WorldWideScience

Sample records for surgery surgeon performs

  1. Musculoskeletal pain among surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech, Katrine Tholstrup

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain is the most common occupational disease in Europe. Surgeons with awkward and static working postures are no exception. Robotic-assisted laparoscopy has been postulated to be superior to conventional laparoscopy regarding the ergonomic strain for surgeons. In this ......BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain is the most common occupational disease in Europe. Surgeons with awkward and static working postures are no exception. Robotic-assisted laparoscopy has been postulated to be superior to conventional laparoscopy regarding the ergonomic strain for surgeons......, and comparative data on surgeons' physical workload with robotic-assisted laparoscopy and conventional laparoscopy. Studies only describing a single surgical modality were excluded. We applied the checklist, STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE), to assess the quality...... fulfilled the criteria of STROBE, with an average score of 13 (range 10-16) out of 18. DISCUSSION: Results, mainly self-reported measures, suggest that robotic-assisted laparoscopy is less strenuous compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, results are limited by the large methodological...

  2. Provision of a surgeon's performance data for people considering elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Amanda; Henderson, Simon

    2015-02-09

    A consumer model of health supports that people undergoing elective surgery should be informed about the past operative performance of their surgeon before making two important decisions: 1. to consent to the proposed surgery, and 2. to have a particular doctor perform the surgery. This information arguably helps empower patients to participate in their care. While surgeons' performance data are available in some settings, there continues to be controversy over the provision of such data to patients, and the question of whether consumers should, or want to, be provided with this information. To assess the effects of providing a surgeon's performance data to people considering elective surgery on patient-based and service utilisation outcomes. For the original review, we searched: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 2009, Issue 4); MEDLINE (Ovid) (1950 to 28 September 2009); EMBASE (Ovid) (1988 to 28 September 2009); PsycINFO (Ovid) (1806 to 28 September 2009); CINAHL (EBSCO) (1982 to 20 October 2009); Current Contents (Ovid) (1992 to 23 November 2009); and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (1861 to 20 October 2009).For this update, we searched: CENTRAL (2009 to 3 March 2014); MEDLINE (Ovid) (2009 to 3 March 2014); EMBASE (Ovid) (2009 to 3 March 2014); PsycINFO (Ovid) (2009 to 9 March 2014); CINAHL (EBSCO) (2009 to 9 March 2014), Current Contents (Web of Science) (November 2009 to 21 March 2014), and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (2009 to 21 March 2014). We applied no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cluster RCTs, quasi-RCTs and controlled before and after studies (CBAs), in which an individual surgeon's performance data were provided to people considering elective surgery. We considered the CBAs for inclusion from 2009 onwards. Two review authors (AH, SH) independently assessed all titles, abstracts, or both of retrieved citations. We identified no studies for inclusion. Consequently, we

  3. A family operation: plastic surgeons who perform aesthetic surgery on spouses or other family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Sara A; Slavin, Sumner A; Goldwyn, Robert M

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether plastic surgeons would perform elective cosmetic surgery on spouses or other family members and how many have done so, the type of procedures, the circumstances under which the surgery took place, and the results. Participants were 465 members of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, representing 30.7 percent of the overall sample pool of 1513 members recruited through anonymous, voluntary participation in an online survey. Approximately half (51.8 percent) were 51 to 65 years old, most were men (91.2 percent), and most were from large urban areas; respondents had been in practice for 1 to 40 years. The plastic surgeons who returned the survey were comfortable performing elective cosmetic procedures on family members, the majority having already done so. Eighty-eight percent reported they would operate on a spouse or other family member, and 83.9 percent reported they already had. The main motivation (67 percent) was their belief that they were the best surgeon for the procedure. The most commonly listed operations were rhinoplasty, abdominoplasty, eyelidplasty, face lift, breast augmentation, and liposuction. Patients included spouses, children, parents, cousins, and in-laws, ranging from teenaged males to women in their 70s. The overwhelming majority (94.2 percent) reported no complications, and 99.5 percent believed the patients were satisfied with their outcome. Survey participants are comfortable with the idea of performing elective cosmetic procedures on family members. Regardless of the invasiveness of the procedure or their relationship with the patient, respondents reported no complications and a high level of patient satisfaction anomalous for any patient-surgeon sample, suggesting that surgeons who operate on family members hold confident opinions of their surgical skills and results.

  4. The effect of Kinesiotape application on functional performance in surgeons who have musculo-skeletal pain after performing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Nihan; Bicici, Seda; Baltaci, Gul; Caner, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    Surgeons make up a unique group that is at risk for developing work-related musculoskeletal symptoms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Kinesiotape technique on pain and functional performance in surgeons who have musculoskeletal system pain after performing surgery. 32 surgeons between the ages of 27 and 44 yrs working in a university hospital were included. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the surgeons' neck and low back pain and the Oswestry Low Back and Neck Disability Indexes were used to determine the impact of pain on daily living activities. First, surgeons were evaluated without Kinesiotape application, then evaluated again on the first day and fourth day of Kinesiotape application. The results showed that surgeons had a significant reduction in neck and low back pain (p < 0.05). There were improvements in both Oswestry Low Back Disability Index and Neck Disability Index scores when compared with their initial status (p < 0.05). After Kinesiotape application, neck and low back range of motions' scores showed an increase (p < 0.05). Findings demonstrated that Kinesio taping would be an effective method for reducing neck and low back pain and improving functional performance.

  5. In surgeons performing cardiothoracic surgery is sleep deprivation significant in its impact on morbidity or mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfour, Leila; Asfour, Victoria; McCormack, David; Attia, Rizwan

    2014-09-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: is there a difference in cardiothoracic surgery outcomes in terms of morbidity or mortality of patients operated on by a sleep-deprived surgeon compared with those operated by a non-sleep-deprived surgeon? Reported search criteria yielded 77 papers, of which 15 were deemed to represent the best evidence on the topic. Three studies directly related to cardiothoracic surgery and 12 studies related to non-cardiothoracic surgery. Recommendations are based on 18 121 cardiothoracic patients and 214 666 non-cardiothoracic surgical patients. Different definitions of sleep deprivation were used in the studies, either reviewing surgeon's sleeping hours or out-of-hours operating. Surgical outcomes reviewed included: mortality rate, neurological, renal, pulmonary, infectious complications, length of stay, length of intensive care stay, cardiopulmonary bypass times and aortic-cross-clamp times. There were no significant differences in mortality or intraoperative complications in the groups of patients operated on by sleep-deprived versus non-sleep-deprived surgeons in cardiothoracic studies. One study showed a significant increase in the rate of septicaemia in patients operated on by severely sleep-deprived surgeons (3.6%) compared with the moderately sleep-deprived (0.9%) and non-sleep-deprived groups (0.8%) (P = 0.03). In the non-cardiothoracic studies, 7 of the 12 studies demonstrated statistically significant higher reoperation rate in trauma cases (P sleep deprivation in cardiothoracic surgeons on morbidity or mortality. However, overall the non-cardiothoracic studies have demonstrated that operative time and sleep deprivation can have a significant impact on overall morbidity and mortality. It is likely that other confounding factors concomitantly affect outcomes in out-of-hours surgery. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  6. A study of the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Diez, Maria C; Benito-Gonzalez, Maria A; Sancibrian, Ramon; Gandarillas-Gonzalez, Marco A; Redondo-Figuero, Carlos; Manuel-Palazuelos, Jose C

    2017-09-15

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has shown significant benefits for patients and healthcare systems. However, due to the poor ergonomic adaptation of operating rooms and surgical instruments, most surgeons suffer from pain caused by musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). A descriptive survey on MIS surgeons working in different surgical specialties has been carried out in Hospital Valdecilla (Spain). The aim is to determine the prevalence of MSDs using a personal interview and the standardized Nordic questionnaire. The study determines the prevalence of MSDs in different parts of the body and their relationship with epidemiological and labor variables. A questionnaire was filled out by 129 surgeons. 90% of surgeons reported MSDs. The higher prevalence appears in the most experienced surgeons. The most affected zones are the lower back (54%), neck (51%), upper back (44%), lower extremities (42%), right shoulder (29%) and right hand (28%). The prevalence of MSDs is higher in MIS surgeons than in any other occupational group. The most vulnerable group is experienced surgeons and there is a potential risk that symptoms will be increased in the future. Muscle strength is revealed as a protective factor against MSDs.

  7. Surgeons' musculoskeletal pain in minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech, Katrine Tholstrup

    Background: A large proportion of surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) experience musculoskeletal pain in the upper body possibly due to awkward and long-term static positions. This can be detrimental for workability and health. The objective of the present review is to sum up...... in surgeons performing MIS is high and derives mainly from static postures. Positioning of monitor, adjustment of table height and instrument design also contribute substantially. Robotic assisted laparoscopy seems less physically demanding for the surgeon compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, some...

  8. [General surgeons and varicose vein surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Cuenca, Germán; Moreno-Egea, Alfredo; Aguayo-Albasini, Jose Luis

    2009-04-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency is a highly prevalent condition, with significant health and economic repercussions. Although important therapeutic developments have been introduced in recent years, the majority are dealt with by general surgeons in national health hospitals. These surgeons do not have the required and continuous training, and continue to perform classic surgery techniques. Also, their presence at scientific, organisational meetings and training is almost nil. We present an update on developments in phlebology, and tapping into the preliminary results of a national survey, we reflect on the current status of phlebology and beyond for those general surgeons who should have a role in this field.

  9. The Future of Plastic Surgery: Surgeon's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Sinan; Karagoz, Huseyin; Zor, Fatih

    2015-11-01

    Since the days of Sushruta, innovation has shaped the history of plastic surgery. Plastic surgeons have always been known as innovators or close followers of innovations. With this descriptive international survey study, the authors aimed to evaluate the future of plastic surgeons by analyzing how plastic surgery and plastic surgeons will be affected by new trends in medicine. Aesthetic surgery is the main subclass of plastic surgery thought to be the one that will change the most in the future. Stem cell therapy is considered by plastic surgeons to be the most likely "game changer." Along with changes in surgery, plastic surgeons also expect changes in plastic surgery education. The most approved assumption for the future of plastic surgery is, "The number of cosmetic nonsurgical procedures will increase in the future." If surgeons want to have better outcomes in their practice, they must at least be open minded for innovations if they do not become innovators themselves. Besides the individual effort of each surgeon, international and local plastic surgery associations should develop new strategies to adopt these innovations in surgical practice and education.

  10. Surgical smoke may be a biohazard to surgeons performing laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seock Hwan; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Chung, Sung Kwang; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2014-08-01

    Surgical smoke production is inevitable during surgical procedures. Although many workplaces have adopted smoke-free environments, healthcare workers, especially surgeons, continue to be exposed to surgical smoke. From February 2013 to March 2013, a total of 20 patients underwent transperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma. A 5-L gas sample was collected 30 min after the electrocautery device was first used and was analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Cancer risk was calculated for carcinogenic compounds and hazard quotient was calculated for noncarcinogenic compounds using US Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. Twenty patients with a median age of 57.5 years were enrolled in the study. Eighteen volatile organic compounds were detected by Japanese indoor air standards mix analysis. The cancer risks were ethanol, 5.10 × 10(-5) ± 6.35 × 10(-5); 1,2-dichloroethane, 4.75 × 10(-3) ± 7.42 × 10(-4); benzene, 1.09 × 10(-3) ± 4.33 × 10(-4); ethylbenzene, 2.87 × 10(-5) ± 1.32 × 10(-5); and styrene, 2.94 × 10(-6) ± 1.16 × 10(-6). The hazard quotients were acetone, 1.88 × 10(-2) ± 7.63 × 10(-3); hexane, 1.48 × 10(-1) ± 8.70 × 10(-2); benzene, 4.66 ± 1.85; toluene, 2.61 × 10(-2) ± 7.23 × 10(-3); p-xylene, 1.81 × 10(-1) ± 6.45 × 10(-2); o-xylene, 2.40 × 10(-2) ± 3.33 × 10(-2); and styrene, 5.15 × 10(-3) ± 2.03 × 10(-3). For five carcinogenic compounds detected, the cancer risk was greater than negligible. For 1,2-dichloroethane and benzene, the risk was classified as unacceptable. Analysis of noncarcinogenic compounds showed that risk reduction measures are needed for benzene. Even though surgical smoke is not an immediate health hazard, operating room personnel should be aware of the potential long-term health risks associated with exposure.

  11. Surgeons and non-surgeons prefer haptic feedback of instrument vibrations during robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Jacqueline K; Kuchenbecker, Katherine J

    2015-10-01

    Clinical robotic surgery systems do not currently provide haptic feedback because surgical instrument interactions are difficult to measure and display. Our laboratory recently developed a technology that allows surgeons to feel and/or hear the high-frequency vibrations of robotic instruments as they interact with patient tissue and other tools. Until now, this type of feedback had not been carefully evaluated by users. We conducted two human-subject studies to discover whether surgeons and non-surgeons value the addition of vibration feedback from surgical instruments during robotic surgery. In the first experiment, 10 surgeons and 10 non-surgeons (n = 20) used an augmented Intuitive da Vinci Standard robot to repeatedly perform up to four dry-lab tasks both with and without haptic and audio feedback. In the second experiment, 68 surgeons and 26 non-surgeons (n = 94) tested the same robot at a surgical conference: each participant spent approximately 5 min performing one or two tasks. Almost all subjects in both experiments (95 and 98 %, respectively) preferred receiving feedback of tool vibrations, and all subjects in the second experiment thought it would be useful for surgeons to have the option of such feedback. About half of the subjects (50, 60 %) preferred haptic and audio feedback together, and almost all the rest (45, 35 %) preferred haptic feedback alone. Subjects stated that the feedback made them more aware of tool contacts and did not interfere with use of the robot. There were no significant differences between the responses of different subject populations for any questions in either experiment. This study illustrates that both surgeons and non-surgeons prefer instrument vibration feedback during robotic surgery. Some participants found audio feedback useful but most preferred haptic feedback overall. This strong preference for tool vibration feedback indicates that this technology provides valuable tactile information to the surgeon.

  12. Plastic Surgeons' Opinions of Facial Surgery for Individuals with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Deborah C.; Turnbull, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    One hundred plastic surgeons responded to a survey on opinions toward facial plastic surgery for individuals with Down's syndrome. Twenty-four of the surgeons had performed the surgery. Surgeons indicated appropriate circumstances for the surgery, consent requirements, degree of understanding expected of the patient, and degree of discomfort…

  13. Organism Encumbrance of Cardiac Surgeon During Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabdic, Ilirijana Haxhibeqiri; Veljovic, Fikret; Straus, Slavenka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Most everyday activities, performed over a long period leads to performance degradation of skeletal muscles as well as spinal column which is reflected in the reduction of maximum force, reduction of the speed of response, reducing control of the movement etc. Although until now many mathematical models of muscles are developed, very small number takes into account the fatigue, and those models that take into account changes in the characteristics of muscles for extended activities, generally considered tiring under certain conditions. Given that the current models of muscle fatigue under arbitrary conditions of activation and load are very limited, this article presents a new model that includes scale of muscles overload. Material and Methods: There are three female cardiac surgeons working performing these surgeries in operating rooms, and their average anthropometric measures for this population is: a) Weight: 62 kg; b) Height: 166 cm. Age: 45 taken in the calculation within the CATIA software, that entity is entitled to 50% of healthy female population that is able to execute these and similar jobs. During the surgery is investigated the two most common positions: position “1” and “2”. We wish to emphasize that the experiment or surgical procedure lasted for two positions for five hours, with the position “1” lasted 0.5 hours, and position “2” lasted about 4.5 hours. The additional load arm during surgery is about 1.0 kg. Results: The analysis was done in three positions: “Operating position 1”, “Operating position 2 ‘, and each of these positions will be considered in its characteristic segments. These segments are: when the body takes the correct position, but is not yet burdened with external load, then when the surgeon receives the load and the third position when the load is lifted at the end of the position. Calculation of internal energy used on the joints is carried out in the context of software analysis of this

  14. Organism Encumbrance of Cardiac Surgeon During Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabdic, Ilirijana Haxhibeqiri; Veljovic, Fikret; Straus, Slavenka

    2016-07-16

    Most everyday activities, performed over a long period leads to performance degradation of skeletal muscles as well as spinal column which is reflected in the reduction of maximum force, reduction of the speed of response, reducing control of the movement etc. Although until now many mathematical models of muscles are developed, very small number takes into account the fatigue, and those models that take into account changes in the characteristics of muscles for extended activities, generally considered tiring under certain conditions. Given that the current models of muscle fatigue under arbitrary conditions of activation and load are very limited, this article presents a new model that includes scale of muscles overload. There are three female cardiac surgeons working performing these surgeries in operating rooms, and their average anthropometric measures for this population is: a) Weight: 62 kg; b) Height: 166 cm. Age: 45 taken in the calculation within the CATIA software, that entity is entitled to 50% of healthy female population that is able to execute these and similar jobs. During the surgery is investigated the two most common positions: position "1" and "2". We wish to emphasize that the experiment or surgical procedure lasted for two positions for five hours, with the position "1" lasted 0.5 hours, and position "2" lasted about 4.5 hours. The additional load arm during surgery is about 1.0 kg. The analysis was done in three positions: "Operating position 1", "Operating position 2 ', and each of these positions will be considered in its characteristic segments. These segments are: when the body takes the correct position, but is not yet burdened with external load, then when the surgeon receives the load and the third position when the load is lifted at the end of the position. Calculation of internal energy used on the joints is carried out in the context of software analysis of this model using CATIA R5v19. The proposed model is based on CATIA software

  15. Ethical challenges in surgery as narrated by practicing surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordam Ann

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to explore the ethical challenges in surgery from the surgeons' point of view and their experience of being in ethically difficult situations. Methods Five male and five female surgeons at a university hospital in Norway were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation into the narratives of nurses and physicians about being in such situations. The transcribed interview texts were subjected to a phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation. Results No differences in ethical reasoning between male and female surgeons were found. They reasoned in both action and relational ethical perspectives. Surgeons focused on their relationships with patients and colleagues and their moral self in descriptions of the ethical challenges in their work. Dialogue and personal involvement were important in their relationships with patients. The surgeons emphasized the importance of open dialogue, professional recognition, and an inclusive and accepting environment between colleagues. Conclusion The surgeons are personally challenged by the existential realities of human life in their relationships with patients. They realized that ethical challenges are an inherent part of performing surgery and of life itself, and say that they have to learn to "live with" these challenges in a way that is confirmed both socially and by their inner moral self. This means accepting their personal and professional limitations, being uncertain, being fallible, and being humble. Living with the ethical challenges of surgery seems to contribute to the surgeons' confidence and vulnerability in their professional identity.

  16. Projections of Demand for Cardiovascular Surgery and Supply of Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Jeung; Park, Nam Hee; Lee, Kun Sei; Chee, Hyun Keun; Sim, Sung Bo; Kim, Myo Jeong; Choi, Ji Suk; Kim, Myunghwa; Park, Choon Seon

    2016-12-01

    While demand for cardiovascular surgery is expected to increase gradually along with the rapid increase in cardiovascular diseases with respect to the aging population, the supply of thoracic and cardiovascular surgeons has been continuously decreasing over the past 10 years. Consequently, this study aims to achieve guidance in establishing health care policy by analyzing the supply and demand for cardiovascular surgeries in the medical service area of Korea. After investigating the actual number of cardiovascular surgeries performed using the National Health Insurance claim data of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service, as well as drawing from national statistics concerning the elderly population aged 65 and over, this study estimated the number of future cardiovascular surgeries by using a cell-based model. To be able to analyze the supply and demand of surgeons, the recent status of new surgeons specializing in thoracic and cardiovascular surgeries and the ratio of their subspecialties in cardiovascular surgeries were investigated. Then, while taking three different scenarios into account, the number of cardiovascular surgeons expected be working in 5-year periods was projected. The number of cardiovascular surgeries, which was recorded at 10,581 cases in 2014, is predicted to increase consistently to reach a demand of 15,501 cases in 2040-an increase of 46.5%. There was a total of 245 cardiovascular surgeons at work in 2014. Looking at 5 year spans in the future, the number of surgeons expected to be supplied in 2040 is 184, to retire is 249, and expected to be working is 309-an increase of -24.9%, 1.6%, and 26.1%, respectively compared to those in 2014. This forecasts a demand-supply imbalance in every scenario. Cardiovascular surgeons are the most central resource in the medical service of highly specialized cardiovascular surgeries, and fostering the surgeons requires much time, effort, and resources; therefore, by analyzing the various factors

  17. [Chronic surplus of Japanese cardiac surgeon--ideal nurse practitioner for cardiac surgery, cardiac surgeon's attitude toward the future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Hirohisa

    2014-03-01

    It is chronically surplus of doctors in the world of cardiac surgery. There are too many cardiac surgeons because cardiac surgery requires a large amount of manpower resources to provide adequate medical services. Many Japanese cardiac surgeons do not have enough opportunity to perform cardiac surgery operations, and many Japanese cardiac surgery residents do not have enough opportunity to learn cardiac surgery operations. There are physician assistants and nurse practitioners in the US. Because they provide a part of medical care to cardiac surgery patients, American cardiac surgeons can focus more energy on operative procedures. Introduction of cardiac surgery specialized nurse practitioner is essential to deliver a high quality medical service as well as to solve chronic problems that Japanese cardiac surgery has had for a long time.

  18. Depth Perception of Surgeons in Minimally Invasive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova, Rositsa; Boulanger, Pierre; Zheng, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) poses visual challenges to the surgeons. In MIS, binocular disparity is not freely available for surgeons, who are required to mentally rebuild the 3-dimensional (3D) patient anatomy from a limited number of monoscopic visual cues. The insufficient depth cues from the MIS environment could cause surgeons to misjudge spatial depth, which could lead to performance errors thus jeopardizing patient safety. In this article, we will first discuss the natural human depth perception by exploring the main depth cues available for surgeons in open procedures. Subsequently, we will reveal what depth cues are lost in MIS and how surgeons compensate for the incomplete depth presentation. Next, we will further expand our knowledge by exploring some of the available solutions for improving depth presentation to surgeons. Here we will review the innovative approaches (multiple 2D camera assembly, shadow introduction) and devices (3D monitors, head-mounted devices, and auto-stereoscopic monitors) for 3D image presentation from the past few years.

  19. A comparison of surgeon's postural muscle activity during robotic-assisted and laparoscopic rectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Grace P Y; Poon, Jensen T C; Law, Wai-Lun

    2013-09-01

    This study compared the muscular activity in the surgeon's neck and upper limbs during robotic-assisted laparoscopic (R-Lap) surgery and conventional laparoscopic (C-Lap) surgery. Two surgeons performed the same procedure of R-Lap and C-Lap low anterior resection, and real-time surface electromyography was recorded in bilateral cervical erector spinae, upper trapezius (UT) and anterior deltoid muscles for over 60 min in each procedure. In one surgeon, forearm muscle activities were also recorded during robotic surgery. Similar levels of cervical muscle activity were demonstrated in both types of surgery. One surgeon showed much higher activity in the left UT muscle during robotic surgery. In the second surgeon, C-Lap was associated with much higher levels of muscle activity in both UT muscles. This may be related to the bilateral abducted arm posture required in maneuvering the laparoscopic instruments. In the forearm region, the "ulnaris" muscles for wrist flexion and extension bilaterally showed high amplitudes during robotic-assisted surgery. Robotic-assisted surgery seemed to demand a higher level of muscle work in the forearm region while greater efforts of shoulder muscles were involved during laparoscopic surgery. There are also individual variations in postural habits and motor control that can affect the muscle activation patterns. This study demonstrated a method of objectively examining the surgeon's physical workload during real-time surgery in the operating theatre, and further research should explore the surgeon's workload in a larger group of surgeons performing different surgical procedures.

  20. Completion rates of anterior and posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorrhexis in pediatric cataract surgery for surgery performed by trainee surgeons with the use of a low-cost viscoelastic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Muralidhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Pediatric cataract surgery is traditionally done with the aid of high-molecular-weight viscoelastics which are expensive. It needs to be determined if low-cost substitutes are just as successful. Aims : The study aims to determine the success rates for anterior and posterior capsulorrhexis and intraocular lens (IOL implantation in the bag for pediatric cataract surgery performed with the aid of a low-molecular-weight viscoelastic. Settings and Design : Nonrandomized observational study. Materials and Methods: Children less than 6 years of age who underwent cataract surgery with IOL implantation in the period May 2008-May 2009 were included. The surgeries were done by pediatric ophthalmology fellows. A standard procedure of anterior capsulorrhexis, lens aspiration with primary posterior capsulorrhexis, anterior vitrectomy, and IOL implantation was followed. Three parameters were studied: successful completion of anterior and posterior capsulorrhexis and IOL implantation in the bag. Results: 33 eyes of 28 children were studied. The success rate for completion was 66.7% and 88.2 % for anterior and posterior capsulorrhexis, respectively. IOL implantation in the bag was successful in 87.9%. Conclusions: 2% hydroxypropylmethylcellulose is a viable low-cost alternative to more expensive options similar to high-molecular-weight viscoelastics. This is of great relevance to hospitals in developing countries.

  1. Volume of Cataract Surgery and Surgeon Gender: The Florida Ambulatory Surgery Center Experience 2005 Through 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Dustin D; Margo, Curtis E; Campbell, Robert R; Greenberg, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Cataract is the most common surgically reversible cause of vision loss and the most common major surgical procedure performed in the United States. To understand how gender composition might affect differences in health services, we examined the surgeon gender-specific rates of routine cataract surgery performed in ambulatory surgical centers in Florida. Routine cataract surgeries were identified through the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) ambulatory surgery center dataset. The background of individual surgeons was determined by linking license numbers in the dataset to physician profiles publicly available from AHCA. From 2005 through 2012, women ophthalmologists in Florida performed roughly half the annual rate of cataract surgery as their male counterparts. This difference is not explained by greater time in clinical practice for men. Further investigation into the causes of this gender-volume disparity is warranted to determine what roles choice and barriers may play.

  2. Plastic Surgery and Suicide: A Clinical Guide for Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vikram; Coffey, M Justin

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have identified an increased risk of suicide among patient populations which a plastic surgeon may have a high risk of encountering: women undergoing breast augmentation, cosmetic surgery patients, and breast cancer patients. No formal guidelines exist to assist a plastic surgeon when faced with such a patient, and not every plastic surgery team has mental health clinicians that are readily accessible for consultation or referral. The goal of this clinical guide is to offer plastic surgeons a set of practical approaches to manage potentially suicidal patients. In addition, the authors review a screening tool, which can assist surgeons when encountering high-risk patients.

  3. Neolithic trepanation decoded- A unifying hypothesis: Has the mystery as to why primitive surgeons performed cranial surgery been solved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    The perplexing mystery of why so many trephined skulls from the Neolithic period have been uncovered all over the world representing attempts at primitive cranial surgery is discussed. More than 1500 trephined skulls have been uncovered throughout the world, from Europe and Scandinavia to North America, from Russia and China to South America (particularly in Peru). Most reported series show that from 5-10% of all skulls found from the Neolithic period have been trephined with single or multiple skull openings of various sizes. The unifying hypothesis proposed by the late medical historian Dr. Plinio Prioreschi (1930-2014) regarding the reason for these trepanations (trephinations) is analyzed. It is concluded that Dr. Prioreschi's cohesive explanation to explain the phenomenon is valid and that his intriguing hypothesis is almost certainly correct. In the opinion of this author, the mystery within an enigma has been solved. PMID:25984386

  4. Danish surgeons' views on minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Hellen; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2014-01-01

    that the risk was equal to traditional laparoscopy (3%). The fraction of surgeons willing to learn SILS and NOTES was 44.6% and 32.7%, respectively. The desire to learn was higher among less experienced and surgically active surgeons. Of the responders, 68.8% considered SILS and 43.2% considered NOTES would...

  5. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    surgeons and 22 plastic surgeons; the response rate was 67%. All breast surgery units had an established cooperation with plastic surgeons. Most breast surgeons used unilateral displacement techniques; plastic surgeons also included breast reduction techniques and replacement with local flaps. Almost all......INTRODUCTION: More than 4,000 Danish women are diagnosed with operable breast cancer annually, and 70% receive breast conserving surgery. Without the use of oncoplastic surgery (OPS), 20-30% will get an unsatisfactory cosmetic result. The aim of this study was to illustrate the level...... of implementation of OPS in Denmark. METHODS: An electronic questionnaire was sent to breast and plastic surgeons performing breast cancer treatment. The questionnaire included demographics, education, experience with operative procedures and opinions on OPS. RESULTS: The questionnaire was sent to 50 breast...

  6. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena Felicia; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: More than 4,000 Danish women are diagnosed with operable breast cancer annually, and 70% receive breast conserving surgery. Without the use of oncoplastic surgery (OPS), 20-30% will get an unsatisfactory cosmetic result. The aim of this study was to illustrate the level...... symmetrisation procedures were performed by plastic surgeons. Breast surgeons had sought more specific education, both international observerships and specific courses. In both groups of surgeons, the majority expressed that both tumour removal and reconstruction should be performed by doctors of their own...

  7. Resident surgeon efficiency in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittner, Andrew C; Sullivan, Brian R

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Comparison of resident surgeon performance efficiencies in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) versus conventional phacoemulsification. Patients and methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted on consecutive patients undergoing phacoemulsification cataract surgery performed by senior ophthalmology residents under the supervision of 1 attending physician during a 9-month period in a large Veterans Affairs medical center. Medical records were reviewed for demographic information, preoperative nucleus grade, femtosecond laser pretreatment, operative procedure times, total operating room times, and surgical complications. Review of digital video records provided quantitative interval measurements of core steps of the procedures, including completion of incisions, anterior capsulotomy, nucleus removal, cortical removal, and intraocular lens implantation. Results Total room time, operation time, and corneal incision completion time were found to be significantly longer in the femtosecond laser group versus the traditional phacoemulsification group (each Pcataract surgery is generally less efficient when trainees have more experience with traditional phacoemulsification. FLACS was found to have a significant advantage in completion of capsulotomy, but subsequent surgical steps were not shorter or longer. Resident learning curve for the FLACS technology may partially explain the disparities of performance. Educators should be cognizant of a potential for lower procedural efficiency when introducing FLACS into resident training. PMID:28203055

  8. Cosmetic surgery in times of recession: macroeconomics for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Lloyd M

    2002-10-01

    Periods of economic downturn place special demands on the plastic surgeon whose practice involves a large amount of cosmetic surgery. When determining strategy during difficult economic times, it is useful to understand the macroeconomic background of these downturns and to draw lessons from businesses in other service industries. Business cycles and monetary policy determine the overall environment in which plastic surgery is practiced. Plastic surgeons can take both defensive and proactive steps to maintain their profits during recessions and to prepare for the inevitable upturn. Care should also be taken when selecting pricing strategy during economic slowdowns.

  9. Real-Time Teleguidance of a Non-Surgeon Crew Medical Officer Performing Orthopedic Surgery at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station During Winter-Over

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The Amundsen-Scott South Pole Research station located at the geographic South Pole, is the most isolated, permanently inhabited human outpost on Earth. Medical care is provided to station personnel by a non-surgeon crew medical officer (CMO). During the winter-over period from February to October, the station is isolated, with no incoming or outgoing flights due to severe weather conditions. In late June, four months after the station had closed for the austral winter, a 31 year old meteorologist suffered a complete rupture of his patellar tendon while sliding done an embankment. An evacuation was deemed to be too risky to aircrews due to the extreme cold and darkness. A panel of physicians from Massachusetts General Hospital, Johns Hopkins University and the University of Texas Medical Branch were able to assess the patient remotely via telemedicine and agreed that surgery was the only means to restore mobility and prevent long term disability. The lack of a surgical facility and a trained surgical team were overcome by conversion of the clinic treatment area, and intensive preparation of medical laypersons as surgical assistants. The non-surgeon CMO and CMO assistant at South Pole, were guided through the administration of spinal anesthetic, and the two-hour operative repair by medical consultants at Massachusetts General Hospital. Real-time video of the operative field, directions from the remote consultants and audio communication were provided by videoconferencing equipment, operative cameras, and high bandwidth satellite communications. In real-time, opening incision/exposure, tendon relocation, hemostatsis, and operative closure by the CMO was closely monitored and guided and by the remote consultants. The patient s subsequent physical rehabilitation over the ensuing months of isolation was also monitored remotely via telemedicine. This was the first time in South Pole s history that remote teleguidance had been used for surgery and represents a model for

  10. Breast conserving surgery versus mastectomy: cancer practice by general surgeons in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemi Esmat

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There appear to be geographical differences in decisions to perform mastectomy or breast conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer. This study was carried out to evaluate general surgeons' preferences in breast cancer surgery and to assess the factors predicting cancer practice in Iran. Methods A structured questionnaire was mailed to 235 general surgeons chosen from the address list of the Iranian Medical Council. The questionnaire elicited information about the general surgeons' characteristics and about their work experience, posts they have held, number of breast cancer operations performed per year, preferences for mastectomy or breast conserving surgery, and the reasons for these preferences. Results In all, 83 surgeons returned the completed questionnaire. The results indicated that only 19% of the surgeons routinely performed breast conserving surgery (BCS and this was significantly associated with their breast cancer case load (P Conclusion The findings indicate that Iranian surgeons do not routinely perform BCS as the first and the best treatment modality. Further research is recommended to evaluate patients' outcomes after BCS treatment in Iran, with regard to available radiotherapy facilities and cultural factors (patients' compliance.

  11. Resident surgeon efficiency in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pittner AC

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrew C Pittner,1 Brian R Sullivan2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, 2Edward Hines Jr VA Hospital, Ophthalmology Section, Hines, IL, USA Purpose: Comparison of resident surgeon performance efficiencies in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS versus conventional phacoemulsification.Patients and methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted on consecutive patients undergoing phacoemulsification cataract surgery performed by senior ophthalmology residents under the supervision of 1 attending physician during a 9-month period in a large Veterans Affairs medical center. Medical records were reviewed for demographic information, preoperative nucleus grade, femtosecond laser pretreatment, operative procedure times, total operating room times, and surgical complications. Review of digital video records provided quantitative interval measurements of core steps of the procedures, including completion of incisions, anterior capsulotomy, nucleus removal, cortical removal, and intraocular lens implantation.Results: Total room time, operation time, and corneal incision completion time were found to be significantly longer in the femtosecond laser group versus the traditional phacoemulsification group (each P<0.05. Mean duration for manual completion of anterior capsulotomy was shorter in the laser group (P<0.001. There were no statistically significant differences in the individual steps of nucleus removal, cortical removal, or intraocular lens placement. Surgical complication rates were not significantly different between the groups.Conclusion: In early cases, resident completion of femtosecond cataract surgery is generally less efficient when trainees have more experience with traditional phacoemulsification. FLACS was found to have a significant advantage in completion of capsulotomy, but subsequent surgical steps were not shorter or longer. Resident learning curve for the

  12. Surgeons' Perspectives on Surgery of Breast Cancer in Iran: The Pattern and Determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massoome Najafi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to assess Iranian surgeons' perceptions toward mastectomy and breast conserving therapy (BCT and determine the contributing factors.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a structured questionnaire was devised and hosted on survey.tums.ac.ir and a link to the questionnaire was emailed to surgeons registered in Iranian Medical Council, branch of Tehran. The results of the current study were compared to a similar study which was performed in 2004 on a comparable sample of surgeons in Tehran, Iran.Results: A total 166 surgeons filled out the study questionnaire. Only 24 surgeons declared that they have not performed BCT before. Variables that showed a significant association with performing BCT were attending a breast surgery or surgical oncology fellowship (P = 0.010 and breast surgery workshop (P = 0.042. No associations were observed between performance of BCT and age category (P = 0.951, gender (P = 0.416, duration of practice (P = 0.821, number of breast cancer patients per year (P = 0.083, and setting of practice categorized as teaching – nonteaching hospitals (P = 0.417. Comparing the results of the current study with the study performed in 2004 revealed a significant increase in the frequency of surgeons who performed BCT (85.5% vs 19.3%, respectively (P < 0.001. Participants of the current study were more likely to mention "lack of experience" as the reason for not performing BCT compared to the previous study (P = 0.004.Conclusions: Our results delineated that there was a significant increase in the percentage of surgeons performing BCT compared to the previous study. Factors significantly associated with performing BCT were participating in a surgical oncology or breast surgery fellowship or short courses in breast surgery.

  13. What surgeons can learn from athletes: mental practice in sports and surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Margaret; Moulton, Carol-Anne; Luu, Shelly; Cil, Tulin

    2014-01-01

    Mental practice has been successfully applied in professional sports for skills acquisition and performance enhancement. The goals of this review are to describe the literature on mental practice within sport psychology and surgery and to explore how the specific principles of mental practice can be applied to the improvement of surgical performance-both in novice and expert surgeons. The authors reviewed the sports psychology, education, and surgery literatures through Medline, PubMed, PsycINFO, and Embase. In sports, mental practice is a valuable tool for optimizing existing motor skill sets once core competencies have been mastered. These techniques have been shown to be more advantageous when used by elite athletes. Within surgery, mental practice studies have focused on skill acquisition among novices with little study of how expert surgeons use it to optimize surgical preparation. We propose that performance optimization and skills acquisition should be viewed as 2 separate domains of mental practice. Further understanding of this phenomenon has implications for changing how we teach and train not only novice surgeons but also how experienced surgeons continue to maintain their skills, acquire new ones, and excel in surgery. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of surgeon's experience and supervision on re-operation rate after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Jacobsen, Steffen; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Society of Anaesthesiologists score, New Mobility Score, time to surgery and type of implant, surgery by unsupervised junior registrars was still a significant independent risk factor for re-operation in technically demanding proximal femoral fractures. CONCLUSION: Unsupervised junior registrars should......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of the performing surgeon's experience and degree of supervision on re-operation rate among patients admitted with a proximal femoral fracture (PFF). METHODS: Prospective study of 600 consecutive patients with proximal femoral fracture in our multimodal...... rehabilitation programme, between 2002 and 2004. Re-operation rate was assessed 6 months postoperatively. Surgeons were grouped as unsupervised junior registrars versus experienced surgeons operating or supervising. Fractures were stratified as technically undemanding or demanding. RESULTS: Unsupervised junior...

  15. Influence of surgeon's experience and supervision on re-operation rate after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Jacobsen, Steffen; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Society of Anaesthesiologists score, New Mobility Score, time to surgery and type of implant, surgery by unsupervised junior registrars was still a significant independent risk factor for re-operation in technically demanding proximal femoral fractures. CONCLUSION: Unsupervised junior registrars should......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of the performing surgeon's experience and degree of supervision on re-operation rate among patients admitted with a proximal femoral fracture (PFF). METHODS: Prospective study of 600 consecutive patients with proximal femoral fracture in our multimodal...... rehabilitation programme, between 2002 and 2004. Re-operation rate was assessed 6 months postoperatively. Surgeons were grouped as unsupervised junior registrars versus experienced surgeons operating or supervising. Fractures were stratified as technically undemanding or demanding. RESULTS: Unsupervised junior...

  16. Emergency surgeon-performed hepatobiliary ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, M R; Aherne, N J; Coffey, C; Power, C P; Kirwan, W O; Redmond, H P

    2002-11-01

    Acute hepatobiliary pathology is a common general surgical emergency referral. Diagnosis requires imaging of the biliary tree by ultrasonography. The accuracy and impact of surgeon-performed ultrasonography (SUS) on the diagnosis of emergent hepatobiliary pathology was examined. A prospective study, over a 6-month period, enrolled all patients with symptoms or signs of acute hepatobiliary pathology. Patients provided informed consent and underwent both SUS and standard radiology-performed ultrasonography (RUS). SUS was performed using a 2-5-MHz broadband portable ultrasound probe by two surgeons trained in ultrasonography, and RUS using a 2-5-MHz fixed unit. SUS results were correlated with those of RUS and pathological diagnoses. Fifty-three consecutive patients underwent 106 ultrasonographic investigations. SUS agreed with RUS in 50 (94.3 per cent) of 53 patients. SUS accurately detected cholelithiasis in all but two cases and no patient was inaccurately diagnosed as having cholelithiasis at SUS (95.2 per cent sensitivity and 100 per cent specificity). As an overall complementary diagnostic tool SUS provided the correct diagnosis in 96.2 per cent of patients. Time to scan was significantly shorter following SUS (3.1 versus 12.0 h, P < 0.05). SUS provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis of emergency hepatobiliary pathology and may contribute to the emergency management of hepatobiliary disease.

  17. Emergency surgeon-performed hepatobiliary ultrasonography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Acute hepatobiliary pathology is a common general surgical emergency referral. Diagnosis requires imaging of the biliary tree by ultrasonography. The accuracy and impact of surgeon-performed ultrasonography (SUS) on the diagnosis of emergent hepatobiliary pathology was examined. METHODS: A prospective study, over a 6-month period, enrolled all patients with symptoms or signs of acute hepatobiliary pathology. Patients provided informed consent and underwent both SUS and standard radiology-performed ultrasonography (RUS). SUS was performed using a 2-5-MHz broadband portable ultrasound probe by two surgeons trained in ultrasonography, and RUS using a 2-5-MHz fixed unit. SUS results were correlated with those of RUS and pathological diagnoses. RESULTS: Fifty-three consecutive patients underwent 106 ultrasonographic investigations. SUS agreed with RUS in 50 (94.3 per cent) of 53 patients. SUS accurately detected cholelithiasis in all but two cases and no patient was inaccurately diagnosed as having cholelithiasis at SUS (95.2 per cent sensitivity and 100 per cent specificity). As an overall complementary diagnostic tool SUS provided the correct diagnosis in 96.2 per cent of patients. Time to scan was significantly shorter following SUS (3.1 versus 12.0 h, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: SUS provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis of emergency hepatobiliary pathology and may contribute to the emergency management of hepatobiliary disease.

  18. Choosing surgery as a specialty: opinions of medical students about surgery and surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borracci, Raúl A; Ferraina, Pedro; Arribalzaga, Eduardo B; Poveda Camargo, Ricardo L

    2014-11-01

    Since the number of applicants to residencies in general surgery in Argentina seems to be decreasing, we designed this work with the objective of studying the factors considered undesirable by students when choosing surgery as a specialty. Between March and April 2012, one-hundred students were surveyed with a structured questionnaire with true/false binary answers in an observational case-control design. The survey contained 26 statements that made reference to characteristics of surgery as a specialty, or about the personality and lifestyle of surgeons, as they could be perceived by students. As a control group the same survey was applied to 20 surgeons who were in contact with the students and that could represent a role model for them during their rotation in surgery. Comparison between students and surgeons showed no difference in most answers, except in «surgery has poor reimbursement» (OR: 8,9; P=.0001), «there is not enough job demand» (OR: 8,1; P=.015), «surgery restrains intellectual development» (OR: 17,5; P=.014), «surgeons have too many non-scheduled activities» (OR: 9,36; P=.024), «they have a limited patient-physician relationship» (OR: 3,61; P=.009), «they have little time for family» (OR: 4,27; P=.036) and «they are exposed to infectious diseases» (OR: 5,90; P=.007). Women would be as interested as men in working as surgeons; a remarkable fact when considering that the surgical specialties have been predominantly filled by men. The fact that surgeons mostly coincide with the views of students means that role models should be reviewed to promote vocations. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Willingness to Pay for Cataract Surgery Provided by a Senior Surgeon in Urban Southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Wang

    Full Text Available To study willingness to pay for cataract surgery and surgical service provided by a senior cataract surgeon in urban Southern China.This study was a cross-sectional willingness-to-pay (WTP interview using bidding formats. Two-hundred eleven persons with presenting visual impairment in either eye due to cataract were enrolled at a tertiary eye hospital. Participants underwent a comprehensive eye examination and a WTP interview for both surgery and service provided by a senior surgeon. Demographic information, socioeconomic status and clinical data were recorded.Among 211 (98% response rate persons completing the interview, 53.6% were women and 80.6% were retired. About 72.2% had a monthly income lower than 1000 renminbi (US $161. A total of 189 (89.6% were willing to pay for cataract and the median amount of WTP was 6000 renminbi (US$968. And 102 (50.7% were willing to pay additional fees for surgery performed by a senior surgeon, and the median amount of WTP was 500 renminbi (US$81. In regression models adjusting for age and gender, persons with preexisting eye diseases other than cataract, were more likely to pay for cataract surgery and service provided by a senior surgeon (P = 0.04 for both.In urban China, cataract patients, especially those with preexisting eye conditions, are willing to pay additional fees for a senior surgeon. Moving to a system where the price of cataract surgery is proportional to the consultant' skill and expertise is possible and may have a potential impact on waiting list and quality of eye care. Further studies are needed to examine the impact of such pricing system on attitudes and choices of cataract patients.

  20. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena Felicia; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: More than 4,000 Danish women are diagnosed with operable breast cancer annually, and 70% receive breast conserving surgery. Without the use of oncoplastic surgery (OPS), 20-30% will get an unsatisfactory cosmetic result. The aim of this study was to illustrate the level...... surgeons and 22 plastic surgeons; the response rate was 67%. All breast surgery units had an established cooperation with plastic surgeons. Most breast surgeons used unilateral displacement techniques; plastic surgeons also included breast reduction techniques and replacement with local flaps. Almost all...

  1. Colorectal surgeons teaching general surgery residents: current challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Connie C; Chow, Christopher J; Rothenberger, David A

    2012-09-01

    Effective teaching for general surgery residents requires that faculty members with colorectal expertise actively engage in the education process and fully understand the current context for residency training. In this article, we review important national developments with respect to graduate medical education that impact resident supervision, curriculum implementation, resident assessment, and program evaluation. We argue that establishing a culture of respect and professionalism in today's teaching environment is one of the most important legacies that surgical educators can leave for the coming generation. Faculty role modeling and the process of socializing residents is highlighted. We review the American College of Surgeons' Code of Professional Conduct, summarize some of the current strategies for teaching and assessing professionalism, and reflect on principles of motivation that apply to resident training both for the trainee and the trainer.

  2. Preventing infection in general surgery: improvements through education of surgeons by surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-08-01

    Surgical patients are at particular risk of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) due to the presence of a surgical site leading to surgical site infection (SSI), and because of the need for intravascular access resulting in catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). A two-year initiative commenced with an initial audit of surgical practice; this was used to inform the development of a targeted educational initiative by surgeons specifically for surgical trainees. Parameters assessed during the initial audit and a further audit after the educational initiative were related to intra- and postoperative aspects of the prevention of SSIs, as well as care of peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) in surgical patients. The proportion of prophylactic antibiotics administered prior to incision across 360 operations increased from 30.0% to 59.1% (P<0.001). Surgical site dressings were observed in 234 patients, and a significant decrease was found in the percentage of dressings that were tampered with during the initial 48h after surgery (16.5% vs 6.2%, P=0.030). In total, 574 PVCs were assessed over the two-year period. Improvements were found in the proportion of unnecessary PVCs in situ (37.9% vs 24.4%, P<0.001), PVCs in situ for >72h (10.6% vs 3.1%, P<0.001) and PVCs covered with clean and intact dressings (87.3% vs 97.6%, P<0.001). Significant improvements in surgical practice were established for the prevention of SSI and CRBSI through a focused educational programme developed by and for surgeons. Potentially, other specific measures may also be warranted to achieve further improvements in infection prevention in surgical practice.

  3. [Management Competence in Leading Positions in Clinical Surgery - What Does a Surgeon Need to Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, W; Meyer, F

    2016-12-01

    Background: Surgeons, more than other specialists, are required to combine high medical expertise with management competence. This is due to changing environments, new demands with respect to quality, the ongoing discussion on increased performance in the context of questionable target agreements, an increasing tendency of university hospitals and other departments and clinics to recruit leading personnel in medicine with management competence, but also to the understanding of one's own role and surgeons' distinguished public reputation. Aim: This narrative review describes the changing environments for surgeons in leading positions in hospitals and provides an overview on the practical use of management skills in surgery. In addition, it advises on how to acquire management competence and presents an educational concept appropriate for surgeons in leading positions. Key points: 1. The management of new challenges in the healthcare system - also in clinical surgery - requires management skills, which are indispensable for a surgeon in a leading position. 2. Management skills in surgery comprise aspects such as communication ability, social competence, cooperation and leadership skills, knowledge on business administration aspects and legal certainty. 3. The necessary knowledge can be acquired in courses leading to a certificate (e.g. "MHM® Medical Hospital Manager") or by earning a "Master of Business Administration" (MBA). Conclusion: Management competence is essential in leading positions in clinical surgery today. The use of these skills is challenging in daily practice. Successfully applied, management competence not only guarantees comprehensive patient care and leadership of employees, but also provides satisfaction in leading positions of a surgical department. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Career and lifestyle satisfaction among surgeons: what really matters? The National Lifestyles in Surgery Today Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troppmann, Kathrin M; Palis, Bryan E; Goodnight, James E; Ho, Hung S; Troppmann, Christoph

    2009-08-01

    Optimizing recruitment of the next surgical generation is paramount. Unfortunately, many nonsurgeons perceive surgeons' lifestyle as undesirable. It is unknown, however, whether the surgeons-important opinion makers about their profession-are indeed dissatisfied. We analyzed responses to a survey mailed to all surgeons who were certified by the American Board of Surgery in 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, and 2004. We performed multivariate analyses to study career dissatisfaction and inability to achieve work-life balance, while adjusting for practice characteristics, demographics, and satisfaction with reimbursement. A total of 895 (25.5%) surgeons responded: mean age was 46 years; 80% were men; 88% were married; 86% had children; 45% were general surgeons; 72% were in urban practice; and 83% were in nonuniversity practice. Surgeons worked 64 hours per week; ideally, they would prefer to work 50 hours per week (median). Fifteen percent were dissatisfied with their careers. On multivariate analysis, significant (p career to their own children. On multivariate analysis, significant risk factors were nonuniversity practice (OR 2.5) and dissatisfaction with reimbursement (OR 3.4). In all, 33.5% did not achieve work-life balance. On multivariate analysis, dissatisfaction with reimbursement (OR 3.0) was a significant risk factor. Respondents' lives could be improved by "limiting emergency call" (77%), "diminishing litigation" (92%), and "improving reimbursement" (94%). Most surgeons are satisfied with their careers. Areas in need of improvement, particularly for nonuniversity surgeons, include reimbursement, work hours, and litigation. Strong local and national advocacy may not only improve career satisfaction, but could also render the profession more attractive for those contemplating a surgical career.

  5. Learning curve for laparoendoscopic single-site surgery for an experienced laparoscopic surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Ling Torng

    2013-11-01

    Conclusion: LESS is a safe and feasible alternative to conventional laparoscopic surgery for adnexal and uterine diseases. A learning curve is not required for LESS surgery for experienced laparoscopic surgeons.

  6. Robotic surgery of locally advanced gastric cancer: a single-surgeon experience of 41 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilescu, C; Procopiuc, L

    2012-01-01

    The mainstay of curative gastric cancer treatment is open gastric resection with regional lymph node dissection. Minimally invasive surgery is yet to become an established technique with a well defined role. Robotic surgery has by-passed some of the limitations of conventional laparoscopy and has proven both safe and feasible. We present our initial experience with robotic surgery based on 41 gastric cancer patients. We especially wish to underline the advantages of the robotic system when performing the digestive tract anastomoses. We present the techniques of end-to-side eso-jejunoanastomoses (using a circular stapler or manual suture) and side-to-side eso-jejunoanastomoses. In our hands, the results with circular stapled anastomoses were good and we advocate against manual suturing when performing anastomoses in robotic surgery. Moreover, we recommend performing totally intracorporeal anastomoses which have a better post-operative outcome, especially in obese patients. We present three methods of realising the total intracorporeal eso-jejuno-anastomosis with a circular stapler: manual purse-string suture, using the OrVil and the double stapling technique. The eso-jejunoanastomosis is one of the most difficult steps in performing the total gastrectomy, but these techniques allow the surgeon to choose the best option for each case. We consider that surgeons who undertake total gastrectomies must have a special training in performing these anastomoses.

  7. Reproducibility of manifest refraction between surgeons and optometrists in a clinical refractive surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstein, Dan Z; Yap, Timothy E; Carp, Glenn I; Archer, Timothy J; Gobbe, Marine

    2014-03-01

    To measure and compare the interobserver reproducibility of manifest refraction according to a standardized protocol for normal preoperative patients in a refractive surgery practice. Private clinic, London, United Kingdom. Retrospective case series. This retrospective study comprised patients attending 2 preoperative refractions before laser vision correction. The first manifest refraction was performed by 1 of 7 optometrists and the second manifest refraction by 1 of 2 surgeons, all trained using a standard manifest refraction protocol. Spherocylindrical data were converted into power vectors for analysis. The dioptric power differences between observers were calculated and analyzed. One thousand nine hundred twenty-two consecutive eyes were stratified into a myopia group and a hyperopia group and then further stratified by each surgeon-optometrist combination. The mean surgeon-optometrist dioptric power difference was 0.21 diopter (D) (range 0.15 to 0.32 D). The mean difference in spherical equivalent refraction was 0.03 D, with 95% of all refractions within ±0.44 D for all optometrist-surgeon combinations. The severity of myopic or hyperopic ametropia did not affect the interobserver reproducibility of the manifest refraction. There was close agreement in refraction between surgeons and optometrists using a standard manifest refraction protocol of less than 0.25 D. This degree of interobserver repeatability is similar to that in intraobserver repeatability studies published to date and may represent the value of training and the use of a standard manifest refraction protocol between refraction observers in a refractive surgery practice involving co-management between surgeons and optometrists. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Surgeon-administered conscious sedation and local anesthesia for ambulatory anorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hina, Miss; Hourigan, Jon S; Moore, Richard A; Stanley, J Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Anorectal procedures are often performed in an outpatient setting using a variety of anesthetic techniques. One technique that has not been well studied is surgeon-administered conscious sedation along with local anesthetic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of this technique with emphasis on safety, efficacy, and patient satisfaction. Chart review was performed on 133 consecutive patients who had anorectal procedures at an outpatient surgery center. Additionally, 65 patients were enrolled prospectively and completed a satisfaction survey. Inclusively, charts of 198 patients who underwent outpatient anorectal surgery under conscious sedation and local anesthesia under the direction of a colorectal surgeon from 2004 through 2008 were reviewed. Parameters related to patient and procedural characteristics, safety, efficacy, and satisfaction were evaluated. Surgeon-administered sedation consisted of combined fentanyl and midazolam in 90 per cent. Eighty per cent of procedures were performed in the prone position and 23 per cent were in combination with an endoscopic procedure. Eighty-two per cent were classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade 1 or 2. Transient mild hypoxemia or hypotension occurred in 4 and 3 per cent of the patients, respectively. Mean operative time was 29 minutes with a mean stay in the postanesthesia care unit of 37 minutes. There were no early major cardiac or respiratory complications. Ninety-seven per cent of the patients surveyed reported a high degree of satisfaction. Surgeon-administered conscious sedation with local anesthesia was well tolerated for outpatient anorectal surgeries. Additional studies are needed to confirm the safety and efficacy of this technique.

  9. Comparison of combined and sequential surgery for proliferative diabetic retinopathy: a single surgeon study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Yang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the results of combined and consecutive surgeries to treat proliferative diabetic retinopathy and cataract. METHODS: Retrospective comparative study. Forty-one patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR were enrolled. Twenty-nine eyes for the combined surgery group and twelve eyes for the sequential group were included. All surgeries were performed by one surgeon. Phacoemulsification was performed using a clear cornea incision. The vitrectomy was performed using a 20-gauge vitreous cutter. RESULTS: The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA and intra- and post-operative complications were the main outcome measures. In the combined surgery group, the BCVA increased in 18 (62.1% eyes, while eight (27.6% eyes remained stable and three (10.3% eyes decreased. Postoperative complications included fibrinous exudation in nine eyes, macular edema in three eyes and vitreous hemorrhage in three eyes. In the sequential surgery group, the BCVA increased in seven (58.3% eyes, remained the same in four (33.3% eyes and was reduced in one (8.3% eye. Postoperative complications included macular edema in two eyes, neovascular glaucoma in two eyes and vitreous hemorrhage in one eye. CONCLUSIONS: Both combined and sequential surgeries are safe and effective for treating PDR and cataracts. The combined surgery had a higher incidence of fibrinous exudation.

  10. The aching surgeon: a survey of physical discomfort and symptoms following open, laparoscopic, and robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plerhoples, Timothy A; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Wren, Sherry M

    2012-03-01

    There is increasing interest in understanding the toll that operating takes on a surgeon's body. The effect of robotic surgery on surgeon discomfort has not been studied. We sought to document the discomfort of robotic surgery compared with open and laparoscopic surgery and to investigate the factors that affect the risk of physical symptoms. Nineteen-thousand eight-hundred and sixty-eight surgeons from all specialties trained in the use of robots were sent a 26-question online survey and 1,407 responded. One-thousand two-hundred and fifteen surgeons who practiced all three approaches were used in the analysis. Eight-hundred and seventy-one surgeons had physical discomfort or symptoms attributable to operating. Of those with symptoms, 55.4% attributed most of the symptoms to laparoscopic surgery, 36.3% to open surgery, and 8.3% to robotic surgery. A higher case load was predictive of increased symptoms for open and laparoscopic surgery, but not for robotic surgery. Robotic surgery was less likely than open or laparoscopic surgery to lead to neck, back, hip, knee, ankle, foot, and shoulder pain and less likely than laparoscopic surgery to lead to elbow and wrist pain. Robotic surgery was more likely than either open or laparoscopic surgery to lead to eye pain, and more likely than open surgery to lead to finger pain. Nearly a third (30.3%) of surgeons admit to giving consideration to their own discomfort when choosing an operative modality. Robotic surgery has promise in reducing the risk of physical discomfort for the operator. This is important as more surgeons consider their own health when choosing a surgical modality.

  11. The Danish Fracture Database can monitor quality of fracture-related surgery, surgeons' experience level and extent of supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Jon; Gromov, Kirill; Brix, Michael

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The importance of supervision and of surgeons' level of experience in relation to patient outcome have been demonstrated in both hip fracture and arthroplasty surgery. The aim of this study was to describe the surgeons' experience level and the extent of supervision for: 1) fracture......-related surgery in general; 2) the three most frequent primary operations and reoperations; and 3) primary operations during and outside regular working hours. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 9,767 surgical procedures were identified from the Danish Fracture Database (DFDB). Procedures were grouped based...... on the surgeons' level of experience, extent of supervision, type (primary, planned secondary or reoperation), classification (AO Müller), and whether they were performed during or outside regular hours. RESULTS: Interns and junior residents combined performed 46% of all procedures. A total of 90% of surgeries...

  12. The Danish Fracture Database can monitor quality of fracture-related surgery, surgeons' experience level and extent of supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M. J.; Gromov, K.; Brix, M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The importance of supervision and of surgeons' level of experience in relation to patient outcome have been demonstrated in both hip fracture and arthroplasty surgery. The aim of this study was to describe the surgeons' experience level and the extent of supervision for: 1) fracture......-related surgery in general; 2) the three most frequent primary operations and reoperations; and 3) primary operations during and outside regular working hours. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 9,767 surgical procedures were identified from the Danish Fracture Database (DFDB). Procedures were grouped based...... on the surgeons' level of experience, extent of supervision, type (primary, planned secondary or reoperation), classification (AO Muller), and whether they were performed during or outside regular hours. RESULTS: Interns and junior residents combined performed 46% of all procedures. A total of 90% of surgeries...

  13. Does general surgery residency prepare surgeons for community practice in British Columbia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hamish

    2009-06-01

    Preparing surgeons for clinical practice is a challenging task for postgraduate training programs across Canada. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a single surgeon entering practice was adequately prepared by comparing the type and volume of surgical procedures experienced in the last 3 years of training with that in the first year of clinical practice. During the last 3 years of general surgery training, I logged all procedures. In practice, the Medical Services Plan (MSP) of British Columbia tracks all procedures. Using MSP remittance reports, I compiled the procedures performed in my first year of practice. I totaled the number of procedures and broke them down into categories (general, colorectal, laparoscopic, endoscopic, hepatobiliary, oncologic, pediatric, thoracic, vascular and other). I then compared residency training with community practice. I logged a total of 1170 procedures in the last 3 years of residency. Of these, 452 were performed during community rotations. The procedures during residency could be broken down as follows: 392 general, 18 colorectal, 242 laparoscopic, 103 endoscopic, 85 hepatobiliary, 142 oncologic, 1 pediatric, 78 thoracic, 92 vascular and 17 other. I performed a total of 1440 procedures in the first year of practice. In practice the break down was 398 general, 15 colorectal, 101 laparoscopic, 654 endoscopic, 2 hepatobiliary, 77 oncologic, 10 pediatric, 0 thoracic, 70 vascular and 113 other. On the whole, residency provided excellent preparation for clinical practice based on my experience. Areas of potential improvement included endoscopy, pediatric surgery and "other," which comprised mostly hand surgery.

  14. The Danish Fracture Database can monitor quality of fracture-related surgery, surgeons' experience level and extent of supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M. J.; Gromov, K.; Brix, M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The importance of supervision and of surgeons' level of experience in relation to patient outcome have been demonstrated in both hip fracture and arthroplasty surgery. The aim of this study was to describe the surgeons' experience level and the extent of supervision for: 1) fracture...... on the surgeons' level of experience, extent of supervision, type (primary, planned secondary or reoperation), classification (AO Muller), and whether they were performed during or outside regular hours. RESULTS: Interns and junior residents combined performed 46% of all procedures. A total of 90% of surgeries...... by interns were performed under supervision, whereas 32% of operations by junior residents were unsupervised. Supervision was absent in 14-16% and 22-33% of the three most frequent primary procedures and reoperations when performed by interns and junior residents, respectively. The proportion of unsupervised...

  15. Qualitative Study of Surgeons Using a Wearable Personal Assistant in Surgeries and Ward Rounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalaliniya, Shahram; Pederson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the utility of a wearable personal assistant (WPA) for orthopedic surgeons in hospitals. A prototype of the WPA was developed on the Google Glass platform for supporting surgeons in three different scenarios: 1) touch-less interaction with medical images in surgery room...

  16. Chinese Orthopedic Surgeons' Practice Regarding Postoperative Thromboembolic Prophylaxis after Major Orthopedic Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-jian Sun; Gui-xing Qiu; Xi-sheng Weng; Yu Zhao; Jin Jin

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess Chinese surgeon practice of thromboprophylaxis following major orthopedic surgery.Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted amongst Chinese orthopedic surgeons.A total of 293 surgeons were surveyed concerning five key aspects of thromboembolic prophylaxis after major orthopedic surgery at the proseminar of Chinese guidelines for prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after major orthopedic surgery in January of 2009.Results Totally,208 surgeons (71.0%) responded,successfully completing the questionnaire.Of them,57.6% respondents selected combined basic,mechanical,and pharmacologic methods for thromboprophylaxis; 51.0% respondents prefer starting prophylaxis 12-24 hours after surgery; 60.3% surgeons would use chemoprophylaxis for 7-10 days; 47.6% respondents prefer VTE prevention based on patients'special conditions and needs upon discharge."Safety" was the most repeated and emphasized factor during VTE prophylaxis.Conclusions Multimodal thromboprophylaxis is frequently used after major orthopedic surgery.Half surgeons prefer to start chemoprophylaxis 12-24 hours after surgery.Thromboprophylaxis regimen varies for discharged patients.

  17. A change in opinion on surgeon's performance indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maytham, Gary; Kessaris, Nicos

    2011-04-01

    Individual performance indicators for cardiac surgeons in the UK were published in 2004. A comprehensive update published in 2009 reported statistically significant decreases in mortality rates suggesting that the publication of this data may have contributed to this improvement in outcomes. In view of this, the authors present an assessment of the attitudes of cardiac surgeons to individual performance tables, having performed this by sending questionnaires exploring the surgeon's views on performance tables to UK cardiac surgeons in 2005 and 2009. The responses demonstrated that whilst the majority of cardiac surgeons (68.8%) were initially opposed to performance tables, the number welcoming their introduction increased significantly (22.9-48.5%) over the four-year period. The attitude of the consultants towards the possible effect of this data on the management of high-risk patients also changed, with fewer consultants believing they would (P=0.0001) or may (P=0.023) avoid these patients. The observed change in attitude of cardiac surgeons may be due to acclimatization to an established system of audit, improved mortality rates, a desire for more transparency following the Bristol Enquiry, or improved risk stratification. These findings may be of benefit to those tasked with initiating these indicators elsewhere.

  18. Measuring performance in virtual reality phacoemulsification surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Per; Laurell, Carl-Gustaf; Simawi, Wamidh; Skarman, Eva; Nordh, Leif; Nordqvist, Per

    2008-02-01

    We have developed a virtual reality (VR) simulator for phacoemulsification surgery. The current work aimed at developing a relative performance index that characterizes the performance of an individual trainee. We recorded measurements of 28 response variables during three iterated surgical sessions in 9 experienced cataract surgeons, separately for the sculpting phase and the evacuation phase of phacoemulsification surgery and compared their outcome to that of a reference group of naive trainees. We defined an individual overall performance index, an individual class specific performance index and an individual variable specific performance index. We found that on an average the experienced surgeons performed at a lower level than a reference group of naive trainees but that this was particularly attributed to a few surgeons. When their overall performance index was further analyzed as class specific performance index and variable specific performance index it was found that the low level performance was attributed to a behavior that is acceptable for an experienced surgeon but not for a naive trainee. It was concluded that relative performance indices should use a reference group that corresponds to the measured individual since the definition of optimal surgery may vary among trainee groups depending on their level of experience.

  19. Colorectal Surgeons Teaching General Surgery Residents: Current Challenges and Opportunities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schmitz, Connie; Chow, Christopher; Rothenberger, David

    2012-01-01

    Effective teaching for general surgery residents requires that faculty members with colorectal expertise actively engage in the education process and fully understand the current context for residency training...

  20. Research articles published by Korean spine surgeons: Scientific progress and the increase in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Hyun Jib; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu

    2017-02-01

    There has been a marked increase in spine surgery in the 21st century, but there are no reports providing quantitative and qualitative analyses of research by Korean spine surgeons. The study goal was to assess the status of Korean spinal surgery and research. The number of spine surgeries was obtained from the Korean National Health Insurance Service. Research articles published by Korean spine surgeons were reviewed by using the Medline/PubMed online database. The number of spine surgeries in Korea increased markedly from 92,390 in 2004 to 164,291 in 2013. During the 2000-2014 period, 1982 articles were published by Korean spine surgeons. The annual number of articles increased from 20 articles in 2000 to 293 articles in 2014. There was a positive correlation between the annual spine surgery and article numbers (particles with Oxford levels of evidence 1, 2, and 3. The mean five-year impact factor (IF) for article quality was 1.79. There was no positive correlation between the annual IF and article numbers. Most articles (65.9%) were authored by neurosurgical spine surgeons. But spinal deformity-related topics were dominant among articles authored by orthopedics. The results show a clear quantitative increase in Korean spinal surgery and research over the last 15years. The lack of a correlation between annual IF and published article numbers indicate that Korean spine surgeons should endeavor to increase research value.

  1. Does general surgery residency prepare surgeons for community practice in British Columbia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hamish

    2009-01-01

    Background Preparing surgeons for clinical practice is a challenging task for postgraduate training programs across Canada. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a single surgeon entering practice was adequately prepared by comparing the type and volume of surgical procedures experienced in the last 3 years of training with that in the first year of clinical practice. Methods During the last 3 years of general surgery training, I logged all procedures. In practice, the Medical Services Plan (MSP) of British Columbia tracks all procedures. Using MSP remittance reports, I compiled the procedures performed in my first year of practice. I totaled the number of procedures and broke them down into categories (general, colorectal, laparoscopic, endoscopic, hepatobiliary, oncologic, pediatric, thoracic, vascular and other). I then compared residency training with community practice. Results I logged a total of 1170 procedures in the last 3 years of residency. Of these, 452 were performed during community rotations. The procedures during residency could be broken down as follows: 392 general, 18 colorectal, 242 laparoscopic, 103 endoscopic, 85 hepatobiliary, 142 oncologic, 1 pediatric, 78 thoracic, 92 vascular and 17 other. I performed a total of 1440 procedures in the first year of practice. In practice the break down was 398 general, 15 colorectal, 101 laparoscopic, 654 endoscopic, 2 hepatobiliary, 77 oncologic, 10 pediatric, 0 thoracic, 70 vascular and 113 other. Conclusion On the whole, residency provided excellent preparation for clinical practice based on my experience. Areas of potential improvement included endoscopy, pediatric surgery and “other,” which comprised mostly hand surgery. PMID:19503663

  2. Simulation-based education and performance assessments for pediatric surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsness, Katherine

    2014-08-01

    Education in the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for a surgeon to perform at an expert level in the operating room, and beyond, must address all potential cognitive and technical performance gaps, professionalism and personal behaviors, and effective team communication. Educational strategies should also seek to replicate the stressors and distractions that might occur during a high-risk operation or critical care event. Finally, education cannot remain fixed in an apprenticeship model of "See one, do one, teach one," whereby patients are exposed to the risk of harm inherent to any learning curve. The majority of these educational goals can be achieved with the addition of simulation-based education (SBE) as a valuable adjunct to traditional training methods. This article will review relevant principles of SBE, explore currently available simulation-based educational tools for pediatric surgeons, and finally make projections for the future of SBE and performance assessments for pediatric surgeons.

  3. Outcome Management in Cardiac Surgery Using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Linda S; Gallardo, Bret E; Speir, Alan M; Ad, Niv

    2016-09-01

    Health care reform has helped streamline patient care and reimbursement by encouraging providers to provide the best outcome for the best value. Institutions with cardiac surgery programs need a methodology to monitor and improve outcomes linked to reimbursement. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database (STSND) is a tool for monitoring outcomes and improving care. This article identifies the purpose, goals, and reporting system of the STSND and ways these data can be used for benchmarking, linking outcomes to the effectiveness of treatment, and identifying factors associated with mortality and complications. We explain the methodology used at Inova Heart and Vascular Institute, Falls Church, Virginia, to perform outcome management by using the STSND and address our performance-improvement cycle through discussion of data collection, analysis, and outcome reporting. We focus on the revision of clinical practice and offer examples of how patient outcomes have been improved using this methodology.

  4. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education ... implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education ...

  5. Comparison of pediatric appendectomy outcomes between pediatric surgeons and general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Ido; Mazeh, Haggi; Levy, Yair; Karavani, Gilad; Ghanem, Muhammad; Armon, Yaron; Vromen, Amos; Eid, Ahmed; Udassin, Raphael

    2013-04-01

    Appendectomy is the most common urgent procedure in children, and surgical outcomes may be affected by the surgeon's experience. This study's aim is to compare appendectomy outcomes performed by pediatric surgeons (PSs) and general surgery residents (GSRs). A retrospective review of all patients younger than 16y treated for appendicitis at two different campuses of the same institution during the years 2008-2009 was performed. Appendectomies were performed by PS in one campus and GSR in the other. Primary end points included postoperative morbidity and hospital length of stay. During the study period, 246 (61%) patients were operated by senior GSR (postgraduate year 5-7) versus 157 (39%) patients by PS. There was no significant difference in patients' characteristics at presentation to the emergency room and the rate of appendeceal perforation (11% versus 15%, P=0.32), and noninfectious appendicitis (5% versus 5% P=0.78) also was similar. Laparoscopic surgery was performed more commonly by GSR (16% versus 9%, P=0.02) with shorter operating time (54±1.5 versus 60±2.1, P=0.01). Interestingly, the emergency room to operating room time was shorter for GSR group (419±14 versus 529±24min, P<0.001). The hospital length of stay was shorter for the GSR group (4.0±0.2 versus 4.5±0.2, P=0.03), and broad-spectrum antibiotics were used less commonly (20% versus 53%, P<0.0001) and so was home antibiotics continuation (13% versus 30%, P<0.0001). Nevertheless, postoperative complication rate was similar (5% versus 7%, P=0.29) and so was the rate of readmissions (2% versus 5%, P=0.52). The results of this study suggest that the presence of a PS does not affect the outcomes of appendectomies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Performing surgery: commonalities with performers outside medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Lister Kneebone

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues for the inclusion of surgery within the canon of performance science. The world of medicine presents rich, complex but relatively under-researched sites of performance. Performative aspects of clinical practice are overshadowed by a focus on the processes and outcomes of medical care, such as diagnostic accuracy and the results of treatment. The primacy of this ‘clinical’ viewpoint - framed by clinical professionals as the application of medical knowledge - hides resonances with performance in other domains. Yet the language of performance is embedded in the culture of surgery - surgeons ‘perform’ operations, work in an operating ‘theatre’ and use ‘instruments’. This paper asks what might come into view if we take this performative language at face value and interrogate surgery from the perspective of performance science. It addresses the following questions: 1.To what extent and in what ways can surgical practice (both consultation and operation be considered as performance?2.How does comparison with two domains domains of non-surgical performance (close-up magic and puppetry illuminate understanding of surgical practice as performance?3.In what ways might including surgery within the canon of performance studies enrich the field of performance science?Two detailed case studies over 5 years with magicians (71.5 hours contact time and puppeteers (50.5 hours contact time identified performative aspects of surgical practice from the perspectives of professionals (as individuals or in groups and audiences. Physical simulation provided a means for non-clinicians to access and experience elements of the surgical world, acting as a prompt for discussion. Thematic analysis was used to establish themes and sub-themes.Key themes were: 1 clinical consultation can be viewed as ‘close-up live performance with a very small audience’ and 2 operative surgery can be viewed as ‘reading bodies within a dextrous team

  7. Workload and surgeon's specialty for outcome after colorectal cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archampong, David; Borowski, David; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    A large body of research has focused on investigating the effects of healthcare provider volume and specialization on patient outcomes including outcomes of colorectal cancer surgery. However there is conflicting evidence about the role of such healthcare provider characteristics in the management...... of colorectal cancer....

  8. Surgeons underestimate their influence on medical students entering surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quillin 3rd, R.C.; Pritts, T.A.; Davis, B.R.; Hanseman, D.; Collins, J.M.; Athota, K.P.; Edwards, M.J.R.; Tevar, A.D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Positive surgical role models influence medical students to pursue a career in surgery. However, the perception by role models of their own effectiveness has yet to be examined. In this study, we evaluated the influence of surgical role models on medical student career choice, and how th

  9. Intraoperative flap complications in lasik surgery performed by ophthalmology residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Romero-Diaz-de-Leon

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Flap-related complications are common intraoperative event during LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmologists. Keratometries and surgeon's first procedure represent a higher probability for flap related complications than some other biometric parameters of patient's eye.

  10. Ultrasound of the acute abdomen performed by surgeons in training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J.P.; Grantcharov, T.P.; Eriksen, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    perform valid abdominal ultrasound examinations of patients referred with acute abdominal pain. METHODS: Patients referred with acute abdominal pain had an ultrasound examination by a surgeon in training as well as by an experienced consultant radiologist whose results served as the gold standard. All...

  11. Colorectal Surgeons Teaching General Surgery Residents: Current Challenges and Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitz, Connie C.; Chow, Christopher J.; Rothenberger, David A

    2012-01-01

    Effective teaching for general surgery residents requires that faculty members with colorectal expertise actively engage in the education process and fully understand the current context for residency training. In this article, we review important national developments with respect to graduate medical education that impact resident supervision, curriculum implementation, resident assessment, and program evaluation. We argue that establishing a culture of respect and professionalism in today's...

  12. Day-care hypospadias surgery: Single surgeon experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekharam V.V.S.S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the results of the early discharge of children after hypospadias repair with an indwelling catheter. Materials and Methods: To facilitate early the discharge of children after hypospadias repair, the author adopted the technique of draining the indwelling urinary catheter into diapers in children undergoing this operation. Home catheter care was taught to the mother; the dressings and catheters were subsequently managed in the outpatient clinic. Results: Over a 2-year period, 43 children were managed by this technique and were sent home within 24-48 h after the operation with an indwelling catheter. Minor problems requiring outpatient visits to the surgeon occurred in nine (20% children after discharge from the hospital. All the nine children were successfully managed as outpatients and no child required rehospitalisation. The catheter remained in position for 5 days in all the children. The overall results were satisfactory with an acceptable (7% fistula rate. Conclusions: It is possible to reduce the duration of the hospital stay of children after hypospadias repair without compromising on the final results.

  13. Telemedicine in plastic surgery: E-consult the attending surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pap, Stephen A; Lach, Elliot; Upton, Joseph

    2002-08-01

    Telemedicine has evolved into a valuable but underused resource for the delivery of health care to patients at a distance, particularly where patient transport is impractical, expensive, complicated, and/or urgent. Today, over 250,000 telemedicine consults are generated annually, involving various specialties in both military and civilian health delivery systems. The ability to evaluate and triage plastic surgery patients through the use of telemedicine has not been widely explored. We have designed, developed, and tested a "store-and-forward" solution at UMass Memorial Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital whereby the plastic surgery residents who responded to a consult request transmitted digital photographs by means of the Internet to the attending physician on call. The customary telephone call between resident and attending physician benefited from the additional photographic data, and patient management resulted in a clear, concise, and unambiguous treatment plan. The initial management suggested by the resident was modified on some occasions, particularly with complex problems. The use of digital images was especially helpful for evaluation of radiographs and complex wounds of the hand and face. The solution proved to be very valuable for both attending physicians and residents in plastic surgery. The photographs provide rich detail and resolution comparable to high-quality prints. The mechanics of obtaining images and the process of sending them electronically was readily mastered. Images reached their destination in only a few minutes over standard telephone lines. No problems were encountered while sending or viewing images on Macintosh or Windows platforms. Determining course of action with a complete clinical history now includes a level of visual detail previously not available. As this application expands into wider use, data integrity and safety will have to be more formally secured and monitored. Our model of telemedicine has broad

  14. [Surgeons can learn from pilots: human factors in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockeel, P; Chatelain, E; Massoure, M-P; David, P; Chapellier, X; Buffat, S

    2009-06-01

    Human factors (HF) study is mandatory to get air transport pilot licences. In aviation, crew resource management (CRM) and declaration of adverse events (feedback) result in improving of air safety. Air missions and surgical procedures have similarities. Bridging the gap is tempting, despite severe warnings against simplistic adaptation. Putting HF theory into surgical practice: how to? Educational principles derived from CRM improve professional attitudes of a team. We propose to translate concepts of CRM to clinical teams. CRM training applying in surgery could allow the work environment to be restructured to reduce human error. Feedback: in aviation, the Bureau of Flight Safety deals with investigations for air events. Pilots, air traffic controllers can anonymously declare nuisance, resulting in a feedback for the whole air force. Adverse events are analysed. Usually, multilevel problems are found, rather than the only responsibility of the last operator. Understanding the mechanisms of human failure finally improves safety. In surgery, CRM and feedback would probably be helpful. Anyway, it requires time; people have to change their mind. Nevertheless people such as fighter pilots, who were very unwilling at the beginning, now consider HF as a cornerstone for security. But it is difficult to estimate the extent of HF-related morbidity and mortality. We propose as a first step to consider CRM and feedback in surgical procedure. HF deals with the mechanisms of human errors and the ways to improve safety and probably improve the surgical team's efficacy.

  15. Should surgeons scrub with chlorhexidine or iodine prior to surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarral, Omar A; McCormack, David J; Ibrahim, Sammra; Shipolini, Alex R

    2011-06-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether chlorhexidine gluconate is equivalent or superior to the use of povidone-iodine during surgical hand scrub. A total of 593 papers were found using the reported searches of which eight represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, date, journal, study type, population, main outcome measures and results are tabulated. We conclude that whilst both chlorhexidine and povidone-iodine reduce bacterial count after scrubbing, the effect of chlorhexidine is both more profound and longer lasting. The studies found analysed the difference in reduction in colony forming units or bacterial count following surgical scrub in order to conclude that chlorhexidine was superior. Four studies went further to analyse cumulative and residual activity by testing for bacterial reduction after using a scrub solution for a number of days, an area in which chlorhexidine showed consistent advantages over povidone-iodine. These findings are given more credibility by the clinical finding of a recent meta-analysis of over 5000 patients in which chlorhexidine as an antiseptic skin preparation was associated with significantly reduced surgical site infection (SSI) in clean-contaminated surgery. Despite this, there is no evidence suggesting the use of chlorhexidine during hand scrub reduces SSI, which perhaps explains why guidelines from the World Health Organization, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Association for Perioperative Practice do not recommend one specific antimicrobial over another for hand scrub.

  16. [What do general, abdominal and vascular surgeons need to know on plastic surgery - aspects of plastic surgery in the field of general, abdominal and vascular surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damert, H G; Altmann, S; Stübs, P; Infanger, M; Meyer, F

    2015-02-01

    There is overlap between general, abdominal and vascular surgery on one hand and plastic surgery on the other hand, e.g., in hernia surgery, in particular, recurrent hernia, reconstruction of the abdominal wall or defect closure after abdominal or vascular surgery. Bariatric operations involve both special fields too. Plastic surgeons sometimes use skin and muscle compartments of the abdominal wall for reconstruction at other regions of the body. This article aims to i) give an overview about functional, anatomic and clinical aspects as well as the potential of surgical interventions in plastic surgery. General/abdominal/vascular surgeons can benefit from this in their surgical planning and competent execution of their own surgical interventions with limited morbidity/lethality and an optimal, in particular, functional as well as aesthetic outcome, ii) support the interdisciplinary work of general/abdominal/vascular and plastic surgery, and iii) provide a better understanding of plastic surgery and its profile of surgical interventions and options.

  17. Journalism and Academic Surgery: The Denver Post and The American Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Don K

    2015-07-01

    Publication in professional journals is where advancements in surgery are reported and verified. Thus academic surgery holds common ground with journalism, where the principles of service, communication, and integrity are the basis of their public trust and standing in society. Writing for the Denver Post the author learned lessons that are relevant to academic surgery. Facts have to be solid. There are important issues to be discussed. Articles have to be interesting and not tiresome to read. And if it's something new--the essence of news--get it out there first. The American Surgeon embodies the same principles. The journal is a place where members of the Southeastern Surgical Congress discuss important matters, like surgical education, and share stories of interest, like a Japanese surgeon trying to treat victims of nuclear war. It is accessible yet disciplined, dedicated to advancing our field and fostering fellowship and communication among its members.

  18. Surgeons and surgery from ancient Persia (5,000 years of surgical history).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargaran, Arman; Fazelzadeh, Afsoon; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali

    2013-08-01

    The development of surgery is indebted to scientists and surgeons from various civilizations throughout history. The present study considers surgery in the ancient Persian civilization. It highlights aspects of the subject, such as findings of the first trephinated skulls in Iran; surgeons' social class (kareto baēšaza in the Avestan language-dating back 3,000 years); surgical operations such as cesarean section and procedures to treat breast cancer; and the use of anesthetic compounds and surgical practice in the military. It is hoped that this catalogue of historical evidence of surgical practice in ancient Persian civilization will contribute to the history of surgery, as an important field in medical science.

  19. Explorative surgery for acute scrotal pain: The importance of patient age, side affected, time to surgery and surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Fabiani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Testicular torsion must be diagnosed quickly and accurately. The delay of the diagnosis and the subsequent delay of surgery may lead to loss testicular viability and orchidectomy. Aim of our retrospective evaluation was to define which element should be considered as major support to the clinician in distinguishing spermatic cord torsion from the other diseases mimicking this clinical emergency requiring surgical exploration. Material and methods: We retrospectively reviewed all clinical and instrumental data of emergency scrotal exploration performed for acute scrotal pain at two different Urological Department in a 10 year period. Results of surgical exploration represented the four diagnostic categories in which patients were divided for statistical evaluation. We evaluated the relationship between diagnosis performed by testicular surgical exploration and the all clinical data available including surgeon involved in the procedures. Results: A total of 220 explorative scrotal surgery were considered. We divided the cases in 4 categories according to the diagnostic results of each surgical procedure. Of all, spermatic cord torsion was diagnosed in 45% (99/220. The total testis salvage rate was of 78.8%. The patients with a diagnosis of spermatic cord torsion were older than patients with appendix torsion (15 vs 11 years in mean. When the affected side was the left, the probability to have a diagnosis of spermatic cord torsion was higher than the right side [χ2 (2, N = 218 = 11.77, p < 0.01]. Time elapsing between onset of symptoms and testicular salvagewas significantly lower even than in case of appendix torsion/necrosis (p < .0001, and of others pathologies diagnosed (p = .0383. Conclusion: In case of spermatic cord torsion, in addition to the clinical data, patient age and left side affected may represent an independent diagnostic predicting factor. The time elapsing between onset of symptoms and explorative

  20. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Surgeon Diagnostic Accuracy in Facial Plastic and Oculoplastic Surgery Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Andrew W; Ishii, Lisa; Joseph, Shannon S; Smith, Jane I; Su, Peiyi; Bater, Kristin; Byrne, Patrick; Boahene, Kofi; Papel, Ira; Kontis, Theda; Douglas, Raymond; Nelson, Christine C; Ishii, Masaru

    2017-07-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a relative contraindication for facial plastic surgery, but formal screening is not common in practice. The prevalence of BDD in patients seeking facial plastic surgery is not well documented. To establish the prevalence of BDD across facial plastic and oculoplastic surgery practice settings, and estimate the ability of surgeons to screen for BDD. This multicenter prospective study recruited a cohort of 597 patients who presented to academic and private facial plastic and oculoplastic surgery practices from March 2015 to February 2016. All patients were screened for BDD using the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ). After each clinical encounter, surgeons independently evaluated the likelihood that a participating patient had BDD. Validated instruments were used to assess satisfaction with facial appearance including the FACE-Q, Blepharoplasty Outcomes Evaluation (BOE), Facelift Outcomes Evaluation (FOE), Rhinoplasty Outcomes Evaluation (ROE), and Skin Rejuvenation Outcomes Evaluation (SROE). Across participating practices (9 surgeons, 3 sites), a total of 597 patients were screened for BDD: 342 patients from site 1 (mean [SD] age, 44.2 [16.5] years); 158 patients, site 2 (mean [SD] age, 46.0 [16.2] years), site 3, 97 patients (mean [SD] age, 56.3 [15.5] years). Overall, 58 patients [9.7%] screened positive for BDD by the BDDQ instrument, while only 16 of 402 patients [4.0%] were clinically suspected of BDD by surgeons. A higher percentage of patients presenting for cosmetic surgery (37 of 283 patients [13.1%]) compared with those presenting for reconstructive surgery (21 of 314 patients [6.7%]) screened positive on the BDDQ (odds ratio, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.20-3.68; P = .01). Surgeons were only able to correctly identify 2 of 43 patients (4.7%) who screened positive for BDD on the BDDQ, and the positive likelihood ratio was only 1.19 (95% CI, 0.28-5.07). Patients screening positive for BDD by the BDDQ had lower

  1. Core competencies for hair restoration surgeons recommended by the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Carlos J; Beehner, Michael L; Cotterill, Paul C; Elliott, Vance W; Haber, Robert S; Harris, James A; Martinick, Jennifer H; Niedbalski, Robert P; Rose, Paul; Rousso, Daniel E; Shapiro, Ronald L

    2009-03-01

    Because hair restoration surgery has changed so significantly, the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS) recently developed and published a Core Curriculum for Hair Restoration Surgery (CCHRS). The ISHRS organized a task force to develop training programs that would not only present the CCHRS but also provide the practical experience necessary to allow a physician to practice safe, aesthetically sound hair restoration surgery. The task force recognized early on that identification of core competencies for hair restoration surgeons was essential to guiding the development of these training experiences. This article presents the competencies that have been identified. The intent of the Core Competencies for Hair Restoration Surgery is to outline the knowledge and skills that are essential to accurately diagnose and treat hair loss, to ensure patient safety, and to optimize aesthetic results. The ISHRS hopes that all existing surgery and dermatology training programs teaching hair restoration surgery procedures will find the Core Competencies useful in developing their curriculums. The Core Competencies were developed through an organized review of the CCHRS by a team of experienced hair restoration surgeons and educators and reviewed and approved by the ISHRS Board of Governors. The diversity of these competencies demonstrate that contemporary hair restoration surgery is a specialty requiring knowledge of several medical disciplines, including genetics, endocrinology, dermatology, tissue preservation, and surgery. The International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery believes identification of these Core Competencies is an important contribution to physician education in hair restoration surgery, and physicians who demonstrate competency in these skills will satisfy patients with contemporary results in a safe environment.

  2. Surgeon length of service and risk-adjusted outcomes: linked observational analysis of the UK National Adult Cardiac Surgery Audit Registry and General Medical Council Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Graeme L; Grant, Stuart W; Freemantle, Nick; Cunningham, David; Munsch, Christopher M; Livesey, Steven A; Roxburgh, James; Buchan, Iain; Bridgewater, Ben

    2014-09-01

    To explore the relationship between in-hospital mortality following adult cardiac surgery and the time since primary clinical qualification for the responsible consultant cardiac surgeon (a proxy for experience). Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected national registry data over a 10-year period using mixed-effects multiple logistic regression modelling. Surgeon experience was defined as the time between the date of surgery and award of primary clinical qualification. UK National Health Service hospitals performing cardiac surgery between January 2003 and December 2012. All patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafts and/or valve surgery under the care of a consultant cardiac surgeon. All-cause in-hospital mortality. A total of 292,973 operations performed by 273 consultant surgeons (with lengths of service from 11.2 to 42.0 years) were included. Crude mortality increased approximately linearly until 33 years service, before decreasing. After adjusting for case-mix and year of surgery, there remained a statistically significant (p=0.002) association between length of service and in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 1.013; 95% CI 1.005-1.021 for each year of 'experience'). Consultant cardiac surgeons take on increasingly complex surgery as they gain experience. With this progression, the incidence of adverse outcomes is expected to increase, as is demonstrated in this study. After adjusting for case-mix using the EuroSCORE, we observed an increased risk of mortality in patients operated on by longer serving surgeons. This finding may reflect under-adjustment for risk, unmeasured confounding or a real association. Further research into outcomes over the time course of surgeon's careers is required. © The Royal Society of Medicine.

  3. What the surgeon cannot see and needs to see before middle ear surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerber, Sébastien; Lefournier, Virginie; Karkas, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    To define the utility of imaging prior to middle ear surgery. Different middle ear pathologies are subsequently described: conductive hearing loss with a normal tympanic membrane, labyrinthine fistulae, tegmen anomalies, opacified tympanic membrane, cholesteatoma, temporal bone fractures and glomus tumors. We discuss the indications and benefits of imaging in each of these pathologies. Preoperative imaging shows interesting features and can be very helpful in the differential diagnosis and in surgical decision-making and planning. However, it is not mandatory and should not be systematic in every middle ear surgery. The modern radiological era provides the otological surgeon with numerous imaging technologies. Yet, these techniques should by no means replace the surgeon's anatomical knowledge, clinical sense and surgical skills. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Accelerometer Measurement of Head Movement During Laparoscopic Surgery as a Tool to Evaluate Skill Development of Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viriyasiripong, Sarayuth; Lopez, Asis; Mandava, Sree Harsha; Lai, Weil R; Mitchell, Gregory C; Boonjindasup, Aaron; Powers, Mary K; Silberstein, Jonathan L; Lee, Benjamin R

    2016-01-01

    To detect and measure surgeons' head movement during laparoscopic simulator performance to determine whether expert surgeons have economy of motion in their head movement, including change of direction, compared with intermediate and novice surgeons. We investigated head movement as an objective tool for assessment of laparoscopic surgical skill and its potential use for assessing novice surgeons' progress on the learning curve. After obtaining institutional review board approval, medical students, urology residents, and attending staff surgeons from an academic institution were recruited. Participants were grouped by level of experience and performed tasks on the Electronic Data Generation for Evaluation laparoscopic simulator. Surgeons wore a commercially available wireless electroencephalogram monitor as a flexible, adjustable, and lightweight headband with 7 sensors-2 forehead sensors, 2 ear sensors, and 3 reference sensors. The headband incorporates a 3-axis accelerometer enabling head movement quantification. A variance analysis was used to compare the average head movement acceleration data between each group. Tulane University Medical Center, New Orleans, LA, an academic medical center and the principal teaching hospital for Tulane University School of Medicine. A total of following 19 participants were recruited for the study and stratified by surgical experience into novice (n = 6), intermediate (n = 9), and expert (n = 4) laparoscopy groups: 6 medical students, 9 urology residents (postgraduate years 1 to5), and 4 attending urologists, respectively. Analysis of the average acceleration rate of head movement showed statistically significant differences among groups on both the vertical axis (p = 0.006) and horizontal axis (p = 0.018) in the laparoscopic suturing task. This demonstrated the ability to distinguish between experts and novice laparoscopic surgeons. The average acceleration among groups did not demonstrate statistical significance on the

  5. Leonardo Fioravanti (1517-1588): a barber-surgeon who influenced the development of reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoni-Rugiu, P; Mazzola, R

    1997-02-01

    Surgery in the Middle Ages was practiced by individuals belonging to the guild of barbers, with no basic medical education. The transformation into a scientific branch of medicine began in the sixteenth century. In this process, a great role was the one played by Leonardo Fioravanti. He was a Doctor in Medicine graduated from the University of Bologna. A controversial man, he was also an innovation in many fields of medicine, such as prevention of diseases, pharmacology, therapy, etc., and he was a surgeon himself. On the way back from one of the last Crusades, he visited the Vianeos brothers in Calabria, and he was able to learn from them the technique for reconstructing the nose that had been devised by Antonio Branca in the previous century and still practiced only by barber-surgeons. He published his experience in a book that probably inspired the contemporary, Gaspare Tagliacozzi, Professor at the University of Bologna, and allowed him to become acquainted with this kind of reconstructive surgery. Tagliacozzi understood the value of the method described by Fioravanti and transformed a barber-surgery technique into a remarkable chapter of scientific surgery by divulging in the academic circles the principles of the pedicled flap, which have been the basis for development of modern plastic surgery.

  6. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database: 2016 Update on Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Marshall L; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Pasquali, Sara K; Hill, Kevin D; Hornik, Christoph; O'Brien, Sean M; Shahian, David M; Habib, Robert H; Edwards, Fred H

    2016-09-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS CHSD) is the largest congenital and pediatric cardiac surgical clinical data registry in the world. With more than 400,000 total operations from nearly all centers performing pediatric and congenital heart operations in North America, the STS CHSD is an unparalleled platform for clinical investigation, outcomes research, and quality improvement activities in this subspecialty. In 2015, several major original publications reported analyses of data in the CHSD pertaining to specific diagnostic and procedural groups, age-defined cohorts, or the entire population of patients in the database. Additional publications reported the most recent development, evaluation, and application of metrics for quality measurement and reporting of pediatric and congenital heart operation outcomes. This use of the STS CHSD for outcomes research and for quality measurement continues to expand as database participation and the available wealth of data in it continue to grow. This article reviews outcomes research and quality improvement articles published in 2015 based on STS CHSD data.

  7. Role of the treating surgeon in the consent process for elective refractive surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schallhorn SC

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Steven C Schallhorn,1–3 Stephen J Hannan,3 David Teenan,3 Julie M Schallhorn1 1Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, 2Roski Eye Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Optical Express, Glasgow, UK Purpose: To compare patient’s perception of consent quality, clinical and quality-of-life outcomes after laser vision correction (LVC and refractive lens exchange (RLE between patients who met their treating surgeon prior to the day of surgery (PDOS or on the day of surgery (DOS. Design: Retrospective, comparative case series. Setting: Optical Express, Glasgow, UK. Methods: Patients treated between October 2015 and June 2016 (3972 LVC and 979 RLE patients who attended 1-day and 1-month postoperative aftercare and answered a questionnaire were included in this study. All patients had a thorough preoperative discussion with an optometrist, watched a video consent, and were provided with written information. Patients then had a verbal discussion with their treating surgeon either PDOS or on the DOS, according to patient preference. Preoperative and 1-month postoperative visual acuity, refraction, preoperative, 1-day and 1-month postoperative questionnaire were compared between DOS and PDOS patients. Multivariate regression model was developed to find factors associated with patient’s perception of consent quality. Results: Preoperatively, 8.0% of LVC and 17.1% of RLE patients elected to meet their surgeon ahead of the surgery day. In the LVC group, 97.5% of DOS and 97.2% of PDOS patients indicated they were properly consented for surgery (P=0.77. In the RLE group, 97.0% of DOS and 97.0% of PDOS patients stated their consent process for surgery was adequate (P=0.98. There was no statistically significant difference between DOS and PDOS patients in most of the postoperative clinical or questionnaire outcomes. Factors predictive of patient’s satisfaction with consent quality

  8. The growth of computer-assisted (robotic surgery in urology 2000–2014: The role of Asian surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepansh Dalela

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The addition of robot to the surgical armamentarium has allowed better patient care and improved disease outcomes. VUI and surgeons of Asian origin have played a pioneering role in dissemination of computer-assisted surgery.

  9. Development and validation of a sensor- and expert model-based training system for laparoscopic surgery: the iSurgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, Karl-Friedrich; Hendrie, Jonathan D; Schmidt, Mona W; Garrow, Carly R; Bruckner, Thomas; Proctor, Tanja; Paul, Sai; Adigüzel, Davud; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; Erben, Andreas; Kenngott, Hannes; Erben, Young; Speidel, Stefanie; Müller-Stich, Beat P; Nickel, Felix

    2017-05-01

    Training and assessment outside of the operating room is crucial for minimally invasive surgery due to steep learning curves. Thus, we have developed and validated the sensor- and expert model-based laparoscopic training system, the iSurgeon. Participants of different experience levels (novice, intermediate, expert) performed four standardized laparoscopic knots. Instruments and surgeons' joint motions were tracked with an NDI Polaris camera and Microsoft Kinect v1. With frame-by-frame image analysis, the key steps of suturing and knot tying were identified and registered with motion data. Construct validity, concurrent validity, and test-retest reliability were analyzed. The Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) was used as the gold standard for concurrent validity. The system showed construct validity by discrimination between experience levels by parameters such as time (novice = 442.9 ± 238.5 s; intermediate = 190.1 ± 50.3 s; expert = 115.1 ± 29.1 s; p Concurrent validity of OSATS and iSurgeon parameters was established. Test-retest reliability was given for 7 out of 8 parameters. The key steps "wrapping the thread around the instrument" and "needle positioning" were most difficult to learn. Validity and reliability of the self-developed sensor-and expert model-based laparoscopic training system "iSurgeon" were established. Using multiple parameters proved more reliable than single metric parameters. Wrapping of the needle around the thread and needle positioning were identified as difficult key steps for laparoscopic suturing and knot tying. The iSurgeon could generate automated real-time feedback based on expert models which may result in shorter learning curves for laparoscopic tasks. Our next steps will be the implementation and evaluation of full procedural training in an experimental model.

  10. Acellular Dermal Matrix in Reconstructive Breast Surgery: Survey of Current Practice among Plastic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M. S.; Koolen, Pieter G. L.; Ashraf, Azra A.; Kim, Kuylhee; Mureau, Marc A. M.; Lee, Bernard T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) in plastic surgery have become increasingly popular particularly for breast reconstruction. Despite their advantages, questions exist regarding their association with a possible increased incidence of complications. We describe a collective experience of plastic surgeons’ use of ADMs in reconstructive breast surgery using an internet-based survey. Methods: Members of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons were recruited through voluntary, anonymous participation in an online survey. The web-based survey garnered information about participant demographics and their experience with ADM use in breast reconstruction procedures. After responses were collected, all data were anonymously processed. Results: Data were ascertained through 365 physician responses of which 99% (n = 361) completed the survey. The majority of participants were men (84.5%) between 51 and 60 years (37.4%); 84.2% used ADM in breast reconstruction, including radiated patients (79.7%). ADM use was not favored for nipple reconstruction (81.5%); 94.6% of participants used drains, and 87.8% administered antibiotics postoperatively. The most common complications were seroma (70.9%) and infection (16%), although 57.4% claimed anecdotally that overall complication rate was unchanged after incorporating ADM into their practice. High cost was a deterrent for ADM use (37.5%). Conclusions: Plastic surgeons currently use ADM in breast reconstruction for both immediate and staged procedures. Of those responding, a majority of plastic surgeons will incorporate drains and use postoperative antibiotics for more than 48 hours. PMID:25973359

  11. [Professional responsibility in surgery and informed consent. Reflections of a clinical surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, Nicola

    2012-09-05

    The medico-legal conflict especially against the surgical profession is reaching ever higher levels, such as to make consider threatened the choice for surgery of the future generations. Surgery is an Art characterized by enthusiasm and entrepreneurship chosen on the basis of a genuine vocation, but nowadays becomes increasingly prey to indirect interests, with profound negative influence on the serenity of its operators. The current legislation, for civil controversies exposes the surgeons to a presumptive judgment of guilt unless the demonstration with proofs of wrong claims, and even from television screens come daily suggestions and incitements to carry out claims also if related to the last ten years of treatments received, if someone suspects or considers to have been object of "malpractice", and particularly without payment for promoters of the shares for lawyers and medico-legal specialists. We try to analyze the situation as objectively as possible, highlighting the inconsistencies and illusions for the rules alleged to protect both the patient and the surgeon, emphasizing instead the responsibilities of different professional groups, while not denying the need for full commitment of surgeons to operate with prudence, diligence and competence.

  12. [FEMALE SURGEONS SHOULD BE AWARE OF THE IMPORTANCE OF A CLEAR VISION FOR THEIR CAREER AND LIFE PLANS TO ACHIEVE THEIR CAREER DEVELOPMENT.: A SURVEY OF 20 FEMALE SURGEONS AT THE DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY AND ONCOLOGY, KYUSHU UNIVERSITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayoshi, Kinuko; Mori, Hitomi; Kameda, Chizu; Nakamura, Katsuya; Ueki, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao

    2015-05-01

    A shortage of surgeons has been a serious problem in recent years. There is an urgent need to utilize female surgeons who tend to resign because of bearing and raising of children. To examine possible measures to deal with the issue, we performed questionnaire survey about work-life balance and career planning on 20 female surgeons in the Department of Surgery and Oncology, Kyushu University. The response rate was 80.0%. In the 16 respondents, seven were unmarried and nine were married. A large fraction of the respondents recognized the importance of work-life-balance. Female surgeons have many difficulties to continue working with good work-life balance; therefore, understanding and cooperation of both their spouses and coworkers is considered to be necessary. Married female surgeons considered that improvement of the working environment and sufficient family support were more important for good work-life balance compared to those who were unmarried. Female surgeons should recognize the importance of improvement of their environment, including the workplace and the family to continue working with good work-life balance in youth and should have the prospects about their career plan of their own.

  13. Surgery for a tree surgeon? Acute presentation of contact dermatitis due to Ailanthus altissima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Warren O; Paget, James T; Mackenzie, Duncan

    2013-03-01

    A tree surgeon presented to hospital with multiple blackening, non-blanching regions of skin on both forearms, following exposure to sap from the 'tree of heaven' (Ailanthus altissima). A referral to plastic surgery was made to consider debridement. Following input from the national poisons centre and dermatology, conservative management with emollient was undertaken. The lesions blistered and exfoliated and were treated with topical steroid and oral antihistamines. Resolving erythema was the only symptom at three weeks. A. altissima, also known as the 'tree of heaven' has known toxins in its bark, leaves and flowers but is also commonly used in folk medicine. Two previous cases of contact dermatitis are reported in the literature but not with acute photo documentation of the lesions or with surgical referral. This demonstrates an important lesson that debridement would not be the appropriate management despite the initial presentation. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Decision making in third molar surgery: a survey of Brazilian oral and maxillofacial surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Igor Batista; Melo, Auremir Rocha; Fernandes, André Vajgel; Cunningham, Larry L; Laureano Filho, José R; Van Sickels, Joseph E

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the variations in decision making among Brazilian oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMFS) and trainees in relation to third molar surgery. A survey on 18 diverse clinical situations related to the assessment and treatment of the third molar surgeries was conducted during the 20th Brazilian National OMFS meeting. Participants were divided into three groups according to their level of training. Another variable studied was length of experience. Correlation between the question answers and the variables was analysed using the chi-square test and the f test. The mean age of participants was 32.68 years, and their mean length of experience was 5.24 years. There were no statistical differences between the level of training and number of years of experience and the responses to 15 of the 18 questions on clinical situations. However, differences were found in responses to prophylactic extraction of asymptomatic third molars, use of non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) during the preoperative surgical period and the use of additional imaging to plan extractions. The group with shorter time of experience (3.8 ± 3.94 years) tended to recommend extractions of asymptomatic third molars more frequently compared with the more experienced surgeons (P = 0.041). More experienced surgeons used NSAIDs in the preoperative surgical period, whereas the majority of the youngest surgeons (4.1 ± 5.96 years of experience) did not (P = 0.0042). The certificated trained and in practice group tended to treat deep lower third molar impactions based on the findings of a panoramic radiograph, without obtaining additional imaging [cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)] before treatment (P = 0.0132). Decision making regarding third molar treatment differs according to the level of training and is influenced by the number of years of experience. Therefore, further continuous education programmes in this area are warranted to make recommendations regarding

  15. [Simplified topical anesthesia protocol for ambulatory cataract surgery: safety and patient and surgeon satisfaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batta, B; Fuchs-Buder, T; Tréchot, F; Angioi, K

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess safety and efficacy of cataract surgery (CS) under topical anesthesia alone, i.e. without pre-anesthetic evaluation and without direct presence of an anesthesiologist. To this end we assessed the incidence of patients' preoperative anxiety, perioperative adverse events and patients' and surgeons' satisfaction. Patients undergoing CS under topical anesthesia over a one-month period were included. An anesthesiologist and nurse anesthetist were present in the area and could intervene in case of an adverse event. Patients' anxiety was scored using the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety & Information Scale (APAIS), and their satisfaction with the Iowa Satisfaction with Anesthesia Scale (ISAS). Surgeons' satisfaction was scored with a VAS from 0 to 10 (0: surgery not possible & 10: excellent surgical conditions). One hundred and twenty-four consecutive patients were included; mean age was 71 (±9.4) years. Mean APAIS I was 6.4/20 (±3.7). Mean APAIS II was 3.1 (±1.8). Mean ISAS score was 5.5/6 (±0.6), indicating high patient satisfaction. Surgeon satisfaction score was 8.9/10 (±1.7). Twenty-three adverse events occurred of which 16 required interventions by the anaesthesiologist or surgeon: 5 supplemental local or regional anaesthesia, 6 iv-analgesia, 5 management of hypertension. These preliminary data suggest that a simplified topical anesthesia protocol for ambulatory CS appears to be feasible and safe, as long as an anesthesia team is present in the area to intervene if needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Learning styles of medical students, general surgery residents, and general surgeons: implications for surgical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Surgical education is evolving under the dual pressures of an enlarging body of knowledge required during residency and mounting work-hour restrictions. Changes in surgical residency training need to be based on available educational models and research to ensure successful training of surgeons. Experiential learning theory, developed by David Kolb, demonstrates the importance of individual learning styles in improving learning. This study helps elucidate the way in which medical students, surgical residents, and surgical faculty learn. Methods The Kolb Learning Style Inventory, which divides individual learning styles into Accommodating, Diverging, Converging, and Assimilating categories, was administered to the second year undergraduate medical students, general surgery resident body, and general surgery faculty at the University of Alberta. Results A total of 241 faculty, residents, and students were surveyed with an overall response rate of 73%. The predominant learning style of the medical students was assimilating and this was statistically significant (p < 0.03) from the converging learning style found in the residents and faculty. The predominant learning styles of the residents and faculty were convergent and accommodative, with no statistically significant differences between the residents and the faculty. Conclusions We conclude that medical students have a significantly different learning style from general surgical trainees and general surgeons. This has important implications in the education of general surgery residents. PMID:20591159

  17. Learning styles of medical students, general surgery residents, and general surgeons: implications for surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Paul T; de Gara, Chris

    2010-06-30

    Surgical education is evolving under the dual pressures of an enlarging body of knowledge required during residency and mounting work-hour restrictions. Changes in surgical residency training need to be based on available educational models and research to ensure successful training of surgeons. Experiential learning theory, developed by David Kolb, demonstrates the importance of individual learning styles in improving learning. This study helps elucidate the way in which medical students, surgical residents, and surgical faculty learn. The Kolb Learning Style Inventory, which divides individual learning styles into Accommodating, Diverging, Converging, and Assimilating categories, was administered to the second year undergraduate medical students, general surgery resident body, and general surgery faculty at the University of Alberta. A total of 241 faculty, residents, and students were surveyed with an overall response rate of 73%. The predominant learning style of the medical students was assimilating and this was statistically significant (p learning style found in the residents and faculty. The predominant learning styles of the residents and faculty were convergent and accommodative, with no statistically significant differences between the residents and the faculty. We conclude that medical students have a significantly different learning style from general surgical trainees and general surgeons. This has important implications in the education of general surgery residents.

  18. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena Felicia; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels

    2015-01-01

    of implementation of OPS in Denmark. METHODS: An electronic questionnaire was sent to breast and plastic surgeons performing breast cancer treatment. The questionnaire included demographics, education, experience with operative procedures and opinions on OPS. RESULTS: The questionnaire was sent to 50 breast...

  19. Comparison of surgical outcomes among infants in neonatal intensive care units treated by pediatric surgeons versus general surgeons: The need for pediatric surgery specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Yoon Jung; Lee, Eun Hee; Lee, Ji Sung

    2017-01-31

    This study compared the outcomes of infants who underwent surgery in neonatal intensive care units by pediatric surgeons and by general surgeons. This was a retrospective study of infants who underwent surgery in neonatal intensive care units between 2010 and 2014. A total of 227 patients were included. Of these patients, 116 were operated on by pediatric surgeons (PS) and 111 were operated on by general surgeons (GS). The outcome measures were the overall rate of operative complications, unplanned reoperation, mortality rate, length of stay, operative time, and number of total number of operative procedures. The overall operative complication rate was higher in the GS group compared with the PS group (18.7% vs. 7.0%, p=0.0091). The rate of unplanned reoperations was also higher in the GS group (10.8% vs. 3.5%, p=0.0331). The median operation time (90min vs. 75min, p=0.0474) and median length of stay (24days vs. 18days, p=0.0075) were significantly longer in the GS group. The adjusted odd ratios of postoperative complications for GS were 2.9 times higher than that of PS (OR 2.90, p=0.0352). The operative quality and patient outcomes of the PS group were superior to those of the GS group. III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Safe laparoscopic colorectal surgery performed by trainees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhoff, Peter Koch; Schultz, Martin; Harvald, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    for the technique to spread. We routinely plan all operations as laparoscopic procedures and most cases are done by supervised trainees. The present study therefore presents the results of operations performed by trainees compared with results obtained by experienced laparoscopic surgeons.......Laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer is safe, but there have been hesitations to implement the technique in all departments. One of the reasons for this may be suboptimal learning possibilities since supervised trainees have not been allowed to do the operations to an adequate extent...

  1. Timing of three-dimensional virtual treatment planning of orthognathic surgery: a prospective single-surgeon evaluation on 350 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swennen, Gwen R J

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the timing for three-dimensional (3D) virtual treatment planning of orthognathic surgery in the daily clinical routine. A total of 350 consecutive patients were included in this study. All patients were scanned following the standardized "Triple CBCT Scan Protocol" in centric relation. Integrated 3D virtual planning and actual surgery were performed by the same surgeon in all patients. Although clinically acceptable, still software improvements especially toward 3D virtual occlusal definition are mandatory to make 3D virtual planning of orthognathic surgery less time-consuming and more user-friendly to the clinician.

  2. Bariatric surgery and vitamin D: key messages for surgeons and clinicians before and after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Leigh A

    2016-10-01

    Obesity is the most widespread nutritional problem globally. Bariatric surgery is the preeminent long-term obesity treatment. Bariatric procedures manipulate the intestines to produces malabsorption and/or restrict the size of the stomach. The most enduring bariatric procedure is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, which utilizes both restriction (small stomach pouch) and malabsorption (duodenum bypass). The in-vogue procedure is the vertical sleeve gastrectomy - resection of the greater curvature of the stomach (predominantly restrictive). Malabsorptive procedures function by decreasing nutrient absorption, primarily fat and fat-soluble nutrients (vitamins A, D, E, and K). Most studies of vitamin D status in bariatric surgery candidates reported a prevalence of over 50% vitamin D deficiency (vitamin D deficiency is also associated with chronic inflammation, obese individuals with vitamin D deficiency have extraordinary risk of adverse surgical outcomes, particularly delayed wound healing and infection due to the role of vitamin D in re-epithelialization and innate immunity. When the risk of adverse surgical outcomes in obesity is combined with that of vitamin D deficiency, there is likely an additive or potentially a synergistic effect. Furthermore, deficiency in fat-soluble vitamins, such as vitamin D, is considered a metabolic complication of bariatric surgery. Thus, determining the vitamin D status of bariatric surgery candidates and amending it preoperatively may prove greatly beneficial acutely and lifelong.

  3. Cancer Surgery: Physically Removing Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in cancer diagnosis, staging, treatment and symptom relief. Robotic surgery. In robotic surgery, the surgeon sits away from the operating table ... to maneuver surgical tools to perform the operation. Robotic surgery helps the surgeon operate in hard-to-reach ...

  4. European Association of Endoscopic Surgeons (EAES) consensus statement on the use of robotics in general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szold, Amir; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Broeders, Ivo; Dankelman, Jenny; Forgione, Antonello; Langø, Thomas; Melzer, Andreas; Mintz, Yoav; Morales-Conde, Salvador; Rhodes, Michael; Satava, Richard; Tang, Chung-Ngai; Vilallonga, Ramon

    2015-02-01

    Following an extensive literature search and a consensus conference with subject matter experts the following conclusions can be drawn: 1. Robotic surgery is still at its infancy, and there is a great potential in sophisticated electromechanical systems to perform complex surgical tasks when these systems evolve. 2. To date, in the vast majority of clinical settings, there is little or no advantage in using robotic systems in general surgery in terms of clinical outcome. Dedicated parameters should be addressed, and high quality research should focus on quality of care instead of routine parameters, where a clear advantage is not to be expected. 3. Preliminary data demonstrates that robotic system have a clinical benefit in performing complex procedures in confined spaces, especially in those that are located in unfavorable anatomical locations. 4. There is a severe lack of high quality data on robotic surgery, and there is a great need for rigorously controlled, unbiased clinical trials. These trials should be urged to address the cost-effectiveness issues as well. 5. Specific areas of research should include complex hepatobiliary surgery, surgery for gastric and esophageal cancer, revisional surgery in bariatric and upper GI surgery, surgery for large adrenal masses, and rectal surgery. All these fields show some potential for a true benefit of using current robotic systems. 6. Robotic surgery requires a specific set of skills, and needs to be trained using a dedicated, structured training program that addresses the specific knowledge, safety issues and skills essential to perform this type of surgery safely and with good outcomes. It is the responsibility of the corresponding professional organizations, not the industry, to define the training and credentialing of robotic basic skills and specific procedures. 7. Due to the special economic environment in which robotic surgery is currently employed special care should be taken in the decision making process when

  5. Measuring surgeon performance of sentinel lymph node biopsy in breast cancer treatment by cumulative sum analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Lindsey; Donald, James C; Olivotto, Ivo A; Lesperance, Mary; van der Westhuizen, Nick; Rusnak, Conrad; Biberdorf, Darren; Ross, Alison; Hayashi, Allen

    2007-05-01

    This study was performed to determine if surgeons' performance of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) for breast cancer varied with time and to devise a method to continuously evaluate that performance. We retrospectively examined the SLNB experience of 13 community surgeons performing 765 SLNBs and 579 concomitant axillary dissections. False-negative rates (FNRs) were assessed for individuals and cohorts defined by caseload. Performance with time was assessed using cumulative sum (CUSUM) analysis. Overall, the SLN identification rate was 94.3%, and FNR was 5.3%. Each surgeon demonstrated variation in identification rate and/or FNR with time. CUSUM analysis provided an effective means to demonstrate when surgeon variation breached performance standards. Surgeon performance of SLNB varied with time, independent of case load. CUSUM may prove to be a useful statistical tool to evaluate performance before adopting stand-alone SLNB.

  6. Adherence to European Society for Cataract and Refractive Surgery recommendations among Italian cataract surgeons: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Andrea; Pertile, Grazia; Marchini, Giorgio; Scarpa, Giuseppe; Ceruti, Piero; Prigione, Guido; Romano, Mario R; Bert, Fabrizio; Gili, Renata; Panico, Claudio; Siliquini, Roberta; Engelbert, Michael

    2016-08-04

    To survey the surgical routines with regards to prophylactic strategies in a sample of Italian hospitals and compare these with European Society for Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ESCRS) guidelines. Six private and 18 public hospitals were included in this clinical-based retrospective study. The overall volume of cataract operations in the 24 centers in 2013 was 43,553. Main outcome measure was incidence of endophthalmitis per 1,000. An incidence of less than 0.13% was considered acceptable. Our study provides the first Italian data on the use of intracameral antibiotics in cataract surgery as recommended by the ESCRS. Thirteen centers (54%) used intracameral cefuroxime at the end of surgery. Of the 13 centers that used cefuroxime, 8 (62%) had an incidence of endophthalmitis less than 0.13%. Of the 7 (29%) centers that did not use intracameral cefuroxime, all had an endophthalmitis rate of greater than 0.13%. This difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). Among the 4 centers not included, 2 used vancomycin in the infusion bottle, 1 a fluoroquinolone, and the last a combination of antibiotics. The majority of surgeons (71%) used preoperative antibiotic eyedrops, but this measure was not shown to be significantly protective. Slightly more than half of the centers surveyed in this study adhered to the recommendations of the ESCRS and routinely employed prophylactic intracameral cefuroxime. An incidence of endophthalmitis greater than 0.13% was encountered significantly more frequently among centers that did not employ intracameral cefuroxime.

  7. DoSurgeons Have More Difficulties in the Hospital Care of Non-surgery Patients Than With Surgery Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero Ruiz, Eduardo; Barbero Allende, José María; Melgar Molero, Virginia; Rebollar Merino, Ángela; García Sánchez, Marta; López Álvarez, Joaquín

    2015-05-01

    A variable percentage of patients admitted to surgical departments are not operated on for several reasons. Our goal is to check if surgeons have more problems in caring for non-operated hospitalized patients than operated ones. We included all patients aged ≥ 14 years discharged in 2010 from General Surgery, Gynaecology, Urology, and Otolaryngology. The main variables were the length of stay, mortality, readmissions, and number of consultations/referrals requested to medical services. Secondary variables were age, sex, number of emergency admissions, total number of diagnoses, and the Charlson comorbidity index (ICh). Between 8.7% and 22.8% of patients admitted to these surgical departments are not operated on. The non-operated patients had a significantly higher stay, mortality, readmissions and consultations/referrals requests than operated ones, with significantly higher age (except Urology), number of diagnoses, emergency admissions and ICh (except Urology). Patients admitted to surgical departments and are not operated on have higher mortality, readmissions and consultation/referrals requests than those operated on, which may be due to their greater medical complexity and urgency of admission. This suggests a greater difficulty in their care by surgeons. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Accuracy of Surgeon's Estimation of Sella Margins during Endoscopic Surgery for Pituitary Adenomas: Verification Using Neuronavigation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Yi; Thiryayi, Wasiq; Ramaswamy, Ragu; Gnanalingham, Kanna

    2011-01-01

    ... types of pathology in which neuronavigation is of most benefit. We performed a prospective cohort study of 32 consecutive patients undergoing image-guided endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas...

  9. Ultrasound of the acute abdomen performed by surgeons in training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J.P.; Grantcharov, T.P.; Eriksen, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Ultrasound has a well-established role in the diagnostic assessment of acute abdominal pain where some ultrasonically easily-accessible organs account for several diagnostic possibilities. The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether surgeons without ultrasound experience could...

  10. American Society of Plastic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know the risks and trust a board-certified plastic surgeon to perform your cosmetic or reconstructive surgery. ASPS member surgeons have the training and experience that ... 1300 Chain Bridge Road McLean, VA 22101 (703) 790-5454 Timothy Germain ...

  11. A Band of Surgeons, a Long Healing Line: Development of Craniofacial Surgery in Response to Armed Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    function, its leaders must strive for success in all aspects (con genital, trauma, microsurgery, regenerative medicine, etc.), not just cosmetic surgery ...A Band of Surgeons, a Long Healing Line: Development of Craniofacial Surgery in Response to Armed Conflict James Alan Chambers, USAF, MC, MD, MPH...Michael R. Davis, USAF, MC, MD,Þ and Todd E. Rasmussen, USAF, MC, MDþ Abstract: Far removed from modern perceptions of cosmetic sur gery, plastic and

  12. Effects of Camera Arrangement on Perceptual-Motor Performance in Minimally Invasive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delucia, Patricia R.; Griswold, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is performed for a growing number of treatments. Whereas open surgery requires large incisions, MIS relies on small incisions through which instruments are inserted and tissues are visualized with a camera. MIS results in benefits for patients compared with open surgery, but degrades the surgeon's perceptual-motor…

  13. Effects of Camera Arrangement on Perceptual-Motor Performance in Minimally Invasive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delucia, Patricia R.; Griswold, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is performed for a growing number of treatments. Whereas open surgery requires large incisions, MIS relies on small incisions through which instruments are inserted and tissues are visualized with a camera. MIS results in benefits for patients compared with open surgery, but degrades the surgeon's perceptual-motor…

  14. Acellular Dermal Matrix in Reconstructive Breast Surgery: Survey of Current Practice among Plastic Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. S. Ibrahim, MD

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Plastic surgeons currently use ADM in breast reconstruction for both immediate and staged procedures. Of those responding, a majority of plastic surgeons will incorporate drains and use postoperative antibiotics for more than 48 hours.

  15. Aortic root and proximal aortic arch replacement (performed by a left-handed surgeon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    We present our standard technique of composite graft replacement performed by a left-handed surgeon. This procedure is performed with a 30-day mortality comparable to that of elective isolated aortic valve replacement.

  16. Practice patterns of cataract surgeons at academic medical centers for the management of inadequate capsule support for intracapsular or sulcus intraocular lens placement during cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Rebecca; Scott, Ingrid U; Tucker, Steven H; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Papachristou, George C

    2016-02-01

    To determine practice patterns with regard to intraocular lens (IOL) placement during cataract surgery when there is inadequate capsule support for intracapsular or sulcus IOL placement. Pennsylvania State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA. Cross-sectional study of anonymous survey results. An online survey was e-mailed to the coordinators of all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited ophthalmology residency programs with a request to forward to all faculty who perform cataract surgery. Sixty-seven (57.2%) of 117 confirmed survey recipients participated. Thirty-six (62.1%) said they felt comfortable placing scleral-fixated posterior chamber IOLs (PC IOLs) independently. Faced with inadequate capsule support, 58.6% would place a primary anterior chamber IOL (AC IOL), 29.3% would place a primary scleral-fixated PC IOL, and 5.3% would leave the patient aphakic for secondary scleral-fixated PC IOL placement. Surgeons not comfortable placing scleral-fixated PC IOLs were most likely to choose primary AC IOLs (77.3%). Surgeons comfortable placing scleral-fixated PC IOLs were more evenly divided between primary AC IOLs (47.2%) and scleral-fixated PC IOLs (41.7%). Among surgeons who favored primary scleral-fixated PC IOLs, 63.7% cited a decreased risk for long-term complications as their reason for IOL choice; 50.0% of surgeons who favored primary AC IOLs cited avoidance of a second surgery. In general, primary AC IOL placement was preferred in the setting of inadequate capsule support, although less so among surgeons who were comfortable placing scleral-fixated PC IOLs. Lack of comfort with scleral-fixated PC IOL placement suggests a potential unmet training need in residency and fellowship programs. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2016 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Adverse cardiac events in children with Williams syndrome undergoing cardiovascular surgery: An analysis of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornik, Christoph P; Collins, Ronnie Thomas; Jaquiss, Robert D B; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Jacobs, Marshall L; Pasquali, Sara K; Wallace, Amelia S; Hill, Kevin D

    2015-06-01

    Patients with Williams syndrome (WS) undergoing cardiac surgery are at risk for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Prevalence and risk factors for such events have not been well described. We sought to define frequency and risk of MACE in patients with WS using a multicenter clinical registry. We identified cardiac operations performed in patients with WS using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (2000-2012). Operations were divided into 4 groups: isolated supravalvular aortic stenosis, complex left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT), isolated right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT), and combined LVOT/RVOT procedures. The proportion of patients with MACE (in-hospital mortality, cardiac arrest, or postoperative mechanical circulatory support) was described and the association with preoperative factors was examined. Of 447 index operations (87 centers), median (interquartile range) age and weight at surgery were 2.4 years (0.6-7.4 years) and 10.6 kg (6.5-21.5 kg), respectively. Mortality occurred in 20 patients (5%). MACE occurred in 41 patients (9%), most commonly after combined LVOT/RVOT (18 out of 87; 21%) and complex LVOT (12 out of 131; 9%) procedures, but not after isolated RVOT procedures. Odds of MACE decreased with age (odds ratio [OR], 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98-0.99), weight (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.93-0.99), but increased in the presence of any preoperative risk factor (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.06-4.00), and in procedures involving coronary artery repair (OR, 5.37; 95% CI, 2.05-14.06). In this multicenter analysis, MACE occurred in 9% of patients with WS undergoing cardiac surgery. Demographic and operative characteristics were associated with risk. Further study is needed to elucidate mechanisms of MACE in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Compliance of ENT emergency surgery with the Royal College of Surgeons standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S; Yao, A; Mahalingam, S; Persaud, R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In 2011 The Royal College of Surgeons of England (RCS) set out best practice standards for emergency surgery. This national pilot audit aimed to determine the compliance of otolaryngology departments in England with these published guidelines. Methods A 26-item online questionnaire was devised that encompassed all the 36 best practices as set out by the RCS for ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgery. This was sent to ENT trainees and consultants based at units in England providing emergency ENT services. Results Data were obtained from 55 of the 102 units (response rate: 54%). A mean compliance of 71% was achieved (range: 25-94%). No units achieved all of the best practices. The standards with the highest compliance included 24-hour availability of blood transfusion and haematology opinion for patients with epistaxis, availability of a consultant or ST3/equivalent for immediate discussion of severe post-tonsillectomy bleeding, 24-hour access to blood transfusion for arrest of haemorrhage and immediate theatre access for arrest of haemorrhage. The areas with the lowest compliance were provision of a pathway for angiography/embolisation for epistaxis and provision of an equipped ENT room on a paediatric ward. Conclusions This audit has highlighted that the majority of departments in England are providing a good standard of ENT emergency care. There is room for improvement in certain areas, such as the provision of an embolisation pathway in the context of refractory epistaxis. We hope that this audit will encourage ENT departments to evaluate their current provision of emergency care and institute changes (where necessary) to maintain and improve their practices.

  19. The impact of positive and negative intraoperative surgeons' leadership behaviors on surgical team performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barling, Julian; Akers, Amy; Beiko, Darren

    2017-07-18

    The effects of surgeons' leadership on team performance are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the simultaneous effects of transformational, passive, abusive supervision and over-controlling leadership behaviors by surgeons on surgical team performance. Trained observers attended 150 randomly selected operations at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Observers recorded instances of the four leadership behaviors enacted by the surgeon. Postoperatively, team members completed validated questionnaires rating team cohesion and collective efficacy. Multiple regression analyses were computed. Data were analyzed using the complex modeling function in MPlus. Surgeons' abusive supervision was negatively associated with psychological safety (unstandardized B = -0.352, p team performance. Significant effects only surfaced for negative leadership behaviors; transformational leadership did not positively influence team performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of surgeon experience, hospital volume, and specialty designation on outcomes in pediatric surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAteer, Jarod P; LaRiviere, Cabrini A; Drugas, George T; Abdullah, Fizan; Oldham, Keith T; Goldin, Adam B

    2013-05-01

    Analyses of volume-outcome relationships in adult surgery have found that hospital and physician characteristics affect patient outcomes, such as length of stay, hospital charges, complications, and mortality. Similar investigations in children's surgical specialties are fewer in number, and their conclusions are less clear. To review the evidence regarding surgeon or hospital experience and their influence on outcomes in children's surgery. A MEDLINE and EMBASE search was conducted for English-language studies published from January 1, 1980, through April 13, 2012. Titles and abstracts were screened in a standardized manner by 2 reviewers. Studies selected for inclusion had to use a measure of hospital or surgeon experience as a predictor variable and had to report postoperative outcomes as dependent response variables. Included studies were reviewed with regard to methodologic quality, and study results were extracted. Sixty-three studies were reviewed. Significant heterogeneity was detected in exposure definitions, outcome measures, and risk adjustment, with the greatest heterogeneity seen in appendectomy studies. Various exposure levels were examined: hospital level in 48 (68%) studies, surgeon level in 11 (17%), and both in 9 (14%). Nineteen percent of studies did not adjust for confounding, and 57% did not adjust for sample clustering. The most consistent methods and reproducible results were seen in the pediatric cardiac surgical literature. Forty-nine studies (78%) showed positive correlation between experience and most primary outcomes, but differences in outcomes and exposure definitions made comparisons between studies difficult. In general, hospital-level factors tended to correlate with outcomes for high-complexity procedures, whereas surgeon-level factors tended to correlate with outcomes for more common procedures. Data on experience-related outcomes in children's surgery are limited in number and vary widely in methodologic quality. Future studies

  1. Surgeon compensation and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, K K; Walker, P M

    2000-06-01

    Financial incentives are the only form of compensation that will motivate surgeons at an academic health sciences center to perform the tasks outlined in the hospital's mission statement. A questionnaire divided into 5 sections: demographics, compensation, time allocation, benefits and incentives, and motivational factors. The Department of Surgery, The Toronto Hospital, Toronto, Ontario. All academic surgeons (N=64) practicing at The Toronto Hospital in July 1997. Of the 64 eligible mailed surveys, there were responses for 59. Of these 59 surgeons, 48 (81%) receive compensation through a fee-for-service method. However, only 32 (54%) of the surgeons prefer the fee-for-service method, while 18 (31%) prefer salary and 9 (15%) prefer an alternative system. On average, these academic surgeons spend 44% of their time teaching or performing research, for which they receive 14% of their total income. Of the motivational factors assessed, financial bonuses are a positive motivational factor for all "surgeon tasks." In addition, task-specific motivational factors were established for research, teaching, and operating, including research facilities, mentorship and prestige, and interesting case types, respectively. Surgeons are not appropriately renumerated for time spent on academic activities, and many would prefer an alternative form of compensation to the fee-for-service method. Knowledge that surgeons are receptive to tasks supporting the hospital's mission statement leads us to conclude that appropriate motivation can shape the activity of academic surgeons. Financial rewards ranked the highest as a motivational factor for all surgeon tasks; however, task-specific motivational factors were identified. Overall, multiple factors, specifically targeted to the individual, will serve to motivate. Thus, compensation packages based on individual preferences and personal motivational factors will be the most successful.

  2. Factors which influence the cardiac surgeon's decision not to operate on patients referred for consideration of surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaprakasam Rajesh

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to document what proportion of patients referred for consideration of cardiac surgery are turned down, the reasons given for not operating and also to evaluate what happens to those patients who do not undergo surgery. Methods 382 elective patients referred for consideration of cardiac surgery to one of six consultant cardiac surgeons at Wythenshawe Hospital during a one year period from were included in the study. Data for those patients who underwent an operation were collected prospectively in a cardiac surgery database. The case notes of those patients who did not undergo an operation were reviewed to establish reasons given by surgeons for not operating. Patients were followed up to determine vital status at the end of the study period. Results 333 (87.2% patients underwent an operation and 49 (12.8% did not. 68% of patients turned down were thought to be too high-risk. 14% of patients did not fulfill symptomatic or prognostic criteria for surgery and in 8% of patients coronary artery surgery was thought ineffective due to poor distal vessels. 6% of patients declined an operation and 4% were thought to be more suitable for coronary angioplasty. Patients turned down for surgery had more renal dysfunction (p = 0.017, respiratory disease (p Conclusion 12.8% of patients referred for consideration of cardiac surgery did not undergo an operation. Two thirds of patients not accepted for surgery were thought too high risk. Those patients who did not undergo an operation had a significantly worse mortality.

  3. Surgeon Training in Telerobotic Surgery via a Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a software and hardware framework for a telerobotic surgery safety and motor skill training simulator. The aims are at providing trainees a comprehensive simulator for acquiring essential skills to perform telerobotic surgery. Existing commercial robotic surgery simulators lack features for safety training and optimal motion planning, which are critical factors in ensuring patient safety and efficiency in operation. In this work, we propose a hardware-in-the-loop simulator directly introducing these two features. The proposed simulator is built upon the Raven-II™ open source surgical robot, integrated with a physics engine and a safety hazard injection engine. Also, a Fast Marching Tree-based motion planning algorithm is used to help trainee learn the optimal instrument motion patterns. The main contributions of this work are (1 reproducing safety hazards events, related to da Vinci™ system, reported to the FDA MAUDE database, with a novel haptic feedback strategy to provide feedback to the operator when the underlying dynamics differ from the real robot’s states so that the operator will be aware and can mitigate the negative impact of the safety-critical events, and (2 using motion planner to generate semioptimal path in an interactive robotic surgery training environment.

  4. The impact of sleep deprivation on surgeons' performance during night shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirian, Ilda

    2014-09-01

    The median incidence of adverse events that may result in patient injury is a total of 9% of all in-hospital admissions. In order to reduce this high incidence initiatives are continuously worked on that can reduce the risk of patient harm during admission by strengthening hospital systems. However, the influence of physicians' shift work on the risk on adverse events in patients remains controversial. In the studies included in this PhD thesis we wished to examine the impact of sleep deprivation and circadian rhythm disturbances on surgeons' during night shifts. Further we wished to examine the impact sleep deprivation had on surgeons' performance as a measure of how patient safety would be affected. We found that sleep deprivation subjectively had an impact on the surgeons and that they were aware of the effect fatigue had on their work performance. As a result they applied different mechanisms to cope with fatigue. Attending surgeons felt that they had a better overview now, due to more experience and better skills, than when they were residents, despite the fatigue on night shifts. We monitored surgeons' performance during night shifts by laparoscopic simulation and cognitive tests in order to assess their performance; no deterioration was found when pre call values were compared to on call values. The surgeons were monitored prospectively for 4 days across a night shift in order to assess the circadian rhythm and sleep. We found that surgeons' circadian rhythm was affected by working night shifts and their sleep pattern altered, resembling that of shift workers on the post call day. We assessed the quality of admission in medical records as a measure of surgeons' performance, during day, evening and night hours and found no deterioration in the quality of night time medical records. However, consistent high errors were found in several categories. These findings should be followed up in the future with respect of clarifying mechanism and consequences for

  5. Surgeons often underestimate the amount of blood loss in replacement surgeries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ganesan Ganesan Ram; Perumal Suresh; Phagal Varthi Vijayaraghavan

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To assess the accuracy of the clinically estimated blood loss (EBL) when compared with the actual blood loss (ABL) in replacement surgeries.Methods:This prospective study was done in Sri Ramachandra Medical Centre from April 2011 to April 2013.Altogether 140 patients undergoing total hip replacement or total knee replacement were included with the inclusion criteria being patients with haemoglobin higher than 100 g/ml and coagulation profile within normal limits.Exclusion criteria were intake of antiplatelet drug or anti-coagulant,bleeding disorders,thrombotic episode,and haematological disorders.There were 65 men and 75 women.In this study,the consultants were free to use any clinical method to estimate the blood loss,including counting the blood-soaked mops and gauze pieces (estimating the volume of blood carded in all the mops and gauzes),measuring blood lost to suction bottles and blood in and around the operative field.The ABL was calculated based on a modification of the Gross's formula using haematocrit values.Results:In 42 of the 140 cases,the EBL exceeded the ABL.These cases had a negative difference in blood loss (or DIFF-BL<0) and were included in the overestimation group,which accounted for 30% of the study population.Of the remaining 98 cases (70%),the ABL exceeded the EBL.Therefore they were put into the underestimation group who had a positive difference in blood loss (DIFF-BL>0).We found that when the average blood loss was small,the accuracy of estimation was high.But when the average blood loss exceeded 500 ml,the accuracy rate decreased significantly.This suggested that clinical estimation is inaccurate with the increase of blood loss.Conclusion:This study has shown that using clinical estimation alone to guide blood transfusion is inadequate.In this study,70% of patients had their blood loss underestimated,proving that surgeons often underestimate blood loss in replacement surgeries.

  6. Surgeons often underestimate the amount of blood loss in replacement surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Ganesan Ganesan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective:To assess the accuracy of the clinically estimated blood loss (EBL when compared with the actual blood loss (ABL in replacement surgeries. Methods: This prospective study was done in Sri Ramachandra Medical Centre from April 2011 to April 2013. Altogether 140 patients undergoing total hip replacement or total knee replacement were included with the inclusion criteria being patients with haemoglobin higher than 100 g/ml and coagulation profile within normal limits. Exclusion criteria were intake of antiplatelet drug or anti-coagulant, bleeding disorders, thrombotic episode, and haematological disorders. There were 65 men and 75 women. In this study, the consultants were free to use any clinical method to estimate the blood loss, including counting the blood-soaked mops and gauze pieces (estimating the volume of blood carried in all the mops and gauzes, measuring blood lost to suction bottles and blood in and around the operative field. The ABL was calculated based on a modification of the Gross’s formula using haematocrit values. Results: In 42 of the 140 cases, the EBL exceeded the ABL. These cases had a negative difference in blood loss (or DIFF-BL<0 and were included in the overestimation group, which accounted for 30% of the study population. Of the remaining 98 cases (70%, the ABL exceeded the EBL. Therefore they were put into the underestimation group who had a positive difference in blood loss (DIFF-BL>0. We found that when the average blood loss was small, the accuracy of estimation was high. But when the average blood loss exceeded 500 ml, the accuracy rate decreased significantly. This suggested that clinical estimation is inaccurate with the increase of blood loss. Conclusion:This study has shown that using clinical estimation alone to guide blood transfusion is inadequate. In this study, 70% of patients had their blood loss underestimated, proving that surgeons often underestimate blood loss in replacement

  7. Operating Room Performance Improves after Proficiency-Based Virtual Reality Cataract Surgery Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Bach-Holm, Daniella; Kjærbo, Hadi; Højgaard-Olsen, Klavs; Subhi, Yousif; Saleh, George M; Park, Yoon Soo; la Cour, Morten; Konge, Lars

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effect of virtual reality proficiency-based training on actual cataract surgery performance. The secondary purpose of the study was to define which surgeons benefit from virtual reality training. Multicenter masked clinical trial. Eighteen cataract surgeons with different levels of experience. Cataract surgical training on a virtual reality simulator (EyeSi) until a proficiency-based test was passed. Technical performance in the operating room (OR) assessed by 3 independent, masked raters using a previously validated task-specific assessment tool for cataract surgery (Objective Structured Assessment of Cataract Surgical Skill). Three surgeries before and 3 surgeries after the virtual reality training were video-recorded, anonymized, and presented to the raters in random order. Novices (non-independently operating surgeons) and surgeons having performed fewer than 75 independent cataract surgeries showed significant improvements in the OR-32% and 38%, respectively-after virtual reality training (P = 0.008 and P = 0.018). More experienced cataract surgeons did not benefit from simulator training. The reliability of the assessments was high with a generalizability coefficient of 0.92 and 0.86 before and after the virtual reality training, respectively. Clinically relevant cataract surgical skills can be improved by proficiency-based training on a virtual reality simulator. Novices as well as surgeons with an intermediate level of experience showed improvement in OR performance score. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quality criteria in bariatric surgery: Consensus review and recommendations of the Spanish Association of Surgeons and the Spanish Society of Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabench Pereferrer, Fátima; Domínguez-Adame Lanuza, Eduardo; Ibarzabal, Ainitze; Socas Macias, María; Valentí Azcárate, Víctor; García Ruiz de Gordejuela, Amador; García-Moreno Nisa, Francisca; González Fernández, Jesús; Vilallonga Puy, Ramón; Vilarrasa García, Nuria; Sánchez Santos, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has proven to be highly effective in controlling obesity and metabolic syndrome; the results of this surgery are not only expressed in terms of weight loss, but also in terms of resolution of comorbidities, improved quality of life and complications. The different parameters used to measure these outcomes require uniformity and reference patterns. Therefore, it is essential to identify those indicators and quality criteria that are helpful in defining the «best practice» principles in bariatric surgery. In this regard, the Section of Obesity of the Spanish Association of Surgeons, in collaboration with the Spanish Society for Bariatric Surgery (SECO), present as an objective to identify the key points that define «quality» in this type of surgery. We describe the main indicators based on the published literature as well as the criteria for referral of the main comorbidities according to the evidence found and grades of recommendation.

  9. Action ethical dilemmas in surgery: an interview study of practicing surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordam Ann

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to describe the kinds of ethical dilemmas surgeons face during practice. Methods Five male and five female surgeons at a University hospital in Norway were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation into the narratives of physicians and nurses about ethically difficult situations in surgical units. The transcribed interview texts were subjected to a phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation. Results No gender differences were found in the kinds of ethical dilemmas identified among male and female surgeons. The main finding was that surgeons experienced ethical dilemmas in deciding the right treatment in different situations. The dilemmas included starting or withholding treatment, continuing or withdrawing treatment, overtreatment, respecting the patients and meeting patients' expectations. The main focus in the narratives was on ethical dilemmas concerning the patients' well-being, treatment and care. The surgeons narrated about whether they should act according to their own convictions or according to the opinions of principal colleagues or colleagues from other departments. Handling incompetent colleagues was also seen as an ethical dilemma. Prioritization of limited resources and following social laws and regulations represented ethical dilemmas when they contradicted what the surgeons considered was in the patients' best interests. Conclusion The surgeons seemed confident in their professional role although the many ethical dilemmas they experienced in trying to meet the expectations of patients, colleagues and society also made them professionally and personally vulnerable.

  10. Live surgery and teleconferencing at the 19th World Congress of the International Association of Surgeons, Gastroenterologists and Oncologists (IASGO) in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Shuji; Han, Ho-Seong; Okamura, Koji; Bao, Congxiao; Kitamura, Yasuichi; Nakashima, Naoki; Tanaka, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Advanced technologies were introduced for the first time at the 19th World Congress of the Inter-national Association of Surgeons, Gastroenterologists and-Oncologists (IASGO) in Beijing, China. Live surgery and multi-station teleconferencing were performed using the super high-speed inter-net to transmit and preserve the high quality life- like images of surgical operations. This is the first time in the history of IASGO that use has been made of this worldwide academic network and user friendly digital video transport system, which has many advantages over traditional telemedicine systems. Here we briefly report these epoch-making sessions and their future expectations

  11. 3D straight-stick laparoscopy versus 3D robotics for task performance in novice surgeons: a randomised crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Fevzi; Jan, Haider; Kent, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    The advent of three-dimensional passive stereoscopic imaging has led to the development of 3D laparoscopy. In simulation tasks, a reduction in error rate and performance time is seen with 3D compared to two-dimensional (2D) laparoscopy with both novice and expert surgeons. Robotics utilises 3D and instrument articulation through a console interface. Robotic trials have demonstrated that tasks performed in 3D produced fewer errors and quicker performance times compared with those in 2D. It was therefore perceived that the main advantage of robotic surgery was in fact 3D. Our aim was to compare 3D straight-stick laparoscopic task performance (3D) with robotic 3D (Robot), to determine whether robotic surgery confers additional benefit over and above 3D visualisation. We randomised 20 novice surgeons to perform four validated surgical tasks, either with straight-stick 3D laparoscopy followed by 3D robotic surgery or in the reverse order. The trial was conducted in two fully functional operating theatres. The primary outcome of the study was the error rate as defined for each task, and the secondary outcome was the time taken to complete each task. The participants were asked to perform the tasks as quickly and as accurately as possible. Data were analysed using SPSS version 21. The median error rate for completion of all four tasks with the robot was 2.75 and 5.25 for 3D with a P value robot was 157.1 and 342.5 s for 3D with a P value robotic systems over 3D straight-stick laparoscopy, in terms of reduced error rate and quicker task performance time.

  12. The Benefit of the Smartphone in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: Smartphone Use Among Maxillofacial Surgery Trainees and iPhone Apps for the Maxillofacial Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Elinor; Payne, Karl Frederick Braekkan; Ahmed, Nabeela; Goodson, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    The use of smartphones has soared among healthcare professionals in recent years, with estimated figures reporting that the majority of clinicians own and use smartphones in the workplace. Smartphones allow the clinician to carry textbooks in their pocket, write documents on the move and use email and internet to enhance productivity and clinical decision making. These advances in smartphone technology have enabled access to healthcare information for the clinician and transfer of data between team members, giving rise to the phenomenon of telemedicine. With the ability to instantly transfer clinical data to the off-site surgeon, combined with purpose-built medical apps, the smartphone is rapidly becoming an invaluable tool for the modern surgeon. Many studies have linked the benefits of smartphones and apps in other surgical specialities, but no article to date has highlighted the merits and full scope of this technology to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. We report that 94 % of British maxillofacial surgery trainees own a smartphone, with 61 % owning an iPhone. 89 % of trainees questioned had downloaded medical apps and used them regularly during clinical activities. We discuss the clinical application of the smartphone in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery and review a list of useful and relevant apps for the modern maxillofacial surgeon using the iPhone as an example platform.

  13. Ergonomics, user comfort, and performance in standard and robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, R. H. van der Schatte; van't Hullenaar, C. D. P.; Ruurda, J. P.; Broeders, I. A. M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Robot-assisted surgical systems have been introduced to improve the outcome of minimally invasive surgery. These systems also have the potential to improve ergonomics for the surgeon during endoscopic surgery. This study aimed to compare the user's mental and physical comfort in performing standard

  14. Evaluation of Effective Factors on the Clinical Performance of General Surgeons in Tehran University of Medical Science, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzianpour, Fereshteh; Mohamadi, Efat; najafpour, Zhila; Yousefinezhadi, Taraneh; Forootan, Sara; Foroushani, Abbas Rahimi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Existence of doctors with high performance is one of the necessary conditions to provide high quality services. There are different motivations, which could affect their performance. Recognizing Factors which effect the performance of doctors as an effective force in health care centers is necessary. The aim of this article was evaluate the effective factors which influence on clinical performance of general surgery of Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Methods: This is a cross-sectional qualitative-quantitative study. This research conducted in 3 phases-phases I: (use of library studies and databases to collect data), phase II: localization of detected factors in first phase by using the Delphi technique and phase III: prioritizing the affecting factors on performance of doctors by using qualitative interviews. Results: 12 articles were analyzed from 300 abstracts during the evaluation process. The output of assessment identified 23 factors was sent to surgeons and their assistants for obtaining their opinions. Quantitative analysis of the findings showed that “work qualification” (86.1%) and “managers and supervisors style” (50%) have respectively the most and the least impact on the performance of doctors. Finally 18 effective factors were identified and prioritized in the performance of general surgeons. Conclusion: The results showed that motivation and performance is not a single operating parameter and it depends on several factors according to cultural background. Therefore it is necessary to design, implementation and monitoring based on key determinants of effective interventions due to cultural background. PMID:27157161

  15. Career and Professional Satisfaction of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residents, Academic Surgeons, and Private Practitioners: Does Gender Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Kyriaki C; Lanzon, Jesse; Edwards, Sean P; Inglehart, Marita R

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether male vs. female oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) residents, academic surgeons (i.e., faculty members), and private practitioners in the U.S. differed in their general career satisfaction and job/professional satisfaction. Survey data were collected in 2011-12 from 267 OMS residents (response rate 55%), 271 OMS academic surgeons (response rate 31%), and 417 OMS private practitioners (response rates 13% web-based survey and 29% postal mail survey). The results showed that while the male vs. female OMS private practitioners and academic surgeons did not differ in their career satisfaction, the female residents had a lower career satisfaction than the male residents (on four-point scale with 4=most satisfied: 3.03 vs. 3.65; pcareer, and were more likely to consider a career change in the next five years than the male residents. While these male and female oral and maxillofacial surgeons in private practice and academia did not differ in their career and job satisfaction, the male and female residents differed significantly, with female residents reporting a significantly poorer career and job satisfaction than male residents. Future research needs to explore ways to improve career and professional satisfaction of female OMS residents.

  16. Functional outcomes of cleft lip surgery. Part I: Study design and surgeon ratings of lip disability and need for lip revision

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trotman, Carroll-Ann; Phillips, Ceib; Essick, Greg K; Faraway, Julian J; Barlow, Steven M; Losken, H Wolfgang; van Aalst, John; Rogers, Lyna

    2007-01-01

    .... In this article, the design of the clinical trial is described and results of a study on subjective evaluations of facial form by surgeons for or against the need for lip revision surgery are presented...

  17. Final visual outcome following re exploration of cataracts performed by trainee surgeons in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehul A Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the outcome of secondary intraocular lens implantation, compare final visual outcome between different categories of surgeon, and evaluate care provided by teaching hospitals to patients with capsular complications. Materials and Methods: Setting: Teaching hospital. Design: Retrospective study. Subjects were recruited by examination of electronic medical records. All patients operated for corrective surgery following capsular complications during cataract surgery were included. All patient medical records were reviewed, and data were collected for 359 eyes. Main outcome measures: Visual acuity and major complications. All collected data were entered into Microsoft Excel and analyzed by SPSS 17 software using cross tabulation and Chi-squared tests. Results: Surgical intervention made a significant difference to the final visual outcome (P < 0.001. The category of the trainee had a significant effect on the final visual outcome (P = 0.021. Conclusion: Capsular complications during cataract surgery should be surgically treated to improve outcome.

  18. Evaluation of equivalent and effective dose by KAP for patient and orthopedic surgeon in vertebral compression fracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Felipe A.; Galeano, Diego C.; Santos, William S.; Silva, Ademir X.; Souza, Susana O.; Carvalho Júnior, Albérico B.

    2017-03-01

    Clinical scenarios were virtually modeled to estimate both the equivalent and effective doses normalized by KAP (Kerma Area Product) to vertebra compression fracture surgery in patient and surgeon. This surgery is known as kyphoplasty and involves the use of X-ray equipment, the C-arm, which provides real-time images to assist the surgeon in conducting instruments inserted into the patient and in the delivery of surgical cement into the fractured vertebra. The radiation transport code used was MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) and a pair of UFHADM (University of Florida Hybrid ADult Male) virtual phantoms. The developed scenarios allowed us to calculate a set of equivalent dose (HT) and effective dose (E) for patients and surgeons. In additional, the same scenario was calculated KAP in the tube output and was used for calculating conversion coefficients (E/KAP and HT/KAP). From the knowledge of the experimental values of KAP and the results presented in this study, it is possible to estimate absolute values of effective doses for different exposure conditions. In this work, we developed scenarios with and without the surgical table with the purpose of comparison with the existing data in the literature. The absence of the bed in the scenario promoted a percentage absolute difference of 56% in the patient effective doses in relation to scenarios calculated with a bed. Regarding the surgeon, the use of the personal protective equipment (PPE) reduces between 75% and 79% the effective dose and the use of the under table shield (UTS) reduces the effective dose of between 3% and 7%. All these variations emphasize the importance of the elaboration of virtual scenarios that approach the actual clinical conditions generating E/KAP and HT/KAP closer to the actual values.

  19. Certificate-of-Need regulation in outpatient surgery and specialty care: implications for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacella, Salvatore J; Comstock, Matthew; Kuzon, William M

    2005-09-15

    For plastic surgeons, independent development of outpatient surgical centers and specialty facilities is becoming increasingly common. These facilities serve as important avenues not only for increasing access and efficiency but in maintaining a sustainable, competitive specialty advantage. Certificate of Need regulation represents a major hurdle to plastic surgeons who attempt to create autonomy in this fashion. At the state level, Certificate of Need programs were initially established in an effort to reduce health care costs by preventing unnecessary capital outlays for facility expansion (i.e., managing supply of health care resources) in addition to assisting with patient safety and access to care. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Certificate of Need regulations on health care costs, patient safety, and access to care and to discuss specific implications of these regulations for plastic surgeons. Within Certificate of Need states, these regulations have done little, if anything, to control health care costs or affect patient safety. Presently, Certificate of Need effects coupled with recent provisions in the Medicare Modernization Act banning development of specialty hospitals may restrict patient access to ambulatory surgical and specialty care. For the plastic surgeon, these effects not only act as an economic barrier to entry but can threaten the efficiencies gained from providing surgical care in an ambulatory setting. An appreciation of these effects is critical to maintaining specialty autonomy and access to fiscal policy.

  20. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    specialty. CONCLUSION: OPS has become integrated in all breast centres, but has not yet been fully implemented. For optimal results in all patients, this study underlines the importance of the inclusion of a dedicated plastic surgeon within the multidisciplinary team for optimal initial evaluation of all...

  1. Clinical Experience amongst Surgeons in the Asymptomatic Carotid Surgery Trial-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibers, Anne; de Waard, Djurre; Bulbulia, Richard; de Borst, Gert Jan; Halliday, Alison

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hospital volume may influence the outcomes of carotid revascularization, but in trials the effect of the clinical experience of individual surgeons on procedural outcome is less certain. We assessed perioperative event rates amongst centers with different trial entry volumes and also t

  2. Application of ergonomic guidelines during minimally invasive surgery: a questionnaire survey of 284 surgeons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wauben, L.; Van Veelen, M.; Gossot, D.; Goossens, R.

    2006-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to obtain an answer for the question: Are ergonomic guidelines applied in the operating room and what are the consequences? Methods: A total of 1,292 questionnaires were sent by email or handed out to surgeons and residents. The subjects worked mainly in Europe, performi

  3. Practice patterns and perceptions of margin status for breast conserving surgery for breast carcinoma: National Survey of Canadian General Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrics, Peter J; Gordon, Maggie; Cornacchi, Sylvie D; Farrokhyar, Forough; Ramsaroop, Amanda; Hodgson, Nicole; Quan, May Lynn; Wright, Francis; Porter, Geoffrey

    2012-12-01

    We surveyed Canadian General Surgeons to examine decision-making in early stage breast cancer. A modified Dillman Method was used for this mail survey of 1443 surgeons. Practice patterns and factors that influence management choices for: preoperative assessment, definition of margin status, surgical techniques and recommendations for re-excision were assessed. The response rate was 51% with 41% treating breast cancer. Most (80%) were community surgeons, with equal distribution of low/medium/high volume and years of practice categories. Approximately 25% of surgeons "sometimes or frequently" performed diagnostic excisional biopsies while 90% report "frequently" or "always" performing preoperative core biopsies. There was marked variation in defining negative and close margins, in the use of intra-operative margin assessment techniques and recommendations for re-excision. Responses revealed significant variation in attitudes and practices. These findings likely reflect an absence of consensus in the literature and potential gaps between best evidence and practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons/Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery Joint Position Statement on Open and Endovascular Surgery for Thoracic Aortic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appoo, Jehangir J; Bozinovski, John; Chu, Michael W A; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Forbes, Thomas L; Moon, Michael; Ouzounian, Maral; Peterson, Mark D; Tittley, Jacques; Boodhwani, Munir

    2016-06-01

    In 2014, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) published a position statement on the management of thoracic aortic disease addressing size thresholds for surgery, imaging modalities, medical therapy, and genetics. It did not address issues related to surgical intervention. This joint Position Statement on behalf of the CCS, Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons, and the Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery provides recommendations about thoracic aortic disease interventions, including: aortic valve repair, perfusion strategies for arch repair, extended arch hybrid reconstruction for acute type A dissection, endovascular management of arch and descending aortic aneurysms, and type B dissection. The position statement is constructed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology, and has been approved by the primary panel, an international secondary panel, and the CCS Guidelines Committee. Advent of endovascular technology has improved aortic surgery safety and extended the indications of minimally invasive thoracic aortic surgery. The combination of safer open surgery with endovascular treatment has improved patient outcomes in this rapidly evolving subspecialty field of cardiovascular surgery.

  5. Experience Of Thoracic Surgery Performed Under Difficult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Thoracic surgery was performed in 32 patients in Medina Hospital. Most of these ... We had two post-operative complications and 2 patients died after having surgery for .... (long standing chest drains, pleural fenestration) and being in ...

  6. 微创时代外科医生的成长与挑战%Surgeons in the era of,minimally invasive surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄志强

    2009-01-01

    Since the Success of the first case of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in 1987,minimally invasive surgery has become the most active field in all the branches of surgery.The traditional concept of surgery needs to be changed as the rapid development of surgical procedures,medical materials and devices,and the requirement of biopsychosocial model of medieine also poses great challenges to today's surgeons.Traditionally trained surgeons may find it difficult to adapt to the new developments.While,on the other hand,young laparoscopists may be at a loss when facing the difficulties encountered during the laparoscopic operation.The surgeons of tomorrow should have profound base of the knowledge of surgery and skillful in laparoscopy at the same time.

  7. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: More than 4,000 Danish women are diagnosed with operable breast cancer annually, and 70% receive breast conserving surgery. Without the use of oncoplastic surgery (OPS), 20-30% will get an unsatisfactory cosmetic result. The aim of this study was to illustrate the level of implement...

  8. Ergonomic assessment of the posture of surgeons performing endoscopic transurethral resections in urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sökeland Jürgen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During transurethral endoscopic prostate and bladder operations the influence of an ergonomic redesign of the arrangement of the operation equipment - including the introduction of a video-assisted resection method ('monitor endoscopy' instead of directly viewing onto the operation area via the endoscope ('direct endoscopy' - was studied with respect to the postures of the surgeons. Methods Postures were analysed on the basis of video recordings of the surgeons performed in the operation theatre during live operations and subsequent visual posture estimation executed by an observer. In particular, head, trunk and arm positions were assigned to posture categories according to a newly developed posture classification schema. 10 urological operations with direct endoscopy and 9 with monitor endoscopy were included. Results Application of direct endoscopy coincides with distinct lateral and sagittal trunk and head inclinations, trunk torsion and strong forearm and upper arm elevations of the surgeons whereas operations with monitor endoscopy were performed with an almost upright head and trunk and hanging arms. The disadvantageous postures observed during direct endoscopy are mainly caused by the necessity to hold the endoscope continuously in close contact with the eye. Conclusion From an ergonomic point of view, application of the video-assisted resection method should be preferred in transurethral endoscopic operations in order to prevent awkward postures of the surgeons and to limit muscular strain and fatigue. Furthermore, the application of the monitor method enables the use of a chair equipped with back support and armrests and benefits the reduction of postural stress.

  9. Opinions among Danish knee surgeons about indications to perform total knee replacement showed considerable variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Anders; Schrøder, Henrik; Husted, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    During the past decade, the incidence of primary total knee replacement (TKA) surgery in Denmark has approximately doubled. This increase could be due to weakened indications to perform TKA surgery. We aimed to investigate variation in opinions about indications to perform TKA among Danish knee...

  10. Transsphenoidal Approach in Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery for Skull Base Lesions: What Radiologists and Surgeons Need to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Garrigós, Elena; Arenas-Jiménez, Juan José; Monjas-Cánovas, Irene; Abarca-Olivas, Javier; Cortés-Vela, Jesús Julián; De La Hoz-Rosa, Javier; Guirau-Rubio, Maria Dolores

    2015-01-01

    In the last 2 decades, endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery has become the most popular choice of neurosurgeons and otolaryngologists to treat lesions of the skull base, with minimal invasiveness, lower incidence of complications, and lower morbidity and mortality rates compared with traditional approaches. The transsphenoidal route is the surgical approach of choice for most sellar tumors because of the relationship of the sphenoid bone to the nasal cavity below and the pituitary gland above. More recently, extended approaches have expanded the indications for transsphenoidal surgery by using different corridors leading to specific target areas, from the crista galli to the spinomedullary junction. Computer-assisted surgery is an evolving technology that allows real-time anatomic navigation during endoscopic surgery by linking preoperative triplanar radiologic images and intraoperative endoscopic views, thus helping the surgeon avoid damage to vital structures. Preoperative computed tomography is the preferred modality to show bone landmarks and vascular structures. Radiologists play an important role in surgical planning by reporting extension of sphenoid pneumatization, recesses and septations of the sinus, and other relevant anatomic variants. Radiologists should understand the relationships of the sphenoid bone and skull base structures, anatomic variants, and image-guided neuronavigation techniques to prevent surgical complications and allow effective treatment of skull base lesions with the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach. ©RSNA, 2015.

  11. Leo Doyle, master surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellar, I

    2000-10-01

    On 3 March 1953 Leo Doyle died at the Mercy Hospital, Melbourne. The day before he died Leo Doyle had been operating at the Mercy Hospital when he took ill. Doyle's final illness was almost certainly the result of the severe aortic stenosis that had been developing over some years. His death at the relatively young age of 61 ended the career of a man described by Sir Gordon Gordon Taylor as the greatest technical surgeon that he had ever seen. In all likelihood Australian surgery will never see the likes of Doyle, a virtuoso surgeon, again. And yet to many of the surgeons who were Doyle's contemporaries and to those who followed him he remained somewhat of an enigma. Perhaps in some way the description of the great French surgeon Baron Dupuytren may also be applicable to Leo Doyle: known to all, loved by many, understood by few. By all accounts Leo Doyle's surgical repertoire knew no bounds. He operated with equal facility on the central nervous system, the head and neck, in the thorax, abdomen and pelvis and he was more than competent in gynaecology, urology and orthopaedics. In the latter part of his career he became, par excellence, a cancer surgeon. He was, arguably, Australia's first surgical oncologist. No procedure was deemed too complicated or demanding. Like some other superb technicians his judgement at times did not match his technical ability. Doyle was one of the first surgeons in Australia to perform hindquarter amputation and he helped to pioneer the operations of total gastrectomy and oesophagogastrectomy. An avid reader of the surgical literature, he possessed an enormous library which was matched by an equally large collection of surgical instruments. Unlike Devine he published relatively little. He was not a good clinical teacher, preferring to teach by example in the operating theatre. Although interested in music and the visual arts, surgery was his life.

  12. Ergonomic status of laparoscopic urologic surgery: survey results from 241 urologic surgeons in china.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boluo Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prolonged and frequent use of laparoscopic equipment raises ergonomic risks that may cause physical distress for surgeons. We aimed to assess the prevalence of urologic surgeons' physical distress associated with ergonomic problems in the operating room (OR and their awareness of the ergonomic guidelines in China. METHODS: A sample of 300 laparoscopic urologists in China was assessed using a questionnaire on demographic information, ergonomic issues in the OR, musculoskeletal symptoms, and awareness of the ergonomic guidelines for the OR. RESULTS: There were 241 survey respondents (86.7% with valid questionnaires. Among the respondents, only 43.6% placed the operating table at pubic height during the actual operation. The majority of the respondents (63.5% used only one monitor during the procedure. Only 29.9% placed the monitor below the eye level. More than half of the respondents (50.6% preferred to use manual control instead of the foot pedal. Most of the respondents (95.0% never used the body support. The respondents experienced discomfort in the following regions, in ascending order: leg (21.6%, hand (30.3%, wrist (32.8%, shoulder (33.6%, back (53.1%, and neck (58.1%. The respondents with over 250 total operations experienced less discomfort than those with less than 250 total operations. Most of the respondents (84.6% were unaware of the ergonomic guidelines. However, almost all of the respondents (98.3% regarded the ergonomic guidelines to be important in the OR. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the laparoscopic urologists were not aware of the ergonomic guidelines for the OR; hence, they have been suffering from varying degrees of physical discomfort caused by ergonomic issues. There is an urgent need for education regarding ergonomic guidelines in the OR for laparoscopic urologists in China.

  13. Intraoperative Flap Complications in LASIK Surgery Performed by Ophthalmology Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Diaz-de-Leon, Lorena; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Navas, Alejandro; Graue-Hernández, Enrique O.; Ramirez-Miranda, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the rate of flap-related complications in LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmology residents and to analyze the risk factors for these complications. Methods: We analyzed 273 flap dissections in 145 patients from March 2013 to February 2014. We included all LASIK surgeries performed by 32 ophthalmology residents using a Moria M2 microkeratome. All the flap-related complications were noted. Comparison between both groups with and without complications was performed with an independent Student's t-test and relative risks were calculated. Results: There were 19 flap-related complications out of the 273 flap dissections (6.95%). The most common complication was incomplete flap dissection (n = 10; 3.66%), followed by free-cap (n = 5; 1.83%), and flap-buttonhole (n = 2; 0.73%). There was no significant difference between the complicated and uncomplicated cases in terms of the right versus the left eye, pachymetry results, white-to-white diameter, and spherical equivalent. But this difference was significant for mean keratometry (P = 0.008), K-min (P = 0.01), and K-max (P = 0.03) between these groups. Final visual acuity after rescheduling laser treatment was similar in both groups. Relative risks for flap-related complications were 2.03 for the first LASIK surgery (CI 95% 0.64 to 6.48; P = 0.22) and 1.26 (CI 95% 0.43 to 3.69; P = 0.66) for the surgeon's flap-related complications. Female gender presented an odds ratio of 2.48 (CI 95% 0.68 to 9.00; P = 0.16) for complications. Conclusion: Flap-related complications are common intraoperative event during LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmologists. Keratometries and surgeon's first procedure represent a higher probability for flap related complications than some other biometric parameters of patient's eye. PMID:27621782

  14. Identification and management of mental health issues by dermatologic surgeons: a survey of American Society for Dermatologic Surgery members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwer, David B; Spitzer, Jacqueline C; Sobanko, Joseph F; Beer, Kenneth R

    2015-03-01

    Dermatologists have long been interested in mental health issues of their patients. Some psychosocial distress likely motivates the pursuit of cosmetic dermatologic treatments. However, a percentage of patients seeking treatment suffer from significant psychopathology, such as body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), which may contraindicate treatment. To assess dermatologic surgeons' strategies for identification and management of mental health issues among patients seeking cosmetic procedures. A survey was sent to 2,855 practicing members of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery by e-mail. Two hundred sixty members completed the survey (9.1%). Approximately, 60% of respondents indicated that they ask new patients about psychiatric treatment history, and 92% reported that they have declined to provide a cosmetic treatment because of concerns about mental health status. Most (94%) indicated that they were aware of BDD, and 62% indicated that they refused to treat a patient believed to have BDD. Respondents estimated that 13% of new patients had BDD and 63% considered BDD to be a contraindication to treatment. Approximately 60% of dermatologic surgeons inquire about the mental health issues of their cosmetic patients. Most are aware of BDD, but less than two-thirds consider it a contraindication to treatment.

  15. Development of a charting method to monitor the individual performance of surgeons at the beginning of their career.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Duclos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Efforts to provide a valid picture of surgeons' individual performance evolution should frame their outcomes in relation to what is expected depending on their experience. We derived the learning curve of young thyroidectomy surgeons as a baseline to enable the accurate assessment of their individual outcomes and avoid erroneous conclusions that may derive from more traditional approaches. METHODS: Operative time and postoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy of 2006 patients who underwent a thyroidectomy performed by 19 young surgeons in five academic hospitals were monitored from April 2008 to December 2009. The database was randomly divided into training and testing datasets. The training data served to determine the expected performance curve of surgeons during their career and factors influencing outcome variation using generalized estimating equations (GEEs. To simulate prospective monitoring of individual surgeon outcomes, the testing data were plotted on funnel plots and cumulative sum charts (CUSUM. Performance charting methods were utilized to present outcomes adjusted both for patient case-mix and surgeon experience. RESULTS: Generation of performance curves demonstrated a gradual reduction in operative time from 139 (95% CI, 137 to 141 to 75 (71 to 80 minutes, and from 15.7% (15.1% to 16.3% to 3.3% (3.0% to 3.6% regarding the nerve palsy rate. Charts interpretation revealed that a very young surgeon had better outcomes than expected, whereas a more experienced surgeon appeared to be a poor performer given the number of years that he had already spent in practice. CONCLUSIONS: Not considering the initial learning curve of surgeons exposes them to biased measurement and to misinterpretation in assessing their individual performance for thyroidectomy. The performance chart represents a valuable tool to monitor the outcome of surgeons with the expectation to provide safe and efficient care to patients.

  16. Reduction Mammoplasty: A Comparison Between Operations Performed by Plastic Surgery and General Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kordahi, Anthony M.; Hoppe, Ian C.; Lee, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reduction mammoplasty is an often-performed procedure by plastic surgeons and increasingly by general surgeons. The question has been posed in both general surgical literature and plastic surgical literature as to whether this procedure should remain the domain of surgical specialists. Some general surgeons are trained in breast reductions, whereas all plastic surgeons receive training in this procedure. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Project provides a unique opportuni...

  17. Malfunctions of robotic system in surgery: role and responsibility of surgeon in legal point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrarese Alessia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic surgery (RS technology has undergone rapid growth in the surgical field since its approval. In clinical practice, failure of robotic procedures mainly results from a surgeon’s inability or to a device malfunction. We reviewed the literature to estimate the impact of this second circumstance in RS and its consequent legal implications. According to data from the literature, device malfunction is rare. We believe it is necessary to complement surgical training with a technical understanding of RS devices.

  18. Patient, surgeon, and healthcare purchaser views on the use of decision and communication aids in orthopaedic surgery: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozic, Kevin J; Chenok, Kate Eresian; Schindel, Jennifer; Chan, Vanessa; Huddleston, James I; Braddock, Clarence; Belkora, Jeffrey

    2014-08-31

    Despite evidence that decision and communication aids are effective for enhancing the quality of preference-sensitive decisions, their adoption in the field of orthopaedic surgery has been limited. The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to evaluate the perceived value of decision and communication aids among different healthcare stakeholders. Patients with hip or knee arthritis, orthopaedic surgeons who perform hip and knee replacement procedures, and a group of large, self-insured employers (healthcare purchasers) were surveyed regarding their views on the value of decision and communication aids in orthopaedics. Patients with hip or knee arthritis who participated in a randomized controlled trial involving decision and communication aids were asked to complete an online survey about what was most and least beneficial about each of the tools they used, the ideal mode of administration of these tools and services, and their interest in receiving comparable materials and services in the future. A subset of these patients were invited to participate in a telephone interview, where there were asked to rank and attribute a monetary value to the interventions. These interviews were analyzed using a qualitative and mixed methods analysis software. Members of the American Hip and Knee Surgeons (AAHKS) were surveyed on their perceptions and usage of decision and communication aids in orthopaedic practice. Healthcare purchasers were interviewed about their perspectives on patient-oriented decision support. All stakeholders saw value in decision and communication aids, with the major barrier to implementation being cost. Both patients and surgeons would be willing to bear at least part of the cost of implementing these tools, while employers felt health plans should be responsible for shouldering the costs. Decision and communication aids can be effective tools for incorporating patients preferences and values into preference-sensitive decisions in orthopaedics. Future

  19. Cost analysis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery: early discharge decreases hospital costs much less than intraoperative variables under the control of the surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudenbush, Brandon L; Gurd, David P; Goodwin, Ryan C; Kuivila, Thomas E; Ballock, R Tracy

    2017-03-01

    Spinal fusion surgery for the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is increasing. Health systems and surgeons are decreasing hospital length of stay (LOS) to decrease costs. The purpose of this study was to review the contribution of an accelerated discharge protocol on the total cost of a single episode of care related to the surgical treatment of AIS at a single institution. A retrospective cost analysis was performed over an 18-month period, from January 2014 through June 2015, before and after the institution of an accelerated discharge program. Patients treated surgically with ICD-9 code 737.30 (Idiopathic Scoliosis) were reviewed. Itemized costs and LOS were analyzed collectively and by surgeon before and after the accelerated discharge protocol. Eighty AIS patients were treated surgically. The accelerated discharge program significantly reduced average LOS from 4.2 days in 2014 to 3.3 days during the first 6 months of 2015 (P≤0.05). There were no increases in complications. There was a 9% decrease in the total average costs per episode of care. A weighted average, a relative average change in costs, and an average cost savings per case were calculated for 12 different categories. Average Surgical Services and Nursing costs decreased during the study period while all other costs increased. The accelerated discharge program did not directly contribute significantly to this decrease in costs. Greatest cost reduction was associated with average bone graft and pedicle screw cost, with an overall 8.5% reduction in pedicle screw use and a 58% reduction in bone graft costs. Intraoperative variables under the direct control of the surgeon contribute much more to cost reduction than an accelerated discharge program for surgically treated AIS patients.

  20. Operating Room Performance Improves after Proficiency-Based Virtual Reality Cataract Surgery Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Bach-Holm, Daniella; Kjærbo, Hadi

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of virtual reality proficiency-based training on actual cataract surgery performance. The secondary purpose of the study was to define which surgeons benefit from virtual reality training. DESIGN: Multicenter masked clinical trial. PARTICIPANTS: Eighteen cataract...... surgeons with different levels of experience. METHODS: Cataract surgical training on a virtual reality simulator (EyeSi) until a proficiency-based test was passed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Technical performance in the operating room (OR) assessed by 3 independent, masked raters using a previously validated...... task-specific assessment tool for cataract surgery (Objective Structured Assessment of Cataract Surgical Skill). Three surgeries before and 3 surgeries after the virtual reality training were video-recorded, anonymized, and presented to the raters in random order. RESULTS: Novices (non...

  1. Career satisfaction among general surgeons in Canada: a qualitative study of enablers and barriers to improve recruitment and retention in general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Najma; Conn, Lesley Gotlib; Chiu, Mary; Korabi, Bochra; Qureshi, Adnan; Nathens, Avery B; Kitto, Simon

    2012-11-01

    To understand what influences career satisfaction among general surgeons in urban and rural areas in Canada in order to improve recruitment and retention in general surgery. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 32 general surgeons in 2010 who were members of the Canadian Association of General Surgeons and who currently practice in either an urban or rural area. Interviews explored factors contributing to career satisfaction, as well as suggestions for preventive, screening, or management strategies to support general surgery practice. Findings revealed that both urban and rural general surgeons experienced the most satisfaction from their ability to resolve patient problems quickly and effectively, enhancing their sense of the meaningfulness of their clinical practice. The supportive relationships with colleagues, trainees, and patients was also cited as a key source of career satisfaction. Conversely, insufficient access to resources and a perceived disconnect between hospital administration and clinical practice priorities were raised as key "systems-level" problems. As a result, many participants felt alienated from their work by these systems-level barriers that were perceived to hinder the provision of high-quality patient care. Career satisfaction among both urban and rural general surgeons was influenced positively by the social aspects of their work, such as patient and colleague relationships, as well as a perception of an increasing amount of control and autonomy over their professional commitments. The modern general surgeon values a balance between professional obligations and personal time that may be difficult to achieve given the current system constraints.

  2. Complication reports for robotic surgery using three arms by a single surgeon at a single institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Hui; Chen, Huang-Hui; Liu, Wei-Min

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to evaluate perioperative complications related to robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery for management of gynaecologic disorders. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight hundred and fifty-one women who underwent robotic procedures between December 2011 and April 2015 were retrospectively included for analysis. Patient demographics, surgical outcomes and complications were evaluated. RESULTS: The overall complication rate was 5.5%, whereas the rate of complications for oncologic cases was 8.4%. Intra-operative complications (n = 7, 0.8%) consisted of five cases of bowel lacerations, one case of ureter laceration and one case of bladder injury. Early and late post-operative complications were 4.0% (n = 34) and 0.8% (n = 6), respectively. Six patients (0.7%) experienced Grade III complications based on the Clavien-Dindo classification and required further surgical intervention. CONCLUSION: Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery is a feasible approach for management of gynaecologic disorders; the complication rates for this type of procedure are acceptable. PMID:27251839

  3. Complication reports for robotic surgery using three arms by a single surgeon at a single institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hui Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate perioperative complications related to robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery for management of gynaecologic disorders. Materials and Methods: Eight hundred and fifty-one women who underwent robotic procedures between December 2011 and April 2015 were retrospectively included for analysis. Patient demographics, surgical outcomes and complications were evaluated. Results: The overall complication rate was 5.5%, whereas the rate of complications for oncologic cases was 8.4%. Intra-operative complications (n = 7, 0.8% consisted of five cases of bowel lacerations, one case of ureter laceration and one case of bladder injury. Early and late post-operative complications were 4.0% (n = 34 and 0.8% (n = 6, respectively. Six patients (0.7% experienced Grade III complications based on the Clavien-Dindo classification and required further surgical intervention. Conclusion: Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery is a feasible approach for management of gynaecologic disorders; the complication rates for this type of procedure are acceptable.

  4. [Selected pages of history of vascular surgery in Russia (contribution of Russian surgeons to world vascular surgery)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovskiĭ, A V; Gliantsev, S P

    2014-01-01

    The article describes the most significant for Russian surgery personalities, facts, and events of the last 180years. An emphasis is placed upon those works, discoveries or operations made by Russians for the first timein the world's practice. To such we refer N.J. Pirogov's topographical anatomy of vessels (1837), N. V. Ekk's portocaval anastomosis (1877), A.A. Yanovsky's lateral arterial suture (1889), S.S. Bryukhonenko's artificial circulation unit (1923-1924), Yu. Yu. Voronoy's renal replantation onto femoral vessels (1933), V.P. Demikhov'stransplantation of vital organs (1946-1959), V.I. Kolesov's mammary-coronary anastomosis (1964),F.A. Serbinenko's endovascular neurosurgery ( 1979), E. I. Chasov's intracoronary thrombolysis by E.I. Chazov( 1974), endovascular prosthetic repair of the thoracic aorta by N.L. Volodos ( 1985) and a series of other facts.

  5. Surgeons' perceptions on industry relations: A survey of 822 surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Maria S; Yang, Jie; Wang, Lily; Yin, Donglei; Talamini, Mark; Pryor, Aurora D

    2017-07-01

    The relationships between industry and medical professionals are controversial. The purpose of our study was to evaluate surgeons' current opinions regarding the industry-surgery partnership, in addition to self-reported industry ties. After institutional review board approval, a survey was sent via RedCap to 3,782 surgeons across the United States. Univariate and multivariable regression analyses were performed to evaluate the responses. The response rate was 23%. From the 822 responders, 226 (27%) reported at least one current relationship with industry, while 297 (36.1%) had at least one such relationship within the past 3 years. There was no difference between general surgery versus other surgical specialties (P = .5). Among the general surgery subspecialties, respondents in minimally invasive surgery/foregut had greater ties to industry compared to other subspecialties (P = .001). In addition, midcareer surgeons, male sex, and being on a reviewer/editorial board were associated with having industry ties (P industry are important for innovation. Our study showed that relationships between surgeons and industry are common, because more than a quarter of our responders reported at least one current relationship. Industry relations are perceived as necessary for operative innovation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Emil Theodor Kocher (1841-1917)--orthopaedic surgeon and the first surgeon Nobel Prize winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbasirević, Marko Z; Zagorac, Slavisa G; Lesić, Aleksandar R

    2013-01-01

    Theodor Emil Kocher (1841-1917), born in Bern, educated in many universities in Europe. Kocher as many surgeons of that time performed orthopedic surgery, general surgery, neurosurgery and endocrine surgery, but he become famous in orthopaedic surgery and endocrine surgery. He is remember as a surgeon who described the approach to the hip joint, elbow joint, maneuver for the reduction of dislocated shoulder joint. He introduced many instruments and many of them, such as Kocher clamp is still in use. Most important Kocher work was the thyroid gland surgery, and he received the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1909, for-in this matter. His nature of meticulous surgeon, scientific and hard working person, dedicated to his patients and students made- found him the place in a history of medicine.

  7. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, ...

  8. Cosmetic ear surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoplasty; Ear pinning; Ear surgery - cosmetic; Ear reshaping; Pinnaplasty ... Cosmetic ear surgery may be done in the surgeon's office, an outpatient clinic, or a hospital. It can be performed under ...

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, ...

  10. [The surgeon at retirement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández del Castillo-Sánchez, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Our vocation has called us to become physicians and we have learned and practiced surgery as part of our medical training and knowledge. Surgery is an art expressed during each intervention carried out with effectiveness and devotion; enjoying the pleasure to perform it without hurry, with harmony, fluency and cleanness. Therefore, medicine and surgery belong to the same vocation being at service of people with the clear mission to heal patients and if we favor it, this activity will get our attention firmly and forever. A physician is a sensitive person that understands the sadness and happiness consequence of his actions at the office, operating room, research and relationships with colleagues. This provides him a pleasant experience of practicing medicine and especially surgery. Medical and surgical professions produce an irresistible attraction and they are very rewarding experiences; however, as time goes by there are effects over physician's health. Surgeons will switch from an active professional role into a passive agent and will need to assess himself and answer if he is still in optimal conditions to practice medicine. Therefore, every surgeon must be prepared to grow old from the start and preserve his Faith once retirement has been accepted as the next step in his career.

  11. Surgeon-performed point-of-care ultrasound in severe eye trauma: Report of two cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Balac, Korana; Bhatia, Chetana Anand

    2016-01-01

    The indications of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) in the management of multiple trauma patients have been expanding. Although computed tomography (CT) scan of the orbit remains the gold standard for imaging orbital trauma, ultrasound is a quick, safe, and portable tool that can be performed bedside. Here we report two patients who had severe eye injuries with major visual impairment where surgeon-performed POCUS was very useful. One had a foreign body injury while the other had blunt trauma. POCUS was done using a linear probe under sterile conditions with minimum pressure on the eyes. Ultrasound showed a foreign body at the back of the left eye globe touching the eye globe in the first patient, and was normal in the second patient. Workup using CT scan, fundsocopy, optical coherence tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging of the orbits confirmed these findings. The first patient had vitreous and sub retinal haemorrhage and a full thickness macular hole of the left eye, while the second had traumatic optic neuropathy. POCUS gave accurate information concerning severe eye injuries. Trauma surgeons and emergency physicians should be trained in performing ocular ultrasound for eye injuries.

  12. The Surgeon's View: Comparison of Two Digital Video Recording Systems in Veterinary Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusto, Gessica; Caramello, Vittorio; Comino, Francesco; Gandini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Video recording and photography during surgical procedures are useful in veterinary medicine for several reasons, including legal, educational, and archival purposes. Many systems are available, such as hand cameras, light-mounted cameras, and head cameras. We chose a reasonably priced head camera that is among the smallest video cameras available. To best describe its possible uses and advantages, we recorded video and images of eight different surgical cases and procedures, both in hospital and field settings. All procedures were recorded both with a head-mounted camera and a commercial hand-held photo camera. Then sixteen volunteers (eight senior clinicians and eight final-year students) completed an evaluation questionnaire. Both cameras produced high-quality photographs and videos, but observers rated the head camera significantly better regarding point of view and their understanding of the surgical operation. The head camera was considered significantly more useful in teaching surgical procedures. Interestingly, senior clinicians tended to assign generally lower scores compared to students. The head camera we tested is an effective, easy-to-use tool for recording surgeries and various veterinary procedures in all situations, with no need for assistance from a dedicated operator. It can be a valuable aid for veterinarians working in all fields of the profession and a useful tool for veterinary surgical education.

  13. Simultaneous development of laparoscopy and robotics provides acceptable perioperative outcomes and shows robotics to have a faster learning curve and to be overall faster in rectal cancer surgery: analysis of novice MIS surgeon learning curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melich, George; Hong, Young Ki; Kim, Jieun; Hur, Hyuk; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Kim, Nam Kyu; Sender Liberman, A; Min, Byung Soh

    2015-03-01

    Laparoscopy offers some evidence of benefit compared to open rectal surgery. Robotic rectal surgery is evolving into an accepted approach. The objective was to analyze and compare laparoscopic and robotic rectal surgery learning curves with respect to operative times and perioperative outcomes for a novice minimally invasive colorectal surgeon. One hundred and six laparoscopic and 92 robotic LAR rectal surgery cases were analyzed. All surgeries were performed by a surgeon who was primarily trained in open rectal surgery. Patient characteristics and perioperative outcomes were analyzed. Operative time and CUSUM plots were used for evaluating the learning curve for laparoscopic versus robotic LAR. Laparoscopic versus robotic LAR outcomes feature initial group operative times of 308 (291-325) min versus 397 (373-420) min and last group times of 220 (212-229) min versus 204 (196-211) min-reversed in favor of robotics; major complications of 4.7 versus 6.5 % (NS), resection margin involvement of 2.8 versus 4.4 % (NS), conversion rate of 3.8 versus 1.1 (NS), lymph node harvest of 16.3 versus 17.2 (NS), and estimated blood loss of 231 versus 201 cc (NS). Due to faster learning curves for extracorporeal phase and total mesorectal excision phase, the robotic surgery was observed to be faster than laparoscopic surgery after the initial 41 cases. CUSUM plots demonstrate acceptable perioperative surgical outcomes from the beginning of the study. Initial robotic operative times improved with practice rapidly and eventually became faster than those for laparoscopy. Developing both laparoscopic and robotic skills simultaneously can provide acceptable perioperative outcomes in rectal surgery. It might be suggested that in the current milieu of clashing interests between evolving technology and economic constrains, there might be advantages in embracing both approaches.

  14. Can carotid angiography be performed by vascular surgeons? A critical evaluation of indications, technique, and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Timothy M; Patel, Ajay; Langan, Eugene M; Gray, Bruce H; Mackrell, Peter J; Taylor, Spence M; Carsten, Christopher G; Cull, David L; Snyder, Bruce A; Miskulin, Joseph; Youkey, Jerry

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine the contemporary indications for diagnostic carotid arteriography and evaluate its utility and safety when performed by vascular surgeons. The records of all patients having selective carotid arteriography from September 2000 through March 2002 at our institution were reviewed. One hundred sixty-four consecutive patients had selective arteriography of the extracranial carotid arteries for the following indications: hemispheric symptoms with stenosis 80% by duplex) internal carotid stenosis (9.8%), ipsilateral internal carotid artery occlusion (7.1%), bilateral high-grade internal carotid artery stenoses (7.1%), vertebral-basilar ischemia (7.0%), contralateral internal carotid occlusion (5.4%), duplex ultrasound from a nonaccredited vascular laboratory (3.3%), and evaluation of nonatherosclerotic carotid disease (3.3%). There were no transient ischemic attacks, strokes, or deaths related to the index procedure. Selective angiography of the extracranial carotid arteries remains an important adjunct in the evaluation of patients with carotid disease. This procedure can be performed safely by vascular surgeons.

  15. Impact of Epilepsy Surgery on Motor Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The impact of epilepsy surgery on motor performance of 37 children (ages 1 month to 15 years with refractory seizures was evaluated at the Wilhelmina University Children's Hospital, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

  16. Simple Tools for Surgeons: Design and Evaluation of mechanical alternatives for robotic instruments for Minimally Invasive Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, J.E.N.

    2006-01-01

    Performing complex tasks in Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) is demanding due to a disturbed hand-eye co-ordination, the application of non-ergonomic instruments with limited number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) and the two-dimensional (2D) view controlled by the surgical assistance. Robotic camera h

  17. Simple Tools for Surgeons: Design and Evaluation of mechanical alternatives for robotic instruments for Minimally Invasive Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, J.E.N.

    2006-01-01

    Performing complex tasks in Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) is demanding due to a disturbed hand-eye co-ordination, the application of non-ergonomic instruments with limited number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) and the two-dimensional (2D) view controlled by the surgical assistance. Robotic camera

  18. Simple Tools for Surgeons: Design and Evaluation of mechanical alternatives for robotic instruments for Minimally Invasive Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, J.E.N.

    2006-01-01

    Performing complex tasks in Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) is demanding due to a disturbed hand-eye co-ordination, the application of non-ergonomic instruments with limited number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) and the two-dimensional (2D) view controlled by the surgical assistance. Robotic camera h

  19. High correlation between performance on a virtual-reality simulator and real-life cataract surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Smith, Phillip; Subhi, Yousif

    2017-01-01

    -tracking software of cataract surgical videos with a Pearson correlation coefficient of -0.70 (p = 0.017). CONCLUSION: Performance on the EyeSi simulator is significantly and highly correlated to real-life surgical performance. However, it is recommended that performance assessments are made using multiple data......PURPOSE: To investigate the correlation in performance of cataract surgery between a virtual-reality simulator and real-life surgery using two objective assessment tools with evidence of validity. METHODS: Cataract surgeons with varying levels of experience were included in the study. All...... antitremor training, forceps training, bimanual training, capsulorhexis and phaco divide and conquer. RESULTS: Eleven surgeons were enrolled. After a designated warm-up period, the proficiency-based test on the EyeSi simulator was strongly correlated to real-life performance measured by motion...

  20. A comparison of performances of consultant surgeons, NCHDs and medical students in a modified HPAT examination.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, A

    2010-06-01

    Following the implementation of the Fottrell report, entry to medical school in Ireland has undergone significant change. Medical school studentship is now awarded based on a combination of points obtained from the final examination of Irish secondary schools (the leaving certificate) combined with HPAT scores (Health Professions Admissions Test). The HPAT is designed to test a candidate\\'s knowledge in several different fields including problem solving skills, logical and non verbal reasoning. A sample HPAT was administered to a test group composed of consultant surgeons, non consultant hospital doctors, and medical students. Statistical analysis was performed and no significant difference was found between the performances of the groups. This is surprising as it was expected that groups with greater experience at medical problem solving would have translated to higher scores. This exposes a flaw within the HPAT system and a potential weakness in the process of doctor selection.

  1. What Is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon? Page Content Article Body If your ... require heart surgery. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Heart Surgeons Have? Pediatric heart surgeons are medical ...

  2. The American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Assessment Tool for Performance of Laparoscopic Colectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Bradley J; Steele, Scott R; Hendren, Samantha K; Bakaki, Paul M; Roberts, Patricia L; Delaney, Conor P; Brady, Justin T; MacRae, Helen M

    2017-07-01

    The lack of consensus for performance assessment of laparoscopic colorectal resection is a major impediment to quality improvement. The purpose of this study was to develop and assess the validity of an evaluation tool for laparoscopic colectomy that is feasible for wide implementation. During the pilot phase, a small group of experts modified previous assessment tools by watching videos for laparoscopic right colectomy with the following categories of experience: novice (less than 20 cases), intermediate (50-100 cases), and expert (more than 500 cases). After achieving sufficient reliability (κ > 0.8), a user-friendly tool was validated among a large group of blinded, trained experts. The study was conducted through the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Operative Competency Evaluation Committee. Raters were from the Operative Competency Evaluation Committee of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. Assessment tool reliability and internal consistency were measured. From October 2014 through February 2015, 4 groups of 5 raters blinded to surgeon skill level evaluated 6 different laparoscopic right colectomy videos (novice = 2, intermediate = 2, expert = 2). The overall Cronbach α was 0.98 (>0.9 = excellent internal consistency). The intraclass correlation for the overall assessment was 0.93 (range, 0.77-0.93) and was >0.74 (excellent) for each step. The average scores (scale, 1-5) for experts were significantly better than those in the intermediate category, with a mean (SD) of 4.51 (0.56) versus 2.94 (0.56; p = 0.003). Videos in the intermediate group scored more favorably than beginner videos for each individual step and overall performance (mean (SD) = 3.00 (0.32) vs 1.78 (0.42); p = 0.006). The study was limited by rater bias to technique and style. The unique and robust methodology in this trial produced an assessment tool that was feasible for raters to use when assessing videotaped laparoscopic right hemicolectomies. The potential

  3. Current attitudes to breast reconstruction surgery for women at risk of post-mastectomy radiotherapy: A survey of UK breast surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, Paula J; Gandhi, Ashu; Kirwan, Cliona C; Jain, Yogesh; Harvey, James R

    2015-08-01

    Decision-making for women requiring reconstruction and post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) includes oncological safety, cosmesis, patient choice, potential delay/interference with adjuvant treatment and surgeon/oncologist preference. This study aimed to quantitatively assess surgeons' attitudes and perceptions about reconstructive options in this setting, and to ascertain if surgical volume influenced advice given. A questionnaire was sent to surgical members of the UK Association of Breast Surgery (ABS) in March-June 2014. The questionnaire elicited information on surgeon volume, reconstructive practice and drivers influencing decision-making. Response rate was 42% (148/355), representing 71% of UK breast units. Delayed breast reconstruction (DBR) was offered more commonly than immediate implant, delayed-immediate or immediate autologous reconstruction (p Quality of Life (HRQoL). Surgeon volume had no effect on reconstruction choice. Common decision-making drivers included negative effects of radiotherapy upon reconstructive and cosmetic outcome. The majority of surgeons (77%) believe the current evidence base is insufficient to guide decision-making. Despite surgeons believing that cosmesis and quality of life are not equivalent between IBR and DBR, DBR remains the commonest approach to this difficult clinical scenario. Surgeons perceive they are using a variety of newer techniques such as Delayed-Immediate Reconstruction and Acellular Dermal Matrices to try to ameliorate the effects of PMRT. This survey demonstrates that there is wide variation in reported surgical practice in this difficult setting. There is widespread acknowledgement of the lack of evidence to guide decision-making. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Integrative advances for OCT-guided ophthalmic surgery and intraoperative OCT: microscope integration, surgical instrumentation, and heads-up display surgeon feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justis P Ehlers

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To demonstrate key integrative advances in microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography (iOCT technology that will facilitate adoption and utilization during ophthalmic surgery. METHODS: We developed a second-generation prototype microscope-integrated iOCT system that interfaces directly with a standard ophthalmic surgical microscope. Novel features for improved design and functionality included improved profile and ergonomics, as well as a tunable lens system for optimized image quality and heads-up display (HUD system for surgeon feedback. Novel material testing was performed for potential suitability for OCT-compatible instrumentation based on light scattering and transmission characteristics. Prototype surgical instruments were developed based on material testing and tested using the microscope-integrated iOCT system. Several surgical maneuvers were performed and imaged, and surgical motion visualization was evaluated with a unique scanning and image processing protocol. RESULTS: High-resolution images were successfully obtained with the microscope-integrated iOCT system with HUD feedback. Six semi-transparent materials were characterized to determine their attenuation coefficients and scatter density with an 830 nm OCT light source. Based on these optical properties, polycarbonate was selected as a material substrate for prototype instrument construction. A surgical pick, retinal forceps, and corneal needle were constructed with semi-transparent materials. Excellent visualization of both the underlying tissues and surgical instrument were achieved on OCT cross-section. Using model eyes, various surgical maneuvers were visualized, including membrane peeling, vessel manipulation, cannulation of the subretinal space, subretinal intraocular foreign body removal, and corneal penetration. CONCLUSIONS: Significant iterative improvements in integrative technology related to iOCT and ophthalmic surgery are demonstrated.

  5. A virtual instrument ergonomics workstation for measuring the mental workload of performing video-endoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W D; Chung, Y H; Berguer, R

    2000-01-01

    The visual and physical interface imposed on the surgeon by video-endoscopic surgery (VES) increases the surgeon's mental workload. Ergonomic studies are needed to develop ways to reduce this workload. We used virtual instrumentation to devise a portable ergonomic workstation to compare the surgeon's mental workloads during simulated open surgery and VES. The system measures palmar tonic skin conductance level (SCL) and electrooculogram (EOG) and frontalis electrical activity to monitor mental stress and concentration levels. We used the system at a national surgery conference on volunteer subjects during a rest period and as they performed simulated surgery, consisting of typing knots using open and VES techniques. The subjects were asked to self-rate their levels of mental concentration and stress during these activities and reported that both progressively increased from rest to the open surgery task to the VES task. The subjects tied fewer knots during the VES than the open task, consistent with the increased demands of the VES task. The SCL progressively increased from rest to the open task to the VES task, correlating with the subjects' reported increase in mental stress level. Eye blinks and low frequency EOG activity decreased from rest to the open task, consistent with the subjects' reported increase in mental concentration level. From the open to the VES task, eye blinks and EOG activity increased, as expected given the greater demands of the VES task. High frequency frontalis activity merits further study as another indicator of the subjects' levels of mental concentration and stress.

  6. Short-term outcomes and one surgeon's learning curve for thoracoscopic esophagectomy performed with the patient in the prone position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshikiri, Taro; Yasuda, Takashi; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masashi; Kanaji, Shingo; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Matsuda, Takeru; Sumi, Yasuo; Nakamura, Tetsu; Fujino, Yasuhiro; Tominaga, Masahiro; Suzuki, Satoshi; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-01

    Thoracoscopic esophagectomy with the patient in the prone position (TEP) is now being performed as minimally invasive esophagectomy for esophageal cancer. This study examines the short-term outcomes and the learning curve associated with TEP. One surgeon ("Surgeon A") performed TEP on 100 consecutive patients assigned to three periods based on treatment order. Each group consisted of 33 or 34 patients. The outcomes of the three groups were compared to define the influence of surgeon expertise. Outcomes improved as Surgeon A gained experience in performing this operation, as evidenced by reduced thoracic operative times between periods 1 and 2, and then between periods 2 and 3 (p = 0.0033 and p = 0.0326, respectively); an increased number of retrieved chest nodes between periods 1 and 2 (p = 0.0070); and a decline in recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) palsy between periods 2 and 3 (p = 0.0450). Period 2 was the pivotal period for each learning curve. An individual surgeon's learning curve over the course of 100 TEP procedures had three outcomes: a shortened operative time, a higher number of retrieved chest nodes, and a decreased rate of RLN palsy. Approximately 30-60 cases were needed to reach a plateau in the TEP procedure and a reduction in the morbidity rate.

  7. Time to be BRAVE: is educating surgeons the key to unlocking the potential of randomised clinical trials in surgery? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Shelley; Mills, Nicola; Cawthorn, Simon J; Donovan, Jenny; Blazeby, Jane M

    2014-03-14

    Well-designed randomised clinical trials (RCTs) provide the best evidence to inform decision-making and should be the default option for evaluating surgical procedures. Such trials can be challenging, and surgeons' preferences may influence whether trials are initiated and successfully conducted and their results accepted. Preferences are particularly problematic when surgeons' views play a key role in procedure selection and patient eligibility. The bases of such preferences have rarely been explored. Our aim in this qualitative study was to investigate surgeons' preferences regarding the feasibility of surgical RCTs and their understanding of study design issues using breast reconstruction surgery as a case study. Semistructured qualitative interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of 35 professionals practicing at 15 centres across the United Kingdom. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically using constant comparative techniques. Sampling, data collection and analysis were conducted concurrently and iteratively until data saturation was achieved. Surgeons often struggle with the concept of equipoise. We found that if surgeons did not feel 'in equipoise', they did not accept randomisation as a method of treatment allocation. The underlying reasons for limited equipoise were limited appreciation of the methodological weaknesses of data derived from nonrandomised studies and little understanding of pragmatic trial design. Their belief in the value of RCTs for generating high-quality data to change or inform practice was not widely held. There is a need to help surgeons understand evidence, equipoise and bias. Current National Institute of Health Research/Medical Research Council investment into education and infrastructure for RCTs, combined with strong leadership, may begin to address these issues or more specific interventions may be required.

  8. Is surgeon intuition equivalent to models of operative complexity in determining the surgical approach for nephron sparing surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: RENAL nephrometry score was associated with surgical approach intuitively chosen by an experienced surgeon, but the presence of adherent perinephric fat did not correlate with decision-making.

  9. Ethics and the facial plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Neeraj

    2016-09-01

    The facial plastic surgeon potentially has a conflict of interest when confronted with the patients requesting surgery, due to the personal gain attainable by agreeing to perform surgery. The aim of this review is to discuss the potential harm the surgeon can inflict by carrying out facial plastic surgery, beyond the standard surgical complications of infection or bleeding. It will discuss the desire for self-improvement and perfection and increase in the prevalence facial plastic surgery. We address the principles of informed consent, beneficence and non-maleficence, as well as justice and equality and how the clinician who undertakes facial plastic surgery is at risk of breaching these principles without due care and diligence.

  10. Surgeons' non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Steven; Paterson-Brown, Simon

    2012-02-01

    The importance of non-technical skills to surgical performance is gaining wide acceptance. This article discusses the core cognitive and social skills categories thought to underpin medical knowledge and surgical expertise, and describes the rise of non-technical skill models of assessment in surgery. Behavior rating systems such as NOTSS (Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons) have been developed to support education and assessment in this regard. We now understand more about these critical skills and how they impact surgery. The challenge in the future is to incorporate them into undergraduate teaching, postgraduate training, workplace assessment, and perhaps even selection.

  11. Randomized controlled trial investigating the effect of music on the virtual reality laparoscopic learning performance of novice surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskovic, D; Rosenthal, R; Zingg, U; Oertli, D; Metzger, U; Jancke, L

    2008-11-01

    Findings have shown that music affects cognitive performance, but little is known about its influence on surgical performance. The hypothesis of this randomized controlled trial was that arousing (activating) music has a beneficial effect on the surgical performance of novice surgeons in the setting of a laparoscopic virtual reality task. For this study, 45 junior surgeons with no previous laparoscopic experience were randomly assigned to three equal groups. Group 1 listened to activating music; group 2 listened to deactivating music; and group 3 had no music (control) while each participant solved a surgical task five times on a virtual laparoscopic simulator. The assessed global task score, the total task time, the instrument travel distances, and the surgeons' heart rate were assessed. All surgical performance parameters improved significantly with experience (task repetition). The global score showed a trend for a between-groups difference, suggesting that the group listening to activating music had the worst performance. This observation was supported by a significant between-groups difference for the first trial but not subsequent trials (activating music, 35 points; deactivating music, 66 points; no music, 91 points; p = 0.002). The global score (p = 0.056) and total task time (p = 0.065) showed a trend toward improvement when participants considered the music pleasant rather than unpleasant. Music in the operating theater may have a distracting effect on novice surgeons performing new tasks. Surgical trainers should consider categorically switching off music during teaching procedures.

  12. Analysis of the drilling sound component from expert performance in a maxillo-facial surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Pablo F.; Gosselin, Florian; Taha, Farid

    2009-01-01

    Auditory displays can have a great potential in surgical simulators that aim at training skills associated to the correct interpretation of auditory information. Here, we present preliminary results in the analysis of the sound produced by the drilling procedure in a maxillo-facial surgery when...... performed by expert surgeons. The motivation of this work is to find relevant acoustic parameters that allow for an efficient synthesis method of auditory displays so that they can effectively convey information on expert surgical drilling....

  13. Inguinal hernia surgery in developing countries: should laparoscopic repairs be performed ?

    OpenAIRE

    Nsadi, Berthier; Detry, Olivier; Arung, Willy

    2017-01-01

    In conclusion, from our own experience of laparoscopic surgery in DRC, we strongly believe that there is no reason to develop inguinal laparoscopic repair in developing countries. Laparoscopic repairs are more expensive and more difficult to perform and to learn. The next step of abdominal wall repairs in the developing world should focus on teaching the surgeons to use either commercial or low-cost mosquito meshes in open repairs and assessing the results of these procedures in such challeng...

  14. [Patient's pain feeling and surgeon's comfort--ECCE versus phacoemulsification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kałuzny, Jakub J; Eliks, Iwona; Mierzejewski, Andrzej; Kałuzny, Bartłomiej

    2004-01-01

    To compare patient's pain and surgeon's comfort during ECCE performed under retrobulbar anesthesia and phacoemulsification under topical anesthesia. 120 patients scheduled for planned routine cataract extraction were divided in 2 groups: group 1-60 eyes, ECCE under retrobulbar anesthesia and group II-60 eyes, phacoemulsification under topical anesthesia. Immediately after operation patients were asked, to answer questions about their feeling during surgery. Simultaneously, the surgeon filled up the questionnaire, concerning patients behavior during the entire procedure. Statistically significant higher level of pain was reported in group I (ECCE). The most painful moment of the procedure was retrobulbar injection. During surgery pain feeling in both groups was similar. Both types of anesthesia provided very good level of surgeon's comfort. The longer operation, the higher level of pain and lower surgeon's comfort were reported in both groups. Patients having ECCE performed under retrobulbar anesthesia reported more pain comparing to phacoemulsification under topical anesthesia. Both anesthesia methods provided high level of surgeon's comfort.

  15. [International Relationship of Japanese General Thoracic Surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Meinoshin

    2017-01-01

    Japanese thoracic surgeons have created personal relationship with European and North American surgeons. During the last 10 years, official relation between Japanese Association for Chest Surgery(JACS) and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) has been established besides personal interaction, and communication among the thoracic surgeons in Asia was prompted through Asia Thoracoscopic Surgery Education Program( ATEP). International relationship through academic associations is expected to contribute to encouraging general thoracic surgeons.

  16. Heart valve surgery: EuroSCORE vs. EuroSCORE II vs. Society of Thoracic Surgeons score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sharoz Rabbani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background This is a validation study comparing the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE II with the previous additive (AES and logistic EuroSCORE (LES and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons’ (STS risk prediction algorithm, for patients undergoing valve replacement with or without bypass in Pakistan. Patients and Methods Clinical data of 576 patients undergoing valve replacement surgery between 2006 and 2013 were retrospectively collected and individual expected risks of death were calculated by all four risk prediction algorithms. Performance of these risk algorithms was evaluated in terms of discrimination and calibration. Results There were 28 deaths (4.8% among 576 patients, which was lower than the predicted mortality of 5.16%, 6.96% and 4.94% by AES, LES and EuroSCORE II but was higher than 2.13% predicted by STS scoring system. For single and double valve replacement procedures, EuroSCORE II was the best predictor of mortality with highest Hosmer and Lemmeshow test (H-L p value (0.346 to 0.689 and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (0.637 to 0.898. For valve plus concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG patients actual mortality was 1.88%. STS calculator came out to be the best predictor of mortality for this subgroup with H-L p value (0.480 to 0.884 and ROC (0.657 to 0.775. Conclusions For Pakistani population EuroSCORE II is an accurate predictor for individual operative risk in patients undergoing isolated valve surgery, whereas STS performs better in the valve plus CABG group.

  17. Literature review of the energy sources for performing laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Tsukasa; Takifuji, Katsunari; Yokoyama, Shozo; Matsuda, Kenji; Higashiguchi, Takashi; Tominaga, Toshiji; Oku, Yoshimasa; Watanabe, Takashi; Nasu, Toru; Hashimoto, Tadamichi; Tamura, Koichi; Ieda, Junji; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Iwamoto, Hiromitsu; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2012-01-27

    Laparoscopic surgery for colorectal disease has become widespread as a minimally invasive treatment. This is important because the increasing availability of new devices allows us to perform procedures with a reduced length of surgery and decreased blood loss. We herein report the results of a literature review of energy sources for laparoscopic colorectal surgery, focused especially on 6 studies comparing ultrasonic coagulating shears (UCS) and other instruments. We also describe our laparoscopic dissection techniques using UCS for colorectal cancer. The short-term outcomes of surgeries using UCS and Ligasure for laparoscopic colorectal surgery were superior to conventional electrosurgery. Some authors have reported that the length of surgery or blood loss when Ligasure was used for laparoscopic colorectal surgery is less than when UCS was used. On the other hand, a recent study demonstrated that there were no significant differences between the short-term outcomes of UCS and Ligasure for laparoscopic colorectal surgery. It is therefore suggested that the choice of technique used should be made according to the surgeon's preference. We also describe our laparoscopic dissection techniques using UCS (Harmonic ACE) for colorectal cancer with regard to the retroperitoneum dissection, dissection technique, dissection technique around the feeding artery, and various other dissection techniques. We therefore review the outcomes of using various energy sources for laparoscopic colorectal surgery and describe our laparoscopic dissection techniques with UCS (Harmonic ACE) for colorectal cancer.

  18. [What Must the (Abdominal) Surgeon Know about Experimental Medicine (?) - Translational Research in General (Abdominal) Surgery(Viszeral-)Chirurg & experimentelle Medizin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wex, T; Kuester, D; Meyer, F

    2015-08-01

    Experimental medicine has evolved tremendously in the last few years. In particular, the introduction of novel techniques, in-vitro models, knock-out/transgenic animals and high-through put analytical methodologies have resulted in a deeper understanding of cellular pathophysiology and diseases. The daily clinical management has benefited by the introduction of biomarkers and targeted therapies. This development has been accompanied by increasing specialisation across all fields of research and medicine. Therefore, clinical-translational research requires a team of competent partners nowadays. The visceral surgeon can contribute significantly to these projects. The present review highlights several aspects of translational research and put chances and potential pitfalls into perspective in context with the work of the visceral surgeon.

  19. Surgery for Primary Cardiac Tumors in Children Early and Late Results in a Multicenter European Congenital Heart Surgeons Association Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padalino, Massimo A.; Vida, Vladimiro L.; Boccuzzo, Giovanna; Tonello, Marco; Sarris, George E.; Berggren, Hakan; Comas, Juan V.; Di Carlo, Duccio; Di Donato, Roberto M.; Ebels, Tjark; Hraska, Viktor; Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; Gaynor, J. William; Metras, Dominique; Pretre, Rene; Pozzi, Marco; Rubay, Jean; Sairanen, Heikki; Schreiber, Christian; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Basso, Cristina; Stellin, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Background-To evaluate indications and results of surgery for primary cardiac tumors in children. Methods and Results-Eighty-nine patients aged Conclusions-Surgery for primary cardiac tumors in children has good early and long-term outcomes, with low recurrence rate. Rhabdomyomas are the most freque

  20. The razor's edge: Australian rock music impairs men's performance when pretending to be a surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancourt, Daisy; Burton, Thomas Mw; Williamon, Aaron

    2016-12-12

    Over the past few decades there has been interest in the role of music in the operating theatre. However, despite many reported benefits, a number of potentially harmful effects of music have been identified. This study aimed to explore the effects of rock and classical music on surgical speed, accuracy and perceived distraction when performing multiorgan resection in the board game Operation. Single-blind, three-arm, randomised controlled trial. Imperial Festival, London, May 2016. Members of the public (n = 352) aged ≥ 16 years with no previous formal surgical training or hearing impairments. Participants were randomised to listen through noise-cancelling headphones to either the sound of an operating theatre, rock music or classical music. Participants were then invited to remove three organs from the board game patient, Cavity Sam, using surgical tweezers. Time taken (seconds) to remove three organs from Cavity Sam; the number of mistakes made in performing the surgery; and perceived distraction, rated on a five-point Likert-type scale from 1 (not at all distracting) to 5 (very distracting). Rock music impairs the performance of men but not women when undertaking complex surgical procedures in the board game Operation, increasing the time taken to operate and showing a trend towards more surgical mistakes. In addition, classical music was associated with lower perceived distraction during the game, but this effect was attenuated when factoring in how much people liked the music, with suggestions that only people who particularly liked the music of Mozart found it beneficial. Rock music (specifically Australian rock music) appears to have detrimental effects on surgical performance. Men are advised not to listen to rock music when either operating or playing board games.

  1. Can Surgeons Reduce the Risk for Dislocation After Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty Performed Using the Posterolateral Approach?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seagrave, Kurt G; Troelsen, Anders; Madsen, Bjørn G

    2017-01-01

    receiving THA via the posterolateral approach. METHODS: We assessed 1326 consecutive primary THAs performed between 2010 and 2015. Patient information was documented, and plain radiographic films were used to evaluate cup positioning, hip offset, and hip length change. A multiple logistic regression...... compared with that in nondislocating THA. Independent risk factors for cup dislocation were increased age, body mass index 30 kg/m(2), and leg shortening of >5 mm. CONCLUSION: Surgeons should aim for a shortening of leg length primary THA...

  2. Multicenter analysis comparing robotic, open, laparoscopic, and vaginal hysterectomies performed by high-volume surgeons for benign indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Peter C; Crane, John T; English, Eric J; Farnam, Richard W; Garza, Devin M; Winter, Marc L; Rozeboom, Jerry L

    2016-06-01

    To compare perioperative outcomes between robotic-assisted benign hysterectomies and abdominal, vaginal, and laparoscopic hysterectomies when performed by high-volume surgeons. A multicenter data analysis compared 30-day outcomes from consecutive robotic-assisted hysterectomies performed by high-volume surgeons (≥60 prior procedures) at nine centers with records retrieved from the Premier Perspective database for abdominal, vaginal, and laparoscopic hysterectomies performed by high-volume gynecologic surgeons. Data on benign hysterectomy disorders from January 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013 were included. Data from 2300 robotic-assisted, 9745 abdominal, 8121 vaginal, and 11 952 laparoscopic hysterectomies were included. The robotic-assisted patient cohort had a significantly higher rate of adhesive disease compared with the vaginal (Plaparoscopic cohorts (Pobesity than the vaginal (Plaparoscopic cohorts (P250g) than the abdominal (Plaparoscopic cohorts (P=0.017). The robotic-assisted cohort experienced significantly fewer intraoperative complications than the abdominal (Physterectomy provided improved outcomes compared with abdominal, vaginal, and laparoscopic hysterectomy. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Study of VITOM in Pediatric Surgery and Urology: Evaluation of Technology Acceptance and Usability by Operating Team and Surgeon Musculoskeletal Discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frykman, Philip K; Freedman, Andrew L; Kane, Timothy D; Cheng, Zhi; Petrosyan, Mikael; Catchpole, Kenneth

    2017-02-01

    We studied operating team acceptability of Video Telescopic Monitor (VITOM(®)) exoscope by exploring the ease of use of the device in two centers. We also assessed factors affecting surgeon musculoskeletal discomfort. We focused on how the operating team interacted with the VITOM system with surrogate measures of usefulness, image quality, ease of use, workload, and setup time. Multivariable linear regression was used to model the relationships between team role, experience, and setup time. Relationships between localized musculoskeletal discomfort and use of VITOM alone, and with loupes, were also analyzed. Four surgeons, 7 surgical techs, 7 circulating nurses, and 13 surgical residents performed 70 pediatric surgical and urological operations. We found that subjective views of each team member were consistently positive with 69%-74% agreed or strongly agreed that VITOM enhanced their ability to perform their job and improved the surgical process. Unexpectedly, the scrub techs and nurses perceived more value and utility of VITOM, presumably because it provides them a view of the operative field that would otherwise be unavailable to them. Team members rated perceptions of image quality highly and workload generally satisfactory. Not surprisingly, setup time decreased with team experience and multivariable modeling showed significant correlations with surgeon and surgical tech experience, but not circulating nurse. An important finding was that surgeon neck discomfort was reduced with use of VITOM alone for magnification, compared with use of loupes and VITOM. The most likely explanation for these findings is improved posture with the neck at a neutral position when viewing the VITOM images, compared with neck flexion with loupes, and thus, a less favorable ergonomic position. This study suggests that there may be small drawbacks associated with VITOM use initially, but these reduce with increased experience and benefit both the surgeon and the rest of the team.

  4. Wilfred Trotter: surgeon, philosopher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Irving B

    2006-08-01

    There is no significant biography that records the accomplishments of Sir Wilfred Trotter, who was a general surgeon in its pure sense at a time when surgical specialization was in its infancy. Trotter was born in the 1870s in England. Despite being bedridden during his childhood with a musculoskeletal condition he was able to study medicine at London University, and eventually became Professor and Chair of Surgery at the University College Hospital, a position he held until his death in November 1939. He made many contributions to surgical care, particularly in the field of oncology. He attended to many famous people, including King George V and Sigmund Freud and was greatly honoured in his own milieu. He was named honorary surgeon and Sargent Surgeon to the king. In addition, he was a thoughtful individual who addressed problems in human behaviour, contradicting the stereotype of the contemporary surgeon.

  5. [Performance indicators of maxillofacial surgery inpatient departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marada, Gyula; Nagy, Ákos; Sebestyén, Andor; Zemplényi, Antal; Radnai, Márta; Boncz, Imre

    2017-03-01

    In Hungary, the number and structure of the maxillofacial surgery departments underwent significant changes in recent decades. The aim of our study was to present the actual performance indicators of maxillofacial inpatient departments and based on the available data to compare the departments. The study was based on the number of beds founded by the National Health Insurance Fund. Performance data were supplied by the National Health Insurance Fund Administration. The assessment included the following indicators: number of beds institutional breakdown by type, number of reimbursed cases, the weighted case number, hospital stay, bed occupancy rates and average length of stay. In the examined period 40% of active beds (65) were in university hospitals. The distribution of reimbursed cases was similar. The university hospitals showed higher weighted case number and case-mix index. The oral surgery departments' bed occupancy rate (45.75%) was below the national average. The indicators show significant differences among different departments in the examined period. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(12), 447-453.

  6. How to perform Mohs micrographic surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Elçin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A considerable number of dermatolologist in Turkey perform standard surgical excision of non-melanoma skin cancer and repair the defects functionally and cosmetically. It is possible to appropriately treat most basal cell carcinomas (BCCs and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs with standard excision and even with curettage and electrodessication. However, for a group of patients at high risk of recurrence, standard excision cannot provide the desired oncologic cure rates. In order to increase the possibility of oncologic cure, it is recommended that high risk BCCs and SCCs should be excised with larger than 4-6 mm safety margins. On the other hand the most common localization for BCCs and SCCs are the face, and using safety margins larger than 4-6 mm on the face might contradict with the principles of tissue-preserving surgical approach. A more unfavorable situation is that the oncologic cure rates remain below 80% for high-risk BCC and SCC even after standard excisions with safety margins of wider than 4-6 mm. The goal of Mohs micrographic surgery is complete tumor removal with maximum preservation of healthy tissue.. Mohs micrographic surgery is a staged surgery that enables 100% assessment of the entire lateral and deep surgical margins microscopically in minutes after excision with horizontally cut frozen sections for residual cancer. Thus, it increases the oncologic cure rate especially for a certain group of patients with high-risk BCC and SCC. The aim of this paper was to review the Mohs technique, the most thorough method for treating BCC and SCC.

  7. Shoulder ultrasonography performed by orthopedic surgeons increases efficiency in diagnosis of rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chih-Hao; Chen, Poyu; Chen, Alvin Chao-Yu; Hsu, Kuo-Yao; Chang, Shih-Sheng; Chan, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Yeung-Jen

    2017-04-20

    Rotator cuff tears are very common and their incidence increases with age. Shoulder ultrasonography has recently gained popularity in detecting rotator cuff tears because of its efficiency, cost-effectiveness, time-saving, and real-time nature of the procedure. Well-trained orthopedic surgeons may utilize shoulder ultrasonography to diagnose rotator cuff tears. The wait time of patients planned to have shoulder MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) to rule in rotator cuff tears may decrease after orthopedic surgeon start doing shoulder ultrasonography as a screening tool for that. Patients with rotator cuff tears may be detected earlier by ultrasonography and have expedited surgical repair. The efficacy in determination of rotator cuff tears will also increase. Patients were retrospectively reviewed from January 2007 to December 2012. They were divided into 2 groups: Ultrasound (-) group and the Ultrasound (+) group. Age, gender, wait time from outpatient department (OPD) visit to MRI exam, MRI exam to operation (OP), and OPD visit to OP, patient number for MRI exam, and number of patients who finally had rotator cuff repair within two groups were compared. The wait time of OPD visit to OP and MRI to OP in patients who received shoulder ultrasonography was significantly less than that in patients did not receive shoulder ultrasonography screening. Only 23.8% of the patients with a suspected rotator cuff injury undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair before ultrasonography was applied as a screening tool. The percentage increased to 53.6% after orthopedic surgeon started using ultrasonography as a screening tool for rotator cuff tears. Office-based shoulder ultrasound examination can reduce the wait time for a shoulder MRI. The efficacy of determination of rotator cuff tears will also increase after the introduction of shoulder ultrasonography.

  8. Radical nephrectomy performed by open, laparoscopy with or without hand-assistance or robotic methods by the same surgeon produces comparable perioperative results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Nazemi

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Radical nephrectomy can be performed using open or laparoscopic (with or without hand assistance methods, and most recently using the da Vinci Surgical Robotic System. We evaluated the perioperative outcomes using a contemporary cohort of patients undergoing radical nephrectomy by one of the above 4 methods performed by the same surgeon. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The relevant clinical information on 57 consecutive patients undergoing radical nephrectomy from September 2000 until July 2004 by a single surgeon was entered in a Microsoft Access DatabaseTM and queried. Following appropriate statistical analysis, p values < 0.05 were considered significant. RESULTS: Of 57 patients, the open, robotic, laparoscopy with or without hand assistance radical nephrectomy were performed in 18, 6, 21, and 12 patients, respectively. The age, sex, body mass index (BMI, incidence of malignancy, specimen and tumor size, tumor stage, Fuhrman grade, hospital stay, change in postoperative creatinine, drop in hemoglobin, and perioperative complications were not significantly different between the methods. While the estimated median blood loss, postoperative narcotic use for pain control, and hospital stay were significantly higher in the open surgery method (p < 0.05, the median operative time was significantly shorter compared to the robotic method (p = 0.02. Operating room costs were significantly higher in the robotic and laparoscopic groups; however, there was no significant difference in total hospital costs between the 4 groups. CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrates that radical nephrectomy can be safely performed either by open, robotic, or laparoscopic with or without hand assistance methods without significant difference in perioperative complication rates. A larger cohort and longer follow up are needed to validate our findings and establish oncological outcomes.

  9. Assessing the Current Status of Enhanced Recovery after Surgery in the Usage of Web-based Survey Questionnaires by Thoracic Surgeons and Nurses Attending the Meeting in Mainland China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na DU

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Though the concept of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS has been progressively known by the surgeons and applied clinically, the current status of its cognition among thoracic surgeons and application in thoracic surgery is still unknown. Based on the analysis of a survey of thoracic surgeons and nurses on chest ERAS during a national conference, we aimed to analyze the status and difficulties of the application of ERAS in thoracic surgery. Methods A total of 773 questionnaires were collected during the first West China chest ERAS Forum and analyzed. The content of the questionnaire can be divided into two parts, including the respondents’ institute and personal information, 10 questions on ERAS. Results (1 Current status of clinical application of ERAS is the concept rather than the practice: 69.6% of the surgeons and 58.7% of the nurses agreed with this view; in addition, 88.5% of the doctors and 85.7% of the nurses believed that the concept of ERAS may be applicable to every branches of surgery; (2 55.6% of the doctors and 69.1% of the nurses believed that the reason of poor clinical application of ERAS included no mature procedure, lack of consensus and specifications; (3 The best team for the clinical practice of ERAS should be based on surgeon-centered multidisciplinary cooperation and integration of medical care: 62.1% of the surgeons and 70.7% of nurses agreed with this view; (4 73.7% of the surgeons and 81.9% of the nurses agreed that mean hospital stay, patients’ experience in hospital and social satisfaction should be the evaluation standard of ERAS practice. Conclusion The application of ERAS in thoracic surgery is still the concept rather than the practice. The reason included the lack of clinical applicable specifications and scheme.

  10. Reasons For Not Performing Keratorefractive Surgery in Patients Seeking Refractive Surgery in a Hospital-Based Cohort in “Yemen”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamashmus, Mahfouth A.; Saleh, Mahmoud F.; Awadalla, Mohamed A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: To determine and analyze the reasons why keratorefractive surgery, laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) were not performed in patients who presented for refractive surgery consultation. Materials and Methods: A retrospective observational study was performed between January 2006 and December 2007 in the Yemen Magrabi Hospital. The case records of 2,091 consecutive new patients who presented for refractive surgery were reviewed. Information from the pre-operative ophthalmic examination, such as refractive error, corneal topography and visual acuity, were analyzed. The reasons for not performing LASIK and PRK in the cases that were rejected were recorded and analyzed. Results: In this cohort, 1,660 (79.4%) patients were advised to have LASIK or PRK from the 2,091 patients examined. LASIK and PRK were not advised in 431 (21%) patients. The most common reasons for not performing the surgery were high myopia >-11.00 Diopters (19%), keratoconus (18%), suboptimal central corneal thickness (15%), cataract (12%) and keratoconus suspect (forme fruste keratoconus) (10%). Conclusion: Patients who requested keratorefractive surgery have a variety of problems and warrant comprehensive attention to selection criteria on the part of the surgeon. Corneal topographies and pachymetry of refractive surgery candidates need to be read cautiously. High-refractive error, keratoconus and insufficient corneal thickness were found to be the leading reasons for not performing keratorefractive surgery in this study. PMID:21180437

  11. The Dangers of Gathering Data: Surgeon-Specific Outcomes Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Victor A.; Ferraris, Suellen P.; Wehner, Paulette S.; Setser, Edward R.

    2011-01-01

    The accuracy of risk adjustment is important in developing surgeon profiles. As surgeon profiles are obtained from observational, nonrandomized data, we hypothesized that selection bias exists in how patients are matched with surgeons and that this bias might influence surgeon profiles. We used the Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk model to calculate observed to expected (O/E) mortality ratios for each of six cardiac surgeons at a single institution. Propensity scores evaluated selection bias that might influence development of risk-adjusted mortality profiles. Six surgeons (four high and two low O/E ratios) performed 2298 coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) operations over 4 years. Multivariate predictors of operative mortality included preoperative shock, advanced age, and renal dysfunction, but not the surgeon performing CABG. When patients were stratified into quartiles based on the propensity score for operative death, 83% of operative deaths (50 of 60) were in the highest risk quartile. There were significant differences in the number of high-risk patients operated upon by each surgeon. One surgeon had significantly more patients in the highest risk quartile and two surgeons had significantly less patients in the highest risk quartile (p < 0.05 by chi-square). Our results show that high-risk patients are preferentially shunted to certain surgeons, and away from others, for unexplained (and unmeasured) reasons. Subtle unmeasured factors undoubtedly influence how cardiac surgery patients are matched with surgeons. Problems may arise when applying national database benchmarks to local situations because of this unmeasured selection bias. PMID:23204823

  12. Da Vinci© Skills Simulator™: is an early selection of talented console surgeons possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Mark; Horton, Kevin; John, Hubert

    2016-12-01

    To investigate whether the learning curve of robotic surgery simulator training depends on the probands' characteristics, such as age and prior experience, we conducted a study of six distinct proband groups, using the da Vinci Skills Simulator: experienced urological robotic surgeons, surgeons with experience as da Vinci tableside assistants, urological surgeons with laparoscopic experience, urological surgeons without laparoscopic experience, and complete novices aged 25 and younger and 40 and older. The results showed that all experienced robotic surgeons reached expert level (>90 %, as defined previously in the literature) within the first three repetitions and remained on a high level of performance. All other groups performed worse. Tableside assistants, laparoscopically experienced surgeons, and younger novices showed a better performance in all exercises than surgeons without laparoscopic experience and older novices. A linear mixed-effects model analysis demonstrated no significant difference in learning curves between proband groups in all exercises except the RW1 exercise for the younger proband group. In summary, we found that performance in robotic surgery, measured by performance scores in three virtual simulator modules using the EndoWrist techniques, was dependent on age and prior experience with robotic and laparoscopic surgery. However, and most importantly, the learning curve was not significantly affected by these factors. This suggests that the da Vinci Skills Simulator™ is a useful practice tool for everyone learning or performing robotic surgery, and that early selection of talented surgeons is neither possible nor necessary.

  13. Time to be BRAVE: is educating surgeons the key to unlocking the potential of randomised clinical trials in surgery? A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Well-designed randomised clinical trials (RCTs) provide the best evidence to inform decision-making and should be the default option for evaluating surgical procedures. Such trials can be challenging, and surgeons’ preferences may influence whether trials are initiated and successfully conducted and their results accepted. Preferences are particularly problematic when surgeons’ views play a key role in procedure selection and patient eligibility. The bases of such preferences have rarely been explored. Our aim in this qualitative study was to investigate surgeons’ preferences regarding the feasibility of surgical RCTs and their understanding of study design issues using breast reconstruction surgery as a case study. Methods Semistructured qualitative interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of 35 professionals practicing at 15 centres across the United Kingdom. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically using constant comparative techniques. Sampling, data collection and analysis were conducted concurrently and iteratively until data saturation was achieved. Results Surgeons often struggle with the concept of equipoise. We found that if surgeons did not feel ‘in equipoise’, they did not accept randomisation as a method of treatment allocation. The underlying reasons for limited equipoise were limited appreciation of the methodological weaknesses of data derived from nonrandomised studies and little understanding of pragmatic trial design. Their belief in the value of RCTs for generating high-quality data to change or inform practice was not widely held. Conclusion There is a need to help surgeons understand evidence, equipoise and bias. Current National Institute of Health Research/Medical Research Council investment into education and infrastructure for RCTs, combined with strong leadership, may begin to address these issues or more specific interventions may be required. PMID:24628821

  14. Self-evaluation: how well do surgery residents judge performance on a rotation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Kenneth W

    2013-05-01

    Surgical trainees are evaluated based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education 6 core competencies. The ability for a learner to recognize strengths and weaknesses in these areas allows for critical self-improvement. Surgery residents rotating on a pediatric surgery rotation for 1 academic year were asked at an exit interview to provide a self-evaluation within the 6 core competencies on a Likert scale from 1 to 5. Self-evaluation scores were compared with a final group consensus attending evaluation. Further analyses included comparing residents as follows: less than R3 (junior residents) versus R3 (senior residents) residents, general surgery versus non-general surgery residents, university versus community residents, residents in the first half of the academic year versus residents in the second half, and top one third- and lowest one third-performing residents. Statistical analysis was performed using Student t tests with significance at P surgery residents, and highest one third-performing residents compared with junior residents, non-general surgery residents, and lowest one third-performing residents. There were no differences between self-evaluations and attending evaluations when comparing university with community residents and residents in the first half of the academic year with residents in the second half of the academic year. Residents appear to have a more critical self-analysis than attending surgeons, with senior residents, general surgery residents, and highest one third-performing residents being the most critical of their own performance. Poorly performing residents appeared to lack insight into their abilities. This method of self-evaluation helps trainees reflect on their performance and highlights trainees who lack self-awareness and need counseling for improvement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A retrospective comparative study of minimally invasive extracorporeal circulation versus conventional extracorporeal circulation in emergency coronary artery bypass surgery patients: a single surgeon analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufa, Magdalena; Schubel, Jens; Ulrich, Christian; Schaarschmidt, Jan; Tiliscan, Catalin; Bauer, Adrian; Hausmann, Harald

    2015-07-01

    At the moment, the main application of minimally invasive extracorporeal circulation (MiECC) is reserved for elective cardiac operations such as coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and/or aortic valve replacement. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcome of emergency CABG operations using either MiECC or conventional extracorporeal circulation (CECC) in patients requiring emergency CABG with regard to the perioperative course and the occurrence of major adverse cardiac and cerebral events (MACCE). We analysed the emergency CABG operations performed by a single surgeon, between January 2007 and July 2013, in order to exclude the differences in surgical technique. During this period, 187 emergency CABG patients (113 MiECC vs 74 CECC) were investigated retrospectively with respect to the following parameters: in-hospital mortality, MACCE, postoperative hospital stay and perioperative transfusion rate. The mean logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation was higher in the CECC group (MiECC 12.1 ± 16 vs CECC 15.0 ± 20.8, P = 0.15) and the number of bypass grafts per patient was similar in both groups (MiECC 2.94 vs CECC 2.93). There was no significant difference in the postoperative hospital stay or in major postoperative complications. The in-hospital mortality was higher in the CECC group 6.8% versus MiECC 4.4% (P = 0.48). The perioperative transfusion rate was lower with MiECC compared with CECC (MiECC 2.6 ± 3.2 vs CECC 3.8 ± 4.2, P = 0.025 units of blood per patient). In our opinion, the use of MiECC in urgent CABG procedures is safe, feasible and shows no disadvantages compared with the use of CECC. Emergency operations using the MiECC system showed a significantly lower blood transfusion rate and better results concerning the unadjusted in-hospital mortality. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  16. Psychological and physical stress among experienced and inexperienced surgeons during laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Klein, Mads; Gögenur, Ismail;

    2012-01-01

    : Surgical procedures are mentally and physically demanding, and stress during surgery may compromise patient safety. We investigated the impact of surgical experience on surgeons' stress levels and how perioperative sleep quality may influence surgical performance....

  17. Association Between Surgeon Scorecard Use and Operating Room Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygourakis, Corinna C; Valencia, Victoria; Moriates, Christopher; Boscardin, Christy K; Catschegn, Sereina; Rajkomar, Alvin; Bozic, Kevin J; Soo Hoo, Kent; Goldberg, Andrew N; Pitts, Lawrence; Lawton, Michael T; Dudley, R Adams; Gonzales, Ralph

    2017-03-01

    Despite the significant contribution of surgical spending to health care costs, most surgeons are unaware of their operating room costs. To examine the association between providing surgeons with individualized cost feedback and surgical supply costs in the operating room. The OR Surgical Cost Reduction (OR SCORE) project was a single-health system, multihospital, multidepartmental prospective controlled study in an urban academic setting. Intervention participants were attending surgeons in orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, and neurological surgery (n = 63). Control participants were attending surgeons in cardiothoracic surgery, general surgery, vascular surgery, pediatric surgery, obstetrics/gynecology, ophthalmology, and urology (n = 186). From January 1 to December 31, 2015, each surgeon in the intervention group received standardized monthly scorecards showing the median surgical supply direct cost for each procedure type performed in the prior month compared with the surgeon's baseline (July 1, 2012, to November 30, 2014) and compared with all surgeons at the institution performing the same procedure at baseline. All surgical departments were eligible for a financial incentive if they met a 5% cost reduction goal. The primary outcome was each group's median surgical supply cost per case. Secondary outcome measures included total departmental surgical supply costs, case mix index-adjusted median surgical supply costs, patient outcomes (30-day readmission, 30-day mortality, and discharge status), and surgeon responses to a postintervention study-specific health care value survey. The median surgical supply direct costs per case decreased 6.54% in the intervention group, from $1398 (interquartile range [IQR], $316-$5181) (10 637 cases) in 2014 to $1307 (IQR, $319-$5037) (11 820 cases) in 2015. In contrast, the median surgical supply direct cost increased 7.42% in the control group, from $712 (IQR, $202-$1602) (16 441 cases

  18. Is the ability to perform transurethral resection of the prostate influenced by the surgeon's previous experience?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Cury

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the influence of the urologist's experience on the surgical results and complications of transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-seven patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate without the use of a video camera were randomly allocated into three groups according to the urologist's experience: a urologist having done 25 transurethral resections of the prostate (Group I - 24 patients; a urologist having done 50 transurethral resections of the prostate (Group II - 24 patients; a senior urologist with vast transurethral resection of the prostate experience (Group III - 19 patients. The following were recorded: the weight of resected tissue, the duration of the resection procedure, the volume of irrigation used, the amount of irrigation absorbed and the hemoglobin and sodium levels in the serum during the procedure. RESULTS: There were no differences between the groups in the amount of irrigation fluid used per operation, the amount of irrigation fluid absorbed or hematocrit and hemoglobin variation during the procedure. The weight of resected tissue per minute was approximately four times higher in group III than in groups I and II. The mean absorbed irrigation fluid was similar between the groups, with no statistical difference between them (p=0.24. Four patients (6% presented with TUR syndrome, without a significant difference between the groups. CONCLUSION: The senior urologist was capable of resecting four times more tissue per time unit than the more inexperienced surgeons. Therefore, a surgeon's experience may be important to reduce the risk of secondary TURP due to recurring adenomas or adenomas that were incompletely resected. However, the incidence of complications was the same between the three groups.

  19. Civil Surgeon Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — USCIS designates certain doctors (also known as civil surgeons) to perform the medical exam required for most Green Card applicants. This data set represents the...

  20. Thyroid Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fax/Phone Home » Thyroid Surgery Leer en Español Thyroid Surgery GENERAL INFORMATION Your doctor may recommend that ... made in conjunction with your endocrinologist and surgeon. Thyroid Surgery FAQs QUESTIONS AND CONSIDERATIONS When thyroid surgery ...

  1. Safety and efficacy of excision and direct closure in acute burns surgery: outcome analysis in a prospective series of 100 patients and a survey of UK burns surgeons' attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Charles J; Wang, Tim; McArthur, Gordon; Williams, Greg; Atkins, Joanne; Jones, Isabel

    2014-12-01

    Many burns surgeons avoid excision and direct closure of acute burns owing to concerns over wound dehiscence, scarring and infection. There is no evidence in the literature to support this practice. We present outcomes of a prospective series of 100 patients who underwent excision and direct closure of 138 burns over a 2-year period, along with results from a survey sent to 33 senior burns surgeons to gauge attitudes towards direct closure in burns surgery. 47% of survey respondents never perform direct closure. Dehiscence was cited as the most common concern, followed by hypertrophic scarring (HTS). In our cohort, the superficial dehiscence rate was 12% and the HTS rate was 16%, with no scarring contractures. Patients with healing time greater than 14 days were more likely to develop HTS (p=0.008), as were those with wound dehiscence (p=0.014). Patients undergoing part-grafting in addition to direct closure took significantly longer to heal than those undergoing direct closure alone (p=0.0002), with the donor site or graft delaying healing in the majority. Excision and direct closure of acute burn wounds avoids donor site morbidity and has an acceptable complication rate. It is a safe and effective treatment for full thickness burns in selected cases.

  2. Virtual reality robotic surgery warm-up improves task performance in a dry laboratory environment: a prospective randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendvay, Thomas S; Brand, Timothy C; White, Lee; Kowalewski, Timothy; Jonnadula, Saikiran; Mercer, Laina D; Khorsand, Derek; Andros, Justin; Hannaford, Blake; Satava, Richard M

    2013-06-01

    Preoperative simulation warm-up has been shown to improve performance and reduce errors in novice and experienced surgeons, yet existing studies have only investigated conventional laparoscopy. We hypothesized that a brief virtual reality (VR) robotic warm-up would enhance robotic task performance and reduce errors. In a 2-center randomized trial, 51 residents and experienced minimally invasive surgery faculty in General Surgery, Urology, and Gynecology underwent a validated robotic surgery proficiency curriculum on a VR robotic simulator and on the da Vinci surgical robot (Intuitive Surgical Inc). Once they successfully achieved performance benchmarks, surgeons were randomized to either receive a 3- to 5-minute VR simulator warm-up or read a leisure book for 10 minutes before performing similar and dissimilar (intracorporeal suturing) robotic surgery tasks. The primary outcomes compared were task time, tool path length, economy of motion, technical, and cognitive errors. Task time (-29.29 seconds, p = 0.001; 95% CI, -47.03 to -11.56), path length (-79.87 mm; p = 0.014; 95% CI, -144.48 to -15.25), and cognitive errors were reduced in the warm-up group compared with the control group for similar tasks. Global technical errors in intracorporeal suturing (0.32; p = 0.020; 95% CI, 0.06-0.59) were reduced after the dissimilar VR task. When surgeons were stratified by earlier robotic and laparoscopic clinical experience, the more experienced surgeons (n = 17) demonstrated significant improvements from warm-up in task time (-53.5 seconds; p = 0.001; 95% CI, -83.9 to -23.0) and economy of motion (0.63 mm/s; p = 0.007; 95% CI, 0.18-1.09), and improvement in these metrics was not statistically significantly appreciated in the less-experienced cohort (n = 34). We observed significant performance improvement and error reduction rates among surgeons of varying experience after VR warm-up for basic robotic surgery tasks. In addition, the VR warm-up reduced errors on

  3. Return to play and performance after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the National Basketball Association: surgeon case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Anthony, Shawn G; Lin, Kenneth M; Wang, Tim; Altchek, David W; Allen, Answorth A

    2017-09-01

    To investigate return to play (RTP) and functional performance after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in National Basketball Association (NBA) players and to perform a systematic review of the literature to understand RTP after ACLR in professional basketball. NBA players undergoing ACLR between 2008 and 2014 by two surgeons were identified. RTP and performance were assessed based on a review of publically available statistics. A systematic review of the literature was performed using the MEDLINE database. Inclusion criteria were: English language, ACL surgery outcome, professional basketball and RTP outcome. We reviewed studies for RTP rates and RTP performance. Our study included 12 professional basketball players with NBA level experience. Eleven of the 12 players returned to their prior level of play. Eight of the 9 (88.9%) players actively playing in the NBA returned to play in the NBA at a mean 9.8 months. Among players returning to NBA play, during RTP season 1, mean per game statistics decreased for the following: minutes, points, rebounds, assists, steals, blocks, turnovers and personal fouls - none of these changes reached statistical significance. Player efficiency ratings significantly declined from pre-injury (12.5) to the first RTP season (7.6) (p = 0.05). By RTP season 2, player performance metrics approximated pre-injury levels and were not significantly different. Six studies met inclusion criteria; reported RTP rates ranged from 78-86%. Identified studies similarly found a decline in functional performance after RTP. There is a high rate (89%) of return to NBA play for NBA players undergoing ACLR. After RTP, however, there is a quantitative decline in initial season 1 RTP statistics with a significant decrease in player efficiency rating. By RTP season 2, performance metrics demonstrated an improvement compared to RTP season 1 but did not reach pre-injury functional performance, though performance metrics are not significantly

  4. Evaluation of the indication for surgical extraction of third molars according to the oral surgeon and the primary care dentist. Experience in the Master of Oral Surgery and Implantology at Barcelona University Dental School

    OpenAIRE

    Fuster Torres, M. Angeles; Gargallo Albiol, Jordi; Berini Aytés, Leonardo; Gay Escoda, Cosme

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Third molar extraction is the most frequent procedure in oral surgery. The present study evaluates the indication of third molar extraction as established by the primary care dentist (PCD) and the oral surgeon, and compares the justification for extraction with the principal reason for patient consultation. Patients and method: A descriptive study was made of 319 patients subjected to surgical removal of a third molar in the context of the Master of Oral Surgery and Implantology...

  5. Choosing a Breast Reconstruction Surgeon and Questions to Ask

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reconstruction Surgery Questions to Ask Your Surgeon About Breast Reconstruction If you’ve had surgery to treat your ... reconstruction. Finding the right plastic surgeon for your breast reconstruction If you decide to have breast reconstruction, you’ ...

  6. Musculoskeletal pain among surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech, Katrine Tholstrup;

    2016-01-01

    , and comparative data on surgeons’ physical workload with robotic-assisted laparoscopy and conventional laparoscopy. Studies only describing a single surgical modality were excluded. We applied the checklist, STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE), to assess the quality...... fulfilled the criteria of STROBE, with an average score of 13 (range 10–16) out of 18. Discussion: Results, mainly self-reported measures, suggest that robotic-assisted laparoscopy is less strenuous compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, results are limited by the large methodological...

  7. Formal analysis of the surgical pathway and development of a new software tool to assist surgeons in the decision making in primary breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanuto, Giuseppe; Pappalardo, Francesco; Rocco, Nicola; Leotta, Marco; Ursino, Venera; Chiodini, Paolo; Buggi, Federico; Folli, Secondo; Catalano, Francesca; Nava, Maurizio B

    2016-10-01

    The increased complexity of the decisional process in breast cancer surgery is well documented. With this study we aimed to create a software tool able to assist patients and surgeons in taking proper decisions. We hypothesized that the endpoints of breast cancer surgery could be addressed combining a set of decisional drivers. We created a decision support system software tool (DSS) and an interactive decision tree. A formal analysis estimated the information gain derived from each feature in the process. We tested the DSS on 52 patients and we analyzed the concordance of decisions obtained by different users and between the DSS suggestions and the actual surgery. We also tested the ability of the system to prevent post breast conservation deformities. The information gain revealed that patients preferences are the root of our decision tree. An observed concordance respectively of 0.98 and 0.88 was reported when the DSS was used twice by an expert operator or by a newly trained operator vs. an expert one. The observed concordance between the DSS suggestion and the actual decision was 0.69. A significantly higher incidence of post breast conservation defects was reported among patients who did not follow the DSS decision (Type III of Fitoussi, N = 4; 33.3%, p = 0.004). The DSS decisions can be reproduced by operators with different experience. The concordance between suggestions and actual decision is quite low, however the DSS is able to prevent post- breast conservation deformities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Robot-assisted surgery in gynecological oncology: current status and controversies on patient benefits, cost and surgeon conditions - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Steffen E; Mosgaard, Berit J; Rosendahl, Mikkel; Dalsgaard, Tórur; Bjørn, Signe F; Frøding, Ligita P; Kehlet, Henrik; Høgdall, Claus K; Lajer, Henrik

    2017-03-01

    Robot-assisted surgery has become more widespread in gynecological oncology. The purpose of this systematic review is to present current knowledge on robot-assisted surgery, and to clarify and discuss controversies that have arisen alongside the development and deployment. A database search in PubMed and EMBASE was performed up until 4 March 2016. The search strategy was developed in collaboration with an information specialist, and by application of the PRISMA guidelines. Human participants and English language were the only restrictive filters applied. Selection was performed by screening of titles and abstracts, and by full text scrutiny. From 2001 to 2016, a total of 76 references were included. Robot-assisted surgery in gynecological oncology has increased, and current knowledge supports that the oncological safety is similar, compared with previous surgical methods. Controversies arise because current knowledge does not clearly document the benefit of robot-assisted surgery, on perioperative outcome compared with the increased costs of the acquisition and application. The rapid development in robot-assisted surgery calls for long-term detailed prospective cohorts or randomized controlled trials. The costs associated with acquisition, application, and maintenance have an unfavorable impact on cost-benefit evaluations, especially when compared with laparoscopy. Future developments in robot-assisted surgery will hopefully lead to competition in the market, which will decrease costs. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  9. 21 CFR 878.4460 - Surgeon's glove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4460 Surgeon's glove. (a) Identification. A surgeon's glove is a device made of natural or synthetic rubber intended to be worn by... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgeon's glove. 878.4460 Section 878.4460...

  10. Should bariatric surgery be performed in adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamish, Andrew J; Reinehr, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Adolescent obesity has markedly increased worldwide in both its extent and prevalence in recent decades and obesity prevention strategies are failing. As a result, effective treatment strategies are urgently needed. As behavioral and pharmacological treatment approaches have only moderate effects in severe obesity, bariatric surgery has begun to emerge as a treatment option. In this debate article, we offer arguments opposing and supporting bariatric surgery in the treatment of severe obesity in adolescents. Bariatric surgery has superior therapeutic outcomes with respect to weight loss and resolution of comorbid diseases over other existing treatments. However, long-term outcomes after bariatric surgery in adolescents are only just beginning to emerge. Furthermore, the procedures are generally considered irreversible, apart from gastric banding. Most importantly, not all adolescents seem to benefit greatly from bariatric surgery and we are not yet able to reliably identify those who stand to gain the greatest benefit. The authors agree that adolescent bariatric surgery should be offered exclusively within formal adolescent obesity programs, delivered by specialist multidisciplinary child/adolescent obesity teams, and within specialist centers, in order to optimize outcomes and minimize potential detrimental effects. Patients and their family/carers must be educated regarding the benefits and risks, potential side effects, expected changes in eating behavior and the lifelong requirement for regular medical follow-up after surgery. Before embarking upon a surgical treatment pathway in adolescents with severe obesity, it may also be beneficial to ensure compliance to treatment is demonstrated, in order to minimize the risk of nutritional deficiencies and associated potential complications.

  11. Surgeon-related factors and outcome in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, G A; Soskolne, C L; Yakimets, W W; Newman, S C

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether surgical subspecialty training in colorectal surgery or frequency of rectal cancer resection by the surgeon are independent prognostic factors for local recurrence (LR) and survival. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Variation in patient outcome in rectal cancer has been shown among centers and among individual surgeons. However, the prognostic importance of surgeon-related factors is largely unknown. METHODS: All patients undergoing potentially curative low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection for primary adenocarcinoma of the rectum between 1983 and 1990 at the five Edmonton general hospitals were reviewed in a historic-prospective study design. Preoperative, intraoperative, pathologic, adjuvant therapy, and outcome variables were obtained. Outcomes of interest included LR and disease-specific survival (DSS). To determine survival rates and to control both confounding and interaction, multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: The study included 683 patients involving 52 surgeons, with > 5-year follow-up obtained on 663 (97%) patients. There were five colorectal-trained surgeons who performed 109 (16%) of the operations. Independent of surgeon training, 323 operations (47%) were done by surgeons performing < 21 rectal cancer resections over the study period. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk of LR was increased in patients of both noncolorectal trained surgeons (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.5, p = 0.001) and those of surgeons performing < 21 resections (HR = 1.8, p < 0.001). Stage (p < 0.001), use of adjuvant therapy (p = 0.002), rectal perforation or tumor spill (p < 0.001), and vascular/neural invasion (p = 0.002) also were significant prognostic factors for LR. Similarly, decreased disease-specific survival was found to be independently associated with noncolorectal-trained surgeons (HR = 1.5, p = 0.03) and surgeons performing < 21 resections (HR = 1.4, p = 0.005). Stage (p < 0

  12. Practice patterns among thyroid cancer surgeons: implications of performing a prophylactic central neck dissection

    OpenAIRE

    Deutschmann, Michael W.; Chin-Lenn, Laura; Nakoneshny, Steven C.; Dort, Joseph C.; Pasieka, Janice L.; Chandarana, Shamir P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Indications for performing a prophylactic central neck dissection (pCND) in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) remain controversial. It is unclear how identification of lymph node (LN) metastases should impact the decision to treat with radioactive iodine (RAI). The goals of this study were to identify indications for performing pCND and identify factors that predict the use of adjuvant RAI. Methods This was a population based cross-sectional analysis. A prospectively collected databas...

  13. Open heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - open ... lung machine is used in most cases during open heart surgery. While the surgeon works on the ... with these procedures, the surgeon may have to open the chest to do the surgery.

  14. The vascular surgeon-scientist: a 15-year report of the Society for Vascular Surgery Foundation/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-mentored Career Development Award Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibbe, Melina R; Dardik, Alan; Velazquez, Omaida C; Conte, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Foundation partnered with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 1999 to initiate a competitive career development program that provides a financial supplement to surgeon-scientists receiving NIH K08 or K23 career development awards. Because the program has been in existence for 15 years, a review of the program's success has been performed. Between 1999 and 2013, 41 faculty members applied to the SVS Foundation program, and 29 from 21 different institutions were selected as awardees, resulting in a 71% success rate. Three women (10%) were among the 29 awardees. Nine awardees (31%) were supported by prior NIH F32 or T32 training grants. Awardees received their K award at an average of 3.5 years from the start of their faculty position, at the average age of 39.8 years. Thirteen awardees (45%) have subsequently received NIH R01 awards and five (17%) have received Veterans Affairs Merit Awards. Awardees received their first R01 at an average of 5.8 years after the start of their K award at the average age of 45.2 years. The SVS Foundation committed $9,350,000 to the Career Development Award Program. Awardees subsequently secured $45,108,174 in NIH and Veterans Affairs funds, resulting in a 4.8-fold financial return on investment for the SVS Foundation program. Overall, 23 awardees (79%) were promoted from assistant to associate professor in an average of 5.9 years, and 10 (34%) were promoted from associate professor to professor in an average of 5.2 years. Six awardees (21%) hold endowed professorships and four (14%) have secured tenure. Many of the awardees hold positions of leadership, including 12 (41%) as division chief and two (7%) as vice chair within a department of surgery. Eight (28%) awardees have served as president of a regional or national society. Lastly, 47 postdoctoral trainees have been mentored by recipients of the SVS Foundation Career Development

  15. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  16. Psychological and Physical Stress in Surgeons Operating in a Standard or Modern Operating Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, M.; Andersen, L.P.H.; Gögenür, Ismayil

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: There have been no studies examining the effect of optimized ergonomic and technical environment on the psychological and physiological stress of the surgeon. The aim of this study was to examine whether optimized ergonomics and technical aids within a modern operating room (OR) affect...... psychological and physiological stress in experienced laparoscopic surgeons. Methods: This was a prospective case-controlled study including 10 experienced surgeons. Surgery was performed in 2 different ORs: a standard room and a modern room (OR1-suite, Karl Storz). The surgeons filled out questionnaires...

  17. Educational backgrounds and quality of training of surgeons performing coronary artery bypass graft procedures in the state of Florida in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisle, Dennis R; Campbell, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Quality of care is in part a result of the medical education practitioners receive. To date, little research has been conducted to assess the relationship between type, quantity, and quality of postgraduate residency and fellowship training and patient outcomes. This article explores the relationship of physician training and certification and surgical outcomes of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting procedures in Florida during 2010. The data set includes 246 surgeons who, as a group, trained at nearly 48% of all thoracic surgery residency programs in the country. There were significant differences in board certifications for general surgery and thoracic surgery among physicians in different quality segmentations. Additionally, statistically significant differences were observed for mortality as a percentage of surgical volume as well as length of stay. These differences in characteristics and outcomes among segmentations of physicians warrant future exploration to identify underlying contributors to quality. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Cost and logistics of implementing a tissue-based American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery surgical skills curriculum for general surgery residents of all clinical years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Brandon; Clark, Philip; Sudan, Ranjan

    2014-02-01

    The cost and logistics of deploying the American College of Surgeons (ACS)/Association of Program Directors in Surgery (APDS) National Technical Skills Curriculum across all training years are not known. This information is essential for residency programs choosing to adopt similar curricula. A task force evaluated the authors' institution's existing simulation curriculum and enhanced it by implementing the ACS/APDS modules. A 35-module curriculum was administered to 35 general surgery residents across all 5 clinical years. The costs and logistics were noted, and resident satisfaction was assessed. The annual operational cost was $110,300 ($3,150 per resident). Cost per module, per resident was $940 for the cadaveric module compared with $220 and $240 for dry simulation and animal tissue-based modules, respectively. Resident satisfaction improved from 2.45 to 4.78 on a 5-point, Likert-type scale after implementing the ACS/APDS modules. The ACS/APDS skills curriculum was implemented successfully across all clinical years. Cadaveric modules were the most expensive. Animal and dry simulation modules were equivalent in cost. The addition of tissue-based modules was associated with high satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [The robotic surgeon training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestani, Alessandro; Rossanese, Marta; Abbinante, Maria; Calandriello, Mattia; Kungulli, Afrovita; Giannarini, Gianluca; Ficarra, Vincenzo

    2015-10-01

    The widespread robotic surgery in the world highlighted the relevance of the training programs for young urologists and residents. In the last years, urologic societies and some independent robotic surgeons strongly worked to standardize some general and specific training modules. Theoretical and practical sections of robotic training programs have been recently specified. The role of simulators, dry and wet laboratories, bedside assistance, and modular (step-by-step) training at console represent the most relevant elements of robotic surgeon training. Ideally, these didactic tools should be available in modern training centers. The development of structured robotic training programs should be considered as one of the priorities that the urologic community must take into account in the near future.

  20. IMPLEMENTING LAPAROSCOPY IN BRAZIL'S NATIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH SYSTEM: THE BARIATRIC SURGEONS' POINT OF VIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUSSENBACH, Samanta; SILVA, Everton N; PUFAL, Milene Amarante; ROSSONI, Carina; CASAGRANDE, Daniela Schaan; PADOIN, Alexandre Vontobel; MOTTIN, Cláudio Corá

    2014-01-01

    Background Although Brazilian National Public Health System (BNPHS) has presented advances regarding the treatment for obesity in the last years, there is a repressed demand for bariatric surgeries in the country. Despite favorable evidences to laparoscopy, the BNPHS only performs this procedure via laparotomy. Aim 1) Estimate whether bariatric surgeons would support the idea of incorporating laparoscopic surgery in the BNPHS; 2) If there would be an increase in the total number of surgeries performed; 3) As well as how BNPHS would redistribute both procedures. Methods A panel of bariatric surgeons was built. Two rounds to answer the structured Delphi questionnaire were performed. Results From the 45 bariatric surgeons recruited, 30 (66.7%) participated in the first round. For the second (the last) round, from the 30 surgeons who answered the first round, 22 (48.9%) answered the questionnaire. Considering the possibility that BNPHS incorporated laparoscopic surgery, 95% of surgeons were interested in performing it. Therefore, in case laparoscopic surgery was incorporated by the BNPHS there would be an average increase of 25% in the number of surgeries and they would be distributed as follows: 62.5% via laparoscopy and 37.5% via laparotomy. Conclusion 1) There was a preference by laparoscopy; 2) would increase the number of operations compared to the current model in which only the laparotomy is available to users of the public system; and 3) the distribution in relation to the type of procedure would be 62.5% and 37.5% for laparoscopy laparotomy. PMID:25409964

  1. The nature of surgeon human capital depreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockenberry, Jason M; Helmchen, Lorens A

    2014-09-01

    To test how practice interruptions affect worker productivity, we estimate how temporal breaks affect surgeons' performance of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Examining 188 surgeons who performed 56,315 CABG surgeries in Pennsylvania between 2006 and 2010, we find that a surgeon's additional day away from the operating room raised patients' inpatient mortality by up to 0.067 percentage points (2.4% relative effect) but reduced total hospitalization costs by up to 0.59 percentage points. Among emergent patients treated by high-volume providers, where temporal distance is most plausibly exogenous, an additional day away raised mortality risk by 0.398 percentage points (11.4% relative effect) but reduced cost by up to 1.4 percentage points. This is consistent with the hypothesis that as temporal distance increases, surgeons are less likely to recognize and address life-threatening complications. Our estimates imply additional intraprocedural treatment intensity has a cost per life-year preserved of $7871-18,500, well within conventional cost-effectiveness cutoffs.

  2. Surgical management of acute cholecystitis. Results of a nation-wide survey among Spanish surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Josep M; Nve, Esther; Jimeno, Jaime; Guirao, Xavier; Figueras, Joan; Arias-Díaz, Javier

    2014-10-01

    There is a wide variability in the management of acute cholecystitis. A survey among the members of the Spanish Association of Surgeons (AEC) analyzed the preferences of Spanish surgeons for its surgical management. The majority of the 771 responders didn't declare any subspecialty (41.6%), 21% were HPB surgeons, followed by colorectal and upper-GI specialities. Early cholecystectomy during the first admission is the preferred method of management of 92.3% of surgeons, but only 42.7% succeed in adopting this practice. The most frequent reasons for changing their preferred practice were: Patients not fit for surgery (43.6%) and lack of availability of emergency operating room (35.2%). A total of 88.9% perform surgery laparoscopically. The majority of AEC surgeons advise index admission cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis, although only half of them succeed in its actual implementation. There is room for improvement in the management of acute cholecystitis in Spanish hospitals.

  3. Hospital variability in postoperative mortality after rectal cancer surgery in the Spanish Association of Surgeons project: The impact of hospital volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Héctor; Biondo, Sebastiano; Codina, Antonio; Ciga, Miguel Á; Enríquez-Navascués, José M; Espín, Eloy; García-Granero, Eduardo; Roig, José Vicente

    2016-01-01

    This multicentre observational study examines variation between hospitals in postoperative mortality after elective surgery in the Rectal Cancer Project of the Spanish Society of Surgeons and explores whether hospital volume and patient characteristics contribute to any variation between hospitals. Hospital variation was quantified using a multilevel approach on prospective data derived from the multicentre database of all rectal adenocarcinomas operated by an anterior resection or an abdominoperineal excision at 84 surgical departments from 2006 to 2013. The following variables were included in the analysis; demographics, American Society of Anaesthesiologists classification, tumour location and stage, administration of neoadjuvant treatment, and annual volume of surgical procedures. A total of 9809 consecutive patients were included. The rate of 30-day postoperative mortality was 1.8% Stratified by annual surgical volume hospitals varied from 1.4 to 2.0 in 30-day mortality. In the multilevel regression analysis, male gender (OR 1.623 [1.143; 2.348]; P<.008), increased age (OR: 5.811 [3.479; 10.087]; P<.001), and ASA score (OR 10.046 [3.390; 43.185]; P<.001) were associated with 30-day mortality. However, annual surgical volume was not associated with mortality (OR 1.309 [0.483; 4.238]; P=.619). Besides, there was a statistically significant variation in mortality between all departments (MOR 1.588 [1.293; 2.015]; P<.001). Postoperative mortality varies significantly among hospitals included in the project and this difference cannot be attributed to the annual surgical volume. Copyright © 2015 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Advances in training for laparoscopic and robotic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, H.W.R.

    2011-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is rapidly becoming a standard in many surgical procedures. This surgical technique should be mastered, up to a certain level, by all surgeons. Several unique psychomotor skills are required from the surgeon in order to perform laparoscopic surgery safely. These skills can be le

  5. Advances in training for laparoscopic and robotic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, H.W.R.

    2011-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is rapidly becoming a standard in many surgical procedures. This surgical technique should be mastered, up to a certain level, by all surgeons. Several unique psychomotor skills are required from the surgeon in order to perform laparoscopic surgery safely. These skills can be

  6. Robotics and the pediatric surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorincz, Attila; Langenburg, Scott; Klein, Michael D

    2003-06-01

    Surgical robots are enabling devices for minimally invasive (laparoscopic) surgery (MIS). They use a computer to enhance a surgeon's skills as hand movements are transmitted to robotic arms. The computer filters tremor, which becomes important at high magnifications of 10 to 15 times available in MIS. It also provides motion scaling so that large hand movements are converted to very small movements of the robotic arm. The robotic arms also have wrists that make suturing and knot tying far more accurate and efficient. Surgical robots are currently used clinically for procedures such as MIS Nissen fundoplication, cholecystectomy, and splenectomy. Laboratory experience indicates that they may provide advantages for newborn procedures such as portoenterostomy for biliary atresia and repair of esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula. They have a potential for making possible MIS procedures, which can only be done open now, and for introducing entirely new procedures as well as for the performance of procedures by operators distant from the patient.

  7. Mentoring surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    From time immemorial mentoring has been the angular stone sustaining the building of medical and surgical education. Good teachers are not necessarily good mentors, and good mentors are not always good teachers. A combination of both is very plausible and should be encouraged. Today, the qualities of a good mentor, in our case the surgeon-mentor, should include respect, time, commitment, trust, determination, encouragement, patience, and opportunity for independence. The mentee would need to respond to similar virtues of trust, encouragement, and respect. The reciprocal consideration of equally divided roles would be clearly desirable. Recognizing the importance of a good mentor and making this role the priority of medical schools would enhance our ability to form better professionals. It would certainly promote professionalism, better patient care, and research.

  8. Do Surgeons Treat Their Patients Like They Would Treat Themselves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.J.; Teunis, T.; Guitton, T.G.; Ring, D.; Biert, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is substantial unexplained geographical and surgeon-to-surgeon variation in rates of surgery. One would expect surgeons to treat patients and themselves similarly based on best evidence and accounting for patient preferences. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) Are surgeons more likely to reco

  9. Ergonomics, user comfort, and performance in standard and robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schatte Olivier, R H; Van't Hullenaar, C D P; Ruurda, J P; Broeders, I A M J

    2009-06-01

    Robot-assisted surgical systems have been introduced to improve the outcome of minimally invasive surgery. These systems also have the potential to improve ergonomics for the surgeon during endoscopic surgery. This study aimed to compare the user's mental and physical comfort in performing standard laparoscopic and robot-assisted techniques. Surgical performance also was analyzed. In this study, 16 surgically inexperienced participants performed three tasks using both a robotic system and standard laparoscopic instrumentation. Distress was measured using questionnaires and an ambulatory monitoring system. Surgical performance was analyzed with time-action analysis. The physiologic parameters (p = 0.000), the questionnaires (p = 0.000), and the time-action analysis (p = 0.001) favored the robot-assisted group in terms of lower stress load and an increase in work efficiency. In this experimental setup, the use of a robot-assisted surgical system was of value in both cognitive and physical stress reduction. Robotic assistance also demonstrated improvement in performance.

  10. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... find out more. Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Oral and facial surgeons ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ...

  11. Does procedure profitability impact whether an outpatient surgery is performed at an ambulatory surgery center or hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotzke, Michael Robert; Courtemanche, Charles

    2011-07-01

    Ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) are small (typically physician owned) healthcare facilities that specialize in performing outpatient surgeries and therefore compete against hospitals for patients. Physicians who own ASCs could treat their most profitable patients at their ASCs and less profitable patients at hospitals. This paper asks if the profitability of an outpatient surgery impacts where a physician performs the surgery. Using a sample of Medicare patients from the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery, we find that higher profit surgeries do have a higher probability of being performed at an ASC compared to a hospital. After controlling for surgery type, a 10% increase in a surgery's profitability is associated with a 1.2 to 1.4 percentage point increase in the probability the surgery is performed at an ASC.

  12. Quality Management and Key Performance Indicators in Oncologic Esophageal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gockel, Ines; Ahlbrand, Constantin Johannes; Arras, Michael; Schreiber, Elke Maria; Lang, Hauke

    2015-12-01

    Ranking systems and comparisons of quality and performance indicators will be of increasing relevance for complex "high-risk" procedures such as esophageal cancer surgery. The identification of evidence-based standards relevant for key performance indicators in esophageal surgery is essential for establishing monitoring systems and furthermore a requirement to enhance treatment quality. In the course of this review, we analyze the key performance indicators case volume, radicality of resection, and postoperative morbidity and mortality, leading to continuous quality improvement. Ranking systems established on this basis will gain increased relevance in highly complex procedures within the national and international comparison and furthermore improve the treatment of patients with esophageal carcinoma.

  13. Kinematic analysis of motor performance in robot-assisted surgery: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisky, Ilana; Patil, Sangram; Hsieh, Michael H; Okamura, Allison M

    2013-01-01

    The inherent dynamics of the master manipulator of a teleoperated robot-assisted surgery (RAS) system can affect the movements of a human operator, in comparison with free-space movements. To measure the effects of these dynamics on operators with differing levels of surgical expertise, a da Vinci Si system was instrumented with a custom surgeon grip fixture and magnetic pose trackers. We compared users' performance of canonical motor control movements during teleoperation with the manipulator and freehand cursor control, and found significant differences in several aspects of motion, including target acquisition error, movement speed, and acceleration. In addition, there was preliminary evidence for differences between experts and novices. These findings could impact robot design, control, and training methods for RAS.

  14. The surgeon and the child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    For many reasons pediatric surgeons have been asked to do all general and thoracic procedures in children. The profession has responded by training more, but the core of special cases requiring pediatric surgical expertise has not changed, and there is concern that the many surgeons now in training will not each do enough cases to attain and maintain operative expertise. This presentation examines the psychological, educational, and surgical literature on the development of expertise, especially operative expertise. From this I conclude that individual surgeon volume when gained in deliberate practice with a coach and with effort is essential, and that several technologies hold promise for allowing deliberate practice in simulation environments. I propose that in order to avoid a decline in pediatric surgical operative expertise we must reorganize pediatric surgical training and practice to align with Optimal Resources for Children's Surgery and the evolution of training in general surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Objective performance measures using motion sensors on an endoscopic tool for evaluating skills in natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Lauren I; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Dargar, Saurabh; Matthes, Kai; De, Suvranu

    2013-01-01

    Natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery is an emerging procedure. High fidelity virtual reality-based simulators allow development of new surgical procedures and tools and train medical personnel without risk to human patients. As part of a project funded by the National Institutes of Health, we are developing a Virtual Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery Trainer (VTEST TM) for this purpose. In this work, objective performance measures derived from motion tracking sensors attached to an endoscope was tested for the transgastric NOTES appendectomy procedure performed with ex-vivo pig organs using the EASIE-R(TM) trainer box. Results from our study shows that both completion time and economy of motion parameters were able to differentiate between expert and novice NOTES surgeons with p value of 0.039 and 0.02 respectively. Jerk computed on sensor 2 data also showed significant results (p = 0.02). We plan to incorporate these objective performance measures in VTEST(TM).

  16. The advent of the restorative plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Matthew J; Pribaz, Julian J; Talbot, Simon G; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan

    2014-01-01

    Plastic surgery is presently typified by the existence of discrete clinical identities, namely that of the cosmetic plastic surgeon and the reconstructive plastic surgeon. The emergence of vascularized composite allotransplantation has been accompanied by the development of a third distinct clinical identity, that of the restorative plastic surgeon. The authors describe the core competencies that characterize this new identity, and discuss the implications of the advent of this new professional paradigm.

  17. Patient expectations and performance measures in dermatologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Erica H

    2016-01-01

    Patient satisfaction has increasingly played an important role in quality-of-care reforms and health care delivery. In dermatologic surgery, patient expectations of procedures and the outcomes are important determinants of satisfaction. Identification of the patient's met and unmet expectations through patient-reported outcome measures may enable a better understanding of the patient's perspective and improve communication and the delivery of care. Performance measures report on the quality of care being delivered. Performance measures currently being implemented into dermatologic practices may have a role in demonstrating the "quality" of dermatologic surgery procedures in the near future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radical nephrectomy performed by open, laparoscopy with or without hand-assistance or robotic methods by the same surgeon produces comparable perioperative results

    OpenAIRE

    Tanya Nazemi; Anton Galich; Samuel Sterrett; Douglas Klingler; Lynette Smith; Balaji, K. C.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Radical nephrectomy can be performed using open or laparoscopic (with or without hand assistance) methods, and most recently using the da Vinci Surgical Robotic System. We evaluated the perioperative outcomes using a contemporary cohort of patients undergoing radical nephrectomy by one of the above 4 methods performed by the same surgeon. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The relevant clinical information on 57 consecutive patients undergoing radical nephrectomy from September 2000 until July 2...

  19. Senior Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Resident Confidence in Performing Invasive Temporomandibular Joint Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momin, Mohmedvasim; Miloro, Michael; Mercuri, Louis G; Munaretto, Alexander; Markiewicz, Michael R

    2017-06-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of confidence that senior-level oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) residents have in the management of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, determine their exposure to various invasive TMJ procedures during training, and assess their confidence in performing those procedures on completion of residency. A questionnaire was designed, and a link to a University of Illinois at Chicago Qualtrics Survey platform (Qualtrics, Provo, UT) was e-mailed to all program directors at Commission on Dental Accreditation-accredited OMS training programs in the United States. The program directors were asked to forward the 20-multiple-choice question anonymous survey to their senior-level residents for completion. The survey included the program's demographic characteristics, resident's confidence in assessing and managing patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), resident's experience performing various invasive TMJ procedures, and whether the resident believed he or she had received sufficient education and clinical experience in the management of TMJ disorders. The data were collected and summarized by use of a standard spreadsheet analysis, as well as appropriate descriptive and analytical statistical tests. The response rate was 28.0%. Of the 56 respondents, 52 (92.9%) reported having received instruction in nonsurgical management of TMDs. All respondents confirmed that invasive TMJ procedures were performed in their program. The most commonly performed procedure was TMJ arthrocentesis (mean rating, 3.11), followed by open TMJ surgery (mean rating, 2.82). The least-performed invasive surgical procedure was autogenous total TMJ replacement surgery (mean rating, 1.39). Eighty percent of residents reported being comfortable managing the TMD patient. The only procedure with which the respondents were highly confident was TMJ arthrocentesis (mean rating, 3.89). This study suggests that confidence levels in the

  20. Stratification of complexity in congenital heart surgery: comparative study of the Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1 method, Aristotle basic score and Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardio- Thoracic Surgery (STS-EACTS mortality score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Ernando Ferraz Cavalcanti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:To determine whether stratification of complexity models in congenital heart surgery (RACHS-1, Aristotle basic score and STS-EACTS mortality score fit to our center and determine the best method of discriminating hospital mortality.Methods:Surgical procedures in congenital heart diseases in patients under 18 years of age were allocated to the categories proposed by the stratification of complexity methods currently available. The outcome hospital mortality was calculated for each category from the three models. Statistical analysis was performed to verify whether the categories presented different mortalities. The discriminatory ability of the models was determined by calculating the area under the ROC curve and a comparison between the curves of the three models was performed.Results:360 patients were allocated according to the three methods. There was a statistically significant difference between the mortality categories: RACHS-1 (1 - 1.3%, (2 - 11.4%, (3-27.3%, (4 - 50 %, (P<0.001; Aristotle basic score (1 - 1.1%, (2 - 12.2%, (3 - 34%, (4 - 64.7%, (P<0.001; and STS-EACTS mortality score (1 - 5.5 %, (2 - 13.6%, (3 - 18.7%, (4 - 35.8%, (P<0.001. The three models had similar accuracy by calculating the area under the ROC curve: RACHS-1- 0.738; STS-EACTS-0.739; Aristotle- 0.766.Conclusion:The three models of stratification of complexity currently available in the literature are useful with different mortalities between the proposed categories with similar discriminatory capacity for hospital mortality.

  1. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Exhibit Opportunities Sponsorship Opportunities Log In Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Download PDF Find a SAGES Surgeon Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Your spine surgeon has determined that you need ...

  2. Practice patterns in breast cancer surgery: Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Geoffrey A; McMulkin-Tait, Heather

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is a common disease, and the surgical management is continually evolving. The objective of this study was to describe the current breast cancer practice patterns among Canadian surgeons. All active General Surgeons (n=1172), as accredited by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, were sent a 31-item questionnaire. Anonymous responses were collected and analyzed regarding surgeon demographics, practice, and perceptions regarding surgical care of breast cancer patients. Overall 640 active surgeons responded; of these, 519 (81%) treated breast cancer and formed the study cohort. Practice settings included community (55%), community with university affiliation (28%), and academic (17%). The majority of surgeons (76%) stated that operations/month. Immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) was used by 57% of surgeons. On multivariate analysis, higher surgeon volume of breast cancer cases (p=0.0008), fellowship training in Surgical Oncology (p=0.009), community population (p=0.001), and academic practice setting (p<0.0001) were independently associated with the use of IBR. Of the 640 surgeons who responded, 79% stated that breast cancer surgery should be performed by "most general surgeons." In Canada, most breast cancer surgery was performed by general surgeons who did not appear to have an interest, as defined by training or clinical volume, in breast cancer. Although variability regarding specific surgical issues was found among subgroups of surgeons, the majority of respondents felt that most general surgeons should treat breast cancer.

  3. Tendências evolutivas dos cirurgiões de catarata presentes no IV Congresso Brasileiro de Catarata e Cirurgia Refrativa Evolutionary trends of cataract surgeons who attended the IV Brazilian Congress of Cataract and Refractive Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcony Rodrigues de Santhiago

    2009-02-01

    4.2% perform the conventional planned extracapsular cataract extraction. For 73.4% of respondents, the periocular block is preferred instead of topical anesthesia (20.2%. The most practiced phacoemulsification technique is the 4-section divide and conquer (32.0%. The hidroximetilcelulosis is the ophthalmic viscosurgical device chosen by 60.8% of respondents. The most used phaco machine is Infiniti® (24.0%, followed by Legacy® (19.8%. CONCLUSION: According to this paper is possible to suggest a tendency to high the surgeons who practice clear corneal incision and topical anesthesia. Besides that it was possible to suggest that in ten years the phacoemulsification seems to be consolidated as the surgeons's procedure of choice.

  4. Smartphones and the plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadithy, Nada; Ghosh, Sudip

    2013-06-01

    Surgical trainees are facing limited training opportunities since the introduction of the European Working Time Directive. Smartphone sales are increasing and have usurped computer sales for the first time. In this context, smartphones are an important portable reference and educational tool, already in the possession of the majority of surgeons in training. Technology in the palm of our hands has led to a revolution of accessible information for the plastic surgery trainee and surgeon. This article reviews the uses of smartphones and applications for plastic surgeons in education, telemedicine and global health. A comprehensive guide to existing and upcoming learning materials and clinical tools for the plastic surgeon is included. E-books, podcasts, educational videos, guidelines, work-based assessment tools and online logbooks are presented. In the limited resource setting of modern clinical practice, savvy plastic surgeons can select technological tools to democratise access to education and best clinical care. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Smartphone apps for orthopaedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Orrin I

    2011-07-01

    The use of smartphones and their associated applications (apps) provides new opportunities for physicians, and specifically orthopaedic surgeons, to integrate technology into clinical practice. The purpose of this study was twofold: to review all apps specifically created for orthopaedic surgeons and to survey orthopaedic residents and surgeons in the United States to characterize the need for novel apps. The five most popular smartphone app stores were searched for orthopaedic-related apps: Blackberry, iPhone, Android, Palm, and Windows. An Internet survey was sent to ACGME-accredited orthopaedic surgery departments to assess the level of smartphone use, app use, and desire for orthopaedic-related apps. The database search revealed that iPhone and Android platforms had apps specifically created for orthopaedic surgery with a total of 61 and 13 apps, respectively. Among the apps reviewed, only one had greater than 100 reviews (mean, 27), and the majority of apps had very few reviews, including AAOS Now and AO Surgery Reference, apps published by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and AO Foundation, respectively. The national survey revealed that 84% of respondents (n = 476) have a smartphone, the majority (55%) have an iPhone, and that 53% of people with smartphones already use apps in clinical practice. Ninety-six percent of respondents who use apps reported they would like more orthopaedic apps and would pay an average of nearly $30 for useful apps. The four most requested categories of apps were textbook/reference, techniques/guides, OITE/board review, and billing/coding. The use of smartphones and apps is prevalent among orthopaedic care providers in academic centers. However, few highly ranked apps specifically related to orthopaedic surgery are available, and the types of apps available do not appear to be the categories most desired by residents and surgeons.

  6. Robotic Applications in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan P. Kypson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, cardiac surgery has been performed through a median sternotomy, which allows the surgeon generous access to the heart and surrounding great vessels. As a paradigm shift in the size and location of incisions occurs in cardiac surgery, new methods have been developed to allow the surgeon the same amount of dexterity and accessibility to the heart in confined spaces and in a less invasive manner. Initially, long instruments without pivot points were used, however, more recent robotic telemanipulation systems have been applied that allow for improved dexterity, enabling the surgeon to perform cardiac surgery from a distance not previously possible. In this rapidly evolving field, we review the recent history and clinical results of using robotics in cardiac surgery.

  7. Robotic Applications in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan P. Kypson MD

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, cardiac surgery has been performed through a median sternotomy, which allows the surgeon generous access to the heart and surrounding great vessels. As a paradigm shift in the size and location of incisions occurs in cardiac surgery, new methods have been developed to allow the surgeon the same amount of dexterity and accessibility to the heart in confined spaces and in a less invasive manner. Initially, long instruments without pivot points were used, however, more recent robotic telemanipulation systems have been applied that allow for improved dexterity, enabling the surgeon to perform cardiac surgery from a distance not previously possible. In this rapidly evolving field, we review the recent history and clinical results of using robotics in cardiac surgery.

  8. Shouldice Herniorrhaphy Technique: Surgeons Need to Remember It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Dervişoğlu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hernia surgery is the second most common surgical intervention performed by general surgeons following emergent surgeries. Shouldice herniorraphy is a classical surgery which is in the high tension repair group. This technique should be known by every surgeon. Also being an alternative method, it can be a necessity in cases in which tension free methods can not be performed. In the present study we investigated the advantages, disadvantages and complications of the Shouldice herniorraphy and Lichtenstein technique with the review of the technical literature. Material and Method: We compared 75 patients who were diagnosed with inguinal hernia and treated with Lichtenstein herniorraphy with 33 patients who were treated with Shouldice herniorraphy in Samsun Bafra Public Hospital between April 2007 and May 2008. Age, sex, hernia type, anesthesia method, mean hospitalisation length, early and late post operative complications were recorded. Result: Early post operative complications were urinary retention, wound infection and hematoma. The patients under spinal anesthesia with urinary retention were treated with urinary catheterization. Superficial wound infection was treated with drainage and antibiotic threapy. Among late postoperative complications; we observed paresthesia in the thigh in one patient in the Shouldice group and relapse hernia in one patient in the Lichtenstein group. Discussion: We suggest that this surgical technique which should be known by every surgeon should be taught to new surgery attenders as an alternative technique. This technique can be an alternative method and also may be the first choice in patients in whom tension free methods can not be applicated.

  9. 15th Chapter of Surgeons Lecture: Surgeon of the new millennium--surgeon, scientist and scholar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S K

    2004-11-01

    The surgeon of the new millennium has come a long way from his humble beginnings in the Middle Ages as the lowly barber-surgeon. The skills and techniques developed by outstanding surgeons like Astley Cooper of the 19th century have withstood the test of time and have been refined by subsequent generations of surgical masters. The scientific basis of modern surgery was put on a firm footing in the early 19th century through the discovery of anaesthesia and microorganisms as a cause of many diseases and surgical complications. The 20th century brought about rapid progress in medicine, information technology (IT) and the life sciences, and closed with a big bang with the completion of the sequencing of the human genome. For the surgeon of the 21st century to remain relevant, he must embrace the concept of the Total Surgeon. Not doing so will render him irrelevant in the course of time, for having good surgical technique alone is insufficient. He must also lead in scientific endeavours to push the frontiers of the life sciences in attempts to solve the insoluble, and be scholarly in thought, attitude and behaviour. In other words, he must be a Surgeon-Scientist-Scholar.

  10. New technologies in thyroid surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Adam M; Gourin, Christine G

    2008-01-01

    Recent technological innovations are facilitating new approaches to surgery of the thyroid gland, including minimally invasive approaches that have the added advantage of allowing the surgeon to avoid drains, thus enabling outpatient surgery. Laryngeal nerve monitoring may be a useful adjunct in identification of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, particularly for the low-volume endocrine surgeon. Endoscopic surgical techniques allow improved visualization and permit thyroidectomy to be performed through small incisions, often less than 3 cm, which may improve cosmetic outcomes. Finally, surgical robotics, with the promise of further enhanced visualization and surgical dexterity better than that possible with traditional endoscopic approaches, may have future applications to thyroid surgery.

  11. Technical modifications for laparoscopic cholecystectomy by the left-handed surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Segura, Antonio; López-Tomassetti Fernández, Eudaldo M; Medina-Arana, Vicente

    2007-10-01

    There is a complete paucity of literature for left-handed surgeons. Some studies revealed that left-handed surgical residents have lesser operating skills and some surgeons have considered leaving surgery at some point in their career owing to laterality-related frustrations. Most important, whereas minimally invasive surgical techniques have had a profound impact on the treatment of diseased gallbladder, these procedures do not eliminate laterality related to the discomfort of left-handed surgeons. Usually, left-handed surgeons must teach themselves a procedure. They must make modifications and learn some technical tips to make a more comfortable, convenient, and safe intervention. The aim of this study was to describe some modifications made by a left-handed surgeon to perform 52 safe laparoscopic cholecystectomies with standard right-handed instruments in our hospital. These surgical steps could be used in a reproducible way to minimize the recurring difficulties of left-handed learners in a surgical residency program.

  12. Ambulatory spine surgery: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Evan O; Brietzke, Sasha C; Weinberg, Alan D; McAnany, Steven J; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C

    2014-08-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Objective To assess the current practices of spine surgeons performing ambulatory surgery in the United States. Methods An electronic survey was distributed to members of the International Society for the Advancement of Spine Surgery. Data were initially examined in a univariate manner; variables with a p value ambulatory spine surgery, and 49.1% were investors in an ambulatory surgery center. Surgeon investors in ambulatory surgery centers were more likely to perform procedures of increased complexity than noninvestors, though limited data precluded a statistical correlation. Surgeons in private practice were more likely to perform ambulatory surgery (94.3%; p = 0.0176), and nonacademic surgeons were both more likely to invest in ambulatory surgery centers (p = 0.0024) and perform surgery at least part of the time in a surgery center (p = 0.0039). Conclusions Though the numbers were too few to calculate statistical significance, there was a trend toward the performance of high-risk procedures on an ambulatory basis being undertaken by those with investment status in an ambulatory center. It is possible that this plays a role in the decision to perform these procedures in this setting versus that of a hospital, where a patient may have better access to care should a complication arise requiring emergent assessment and treatment by a physician. This decision should divest itself of financial incentives and focus entirely on patient safety.

  13. Gynaecomastia surgery in the Netherlands: what, why, who, where….

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapid, Oren; Klinkenbijl, Jean H G; Oomen, Matthijs W N; van Wingerden, Jan J

    2014-05-01

    Gynaecomastia, breast enlargement in men, is common in all age groups. It is operated on by plastic surgeons, general surgeons and paediatric surgeons. It is therefore possible that there is a difference in the populations treated, the indications for surgery and the management used by the different practitioners. We performed a survey in order to assess the approach to treatment of gynaecomastia by the different disciplines. An electronic survey questionnaire was sent to members of the Dutch societies of surgery, paediatric surgery and plastic surgery. We received 105 responses from plastic surgeons, 95 from general surgeons and 15 from paediatric surgeons, representing respective response rates of 38.7%, 23.8% and 42.8%. Plastic surgeons operated on gynaecomastia most frequently. The diagnostic criteria and workup were similar for all disciplines, although general surgeons used more imaging. There was a difference in the side operated on. General surgeons and paediatric surgeons operated mainly on unilateral cases (74% and 52%), while plastic surgeons operated mainly on bilateral cases (85%). Pharmaceutical treatment with Tamoxifen was reported only by general surgeons (13%). All disciplines used mainly the periareolar incision. Plastic surgeons reported more often the use of other surgical approaches as well as adjunctive liposuction and they did not always submit tissue for pathological examination. Perioperative antibiotics, drains and pressure garments were not always used. All disciplines agreed that the most common complication was bleeding, followed by seroma, infection, insufficient results, inverted nipple and nipple necrosis. This survey highlights some differences in the practice of gynaecomastia surgery. The findings appear to point to the fact that the indications are different, being more aesthetic in the case of plastic surgeons. The results of this survey are important in establishing the standard of care and may be helpful for setting guidelines.

  14. Clinical outcomes and costs of cataract surgery performed by planned ECCE and phacoemulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, X; Comas, M; Castilla, M; Cots, F; Alarcón, S

    1998-01-01

    To compare clinical outcomes and costs of cataract surgery between patients operated with standard extracapsular extraction (ECCE) and those undergoing phacoemulsification. Patients from the Ophthalmology Department of a teaching hospital in Barcelona (Spain) scheduled for cataract surgery, not combined with any other ophthalmic procedure. A retrospective analysis has been performed on a database of 1046 patients undergoing ECCE and phacoemulsification. The outcome measures used were: surgical complications, visual acuity and costs of surgery and of follow-up. Overall rate of all complications and postoperative visual acuity were compared between the two groups, adjusting for age, preoperative visual acuity, medical and ocular comorbidity. 31.9% of the patients (334) underwent phacoemulsification, and 68.1% (712) underwent ECCE. Patients undergoing phacoemulsification presented a frequency of intra- and postoperative complications lower than those undergoing ECCE (odds ratio 0.57, 95%CI 0.37-0.87 and 0.66, 95%CI 0.46-0.96, respectively), specifically for intraoperative iris trauma (3.1% vs 0.3%, p = 0.004), residual posterior capsular opacity (2% vs 0.3%, p = 0.035) and postoperative corneal edema (7.4% vs 3.6%, p = 0.016). Costs of intervention and follow-up were lower for phacoemulsification compared with ECCE (23.9% and 14%, respectively). But global costs were slightly higher for phacoemulsification (4.87%), due to supply costs, which were more than twice those of ECCE. Phacoemulsification, when performed by an experienced surgeon, has better clinical outcomes than planned extracapsular extraction, and costs may be lower since supply costs are expected to decrease as the phacoemulsification technique becomes more widespread.

  15. The effect of a performance-based intra-procedural checklist on a simulated emergency laparoscopic task in novice surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Boghdady, Michael; Tang, Benjie; Alijani, Afshin

    2016-09-01

    Surgical checklists are in use as means to reduce errors. Checklists are infrequently applied during emergency situations in surgery. We aimed to study the effect of a simple self-administered performance-based checklist on the laparoscopic task when applied during an emergency-simulated scenario. The aviation checklist for unexpected situations is commonly used for simulated training of pilots to handle emergency during flights. This checklist was adopted for use as a standardised-performance-based checklist during emergency surgical tasks. Thirty consented laparoscopic novices were exposed unexpectedly to a bleeding vessel in a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator as an emergency scenario. The task consisted of using laparoscopic clips to achieve haemostasis. Subjects were randomly allocated into two equal groups; those using the checklist that was applied once every 20 s (checklist group) and those without (control group). The checklist group performed significantly better in 5 out of 7 technical factors when compared to the control group: right instrument path length (m), median (IQR) 1.44 [1.22] versus 2.06 [1.70] (p = 0.029), right instrument angular path (degree) 312.10 (269.44 versus 541.80 [455.16] (p = 0.014), left instrument path length (m) 1.20 [0.60] versus 2.08 [2.02] (p = 0.004), and left instrument angular path (degree) 277.62 [132.11] versus 385.88 [428.42] (p = 0.017). The checklist group committed significantly fewer number of errors in the application of haemostatic clips, 3 versus 28 (p = 0.006). Although statistically not significant, total blood loss (lit) decreased in the checklist group from 0.83 [1.23] to 0.78 [0.28] (p = 0.724) and total time (sec) from 186.51 [145.69] to 125.14 [101.46] (p = 0.165). The performance-based intra-procedural checklist significantly enhanced the surgical task performance of novices in an emergency-simulated scenario.

  16. Comparison of pediatric surgical outcomes by the surgeon's degree of specialization in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Daniel; Papandria, Dominic; Yang, Jessica; Zhang, Yiyi; Ortega, Gezzer; Colombani, Paul M; Chang, David C; Abdullah, Fizan

    2013-08-01

    Improved surgical outcomes in children have been associated with pediatric surgical specialization, previously defined by surgeon operative volume or fellowship training. The present study evaluates pediatric surgical outcomes through classifying surgeons by degrees of pediatric versus adult operative experience. A cross-sectional study was performed using nationally representative hospital discharge data from 1998 to 2007. Patients under 18 years of age undergoing inpatient operations in neurosurgery, otolaryngology, cardiothoracic, general surgery, orthopedic surgery, and urology were included. An index was created, calculating the proportion of children treated by each surgeon. In-hospital mortality and length of stay were compared by index quartiles. Multivariate analysis was adjusted for patient and hospital characteristics. A total of 119,164 patients were operated on by 13,141 surgeons. Within cardiothoracic surgery, there were 1.78 (p=0.02) and 2.61 (ppediatric specialization respectively with the highest quartile. For general surgery, a 2.15 (p=0.04) increase in odds for mortality was found when comparing surgeons between the lowest and the highest quartiles. Comparing the least to the most specialized surgeons, length of stay increased 1.14 days (p=0.02) for cardiothoracic surgery, 0.58 days (p=0.04) for neurosurgery, 0.23 days (p=0.02) for otolaryngology, and decreased by 1.06 days (psurgery. The present study demonstrates that surgeons caring preferentially for children-as a proportion of their overall practice-generally have improved mortality outcomes in general and cardiothoracic surgery. These data suggest a benefit associated with increased referral of children to pediatric practitioners, but further study is required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Performance analysis of exam gloves used for aseptic rodent surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMoine, Dana M; Bergdall, Valerie K; Freed, Carrie

    2015-05-01

    Aseptic technique includes the use of sterile surgical gloves for survival surgeries in rodents to minimize the incidence of infections. Exam gloves are much less expensive than are surgical gloves and may represent a cost-effective, readily available option for use in rodent surgery. This study examined the effectiveness of surface disinfection of exam gloves with 70% isopropyl alcohol or a solution of hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid (HP-PA) in reducing bacterial contamination. Performance levels for asepsis were met when gloves were negative for bacterial contamination after surface disinfection and sham 'exertion' activity. According to these criteria, 94% of HP-PA-disinfected gloves passed, compared with 47% of alcohol-disinfected gloves. In addition, the effect of autoclaving on the integrity of exam gloves was examined, given that autoclaving is another readily available option for aseptic preparation. Performance criteria for glove integrity after autoclaving consisted of: the ability to don the gloves followed by successful simulation of wound closure and completion of stretch tests without tearing or observable defects. Using this criteria, 98% of autoclaved nitrile exam gloves and 76% of autoclaved latex exam gloves met performance expectations compared with the performance of standard surgical gloves (88% nitrile, 100% latex). The results of this study support the use of HP-PA-disinfected latex and nitrile exam gloves or autoclaved nitrile exam gloves as viable cost-effective alternatives to sterile surgical gloves for rodent surgeries.

  18. 韦伯斯特与中国整形外科的蕴育%American surgeon J.P.Webster and the beginning of plastic surgery in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡俊; 甄橙; 李东

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究美国医生韦伯斯特在中国整形外科早期发展过程中所扮演的角色和所起的作用.方法 通过查阅哥伦比亚大学图书馆馆藏档案资料、检索相关文献、资料分析并辅以口述历史的研究方法.结果 获得了韦伯斯特两次来华的经历资料和1948年上海整形外科学习班的细节.了解了参加过这次学习班的中围医生以后所从事的工作,特别是朱洪荫、汪良能和张涤生.客观评价了韦伯斯特在中国整形外科学的发展上所起到的作用.结论 韦伯斯特于20世纪20年代较早地在北京协和医院开展整形外科临床实践,后又通过上海整形外科学习班启发了中国最早一批专门从事整形外科的医生.%Objective To investigate the role of American plastic surgeon Jerome P. Webster in the history of plastic surgery in China. Methods The archives stored in J. P. Webster' s library and documents are analyzed and information is also collected by interviewing some senior plastic surgeon ( oral history). Results The experience of Webster in China for two times and the documents about the Shanghai plastic surgery course in 1948 were acquired. The doctors who participated the Shanghai plastic surgery course were studied for their career, especially Hongyin Zhu, Liangneng Wang, and Disheng Zhang. The role of Webster in the development of plastic surgery in China was evaluated objectively. Conclusions Webster started his career in Peking Union Medical College at early 1920s, who went back to China in 1948 to enlighten the first group of Chinese plastic surgeon in Shanghai plastic surgery course.

  19. Paying surgeons less has cost more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Joseph; Derman, Peter

    2012-12-01

    The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 mandated reductions in physician reimbursement. This reduction in payments could be envisioned to limit expenditures on 2 counts: first, individual fees would be lower, producing inherent savings. Furthermore, reducing fees should depress the incentive to work, thereby generating additional savings from reduced output. A rival point of view holds that lower fees might paradoxically lead to greater spending because surgeons compensate for per-case reductions by performing more cases. If this income-targeting hypothesis is correct, lower per-case fees leads to increased volume. Increased work output has particularly sizable economic effects in fields like orthopedic surgery because the total cost of orthopedic interventions is usually many times larger than the physician's fee (largely owing to the cost of implants). As such, increases in work volume more than negate the potential savings from lower surgeon's fees.This phenomenon was studied in the context of total knee arthroplasty. In the decade spanning 1996 to 2005, inflation-adjusted physician reimbursement decreased by approximately 5% per year, leading to a cumulative drop in reimbursement from $2847 to $1685. Nonetheless, because the number of procedures performed increased from 253,841 to 498,169 and because payments to hospitals far exceeded payments to surgeons, total expenditures for total knee arthroplasty increased dramatically: more than $7.1 billion additional was spent on hospital payments. Continuing to pay surgeons less is apt to continue to cost more. Counter to intuition, the best strategy for controlling overall spending might be higher, not lower, surgical fees.

  20. Surgeon and nonsurgeon personalities at different career points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosdeck, Joseph M; Osayi, Sylvester N; Peterson, Laura A; Yu, Lianbo; Ellison, Edwin Christopher; Muscarella, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated correlations between personality traits and job performance and satisfaction. Evidence suggests that personality differences exist between surgeons and nonsurgeons, some of which may develop during medical training. Understanding these personality differences may help optimize job performance and satisfaction among surgical trainees and be used to identify individuals at risk of burnout. This study aims to identify personality traits of surgeons and nonsurgeons at different career points. We used The Big Five Inventory, a 44-item measure of the five factor model. Personality data and demographics were collected from responses to an electronic survey sent to all faculty and house staff in the Departments of Surgery, Medicine, and Family Medicine at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. Data were analyzed to identify differences in personality traits between surgical and nonsurgical specialties according to level of training and to compare surgeons to the general population. One hundred ninety-two house staff and faculty in surgery and medicine completed the survey. Surgeons scored significantly higher on conscientiousness and extraversion but lower on agreeableness compared to nonsurgeons (all P personality differences between surgical and nonsurgical specialties. The use of personality testing may be a useful adjunct in the residency selection process for applicants deciding between surgical and nonsurgical specialties. It may also facilitate early intervention for individuals at high risk for burnout and job dissatisfaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Branding of vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perler, Bruce A

    2008-03-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery surveyed primary care physicians (PCPs) to understand how PCPs make referral decisions for their patients with peripheral vascular disease. Responses were received from 250 PCPs in 44 states. More than 80% of the respondents characterized their experiences with vascular surgeons as positive or very positive. PCPs perceive that vascular surgeons perform "invasive" procedures and refer patients with the most severe vascular disease to vascular surgeons but were more than twice as likely to refer patients to cardiologists, believing they are better able to perform minimally invasive procedures. Nevertheless, PCPs are receptive to the notion of increasing referrals to vascular surgeons. A successful branding campaign will require considerable education of referring physicians about the totality of traditional vascular and endovascular care increasingly provided by the contemporary vascular surgical practice and will be most effective at the local grassroots level.

  2. The ergonomics of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) navigation in terms of performance, stress, and cognitive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, David R C; Orihuela-Espina, Felipe; Leff, Daniel R; Sodergren, Mikael H; Athanasiou, Thanos; Darzi, Ara W; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2011-04-01

    The evolution toward minimally invasive surgery and subsequently to natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) poses challenges to the surgeon in terms of increased task complexity requiring greater visuospatial and navigational ability. Neuroergonomics is the study of the brain and behavior at work, and establishing the baseline cortical response for NOTES procedures will help to ascertain whether technological innovation such as navigational aids can alleviate the task-induced cognitive burden. The aims of the current study are to characterize the impact of navigation within a NOTES environment on the subject in terms of (1) performance, (2) stress, (3) prefrontal cortical activity, and (4) how this is influenced by expertise. In all, 29 subjects were assessed for performance, stress response, and prefrontal cortical activity during a NOTES navigational task within a validated NOTES simulator. Experts performed significantly better than novices (P < .05). Expertise was not a predictor for overall changes in prefrontal cortical activity. The differences between experts and novices were modulated by the location of prefrontal cortical activity, with experts demonstrating more pronounced lateral prefrontal cortical activation compared with novices. Stress was not an independent predictor of changes in prefrontal cortical hemodynamics. This study is the first to characterize the performance, stress, and neurocognitive behavior associated with natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery navigation. The results indicate the relevance of visuospatial centers in successful task execution, and they serve as a baseline within the neuroergonomic paradigm for investigating performance-enhancing technology. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 21 CFR 878.4470 - Surgeon's gloving cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgeon's gloving cream. 878.4470 Section 878.4470...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4470 Surgeon's gloving cream. (a) Identification. Surgeon's gloving cream is an ointment intended to be used to lubricate the...

  4. Report from the Committee for Improving the Work Environment of Japanese Surgeons: survey on effects of the fee revision for medical services provided by surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Tominaga, Ryuji; Nio, Masaki; Iwanaka, Tadashi; Okoshi, Kae; Kaneko, Koichi; Nagano, Hiroaki; Nishida, Takahiro; Nishida, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Ken; Maehara, Tadaaki; Masuda, Munetaka; Matsufuji, Hiroshi; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Tabayashi, Koichi; Satomi, Susumu; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to achieve improvements in the work environment of Japanese surgeons and shortage of surgeons. Questionnaires were distributed to selected Japanese surgical Society (JSS) members. Retrospective analysis was conducted comparing the current 2011 survey with previous 2007 survey. To examine the influence of 2010 revision of the fee for medical services performed by surgeons, we distributed a second questionnaire to directors of hospitals and administrators of clerks belonging to official institutes in JSS. Collective data were analyzed retrospectively. The main potential causes for the shortage of surgeons in Japan were long hours (72.8 %), excessive emergency surgeries (69.4 %), and high risk of lawsuit (67.7 %). Mean weekly working hours of surgeons in national or public university hospitals and private university hospitals were 96.2 and 85.6, respectively. Approximately 70 % of surgeons were forced to do hardworking tasks, possibly leading to death from overwork. Of note, approximately 25 % of surgeons had over time of more than 100 h a week, coinciding to the number of hours that might lead to death from fatigue, described in the Japanese labor law. Although the total medical service fee in hospitals, especially in large-scale hospitals with more than 500 beds, increased markedly after 2010 revision of the fee for medical services performed by surgeons, few hospitals gave perquisites and/or incentives to surgeons. To prevent and avoid collapse of the surgical specialty in Japan, an improvement in the work environment of surgeons by initiation of the JSS would be required as soon as possible.

  5. Hypnosis-induced mental training improves performance on the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Gideon; Arnon, Zahi; Laniado, Monica; Schiff, Elad; Matter, Ibrahim

    2015-05-01

    Mental training (MT) is used extensively by musicians and athletes to improve their performance. Recently, it has been suggested as a training method for surgical trainees. We assessed the influence of MT, induced by hypnosis, on the performance of simulated tasks on a laparoscopic simulator, as compared to a non-specific relaxing intervention. 11 surgeons completed a proficiency-based training program on the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) simulator, until they reached performance plateau of the peg transfer task. Thereafter, they received a single music session, as a relaxing intervention, followed by repeating of the peg transfer task. Then they went through a hypnosis session guided by an experienced psychologist, with suggestions of smooth flow of pegs from one position on the board to another, and re-performed the task. Plateau performance was 51.1 ± 6.9 s. After the music session performance improved by 6.3% to 47.9 ± 5.4 s (p = 0.86). After the MT session performance further improved by 15.3% to 40.1 ± 5.8 s (p = 0.009), which was a 21.6% improvement from baseline (p Hypnosis-induced MT significantly improves performance on the FLS simulator, which cannot be attributed to its relaxing qualities alone. This study contributes evidence to the effectiveness of MT in surgical skills acquisition and suggests that hypnotic techniques should be used in mental preparation processes. There is a need to further study these effects on operating room performance.

  6. Surgeon-performed touch preparation of breast core needle biopsies may provide accurate same-day diagnosis and expedite treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Pranjali V; Korourian, Soheila; Malak, Sharp; Ochoa, Daniela; Lipschitz, Riley; Henry-Tillman, Ronda; Suzanne Klimberg, V

    2014-04-01

    We aimed to determine the accuracy of surgeon-performed touch-preparation cytology (TPC) of breast core-needle biopsies (CNB) and the ability to use TPC results to initiate treatment planning at the same patient visit. A single-institution retrospective review of TPC results of ultrasound-guided breast CNB was performed. All TPC slides were prepared by surgeons performing the biopsy and interpreted by the pathologist. TPC results were reported as positive/suspicious, atypical, negative/benign, or deferred; these were compared with final pathology of cores to calculate accuracy. Treatment planning was noted as having taken place if the patient had requisition of advanced imaging, referrals, or surgical planning undertaken during the same visit. Four hundred forty-seven CNB specimens with corresponding TPC were evaluated from 434 patient visits, and 203 samples (45.4 %) were malignant on final pathology. When the deferred, atypical, and benign results were considered negative and positive/suspicious results were considered positive, sensitivity and specificity were 83.7 % (77.9-88.5 %) and 98.4 % (95.9-99.6 %), respectively; positive and negative predictive values were 97.7 % (94.2-99.4 %) and 87.9 % (83.4-91.5 %), respectively. In practice, patients with atypical or deferred results were asked to await final pathology. An accurate same-day diagnosis (TPC positive/suspicious) was hence feasible in 83.7 % (170 of 203) of malignant and 79.5 % (194 of 244) of benign cases (TPC negative). Of patients who had a same-day diagnosis of a new malignancy, 77.3 % had treatment planning initiated at the same visit. Surgeon-performed TPC of breast CNB is an accurate method of same-day diagnosis that allows treatment planning to be initiated at the same visit and may serve to expedite patient care.

  7. Outcomes of manual extracapsular versus phacoemulsification cataract extraction by beginner resident surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Landen A; Blomquist, Preston H; Sullivan, Brian R

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of phacoemulsification cataract extraction and manual extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) performed by beginning resident surgeons. Dallas Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA. Retrospective cohort study. A review was performed of each resident's series of initial cataract surgery procedures as a late first-year or second-year resident. Data were collected for cases performed over almost a 6-year period during which initially the first primary surgeon cases were ECCE and later, the first primary surgeon cases were phacoemulsification. For each case, the following data were gathered: technique of cataract extraction, laterality, resident, vitreous loss or dropped nucleus, placement of posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL), and need for reoperation within 90 days of surgery. Complications occurred in 6 (2.5%) of 244 cases in which phacoemulsification was performed by a beginner resident primary surgeon and in 7 (4.1%) of 172 cases in which ECCE was used (P=.40). Posterior chamber IOLs were placed in all but 2 phacoemulsification cases and 4 ECCE cases (P=.24). Moreover, 3 cases in the phacoemulsification group and 1 case in the ECCE group required a reoperation within 90 days (P=.65). Phacoemulsification cataract extraction can be taught safely and effectively to residents with no cataract surgery experience as a primary surgeon. Copyright © 2013 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ergonomics in laparoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supe Avinash

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic surgery provides patients with less painful surgery but is more demanding for the surgeon. The increased technological complexity and sometimes poorly adapted equipment have led to increased complaints of surgeon fatigue and discomfort during laparoscopic surgery. Ergonomic integration and suitable laparoscopic operating room environment are essential to improve efficiency, safety, and comfort for the operating team. Understanding ergonomics can not only make life of surgeon comfortable in the operating room but also reduce physical strains on surgeon.

  9. The surgeon and human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Jens; Kalangu, Kazadi K N

    2003-08-01

    The moral dilemmas faced by surgeons worldwide who treat patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be viewed against the background of experience in sub-Saharan countries, where the community prevalence is in excess of 25% (90% of hospital inpatients). When seeking consent for an HIV test before surgery, frank communication regarding the surgeons' perspective of risks to themselves and the patient is helpful. When consent for a test must be obtained from a substitute decision-maker, the surgeon should consider if the patient would want the decision-maker to know the result. Understanding the natural history of HIV in the surgical setting can help deal with the uncertainties encountered and should be a research priority for developing countries. International professional organizations are useful platforms for the exchange of ideas when surgeons encounter uncertainty by increasing access to journals and creating opportunities for discussion. Although supervisory bodies in some parts of the world prevent HIV-infected surgeons from putting patients at risk by offering surgery, the withdrawal of their services in developing countries can cause more harm than good. Surgeons in that position may be entitled to offer surgery but only with full disclosure of the risk of HIV infection to the patient. The decision-making process known as "accountability for reasonableness" allows surgeons to determine fairness, legitimacy, and acceptability when making resource allocation decisions involving patients with HIV.

  10. [Beginnings of bariatric and metabolic surgery in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltasar, Aniceto; Domínguez-Adame, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    When bariatric and metabolic surgery initially began in Spain, it was a subject of debate, due to not knowing exactly who were the first surgeons to perform it. A study has revealed the authors of the first interventions.

  11. Comparison of patient and surgeon expectations of total hip arthroplasty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Jourdan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Analysis of discrepancies between patient and surgeon expectations before total hip arthroplasty (THA should enable a better understanding of motives of dissatisfaction about surgery, but this question has been seldom studied. Our objectives were to compare surgeons' and patients' expectations before THA, and to study factors which affected surgeon-patient agreement. METHODS: 132 adults (mean age 62.8+/-13.7 years, 52% men on waiting list for THA in three tertiary care centres and their 16 surgeons were interviewed to assess their expectations using the Hospital for Special Surgery Total Hip Replacement Expectations Survey (range 0-100. Patients' and surgeons' answers were compared, for the total score and for the score of each item. Univariate analyses tested the effect of patients' characteristics on surgeons' and patients' expectations separately, and on surgeon-patient differences. RESULTS: Surgeon and patient expectations' mean scores were high (respectively 90.9+/-11.1 and 90.0+/-11.6 over 100. Surgeons' and patients' expectations showed no systematic difference, but there was little agreement on Bland and Altman graph and correlation coefficient was low. Patients had higher expectations than surgeons for sports. Patients rated their expectations according to trust in physician and mental quality of life, surgeons considered disability. More disabled patients and patients from a low-income professional category were often "more optimistic" than their surgeons. CONCLUSION: Surgeons and patients often do not agree on what to expect from THA. More disabled patients expect better outcomes than their surgeons.

  12. Robotics and allied technologies in endoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buess, G F; Schurr, M O; Fischer, S C

    2000-02-01

    Endoscopic surgery was developed in the 1970s and 1980s, with initial work conducted by pioneering surgeons. After the development of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, the breakthrough of endoscopic surgery had a great effect on all surgical specialties. Starting with rather simple procedures, such as cholecystectomy, a rapid progression toward more complex procedures, such as reflux or colonic surgery, took place. It was realized at this time that the existing endoscopic instruments allowed only a limited preciseness when performing the procedures, and part of the information from inside the abdominal cavity was not available to the surgeon. This prompted a discussion with engineers concerning the development of more advanced technologies to give those performing endoscopic surgery the same quality of information and manipulation that surgeons have when performing open surgery. These qualities include (1) instruments and manipulators that allow surgical action under endoscopic control with all degrees of freedom; (2) devices that provide surgeons with tactile feedback; and (3) vision systems that provide surgeons with the same quality of visual information as with open surgery, namely, high resolution, excellent color quality, precise spatial information, and a constant clear view for optimal surgical action. At the end of 1999, some of the aforementioned quality concepts found their way into the surgical routine, but most of the concepts are still being developed. Another decade will pass before endoscopic surgery procedures will be closer to the technological goals.

  13. Cirurgia ortognática: orientações legais aos ortodontistas e cirurgiões bucofaciais Orthognathic surgery: legal orientations to orthodontists and bucomaxilofacial surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina de Oliveira Ribas

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores entrevistaram especialistas em Ortodontia e em Cirurgia Bucomaxilofacial, elaboraram uma lista de ocorrências específicas do dia-a-dia do exercício da especialidade, redigindo, com base na legislação vigente e na literatura, uma série de orientações, atitudes e comportamentos que sugerem como rotina aos profissionais.The authors created a highligths list with the day-by-day working, focusing the law and literature review suggesting some attitudes involved with orthognathic treatment cases. Data came from orthodontists and bucomaxilofacial surgeon experts interviews and literature

  14. Thoracic surgery in the real world: does surgical specialty affect outcomes in patients having general thoracic operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Victor A; Saha, Sibu P; Davenport, Daniel L; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2012-04-01

    Most general thoracic operations in the United States are performed by general surgeons. Results obtained by those identified as general surgeons are often compared with those identified as thoracic surgeons. We interrogated the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database over a 5-year period to compare outcomes in patients who underwent similar operations by surgeons identified as either thoracic surgeons or general surgeons. We employed propensity-score matching to minimize confounding when estimating the effect of surgeon identity on postoperative outcomes. During the study period, thoracic surgeons performed 3,263 major pulmonary or esophageal operations, and general surgeons performed 15,057 similar operations. Compared with patients operated on by general surgeons, patients operated on by thoracic surgeons had significant excess multivariate comorbidities, including insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, concurrent pneumonia, congestive heart failure, previous cardiac surgery, dialysis-dependent renal failure, disseminated cancer, prior sepsis, and previous operation within 30 days. Likewise, patients in highest risk categories had operations performed by thoracic surgeons more commonly than by general surgeons. Unadjusted comparisons for mortality and serious morbidity showed significantly worse mortality and pulmonary complications in patients operated on by thoracic surgeons. However, with propensity matching according to surgeon type, thoracic surgeons had significantly fewer serious adverse outcomes compared with general surgeons, and this decreased morbidity occurred in a higher risk cohort. Our results show that patients operated on by thoracic surgeons have higher acuity compared with patients operated on by general surgeons. When patients are matched for comorbidities and serious preoperative risk factors, thoracic surgeons have improved outcomes, especially with regard to

  15. Ergonomic factors on task performance in laparoscopic surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, D J; Jakimowicz, Jack J; Albayrak, A; Goossens, R H M

    2012-05-01

    This paper evaluates the effect of ergonomic factors on task performance and trainee posture during laparoscopic surgery training. Twenty subjects without laparoscopic experience were allotted into 2 groups. Group 1 was trained under the optimal ergonomic simulation setting according to current ergonomic guidelines (Condition A). Group 2 was trained under non-optimal ergonomic simulation setting that can often be observed during training in a skills lab (Condition B). Posture analysis showed that the subjects held a much more neutral posture under Condition A than under Condition B (poptimal ergonomic simulation setting leads to better task performance. In addition, no significant differences of task performance, for Groups 1 and 2 using the same test setting were found. However, better performance was observed for Group 1. It can be concluded that the optimal and non-optimal training setting have different learning effects on trainees' skill learning.

  16. How many orthopedic surgeons does it take to write a research article? 50 years of authorship proliferation in and internationalization of the orthopedic surgery literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Luthfur; Muirhead-Allwood, Sarah K

    2010-07-13

    Publications are considered to indicate academic achievement and can lead to various rewards, including job opportunities and research funding. Recent years have seen a rising trend in the number of articles published, multiple authorship, and internationalization of the biomedical literature. The goal of this study was to analyze the trends in authorship over the past 50 years to determine whether the orthopedic literature parallels trends seen in other areas of the biomedical literature. We performed an observational study with analysis of the number of authors and geographic origin of articles published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery British Volume (JBJS) and Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research (CORR). We analyzed 2776 articles (CORR, n=1809; JBJS, n=967) published between 1958 and 2008 at 10-year intervals. There has been a significant increase in the mean number of authors per article from 1.638 to 4.08 (P<.0001) and 1.633 to 4.540 (P<.0001) for CORR and JBJS, respectively between 1958 and 2008. There has been a significant increase in the international contribution to both journals (P<.0001). The number of countries contributing to articles increased from 5 to 39 and from 17 to 33 for CORR and JBJS, respectively. These findings are similar to other areas of the biomedical literature. The reasons for this proliferation are multifactorial, including multicenter trials and inappropriate authorship. Guidelines for authorship and preparation of manuscripts from the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors or from individual journals are widely available, and every effort should be made to adhere to them to prevent inappropriate authorship proliferation in the future.

  17. Physical Therapy and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Onate, Rafael; Ward, Michael M.; Kerr, Gail S.

    2012-01-01

    Physical therapy and orthopedic surgery are important components in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Supervised physical therapy is more effective that individual or unsupervised exercise in improving symptoms, but controlled trials suggest than combined inpatient and outpatient therapy provides the greatest improvement. Recommendations for exercise are universal, but the best types and sequence of therapies are not known. Total hip replacement is the surgery most commonly performed for AS, with good long-term implant survival. Heterotopic ossification may occur no more frequently after hip replacement in patients with AS than in patients with other diseases. Corrective spinal surgery is rarely performed and requires specialized centers and experienced surgeons. PMID:22543536

  18. Think small: nanotechnology for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Amir R; Brenner, Sara A

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the topic of nanotechnology to plastic surgeons and to discuss its relevance to medicine in general and plastic surgery in particular. Nanotechnology will be defined, and some important historical milestones discussed. Common applications of nanotechnology in various medical and surgical subspecialties will be reviewed. Future applications of nanotechnology to plastic surgery will be examined. Finally, the critical field of nanotoxicology and the safe use of nanotechnology in medicine and plastic surgery will be addressed.

  19. Worldwide practice in gastric cancer surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenkman, Hylke Jf; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ruurda, Jelle P; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the current status of gastric cancer surgery worldwide. METHODS: An international cross-sectional survey on gastric cancer surgery was performed amongst international upper gastro-intestinal surgeons. All surgical members of the International Gastric Cancer Association were invited

  20. Incidence, Predictors, and Postoperative Complications of Blood Transfusion in Thoracic and Lumbar Fusion Surgery: An Analysis of 13,695 Patients from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoude, Ahmed; Nooh, Anas; Fortin, Maryse; Aldebeyan, Sultan; Jarzem, Peter; Ouellet, Jean; Weber, Michael H

    2016-12-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Objective To identify predictive factors for blood transfusion and associated complications in lumbar and thoracic fusion surgeries. Methods The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database was used to identify patients who underwent lumbar or thoracic fusion from 2010 to 2013. Multivariate analysis was used to determine predictive factors and postoperative complications associated with transfusion. Results Out of 13,695 patients, 13,170 had lumbar fusion and 525 had thoracic fusion. The prevalence of transfusion was 31.8% for thoracic and 17.0% for lumbar fusion. The multivariate analysis showed that age between 50 and 60, age between 61 and 70, age > 70, dyspnea, American Society of Anesthesiologists class 3, bleeding disease, multilevel surgery, extended surgical time, return to operation room, and higher preoperative blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were predictors of blood transfusion for lumbar fusion. Multilevel surgery, preoperative BUN, and extended surgical time were predictors of transfusion for thoracic fusion. Patients receiving transfusions who underwent lumbar fusion were more likely to develop wound infection, venous thromboembolism, pulmonary embolism, and myocardial infarction and had longer hospital stay. Patients receiving transfusions who underwent thoracic fusion were more likely to have extended hospital stay. Conclusion This study characterizes incidence, predictors, and postoperative complications associated with blood transfusion in thoracic and lumbar fusion. Pre- and postoperative planning for patients deemed to be at high risk of requiring blood transfusion might reduce postoperative complications in this population.

  1. Tele-surgery simulation with a patient organ model for robotic surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, S; Suzuki, N; Hattori, A; Hayashibe, M; Konishi, K; Kakeji, Y; Hashizume, M

    2005-12-01

    Robotic systems are increasingly being incorporated into general laparoscopic and thoracoscopic surgery to perform procedures such as cholecystectomy and prostatectomy. Robotic assisted surgery allows the surgeon to conduct minimally invasive surgery with increased accuracy and with potential benefits for patients. However, current robotic systems have their limitations. These include the narrow operative field of view, which can make instrument manipulation difficult. Current robotic applications are also tailored to specific surgical procedures. For these reasons, there is an increasing demand on surgeons to master the skills of instrument manipulation and their surgical application within a controlled environment. This study describes the development of a surgical simulator for training and mastering procedures performed with the da Vinci surgical system. The development of a tele-surgery simulator and the construction of a training center are also described, which will enable surgeons to simulate surgery from or in remote places, to collaborate over long distances, and for off-site expert assistance.

  2. Kant and the cosmetic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, J S

    1989-07-01

    Philosophers know that modern philosophy owes a great debt to the intellectual contributions of the 18th century philosopher Immanuel Kant. This essay attempts to show how cosmetic surgeons, and all surgeons at that, could learn much from his work. Not only did Kant write about the structure of human reasoning and how it relates to appearances but he also wrote about the nature of duties and other obligations. His work has strongly influenced medical ethics. In a more particular way, Kant wrote the most important work on aesthetics. His theory still influences how philosophers understand the meaning of the beautiful and how it pertains to the human figure. This essay presents an exercise in trying to apply Kantian philosophy to aesthetic plastic surgery. Its intention is to show cosmetic surgeons some of the implicit and explicit philosophical principles and potential arguments undergirding their potential surgical evaluations. It is meant to challenge the surgeon to reconsider how decisions are made using philosophical reasoning instead of some of the more usual justifications based on psychology or sociology.

  3. Plastic Surgery Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PSN PSEN GRAFT Contact Us News Plastic Surgery Statistics Plastic surgery procedural statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Statistics by Year Print 2016 Plastic Surgery Statistics 2015 ...

  4. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Administration of Anesthesia Administration ... Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries ...

  5. Objective assessment of surgical performance and its impact on a national selection programme of candidates for higher surgical training in plastic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Sean M

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to develop and validate a transparent, fair and objective assessment programme for the selection of surgical trainees into higher surgical training (HST) in plastic surgery in the Republic of Ireland. METHODS: Thirty-four individuals applied for HST in plastic surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) in the academic years 2005-2006 and 2006-2007. Eighteen were short-listed for interview and further assessment. All applicants were required to report on their undergraduate educational performance and their postgraduate professional development. Short-listed applicants completed validated objective assessment simulations of surgical skills, an interview and assessment of their suitability for a career in surgery. RESULTS: When applicants\\' short-listing scores were combined with their interview scores and assessment of their suitability for a career in surgery, individuals who were selected for HST in plastic surgery performed significantly better than those who were not (P<0.002). However, when the assessment of technical skills scores were added the significance level of this difference increased further (P<0.0001) as did the statistical power of the difference to 99.9%, thus increasing the robustness of the selection package. CONCLUSION: The results from this study suggest that the assessment protocol we used to select individuals for HST in plastic surgery reliably and statistically significantly discriminated between the performances of candidates.

  6. William Cheselden: anatomist, surgeon, and medical illustrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, M A

    1999-11-01

    William Cheselden was Great Britain's foremost surgeon/scientist in the first half of the 18th century. Cheselden directly challenged the Company of Barber-Surgeons' exclusive right to control dissection in London by being the first to conduct a regular series of anatomy lectures and demonstrations outside of the Company's Hall. He incorporated his lecture syllabus into a handbook of anatomy, The Anatomy of the Humane Body, which was used by students for nearly 100 years. Cheselden also wrote the text and drew the illustrations for a majestic atlas of comparative osteology, the Osteographia, or the Anatomy of the Bones. Cheselden used his superior knowledge of anatomy to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with perineal lithotomy, one of the few operations possible in his era. Sagacious and pragmatic, Cheselden recognized that the enlightened practice of surgery beginning to take root in 18th-century London could flourish only under an autonomous body of surgeons. Cheselden used his personal funds and political skills to urge Parliament to pass legislation for the dissolution of the combined Company of Barber-Surgeons and the establishment of separate and distinct Surgeons' and Barbers' Companies. After disjoinder of the two groups on May 2, 1745, Cheselden served as one of the Wardens of the new Company of Surgeons--a predecessor of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. In 1746, Cheselden, who helped design the first Surgeons' Hall, served as the Company's Master.

  7. Standing equine sinus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakzai, Safia Z; Dixon, Padraic M

    2014-04-01

    Trephination of the equine sinuses is a common surgical procedure in sedated standing horses. Standing sinus flap surgery has become increasingly popular in equine referral hospitals and offers several advantages over sinusotomy performed under general anesthesia, including reduced patient-associated risks and costs; less intraoperative hemorrhage, allowing better visualization of the operative site; and allows surgeons to take their time. Other minimally invasive surgical procedures include sinoscopic surgery, balloon sinuplasty, and transnasal laser sinonasal fenestration. Despite the procedure used, appropriate indications for surgery, good patient selection, and familiarity with regional anatomy and surgical techniques are imperative for good results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cirurgia de catarata realizada por residentes: avaliação dos riscos Cataract surgery performed by residents: risk analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Barreto Junior

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a frequência de complicações nas cirurgias de catarata realizada por residentes de um hospital universitário (segundo e terceiro anos, comparado com as realizadas por cirurgiões experientes (assistentes. MÉTODOS: Análise retrospectiva dos prontuários de todos pacientes submetidos à cirurgia de catarata realizadas nas primeiras quinzenas de março (época do início do aprendizado da técnica cirúrgica e de novembro (meados do aprendizado da técnica. Foram analisados a época da realização da cirurgia; graduação do cirurgião (residente ou médico assistente; técnica cirúrgica empregada (extração extracapsular ou facoemulsificação e a ocorrência de complicações per-operatórias e pós-operatórias. RESULTADOS: Foram analisadas 481 cirurgias, destas, 194 (40% foram realizadas pelos residentes do terceiro ano, 165 (34% pelos residentes do segundo ano e 116 (26% pelos assistentes. A complicação mais frequentemente encontrada em todas as cirurgias foi a rotura de cápsula posterior (4,8%. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa de complicações entre as cirurgias realizadas em março e novembro (p=0,97, bem como entre os residentes sob supervisão e os assistentes (p=0,08. CONCLUSÃO: A rotura de cápsula posterior continua sendo a complicação mais frequentemente encontrada nas cirurgias de residentes em treinamento. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa entre as taxas de complicação destes residentes e os assistentes, o que demonstra o importante papel de uma supervisão adequada.PURPOSE: To evaluate the complication's rate of cataract surgery performed by ophthalmology residents (second and third-year and experienced surgeons at a public teaching hospital. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of all patients who had cataract surgery between March (begin of the technique practice and November (end of the technique practice was conducted. RESULTS: In 481 cataracts surgeries

  9. Psychological and Physical Stress in Surgeons Operating in a Standard or Modern Operating Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, M.; Andersen, L.P.H.; Alamili, M.

    2010-01-01

    concerning physical and psychological wellbeing before and after surgery and had their heart rate variability registered during surgery. Results: Preoperative to postoperative physical strain and pain measurements revealed a systematical difference with 14 of 15 parameters favoring the modern OR. Two...... of these parameters reached statistical significance. We did not find any significant differences in the subjective parameters of surgeon satisfaction or the measured heart rate variability parameters. Conclusions: Physical strain on the surgeon was reduced when performing laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a modern......Purpose: There have been no studies examining the effect of optimized ergonomic and technical environment on the psychological and physiological stress of the surgeon. The aim of this study was to examine whether optimized ergonomics and technical aids within a modern operating room (OR) affect...

  10. [Coronary artery bypass surgery: methods of performance monitoring and quality control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, A; Sergeant, P; Ennker, J

    2009-10-01

    The strength of coronary bypass operations depends on the preservation of their benefits regarding freedom of symptoms, quality of life and survival, over decades. Significant variability of the results of an operative intervention according to the hospital or the operating surgeon is considered a weakness in the procedure. The external quality insurance tries to reach a transparent service providing market through hospital ranking comparability. Widely available information and competition will promote the improvement of the whole quality. The structured dialog acts as a control instrument for the BQS (Federal Quality Insurance). It is launched in case of deviations from the standard references or statistically significant differences between the results of the operations in any hospital and the average notational results. In comparison to the external control the hospital internal control has greater ability to reach a medically useful statement regarding the results of the treatment and to correct the mistakes in time. An online information portal based on a departmental databank (DataWarehouse, DataMart) is an attractive solution for the physician in order to get transparently and timely informed about the variability in the performance.The individual surgeon significantly influences the short- and long-term treatment results. Accordingly, selection, targeted training and performance measurements are necessary.Strict risk management and failure analysis of individual cases are included in the methods of internal quality control aiming to identify and correct the inadequacies in the system and the course of treatment. According to the international as well as our own experience, at least 30% of the mortalities after bypass operations are avoidable. A functioning quality control is especially important in minimally invasive interventions because they are often technically more demanding in comparison to the conventional procedures. In the field of OPCAB surgery

  11. Military Surgeon and Humanity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Lu; WANG Yiran

    2015-01-01

    Military surgeons are a special group of doctors. They are both medical workers and soldiers.Their mission is to serve the wounded on the battlefield.And there is no doubt that military surgeons will save our comrades in the army. However,should a military surgeon save the wounded enemy? It is indeed a dilemma.Some may save the wounded enemy because military surgeons are doctors after all and they can't possibly abandon anybody to his fate,but some refuse to do so because military surgeons are soldiers.Therefore,some situations on the battlefield are discussed and advice is suggested for military surgeons,with heartfelt anticipation for there being less casualties on the battlefield as well as alleviating human suffering caused by war.

  12. Military Surgeon and Humanity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; Lu; WANG; Yiran

    2015-01-01

    Military surgeons are a special group of doctors.They are both medical workers and soldiers.Their mission is to serve the wounded on the battlefield.And there is no doubt that military surgeons will save our comrades in the army.However,should a military surgeon save the wounded enemy?It is indeed a dilemma.Some may save the wounded enemy because military surgeons are doctors after all and they can’t possibly abandon anybody to his fate,but some refuse to do so because military surgeons are soldiers.Therefore,some situations on the battlefield are discussed and advice is suggested for military surgeons,with heartfelt anticipation for there being less casualties on the battlefield as well as alleviating human suffering caused by war.

  13. Public perception of dermatologic surgery in Saudi Arabia: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHargan, Abdullah H; Al-Hejin, Nujud R; AlSufyani, Mohammed A

    2017-05-15

    Dermatologic surgery is a well established subspecialty in dermatology, but observations suggest that the public may not be aware of this field. To explore the public perception of the nature and scope of dermatologic surgery Methods: A cross-sectional online-based survey consisting of two parts was used. The first part recorded demographic data. The second part presented a series of clinical scenarios in common surgical and cosmetic procedures performed by dermatologic surgeons to determine respondents' choice among three specialties: general surgery, plastic surgery, and dermatologic surgery. A total of 1,248 responses were recorded. Seventy-four percent of respondents were female, with 80.29% between the ages of 18 and 34 years. Forty-nine percent considered dermatologic surgeons to be specialized skin surgeons and 71.63% said they would consult dermatologic surgeons for skin tumor excisions. However, plastic surgeons emerged more favorably for cosmetic procedures. For office-based procedures, 80.85% and 87.18% of respondents chose plastic surgeons for fillers and Botox® injections, respectively, compared to 15.79% and 12.02% of respondents who chose dermatologic surgeons. Although the majority of participants showed no doubt about the surgical skills of dermatologic surgeons, the responses demonstrate that the public is not aware of the full scope and practice of dermatologic surgery, especially as it pertains to cosmetic procedures. Therefore, we must educate the public about the field and branches of dermatologic surgery.

  14. [Hospital variation in anastomotic leakage after rectal cancer surgery in the Spanish Association of Surgeons project: The contribution of hospital volume].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Héctor; Biondo, Sebastiano; Codina, Antonio; Ciga, Miguel Á; Enríquez-Navascués, José; Espín, Eloy; García-Granero, Eduardo; Roig, José Vicente

    2016-04-01

    This multicentre observational study aimed to determine the anastomotic leak rate in the hospitals included in the Rectal Cancer Project of the Spanish Society of Surgeons and examine whether hospital volume may contribute to any variation between hospitals. Hospital variation was quantified using a multilevel approach on prospective data derived from the multicentre database of all adenocarcinomas of the rectum operated by an anterior resection at 84 surgical departments from 2006 to 2013. The following variables were included in the analysis; demographics, American Society of Anaesthesiologists classification, use of defunctioning stoma, tumour location and stage, administration of neoadjuvant treatment, and annual volume of elective surgical procedures. A total of 7231 consecutive patients were included. The rate of anastomotic leak was 10.0%. Stratified by annual surgical volume hospitals varied from 9.9 to 11.3%. In multilevel regression analysis, the risk of anastomotic leak increased in male patients, in patients with tumours located below 12 cm from the anal verge, and advanced tumour stages. However, a defunctioning stoma seemed to prevent this complication. Hospital surgical volume was not associated with anastomotic leak (OR: 0.852, [0.487-1.518]; P=.577). Furthermore, there was a statistically significant variation in anastomotic leak between all departments (MOR: 1.475; [1.321-1.681]; P<0.001). Anastomotic leak varies significantly among hospitals included in the project and this difference cannot be attributed to the annual surgical volume. Copyright © 2015 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Find a Surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ...

  16. General Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bbshehu

    underwent major colonic restorative resection between July 1997 and September 199 in order to ... factors, the level of anastomosis and the experience of the surgeon are perhaps the ... indications for surgery and cancer stage were similar.

  17. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  18. Endocrine Surgery: A Hopkins Legacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udelsman, Robert

    2017-09-06

    : The field of Endocrine Surgery is linked to extraordinary contributions made by Hopkins leaders in surgery including William Stewart Halsted, Harvey Cushing, and John L Cameron. Halsted's contributions to the anatomic basis of thyroid and parathyroid surgery were based on his experimental and clinical work performed at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Halsted's disciple, Harvey Cushing, created the field of modern neurosurgery and recognized the disease and syndrome that are immortalized with his name. The Halstedian principles promulgated and transmitted by John L Cameron to subsequent generations of endocrine surgeons at Hopkins have transformed the field of Endocrine Surgery with the stamp of Johns Hopkins Hospital.

  19. Transplant surgeon formation: vocation, incentives, between old and new surgeon generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaria, G; Cardillo, A

    2006-05-01

    The training of the transplant surgeon is one of the most difficult paths in medicine. The transplant surgeon must be trained as a general and a vascular surgeon; he has to be skilled and upgraded in transplant surgical technique; he has to decide the suitability of the donor and of the organs as well as the immunosuppressive therapy for each recipient; he must know the intensive care unit, hepatology, and nephrology. The transplant surgeon has to deal with surgical, infectious, and metabolic complications after organ transplantation. Thus, clinical formation of the transplant surgeon is multifactorial and always upgraded. However, transplants never happen in the morning; retrivals are more likely to be in the night (especially the holidays ones). "Weekend" is a word not frequently used by transplant surgeons. Moreover, when the transplant procedure happens, the normal activity of the ward and of the outpatient clinic were have to be done. The transplant surgeon must have a sort of "vocation" for such a job. Organ harvesting setting is a good proof of adaptability, always during nighttime, often in small hospitals with operating room nurses unfamiliar with the procedure, sometimes waiting for some colleagues or delaying the surgery. This vocation is enhanced by enthusiasm, but incentives are necessary to feed this love. Incentives should be professional and economic; transplant surgeons should be allowed to make clinical decisions, to choose the surgical technique of transplantation, to control the decision process. Lastly, due to the "total on call," the surgeon should profit from a right salary avoiding extramural activities.

  20. Preoperative Breast MRI: Surgeons' Patient Selection Patterns and Potential Bias in Outcomes Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyon; Tanaka, Elaine; Eby, Peter R; Zhou, Shouhao; Wei, Wei; Eppelheimer, Christine; Loving, Vilert A

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine which patient- and tumor-related and clinical variables influence dedicated breast surgeons' and general surgeons' referrals for preoperative breast MRI for patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer. Surgeons who perform breast surgery responded to a survey from June 16, 2014, through August 11, 2014. Participants self-identified as breast or general surgeons and provided professional practice details. They used Likert scores (range, 1-7 with increasing likelihood to order MRI) to weigh numerous patient- and tumor-related and clinical variables. Mean likelihood scores were calculated and compared using a linear mixed model. A p ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Two hundred eighty-nine surveys from 154 (53%) breast surgeons and 135 (47%) general surgeons showed an overall likelihood to refer for patients with a BRCA mutation (mean Likert score, 6.17), familial (mean Likert score, 5.33) or personal (mean Likert score, 5.10) breast cancer history, extremely dense breasts (mean Likert score, 5.30), age younger than 40 years (mean Likert score, 5.24), axillary nodal involvement (mean Likert score, 6.22), tumor that is mammographically occult (mean Likert score, 5.62) or fixed to the pectoralis (mean Likert score, 5.49), tumor that is a candidate for neoadjuvant treatment (mean Likert score, 5.38), multifocal or multicentric disease (mean Likert score, 5.22), invasive lobular carcinoma (mean Likert score, 5.20), T3 (mean Likert score, 4.48) or T2 (mean Likert score, 4.41) tumor, triple-negative breast cancer (mean Likert score, 4.66), a patient who is a candidate for mastectomy requesting breast conservation therapy (mean Likert score, 5.27), and radiologists' recommendations (mean Likert score, 5.19). Across all patient ages, breast surgeons referred more often than did general surgeons (mean Likert score, 4.32 vs 3.92; p = 0.03), especially for patients with BRCA mutation (mean Likert score, 6.39 vs 5.93; p

  1. Abdominoperineal Resection, Pelvic Exenteration, and Additional Organ Resection Increase the Risk of Surgical Site Infection after Elective Colorectal Surgery: An American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwaan, Mary R; Melton, Genevieve B; Madoff, Robert D; Chipman, Jeffrey G

    2015-12-01

    Determining predictors of surgical site infection (SSI) in a large cohort is important for the design of accurate SSI surveillance programs. We hypothesized that additional organ resection and pelvic exenterative procedures are associated independently with a higher risk of SSI. Patients in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program® (ACS NSQIP®; American College of Surgeons, Chicago, IL) database (2005-2012) were identified (n=112,282). Surgical site infection (superficial or deep SSI) at 30 d was the primary outcome. Using primary and secondary CPT® codes (American Medical Association, Chicago, IL) pelvic exenteration was defined and additional organ resection was defined as: bladder resection/repair, hysterectomy, partial vaginectomy, additional segmental colectomy, small bowel, gastric, or diaphragm resection. Univariable analysis of patient and procedure factors identified significant (p40 (OR: 2.51), pulmonary comorbidities (OR: 1.22), smoking (OR: 1.24), bowel obstruction (OR: 1.40), wound classification 3 or 4 (OR: 1.18), and abdominoperineal resection (OR: 1.58). Laparoscopic or laparoscopically assisted procedures offered a protective effect against incision infection (OR: 0.55). Additional organ resection (OR: 1.08) was also associated independently with SSI, but the magnitude of the effect was decreased after accounting for operative duration. In the analysis that excludes operative duration, pelvic exenteration is associated with SSI (OR: 1.38), but incorporating operative duration into the model results in this variable becoming non-significant. In addition to other factors, obesity, surgery for bowel obstruction, abdominoperineal resection, and additional organ resection are independently associated with a higher risk of SSI. Surgical site infection risk in pelvic exenteration and multiple organ resection cases appears to be mediated by prolonged operative duration. In these established high-risk sub-groups of

  2. Computer-assessed performance of psychomotor skills in endoscopic otolaryngology surgery: construct validity of the Dundee Endoscopic Psychomotor Otolaryngology Surgery Trainer (DEPOST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Peter D; Steven, Richard; Zhang, Dong; Li, Heng; Abel, Eric W

    2015-11-01

    This study was undertaken to introduce and establish the value of the Dundee Endoscopic Psychomotor Otolaryngology Surgery Trainer (DEPOST) as a customisable, objective real-time scoring system for trainee assessment. The construct validity of the system was assessed by comparing the performance of experienced otolaryngologists with that of otolaryngology trainees, junior doctors and medical students. Forty two subjects (13 Consultants, 8 senior trainees, 13 junior trainees and 8 junior doctors/medical students) completed a single test on DEPOST. The test involved using a 30° rigid endoscope and a probe with position sensor, to identify a series of lights in a complex 3-dimensional model. The system scored subjects for time, success rate, and economy of movement (distance travelled). An analysis of variance and correlation analysis were used for the data analysis, with statistical significance set at 0.05. Increasing experience led to significantly improved performance with the DEPOST (p < 0.01). Senior trainees' results were significantly better than those of consultant otolaryngologists in success rate and time (p < 0.05 & p < 0.05). Consultants were the most efficient in their movement (p = 0.051) CONCLUSIONS: The system provides an accurate and customisable assessment of endoscopic skill in otolaryngologists. The DEPOST system has construct validity, with master surgeons and senior trainees completing the tasks more accurately without sacrificing execution time, success rate or efficiency of movement.

  3. Society of Gynecologic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search Member Login Home About Mission Strategic Plan Leadership Bylaws History Past Presidents Past TeLinde Lectures Past Distinguished Surgeon ... Search Member Login Home About Mission Strategic Plan Leadership Bylaws History Past Presidents Past TeLinde Lectures Past Distinguished Surgeon ...

  4. Find a Surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to the need for harmony between facial appearance and function. As ... skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to the need for harmony between facial appearance and function. As ...

  5. Hand dominance in orthopaedic surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lui, Darren F

    2012-08-01

    Handedness is perhaps the most studied human asymmetry. Laterality is the preference shown for one side and it has been studied in many aspects of medicine. Studies have shown that some orthopaedic procedures had poorer outcomes and identified laterality as a contributing factor. We developed a questionnaire to assess laterality in orthopaedic surgery and compared this to an established scoring system. Sixty-two orthopaedic surgeons surveyed with the validated Waterloo Handedness Questionnaire (WHQ) were compared with the self developed Orthopaedic Handedness Questionnaire (OHQ). Fifty-eight were found to be right hand dominant (RHD) and 4 left hand dominant (LHD). In RHD surgeons, the average WHQ score was 44.9% and OHQ 15%. For LHD surgeons the WHQ score was 30.2% and OHQ 9.4%. This represents a significant amount of time using the non dominant hand but does not necessarily determine satisfactory or successful dexterity transferable to the operating room. Training may be required for the non dominant side.

  6. Ergonomics in Laparoscopic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Supe Avinash; Kulkarni Gaurav; Supe Pradnya

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery provides patients with less painful surgery but is more demanding for the surgeon. The increased technological complexity and sometimes poorly adapted equipment have led to increased complaints of surgeon fatigue and discomfort during laparoscopic surgery. Ergonomic integration and suitable laparoscopic operating room environment are essential to improve efficiency, safety, and comfort for the operating team. Understanding ergonomics can not only make life of surgeon comf...

  7. Management of hemodynamically unstable pelvic trauma: results of the first Italian consensus conference (cooperative guidelines of the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology -Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology- and the World Society of Emergency Surgery).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnone, Stefano; Coccolini, Federico; Manfredi, Roberto; Piazzalunga, Dario; Agazzi, Roberto; Arici, Claudio; Barozzi, Marco; Bellanova, Giovanni; Belluati, Alberto; Berlot, Giorgio; Biffl, Walter; Camagni, Stefania; Campanati, Luca; Castelli, Claudio Carlo; Catena, Fausto; Chiara, Osvaldo; Colaianni, Nicola; De Masi, Salvatore; Di Saverio, Salomone; Dodi, Giuseppe; Fabbri, Andrea; Faustinelli, Giovanni; Gambale, Giorgio; Capponi, Michela Giulii; Lotti, Marco; Marchesi, Gianmariano; Massè, Alessandro; Mastropietro, Tiziana; Nardi, Giuseppe; Niola, Raffaella; Nita, Gabriela Elisa; Pisano, Michele; Poiasina, Elia; Poletti, Eugenio; Rampoldi, Antonio; Ribaldi, Sergio; Rispoli, Gennaro; Rizzi, Luigi; Sonzogni, Valter; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Ansaloni, Luca

    2014-03-07

    Hemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Trauma is a major problem in blunt traumatic injury. No cosensus has been reached in literature on the optimal treatment of this condition. We present the results of the First Italian Consensus Conference on Pelvic Trauma which took place in Bergamo on April 13 2013. An extensive review of the literature has been undertaken by the Organizing Committee (OC) and forwarded to the Scientific Committee (SC) and the Panel (JP). Members of them were appointed by surgery, critical care, radiology, emergency medicine and orthopedics Italian and International societies: the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and the World Society of Emergency Surgery. From November 2012 to January 2013 the SC undertook the critical revision and prepared the presentation to the audience and the Panel on the day of the Conference. Then 3 recommendations were presented according to the 3 submitted questions. The Panel voted the recommendations after discussion and amendments with the audience. Later on a email debate took place until December 2013 to reach a unanimous consent. We present results on the 3 following questions: which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an extraperitoneal pelvic packing? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an external fixation? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs emergent angiography? No longer angiography is considered the first therapeutic maneuver in such a patient. Preperitoneal pelvic packing and external fixation, preceded by pelvic binder have a pivotal role in the management of these patients

  8. [Abdominal compartment syndrome: survey on the awareness of Portuguese general surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sílvia; Gomes, Aline; Graça, Susana; Ferreira, António; Fernandes, Gonçalo; Esteves, Joana; Costa, Alexandre; Fernandes, Paula; Castelões, Paula; Maciel, Jorge

    2011-12-01

    The Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (ACS) is a clinical entity recognized for over a century, but only recently its risk criteria, monitorization and treatment have been defined by the World Society of the Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WSACS). The general surgeon's involvement is vital since this syndrome is common in surgical patients and because its treatment may culminate in a laparostomy. 250 questionnaires of 17 questions were distributed among general surgeons attending the XXVIII Portuguese Congress of Surgery. The data were analyzed using SPSS® v16. We received 36,4% (91) of the delivered questionnaires, most of which from male surgeons (63,7%), from central hospitals (75,8%), working 42 h per week (70.3%), whose average of age was 38 years. About half of the respondents received training in Intensive Care Units. All surgeons had already heard about measuring the Intra- abdominal Pressure (IAP), which was being performed at 89% of their hospitals. About 40% of surgeons only admitted intra-abdominal hypertension above 20 mmHg (only 22% indicated the correct value of 12 mmHg). 36,3% of surgeons suggested that a decompressive laparostomy must be carried out for primary ACS if IAP greater then 20 mmHg with new organ failure; 36.3% favoured the "Vacuum-pack"-like system, and 56% only re-operate the patients "as needed". 48,4% of surgeons had already performed decompressive laparostomy, 66% of which had residence training in a ICU (p = 0,005). Respondents also pointed an average mortality related to ACS of 81% without laparostomy, and a reduction to 38,5% after performing that procedure. Only 26% of the surgeons were aware of the WSACS consensus definitions and recommendations, of those, 83% had already performed a laparostomy (Pdivulgation.

  9. Results of radial and astigmatic keratotomy by beginning refractive surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, M L; Imperia, P S; Elander, R; Alcala, P L; Maloney, R K; Holland, G N

    1993-05-01

    There is little information available on the results of radial and astigmatic keratotomy surgery that is performed by beginning refractive surgeons. A retrospective review of all refractive keratotomies performed by Corneal Fellows in the University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Ophthalmology between October 1985 and October 1991 was performed. Data from all eyes with at least 3 months of follow-up were analyzed. Visual acuity, refractive error, and complication rates were compared with published case series. The mean preoperative spherical equivalent for the 79 eyes analyzed was -3.97 diopters (D) (range, -0.75 to -8.50 D). The mean postoperative spherical equivalent was -0.44 D (range, +1.50 to -3.88 D). The postoperative spherical equivalent was within 1.00 D of emmetropia in 85% of eyes, and uncorrected visual acuity was 20/40 or better in 94% of eyes. There were no vision-threatening complications. No patient lost more than one line of best-corrected visual acuity. Radial and astigmatic keratotomies that are performed by beginning refractive surgeons in a supervised setting can be safe and effective procedures with results comparable with those obtained by experienced refractive surgeons.

  10. Current trends in robotic surgery for otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, J Kenneth; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar

    2013-09-01

    As minimally invasive surgery has become common in head and neck surgery, the role of robotic surgery has expanded from thyroid surgery and transoral robotic surgery (TORS) of the oropharynx and supraglottic to other areas. Surgeons have advanced the limits of TORS, adapting lasers to the Da Vinci robot for glottic cancer, and combining existing techniques for transoral supraglottic laryngectomy and hypopharyngectomy to perform transoral total laryngectomy. Skull base approaches have been reported with some success in case reports and cadaver models, but the current instrument size and configuration limit the applicability of the current robotic system. Surgeons have reported reconstruction of the head and neck via local and free flaps. Using the previously reported approaches for thyroidectomy via modified facelift incision, neck dissection has also been reported. Future applications of robotic surgery in otolaryngology may be additionally expanded, as several new robotic technologies are under development for endolaryngeal work and neurotology.

  11. The Cataract National Dataset electronic multi-centre audit of 55,567 operations: variation in posterior capsule rupture rates between surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, R L; Taylor, H; Smith, R; Sparrow, J M

    2010-05-01

    To demonstrate variations in posterior capsule rupture (PCR) rate between surgeons of the same and different grades as a by-product of routine clinical care. NHS departments using electronic medical record (EMR) systems to collect the Cataract National Dataset (CND) were invited to submit data. Data were remotely extracted, anonymised, assessed for conformity and completeness, and analysed for rates of PCR for individual surgeons within each of the three grades. Data were extracted on 55,567 cataract operations performed at 12 NHS trusts by 406 surgeons between November 2001 and July 2006. Data on the grade of 404 of the 406 surgeons who contributed to the study were available for 55,515 cases (99.9%) and were used for this analysis. Variation in PCR rate between surgeons was highest for the most junior grade of surgeon and between those surgeons contributing relatively few cases to the data set. Variation in PCR was lowest among experienced surgeons contributing large numbers of cases to the data set. Considerable variation in PCR rate exists both between and within surgical grades. Routine electronic collection of the CND allows detailed analysis of variations in PCR rates between individual surgeons. To define acceptable limits for this benchmark complication of cataract surgery, further work is needed to adjust surgeons' outcomes for the case mix complexity.

  12. Knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns in surgical management of bicuspid aortopathy: a survey of 100 cardiac surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Subodh; Yanagawa, Bobby; Kalra, Sameer; Ruel, Marc; Peterson, Mark D; Yamashita, Michael H; Fagan, Andrew; Currie, Maria E; White, Christopher W; Wai Sang, Stephane Leung; Rosu, Cristian; Singh, Steve; Mewhort, Holly; Gupta, Nandini; Fedak, Paul W M

    2013-11-01

    would perform valve-sparing surgery. Of note, 40% of respondents used an index measure of aortic size to body surface area in addition to absolute aortic diameter in assessing the threshold for intervention. This large survey uncovered significant gaps in the knowledge and attitudes of surgeons toward the diagnosis and management of bicuspid aortopathy, many of which were at odds with current guideline recommendations. Efforts to promote knowledge translation in this area are strongly encouraged. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Laparoscopic Skills and Cognitive Function are not Affected in Surgeons During a Night Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Andersen, Lærke T; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    simulation and the d2 test of attention at 8 a.m. before call and at 4 a.m. on call. Sleep was measured by wrist actigraphy and sleepiness by the Karolinska sleepiness scale. SETTING: Department of Surgery at Herlev Hospital, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Overall, 30 interns, residents, and attending surgeons were...... compared with on-call values. The d2 test of attention showed significantly improved values on call compared with before call. CONCLUSION: Sleep deprivation during a 17-hour night shift did not impair surgeons' psychomotor or cognitive performance....

  14. Customised 3D Printing: An Innovative Training Tool for the Next Generation of Orbital Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scawn, Richard L; Foster, Alex; Lee, Bradford W; Kikkawa, Don O; Korn, Bobby S

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing or 3D printing is the process by which three dimensional data fields are translated into real-life physical representations. 3D printers create physical printouts using heated plastics in a layered fashion resulting in a three-dimensional object. We present a technique for creating customised, inexpensive 3D orbit models for use in orbital surgical training using 3D printing technology. These models allow trainee surgeons to perform 'wet-lab' orbital decompressions and simulate upcoming surgeries on orbital models that replicate a patient's bony anatomy. We believe this represents an innovative training tool for the next generation of orbital surgeons.

  15. Discordance between patient and surgeon satisfaction after total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ian A; Harris, Anita M; Naylor, Justine M; Adie, Sam; Mittal, Rajat; Dao, Alan T

    2013-05-01

    We surveyed 331 patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty pre-operatively, and patients and surgeons were both surveyed 6 and 12 months post-operatively. We identified variables (demographic factors, operative factors and patient expectations) as possible predictors for discordance in patient-surgeon satisfaction. At 12 months, 94.5% of surgeons and 90.3% of patients recorded satisfaction with the outcome. The discordance between patient and surgeon satisfaction was mainly due to patient dissatisfaction-surgeon satisfaction. In an adjusted analysis, the strongest predictors of discordance in patient-surgeon satisfaction were unmet patient expectations and the presence of complications. Advice to potential joint arthroplasty candidates regarding the decision to proceed with surgery should be informed by patient reported outcomes, rather than the surgeon's opinion of the likelihood of success.

  16. The scope of plastic surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-03

    Aug 3, 2013 ... areas of surgery (especially general surgery), plastic surgeons are arguably the .... Who do you feel are experts in laparoscopic surgery? e (general surgeons) a. Maxillofacial .... of pressure sore. ORIF = open reduction internal fixation. ... Plastic versus cosmetic surgery: What's the difference? Plast Reconstr.

  17. Practice patterns in the perioperative treatment of patients undergoing septorhinoplasty: a survey of facial plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadfar, Scott; Deal, Allison M; Jarchow, Andrea M; Yang, Hojin; Shockley, William W

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The common practices used in the perioperative care of patients undergoing septorhinoplasty are diverse and controversial. A consensus statement on the preferred clinical pathway in the perioperative treatment of patients undergoing septorhinoplasty has yet to be approached formally. OBJECTIVES To investigate the perioperative treatment of patients undergoing septorhinoplasty and to identify common practice patterns based on the preferences of leading facial plastic surgeons. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We distributed an online survey to members of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Specifically, fellowship directors and academic contact members were anonymously polled and stratified by the number of septorhinoplasties performed annually. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE A cohesive clinical guide to perioperative treatment after rhinoplasty. RESULTS Of the 92 members surveyed, 67 (73%) successfully completed the survey. The distribution of respondents included 43 academicians (64%) and 24 physicians in private practice (36%). Twenty-eight surgeons (42%) performed fewer than 50 rhinoplasties a year and 39 (58%), more than 50, representing 3510 to 4549 septorhinoplasties in total among respondents. Forty-four surgeons (66%) refrained from using any packing, and 41 (61%) used intranasal splints, with polymeric silicone splints the most popular of these (n = 24 [59%]). Sixty-six surgeons (99%) used external nasal splints, including 49 (74%) who used a thermoplastic splint and 49 (74%) who left the external nasal splint in place for 7 days or longer. The most common postoperative interventions to reduce edema and ecchymosis were elevation of the head of bed by 62 (93%), ice packs by 50 (75%), and Arnica montana by 33 (49%). Only 12 surgeons (18%) used postoperative corticosteroids to reduce edema. Fifty-six respondents (84%) prohibited participation in contact sports until at least 6 weeks after surgery. CONCLUSIONS AND

  18. The Initial Learning Curve for Robot-Assisted Sleeve Gastrectomy: A Surgeon's Experience While Introducing the Robotic Technology in a Bariatric Surgery Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilallonga, Ramon; Fort, José Manuel; Gonzalez, Oscar; Caubet, Enric; Boleko, Angeles; Neff, Karl John; Armengol, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Robot-assisted sleeve gastrectomy has the potential to treat patients with obesity and its comorbidities. To evaluate the learning curve for this procedure before undergoing Roux en-Y gastric bypass is the objective of this paper. Materials and Methods. Robot-assisted sleeve gastrectomy was attempted in 32 consecutive patients. A survey was performed in order to identify performance variables during completion of the learning curve. Total operative time (OT), docking time (DT), complications, and length of hospital stay were compared among patients divided into two cohorts according to the surgical experience. Scattergrams and continuous curves were plotted to develop a robotic sleeve gastrectomy learning curve. Results. Overall OT time decreased from 89.8 minutes in cohort 1 to 70.1 minutes in cohort 2, with less than 5% change in OT after case 19. Time from incision to docking decreased from 9.5 minutes in cohort 1 to 7.6 minutes in cohort 2. The time required to dock the robotic system also decreased. The complication rate was the same in the two cohorts. Conclusion. Our survey indicates that technique and outcomes for robot-assisted sleeve gastrectomy gradually improve with experience. We found that the learning curve for performing a sleeve gastrectomy using the da Vinci system is completed after about 20 cases.

  19. Herniation of the cervical disk in plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Chen, Tim-Mo

    2012-12-01

    Herniations of the cervical disk in plastic surgeons are far more common in practice than the paucity of reported cases would indicate. A likely explanation may be the peculiar, nonergonomic positions that plastic surgeons must hold during surgery while wearing a headlight and loupes. From January 2003 to December 2006, at Tri-Service General Hospital, Taiwan, 4 plastic surgeons experienced herniations of the cervical disk. Magnetic resonance imaging study indicated there was disk herniation or bulging with spinal cord impingement. Two plastic surgeons received cervical diskectomy, corpectomy with strut reconstruction using titanium cages. These 2 surgeons were symptom-free 2 years after their operations. The other 2 plastic surgeons were under conservative physical therapy with persistent symptoms. The clinical evidence indicated that cervical disk herniation is an occupational hazard in plastic surgeons. To prevent prolonged hyperflexion and twisting of the neck, we proposed wearing a cervical brace during surgery for the plastic surgeons at Tri-Service-General Hospital since January 2008. No more plastic surgeons have experienced herniation of the cervical disk since then. The results indicated that wearing a cervical brace may be an effective measure to protect plastic surgeons from cervical disk disease.

  20. Searching for Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Scholars in Residence Clinical Trials Methods Course Health Services Research Methods Course Surgeon Specific Registry NSQIP Annual ... Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Gaza Strip Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey ...

  1. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care for You How to Use Apps and Social Media for Your Practice Why Participation in the STS ... STS_CTsurgery Surgeons Residents & Students Allied ... Hotel Discount for STS Members Copyright © 2016 The Society ...

  2. Has medical history importance for surgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangensteen, O W

    1975-03-01

    Surgeons will do well to remember that the two most important contributions to the growth and extension of surgery came from two disciplines, not then regarded as the most innovative. Anesthesia came from dentistry, the work primarily of W.T.G. Morton of Boston; prophylactic surgical antisepsis originated with the obstetrician Semmelweis, who developed a scheme of prophylactic chemical antisepsis that still remains the core of surgical antisepsis. In the mid 1880's, largely as a result of the work of Chamberland and others of the Pasteur school, surgeons in France and Germany substituted thermal for chemical antisepsis, whenever applicable. Whereas Lister's influence was tremendous in fostering acceptance of antisepsis by surgeons, by the end of his professorial career he had begun his capitulation to prophylactic antisepsis, which was complete by 1896 to the very practices that Semmelweis had proved the value of almost five decades previously. These were 19th century innovations. The greatest boon to surgery's advance in this century has been control of cellulitic infections through chemotherapeutic agencies, the sulfonamides and antibiotics. The tremendous upsurge of interest in research at the end of World War II brought surgeons to a fuller realization of the significant part they could play in the advance of their discipline. Intimate alignment of surgeons with physiologists of the circulation begot intracardiac surgery, a significant innovation with consequences of tremendous import for greater medicine's advance. Today, surgeons attacking the problem of tissue transplantation are aligning themselves with biochemists, geneticists, immunologists, experimental pathologists, and pharmacologists in their broad approach to the phenomenon of allograft rejection. The great extension of vascular surgery since World War II has made jewelers of surgeons of small tubular structures. The technical phases of these demanding operative procedures have largely been overcome

  3. The delivery of general paediatric surgery in Ireland: a survey of higher surgical trainees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, E

    2012-12-01

    The delivery of general paediatric surgery is changing in Ireland. Fewer paediatric surgical procedures are being performed by newly appointed consultant general surgeons, resulting in increased referrals to the specialist paediatric surgeons of uncomplicated general paediatric surgical problems. We surveyed current higher surgical trainees about their views on provision of paediatric surgical services.

  4. [The educational program for modern military surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, C; Gutcke, A; Klein, B; Rauhut, F; Friemert, B; Kollig, E W; Weller, N; Lieber, A

    2010-02-01

    Casualties in military conflict produce patterns of injuries that are not seen in routine surgical practice at home. In an era of increasing surgical sub-specialization the deployed surgeon needs to acquire and maintain a wide range of skills from a variety of surgical specialties. Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have become the modus operandi for terrorists and in the current global security situation these tactics can be equally employed against civilian targets. Therefore, knowledge and training in the management of these injuries are relevant to both military and civilian surgeons. To create this kind of military surgeon the so-called "DUO-plus" model for the training of surgical officers (specialization general surgery plus a second specialization either in visceral surgery or orthopedics/trauma surgery) has been developed in the Joint Medical Service of the German Bundeswehr. Other relevant skills, such as emergency neurotraumatology, battlefield surgery with integrated oral and craniomaxillofacial surgery and emergency gynecology, are integrated into this concept and will be taught in courses. Log books will be kept in accordance with the training curricula. On successful completion of the program medical officers will be officially appointed as Medical Officer "Einsatzchirurg" by their commanding officers for a maximum of 5 years and it will be necessary to renew it after this period. These refresher programs will require participation in visiting physicians programs in the complementary surgical disciplines in order to retain the essential specific skills.

  5. Dual antiplatelet therapy use by Canadian cardiac surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Bobby; Ruel, Marc; Bonneau, Christopher; Lee, Myunghyun M; Chung, Jennifer; Al Shouli, Sadek; Fagan, Andrew; Al Khalifa, Abdulwahab; White, Christopher W; Yamashita, Michael H; Currie, Maria E; Teoh, Hwee; Mewhort, Holly E M; Verma, Subodh

    2015-12-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone treatment for patients with acute coronary syndrome. Recent Canadian Guidelines recommend the use of dual antiplatelet therapy for 1 year after coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with acute coronary syndrome, but considerable variability remains. We performed a survey of 75 Canadian cardiac surgeons to assess the use of dual antiplatelet therapy. Whereas 58.6% of respondents indicated that the benefits of dual antiplatelet therapy were seen irrespective of how patients were managed after acute coronary syndrome, 36.2% believed that the benefits of dual antiplatelet therapy were limited to those treated medically or percutaneously. In regard to the timing of dual antiplatelet therapy administration, 57% of respondents indicated that dual antiplatelet therapy should be given upstream in the emergency department, whereas 36.2% responded that dual antiplatelet therapy should be given only once the coronary anatomy has been defined. The majority surveyed (81%) weighed bleeding risk as being more important than ischemic risk reduction. In stable patients after acute coronary syndrome, the majority of surgeons would wait approximately 4 days after the last dose of P2Y12 antagonist before coronary artery bypass grafting. Only 44.6% indicated that they routinely use dual antiplatelet therapy postrevascularization in the setting of acute coronary syndrome. Rather, most surgeons use dual antiplatelet therapy for select patients, such as those with a stented vessel without a bypass graft, endarterectomy, or off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Cardiac surgeons exhibit variation in their attitudes and practice patterns toward dual antiplatelet therapy after coronary artery bypass grafting, and in approximately half of cases, their practice does not adhere to current guideline recommendations. New trials focusing on coronary artery bypass grafting cases in their primary analysis and educational initiatives for surgeons

  6. Professionalism and Commercialism on Cosmetic Surgeons' Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Yeon; Park, SangHee

    2016-07-15

    This study analyzed the homepages of 250 cosmetic surgeons' websites by focusing on the representation of cosmetic surgery providers, cosmetic surgery recipients, and cosmetic surgery practice itself. Based on a literature review, some common elements of the webpages were preidentified as the indicators of professionalism or commercialism. Subsequently, each homepage was scrutinized for their presence and salience. Overall, cosmetic surgeons' websites were high in professionalism and low in commercialism in their representation of the service providers. In depicting the recipients, the websites were moderate in both professionalism and commercialism. The representation of practice was low in professionalism and moderate in commercialism. Implications of these findings for doctors, regulators, and consumer advocates are discussed and directions for future research are proposed.

  7. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws and ... Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by ...

  8. Quality of life of indian pediatric surgeons: Results of a survey (of indian association of pediatric surgeons members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M M Zameer

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: This is the first study which objectively highlights that most surgeons are happy professionally and financially in due course of time and demolishes the common belief that pediatric surgeons are unsatisfied. It also acts as a point of reference and encouragement to newer aspirants in pediatric surgery.

  9. Surgeons' work engagement: influencing factors and relations to job and life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mache, Stefanie; Vitzthum, Karin; Klapp, Burghard F; Danzer, Gerhard

    2014-08-01

    Work engagement has become a topic of great interest in recent years. However, clinicians' work engagement has rarely been studied and relatively little is known about its predictors and consequences. Therefore the objective of this cross-sectional questionnaire study was to test a model of possible institutional and personal predictors and significant relations to job and life satisfaction. 123 clinicians specializing in Surgery Medicine participated in the study. Self-administered questionnaires, including the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, the Brief Resilient Coping Scale and the Questionnaire for Self-efficacy, Optimism and Pessimism, were administered. Bivariate analyses and a stepwise regression analysis were performed. The whole sample of surgeons rated work engagement with a high mean of M = 4.38; SD = .91. Job satisfaction and perceived quality of life have been rated with moderate scores. The results show that job resources have a greater impact on surgeons' work engagement than their job demands. Significant correlations between surgeons' work engagement, their job satisfaction and quality of life were found. Moreover, work engagement mediated the relation between institutional factors and surgeons' job satisfaction. Our research suggests that strengthening surgeons' work engagement will contribute to a more sustainable workplace, in terms of both individual and hospital performance. Therefore, increasing work engagement among surgeons should be of concern for supervisors and hospital managers. Future research should focus on further predictors that may have an influence on health professionals' work engagement. Another field for future research is to study potential effects of interventions on work engagement. Copyright © 2013 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Practice models and roles of physician extenders in dermatologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Emily P; Hanke, C William; Kimball, Alexa Boer

    2011-05-01

    The prevalence of physician extenders (PEs) has increased significantly in dermatologic surgery over the last decade. An analysis was performed of the staff in dermatologic surgery practices, roles of PEs, and level of supervision. Mohs fellowship-trained (MMSFT) dermatologic surgeons were more likely to employ registered nurses (n=85, 73.9%) than non-fellowship-trained (NMMSFT) surgeons (n=65, 50.0%, pdermatology patients, but NMMSFT surgeons were twice as likely as MMSFT surgeons to have their PEs involved in performing or assisting with cosmetic procedures. MMSFT surgeons (38.5%) were twice as likely to have direct supervision of their PEs as NMMSFT surgeons (16.1%, p=.01). PEs are highly prevalent in dermatologic surgery practices and are playing direct roles in the delivery of dermatologic care. Promoting patient safety through appropriate extender supervision and reporting of patient outcomes are highly needed as this sector of the dermatologic surgery workforce continues to expand. © 2011 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc.

  11. Development of plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pećanac Marija Đ.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Plastic surgery is a medical specialty dealing with corrections of defects, improvements in appearance and restoration of lost function. Ancient Times. The first recorded account of reconstructive plastic surgery was found in ancient Indian Sanskrit texts, which described reconstructive surgeries of the nose and ears. In ancient Greece and Rome, many medicine men performed simple plastic cosmetic surgeries to repair damaged parts of the body caused by war mutilation, punishment or humiliation. In the Middle Ages, the development of all medical braches, including plastic surgery was hindered. New age. The interest in surgical reconstruction of mutilated body parts was renewed in the XVIII century by a great number of enthusiastic and charismatic surgeons, who mastered surgical disciplines and became true artists that created new forms. Modern Era. In the XX century, plastic surgery developed as a modern branch in medicine including many types of reconstructive surgery, hand, head and neck surgery, microsurgery and replantation, treatment of burns and their sequelae, and esthetic surgery. Contemporary and future plastic surgery will continue to evolve and improve with regenerative medicine and tissue engineering resulting in a lot of benefits to be gained by patients in reconstruction after body trauma, oncology amputation, and for congenital disfigurement and dysfunction.

  12. Infectious complications in implant based breast surgery and implications for plastic surgeons [Infektiöse Komplikationen bei alloplastischen Brustoperationen und Implikationen für Plastische Chirurgen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horch, Raymund E.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available [english] Implantation of breast prosthesis is still one of the most frequently performed breast reconstructing or contouring procedures. Infectious complications and capsular contracture are inherent problems that may have different causes which are not clearly defined yet in terms of pathophysiology. Recent findings showed bacterial contamination as a major cause of implant failure. Since this has direct implications for the surgical management we report on biofilm development on alloplastic breast prostheses, characteristics and effects after implantation of medical devices in general. This article gives a review of the current literature and discusses possible issues to solve the problem of infection after implantation of breast prosthesis. In conclusion the reinsertion of single-use devices should not be recommended and should be strictly avoided when a device related infection has occured. According to current knowledge contaminated implants should be removed, the infection then be cured and if necessary, a new prosthesis may be implanted after a regeneration period. Alternatively a change in therapy towards autologous tissue reconstruction should be considered if previous attempts with alloplastic prostheses have failed and if radiation therapy has worsened the local tissue situation in the recipient area.[german] Implantationen von Brust-Prothesen sind für Brustrekonstruktionen oder Konturierungen noch immer die am häufigsten durchgeführten Verfahren. Typische inhärente Probleme sind dabei neben infektiösen Komplikationen die Kapselkontrakturen, deren unterschiedliche Ursachen bezüglich der Pathophysiologie noch nicht eindeutig geklärt sind.Neuere Erkenntnisse weisen auf bakterielle Kontamination als eine der Hauptursachen von Implantatversagen hin. Da dies direkte Auswirkungen auf die chirurgische Behandlung hat, berichten wir über das Problem der Biofilmentwicklung auf alloplastischen Brustimplantaten sowie über deren Effekte

  13. Otoplasty (Cosmetic Ear Surgery)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... By Mayo Clinic Staff Otoplasty — also known as cosmetic ear surgery — is a procedure to change the ... Society of Plastic Surgeons. http://www.plasticsurgery.org/Cosmetic-Procedures/Ear-Surgery.html. Accessed June 16, 2015. ...

  14. Preparing for Breast Reconstruction Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Breast Reconstruction Surgery Preparing for Breast Reconstruction Surgery Your surgeon can help you know what to ... The plan for follow-up Costs Understanding your surgery costs Health insurance policies often cover most or ...

  15. Tests and visits before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before surgery - tests; Before surgery - doctor visits ... Pre-op is the time before your surgery. It means "before operation." During this time, you will meet with one of your doctors. This may be your surgeon or primary care ...

  16. Surgeon unemployment: would practice sharing be a viable solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeam, Elliot; Feinberg, Stan

    2016-04-01

    Surgeon unemployment has become a crisis within Canadian surgery in recent years. Without dedicated governmental workforce planning, ensuring that new residency graduates can find employment will require new models of employment. Practice sharing, whereby a new graduate and a senior surgeon partner to divide their practices, allows the senior surgeon to wind down and the newer surgeon to ramp up. Importantly, this arrangement builds in formal mentoring, which is so important in the early years of starting a surgical practice. Practice sharing may be a solution for the workforce issues currently afflicting new surgical graduates across Canada.

  17. [Endoscopic surgery for benign esophageal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Soji

    2006-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal achalasia are common benign esophageal diseases. Today minimally invasive surgery is recommended to treat these diseases. Surgical indications for GERD are failure of medical management, medical complications attributable to a large hiatal hernia, 'atypical' symptoms (asthma, hoarseness, cough, chest pain, aspiration), etc. according to the Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) guidelines. Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication has emerged as the most widely accepted procedure for GERD patients with normal esophageal motility. Partial fundoplication (e.g., Toupet fundoplication) is also considered to decrease the possibility of postoperative dysphagia. Although pneumatic dilatation has been the first line treatment for esophageal achalasia, laparoscopic Heller myotomy and partial fundoplication (e.g., Dor fundoplication) to prevent reflux is preferred by most gastroenterologists and surgeons as the primary treatment modality. Laparoscopic surgery for GERD and esophageal achalasia are effective in most patients and safe in all patients. Finally, laparoscopic surgery should be performed only by skilled surgeons.

  18. Assessment of patient factors, surgeons, and surgeon teams in immediate implant-based breast reconstruction outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfrerer, Lisa; Mattos, David; Mastroianni, Melissa; Weng, Qing Y; Ricci, Joseph A; Heath, Martha P; Lin, Alex; Specht, Michelle C; Haynes, Alex B; Austen, William G; Liao, Eric C

    2015-02-01

    Outcome studies of immediate implant-based breast reconstruction have focused largely on patient factors, whereas the relative impact of the surgeon as a contributing variable is not known. As the procedure requires collaboration of both a surgical oncologist and a plastic surgeon, the effect of the surgeon team interaction can have a significant impact on outcome. This study examines outcomes in implant-based breast reconstruction and the association with patient characteristics, surgeon, and surgeon team familiarity. A retrospective review of 3142 consecutive implant-based breast reconstruction mastectomy procedures at one institution was performed. Infection and skin necrosis rates were measured. Predictors of outcomes were identified by unadjusted logistic regression followed by multivariate logistic regression. Surgeon teams were grouped according to number of cases performed together. Patient characteristics remain the most important predictors for outcomes in implant-based breast reconstruction, with odds ratios above those of surgeon variables. The authors observed significant differences in the rate of skin necrosis between surgical oncologists with an approximately two-fold difference between surgeons with the highest and lowest rates. Surgeon teams that worked together on fewer than 150 procedures had higher rates of infection. Patient characteristics are the most important predictors for surgical outcomes in implant-based breast reconstruction, but surgeons and surgeon teams are also important variables. High-volume surgeon teams achieve lower rates of infection. This study highlights the need to examine modifiable risk factors associated with optimum implant-based breast reconstruction outcomes, which include patient and provider characteristics and the surgical team treating the patient. Risk, III.

  19. Ophthalmic plastic and orbital surgery in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Lin, I-Chan; Shen, Yun-Dun; Hsu, Wen-Ming

    2014-06-01

    We describe in this paper the current status of ophthalmic plastic and orbital surgery in Taiwan. Data were collected from the Bureau of National Health Insurance of Taiwan, the Bulletin of the Taiwan Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Society, and the Statistics Yearbook of Practicing Physicians and Health Care Organizations in Taiwan by the Taiwan Medical Association. We ascertained that 94 ophthalmologists were oculoplastic surgeons and accounted for 5.8% of 1621 ophthalmologists in Taiwan. They had their fellowship training abroad (most ophthalmologists trained in the United States of America) or in Taiwan. All ophthalmologists were well trained and capable of performing major oculoplastic surgeries. The payment rates by our National Health Insurance for oculoplastic and orbital surgeries are relatively low, compared to Medicare payments in the United States. Ophthalmologists should promote the concept that oculoplastic surgeons specialize in periorbital plastic and aesthetic surgeries. However, general ophthalmologists should receive more educational courses on oculoplastic and cosmetic surgery.

  20. "Einsatzchirurgie"--experiences of German military surgeons in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, Christian; Hauer, Thorsten; Huschitt, Niels; Palm, Hans-Georg

    2011-04-01

    In 2010, the world witnessed 32 wars and other armed conflicts. Epidemiological analyses of mechanisms and patterns of injury of soldiers sent into these conflicts can be utilised to identify the surgical expertise that is required in a combat setting providing important parameters to adjust medical infrastructure and training requirements for future Military Surgeons. Today in 2011, the German Bundeswehr runs a combat support hospital (role 3) in Mazar-e-Sharif in Northern Afghanistan providing a multidisciplinary capability profile. Furthermore, there are two role 2 medical treatment facilities (rescue centres) in Kunduz and Feyzabad for life-saving procedures and damage control operations in order to enable rapid evacuation to a higher level of care. Epidemiological analyses of injury patterns and mechanisms have shown that 2,299 soldiers of the coalition forces have been killed in Afghanistan until January 15, 2011. Of these, 21.4% died in non-hostile action (2010). The leading causes of injury were explosive devices (up to 60%) followed by gunshot wounds. Chest or abdominal injuries (40%) and traumatic brain injuries (35%) were the main causes of death for soldiers killed in action. The analysis of all surgical procedures performed in Northern Afghanistan demonstrates that most of the patients who underwent surgery until 2009 were local civilians. Most of these operations involved osteosynthesis and soft tissue debridement. Due to the recently aggravated tactical situation within the theatre, a significant increase of mass casualty situations and combat-related injuries was noticed. The casualties in this military conflict present with injury patterns that are not seen in routine surgical practice at home. In an era of increasing surgical sub-specialisation, the deployed military surgeon needs to acquire and maintain a wide range of skills including a variety of surgical fields. In order to create this kind of military surgeon, the so-called DUO plus model for

  1. The Core Competencies for General Orthopaedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellam, James F; Archibald, Douglas; Barber, James W; Christian, Eugene P; D'Ascoli, Richard J; Haynes, Richard J; Hecht, Suzanne S; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Kellam, James F; McLaren, Alexander C; Peabody, Terrance D; Southworth, Stephen R; Strauss, Robert W; Wadey, Veronica M R

    2017-01-18

    With the changing delivery of orthopaedic surgical care, there is a need to define the knowledge and competencies that are expected of an orthopaedist providing general and/or acute orthopaedic care. This article provides a proposal for the knowledge and competencies needed for an orthopaedist to practice general and/or acute care orthopaedic surgery. Using the modified Delphi method, the General Orthopaedic Competency Task Force consisting of stakeholders associated with general orthopaedic practice has proposed the core knowledge and competencies that should be maintained by orthopaedists who practice emergency and general orthopaedic surgery. For relevancy to clinical practice, 2 basic sets of competencies were established. The assessment competencies pertain to the general knowledge needed to evaluate, investigate, and determine an overall management plan. The management competencies are generally procedural in nature and are divided into 2 groups. For the Management 1 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to provide definitive care including assessment, investigation, initial or emergency care, operative or nonoperative care, and follow-up. For the Management 2 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to assess, investigate, and commence timely non-emergency or emergency care and then either transfer the patient to the appropriate subspecialist's care or provide definitive care based on the urgency of care, exceptional practice circumstance, or individual's higher training. This may include some higher-level procedures usually performed by a subspecialist, but are consistent with one's practice based on experience, practice environment, and/or specialty interest. These competencies are the first step in defining the practice of general orthopaedic surgery including acute orthopaedic care. Further validation and discussion among educators, general orthopaedic surgeons, and subspecialists will ensure that these are relevant to clinical practice. These

  2. British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons first national audit in support of revalidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Simon N; Lowe, Derek

    2011-09-01

    This is the first national audit of Fellows of the British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon with the specific purpose of supporting consultant revalidation. The audit was performed online. There were 127 responses from 275 email invitations. The audit reflects the range of activity by consultants with over 90% being involved in dento-alveolar, trauma and oral medicine. 78% of consultants performing head and neck oncology had a database and 75% of cleft lip and palate surgeons. Contributions to audits in the last 3 years were least common in oral medicine (7%), skull base (7%), aesthetic surgery (8%), and paediatric maxillofacial surgery (12%). There were many different audits reflected in consultants responses and there is merit in focusing on specific audits suitable for national comparison and benchmarking.

  3. Chinese medicine and the surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ping-Chung; Biji, Sreedhar; Yeung, Chung-Kwong

    2011-07-01

    The surgeon aims at a direct, complete removal of the pathology. In spite of the modern advancements of imaging facilities and precision instrumentations, unsatisfactory results and recurrences are not uncommon. This paper provides a general review of the four specific areas in surgery that would benefit from Chinese medicine. Extensive searches were made on four surgical areas based on available English language journals, viz. low-back pain, chronic ulcers, renal calculus, and enuresis in children, in the past 10 years. The quoted communications are mainly related to clinical evidences, while a smaller number of crucial laboratory reports are also included. Low-back pain, a most frequent orthopaedic problem, would benefit from acupuncture treatment. Chronic leg ulcers could achieve better results of healing using herbal supplements. Problems of renal stones, besides the conventional methods of removal, could be further supplemented with herbal drinks that aim at prevention of recurrences. Enuresis in children, an untreatable common condition, may respond well to acupuncture. Surgeons should keep an open mind. In case of difficulties, they could seriously consider options of traditional treatment.

  4. Association Between Flexible Duty Hour Policies and General Surgery Resident Examination Performance: A Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blay, Eddie; Hewitt, D Brock; Chung, Jeanette W; Biester, Thomas; Fiore, James F; Dahlke, Allison R; Quinn, Christopher M; Lewis, Frank R; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2017-02-01

    Concerns persist about the effect of current duty hour reforms on resident educational outcomes. We investigated whether a flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policy (Flexible Policy) was associated with differential general surgery examination performance compared with current ACGME duty hour policy (Standard Policy). We obtained examination scores on the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination, Qualifying Examination (written boards), and Certifying Examination (oral boards) for residents in 117 general surgery residency programs that participated in the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial. Using bivariate analyses and regression models, we compared resident examination performance across study arms (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) for 2015 and 2016, and 1 year of the Qualifying Examination and Certifying Examination. Adjusted analyses accounted for program-level factors, including the stratification variable for randomization. In 2016, FIRST trial participants were 4,363 general surgery residents. Mean American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination scores for residents were not significantly different between study groups (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) overall (Flexible Policy: mean [SD] 502.6 [100.9] vs Standard Policy: 502.7 [98.6]; p = 0.98) or for any individual postgraduate year level. There was no difference in pass rates between study arms for either the Qualifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 90.4% vs Standard Policy: 90.5%; p = 0.99) or Certifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 86.3% vs Standard Policy: 88.6%; p = 0.24). Results from adjusted analyses were consistent with these findings. Flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policies were not associated with differences in general surgery resident performance on examinations during the FIRST Trial. However, more years under flexible duty hour policies might be needed to observe an effect. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons

  5. The application of European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation II (EuroSCORE II and Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS risk-score for risk stratification in Indian patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Borde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To validate European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation II (EuroSCORE II and Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS risk-score for predicting mortality and STS risk-score for predicting morbidity in Indian patients after cardiac surgery. Materials and Methods: EuroSCORE II and STS risk-scores were obtained pre-operatively for 498 consecutive patients. The patients were followed for mortality and various morbidities. The calibration of the scoring systems was assessed using Hosmer-Lemeshow test. The discriminative capacity was estimated by area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves. Results: The mortality was 1.6%. For EuroSCORE II and STS risk-score C-statics of 5.43 and 6.11 were obtained indicating satisfactory model fit for both the scores. Area under ROC was 0.69 and 0.65 for EuroSCORE II and STS risk-score with P values of 0.068 and 0.15, respectively, indicating poor discriminatory power. Good fit and discrimination was obtained for renal failure, long-stay in hospital, prolonged ventilator support and deep sternal wound infection but the scores failed in predicting risk of reoperation and stroke. Mortality risk was correctly estimated in low ( 5% patients by both scoring systems. Conclusions: EuroSCORE II and STS risk-scores have satisfactory calibration power in Indian patients but their discriminatory power is poor. Mortality risk was over-estimated by both the scoring systems in high-risk patients. The present study highlights the need for forming a national database and formulating risk stratification tools to provide better quality care to cardiac surgical patients in India.

  6. Heart Surgery: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon? (American Academy of Pediatrics) Also in Spanish Patient Handouts Aortic valve surgery - open (Medical Encyclopedia) ... Spanish Open heart surgery (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish ... heart surgery Pediatric heart surgery - discharge Sternal exploration or closure Related ...

  7. Global plastic surgeons images depicted in motion pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Se Jin; Park, Sowhey; Hwang, Kun

    2013-03-01

    Motion pictures are made to entertain and enlighten people, but they are viewed differently by different people. What one considers to be a tearjerker may induce giggles in another. We have gained added interest in this because our professional pictures contain plastic surgery in their venue. We have recently reviewed 21 motion pictures that were made from 1928 to 2006 and that includes plastic surgical procedures in their content. As a habit, we tried to analyze them from a surgical point of view. About one third (35.7%) of the patients were criminals, whereas 14.3% of them were spies. One third of the procedures were done by illegitimate "surgeons," whereas a quarter of the procedures (25%) were performed by renowned surgeons. Surgeons who were in love with the patients did the rest (25%) of the operations. The complication rate was 14.3%; the surgery was successful in 85.7% of cases, but were the patients happy with the results? This was not the case in the movies. Only 7.7% were happy; 14.5 % of them were eminently unhappy. Why the discrepancy? It is difficult to analyze the minds of the people in the film, but considering that the majority of the characters in the films were rather unsavory, one may deduce that a crooked mind functions differently. Motion pictures have advanced greatly in the past several decades with the advent of improved mechanical and electronic devices, and plastic surgery as also advanced in tandem. This surgical field has become a common procedure in our daily life. It is readily available and mostly painless. However, the public sees it in only one way, that is, that the performing physicians are highly compensated. Very few consider the efforts and the suffering that accompanies each and every surgical procedure as it is performed. Perhaps, it is too much to hope for a day that will come when we will see a film that portrays the mental anguish that accompanies each and every procedure the plastic surgeon makes.

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available AAOMS - Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We ... may require one or more surgeries depending on the extent of the repair needed. Click here to ...

  9. Improving operating theatre communication between the orthopaedics surgeon and radiographer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Cheng Hong; Gordon, Robert; Nusem, Iulian

    2014-05-01

    This study was designed to assess the importance of communication between surgeons and radiographers in the operation of image intensifiers during orthopaedic surgery. This study was designed and conducted as single-centre, observational study. Fifteen medical officers and 15 radiographers were involved in this study. Each of the 15 radiographers was assigned to a medical officer. The 15 pairs were then each given a task to simulate achieving 'perfect circles' on fluoroscopy for distal locking of an intramedullary nail. The time taken for the surgeon to verbally instruct the radiographer how to position the image intensifier in order to achieve 'perfect circles' was recorded. The overall time taken to perform the task, and total number of images taken was recorded before and after a terminology system to manoeuvre image intensifier was introduced to the pairs. The mean time taken for the pairs to achieve perfect circles after the introduction of the manoeuvre terminology showed statistically significant reduction from 212 to 97 s (t = 4.212, df = 88, P radiographer, can reduce the time to acquire the desired images, and requires less radiation exposure in the process. © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  10. How Can We Improve Education of Breast Surgeons Across Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacinska, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    '™s land. Across Europe oncoplastic reconstruction is performed by specialist breast, general or plastic surgeons, sometimes in collaboration with each other. There may be dispute as who should or should not be involved. This needs to be addressed. 3. Oncoplastic reconstruction technique expansion. Significant expansion in number, variety and complexity of available techniques is a fact. A good example would be a 6-fold increase together with a low rate of complications in some Eastern European countries over the last decade 4. CME. European breast surgeons want to improve their skills, as evidenced by fully or overbooked ESSO-endorsed breast surgery courses and other high quality workshops. Applications for the European Examination in Breast Surgery (EBSQBS) continue to increase. Celsius.

  11. Does Surgeon Experience Impact the Risk of Complications After Bernese Periacetabular Osteotomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novais, Eduardo N; Carry, Patrick M; Kestel, Lauryn A; Ketterman, Brian; Brusalis, Christopher M; Sankar, Wudbhav N

    2017-04-01

    Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is a technically challenging procedure with potential risk for major complications and a previously reported steep learning curve. However, the impact of contemporary hip preservation fellowships on the learning curve of PAO has not been established. (1) What was the frequency of major complications during the PAO learning curve of two surgeons who recently graduated from hip preservation fellowships? (2) Is increasing level of experience associated with the risk of a complication and with operative time, a possible surrogate measure of surgical performance? We retrospectively studied 81 PAOs performed by one of two surgeons who recently graduated from a hip preservation fellowship during their first 4 years of practice in two institutions. One of the surgeons participated as a fellow in 78 PAOs with an increasing level of responsibility during the course of 1 full year. The other surgeon performed 41 PAOs as a fellow during 6 months, also with an increasing level of responsibility during that time. There were 68 (84%) female and 13 (16%) male patients (mean age, 18 years; range, 10-36 years). The frequency of complications was recorded early and at 1 year after surgery and graded according to a validated classification system describing five grades of complications. Complications that required surgical intervention (Grade III) and life-threatening complications (Grade IV) were considered major complications. Persistent pain after surgery, although considered a failure of PAO, was not considered a surgical complication as a result of the multifactorial etiology of pain after hip-preserving surgery. However, early reoperation and revision surgery were counted as complications. To evaluate the association between increasing level of experience and the occurrence of complications, we divided each surgeon's experience into his first 20 procedures (initial interval) and his second 20 (experienced interval) to test whether the

  12. Performance and Return to Sport After Sports Hernia Surgery in NFL Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Robert A; Evans, David C; Echo, Anthony; McCulloch, Patrick C; Lintner, David M; Varner, Kevin E; Harris, Joshua D

    2017-04-01

    Recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of athletic pubalgia (AP), also known as sports hernia, once underrecognized and undertreated in professional football, are becoming more common. Surgery as the final treatment for sports hernia when nonsurgical treatment fails remains controversial. Given the money involved and popularity of the National Football League (NFL), it is important to understand surgical outcomes in this patient population. After AP surgery, players would: (1) return to sport (RTS) at a greater than 90% rate, (2) play fewer games for fewer years than matched controls, (3) have no difference in performance compared with before AP surgery, and (4) have no difference in performance versus matched controls. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Internet-based injury reports identified players who underwent AP surgery from January 1996 to August 2015. Demographic and performance data were collected for each player. A 1:1 matched control group and an index year analog were identified. Control and case performance scores were calculated using a standardized scoring system. Groups were compared using paired Student t tests. Fifty-six NFL players (57 AP surgeries) were analyzed (mean age, 28.2 ± 3.1 years; mean years in NFL at surgery, 5.4 ± 3.2). Fifty-three players were able to RTS. Controls were in the NFL longer (P .05) difference in pre- versus post-AP surgery performance scores and no significant (P > .05) difference in postoperative performance scores versus controls post-index. There was a high RTS rate after AP surgery without a significant difference in postoperative performance, though career length and games per season after AP surgery were significantly less than that of matched controls.

  13. Designing a leadership development program for surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Gregory A; Pradarelli, Jason C; Lemak, Christy Harris; Mulholland, Michael W; Dimick, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous leadership development programs (LDPs) exist in health care, no programs have been specifically designed to meet the needs of surgeons. This study aimed to elicit practicing surgeons' motivations and desired goals for leadership training to design an evidence-based LDP in surgery. At a large academic health center, we conducted semistructured interviews with 24 surgical faculty members who voluntarily applied and were selected for participation in a newly created LDP. Transcriptions of the interviews were analyzed using analyst triangulation and thematic coding to extract major themes regarding surgeons' motivations and perceived needs for leadership knowledge and skills. Themes from interview responses were then used to design the program curriculum specifically to meet the leadership needs of surgical faculty. Three major themes emerged regarding surgeons' motivations for seeking leadership training: (1) Recognizing key gaps in their formal preparation for leadership roles; (2) Exhibiting an appetite for personal self-improvement; and (3) Seeking leadership guidance for career advancement. Participants' interviews revealed four specific domains of knowledge and skills that they indicated as desired takeaways from a LDP: (1) leadership and communication; (2) team building; (3) business acumen/finance; and (4) greater understanding of the health care context. Interviews with surgical faculty members identified gaps in prior leadership training and demonstrated concrete motivations and specific goals for participating in a formal leadership program. A LDP that is specifically tailored to address the needs of surgical faculty may benefit surgeons at a personal and institutional level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. History of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Williams, William G

    2015-10-01

    The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society is a group of over 100 pediatric heart surgeons representing 72 institutions that specialize in the treatment of patients with congenital heart defects. The Society began in 1972 and incorporated as a not-for-profit charitable organization in 2004. It has become the face and voice of congenital heart surgery in North America. In 1985, the Society established a data center for multicenter clinical research studies to encourage congenital heart professionals to participate in improving outcomes for our patients. The goals of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society are to stimulate the study of congenital cardiac physiology, pathology, and management options which are instantiated in data collection, multi-institutional studies, and scientific meetings. Honest and open discussion of problems with possible solutions to the challenges facing congenital heart professionals have been the strength of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. It is imperative for the growth of an organization to know from where it came in order to know to where it is going. The purpose of this article is to review the history of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Opioid prescribing patterns after Mohs micrographic surgery and standard excision: a survey of American Society for Dermatologic Surgery members and a chart review at a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kalynne; Calder, Scott; Larsen, Brooke; Duffy, Keith; Bowen, Glen; Tristani-Firouzi, Payam; Hadley, Michael; Endo, Justin

    2014-08-01

    Little is known about postoperative opioid prescribing patterns among dermatologic surgeons. To better understand postoperative opioid prescribing patterns among dermatologic surgeons in the United States. Two-part analysis consisting of a retrospective chart review of 233 dermatologic surgery patients at a single institution and an e-mail survey of American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS) members. (1) Retrospective review: 35% (82/233) of the patients received an opioid prescription. Larger defect size, repair of the defect, perioral and nasal site, and surgeon A or B performing surgery predicted opioid prescription. (2) E-mail survey: 556 ASDS members practicing within the United States responded. Sixty-four percent (357/556) reported prescribing opioids after ≤10% of cases. Surgeons younger than 55 years old, male surgeons, and surgeons in the southern and western United States were more likely to prescribe opioids after >10% of cases. Seventy-six percent (397/520) believed patients used ≤50% of the opioid pills prescribed. The retrospective review suggests that opioid prescribing is predicted by characteristics of the surgery (i.e., size, defect repair type, and anatomic location) and characteristics of the surgeon (i.e., age, sex, and practice location) with significant heterogeneity in prescribing habits. The national survey results raise the possibility that patients might not take all prescribed opioid pills after dermatologic surgery. Further investigation is warranted to determine how patients are actually using prescription pain pills to balance pain control with patient safety.

  16. Performance of PROMIS for Healthy Patients Undergoing Meniscal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Kyle J; Glass, Natalie; Anthony, Chris A; Hettrich, Carolyn M; Albright, John; Amendola, Annunziato; Wolf, Brian R; Bollier, Matthew

    2017-06-07

    The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) was developed as an extensive question bank with multiple health domains that could be utilized for computerized adaptive testing (CAT). In the present study, we investigated the use of the PROMIS Physical Function CAT (PROMIS PF CAT) in an otherwise healthy population scheduled to undergo surgery for meniscal injury with the hypotheses that (1) the PROMIS PF CAT would correlate strongly with patient-reported outcome instruments that measure physical function and would not correlate strongly with those that measure other health domains, (2) there would be no ceiling effects, and (3) the test burden would be significantly less than that of the traditional measures. Patients scheduled to undergo meniscal surgery completed the PROMIS PF CAT, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Marx Knee Activity Rating Scale, Short Form-36 (SF-36), and EuroQol-5 Dimension (EQ-5D) questionnaires. Correlations were defined as high (≥0.7), high-moderate (0.61 to 0.69), moderate (0.4 to 0.6), moderate-weak (0.31 to 0.39), or weak (≤0.3). If ≥15% respondents to a patient-reported outcome measure obtained the highest or lowest possible score, the instrument was determined to have a significant ceiling or floor effect. A total of 107 participants were analyzed. The PROMIS PF CAT had a high correlation with the SF-36 Physical Functioning (PF) (r = 0.82, p ceiling effects, with 0% of the participants achieving the lowest and highest score, respectively. The PROMIS PF CAT correlates strongly with currently used patient-reported outcome measures of physical function and demonstrates no ceiling effects for patients with meniscal injury requiring surgery. It may be a reasonable alternative to more burdensome patient-reported outcome measures.

  17. Spectrum of colorectal surgery operations performed in a single paediatric surgery unit in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiwo A. Lawal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal surgery is a budding subspecialty of paediatric surgery and typifies the advances in the management of surgical conditions in children. The colorectal burden in resource poor settings, though reported to be challenging, remains undocumented. The aim of the present study was to review the typical operative paediatric colorectal caseload in a single centre in sub-Saharan Africa. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of the operative records of the division was conducted between 2009 and 2013. Data were obtained on the demography, diagnosis, procedure performed and type of anaesthesia used; entered into a computer using SPSS (IBM Corp; Armonk, NY and analysed. Results: A total of 120 colorectal operations were performed in 90 patients with age ranging from 1 to 13 years. The major diagnoses were anorectal malformations (64.4% and Hirschsprung disease (HD (31.1%. The most often performed operations were colostomy (45.0%, posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (17.5% and pull through (17.5%. The number of colorectal operations performed each year ranged from 12 in 2009 to 36 in 2012. A higher proportion of patients with anorectal malformations (46.6% presented within the neonatal period compared with those with HD (17.9%, P = 0.005. The age at definitive surgery was less in patients with anorectal malformations compared to patients with HD (P = 0.003. Conclusions: Congenital malformations represent the bulk of the caseload in paediatric colorectal surgery in sub-Saharan Africa and patients typically present late; although patients with anorectal malformations present and are operated upon significantly earlier than those with HD.

  18. Cataract surgery practices in the United States Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havnaer, Annika G; Greenberg, Paul B; Cockerham, Glenn C; Clark, Melissa A; Chomsky, Amy

    2017-04-01

    To describe current cataract surgery practices within the United States Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Veterans Health Administration hospitals in the U.S. Retrospective data analysis. An initial e-mail containing a link to an anonymous 32-question survey of cataract surgery practices was sent to participants in May 2016. Two reminder e-mails were sent to nonresponders 1 week and 2 weeks after the initial survey was sent; the remaining nonresponders were called twice over a 2-week period. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The response rate was 75% (67/89). Cataract surgeons routinely ordered preoperative testing in 29 (45%) of 65 sections and preoperative consultations in 26 (39%) of 66 sections. In 22 (33%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons administered intracameral antibiotics. In 61 (92%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons used toric intraocular lenses (IOLs). In 20 (30%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons used multifocal IOLs. Cataract surgeons in 6 (9%) of 66 sections performed femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery. In 6 (9%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons performed immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery. Forty-nine (74%) ophthalmology chiefs reported a high level of satisfaction with Veterans Affairs ophthalmology. The survey results indicate that in cataract surgery in the VHA, routine preoperative testing is commonly performed and emerging practices, such as femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery and immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery, have limited roles. The results of this survey could benchmark future trends in U.S. cataract surgery practices, especially in teaching hospital settings. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Applications of robotics in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panait, L; Doarn, C R; Merrell, R C

    2002-01-01

    The end of the 20th century brought an increased use of computerized technology in medicine and surgery. The development of robotic surgical systems opened new approaches in general and cardiac surgery. Two leading robotic companies, Computer Motion, Inc. and Intuitive Surgical, Inc. have developed the Zeus and Da Vinci respectively, as very effective tools for surgeons to use. Both of them consist of a surgeon console, located far from the operating table, and three robotic arms, which reproduce inside the patient's body the movements performed by the surgeon at the console. The advantages of robotic surgery over laparoscopy and open surgery include: better eye-hand coordination, tremor filtration, steadiness of camera, 3-D vision, motion scale, more degrees of freedom for instruments etc. Of course, there are also some disadvantages, like the lack of tactile feedback, long time of set up, long learning curve, high cost etc. However, the advantages seem to overcome the disadvantages and more and more operations are conducted using robots. The impact of robotics in surgery is therefore very promising and in the future it will probably open even more new ways in the surgical practice and education both in Romania and across the globe.

  20. Impact of objectively assessing surgeons' teaching on effective perioperative instructional behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cheryl I; Gupta, Rama N; Larson, Joseph R; Abubars, Omar I; Kwiecien, Andrew J; Lake, Alexander D; Hozain, Ahmed E; Tanious, Adam; O'Brien, Trevor; Basson, Marc D

    2013-10-01

    Advancing surgical technology and decreasing resident learning hours have limited exposure to perioperative training, necessitating more effective and efficient perioperative teaching by faculty surgeons. Participation in collaborative efforts and process improvement can change behaviors and enhance teaching. To promote deliberate teaching of residents, change resident perception of their teachers, and produce sustainable improvements by objectively measuring surgeons' perioperative teaching performance. This 3-phase observational study of surgeons' perioperative teaching behaviors included university-based surgeons, general surgery residents, and preclinical student observers and involved elective cases at a 600+ bed tertiary hospital. Initially, we measured teaching behaviors by surgeons unaware of study objectives, provided aggregate and confidential individual feedback, and developed standardized preoperative briefings and postoperative debriefings. Phase 2 applied a deliberate teaching model and reinforced behaviors with continuous process improvement efforts (Plan, Do, Check, Act) and repeat observations. Phase 3 used resident prompts to enhance teaching behaviors and demonstrate sustainability. Resident surveys conducted 3 times assessed perceptions of deliberate guidance by faculty when compared with national benchmarks. Introduction of deliberate faculty preprocedural focusing and postprocedural reinforcement to facilitate resident learning. More frequent and complete perioperative teaching by faculty and the perception of enhanced teaching by residents. Faculty more commonly and more completely performed the 10-step preoperative briefings and postoperative debriefings (P teaching styles significantly improved and residents' survey-reported assessments of faculty teaching improved over national data for describing procedural steps (P = .02) and requests for resident self-evaluation (P = .006). Objective recording of teaching behavior frequency

  1. Use of robotics in oncology surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle-Lindrud, Susan

    2015-06-01

    Robotic surgery is an exciting technology that allows the surgeon to sit at a computer console near the operating table, using mechanical arms with surgical instruments attached to them. This type of surgery is minimally invasive, and the procedure is performed through tiny incisions. This technology is widely used in the United States and is expected to evolve over time with an increase in the number and types of procedures.

  2. Clinical innovations in Philippine thoracic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Luis. J. Danguilan

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic surgery in the Philippines followed the development of thoracic surgery in the United States and Europe. With better understanding of the physiology of the open chest and refinements in thoracic anesthetic and surgical approaches, Filipino surgeons began performing thoracoplasties, then lung resections for pulmonary tuberculosis and later for lung cancer in specialty hospitals dealing with pulmonary diseases—first at the Quezon Institute (QI) and presently at the Lung Center of the P...

  3. The pitfalls of laparoscopic surgery: challenges for robotics and telerobotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, Garth H

    2002-02-01

    After its debut in 1988, laparoscopic cholecystectomy rapidly became the standard of care for cholelithiasis, yet very few surgeons use minimally invasive techniques for other abdominal operations. Why do most surgeons continue to perform traditional open gastrointestinal operations? We believe that the answer to this question lies in the fact that advanced laparoscopic operations are difficult to learn, perform, and master. A number of inherent pitfalls of laparoscopy hinder the performance of these operations even after the surgeon has accumulated years of experience. These pitfalls include an unstable video camera platform, limited motion (degrees of freedom) of straight laparoscopic instruments, two-dimensional imaging, and poor ergonomics for the surgeon. Inexperienced or bored laparoscopic camera-holders move the camera frequently and rotate it away from the horizon. The long, straight laparoscopic instruments are limited in their motion by the fixation enforced by the abdominal wall trocars. Similarly, the standard two-dimensional video imaging used in most laparoscopic operations impedes the surgeon's depth perception, compounding the limitations of laparoscopic instruments. In addition, surgeons are forced to assume ergonomically awkward stances in performing many laparoscopic operations. These four factors hinder a surgeon's efforts to learn and to perform advanced laparoscopic operations, significantly lengthening the learning curve. The articles presented in this issue suggest that robotics and telerobotics offer solutions to these nagging pitfalls of laparoscopic surgery.

  4. Evaluation of racing performance after colic surgery in Thoroughbreds: 85 cases (1996-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Joy E; Boston, Raymond C; Brauer, Thomas

    2013-08-15

    To determine racing performance after surgery for colic in Thoroughbreds. Retrospective cohort study. 85 racing Thoroughbreds that survived to discharge following colic surgery and 170 race-matched reference horses. Earnings, starts, and earnings per start were compared between horses that underwent surgery and reference horses, the proportions of horses that returned to racing were analyzed, and career longevity was determined. Among 85 racing Thoroughbreds that underwent colic surgery, 31 (36%) had primarily small intestinal lesions, of which 11 underwent resection; 54 (64%) had large intestinal lesions, of which 2 underwent resection. Fifty-nine of 85 (69%) horses that underwent colic surgery returned to racing after a 6-month recovery period versus 125 of 170 (73%) reference horses (OR, 0.81). In the 36-month postoperative period, reference horses earned a mean of $7,866 more, had a mean of 0.26 more starts, and had mean earnings per start of $29 more than horses that underwent surgery. Horses that underwent surgery did not have different career lengths than reference horses. Horses that underwent colic surgery did not have a significant reduction in measures of performance or career length, compared with a reference cohort.

  5. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by a trained ... Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by a trained ...

  6. [The first woman surgeons in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, M; De Jong, E

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the position of woman surgeons in the Netherlands. In 1913 the first woman, Heleen Robert, was accepted as member of the Dutch Society of Surgery. Three others, Jeanne Knoop, Frieda van Hasselt and Rosalie Wijnberg, followed during the next ten years. The nomination of Rosalie Wijnberg caused a turbulent discussion as she was working as a gynaecologist and not as a surgeon. One can wonder about this argument as other members were gynaecologists too. It seems that the male attitudes towards women were changing as more women entered the male dominated field. Nevertheless, from 1931 on, the year in which the registration of specialists was created, a number of women succeeded in obtaining a registration in surgery. Four of them were interviewed: dr. D.A.E. Norel, A.G. Wiersum-de Kwaadsteniet, J. Leeksma-Lievense and A.A. Fierstra. The general opinion still is that surgery is not a female profession. At the moment there are some twenty women working as general surgeon compared to a seven hundred men.

  7. Variability in orthopedic surgeon treatment preferences for nondisplaced scaphoid fractures: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Megan Carroll; Braunstein, Jake; Merenstein, Daniel; Neufeld, Steven; Narvaez, Michael; Friedland, Robert; Bruce, Katherine; Pfaff, Ashley

    2016-12-01

    The absence of a best practice treatment standard contributes to clinical variation in medicine. Often in the absence of evidence, a standard of care is developed and treatment protocols are implemented. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the standard of care for the treatment of nondisplaced scaphoid fractures is uniform among orthopedic surgeons. A survey of orthopedic surgeons actively practicing in the US or abroad was conducted to elicit preferred treatment strategies for nondisplaced scaphoid fractures. The surgeons were recruited at orthopedic conferences, clinical visits, and via email. The survey included demographic questions along with a short clinical vignette. The option for fracture management included surgical versus nonsurgical treatment. For those who chose nonsurgical treatment, type/duration of immobilization was recorded. Cost analysis was performed to estimate direct and indirect costs of various treatment options. A total of 494 orthopedic surgeons completed the survey. The preference for surgical treatment was preferred in 13% of respondents. Hand/upper extremity specialists were significantly more likely to operate compared with generalists (p = 0.0002). Surgeons younger than forty-five were nearly twice as likely to choose surgery (p = 0.01). There was no clear consensus on duration of immobilization as 30% of surgeons chose 6 weeks, 33% selected 8 weeks, and 27% opted for 12 weeks. Total cost of surgery was 49% greater than that of nonoperative treatment. With each additional week of immobilization for nonoperative treatment, the total costs of surgical treatment near that of nonoperative treatment. There exist clear trends in how specific demographic groups choose to treat the nondisplaced scaphoid fracture. Whether these trends are the result of generational gaps or additional subspecialty training remains difficult to determine, but there is need to pursue a more consistent approach that benefits the patients and the

  8. Surgeon and Hospital Level Variation in the Costs of Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Alexander P; Leow, Jeffrey J; Chang, Steven L; Chung, Benjamin I; Meyer, Christian P; Kibel, Adam S; Menon, Mani; Nguyen, Paul L; Choueiri, Toni K; Reznor, Gally; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Sammon, Jesse D; Sun, Maxine; Trinh, Quoc-Dien

    2016-10-01

    We assessed surgeon and hospital level variation in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy costs and predictors of high and low cost surgery. The study population consisted of a weighted sample of 291,015 men who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer by 667 surgeons at 197 U.S. hospitals from 2003 to 2013. We evaluated 90-day direct hospital costs (2014 USD) in the Premier Hospital Database. High costs per robot-assisted radical prostatectomy were those above the 90th percentile and low costs were those below the 10th percentile. Mean hospital cost per robot-assisted radical prostatectomy was $11,878 (95% CI $11,804-$11,952). Mean cost was $2,837 (95% CI $2,805-$2,869) in the low cost group vs $25,906 (95% CI $24,702-$25,490) in the high cost group. Nearly a third of the variation in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy cost was attributable to hospital characteristics and more than a fifth was attributable to surgeon characteristics (R-squared 30.43% and 21.25%, respectively). High volume surgeons and hospitals (90th percentile or greater) had decreased odds of high cost surgery (surgeons: OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.11-0.54; hospitals: OR 0.105, 95% CI 0.02-0.46). The performance of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy at a high volume hospital was associated with increased odds of low cost robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (OR 839, 95% CI 122-greater than 999). This study provides insight into the role of surgeons and hospitals in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy costs. Given the substantial variability, identifying and remedying the root cause of outlier costs may yield substantial benefits. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Surgeon-patient communication during awake procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire S; Guyton, Kristina; Pariser, Joseph J; Siegler, Mark; Schindler, Nancy; Langerman, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Surgeons are increasingly performing procedures on awake patients. Communication during such procedures is complex and underexplored in the literature. Surgeons were recruited from the faculty of 2 hospitals to participate in an interview regarding their approaches to communication during awake procedures. Three researchers used the constant comparative method to transcribe, code, and review interviews until saturation was reached. Twenty-three surgeons described the advantages and disadvantages of awake procedures, their communication with the awake patient, their interactions with staff and with trainees, the environment of awake procedures, and how communication in this context is taught and learned. Surgeons recognized communication during awake procedures as important and reported varied strategies for ensuring patient comfort in this context. However, they also acknowledged challenges with multiparty communication during awake procedures, especially in balancing commitments to teaching with their duty to comfort the patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Communication between the obese patient and bariatric surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Angulo, David; Munitiz, Vicente; Ortiz, M Ángeles; Martínez de Haro, Luisa F; Frutos, M Dolores; Hernández, Antonio; Parrilla, Pascual

    2015-10-01

    Communication between the bariatric surgeon and the obese patient is very important as it influences the expectations of patients with regard to surgery, aim of the surgery and the understanding of the mechanisms of failure of surgery. Furthermore, the incidence of certain psychopathology in these patients makes it necessary for the surgeon to have the ability to communicate to the patient the need for motivation and the maintenance of healthy life habits. Although the topic is subjective, in this article we review several useful recommendations to optimize communication before and after surgery. Finally, we emphasize the need to create workshops to train the bariatric surgeon in these issues that we consider so important. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduction in Surgical Wound Infection Rates Associated with Reporting Data to Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GD Taylor

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that wound infection (surgical site infection [ ssi ] rates fall when surgeons are provided with data on their performance. Since 1987, the authors have been performing concurrent surveillance of surgical patients and confidentially reporting surgeon-specific ssi rates to individual surgeons and their clinical directors, and providing surgeons with the mean rates of their peers. The program has been gradually refined and expanded. Data are now collected on wound infection risk and report risk adjusted rates compared with the mean for hospitals in the United States National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (nnis data bank. Since inception through to December 1993, ssi rates have fallen 68% in clean contaminated general surgery cases (relative risk [rr] 0.36, 95% ci 0.2 to 0.6, P=0.0001, 64% in clean plastic surgery cases (rr 0.35, 95% ci 0.06 to 1.8, 72% in caesarean section cases (rr 0.23, 95% ci 0.03 to 1.96 and 42% in clean cardiovascular surgery cases (rr 0.59, 95% ci 0.34 to 1.0. In clean orthopedic surgery the ssi rate remained stable from 1987 through 1992. In 1993 a marked increase was experienced. Reasons for this are being explored. Overall there was a 32% decrease in ssi rate between the index year and 1993 or, in percentage terms, 2.8% to 1.9% (rr 0.65, 95% ci 0.51 to 0.86, P=0.002. ssi surveillance should become standard in Canadian hospitals interested in improving the quality of surgical care and reducing the clinical impact and cost associated with nosocomial infection.

  12. Recent advances of robotic surgery and single port laparoscopy in gynecologic oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Yong Wook; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Young Tae

    2009-01-01

    Two innovative approaches in minimally invasive surgery that have been introduced recently are the da Vinci robotic platform and single port laparoscopic surgery (SPLS). Robotic surgery has many advantages such as 3-dimensional view, the wrist like motion of the robotic arm and ergonomically comfortable position for the surgeon. Numerous literatures have demonstrated the feasibility of robotic surgery in gynecologic oncology. However, further research should be performed to demonstrate the su...

  13. Should the surgeon or the general practitioner (GP follow up patients after surgery for colon cancer? A randomized controlled trial protocol focusing on quality of life, cost-effectiveness and serious clinical events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ringberg Unni

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All patients who undergo surgery for colon cancer are followed up according to the guidelines of the Norwegian Gastrointestinal Cancer Group (NGICG. These guidelines state that the aims of follow-up after surgery are to perform quality assessment, provide support and improve survival. In Norway, most of these patients are followed up in a hospital setting. We describe a multi-centre randomized controlled trial to test whether these patients can be followed up by their general practitioner (GP without altering quality of life, cost effectiveness and/or the incidence of serious clinical events. Methods and Design Patients undergoing surgery for colon cancer with histological grade Dukes's Stage A, B or C and below 75 years of age are eligible for inclusion. They will be randomized after surgery to follow-up at the surgical outpatient clinic (control group or follow-up by the district GP (intervention group. Both study arms comply with the national NGICG guidelines. The primary endpoints will be quality of life (QoL (measured by the EORTC QLQ C-30 and the EQ-5D instruments, serious clinical events (SCEs, and costs. The follow-up period will be two years after surgery, and quality of life will be measured every three months. SCEs and costs will be estimated prospectively. The sample size was 170 patients. Discussion There is an ongoing debate on the best method of follow-up for patients with CRC. Due to a wide range of follow-up programmes and paucity of randomized trials, it is impossible to draw conclusions about the best combination and frequency of clinic (or family practice visits, blood tests, endoscopic procedures and radiological examinations that maximize the clinical outcome, quality of life and costs. Most studies on follow-up of CRC patients have been performed in a hospital outpatient setting. We hypothesize that postoperative follow-up of colon cancer patients (according to national guidelines by GPs will not have

  14. [Robotic surgery in gynecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorba, Roland

    2012-06-24

    Minimally invasive surgery has revolutionized gynecological interventions over the past 30 years. The introduction of the da Vinci robotic surgery in 2005 has resulted in large changes in surgical management. The robotic platform allows less experienced laparoscopic surgeons to perform more complex procedures. It can be utilized mainly in general gynecology and reproductive gynecology. The robot is being increasingly used for procedures such as hysterectomy, myomectomy, adnexal surgery, and tubal anastomosis. In urogynecology, the robot is being utilized for sacrocolopexy as well. In the field of gynecologic oncology, the robot is being increasingly used for hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy in oncologic diseases. Despite the rapid and widespread adaption of robotic surgery in gynecology, there are no randomized trials comparing its efficacy and safety to other traditional surgical approaches. This article presents the development, technical aspects and indications of robotic surgery in gynecology, based on the previously published reviews. Robotic surgery can be highly advantageous with the right amount of training, along with appropriate patient selection. Patients will have less blood loss, less post-operative pain, faster recovery, and fewer complications compared to open surgery and laparoscopy. However, until larger randomized control trials are completed which report long-term outcomes, robotic surgery cannot be stated to have priority over other surgical methods.

  15. A surgeon's quest

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Valiathan

    2008-09-01

    This last part of surgery, namely, operations, is a reflection on the healing art; it is a tacit acknowledgement of the insufficiency of surgery. It is like an armed savage who attempts to get that by force which a civilised man would get by stratagem.

  16. Training a cataract surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Babar Qureshi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Training in cataract surgery is one of the key factors needed to ensure high quality cataract surgery with good visual outcomes and patient satisfaction. The training has to impart the right skills to the right person by the right trainer and in the right environment.

  17. Reliable assessment of general surgeons' non-technical skills based on video-recordings of patient simulated scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanager, Lene; Beier-Holgersen, Randi; Dieckmann, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    Nontechnical skills are essential for safe and efficient surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of an assessment tool for surgeons' nontechnical skills, Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons dk (NOTSSdk), and the effect of rater training.......Nontechnical skills are essential for safe and efficient surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of an assessment tool for surgeons' nontechnical skills, Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons dk (NOTSSdk), and the effect of rater training....

  18. Magnification for the dermatologic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodkiewicz, Hubert M; Joseph, Aaron K

    2017-06-01

    Ergonomic practice increases the productivity, quality, and longevity of the dermatologic surgeon. When used properly, magnification devices can be ergonomic and beneficial additions to the dermatologic surgeon's practice. Herein, we review the available magnification options for the dermatologic surgeon and evaluate the options based on cost, design, and functional advantages and disadvantages. Magnification for the dermatologic surgeon may be a useful tool for a healthier, more efficient, and higher-quality practice.

  19. Advanced laparoscopic bariatric surgery Is safe in general surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuckelman, John; Bingham, Jason; Barron, Morgan; Lallemand, Michael; Martin, Matthew; Sohn, Vance

    2017-05-01

    Bariatric surgery makes up an increasing percentage of general surgery training. The safety of resident involvement in these complex cases has been questioned. We evaluated patient outcomes in resident performed laparoscopic bariatric procedures. Retrospective review of patients undergoing a laparoscopic bariatric procedure over seven years at a tertiary care single center. Procedures were primarily performed by a general surgery resident and proctored by an attending surgeon. Primary outcomes included operative volume, operative time and leak rate with perioperative outcomes evaluated as secondary outcomes. A total of 1649 bariatric procedures were evaluated. Operations included laparoscopic bypass (690) and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (959). Average operating time was 136 min. Eighteen leaks (0.67%) were identified. Graduating residents performed an average of 89 laparoscopic bariatric cases during their training. There were no significant differences between resident levels with concern to operative time or leak rate (p 0.97 and p = 0.54). General surgery residents can safely perform laparoscopic bariatric surgery. When proctored by a staff surgeon, a resident's level of training does not significantly impact leak rate. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. The future of glaucoma surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsham Sheybani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma surgery is ripe for innovation. In the last few years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of devices approaching commercialization. While not all that is new is necessarily good, the role of these devices in changing glaucoma surgery is equally important in terms of both success and failure. Trabeculectomy, the most commonly performed incisional filtration surgery for glaucoma, is subjective by nature and certainly has risks. As devices aim to standardize glaucoma surgery, specifically subconjunctival filtration surgery, predictability and in turn safety should theoretically improve. This may allow the glaucoma surgeon to intervene earlier in the disease process, prevent more advanced vision loss and potentially decrease the burden of medications.

  1. Interns' Day in Surgery: improving intern performance through a simulation-based course for final year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sankar N; Page, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    The transition from final year medical student into the first year of clinical practice is known to be associated with anxiety and stress that ultimately affects job performance. Studies have shown that much of this stress and anxiety results from a junior doctor's lack of confidence in performing a number of basic tasks. We investigated if implementation of a half-day simulation-based course in the final year medical students results in increased confidence in performing these tasks. Final year medical students of the University of Tasmania's School of Medicine posted at the Royal Hobart Hospital participated in a half-day simulation course, comprised of multiple simulation stations, which required students to perform the basic tasks a competent surgical intern would be expected to complete. Students completed a survey which investigated their confidence with each task before and after the course. Overall, the majority of students thought that the Interns' Day in Surgery course was useful. The most significant improvements perceived were in case presentation (57.5% to 94.6%; P = 0.02) and communication with patients and other professional colleagues (55.5% to 75.5%; P = 0.01). A follow-up survey of doctors who attended this course reinforced its benefits. Simulation-based courses in clinical practice provide good learning opportunities for final year medical students within the curriculum. This study confirms significant gains in all skills categories practised during the course with perceived benefits subsequently identified by interns. This should lead to a less stressful and more successful transition from student to doctor and ultimately, better patient care. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  2. Among Musculoskeletal Surgeons, Job Dissatisfaction Is Associated With Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wulfften Palthe, Olivier D R; Neuhaus, Valentin; Janssen, Stein J; Guitton, Thierry G; Ring, David

    2016-08-01

    Burnout is common in professions such as medicine in which employees have frequent and often stressful interpersonal interactions where empathy and emotional control are important. Burnout can lead to decreased effectiveness at work, negative health outcomes, and less job satisfaction. A relationship between burnout and job satisfaction is established for several types of physicians but is less studied among surgeons who treat musculoskeletal conditions. We asked: (1) For surgeons treating musculoskeletal conditions, what risk factors are associated with worse job dissatisfaction? (2) What risk factors are associated with burnout symptoms? Two hundred ten (52% of all active members of the Science of Variation Group [SOVG]) surgeons who treat musculoskeletal conditions (94% orthopaedic surgeons and 6% trauma surgeons; in Europe, general trauma surgeons do most of the fracture surgery) completed the Global Job Satisfaction instrument, Shirom-Malamed Burnout Measure, and provided practice and surgeon characteristics. Most surgeons were male (193 surgeons, 92%) and most were academically employed (186 surgeons, 89%). Factors independently associated with job satisfaction and burnout were identified with multivariable analysis. Greater symptoms of burnout (β, -7.13; standard error [SE], 0.75; 95% CI, -8.60 to -5.66; p < 0.001; adjusted R(2), 0.33) was the only factor independently associated with lower job satisfaction. Having children (β, -0.45; SE, 0.0.21; 95% CI, -0.85 to -0.043; p = 0.030; adjusted R(2), 0.046) was the only factor independently associated with fewer symptoms of burnout. Among an active research group of largely academic surgeons treating musculoskeletal conditions, most are satisfied with their job. Efforts to limit burnout and job satisfaction by optimizing engagement in and deriving meaning from the work are effective in other settings and merit attention among surgeons. Level II, prognostic study.

  3. General versus vascular surgeon: impact of a vascular fellowship on clinical practice, surgical case load, and lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Randall W

    2010-02-01

    An applicant shortage for vascular surgery (VS) residencies exists despite an increase in available training positions created to meet the growing demands for vascular surgeons. After 3 years of practice as an American Board of Surgery (ABS)-certified/board-eligible general surgeon, the author of this study attended an accredited 1-year VS training fellowship and received an ABS certificate of Added Qualifications in VS. The purpose of this review was to investigate the implications completing a vascular fellowship has had on VS procedure patterns, vascular procedure competency, clinical practice, career, and lifestyle with the aim of attracting trainees to the field of VS. The author's operative logs were reviewed retrospectively to summarize vascular procedures performed before and after the vascular fellowship. Statistical analysis was performed comparing the types and volume of vascular procedures before and after the vascular fellowship. Changes in professional career and personal life also were examined. The author performed 401 vascular procedures during 2.8 years as a general surgeon. In the first 3.4 years after the vascular fellowship, vascular procedure volume increased to 1563. The mean number of vascular procedures performed per year increased from 143.2 as a general surgeon to 459.7 as a vascular surgeon. The three major differences in vascular procedures occurring after the vascular fellowship were (1) a threefold increase in the number of vascular procedures performed, (2) a shift from major open to venous and endovascular procedures, and (3) an increase in case complexity. Specializing in VS also has resulted in increased career opportunities, more career satisfaction, a direct financial benefit, and more flexibility for lifestyle and family. Because of these positive changes, the author encourages medical students and residents interested in VS to explore the specialty early, seek vascular surgeons to serve as mentors, and enter one of the new VS

  4. 胸腔镜手术在中国地市级医院胸外科应用现状的问卷调查%A Questionnaire Study Investigating Current Application Status of Video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery of Thoracic Surgeons in Some Municipal Hospitals in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜恒; 廖虎; 宋志芳; 林琳; 马林; 车国卫; 刘伦旭

    2013-01-01

    ,and provide evidence for further VATS study and training.Methods We conducted a questionnaire study for thoracic surgeons in municipal hospitals who attended the 5th West China Forum on Mini-invasive Thoracic Surgery in 2012.The questionnaire content included general descriptions of the thoracic surgeons,the departments of thoracic surgery where they worked,and VATS application starus in their hospitals.A total of 263 surgeons were investigated,and 183 (69.58%)valid questionnaires were collected for descriptive analysis.Results (1) Responders' view of VATS:There were 89.62% (164/183) responders who believed that the advantages of VATS were mainly mini-invasive and fast postoperative recovery,while its disadvantage was high cost (76.50%,140/183).There were 71.04% (130/183) responders who thought that VATS lobectomy could provide a higher postoperative quality of life for lung cancer patients,while only 12.57% (23/183) responders thought that the 5-year survival rate of VATS was higher than that of open thoracotomy.There were 60.11% (110/183) responders who believed that VATS was less widely performed in China than America,but VATS level of very few hospitals in China was superior or equal to American level.There were 52.46% (96/183) responders who agreed that VATS could be used for the treatment of locally advanced lung cancer.(2)Training situation of VATS lobectomy for lung cancer:Learning class or short-term training (32.24%,59/183)was the best way to learn VATS lobectomy.Their main learning process was from open thoracotomy to mini-thoracotomy then to VATS (60.66%,111/183).Single-direction thoracoscopic lobectomy was the most popular VATS technique (54.64%,100/183),and its learning curve was at least 30 cases (26.78%,49/183).(3) VATS application status:VATS was performed in all the hospitals investigated.Benign thoracic diseases were most commonly chosen by thoracic surgeons who started to perform VATS (81.42%,149/183).The main initial hurdles of

  5. A Qualitative assessment of the impact of handedness among left-handed surgeons in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Mohamed S; Saquib, Juliann; Al-Mazrou, AbdulRahman; Saquib, Nazmus

    2017-03-31

    Among Muslims, the use of the left hand in daily activities is discouraged; many people believe that left-handed physicians lack the competency for surgery. The study aim was to document the experience of left-handed surgeons in Saudi Arabia and the impact of handedness on their training, job performance, collegial relationships, and career progression. This qualitative study included 9 left-handed physicians in various surgical specialties from 4 major hospitals in Al-Qassim, Saudi Arabia. Face-to-face interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire were conducted. Interview transcripts were analysed with Qualitative Content Analysis Method. Of the participants, 78% were male and the mean age was 40 years. Twenty-two per cent were consultants, 67% were specialists, and 11% were resident physicians. Participants reported the following: (a) a lack of training programmes specific to handedness in undergraduate and postgraduate medical training, (b) inconvenience while being assisted by a right-handed colleague, (c) stress, fatigue, and physical pain due to the use of right-handed instruments, and (d) training of the right hand being the most common adaptation technique for a left-handed surgeon. It was concluded that left-handed surgeons experience difficulty with right-handed instruments and right-handed colleagues during surgery. It is recommended that clinical curriculum incorporate hand-specific training in surgery.

  6. Toward late career transitioning: a proposal for academic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Robin; McLeod, Robin; Latter, David; Keshavjee, Shaf; Rotstein, Ori; Fehlings, Michael G; Ahmed, Najma; Nathens, Avery; Rutka, James

    2017-08-01

    In the absence of a defined retirement age, academic surgeons need to develop plans for transition as they approach the end of their academic surgical careers. The development of a plan for late career transition represents an opportunity for departments of surgery across Canada to initiate a constructive process in cooperation with the key stakeholders in the hospital or institution. The goal of the process is to develop an individual plan for each faculty member that is agreeable to the academic surgeon; informs the surgical leadership; and allows the late career surgeon, the hospital, the division and the department to make plans for the future. In this commentary, the literature on the science of aging is reviewed as it pertains to surgeons, and guidelines for late career transition planning are shared. It is hoped that these guidelines will be of some value to academic programs and surgeons across the country as late career transition models are developed and adopted.

  7. Minimally invasive surgery. Future developments.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    The rapid development of minimally invasive surgery means that there will be fundamental changes in interventional treatment. Technological advances will allow new minimally invasive procedures to be developed. Application of robotics will allow some procedures to be done automatically, and coupling of slave robotic instruments with virtual reality images will allow surgeons to perform operations by remote control. Miniature motors and instruments designed by microengineering could be introdu...

  8. Sir Charles Ballance: pioneer British neurological surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J L

    1999-03-01

    nerve regeneration and nerve grafting, and after many years of devoted research, he devised successful operations for facial nerve paralysis. For this and early vascular work, he is often credited as the first English surgeon to reintroduce classical Hunterian methods of experiment into surgery. He was honored as the founder and President of The Society of British Neurological Surgeons in 1926. Perhaps best known as a general and aural surgeon, Ballance was second only to Horsley in reputation as a pioneer British neurological surgeon. Described as a painstakingly slow but delicate and meticulous operator, Ballance made a contribution to neurosurgery and temporal bone surgery that was immense.

  9. The Implementation of Robotic Surgery in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matanes, Emad; Boulus, Sari; Lowenstein, Lior

    2015-09-01

    In the last decade the number of robotic devices and the medical procedures utilizing them increased significantly around the world. To evaluate the implementation of robotic surgeries in Israel in various surgical disciplines. We conducted a retrospective study accessing information about the annual purchases of robots, the number of physicians trained for their use, and the number of robotic surgeries performed each year, according to indications of surgery and the disciplines of the operating medical staff. The data were taken from the database of Intuitive Surgical Inc. Six robots were purchased by six medical centers in Israel during the years 2008-2013. There are currently 150 physicians trained to use the robot in one of the simulators of Intuitive Surgical Inc. Of them, 104 are listed as active robotic surgeons. Most of these physicians are urologists, gynecologists, or general surgeons. The number of robotic surgeries increased each year in all fields in which it was implemented. In 2013, 975 robotic surgeries were performed in Israel. Of them, 52% were performed by urologists; 89% of them were radical prostatectomy. The use of robotic surgery increased considerably in Israel over recent years, in urology, gynecology, general surgery, and otolaryngology. Despite the lack of conclusive evidence of the advantages of robotic surgery over the laparoscopic approach, the market power and the desire to be at the technological forefront drive many medical centers to purchase the robot and to train physicians in its use.

  10. Augmented-reality-guided biopsy of a tumor near the skull base: the surgeon's experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, Georg; Sudra, Gunther; Ghanai, Sassan; Salb, Tobias; Dillmann, Ruediger; Marmulla, Ruediger; Hassfeld, Stefan

    2005-04-01

    INPRES, a system for Augmented Reality has been developed in the collaborative research center "Information Technology in Medicine - Computer- and Sensor-Aided Surgery". The system is based on see-through glasses. In extensive preclinical testing the system has proven its functionality and tests with volunteers had been performed successfully, based on MRI imaging. We report the surgeons view of the first use of the system for AR guided biopsy of a tumour near the skull base. Preoperative planning was performed based on CT image data. The information to be projected was the tumour volume and was segmented from image data. With the use of infrared cameras, the positions of patient and surgeon were tracked intraoperatively and the information on the glasses displays was updated accordingly. The systems proved its functionality under OR conditions in patient care: Augmented reality information could be visualized with sufficient accuracy for the surgical task. After intraoperative calibration by the surgeon, the biopsy was acquired successfully. The advantage of see through glasses is their flexibility. A virtual stereoscopic image can be set up wherever and whenever desired. A biopsy at a delicate location could be performed without the need for wide exposure. This means additional safety and lower operation related morbidity to the patient. The integration of the calibration-procedure of the glasses into the intraoperative workflow is of importance to the surgeon.

  11. American College of Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery Resident Skills Curriculum ACS/APDS/ASE Resident Prep Curriculum ACS/ASE Medical Student Core Curriculum ACS/ ... Registry Trauma Education Trauma Education Trauma Education Achieving Zero Preventable Deaths Trauma Systems Conference Advanced Surgical Skills ...

  12. Society of Reproductive Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affiliated society to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine . Below are links to publications authored by ASRM and its affiliated societies. Latest Additions: Diagnostic Testing for Male Factor Infertility Robotic surgery The Intrauterine Device (IUD): A Long-acting ...

  13. Effect of anesthetic, tag size, and surgeon experience on postsurgical recovering after implantation of electronic tags in a neotropical fish: Prochilodus lineatus (Valenciennes, 1837 (Characiformes: Prochilodontidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M. Lopes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Implantation of telemetry transmitters in fish can be affected by different parameters. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of type of anesthetic, tag size, and surgeon experience on surgical and postsurgical wound healing in the neotropical fish Prochilodus lineatus . In total, eighty fish were surgically implanted with telemetry transmitters and forty fish were kept as controls. Forty fish were implanted with a small tag and other forty were implanted with a large tag. Similarly, forty fish were anesthetized with eugenol and forty fish were anesthetized by electroanesthesia, and forty surgeries were performed by an expert surgeon and forty surgeries were performed by novice surgeons. At the end of the experimental period seventeen (21.3% tagged fish had postsurgical complications, including death (1.3%, tag expulsion (2.5%, antenna migration (2.5%, and infection (15%. Tag size was the key determinant for postsurgical complications. Surgical details and postsurgical wound healing were not affected by type of anesthetic. Incision size, duration of surgery, and wound area were significantly affected by tag size and surgeon experience, and the number of sutures was significantly affected by tag size only. The results indicate that successful implantation of telemetry transmitters is dependent upon surgeon experience and tag size.

  14. Is expertise in pediatric surgery necessary to perform laparoscopic splenectomy in children? An experience from a department of general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaglio, Marcello; Romano, Fabrizio; Garancini, Mattia; Degrate, Luca; Luperto, Margherita; Uggeri, Fabio; Scotti, Mauro; Uggeri, Franco

    2012-06-01

    Splenectomy is frequently required in children for various hematologic pathologic findings. Because of progress in minimally invasive techniques, laparoscopic splenectomy (LS) has become feasible. The objective of this report is to present a monocentric experience and to evaluate the efficacy of and complications observed after laparoscopic splenic procedures in a department of general surgery. 57 consecutive LSs have been performed in a pediatric population between January 2000 and October 2010. There were 33 females and 24 males with a median age of 12 years (range 4-17). Indications were: hereditary spherocytosis 38 cases, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura 10, sickle cell disease (SCD) 6, thrombocytopenic thrombotic purpura 2 and non-hodgkin lymphoma 1 case. Patients were operated on using right semilateral position, employing Atlas Ligasure vessel sealing system in 49 cases (86%) and Harmonic Scalpel + EndoGIA in 8. In 24 patients (42.1%), a cholecystectomy was associated. Two patients required conversion to open splenectomy (3.5%). In three cases, a minilaparotomy was performed for spleen removal (5.2%). Accessory spleens were identified in three patients (5.2%). Complications (8.8%) included bleeding (two), abdominal collection (one) and pleural effusion (two). There was no mortality. Average operative time was 128 min (range 80-220). Average length of stay was 3 days (range 2-7). Mean blood loss was 80 ml (range 30-500) with a transfusion rate of 1.7% (one patient). Laparoscopic spleen surgery is safe, reliable and effective in the pediatric population with hematologic disorders and is associated with minimal morbidity, zero mortality, and a short length of stay. Ligasure vessel sealing system shortened operative time and blood loss. On the basis of the results, we consider laparoscopic approach the gold standard for the treatment of these patients even in a department of general surgery.

  15. Man versus Machine: Software Training for Surgeons-An Objective Evaluation of Human and Computer-Based Training Tools for Cataract Surgical Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Nizar; Smith, Phillip; Emeriewen, Krisztina; Sharma, Anant; Jones, Simon; Wawrzynski, James; Tang, Hongying; Sullivan, Paul; Caputo, Silvestro; Saleh, George M

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to address two queries: firstly, the relationship between two cataract surgical feedback tools for training, one human and one software based, and, secondly, evaluating microscope control during phacoemulsification using the software. Videos of surgeons with varying experience were enrolled and independently scored with the validated PhacoTrack motion capture software and the Objective Structured Assessment of Cataract Surgical Skill (OSACCS) human scoring tool. Microscope centration and path length travelled were also evaluated with the PhacoTrack software. Twenty-two videos correlated PhacoTrack motion capture with OSACCS. The PhacoTrack path length, number of movements, and total procedure time were found to have high levels of Spearman's rank correlation of -0.6792619 (p = 0.001), -0.6652021 (p = 0.002), and -0.771529 (p = 0001), respectively, with OSACCS. Sixty-two videos evaluated microscope camera control. Novice surgeons had their camera off the pupil centre at a far greater mean distance (SD) of 6.9 (3.3) mm, compared with experts of 3.6 (1.6) mm (p ≪ 0.05). The expert surgeons maintained good microscope camera control and limited total pupil path length travelled 2512 (1031) mm compared with novices of 4049 (2709) mm (p ≪ 0.05). Good agreement between human and machine quantified measurements of surgical skill exists. Our results demonstrate that surrogate markers for camera control are predictors of surgical skills.

  16. Surgical complications and their implications for surgeons' well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, A; Faiz, O; Bicknell, C; Vincent, C

    2013-12-01

    Healthcare professionals can be seriously affected when they are involved in major clinical incidents. The impact of such incidents on staff is of particular relevance to surgery, as the operating room is one of the highest-risk areas for serious complications. This qualitative study aimed to assess the personal and professional impact of surgical complications on surgeons. This single time point study involved semistructured, individual interviews with general and vascular surgeons, consultants and senior registrars from two National Health Service organizations in London, UK. Twenty-seven surgeons participated. Many were seriously affected by major surgical complications. Surgeons' practice was also often affected, not always in the best interest of their patients. The surgeons' reactions depended on the preventability of the complications, their personality and experience, patient outcomes and patients' reactions, as well as colleagues' reactions and the culture of the institution. Discussing complications, deconstructing the incidents and rationalizing were the most commonly quoted coping mechanisms. Institutional support was generally described as inadequate, and the participants often reported the existence of strong institutional blame cultures. Suggestions for supporting surgeons in managing the personal impact of complications included better mentoring, teamwork approaches, blame-free opportunities for the discussion of complications, and structures aimed at the human aspects of complications. Those involved in the management of surgical services need to consider how to improve support for surgeons in the aftermath of major surgical incidents. © 2013 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Relationships between study habits, burnout, and general surgery resident performance on the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeds, Matthew R; Thrush, Carol R; McDaniel, Faith K; Gill, Roop; Kimbrough, Mary K; Shames, Brian D; Sussman, Jeffrey J; Galante, Joseph M; Wittgen, Catherine M; Ansari, Parswa; Allen, Steven R; Nussbaum, Michael S; Hess, Donald T; Knight, David C; Bentley, Frederick R

    2017-09-01

    The American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) is used by programs to evaluate the knowledge and readiness of trainees to sit for the general surgery qualifying examination. It is often used as a tool for resident promotion and may be used by fellowship programs to evaluate candidates. Burnout has been associated with job performance and satisfaction; however, its presence and effects on surgical trainees' performance are not well studied. We sought to understand factors including burnout and study habits that may contribute to performance on the ABSITE examination. Anonymous electronic surveys were distributed to all residents at 10 surgical residency programs (n = 326). Questions included demographics as well as study habits, career interests, residency characteristics, and burnout scores using the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory, which assesses burnout because of both exhaustion and disengagement. These surveys were then linked to the individual's 2016 ABSITE and United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) step 1 and 2 scores provided by the programs to determine factors associated with successful ABSITE performance. In total, 48% (n = 157) of the residents completed the survey. Of those completing the survey, 48 (31%) scored in the highest ABSITE quartile (≥75th percentile) and 109 (69%) scored less than the 75th percentile. In univariate analyses, those in the highest ABSITE quartile had significantly higher USMLE step 1 and step 2 scores (P burnout scores (disengagement, P Burnout Inventory exhaustion (P = 0.02), and USMLE step 1 and 2 scores (P = 0.007 and 0.0001, respectively). Residents who perform higher on the ABSITE have a regular study schedule throughout the year, report less burnout because of exhaustion, study away from home, and have shown success in prior standardized tests. Further study is needed to determine the effects of burnout on clinical duties, career advancement, and satisfaction. Copyright © 2017

  18. Imaging of bone tumors for the musculoskeletal oncologic surgeon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errani, C., E-mail: costantino.errani@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Kreshak, J., E-mail: j.kreshak@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Ruggieri, P., E-mail: pietro.ruggieri@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Alberghini, M., E-mail: marco.alberghini@ior.it [Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Picci, P., E-mail: piero.picci@ior.it [Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Research, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Vanel, D., E-mail: daniel.vanel@ior.it [Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Research, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    The appropriate diagnosis and treatment of bone tumors requires close collaboration between different medical specialists. Imaging plays a key role throughout the process. Radiographic detection of a bone tumor is usually not challenging. Accurate diagnosis is often possible from physical examination, history, and standard radiographs. The location of the lesion in the bone and the skeleton, its size and margins, the presence and type of periosteal reaction, and any mineralization all help determine diagnosis. Other imaging modalities contribute to the formation of a diagnosis but are more critical for staging, evaluation of response to treatment, surgical planning, and follow-up.When necessary, biopsy is often radioguided, and should be performed in consultation with the surgeon performing the definitive operative procedure. CT is optimal for characterization of the bone involvement and for evaluation of pulmonary metastases. MRI is highly accurate in determining the intraosseous extent of tumor and for assessing soft tissue, joint, and vascular involvement. FDG-PET imaging is becoming increasingly useful for the staging of tumors, assessing response to neoadjuvant treatment, and detecting relapses.Refinement of these and other imaging modalities and the development of new technologies such as image fusion for computer-navigated bone tumor surgery will help surgeons produce a detailed and reliable preoperative plan, especially in challenging sites such as the pelvis and spine.

  19. Opportunities in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Worldwide Surgeons' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Michael; Newman, Jared M; Khlopas, Anton; Chughtai, Morad; Martinez, Nick; Bhowmik-Stoker, Manoshi; Mont, Michael A

    2017-07-25

    This study surveyed a group of US and international orthopaedic surgeons to prioritize areas of improvement in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Specifically, we assessed surgeon responses regarding the top five areas of TKA needing improvement; which were stratified by: a) US surgeons, b) international surgeons, c) US surgeons' implant-brand-loyalty, and d) surgeons' years of experience and case volume. Four hundred and eighteen surgeons who were board-certified, in practice for at least two years, spent 60% of their time in clinical practice, and performed a minimum of 25 lower extremity joint arthroplasties per year were surveyed. They chose the top five areas (among 17) needing improvement for TKA. Results were stratified by surgeons' location (US and international), implant-brand-loyalty, years of experience, and case volume. Functional outcomes was the top identified area for improvement (US 63% and international 71%), followed by brand loyalty (Company I 68%, other brand 59%, and multi-brand/no loyalty 66%), years of experience (early-career 64%, mid-career 63%, and late-career 75%) and case volume (low-volume 69%, mid-volume 60%, and high-volume 71%). Following this was costs for US surgeons (47%) and implant survivorship for international surgeons (57%). While costs were the next highest area for specific Company-loyal surgeons (57%), implant survivorship was the next highest area for the other two cohorts. Implant survivorship was the second most important area of improvement regardless of years of experience and for low- and mid-volume surgeons. Surgeons identified functional outcomes as the most important area needing improvement. Cost of implants was more important for American as compared to international surgeons.

  20. Impact of implementation of a pediatric surgery fellowship on general surgery resident operative volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Rebecca A; Phillips, Sharon E; Terhune, Kyla P

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of the initiation of a pediatric surgery fellowship on general surgery resident operative volume at 1 major academic institution. Retrospective review of operative records obtained from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) general surgery resident and pediatric surgery fellow case logs. Data collected included number and type of pediatric index cases per year, number of total pediatric surgery cases per year, and number of total cases logged as primary surgeon to date. Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Department of Surgery, which has an accredited general surgery program, finishes 7 chief residents per year during the study period, and instituted a new pediatric surgery fellowship in 2007. Case logs submitted by third and fourth year general surgery residents and first and second year pediatric surgery fellows were studied. The number of pediatric attending surgeons, relative value units (RVUs), and hospital admissions increased from 2003 to 2011. The median number of pediatric index cases performed by a resident decreased after the onset of fellowship from 34 cases to 23.5 cases per year (p pediatric surgery rotation also decreased from 74 to 53 cases per year after onset of the fellowship (p surgery resident index and overall case volume in pediatric surgery. Although operative volume is only 1 measure of surgical educational value, these findings suggest that the addition of surgical fellowships affects the educational experience of general surgery residents. We recommend that residency programs establish goals and calculate any potential impact on general surgery resident case volume before initiating a new surgical fellowship. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Center of Cardiac Surgery Robotic Computerized Telemanipulation as Part of a Comprehensive Approach to Advanced Heart Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Robotic OR Appendix E: Comparison Chart of daVinci Simulator Skill Sets and Training Exercise Activities 1 INTRODUCTION Robotic surgery recently...techniques in endoscopic cardiac bypass surgery is important not only for surgeons and surgical teams just beginning to perform robotic surgery , but also...Director, Robotic Surgery Scott Keith, PhD Faculty, Division of Biostatistics Rebecca O’Shea, MBA Senior Vice President for Clinical

  2. Visual-Motor Learning Using Haptic Devices: How Best to Train Surgeons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Giles

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic surgery has revolutionised medicine but requires surgeons to learn new visual-motor mappings. The optimal method for training surgeons is unknown. For instance, it may be easier to learn planar movements when training is constrained to a plane, since this forces the surgeon to develop an appropriate perceptual-motor map. In contrast, allowing the surgeon to move without constraints could improve performance because this provides greater experience of the control dynamics of the device. In order to test between these alternatives, we created an experimental tool that connected a commercially available robotic arm with specialised software that presents visual stimuli and objectively records kinematics. Participants were given the task of generating a series of aiming movements to move a visual cursor to a series of targets. The actions required movement along a horizontal plane, whereas the visual display was a screen positioned perpendicular to this plane (ie, vertically. One group (n=8 received training where the force field constrained their movement to the correct plane of action, whilst a second group (n=8 trained without constraints. On test trials (after training the unconstrained group showed better performance, as indexed by reduced movement duration and reduced path length. These results show that participants who explored the entire action space had an advantage, which highlights the importance of experiencing the full dynamics of a control device and the action space when learning a new visual-motor mapping.

  3. Asian perspective in surgery: thoracic surgery in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turna, Akif

    2016-08-01

    Turkey with a population of 78 million is located between Asia and Europe geographically and culturally. There are 577 active pure thoracic surgeon and 37 thoracic surgery teaching units. Thoracic surgeons usually deal with lung cancer patients due to relatively higher rate of tobacco usage as well as inflammatory diseases such as pulmonary hydatid disease, bronchiectasis and empyema. Minimally invasive thoracic surgery has been a new approach which is being adapted by increasingly more surgeons. There are a number of reasons to predict that the number of thoracic surgical cases will be increased and new generation of thoracic surgeons will be operating more minimally invasive resectional surgeries for most lung cancer in future.

  4. [Physical therapy performance in respiratory and motor involvement during postoperative in children submitted to abdominal surgeries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo, Caroline C; Gonçalves, Marcela T; Piccolo, Mariana M; Lima, Simone; Rosa, George J da; Paulin, Elaine; Schivinski, Camila S

    2011-01-01

    to verify the physiotherapy performance in the respiratory and motor affections during postoperative period in pediatric patients undergoing abdominal surgery. was a literature review of articles published in the databases Lilacs, Medline and SciELO in the period 1983 to 2010 as well as books, papers presented at scientific meetings and journals of the area, who approached the post-therapy of abdominal surgery in children. The keywords used were: abdominal surgery, children and physiotherapy. 28 articles, one book chapter and one dissertation had been selected that examined the question and proposed that contained all, or at least two of the descriptors listed. Most of the material included covers the incidence of respiratory complications after surgery for pediatric abdominal surgery due to immaturity of the respiratory system of this population, abdominal manipulation of surgical period, the prolonged time in bed, pain at the incision site and waste anesthetic. Some authors also discuss the musculoskeletal and connective tissue arising from the inaction and delay of psychomotor development consequent to periods of hospitalization in early childhood, taking on the role of physiotherapy to prevent motor and respiratory involvement. there are few publications addressing this topic, but the positive aspects of physiotherapy have been described, especially in relation to the prevention of respiratory complications and motor, recognized the constraints and consequences of hospitalizations and surgeries cause in children.

  5. Mastering Robotic Surgery: Where Does the Learning Curve Lead Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfi, Ciro; Umanskiy, Konstantin

    2017-01-18

    The robotic surgical technology introduced over the last decade and a half has revolutionized many aspects of performing complex procedures. It combines technological and clinical innovations to improve surgical quality and patient outcomes. Yet, to date, there is still a lack of standardization in training and certification of robotic surgeons. The criteria for proficiency and credentialing in robotic surgery vary widely among institutions. The aim of this review is to discuss the key points of training and surgeon assessment in robotic surgery, as well as the challenges that still need to be overcome.

  6. Surgeon-industry conflict of interest: survey of opinions regarding industry-sponsored educational events and surgeon teaching: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Christian P; Dea, Nicolas; Dvorak, Marcel F; Lee, Robert S; Hartig, Dennis; Fisher, Charles G

    2014-03-01

    Conflict of interest (COI) as it applies to medical education and training has become a source of considerable interest, debate, and regulation in the last decade. Companies often pay surgeons as faculty for educational events and often sponsor and give financial support to major professional society meetings. Professional medical societies, industry, and legislators have attempted to regulate potential COI without consideration for public opinion. The practice of evidence-based medicine requires the inclusion of patient opinion along with best available evidence and expert opinion. The primary goal of this study was to assess the opinion of the general population regarding surgeon-industry COI for education-related events. A Web-based survey was administered, with special emphasis on the surgeon's role in industry-sponsored education and support of professional societies. A survey was constructed to sample opinions on reimbursement, disclosure, and funding sources for educational events. There were 501 completed surveys available for analysis. More than 90% of respondents believed that industry funding for surgeons' tuition and travel for either industry-sponsored or professional society educational meetings would either not affect the quality of care delivered or would cause it to improve. Similar results were generated for opinions on surgeons being paid by industry to teach other surgeons. Moreover, the majority of respondents believed it was ethical or had no opinion if surgeons had such a relationship with industry. Respondents were also generally in favor of educational conferences for surgeons regardless of funding source. Disclosures of a surgeon-industry relationship, especially if it involves specific devices that may be used in their surgery, appears to be important to respondents. The vast majority of respondents in this study do not believe that the quality of their care will be diminished due to industry funding of educational events, for surgeon

  7. Fragmented international volunteerism: need for a global pediatric surgery network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Marilyn W

    2010-02-01

    Pediatric general surgeons volunteering internationally often work independently, some without prior assessment of the needs of those they wish to assist. Consequently, care may be inefficient, duplicated, or misdirected. A study was performed to assess whether a network for pediatric surgery volunteer work exists. A search of the Internet was performed to determine whether a pediatric surgery network exists. Worldwide pediatric surgery societies were identified and grouped by country according to income. Web sites for medical volunteer organizations were examined for links to a network of pediatric surgery volunteer work. A search of the Internet revealed no pediatric surgery volunteer network. Ninety-seven pediatric surgery societies were identified. Fifty-one of the organizations were identified as residing in low- and middle-income countries. Searching 50 Web sites for these societies revealed no existing pediatric surgery network. Of 45 Web sites for volunteer medical work, 1 surgery networking Web site was identified. Only 4 pediatric general surgery international volunteer opportunities were cited on that Web site. This study demonstrated that no pediatric surgery volunteer network exists. By identifying pediatric surgery organizations in low- and middle-income countries, it is speculated that one might link the surgeons in these regions with those wishing to volunteer their services. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Denis Browne: maverick or master surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D E

    2000-11-01

    The current generation of surgeons may remember Denis Browne only as an inventor of surgical instruments which few people use, an innovator of procedures condemned as inadequate, and a personality bristling with controversy: a maverick indeed. And yet this assessment belies his influence as the founder of modern paediatric surgery in the development of British surgery. Further, his innovative operations in a range of paediatric lesions were revolutionary in the context of the time. Browne was born in 1892 and educated in Australia, although his whole surgical career was in England. He had a remarkable family background; unique Australian experiences in childhood, when he commenced to display independence and individuality of spirit, through University, where he gained 'Blues' in tennis and shooting, to war, where he served in Gallipoli and France; and to controversies that surrounded him in his battle to establish paediatric surgery as a legitimate surgical discipline. He certainly had a prickly personality and a particular venom reserved for orthopaedic surgeons and anatomists, but his achievements may have been possible only by one possessed of such a strong and towering character.

  9. Recognizing surgeon's actions during suture operations from video sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Ohya, Jun; Chiba, Toshio; Xu, Rong; Yamashita, Hiromasa

    2014-03-01

    Because of the shortage of nurses in the world, the realization of a robotic nurse that can support surgeries autonomously is very important. More specifically, the robotic nurse should be able to autonomously recognize different situations of surgeries so that the robotic nurse can pass necessary surgical tools to the medical doctors in a timely manner. This paper proposes and explores methods that can classify suture and tying actions during suture operations from the video sequence that observes the surgery scene that includes the surgeon's hands. First, the proposed method uses skin pixel detection and foreground extraction to detect the hand area. Then, interest points are randomly chosen from the hand area so that their 3D SIFT descriptors are computed. A word vocabulary is built by applying hierarchical K-means to these descriptors, and the words' frequency histogram, which corresponds to the feature space, is computed. Finally, to classify the actions, either SVM (Support Vector Machine), Nearest Neighbor rule (NN) for the feature space or a method that combines "sliding window" with NN is performed. We collect 53 suture videos and 53 tying videos to build the training set and to test the proposed method experimentally. It turns out that the NN gives higher than 90% accuracies, which are better recognition than SVM. Negative actions, which are different from either suture or tying action, are recognized with quite good accuracies, while "Sliding window" did not show significant improvements for suture and tying and cannot recognize negative actions.

  10. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopy surgery: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jo(a)o Moreira-Pinto; Estev(a)o Lima; Jorge Correia-Pinto; Carla Rolanda

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery started spreading worldwide in 1987, when the first laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed. Meanwhile, improvement of endoscopic equipment and instruments allowed gastroenterologists to attempt more aggressive endoluminal interventions, even beyond the wall barrier. The first transgastric peritoneoscopy, in 2004, brought to light the concept of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). The idea of incisionless surgery is attractive and has become a new goal for both surgeons and other people interested in this field of investigation. The authors present a review of all developments concerning NOTES, including animal studies and human experience.

  11. Performance assessment of the risk index category for surgical site infection after colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masanori; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Nomura, Satoshi; Hanawa, Hidetsugu; Chihara, Naoto; Mizutani, Satoshi; Yoshino, Masanori; Uchida, Eiji

    2015-02-01

    The traditional National Healthcare Safety Network (previously National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance) risk index is used to predict the risk of surgical site infection across many operative procedures. However, this index may be too simple to predict risk in the various procedures performed in colorectal surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the risk index by analyzing the impact of the risk index factors on surgical site infection after abdominal colorectal surgery. Using our surgical site infection surveillance database, we analyzed retrospectively 538 consecutive patients who underwent abdominal colorectal surgery between 2005 and 2010. Correlations between surgical site infection and the following risk index factors were analyzed: length of operation, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, wound classification, and use of laparoscopy. The 75th percentile for length of operation was determined separately for open and laparoscopic surgery in the study model. Univariate analyses showed that surgical site infection was more strongly associated with a >75th percentile length of operation in the study model (odds ratio [OR], 2.07) than in the traditional risk index model (OR, 1.64). Multivariable analysis found that surgical site infection was independently associated with a >75th percentile length of operation in the study model (OR, 2.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.66-4.55), American Society of Anesthesiologists score ≥3 (OR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.10-4.34), wound classification ≥III (OR, 5.29; 95% CI, 2.62-10.69), and open surgery (OR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.07-5.17). Performance of the risk index category was improved in the study model compared with the traditional model. The risk index category is sufficiently useful for predicting the risk of surgical site infection after abdominal colorectal surgery. However, the 75th percentile length of operation should be set separately for open and laparoscopic surgery.

  12. [Surgeons in Krakow between WWI and WWII].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, A; Dolecki, M

    2001-01-01

    During the war time when Polish borders had not been established yet, apart from having two surgical departments Jagiellonian University, Krakow had surgical departments in the Bonifratow, Izraelicki and Military Hospitals. More surgical departments were opened up in later years in pubic Health System Hospitals, among them were Narutowicz at near Pradnicka street and Sisters of Mercy at Lea street. Other well-known Krakow surgeons operated in smaller, private surgeries, such as: Dom Zdrowia (House of Health) or Zwiazkowy (Union) Clinic. At that time only 30 Surgeons worked in Kraków. They were outstanding specialists with a broad practice. Among them were Maksymilian Rutkowski, Jan Glatzel, Stanislaw Nowicki, Michal Hladij. Gradually, younger surgeons started to join them. they were: Jan Kowalczyk, Jerzy Jasienski, Stanislaw Kania, Wladyslaw Laszczak, Jozef Bugusz, Jozef Gasinski. Many of them who worked in the surgical hospitals in Krakow, left the city after obtaining a professorship (like Kornel Michejda, professor at the University of Wilno) or became heads of wards, like Zygmunt Drobniewicz, Alfons Mackowski and Tadeusz Guschlbauer. All of these surgeons were highly respected by the medical community as well as by the general public in their respective town and surrounding areas. A large income allowed that best of them to fund and supply their own wards. Occasionally, however, among the less successful surgeons, an uncompromising competition for patients developed. These events were disapproved and condemned by the medical establishment. Many surgeons led an active life outside of their profession. A surgeon with an exceptionally colorful personality was Jan Glatzel: witty, highly intelligent, a connoisseur of fine art, book lover with an active social life. Maksymilian Rutkowski was active in charitable organizations, helping to support Bratnia Pomoc Medykow. Michal Hladij, president of KS Cracovia, vice president of Krakowski Klub Automobilowy rendered his

  13. Vascular injuries during gynecological laparoscopy: the vascular surgeon's advice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Barbosa Barros

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Iatrogenic vascular problems due to laparoscopy are a well recognized problem and lead to significant repercussions. In this context, a ten-year review of cases topic is presented, based on experience gained while heading two important vascular surgery services. CASES: Five patients with vascular injuries during elective laparoscopy are described. These patients presented with seven lesions of iliac vessels. All cases were evaluated immediately and required laparotomy, provisional hemostasis and urgent attendance by a vascular surgeon. Direct suturing was performed in three cases. One aortoiliac bypass and one ilioiliac reversed venous graft were made. Venous lesions were sutured. One case of a point-like perforation of the small bowel was found. There were no deaths and no complications during the postoperative period. DISCUSSION: Important points on this subject are made, and advice is given. There needs to be immediate recognition of the vascular injury, and expert repair by a vascular surgeon is recommended, in order to significantly reduce the degree of complications.

  14. [What rhinoplasty surgeons should know about body dysmorphic disorder (BDD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, M; Scheithauer, M; Hoffmann, T K; Hellings, P; Picavet, V

    2014-08-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by an excessive concern with a non-existing or slight defect in physical appearance. BDD patients frequently show impaired judgment regarding the psychiatric origin of their concerns and often seek aesthetic treatment to resolve their appearance concerns. The central position of the nose in the face makes the nose one of the most common areas of concern in patients with BDD. Thus, aesthetic rhinoplasty is suspected to be one of the most frequently requested and performed surgical procedures in this population. However, there is a growing consensus that BDD should be considered a contraindication for aesthetic rhinoplasty, as favourable outcome is unlike [1-5]. In order to prevent patients from undergoing unsatisfying surgery and in the context of the increasing importance of medico-legal arguments, the rhinoplasty surgeon should be familiar with BDD. This article provides a focused review of issues pertaining to BDD that are relevant to the rhinoplasty surgeon. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Epilepsy surgery does not harm motor performance of children and adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Empelen, R; Jennekens-Schinkel, A; Gorter, JW; Volman, MJM; van Nieuwenhuizen, O; Helders, PJM

    2005-01-01

    The impact of epilepsy surgery on motor performance, activities of daily life (ADL) and caregiver assistance was assessed in 37 children (age range 0.1-15.4 years) with pharmacologically untreatable epilepsy, 17 of whom were also diagnosed as having spasticity of cerebral origin. All patients underw

  16. Best evidence topic: Should ventral hernia repair be performed at the same time as bariatric surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Saif Sait

    2016-11-01

    Until large volume, high quality randomized control trials can be performed, a case by case approach is best, where the patients' symptoms, anatomy, type of bariatric surgery and their personal preferences are considered, and an open discussion on the risks and benefits of each approach is undertaken.

  17. The coordinate system of the eye in cataract surgery: Performance comparison of the circle Hough transform and Daugman's algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachynska, Alzbeta; Oplatkova, Zuzana Kominkova; Sramka, Martin

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the work is to determine the coordinate system of an eye and insert a polar-axis system into images captured by a slip lamp. The image of the eye with the polar axis helps a surgeon accurately implant toric intraocular lens in the required position/rotation during the cataract surgery. In this paper, two common algorithms for pupil detection are compared: the circle Hough transform and Daugman's algorithm. The procedures were tested and analysed on the anonymous data set of 128 eyes captured at Gemini eye clinic in 2015.

  18. [The cardiovascular surgeon and the Syntax score].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Sánchez, Mario; Soulé-Egea, Mauricio; Herrera-Alarcón, Valentín; Barragán-García, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    The Syntax score has been established as a tool to determine the complexity of coronary artery disease and as a guide for decision-making among coronary artery bypass surgery and percutaneous coronary intervention. The purpose of this review is to systematically examine what the Syntax score is, and how the surgeon should integrate the information in the selection and treatment of patients. We reviewed the results of the SYNTAX Trial, the clinical practice guidelines, as well as the benefits and limitations of the score. Finally we discuss the future directions of the Syntax score.

  19. Tendon Transfer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is ... include: Repair or transfer of nerves Repair of muscle or tendon Splinting or fusion of joints Find a hand surgeon in your area to discuss the best ...

  20. The Glass Houses of Attending Surgeons: An Assessment of Unprofessional Behavior on Facebook Among Practicing Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenfeld, Sean J; Sudbeck, Craig; Luers, Thomas; Adamson, Peter; Cook, Gates; Schenarts, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Our recent publication demonstrated that unprofessional behavior on Facebook is common among surgical residents. In the formulation of standards and curricula to address this issue, it is important that surgical faculty lead by example. Our current study refocuses on the Facebook profiles of faculty surgeons involved in the education of general surgery residents. The American College of Surgeons (ACS) web site was used to identify general surgery residencies located in the Midwest. Departmental web sites were then searched to identify teaching faculty for the general surgery residency. Facebook was then searched to determine which faculty had profiles available for viewing by the general public. Profiles were then placed in 1 of the 3 following categories: professional, potentially unprofessional, or clearly unprofessional. A chi-square test was used to determine significance. In all, 57 residency programs were identified on the ACS web site, 100% of which provided an institutional web site listing the surgical faculty. A total of 758 general surgery faculty were identified (133 women and 625 men), of which 195 (25.7%) had identifiable Facebook accounts. In all, 165 faculty (84.6%) had no unprofessional content, 20 (10.3%) had potentially unprofessional content, and 10 (5.1%) had clearly unprofessional content. Inter-rater reliability was good (88.9% agreement, κ = 0.784). Clearly unprofessional behavior was found only in male surgeons. For male surgeons, clearly unprofessional behavior was more common among those in practice for less than 5 years (p = 0.031). Alcohol and politics were the most commonly found variables in the potentially unprofessional group. Inappropriate language and sexually suggestive material were the most commonly found variables in the clearly unprofessional group. Unprofessional behavior on Facebook is less common among surgical faculty compared with surgical residents. However, the rates remain unacceptably high, especially among men and

  1. Two surgeons and the ECG-a double blind study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ulf Martin Schilling

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the capability of operating abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons to analyze a set of standardized ECG. Methods: Twenty operating abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons at a university hospital were included. Each participant analyzed a set of five standardized ECG with an answering scheme for eight different items, giving a maximum score of 40. The answers were matched according to specialty and experience of the doctors of less than 5 years, between 5 and 10 years or more than 10 years. The reference standard was set by two independent consultants in cardiology. Results: The mean overall score was 25.25 (63.13%±4.78%) varying between 38 (95%) and 20(50%). Abdominal surgeons performed a mean score of 27.625 (69.06%±9.53%), and orthopaedic surgeons 23.67 points (59.17%±3.69%). The difference between the performance of abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons was not significant (P=0.09). 20/20 surgeons identified ST-elevation and no surgeon accepted the ECG showing acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction as normal. Conclusions: Abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons provided an answering scheme are able to interprete the ECG and identify both the normal and the ECG showing life-threatening pathology. The hypothesis that surgeons were unable to interprete the ECG must be rejected.

  2. Racing performance in Standardbred trotting horses with proximal palmar/plantar first phalangeal fragments relative to the timing of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmalt, J L; Borg, H; Näslund, H; Waldner, C

    2015-07-01

    Proximal palmar/plantar osteochondral fragmentation of the first phalanx is a frequent radiographic finding in Standardbred horses. These lesions are routinely removed prior to the onset of a racing career with no evidence to support the timing of this surgical intervention. To determine whether horses racing before surgery slowed as they approached surgery date and whether they speeded up after surgery. To investigate the factors affecting whether a horse raced after surgery and compare the performance of horses that did and did not race before surgery. A retrospective study using 193 Swedish Standardbred trotters. Medical records and radiographs of each horse were examined. Racing data were retrieved from official online records. Generalising estimating equations were used to examine presurgery racing performance and determine whether this differed between horses that raced before surgery and those that had not. Multivariable regression was used to examine career earnings and number of career races. Horses racing before surgery neither slowed as they approached surgery, nor speeded up after surgery. Race speed of horses raced before surgery was not different from those that only raced after surgery. Racing before surgery was not associated with whether horses raced following surgery. Only horses with 3 affected legs had slower race speeds than other horses. No other horse level variables affected race speed, number of career races, career earnings or top speed. There was no significant difference in race speed between horses that raced before surgery and those that did not. Horses did not slow down prior to surgery. Horses with 3 affected legs ran slower than those with only a single or 2 affected limbs. There was no association between timing of surgery and race speed or career longevity. The potential benefits of surgical intervention should be critically examined. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  3. How often should we perform arterial blood gas analysis during thoracoscopic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganter, Michael T; Schneider, Uwe; Heinzelmann, Michel; Zaugg, Michael; Lucchinetti, Eliana; Zollinger, Andreas; Hofer, Christoph K

    2007-12-01

    To continuously measure arterial blood gases (ABGs), to calculate the percentage of anticipated changes over time, and to develop recommendations for sampling frequencies of arterial blood gases in patients undergoing thoracoscopic surgery. Prospective, observational clinical trial. University hospital. 43 consecutive elective patients undergoing thoracoscopic surgery with one-lung ventilation. A Paratrend 7 probe for continuous arterial partial pressure of oxygen and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide measurement was introduced through a radial artery cannula in the awake patient before surgery. Data were collected throughout the procedure until patients left the operating room. Afterward, time courses of arterial blood gas values were transformed into frequency space by fast Fourier transform analysis, and the expected deviations in arterial blood gases were calculated over time. Forty-three consecutive patients undergoing thoracoscopic surgery were included, and arterial blood gas values were measured during a total of 141.5 h. Critical arterial partial pressure of oxygen values arterial partial pressure of oxygen and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide time courses in all patients. It takes only 5, 10, or 20 minutes for the arterial partial pressure of oxygen to change 10%, 20%, or 40%, respectively (95% confidence). Current standards to monitor arterial blood gases are not sufficient to detect and prevent hypoxemic events during thoracoscopic surgery with one-lung ventilation. Intermittent arterial blood gas analyses must be performed more frequently, up to every 10 minutes, to detect changes of 20% in arterial partial pressure of oxygen.

  4. Spine Surgeon Selection Criteria: Factors Influencing Patient Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Blaine T; Ahn, Junyoung; Bohl, Daniel D; Mayo, Benjamin C; Louie, Philip K; Singh, Kern

    2016-07-01

    A prospective questionnaire. The aim of this study was to evaluate factors that patients consider when selecting a spine surgeon. The rise in consumer-driven health insurance plans has increased the role of patients in provider selection. The purpose of this study is to identify factors that may influence a patient's criteria for selecting a spine surgeon. Two hundred thirty-one patients who sought treatment by one spine surgeon completed an anonymous questionnaire consisting of 26 questions. Four questions regarded demographic information; 16 questions asked respondents to rate the importance of specific criteria regarding spine surgeon selection (scale 1-10, with 10 being the most important); and six questions were multiple-choice regarding patient preferences toward aspects of their surgeon (age, training background, etc.). Patients rated board certification (9.26 ± 1.67), in-network provider status (8.10 ± 3.04), and friendliness/bedside manner (8.01 ± 2.35) highest among factors considered when selecting a spine surgeon. Most patients (92%) reported that 30 minutes or less should pass between check-in and seeing their surgeon during a clinic appointment. Regarding whether their spine surgeon underwent training as a neurosurgeon versus an orthopedic surgeon, 25% reported no preference, 52% preferred neurosurgical training, and 23% preferred orthopedic training. Our findings suggest that board certification and in-network health insurance plans may be most important in patients' criteria for choosing a spine surgeon. Advertisements were rated least important by patients. Patients expressed varying preferences regarding ideal surgeon age, training background, proximity, medical student/resident involvement, and clinic appointment availability. The surgeon from whom patients sought treatment completed an orthopedic surgery residency; hence, it is notable that 52% of patients preferred a spine surgeon with a neurosurgical background. In the context

  5. How Social Are We? A Cross-Sectional Study of the Website Presence and Social Media Activity of Canadian Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvenue, Giancarlo; Copeland, Andrea; Devon, Karen M; Semple, John L

    2016-10-01

    The internet and social media are increasingly being used by patients not only for health-related research, but also for obtaining information on their surgeon. Having an online presence via a website and social media profile is one-way plastic surgeons can meet this patient driven demand. The authors sought to document current website and social media usage of Canadian plastic surgeons and to determine if this usage correlated with years in practice. A Google search was performed using publicly available lists of all plastic surgeons registered with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) and the Canadian Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (CSAPS). This search found 42% (268/631) of RCPSC plastic surgeons had a website and 85% (536/631) had a profile on social media. Younger RCPSC surgeons (registered for less years) were significantly more likely to have a website (12.8 vs. 21.9 years, P social media profile (16.2 vs. 23.9 years, P social media platform most used was RateMDs (81%) followed in decreasing order by: LinkedIn (28%), RealSelf (22%), Facebook (20%), Google+ (17%) and Twitter (16%). Dual RCPSC-CSAPS members were more likely than RCPSC-only members to have a website (56 vs. 36%, P social media profile (P social media presence by Canadian plastic surgeons is comparable to counterparts in the US and UK. It may be possible to better optimize online presence through education of current search engine technology and becoming active on multiple social media platforms. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Future of cosmetic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert Alan

    2014-04-01

    Changes in cosmetic surgery will be driven by several key forces. The patient's self-image, and perceived place in society, will continue to drive patients to the cosmetic surgeon as well as to demand newer and better treatments. Technological advances, especially those based on an enhanced understanding of cellular and tissue physiology, promise enhanced tools other than the scalpel for the surgeon. Conceptual advances in our understanding of beauty and patient psychology will lead to a more integrative approach to cosmetic surgery.

  7. Advocacy--answering old mail. Canadian Association of General Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, R G

    1999-06-01

    Since its inception in 1977, the Canadian Association of General Surgeons (CAGS) has struggled with its responsibility to represent general surgeons in practices across this country. The CAGS has tended to be mute in the presentation of many of its accomplishments, which have improved the role of specialists in community practice, training programs and the subspecialties of general surgery. With the forthcoming changes in direction for the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, based on a recent external survey, the CAGS has a golden opportunity to advocate for a clear identity, autonomous from the Royal College for the purposes of scientific meetings, continuing professional development, scientific and practice affiliation with other surgical specialty societies, and new developments with corporate sector support for advancements in science technology and education. Advocacy for general surgery must be stressed as the priority for the CAGS into the future.

  8. The Impact of Individual Surgeon Volume on Hysterectomy Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Jonathan P.; Kantartzis, Kelly L.; Lee, Ted; Bonidie, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Hysterectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures women will undergo in their lifetime. Several factors affect surgical outcomes. It has been suggested that high-volume surgeons favorably affect outcomes and hospital cost. The objective is to determine the impact of individual surgeon volume on total hospital costs for hysterectomy. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort of women undergoing hysterectomy for benign indications from 2011 to 2013 at 10 hospitals within the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center System. Cases that included concomitant procedures were excluded. Costs by surgeon volume were analyzed by tertile group and with linear regression. Results: We studied 5,961 hysterectomies performed by 257 surgeons: 41.5% laparoscopic, 27.9% abdominal, 18.3% vaginal, and 12.3% robotic. Surgeons performed 1–542 cases (median = 4, IQR = 1–24). Surgeons were separated into equal tertiles by case volume: low (1–2 cases; median total cost, $4,349.02; 95% confidence interval [CI] [$3,903.54–$4,845.34]), medium (3–15 cases; median total cost, $2,807.90; 95% CI [$2,693.71–$2,926.93]) and high (>15 cases, median total cost $2,935.12, 95% CI [$2,916.31–$2,981.91]). ANOVA analysis showed a significant decrease (P < .001) in cost from low-to-medium– and low-to-high–volume surgeons. Linear regression showed a significant linear relationship (P < .001), with a $1.15 cost reduction per case with each additional hysterectomy. Thus, if a surgeon performed 100 cases, costs were $115 less per case (100 × $1.15), for a total savings of $11,500.00 (100 × $115). Conclusion: Overall, in our models, costs decreased as surgeon volume increased. Low-volume surgeons had significantly higher costs than both medium- and high-volume surgeons.

  9. Virtual-reality simulation to assess performance in hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Poul; Palm, Henrik; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Internal fixation of hip fractures is a common and important procedure that orthopedic surgeons must master early in their career. Virtual-reality training could improve initial skills, and a simulation-based test would make it possible to ensure basic competency of junior...... experienced surgeon failing the test. INTERPRETATION: The simulation-based test was reliable and valid in our setting, and the pass/fail standard could discriminate between novices and experienced surgeons. Potentially, training and testing of future junior surgeons on a virtual-reality simulator could ensure...

  10. Optimal Brain Surgeon on Artificial Neural Networks in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Niels Hørbye; Job, Jonas Hultmann; Klyver, Katrine;

    2012-01-01

    It is shown how the procedure know as optimal brain surgeon can be used to trim and optimize artificial neural networks in nonlinear structural dynamics. Beside optimizing the neural network, and thereby minimizing computational cost in simulation, the surgery procedure can also serve as a quick...

  11. [Endovascular surgery in the war].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, V A; Samokhvalov, I M

    2015-01-01

    Rapid growth of medical technologies has led to implementation of endovascular methods of diagnosis and treatment into rapidly developing battlefield surgery. This work based on analysing all available current publications generalizes the data on using endovascular surgery in combat vascular injury. During the Korean war (1950-1953) American surgeons for the first time performed endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta - the first intravascular intervention carried out in a zone of combat operations. Half a century thereafter, with the beginning of the war in Afghanistan (2001) and in Iraq (2003) surgeons of central hospitals of the USA Armed Forces began performing delayed endovascular operations to the wounded. The development of technologies, advent of mobile angiographs made it possible to later on implement high-tech endovascular interventions in a zone of combat operations. At first, more often they performed implantation of cava filters, somewhat afterward - angioembolization of damaged accessory vessels, stenting and endovascular repair of major arteries. The first in the theatre of war endovascular prosthetic repair of the thoracic aorta for severe closed injury was performed in 2008. Russian experience of using endovascular surgery in combat injuries is limited to diagnostic angiography and regional intraarterial perfusion. Despite the advent of stationary angiographs in large hospitals of the RF Ministry of Defence in the early 1990s, endovascular operations for combat vascular injury are casuistic. Foreign experience in active implementation of endovascular technologies to treatment of war-time injuries has substantiated feasibility of using intravascular interventions in tertiary care military hospitals. Carrying out basic training courses on endovascular surgery should become an organic part of preparing multimodality general battlefield surgeons rendering care on the theatre of combat operations.

  12. Creativity and the surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauderer, Michael W L

    2009-01-01

    This Robert E. Gross lecture is an analysis of the concept of creativity and how it relates to the practice of surgery. The questions-why surgery and creativity are closely associated; what influences creativity; why we should be concerned about it; and, finally, what rewards it brings-are discussed. In a personal note, the author describes his approach to creativity, with simplification as a central theme. He presents 6 examples of his work and the lessons learned from this activity. He stresses the importance of fostering creativity in all institutions in which physicians are trained and the need to focus on medical students, residents, and fellows. The critical importance of identifying, nurturing, and protecting innovators, as well as the role of the mentor, is emphasized. Because creativity has a place in many settings and discovery encompasses a wide spectrum, the author provides multiple suggestions aimed at encouraging the participation of those providing surgical care in the fulfilling experience of creative activity and innovation.

  13. Postcardiotomy centrifugal assist: a single surgeon's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jack J; McKenney-Knox, Charlotte A; Wagner-Mann, Colette C

    2002-11-01

    Because of the infrequent application of cardiac assist devices for postcardiotomy heart failure, most published reports include the results of learning curves from multiple surgeons. Between October 1986 and June 2001, a single surgeon used 35 Sarns Centrifugal Pumps as ventricular assist devices in 21 patients with severe hemodynamic compromise after open heart surgery (0.88% incidence). Patients' ages ranged from 39 to 77 (mean, 59.6 years). Three patients required right ventricular assist devices, 4 left ventricular assist devices, and 14 had biventricular assist devices. For all, the indication for application was inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass despite multiple inotropes and intraaortic balloon pumping. All were expected to be intraoperative deaths without further mechanical assistance. Patients were assisted from 2 to 434 h (median, 48 h). Fifteen patients (71.4%) were weaned from device(s), and 11 patients (52.4%) were hospital survivors. Actuarial survival in those dismissed from the hospital was 78% at 5 years and 39% at 10 years. Patients facing certain demise after cardiac surgery can be salvaged with temporary centrifugal mechanical assist. Results are competitive with that achieved with more sophisticated devices. Hospital survivors enjoy reasonable longevity.

  14. Telemedicine and Plastic Surgery: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Souto Valente

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Telemedicine can be defined as the use of electronic media for transmission of information and medical data from one site to another. The objective of this study is to demonstrate an experience of telemedicine in plastic surgery. Methods. 32 plastic surgeons received a link with password for real-time streaming of a surgery. At the end of the procedure, the surgeons attending the procedure by the Internet answered five questions. The results were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results. 27 plastic surgeons attended the online procedure in real-time. 96.3% considered the access to the website as good or excellent and 3.7% considered it bad. 14.8% reported that the transmission was bad and 85.2% considered the quality of transmission as good or excellent. 96.3% classified the live broadcasting as a good or excellent learning experience and 3.7% considered it a bad experience. 92.6% reported feeling able to perform this surgery after watching the demo and 7.4% did not feel able. 100% of participants said they would like to participate in other surgical demonstrations over the Internet. Conclusion. We conclude that the use of telemedicine can provide more access to education and medical research, for plastic surgeons looking for medical education from distant regions.

  15. An internist's role in perioperative medicine: a survey of surgeons' opinions

    Science.gov (United States)

    PausJenssen, Lisa; Ward, Heather A; Card, Sharon E

    2008-01-01

    Background Literature exists regarding the perioperative role of internists. Internists rely on this literature assuming it meets the needs of surgeons without actually knowing their perspective. We sought to understand why surgeons ask for preoperative consultations and their view on the internist's role in perioperative medicine. Methods Survey of surgeons in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada regarding an internist's potential role in perioperative care. Results Fifty-nine percent responded. The majority request a preoperative consultation for a difficult case (83%) or specific problem (81%). While almost half feel that a preoperative consultation is to "clear" a patient for surgery, 33% disagree with this statement. The majority believe the internist should discuss risk with the patient. Aspects of the preoperative consultation deemed most important are cardiac medication optimization (93%), cardiac risk stratification (83%), addition of β-blockers (76%), and diabetes management (74%). Conclusion Surgeons perceive the most important roles for the internist as cardiac risk stratification and medication management. Areas of controversy identified amongst the surgeons included who should inform the patient of their operative risk, and whether the internist should follow the patient daily postoperatively. Unclear expectations have the potential to impact on patient safety and informed consent unless acknowledged and acted on by all. We recommend that internists performing perioperative consults communicate directly with the consulting physician to ensure that all parties are in accordance as to each others duties. We also recommend that the teaching of perioperative consults emphasizes the interdisciplinary communication needed to ensure that patient needs are not neglected when one specialty assumes the other will perform a function. PMID:18208614

  16. Up Close and Personal: A Statewide Collaborative's Effort to Get Individual Surgeon Quality Improvement Data to the Practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Brian J; Cecil, William; Cofer, Joseph B; Clarke, P Chris; Guillamondegui, Oscar

    2016-03-01

    Ranking of surgeons and hospitals focuses on procedure volume and hospitality. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program provides vetted outcomes of surgical quality and therefore can direct improvement. Our statewide collaborative's analysis creates personalized surgeon data to drive quality improvement. Statewide National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data generated specific measures from 103,656 general/vascular cases and identified individual surgeon's outcome of occurrences and length of procedure. We assumed a normal distribution and called the top 2.5 per cent as exemplars and the bottom 2.5 per cent as outliers. For length of operation, a standard duration was calculated, and identified outliers as longer than the 95th percentile of the upper confidence interval/procedure. Since 2009, sharing best practice reduced statewide mortality rate by 31.5 per cent and postoperative morbidity by 33.3 per cent. For length of surgery, long outliers have more complications (urinary tract infection, organ space/surgical site infection, sepsis, septic shock, prolonged intubation, pneumonia, deep venous thrombosis, deep incisional infection, and wound disruption). No significant trends in surgeon performance were seen over 24 months. A statewide collaborative has resulted in substantial risk-adjusted reductions in surgical morbidity and mortality. These results of the individual surgeon demonstrate best practices are shared, a proven tool for improvement in our collaborative.

  17. Masticatory performance, muscle activity, and occlusal force in preorthognathic surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, G S; Throckmorton, G S; Ellis, E; Sinn, D P

    1994-05-01

    Previous studies have indicated that patients scheduled for orthognathic surgery tend to have lower maximum bite forces and exert lower forces during mastication. The effect of these deficits on masticatory performance have not been previously assessed. Masticatory performance was analyzed in four groups: male and female orthognathic surgery patients prior to presurgical orthodontics (n = 12 and 23), and male and female controls (n = 27 and 31). Mastication performance was analyzed by having the subjects chew 5-g pieces of carrot for 20 cycles and measuring the resulting median particle size with a standard sieve method. Masticatory performance showed the same trends as maximum bite force and masticatory forces: male controls had the best and patients the poorest masticatory performance. There was a weak correlation between masticatory performance and maximum bite force at the molar positions. Masticatory performance also weakly correlated to electromyographic signals during mastication of a constant bolus (gummy bears) for all muscles except the left posterior temporalis. Correlations were generally not present or were very weak between masticatory performance, estimated masticatory forces, and muscle efficiency, suggesting that muscle efficiency and forces generated during mastication are not the primary factors that determine masticatory performance. Other factors contributing to a person's ability to chew food might include occlusal relationships and mechanical advantage.

  18. Robotic mitral valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kypson, Alan P; Nifong, L Wiley; Chitwood, W Randolph

    2003-12-01

    A renaissance in cardiac surgery has begun. The early clinical experience with computer-enhanced telemanipulation systems outlines the limitations of this approach despite some procedural success. Technologic advancements, such as the use of nitinol U-clips (Coalescent Surgical Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) instead of sutures requiring manual knot tying, have been shown to decrease operative times significantly. It is expected that with further refinements and development of adjunct technologies, the technique of computer-enhanced endoscopic cardiac surgery will evolve and may prove to be beneficial for many patients. Robotic technology has provided benefits to cardiac surgery. With improved optics and instrumentation, incisions are smaller. The ergometric movements and simulated three-dimensional optics project hand-eye coordination for the surgeon. The placement of the wristlike articulations at the end of the instruments moves the pivoting action to the plane of the mitral annulus. This improves dexterity in tight spaces and allows for ambidextrous suture placement. Sutures can be placed more accurately because of tremor filtration and high-resolution video magnification. Furthermore, the robotic system may have potential as an educational tool. In the near future, surgical vision and training systems might be able to model most surgical procedures through immersive technology. Thus, a "flight simulator" concept emerges where surgeons may be able to practice and perform the operation without a patient. Already, effective curricula for training teams in robotic surgery exist. Nevertheless, certain constraints continue to limit the advancement to a totally endoscopic computer-enhanced mitral valve operation. The current size of the instruments, intrathoracic instrument collisions, and extrathoracic "elbow" conflicts still can limit dexterity. When smaller instruments are developed, these restraints may be resolved. Furthermore, a working port incision is still required for

  19. Ambulatory anesthesia in plastic surgery: opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Facque AR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alexander R Facque, Peter J Taub Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: In 2013, there were 17 million procedures performed by plastic and reconstructive surgeons in the United States in the private office or ambulatory “surgicenter” setting, as well as additional operations performed in hospitals on an outpatient basis. As interest in performing increasingly complex surgical procedures on an outpatient basis continues to grow, the surgeon and anesthesiologist alike must be prepared to offer safe and reliable anesthesia and analgesia in the ambulatory setting. Surgeons must be aware of the possible techniques that will be employed in their surgeries in order to anticipate and prepare patients for possible postoperative side effects, and anesthesiologists must be prepared to offer such techniques in order to ensure a relatively rapid return to normal activity despite potentially having undergone major surgery. The following is a review of the specific considerations that should be given to ambulatory plastic surgery patients with comments on recent developments in the techniques used to safely administer agreeable and effective anesthesia. Keywords: ambulatory surgery, cosmetic anesthesia, outpatient, ambulatory anesthesia

  20. Minimally Invasive Direct Thoracic Interbody Fusion (MIS-DTIF): Technical Notes of a Single Surgeon Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Hamid; Abbasi, Ali

    2016-07-18

    Minimally invasive direct thoracic interbody fusion (MIS-DTIF) is a new single surgeon procedure for fusion of the thoracic vertebrae below the scapula (T6/7) to the thoracolumbar junction. In this proof of concept study, we describe the surgical technique for MIS-DTIF and report our experience and the perioperative outcomes of the first four patients who underwent this procedure. In this study we attempt to establish the safety and efficacy of MIS-DTIF. We have performed MIS-DTIF on six spinal levels in four patients with degenerative disk disease or disk herniation. We recorded surgery time, blood loss, fluoroscopy time, complications, and patient-reported pain. Throughout the MIS-DTIF procedure, the surgeon is aided by biplanar fluoroscopic imaging and electrophysiological monitoring. The surgeon approaches the spine with a series of gentle tissue dilations and inserts a working tube that establishes a direct connection from the outside of the skin to the disk space. Through this working tube, the surgeon performs a discectomy and inserts an interbody graft or cage. The procedure is completed with minimally invasive (MI) posterior pedicle screw fixation. For the single level patients the mean blood loss was 90 ml, surgery time 43 minutes, fluoroscopy time 293 seconds, and hospital stay two days. For the two-level surgeries, the mean blood loss was 27 ml, surgery time 61 minutes, fluoroscopy time 321 seconds, and hospital stay three days. We did not encounter any clinically significant complications. Thirty days post-surgery, the patients reported a statistically significant reduction of 5.3 points on a 10-point sliding pain scale. MIS-DTIF with pedicle screw fixation is a safe and clinically effective procedure for fusions of the thoracic spine. The procedure is technically straightforward and overcomes many of the limitations of the current minimally invasive (MI) approaches to the thoracic spine. MIS-DTIF has the potential to improve patient outcomes and

  1. [Fundamentals of laparoscopic surgery in Colombia using telesimulation: an effective educational tool for distance learning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henao, Óscar; Escallón, Jaime; Green, Jessica; Farcas, Mónica; Sierra, Juan Manuel; Sánchez, William; Okrainec, Allan

    2013-01-01

    The Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery program is an educational program developed by the Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons, which includes a handson skills training component, a cognitive component, and an assessment component for laparoscopic surgery. Its main objective is to provide surgical residents and practicing surgeons with the opportunity to learn fundamental skills and obtain the theoretical knowledge required to perform laparoscopic surgery, guaranteeing a better performance in the operating room, and thus, improving patient security. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of telesimulation for teaching the Fundamentals of Laparosopic Surgery program in Colombia. Twenty participants (ten general surgeons and ten general surgery residents) in two cities in Colombia participated in eight weekly telesimulation sessions. Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery scores were obtained for each participant before the telesimulation sessions (pre-test scores) and after telesimulation training was completed (post-test scores). Using scoring parameters developed by the Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons, we found a significant improvement between pre-test and post-test scores. All the participants passed the skills component of the course. This study evidences the effectiveness of telesimulation to improve the laparoscopic skills of the participants who had no previous knowledge of the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery program, which guaranteed obtaining the necessary score for approving the practical component of the program.

  2. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  3. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  4. [Robotic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Portillo, Mucio; Valenzuela-Salazar, Carlos; Quiroz-Guadarrama, César David; Pachecho-Gahbler, Carlos; Rojano-Rodríguez, Martín

    2014-12-01

    Medicine has experienced greater scientific and technological advances in the last 50 years than in the rest of human history. The article describes relevant events, revises concepts and advantages and clinical applications, summarizes published clinical results, and presents some personal reflections without giving dogmatic conclusions about robotic surgery. The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) defines robotic surgery as a surgical procedure using technology to aid the interaction between surgeon and patient. The objective of the surgical robot is to correct human deficiencies and improve surgical skills. The capacity of repeating tasks with precision and reproducibility has been the base of the robot´s success. Robotic technology offers objective and measurable advantages: - Improving maneuverability and physical capacity during surgery. - Correcting bad postural habits and tremor. - Allowing depth perception (3D images). - Magnifying strength and movement limits. - Offering a platform for sensors, cameras, and instruments. Endoscopic surgery transformed conceptually the way of practicing surgery. Nevertheless in the last decade, robotic assisted surgery has become the next paradigm of our era.

  5. American Society of Plastic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PRS PRS GO PSN PSEN GRAFT Contact Us Cosmetic Surgery New procedures and advanced technologies offer plastic surgery ... David Berman MD 14 Pidgeon Hill Drive Berman Cosmetic Surgery & S... Sterling, VA 20165 Website Franklin Richards MD Suite ...

  6. Do Orthopaedic Surgeons Acknowledge Uncertainty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunis, Teun; Janssen, Stein; Guitton, Thierry G; Ring, David; Parisien, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Much of the decision-making in orthopaedics rests on uncertain evidence. Uncertainty is therefore part of our normal daily practice, and yet physician uncertainty regarding treatment could diminish patients' health. It is not known if physician uncertainty is a function of the evidence alone or if other factors are involved. With added experience, uncertainty could be expected to diminish, but perhaps more influential are things like physician confidence, belief in the veracity of what is published, and even one's religious beliefs. In addition, it is plausible that the kind of practice a physician works in can affect the experience of uncertainty. Practicing physicians may not be immediately aware of these effects on how uncertainty is experienced in their clinical decision-making. We asked: (1) Does uncertainty and overconfidence bias decrease with years of practice? (2) What sociodemographic factors are independently associated with less recognition of uncertainty, in particular belief in God or other deity or deities, and how is atheism associated with recognition of uncertainty? (3) Do confidence bias (confidence that one's skill is greater than it actually is), degree of trust in the orthopaedic evidence, and degree of statistical sophistication correlate independently with recognition of uncertainty? We created a survey to establish an overall recognition of uncertainty score (four questions), trust in the orthopaedic evidence base (four questions), confidence bias (three questions), and statistical understanding (six questions). Seven hundred six members of the Science of Variation Group, a collaboration that aims to study variation in the definition and treatment of human illness, were approached to complete our survey. This group represents mainly orthopaedic surgeons specializing in trauma or hand and wrist surgery, practicing in Europe and North America, of whom the majority is involved in teaching. Approximately half of the group has more than 10 years

  7. Transoral Robotic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Shokjean

    2017-01-01

    Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is a technique used to treat oral, throat, and skull base cancers using a minimally invasive robotic approach through the mouth and throat. The TORS procedure allows deeper access and dissection of suspicious lesions and neoplastic growths in the oral cavity and those that extend from the throat to the base of the skull. Robotic surgery allows the surgeon to operate in tight spaces without a large open incision. This article discusses symptoms and risk factors of oral, throat, and skull base cancers; types of procedures that can be performed using the TORS approach; specialized instrumentation; patient selection; surgical advantages and disadvantages; patient benefits; and the role of the surgical team in preparing to intraoperatively care for the TORS patient.

  8. Performance and Return-to-Sport after Tommy John Surgery in Major League Baseball Pitchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anil Kumar; Erickson, Brandon J.; Harris, Joshua David; Bach, Bernard R.; Abrams, Geoffrey D.; Juan, Angielyn San; Cole, Brian J.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is a common procedure performed in Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers with symptomatic UCL deficiencies. The purpose of this study was to determine: 1) the rate of return to pitching in the MLB following UCLR, 2) performance after return to pitching, and 3) the difference in return to pitching and performance between pitchers who underwent UCLR and matched controls who did not. Methods: MLB pitchers with symptomatic UCL deficiency that underwent UCLR between 1986 and 2012 were evaluated. Players' data was extracted from MLB team websites, injury reports, player profiles/biographies, press releases and cross-referenced with the MLB injury database (MLB411). All player, elbow, and surgical demographic data were analyzed. Age, body mass index (BMI), position, handedness, and MLB experience-matched controls were selected from the MLB during the same years as those undergoing UCLR. An "index year" was designated for controls, analogous to UCLR year in cases. Return to pitching and performance measures in MLB was compared between cases and controls. Student's t-tests were performed for analysis of within-group and between-group variables, respectively. Results: One hundred forty-eight pitchers (83%) were able to return to pitching in MLB. Length of career in MLB following UCLR was 3.9 +/- 2.84 years. Revision rate was 3.9%. In the year prior to UCLR (or index year in controls), cases were significantly (p<0.05) worse than controls with regard to number of innings pitched, games played, wins, and winning percentage and were not significantly different than controls in all remaining parameters. Pitchers undergoing UCLR had significantly (p<0.05) fewer losses, a lower losing percentage, and lower earned run average (ERA) following surgery (versus pre-surgery). In addition, cases threw significantly (p<0.05) fewer walks and allowed fewer hits, runs, and home runs following surgery. Comparisons between cases and

  9. Clinical observation on fibrin glue technique in pterygium surgery performed with limbal autograft transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the efficiency and safety of fibrin glue to suture technique in pterygium surgery performed with limbal autograft.METHODS: A prospective randomized clinical trial was carried out in 60 eyes of 48 patients operated for primary nasal pterygium. Autologous limbal graft taken from the superotemporal limbus was used to cover the sclera after pterygium excision under local anesthesia with 2% lidocaine. In 22 cases(30 eyes, the transplant was attached to the sclera with a fibrin tissue adhesive(group 1and in 26 cases(30 eyeswith 10-0 Virgin silk sutures(group 2. Patients were followed up at least for 3 months. Time of operation, matching degree of graft and visual analogue scale(VASscore were mainly observed and recorded. RESULTS: Patient symptoms were significantly less and biomicroscopic findings were better in group 1. Pterygium recurrence was seen in 1 case of group 1, and 1 case of group 2. Average surgery time was shorter(PCONCLUSION: Using fibrin glue for graft fixation in pterygium surgery causes significantly less postoperative pain and shortens surgery time significantly.

  10. Robotic thoracic surgery: The state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Although the cumulative experience worldwide is still limited and evolving, Robotic Thoracic Surgery is an evolution over VATS. There is however a lot of concern among established high-volume VATS centers regarding the superiority of the robotic technique. We have over 7 years experience and believe that any new technology designed to make minimal invasive surgery easier and more comfortable for the surgeon is most likely to have better and safer outcomes in the long run. Our only concern is its cost effectiveness and we believe that if the cost factor is removed more and more surgeons will use the technology and it will increase the spectrum and the reach of minimally invasive thoracic surgery. This article reviews worldwide experience with robotic thoracic surgery and addresses the potential benefits and limitations of using the robotic platform for the performance of thoracic surgical procedures.

  11. Robotic surgery: colon and rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seong Kyu; Carmichael, Joseph C; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Although robotic technology aims to obviate some of the limitations of conventional laparoscopic surgery, the role of robotics in colorectal surgery is still largely undefined and different with respect to its application in abdominal versus pelvic surgery. This review aims to elucidate current developments in colorectal robotic surgery.In colon surgery, robotic techniques are associated with longer operative times and higher costs compared with laparoscopic surgery. However, robotics provides a stable camera platform and articulated instruments that are not subject to human tremors. Because of these advantages, robotic systems can play a role in complex procedures such as the dissection of lymph nodes around major vessels. In addition robot-assisted hand-sewn intracorporeal anastomoses can be easily performed by the surgeon, without a substantial need for a competent assistant. At present, although the short-term outcomes and oncological adequacy of robotic colon resection have been observed to be acceptable, the long-term outcomes of robotic colon resection remain unknown.In rectal surgery, robotic-assisted surgery for rectal cancer can be carried out safely and in accordance with current oncological principles. However, to date, the impact of robotic rectal surgery on the long-term oncological outcomes of minimally invasive total mesorectal excision remains undetermined. Robotic total mesorectal excision may allow for better preservation of urinary and sexual functions, and robotic surgery may attenuate the learning curve for laparoscopic rectal resection. However, a major drawback to robotic rectal surgery is the high cost involved.Large-scale prospective randomized clinical trials such as the international randomized trial ROLARR are required to establish the benefits of robotic rectal surgery.

  12. 21 CFR 878.4480 - Absorbable powder for lubricating a surgeon's glove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Absorbable powder for lubricating a surgeon's... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4480 Absorbable powder for lubricating a surgeon's glove. (a) Identification. Absorbable powder...

  13. Clearing the backlog: trichiasis surgeon retention and productivity in northern Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmael Habtamu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2006 there were an estimated 645,000 people in Amhara, Ethiopia, with trachomatous trichiasis (TT who needed surgery. Despite an extensive integrated eye care worker training programme (IECW and robust support for TT surgical services, productivity has not reached targets. We investigated why surgeon productivity was below target. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Confidential interviews were conducted in person with TT surgeons trained from 24 selected districts in Amhara Region and their supervisors. Determinants of attrition and productivity were investigated. We interviewed 225 people who had received IECW training; 139 (59% had subsequently changed career/job. Staff retention was associated with good road access to their health centre, mobile telephone network and a shorter time from initial training. Amongst the 94 IECW still working in the programme, the average number of patients operated was 41/year, which was mostly (86% done through outreach campaigns and only 14% of cases were performed in the static facilities where they routinely worked. Spot checks were made of surgical instruments and consumables: only 3/94 IECW had the minimum instruments and consumables to perform surgery. The main barriers to operating were lack of time, shortage of consumables, lack of patients, lack of support and equipment problems. Very few IECW received ongoing supervision or active management. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Surgeon attrition rates are high. Vertical surgery campaigns were effective in treating large numbers of cases, whilst static-site service productivity was low. Good health system management is key to building a well-staffed and well-run service.

  14. Surgeon-industry conflict of interest: survey of North Americans' opinions regarding surgeons consulting with industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Christian P; Dea, Nicolas; Noonan, Vanessa K; Bailey, Christopher S; Dvorak, Marcel F S; Fisher, Charles G

    2014-04-01

    Surgeon-industry conflict of interest (COI) has become a source of considerable interest. Professional medical societies, industry, and policy makers have attempted to regulate potential COI without consideration for public opinion. The objective of this study was to report on the opinions of individuals representing the general public regarding surgeon-industry consulting relationships. Web-based survey. Survey was administered using a "spine Web site," and opinions are collected on surgeon-industry consulting and regulation. Associations among responses to similar questions were assessed to ensure validity and subgroup analysis performed for respondent age, sex, education, insurance, employment, and patient status. Six hundred ten of 642 surveys had complete data. The sample population comprised more females and was older and more educated than the American population. About 80% of respondents felt it was ethical and either beneficial or of no influence to the quality of health care if surgeons were consultants for surgical device companies. Most felt disclosure of an industry relationship was important and paying surgeons royalties for devices, other than those they directly implant, would not affect quality of care. Respondents support multidisciplinary surgeon-industry COI regulation and trust doctors and their professional societies to head this effort. Despite the known potential negative impact of surgeon-industry COI on patient care, this study revealed that this does not seem to be reflected in the opinion of the general public. The respondents felt that disclosure is deemed one of the most important means of self-regulation and COI management, which is in agreement with current trends of most spine societies and journals that are increasing the stringency of disclosure policies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Robotics in pediatric surgery: perspectives for imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kant, Adrien J.; Klein, Michael D. [Stuart Frankel Foundation Computer-Assisted Robot-Enhanced Surgery Program, Children' s Research Center of Michigan, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Langenburg, Scott E. [Stuart Frankel Foundation Computer-Assisted Robot-Enhanced Surgery Program, Children' s Research Center of Michigan, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Pediatric Surgery, Children' s Hospital of Michigan, 3901 Beaubien, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Robotic surgery will give surgeons the ability to perform essentially tremorless microsurgery in tiny spaces with delicate precision and may enable procedures never before possible on children, neonates, and fetuses. Collaboration with radiologists, engineers, and other scientists will permit refinement of image-guided technologies and allow the realization of truly remarkable concepts in minimally invasive surgery. While robotic surgery is now in clinical use in several surgical specialties (heart bypass, prostate removal, and various gastrointestinal procedures), the greatest promise of robotics lies in pediatric surgery. We will briefly review the history and background of robotic technology in surgery, discuss its present benefits and uses and those being explored, and speculate on the future, with attention to the current and potential involvement of imaging modalities and the role of image guidance. (orig.)

  16. The Effect of Technical Performance on Patient Outcomes in Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecso, Andras B; Szasz, Peter; Kerezov, Georgi; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2017-03-01

    Systematic review of the effect of intraoperative technical performance on patient outcomes. The operating room is a high-stakes, high-risk environment. As a result, the quality of surgical interventions affecting patient outcomes has been the subject of discussion and research for years. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and Cochrane databases were searched. All surgical specialties were eligible for inclusion. Data were reviewed in regards to the methods by which technical performance was measured, what patient outcomes were assessed, and how intraoperative technical performance affected patient outcomes. Quality of evidence was assessed using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI). Of the 12,758 studies initially identified, 24 articles (7775 total participants) were ultimately included in this review. Seventeen studies assessed the performance of the faculty alone, 2 assessed both the faculty and trainees, 1 assessed trainees alone, and in 4 studies, the level of the operating surgeon was not specified. In 18 studies, a performance assessment tool was used. Patient outcomes were evaluated using intraoperative complications, short-term morbidity, long-term morbidity, short-term mortality, and long-term mortality. The average MERSQI score was 11.67 (range 9.5-14.5). Twenty-one studies demonstrated that superior technical performance was related to improved patient outcomes. The results of this systematic review demonstrated that superior technical performance positively affects patient outcomes. Despite this initial evidence, more robust research is needed to directly assess intraoperative technical performance and its effect on postoperative patient outcomes using meaningful assessment instruments and reliable processes.

  17. The role of imaging for the surgeon in primary malignant bone tumors of the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, M., E-mail: michele.rocca@ior.it [General and Thoracic Surgery, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Pupilli 1, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Salone, M. [General and Thoracic Surgery, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Pupilli 1, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Galletti, S. [Ultrasound Unit, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Balladelli, A. [Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Vanel, D. [Research in Imaging Musculo Skeletal Tumors, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Briccoli, A. [General and Thoracic Surgery, The Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Pupilli 1, 40136 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Primary malignant chest wall tumors are rare. The most frequent primary malignant tumor of the chest wall is chondrosarcoma, less common are primary bone tumors belonging to the Ewing Family Bone Tumors (EFBT), or even rarer are osteosarcomas. They represent a challenging clinical entities for surgeons as the treatment of choice for these neoplasms is surgical resection, excluding EFBT which are normally treated by a multidisciplinary approach. Positive margins after surgical procedure are the principal risk factor of local recurrence, therefore to perform adequate surgery a correct preoperative staging is mandatory. Imaging techniques are used for diagnosis, to determine anatomic site and extension, to perform a guided biopsy, for local and general staging, to evaluate chemotherapy response, to detect the presence of a recurrence. This article will focus on the role of imaging in guiding this often difficult surgery and the different technical possibilities adopted in our department to restore the mechanics of the thoracic cage after wide resections.

  18. Endoscopic tympanoplasty: learning curve for a surgeon already trained in microscopic tympanoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Sedat; Bayraktar, Cem

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the learning curve of endoscopic tympanoplasty for a surgeon already trained in microscopic tympanoplasty. We analyzed the clinical records of 81 patients who underwent transcanal endoscopic type 1 tympanoplasty and 30 control patients who underwent microscopic tympanoplasty between 2013 and 2015 in a tertiary hospital. All operations were performed by a single surgeon already trained in microscopic tympanoplasty. Patients were divided into four groups according to the date of surgery chronologically (group 1 early stage, group 2 intermediate stage, group 3 advanced stage and group 4 control). We evaluated the four groups according to surgery duration, audiometric results, and graft intake success. The operation duration shortened in accordance with the surgeon's experience and there were two subsequent steps during the learning curve: first, after 30 procedures; and second, after 60 procedures. The mean operation duration was 88.60 ± 21.10 min in group 1, and 62.00 ± 12.48 min in group 2. After 60 procedures, the mean operation duration was 43.81 ± 8.34 min in group 3. In the control group, the microscopic tympanoplasty duration was 69.93 ± 12.56 min. When we compared audiologic results (air conduction, bone conduction, and air-bone gap) and graft intake success rates, there were no significant differences between groups. Endoscopic tympanoplasty is a minimally invasive and effective technique. Mastering endoscopic tympanoplasty takes approximately 60 operations for a surgeon already trained in microscopic tympanoplasty. Graft intake success rates and hearing results are stable during the learning curve.

  19. Professor Monastyrski N.D. (1847–1888): One of the Forgotten Pioneers of Biliary Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachabayov, Mahir; Kubachev, Kubach

    2017-01-01

    Today, the ingenious and untimely deceased surgeon Monastyrski’s name is almost lost in the history of medicine and means little, if anything, to young surgeons. Monastyrski Nestor Dmitrievich was born in 1847 in Czerniowce and graduated from the medical faculty of the University of Vienna. Deeply inspired by the stars of European medicine and surgery: Billroth, Kaposi, Mikulicz, he became a brilliant surgeon and teacher. Monastyrski performed the first gastroenterostomy in Russia and was one of the pioneers of the aseptic method in Russia. In May 1887 he performed the historical first cholecystojejunostomy in the world. In 1888, exhausted by a tumor of the right kidney, Monastyrski insisted on surgery which resulted in his death several hours later. The department of surgery which was founded by Monastyrski N.D. in the Clinical Institute of Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna (today – North-Western State Medical Academy named after I.I. Mechnikov) was named after him. PMID:28373287

  20. Professor Monastyrski N.D. (1847-1888): One of the Forgotten Pioneers of Biliary Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachabayov, Mahir; Kubachev, Kubach

    2017-06-01

    Today, the ingenious and untimely deceased surgeon Monastyrski's name is almost lost in the history of medicine and means little, if anything, to young surgeons. Monastyrski Nestor Dmitrievich was born in 1847 in Czerniowce and graduated from the medical faculty of the University of Vienna. Deeply inspired by the stars of European medicine and surgery: Billroth, Kaposi, Mikulicz, he became a brilliant surgeon and teacher. Monastyrski performed the first gastroenterostomy in Russia and was one of the pioneers of the aseptic method in Russia. In May 1887 he performed the historical first cholecystojejunostomy in the world. In 1888, exhausted by a tumor of the right kidney, Monastyrski insisted on surgery which resulted in his death several hours later. The department of surgery which was founded by Monastyrski N.D. in the Clinical Institute of Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna (today - North-Western State Medical Academy named after I.I. Mechnikov) was named after him. © 2017 Marshfield Clinic.

  1. First Clinical Experience in Urologic Surgery with a Novel Robotic Lightweight Laparoscope Holder

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Jean-Alexandre; Lanchon, Cecilia; Voros, Sandrine; Medici, Maud; Descotes, Jean-Luc; Troccaz, Jocelyne; Cinquin, Philippe; Rambeaud, Jean-Jacques; Moreau-Gaudry, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility and the safety of a surgeon-controlled robotic endoscope holder in laparoscopic surgery. Materials and methods: From March 2010 to September 2010, 20 patients were enrolled prospectively to undergo a laparoscopic surgery using an innovative robotic endoscope holder. Two surgeons performed 6 adrenalectomies, 4 sacrocolpopexies, 5 pyeloplasties, 4 radical prostatectomies and 1 radical nephrectomy. Demographic data, overall set-up time, operative time, number of assistants needed were reviewed. Surgeon's satisfaction regarding the ergonomics was assessed using a ten point scale. Postoperative clinical outcomes were reviewed at day 1 and 1 month postoperatively. Results: The