages of West Java Province. Methods A qualitative study using focus group discussions (FGDs and in-depth interviews was conducted in six villages of three districts in West Java Province from March to July 2009. Twenty FGDs and 165 in-depth interviews were conducted involving a total of 295 participants representing mothers, fathers, health care providers, traditional birth attendants and community leaders. The FGD and in-depth interview guidelines included reasons for using a trained or a traditional birth attendant and reasons for having a home or an institutional delivery. Results The use of traditional birth attendants and home delivery were preferable for some community members despite the availability of the village midwife in the village. Physical distance and financial limitations were two major constraints that prevented community members from accessing and using trained attendants and institutional deliveries. A number of respondents reported that trained delivery attendants or an institutional delivery were only aimed at women who experienced obstetric complications. The limited availability of health care providers was reported by residents in remote areas. In these settings the village midwife, who was sometimes the only health care provider, frequently travelled out of the village. The community perceived the role of both village midwives and traditional birth attendants as essential for providing maternal and health care services. Conclusions A comprehensive strategy to increase the availability, accessibility, and

  8. Types and delivery of emotional support to promote linkage and engagement in HIV care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook CL

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Christa L Cook,1 Shantrel Canidate,2 Nicole Ennis,3 Robert L Cook4 1Department of Family, Community, and Health System Science, College of Nursing, 2Social and Behavioral Science, College of Public Health and Health Profession, 3Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, College of Public Health and Health Professions, 4Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions and College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Purpose: Despite recommendations for early entry into human immunodeficiency virus (HIV care, many people diagnosed with HIV delay seeking care. Multiple types of social support (ie, cognitive, emotional, and tangible are often needed for someone to transition into HIV care, but a lack of emotional support at diagnosis may be the reason why some people fail to stay engaged in care. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify how people living with HIV conceptualized emotional support needs and delivery at diagnosis. Method: We conducted a secondary analysis of qualitative data from 27 people living with HIV, many of whom delayed entry into HIV care. Results: Participants described their experiences seeking care after an HIV diagnosis and identified components of emotional support that aided entry into care – identification, connection, and navigational presence. Many participants stated that these types of support were ideally delivered by peers with HIV. Conclusion: In clinical practice, providers often use an HIV diagnosis as an opportunity to educate patients about HIV prevention and access to services. However, this type of social support may not facilitate engagement in care if emotional support needs are not met. Keywords: linkage to care, engagement in care, social support, qualitative

  9. Designing Clinical Space for the Delivery of Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Rose; Davis, Melinda M; Hall, Jennifer; Heintzman, John; Muench, John; Smeds, Brianna; Miller, Benjamin F; Miller, William L; Gilchrist, Emma; Brown Levey, Shandra; Brown, Jacqueline; Wise Romero, Pam; Cohen, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    delivery of integrated behavioral health and primary care. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  10. 2016 CAPS ethics session/Ein debate: 1. Regionalization of pediatric surgical care 2. Ethical introduction of surgical innovation 3. Addressing stress in a surgical practice: resiliency, well-being, and burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwell, Charles E; Chiu, Priscilla; Fecteau, Annie; Gow, Kenneth W; Mueller, Claudia M; Price, David; Zigman, Andrew F

    2017-05-01

    The following is the conference proceeding of the Second Ein Debate from the 48th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association of Paediatric Surgeons held in Vancouver, BC, from September 22 to 24, 2016. The three main topics for debate, as prepared by the members of the CAPS Ethics Committee, are: 1. Regionalization of care: pros and cons, 2. Innovation in clinical care: ethical considerations, and 3. Surgeon well-being: caring for the caregiver. The authors of this paper, as participants in the debate, were assigned their positions at random. Therefore, the opinions they express within this summary might not reflect their own viewpoints. In the first discussion, arguments for and against the regionalization of pediatric surgical care are discussed, primarily in the context of a case of BA. In the pro argument, the evidence and lessons learned from different European countries are explored as well as different models to provide the best BA care outside of large teaching centers. In the counterargument, the author explains how regionalization of care could be detrimental for the patient, the family, the regional center, and for the health care system in general. In the debate on surgical innovation the authors define surgical innovation. They review the pertinent ethical principles, explore a model for its implementation, and the role of the institution at which the innovation is proposed. In the third section, surgeon well-being is examined, and recent literature on surgeon resiliency and burnout both at the attending and resident level is reviewed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Truth in Reporting: How Data Capture Methods Obfuscate Actual Surgical Site Infection Rates within a Health Care Network System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeianou, Liliana; Cauley, Christy E; Antonelli, Donna; Bird, Sarah; Rattner, David; Hutter, Matthew; Mahmood, Sadiqa; Schnipper, Deborah; Rubin, Marc; Bleday, Ronald; Kenney, Pardon; Berger, David

    2017-01-01

    between standardized infection rates was 0.03 (p = 0.88). During 25 site-time period observations, National Surgical Quality Improvement Program and National Healthcare Safety Network data matched for 52% of observations (13/25). κ = 0.10 (95% CI, -0.1366 to 0.3402; p = 0.403), indicating poor agreement. This study investigated hospitals located in the Northeastern United States only. Variation in Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services-mandated National Healthcare Safety Network infection surveillance methodology leads to unreliable results, which is apparent when these results are compared with standardized data. High-quality data would improve care quality and compare outcomes among institutions.

  12. In-hospital fellow coverage reduces communication errors in the surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mallory; Alban, Rodrigo F; Hardy, James P; Oxman, David A; Garcia, Edward R; Hevelone, Nathanael; Frendl, Gyorgy; Rogers, Selwyn O

    2014-06-01

    Staff coverage strategies of intensive care units (ICUs) impact clinical outcomes. High-intensity staff coverage strategies are associated with lower morbidity and mortality. Accessible clinical expertise, team work, and effective communication have all been attributed to the success of this coverage strategy. We evaluate the impact of in-hospital fellow coverage (IHFC) on improving communication of cardiorespiratory events. A prospective observational study performed in an academic tertiary care center with high-intensity staff coverage. The main outcome measure was resident to fellow communication of cardiorespiratory events during IHFC vs home coverage (HC) periods. Three hundred twelve cardiorespiratory events were collected in 114 surgical ICU patients in 134 study days. Complete data were available for 306 events. One hundred three communication errors occurred. IHFC was associated with significantly better communication of events compared to HC (Pcommunicated 89% of events during IHFC vs 51% of events during HC (PCommunication patterns of junior and midlevel residents were similar. Midlevel residents communicated 68% of all on-call events (87% IHFC vs 50% HC, Pcommunicated 66% of events (94% IHFC vs 52% HC, PCommunication errors were lower in all ICUs during IHFC (Pcommunication errors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. DRG migration: A novel measure of inefficient surgical care in a value-based world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Byron D; Mehta, Hemalkumar B; Sieloff, Eric; Shan, Yong; Senagore, Anthony J

    2018-03-01

    Diagnosis-Related Group (DRG) migration, DRG 331 to 330, is defined by the assignment to a higher cost DRG due only to post admission comorbidity or complications (CC). We assessed the 5% national Medicare data set (2011-2014) for colectomy (DRG's 331/330), excluding present on admission CC's and selecting patients with one or more CC's post-admission to define the impact on payments, cost, and length of stay (LOS). The incidence of DRG migration was 14.2%. This was associated with statistically significant increases in payments, hospital cost, and LOS compared to DRG 331 patients. When DRG migration rate was extrapolated to the entire at risk population, the results were an increase of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) cost by $98 million, hospital cost by $418 million, and excess hospital days equaling 68,669 days. These negative outcomes represent potentially unnecessary variations in the processes of care, and therefore a unique economic concept defining inefficient surgical care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. General and acute care surgical procedures in patients with left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaoutakis, George J; Bittle, Gregory J; Allen, Jeremiah G; Weiss, Eric S; Alejo, Jennifer; Baumgartner, William A; Shah, Ashish S; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Efron, David T; Conte, John V

    2014-04-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have become common as a bridge to heart transplant as well as destination therapy. Acute care surgical (ACS) problems in this population are prevalent but remain ill-defined. Therefore, we reviewed our experience with ACS interventions in LVAD patients. A total of 173 patients who received HeartMate(®) XVE or HeartMate(®) II (HMII) LVADs between December 2001 and March 2010 were studied. Patient demographics, presentation of ACS problem, operative intervention, co-morbidities, transplantation, complications, and survival were analyzed. A total of 47 (27 %) patients underwent 67 ACS procedures at a median of 38 days after device implant (interquartile range 15-110), with a peri-operative mortality rate of 5 % (N = 3). Demographics, device type, and acuity were comparable between the ACS and non-ACS groups. A total of 21 ACS procedures were performed emergently, eight were urgent, and 38 were elective. Of 29 urgent and emergent procedures, 28 were for abdominal pathology. In eight patients, the cause of the ACS problem was related to LVADs or anticoagulation. Cumulative survival estimates revealed no survival differences if patients underwent ACS procedures (p = 0.17). Among HMII patients, transplantation rates were unaffected by an ACS intervention (p = 0.2). ACS problems occur frequently in LVAD patients and are not associated with adverse outcomes in HMII patients. The acute care surgeon is an integral member of a comprehensive approach to effective LVAD management.

  15. Global Lessons In Frugal Innovation To Improve Health Care Delivery In The United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Yasser; Taylor, Andrea; Harris, Matthew; Wadge, Hester; Escobar, Erin; Prime, Matt; Patel, Hannah; Carter, Alexander W; Parston, Greg; Darzi, Ara W; Udayakumar, Krishna

    2017-11-01

    In a 2015 global study of low-cost or frugal innovations, we identified five leading innovations that scaled successfully in their original contexts and that may provide insights for scaling such innovations in the United States. We describe common themes among these diverse innovations, critical factors for their translation to the United States to improve the efficiency and quality of health care, and lessons for the implementation and scaling of other innovations. We highlight promising trends in the United States that support adapting these innovations, including growing interest in moving care out of health care facilities and into community and home settings; the growth of alternative payment models and incentives to experiment with new approaches to population health and care delivery; and the increasing use of diverse health professionals, such as community health workers and advanced practice providers. Our findings should inspire policy makers and health care professionals and inform them about the potential for globally sourced frugal innovations to benefit US health care.

  16. Place of Delivery Associated With Postnatal Care Utilization Among Childbearing Women in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Chungu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivePostnatal care (PNC utilization is critical to the prevention of maternal morbidity and mortality. Despite its importance, the proportion of women utilizing this service is still low in Zambia. We investigated if place of delivery was associated with PNC utilization in the first 48 h among childbearing women in Zambia.MethodsData from the 2013/14 Zambia Demographic and Health Survey for women, aged 15–49 years, who reported giving birth in the 2 years preceding the survey was used. The data comprised of sociodemographic and other obstetric data, which were cleaned, recoded, and analyzed using STATA version 13 (Stata Corporation, College Station, TX, USA. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the association of place of delivery and other background variables.ResultsWomen who delivered in a health facility were more likely to utilize PNC in the first 48 h compared to those who did not deliver in a health facility: government hospital (AOR 7.24, 95% CI 4.92–11.84, government health center/clinic (AOR 7.15 95% CI 4.79–10.66, other public sector (AOR 23.2 95% CI 3.69–145.91, private hospital/clinic (AOR 10.08 95% CI 3.35–30.35, and Mission hospital/clinic (AOR 8.56 95% CI 4.71–15.53. Additionally, women who were attended to by a skilled personnel during delivery of the baby were more likely to utilize PNC (AOR 2.30, 95% CI 1.57–3.37. Women from rural areas were less likely to utilize PNC in the first 48 h (AOR 0.70, 95% CI 0.53–0.90.ConclusionPlace of delivery was found to be linked with PNC utilization in this population although access to health care is still driven by inequity-related dynamics and imbalances. Given that inequity stresses are heaviest in the rural and poor groups, interventions should aim to reach this group.SignificanceThe study results will help program managers to increase access to health facility delivery and direct interventional efforts toward the affected subpopulations

  17. Place of Delivery Associated With Postnatal Care Utilization Among Childbearing Women in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chungu, Charles; Makasa, Mpundu; Chola, Mumbi; Jacobs, Choolwe Nkwemu

    2018-01-01

    Postnatal care (PNC) utilization is critical to the prevention of maternal morbidity and mortality. Despite its importance, the proportion of women utilizing this service is still low in Zambia. We investigated if place of delivery was associated with PNC utilization in the first 48 h among childbearing women in Zambia. Data from the 2013/14 Zambia Demographic and Health Survey for women, aged 15-49 years, who reported giving birth in the 2 years preceding the survey was used. The data comprised of sociodemographic and other obstetric data, which were cleaned, recoded, and analyzed using STATA version 13 (Stata Corporation, College Station, TX, USA). Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the association of place of delivery and other background variables. Women who delivered in a health facility were more likely to utilize PNC in the first 48 h compared to those who did not deliver in a health facility: government hospital (AOR 7.24, 95% CI 4.92-11.84), government health center/clinic (AOR 7.15 95% CI 4.79-10.66), other public sector (AOR 23.2 95% CI 3.69-145.91), private hospital/clinic (AOR 10.08 95% CI 3.35-30.35), and Mission hospital/clinic (AOR 8.56 95% CI 4.71-15.53). Additionally, women who were attended to by a skilled personnel during delivery of the baby were more likely to utilize PNC (AOR 2.30, 95% CI 1.57-3.37). Women from rural areas were less likely to utilize PNC in the first 48 h (AOR 0.70, 95% CI 0.53-0.90). Place of delivery was found to be linked with PNC utilization in this population although access to health care is still driven by inequity-related dynamics and imbalances. Given that inequity stresses are heaviest in the rural and poor groups, interventions should aim to reach this group. The study results will help program managers to increase access to health facility delivery and direct interventional efforts toward the affected subpopulations, such as the young and rural women. Furthermore, results will help

  18. The role of team climate in improving the quality of chronic care delivery: a longitudinal study among professionals working with chronically ill adolescents in transitional care programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane M; Strating, Mathilde M H; Nieboer, Anna P

    2014-05-22

    This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of implementing transition programmes in improving the quality of chronic care delivery and (2) identify the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery over time. This longitudinal study was undertaken with professionals working in hospitals and rehabilitation units that participated in the transition programme 'On Your Own Feet Ahead!' in the Netherlands. A total of 145/180 respondents (80.6%) filled in the questionnaire at the beginning of the programme (T1), and 101/173 respondents (58.4%) did so 1 year later at the end of the programme (T2). A total of 90 (52%) respondents filled in the questionnaire at both time points. Two-tailed, paired t tests were used to investigate improvements over time and multilevel analyses to investigate the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery. Transition programme. Quality of chronic care delivery measured with the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care Short version (ACIC-S). The overall ACIC-S score at T1 was 5.90, indicating basic or intermediate support for chronic care delivery. The mean ACIC-S score at T2 significantly improved to 6.70, indicating advanced support for chronic care. After adjusting for the quality of chronic care delivery at T1 and significant respondents' characteristics, multilevel regression analyses showed that team climate at T1 (pteam climate (pteam climate to enhance the quality of chronic care delivery to chronically ill adolescents. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Meeting the challenge of COPD care delivery in the USA: a multiprovider perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, MeiLan K; Martinez, Carlos H; Au, David H; Bourbeau, Jean; Boyd, Cynthia M; Branson, Richard; Criner, Gerard J; Kalhan, Ravi; Kallstrom, Thomas J; King, Angela; Krishnan, Jerry A; Lareau, Suzanne C; Lee, Todd A; Lindell, Kathleen; Mannino, David M; Martinez, Fernando J; Meldrum, Catherine; Press, Valerie G; Thomashow, Byron; Tycon, Laura; Sullivan, Jamie Lamson; Walsh, John; Wilson, Kevin C; Wright, Jean; Yawn, Barbara; Zueger, Patrick M; Bhatt, Surya P; Dransfield, Mark T

    2016-06-01

    The burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the USA continues to grow. Although progress has been made in the the development of diagnostics, therapeutics, and care guidelines, whether patients' quality of life is improved will ultimately depend on the actual implementation of care and an individual patient's access to that care. In this Commission, we summarise expert opinion from key stakeholders-patients, caregivers, and medical professionals, as well as representatives from health systems, insurance companies, and industry-to understand barriers to care delivery and propose potential solutions. Health care in the USA is delivered through a patchwork of provider networks, with a wide variation in access to care depending on a patient's insurance, geographical location, and socioeconomic status. Furthermore, Medicare's complicated coverage and reimbursement structure pose unique challenges for patients with chronic respiratory disease who might need access to several types of services. Throughout this Commission, recurring themes include poor guideline implementation among health-care providers and poor patient access to key treatments such as affordable maintenance drugs and pulmonary rehabilitation. Although much attention has recently been focused on the reduction of hospital readmissions for COPD exacerbations, health systems in the USA struggle to meet these goals, and methods to reduce readmissions have not been proven. There are no easy solutions, but engaging patients and innovative thinkers in the development of solutions is crucial. Financial incentives might be important in raising engagement of providers and health systems. Lowering co-pays for maintenance drugs could result in improved adherence and, ultimately, decreased overall health-care spending. Given the substantial geographical diversity, health systems will need to find their own solutions to improve care coordination and integration, until better data for interventions

  20. Last Mile Towards Efficient Healthcare Delivery in Switzerland: eHealth Enabled Applications Could Speed Up the Care Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yihan; Bürkle, Thomas; Holm, Jürgen; Zetz, Erwin; Denecke, Kerstin

    2018-01-01

    A precise and timely care delivery depends on an efficient triage performed by primary care providers and smooth collaboration with other medical specialities. In recent years telemedicine gained increasing importance for efficient care delivery. It's use, however, has been limited by legal issues, missing digital infrastructures, restricted support from health insurances and the digital divide in the population. A new era towards eHealth and telemedicine starts with the establishment of national eHealth regulations and laws. In Switzerland, a nation-wide digital infrastructure and electronic health record will be established. But appropriate healthcare apps to improve patient care based on this infrastructure remain rare. In this paper, we present two applications (self-anamnesis and eMedication assistant) for eHealth enabled care delivery which have the potential to speed up diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Generic project definitions for improvement of health care delivery: a case-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeijer, Gerard C; Does, Ronald J M M; de Mast, Jeroen; Trip, Albert; van den Heuvel, Jaap

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to create actionable knowledge, making the definition of process improvement projects in health care delivery more effective. This study is a retrospective analysis of process improvement projects in hospitals, facilitating a case-based reasoning approach to project definition. Data sources were project documentation and hospital-performance statistics of 271 Lean Six Sigma health care projects from 2002 to 2009 of general, teaching, and academic hospitals in the Netherlands and Belgium. Objectives and operational definitions of improvement projects in the sample, analyzed and structured in a uniform format and terminology. Extraction of reusable elements of earlier project definitions, presented in the form of 9 templates called generic project definitions. These templates function as exemplars for future process improvement projects, making the selection, definition, and operationalization of similar projects more efficient. Each template includes an explicated rationale, an operationalization in the form of metrics, and a prototypical example. Thus, a process of incremental and sustained learning based on case-based reasoning is facilitated. The quality of project definitions is a crucial success factor in pursuits to improve health care delivery. We offer 9 tried and tested improvement themes related to patient safety, patient satisfaction, and business-economic performance of hospitals.

  2. Registered dietitian nutritionists bring value to emerging health care delivery models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jortberg, Bonnie T; Fleming, Michael O

    2014-12-01

    Health care in the United States is the most expensive in the world; however, most citizens do not receive quality care that is comprehensive and coordinated. To address this gap, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement developed the Triple Aim (ie, improving population health, improving the patient experience, and reducing costs), which has been adopted by patient-centered medical homes and accountable care organizations. The patient-centered medical home and other population health models focus on improving the care for all people, particularly those with multiple morbidities. The Joint Principles of the Patient-Centered Medical Home, developed by the major primary care physician organizations in 2007, recognizes the key role of the multidisciplinary team in meeting the challenge of caring for these individuals. Registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) bring value to this multidisciplinary team by providing care coordination, evidence-based care, and quality-improvement leadership. RDNs have demonstrated efficacy for improvements in outcomes for patients with a wide variety of medical conditions. Primary care physicians, as well as several patient-centered medical home and population health demonstration projects, have reported the benefits of RDNs as part of the integrated primary care team. One of the most significant barriers to integrating RDNs into primary care has been an insufficient reimbursement model. Newer innovative payment models provide the opportunity to overcome this barrier. In order to achieve this integration, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and RDNs must fully understand and embrace the opportunities and challenges that the new health care delivery and payment models present, and be prepared and empowered to lead the necessary changes. All stakeholders within the health care system need to more fully recognize and embrace the value and multidimensional role of the RDN on the multidisciplinary team. The Academy's Patient

  3. Surgical stress response and the potential role of preoperative glucocorticoids on post-anesthesia care unit recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinthorsdottir, Kristin J; Kehlet, Henrik; Aasvang, Eske K

    2017-01-01

    The immediate postoperative course in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) remains a challenge across surgical procedures. Postoperative pain, sedation/cognitive dysfunction, nausea and vomiting (PONV), circulatory and respiratory problems and orthostatic intolerance constitute the bulk of the di......-anesthesia care unit (PACU), but with a scarcity of intervention studies using glucocorticoids to control inflammation. We, therefore, suggest a future research focus on the role of inflammation and effect of glucocorticoids in the PACU setting to improve patient recovery....

  4. Obstetric care and method of delivery in Mexico: results from the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Heredia-Pi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the current clinical, socio-demographic and obstetric factors associated with the various types of delivery strategies in Mexico. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study based on the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT of 6,736 women aged 12 to 49 years. Delivery types discussed in this paper include vaginal delivery, emergency cesarean section and planned cesarean section. Using bivariate analyses, sub-population group differences were identified. Logistic regression models were applied, including both binary and multinomial outcome variables from the survey. The logistic regression results identify those covariates associated with the type of delivery. RESULTS: 53.1% of institutional births in the period 2006 through 2012 were vaginal deliveries, 46.9% were either a planned or emergency cesarean sections. The highest rates of this procedure were among women who reported a complication during delivery (OR: 4.21; 95%CI: 3.66-4.84, between the ages of 35 and 49 at the time of their last child birth (OR: 2.54; 95%CI: 2.02-3.20 and women receiving care through private healthcare providers during delivery (OR: 2.36; 95%CI: 1.84-3.03. CONCLUSIONS: The existence of different socio-demographic and obstetric profiles among women who receive care for vaginal or cesarean delivery, are supported by the findings of the present study. The frequency of vaginal delivery is higher in indigenous women, when the care provider is public and, in women with two or more children at time of the most recent child birth. Planned cesarean deliveries are positively associated with years of schooling, a higher socioeconomic level, and higher age. The occurrence of emergency cesarean sections is elevated in women with a diagnosis of a health issue during pregnancy or delivery, and it is reduced in highly marginalized settings.

  5. Obstetric care and method of delivery in Mexico: results from the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia-Pi, Ileana; Servan-Mori, Edson E; Wirtz, Veronika J; Avila-Burgos, Leticia; Lozano, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    To identify the current clinical, socio-demographic and obstetric factors associated with the various types of delivery strategies in Mexico. This is a cross-sectional study based on the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT) of 6,736 women aged 12 to 49 years. Delivery types discussed in this paper include vaginal delivery, emergency cesarean section and planned cesarean section. Using bivariate analyses, sub-population group differences were identified. Logistic regression models were applied, including both binary and multinomial outcome variables from the survey. The logistic regression results identify those covariates associated with the type of delivery. 53.1% of institutional births in the period 2006 through 2012 were vaginal deliveries, 46.9% were either a planned or emergency cesarean sections. The highest rates of this procedure were among women who reported a complication during delivery (OR: 4.21; 95%CI: 3.66-4.84), between the ages of 35 and 49 at the time of their last child birth (OR: 2.54; 95%CI: 2.02-3.20) and women receiving care through private healthcare providers during delivery (OR: 2.36; 95%CI: 1.84-3.03). The existence of different socio-demographic and obstetric profiles among women who receive care for vaginal or cesarean delivery, are supported by the findings of the present study. The frequency of vaginal delivery is higher in indigenous women, when the care provider is public and, in women with two or more children at time of the most recent child birth. Planned cesarean deliveries are positively associated with years of schooling, a higher socioeconomic level, and higher age. The occurrence of emergency cesarean sections is elevated in women with a diagnosis of a health issue during pregnancy or delivery, and it is reduced in highly marginalized settings.

  6. Comparison of homecare costs of local wound care in surgical patients randomized between occlusive and gauze dressings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubbink, Dirk Th; Vermeulen, Hester; van Hattem, Jarne

    2008-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To study the material and nursing costs and outcome of wound care at home comparing two dressing groups (occlusive vs. gauze-based) in surgical patients after hospital dismissal. BACKGROUND: The large variety in dressing materials and lack of convincing evidence make the choice

  7. Fewer intensive care unit refusals and a higher capacity utilization by using a cyclic surgical case schedule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houdenhoven, Mark; van Oostrum, Jeroen M.; Wullink, Gerhard; Hans, Elias W.; Hurink, Johann L.; Bakker, Jan; Kazemier, Geert

    Purpose: Mounting health care costs force hospital managers to maximize utilization of scarce resources and simultaneously improve access to hospital services. This article assesses the benefits of a cyclic case scheduling approach that exploits a master surgical schedule (MSS). An MSS maximizes

  8. Bedside intravascular ultrasound-guided inferior vena cava filter placement in medical-surgical intensive care critically-ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Abusedera

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Bedside IVUS-guided filter placement in medical-surgical critically ill patient in intensive care unit is a feasible, safe and reliable technique for IVC interruption. IVUS may be the most appropriate tool to guide filter insertion in obese patient.

  9. Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus Aureus and Cross-Contamination in a Surgical Intensive Care Unit: Efficacy of Mupirocin Ointment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Talon; C. Rouget; V. Cailleaux; P. Bailly; M. Thouverez; F. Barale; Y. Michel-Briand

    1995-01-01

    textabstractA six month prospective study was carried out in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) of a university hospital to assess the incidence and routes of exogenous colonization by Staphylococcus aureus. A total of 157 patients were included in the study. One thousand one hundred and eleven

  10. Creating patient value in glaucoma care : applying quality costing and care delivery value chain approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.F. de Korne (Dirk); J.C.A. Sol (Kees); T. Custers (Thomas); E. van Sprundel (Esther); B.M. van Ineveld (Martin); H.G. Lemij (Hans); N.S. Klazinga (Niek)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore in a specific hospital care process the applicability in practice of the theories of quality costing and value chains. Design/methodology/approach: In a retrospective case study an in-depth evaluation of the use of a quality cost model

  11. Jewish laws, customs, and practice in labor, delivery, and postpartum care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Anita; Rom, Miriam; Newsome-Wicks, Mona; Engelhardt, Kay; Woloski-Wruble, Anna

    2009-07-01

    Many communities throughout the world, especially in the United States and Israel, contain large populations of religiously observant Jews. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive, descriptive guide to specific laws, customs, and practices of traditionally, religious observant Jews for the culturally sensitive management of labor, delivery, and postpartum. Discussion includes intimacy issues between husband and wife, dietary laws, Sabbath observance, as well as practices concerning prayer, communication trends, modesty issues, and labor and birth customs. Health care professionals can tailor their practice by integrating their knowledge of specific cultures into their management plan.

  12. Infirmity and injury complexity are risk factors for surgical-site infection after operative fracture care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachoura, Abdo; Guitton, Thierry G; Smith, R Malcolm; Vrahas, Mark S; Zurakowski, David; Ring, David

    2011-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgical-site infections prolong hospital stays, double rehospitalization rates, and increase healthcare costs. Additionally, patients with orthopaedic surgical-site infections (SSI) have substantially greater physical limitations and reductions in their health-related quality of life. However, the risk factors for SSI after operative fracture care are unclear. We determined the incidence and quantified modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors for SSIs in patients with orthopaedic trauma undergoing surgery. We retrospectively indentified, from our prospective trauma database and billing records, 1611 patients who underwent 1783 trauma-related procedures between 2006 and 2008. Medical records were reviewed and demographics, surgery-specific data, and whether the patients had an SSI were recorded. We determined which if any variables predicted SSI. Six factors independently predicted SSI: (1) the use of a drain, OR 2.3, 95% CI (1.3-3.8); (2) number of operations OR 3.4, 95% CI (2.0-6.0); (3) diabetes, OR 2.1, 95% CI (1.2-3.8); (4) congestive heart failure (CHF), OR 2.8, 95% CI (1.3-6.5); (5) site of injury tibial shaft/plateau, OR 2.3, 95% CI (1.3-4.2); and (6) site of injury, elbow, OR 2.2, 95% CI (1.1-4.7). The risk factors for SSIs after skeletal trauma are most strongly determined by nonmodifiable factors: patient infirmity (diabetes and heart failure) and injury complexity (site of injury, number of operations, use of a drain). Level II, prognostic study. See the Guideline for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  13. Effect of delirium motoric subtypes on administrative documentation of delirium in the surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Lan N; Pham, Vy P; Shirkey, Beverly A; Swan, Joshua T

    2017-06-01

    This study compares the proportions of surgical intensive care unit (ICU) patients with delirium detected using the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU (CAM-ICU) who received administrative documentation for delirium using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes, stratified by delirium motoric subtypes. This retrospective cohort study was conducted at a surgical ICU from 06/2012 to 05/2013. Delirium was assessed twice daily and was defined as having ≥1 positive CAM-ICU rating. Delirious patients were categorized into hyperactive/mixed and hypoactive subtypes using corresponding Richmond Agitation Sedation Scales. Administrative documentation of delirium was defined as having ≥1 of 32 unique ICD-9-CM codes. Proportions were compared using Pearson's Chi-square test. Of included patients, 40 % (423/1055) were diagnosed with delirium, and 17 % (183/1055) had an ICD-9-CM code for delirium. The sensitivity and specificity of ICD-9-CM codes for delirium were 36 and 95 %. ICD-9-CM codes for delirium were available for 42 % (95 % CI 35-48 %; 105/253) of patients with hyperactive/mixed delirium and 27 % (95 % CI 20-34 %; 46/170) of patients with hypoactive delirium (relative risk = 1.5; 95 % CI 1.2-2.0; p = 0.002). ICD-9-CM codes yielded a low sensitivity for identifying patients with CAM-ICU positive delirium and were more likely to identify hyperactive/mixed delirium compared with hypoactive delirium.

  14. Delivery of Services of Day Care Workers In Sta. Maria, Laguna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROLANDO R. CRUZADA, JR.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the determination of the delivery of services of day care workers in the municipality of Sta. Maria, Province of Laguna during the first semester of school year 2012-2013. Descriptive research was used in this study. Among the key findings were that Day Care Workers with respect to interactional relationship accomplished the functions with outstanding adequacy such as constantly giving feedback and praises on the performance of children, along with workers and parents coordination and cooperation, with verbal interpretation of Always Observe. In terms of instructional quality both group of respondents perceived that day care workers in-charge had adequate abilities and competencies concerning their education and trainings in connection with teaching small children with verbal interpretation of Always Observe. The parents had confidence to the day care workers in-charge of their children aside from regularly consulting the day care workers about their children’s progress with verbal interpretation of Always Observe. There were only 871 households who availed of the services of day care centers in which 27 workers were employed and each of them assigned to handle an average of 33 children. Notable along with other findings was the day care workers and parents had the same perception as to the extent of services provided by the Day Care Center with respect to interactional relationship, instructional quality and parental participation. Subsequently the study ensued with these five factual remarks: Children’s interactions with parents in the centers were the direct mechanisms through which children learn. The educational qualification and the capability of the day care workers to handle small children were the primary essentials in children’s learning. Parents’ participation in the day care centers premises brought harmonious relationship between the Day Care Workers and children as well. The capacity of day care worker

  15. Delivery system characteristics and their association with quality and costs of care: implications for accountable care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukmaitov, Askar; Harless, David W; Bazzoli, Gloria J; Carretta, Henry J; Siangphoe, Umaporn

    2015-01-01

    Implementation of accountable care organizations (ACOs) is currently underway, but there is limited empirical evidence on the merits of the ACO model. The aim was to study the associations between delivery system characteristics and ACO competencies, including centralization strategies to manage organizations, hospital integration with physicians and outpatient facilities, health information technology, infrastructure to monitor community health and report quality, and risk-adjusted 30-day all-cause mortality and case-mixed-adjusted inpatient costs for the Medicare population. Panel data (2006-2009) were assembled from Florida and multiple sources: inpatient hospital discharge, vital statistics, the American Hospital Association, the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society, and other databases. We applied a panel study design, controlling for hospital and market characteristics. Hospitals that were in centralized health systems or became more centralized over the study period had significantly larger reductions in mortality compared with hospitals that remained freestanding. Surprisingly, tightly integrated hospital-physician arrangements were associated with increased mortality; as such, hospitals may wish to proceed cautiously when developing specific types of alignment with local physician organizations. We observed no statistically significant differences in the growth rate of costs across hospitals in any of the health systems studied relative to freestanding hospitals. Although we observed quality improvement in some organizational types, these outcome improvements were not coupled with the additional desired objective of lower cost growth. This implies that additional changes not present during our study period, potentially changes in provider payment approaches, are essential for achieving the ACO objectives of higher quality of care at lower costs. Provider organizations implementing ACOs should consider centralizing service delivery as a

  16. Pneumonia in the surgical intensive care unit: is every one preventable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Wendy L; Zalewski, Christy; Hemmila, Mark R

    2011-10-01

    Pneumonia is a major complication for hospitalized patients and has come under the scrutiny of health care regulating bodies, which propose that hospital-acquired pneumonia should not be reimbursed and potentially be a "never event." We hypothesized that many of our acutely injured patients develop pneumonia at the time of their initial traumatic event despite aggressive measures to prevent pneumonia during hospitalization. This retrospective review included all mechanically ventilated patients admitted to a mixed surgical intensive care units (ICU; trauma, general surgery, and burns) who developed pneumonia from 2006 to 2008. All pneumonia diagnosed by culture were obtained from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens with ≥ 10(4) colony forming united (CFU)/mL considered a positive result. Criteria for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) applied only to those patients ventilated mechanically for >48 hours at the time of a positive BAL culture. Aspiration organisms included Streptococcus species, methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, and oral flora. This was an institutional review board-approved study. There were 208 mechanically ventilated who patients underwent BAL, half of which were performed in the first 48 hours after admission for fever, infiltrate on chest radiograph, or increasing white blood cell count (early BAL group). Of these patients, 58% had positive BAL cultures (pneumonia) but did not have VAP. Only 10% of patients studied with early BAL had no growth on culture. Although the predominant organisms in the early BAL group were aspiration-type organisms, 17% had resistant pathogens, and 16% had other Gram-negative rods (GNR). This percentage was compared with the VAP group in whom 33% of patients had resistant organisms (P = .04) and 8% other GNR (P = NS). Twenty-five patients with ≤ 10(4) CFU/mL on early BAL underwent repeat BAL, and 16 (64%) were later diagnosed with VAP. Many intubated patients in the surgical

  17. What's the diagnosis? Organisational culture and palliative care delivery in residential aged care in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Rosemary; Boyd, Michal; Foster, Sue; Robinson, Jackie; Gott, Merryn

    2016-07-01

    Organisational culture has been shown to impact on resident outcomes in residential aged care (RAC). This is particularly important given the growing number of residents with high palliative care needs. The study described herein (conducted from January 2013 to March 2014) examined survey results from a convenience sample of 46 managers, alongside interviews with a purposively selected sample of 23 bereaved family members in order to explore the perceptions of organisational culture within New Zealand RAC facilities in one large urban District Health Board. Results of the Organisational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) completed by managers indicated a preference for a 'Clan' and the structured 'Hierarchy' culture. Bereaved family interviews emphasised both positive and negative aspects of communication, leadership and teamwork, and relationship with residents. Study results from both managers' OCAI survey scores and next of kin interviews indicate that while the RAC facilities are culturally oriented towards providing quality care for residents, they may face barriers to adopting organisational processes supportive of this goal. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Examining leadership as a strategy to enhance health care service delivery in regional hospitals in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Sagaren; Gerwel Proches, Cecile N; Kader, Abdulla

    2018-01-01

    Background Four public hospitals in South Africa, which render both specialized and nonspecialized services to thousands of patients, were examined to determine the impact of leadership on health care service delivery. These hospitals were inundated by various problems that were impacting negatively on health care service delivery. Purpose This research study aimed to gain a comprehensive understanding of the challenges, complexities and constraints facing public health care in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) and to examine leadership as a strategy to enhance healthcare service delivery with a particular focus on four regional hospitals in the KZN Province. Methods The mixed-method research approach was utilized. Purposive sampling and stratified random sampling were employed in the research setting, and in-depth, semistructured interviews and questionnaires were used to collect data. Data were analyzed using the Nvivo computer software package for in-depth interviews and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software for the quantitative analysis. Results The research findings showed that the current leadership framework adopted by the health care leaders in regional hospitals in KZN is weak and is contributing to poor health care service delivery. Conclusion This study, therefore, aimed to address the current challenges and weaknesses that are impacting negatively on health care service delivery in regional hospitals in the KZN Province and made recommendations for improvement. PMID:29535529

  19. Examining leadership as a strategy to enhance health care service delivery in regional hospitals in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Sagaren; Gerwel Proches, Cecile N; Kader, Abdulla

    2018-01-01

    Four public hospitals in South Africa, which render both specialized and nonspecialized services to thousands of patients, were examined to determine the impact of leadership on health care service delivery. These hospitals were inundated by various problems that were impacting negatively on health care service delivery. This research study aimed to gain a comprehensive understanding of the challenges, complexities and constraints facing public health care in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) and to examine leadership as a strategy to enhance healthcare service delivery with a particular focus on four regional hospitals in the KZN Province. The mixed-method research approach was utilized. Purposive sampling and stratified random sampling were employed in the research setting, and in-depth, semistructured interviews and questionnaires were used to collect data. Data were analyzed using the Nvivo computer software package for in-depth interviews and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software for the quantitative analysis. The research findings showed that the current leadership framework adopted by the health care leaders in regional hospitals in KZN is weak and is contributing to poor health care service delivery. This study, therefore, aimed to address the current challenges and weaknesses that are impacting negatively on health care service delivery in regional hospitals in the KZN Province and made recommendations for improvement.

  20. Using information technology for an improved pharmaceutical care delivery in developing countries. Study case: Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edoh, Thierry Oscar; Teege, Gunnar

    2011-10-01

    One of the problems in health care in developing countries is the bad accessibility of medicine in pharmacies for patients. Since this is mainly due to a lack of organization and information, it should be possible to improve the situation by introducing information and communication technology. However, for several reasons, standard solutions are not applicable here. In this paper, we describe a case study in Benin, a West African developing country. We identify the problem and the existing obstacles for applying standard ECommerce solutions. We develop an adapted system approach and describe a practical test which has shown that the approach has the potential of actually improving the pharmaceutical care delivery. Finally, we consider the security aspects of the system and propose an organizational solution for some specific security problems.

  1. Improving the delivery of care and reducing healthcare costs with the digitization of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noffsinger, R; Chin, S

    2000-01-01

    In the coming years, the digitization of information and the Internet will be extremely powerful in reducing healthcare costs while assisting providers in the delivery of care. One example of healthcare inefficiency that can be managed through information digitization is the process of prescription writing. Due to the handwritten and verbal communication surrounding prescription writing, as well as the multiple tiers of authorizations, the prescription drug process causes extensive financial waste as well as medical errors, lost time, and even fatal accidents. Electronic prescription management systems are being designed to address these inefficiencies. By utilizing new electronic prescription systems, physicians not only prescribe more accurately, but also improve formulary compliance thereby reducing pharmacy utilization. These systems expand patient care by presenting proactive alternatives at the point of prescription while reducing costs and providing additional benefits for consumers and healthcare providers.

  2. Service readiness, health facility management practices, and delivery care utilization in five states of Nigeria: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Anastasia J; Ilombu, Onyebuchi; Akinyemi, Akanni Ibukun

    2016-10-06

    Existing studies of delivery care in Nigeria have identified socioeconomic and cultural factors as the primary determinants of health facility delivery. However, no study has investigated the association between supply-side factors and health facility delivery. Our study analyzed the role of supply-side factors, particularly health facility readiness and management practices for provision of quality maternal health services. Using linked data from the 2005 and 2009 health facility and household surveys in the five states in which the Community Participation for Action in the Social Sector (COMPASS) project was implemented, indices of health service readiness and management were developed based on World Health Organization guidelines. Multilevel logistic regression models were run to determine the association between these indices and health facility delivery among 2710 women aged 15-49 years whose last child was born within the five years preceding the surveys and who lived in 51 COMPASS LGAs. The health facility delivery rate increased from 25.4 % in 2005 to 44.1 % in 2009. Basic amenities for antenatal care provision, readiness to deliver basic emergency obstetric and newborn care, and management practices supportive of quality maternal health services were suboptimal in health facilities surveyed and did not change significantly between 2005 and 2009. The LGA mean index of basic amenities for antenatal care provision was more positively associated with the odds of health facility delivery in 2009 than in 2005, and in rural than in urban areas. The LGA mean index of management practices was associated with significantly lower odds of health facility delivery in rural than in urban areas. The LGA mean index of facility readiness to deliver basic emergency obstetric and neonatal care declined slightly from 5.16 in 2005 to 3.98 in 2009 and was unrelated to the odds of health facility delivery. Supply-side factors appeared to play a role in health facility delivery

  3. Surgical site infection following hernia repair in the day care setting of a developing country: a retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardhan, A.; Mazahir, S.; Alvi, A.R.; Murtaza, G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence proportion of surgical site infection following hernia repair in a daycare setting at a tertiary care hospital of a low-income country. Methods: The retrospective audit was done at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from June 1, 2008 to May 30, 2009. Patients with age >15 years who underwent Lichenstein's open mesh repair in daycare were included. Surgical Site Infection was labelled if the records revealed any of the following: opening of the wound by the primary surgeon; pain, tenderness and raised temperature of skin; purulent discharge from the wound; if the surgeon had documented it as a surgical site infection. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis. Results: After reviewing the retrieved files, 104 patients were found eligible. Of them, 102 (98%) were males. Overall wound-related complications were found in 13 (12.5%), whereas surgical site infection was found in 8 (7.7%) patients. The mean age of those with infections was 38.7+-18 year, while that of those with no surgical site infection was 47.8+-18 years. Smoking was found significantly associated with surgical site infection with 5.8 times higher incidence as compared to the non-smokers (OR with 95% CI: 5.6 (1.2, 25.3)). Conclusions: The incidence of surgical site infection after hernia repair with mesh in a daycare setting at a tertiary care hospital of a low-income country was higher than internationally reported incidence. Smoking was found to be a significant risk factor. (author)

  4. Implementation of Enhanced Recovery After Surgery: a strategy to transform surgical care across a health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramlich, Leah M; Sheppard, Caroline E; Wasylak, Tracy; Gilmour, Loreen E; Ljungqvist, Olle; Basualdo-Hammond, Carlota; Nelson, Gregg

    2017-05-19

    Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) programs have been shown to have a positive impact on outcome. The ERAS care system includes an evidence-based guideline, an implementation program, and an interactive audit system to support practice change. The purpose of this study is to describe the use of the Theoretic Domains Framework (TDF) in changing surgical care and application of the Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) model to analyze end-to-end implementation of ERAS in colorectal surgery across multiple sites within a single health system. The ultimate intent of this work is to allow for the development of a model for spread, scale, and sustainability of ERAS in Alberta Health Services (AHS). ERAS for colorectal surgery was implemented at two sites and then spread to four additional sites. The ERAS Interactive Audit System (EIAS) was used to assess compliance with the guidelines, length of stay, readmissions, and complications. Data sources informing knowledge translation included surveys, focus groups, interviews, and other qualitative data sources such as minutes and status updates. The QUERI model and TDF were used to thematically analyze 189 documents with 2188 quotes meeting the inclusion criteria. Data sources were analyzed for barriers or enablers, organized into a framework that included individual to organization impact, and areas of focus for guideline implementation. Compliance with the evidence-based guidelines for ERAS in colorectal surgery at baseline was 40%. Post implementation compliance, consistent with adoption of best practice, improved to 65%. Barriers and enablers were categorized as clinical practice (22%), individual provider (26%), organization (19%), external environment (7%), and patients (25%). In the Alberta context, 26% of barriers and enablers to ERAS implementation occurred at the site and unit levels, with a provider focus 26% of the time, a patient focus 26% of the time, and a system focus 22% of the time. Using the

  5. Delivery of eye and vision services in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthea M Burnett

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Routine eye and vision assessments are vital for the detection and subsequent management of vision loss, which is particularly important for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, who face higher rates of vision loss than other Australians. In order to guide improvements, this paper will describe patterns, variations and gaps in these eye and vision assessments for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Methods: Clinical audits from 124 primary health care centres (sample size 15,175 from five Australian States and Territories were conducted during 2005-2012. Main outcome measure was adherence to current guidelines for delivery of eye and vision assessments to adults with diabetes, those without a diagnosed major chronic disease and children attending primary health care centres. Results: Overall delivery of recommended eye and vision assessments varied widely between health centres. Of the adults with diabetes, 45% had a visual acuity assessment recorded within the previous 12 months (health centre range 0-88%, and 33% had a retinal examination recorded (health centre range 0-73%. Of the adults with no diagnosed major chronic disease, 31% had a visual acuity assessment recorded within the previous two years (health centre range 0-30%, and 13% had received an examination for trichiasis (health centre range 0-40%. In children, 49% had a record of a vision assessment (health centre range 0-97%, and 25% had a record of an examination for trachoma within the previous 12 months (health centre range 0-63%. Conclusions: There was considerable range, and variation in the recorded delivery of scheduled eye and vision assessments across health centres. Sharing the successful strategies of the better-performing health centres to support focused improvements in key areas of need may increase overall rates of eye examinations – important for the timely detection, referral and treatment of eye conditions affecting Aboriginal and

  6. Older women's health priorities and perceptions of care delivery: results of the WOW health survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Cara; Mayo, Nancy; Ducharme, Francine

    2005-07-19

    As women get older, their health priorities change. We surveyed a sample of older Canadian women to investigate what health priorities are of concern to them, their perceptions about the care delivered to address these priorities and the extent to which priorities and perceptions of care differ across age groups and provinces. The WOW (What Older women Want) cross-sectional health survey was mailed in October 2003 to 5000 community-dwelling women aged 55-95 years from 10 Canadian provinces. Women were asked questions on 26 health priorities according to the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, and their perceptions of whether these priorities were being addressed by health care providers through screening or counselling. Differences in priorities and perceptions of care delivery were examined across age groups and provinces. The response rate was 52%. The mean age of the respondents was 71 (standard deviation 7) years. The health priorities identified most frequently by the respondents were preventing memory loss (88% of the respondents), learning about the side effects of medications (88%) and correcting vision impairment (86%). Items least frequently selected were counselling about community programs (28%), counselling about exercise (33%) and pneumonia vaccination (33%). Up to 97% of the women recalled being adequately screened for heart disease and stroke risk factors, but as little as 11% reported receiving counselling regarding concerns about memory loss or end-of-life issues. Women who stated that specific priorities were of great concern or importance to them were more than twice as likely as those who stated that they were not of great concern or importance to perceive that these priorities were being addressed: osteoporosis (odds ratio [OR] 2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.1- 3.2), end-of-life care (OR 2.6, 95% CI 2.0-3.4), anxiety reduction (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.8-2.6), fall prevention (OR 2.1, 95

  7. Whiteboard Use in Labor and Delivery: A Tool to Improve Patient Knowledge of the Name of the Delivery Provider and Satisfaction with Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Verónica Maria; Sun, Mengyang; Bernstein, Peter S; Ferzli, Myriam; Kim, Mimi; Goffman, Dena

    2018-04-01

    Introduction The impact of whiteboard use in labor rooms has not previously been studied. This quality improvement study aimed to evaluate patient knowledge of their delivering physician's name and the change in patient satisfaction after the implementation of a whiteboard in labor rooms. Methods A multidisciplinary team designed a dry-erase whiteboard prompting care providers to record their names, roles and patient care information. A questionnaire was administered to patients before and after the whiteboard implementation. Patients who had a planned cesarean or vaginal birth within 1 h of admission were excluded. Categorical variables were compared using Chi square and Fisher's exact tests. A multivariable logistic regression was performed to control for confounders. Results 191 patients completed the questionnaires. Although patients were not randomized, the pre-and post-intervention groups were similar. Post-intervention, we found a significant increase in recalling the delivery resident's name [21/101 (20.8%) vs. 33/90 (36.7%), p = 0.016] and a non-significant increase in recalling the name of the attending and nurse [19/101 (18.8%) vs. 23/90 (25.6%), p = 0.296; 46/101 (45.5%) vs. 53/90 (58.9%), p = 0.082]. Post-intervention, patient satisfaction with care was significantly higher [83/101 (82.2%) vs. 83/89 (93.3%), p = 0.028]. Knowledge of the delivery resident's name was associated with higher patient satisfaction [115/137 (84%) vs. 51/53 (96%), p = 0.03] and attendance of the postpartum care visit [50.4% (69/137) vs. 64.8% (35/54), p = 0.049]. Discussion The use of a well-designed whiteboard increases laboring patients' knowledge of their delivery physician's name and may improve patient satisfaction with care on Labor and Delivery.

  8. Explaining the de-prioritization of primary prevention: Physicians' perceptions of their role in the delivery of primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Christina L

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While physicians are key to primary preventive care, their delivery rate is sub-optimal. Assessment of physician beliefs is integral to understanding current behavior and the conceptualization of strategies to increase delivery. Methods A focus group with regional primary care physician (PCP Opinion Leaders was conducted as a formative step towards regional assessment of attitudes and barriers regarding preventive care delivery in primary care. Following the PRECEDE-PROCEED model, the focus group aim was to identify conceptual themes that characterize PCP beliefs and practices regarding preventive care. Seven male and five female PCPs (family medicine, internal medicine participated in the audiotaped discussion of their perceptions and behaviors in delivery of primary preventive care. The transcribed audiotape was qualitatively analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Results The PCPs' own perceived role in daily practice was a significant barrier to primary preventive care. The prevailing PCP model was the "one-stop-shop" physician who could provide anything from primary to tertiary care, but whose provision was dominated by the delivery of immediate diagnoses and treatments, namely secondary care. Conclusions The secondary-tertiary prevention PCP model sustained the expectation of immediacy of corrective action, cure, and satisfaction sought by patients and physicians alike, and, thereby, de-prioritized primary prevention in practice. Multiple barriers beyond the immediate control of PCP must be surmounted for the full integration of primary prevention in primary care practice. However, independent of other barriers, physician cognitive value of primary prevention in practice, a base mediator of physician behavior, will need to be increased to frame the likelihood of such integration.

  9. Innovative care models for high-cost Medicare beneficiaries: delivery system and payment reform to accelerate adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Karen; Buttorff, Christine; Leff, Bruce; Samus, Quincy M; Szanton, Sarah; Wolff, Jennifer L; Bandeali, Farhan

    2015-05-01

    About a third of Medicare beneficiaries are covered by Medicare Advantage (MA) plans or accountable care organizations (ACOs). As a result of assuming financial risk for Medicare services and/or being eligible for shared savings, these organizations have an incentive to adopt models of delivering care that contribute to better care, improved health outcomes, and lower cost. This paper identifies innovative care models across the care continuum for high-cost Medicare beneficiaries that MA plans and ACOs could adopt to improve care while potentially achieving savings. It suggests policy changes that would accelerate testing and spread of promising care delivery model innovations. Targeted review of the literature to identify care delivery models focused on high-cost or high-risk Medicare beneficiaries. This paper presents select delivery models for high-risk Medicare beneficiaries across the care continuum that show promise of yielding better care at lower cost that could be considered for adoption by MA plans and ACOs. Common to these models are elements of the Wagner Chronic Care Model, including practice redesign to incorporate a team approach to care, the inclusion of nonmedical personnel, efforts to promote patient engagement, supporting provider education on innovations,and information systems allowing feedback of information to providers. The goal of these models is to slow the progression to long-term care, reduce health risks, and minimize adverse health impacts, all while achieving savings.These models attempt to maintain the ability of high-risk individuals to live in the home or a community-based setting, thereby avoiding costly institutional care. Identifying and implementing promising care delivery models will become increasingly important in launching successful population health initiatives. MA plans and ACOs stand to benefit financially from adopting care delivery models for high-risk Medicare beneficiaries that reduce hospitalization. Spreading

  10. An Innovative Program in the Science of Health Care Delivery: Workforce Diversity in the Business of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essary, Alison C; Wade, Nathaniel L

    2016-01-01

    According to the most recent statistics from the National Center for Education Statistics, disparities in enrollment in undergraduate and graduate education are significant and not improving commensurate with the national population. Similarly, only 12% of graduating medical students and 13% of graduating physician assistant students are from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups. Established in 2012 to promote health care transformation at the organization and system levels, the School for the Science of Health Care Delivery is aligned with the university and college missions to create innovative, interdisciplinary curricula that meet the needs of our diverse patient and community populations. Three-year enrollment trends in the program exceed most national benchmarks, particularly among students who identify as Hispanic and American Indian/Alaska Native. The Science of Health Care Delivery program provides students a seamless learning experience that prepares them to be solutions-oriented leaders proficient in the business of health care, change management, innovation, and data-driven decision making. Defined as the study and design of systems, processes, leadership and management used to optimize health care delivery and health for all, the Science of Health Care Delivery will prepare the next generation of creative, diverse, pioneering leaders in health care.

  11. Office-Based Tools and Primary Care Visit Communication, Length, and Preventive Service Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafata, Jennifer Elston; Shay, L Aubree; Brown, Richard; Street, Richard L

    2016-04-01

    The use of physician office-based tools such as electronic health records (EHRs), health risk appraisal (HRA) instruments, and written patient reminder lists is encouraged to support efficient, high-quality, patient-centered care. We evaluate the association of exam room use of EHRs, HRA instruments, and self-generated written patient reminder lists with patient-physician communication behaviors, recommended preventive health service delivery, and visit length. Observational study of 485 office visits with 64 primary care physicians practicing in a health system serving the Detroit metropolitan area. Study data were obtained from patient surveys, direct observation, office visit audio-recordings, and automated health system records. Outcome measures included visit length in minutes, patient use of active communication behaviors, physician use of supportive talk and partnership-building communication behaviors, and percentage of delivered guideline-recommended preventive health services for which patients are eligible and due. Simultaneous linear regression models were used to evaluate associations between tool use and outcomes. Adjusted models controlled for patient characteristics, physician characteristics, characteristics of the relationship between the patient and physician, and characteristics of the environment in which the visit took place. Prior to adjusting for other factors, visits in which the EHR was used on average were significantly (p communication behaviors facilitating patient involvement (2.1 vs. 2.6 occurrences), but more use of active patient communication behaviors (4.4 vs. 2.6). Likewise, HRA use was significantly associated with increased preventive services delivery (62.1 percent vs. 57.0 percent). All relationships remained significant (p > .05) in adjusted models with the exception of that between HRA use and preventive service delivery. Office-based tools intended to facilitate the implementation of desired primary care practice

  12. Coverage and Financial Risk Protection for Institutional Delivery: How Universal Is Provision of Maternal Health Care in India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinja, Shankar; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Gupta, Rakesh; Sharma, Atul; Rana, Saroj Kumar; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    India aims to achieve universal access to institutional delivery. We undertook this study to estimate the universality of institutional delivery care for pregnant women in Haryana state in India. To assess the coverage of institutional delivery, we analyze service coverage (coverage of public sector institutional delivery), population coverage (coverage among different districts and wealth quintiles of the population) and financial risk protection (catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment as a result of out-of-pocket expenditure for delivery). We analyzed cross-sectional data collected from a randomly selected sample of 12,191 women who had delivered a child in the last one year from the date of data collection in Haryana state. Five indicators were calculated to evaluate coverage and financial risk protection for institutional delivery--proportion of public sector deliveries, out-of-pocket expenditure, percentage of women who incurred no expenses, prevalence of catastrophic expenditure for institutional delivery and incidence of impoverishment due to out-of-pocket expenditure for delivery. These indicators were calculated for the public and private sectors for 5 wealth quintiles and 21 districts of the state. The coverage of institutional delivery in Haryana state was 82%, of which 65% took place in public sector facilities. Approximately 63% of the women reported no expenditure on delivery in the public sector. The mean out-of-pocket expenditures for delivery in the public and private sectors in Haryana were INR 771 (USD 14.2) and INR 12,479 (USD 229), respectively, which were catastrophic for 1.6% and 22% of households, respectively. Our findings suggest that there is considerably high coverage of institutional delivery care in Haryana state, with significant financial risk protection in the public sector. However, coverage and financial risk protection for institutional delivery vary substantially across districts and among different socio

  13. AcademyHealth's Delivery System Science Fellowship: Training Embedded Researchers to Design, Implement, and Evaluate New Models of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanani, Nisha; Hahn, Erin; Gould, Michael; Brunisholz, Kimberly; Savitz, Lucy; Holve, Erin

    2017-07-01

    AcademyHealth's Delivery System Science Fellowship (DSSF) provides a paid postdoctoral pragmatic learning experience to build capacity within learning healthcare systems to conduct research in applied settings. The fellowship provides hands-on training and professional leadership opportunities for researchers. Since its inception in 2012, the program has grown rapidly, with 16 health systems participating in the DSSF to date. In addition to specific projects conducted within health systems (and numerous publications associated with those initiatives), the DSSF has made several broader contributions to the field, including defining delivery system science, identifying a set of training objectives for researchers working in delivery systems, and developing a national collaborative network of care delivery organizations, operational leaders, and trainees. The DSSF is one promising approach to support higher-value care by promoting continuous learning and improvement in health systems. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  14. Status of governmental oral health care delivery system in Haryana, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Vashist

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health system should be organized to meet the needs of entire population of the nation. This means that the state has the direct responsibility for the health of its population and improving the quality of life through research, education, and provision of health services. The present study was conducted to evaluate the government oral health care delivery system in Haryana, India. Materials and Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted among 135 dental care units (DCUs of various primary health centers (PHCs, community health centers (CHCs, and general hospitals (GHs existing in the state by employing a cluster random sampling technique. Data regarding the provision of water and electricity supply, dental man power and their qualification, number and type of instruments in the dental operatory unit, etc., were collected on a structured format. Statistical analysis was done using number and percentages (SPSS package version 16. Results: Alternative source of electricity (generator existed in only a few of health centers. About 93.4% (155 of the staff were graduates (BDS and 6.6% (11 were postgraduates (MDS. Ultrasonic scaler was available at dental units of 83.1% (64 of PHCs, 73.1% (19 of CHCs, and 93.8% (30 of GHs. Patient drapes were provided in 48.1% (65 of the DCUs, doctor′s aprons were provided in 74.1% (100 of the places. Conclusion: There is a shortfall in infrastructure and significant problem with the adequacy of working facilities. A great deal of effort is required to harmonize the oral health care delivery system.

  15. Towards a Better Health Care Delivery System: The Tamil Nadu model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathi, R; Sinha, S P

    2016-01-01

    The Tamil Nadu model of public health is renowned for its success in providing quality health services at an affordable cost especially to the rural people. Tamil Nadu is the only state with a distinctive public health cadre in the district level and also the first state to enact a Public Health Act in 1939. Tamil Nadu has gained significant ground in the various aspects of health in the last few decades largely because of the significant reforms in its health sector which dates back to 1980s which saw rigorous expansion of rural health infrastructure in the state besides deployment of thousands of multipurpose health workers as village health nurses in rural areas. Effective implementation of Universal Immunization Programme, formation of Tamil Nadu Medical Services Corporation for regulating the drug procurement and promoting generic drugs, early incorporation of indigenous system of medicine into health care service, formulation of a health policy in 2003 by the state with special emphasis on low-income, disadvantaged communities alongside efficient implementation of The Tamil Nadu Health Systems Project (TNHSP) are the major factors which contributed for the success of the state. The importance of good political commitment and leadership in the health gains of the state warrants special mention. Moreover, the economic growth of the state, improved literacy rate, gender equality, and lowered fertility rate in the last few decades and contributions from the private sector have their share in the public health success of the state. In spite of some flaws and challenges, the Tamil Nadu Model remains the prototype health care delivery system in resource-limited settings which can be emulated by other states also toward a better health care delivery system.

  16. Towards a better health care delivery system: The Tamil Nadu model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Parthasarathi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tamil Nadu model of public health is renowned for its success in providing quality health services at an affordable cost especially to the rural people. Tamil Nadu is the only state with a distinctive public health cadre in the district level and also the first state to enact a Public Health Act in 1939. Tamil Nadu has gained significant ground in the various aspects of health in the last few decades largely because of the significant reforms in its health sector which dates back to 1980s which saw rigorous expansion of rural health infrastructure in the state besides deployment of thousands of multipurpose health workers as village health nurses in rural areas. Effective implementation of Universal Immunization Programme, formation of Tamil Nadu Medical Services Corporation for regulating the drug procurement and promoting generic drugs, early incorporation of indigenous system of medicine into health care service, formulation of a health policy in 2003 by the state with special emphasis on low-income, disadvantaged communities alongside efficient implementation of The Tamil Nadu Health Systems Project (TNHSP are the major factors which contributed for the success of the state. The importance of good political commitment and leadership in the health gains of the state warrants special mention. Moreover, the economic growth of the state, improved literacy rate, gender equality, and lowered fertility rate in the last few decades and contributions from the private sector have their share in the public health success of the state. In spite of some flaws and challenges, the Tamil Nadu Model remains the prototype health care delivery system in resource-limited settings which can be emulated by other states also toward a better health care delivery system.

  17. Closed Incision Negative Pressure Therapy Versus Standard of Care Surgical Dressing in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-06-07

    Surgical Wound; Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty; Wounds and Injuries; Joint Disease; Musculoskeletal Disease; Prosthesis-Related Infections; Infection; Postoperative Complications; Pathologic Processes

  18. Unconscious race and social class bias among acute care surgical clinicians and clinical treatment decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Adil H; Schneider, Eric B; Sriram, N; Dossick, Deborah S; Scott, Valerie K; Swoboda, Sandra M; Losonczy, Lia; Haut, Elliott R; Efron, David T; Pronovost, Peter J; Lipsett, Pamela A; Cornwell, Edward E; MacKenzie, Ellen J; Cooper, Lisa A; Freischlag, Julie A

    2015-05-01

    , 0.66 [95% CI, 0.57-0.75]) relative to men (mean IAT D scores, 0.44 [95% CI, 0.37-0.52] and 0.82 [95% CI, 0.75-0.89], respectively). In univariate analyses, we found an association between race/social class bias and 3 of 27 possible patient-care decisions. Multivariable analyses revealed no association between the IAT D scores and vignette-based clinical assessments. Unconscious social class and race biases were not significantly associated with clinical decision making among acute care surgical clinicians. Further studies involving real physician-patient interactions may be warranted.

  19. Effects of a surgical ward care protocol following open colon surgery as part of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, BoYeoul; Park, SungHee; Park, KyuJoo; Ryoo, SeungBum

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the effects of a standardised care protocol as part of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme on the management of patients who underwent open colon surgery at the University Hospital, South Korea. Patients who undergo open colon surgery often have concerns about their care as they prepare for hospitalisation. By shortening hospital stay lengths, enhanced recovery after surgery programmes could reduce the number of opportunities for patient education and communication with nurses. Therefore, our surgical team developed an enhanced recovery after surgery programme, applied using a care protocol for patients with colorectal cancer, that spans the entire recovery process. A retrospective, comparative study was conducted using a care protocol as part of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme. Comparisons were made before and after the implementation of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme with a care protocol. Records of 219 patients who underwent open colon surgery were retrospectively audited. The records were grouped according to the care protocol used (enhanced recovery after surgery programme with a care protocol or traditional care programme). The outcomes, including postoperative bowel function recovery, postoperative pain control, recovery time and postoperative complications, were compared between two categories. Patients who were managed using the programme with a care protocol had shorter hospital stays, fewer complications, such as postoperative ileus wound infections, and emergency room visits than those who were managed using the traditional care programme. The findings can be used to facilitate the implementation of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme with a care protocol following open colon surgery. We present a care protocol that enables effective management using consistent and standardised education providing bedside care for patients who undergo open colon surgery. This care protocol empowers long

  20. Assisted Vaginal Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Assisted Vaginal Delivery Home For Patients Search FAQs Assisted Vaginal ... Vaginal Delivery FAQ192, February 2016 PDF Format Assisted Vaginal Delivery Labor, Delivery, and Postpartum Care What is ...

  1. [Medical and surgical health care for congenital heart disease: a panoramic vision of the reality in Mexico. Inquiry 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; De-la-Llata, Manuel; Vizcaíno, Alfredo; Ramírez, Samuel; Bolio, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    The only way to characterize the Mexican problem related to congenital heart disease care is promoting the creation of a national database for registering the organization, resources, and related activities. The Health Secretary of Mexico adopted a Spanish registration model to design a survey for obtaining a national Mexican reference in congenital heart disease. This survey was distributed to all directors of medical and/or surgical health care centers for congenital heart disease in Mexico. This communication presents the results obtained in relation to organization, resources and activities performed during the last year 2009. From the 22 health care centers which answered the survey 10 were reference centers (45%) and 12 were assistant centers (55%). All of them are provided with cardiologic auxiliary diagnostic methods. Except one, all centers have at least one bidimentional echocardiography apparatus. There is a general deficit between material and human resources detected in our study. Therapeutic actions for congenital heart disease (70% surgical and 30% therapeutical interventionism) show a clear centralization tendency for this kind of health care in Mexico City, Monterrey and finally Guadalajara. Due to the participation of almost all cardiac health centers in Mexico, our study provides an important information related to organization, resources, and medical and/or surgical activities for congenital heart disease. The data presented not only show Mexican reality, but allows us to identify better the national problematic for establishing priorities and propose solution alternatives.

  2. Delivery of care consistent with the psychosocial standards in pediatric cancer: Current practices in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialla, Michele A; Canter, Kimberly S; Chen, Fang Fang; Kolb, E Anders; Sandler, Eric; Wiener, Lori; Kazak, Anne E

    2018-03-01

    With published evidence-based Standards for Psychosocial Care for Children with Cancer and their Families, it is important to know the current status of their implementation. This paper presents data on delivery of psychosocial care related to the Standards in the United States. Pediatric oncologists, psychosocial leaders, and administrators in pediatric oncology from 144 programs completed an online survey. Participants reported on the extent to which psychosocial care consistent with the Standards was implemented and was comprehensive and state of the art. They also reported on specific practices and services for each Standard and the extent to which psychosocial care was integrated into broader medical care. Participants indicated that psychosocial care consistent with the Standards was usually or always provided at their center for most of the Standards. However, only half of the oncologists (55.6%) and psychosocial leaders (45.6%) agreed or strongly agreed that their psychosocial care was comprehensive and state of the art. Types of psychosocial care provided included evidence-based and less established approaches but were most often provided when problems were identified, rather than proactively. The perception of state of the art care was associated with practices indicative of integrated psychosocial care and the extent to which the Standards are currently implemented. Many oncologists and psychosocial leaders perceive that the delivery of psychosocial care at their center is consistent with the Standards. However, care is quite variable, with evidence for the value of more integrated models of psychosocial services. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The effectiveness of birth plans in increasing use of skilled care at delivery and postnatal care in rural Tanzania: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magoma, Moke; Requejo, Jennifer; Campbell, Oona; Cousens, Simon; Merialdi, Mario; Filippi, Veronique

    2013-04-01

    To determine the effectiveness of birth plans in increasing use of skilled care at delivery and in the postnatal period among antenatal care (ANC) attendees in a rural district with low occupancy of health units for delivery but high antenatal care uptake in northern Tanzania. Cluster randomised trial in Ngorongoro district, Arusha region, involving 16 health units (8 per arm). Nine hundred and five pregnant women at 24 weeks of gestation and above (404 in the intervention arm) were recruited and followed up to at least 1 month postpartum. Skilled delivery care uptake was 16.8% higher in the intervention units than in the control [95% CI 2.6-31.0; P = 0.02]. Postnatal care utilisation in the first month of delivery was higher (difference in proportions: 30.0% [95% CI 1.3-47.7; P < 0.01]) and also initiated earlier (mean duration 6.6 ± 1.7 days vs. 20.9 ± 4.4 days, P < 0.01) in the intervention than in the control arm. Women's and providers' reports of care satisfaction (received or provided) did not differ greatly between the two arms of the study (difference in proportion: 12.1% [95% CI -6.3-30.5] P = 0.17 and 6.9% [95% CI -3.2-17.1] P = 0.15, respectively). Implementation of birth plans during ANC can increase the uptake of skilled delivery and post delivery care in the study district without negatively affecting women's and providers' satisfaction with available ANC services. Birth plans should be considered along with the range of other recommended interventions as a strategy to improve the uptake of maternal health services. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Older men’s satisfaction (or dissatisfaction with health care delivery in St Catherine, Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Bourne

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Paul A Bourne1, Chloe Morris1, Christopher AD Charles2, Maureen D Kerr-Campbell3, Denise Eldemire-Shearer11Department of Community Health and Psychiatry and 2King Graduate School, Monroe College, Bronx, and Center for Victim Support, Harlem Hospital Center, New York; 3Systems Development Unit, Main Library, Faculty of Humanities and Education, The University of the West Indies, Mona, JamaicaAbstract: Patient satisfaction and quality of life are becoming increasingly important among the more traditional clinical outcomes in the monitoring and evaluation of health care delivery. This study explored patient’s self-rated health and patient satisfaction with health care ­providers, and examined whether health care providers are a barrier to patient care. The sample consisted of 2000 men aged 55 years and older in the parish of St Catherine, Jamaica. A 132-item ­questionnaire was used to collect the data. Descriptive statistics was used to provide information about their satisfaction with the health care system. Seventy-four percent of the sample indicated good self-rated health status (excellent, 19.0%. Forty-seven percent of the sample had sought advice from a health care provider in the last 12 months; 14.1% understood the advice of the clinician, community health aide (19.9%, pharmacist (15.4%, nurse (2.1% and nurse aide (4.6%. The respondents indicated that community health aides contributed more to improving their health (43.4% when compared with nurses (34.8%, clinicians (17.5%, and herbalists (3.7%. Furthermore, 31.7% indicated that their medical doctors were hospitable and 4.2% were knowledgeable. Negative self-rated health, perceived lack of knowledge among doctors, lack of understanding of advice from health care providers, are just some of the factors associated with dissatisfaction of patients with chronic conditions. These findings provide a framework and foundation from which further studies on effective intervention aimed at

  5. Proximity to Pediatric Cardiac Surgical Care among Adolescents with Congenital Heart Defects in 11 New York Counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerhalter, Kristin M; Insaf, Tabassum Z; Akkaya-Hocagil, Tugba; McGarry, Claire E; Farr, Sherry L; Downing, Karrie F; Lui, George K; Zaidi, Ali N; Van Zutphen, Alissa R

    2017-11-01

    Many individuals with congenital heart defects (CHDs) discontinue cardiac care in adolescence, putting them at risk of adverse health outcomes. Because geographic barriers may contribute to cessation of care, we sought to characterize geographic access to comprehensive cardiac care among adolescents with CHDs. Using a population-based, 11-county surveillance system of CHDs in New York, we characterized proximity to the nearest pediatric cardiac surgical care center among adolescents aged 11 to 19 years with CHDs. Residential addresses were extracted from surveillance records documenting 2008 to 2010 healthcare encounters. Addresses were geocoded using ArcGIS and the New York State Street and Address Maintenance Program, a statewide address point database. One-way drive and public transit time from residence to nearest center were calculated using R packages gmapsdistance and rgeos with the Google Maps Distance Matrix application programming interface. A marginal model was constructed to identify predictors associated with one-way travel time. We identified 2522 adolescents with 3058 corresponding residential addresses and 12 pediatric cardiac surgical care centers. The median drive time from residence to nearest center was 18.3 min, and drive time was 30 min or less for 2475 (80.9%) addresses. Predicted drive time was longest for rural western addresses in high poverty census tracts (68.7 min). Public transit was available for most residences in urban areas but for few in rural areas. We identified areas with geographic barriers to surgical care. Future research is needed to determine how these barriers influence continuity of care among adolescents with CHDs. Birth Defects Research 109:1494-1503, 2017.© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Strength of primary care service delivery: a comparative study of European countries, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlič, Danica R; Sever, Maja; Klemenc-Ketiš, Zalika; Švab, Igor; Vainieri, Milena; Seghieri, Chiara; Maksuti, Alem

    2018-05-01

    AimWe sought to examine strength of primary care service delivery as measured by selected process indicators by general practitioners from 31 European countries plus Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. We explored the relation between strength of service delivery and healthcare expenditures. The strength of a country's primary care is determined by the degree of development of a combination of core primary care dimensions in the context of its healthcare system. This study analyses the strength of service delivery in primary care as measured through process indicators in 31 European countries plus Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. A comparative cross-sectional study design was applied using the QUALICOPC GP database. Data on the strength of primary healthcare were collected using a standardized GP questionnaire, which included 60 questions divided into 10 dimensions related to process, structure, and outcomes. A total of 6734 general practitioners participated. Data on healthcare expenditure were obtained from World Bank statistics. We conducted a correlation analysis to analyse the relationship between strength and healthcare expenditures.FindingsOur findings show that the strength of service delivery parameters is less than optimal in some countries, and there are substantial variations among countries. Continuity and comprehensiveness of care are significantly positively related to national healthcare expenditures; however, coordination of care is not.

  7. In-Person Communication Between Radiologists and Acute Care Surgeons Leads to Significant Alterations in Surgical Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Elliot C; Alam, Hasan B; Brown, Richard K J; Stojanovska, Jadranka; Davenport, Matthew S

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if direct in-person communication between an acute care surgical team and radiologists alters surgical decision making. Informed consent was waived for this institutional review board-exempt, HIPAA-compliant, prospective quality improvement study. From January 29, 2015 to December 10, 2015, semiweekly rounds lasting approximately 60 min were held between the on-call acute care surgery team (attending surgeon, chief resident, and residents) and one of three expert abdominal radiologists. A comprehensive imaging review was performed of recent and comparison examinations for cases selected by the surgeons in which medical and/or surgical decision making was pending. All reviewed examinations had available finalized reports known to the surgical team. RADPEER interradiologist concordance scores were assigned to all reviewed examinations. The impression and plan of the attending surgeon were recorded before and after each in-person review. One hundred patients were reviewed with 11 attending surgeons. The in-person meetings led to changes in surgeons' diagnostic impressions in 43% (43 of 100) and changes in medical and/or surgical planning in 43% (43 of 100; 20 acute changes, 23 nonacute changes, 19 changes in operative management) of cases. There were major discrepancies (RADPEER score ≥3) between the impression of the reviewing radiologist and the written report in 11% of cases (11 of 100). Targeted in-person collaboration between radiologists and acute care surgeons is associated with substantial and frequent changes in patient management, even when the original written report contains all necessary data. The primary mechanism seems to be promotion of a shared mental model that facilitates the exchange of complex information. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Caring to learn, learning to care: Inmate Hospice Volunteers and the Delivery of Prison End-of-Life Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloyes, Kristin G.; Rosenkranz, Susan J.; Supiano, Katherine P.; Berry, Patricia H.; Routt, Meghan; Llanque, Sarah M.; Shannon-Dorcy, Kathleen

    2017-01-01

    The increasing numbers of aging and chronically ill prisoners incarcerated in Western nations is well documented, as is the growing need for prison-based palliative and end-of-life care. Less often discussed is specifically how end-of-life care can and should be provided, by whom, and with what resources. One strategy incorporates prisoner volunteers into end-of-life services within a peer care program. This article reports on one such program based on focused ethnographic study including in-depth interviews with inmate hospice volunteers, nursing staff, and corrections officers working in the hospice program. We describe how inmate volunteers learn hospice care through formal education and training, supervised practice, guidance from more experienced inmates, and support from correctional staff. We discuss how emergent values of mentorship and stewardship are seen by volunteers and staff as integral to prison hospice sustainability and discuss implications of this volunteer-centric model for response-ability for the end-of-life care of prisoners. PMID:28100141

  9. A comparison of communication models of traditional and video-mediated health care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiris, George; Edison, Karen; Vijaykumar, Santosh

    2005-10-01

    While there may be benefits that accrue to the use of telemedicine technology in patient care, such as decreased costs and improved access, it has yet to be determined how telemedicine impacts patients' ability to express themselves and accordingly, how it impacts health care providers' communication of instructions or expressions of empathy. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of telemedicine technology on communication by comparing the style and content of communication between actual (i.e., face to face) and virtual (i.e., non-face to face, telemedical) dermatology visits. The hypothesis was that there is no difference in the content and style of communication between actual and virtual visits in dermatology. Face-to-face and video-mediated dermatology sessions were observed and also audiotaped, timed and transcribed. A content analysis was performed. Average duration of a face-to-face session was 11 min (S.D. 0.08) and of a telemedical session 9 min (S.D. 0.002). Small talk occurred in 20% of all face-to-face and 29.6% of all telemedical visits. Clinical assessment occurred in all sessions. Patient education occurred in 90% of face-to-face and 78% of telemedical visits. Other themes were also identified (e.g., discussion of treatment, promotion of compliance, psychosocial issues). In 14.8% of telemedical sessions technical issues were raised. Findings indicate that communication patterns in the two modes of care delivery are comparable.

  10. Missed surgical intensive care unit billing: potential financial impact of 24/7 faculty presence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Kimberly M; Bollins, John P; Armen, Scott B; Thomas, Yalaunda M; Steinberg, Steven M; Cook, Charles H

    2009-07-01

    To efficiently capture evaluation and management (E&M) and procedural billing in our surgical intensive care unit (SICU), we have developed an electronic billing system that links to the electronic medical record (EMR). In this system, only notes electronically signed and coded by an attending generate billing charges. We hypothesized that capture of missed billing during nighttime and weekends might be sufficient to subsidize 24/7 in-house attending coverage. A retrospective chart EMR review was performed of the EMRs for all SICU patients during a 2-month period. Note type, date, time, attending signature, and coding were analyzed. Notes without attending signature, diagnosis, or current procedural terminology (CPT) code were considered incomplete and identified as "missed billing." Four hundred and forty-three patients had 465 admissions generating 2,896 notes. Overall, 76% of notes were signed and coded by an attending and billed. Incomplete (not billed) notes represented an overall missed billing opportunity of $159,138 for the 2-month time period (approximately $954,000 annually). Unbilled E&M encounters during weekdays totaled $54,758, whereas unbilled E&M and procedures from weeknights and weekends totaled $88,408 ($44,566 and $43,842, respectively). Missed billing after-hours thus represents approximately $530K annually, extrapolating to approximately $220K in collections from our payer mix. Surprisingly, missed E&M and procedural billing during weekdays totaled $70,730 (approximately $425K billing, approximately $170K collections annually), and typically represented patients seen, but transferred from the SICU before attending documentation was completed. Capture of nighttime and weekend ICU collections alone may be insufficient to add faculty or incentivize in-house coverage, but could certainly complement other in-house derived revenues to such ends. In addition, missed daytime billing in busy modern ICUs can be substantial, and use of an EMR to identify

  11. The turn team: a novel strategy for reducing pressure ulcers in the surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Mary D; Cross, Linda C; Dunlap, Martha; Rencher, Rugenia; Larkins, Elizabeth R; Carpenter, David L; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-03-01

    Pressure ulcers cause significant morbidity and mortality in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU). The purpose of this study was to determine if a dedicated team tasked with turning and repositioning all hemodynamically stable SICU patients could decrease the formation of pressure ulcers. A total of 507 patients in a 20-bed SICU in a university hospital were assessed for pressure ulcers using a point prevalence strategy, between December 2008 and September 2010, before and after implementation of a team tasked with turning and repositioning all hemodynamically stable patients every 2 hours around the clock. At baseline, when frequent turning was encouraged but not required, a total of 42 pressure ulcers were identified in 278 patients. After implementation of the turn team, a total of 12 pressure ulcers were identified in 229 patients (p < 0.0001). The preintervention group included 34 stage I and II ulcers and 8 higher stage ulcers. After implementation of the turn team, there were 7 stage I and II ulcers and 5 higher stage ulcers. The average Braden score was 16.5 in the preintervention group and 13.4 in the postintervention group (p = 0.04), suggesting that pressure ulcers were occurring in higher risk patients after implementation of the turn team. A team dedicated to turning SICU patients every 2 hours dramatically decreased the incidence of pressure ulcers. The majority of stage I and stage II ulcers appear to be preventable with an aggressive intervention aimed at pressure ulcer prevention. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Obstetric Outcomes and Delivery-Related Health Care Utilization and Costs Among Pregnant Women With Multiple Chronic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelman, Tyler N. A.; Heisler, Michele; Dalton, Vanessa K.

    2018-01-01

    Our objective was to measure obstetric outcomes and delivery-related health care utilization and costs among pregnant women with multiple chronic conditions. We used 2013–2014 data from the National Inpatient Sample to measure obstetric outcomes and delivery-related health care utilization and costs among women with no chronic conditions, 1 chronic condition, and multiple chronic conditions. Women with multiple chronic conditions were at significantly higher risk than women with 1 chronic condition or no chronic conditions across all outcomes measured. High-value strategies are needed to improve birth outcomes among vulnerable mothers and their infants. PMID:29420168

  13. Bargaining power within couples and use of prenatal and delivery care in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle, K; Frankenberg, E; Thomas, D

    2001-06-01

    Indonesian women's power relative to that of their husbands is examined to determine how it affects use of prenatal and delivery care. Holding household resources constant, a woman's control over economic resources affects the couple's decision-making. Compared with a woman with no assets that she perceives as being her own, a woman with some share of household assets influences reproductive health decisions. Evidence suggests that her influence on service use also varies if a woman is better educated than her husband, comes from a background of higher social status than her husband's, or if her father is better educated than her father-in-law. Therefore, both economic and social dimensions of the distribution of power between spouses influence use of services, and conceptualizing power as multidimensional is useful for understanding couples' behavior.

  14. The Impact of Direct Provision Accommodation for Asylum Seekers on Organisation and Delivery of Local Primary Care and Social Care Services: A Case Study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pieper, Hans-Olaf

    2011-05-15

    Abstract Background Many western countries have policies of dispersal and direct provision accommodation (state-funded accommodation in an institutional centre) for asylum seekers. Most research focuses on its effect on the asylum seeking population. Little is known about the impact of direct provision accommodation on organisation and delivery of local primary care and social care services in the community. The aim of this research is to explore this issue. Methods In 2005 a direct provision accommodation centre was opened in a rural area in Ireland. A retrospective qualitative case study was designed comprising in-depth interviews with 37 relevant stakeholders. Thematic analysis following the principles of framework analysis was applied. Results There was lack of advance notification to primary care and social care professionals and the community about the new accommodation centre. This caused anxiety and stress among relevant stakeholders. There was insufficient time to plan and prepare appropriate primary care and social care for the residents, causing a significant strain on service delivery. There was lack of clarity about how primary care and social care needs of the incoming residents were to be addressed. Interdisciplinary support systems developed informally between healthcare professionals. This ensured that residents of the accommodation centre were appropriately cared for. Conclusions Direct provision accommodation impacts on the organisation and delivery of local primary care and social care services. There needs to be sufficient advance notification and inter-agency, inter-professional dialogue to manage this. Primary care and social care professionals working with asylum seekers should have access to training to enhance their skills for working in cross-cultural consultations.

  15. The impact of direct provision accommodation for asylum seekers on organisation and delivery of local primary care and social care services: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Hans-Olaf; Clerkin, Pauline; MacFarlane, Anne

    2011-05-15

    Many western countries have policies of dispersal and direct provision accommodation (state-funded accommodation in an institutional centre) for asylum seekers. Most research focuses on its effect on the asylum seeking population. Little is known about the impact of direct provision accommodation on organisation and delivery of local primary care and social care services in the community. The aim of this research is to explore this issue. In 2005 a direct provision accommodation centre was opened in a rural area in Ireland. A retrospective qualitative case study was designed comprising in-depth interviews with 37 relevant stakeholders. Thematic analysis following the principles of framework analysis was applied. There was lack of advance notification to primary care and social care professionals and the community about the new accommodation centre. This caused anxiety and stress among relevant stakeholders. There was insufficient time to plan and prepare appropriate primary care and social care for the residents, causing a significant strain on service delivery. There was lack of clarity about how primary care and social care needs of the incoming residents were to be addressed. Interdisciplinary support systems developed informally between healthcare professionals. This ensured that residents of the accommodation centre were appropriately cared for. Direct provision accommodation impacts on the organisation and delivery of local primary care and social care services. There needs to be sufficient advance notification and inter-agency, inter-professional dialogue to manage this. Primary care and social care professionals working with asylum seekers should have access to training to enhance their skills for working in cross-cultural consultations.

  16. The impact of direct provision accommodation for asylum seekers on organisation and delivery of local primary care and social care services: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clerkin Pauline

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many western countries have policies of dispersal and direct provision accommodation (state-funded accommodation in an institutional centre for asylum seekers. Most research focuses on its effect on the asylum seeking population. Little is known about the impact of direct provision accommodation on organisation and delivery of local primary care and social care services in the community. The aim of this research is to explore this issue. Methods In 2005 a direct provision accommodation centre was opened in a rural area in Ireland. A retrospective qualitative case study was designed comprising in-depth interviews with 37 relevant stakeholders. Thematic analysis following the principles of framework analysis was applied. Results There was lack of advance notification to primary care and social care professionals and the community about the new accommodation centre. This caused anxiety and stress among relevant stakeholders. There was insufficient time to plan and prepare appropriate primary care and social care for the residents, causing a significant strain on service delivery. There was lack of clarity about how primary care and social care needs of the incoming residents were to be addressed. Interdisciplinary support systems developed informally between healthcare professionals. This ensured that residents of the accommodation centre were appropriately cared for. Conclusions Direct provision accommodation impacts on the organisation and delivery of local primary care and social care services. There needs to be sufficient advance notification and inter-agency, inter-professional dialogue to manage this. Primary care and social care professionals working with asylum seekers should have access to training to enhance their skills for working in cross-cultural consultations.

  17. Effectiveness of direct-current cardioversion for treatment of supraventricular tachyarrhythmias, in particular atrial fibrillation, in surgical intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Andreas; Ritsch, Nicole; Knotzer, Hans; Dünser, Martin; Schobersberger, Wolfgang; Ulmer, Hanno; Mutz, Norbert; Hasibeder, Walter

    2003-02-01

    To evaluate primary success rate and effectiveness of direct-current cardioversion in postoperative critically ill patients with new-onset supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. Prospective intervention study. Twelve-bed surgical intensive care unit in a university teaching hospital. Thirty-seven consecutive, adult surgical intensive care unit patients with new-onset supraventricular tachyarrhythmias without previous history of tachyarrhythmias. Direct-current cardioversion using a monophasic, damped sinus-wave defibrillator. Energy levels used were 50, 100, 200, and 300 J for regular supraventricular tachyarrhythmias (n = 6) and 100, 200, and 360 J for irregular supraventricular tachyarrhythmias (n = 31). None of the patients was hypoxic, hypokalemic, or hypomagnesemic at onset of supraventricular tachyarrhythmia. Direct-current cardioversion restored sinus rhythm in 13 of 37 patients (35% primary responders). Most patients responded to the first or second direct-current cardioversion shock. Only one of 25 patients requiring more than two direct-current cardioversion shocks converted into sinus rhythm. Primary responders were significantly younger and demonstrated significant differences in arterial Po2 values at onset of supraventricular tachyarrhythmias compared with nonresponders. At 24 and 48 hrs, only six (16%) and five (13.5%) patients remained in sinus rhythm, respectively. In contrast to recent literature, direct-current cardioversion proved to be an ineffective method for treatment of new-onset supraventricular tachyarrhythmias and, in particular, atrial fibrillation with a rapid ventricular response in surgical intensive care unit patients.

  18. Selecting a change and evaluating its impact on the performance of a complex adaptive health care delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaz A Boustani

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaz A Boustani1,2,3,4, Stephanie Munger1,2, Rajesh Gulati3,4, Mickey Vogel4, Robin A Beck3,4, Christopher M Callahan1,2,3,41Indiana University Center for Aging Research, 2Regenstrief Institute Inc., 3Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, 4Indiana University Medical Group-Primary Care; Indianapolis, IN USAAbstract: Complexity science suggests that our current health care delivery system acts as a complex adaptive system (CAS. Such systems represent a dynamic and flexible network of individuals who can coevolve with their ever changing environment. The CAS performance fluctuates and its members’ interactions continuously change over time in response to the stress generated by its surrounding environment. This paper will review the challenges of intervening and introducing a planned change into a complex adaptive health care delivery system. We explore the role of the “reflective adaptive process” in developing delivery interventions and suggest different evaluation methodologies to study the impact of such interventions on the performance of the entire system. We finally describe the implementation of a new program, the Aging Brain Care Medical Home as a case study of our proposed evaluation process.Keywords: complexity, aging brain, implementation, complex adaptive system, sustained change, care delivery

  19. Value-Based Health Care Delivery, Preventive Medicine and the Medicalization of Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhelmsson, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    The real paradigm shift for healthcare is often stated to include a transition from accentuating health care production and instead emphasize patient value by moving to a 'value-based health care delivery'. In this transition, personalized medicine is sometimes referred to as almost a panacea in solving the current and future health challenges. In theory, the progress of precision medicine sounds uncontroversial and most welcomed with its promise of a better healthcare for all, with real benefits for the individual patient provided a tailored and optimized treatment plan suitable for his or her genetic makeup. And maybe, therefore, the assumptions underpinning personalized medicine have largely escaped questioning. The use of personalized medicine and the use of digital technologies is reshaping our health care system and how we think of health interventions and our individual responsibility. However, encouraging individuals to engage in preventive health activities possibly avoids one form of medicalization (clinical), but on the other hand, it takes up another form (preventive medicine and 'self-care') that moves medical and health concerns into every corner of everyday life. This ought to be of little value to the individual patient and public health. We ought to instead demand proof of these value ideas and the lacking research. Before this is in place critical appraisal and cynicism are requisite skills for the future. Otherwise, we are just listening to visionaries when we put our future health into their hands and let personalized solutions reach into people's everyday life regardless of patient safety and integrity.

  20. The application of the modified surgical wound dressing in wound care after tracheotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Mei

    2017-01-01

    Discussion: The design of the herein-described modified surgical wound dressing is based on a butterfly shaped adhesive and mirrors the advantages of a modern surgical wound dressing. Its shape is suitable for the physiological structure of the neck, making it more comfortable to use. Aseptic packaging and a high degree of adhesiveness guarantee continuous fixation and pulling. At the same time, the design of the dressing decreases the chance of infection.

  1. A STUDY ON THE POST SURGICAL WOUND INFECTIONS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN KANCHIPURAM

    OpenAIRE

    Sivasankari; Thenmozhi Valli Pitchai; Anitha; Senthamarai; Venugopal

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Surgical site infections are the infections that occur within thirty days after the operative procedure (Except in case of added implants). Surgical site infections are the 3rd most commonly reported nosocomial infections accounting for a quarter of all such infections. A wide range of organisms are known to infect wounds like gram positive cocci, gram negative bacilli, spore formers, aerobes and anaerobes. Despite the advances in operative technique and better unde...

  2. Ante natal care services utilization, delivery practices and factors affecting them in tribal area of North Maharashtra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin S Mumbare

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Utilization of Ante natal care (ANC services is poor in the tribal areas, causing increased maternal morbidity and mortality. Objective: This study was carried out to find out ANC services utilization, delivery practices and factors affecting them in a tribal area of North Maharashtra in Nashik district. Design: Cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in two tribal blocks of Nashik district. Cluster sampling technique was used. 210 mothers in the selected clusters, who had delivered within last 1 year, were interviewed. Information about the ANC services utilization and place of delivery was recorded. Relevant socio-demographic data were also collected. Results: Adequate ANC services utilization was found to be 64.76%. Home deliveries were 34.29% and home deliveries conducted by untrained persons were 15.24%. Conclusion: The utilization of ANC services and deliveries at health centers were significantly associated with education of the women and their spouses, and the socioeconomic status of the family. Main reasons for inadequate utilization of ANC services were financial, unawareness about ANC services, etc. Place of delivery was associated with the type of the family. Traditional practices were the most common reason for conducting the deliveries at home.

  3. The Delivery of Health Promotion and Environmental Health Services; Public Health or Primary Care Settings?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Bjørn Jensen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The WHO Regional Office for Europe developed a set of public health functions resulting in the ten Essential Public Health Operations (EPHO. Public health or primary care settings seem to be favorable to embrace all actions included into EPHOs. The presented paper aims to guide readers on how to assign individual health promotion and environmental health services to public health or primary care settings. Survey tools were developed based on EPHO 2, 3 and 4; there were six key informant surveys out of 18 contacted completed via e-mails by informants working in Denmark on health promotion and five face-to-face interviews were conducted in Australia (Melbourne and Victoria state with experts from environmental health, public health and a physician. Based on interviews, we developed a set of indicators to support the assignment process. Population or individual focus, a system approach or one-to-one approach, dealing with hazards or dealing with effects, being proactive or reactive were identified as main element of the decision tool. Assignment of public health services to one of two settings proved to be possible in some cases, whereas in many there is no clear distinction between the two settings. National context might be the one which guides delivery of public health services.

  4. The Delivery of Health Promotion and Environmental Health Services; Public Health or Primary Care Settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørn Jensen, Lene; Lukic, Irena; Gulis, Gabriel

    2018-05-07

    The WHO Regional Office for Europe developed a set of public health functions resulting in the ten Essential Public Health Operations (EPHO). Public health or primary care settings seem to be favorable to embrace all actions included into EPHOs. The presented paper aims to guide readers on how to assign individual health promotion and environmental health services to public health or primary care settings. Survey tools were developed based on EPHO 2, 3 and 4; there were six key informant surveys out of 18 contacted completed via e-mails by informants working in Denmark on health promotion and five face-to-face interviews were conducted in Australia (Melbourne and Victoria state) with experts from environmental health, public health and a physician. Based on interviews, we developed a set of indicators to support the assignment process. Population or individual focus, a system approach or one-to-one approach, dealing with hazards or dealing with effects, being proactive or reactive were identified as main element of the decision tool. Assignment of public health services to one of two settings proved to be possible in some cases, whereas in many there is no clear distinction between the two settings. National context might be the one which guides delivery of public health services.

  5. Experiences of practice facilitators working on the Improved Delivery of Cardiovascular Care project: Retrospective case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddy, Clare; Rowan, Margo; Valiquette-Tessier, Sophie-Claire; Drosinis, Paul; Crowe, Lois; Hogg, William

    2018-01-01

    To examine the barriers to and facilitators of practice facilitation experienced by participants in the Improving Delivery of Cardiovascular Care (IDOCC) project. Case studies of practice facilitators' narrative reports. Eastern Ontario. Primary care practices that participated in the IDOCC project. Cases were identified by calculating sum scores in order to determine practices' performance relative to their peers. Two case exemplars were selected that scored within ± 1 SD of the total mean score, and a qualitative analysis of practice facilitators' narrative reports was conducted using a 5-factor implementation framework to identify barriers and facilitators. Narratives were divided into 3 phases: planning, implementation, and sustainability. Barriers and facilitators fluctuated over the intervention's 3 phases. Site A reported more barriers (n = 47) than facilitators (n = 38), while site B reported a roughly equal number of barriers (n = 144) and facilitators (n = 136). In both sites, the most common barriers involved organizational and provider factors and the most common facilitators were associated with innovation and structural factors. Both practices encountered various barriers and facilitators throughout the IDOCC's 3 phases. The case studies reveal the complex interactions of these factors over time, and provide insight into the implementation of practice facilitation programs. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  6. Evaluation of health care delivery integration: the case of the Russian Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheiman, Igor; Shevski, Vladimir

    2014-04-01

    Fragmentation in organization and discontinuities in the provision of medical care are problems in all health systems, whether it is the mixed public-private one in the USA, national health services in the UK, or insurance based one in Western Europe and Russia. In all of these countries a major challenge is to strengthen integration in order to enhance efficiency and health outcomes. This article assesses issues related to fragmentation and integration in conceptual terms and argues that key attributes of integration are teamwork, coordination and continuity of care. It then presents a summary of service integration problems in Russia and the results of a large survey of physicians concerning the attributes of integration. It is argued that characteristics of the national service delivery model don't ensure integration. The Semashko model is not an equivalent to the integrated model. Big organizational forms of service provision, like polyclinics and integrated hospital-polyclinics, don't have higher scores of integration indicators than smaller ones. Proposals to improve integration in Russia are presented with the focus on the regular evaluation of integration/fragmentation, regulation of integration activities, enhancing the role of PHC providers, economic incentives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The challenges of leading change in health-care delivery from the front-line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Vivienne

    2017-09-01

    The public sector is facing turbulent times and this challenges nurses, who are expected to serve both patient interests and the efficiency drives of their organisations. In the context of implementing person-centred health policy, this paper explores the evolving role of front-line nurses as leaders and champions of change. Nurses can be seen to have some autonomy in health-care delivery. However, they are subject to systems of social control. In implementing person-centred policy, nurses can be seen to be doing the best they can within a constrained environment. A survey of nursing practice in person-centred health-policy implementation is presented. Despite much being written about managing health-professional resistance to policy implementation, there is a gap between what is being asked of nurses and the resources made available to them to deliver. In this milieu, nurses are utilising their discretion and leading from the front-line in championing change. Empowering nurses who seek to lead patient involvement could be the key to unlocking health-care improvement. Health services tend to be over-managed and under-led and there is a need to harness the potential of front-line nurses by facilitating leadership development through appropriate organisational support. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Ranking of healthcare programmes based on health outcome, health costs and safe delivery of care in hospital pharmacy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisseau, Lionel; Bussières, Jean-François; Bois, Denis; Vallée, Marc; Racine, Marie-Claude; Bonnici, André

    2013-02-01

    To establish a consensual and coherent ranking of healthcare programmes that involve the presence of ward-based and clinic-based clinical pharmacists, based on health outcome, health costs and safe delivery of care. This descriptive study was derived from a structured dialogue (Delphi technique) among directors of pharmacy department. We established a quantitative profile of healthcare programmes at five sites that involved the provision of ward-based and clinic-based pharmaceutical care. A summary table of evidence established a unique quality rating per inpatient (clinic-based) or outpatient (ward-based) healthcare programme. Each director rated the perceived impact of pharmaceutical care per inpatient or outpatient healthcare programme on three fields: health outcome, health costs and safe delivery of care. They agreed by consensus on the final ranking of healthcare programmes. A ranking was assigned for each of the 18 healthcare programmes for outpatient care and the 17 healthcare programmes for inpatient care involving the presence of pharmacists, based on health outcome, health costs and safe delivery of care. There was a good correlation between ranking based on data from a 2007-2008 Canadian report on hospital pharmacy practice and the ranking proposed by directors of pharmacy department. Given the often limited human and financial resources, managers should consider the best evidence available on a profession's impact to plan healthcare services within an organization. Data are few on ranking healthcare programmes in order to prioritize which healthcare programme would mostly benefit from the delivery of pharmaceutical care by ward-based and clinic-based pharmacists. © 2012 The Authors. IJPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  9. Fragmentation of Care after Surgical Discharge: Non-Index Readmission after Major Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chaoyi; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Shara, Nawar M; Langan, Russell C; Hong, Young; Johnson, Lynt B; Al-Refaie, Waddah B

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite national emphasis on care coordination, little is known about how fragmentation affects cancer surgery outcomes. Our study examines a specific form of fragmentation in post-discharge care—readmission to a hospital different from the location of the operation—and evaluates its causes and consequences among patients readmitted after major cancer surgery. STUDY DESIGN We used the State Inpatient Database of California (2004 to 2011) to identify patients who had major cancer surgery and their subsequent readmissions. Logistic models were used to examine correlates of non-index readmissions and to assess associations between location of readmission and outcomes, measured by in-hospital mortality and repeated readmission. RESULTS Of 9,233 readmissions within 30 days of discharge after major cancer surgery, 20.0% occurred in non-index hospitals. Non-index readmissions were associated with emergency readmission (odds ratio [OR] = 2.63; 95% CI, 2.26–3.06), rural residence (OR = 1.81; 95% CI, 1.61–2.04), and extensive procedures (eg hepatectomy vs proctectomy; OR = 2.77; CI, 2.08–3.70). Mortality was higher during non-index readmissions than index readmissions independent of patient, procedure, and hospital factors (OR = 1.31; 95% CI, 1.03–1.66), but was mitigated by adjusting for conditions present at readmission (OR = 1.24; 95% CI, 0.98–1.58). Non-index readmission predicted higher odds of repeated readmission within 60 days of discharge from the first readmission (OR = 1.16; 95% CI, 1.02–1.32), independent of all covariates. CONCLUSIONS Non-index readmissions constitute a substantial proportion of all readmissions after major cancer surgery. They are associated with more repeated readmissions and can be caused by severe surgical complications and increased travel burden. Overcoming disadvantages of non-index readmissions represents an opportunity to improve outcomes for patients having major cancer surgery. PMID:27016905

  10. 45 CFR 61.9 - Reporting civil judgments related to the delivery of a health care item or service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting civil judgments related to the delivery of a health care item or service. 61.9 Section 61.9 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE INFORMATION...

  11. Caesarean section deliveries: Experiences of mothers of midwifery care at a public hospital in Nelson Mandela Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jikijela, Thobeka P; James, Sindiwe; Sonti, Balandeli S I

    2018-01-30

    The rate of caesarean section deliveries has increased globally and mothers are faced with challenges of postoperative recovery and caring thereof. Midwives have a duty to assist these mothers to self-care. The objective was to explore and describe experiences of post-caesarean section delivered mothers of midwifery care at a public hospital in Nelson Mandela Bay. A qualitative, descriptive and explorative research design was used in the study. Data were collected from 11 purposively criterion-selected mothers who had a caesarean section delivery. One-on-one semi-structured interviews were conducted in the post-natal wards. Research ethics, namely autonomy, beneficence, justice and informed consent, were adopted in the study. All participants were informed of their right to withdraw from the study at any stage without penalties. Interviews were analysed using Tesch's method of data analysis. Three main themes were identified as experiences of: diverse pain, physical limitation and frustration and health care services as different. Experiences of mothers following a caesarean section delivery with midwifery services at a public hospital in Nelson Mandela Bay were explored and described as diverse. A need for adequate pain management as well as assistance and breastfeeding support to mothers following caesarean delivery was identified as crucial to promote a good mother-to-child relationship.

  12. Health insurance determines antenatal, delivery and postnatal care utilisation : evidence from the Ghana Demographic and Health Surveillance data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Browne, Joyce L; Kayode, Gbenga A; Arhinful, Daniel; Fidder, Samuel A J; Grobbee, Diederick E; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the effect of maternal health insurance status on the utilisation of antenatal, skilled delivery and postnatal care. DESIGN: A population-based cross-sectional study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: We utilised the 2008 Demographic and Health Survey data of Ghana,

  13. Existing infrastructure for the delivery of emergency care in post-conflict Rwanda: An initial descriptive study

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    Leana S. Wen

    2011-06-01

    Conclusion: Despite ongoing challenges, the infrastructure for the delivery of emergency care is much improved since 1994, and Rwanda’s continuing progress can serve as a model for EM development in other developing and/or post-conflict countries in Africa.

  14. International consensus statement on surgical education and training in an era of reduced working hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, John P

    2011-01-01

    An international consensus statement has been developed as a reference on the key principles to be considered during discussions on surgical education and training and the delivery of surgical care in an era of restricted hours. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. EFFECTS OF AROMATHERAPY MASSAGE ON THE SLEEP QUALITY AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF PATIENTS IN A SURGICAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özlü, Zeynep Karaman; Bilican, Pınar

    2017-01-01

    Surgical pain is experienced by inpatients with clinical, disease-related concerns, unknown encounters after surgery, quality of sleep, restrictions in position after surgery is known to be serious. The study was conducted to determine the effect of aromatherapy massage on quality of sleep and physiological parameters in surgical intensive care patients. This is an experimental study. The sample of this study consisted of 60 patients who were divided into two groups as experimental group and control group including 30 patients in each one. The participants were postoperative patients, absent complications, who were unconscious and extubated. A data collection form on personal characteristics of the patients, a registration form on their physical parameters and the Richards-Campbell Sleep Scale (RCSQ) were used to collect the data of the study. The Richards-Campbell Sleep Scale indicated that while the experimental group had a mean score of 53.80 ± 13.20, the control group had a mean score of 29.08 ± 9.71 and there was a statistically significant difference between mean scores of the groups. In a comparison of physiologic parameters, only diastolic blood pressure measuring between parameters in favor of an assembly as a statistically significant difference was detected. Results of the study showed that aromatherapy massage enhanced the sleep quality of patients in a surgical intensive care unit and resulted in some positive changes in their physiological parameters.

  16. The Gap Between Clinical Research and Standard of Care: A Review of Frailty Assessment Scales in Perioperative Surgical Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Baddigam, Ramya; Wajahn, Jennifer; Sipes, Angela C; Arias-Morales, Carlos E; Gastaldo, Nicholas; Bergese, Sergio D

    2016-01-01

    The elderly population in the United States is increasing exponentially in tandem with risk for frailty. Frailty is described by a clinically significant state where a patient is at risk for developing complications requiring increased assistance in daily activities. Frailty syndrome studied in geriatric patients is responsible for an increased risk for falls, and increased mortality. In efforts to prepare for and to intervene in perioperative complications and general frailty, a universal scale to measure frailty is necessary. Many methods for determining frailty have been developed, yet there remains a need to define clinical frailty and, therefore, the most effective way to measure it. This article reviews six popular scales for measuring frailty and evaluates their clinical effectiveness demonstrated in previous studies. By identifying the most time-efficient, criteria comprehensive, and clinically effective scale, a universal scale can be implemented into standard of care and reduce complications from frailty in both non-surgical and surgical settings, especially applied to the perioperative surgical home model. We suggest further evaluation of the Edmonton Frailty Scale for inclusion in patient care.

  17. The Gap Between Clinical Research and Standard of Care: A Review of Frailty Assessment Scales in Perioperative Surgical Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Stoicea

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The elderly population in the United States is increasing exponentially in tandem with risk for frailty. Frailty is described by a clinically significant state where a patient is at risk for developing complications requiring increased assistance in daily activities. Frailty syndrome studied in geriatric patients is responsible for an increased risk for falls, and increased mortality. In efforts to prepare for and to intervene in perioperative complications and general frailty, a universal scale to measure frailty is necessary. Many methods for determining frailty have been developed, yet there remains a need to define clinical frailty and therefore the most effective way to measure it. This article reviews six popular scales for measuring frailty and evaluates their clinical effectiveness demonstrated in previous studies. By identifying the most time-efficient, criteria comprehensive, and clinically effective scale, a universal scale can be implemented into standard of care and reduce complications from frailty in both non-surgical and surgical settings, especially applied to the perioperative surgical home model. We suggest further evaluation of the Edmonton Frailty Scale for inclusion in patient care.

  18. Knowledge about complementary, alternative and integrative medicine (CAM) among registered health care providers in Swedish surgical care: a national survey among university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerså, Kristofer; Stener Victorin, Elisabet; Fagevik Olsén, Monika

    2012-04-12

    Previous studies show an increased interest and usage of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the general population and among health care workers both internationally and nationally. CAM usage is also reported to be common among surgical patients. Earlier international studies have reported that a large amount of surgical patients use it prior to and after surgery. Recent publications indicate a weak knowledge about CAM among health care workers. However the current situation in Sweden is unknown. The aim of this study was therefore to explore perceived knowledge about CAM among registered healthcare professions in surgical departments at Swedish university hospitals. A questionnaire was distributed to 1757 registered physicians, nurses and physiotherapists in surgical wards at the seven university hospitals in Sweden from spring 2010 to spring 2011. The questionnaire included classification of 21 therapies into conventional, complementary, alternative and integrative, and whether patients were recommended these therapies. Questions concerning knowledge, research, and patient communication about CAM were also included. A total of 737 (42.0%) questionnaires were returned. Therapies classified as complementary; were massage, manual therapies, yoga and acupuncture. Alternative therapies; were herbal medicine, dietary supplements, homeopathy and healing. Classification to integrative therapy was low, and unfamiliar therapies were Bowen therapy, iridology and Rosen method. Therapies recommended by > 40% off the participants were massage and acupuncture. Knowledge and research about CAM was valued as minor or none at all by 95.7% respectively 99.2%. Importance of possessing knowledge about it was valued as important by 80.9%. It was believed by 61.2% that more research funding should be addressed to CAM research, 72.8% were interested in reading CAM-research results, and 27.8% would consider taking part in such research. Half of the participants (55.8%) were

  19. Knowledge about complementary, alternative and integrative medicine (CAM among registered health care providers in Swedish surgical care: a national survey among university hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjerså Kristofer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies show an increased interest and usage of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in the general population and among health care workers both internationally and nationally. CAM usage is also reported to be common among surgical patients. Earlier international studies have reported that a large amount of surgical patients use it prior to and after surgery. Recent publications indicate a weak knowledge about CAM among health care workers. However the current situation in Sweden is unknown. The aim of this study was therefore to explore perceived knowledge about CAM among registered healthcare professions in surgical departments at Swedish university hospitals. Method A questionnaire was distributed to 1757 registered physicians, nurses and physiotherapists in surgical wards at the seven university hospitals in Sweden from spring 2010 to spring 2011. The questionnaire included classification of 21 therapies into conventional, complementary, alternative and integrative, and whether patients were recommended these therapies. Questions concerning knowledge, research, and patient communication about CAM were also included. Result A total of 737 (42.0% questionnaires were returned. Therapies classified as complementary; were massage, manual therapies, yoga and acupuncture. Alternative therapies; were herbal medicine, dietary supplements, homeopathy and healing. Classification to integrative therapy was low, and unfamiliar therapies were Bowen therapy, iridology and Rosen method. Therapies recommended by > 40% off the participants were massage and acupuncture. Knowledge and research about CAM was valued as minor or none at all by 95.7% respectively 99.2%. Importance of possessing knowledge about it was valued as important by 80.9%. It was believed by 61.2% that more research funding should be addressed to CAM research, 72.8% were interested in reading CAM-research results, and 27.8% would consider taking part in

  20. Neuropsychologists as primary care providers of cognitive health: A novel comprehensive cognitive wellness service delivery model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimental, Patricia A; O'Hara, John B; Jandak, Jessica L

    2018-01-01

    By virtue of their extensive knowledge base and specialized training in brain-behavior relationships, neuropsychologists are especially poised to execute a unique broad-based approach to overall cognitive wellness and should be viewed as primary care providers of cognitive health. This article will describe a novel comprehensive cognitive wellness service delivery model including cognitive health, anti-aging, lifelong wellness, and longevity-oriented practices. These practice areas include brain-based cognitive wellness, emotional and spiritually centric exploration, and related multimodality health interventions. As experts in mind-body connections, neuropsychologists can provide a variety of evidence-based treatment options, empowering patients with a sense of value and purpose. Multiple areas of clinical therapy skill-based learning, tailor-made to fit individual needs, will be discussed including: brain stimulating activities, restorative techniques, automatic negative thoughts and maladaptive thinking reduction, inflammation and pain management techniques, nutrition and culinary focused cognitive wellness, spirituality based practices and mindfulness, movement and exercise, alternative/complimentary therapies, relationship restoration/social engagement, and trauma healing/meaning. Cognitive health rests upon the foundation of counteracting mind-body connection disruptions from multiple etiologies including inflammation, chronic stress, metabolic issues, cardiac conditions, autoimmune disease, neurological disorders, infectious diseases, and allergy spectrum disorders. Superimposed on these issues are lifestyle patterns and negative health behaviors that develop as ill-fated compensatory mechanisms used to cope with life stressors and aging. The brain and body are electrical systems that can "short circuit." The therapy practices inherent in the proposed cognitive wellness service delivery model can provide preventative insulation and circuit breaking against

  1. Improved delivery of cardiovascular care (IDOCC through outreach facilitation: study protocol and implementation details of a cluster randomized controlled trial in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbari Ayub

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need to find innovative approaches for translating best practices for chronic disease care into daily primary care practice routines. Primary care plays a crucial role in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. There is, however, a substantive care gap, and many challenges exist in implementing evidence-based care. The Improved Delivery of Cardiovascular Care (IDOCC project is a pragmatic trial designed to improve the delivery of evidence-based care for the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease in primary care practices using practice outreach facilitation. Methods The IDOCC project is a stepped-wedge cluster randomized control trial in which Practice Outreach Facilitators work with primary care practices to improve cardiovascular disease prevention and management for patients at highest risk. Primary care practices in a large health region in Eastern Ontario, Canada, were eligible to participate. The intervention consists of regular monthly meetings with the Practice Outreach Facilitator over a one- to two-year period. Starting with audit and feedback, consensus building, and goal setting, the practices are supported in changing practice behavior by incorporating chronic care model elements. These elements include (a evidence-based decision support for providers, (b delivery system redesign for practices, (c enhanced self-management support tools provided to practices to help them engage patients, and (d increased community resource linkages for practices to enhance referral of patients. The primary outcome is a composite score measured at the level of the patient to represent each practice's adherence to evidence-based guidelines for cardiovascular care. Qualitative analysis of the Practice Outreach Facilitators' written narratives of their ongoing practice interactions will be done. These textual analyses will add further insight into understanding critical factors impacting

  2. Unlicensed and off-label use of drugs in pediatric surgical units at tertiary care hospitals of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Khan, Jamshaid Ali; Shakeel, Faisal; Asim, Syed Muhammad

    2017-08-01

    Background Unlicensed and off-label prescribing practice is global dilemma around the world. This pioneering study was designed to determine unlicensed and off-label use of drug in surgical wards of tertiary care hospitals of Pakistan. Objective To assess unlicensed and off-label use of drugs in pediatric surgical unit at three tertiary care hospitals in Peshawar, Pakistan. Setting Two government and one private tertiary care hospitals in Pakistan. Method Drug profiles of 895 patients from three different clinical settings were evaluated for unlicensed and off-label use of drugs using Micromedex DRUGDEX. Main outcome measure Characteristics of the unlicensed and off-label drug prescriptions. Result Total of 3168 prescribed drugs were analyzed in this study. Indication (38.7%) and dose (34.8%) were the most frequent off-label categories. In comparison with the corresponding reference categories, infants and children, male patients and having less than five prescribed drugs were significant predictors of unlicensed prescriptions. In comparison with the corresponding reference categories, significant predictors of off-label drug prescribing were children younger than two year, children between 2-12 years, patient staying at hospital less than 5 days and patients having less than five prescribed drugs. Conclusion The prevalence of unlicensed and off-label drug prescriptions are high at pediatric surgical ward of tertiary care hospitals. More awareness of the efficacy and safety of drugs are required in pediatrics. In addition, new formulations with advanced dosing for children are also required to minimize the risk of adverse outcomes.

  3. Compassion fatigue, moral distress, and work engagement in surgical intensive care unit trauma nurses: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Virginia M; Leslie, Gail; Clark, Kathleen; Lyons, Pat; Walke, Erica; Butler, Christina; Griffin, Martha

    2014-01-01

    Preparation for replacing the large proportion of staff nurses reaching retirement age in the next few decades in the United States is essential to continue delivering high-quality nursing care and improving patient outcomes. Retaining experienced critical care nurses is imperative to successfully implementing the orientation of new inexperienced critical care nurses. It is important to understand factors that affect work engagement to develop strategies that enhance nurse retention and improve the quality of patient care. Nurses' experience of moral distress has been measured in medical intensive care units but not in surgical trauma care units, where nurses are exposed to patients and families faced with sudden life-threatening, life-changing patient consequences.This pilot study is a nonexperimental, descriptive, correlational design to examine the effect of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, moral distress, and level of nursing education on critical care nurses' work engagement. This is a partial replication of Lawrence's dissertation. The study also asked nurses to describe sources of moral distress and self-care strategies for coping with stress. This was used to identify qualitative themes about the nurse experiences. Jean Watson's theory of human caring serves as a framework to bring meaning and focus to the nursing-patient caring relationship.A convenience sample of 26 of 34 eligible experienced surgical intensive care unit trauma nurses responded to this survey, indicating a 77% response rate. Twenty-seven percent of the nurses scored high, and 73% scored average on compassion satisfaction. On compassion fatigue, 58% scored average on burnout and 42% scored low. On the secondary traumatic stress subscale, 38% scored average, and 62% scored low. The mean moral distress situations subscale score was 3.4, which is elevated. The mean 9-item Utrecht Work Engagement Scale total score, measuring work engagement, was 3.8, which is considered low

  4. Penicillin allergy and surgical prophylaxis: Cephalosporin cross-reactivity risk in a pediatric tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Ralph J; Kako, Hiromi; Chovanec, Thomas; Ramesh, Archana; Bissonnette, Bruno; Tobias, Joseph D

    2015-05-01

    First generation cephalosporins are commonly used as antibiotic prophylaxis prior to surgery. Patients labeled as penicillin-allergic are often precluded from receiving cephalosporins because of an allergic cross-reactivity. The aims of this study were to evaluate the clinical practice for surgical prophylaxis at Nationwide Children's Hospital and to determine the incidence of adverse effects and allergic reactions when using cephalosporins in patients labeled as penicillin-allergic. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify patients who were allergic to penicillin, penicillin antibiotic family, who required surgical treatment for an existing medical condition, and received an antibiotic to prevent surgical site infection. Five hundred thirteen penicillin-allergic patients were identified, encompassing 624 surgical cases. Cephalosporins were administered in 153 cases (24.5%) with cefazolin used 83% of the time. Only one documented case of nonanaphylactic reaction was reported. Clindamycin was the most common cephalosporin substitute (n=387), and the reported adverse reaction rate was 1.5%. No cases of anaphylaxis were documented. Our data suggest that the administration of cephalosporins for surgical prophylaxis following induction of anesthesia in a patient with a known or reported penicillin-allergy appears appropriate and results in a lower adverse event rate that when clindamycin is administered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Selecting a Dynamic Simulation Modeling Method for Health Care Delivery Research—Part 2: Report of the ISPOR Dynamic Simulation Modeling Emerging Good Practices Task Force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Deborah A.; Burgos-Liz, Lina; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Crown, William; Padula, William V.; Wong, Peter K.; Pasupathy, Kalyan S.; Higashi, Mitchell K.; Osgood, Nathaniel D.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous report, the ISPOR Task Force on Dynamic Simulation Modeling Applications in Health Care Delivery Research Emerging Good Practices introduced the fundamentals of dynamic simulation modeling and identified the types of health care delivery problems for which dynamic simulation modeling

  6. What Is a Cesarean Delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Pinterest Email Print What is a cesarean delivery? A cesarean delivery is a surgical procedure in which a fetus ... 32.2% of U.S. births were by cesarean delivery. 2 The CDC also found that the number ...

  7. Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury in medical, surgical, and intensive care unit: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T B Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common complication in hospitalized patients. There are few comparative studies on hospital-acquired AKI (HAAKI in medical, surgical, and ICU patients. This study was conducted to compare the epidemiological characteristics, clinical profiles, and outcomes of HAAKI among these three units. All adult patients (>18 years of either gender who developed AKI based on RIFLE criteria (using serum creatinine, 48 h after hospitalization were included in the study. Patients of acute on chronic renal failure and AKI in pregnancy were excluded. Incidence of HAAKI in medical, surgical, and ICU wards were 0.54%, 0.72%, and 2.2% respectively ( P < 0.0001. There was no difference in age distribution among the groups, but onset of HAAKI was earliest in the medical ward ( P = 0.001. RIFLE-R was the most common AKI in medical (39.2% and ICU (50% wards but in the surgical ward, it was RIFLE-F that was most common (52.6%. Acute tubular necrosis was more common in ICU ( P = 0.043. Most common etiology of HAAKI in medical unit was drug induced (39.2%, whereas in surgical and ICU, it was sepsis (34% and 35.2% respectively. Mortality in ICU, surgical and medical units were 73.5%, 43.42%, and 37.2%, respectively ( P = 0.003. Length of hospital stay in surgical, ICU and medical units were different ( P = 0.007. This study highlights that the characters of HAAKI are different in some aspects among different hospital settings.

  8. The anesthetic, critical care and surgical challenges in the management of craniopharyngioma

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    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the childhood brain neoplasms, craniopharyngioma constitutes about 2-6% of all primary intracranial tumors. Craniopharyngioma poses a multitude of challenges to the neurosurgeon, endocrinologist, oncologist, intensivist and the anesthesiologist. The morbidity and mortality due to radical surgical treatment is quite high, to the extent of 40-50%. The conservative approach with limited surgical intervention and radiotherapy assistance is taken by some neurosurgeons, but its usefulness is very doubtful. We are reporting a case of craniopharyngioma in an 18-year-old female who had progressive loss of vision and was successfully managed with combined radical surgery and medical therapy.

  9. Health insurance determines antenatal, delivery and postnatal care utilisation: evidence from the Ghana Demographic and Health Surveillance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Joyce L; Kayode, Gbenga A; Arhinful, Daniel; Fidder, Samuel A J; Grobbee, Diederick E; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin

    2016-03-18

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of maternal health insurance status on the utilisation of antenatal, skilled delivery and postnatal care. A population-based cross-sectional study. We utilised the 2008 Demographic and Health Survey data of Ghana, which included 2987 women who provided information on maternal health insurance status. Utilisation of antenatal, skilled delivery and postnatal care. Multivariable logistic regression was applied to determine the independent association between maternal health insurance and utilisation of antenatal, skilled delivery and postnatal care. After adjusting for socioeconomic, demographic and obstetric factors, we observed that among insured women the likelihood of having antenatal care increased by 96% (OR 1.96; 95% CI 1.52 to 2.52; p valuehealth insurance status plays a significant role in the uptake of the maternal, neonatal and child health continuum of care service. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Critical Care Delivery: The Importance of Process of Care and ICU Structure to Improved Outcomes: An Update From the American College of Critical Care Medicine Task Force on Models of Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weled, Barry J; Adzhigirey, Lana A; Hodgman, Tudy M; Brilli, Richard J; Spevetz, Antoinette; Kline, Andrea M; Montgomery, Vicki L; Puri, Nitin; Tisherman, Samuel A; Vespa, Paul M; Pronovost, Peter J; Rainey, Thomas G; Patterson, Andrew J; Wheeler, Derek S

    2015-07-01

    In 2001, the Society of Critical Care Medicine published practice model guidelines that focused on the delivery of critical care and the roles of different ICU team members. An exhaustive review of the additional literature published since the last guideline has demonstrated that both the structure and process of care in the ICU are important for achieving optimal patient outcomes. Since the publication of the original guideline, several authorities have recognized that improvements in the processes of care, ICU structure, and the use of quality improvement science methodologies can beneficially impact patient outcomes and reduce costs. Herein, we summarize findings of the American College of Critical Care Medicine Task Force on Models of Critical Care: 1) An intensivist-led, high-performing, multidisciplinary team dedicated to the ICU is an integral part of effective care delivery; 2) Process improvement is the backbone of achieving high-quality ICU outcomes; 3) Standardized protocols including care bundles and order sets to facilitate measurable processes and outcomes should be used and further developed in the ICU setting; and 4) Institutional support for comprehensive quality improvement programs as well as tele-ICU programs should be provided.

  11. Adoption and Completeness of Documentation Using a Structured Delivery Record in Secondary Care, Subdistrict Government Hospitals of Karnataka State, India

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    Prem K. Mony

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Poor medical record documentation remains a pervasive problem in hospital delivery rooms, hampering efforts aimed at improving the quality of maternal and neonatal care in resource-limited settings. We evaluated the feasibility and completeness of labor room documentation within a quasi-experimental study aimed at improving emergency preparedness for obstetric and neonatal emergencies in 8 nonteaching, subdistrict, secondary care hospitals of Karnataka state, India. Methods: We redesigned the existing open-ended case sheet into a structured, delivery record cum job aide adhering to principles of local clinical relevance, parsimony, and computerizability. Skills and emergency drills training along with supportive supervision were introduced in 4 “intervention arm” hospitals while the new delivery records were used in eight intervention and control hospitals. Results: Introduction of the new delivery record was feasible over a “run-in” period of 4 months. About 92% (6103 of 6634 of women in intervention facilities and 80% (6205 of 7756 in control facilities had their delivery records filled in during the 1-year study period. Completeness of delivery record documentation fell into one of two subsets with one set of parameters being documented with minimal inputs (in both intervention and control sites and another set of parameters requiring more intensive training efforts (and seen more in intervention than in control sites; P < .05. Conclusion: Under the stewardship of the local government, it was possible to institute a robust, reliable, and valid medical record documentation system as part of efforts to improve intrapartum and postpartum maternal and newborn care in hospitals.

  12. Do we provide affordable, accessible and administrable health care? An assessment of SES differential in out of pocket expenditure on delivery care in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Jalandhar; Dwivedi, Rinshu

    2017-03-01

    Reproductive and Child Health (RCH) financing is a key area of focus which can lead towards an overall empowerment of women through financial inclusion. The major objectives of this paper are: first; to examine the socio-economic differentials in Out of Pocket Expenditure (OOPE) on delivery care, second; to look into the role of insurance coverage, third; to analyse various sources of financing, and fourth; to measure the adjusted effect of various covariates on the level of OOPE. Data were extracted from the National Sample Survey Organisations (NSSO), 71st round "Key indicators of social consumption in India, Health" conducted by the GoI during January to June 2014. Multivariate Generalised Linear Regression Model (GLRM) has been used to analyse the various covariates of OOPE on maternity care. Multivariate analysis has demonstrated a significant association between socioeconomic status of women and the level of OOPE on delivery care. Level of education, urban residence, higher caste and social group affiliation, strong economic conditions, and use of private facilities for the child birth among the mothers were a significant predictor of the expenditure on maternity care. Despite various efforts by the central and state governments to reduce financial burden, still a large number of households are paying a significant amount from their own pockets. There is an immediate need to re-look in the aspects of insurance coverage and high level of OOPE in delivery care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of intensivist coverage in a post-anaesthesia care unit on surgical patients' case mix and characteristics of the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastrup, Marc; Seeling, Matthes; Barthel, Stefan; Bloch, Andy; le Claire, Marie; Spies, Claudia; Scheller, Matthias; Braun, Jan

    2012-07-18

    There is an increasing demand for intensive care in hospitals, which can lead to capacity limitations in the intensive care unit (ICU). Due to postponement of elective surgery or delayed admission of emergency patients, outcome may be negatively influenced. To optimize the admission process to intensive care, the post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU) was staffed with intensivist coverage around the clock. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the impact of the PACU on the structure of ICU-patients and the contribution to overall hospital profit in terms of changes in the case mix index for all surgical patients. The administrative data of all surgical patients (n = 51,040) 20 months prior and 20 months after the introduction of a round-the-clock intensivist staffing of the PACU were evaluated and compared. The relative number of patients with longer length of stay (LOS) (more than seven days) in the ICU increased after the introduction of the PACU. The average monthly number of treatment days of patients staying less than 24 hours in the ICU decreased by about 50% (138.95 vs. 68.19 treatment days, P case mix index (CMI) per hospital day for all surgical patients was significantly higher after the introduction of a PACU: 0.286 (± 0.234) vs. 0.309 (± 0.272) P case mix index of the patients per hospital day, increased after the implementation of a PACU and more patients can be treated in the same time, due to a better use of resources.

  14. Adverse outcomes after percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy versus surgical tracheostomy in intensive care patients: case series and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosz K

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Konrad Jarosz,1 Bartosz Kubisa,2 Agata Andrzejewska,3 Katarzyna Mrówczyńska,3 Zbigniew Hamerlak,4 Alicja Bartkowska-Śniatkowska5 1Department of Clinical Nursing, Pomeranian Medical University, 2Thoracic Surgery and Transplantation Department, Pomeranian Medical University, 3Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Department, Pomeranian Medical University, 4Stomatology Department, Pomeranian Medical University, 5Anaesthesiology and Pediatric Intensive Care Department, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Szczecin, Poland Abstract: Tracheostomy is a routinely done procedure in the setting of intensive care unit (ICU in patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation. There are two ways of making a tracheostomy: an open surgical tracheostomy and percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy. Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy is associated with fewer complications than open tracheostomy. In this study, we would like to compare both techniques of performing a tracheostomy in ICU patients and to present possible complications, methods of diagnosing and treating and minimizing their risk. Keywords: tracheostomy, percutaneous tracheostomy, percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy, bronchoscopy, surgical tracheostomy, tracheoesophageal fistula, tracheostomy complications

  15. Progress in the utilization of antenatal and delivery care services in Bangladesh: where does the equity gap lie?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulok, Mohammad Habibullah; Sabah, Md Nasim-Us; Uddin, Jalal; Enemark, Ulrika

    2016-07-29

    Universal access to health care services does not automatically guarantee equity in the health system. In the post Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) era, the progress towards universal access to maternal health care services in a developing country, like Bangladesh requires an evaluation in terms of equity lens. This study, therefore, analysed the trend in inequity and identified the equity gap in the utilization of antenatal care (ANC) and delivery care services in Bangladesh between 2004 and 2011. The data of this study came from the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey. We employed rate ratio, concentration curve and concentration index to examine the trend in inequity of ANC and delivery care services. We also used logistic regression models to analyse the relationship between socioeconomic factors and maternal health care services. The concentration index for 4+ ANC visits dropped from 0.42 in 2004 to 0.31 in 2011 with a greater decline in urban area. There was almost no change in the concentration index for ANC services from medically trained providers during this period. We also found a decreasing trend in inequity in the utilization of both health facility delivery and skilled birth assistance but this trend was again more pronounced in urban area compared to rural area. The concentration index for C-section delivery decreased by about 33 % over 2004-2011 with a similar rate in both urban and rural areas. Women from the richest households were about 3 times more likely to have 4+ ANC visits, delivery at a health facility and skilled birth assistance compared to women from the poorest households. Women's and their husbands' education were significantly associated with greater use of maternal health care services. In addition, women's exposure to mass media, their involvement in microcredit programs and autonomy in healthcare decision-making appeared as significant predictors of using some of these health care services. Bangladesh faces not only a

  16. Implementation of a 4-tier Cloud-Based Architecture for Collaborative Health Care Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Azeez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cloud services permit healthcare providers to ensure information handling and allow different service resources such as Software as a Service (SaaS, Platform as a Service (PaaS and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS on the Internet, given that security and information proprietorship concerns are attended to. Health Care Providers (HCPs in Nigeria however, have been confronted with various issues because of their method of operations. Amongst the issues are ill-advised methods of data storage and unreliable nature of patient medical records. Apart from these challenges, trouble in accessing quality healthcare services, high cost of medical services, and wrong analysis and treatment methodology are not left out. Cloud Computing has relatively possessed the capacity to give proficient and reliable method for securing medical information and the need for data mining tools in this form of distributed system will go a long way in achieving the objective set out for this project. The aim of this research therefore is to implement a cloud-based architecture that is suitable to integrate Healthcare Delivery into the cloud to provide a productive mode of operation. The proposed architecture consists of four phases (4-Tier; a User Authentication and Access Control Engine (UAACE which prevents unauthorized access to patient medical records and also utilizes standard encryption/decoding techniques to ensure privacy of such records. The architecture likewise contains a Data Analysis and Pattern Prediction Unit (DAPPU which gives valuable data that guides decision making through standard Data mining procedures as well as Cloud Service Provider (CSP and Health Care Providers (HCPs. The architecture which has been implemented on CloudSim has proved to be efficient and reliable base on the results obtained when compared with previous work.

  17. Leveraging Diverse Data Sources to Identify and Describe U.S. Health Care Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Genna R; Jones, David J; Heeringa, Jessica; Barrett, Kirsten; Furukawa, Michael F; Miller, Dan; Mutti, Anne; Reschovsky, James D; Machta, Rachel; Shortell, Stephen M; Fraze, Taressa; Rich, Eugene

    2017-12-15

    Health care delivery systems are a growing presence in the U.S., yet research is hindered by the lack of universally agreed-upon criteria to denote formal systems. A clearer understanding of how to leverage real-world data sources to empirically identify systems is a necessary first step to such policy-relevant research. We draw from our experience in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Comparative Health System Performance (CHSP) initiative to assess available data sources to identify and describe systems, including system members (for example, hospitals and physicians) and relationships among the members (for example, hospital ownership of physician groups). We highlight five national data sources that either explicitly track system membership or detail system relationships: (1) American Hospital Association annual survey of hospitals; (2) Healthcare Relational Services Databases; (3) SK&A Healthcare Databases; (4) Provider Enrollment, Chain, and Ownership System; and (5) Internal Revenue Service 990 forms. Each data source has strengths and limitations for identifying and describing systems due to their varied content, linkages across data sources, and data collection methods. In addition, although no single national data source provides a complete picture of U.S. systems and their members, the CHSP initiative will create an early model of how such data can be combined to compensate for their individual limitations. Identifying systems in a way that can be repeated over time and linked to a host of other data sources will support analysis of how different types of organizations deliver health care and, ultimately, comparison of their performance.

  18. Examining Delivery Method and Infant Feeding Intentions between Women in Traditional and Non-Traditional Prenatal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risisky, Deb; Chan, Ronna L; Zigmont, Victoria A; Asghar, Syed Masood; DeGennaro, Nancy

    2018-02-01

    Introduction The purpose of the study is to evaluate delivery method and breastfeeding initiation in women enrolled in group prenatal care (CenteringPregnancy) and in traditional prenatal care. Methods Data were obtained from medical records of a hospital-based midwifery practice in south central Connecticut that offered both types of prenatal care programs. Medical information from 307 women enrolled in this practice was included in the analysis. Out of the 307, 80 were enrolled in group prenatal care. Socio-demographic, lifestyle, and previous and current obstetrical information from medical records formed the basis of comparison. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were carried out. Results Women in Centering had fewer planned cesarean sections (1.3 vs. 12.8%) and had a higher breastfeeding initiation (88.7 vs. 80.0%). However, Centering women were found to have a higher portion of unplanned cesarean sections (27.5 vs. 11.0%). Both the unadjusted and the adjusted odds ratios of having a cesarean planned delivery were lower in the group care. Women in Centering had 2.44 (95% CI 1.05, 5.66) times the odds of breastfeeding initiation compared to the odds for women in traditional prenatal care after adjusting for maternal age, smoking status, gestation and race. Discussion CenteringPregnancy can have positive impact for the woman and baby. This program implementation saw lower rates of elective cesarean sections and increased breastfeeding compared to women in traditional care.

  19. Mobile surgical services in primary care in a rural and remote setting: Experience and evidence from Yala, Cross River State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Monjok

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Surgical conditions account for 11 to 15% of the global burden of disease. Yet, surgical services are very scarce in the rural areas of Nigeria where approximately 60 to 80% of the population resides. Among other basic contributing factors is the shortage of surgical workforce, since Nigeria’s few surgeons practise in the urban centre of the major cities. One way to respond to this acute shortage of surgeons is the training of generalist medical doctors to undertake surgery in rural areas. The introduction of mobile surgical services in rural populations as part of the existing primary health care activities in the Local Government Areas (districts can reduce surgical morbidity and mortality in Nigeria. This can be done by the generalist physician with training and experience in surgery using local health staff and simple surgical equipment. A number of recommendations are made.

  20. Rapid control of a methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in a medical surgical intensive care unit (ICU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anjum; Lampitoc, Marianita; Salaripour, Maryam; McKernan, Patricia; Devlin, Roslyn; Muller, Matthew P

    2009-01-01

    Outbreaks of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the intensive care unit setting can be prolonged and difficult to control. This report describes the rapid control of an outbreak of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a 24-bed open-concept medical surgical intensive care unit with a baseline methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus acquisition rate of 1.5 cases per 1000 patient days. This institution's infection control policy mandates an outbreak investigation if two cases of hospital-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization or infection are identified in an intensive care unit within a four-week period. In July 2007, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was identified in the sputum of two patients within a one-week period. Screening of all patients in the intensive care unit identified one additional case and a fourth case was identified from a clinical specimen before control measures were implemented. Initial control measures included healthcare worker education, enhanced surveillance, patient cohorting, and enhanced environmental cleaning. Despite these measures, three more cases occurred. All patients were then placed in contact isolation, healthcare workers were screened, and the nursing staff was cohorted. After two weeks without a case, two additional cases were identified. Decolonization of all positive patients was initiated. No further cases occurred over a five-week period and the outbreak was declared over. The outbreak resulted in nine cases of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization (n = 8) or infection (n = 1) over an 11-week period. Only one of 175 healthcare workers was colonized and it was not the outbreak strain. Early detection and the stepwise addition of infection control measures resulted in the rapid control of an outbreak of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a medical surgical intensive care unit without unit closure. A low threshold of suspicion and

  1. Adopting a surgical safety checklist could save money and improve the quality of care in U.S. hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semel, Marcus E; Resch, Stephen; Haynes, Alex B; Funk, Luke M; Bader, Angela; Berry, William R; Weiser, Thomas G; Gawande, Atul A

    2010-09-01

    Use of the World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist has been associated with a significant reduction in major postoperative complications after inpatient surgery. We hypothesized that implementing the checklist in the United States would generate cost savings for hospitals. We performed a decision analysis comparing implementation of the checklist to existing practice in U.S. hospitals. In a hospital with a baseline major complication rate after surgery of at least 3 percent, the checklist generates cost savings once it prevents at least five major complications. Using the checklist would both save money and improve the quality of care in hospitals throughout the United States.

  2. Lumbosacral pain: Delivery of care to patients in the United Kingdom Podchufarova E.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Podchufarova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal pain syndromes are one of the most common causes of disability and referral to a medical specialist. Seven million consultations for lumbosacral pain are annually carried out in the United Kingdom.Examination of patients with back pain. Three levels of health care delivered to patients with back pain in the United Kingdom may be arbitrarily identified. Level 1 is outpatient: a general practitioner jointly with a manipulative therapist, a physiotherapist, a rehabilitation specialist, and mid-level health workers render care to patients with insignificant and mild pain syndrome; Level 2 is also outpatient, which involves the participation of a hospital or multidisciplinary team consultant, for example, in a musculoskeletal pain service or a specialized pain center; Level 3 is to deliver care at neurosurgical or orthopedic hospital, by applying invasive interventions. Acute back pain is a benign condition in the vast majority of cases; there is no need for additional instrumental and laboratory studies; but spinal X-ray study, computed tomography (СT scan, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, general blood and urine tests are required when marked neurological and somatic disorders are present.Management of patients with acute lumbosacral pain is to inform a patient about the benign nature of the disease; to exclude bed rest; to explain the need to maintain normal activity; to train how to correctly lift weights and to maintain normal posture; to refer for manual and exercise therapy in order to return to normal motor activity; to use proven effective medication. In most cases, acute back pain goes away spontaneously for a short period of time; an active treatment approach is considered to be optimal. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and acetaminophen are used for analgesia if required. Patients who show no improvement after 4 weeks of treatment need rescreening for markers of potentially dangerous spinal diseases, as

  3. Maternal health care professionals' perspectives on the provision and use of antenatal and delivery care: a qualitative descriptive study in rural Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graner, Sophie; Mogren, Ingrid; Duong, Le Q; Krantz, Gunilla; Klingberg-Allvin, Marie

    2010-10-14

    High quality maternal health care is an important tool to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality. Services offered should be evidence based and adapted to the local setting. This qualitative descriptive study explored the perspectives and experiences of midwives, assistant physicians and medical doctors on the content and quality of maternal health care in rural Vietnam. The study was performed in a rural district in northern Vietnam. Four focus group discussions with health care professionals at primary health care level were conducted. The data was analysed using qualitative manifest and latent content analysis. Two main themes emerged: "Contextual conditions for maternal health care" and "Balancing between possibilities and constraints". Contextual conditions influenced both pregnant women's use of maternal health care and health care professionals' performance. The study participants stated that women's uses of maternal health care were influenced by economical constraints and cultural norms that impeded their autonomy in relation to childbearing. Structural constraints within the health care system included inadequate financing of the primary health care, resulting in lack of human resources, professional re-training and adequate equipment. Contextual conditions strongly influenced the performance and interaction between pregnant women and health care professionals within antenatal care and delivery care in a rural district of Vietnam. Although Vietnam is performing comparatively well in terms of low maternal and child mortality figures, this study revealed midwives' and other health care professionals' perceived difficulties in their daily work. It seemed maternal health care was under-resourced in terms of staff, equipment and continuing education activities. The cultural setting in Vietnam constituting a strong patriarchal society and prevailing Confucian norms limits women's autonomy and reduce their possibility to make independent decisions about their

  4. Putting the MeaT into TeaM Training: Development, Delivery, and Evaluation of a Surgical Team-Training Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Neal E; Paige, John T; Arora, Sonal; Fernandez, Gladys L; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Tsuda, Shawn T; Powers, Kinga A; Langlois, Gerard; Stefanidis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Despite importance to patient care, team training is infrequently used in surgical education. To address this, a workshop was developed by the Association for Surgical Education Simulation Committee to teach team training using high-fidelity patient simulators and the American College of Surgeons-Association of Program Directors in Surgery team-training curriculum. Workshops were conducted at 3 national meetings. Participants completed preworkshop and postworkshop questionnaires to define experience, confidence in using simulation, intention to implement, as well as workshop content quality. The course consisted of (A) a didactic review of Preparation, Implementation, and Debriefing and (B) facilitated small group simulation sessions followed by debriefings. Of 78 participants, 51 completed the workshops. Overall, 65% indicated that residents at their institutions used patient simulation, but only 33% used the American College of Surgeons-the Association of Program Directors in Surgery team-training modules. The workshop increased confidence to implement simulation team training (3.4 ± 1.3 vs 4.5 ± 0.9). Quality and importance were rated highly (5.4 ± 00.6, highest score = 6). Preparation for simulation-based team training is possible in this workshop setting, although the effect on actual implementation remains to be determined. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of university hospitals as centers of excellence for shared health-care-delivery of in- and outpatients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelhard, K.; Matzko, M.; Bruening, R.; Holzknecht, N.; Stark, V.; Reiser, M.

    2002-01-01

    Problem. Health care delivery in Germany has to face severe challenges that will lead to a closer integration of services for in- and out-patients. University hospitals play an important role due to their activities in research, education and health care delivery. They are requested to promote and evaluate new means and ways for health care delivery. Methods. The Institute of Clinical Radiology at the University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University started teleradiological services for hospitals and general practices in January 1999 in the framework of the ''Imaging services - teleradiological center of excellence''. Legal, technical and organizational prerequisites were analyzed. Results. Networks between university hospitals and general practices are not likely to solve all future problems. They will, however, increase the availability of the knowledge of experts even in rural areas and contribute to a quality ensured health care at the patients home. Future developments may lead to international co-operations and such services may be available to patients abroad. Conclusion. Legal, technical and organizational obstacles have to be overcome to create a framework for high quality telemedical applications. University hospitals will play an important role in promoting and evaluating teleradiological services. (orig.) [de

  6. Effect of married women's beliefs about gender equity on their use of prenatal and delivery care in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ying; Zhang, Qiaoli; Yang, Li; Ye, Jianli; Lv, Mentao

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the effect of married women's beliefs regarding gender equity on their use of prenatal and delivery care in China's rural Xinjiang and Anhui provinces. In this survey, 1029 women aged from 15 to 69 years, living in rural Xinjiang and Anhui provinces, and married, answered a questionnaire designed to collect information on their demographic characteristics, reproductive history (number of pregnancies, level of prenatal care, and mode and place of delivery), and beliefs regarding gender equity. We quantified "belief in gender equity" based on responses to 7 specific statements and graded the responses according to a system scoring the strength of the overall belief (a total score ≥19, strong; 15-18, moderate; and ≤14, weak). Only 34.3% of the women demonstrated strong convictions about gender equity. Even after adjusting for education and ethnicity, the percentage of women who received consistent prenatal care and were delivered at a maternity facility was highest among those scoring 19 or higher, and the reverse was true for women scoring 14 or less. Overall, women in China's rural Xinjiang and Anhui provinces do not hold strong convictions about gender equity. There was a positive correlation between belief in gender equity and use of prenatal and delivery care. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Statistics of causes of death and analysis of risk factors in a surgical intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianhua, Yao; Xingxing, Shi; Fen, Wang; Xijing, Zhang

    2015-11-01

    To summarize the causes of death and to analyze the risk factors in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU). The relevant information of patients died in the SICU of Xijing Hospital of Fourth Military Medical University in past 15 years (from December 1999 to February 2015) was retrospectively analyzed. The gender, age, reason and date of hospitalization, date of transfer SICU, past medical history, whether or not admitted directly from emergency department or transferred from other department, operated or not, date of death, the main cause of death, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score, the history of undergoing mechanical ventilation, continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), or antifungal therapy, as well as the ratio of the patients with body temperature higher than 39 °C, white blood cell (WBC) count higher than 10 x 10⁹/L, platelet (PLT) count below 100 x 10⁹/L, albumin (Alb) below 35 g/L of two periods, namely from December 1999 to July 2007 (the first period), and from August 2007 to February 2015 (the second period) were compared. The above parameters were compared with those of 201 survivors in SICU, and the risk factors leading to death were analyzed by logistic regression. From December 1999 to February 2015, 4 317 patients were taken care of in the SICU. Among them, the number of death was 186, and the mortality rate was 4.3%. In the first time period (from December 1999 to July 2007), the total number of patients was 1 356, and the number of death were 109 (the mortality rate was 8.0%). In the second period, i.e. from August 2007 to February 2015, the number of SICU patients was 2,961, and 77 died (the mortality rate was 2.6%). The difference of mortality rate between the two periods was statistically significant (χ² = 66.707, P = 0.001 ). The death rate of patients transferred directly from emergency department in the first period was 79.8% (87/109), and it was lower in the second period (51.9%, 40/77, χ² = 16

  8. The utilization rate of the regional health information exchange: how it impacts on health care delivery outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäenpää, Tiina; Asikainen, Paula; Gissler, Mika; Siponen, Kimmo; Maass, Marianne; Saranto, Kaija; Suominen, Tarja

    2012-01-01

    Interest in improving quality and effectiveness is the primary driver for health information exchange efforts across a health care system to improve the provision of public health care services. The aim here was to describe and identify the impact of a regional health information exchange (HIE) using quantitative statistics for 2004-2008 in one hospital district in Finland. We conducted a comparative, longitudinal 5-year follow-up study to evaluate the utilization rates of HIE, and the impact on health care delivery outcomes. The selected outcomes were total laboratory tests, radiology examinations, appointments, emergency visits, and referrals. The HIE utilization rates increased annually in all 10 federations of municipalities, and the viewing of reference information increased steadily in each professional group over the 5-year study period. In these federations, a significant connection was found to the number of laboratory tests and radiology examinations, with a statistically significant increase in the number of viewed references and use of HIE. The higher the numbers of emergency visits and appointments, the higher the numbers of emergency referrals to specialized care, viewed references, and HIE usage among the groups of different health care professionals. There is increasing interest in HIE usage through regional health information system among health professionals to improve health care delivery regionally and bring information on the patient directly to care delivery. It will be important to study which changes in working methods in the service system are explained by RHIS. Also, the experiences of the change that has taken place should be studied among the different stakeholders, administrative representatives, and patients.

  9. Medical and surgical tourism: the new world of health care globalization and what it means for the practicing surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unti, James A

    2009-04-01

    In this issue of the Bulletin, the leadership of the American College of Surgeons has published a Statement on Medical and Surgical Tourism (see page 26). The statement addresses a number of concerns about this new industry and some of the safety and quality issues that patients may encounter if they seek health care services outside of the U.S. On June 16, 2008, the American Medical Association adopted its own first set of guidelines on medical tourism to help ensure the safety of patients who are considering traveling abroad for medical care. The American College of Surgeons' statement and the American Medical Association's guidelines together provide an important set of principles for consideration by patients, employers, insurers, and other third-party groups responsible for coordinating such travel outside of the country.

  10. Surgical data science: The new knowledge domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedula, S Swaroop; Hager, Gregory D

    2017-04-01

    -assisted active learning of surgical skill. However, the potential for transforming surgical care and training through SDS may only be realized through a cultural shift that not only institutionalizes technology to seamlessly capture data but also assimilates individuals with expertise in data science into clinical research teams. Furthermore, collaboration with industry partners from the inception of the discovery process promotes optimal design of data products as well as their efficient translation and commercialization. As surgery continues to evolve through advances in technology that enhance delivery of care, SDS represents a new knowledge domain to engineer surgical care of the future.

  11. Surgical data science: The new knowledge domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedula, S. Swaroop; Hager, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    -assisted active learning of surgical skill. However, the potential for transforming surgical care and training through SDS may only be realized through a cultural shift that not only institutionalizes technology to seamlessly capture data but also assimilates individuals with expertise in data science into clinical research teams. Furthermore, collaboration with industry partners from the inception of the discovery process promotes optimal design of data products as well as their efficient translation and commercialization. As surgery continues to evolve through advances in technology that enhance delivery of care, SDS represents a new knowledge domain to engineer surgical care of the future. PMID:28936475

  12. Surgical data science: the new knowledge domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedula S. Swaroop

    2017-04-01

    assessments, automated virtual coaching, and robot-assisted active learning of surgical skill. However, the potential for transforming surgical care and training through SDS may only be realized through a cultural shift that not only institutionalizes technology to seamlessly capture data but also assimilates individuals with expertise in data science into clinical research teams. Furthermore, collaboration with industry partners from the inception of the discovery process promotes optimal design of data products as well as their efficient translation and commercialization. As surgery continues to evolve through advances in technology that enhance delivery of care, SDS represents a new knowledge domain to engineer surgical care of the future.

  13. Surgical emergencies in obstetrics and gynaecology in a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Hanoon P; Dahal, Prerana; Rai, Rubina; Budhathoki, ShyamSundar

    2013-01-01

    The management of Obstetrics and Gynaecological Emergency is directed at the preservation of life, health, sexual function and the perpetuation of fertility. Main aim of the study was to access the burden of Surgical Emergency in Obstetrics and Gynaecology and their course of management at BPKIHS. A total of 314 women presenting at the emergency admission room of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department of BPKIHS over two years, who required surgical intervention were included in this hospital based descriptive study. Clinical assessment and routine laboratory investigations were performed in all cases. All patients who presented with shock were resuscitated and surgery was done at earliest possible time. The age of patients ranged from 15- 55 years with approximately 43% in the 25-34 years category. Ninety two percent of them were married. Among the unmarried, 64% came with problems related to unsafe abortion. About 61% of females presenting as acute surgical abdomen had ruptured ectopic pregnancy, 7.64% had twisted ovarian cyst, and 6.26% had haemoperitoneum and pyoperitoneum following vaginal hysterectomies, total abdominal hysterectomies and caesarean section. Almost half (47.8%) of the cases underwent salphingectomy. Women present with wide range of complaints and conditions in the admission room of Obstetrics and Gynecology department of BPKIHS. Skilled clinicians, immediate investigation facilities and experienced specialty Obstetrical and Gynaecological surgeons are the main backbone of the emergency case management and saving lives. Study indicates there is need of some prospective study to establish the causes of rising trend in Ectopic Pregnancies.

  14. What do surgical oncology staff nurses know about colorectal cancer ostomy care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmill, Robin; Kravits, Kathy; Ortiz, Mildred; Anderson, Casandra; Lai, Lily; Grant, Marcia

    2011-02-01

    For most patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer, dealing with the adjustment and rehabilitation after treatment can be overwhelming. There is a significant need for expert educational and counseling support, especially for the patient with a new ostomy. This pilot study describes acute care oncology staff nurses' knowledge about and attitudes toward providing direct ostomy care support and education. This study is part of a larger project assessing gaps in education and services in support of patients with colorectal cancer. The Survey on Ostomy Care questionnaire designed to assess nurses' knowledge about and attitudes toward ostomy care was administered to oncology staff nurses at a comprehensive cancer center. Only 30% of staff nurses surveyed strongly agreed or agreed with the statement, "I care for ostomy patients often enough to keep up my skills in ostomy care." Maintaining staff nurses' ability to teach and demonstrate to patients complex care such as ostomy care depends on the ability to practice both education and hands-on skills. Staff nurses identify that lack of opportunity to care for the new ostomy patient influences their ability to maintain skill expertise. The results show the need to explore the provision of ongoing staff education for low-volume patient populations using creative teaching strategies, such as clinical simulation and short videos. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Resident use of the Internet, e-mail, and personal electronics in the care of surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Mathew A; Fish, Joel S

    2015-01-01

    The use of smartphones, e-mail, and the Internet has affected virtually all areas of patient care. Current university and hospital policies concerning the use of devices may be incongruent with day-to-day patient care. The goal was to assess the current usage patterns of the Internet, e-mail, and personal electronics for clinical purposes by surgical residents as well as their communication habits and preferences. Also assessed was residents' knowledge regarding the institutional policies surrounding these issues. Surgical residents (n = 294) at a large teaching institution were surveyed regarding their knowledge of university policies as well as daily use of various communication technologies. Communication preferences were determined using theoretical clinical scenarios. Our survey with a response rate of 54.7% (n = 161) revealed that 93.8% of participants indicated daily Internet use for clinical duties. Most respondents (72%) were either completely unaware of the existence of guidelines for its use or aware but had no familiarity with their content. Use of e-mail for clinical duties was common (85%), and 74% of the respondents rated e-mail as "very important" or "extremely important" for patient care. Everyone who responded had a mobile phone with 98.7% being "smartphones," which the majority (82.9%) stated was "very important" or "extremely important" for patient care. Text messaging was the primary communication method for 57.8% of respondents. The traditional paging system was the primary communication method for only 1.3% of respondents and the preferred method for none. Daily use of technology is the norm among residents; however, knowledge of university guidelines was exceedingly low. Residents need better education regarding current guidelines. Current guidelines do not reflect current clinical practice. Hospitals should consider abandoning the traditional paging system and consider facilitating better use of residents' mobile phones.

  16. Midwives' and patients' perspectives on disrespect and abuse during labor and delivery care in Ethiopia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrowes, Sahai; Holcombe, Sarah Jane; Jara, Dube; Carter, Danielle; Smith, Katheryn

    2017-08-22

    It is increasingly recognized that disrespect and abuse of women during labor and delivery is a violation of a woman's rights and a deterrent to the use of life-saving, facility-based labor and delivery services. In Ethiopia, rates of skilled birth attendance are still only 28% despite a recent dramatic national scale up in the numbers of trained providers and facilities. Concerns have been raised that womens' perceptions of poor quality of care and fear of mistreatment might contribute to this low utilization. This study examines the experiences of disrespect and abuse in maternal care from the perspectives of both providers and patients. We conducted 45 in-depth interviews at four health facilities in Debre Markos, Ethiopia with midwives, midwifery students, and women who had given birth within the past year. Students and providers also took a brief quantitative survey on patients' rights during labor and delivery and responded to clinical scenarios regarding the provision of stigmatized reproductive health services. We find that both health care providers and patients report frequent physical and verbal abuse as well as non-consented care during labor and delivery. Providers report that most abuse is unintended and results from weaknesses in the health system or from medical necessity. We uncovered no evidence of more systematic types of abuse involving detention of patients, bribery, abandonment or ongoing discrimination against particular ethnic groups. Although health care providers showed good basic knowledge of confidentiality, privacy, and consent, training on the principles of responsive and respectful care, and on counseling, is largely absent. Providers indicated that they would welcome related practical instruction. Patient responses suggest that women are aware that their rights are being violated and avoid facilities with reputations for poor care. Our results suggest that training on respectful care, offered in the professional ethics modules of the

  17. Mental health care delivery system reform in Belgium: the challenge of achieving deinstitutionalisation whilst addressing fragmentation of care at the same time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicaise, Pablo; Dubois, Vincent; Lorant, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Most mental health care delivery systems in welfare states currently face two major issues: deinstitutionalisation and fragmentation of care. Belgium is in the process of reforming its mental health care delivery system with the aim of simultaneously strengthening community care and improving integration of care. The new policy model attempts to strike a balance between hospitals and community services, and is based on networks of services. We carried out a content analysis of the policy blueprint for the reform and performed an ex-ante evaluation of its plan of operation, based on the current knowledge of mental health service networks. When we examined the policy's multiple aims, intermediate goals, suggested tools, and their articulation, we found that it was unclear how the new policy could achieve its goals. Indeed, deinstitutionalisation and integration of care require different network structures, and different modes of governance. Furthermore, most of the mechanisms contained within the new policy were not sufficiently detailed. Consequently, three major threats to the effectiveness of the reform were identified. These were: issues concerning the relationship between network structure and purpose, the continued influence of hospitals despite the goal of deinstitutionalisation, and the heterogeneity in the actual implementation of the new policy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. "Beating osteoARThritis": development of a stepped care strategy to optimize utilization and timing of non-surgical treatment modalities for patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smink, A.J.; Ende, C.H.; Vliet-Vlieland, Th.P.M.; Swierstra, B.A.; Kortland, J.H.; Bijlsma, J.W.; Voorn, T.B.; Schers, H.J.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.; Dekker, J.

    2011-01-01

    Inadequacies in health care practices have been reported despite existing guidelines to manage hip or knee osteoarthritis. To facilitate guideline implementation and improve utilization of non-surgical treatment options a care strategy should be developed. This study describes the development of an

  19. "Beating osteoARThritis": Development of a stepped care strategy to optimize utilization and timing of non-surgical treatment modalities for patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smink, A.J.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Swierstra, B.A.; Kortland, J.H.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Voorn, T.B.; Schers, H.J.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.; Dekker, J.

    2011-01-01

    Inadequacies in health care practices have been reported despite existing guidelines to manage hip or knee osteoarthritis. To facilitate guideline implementation and improve utilization of non-surgical treatment options a care strategy should be developed. This study describes the development of an

  20. A 15-Year Comparative Prospective Study of Surgical and Prosthetic Care and Aftercare of Overdenture Treatment in the Atrophied Mandible : Augmentation Versus Nonaugmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Anita; Stellingsma, Cornelis; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Vissink, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundDifferent treatment strategies for the atrophied mandible are described in literature. The need for long term care and aftercare for these strategies is sparsely described, however. PurposeTo prospectively assess the need for prosthetic and surgical care and aftercare of two implant

  1. Hemodynamic and oxygenation changes in surgical intensive care unit patients with fever and fever lowering nursing interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Sevim; Yildirim, Ismail; Arslan, Ibrahim; Yildirim, Sinan; Erdal, Fatih; Yandi, Yunus Emre

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of fever and nursing interventions to lower fever on hemodynamic values and oxygenation in febrile (temperature greater than 38.3°C) surgical intensive care unit patients. This retrospective study was conducted in 53 febrile patients out of 519 patients admitted to the surgical intensive care unit at a university hospital. Data were obtained from the medical records, laboratory files and nursing notes. Statistical analysis of the data was analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance and a paired sample t-test. The average hourly urine output (F = 5.46; P = 0.002) and systolic blood pressure (F = 2.87; P = 0.03) were significantly lower after fever onset. Heart rate, respiratory rate, positive end-expiratory pressure settings and FiO(2) settings were unchanged after the development of fever. Diastolic blood pressure and oxygen saturation had non-statistically significant decreases. Nursing interventions for febrile patients consisted of medication administration (69.8%), ice (62.3%) and sponging with tepid water (62.3%). The present results showed that fever was associated with an increase in heart rate, decreased systolic arterial pressure, mean arterial pressure, oxygen saturation and hourly urine output. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. A retrospective comparison of VLBW outcomes before and after implementing new delivery room guidelines at a regional tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodaver, A; Blunt, M; Satnes, K; Escobedo, M; Hallford, G; Szyld, E

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the impact of implemented protocol changes on delivery room interventions and very low birth weight (VLBW) health outcomes. Retrospective study comparing birth characteristics, interventions and health outcomes of VLBW infants born in a tertiary care center before (calendar years 2008 to 2009) and after (calendar years 2012 to 2013) implementing new protocols using Chi-square analyses. Four hundred and nine were born before and 303 after changes were implemented. Postimplementation infants had more use of antenatal steroids (P=0.02), gestational age ⩽24 weeks (P=0.03) and birth weights between 501 and 750 g (P=0.04) and less oxygen administration (P=0.002), face mask ventilation (P=0.0001), surfactant use (P=0.0001), chest compressions (P=0.0001), intubation (P=0.002), epinephrine use (P=0.011), hypothermia (P=0.0001) and discharges home on supplemental oxygen (P=0.05). Changes creating a new delivery team, adopting new delivery practice guidelines and updating delivery room equipment resulted in positive outcomes for delivery room practices and patient outcomes.

  3. Explaining the amount of care needed by hospitalised surgical patients: a prospective time and motion study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostveen, Catharina J.; Vermeulen, Hester; Gouma, Dirk J.; Bakker, Piet J.; Ubbink, Dirk T.

    2013-01-01

    Hospitals provide care for patients with a variety of diseases, co-morbidities and complications. The actual amount of care these patients need is unclear. Given the recent developments such as ageing, multi-morbidity and budgetary restraints, a practical explanatory model would avail healthcare

  4. Quality-of-care initiative in patients treated surgically for perforated peptic ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M H; Larsson, Heidi Jeanet; Rosenstock, S

    2013-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity are considerable after treatment for perforated peptic ulcer (PPU). Since 2003, a Danish nationwide quality-of-care (QOC) improvement initiative has focused on reducing preoperative delay, and improving perioperative monitoring and care for patients with PPU. The present...... study reports the results of this initiative....

  5. Non-surgical care in patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis is modestly consistent with a stepped care strategy after its implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smink, Agnes J; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Schers, Henk J; Swierstra, Bart A; Kortland, Joke H; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Teerenstra, Steven; Voorn, Theo B; Dekker, Joost; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van den Ende, Cornelia H M

    2014-08-01

    To improve the management of hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA), a stepped care strategy (SCS) has been developed that presents the optimal sequence for care in three steps. This study evaluates the extent to which clinical practice is consistent with the strategy after implementation and identifies determinants of SCS-consistent care. A 2-year observational prospective cohort study. General practices in the region of Nijmegen in the Netherlands. Three hundred and thirteen patients with hip or knee OA and their general practitioner (GP). Multifaceted interventions were developed to implement the strategy. Consistency between clinical practice and the strategy was examined regarding three aspects of care: (i) timing of radiological assessment, (ii) sequence of non-surgical treatment options and (iii) making follow-up appointments. Out of the 212 patients who reported to have had an X-ray, 92 (44%) received it in line with the SCS. The sequence of treatment was inconsistent with the SCS in 58% of the patients, which was mainly caused by the underuse of lifestyle advice and dietary therapy. In 57% of the consultations, the patient reported to have been advised to make a follow-up appointment. No determinants that influenced all three aspects of care were identified. Consistency with the SCS was found in about half of the patients for each of the three aspects of care. Health care can be further optimized by encouraging GP s to use X-rays more appropriately and to make more use of lifestyle advice, dietary therapy and follow-up appointments. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  6. Human resources for health care delivery in Tanzania: a multifaceted problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzi Fatuma

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent years have seen an unprecedented increase in funds for procurement of health commodities in developing countries. A major challenge now is the efficient delivery of commodities and services to improve population health. With this in mind, we documented staffing levels and productivity in peripheral health facilities in southern Tanzania. Method A health facility survey was conducted to collect data on staff employed, their main tasks, availability on the day of the survey, reasons for absenteeism, and experience of supervisory visits from District Health Teams. In-depth interview with health workers was done to explore their perception of work load. A time and motion study of nurses in the Reproductive and Child Health (RCH clinics documented their time use by task. Results We found that only 14% (122/854 of the recommended number of nurses and 20% (90/441 of the clinical staff had been employed at the facilities. Furthermore, 44% of clinical staff was not available on the day of the survey. Various reasons were given for this. Amongst the clinical staff, 38% were absent because of attendance to seminar sessions, 8% because of long-training, 25% were on official travel and 20% were on leave. RCH clinic nurses were present for 7 hours a day, but only worked productively for 57% of time present at facility. Almost two-third of facilities had received less than 3 visits from district health teams during the 6 months preceding the survey. Conclusion This study documented inadequate staffing of health facilities, a high degree of absenteeism, low productivity of the staff who were present and inadequate supervision in peripheral Tanzanian health facilities. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of decentralized health care in Tanzania.

  7. Innovative Models of Dental Care Delivery and Coverage: Patient-Centric Dental Benefits Based on Digital Oral Health Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John; Mills, Shannon; Foley, Mary E

    2018-04-01

    Innovative models of dental care delivery and coverage are emerging across oral health care systems causing changes to treatment and benefit plans. A novel addition to these models is digital risk assessment, which offers a promising new approach that incorporates the use of a cloud-based technology platform to assess an individual patient's risk for oral disease. Risk assessment changes treatment by including risk as a modifier of treatment and as a determinant of preventive services. Benefit plans are being developed to use risk assessment to predetermine preventive benefits for patients identified at elevated risk for oral disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Integrated health care delivery system conducts ad agency search as part of its brand-launching effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, G

    1999-01-01

    PennState Geisinger Health System, Hershey, Pa., conducted an extensive ad agency search after its inception in 1997. The integrated health care delivery system needed to introduce its brand to an audience that was confused by the wide array of available health care options. BVK/McDonald, Milwaukee, the agency selected, has created a branding campaign that revolves around the tag-line "The power of health." PennState Geisinger will tabulate the results of BVK/McDonald's multi-million dollar campaign in 2000; at that time it will know whether its selection committee chose wisely.

  9. Factors that determine the use of skilled care during delivery in India: implications for achievement of MDG-5 targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Indrajit

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study is to identify individual level factors that determine the use of skilled birth attendants in India. Data from the cross-sectional, population-based NFHS 3 Survey 2005-06 was used. A sample of 31,797 women, aged 15-49 years, who gave births in the 3 months preceding the survey and for whom information was available on most variables, were included in the analysis. Both bivariate and multivariate techniques were used to determine factors associated with the use of skilled attendants at birth. In the study we found that wealth is one of the strongest determinants of skilled birth attendant use, with the poor being at a disadvantage. There are significant differences in the use of skilled delivery care among the urban and rural populations in India. Women in urban areas are more likely to use skilled attendants. Muslim women and women with lower levels of education are also less likely to avail skilled delivery services. The use of skilled care depended significantly on the place of delivery. Women who gave history of antenatal visits were more likely to have skilled attendants at birth. Our analysis demonstrates that there are several financial, social, regional and cultural barriers to skilled birth attendant use in India. Effective strategies need to be planned to generate demand for skilled birth attendants and reduce barriers to care seeking, especially among rural poor.

  10. Surgical site infection and pattern of antibiotic use in a tertiary care hospital in Peshawar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, W.A.; Khan, M.; Jehanzeb, M.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is most common complication following surgical procedures. The objective of the study was to collect information on SSI regarding the most frequent pathogen in cases operated in casualty of Lady Read ing Hospital (LRH) Peshawar, and sensitivity of the isolated pathogens to different antibiotics used. Methods: The study was carried out at surgical 'B' unit (SBU) LRH from Jan 1, 2009 till Dec 31, 2009. A total of 100 patients who developed SSI after being operated for peritonitis following traumatic gut perforations, perforated appendix and enteric perforation. The patients included presented to casualty, operated in casualty OT and were shifted to the SBU, LRH. Children and patients operated on the elective list were excluded. Data was collected on specially designed proforma. Demographic details, details of SSI, culture/sensitivity reports and antibiotic used for prophylaxis and after C/S report were recorded. Results: Out of a total of 100, 72 had superficial, 20 had organ/space and 8 had deep SSI. Organisms were isolated in 77 cases (77%). E. coli being most common pathogen (46%), followed by Pseudomonas (23%), mixed growth of Staph. Aureus or MRSA (13%), MRSA (5%) and Staph aureus (4%) in descending order. No growth was reported in 23% of cases. Conclusion: E.coli was the most common organism involved in SSI in SBU LRH. The incidence of infection with MRSA in our unit is high. Combination of antibiotics like pipreacillin/Tazobactam, Cefoperazone/Sulbactam, were most effective against the isolated organisms, except MRSA where Linezolid, vancomycin and Tiecoplanin were effective. (author)

  11. Patients' experiences and satisfaction about care provided by male nurses in medical surgical units in Islamabad, Pakistan: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younas, Ahtisham; Sundus, Amara

    2018-01-01

    Nursing is predominantly a female profession and caring has been considered an attribute of female nurses, which could imply a noncaring image of male nurses. To determine patients' experiences and satisfaction from care provided by male nurses in a private hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan. This cross-sectional study included a purposive sample of 50 patients admitted to medical surgical units for at least 2 days and who had at least three professional interactions with a male nurse. The Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scale was used for data collection. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. The total score for experience and satisfaction was 81 and 51, respectively. A statistically significant difference existed between experience and satisfaction scores of male and female participants, indicating that males were more pleased and satisfied with their experience of receiving care from male nurses compared to the female participants. The male nurses were concerned for their patients, they were knowledgeable about the patients' condition and care, and provided them with clear explanations of the medical and nursing procedures. However, they seem to lack interpersonal relationship with patients and did not take initiative in understanding their patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Mainstreaming of Ayurveda, Yoga, Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha, and Homeopathy with the health care delivery system in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available India has a population of 1.21 billion people and there is a high degree of socio-cultural, linguistic, and demographic heterogeneity. There is a limited number of health care professionals, especially doctors, per head of population. The National Rural Health Mission has decided to mainstream the Ayurveda, Yoga, Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha, and Homeopathy (AYUSH system of indigenous medicine to help meet the challenge of this shortage of health care professionals and to strengthen the delivery system of the health care service. Multiple interventions have been implemented to ensure a systematic merger; however, the anticipated results have not been achieved as a result of multiple challenges and barriers. To ensure the accessibility and availability of health care services to all, policy-makers need to implement strategies to facilitate the mainstreaming of the AYUSH system and to support this system with stringent monitoring mechanisms.

  13. Challenges to Value-Enhancing Innovation in Health Care Delivery: Commonalities and Contrasts with Innovation in Drugs and Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Steven; Gates, Susan M; Blume-Kohout, Margaret E; Burgdorf, James R; Wu, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Limiting the growth of health care costs while improving population health is perhaps the most important and difficult challenge facing U.S. health policymakers. The role of innovation in advancing these social goals is controversial, with many seeing innovation as a major cause of cost growth and many others viewing innovation as crucial for improving the quality of care and health outcomes. The authors argue that mitigating the tension between improving health and controlling costs requires more-nuanced perspectives on innovation. More specifically, they argue that policymakers should carefully distinguish between innovative activities that are worth their social costs and activities that are not worth their social costs and try to encourage the former and discourage the latter. The article considers innovation in drugs, devices, and methods of delivering health care, with particular attention to delivery.

  14. Drug correction of intestinal motility disorders in intensive care in the postoperative period in surgical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novitskaya-Usenko L.V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: improving the results of the complex treatment of patients with surgical pathology of abdominal organs by improving prevention and treatment of motor-evacuation disorders of the gastrointestinal tract in the postoperative period. Results: the article presents data on the use of metoclopramide, L- ar¬ginine, simethicone for the prevention of postoperative dysmotility development. It is proved that L-arginine use reduces the effects of peripheral vasospasm by improving microcirculation of the intestinal wall and this leads to a more rapid recovery of motor-evacuation