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Sample records for surgery residency programs

  1. Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors' selection criteria.

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    Orr, Justin D; Hoffmann, Jeffrey D; Arrington, Edward D; Gerlinger, Tad L; Devine, John G; Belmont, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Factors associated with successful selection in U.S. Army orthopaedic surgical programs are unreported. The current analysis includes survey data from all Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors (PDs) to determine these factors. PDs at all Army orthopaedic surgery residency programs were provided 17 factors historically considered critical to successful selection and asked to rank order the factors as well as assign a level of importance to each. Results were collated and overall mean rankings are provided. PDs unanimously expressed that performance during the on-site orthopaedic surgery rotation at the individual program director's institution was most important. Respondents overwhelmingly reported that Steps 1 and 2 licensing exam scores were next most important, respectively. Survey data demonstrated that little importance was placed on letters of recommendation and personal statements. PDs made no discriminations based on allopathic or osteopathic degrees. The most important factors for Army orthopaedic surgery residency selection were clerkship performance at the individual PD's institution and licensing examination score performance. Army PDs consider both USMLE and COMLEX results, because Army programs have a higher percentage of successful osteopathic applicants.

  2. [The new residency program in neurological surgery in Spain].

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    Lobato, R D; Fernandez Alen, J; Alday, R; Gómez, P A; Lagares, A

    2003-09-01

    A new Residency Program in Neurological Surgery has been recently elaborated by the "Comisión Nacional de Neurocirugía" following the requirement of the National Council of Specialities. This new Program, which will replace the one proposed in 1992, has been designed in a similar way as those applied in countries providing the best neurosurgical training. Changes included deal with the definition of the speciality, and the introduction of new rotations,a resident Log Book, a Tutor with a well defined profil and commitments, a structured planning of academic and clinical objectives, a rotation or training in research, and a planning for continuous evaluation of the progress of the resident. It is likely that an appropriate application of the new Program in Spanish neurosurgical units with accreditation for training will result in formation of highly competent neurosurgeons. However, there are new challenges for improving neurosurgical training and the development of our speciality in Spain, as those related with new legislation regulating resident working hours, or some political decisions changing the mechanisms for controlling the number of resident positions per year.

  3. Goals and Methodology for a Surgery Residency Program: A Committee Approach.

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    Knecht, Charles D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Written goals of a small animal residency program established by Purdue University are identified and an elaborate list of methodology for goals is provided. Tables include: summary of required activities of residents, checklist of residency progress, and comparable effort for surgery residency and masters program. (Author/MLW)

  4. Integrated bariatric surgery residency

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    Eltorai AE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adam EM Eltorai Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, RI, USA Abstract: Obesity is a major public health concern. Given its lasting efficacy for improving obesity and obesity-related diseases, bariatric surgery is an increasingly common treatment option. As the implementation of the Affordable Care Act progresses, the impending physician shortage will become more severe. Thus there will be an even greater need for doctors specialized in the management and treatment of obese patients. The development of integrated bariatric surgery residency programs could be considered and is discussed herein. Keywords: obesity, bariatric surgery, integrated residency, surgery education

  5. Does intentional support of degree programs in general surgery residency affect research productivity or pursuit of academic surgery?

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    Joshua Smith, Jesse; Patel, Ravi K; Chen, Xi; Tarpley, Margaret J; Terhune, Kyla P

    2014-01-01

    Many residents supplement general surgery training with years of dedicated research, and an increasing number at our institution pursue additional degrees. We sought to determine whether it was worth the financial cost for residency programs to support degrees. We reviewed graduating chief residents (n = 69) in general surgery at Vanderbilt University from 2001 to 2010 and collected the data including research time and additional degrees obtained. We then compared this information with the following parameters: (1) total papers, (2) first-author papers, (3) Journal Citation Reports impact factors of journals in which papers were published, and (4) first job after residency or fellowship training. The general surgery resident training program at Vanderbilt University is an academic program, approved to finish training 7 chief residents yearly during the time period studied. Chief residents in general surgery at Vanderbilt who finished their training 2001 through 2010. We found that completion of a degree during residency was significantly associated with more total and first-author publications as compared with those by residents with only dedicated research time (p = 0.001 and p = 0.017). Residents completing a degree also produced publications of a higher caliber and level of authorship as determined by an adjusted resident impact factor score as compared with those by residents with laboratory research time only (p = 0.005). Degree completion also was significantly correlated with a first job in academia if compared to those with dedicated research time only (p = 0.046). Our data support the utility of degree completion when economically feasible and use of dedicated research time as an effective way to significantly increase research productivity and retain graduates in academic surgery. Aggregating data from other academic surgery programs would allow us to further determine association of funding of additional degrees as a means to encourage academic

  6. Impact of a weekly reading program on orthopedic surgery residents' in-training examination.

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    Weglein, Daniel G; Gugala, Zbigniew; Simpson, Suzanne; Lindsey, Ronald W

    2015-05-01

    In response to a decline in individual residents' performance and overall program performance on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE), the authors' department initiated a daily literature reading program coupled with weekly tests on the assigned material. The goal of this study was to assess the effect of the reading program on individual residents' scores and the training program's OITE scores. The reading program consisted of daily review articles from the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, followed by a weekly written examination consisting of multiple-choice or fill-in-the-blank questions. All articles were selected and all questions were written by the departmental chair. A questionnaire was given to assess residents' perceptions of the weekly tests. As a result of implementing the reading program for a 10-month period, residents' subsequent performance on the OITE significantly improved (mean score increase, 4, Porthopedic surgery residents.

  7. Attitudes toward professionalism education in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery residency programs.

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    Nichols, Brent G; Stadler, Michael E; Poetker, David M

    2015-02-01

    Resident professionalism development is important for physician training and patient care. Meaningful professionalism curriculum requires collaboration between learners and educators. We aimed to better understand attitudes of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (OHNS) program directors (PDs) and residents toward professionalism education. Prospective survey. We identified contemporary methods of professionalism evaluation and education and formulated questions to assess attitudes toward professionalism education. Surveys were electronically distributed to 104 PDs who were asked to forward a separate survey to residents. The resident survey was completed by 110 OHNS residents, and the PD survey was completed by 33 OHNS PDs. The majority of residents (78%) and faculty (84%) believed professionalism could be taught. Role modeling (93%) and morbidity and mortality conference (90%) were the most common methods of education. Faculty questionnaires (100%) and nursing/ancillary staff questionnaires (93%) were the most common methods of resident evaluation. The majority of residents considered faculty mentoring (66%) and small group discussions (56%) to be useful methods for teaching professionalism, whereas only 14% considered formal lectures useful. Residents valued questionnaires by faculty (98%), medical staff (97%), and patients (94%) for professionalism evaluation. We are the first to study OHNS residents and PDs attitudes toward professionalism evaluation and education. Residents value mentoring programs and small group sessions rather than formal didactics and value evaluation from multiple sources. Programs should consider incorporating these specific educational and evaluative methods into their professionalism curricula. N/A. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Adoption of robotics in a general surgery residency program: at what cost?

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    Mehaffey, J Hunter; Michaels, Alex D; Mullen, Matthew G; Yount, Kenan W; Meneveau, Max O; Smith, Philip W; Friel, Charles M; Schirmer, Bruce D

    2017-06-01

    Robotic technology is increasingly being utilized by general surgeons. However, the impact of introducing robotics to surgical residency has not been examined. This study aims to assess the financial costs and training impact of introducing robotics at an academic general surgery residency program. All patients who underwent laparoscopic or robotic cholecystectomy, ventral hernia repair (VHR), and inguinal hernia repair (IHR) at our institution from 2011-2015 were identified. The effect of robotic surgery on laparoscopic case volume was assessed with linear regression analysis. Resident participation, operative time, hospital costs, and patient charges were also evaluated. We identified 2260 laparoscopic and 139 robotic operations. As the volume of robotic cases increased, the number of laparoscopic cases steadily decreased. Residents participated in all laparoscopic cases and 70% of robotic cases but operated from the robot console in only 21% of cases. Mean operative time was increased for robotic cholecystectomy (+22%), IHR (+55%), and VHR (+61%). Financial analysis revealed higher median hospital costs per case for robotic cholecystectomy (+$411), IHR (+$887), and VHR (+$1124) as well as substantial associated fixed costs. Introduction of robotic surgery had considerable negative impact on laparoscopic case volume and significantly decreased resident participation. Increased operative time and hospital costs are substantial. An institution must be cognizant of these effects when considering implementing robotics in departments with a general surgery residency program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Chances and risks of a new residency program for orthopedics and trauma surgery].

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    2013-04-01

    The residency program for a specialist in orthopedics and trauma surgery is facing fundamental changes based on an initiative originating from the working group "medical training" of the German Medical Association (GMA). A survey indicated that 50 % of all trainees are dissatisfied with their current situation. It appears important to integrate the ideas and wishes of current orthopedic residents in a novel training concept. To assess this a survey was performed by the Young Forum of the German Society for Orthopedics und Trauma Surgery. The internet-based short survey was conducted in January 2013 among members of the professional societies (DGU, DGOU and DGOOC). 408 physicians participated. The majority of the participating physicians is interested in a career in orthopedics and trauma surgery with primarily operative contents. Accordingly the majority (62 %, n = 253) voted against a reduction of numbers of surgical interventions with 86 % (n = 351) confirming the necessity that these operations must be carried out by the trainee himself. The upcoming changes in residency program for orthopedics and trauma surgery offer the opportunity for a well structured and practical oriented residency program. It could be a further step in increasing satisfaction in this profession. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. A survey of the pediatric surgery program directors: optimizing resident research to make pediatric surgery training more efficient.

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    Markel, Troy A; Rescorla, Frederick J

    2015-06-01

    Resident Research (RR) has been a presumed requirement for pediatric surgery fellowship candidates. We hypothesized that: 1) pediatric surgery leaders would no longer feel that RR was necessary for fellowship candidates, 2) the type of study performed would not impact a program's opinion of candidates, and 3) the timing of RR could be altered for those interested in a research career. An anonymous survey was sent to pediatric surgery fellowship program directors (PDs). Sixty-three percent responded, and answers were compared via Chi square analysis with ppediatric surgery fellowship candidates. Seventy-five percent had no preference between one or two years of research (p=0.0005), 79% placed no heavier weight on basic or clinical research (psurgery may not be necessary. Pediatric surgery candidates who partake in RR are not penalized for their choice of study. Increasing efficiency of training is important in today's era of medical training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Where have all the cardiothoracic surgery residents gone? Placement of graduating residents by United States thoracic surgery training programs, 1998 to 2002.

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    Wheatley, Grayson H; Lee, Richard

    2006-01-01

    We studied the evolving job placement trends of graduating cardiothoracic surgery residents over a 5-year period from the perspective of the program director. Graduate placement questionnaires were sent to program directors of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited United States thoracic surgery residency programs (n = 92). Program directors were asked to categorize the type of job that each resident chose upon graduation (1998-2002). Of the program directors surveyed, 71.7% (66/92) responded, representing 76.4% (545/714) of the total graduating resident population during the study period. Three-year training programs constituted 24.2% (16/66) of the respondents and accounted for 20.2% (110/545) of the graduates. Annually, graduates most commonly chose private practice jobs. Between 2001 and 2002, the percentage of graduates entering fellowships increased (11.8% [13/110] versus 19.1% [21/110], P = .008) as the percentage of graduates choosing private practice positions decreased (56.4% [62/110] versus 45.5% [50/110], P = .15). In total, 12.8% (70/545) of the graduates pursued fellowships, with associated specialty choices being: 38.6% (27/70) adult cardiac, 37.1% (26/70) congenital, 15.7% (11/70) transplantation, and 8.6% (6/70) thoracic. There were no significant differences between 2-year and 3-year training program graduates in choice of private practice versus academic jobs. In 2002, a greater percentage of graduates chose to pursue fellowship training at the expense of private practice employment. This difference may in part result from fewer employment opportunities rather than graduate choice. Ongoing studies are needed to follow this trend. Annual analysis of the placement of all graduating residents would help to identify changes in employment.

  12. History of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program at Universidad el Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia.

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    Castro-Núñez, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    The formal training of oral and maxillofacial surgeons in Colombia started in 1958 at Hospital Sanjos6, thanks to the titanic work of Waldemar Wilhelm, a German-born surgeon who settled in BogotA in 1950. Today there are seven institutions in Colombia that offer residency programs in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this article is to describe the history of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program at Universidad El Bosque in Bogota.

  13. Cardiovascular Surgery Residency Program: Training Coronary Anastomosis Using the Arroyo Simulator and UNIFESP Models.

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    Maluf, Miguel Angel; Gomes, Walter José; Bras, Ademir Massarico; Araújo, Thiago Cavalcante Vila Nova de; Mota, André Lupp; Cardoso, Caio Cesar; Coutinho, Rafael Viana dos S

    2015-01-01

    Engage the UNIFESP Cardiovascular Surgery residents in coronary anastomosis, assess their skills and certify results, using the Arroyo Anastomosis Simulator and UNIFESP surgical models. First to 6th year residents attended a weekly program of technical training in coronary anastomosis, using 4 simulation models: 1. Arroyo simulator; 2. Dummy with a plastic heart; 3. Dummy with a bovine heart; and 4. Dummy with a beating pig heart. The assessment test was comprised of 10 items, using a scale from 1 to 5 points in each of them, creating a global score of 50 points maximum. The technical performance of the candidate showed improvement in all items, especially manual skill and technical progress, critical sense of the work performed, confidence in the procedure and reduction of the time needed to perform the anastomosis after 12 weeks practice. In response to the multiplicity of factors that currently influence the cardiovascular surgeon training, there have been combined efforts to reform the practices of surgical medical training. 1 - The four models of simulators offer a considerable contribution to the field of cardiovascular surgery, improving the skill and dexterity of the surgeon in training. 2 - Residents have shown interest in training and cooperate in the development of innovative procedures for surgical medical training in the art.

  14. Cardiovascular Surgery Residency Program: Training Coronary Anastomosis Using the Arroyo Simulator and UNIFESP Models

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    Miguel Angel Maluf

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: Engage the UNIFESP Cardiovascular Surgery residents in coronary anastomosis, assess their skills and certify results, using the Arroyo Anastomosis Simulator and UNIFESP surgical models. METHODS: First to 6th year residents attended a weekly program of technical training in coronary anastomosis, using 4 simulation models: 1. Arroyo simulator; 2. Dummy with a plastic heart; 3. Dummy with a bovine heart; and 4. Dummy with a beating pig heart. The assessment test was comprised of 10 items, using a scale from 1 to 5 points in each of them, creating a global score of 50 points maximum. RESULTS: The technical performance of the candidate showed improvement in all items, especially manual skill and technical progress, critical sense of the work performed, confidence in the procedure and reduction of the time needed to perform the anastomosis after 12 weeks practice. In response to the multiplicity of factors that currently influence the cardiovascular surgeon training, there have been combined efforts to reform the practices of surgical medical training. CONCLUSION: 1 - The four models of simulators offer a considerable contribution to the field of cardiovascular surgery, improving the skill and dexterity of the surgeon in training. 2 - Residents have shown interest in training and cooperate in the development of innovative procedures for surgical medical training in the art.

  15. The surgical experience of general surgery residents: an analysis of the applicability of the specialty program in General and Digestive Surgery.

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    Targarona Soler, Eduardo Ma; Jover Navalon, Jose Ma; Gutierrez Saiz, Javier; Turrado Rodríguez, Víctor; Parrilla Paricio, Pascual

    2015-03-01

    Residents in our country have achieved a homogenous surgical training by following a structured residency program. This is due to the existence of specific training programs for each specialty. The current program, approved in 2007, has a detailed list of procedures that a surgeon should have performed in order to complete training. The aim of this study is to analyze the applicability of the program with regard to the number of procedures performed during the residency period. A data collection form was designed that included the list of procedures from the program of the specialty; it was sent in April 2014 to all hospitals with accredited residency programs. In September 2014 the forms were analysed, and a general descriptive study was performed; a subanalysis according to the resident's sex and Autonomous region was also performed. The number of procedures performed according to the number of residents in the different centers was also analyzed. The survey was sent to 117 hospitals with accredited programs, which included 190 resident places. A total of 91 hospitals responded (53%). The training offered adapts in general to the specialty program. The total number of procedures performed in the different sub-areas, in laparoscopic and emergency surgery is correct or above the number recommended by the program, with the exception of esophageal-gastric and hepatobiliary surgery. The sub-analysis according to Autonomous region did not show any significant differences in the total number of procedures, however, there were significant differences in endocrine surgery (P=.001) and breast surgery (P=.042). A total of 55% of residents are female, with no significant differences in distribution in Autonomous regions. However, female surgeons operate more than their male counterparts during the residency period (512±226 vs. 625±244; P<.01). The number of residents in the hospital correlates with the number of procedures performed; the residents with more procedures

  16. Orthopaedic Surgery Residency: Perspectives of Applicants and Program Directors on Medical Student Away Rotations.

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    O'Donnell, Seth W; Drolet, Brian C; Brower, Jonathan P; LaPorte, Dawn; Eberson, Craig P

    2017-01-01

    Senior medical students frequently rotate at orthopaedic residency programs away from their home medical schools. However, to our knowledge, the perspective of program directors (PDs) and applicants on the value, objectives, and costs of these rotations has not been studied. Surveys evaluating the frequency, costs, benefits, and objectives of away rotations were distributed to all orthopaedic residency PDs in the United States and applicants in the 2014-2015 Match cycle. Data analysis was conducted to perform inferential and descriptive statistics; comparisons were made between and among PD and applicant groups using two-tailed means Student t-test and analysis of variance. A total of 74 PD (46.0%) and 524 applicant (49.3%) responses were obtained from a national distribution. Applicants completed an average of 2.4 away rotations, with an average cost of $2,799. When stratified on self-reported likelihood of Matching, there were no substantial differences in the total number of rotations performed. The only marked differences between these groups were the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score and the number of applications to residency programs. PDs reported that significantly fewer rotations should be allowed, whereas applicants suggested higher limits (2.42 rotations versus 6.24, P < 0.001). PDs and applicants had similar perspectives on the value of away rotations; both groups reported more value in finding a "good fit" and making a good impression at the program and placed less value on the educational impact. The value of orthopaedic away rotations appears more utilitarian than educational for both PDs and applicants. Rotations are performed regardless of perceived likelihood of Matching and are used by students and programs to identify a "good fit." Therefore, given the portion of an academic year that is spent on orthopaedic rotations, findings showing perceived low educational value and marked discrepancies between the expected number of

  17. Evaluation of the Current Perspectives on Letters of Recommendation for Residency Applicants among Plastic Surgery Program Directors

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    K. Shultz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The goals of this project were to evaluate the current perspective on letters of recommendation and to assess the need for, and acceptance of, a more standardized letter of recommendation (LOR. Methods. An eight-question survey was distributed to plastic surgery program directors. A five-point Likert scale was selected as a means of quantifying the participants’ responses to the survey. Results. Twenty-eight of 71 program directors (39.4% completed the survey. The majority of participants felt that current LOR did not offer a realistic way to compare applicants (mean±SD, 2.9±0.8. While most agreed that increasing the objectivity of LOR would be valuable in comparing applicants (mean±SD, 4.1±0.9, the overall average response to whether a more standardized letter format would improve the resident selection process remained only slightly better than neutral (mean±SD, 3.5±1.2. Most of the chairmen supported the notion that familiarity with the author of the LOR strengthened the recommendation (mean±SD, 4.5±0.6. Conclusion. The majority of plastic surgery program directors would like more objectivity in comparing applicants but are ambivalent about a standardized letter of recommendation.

  18. Colorectal Surgeons Teaching General Surgery Residents: Current Challenges and Opportunities

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    Schmitz, Connie C.; Chow, Christopher J.; Rothenberger, David A

    2012-01-01

    Effective teaching for general surgery residents requires that faculty members with colorectal expertise actively engage in the education process and fully understand the current context for residency training. In this article, we review important national developments with respect to graduate medical education that impact resident supervision, curriculum implementation, resident assessment, and program evaluation. We argue that establishing a culture of respect and professionalism in today's...

  19. Impact of implementation of a pediatric surgery fellowship on general surgery resident operative volume.

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    Snyder, Rebecca A; Phillips, Sharon E; Terhune, Kyla P

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of the initiation of a pediatric surgery fellowship on general surgery resident operative volume at 1 major academic institution. Retrospective review of operative records obtained from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) general surgery resident and pediatric surgery fellow case logs. Data collected included number and type of pediatric index cases per year, number of total pediatric surgery cases per year, and number of total cases logged as primary surgeon to date. Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Department of Surgery, which has an accredited general surgery program, finishes 7 chief residents per year during the study period, and instituted a new pediatric surgery fellowship in 2007. Case logs submitted by third and fourth year general surgery residents and first and second year pediatric surgery fellows were studied. The number of pediatric attending surgeons, relative value units (RVUs), and hospital admissions increased from 2003 to 2011. The median number of pediatric index cases performed by a resident decreased after the onset of fellowship from 34 cases to 23.5 cases per year (p pediatric surgery rotation also decreased from 74 to 53 cases per year after onset of the fellowship (p surgery resident index and overall case volume in pediatric surgery. Although operative volume is only 1 measure of surgical educational value, these findings suggest that the addition of surgical fellowships affects the educational experience of general surgery residents. We recommend that residency programs establish goals and calculate any potential impact on general surgery resident case volume before initiating a new surgical fellowship. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Development and implementation of a formalized geriatric surgery curriculum for general surgery residents.

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    Barbas, Andrew S; Haney, John C; Henry, Brandon V; Heflin, Mitchell T; Lagoo, Sandhya A

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growth of the elderly population, most surgical training programs lack formalized geriatric education. The authors' aim was to implement a formalized geriatric surgery curriculum at an academic medical center. Surgery residents were surveyed on attitudes toward the care of elderly patients and the importance of various geriatric topics to daily practice. A curriculum consisting of 16 didactic sessions was created with faculty experts moderating. After curriculum completion, residents were surveyed to assess curriculum impact. Residents expressed increased comfort in accessing community resources. A greater percentage of residents recognized the significance of delirium and acute renal failure in elderly patients. Implementing a geriatric surgery curriculum geared toward surgery residents is feasible and can increase resident comfort with multidisciplinary care and recognition of clinical conditions pertinent to elderly surgical patients. This initiative also provided valuable experience for geriatric surgery curriculum development.

  1. Cost and logistics of implementing a tissue-based American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery surgical skills curriculum for general surgery residents of all clinical years.

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    Henry, Brandon; Clark, Philip; Sudan, Ranjan

    2014-02-01

    The cost and logistics of deploying the American College of Surgeons (ACS)/Association of Program Directors in Surgery (APDS) National Technical Skills Curriculum across all training years are not known. This information is essential for residency programs choosing to adopt similar curricula. A task force evaluated the authors' institution's existing simulation curriculum and enhanced it by implementing the ACS/APDS modules. A 35-module curriculum was administered to 35 general surgery residents across all 5 clinical years. The costs and logistics were noted, and resident satisfaction was assessed. The annual operational cost was $110,300 ($3,150 per resident). Cost per module, per resident was $940 for the cadaveric module compared with $220 and $240 for dry simulation and animal tissue-based modules, respectively. Resident satisfaction improved from 2.45 to 4.78 on a 5-point, Likert-type scale after implementing the ACS/APDS modules. The ACS/APDS skills curriculum was implemented successfully across all clinical years. Cadaveric modules were the most expensive. Animal and dry simulation modules were equivalent in cost. The addition of tissue-based modules was associated with high satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Recent trends in resident career choices after plastic surgery training.

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    Herrera, Fernando A; Chang, Eric I; Suliman, Ahmed; Tseng, Charles Y; Bradley, James P

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the initial career choice of plastic surgery residents after completion of training during the last five years and to identify any factors that may influence choice of career path. Demographic data were obtained from graduates of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited US plastic surgery residency programs between the years of 2005 and 2010. The type of practice and pursuit of fellowship were recorded for each graduate. Sex, age at graduation, marital status, dependents, advanced degrees, previous research, type of training program, primary residency, and length of plastic surgery training were also documented. Comparison of outcomes between the two plastic surgery training pathways (integrated vs independent) was analyzed. Data were collected for 424 graduates from 37 different training programs. Of these programs, 11% were from the West coast, 32% from Midwest, 33% from East coast, and 24% from the South. Seventy-nine percent of residents were male, mean age at graduation was 35 (2.89) years. Forty-nine percent of residents were married, 30% had one or more dependents, 6% had advanced degrees, and 18% had previous research experience. Fifty-eight percent of graduates were from independent programs. Forty-eight percent of residents pursued private practice immediately after graduation, 8% pursued academic practice, 41% pursued specialty fellowships, and 3% had military commitments. Most of the residents chose to pursue private practice on completion of residency. Independent residents were significantly more likely to pursue private practice immediately compared to integrated/combined residents. No other factors were significant for practice choice.

  3. Superior subconjunctival anesthesia versus retrobulbar anesthesia for manual small-incision cataract surgery in a residency training program: a randomized controlled trial

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    Kongsap P

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pipat KongsapDepartment of Ophthalmology, Prapokklao Hospital, Chanthaburi, Thailand; Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, ThailandPurpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of subconjunctival anesthesia as compared to retrobulbar anesthesia for pain control during manual small-incision cataract surgery (MSICS performed by third-year residents.Design: A randomized, controlled trial.Patients and methods: A total of 150 patients undergoing routine cataract surgery were randomly assigned to receive either subconjunctival anesthesia (group 1, n = 75 or retrobulbar anesthesia (group 2, n = 75. Third-year residents performed MSICS using the modified Blumenthal technique. Subconjunctival anesthesia was administered by injecting 2% xylocaine with adrenalin into the superior conjunctiva, and retrobulbar anesthesia by injecting 2 mL of 2% xylocaine with adrenalin into the retrobulbar space. We studied the following variables: intraoperative pain score rated on a 100-point visual analog scale (VAS, operative time, and injection and operative complications.Results: A mean age of 69 vs 70 years, an operative time of 47.1 (SD, 9.9 min vs 47.7 (10.9 min, and a median (interquartile range pain score of 40 (range, 20–70 vs 40 (range, 20–50 were observed in the subconjunctival and the retrobulbar groups, respectively. The injection complication of subconjunctival hemorrhage was significantly higher in the subconjunctival group (25.3% compared to the retrobulbar group (1.3%. The operative complication rate between groups was not different (P > 0.05.Conclusion: Both, superior subconjunctival anesthesia and retrobulbar anesthesia were effective during MSICS when used in a residency training program.Keywords: subconjunctival anesthesia, retrobulbar anesthesia, cataract surgery, small-incision cataract surgery, visual analog scale, pain score

  4. Workplace bullying of general surgery residents by nurses.

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    Schlitzkus, Lisa L; Vogt, Kelly N; Sullivan, Maura E; Schenarts, Kimberly D

    2014-01-01

    Workplace bullying is at the forefront of social behavior research, garnering significant media attention. Most of the medical research has addressed bullying of nurses by physicians and demonstrates that patient care and outcomes may suffer. The intent of this study was to determine if general surgery residents are bullied by nurses. A survey instrument previously validated (Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised) to evaluate for workplace bullying was modified to reflect the resident-nurse relationship. After institutional review board approval, the piloted online survey was sent to general surgery program directors to forward to general surgery residents. Demographic data are presented as percentages, and for negative acts, percentages of daily, weekly, and monthly frequencies are combined. Allopathic general surgery residencies in the United States. General surgery residents. The response rate was 22.1% (n = 452). Most respondents were men (55%) and had a mean age of 29 years (standard deviation = 7). Although 27.0% of the respondents were interns, the remaining classes were equally represented (12%-18% of responses/class). The respondents were primarily from medium-sized residency programs (45%), in the Midwest (28%), training in university programs (72%), and rotating primarily in a combined private and county hospital that serves both insured and indigent patients (59%). The residents had experienced each of the 22 negative acts (11.5%-82.5%). Work-related bullying occurs more than person-related bullying and physical intimidation. Ignoring of recommendations or orders by nurses occurs on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis for 30.2% of residents (work-related bullying). The most frequent person-related bullying act is ignoring the resident when they approach or reacting in a hostile manner (18.0%), followed by ignoring or excluding the resident (17.1%). Workplace bullying of general surgery residents by nurses is prominent. Future research is needed to determine

  5. Ongoing deficits in resident training for minimally invasive surgery.

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    Park, Adrian; Witzke, Donald; Donnelly, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Patient preference has driven the adoption of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques and altered surgical practice. MIS training in surgical residency programs must teach new skill sets with steep learning curves to enable residents to master key procedures. Because no nationally recognized MIS curriculum exists, this study asked experts in MIS which laparoscopic procedures should be taught and how many cases are required for competency. Expert recommendations were compared to the number of cases actually performed by residents (Residency Review Committee [RRC] data). A detailed survey was sent nationwide to all surgical residency programs (academic and private) known to offer training in MIS and/or have a leader in the field. The response rate was approximately 52%. RRC data were obtained from the resident statistics summary report for 1998-1999. Experts identified core procedures for MIS training and consistently voiced the opinion that to become competent, residents need to perform these procedures many more times than the RRC data indicate they currently do. At present, American surgical residency programs do not meet the suggested MIS case range or volume required for competency. Residency programs need to be restructured to incorporate sufficient exposure to core MIS procedures. More expert faculty must be recruited to train residents to meet the increasing demand for laparoscopy.

  6. Thoughts of Quitting General Surgery Residency: Factors in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginther, David Nathan; Dattani, Sheev; Miller, Sarah; Hayes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Attrition rates in general surgery training are higher than other surgical disciplines. We sought to determine the prevalence with which Canadian general surgery residents consider leaving their training and the contributing factors. An anonymous survey was administered to all general surgery residents in Canada. Responses from residents who considered leaving their training were assessed for importance of contributing factors. The study was conducted at the Royal University Hospital, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, a tertiary academic center. The response rate was approximately 34.0%. A minority (32.0%) reported very seriously or somewhat seriously considering leaving their training, whereas 35.2% casually considered doing so. Poor work-life balance in residency (38.9%) was the single-most important factor, whereas concern about future unemployment (16.7%) and poor future quality of life (15.7%) were next. Enjoyment of work (41.7%) was the most frequent mitigating factor. Harassment and intimidation were reported factors in 16.7%. On analysis, only intention to practice in a nonacademic setting approached significant association with thoughts of leaving (odds ratio = 1.92, CI = 0.99-3.74, p = 0.052). There was no association with sex, program, postgraduate year, relationship status, or subspecialty interest. There was a nonsignificant trend toward more thoughts of leaving with older age. Canadian general surgery residents appear less likely to seriously consider quitting than their American counterparts. Poor work-life balance in residency, fear of future unemployment, and anticipated poor future quality of life are significant contributors to thoughts of quitting. Efforts to educate prospective residents about the reality of the surgical lifestyle, and to assist residents in securing employment, may improve completion rates. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Colorectal surgeons teaching general surgery residents: current challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Connie C; Chow, Christopher J; Rothenberger, David A

    2012-09-01

    Effective teaching for general surgery residents requires that faculty members with colorectal expertise actively engage in the education process and fully understand the current context for residency training. In this article, we review important national developments with respect to graduate medical education that impact resident supervision, curriculum implementation, resident assessment, and program evaluation. We argue that establishing a culture of respect and professionalism in today's teaching environment is one of the most important legacies that surgical educators can leave for the coming generation. Faculty role modeling and the process of socializing residents is highlighted. We review the American College of Surgeons' Code of Professional Conduct, summarize some of the current strategies for teaching and assessing professionalism, and reflect on principles of motivation that apply to resident training both for the trainee and the trainer.

  8. Colorectal Surgeons Teaching General Surgery Residents: Current Challenges and Opportunities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schmitz, Connie; Chow, Christopher; Rothenberger, David

    2012-01-01

    Effective teaching for general surgery residents requires that faculty members with colorectal expertise actively engage in the education process and fully understand the current context for residency training...

  9. Oral and maxillofacial surgery residents have poor understanding of biostatistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Al M; Laskin, Daniel M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate residents' understanding of biostatistics and interpretation of research results. A questionnaire previously used in internal medicine residents was modified to include oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) examples. The survey included sections to identify demographic and educational characteristics of residents, attitudes and confidence, and the primary outcome-knowledge of biostatistics. In 2009 an invitation to the Internet survey was sent to all 106 program directors in the United States, who were requested to forward it to their residents. One hundred twelve residents responded. The percentage of residents who had taken a course in epidemiology was 53%; biostatistics, 49%; and evidence-based dentistry, 65%. Conversely, 10% of OMS residents had taken none of these classes. Across the 6-item test of knowledge of statistical methods, the mean percentage of correct answers was 38% (SD, 22%). Nearly half of the residents (42%) could not correctly identify continuous, ordinal, or nominal variables. Only 21% correctly identified a case-control study, but 79% correctly identified that the purpose of blinding was to reduce bias. Only 46% correctly interpreted a clinically unimportant and statistically nonsignificant result. None of the demographic or experience factors of OMS residents were related to statistical knowledge. Overall, OMS resident knowledge was below that of internal medicine residents (Pbiostatistics and the interpretation of research and are thus unprepared to interpret the results of published clinical research. Residency programs should include effective biostatistical training in their curricula to prepare residents in evidence-based dentistry. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Learning styles in two otolaryngology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laeeq, Kulsoom; Weatherly, Robert A; Carrott, Alice; Pandian, Vinciya; Cummings, Charles W; Bhatti, Nasir I

    2009-12-01

    Kolb portrays four learning styles depending on how an individual grasps or transforms experience: accommodating, assimilating, diverging, and converging. Past studies in surgery, medicine, and anesthesia identified the predominant learning style in each of these specialties. The prevalence of different learning styles and existence of a predominant style, if any, has not been reported for otolaryngology residency programs. The purpose of our study was to determine if otolaryngology residents have a preferred learning style that is different from the predominant learning styles reported for other specialties. We conducted a survey of the otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents at two residency programs. Kolb's Learning Style Index (LSI) version 3.1 was administered to 46 residents from Johns Hopkins University and Kansas University Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery programs. LSI is a widely used 12-item questionnaire, with each item followed by four options. The subjects graded the options depending on how the options applied to them. Forty-three otolaryngology residents completed the survey, with a response rate of 93.47%. The predominant learning style was converging (55.81%) followed by accommodating (18.61%), accounting for the learning styles of 74.42% of the total population. There were only 13.95% assimilating and 6.98% diverging learning styles. Two residents (4.65%) had their preference balanced across four learning styles. The predominant learning styles in otolaryngology were converging and accommodating, accounting for three fourths of the population. It would be desirable to modify our curriculum in a way that will optimize and facilitate learning.

  11. The Canadian general surgery resident: defining current challenges for surgical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Corey; Labossière, Joseph; Rommens, Kenton; Birch, Daniel W

    2012-08-01

    Surgery training programs in Canada and the United States have recognized the need to modify current models of training and education. The shifting demographic of surgery trainees, lifestyle issues and an increased trend toward subspecialization are the major influences. To guide these important educational initiatives, a contemporary profile of Canadian general surgery residents and their impressions of training in Canada is required. We developed and distributed a questionnaire to residents in each Canadian general surgery training program, and residents responded during dedicated teaching time. In all, 186 surveys were returned for analysis (62% response rate). The average age of Canadian general surgery residents is 30 years, 38% are women, 41% are married, 18% have dependants younger than 18 years and 41% plan to add to or start a family during residency. Most (87%) residents plan to pursue postgraduate education. On completion of training, 74% of residents plan to stay in Canada and 49% want to practice in an academic setting. Almost half (42%) of residents identify a poor balance between work and personal life during residency. Forty-seven percent of respondents have appropriate access to mentorship, whereas 37% describe suitable access to career guidance and 40% identify the availability of appropriate social supports. Just over half (54%) believe the stress level during residency is manageable. This survey provides a profile of contemporary Canadian general surgery residents. Important challenges within the residency system are identified. Program directors and chairs of surgery are encouraged to recognize these challenges and intervene where appropriate.

  12. National Survey of Burnout among US General Surgery Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Leisha C; Jeffe, Donna B; Jin, Linda; Awad, Michael M; Turnbull, Isaiah R

    2017-01-01

    Background Burnout is a complex syndrome of emotional distress that can disproportionately affect individuals who work in healthcare professions. Study Design For a national survey of burnout in US general surgery residents, we asked all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited general surgery program directors to email their general surgery residents an invitation to complete an anonymous, online survey. Burnout was assessed with the Maslach Burnout Inventory; total scores for Emotional Exhaustion (EE), Depersonalization (DP), and Personal Accomplishment (PA) subscales were calculated. Burnout was defined as having a score in the highest tertile for EE or DP or lowest tertile for PA. Chi-square tests and one-way analyses of variance were used to test associations between burnout tertiles for each subscale and various resident and training-program characteristics as appropriate. Results From April–December, 2014, 665 residents actively engaged in clinical training had data for analysis; 69% met the criterion for burnout on at least one subscale. Higher burnout on each subscale was reported by residents planning private practice compared with academic careers. A greater proportion of women than men reported burnout on EE and PA. Higher burnout on EE and DP was associated with greater work hours per week. Having a structured mentoring program was associated with lower burnout on each subscale. Conclusions The high rates of burnout among general surgery residents are concerning given the potential impact of burnout on the quality of patient care. Efforts to identify at-risk populations and to design targeted interventions to mitigate burnout in surgical trainees are warranted. PMID:27238875

  13. Cardiothoracic surgery resident education: update on resident recruitment and job placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Jorge D; Ermis, Peter; Laudito, Antonio; Lee, Richard; Wheatley, Grayson H; Paul, Sean; Calhoon, John

    2006-09-01

    Applications to cardiothoracic surgery training programs have steadily declined. The application cycle for 2004 marked the first time the number of applicants was lower than the positions offered. This survey reflects on this trend in applications and the perspectives of current and graduating residents. In June 2004, the Thoracic Surgery Residents Association, in conjunction with CTSNet, surveyed residents completing accredited cardiothoracic training or additional subspecialization. Participation was anonymous and voluntary. Of the 140 graduates, 88 responded. Most were male (92%) and married (72%). Their average age was 35.7 years, and 56% had children. The mean educational debt was less than $50,000. Of the 88 respondents, 69 (78%) had plans to seek jobs whereas 15 (17%) sought additional training. Among job-seeking residents, 12% received no offers. Also, 59% of graduates initially sought a position in academics and 41% in private practice. Nearly one quarter (23%) reported that they would not choose a career in cardiothoracic surgery again, and more than half (52%) would not strongly recommend cardiothoracic surgery to potential trainees. Almost all (90%) of the graduates believed that the number of cardiothoracic training spots should be decreased, and 92% believed that a reduction in training positions should be achieved by closing marginal training programs. Additionally, 91% believed reimbursement for cardiothoracic surgery was inadequate, and 88% thought low reimbursement resulted in restricted patient access and decreased quality of care. Cardiothoracic training programs are having difficulty in both applicant recruitment and in suitable job placement. This frustration in the job search coupled with reimbursement and lifestyle issues most likely contributes to the general dissatisfaction conveyed by the graduates. If these trends continue, the field will be faced with a crisis of unfilled residency programs and unemployed graduates.

  14. An Ambulatory Program for Surgical Residents and Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Margaret

    1988-01-01

    A pilot program based in a freestanding ambulatory surgery center at the Chicago Medical School Department of Surgery is described, its curriculum outlined, and the daily activities of the residents and medical students are detailed. A brief history of ambulatory surgery is given. (Author/MLW)

  15. Applying to plastic surgery residency: factors associated with medical student career choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Arin K; May, James W

    2008-03-01

    Applications to plastic surgery residency increased 34 percent from 2002 to 2005, despite decreasing applications to other surgical subspecialties. During this period, medical education, reimbursement, work hours, and media coverage have changed. To determine factors responsible for rising applications to plastic surgery residencies, medical student applicants to plastic surgery residencies for 2005 were surveyed. Applicants recorded exposure to plastic surgery during medical school and graded the influence of personality, lifestyle, income potential, and media coverage on their decision to choose plastic surgery training. To further study the effects of plastic surgery exposure on career choice, the percentage of graduating students applying to plastic surgery residency was compared between medical schools with and without plastic surgery training programs. Medical schools that provided greater exposure to plastic surgery and schools with plastic surgery training programs had a higher percentage of graduates applying to plastic surgery residency (p personality of plastic surgeons as a significant factor in their career choice. Lifestyle and income potential were moderately important, whereas media coverage minimally affected career decision. Applicants typically decided on a plastic surgical career during the third year of medical school. Medical student exposure to plastic surgery is the most influential factor in a student's decision to pursue a career in plastic surgery. To continue the increasing applicant trend toward plastic surgery, plastic surgeon engagement of medical students should be emphasized, ideally before the third year of medical school.

  16. Measuring general surgery residents' communication skills from the patient's perspective using the Communication Assessment Tool (CAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stausmire, Julie M; Cashen, Constance P; Myerholtz, Linda; Buderer, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The Communication Assessment Tool (CAT) has been used and validated to assess Family and Emergency Medicine resident communication skills from the patient's perspective. However, it has not been previously reported as an outcome measure for general surgery residents. The purpose of this study is to establish initial benchmarking data for the use of the CAT as an evaluation tool in an osteopathic general surgery residency program. Results are analyzed quarterly and used by the program director to provide meaningful feedback and targeted goal setting for residents to demonstrate progressive achievement of interpersonal and communication skills with patients. The 14-item paper version of the CAT (developed by Makoul et al. for residency programs) asks patients to anonymously rate surgery residents on discrete communication skills using a 5-point rating scale immediately after the clinical encounter. Results are reported as the percentage of items rated as "excellent" (5) by the patient. The setting is a hospital-affiliated ambulatory urban surgery office staffed by the residency program. Participants are representative of adult patients of both sexes across all ages with diverse ethnic backgrounds. They include preoperative and postoperative patients, as well as those needing diagnostic testing and follow-up. Data have been collected on 17 general surgery residents from a single residency program representing 5 postgraduate year levels and 448 patient encounters since March 2012. The reliability (Cronbach α) of the tool for surgery residents was 0.98. The overall mean percentage of items rated as excellent was 70% (standard deviations = 42%), with a median of 100%. The CAT is a useful tool for measuring 1 facet of resident communication skills-the patient's perception of the physician-patient encounter. The tool provides a unique and personalized outcome measure for identifying communication strengths and improvement opportunities, allowing residents to receive

  17. The General Surgery Chief Resident Operative Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Horvath, Karen D.; Goldin, Adam B.; Gow, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The chief resident (CR) year is a pivotal experience in surgical training. Changes in case volume and diversity may impact the educational quality of this important year. OBJECTIVE To evaluate changes in operative experience for general surgery CRs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Review of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs from 1989–1990 through 2011–2012 divided into 5 periods. Graduates in period 3 were the last to train with unrestricted work hours; those in period 4 were part of a transition period and trained under both systems; and those in period 5 trained fully under the 80-hour work week. Diversity of cases was assessed based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education defined categories. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Total cases and defined categories were evaluated for changes over time. RESULTS The average total CR case numbers have fallen (271 in period 1 vs 242 in period 5, P surgery training may be jeopardized by reduced case diversity. Chief resident cases are crucial in surgical training and educators should consider these findings as surgical training evolves. PMID:23864049

  18. Innovation in Pediatric Surgical Education for General Surgery Residents: A Mobile Web Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouch, Joshua D; Wagner, Justin P; Scott, Andrew; Sullins, Veronica F; Chen, David C; DeUgarte, Daniel A; Shew, Stephen B; Tillou, Areti; Dunn, James C Y; Lee, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    General surgery residents lack a standardized educational experience in pediatric surgery. We hypothesized that the development of a mobile educational interface would provide general surgery residents broader access to pediatric surgical education materials. We created an educational mobile website for general surgery residents rotating on pediatric surgery, which included a curriculum, multimedia resources, the Operative Performance Rating Scale (OPRS), and Twitter functionality. Residents were instructed to consult the curriculum. Residents and faculty posted media using the Twitter hashtag, #UCLAPedSurg, and following each surgical procedure reviewed performance via the OPRS. Site visits, Twitter posts, and OPRS submissions were quantified from September 2013 to July 2014. The pediatric surgery mobile website received 257 hits; 108 to the homepage, 107 to multimedia, 28 to the syllabus, and 19 to the OPRS. All eligible residents accessed the content. The Twitter hashtag, #UCLAPedSurg, was assigned to 20 posts; the overall audience reach was 85 individuals. Participants in the mobile OPRS included 11 general surgery residents and 4 pediatric surgery faculty. Pediatric surgical education resources and operative performance evaluations are effectively administered to general surgery residents via a structured mobile platform. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Plastic Surgery Residents' Understanding and Attitudes Toward Biostatistics: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarla, Srinivas M; Lifchez, Scott D; Losee, Joseph; Hultman, Charles Scott; Redett, Richard J

    2016-08-01

    An understanding of biostatistics is a critical skill for the practicing plastic surgeon. The purpose of the present study was to assess plastic surgery residents' attitudes and understanding of biostatistics. This was a cross-sectional study of plastic surgery residents. A survey assessing resident attitudes regarding biostatistics, confidence with biostatistical concepts, and objective knowledge of biostatistics was distributed electronically to trainees in plastic surgery programs in the United States. Bivariate and regression analyses were used to identify significant associations and adjust for confounders/effect modifiers. One hundred twenty-three residents responded to the survey (12.3% response rate). Respondents expressed positive attitudes regarding biostatistics in plastic surgery practice, but only moderate levels of confidence with various biostatistical concepts. Both attitudes and confidence were positively associated with the number of plastic surgery journals read monthly and formal coursework in biostatistics (P biostatistics in the practice of plastic surgery but have only a fair understanding of core statistical concepts.

  20. Canadian vascular surgery residents' perceptions regarding future job opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Joel A; Dubois, Luc; Power, Adam H; DeRose, Guy; MacKenzie, Kent S; Forbes, Thomas L

    2015-06-01

    The objective was to determine the employment environment for graduates of Canadian vascular surgery training programs. A cross-sectional survey of residents and graduates (2011-2012) was used. Thirty-seven residents were invited with a response rate of 57%, and 14 graduates with a response rate of 71%; 70% of graduates felt the job market played an important role in their decision to pursue vascular surgery as a career compared to 43% of trainees. The top three concerns were the lack of surgeons retiring, the overproduction of trainees, and saturation of the job market. The majority (62%) of trainees see themselves extending their training due to lack of employment. All of the graduates obtained employment, with 50% during their second year (of two years) of training and 30% after training was completed. Graduates spent an average of 12 ± 10.6 months seeking a position and applied to 3.3 ± 1.5 positions, with a mean of 1.9 ± 1.3 interviews and 2 ± 1.2 offers. There was a discrepancy between the favorable employment climate experienced by graduates and the pessimistic outlook of trainees. We must be progressive in balancing the employment opportunities with the number of graduates. Number and timing of job offers is a possible future metric of the optimal number of residents.

  1. Incorporating resident research into the dermatology residency program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner RF Jr

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Richard F Wagner Jr, Sharon S Raimer, Brent C Kelly Department of Dermatology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA Abstract: Programmatic changes for the dermatology residency program at The University of Texas Medical Branch were first introduced in 2005, with the faculty goal incorporating formal dermatology research projects into the 3-year postgraduate training period. This curriculum initially developed as a recommendation for voluntary scholarly project activity by residents, but it evolved into a program requirement for all residents in 2009. Departmental support for this activity includes assignment of a faculty mentor with similar interest about the research topic, financial support from the department for needed supplies, materials, and statistical consultation with the Office of Biostatistics for study design and data analysis, a 2-week elective that provides protected time from clinical activities for the purpose of preparing research for publication and submission to a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a departmental award in recognition for the best resident scholarly project each year. Since the inception of this program, five classes have graduated a total of 16 residents. Ten residents submitted their research studies for peer review and published their scholarly projects in seven dermatology journals through the current academic year. These articles included three prospective investigations, three surveys, one article related to dermatology education, one retrospective chart review, one case series, and one article about dermatopathology. An additional article from a 2012 graduate about dermatology education has also been submitted to a journal. This new program for residents was adapted from our historically successful Dermatology Honors Research Program for medical students at The University of Texas Medical Branch. Our experience with this academic initiative to promote dermatology research by

  2. A strategic approach to quality improvement and patient safety education and resident integration in a general surgery residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Heron, Colette T; Jarman, Benjamin T

    2014-01-01

    To outline a structured approach for general surgery resident integration into institutional quality improvement and patient safety education and development. A strategic plan to address Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Clinical Learning Environment Review assessments for resident integration into Quality Improvement and Patient Safety initiatives is described. Gundersen Lutheran Medical Foundation is an independent academic medical center graduating three categorical residents per year within an integrated multi-specialty health system serving 19 counties over 3 states. The quality improvement and patient safety education program includes a formal lecture series, online didactic sessions, mandatory quality improvement or patient safety projects, institutional committee membership, an opportunity to serve as a designated American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project and Quality in Training representative, mandatory morbidity and mortality conference attendance and clinical electives in rural surgery and international settings. Structured education regarding and participation in quality improvement and patient safety programs are able to be accomplished during general surgery residency. The long-term outcomes and benefits of these strategies are unknown at this time and will be difficult to measure with objective data. © 2013 Published by Association of Program Directors in Surgery on behalf of Association of Program Directors in Surgery.

  3. The Tsao Fellowship in Global Health: A Model for International Fellowships in a Surgery Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Caroline A; Taro, Trisa B; Wipfli, Heather L; Ly, Stephanie; Gillenwater, Justin T; Costa, Melinda A; Gutierrez, Ricardo D; Magee, William

    2016-03-01

    To present a model for integrated global health fellowships in plastic surgical residency training. National surveys have found that North American surgical residents have significant interest in international training. While global health training opportunities exist, less than a third of these are housed within surgical residency programs; even fewer are designed specifically for plastic surgery residents. The Tsao Fellowship was created through a partnership between Operation Smile, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Shriners Hospital for Children, and the University of Southern California. Designed for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accredited plastic surgery residents between their third and fourth years of residency, the fellowship curriculum is completed over 24 months and divided into 3 areas: clinical research, international reconstructive surgery fieldwork, and the completion of a Master of Science in Clinical and Biomedical Investigations. The Tsao Fellowship has matriculated 4 fellows: 3 have graduated from the program and 1 is in the current cycle. Fellows completed 4 to 7 international missions each cycle and have performed an aggregate total of 684 surgical procedures. Each fellow also conducted 2 to 6 research projects and authored several publications. All fellows continue to assume leadership roles within the field of global reconstructive surgery. Comprehensive global health fellowships provide invaluable opportunities beyond surgical residency. The Tsao Fellowship is a model for integrating international surgical training with global health research in plastic surgical residency that can be applied to other residency programs and different surgical specialties.

  4. The benefits of international rotations to resource-limited settings for U.S. surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Jaymie A; Groen, Reinou S; Price, Raymond R; Nwomeh, Benedict C; Kingham, T Peter; Hardy, Mark A; Kushner, Adam L

    2013-04-01

    U.S. surgery residents increasingly are interested in international experiences. Recently, the Residency Review Committee approved international surgery rotations for credit toward graduation. Despite this growing interest, few U.S. surgery residency programs offer formal international rotations. We aimed to present the benefits of international surgery rotations and how these rotations contribute to the attainment of the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies. An e-mail-based survey was sent in November 2011 to the 188 members of Surgeons OverSeas, a group of surgeons, residents, fellows, and medical students with experience working in resource-limited settings. They were asked to list 5 benefits of international rotations for surgery residents. The frequency of benefits was qualitatively grouped into 4 major categories: educational, personal, benefits to the foreign institution/Global Surgery, and benefits to the home institution. The themes were correlated with the 6 ACGME competencies. The 58 respondents (31% response rate) provided a total of 295 responses. Fifty themes were identified. Top benefits included learning to optimally function with limited resources, exposure to a wide variety of operative pathology, exposure to a foreign culture, and forming relationships with local counterparts. All ACGME competencies were covered by the themes. International surgery rotations to locations in which resources are constrained, operative diseases vary, and patient diversity abound provide unique opportunities for surgery residents to attain the 6 ACGME competencies. General surgery residency programs should be encouraged to establish formal international rotations as part of surgery training to promote resident education and assist with necessary oversight. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Opioid Prescribing Education in Surgical Residencies: A Program Director Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorkgitis, Brian K; Bryant, Elizabeth; Raygor, Desiree; Brat, Gabriel; Smink, Douglas S; Crandall, Marie

    2017-09-04

    Opioid abuse and misuse is a public health crisis. A national effort to reduce this phenomenon is ongoing. Residents represent a large pool of opioid prescribers but, are often not the target for opioid prescribing education (OPE). We developed a survey to assess current opioid prescribing practices and education among surgical residents. An Institutional Review Board and Association of Program Directors in Surgery approved survey was electronically mailed to surgical program directors (PDs). The survey included questions regarding residency type, location, number of graduates per year, perceived value of OPE, residency policy on prescribing outpatients controlled substances, presence of OPE, and preferred method of OPE. A total of 248 PDs were e-mailed the survey with 110 complete responses (44.4%). Of all 104 (94.5%) allow residents to prescribe outpatient opioids with 24 (23.1%) limiting the opioid class prescribed. A total of 29 (27.9%) programs require residents to obtain their own Drug Enforcement Administration registration. Only 22 (20.0%) programs had in place mandatory OPE, 7 (6.4%) PDs were unsure if OPE was a mandatory educational requirement. Furthermore, 70 (79.5%) of programs currently without OPE are considering adding it. Didactic lecture (18, 81.8%) is the most common modality for OPE. The mode time dedicated to OPE was 1 hour. When PDs were asked about which method would be best to deliver OPE, the most common response was case-based scenarios (39, 35.5%). Bivariate statistics were performed and no association was found between OPE and program characteristics'. Most surgical residency programs allow residents to prescribe outpatient opioids, very few require OPE. The most common method of OPE was didactic lectures. To enhance a resident's knowledge in prescribing opioids, programs should incorporate OPE into their curriculum. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Training general surgery residents in pediatric surgery: educational value vs time and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Steven L; Sydorak, Roman M; Applebaum, Harry

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the educational value of pediatric surgery rotations, the likelihood of performing pediatric operations upon completing general surgery (GS) residency, and time and cost of training GS residents in pediatric surgery. A survey was administered to GS residents that evaluated the pediatric surgery rotation and anticipated practice intentions. A retrospective analysis (2005-2006) of operative times for unilateral inguinal hernia repair, bilateral inguinal hernia repair, and umbilical hernia repair was also performed. Procedure times were compared for operations performed by a pediatric surgeon with and without GS residents. Cost analysis was based on time differences. General surgery residents (n = 19) considered the pediatric surgery rotation to have high educational value (4.7 +/- 0.6 of 5) with extensive teaching (4.6 +/- 0.7) and operative experience (4.4 +/- 0.8). Residents listed pediatric surgery exposure, operative technique, and observed work ethic as most valuable. Upon graduation, residents expect to perform pediatric operations 2 to 3 times annually. Thirty-seven percent of residents felt competent to perform appendectomy (patients >5 years), 32% appendectomy (3-5 years), 21% gastrostomy (>1 year), and 11% inguinal herniorrhaphy (>1 year). Operative times and costs were significantly higher in operative procedures performed with a GS resident. General surgery residents considered pediatric surgery as a valuable educational experience. Residents anticipate performing pediatric operations a few times annually. Training GS residents in pediatric surgery increased operative time and cost. This information may be useful in determining the appropriate setting for resident education as well as budget planning for pediatric surgical practices.

  7. [Oral and maxillofacial surgery residency training in the United States: what can we learn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y F

    2017-04-09

    China is currently in the process of establishing formal residency training programs in oral and maxillofacial surgery and other medical and dental specialties. Regulatory agencies, and educational and academic institutions in China are exploring mechanisms, goals and standards of residency training that meet the needs of the Chinese healthcare system. This article provides an introduction of residency training in oral and maxillofacial surgery in the United States, with emphasis on the accreditation standard by the Commission on Dental Accreditation. As there are fundamental differences in the medical and dental education systems between China and United States, the training standards in the United States may not be entirely applicable in China. A competency-based training model that focus on overall competencies in medical knowledge, clinical skills and values at the time of graduation should be taken into consideration in a Chinese residency training program in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  8. Patients' attitude towards residents' participation during gynaecological surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Marco A. C.; van der Linden, Paul J. Q.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate patients' attitude towards participation of residents in training in gynaecological surgery and patients understanding of resident position. Study design: An observational survey study was performed between July and February 2007-2008 in an outpatient clinic of a department of

  9. Patients' attitude towards residents' participation during gynaecological surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Marco A. C.; van der Linden, Paul J. Q.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate patients' attitude towards participation of residents in training in gynaecological surgery and patients understanding of resident position. Study design: An observational survey study was performed between July and February 2007-2008 in an outpatient clinic of a department of

  10. Expansion of the coordinator role in orthopaedic residency program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Richard E; Murphy, Laurie A; Murphy, James E

    2008-03-01

    The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME) Data Accreditation System indicates 124 of 152 orthopaedic surgery residency program directors have 5 or fewer years of tenure. The qualifications and responsibilities of the position based on the requirements of orthopaedic surgery residency programs, the institutions that support them, and the ACGME Outcome Project have evolved the role of the program coordinator from clerical to managerial. To fill the void of information on the coordinators' expanding roles and responsibilities, the 2006 Association of Residency Coordinators in Orthopaedic Surgery (ARCOS) Career survey was designed and distributed to 152 program coordinators in the United States. We had a 39.5% response rate for the survey, which indicated a high level of day-to-day managerial oversight of all aspects of the residency program; additional responsibilities for other department or division functions for fellows, rotating medical students, continuing medical education of the faculty; and miscellaneous business functions. Although there has been expansion of the role of the program coordinator, challenges exist in job congruence and position reclassification. We believe use of professional groups such as ARCOS and certification of program coordinators should be supported and encouraged.

  11. MIS training in Canada: a national survey of general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Alia; Vergis, Ashley; Jimenez, Carolina; Green, Jessica; Pryor, Aurora; Schlachta, Christopher M; Okrainec, Allan

    2011-09-01

    General surgery trainees' perceptions regarding their own laparoscopic training remain poorly defined. The objective of this survey was to identify and evaluate learner experiences with laparoscopic procedures in general surgery programs on a national level. Two hundred eighty-four residents were identified and contacted at English-speaking general surgery programs across Canada. Each was asked to complete a web- or paper-based survey regarding their demographics, experiences with basic and advanced minimally invasive surgery (MIS) procedures, and perceived barriers to training. Two hundred fifty-two of 284 (89%) surveyed residents responded. Eighty-seven percent of the residents had access to a skills lab that taught MIS techniques; however, standardized MIS curricula were implemented 53% of the time. Eighty percent of residents felt that skills lab training translated to improved performance in the OR. Although 90% of residents felt that they would be comfortable performing basic laparoscopic procedures, only 8% stated they would be comfortable performing advanced procedures at the end of their training. Moreover, 90% of general surgery residents felt that it was the academic surgical department's responsibility to teach both basic and advanced procedures, and 35% of respondents felt their surgical program was meeting this requirement. Half of the residents felt they had limited opportunity to be a primary surgeon because an MIS fellow was present. There exists a wide disparity between the expectations of residents and their actual experience. The majority of residents are concerned that they will not acquire sufficient laparoscopic skills during their training to perform advanced cases in practice. Additionally, the balance between resident and fellow-level cases needs to be more clearly defined as the majority of respondents identified the presence of a MIS fellow as a negative learning influence. Finally, although most centers had a surgical skills lab, 47% of

  12. [Surgery training of gynecologic residents: master and student in the operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathat, G; Hoa, D; Gagnayre, R; Hoffet, M; Mares, P

    2008-02-01

    Describe the surgical training of gynecologic residents in the operating room, by collecting the opinion of French gynecologists. A questionnaire investigating this subject was put on a web site. Every French gynecologist could answer the questionnaire from a duration of six months. The data of the inquiry were studied by comparing five groups: residents (group 1), fellows (group 2), seniors of public hospital (group 3), and seniors of private hospitals (group 4), or, groups 2, 3 and 4 together, as Group A. Six hundred and fifty-seven gynecologists answered the inquiry. For the residents, lack of time and senior's weak educational motivation are the explanations most frequently retained in order to explain that residents do not operate. For group A, it is rather the residents' skills which is the most important fact to have residents operate. Residents more often practice surgery in general public hospital that in faculty hospital. For 31% of all the referees, heads of departments do not incite their teams to have residents operate. Nearly 25% of all the investigated believe that a man operates more than a woman in resident curriculum. Besides, by analyzing the answers of groups 1 and 2, we were able to correlate resident seniority at their first practice of 13 surgical operations. For 26% of the group A, residents operate less than they do during their own studies. Finally, all the investigated confirm the lack of surgical assessment in the resident curriculum. Decision to let the resident operate remains too dependent on senior personal appreciation and does not seem to join a strategy of training. Opinions of surgical training in the operating room is different between residents and seniors. Operating time increases when residents operate but there is no effect on quality of care. These results show again the necessity of a formal teaching and assessment, in a resident program with objectives, collecting every resident's surgery volume. These educational

  13. Global health training in pediatric residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Brett D; Lee, Anne Cc; Newby, P K; Chamberlin, M Robert; Huang, Chi-Cheng

    2008-07-01

    Our goal was to describe current resident interest, participation, curricula, resources, and obstacles related to global health training within pediatric residency programs. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of the 201 accredited pediatric residency programs in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Caribbean from October 2006 to January 2007. Survey topics included resident interest and participation in electives, training opportunities, program support, and educational curricular content related to global health. Of the 201 surveyed pediatric residency programs, 106 (53%) responded. Fifteen percent of responding programs reported that a majority of their residents were interested in global health. Fifty-two percent offered a global health elective within the previous year, and 47% had formally incorporated global health into their training curricula. Six percent of the programs reported a formalized track or certificate in global health. The median number of residents per program participating in global health electives within the previous year was 0 during postgraduate year 1, 1 during postgraduate year 2, and 2 during postgraduate year 3. The median number of all residents per program participating in a global health elective in the previous year was 3 (7.4% of program size). Among programs that offered a global health elective, support to participating residents included prerequisite clinical training (36%), cultural orientation (36%), language training (15%), faculty mentorship (82%), and post-elective debriefing (77%). Fourteen percent of the programs provided full funding for resident electives. Characteristics of pediatric residency programs that were significantly associated with higher resident participation in a global health elective were larger program size, university affiliation, greater reported resident interest, and faculty involvement in global health. More than half of the pediatric residency programs surveyed offered a global health

  14. History of Argentine surgery, abaut general surgery residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jankilevich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This work, as its title indicates, is targeted to young general surgery residents, who have been kind enough to open their journal for this collaboration. A gesture that I appreciate and I’ll try to give back narrating some facts of the first century of our independence. The story starts a few decades before 1810, especially with the institution of the Viceroyalty of Rio de la Plata, and ends at 1880, when indigenous peoples are submited, traditional estate, the gaucho gerrillas and the last caudillos (the pattern and the National Guards pawns are extinguished, agriculture and industry develops, the railroad replaces the wagons, is mass immigration and techniques of exploitation of natural resources strengthens social and economic structure, policy that starts the National Organization bequeathed to us Eighty generation. Two figures are presented as conclusion and synthesis of this period and serve as a bridge that starts from 1880: Francisco Javier Muñiz and Manuel Augusto Montes de Oca. The first such example of a surgeon in the wars of independence, internal frontier garrisons, the vicissitudes of the early university studies and creative work in the solitude of the peoples of campaign not only providing a commendable assistance but researching and discovering the first indigenous smallpox vaccine, rectifying errors jennerianos concept of cows pox disease of horses were infected, combating epidemics and initiating scientific research, natural sciences and producing valued communications throughout the world, as in the case of Darwin himself, who makes the research Muñiz as one of the foundations of his theory of evolution of species. The second: Montes de Oca, is the archetype and the teacher of those surgeons of the eighties generation. He gather in his person a more advanced knowledge and understanding of their subject, son of exile and disagreements before the national organization, contact to Europe, but attached to the reality of

  15. Leadership and business education in orthopaedic residency training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesau, Carter D; Heim, Kathryn A; Parekh, Selene G

    2011-01-01

    Leadership and business challenges have become increasingly present in the practice of medicine. Orthopaedic residency programs are at the forefront of educating and preparing orthopaedic surgeons. This study attempts to quantify the number of orthopaedic residency programs in the United States that include leadership or business topics in resident education program and to determine which topics are being taught and rate the importance of various leadership characteristics and business topics. A survey was sent to all orthopaedic department chairpersons and residency program directors in the United States via e-mail. The survey responses were collected using a survey collection website. The respondents rated the importance of leadership training for residents as somewhat important. The quality of character, integrity, and honesty received the highest average rating among 19 different qualities of good leaders in orthopaedics. The inclusion of business training in resident education was also rated as somewhat important. The topic of billing and coding received the highest average rating among 14 different orthopaedically relevant business topics. A variety of topics beyond the scope of clinical practice must be included in orthopaedic residency educational curricula. The decreased participation of newly trained orthopaedic surgeons in leadership positions and national and state orthopaedic organizations is concerning for the future of orthopaedic surgery. Increased inclusion of leadership and business training in resident education is important to better prepare trainees for the future.

  16. International plastic surgery missions: a framework for resident education using the CanMEDS competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Colin P; Lecours, Catherine; Bortoluzzi, Patricia; Caouette-Laberge, Louise; Ying, Yvonne

    2013-10-01

    Residency education has shifted over the past decade in an attempt to graduate well-rounded physicians. There is a recognition that a physician's abilities must extend beyond medical knowledge. The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada introduced the CanMEDS physician competency framework in 2005. The framework provides 7 areas of competencies that are aimed at providing improved patient care. These competencies are medical expert, communicator, collaborator, manager, health advocate, scholar, and professional. Teaching and evaluating many of these competencies is often challenging for residency training programs. We believe that international surgical missions provide a prime opportunity to teach and evaluate all CanMEDS' roles.Plastic surgery is a field with many different organizations involved in international surgery. Many plastic surgery training programs offer opportunities for residents to become involved in these international surgical missions. Through these trips, residents gain surgical experience, see a variety and volume of clinical cases, and have the opportunity to travel to a foreign country and experience different cultures. We believe that international plastic surgery surgical missions also provide an exceptional micro environment for the teaching of CanMEDS roles. Using examples from residents' personal experiences on international plastic surgery missions to China, Mali, and Cambodia, we describe the benefits of these missions in transferring the CanMEDS competencies to resident training.

  17. The effects of the addition of a pediatric surgery fellow on the operative experience of the general surgery resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Alexander; Garwe, Tabitha; Adeseye, Ademola; Ruiz-Elizalde, Alejandro; Churchill, Warren; Tuggle, David; Mantor, Cameron; Lees, Jason

    2015-06-01

    Adding fellows to surgical departments with residency programs can affect resident education. Our specific aim was to evaluate the effect of adding a pediatric surgery (PS) fellow on the number of index PS cases logged by the general surgery (GS) residents. At a single institution with both PS and GS programs, we examined the number of logged cases for the fellows and residents over 10 years [5 years before (Time 1) and 5 years after (Time 2) the addition of a PS fellow]. Additionally, the procedure related relative value units (RVUs) recorded by the faculty were evaluated. The fellows averaged 752 and 703 cases during Times 1 and 2, respectively, decreasing by 49 (P = 0.2303). The residents averaged 172 and 161 cases annually during Time 1 and Time 2, respectively, decreasing by 11 (P = 0.7340). The total number of procedure related RVUs was 4627 and 6000 during Times 1 and 2, respectively. The number of cases logged by the PS fellows and GS residents decreased after the addition of a PS fellow; however, the decrease was not significant. Programs can reasonably add an additional PS fellow, but care should be taken especially in programs that are otherwise static in size.

  18. Outcome-based residency education: teaching and evaluating the core competencies in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Gregory N; Basu, C Bob; Leong, Mimi; Mateo, Carol; Hollier, Larry H; Stal, Samuel

    2008-06-01

    Through its oversight of residency education in the United States, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has mandated new structural changes in resident education with its newly created core competencies and an emphasis on outcomes-based education. These core competencies represent the central areas in which the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education believes a plastic surgery resident should receive adequate and appropriate education and training. In addition, as part of this outcomes-based education, residents are to be evaluated on their level of mastery in these core competencies. Increasingly, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education will assess the ability of residency programs to integrate the teaching and evaluating of the core competencies in their accreditation process of plastic surgery residency programs. This shift in residency evaluation initiated by the Outcomes Project by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education will have a significant impact in how plastic surgery residents are taught and, as importantly, evaluated in the coming years. The objectives of this work were as follows: (1) to outline the different methods available to foster a core competency-based plastic surgery training curriculum and (2) to serve as a primer to help both full-time academic and clinical faculty to further develop their curriculum to successfully teach and constructively evaluate their residents in the core competencies in accordance with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education guidelines. At the conclusion of this review, the reader should have a better understanding of what is necessary to formulate and help foster a plastic surgery core competency curriculum, particularly with an emphasis on the contemporary methods used for outcomes evaluations.

  19. Quality Improvement in Otolaryngology Residency: Survey of Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowe, Sarah N

    2016-02-01

    The Clinical Learning Environment Review focuses on the responsibility of the sponsoring institution for quality and patient safety. Very little information is known regarding the status of quality improvement (QI) education during otolaryngology training. The purpose of this survey is to evaluate the extent of resident and faculty participation in QI and identify opportunities for both resident curriculum and faculty development. Cross-sectional survey A 15-item survey was distributed to all 106 otolaryngology program directors. The survey was developed after an informal review of the literature regarding education in QI and patient safety. Questions were directed at the format and content of the QI curriculum, as well as barriers to implementation. There was a 39% response rate. Ninety percent of responding program directors considered education in QI important or very important to a resident's future success. Only 23% of responding programs contained an educational curriculum in QI, and only 33% monitored residents' individual outcome measures. Barriers to implementation of a QI program included inadequate number of faculty with expertise in QI (75%) and competing resident educational demands (90%). Every program director considered morbidity and mortality conferences as an integral component in QI education. Program directors recognize the importance of QI in otolaryngology practice. Unfortunately, this survey identifies a distinct lack of resources in support of these educational goals. The results highlight the need to generate a comprehensive and stepwise approach to QI for faculty development and resident instruction. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  20. Effect of Doximity Residency Rankings on Residency Applicants’ Program Choices

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    Aimee M. Rolston

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Choosing a residency program is a stressful and important decision. Doximity released residency program rankings by specialty in September 2014. This study sought to investigate the impact of those rankings on residency application choices made by fourth year medical students. Methods: A 12-item survey was administered in October 2014 to fourth year medical students at three schools. Students indicated their specialty, awareness of and perceived accuracy of the rankings, and the rankings’ impact on the programs to which they chose to apply. Descriptive statistics were reported for all students and those applying to Emergency Medicine (EM. Results: A total of 461 (75.8% students responded, with 425 applying in one of the 20 Doximity ranked specialties. Of the 425, 247 (58% were aware of the rankings and 177 looked at them. On a 1-100 scale (100=very accurate, students reported a mean ranking accuracy rating of 56.7 (SD 20.3. Forty-five percent of students who looked at the rankings modified the number of programs to which they applied. The majority added programs. Of the 47 students applying to EM, 18 looked at the rankings and 33% changed their application list with most adding programs. Conclusion: The Doximity rankings had real effects on students applying to residencies as almost half of students who looked at the rankings modified their program list. Additionally, students found the rankings to be moderately accurate. Graduating students might benefit from emphasis on more objective characterization of programs to assess in light of their own interests and personal/career goals

  1. Are Nursing Students Appropriate Partners for the Interdisciplinary Training of Surgery Residents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Ingram, Katherine M; Williams, Kristy H; Bencken, Crystal L; Swiderski, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Interdisciplinary team training in a simulation center recreates clinical team interactions and holds promise in improving teamwork of clinicians by breaking down educational silos. The objective of our study was to assess the appropriateness of interdisciplinary training with general surgery residents and nursing students. Over 2 consecutive academic years (2012-2013 and 2013-2014), general surgery residents participated in interdisciplinary team-training simulation-based sessions with senior nursing students. Scenario objectives included demonstration of appropriate teamwork and communication, and clinical decision making; sessions incorporated interdisciplinary debriefing of the scenarios. Participants were asked to assess their team-training experience and the appropriateness of their team-training partner. Responses were compared. A total of 16 team-training sessions were conducted during the study period. Overall, 12 surgery residents (67%) and 44 nursing students (63%) who had participated in at least 1 session responded to the survey. Although both residents and nursing students indicated that the knowledge and team skills acquired during these sessions were useful to them in clinical practice (73% vs 86%, respectively; p = not significant), residents rated their educational value lower (3.3 vs 4.3 on a 5-point scale, respectively; p nursing students (p nursing students, debriefing (91%), observation of others (68%), and interaction with resident physicians (66%) ranked highest; 48% of student nurses preferred residents as team-training partners whereas 100% residents preferred practicing nurses and 0% with nursing students owing to their limited clinical experience. Interdisciplinary team training and debriefing of surgery residents with nursing students is feasible and highly valued by nursing students. Nevertheless, our experience indicates that residents do not prefer nursing students as team-training partners owing to their limited clinical experience

  2. Best Practices for Robotic Surgery Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Stephanie J; Goldenberg, David; Winder, Joshua S; Juza, Ryan M; Lyn-Sue, Jerome R

    2017-01-01

    Robotic surgical programs are increasing in number. Efficient methods by which to monitor and evaluate robotic surgery teams are needed. Best practices for an academic university medical center were created and instituted in 2009 and continue to the present. These practices have led to programmatic development that has resulted in a process that effectively monitors leadership team members; attending, resident, fellow, and staff training; credentialing; safety metrics; efficiency; and case volume recommendations. Guidelines for hospitals and robotic directors that can be applied to one's own robotic surgical services are included with examples of management of all aspects of a multispecialty robotic surgery program. The use of these best practices will ensure a robotic surgery program that is successful and well positioned for a safe and productive environment for current clinical practice.

  3. Current status of residency training in laparoscopic surgery in Brazil: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nácul, Miguel Prestes; Cavazzola, Leandro Totti; de Melo, Marco Cezário

    2015-01-01

    The surgeon's formation process has changed in recent decades. The increase in medical schools, new specialties and modern technologies induce an overhaul of medical education. Medical residency in surgery has established itself as a key step in the formation of the surgeon, and represents the ideal and natural way for teaching laparoscopy. However, the introduction of laparoscopic surgery in the medical residency programs in surgical specialties is insufficient, creating the need for additional training after its termination. To review the surgical teaching ways used in services that published their results. Survey of relevant publications in books, internet and databases in PubMed, Lilacs and Scielo through july 2014 using the headings: laparoscopy; simulation; education, medical; learning; internship and residency. The training method for medical residency in surgery focused on surgical procedures in patients under supervision, has proven successful in the era of open surgery. However, conceptually turns as a process of experimentation in humans. Psychomotor learning must not be developed directly to the patient. Training in laparoscopic surgery requires the acquisition of psychomotor skills through training conducted initially with surgical simulation. Platforms based teaching problem solving as the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery, developed by the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgery and the Laparoscopic Surgical Skills proposed by the European Society of Endoscopic Surgery has been widely used both for education and for the accreditation of surgeons worldwide. The establishment of a more appropriate pedagogical process for teaching laparoscopic surgery in the medical residency programs is mandatory in order to give a solid surgical education and to determine a structured and safe professional activity.

  4. The ACGME case log: general surgery resident experience in pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Kenneth W; Drake, F Thurston; Aarabi, Shahram; Waldhausen, John H

    2013-08-01

    General surgery (GS) residents in ACGME programs log cases performed during their residency. We reviewed designated pediatric surgery (PS) cases to assess for changes in performed cases over time. The ACGME case logs for graduating GS residents were reviewed from academic year (AY) 1989-1990 to 2010-2011 for designated pediatric cases. Overall and designated PS cases were analyzed. Data were combined into five blocks: Period I (AY1989-90 to AY1993-94), Period II (AY1994-95 to AY1998-99), Period III (AY1999-00 to AY2002-03), Period IV (AY2003-04 to AY2006-07), and Period V (AY2007-08 to AY2010-11). Periods IV and V were delineated by implementation of duty hour restrictions. Student t-tests compared averages among the time periods with significance at P pediatric cases declined for each period from an average of 47.7 in Period I to 33.8 in Period V. These changes are due to a decline in hernia repairs, which account for half of cases. All other cases contributed only minimally to the pediatric cases. The only laparoscopic cases in the database were anti-reflux procedures, which increased over time. GS residents perform a diminishing number of designated PS cases. This decline occurred before the onset of work-hour restrictions. These changes have implications on the capabilities of the current graduating workforce. However, the case log does not reflect all cases trainees may be exposed to, so revision of this list is recommended. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The ACGME case log: General surgery resident experience in pediatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Kenneth W.; Drake, F. Thurston; Aarabi, Shahram; Waldhausen, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Background General surgery (GS) residents in ACGME programs log cases performed during their residency. We reviewed designated pediatric surgery (PS) cases to assess for changes in performed cases over time. Methods The ACGME case logs for graduating GS residents were reviewed from academic year (AY) 1989–1990 to 2010–2011 for designated pediatric cases. Overall and designated PS cases were analyzed. Data were combined into five blocks: Period I (AY1989–90 to AY1993–94), Period II (AY1994–95 to AY1998–99), Period III (AY1999–00 to AY2002–03), Period IV (AY2003–04 to AY2006–07), and Period V (AY2007–08 to AY2010–11). Periods IV and V were delineated by implementation of duty hour restrictions. Student t-tests compared averages among the time periods with significance at P < .05. Results Overall GS case load remained relatively stable. Of total cases, PS cases accounted for 5.4% in Period I and 3.7% in Period V. Designated pediatric cases declined for each period from an average of 47.7 in Period I to 33.8 in Period V. These changes are due to a decline in hernia repairs, which account for half of cases. All other cases contributed only minimally to the pediatric cases. The only laparoscopic cases in the database were anti-reflux procedures, which increased over time. Conclusions GS residents perform a diminishing number of designated PS cases. This decline occurred before the onset of work-hour restrictions. These changes have implications on the capabilities of the current graduating workforce. However, the case log does not reflect all cases trainees may be exposed to, so revision of this list is recommended. PMID:23932601

  6. Residency characteristics that matter most to plastic surgery applicants: a multi-institutional analysis and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinno, Sammy; Mehta, Karan; Squitieri, Lee; Ranganathan, Kavitha; Koeckert, Michael S; Patel, Ashit; Saadeh, Pierre B; Thanik, Vishal

    2015-06-01

    The National Residency Matching Program Match is a very unique process in which applicants and programs are coupled to each other based on a ranking system. Although several studies have assessed features plastic surgery programs look for in applicants, no study in the present plastic surgery literature identifies which residency characteristics are most important to plastic surgery applicants. Therefore, we sought to perform a multi-institutional assessment as to which factors plastic surgery residency applicants consider most important when applying for residency. A validated and anonymous questionnaire containing 37 items regarding various program characteristics was e-mailed to 226 applicants to New York University, Albany, University of Michigan, and University of Southern California plastic surgery residency programs. Applicants were asked to rate each feature on a scale from 1 to 10, with 10 being the most important. The 37 variables were ranked by the sum of the responses. The median rating and interquartile range as well as the mean for each factor was then calculated. A Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare medians in rank order. A total of 137 completed questionnaires were returned, yielding a 61% response rate. The characteristics candidates considered most important were impressions during the interview, experiences during away rotations, importance placed on resident training/support/mentoring by faculty, personal experiences with residents, and the amount of time spent in general surgery. The characteristics candidates considered least important were second-look experiences, compensation/benefits, program reputation from Internet forums, accessibility of program coordinator, opportunity for laboratory research, and fellowship positions available at the program. Applicants value personal contact and time spent in general surgery when selecting residency programs. As the number of integrated programs continues to grow, programs will benefit

  7. Putting "Rural" into Psychiatry Residency Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, William A.; Pomerantz, Andrew; Schwartz, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Evidence indicates disparities in the number of psychiatrists practicing in rural America compared to urban areas suggesting the need for a greater emphasis on rural psychiatry in residency training programs. The authors offer suggestions for integrating a rural focus in psychiatry residency training to foster greater competency and…

  8. The value of resident teaching to improve student perceptions of surgery clerkships and surgical career choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Lorin D; Estes, Norman C; Ash, Jennifer; Meyer, Lynne E

    2006-03-01

    A fundamental function of attending faculty is to teach and mentor medical students, but the benefit of the resident's role is recognized increasingly. Our Standardized Institutional Clinical Clerkship Assessment allows students to rate 27 factors relative to a clinical clerkship. Scores from 1998 to 2005 were used to evaluate our surgical clerkship program and to compare resident and attending teachers. Student surgery career choices also were monitored. Medical students routinely scored residents more highly than attending faculty. Attendings' scores did not improve; however, residents' teaching and overall clerkship scores improved during the study period and paralleled students' increased selection of a surgical career. Students perceived residents as teachers more than attendings. Residents may have significant influence over students' career choice by their teaching and mentoring activities, which benefit attending efforts.

  9. Evaluation of the orthopedic residency training program in Saudi Arabia and comparison with a selected Canadian residency program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Ahaideb A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abdulaziz Al-Ahaideb,1 Hamza M Alrabai,1 Osama A Alrehaili,1 Abdulaziz N Aljurayyan,1 Ranyah M Alsaif,2 Nizar Algarni,1 Hazem M Al-Khawashki,1 Abdulrahman D Algarni1 1Department of Orthopedics, 2Department of Physiotherapy, King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Objective: The primary aim of the present study was to assess the quality of the Saudi Orthopedic Residency Program. Methodology: As a comparator, a cross-sectional survey involving 76 Saudi residents from different training centers in Saudi Arabia namely; Riyadh, Jeddah, Medina, Abha, and Dammam and 15 Canadian. Results: The results showed that Canadian residents read more peer-reviewed, scholarly articles compared with Saudi residents (P=0.002. The primary surgical role for residents was to hold retractors during surgery. The survey respondents strongly supported the ability to recommend removal of incompetent trainers. Saudi trainees were more apprehensive of examinations than Canadian trainees (P<0.0001. Most residents preferred studying multiple-choice questions before examinations. Saudi and Canadian participants considered their programs to be overcrowded. Unlike Canadian participants, Saudi trainees reported an inadequate level of training (P<0.0001. Conclusion: Educational resources should be readily accessible and a mentorship system monitoring residents' progress should be developed. The role of the resident must be clearly defined and resident feedback should not be ignored. Given the importance of mastering basic orthopedic operative skills for residents, meaningful remedial action should be taken with incompetent trainers. Keywords: evaluation, medical education, orthopedic board, residency program, training

  10. Learning styles vary among general surgery residents: analysis of 12 years of data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammen, Joshua M V; Fischer, David R; Anderson, Andrea; James, Laura E; Nussbaum, Michael S; Bower, Robert H; Pritts, Timothy A

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the learning styles of individuals may assist in the tailoring of an educational program to optimize learning. General surgery faculty and residents have been characterized previously as having a tendency toward particular learning styles. We seek to understand better the learning styles of general surgery residents and differences that may exist within the population. The Kolb Learning Style Inventory was administered yearly to general surgery residents at the University of Cincinnati from 1994 to 2006. This tool allows characterization of learning styles into 4 groups: converging, accommodating, assimilating, and diverging. The converging learning style involves education by actively solving problems. The accommodating learning style uses emotion and interpersonal relationships. The assimilating learning style learns by abstract logic. The diverging learning style learns best by observation. Chi-square analysis and analysis of variance were performed to determine significance. Surveys from 1994 to 2006 (91 residents, 325 responses) were analyzed. The prevalent learning style was converging (185, 57%), followed by assimilating (58, 18%), accommodating (44, 14%), and diverging (38, 12%). At the PGY 1 and 2 levels, male and female residents differed in learning style, with the accommodating learning style being relatively more frequent in women and assimilating learning style more frequent in men (Table 1, p learning style did not seem to change with advancing PGY level within the program, which suggests that individual learning styles may be constant throughout residency training. If a resident's learning style changed, it tended to be to converging. In addition, no relation exists between learning style and participation in dedicated basic science training or performance on the ABSIT/SBSE. Our data suggests that learning style differs between male and female general surgery residents but not with PGY level or ABSIT/SBSE performance. A greater

  11. Step-by-step phacoemulsification training program for ophthalmology residents

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    Wang Yulan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim was to analyze the learning curve of phacoemulsification (phaco performed by residents without experience in performing extra-capsular cataract extraction (ECCE in a step-by-step training program (SBSTP. Materials and Methods: Consecutive surgical records of phaco performed from March 2009 to Sept 2011 by four residents without previous ECCE experience were retrospectively reviewed. The completion rate of the first 30 procedures by each resident was calculated. The main intraoperative phaco parameter records for the first 30 surgeries by each resident were compared with those for their last 30 surgeries. Intraoperative complications in the residents′ procedures were also recorded and analyzed. Results: A total of 1013 surgeries were performed by residents. The completion rate for the first 30 phaco procedures was 79.2 μ 5.8%. The main reasons for halting the procedure were as follows: Anterior capsule tear, inability to crack the nucleus, and posterior capsular rupture during phaco or cortex removal. Cumulative dissipated energy of phaco power used during the surgeries was significantly less in the last 30 cases compared with the first 30 cases (30.10 μ 17.58 vs. 55.41 μ 37.59, P = 0.021. Posterior capsular rupture rate was 2.5 μ 1.2% in total (10.8 μ 4.2% in the first 30 cases and 1.7 μ 1.9% in the last 30 cases, P = 0.008; a statistically significant difference. Conclusion:The step-by-step training program might be a necessary process for a resident to transit from dependence to a self-supported operator. It is also an essential middle step between wet lab training to performing the entire phaco procedure on the patient both effectively and safely.

  12. Preparedness of Entering Pediatric Dentistry Residents: Advanced Pediatric Program Directors' and First-Year Residents' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkauskas, John; Seale, N Sue; Casamassimo, Paul; Rutkauskas, John S

    2015-11-01

    For children to receive needed oral health care, adequate training at both the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels of dental education is required, but previous studies have found inadequacies in predoctoral education that lead to general dentists' unwillingness to treat certain young populations. As another way of assessing predoctoral preparation, the aim of this study was to determine the perspectives of first-year residents and pediatric program directors about residents' preparedness to enter advanced education programs in pediatric dentistry. Surveys were sent to all 74 U.S. program directors and 360 first-year residents. The survey focused on procedures related to prevention, behavior management, restorative procedures, pulp therapy, sedation, and surgery, as well as treating patients funded by Medicaid and with special health care needs. Among the first-year residents, 173 surveys were returned for a 48% response rate; 61 directors returned surveys for an 82% response rate. Only half of the residents (55%) reported feeling adequately prepared for their first year in residency; less than half cited adequate preparation to place stainless steel crowns (SSCs) (42%) and perform pulpotomies (45%). Far fewer felt adequately prepared to provide treatment for children six months to three years of age, including examinations (29%), infant oral exams (27%), and children with severe caries (37%). The program directors were even less positive about the adequacy of residents' preparation. Only 17% deemed them adequately prepared to place SSCs and 13% to perform pulpotomies. Approximately half reported their first-year residents were inadequately prepared to treat very young children and children with severe caries (55% each). This study found that the perceived inadequacy of predoctoral education in pediatric dentistry was consistent at both the learner and educator levels, supporting previous studies identifying inadequacies in this area.

  13. Identifying and Eliminating Deficiencies in the General Surgery Resident Core Competency Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Nicole M; Milewicz, Allen; Whitney, Stephen E; Liang, Michael K; Braxton, Carla C

    2014-06-01

    Although the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has defined 6 core competencies required of resident education, no consensus exists on best practices for reaching resident proficiency. Surgery programs must develop resourceful methods to incorporate learning. While patient care and medical knowledge are approached with formal didactics and traditional Halstedian educational formats, other core competencies are presumed to be learned on the job or emphasized in conferences. To test the hypothesis that our residents lack a foundation in several of the nonclinical core competencies and to seek to develop a formal curriculum that can be integrated into our current didactic time, with minimal effect on resident work hours and rest hours. Anonymous Likert-type scale needs assessment survey requesting residents within a large single general surgery residency program to rate their understanding, working knowledge, or level of comfort on the following 10 topics: negotiation and conflict resolution; leadership styles; health care legislation; principles of quality delivery of care, patient safety, and performance improvement; business of medicine; clinical practice models; role of advocacy in health care policy and government; personal finance management; team building; and roles of innovation and technology in health care delivery. Proportions of resident responses scored as positive (agree or strongly agree) or negative (disagree or strongly disagree). In total, 48 surgery residents (70%) responded to the survey. Only 3 topics (leadership styles, team building, and roles of innovation and technology in health care delivery) had greater than 70% positive responses, while 2 topics (negotiation and conflict resolution and principles of quality delivery of care, patient safety, and performance improvement) had greater than 60% positive responses. The remaining topics had less than 40% positive responses, with the least positive responses on the topics

  14. The Chief Resident Role in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafner, John W. Jr., MD, MPH

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Study Objectives: Although other specialties have examined the role of the chief resident (CR, the role and training of the emergency medicine (EM CR has largely been undefined.Methods: A survey was mailed to all EM CRs and their respective program directors (PD in 124 EM residency programs. The survey consisted of questions defining demographics, duties of the typical CR, and opinions regarding the level of support and training received. Multiple choice, Likert scale (1 strong agreement, 5 strong disagreement and short-answer responses were used. We analyzed associations between CR and PD responses using Chi-square, Student’s T and Mann-Whitney U tests.Results: Seventy-six percent of CRs and 65% of PDs responded and were similar except for age (31 vs. 42 years; p<0.001. CR respondents were most often male, in year 3 of training and held the position for 12 months. CRs and PDs agreed that the assigned level of responsibility is appropriate (2.63 vs. 2.73, p=0.15; but CRs underestimate their influence in the residency program (1.94 vs. 2.34, p=0.002 and the emergency department (2.61 vs. 3.03, p=0.002. The majority of CRs (70% and PDs (77% report participating in an extramural training program, and those CRs who participated in training felt more prepared for their job duties (2.26 vs. 2.73; p=0.03.Conclusion: EM CRs feel they have appropriate job responsibility but believe they are less influential in program and department administration than PD respondents. Extramural training programs for incoming CRs are widely used and felt to be helpful. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:120-125.

  15. Orthopedic Surgery Resident Debt Load and Its Effect on Career Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joey P; Cassidy, Dale B; Tofte, Josef N; Bariteau, Jason T; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-05-01

    Student loan debt has become a topic of discussion and debate among physicians and legislators. This study seeks to assess the level of debt of orthopedic surgery residents and to determine whether debt burden affects the career choice of orthopedic trainees. A 26-question, anonymous survey was distributed via email to resident trainees enrolled in different medical and surgical specialty training programs across the United States. Orthopedic trainees were compared with trainees in other specialties using comparative statistics. Of the approximately 13,503 residents who were sent the survey, a total of 3076 responded, including 167 of an estimated 580 orthopedic residents, for approximate response rates of 22.8% and 28.8%, respectively. On average, orthopedic surgery residents were at a later post-graduate year than overall respondents (Porthopedic surgery residents (57.21% vs 49.08%, respectively; P=.041). More than 50% of all respondents agreed that student loan debt would affect their type or location of practice. The majority of orthopedic residents take student loan debt into consideration when determining their final location and type of practice, although less so for orthopedic trainees compared with other specialties. As medical education continues to become more expensive and the threat of dropping physician reimbursement looms on the horizon, student debt may become a primary driving factor for young American physicians' career plans. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e438-e443.].

  16. Impact of pharmaceutical company representatives on internal medicine residency programs. A survey of residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichstein, P R; Turner, R C; O'Brien, K

    1992-05-01

    To survey internal medicine residency program directors regarding interactions between their residents and pharmaceutical company (PC) representatives (PCRs) a questionnaire was sent to the directors of all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved internal medicine residency programs. The survey included 444 program directors, of whom 272 (61.16%) responded. The majority of program directors, 228 (83.8%), allowed PCRs to meet with residents during working hours and 241 (88.6%) permitted PC sponsorship of conferences. About half of the program directors were "moderately" or "very" concerned about the potential adverse effects of PC marketing on resident attitudes and prescribing practices. Seventy percent "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that the benefits of PC sponsorship outweigh the adverse effects and 41.5% believed that refusal to allow PCRs to meet with residents would jeopardize PC funding of other departmental activities. Most program directors reported that alternate funds for conferences were available if PC support was withdrawn. "Unethical" marketing activities were observed by 14.3% of program directors and 37.5% reported that residents had participated in PC-sponsored trips during the 3 years prior to the survey. At the time of this survey, only 35.3% of programs had developed formal policies regulating PCR activities and 25.7% provided residents with formal instruction on marketing issues. Knowledge of the current extent of PCR interactions with residents may be helpful to program directors in developing policies regulating PC-marketing activities.

  17. Coping with disaster: relocating a residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlay, Lydia A; Searle, Nancy S; Gitlin, Melvin C

    2007-08-01

    In September 2005, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the Tulane University School of Medicine relocated temporarily from New Orleans to the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. For Tulane's residency program in anesthesiology, a training consortium was formed in Texas consisting of the University of Texas at Houston, Baylor College of Medicine, the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. The authors explain the collaborative process that allowed the consortium to find spaces to accommodate Tulane's 30 anesthesiology residents within 30 days after they left New Orleans, and they offer reflections and recommendations. The residents were grateful to continue training close to home, and for maintaining the Tulane program. The consortium successfully provided an administrative and academic framework, logistical support, clinical capacity for the residents to complete the required numbers and types of cases, and integration into preexisting didactic programs. Communications represented a major challenge; the importance of having an up-to-date disaster plan, including provisions for communication using more than one modality or provider, cannot be underestimated. Other challenges included resuming a training program without basic information regarding medical credentials or training status, competing for resources with businesses that had also relocated, maintaining a coordinated decision-making process, and managing the behavioral sequelae after the disaster. Of the original 30 Tulane residents, 23 (77%) relocated to Houston. Seventeen (74%) of those who relocated either graduated or returned with the program to New Orleans. The program has retained its status of full accreditation.

  18. The evolution of racial, ethnic, and gender diversity in US otolaryngology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joseph S; Young, Meredith; Velly, Ana M; Nguyen, Lily H P

    2013-07-01

    To examine the evolution of racial, ethnic, and gender diversity in US otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residency programs and compare these figures with other residency programs. Retrospective database review. US residency programs. Information concerning minority and female representation in US residency programs was obtained from annually published graduate medical education reports by the Journal of the American Medical Association from 1975 to 2010. Minority representation among US population and university students was obtained from the US Census Bureau. The racial, ethnic, and gender diversity of otolaryngology residents was then compared with other medical fields (general surgery, family medicine, and internal medicine). Underrepresentation in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery is particularly disconcerting for African Americans (-2.3%/y, P = .09) and Native Americans (1.5%/y, P = .11) given their nonsignificant annual growth rates. Hispanic representation (17.3%/y, P otolaryngology but is half the rate of growth of the Hispanic American population (32.8%/y, P otolaryngology residents. Despite increasing gender, ethnic, and racial diversity among medical residents in general, female and certain minority group representation in US otolaryngology residency programs is lagging. These findings are in contrast to rising trends of diversity within other residency programs including general surgery.

  19. General Surgery Resident Vascular Operative Experience in the Era of Endovascular Surgery and Vascular Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huan; Maximus, Steven; Kim, Jerry J; Smith, Brian; Kim, Dennis; Koopmann, Matthew; DeVirgilio, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Advances in endovascular surgery have resulted in a decline in major open arterial reconstructions nationwide. Our objective is to investigate the effect of endovascular surgery on general surgery resident experience with open vascular surgery. Between 2004 and 2014, 112 residents graduated from two academic institutions in Southern California. Residents were separated into those who graduated in 2004 to 2008 (period 1) and in 2009 to 2014 (period 2). Case volumes of vascular procedures were compared using two-sample t test. A total of 43 residents were in period 1 and 59 residents were in period 2. In aggregate, there was no significant difference in open cases recorded between the two periods (84 vs 87, P = 0.194). Subgroup analysis showed period 2 recorded significantly fewer cases of open aneurysm repair (5 vs 3, P surgery residents experienced a significant decline in several index open major arterial reconstruction cases. This decline was offset by maintenance of dialysis access procedures. If the trend continues, future general surgeons will not be proficient in open vascular procedures.

  20. [Current problems in training of minimally invasive surgery: vision of residents in pediatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, C; Cano, I; Peláez, D; Fuentes, S; Tardáguila, A R

    2013-01-01

    Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) is getting more and more important in our specialty. However, the formation of the residents on MIS is, in many cases, irregular. The purpose of this study is to assess the state of training in MIS among the residents of Pediatric Surgery and their potential weaknesses. An electronic survey was distributed among 71 residents of Pediatric Surgery from 17 national hospitals. The response rate was 70.2%.100% of the residents are interested in a broadening of training activities in MIS. The main areas of interest are gastrointestinal (92%) and thoracic (47%) surgery. Only 57% have access to training facilities and less than half of them attend to courses and conferences. 80% believe that they are not given adequate attention from specialized associations. 52% think they should do rotations at referral centers, 86% that courses and seminars should be enhanced, and 44% that the responsibility of the resident in surgery should be increased. The main defects encountered in their training are scarce volume of patients, lack of financial support and overcoming the learning curve of surgeons in their services. Despite the advance of the MIS, resident's training in this discipline still has shortcomings, as expressed in their views. Knowledge of the current state of training should be the starting point for designing a training strategy that ensures adequate skills.

  1. Resident surgeon efficiency in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittner, Andrew C; Sullivan, Brian R

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Comparison of resident surgeon performance efficiencies in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) versus conventional phacoemulsification. Patients and methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted on consecutive patients undergoing phacoemulsification cataract surgery performed by senior ophthalmology residents under the supervision of 1 attending physician during a 9-month period in a large Veterans Affairs medical center. Medical records were reviewed for demographic information, preoperative nucleus grade, femtosecond laser pretreatment, operative procedure times, total operating room times, and surgical complications. Review of digital video records provided quantitative interval measurements of core steps of the procedures, including completion of incisions, anterior capsulotomy, nucleus removal, cortical removal, and intraocular lens implantation. Results Total room time, operation time, and corneal incision completion time were found to be significantly longer in the femtosecond laser group versus the traditional phacoemulsification group (each Pcataract surgery is generally less efficient when trainees have more experience with traditional phacoemulsification. FLACS was found to have a significant advantage in completion of capsulotomy, but subsequent surgical steps were not shorter or longer. Resident learning curve for the FLACS technology may partially explain the disparities of performance. Educators should be cognizant of a potential for lower procedural efficiency when introducing FLACS into resident training. PMID:28203055

  2. Resident surgeon efficiency in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pittner AC

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrew C Pittner,1 Brian R Sullivan2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, 2Edward Hines Jr VA Hospital, Ophthalmology Section, Hines, IL, USA Purpose: Comparison of resident surgeon performance efficiencies in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS versus conventional phacoemulsification.Patients and methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted on consecutive patients undergoing phacoemulsification cataract surgery performed by senior ophthalmology residents under the supervision of 1 attending physician during a 9-month period in a large Veterans Affairs medical center. Medical records were reviewed for demographic information, preoperative nucleus grade, femtosecond laser pretreatment, operative procedure times, total operating room times, and surgical complications. Review of digital video records provided quantitative interval measurements of core steps of the procedures, including completion of incisions, anterior capsulotomy, nucleus removal, cortical removal, and intraocular lens implantation.Results: Total room time, operation time, and corneal incision completion time were found to be significantly longer in the femtosecond laser group versus the traditional phacoemulsification group (each P<0.05. Mean duration for manual completion of anterior capsulotomy was shorter in the laser group (P<0.001. There were no statistically significant differences in the individual steps of nucleus removal, cortical removal, or intraocular lens placement. Surgical complication rates were not significantly different between the groups.Conclusion: In early cases, resident completion of femtosecond cataract surgery is generally less efficient when trainees have more experience with traditional phacoemulsification. FLACS was found to have a significant advantage in completion of capsulotomy, but subsequent surgical steps were not shorter or longer. Resident learning curve for the

  3. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Case Log: General Surgery Resident Thoracic Surgery Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansier, Nicole; Varghese, Thomas K.; Verrier, Edward D.; Drake, F. Thurston; Gow, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    Background General surgery resident training has changed dramatically over the past 2 decades, with likely impact on specialty exposure. We sought to assess trends in general surgery resident exposure to thoracic surgery using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs over time. Methods The ACGME case logs for graduating general surgery residents were reviewed from academic year (AY) 1989–1990 to 2011–2012 for defined thoracic surgery cases. Data were divided into 5 eras of training for comparison: I, AY89 to 93; II, AY93 to 98; III, AY98 to 03; IV, AY03 to 08; V, AY08 to 12. We analyzed quantity and types of cases per time period. Student t tests compared averages among the time periods with significance at a p values less than 0.05. Results A total of 21,803,843 general surgery cases were reviewed over the 23-year period. Residents averaged 33.6 thoracic cases each in period I and 39.7 in period V. Thoracic cases accounted for nearly 4% of total cases performed annually (period I 3.7% [134,550 of 3,598,574]; period V 4.1% [167,957 of 4,077,939]). For the 3 most frequently performed procedures there was a statistically significant increase in thoracoscopic approach from period II to period V. Conclusions General surgery trainees today have the same volume of thoracic surgery exposure as their counterparts over the last 2 decades. This maintenance in caseload has occurred in spite of work-hour restrictions. However, general surgery graduates have a different thoracic surgery skill set at the end of their training, due to the predominance of minimally invasive techniques. Thoracic surgery educators should take into account these differences when training future cardiothoracic surgeons. PMID:24968766

  4. Employment and satisfaction trends among general surgery residents from a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr-Taro, Amy E; Kotwall, Cyrus A; Menon, Rema P; Hamann, M Sue; Nakayama, Don K

    2008-01-01

    Physician satisfaction is an important and timely issue in health care. A paucity of literature addresses this question among general surgeons. To review employment patterns and job satisfaction among general surgery residents from a single university-affiliated institution. All general surgery residents graduating from 1986 to 2006, inclusive, were mailed an Institutional Review Board-approved survey, which was then returned anonymously. Information on demographics, fellowship training, practice characteristics, job satisfaction and change, and perceived shortcomings in residency training was collected. A total of 31 of 34 surveys were returned (91%). Most of those surveyed were male (94%) and Caucasian (87%). Sixty-one percent of residents applied for a fellowship, and all but 1 were successful in obtaining their chosen fellowship. The most frequent fellowship chosen was plastic surgery, followed by minimally invasive surgery. Seventy-one percent of residents who applied for fellowship felt that the program improved their competitiveness for a fellowship. Most of the sample is in private practice, and of those, 44% are in groups with more than 4 partners. Ninety percent work less than 80 hours per week. Only 27% practice in small towns (population training in pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and thoracic surgery. Eighty-three percent agreed that they would again choose a general surgery residency, 94% of those who completed a fellowship would again choose that fellowship, and 90% would again choose their current job. Twenty-three percent agreed that they had difficulty finding their first job, and 30% had fewer job offers than expected. Thirty-five percent of the graduates have changed jobs: 29% of the residents have changed jobs once, and 6% have changed jobs at least twice since completing training. Reasons for leaving a job included colleague issues (82%), financial issues (82%), inadequate referrals (64%), excessive trauma (64%), and marriage or family reasons (55

  5. Urology residents training in laparoscopic surgery. Development of a virtual reality model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Baños, J L; Ballestero-Diego, R; Truan-Cacho, D; Aguilera-Tubet, C; Villanueva-Peña, A; Manuel-Palazuelos, J C

    2015-11-01

    The training and learning of residents in laparoscopic surgery has legal, financial and technological limitations. Simulation is an essential tool in the training of residents as a supplement to their training in laparoscopic surgery. The training should be structured in an appropriate environment, with previously established and clear objectives, taught by professionals with clinical and teaching experience in simulation. The training should be conducted with realistic models using animals and ex-vivo tissue from animals. It is essential to incorporate mechanisms to assess the objectives during the residents' training progress. We present the training model for laparoscopic surgery for urology residents at the University Hospital Valdecilla. The training is conducted at the Virtual Hospital Valdecilla, which is associated with the Center for Medical Simulation in Boston and is accredited by the American College of Surgeons. The model is designed in 3 blocks, basic for R1, intermediate for R2-3 and advanced for R4-5, with 9 training modules. The training is conducted in 4-hour sessions for 4 afternoons, for 3 weeks per year of residence. Residents therefore perform 240 hours of simulated laparoscopic training by the end of the course. For each module, we use structured objective assessments to measure each resident's training progress. Since 2003, 9 urology residents have been trained, in addition to the 5 who are currently in training. The model has undergone changes according to the needs expressed in the student feedback. The acquisition of skills in a virtual reality model has enabled the safe transfer of those skills to actual practice. A laparoscopic surgery training program designed in structured blocks and with progressive complexity provides appropriate training for transferring the skills acquired using this model to an actual scenario while maintaining patient safety. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Surgical Residents are Excluded From Robot-assisted Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Malene; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Implementation of a robotic system may influence surgical training. The aim was to report the charge of the operating surgeon and the bedside assistant at robot-assisted procedures in urology, gynecology, and colorectal surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A review of hospital charts from...... performed. In 10 (1.3%) of these procedures, a resident attended as bedside assistant and never as operating surgeon in the console. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate a severe problem with surgical education. Robot-assisted surgery is increasingly used; however, robotic surgical training during residency...... surgical procedures during a 1-year period from October 2013 to October 2014. All robot-assisted urologic, gynecologic, and colorectal procedures were identified. Charge of both operating surgeon in the console and bedside assistant were registered. RESULTS: A total of 774 robot-assisted procedures were...

  7. Training general surgery residents to avoid postoperative cardiac events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Thomas R; McGoldrick, Jennifer; Fox, Sheryl; Haller, Chris C; Arevalo, Jane

    2007-11-01

    Expertise in cardiac risk assessment takes years to acquire, but unnecessary cardiology consultation delays treatment and consumes scarce resources. A retrospective review was performed of the cardiac work-up and postoperative events during 1 year on a general surgery service. Postgraduate year 1-3 general surgery residents were instructed to obtain a cardiology consult if a patient had any of the following: (1) had undergone coronary artery intervention more than 2 years in the past; (2) was taking an anti-anginal medication (nitroglycerine, Ca channel, or beta-blocker); or (3) was symptomatic or had an abnormal electrocardiogram. Whether a patient was symptomatic was to be tempered by the nature of the planned procedure. Supervised residents screened 720 unique patients for surgery. Cardiology consultation was obtained in 37. All but 1 (97%) patient referred to cardiology met at least 1 of the earlier-described criteria; with 8 (22%) meeting all 3 criteria. On average, patients referred to the cardiologists were taking 1.4 anti-anginal medications; and 1 patient sustained a fatal myocardial infarction after referral. Cardiac imaging (stress test or catheterization) was performed on 24 (65%) referred patients and was positive in 8 (33%). After minimizing cardiac risk by medication or intervention, the surgery service declined to offer the planned procedure to 11 (30%) of the referred patients and an additional 5 (15%) patients declined surgery. The overall surgical mortality was 2%. None of the patients in this series sustained a postoperative myocardial infarction or cardiac death. Postoperative supraventricular tachycardia was not influenced significantly by cardiology consultation (5% referred patients vs 1% nonreferred). Our criteria for obtaining cardiology consultation in general surgery patients appears to appropriately select patients in need of further work-up. Information obtained from a cardiac consultation frequently leads to a re-evaluation of the

  8. Reducing oral and maxillofacial surgery resident risk exposure: lessons from graduate medical education reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrow, Suzanne Morse; Buhrow, Jack A

    2013-12-01

    It is estimated that, in the United States, more than 40,000 patients are injured each day because of preventable medical errors. Although numerous studies examine the causes of medical trainee errors and efforts to mitigate patient injuries in this population, little research exists on adverse events experienced by oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) residents or strategies to improve patient safety awareness in OMFS residency programs. The authors conducted a retrospective literature review of contemporary studies on medical trainees' reported risk exposure and the impact of integrating evidence-based patient safety training into residency curricula. A review of the literature suggests that OMFS residents face similar risks as medical trainees in medical, surgical, and anesthesia residency programs and may benefit from integrating competency-based safety training in the OMFS residency curriculum. OMFS trainees face particular challenges when transitioning from dental student to surgical resident, particularly related to their limited clinical exposure to high-reliability organizations, which may place them at higher risk than other medical trainees. OMFS educators should establish resident competence in patient safety principles and system improvement strategies throughout the training period.

  9. Relationships between study habits, burnout, and general surgery resident performance on the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeds, Matthew R; Thrush, Carol R; McDaniel, Faith K; Gill, Roop; Kimbrough, Mary K; Shames, Brian D; Sussman, Jeffrey J; Galante, Joseph M; Wittgen, Catherine M; Ansari, Parswa; Allen, Steven R; Nussbaum, Michael S; Hess, Donald T; Knight, David C; Bentley, Frederick R

    2017-09-01

    The American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) is used by programs to evaluate the knowledge and readiness of trainees to sit for the general surgery qualifying examination. It is often used as a tool for resident promotion and may be used by fellowship programs to evaluate candidates. Burnout has been associated with job performance and satisfaction; however, its presence and effects on surgical trainees' performance are not well studied. We sought to understand factors including burnout and study habits that may contribute to performance on the ABSITE examination. Anonymous electronic surveys were distributed to all residents at 10 surgical residency programs (n = 326). Questions included demographics as well as study habits, career interests, residency characteristics, and burnout scores using the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory, which assesses burnout because of both exhaustion and disengagement. These surveys were then linked to the individual's 2016 ABSITE and United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) step 1 and 2 scores provided by the programs to determine factors associated with successful ABSITE performance. In total, 48% (n = 157) of the residents completed the survey. Of those completing the survey, 48 (31%) scored in the highest ABSITE quartile (≥75th percentile) and 109 (69%) scored less than the 75th percentile. In univariate analyses, those in the highest ABSITE quartile had significantly higher USMLE step 1 and step 2 scores (P burnout scores (disengagement, P Burnout Inventory exhaustion (P = 0.02), and USMLE step 1 and 2 scores (P = 0.007 and 0.0001, respectively). Residents who perform higher on the ABSITE have a regular study schedule throughout the year, report less burnout because of exhaustion, study away from home, and have shown success in prior standardized tests. Further study is needed to determine the effects of burnout on clinical duties, career advancement, and satisfaction. Copyright © 2017

  10. Benefits of externships with pediatric dentistry programs for potential residents: program directors' and current residents' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Ulrich; Storey, Bryan; Hanson, Peter D

    2014-03-01

    This study's goal was to understand the extent, framework, and benefits of externships with prospective residency programs undertaken by predoctoral dental students or dentists interested in applying for a residency program. In 2012, a questionnaire was sent to all pediatric dentistry residents and program directors in the United States (63 percent and 74 percent return rate, respectively). Externships were offered by fifty-seven of the seventy-six programs. Most program directors (95 percent) agreed that externships are beneficial and compensate at least partially for the lack of numerical National Board Dental Examination scores or class rankings. Among the responding residents, 61 percent were female. The top reasons given by residents for choosing to extern with a certain program were its location and perceived reputation. Of the 249 respondents who did an externship, 47 percent externed with their current program. The acceptance rate into the number one choice of program was similar among those who did an externship vs. those who did not (73 percent vs. 75 percent). No relationship was found between gender and externships among the 341 respondents who were accepted into their top choice. Most of the residents (98.8 percent) felt that completing an externship was beneficial, and 88 percent got an increased understanding for the differences between university- and non-university-based residency programs.

  11. Improving the Teaching Skills of Residents in a Surgical Training Program: Results of the Pilot Year of a Curricular Initiative in an Ophthalmology Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Yewlin E; Newman, Lori R; Loewenstein, John I; Kloek, Carolyn E

    2015-01-01

    To design and implement a teaching skills curriculum that addressed the needs of an ophthalmology residency training program, to assess the effect of the curriculum, and to present important lessons learned. A teaching skills curriculum was designed for the Harvard Medical School (HMS) Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology. Results of a needs assessment survey were used to guide curriculum objectives. Overall, 3 teaching workshops were conducted between October 2012 and March 2013 that addressed areas of need, including procedural teaching. A postcurriculum survey was used to assess the effect of the curriculum. Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, a tertiary care institution in Boston, MA. Overall, 24 residents in the HMS Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology were included. The needs assessment survey demonstrated that although most residents anticipated that teaching would be important in their future career, only one-third had prior formal training in teaching. All residents reported they found the teaching workshops to be either very or extremely useful. All residents reported they would like further training in teaching, with most residents requesting additional training in best procedural teaching practices for future sessions. The pilot year of the resident-as-teacher curriculum for the HMS Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology demonstrated a need for this curriculum and was perceived as beneficial by the residents, who reported increased comfort in their teaching skills after attending the workshops. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Laparoscopic skill laboratory in urological surgery: tools and methods for resident training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio C. M. Torricelli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Laparoscopy has certainly brought considerable benefits to patients, but laparoscopic surgery requires a set of skills different from open surgery, and learning in the operating room may increase surgical time, and even may be harmful to patients. Several training programs have been developed to decrease these potential prejudices. PURPOSES: to describe the laparoscopic training program for urological residents of the "Hospital das Clinicas" of the Sao Paulo Medical School, to report urological procedures that are feasible in dry and wet labs, and to perform a critical analysis of the cost-benefit relation of advanced laparoscopic skills laboratory. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The laparoscopic skill lab has two virtual simulators, three manual simulators, and four laparoscopic sets for study with a porcine model. The urology residents during their first year attend classes in the virtual and manual simulator and helps the senior urological resident in activities carried out with the laparoscopic sets. During the second year, the urological resident has six periods per week, each period lasting four hours, to perform laparoscopic procedures with a porcine model. Results: In a training program of ten weeks, one urological resident performs an average of 120 urological procedures. The most common procedures are total nephrectomy (30%, bladder suture (30%, partial nephrectomy (10%, pyeloplasty (10%, ureteral replacement or transuretero anastomosis (10%, and others like adrenalectomy, prostatectomy, and retroperitoneoscopy. These procedures are much quicker and caused less morbidity. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic skills laboratory is a good method for achieving technical ability.

  13. Analysis of Resident Case Logs in an Anesthesiology Residency Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias Vested;

    2016-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to examine Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs for Stanford anesthesia residents graduating in 2013 (25 residents) and 2014 (26 residents). The resident with the fewest recorded patients in 2013 had 43% the number of patients compared with the...

  14. The Teacher-in-Residence Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poda, Janice H.

    1993-01-01

    South Carolina Center for Teacher Recruitment created the Teacher-in-Residence fellowship in 1986, when a classroom teacher and counselor became the first representative to the South Carolina Teacher Cadet Program--a project encouraging bright high school students to consider education careers. The representative helped plan curriculum training…

  15. OUTLINE OF THE PROGRAM FOR TRAINABLE RESIDENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunland Training Center, Gainesville, FL.

    PHILOSOPHY, GOALS, AND DESCRIPTION OF RESIDENTS PARTICIPATING IN THIS PROGRAM ARE PRESENTED. ACTIVITIES ARE OUTLINED FOR BEGINNERS, INTERMEDIATES, ADULT MEN, AND ADULT WOMEN IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS--(1) PERCEPTION DEVELOPMENT, (2) COMMUNICATION AND EXPRESSION SKILLS, (3) MOTOR SKILLS, (4) NUMBER CONCEPTS, (5) PERSONAL HEALTH AND GROOMING SKILLS,…

  16. Resident designed intern orientation to address the new ACGME Common Program Requirements for resident supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rialon, Kristy L; Barfield, Michael E; Elfenbein, Dawn M; Lunsford, Keri E; Tracy, Elisabeth T; Migaly, John

    2013-01-01

    To design an orientation for surgical interns to meet the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Common Program Requirements regarding supervision, to test patient-management competencies, and to assess confidence on skills and tasks pre-orientation and post-orientation. Twenty-seven incoming surgical interns participated in a two-day orientation to clinical duties. Activities included a pre-test, lectures, simulation, oral examination, intern shadowing, and a post-test. Incoming interns were surveyed before and after orientation and two months later for confidence in patient-management and surgical intern skills. Paired t-tests were used to determine if confidence improved pre-orientation and post-orientation, and two months following orientation. The study took place at an academic training hospital. All (n = 27) postgraduate year-1 (PGY-1) surgical residents at our institution, which included the categorical and nondesignated preliminary general surgery, urology, orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology, and neurosurgery programs. All interns passed the oral and written examinations, and were deemed able to be indirectly supervised, with direct supervision immediately available. They reported increased confidence in all areas of patient management addressed during orientation, and this confidence was retained after two months. In surgical and floor-related tasks and skills, interns reported no increase in confidence directly following orientation. However, after two months, they reported a significant increase in confidence, particularly in those tasks that are performed often. New requirements for resident supervision require creative ways of verifying resident competency in basic skills. This type of orientation is an effective way to address the new requirements of supervision and teach interns the tasks and skills that are necessary for internship. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  17. National trends in minimally invasive and open operative experience of graduating general surgery residents: implications for surgical skills curricula development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Jeffrey S; Smith, Lynette; Are, Madhuri; Edney, James; Azarow, Kenneth; Mercer, David W; Thompson, Jon S; Are, Chandrakanth

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze national trends in minimally invasive and open cases of all graduating residents in general surgery. A retrospective analysis was performed on data obtained from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education logs (1999-2008) of graduating residents from all US general surgery residency programs. Data were analyzed using Mantel-Haenszel χ(2) tests and the Bonferroni adjustment to detect trends in the number of minimally invasive and open cases. Minimally invasive procedures accounted for an increasing proportion of cases performed (3.7% to 11.1%, P pediatric surgery (P surgery residents in the United States are performing a greater number of minimally invasive and fewer open procedures for common surgical conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Does operative experience during residency correlate with reported competency of recent general surgery graduates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Arash; Lai, Sarah; Butterworth, Sonia; Hameed, Morad; Schiller, Dan; Skarsgard, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Identification of attributes of residency training that predict competency would improve surgical education. We hypothesized that case experience during residency would correlate with self-reported competency of recent graduates. Methods Aggregate case log data of residents enrolled in 2 general surgery programs were collected over a 12-month period and stratified into Surgical Council on Resident Education (SCORE) categories. We surveyed recent (surgery (4, 0.04%), and the least common EU procedure was abdomen–spleen (1, 0.1%). The questionnaire response rate was 45%. For EC procedures, self-reported competency was highest in skin and soft tissue, thoracic and head and neck (each 100%) and lowest in vascular–venous (54%), whereas for EU procedures it was highest in abdomen–general (100%) and lowest in vascular–arterial (62%). The correlation between case volume and self-reported competency was poor (R = 0.2 for EC procedures). Conclusion Self-reported competency correlates poorly with operative case experience during residency. Other curriculum factors, including specific rotations and timing, balance between inpatient and outpatient surgical experience and competition for cases, may contribute to procedural competency acquisition during residency. PMID:22854144

  19. Port- a- Cath Catheter placement by general surgery residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Schlottmann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years an increasing incidence and prevalence of oncological diseases is observed, with a consequent increase in chemotherapies. In order to avoid repeated venipuncture of patients and toxicity in small veins during different cycles of treatment, devices that provide a permanent central venous access are used. The aim of this study was to evaluate the success and safety of port a cath devices inserted by surgery residents. A consecutive case series of patients in whom Port-a-CathTM catheter was placed by residents of surgery in the period from March 2009 to January 2014 were included. A total of 358 Port-a-CathTM catheters were inserted. Average age 58.7 years (16-88. Females 53.1%. Chemotherapy treatment for solid neoplasias (74.8% and for hematological diseases (25.2%. SThe different venous accesses were: Subclavian (67.6%, Cephalic (27.4%, external jugular (3.3%, internal jugular (1.7%. The morbidity rate was 5.3%, twelve patients with catheter-associated infection requiring the removal of it, 3 venous thrombosis with subsequent replacement of the catheter and 4 patients required pleural drainage. Port-a-CathTM catheter placement by residents is a safe and effective procedure for the administration of chemotherapy

  20. A standardized resident training program in endoscopic surgery in general and in laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal (TEP) inguinal hernia repair in particular

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miserez, Marc; Arregui, Maurice; Bisgaard, Thue

    2009-01-01

    The need for acquisition of specific laparoscopic skills has emphasized the role of a preclinical laboratory-training program. However, for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair with a steep learning curve, especially for totally extraperitoneal repair, preclinical skill training remains a challeng...

  1. Self-evaluation: how well do surgery residents judge performance on a rotation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Kenneth W

    2013-05-01

    Surgical trainees are evaluated based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education 6 core competencies. The ability for a learner to recognize strengths and weaknesses in these areas allows for critical self-improvement. Surgery residents rotating on a pediatric surgery rotation for 1 academic year were asked at an exit interview to provide a self-evaluation within the 6 core competencies on a Likert scale from 1 to 5. Self-evaluation scores were compared with a final group consensus attending evaluation. Further analyses included comparing residents as follows: less than R3 (junior residents) versus R3 (senior residents) residents, general surgery versus non-general surgery residents, university versus community residents, residents in the first half of the academic year versus residents in the second half, and top one third- and lowest one third-performing residents. Statistical analysis was performed using Student t tests with significance at P surgery residents, and highest one third-performing residents compared with junior residents, non-general surgery residents, and lowest one third-performing residents. There were no differences between self-evaluations and attending evaluations when comparing university with community residents and residents in the first half of the academic year with residents in the second half of the academic year. Residents appear to have a more critical self-analysis than attending surgeons, with senior residents, general surgery residents, and highest one third-performing residents being the most critical of their own performance. Poorly performing residents appeared to lack insight into their abilities. This method of self-evaluation helps trainees reflect on their performance and highlights trainees who lack self-awareness and need counseling for improvement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of Integrated Vascular Residencies on Academic Productivity within Vascular Surgery Divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bradford J; Valsangkar, Nakul P; Liang, Tiffany W; Murphy, Michael P; Zimmers, Teresa A; Bell, Teresa M; Davies, Mark G; Koniaris, Leonidas G

    2017-02-01

    Changing training paradigms in vascular surgery have been introduced to reduce overall training time. Herein, we sought to examine how shortened training for vascular surgeons may have influenced overall divisional academic productivity. Faculty from the top 55 surgery departments were identified according to National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding. Academic metrics of 315 vascular surgery, 1,132 general surgery, and 2,403 other surgical specialties faculty were examined using institutional Web sites, Scopus, and NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools from September 1, 2014, to January 31, 2015. Individual-level and aggregate numbers of publications, citations, and NIH funding were determined. The mean size of the vascular divisions was 5 faculty. There was no correlation between department size and academic productivity of individual faculty members (R(2) = 0.68, P = 0.2). Overall percentage of vascular surgery faculty with current or former NIH funding was 20%, of which 10.8% had major NIH grants (R01/U01/P01). Vascular surgery faculty associated with integrated vascular training programs demonstrated significantly greater academic productivity. Publications and citations were higher for vascular surgery faculty from institutions with both integrated and traditional training programs (48 of 1,051) compared to those from programs with integrated training alone (37 of 485) or traditional fellowships alone (26 of 439; P productivity was improved within vascular surgery divisions with integrated training programs or both program types. These data suggest that the earlier specialization of integrated residencies in addition to increasing dedicated vascular training time may actually help promote research within the field of vascular surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Plastic surgery residents' attitudes and understanding of biostatistics: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarla, Srinivas M; Redett, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    To assess plastic surgery residents' knowledge, attitudes, and comfort with biostatistics. Cross-sectional study. Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital. A total of 22 plastic surgery residents (91% response rate) completed the study. The study sample consisted of 18 residents in the integrated training path and 4 in the independent training track and was equally divided between junior and senior residents. Most respondents (>54%) had taken at least 1 course in biostatistics or epidemiology. More than 90% of residents reported reading at least 1 plastic surgical journal on a regular basis (mean 2.1 ± 1.5 journals/month). Most residents expressed a desire to learn more about biostatistics (68.2%), reported using statistical information in forming clinical opinions (86.3%), and placed a high value on knowledge of biostatistics in appraising the surgical literature (90.9%). However, only 45% of respondents reported being able to understand all the statistical terms encountered in journal articles. Only 50% of respondents felt comfortable with assessing whether the appropriate statistical tests were used to answer a research question. In case studies, the mean percentage of correct responses was 53.0 ± 24.5% (range: 0-83.3). Higher performance scores were associated with a prior course in biostatistics (p = 0.04) and the number of journals read monthly (p = 0.003). Respondents had difficulty with study design (45.5% correct), analysis of variance (45.5% correct), time to event analysis (9.1% correct), and interpreting a 95% confidence interval (45.5% correct). The number of correct responses strongly correlated with respondent confidence in biostatistics (r = 0.70, p biostatistics but have only a fair understanding of core statistical concepts. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of Resident Case Logs in an Anesthesiology Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias Vested; Macario, Alex

    2016-04-15

    Our goal in this study was to examine Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs for Stanford anesthesia residents graduating in 2013 (25 residents) and 2014 (26 residents). The resident with the fewest recorded patients in 2013 had 43% the number of patients compared with the resident with the most patients, and in 2014, this equaled 48%. There were residents who had 75% more than the class average number of cases for several of the 12 case types and 3 procedure types required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Also, there were residents with fewer than half as many for some of the required cases or procedure types. Some of the variability may have been because of the hazards of self-reporting.

  5. Case-Logging Practices in Otolaryngology Residency Training: National Survey of Residents and Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermody, Sarah M; Gao, William; McGinn, Johnathan D; Malekzadeh, Sonya

    2017-06-01

    Objective (1) Evaluate the consistency and manner in which otolaryngology residents log surgical cases. (2) Assess the extent of instruction and guidance provided by program directors on case-logging practices. Study Design Cross-sectional national survey. Setting Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education otolaryngology residency programs in the United States. Subjects and Methods US otolaryngology residents, postgraduate year 2 through graduating chiefs as of July 2016, were recruited to respond to an anonymous questionnaire designed to characterize surgical case-logging practices. Program directors of US otolaryngology residency programs were recruited to respond to an anonymous questionnaire to elucidate how residents are instructed to log cases. Results A total of 272 residents and 53 program directors completed the survey, yielding response rates of 40.6% and 49.5%, respectively. Perceived accuracy of case logs is low among residents and program directors. Nearly 40% of residents purposely choose not to log certain cases, and 65.1% of residents underreport cases performed. More than 80% of program directors advise residents to log procedures performed outside the operating room, yet only 16% of residents consistently log such cases. Conclusion Variability in surgical case-logging behaviors and differences in provided instruction highlight the need for methods to improve consistency of logging practices. It is imperative to standardize practices across otolaryngology residency programs for case logs to serve as an accurate measure of surgical competency. This study provides a foundation for reform efforts within residency programs and for the Resident Case Log System.

  6. Senior Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Resident Confidence in Performing Invasive Temporomandibular Joint Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momin, Mohmedvasim; Miloro, Michael; Mercuri, Louis G; Munaretto, Alexander; Markiewicz, Michael R

    2017-06-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of confidence that senior-level oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) residents have in the management of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, determine their exposure to various invasive TMJ procedures during training, and assess their confidence in performing those procedures on completion of residency. A questionnaire was designed, and a link to a University of Illinois at Chicago Qualtrics Survey platform (Qualtrics, Provo, UT) was e-mailed to all program directors at Commission on Dental Accreditation-accredited OMS training programs in the United States. The program directors were asked to forward the 20-multiple-choice question anonymous survey to their senior-level residents for completion. The survey included the program's demographic characteristics, resident's confidence in assessing and managing patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), resident's experience performing various invasive TMJ procedures, and whether the resident believed he or she had received sufficient education and clinical experience in the management of TMJ disorders. The data were collected and summarized by use of a standard spreadsheet analysis, as well as appropriate descriptive and analytical statistical tests. The response rate was 28.0%. Of the 56 respondents, 52 (92.9%) reported having received instruction in nonsurgical management of TMDs. All respondents confirmed that invasive TMJ procedures were performed in their program. The most commonly performed procedure was TMJ arthrocentesis (mean rating, 3.11), followed by open TMJ surgery (mean rating, 2.82). The least-performed invasive surgical procedure was autogenous total TMJ replacement surgery (mean rating, 1.39). Eighty percent of residents reported being comfortable managing the TMD patient. The only procedure with which the respondents were highly confident was TMJ arthrocentesis (mean rating, 3.89). This study suggests that confidence levels in the

  7. Intraoperative Flap Complications in LASIK Surgery Performed by Ophthalmology Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Diaz-de-Leon, Lorena; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Navas, Alejandro; Graue-Hernández, Enrique O.; Ramirez-Miranda, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the rate of flap-related complications in LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmology residents and to analyze the risk factors for these complications. Methods: We analyzed 273 flap dissections in 145 patients from March 2013 to February 2014. We included all LASIK surgeries performed by 32 ophthalmology residents using a Moria M2 microkeratome. All the flap-related complications were noted. Comparison between both groups with and without complications was performed with an independent Student's t-test and relative risks were calculated. Results: There were 19 flap-related complications out of the 273 flap dissections (6.95%). The most common complication was incomplete flap dissection (n = 10; 3.66%), followed by free-cap (n = 5; 1.83%), and flap-buttonhole (n = 2; 0.73%). There was no significant difference between the complicated and uncomplicated cases in terms of the right versus the left eye, pachymetry results, white-to-white diameter, and spherical equivalent. But this difference was significant for mean keratometry (P = 0.008), K-min (P = 0.01), and K-max (P = 0.03) between these groups. Final visual acuity after rescheduling laser treatment was similar in both groups. Relative risks for flap-related complications were 2.03 for the first LASIK surgery (CI 95% 0.64 to 6.48; P = 0.22) and 1.26 (CI 95% 0.43 to 3.69; P = 0.66) for the surgeon's flap-related complications. Female gender presented an odds ratio of 2.48 (CI 95% 0.68 to 9.00; P = 0.16) for complications. Conclusion: Flap-related complications are common intraoperative event during LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmologists. Keratometries and surgeon's first procedure represent a higher probability for flap related complications than some other biometric parameters of patient's eye. PMID:27621782

  8. Welcome to cultural competency: surgery's efforts to acknowledge diversity in residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Catherine L; Chun, Maria B J

    2013-01-01

    Although cultural competency is not a new concept in healthcare, it has only recently been formally embraced as important in the field of surgery. All physicians, including and especially surgeons, must acknowledge the potential influence of culture in order to provide effective and equitable care for patients of all backgrounds. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) recognizes cultural competency as a component of "patient care," "professionalism," and "interpersonal and communication skills." A systematic literature search was conducted using the MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases. All publications focusing on surgical residents and the assessment of patient care, professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, or specifically cultural competency and/or were considered. This initial search resulted in 12 articles. To further refine the review, publications discussing curricula in residencies other than surgery, the assessment of technical, or clinical skills and/or without any explicit focus on cultural competency were excluded. Based on the specified inclusion and exclusion criteria, 5 articles were selected. These studies utilized various methods to improve surgical residents' cultural competency, including lectures, Objective Structural Clinical Examinations (OSCE), and written exercises and evaluations. A number of surgical residency programs have made promising strides in training culturally competent surgeons. Ultimately, in order to maximize our collective efforts to improve the quality of health care, the development of cultural competency curricula must be made a priority and such training should be a requirement for all trainees in surgical residency programs. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Does general surgery residency prepare surgeons for community practice in British Columbia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hamish

    2009-06-01

    Preparing surgeons for clinical practice is a challenging task for postgraduate training programs across Canada. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a single surgeon entering practice was adequately prepared by comparing the type and volume of surgical procedures experienced in the last 3 years of training with that in the first year of clinical practice. During the last 3 years of general surgery training, I logged all procedures. In practice, the Medical Services Plan (MSP) of British Columbia tracks all procedures. Using MSP remittance reports, I compiled the procedures performed in my first year of practice. I totaled the number of procedures and broke them down into categories (general, colorectal, laparoscopic, endoscopic, hepatobiliary, oncologic, pediatric, thoracic, vascular and other). I then compared residency training with community practice. I logged a total of 1170 procedures in the last 3 years of residency. Of these, 452 were performed during community rotations. The procedures during residency could be broken down as follows: 392 general, 18 colorectal, 242 laparoscopic, 103 endoscopic, 85 hepatobiliary, 142 oncologic, 1 pediatric, 78 thoracic, 92 vascular and 17 other. I performed a total of 1440 procedures in the first year of practice. In practice the break down was 398 general, 15 colorectal, 101 laparoscopic, 654 endoscopic, 2 hepatobiliary, 77 oncologic, 10 pediatric, 0 thoracic, 70 vascular and 113 other. On the whole, residency provided excellent preparation for clinical practice based on my experience. Areas of potential improvement included endoscopy, pediatric surgery and "other," which comprised mostly hand surgery.

  10. Radiology residents as teachers: Current status of teaching skills training in United States residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Andrea

    2010-07-01

    Radiology residents often teach medical students and other residents. Workshops developed with the goal of improving resident teaching skills are becoming increasingly common in various fields of medicine. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and structure of resident-teacher training opportunities within radiology programs in the United States. Program directors with membership in the Association of Program Directors in Radiology (APDR) were surveyed to determine views on a panel of topics related to resident-teacher training programs. A total of 114 (56%) of 205 APDR members completed an online survey. Approximately one-third (32%) stated that their program provided instruction to residents on teaching skills. The majority of these programs (72%) were established within the last 5 years. Residents provided teaching to medical students (94%) and radiology residents (90%). The vast majority of program directors agreed that it is important for residents to teach (98%) and that these teaching experiences helped residents become better radiologists (85%). Ninety-four percent of program directors felt that the teaching skills of their residents could be improved, and 85% felt that residents would benefit from instruction on teaching methods. Only one-third of program directors felt their program adequately recognized teaching provided by residents. Program directors identified residents as being active contributors to teaching in most programs. Although teaching was viewed as an important skill to develop, few programs had instituted a resident-teacher curriculum. Program directors felt that residents would benefit from structured training to enhance teaching skills. Future studies are needed to determine how best to provide teaching skills training for radiology trainees. 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quality Improvement-Focused Departmental Grand Rounds Reports: A Strategy to Engage General Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Jonathan S; Mitchell, Katrina B; Afaneh, Cheguevera; Rich, Barrie S; Frey, Theresa J; Gellman, Carol; Pomp, Alfons; Michelassi, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    Background Many institutions are seeking ways to enhance their surgical trainees' quality improvement (QI) skills. Objective To educate trainees about the importance of lifelong performance improvement, chief residents at New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Medicine are members of a multidisciplinary QI team tasked with improving surgical outcomes. We describe the process and the results of this effort. Methods Our analysis used 2 data sources to assess complication rates: the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) and ECOMP, our own internal complication database. Chief residents met with a multidisciplinary QI team to review complication rates from both data sources. Chief residents performed a case-by-case analysis of complications and a literature search in areas requiring improvement. Based on this information, chief residents met with the multidisciplinary team to select interventions for implementation, and delivered QI-focused grand rounds summarizing the QI process and new interventions. Results Since 2009, chief residents have presented 16 QI-focused grand rounds. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) and surgical site infections (SSIs) were the most frequently discussed. Interventions to improve UTIs and SSIs were introduced to the department of surgery through these reports in 2011 and 2012. During this time we saw improvement in outcomes as measured by NSQIP odds ratio. Conclusions Departmental grand rounds are a suitable forum to review NSQIP data and our internal, resident-collected data as a means to engage chief residents in QI improvement, and can serve as a model for other institutions to engage surgery residents in QI projects.

  12. Should general surgery residents be taught laparoscopic pyloromyotomies? An ethical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Mauricio A; Hartin, Charles W; McCullough, Laurence B

    2014-01-01

    bioethics. Nonnegotiable goods are goals for residency training that should never be sacrificed or negotiated away. Fiduciary responsibility to the patient, regardless of level of training, should never be compromised, because doing so violates the professional virtue of integrity. The education of the resident is paramount to afford him or her the opportunity to provide competent care without supervision to future patients. Such professional competence is the intellectual and clinical foundation of fiduciary responsibility, making achievement of educational goals during residency training another nonnegotiable good. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. PREPARATION OF CERTIFICATES BY GENERAL SURGERY RESIDENT PHYSICIANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Lazzarino (h

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The physician’s certificate is a statement regarding a present or past event in which the physician has intervened while exercising his/her profession. It is considered written and personal evidence of the attending physician, which verifies the event described. Official certificates are those which must be issued in compliance with legal provisions, while ordinary certificates are private documents prepared at the request of the patient himself/herself. 88 certificates issued by general surgery resident physicians at the patient’s request were assessed, between October and December 2013. All the ordinary certificates assessed were aimed at controlling absenteeism. They all included the patient’s name and surname, date, signature and seal. The preparation of a physicians’ certificate is mandatory, and should only include the facts verified by the physician himself/herself, and upon the patient’s request. General surgery resident physicians are duly licensed medical doctors, which means that they are empowered by law to issue certificates, verifications and/or statements made in the course of their profession, regarding conditions of health or illness, as well as the management, prescription, indication, application or control of the procedures

  14. Assessing residents' operative skills for external ventricular drain placement and shunt surgery in pediatric neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldave, Guillermo; Hansen, Daniel; Briceño, Valentina; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jea, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors previously demonstrated the use of a validated Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) tool for evaluating residents' operative skills in pediatric neurosurgery. However, no benchmarks have been established for specific pediatric procedures despite an increased need for meaningful assessments that can either allow for early intervention for underperforming trainees or allow for proficient residents to progress to conducting operations independently with more passive supervision. This validated methodology and tool for assessment of operative skills for common pediatric neurosurgical procedures-external ventricular drain (EVD) placement and shunt surgery- was applied to establish its procedure-based feasibility and reliability, and to document the effect of repetition on achieving surgical skill proficiency in pediatric EVD placement and shunt surgery. METHODS A procedure-based technical skills assessment for EVD placements and shunt surgeries in pediatric neurosurgery was established through the use of task analysis. The authors enrolled all residents from 3 training programs (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston Methodist Hospital, and University of Texas-Medical Branch) who rotated through pediatric neurosurgery at Texas Children's Hospital over a 26-month period. For each EVD placement or shunt procedure performed with a resident, the faculty and resident (for self-assessment) completed an evaluation form (OSATS) based on a 5-point Likert scale with 7 categories. Data forms were then grouped according to faculty versus resident (self) assessment, length of pediatric neurosurgery rotation, postgraduate year level, and date of evaluation ("beginning of rotation," within 1 month of start date; "end of rotation," within 1 month of completion date; or "middle of rotation"). Descriptive statistical analyses were performed with the commercially available SPSS statistical software package. A p value skills. The learning curves

  15. Initial experiences in embedding core competency education in entry-level surgery residents through a nonclinical rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahol, Kanav; Huston, Carrie; Hamann, Jessica; Ferrara, John J

    2011-03-01

    Health care continues to expand in scope and in complexity. In this changing environment, residents are challenged with understanding its intricacies and the impact it will have on their professional activities and careers. Embedding each of the competency elements in residents in a meaningful way remains a challenge for many surgery residency program directors. We established a nonclinical rotation to provide surgery postgraduate year-1 (PGY-1) residents with a structured, multifaceted, largely self-directed curriculum into which each of the 6 core competencies are woven. Posttesting strategies were established for most curricular experiences to ensure to the greatest possible extent that each resident will have achieved an acceptable level of understanding of each of the competency areas before being given credit for the rotation. By uniformly exceeding satisfactory scores on respective objective analyses, residents demonstrated an increased (at least short-term) understanding of each of the assessed competency areas. Our project sought to address a prior lack of opportunity for our residents to develop a sound foundation for our residents in systems-based practice. Our new rotation addresses systems-based practice in several different learning environments, including emergency medical service ride-along, sentinel event participation, and hospice visits. Several research projects have enhanced the overall learning program. Our experience shows that a rotation dedicated to competency training can provide an innovative and engaging means of teaching residents the value of each element.

  16. Enhancing teamwork between chief residents and residency program directors: description and outcomes of an experiential workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhillips, Heather A; Frohna, John G; Murad, M Hassan; Batra, Maneesh; Panda, Mukta; Miller, Marsha A; Brigham, Timothy P; Doughty, Robert A

    2011-12-01

    An effective working relationship between chief residents and residency program directors is critical to a residency program's success. Despite the importance of this relationship, few studies have explored the characteristics of an effective program director-chief resident partnership or how to facilitate collaboration between the 2 roles, which collectively are important to program quality and resident satisfaction. We describe the development and impact of a novel workshop that paired program directors with their incoming chief residents to facilitate improved partnerships. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sponsored a full-day workshop for residency program directors and their incoming chief residents. Sessions focused on increased understanding of personality styles, using experiential learning, and open communication between chief residents and program directors, related to feedback and expectations of each other. Participants completed an anonymous survey immediately after the workshop and again 8 months later to assess its long-term impact. Participants found the workshop to be a valuable experience, with comments revealing common themes. Program directors and chief residents expect each other to act as a role model for the residents, be approachable and available, and to be transparent and fair in their decision-making processes; both groups wanted feedback on performance and clear expectations from each other for roles and responsibilities; and both groups identified the need to be innovative and supportive of changes in the program. Respondents to the follow-up survey reported that workshop participation improved their relationships with their co-chiefs and program directors. Participation in this experiential workshop improved the working relationships between chief residents and program directors. The themes that were identified can be used to foster communication between incoming chief residents and residency directors and to

  17. Pediatric training in emergency medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, S; Fleisher, G; Henretig, F; Ruddy, R

    1982-04-01

    Endorsed emergency medicine (EM) residency programs were surveyed as to the nature and extent of training they provided in pediatric emergency care (PEC). In the surveys returned (82%) there were several important findings. The amount of time in PEC training was generally two months per year of training. This accounted for 16% of training time. However, the volume of pediatric patients was 25% of the overall patient population. There was wide variation in the sites of PEC training. Didactic sessions often did not cover even core topics. The training program directors were equally divided in their satisfaction with this aspect of their programs. Changes were recommended by 80% of the directors. Changes most often suggested were increasing pediatric patient exposure and obtaining PEC specialists as trainers.

  18. Career decisions and the structure of training: an American Board Of Colon and Rectal Surgery survey of colorectal residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Constance C; Rothenberger, David A; Trudel, Judith L; Wolff, Bruce G

    2009-07-01

    To investigate potential impacts of restructuring general surgery training on colorectal (CR) surgery recruitment and expertise. In response to the American Surgical Association Blue Ribbon Committee report on surgical education (2004), the American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery, working with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and American Board of Surgery, established a committee (2006) to review residency training curricula and study new pathways to certification as a CR surgeon. To address concerns related to shortened general surgery residency, the American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery committee surveyed recent, current, and entering CR residents on the timing and factors associated with their career choice and opinions regarding restructuring. A 10-item, online survey of 189 CR surgeons enrolled in the class years of 2005, 2006, and 2007 was administered and analyzed May to July 2007. One hundred forty-five CR residents responded (77%); results were consistent across class years and types of general surgery training program. Seventy percent of respondents had rotated onto a CR service by the end of their PGY-2 year. Most identified CR as a career interest in their PGY-3 or PGY-4 year. Overall interest in CR surgery, the influence of CR mentors and teachers, and positive exposure to CR as PGY-3, PGY-4, or PGY-5 residents were the top cited factors influencing choice decisions. Respondents were opposed to restructuring by a 2:1 ratio, primarily because of concerns about inadequate training and lack of time to develop technical expertise. Shortening general surgery residency would not necessarily limit exposure to CR rotations and mentors unless such rotations are cut. The details of proposed restructuring are critical.

  19. Pharmacist educators in family medicine residency programs: A qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgenson Derek

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 25-29% of North American family medicine residency programs utilize a pharmacist to teach residents. Little is known about the impact that these pharmacist educators have on residency training. The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of residents, residency directors and pharmacists within Canadian family medicine residency programs that employ a pharmacist educator to better understand the impact of the role. Methods Recruitment from three cohorts (residents, residency directors, pharmacists within family medicine residency programs across Canada for one-on-one semi-structured interviews followed by thematic analysis of anonymized transcript data. Results 11 residents, 6 residency directors and 17 pharmacist educators participated in interviews. Data themes were: (1 strong value of the teaching with respect to improved resident knowledge, confidence and patient care delivery; (2 lack of a formal pharmacotherapy curriculum; (3 desire for expansion of pharmacist teaching; (4 impact of teaching on collaboration; (5 impact of teaching on residency program faculty; and (6 lack of criticism of the role. Conclusions The pharmacist educator role is valued within residency programs across Canada and the role has a positive impact on several important aspects of family medicine resident training. Suggestions for improvement focused on expanding the teaching role and on implementing a formal curriculum for pharmacist educators to follow.

  20. Optimizing the Selection of General Surgery Residents: A National Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louridas, Marisa; Szasz, Peter; Montbrun, Sandra de; Harris, Kenneth A; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    Surgical programs strive to recruit trainees who will graduate as competent surgeons; however, selection processes vary between institutions. The purpose of the present study was to (1) solicit program directors' (PDs) opinions on the proportion of trainees who have difficulty achieving competence and (2) establish consensus on the desired attributes of general surgery (GS) candidates and the technical skills that would be most indicative of future performance. Delphi consensus methodology was used. An open-ended questionnaire, followed by a closed-ended questionnaire, formulated as a 5-point Likert scale, was administered. A Cronbach α ≥ 0.8 with 80% of responses in agreement (4-agree and 5-strongly agree) determined the threshold for consensus. The first and second rounds were completed by 14 and 11, of a potential 17, GS PDs, respectively. PDs felt that 5% or less of trainees have difficulty reaching competence in clinical knowledge, 5% to 10% in decision-making, and 5% to 15% in technical skill by the time of completion of training. Consensus was excellent (α = 0.92). The top attributes for success in GS included work ethic and passion for surgery. Technical skills that felt to be most appropriate were open tasks (one-handed tie and subcuticular suture) and laparoscopic tasks (coordination, grasping, and cutting). PDs indicate that of the 3 domains, the largest proportion of trainees had difficulty reaching competence in technical skill. Consensus among PDs suggests that top personal attributes include work ethic and passion for surgery. Consensus of technical tasks for inclusion into selection was basic open and laparoscopic skills. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The 2010 Thoracic Surgery Residents Association workforce survey report: a view from the trenches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkaria, Inderpal S; Carr, Shamus R; MacIver, Robroy H; Whitson, Bryan A; Joyce, David L; Stulak, John; Mery, Carlos M; Guitron, Julian; Singh, R Ramesh; Mettler, Bret; Turek, Joseph W

    2011-12-01

    Workforce estimates suggest 11% of general surgery residents are considering careers in cardiothoracic (CT) surgery. In an effort to identify areas for programmatic improvement, we examined trends in thoracic surgery residents' perspectives on training and employment. Results from the 2010 Thoracic Surgery Residents Association workforce survey were analyzed. The survey was administered to all trainees in North America during the annual in-service exam. Longitudinal trends from 2006 to 2010 are reported. Of 299 respondents, 76% (228 of 299) were US citizens. The most common determinants in choosing CT surgery were types of cases (123 of 299, 41%) and mentorship (95 of 299, 32%). Sixty-five percent (193 of 299) would recommend CT surgery to potential trainees. While 81% (242 of 299) felt they would be adequately trained in their program, 39% (118 of 299) planned additional fellowship training. Only 23% (70 of 299) felt the 80-hour work week had a positive impact on training. Of residents seeking jobs, 68% (62 of 92) received 2 or more job interviews and 70% (69 of 99) more than 1 job offer. Seventeen percent (16 of 92) had no offers. While 45% (51 of 114) reported still searching for employment, 20% (23 of 114) had accepted private practice positions, 25% (29 of 114) academic positions, and 6% (7 of 114) fellowship positions. Education-related debt was greater than $100,000 in 46% (140 of 299) and greater than $200,000 in 17% (52 of 299). From 2007 to 2010, CT residents reporting debt greater than $200,000 rose from 8% to 17%. Accepted fellowship training positions dropped to 6% in 2010 compared with 13% and 15% in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Diminished CT job opportunities remain a concern. There are concerning trends in debt accrual and perceptions of work-hour restrictions on quality of training. These data justify further investigation into areas of improvement in CT training. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  2. Teaching Residents and Program Directors about Physician Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broquet, Karen E.; Rockey, Paul H.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Residents are at a higher risk than the general population for the development of stress-related problems, depression, or suicide. The authors describe a curriculum for educating PGY-1s and residency program directors about physician impairment. Methods: A resident wellness program was established with the goals of preventing resident…

  3. Generation Y and the Integrated Plastic Surgery Residency Match: A Cross-sectional Study of the 2011 Match Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria R. Sue, MA

    2013-08-01

    Conclusions: US senior status, AOA membership, and attendance at a top 40 medical school are predictors of matching into integrated plastic surgery. Program directors need to be aware of the background of the millennial applicants to recruit and maintain top residents.

  4. Striving for work-life balance: effect of marriage and children on the experience of 4402 US general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Michael C; Yeo, Heather; Roman, Sanziana A; Bell, Richard H; Sosa, Julie A

    2013-03-01

    To determine how marital status and having children impact US general surgical residents' attitudes toward training and personal life. There is a paucity of research describing how family and children affect the experience of general surgery residents. Cross-sectional survey involving all US categorical general surgery residents. Responses were evaluated by resident/program characteristics. Statistical analysis included the χ test and hierarchical logistic regression modeling. A total of 4402 residents were included (82.4% response rate) and categorized as married, single, or other (separated/divorced/widowed). Men were more likely to be married (57.8% vs 37.9%, P work (P work (P work hours caused strain on family life (P work (P = 0.001), were happy at work (P = 0.001), and reported a good program fit (P = 0.034), but had strain on family life (P work [odds ratio (OR): 1.22, P = 0.035], yet feeling that work caused family strain (OR: 1.66, P work (OR: 0.81, P = 0.007). Residents who were married or parents reported greater satisfaction and work-life conflict. The complex effects of family on surgical residents should inform programs to target support mechanisms for their trainees.

  5. A residents' program for educating adolescents about mental health issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coverdale, J H; Battaglia, J; Bushong, C P

    1991-09-01

    This paper describes a school-based program in which psychiatry residents educate adolescents about a variety of mental health topics. Adolescents responded positively to the program and were principally concerned about drugs, depression, suicide, and family problems. Residents also liked presenting in the schools. Participation in this program allowed residents to learn about agency consultation and secondary prevention. Possibilities for program expansion are discussed.

  6. Bariatric surgery and the changing current scope of general surgery practice: implications for general surgery residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaedi, Rouzbeh; Ali, Mohamed R; Pierce, Jonathan L; Scherer, Lynette A; Galante, Joseph M

    2015-02-01

    The scope of general surgery practice has evolved tremendously in the last 20 years. However, clinical experience in general surgery residency training has undergone relatively little change. To evaluate the current scope of academic general surgery and its implications on surgical residency. The University HealthSystem Consortium and Association of American Medical Colleges established the Faculty Practice Solution Center (FPSC) to characterize physician productivity. The FPSC is a benchmarking tool for academic medical centers created from revenue data collected from more than 90,000 physicians who practice at 95 institutions across the United States. The FPSC database was queried to evaluate the annual mean procedure frequency per surgeon (PFS) in each calendar year from 2006 through 2011. The associated work relative value units (wRVUs) were also examined to measure physician effort and skill. During the 6-year period, 146 distinct Current Procedural Terminology codes were among the top 100 procedures, and 16 of these procedures ranked in the top 10 procedures in at least 1 year. The top 10 procedures accounted for more than half (range, 52.5%-57.2%) of the total 100 PFS evaluated for each year. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass was consistently among the top 10 procedures in each year (PFS, 18.2-24.6). The other most frequently performed procedures included laparoscopic cholecystectomy (PFS, 30.3-43.5), upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy (PFS, 26.5-34.3), mastectomy (PFS, 16.5-35.0), inguinal hernia repair (PFS, 15.5-22.1), and abdominal wall hernia repair (PFS, 21.6-26.1). In all years, laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass generated the highest number of wRVUs (wRVUs, 491.0-618.2), and laparoscopic cholecystectomy was regularly the next highest (wRVUs, 335.8-498.7). A significant proportion of academic general surgery is composed of bariatric surgery, yet surgical training does not sufficiently emphasize the necessary exposure to technical expertise

  7. Maternity leave: existing policies in obstetrics and gynecology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J L; Baillie, S; Hodgson, C S; Vontver, L; Platt, L D

    2001-12-01

    To survey program directors in obstetrics and gynecology regarding maternity leave and to determine how programs are dealing with maternity leave coverage. Questionnaires regarding impact and policy on maternity leave were mailed to accredited obstetrics and gynecology residency programs. A total of 188 of 274 (69%) questionnaires were returned completed. Respectively, 80% and 69% of respondents indicated that they have a formal maternity (maximum mean 8.7 weeks) and paternity (mean 5.27 days) leave policy. Approximately 75% of programs require residents to make up time if their leave exceeds 8 weeks during the first 3 years. Eighty-five percent of programs require residents to make up time if their leave exceeds 6 weeks during the fourth year. Ninety-three percent of programs require residents to make up time if their leave exceeds 20 weeks over the 4 years. Seventy-seven percent of respondents have other residents in their program cover for the absent resident. Thirty-seven percent of programs have schedules flexible enough to allow rearrangement so that some rotations go uncovered. Eighty-three percent of programs surveyed stated that maternity leave has a somewhat to very significant impact on the residents' schedules. Most residency programs have written maternity/paternity leave policies. A more flexible curriculum may help to accommodate the residents on leave without overburdening the residents who are left to cover.

  8. Factors used by program directors to select hand surgery fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, Matthew S; Bollinger, Alexander J; Cassidy, Charles; Jebson, Peter J L

    2014-11-01

    To identify factors and attributes hand surgery fellowship program directors consider important in selecting applicants for interview and ranking. A web-based questionnaire was sent to all hand fellowship program directors in the United States. The questionnaire was designed to identify the most important criteria in granting an interview, sources of letters of recommendation, the interview process, and factors used to rank a candidate. Each criterion was ranked in importance on a 1 to 5 Likert scale, with 1 being not important and 5 being critical. All responses were anonymous. The most important criterion for each section of the survey was determined by comparing the average Likert scores. Fifty-two of 76 program directors responded (68%). The criteria with the highest mean Likert scores for offering an applicant an interview were, in order, quality letters of recommendation from hand surgeons, completion of an orthopedic surgery residency, comments regarding the applicant's technical competence, applicant having an MD degree (as opposed to a DO degree), and residency program reputation. The letters of recommendation with the highest value were from the division chief of hand surgery and another hand surgeon in the division/department. The most important features of the interview were maturity of applicant, ability of applicant to articulate thoughts, ability to listen well, self-confidence, and relevant questions asked. The most important factors in ranking a candidate were applicant integrity, commitment to hard work, quality of letters of recommendation, quality of the interview, and ability to work well with other members of the hand surgery team. There are identifiable factors considered important by hand surgery fellowship directors when selecting and ranking an applicant. This information may be valuable to medical students and residents contemplating careers in hand surgery. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier

  9. Radiology resident teaching skills improvement: impact of a resident teacher training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Teaching is considered an essential competency for residents to achieve during their training. Instruction in teaching skills may assist radiology residents in becoming more effective teachers and increase their overall satisfaction with teaching. The purposes of this study were to survey radiology residents' teaching experiences during residency and to assess perceived benefits following participation in a teaching skills development course. Study participants were radiology residents with membership in the American Alliance of Academic Chief Residents in Radiology or the Siemens AUR Radiology Resident Academic Development Program who participated in a 1.5-hour workshop on teaching skills development at the 2010 Association of University Radiologists meeting. Participants completed a self-administered, precourse questionnaire that addressed their current teaching strategies, as well as the prevalence and structure of teaching skills training opportunities at their institutions. A second postcourse questionnaire enabled residents to evaluate the seminar and assessed new knowledge and skill acquisition. Seventy-eight residents completed the precourse and postcourse questionnaires. The vast majority of respondents indicated that they taught medical students (72 of 78 [92.3%]). Approximately 20% of residency programs (17 of 78) provided residents with formal didactic programs on teaching skills. Fewer than half (46.8%) of the resident respondents indicated that they received feedback on their teaching from attending physicians (36 of 77), and only 18% (13 of 78) routinely gave feedback to their own learners. All of the course participants agreed or strongly agreed that this workshop was helpful to them as teachers. Few residency programs had instituted resident teacher training curricula. A resident teacher training workshop was perceived as beneficial by the residents, and they reported improvement in their teaching skills. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by

  10. Does general surgery residency prepare surgeons for community practice in British Columbia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hamish

    2009-01-01

    Background Preparing surgeons for clinical practice is a challenging task for postgraduate training programs across Canada. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a single surgeon entering practice was adequately prepared by comparing the type and volume of surgical procedures experienced in the last 3 years of training with that in the first year of clinical practice. Methods During the last 3 years of general surgery training, I logged all procedures. In practice, the Medical Services Plan (MSP) of British Columbia tracks all procedures. Using MSP remittance reports, I compiled the procedures performed in my first year of practice. I totaled the number of procedures and broke them down into categories (general, colorectal, laparoscopic, endoscopic, hepatobiliary, oncologic, pediatric, thoracic, vascular and other). I then compared residency training with community practice. Results I logged a total of 1170 procedures in the last 3 years of residency. Of these, 452 were performed during community rotations. The procedures during residency could be broken down as follows: 392 general, 18 colorectal, 242 laparoscopic, 103 endoscopic, 85 hepatobiliary, 142 oncologic, 1 pediatric, 78 thoracic, 92 vascular and 17 other. I performed a total of 1440 procedures in the first year of practice. In practice the break down was 398 general, 15 colorectal, 101 laparoscopic, 654 endoscopic, 2 hepatobiliary, 77 oncologic, 10 pediatric, 0 thoracic, 70 vascular and 113 other. Conclusion On the whole, residency provided excellent preparation for clinical practice based on my experience. Areas of potential improvement included endoscopy, pediatric surgery and “other,” which comprised mostly hand surgery. PMID:19503663

  11. The impact of re-engineering a multi-institutional residency program on resident perceptions of the individual institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobkin, Eric; Fassler, Steven; Horowitz, Sheryl; Kirton, Orlando; Civetta, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    We report on the development of a survey tool used to assess resident perceptions of support and educational quality among multiple institutions in an integrated surgical residency, as well as its use in measuring the impact of re-engineering on that program. The University of Connecticut Integrated General Surgical Residency (UCIGSR) is a multisite program that was placed on probation by the Residency Review Committee in Surgery (RRC) in November 1998. This led to a re-evaluation and a re-engineering of the program. In order to better assess the residents' evaluation of the program, we serially examined their attitudes with a survey of 65 questions. A 4-point grading scale (1 = Poor, 4 = Excellent) was used, and each resident was required to complete a survey beginning shortly after RRC probation was announced and at 6-month intervals. Seven global questions in the survey, directed at residency program support and educational quality, were asked for each of the 4 individual adult hospitals, for a total of 28 questions. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using the Jonckhere-Terpstra and the Mann-Whitney U tests. The results demonstrated significant improvement for all 7 questions in all 4 hospitals between November 1998 (S1) and November 1999 (S3). Average scores for all 7 questions, Hospital Support (HS), Departmental Support (DS), Hospital Teaching (HT), Outpatient Teaching (OTC), Operating Room Teaching (ORT), Grand Rounds (GR), and Morbidity and Mortality Conferences (MM), improved in every hospital by 16-28%. In S1, 1 out of 28 questions received an average score greater than or equal to 3, whereas on the most recent survey, 17 of 28 scored greater than or equal to 3 and 78.5% of the questions demonstrated statistically significant improvement (p < 0.05). Three of the 4 hospitals now have a combined overall average score greater than or equal to 3 for all 7 questions. Areas of strength in each hospital had the least amount of improvement yet

  12. Improving Communication Skills: A Course for Academic Medical Center Surgery Residents and Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raper, Steven E; Gupta, Meera; Okusanya, Olugbenga; Morris, Jon B

    2015-01-01

    surgery. A course in communication, as developed here, quantitatively confirms the effectiveness of this approach to teaching communication skills as well as identifying areas for improvement. Such a course was part of a plan to increase the percentage of "top box" HCAHPS scores and percentile rankings. Faculty can impart the skills gained from such a course to residents attempting to successfully navigate the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Milestones and future careers as practicing surgeons. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Global Women's Health Education in Canadian Obstetrics and Gynaecology Residency Programs: A Survey of Program Directors and Senior Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Heather C; Randle, Elizabeth A; Scott, Heather M; Shaw, Dorothy; Kent, Nancy; Nakajima, Amy K; Spitzer, Rachel F

    2015-10-01

    To become culturally competent practitioners with the ability to care and advocate for vulnerable populations, residents must be educated in global health priorities. In the field of obstetrics and gynaecology, there is minimal information about global women's health (GWH) education and interest within residency programs. We wished to determine within obstetrics and gynaecology residency programs across Canada: (1) current GWH teaching and support, (2) the importance of GWH to residents and program directors, and (3) the level of interest in a national postgraduate GWH curriculum. We conducted an online survey across Canada of obstetrics and gynaecology residency program directors and senior obstetrics and gynaecology residents. Of 297 residents, 101 (34.0%) responded to the survey and 76 (26%) completed the full survey. Eleven of 16 program directors (68.8%) responded and 10/16 (62.5%) provided complete responses. Four of 11 programs (36.4%) had a GWH curriculum, 2/11 (18.2%) had a GWH budget, and 4/11 (36.4%) had a GWH chairperson. Nine of 10 program directors (90%) and 68/79 residents (86.1%) felt that an understanding of GWH issues is important for all Canadian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees. Only 1/10 program directors (10%) and 11/79 residents (13.9%) felt that their program offered sufficient education in these issues. Of residents in programs with a GWH curriculum, 12/19 (63.2%) felt that residents in their program who did not undertake an international elective would still learn about GWH, versus only 9/50 residents (18.0%) in programs without a curriculum (P < 0.001). Obstetrics and gynaecology residents and program directors feel that GWH education is important for all trainees and is currently insufficient. There is a high level of interest in a national postgraduate GWH educational module.

  14. Total Extraperitoneal Hernia Repair: Residency Teaching Program and Outcome Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Fabio; Mota-Moya, Pau; Munday, Andrew; Romy, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Total extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair has been shown to offer less pain, shorter postoperative hospital stay and earlier return to work when compared to open surgery. Our institution routinely performs TEP procedures for patients with primary or recurrent inguinal hernias. The aim of this study was to show that supervised senior residents can safely perform TEP repairs in a teaching setting. All consecutive patients treated for inguinal hernias by laparoscopic approach from October 2008 to June 2012 were retrospectively analyzed from a prospective database. A total of 219 TEP repairs were performed on 171 patients: 123 unilateral and 48 bilateral. The mean patient age was 51.6 years with a standard deviation (SD) of ± 15.9. Supervised senior residents performed 171 (78 %) and staff surgeons 48 (22 %) TEP repairs, respectively. Thirty-day morbidity included cases of inguinal paresthesias (0.4 %, n = 1), umbilical hematomas (0.9 %, n = 2), superficial wound infections (0.9 %, n = 2), scrotal hematomas (2.7 %, n = 6), postoperative urinary retentions (2.7 %, n = 6), chronic pain syndromes (5 %, n = 11) and postoperative seromas (6.7 %, n = 14). Overall, complication rates were 18.7 % for staff surgeons and 19.3 % for residents (p = 0.83). For staff surgeons and residents, mean operative times for unilateral hernia repairs were 65 min (SD ± 18.9) and 77.6 min (SD ± 29.8) (p = 0.043), respectively, while mean operative times for bilateral repairs were 115 min (SD ± 40.1) and 103.6 (SD ± 25.9) (p = 0.05). TEP repair is a safe procedure when performed by supervised senior surgical trainees. Teaching of TEP should be routinely included in general surgery residency programs.

  15. Factors influencing residency choice of general surgery applicants--how important is the availability of a skills curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Miles, William S; Greene, Frederick L

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the factors that impact residency choice by general surgery applicants and the importance of the availability of skill curricula. Fourth-year medical students (n = 104) interviewing for a general surgery position in an academic medical center voluntarily completed an anonymous survey detailing questions about the factors that influenced their choice of a residency program. Applicants were asked to rank in order of importance 14 factors potentially influencing their decision making and to address specifically the value of skills training. Data are reported as medians (range). The applicants' median age was 26 (range, 24-35) years; 44% were women, and the prior simulator exposure was 1 (range, 0-90) hour. The factors influencing the choice of residency in order of importance were the quality of life of current residents, the volume and variety of cases, and the quality of the curriculum (medians, 3-4), followed by the reputation of the institution and the program director, the location, and mentor advice (medians, 6-8); and the presence of expertise in areas of interest, the availability of a skills curriculum, the academic versus private designation, the efficiency of the hospital, and the size of residency (medians, 9-10). Women were more likely than men to rank lifestyle higher. Applicants' decision making was influenced positively in 92% by the presence of an organized skills curriculum. The main determinants of the applicants' choice of a general surgery program are the quality of life of the residents and the anticipated clinical experience and curriculum quality. The availability of organized skills curricula is low in the applicant priorities, but it does influence their decision-making process. These findings may help program directors to optimize their residency curriculum and interviewing process.

  16. Perspectives of Residents of Mashhad School of Dentistry about the Curriculum of Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Sarabadani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was carried out to analyze the viewpoint of the residents of school of dentistry about the curriculum presented in the residency program to students of Mashhad School of Dentistry. Methods: To evaluate the perspectives of residents of dental school about the curriculum and regulations of residency program, a questionnaire was designed whose validity and reliability were confirmed by the authorities of School of Dentistry and test-retest reliability, respectively. The questionnaire was distributed among 100 residents and 80 of them completed the questionnaires. The data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 11.5. Results: A total of 43% of residents were informed of the curriculum (e.g. academic leave, transfer, removal of semester, etc.. As for the ability to write research proposal, 42.7% of residents were reported to have a favorable status, i.e. they were able to write more than 80% of their proposal. From among the residents, 30.4% had specialized English language certificate. Most of them (77% were satisfied with the professional staff, faculty members, of the faculty. Many students liked to participate in the teaching method courses of the residency program. Conclusion: Residents maintained that the curriculum in such domains as educational and research issues and special capabilities had some weak points. Thus, appropriate strategies are recommended to be applied to revise the curriculum using the residents’ views on these programs.

  17. The Colorado Humanitarian Surgical Skills Workshop: A Cadaver-Based Workshop to Prepare Residents for Surgery in Austere Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yihan; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Meguid, Robert A; Kuwayama, David P

    2017-08-29

    Interest in humanitarian surgery is high among surgical and obstetric residents. The Colorado Humanitarian Surgical Skills Workshop is an annual 2-day course exposing senior residents to surgical techniques essential in low- and middle-income countries but not traditionally taught in US residencies. We evaluated the course's ability to foster resident comfort, knowledge, and competence in these skills. The cohort of course participants was studied prospectively. Participants attended didactic sessions followed by skills sessions using cadavers. Sample areas of focus included general surgery (mesh-free hernia repair), orthopedics (powerless external fixation), and neurosurgery (powerless craniotomy). Before and after the course, participants answered a questionnaire assessing confidence with taught skills; took a knowledge-based test composed of multiple choice and open-ended questions; and participated in a manual skills test of tibial external fixation. The Center for Surgical Innovation, University of Colorado School of Medicine. A total of 12 residents (11 general surgical and 1 obstetric) from ten US institutions. After the course, participants perceived increased confidence in performing all 27 taught procedures and ability to practice in low- and middle-income countries. In knowledge-based testing, 10 of 12 residents demonstrated improvement on multiple choice questioning and 9 of 12 residents demonstrated improvement on open-ended questioning with structured scoring. In manual skills testing, all external fixator constructs demonstrated objective improvement on structured scoring and subjective improvement on stability assessment. For senior residents interested in humanitarian surgery, a combination of skills-focused teaching and manual practice led to self-perceived and objective improvement in relevant surgical knowledge and skills. The Colorado Humanitarian Surgical Skills Workshop represents an effective model for transmitting essential surgical

  18. Generation Y and the Integrated Plastic Surgery Residency Match: A Cross-sectional Study of the 2011 Match Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue, Gloria R; Narayan, Deepak

    2013-08-01

    Plastic surgery is the most competitive specialty in medicine. We sought to identify factors associated with the successful match of generation Y applicants into integrated plastic surgery residency. We utilized the most recent data from the Charting Outcomes in the Match published by the National Resident Matching Program in 2011. We had data on US senior or independent applicant status, Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) status, attendance of top 40 medical schools, advanced degree status, and number of contiguous ranks within plastic surgery. Our main outcome measure was match status. A total of 81 out of 197 applicants (41.1%) successfully matched into integrated plastic surgery in the 2011 main match. US seniors matched at a significantly higher rate compared to independent applicants (44.0% vs 24.1%, P = 0.044). Matched US seniors were more likely to have AOA membership compared to unmatched US seniors (45.9% vs 27.7%, P = 0.014) and attend a top 40 medical school (52.7% vs 35.1%, P = 0.022). There were no differences in terms of advanced degrees between matched and unmatched US seniors. Unmatched US seniors were more likely to have 3 or fewer contiguous ranks of plastic surgery residency programs than matched US seniors (86.2% vs 68.9%, P = 0.007). US senior status, AOA membership, and attendance at a top 40 medical school are predictors of matching into integrated plastic surgery. Program directors need to be aware of the background of the millennial applicants to recruit and maintain top residents.

  19. [Medical residency program: perceptions of medical residents in hospitals of Lima and Callao].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miní, Elsy; Medina, Julio; Peralta, Verónica; Rojas, Luis; Butron, Joece; Gutiérrez, Ericson L

    2015-01-01

    In order to rate the medical residency training program from the perceptions of residents, a structured survey, based on international literature, was applied to 228 participants. 48.2% of residents rated their training as “good,” 36.4% as “fair” and 15.4% as “poor”. Most of the residents had low supervision while on call, were overworked and did not have rest after being on call. Having a good annual curriculum (OR: 8.5; 95% CI: 4.1 to 7.4) and university promotion of research (OR 2.4, 95% CI: 1.1 to 5.2) were independent factors associated with higher ratings of training. In conclusion, the rating of residents about their training is mostly good, but this percentage does not exceed 50%. Training authorities could use these results to propose improvements in training programs for medical residents in Peru.

  20. Wellness: A Developmental Programming Model for Residence Halls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Mark J.

    1985-01-01

    Demonstrates how a Wellness model can be an effective vehicle for promoting developmental programs in residence halls. The Wellness model is examined in terms of marketing, student development theory, and balanced programming. (BL)

  1. Dedicated Research Time During Surgery Residency Leads to a Significant Decline In Self-Assessed Clinical Aptitude and Surgical Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grova, Monica M; Yang, Anthony D; Humphries, Misty D; Galante, Joseph M; Salcedo, Edgardo S

    2017-05-19

    The surgical community commonly perceives a decline in surgical and patient care skills among residents who take dedicated time away from clinical activity to engage in research. We hypothesize that residents perceive a decline in their skills because of dedicated research time. UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, an institutional tertiary care center. General surgery residents and graduates from UC Davis general surgery residency training program, who had completed at least 1 year of research during their training. A total of 35 people were asked to complete the survey, and 19 people submitted a completed survey. Participants were invited to complete an online survey. Factors associated with the decline in skills following their research years were examined. All statistical analyses were performed with IBM SPSS Statistics software. A total of 19 current or former general surgery residents responded to the survey (54% response rate). Overall, 42% described their research as "basic science." Thirteen residents (68%) dedicated 1 year to research, while the remainder spent 2 or more years. Basic science researchers were significantly more likely to report a decrease in clinical judgment (75% vs. 22%, p = 0.013) as well as a decrease in patient care skills (63% vs. 0%, p = 0.002). Residents who dedicated at least 2 years to research were more likely to perceive a decline in overall aptitude and surgical skills (100% vs. 46%, p = 0.02), and a decline in patient care skills (67% vs. 8%, p = 0.007). Most residents who dedicate time for research perceive a decline in their overall clinical aptitude and surgical skills. This can have a dramatic effect on the confidence of these residents in caring for patients and leading a care team once they re-enter clinical training. Residents who engaged in 2 or more years of research were significantly more likely to perceive these problems. Further research should determine how to keep residents who are interested in academics

  2. Supplementary Educational Models in Canadian Neurosurgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Won Hyung A; Chan, Sonny; Sutherland, Garnette R

    2017-03-01

    The proposed implementation of work hour restrictions has presented a significant challenge of maintaining the quality of resident education and ensuring adequate hands-on experience that is essential for novice surgeons. To maintain the level of resident surgical competency, revision of the apprentice model of surgical education to include supplementary educational methods, such as laboratory and virtual reality (VR) simulations, have become frequent topics of discussion. We aimed to better understand the role of supplementary educational methods in Canadian neurosurgery residency training. An online survey was sent to program directors of all 14 Canadian neurosurgical residency programs and active resident members of the Canadian Neurosurgical Society (N=85). We asked 16 questions focusing on topics of surgeon perception, current implementation and barriers to supplementary educational models. Of the 99 surveys sent, 8 out of 14 (57%) program directors and 37 out of 85 (44%) residents completed the survey. Of the 14 neurosurgery residency programs across Canada, 7 reported utilizing laboratory-based teaching within their educational plan, while only 3 programs reported using VR simulation as a supplementary teaching method. The biggest barriers to implementing supplementary educational methods were resident availability, lack of resources, and cost. Work-hour restrictions threaten to compromise the traditional apprentice model of surgical training. The potential value of supplementary educational methods for surgical education is evident, as reported by both program directors and residents across Canada. However, availability and utilization of laboratory and VR simulations are limited by numerous factors such as time constrains and lack of resources.

  3. Effect of residents' previous laparoscopic surgery experience on initial robotic suturing experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Gokhan Sami; Walsh, Teresa M; Borahay, Mostafa; Zeybek, Burak; Wen, Michael; Breitkopf, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To assess the impact of gynecology residents' previous laparoscopic experience on the learning curve of robotic suturing techniques and the value of initial structured teaching in dry lab prior to surgery. Methods. Thirteen gynecology residents with no previous robotic surgery experience were divided into Group 1, consisting of residents with 2 or fewer laparoscopic experiences, and Group 2, consisting of residents with 3 or more laparoscopic experiences. Group 1 had a dry-laboratory training in suturing prior to their initial experience in the operating room. Results. For all residents, it took on average 382 ± 159 seconds for laparoscopic suturing and 326 ± 196 seconds for robotic suturing (P = 0.12). Residents in Group 1 had a lower mean suture time than residents in Group 2 for laparoscopic suturing (P = 0.009). The residents in Group 2, however, had a lower mean suture time on the robot compared to Group 1 (P = 0.5). Conclusion. Residents with previous laparoscopic suturing experience may gain more from a robotic surgery experience than those with limited laparoscopic surgery experience. In addition, dry lab training is more efficient than hands-on training in the initial phase of teaching for both laparoscopic and robotic suturing skills.

  4. Incorporation of lean methodology into pharmacy residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Natalie; Snider, Holly; Edgerton, Lisa; Whalin, Laurie

    2017-03-15

    The implementation of lean methodology into pharmacy residency programs at a community teaching hospital is described. New Hanover Regional Medical Center, a community teaching hospital in southeastern North Carolina, fully adopted a lean culture in 2010. Given the success of lean strategies organizationally, this methodology was used to assist with the evaluation and development of its pharmacy residency programs in 2014. Lean tools and activities have also been incorporated into residency requirements and rotation learning activities. The majority of lean events correspond to the required competency areas evaluating leadership and management, teaching, and education. These events have included participation in and facilitation of various lean problem-solving and communication tools. The application of the 4 rules of lean has resulted in enhanced management of the programs and provides a set of tools by which continual quality improvement can be ensured. Regular communication and direct involvement of all invested parties have been critical in developing and sustaining new improvements. In addition to program enhancements, lean methodology offers novel methods by which residents may be incorporated into leadership activities. The incorporation of lean methodology into pharmacy residency programs has translated into a variety of realized and potential benefits for the programs, the preceptors and residents, and the health system. Specific areas of growth have included quality-improvement processes, the expansion of leadership opportunities for residents, and improved communication among program directors, preceptors, and residents. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Does resident participation influence otolaryngology-head and neck surgery morbidity and mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Nicholas B; Reh, Douglas D; Eisele, David W; Francis, Howard W; Gourin, Christine G

    2016-10-01

    Patients may perceive resident procedural participation as detrimental to their outcome. Our objective is to investigate whether otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) housestaff participation is associated with surgical morbidity and mortality. Case-control study. OHNS patients were analyzed from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program 2006 to 2013 databases. We compared the incidence of 30-day postoperative morbidity, mortality, readmissions, and reoperations in patients operated on by resident surgeons with attending supervision (AR) with patients operated on by an attending surgeon alone (AO) using cross-tabulations and multivariable regression. There were 27,018 cases with primary surgeon data available, with 9,511 AR cases and 17,507 AO cases. Overall, 3.62% of patients experienced at least one postoperative complication. The AR cohort had a higher complication rate of 5.73% than the AO cohort at 2.48% (P < .001). After controlling for all other variables, there was no significant difference in morbidity (odds ratio [OR] = 1.05 [0.89 to 1.24]), mortality (OR = 0.91 [0.49 to 1.70]), readmission (OR = 1.29 [0.92 to 1.81]), or reoperation (OR = 1.28 [0.91 to 1.80]) for AR compared to AO cases. There was no difference between postgraduate year levels for adjusted 30-day morbidity or mortality. There is an increased incidence of morbidity, mortality, readmission, and reoperation in OHNS surgical cases with resident participation, which appears related to increased comorbidity with AR patients. After controlling for other variables, resident participation was not associated with an increase in 30-day morbidity, mortality, readmission, or reoperation odds. These data suggest that OHNS resident participation in surgical cases is not associated with poorer short-term outcomes. 3b Laryngoscope, 126:2263-2269, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Advanced airway management teaching in otolaryngology residency programs in Canada: A survey of residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Valérie; Kus, Lukas H; Zhang, Xun; Richardson, Keith; Nguyen, Lily H

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a study to assess residents' levels of comfort with advanced airway management in Canadian otolaryngology residency programs. In October 2008, an electronic questionnaire was sent to all otolaryngology residents in Canada. Responses were voluntary and anonymous. The response rate was 64.8% (94 of 145 residents). Residents were asked about the amount of teaching they received and the amount they would like to receive each year in four areas: emergency surgical airway, pediatric airway, airway trauma, and management of complications during laryngoscopy/bronchoscopy. They were also asked how comfortable they were with their current level of knowledge in these areas. Overall, residents were not comfortable with difficult airway situations, scoring a mean of 3.08 on a 5-point Likert scale. Residents were most comfortable with the emergency airway and least comfortable with the pediatric airway. Overall, residents indicated that they had not received adequate teaching on advanced airway management, and they consistently desired more. With respect to the type of instruction, most residents requested more teaching via simulations, mannequins, and cadaver or animal models. Linear regression models revealed a positive relationship between their overall comfort with airway management and the number of airway teaching hours they received. Their consensus was that formal airway training should occur during postgraduate year (PGY) 2, with refresher courses offered every 2 years. This is the first wide-scale assessment of the status of airway teaching in otolaryngology residency programs in Canada. Overall, our findings suggest that otolaryngology residents in these programs are not comfortable with advanced airway management early in their training and feel they would benefit from a significant increase in airway teaching time. Comfort levels improved with increasing levels of training such that PGY5 residents indicated they were indeed comfortable with advanced

  7. A theory-informed, process-oriented Resident Scholarship Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satid Thammasitboon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires residency programs to provide curricula for residents to engage in scholarly activities but does not specify particular guidelines for instruction. We propose a Resident Scholarship Program that is framed by the self-determination theory (SDT and emphasize the process of scholarly activity versus a scholarly product. Methods: The authors report on their longitudinal Resident Scholarship Program, which aimed to support psychological needs central to SDT: autonomy, competence, and relatedness. By addressing those needs in program aims and program components, the program may foster residents’ intrinsic motivation to learn and to engage in scholarly activity. To this end, residents’ engagement in scholarly processes, and changes in perceived autonomy, competence, and relatedness were assessed. Results: Residents engaged in a range of scholarly projects and expressed positive regard for the program. Compared to before residency, residents felt more confident in the process of scholarly activity, as determined by changes in increased perceived autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Scholarly products were accomplished in return for a focus on scholarly process. Conclusions: Based on our experience, and in line with the SDT, supporting residents’ autonomy, competence, and relatedness through a process-oriented scholarship program may foster the curiosity, inquisitiveness, and internal motivation to learn that drives scholarly activity and ultimately the production of scholarly products.

  8. Using Reflections of Recent Resident Graduates and their Pediatric Colleagues to Evaluate a Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Kamei, M.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purposes: In response to the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME mandate for residency programs to use feedback to improve its educational program, we piloted a novel evaluation strategy of a residency program using structured interviews of resident graduates working in a primary care practice and their physician associates. Methods: A research assistant performed a structured telephone interview. Quantitative data assessing the graduate’s self-assessment and the graduate’s clinical practice by the associate were analyzed. In addition, we performed a qualitative analysis of the interviews. Results: Thirteen resident graduates in primary care practice and seven physician practice associates participated in the study. Graduate self-assessment revealed high satisfaction with their residency training and competency. The associates judged our graduates as highly competent and mentioned independent decision-making and strong interpersonal skills (such as teamwork and communication as important. They specifically cited the graduate’s skills in intensive care medicine and adolescent medicine as well as communication and teamwork skills as important contributions to their practice. Conclusions: The ACGME Outcomes Project, which increases the emphasis on educational outcomes in the accreditation of residency education programs, requires programs to provide evidence of its effectiveness in preparing residents for practice. Direct assessment of the competency of our physician graduates in practice using structured interviews of graduates and their practice associates provide useful feedback information to a residency program as part of a comprehensive evaluation plan of our program’s curriculum and can be used to direct future educational initiatives of our training program

  9. Residents' perceptions of implant surgical training in advanced education in prosthodontic programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Lee, Damian J; Knoernschild, Kent L; Campbell, Stephen D; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess residents' perspectives on their implant surgical training in Advanced Education in Prosthodontic programs in the United States. Questionnaires were distributed to all prosthodontic residents (N = 442). The 27 questions assessed the subjective and objective aspects of implant surgical training from the view of prosthodontic residents. The data were compiled and reported as frequencies. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. One hundred and ninety-eight responses (44.8%) were received and analyzed. Forty-seven percent (94) of the respondents felt that the philosophy of their programs regarding implant placement in prosthodontics was "optional but encouraged," whereas 30% (60) felt that it was "mandatory." The majority of the respondents (73%, 144) stated that their programs allowed them to place implants for their own patients. For those respondents who placed their own implants, 40% (58) of them indicated that the level of their clinical training was "competent." Almost half of the respondents expressed that they would like to have a proficient level of clinical training in implant surgery by the completion of their residency programs. Forty-four percent (87) of the respondents felt their residency training adequately prepared them for implant surgery, whereas the other 37% (73) did not. For those who did not, 74% (55) felt their residency programs should have prepared them for implant surgical training. The current generation of prosthodontic residents has an opportunity to place implants in their programs and would like to be trained in surgical aspects of implant dentistry at the level of competency or higher. © 2010 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  10. Learning styles of medical students, general surgery residents, and general surgeons: implications for surgical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Surgical education is evolving under the dual pressures of an enlarging body of knowledge required during residency and mounting work-hour restrictions. Changes in surgical residency training need to be based on available educational models and research to ensure successful training of surgeons. Experiential learning theory, developed by David Kolb, demonstrates the importance of individual learning styles in improving learning. This study helps elucidate the way in which medical students, surgical residents, and surgical faculty learn. Methods The Kolb Learning Style Inventory, which divides individual learning styles into Accommodating, Diverging, Converging, and Assimilating categories, was administered to the second year undergraduate medical students, general surgery resident body, and general surgery faculty at the University of Alberta. Results A total of 241 faculty, residents, and students were surveyed with an overall response rate of 73%. The predominant learning style of the medical students was assimilating and this was statistically significant (p < 0.03) from the converging learning style found in the residents and faculty. The predominant learning styles of the residents and faculty were convergent and accommodative, with no statistically significant differences between the residents and the faculty. Conclusions We conclude that medical students have a significantly different learning style from general surgical trainees and general surgeons. This has important implications in the education of general surgery residents. PMID:20591159

  11. Learning styles of medical students, general surgery residents, and general surgeons: implications for surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Paul T; de Gara, Chris

    2010-06-30

    Surgical education is evolving under the dual pressures of an enlarging body of knowledge required during residency and mounting work-hour restrictions. Changes in surgical residency training need to be based on available educational models and research to ensure successful training of surgeons. Experiential learning theory, developed by David Kolb, demonstrates the importance of individual learning styles in improving learning. This study helps elucidate the way in which medical students, surgical residents, and surgical faculty learn. The Kolb Learning Style Inventory, which divides individual learning styles into Accommodating, Diverging, Converging, and Assimilating categories, was administered to the second year undergraduate medical students, general surgery resident body, and general surgery faculty at the University of Alberta. A total of 241 faculty, residents, and students were surveyed with an overall response rate of 73%. The predominant learning style of the medical students was assimilating and this was statistically significant (p learning style found in the residents and faculty. The predominant learning styles of the residents and faculty were convergent and accommodative, with no statistically significant differences between the residents and the faculty. We conclude that medical students have a significantly different learning style from general surgical trainees and general surgeons. This has important implications in the education of general surgery residents.

  12. Robotic Surgery Simulator: Elements to Build a Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillou, Xavier; Collon, Sylvie; Martin-Francois, Sandrine; Doerfler, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Face, content, and construct validity of robotic surgery simulators were confirmed in the literature by several studies, but elements to build a training program are still lacking. The aim of our study was to validate a progressive training program and to assess according to prior surgical experience the amount of training needed with a robotic simulator to complete the program. Exercises using the Da Vinci Skill Simulator were chosen to ensure progressive learning. A new exercise could only be started if a minimal score of 80% was achieved in the prior one. The number of repetitions to achieve an exercise was not limited. We devised a "performance index" by calculating the ratio of the sum of scores for each exercise over the number of repetitions needed to complete the exercise with at least an 80% score. The study took place at the François Baclesse Cancer Center. Participants all work at the primary care university Hospital located next to the cancer center. A total of 32 surgeons participated in the study- 2 experienced surgeons, 8 junior and 8 senior residents in surgery, 6 registrars, and 6 attending surgeons. There was no difference between junior and senior residents, whereas the registrars had better results (p < 0.0001). The registrars performed less exercise repetitions compared to the junior or senior residents (p = 0.012). Attending surgeons performed significantly more repetitions than registrars (p = 0.024), but they performed fewer repetitions than junior or senior residents with no statistical difference (p = 0.09). The registrars had a performance index of 50, which is the best result among all novice groups. Attending surgeons were between senior and junior residents with an index at 33.85. Choice of basic exercises to manipulate different elements of the robotic surgery console in a specific and progressive order enables rapid progress. The level of prior experience in laparoscopic surgery affects outcomes. More advanced laparoscopic expertise

  13. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Surgery Resident Operative Logs: The Last Quarter Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Aarabi, Shahram; Garland, Brandon T; Huntington, Ciara R; McAteer, Jarod P; Richards, Morgan K; Zern, Nicole Kansier; Gow, Kenneth W

    2017-05-01

    To describe secular trends in operative experience for surgical trainees across an extended period using the most comprehensive data available, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs. Some experts have expressed concern that current trainees are inadequately prepared for independent practice. One frequently mentioned factor is whether duty hours' restrictions (DHR) implemented in 2003 and 2004 contributed by reducing time spent in the operating room. A dataset was generated from annual ACGME reports. Operative volume for total major cases (TMC), defined categories, and four index laparoscopic procedures was evaluated. TMC dropped after implementation of DHR but rebounded after a transition period (949 vs 946 cases, P = nonsignificance). Abdominal cases increased from 22% of overall cases to 31%. Alimentary cases increased from 21% to 26%. Trauma and vascular surgery substantially decreased. For trauma, this drop took place well before DHR. The decrease in vascular surgery also began before DHR but continued afterward as well: 148 cases/resident in the late 1990s to 107 currently. Although total operative volume rebounded after implementation of DHR, diversity of operative experienced narrowed. The combined increase in alimentary and abdominal cases is nearly 13%, over a half-year's worth of operating in 5-year training programs. Bedrock general surgery cases-trauma, vascular, pediatrics, and breast-decreased. Laparoscopic operations have steadily increased. If the competence of current graduates has, in fact, diminished. Our analysis suggests that operative volume is not the problem. Rather, changing disease processes, subspecialization, reductions in resident autonomy, and technical innovation challenge how today's general surgeons are trained.

  14. Working and training conditions of residents in pediatric surgery: a nationwide survey in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reismann, M; Ellerkamp, V; Dingemann, J

    2010-09-01

    As in other surgical specialties, increasing concern has been expressed worldwide about the shortage of trainees in pediatric surgery training programs. We performed a nationwide survey to investigate the current situation in Germany. An internet-based nationwide survey comprising 36 questions on training conditions in pediatric surgery was linked to the homepage of the German Society of Pediatric Surgery from June to September 2008. Statements on the following aspects were evaluated by responding residents using a scale from 1 (I do not agree at all) to 5 (I fully agree): workplace, cooperation with colleagues, head of the department, cooperation with other specialties, training and research conditions. A median value of 3 indicated an unsatisfactory assessment, with at least 50% of respondents giving an indifferent or negative response. 70 questionnaires were completed. Some of the evaluations revealed problematic areas. In particular, statements regarding working hours revealed dissatisfaction among the responding doctors. The median value accorded the statement "I am satisfied with the current working time regulation" was 2.9. With regard to departmental heads, some criticisms were directed against a perceived lack of soft skills. According to the respondents, their involvement in decision-making processes was insufficient ("We are involved in decision-making processes affecting our working conditions" - median value 2.4). Residents were also dissatisfied with the feedback they received for their work ("I get enough feedback regarding my achievement" - median value 2.6). Another problem area was career development ("I will finish my specialist training in time" - median value 2.9). However, these points did not affect overall satisfaction. Trainee satisfaction with regulations on working hours is low. Despite a general satisfaction with all fields appraised, improvements in various individual areas, e. g., the attitude of departmental heads and strategies of

  15. Change of residence and functional status within three months and one year following hip fracture surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza-Vega, Patrocinio; Jiménez-Moleón, José Juan; Kristensen, Morten Tange

    2014-01-01

    To study the recovery of patients in terms of 18 activities of daily living and change of residence within the year following a hip fracture. This prospective cohort study was carried out in a trauma service of an acute hospital in southern Spain including 159 patients with a hip fracture, 65 years or older and allowed weight-bearing after surgery. Patients or their relatives were interviewed about their residential status and functional level at pre-fracture, three months and one year after surgery, using the Functional Independence Measure. Losses of function for the main activities affected were, at the first month, third month and one year relative to the pre-fracture status, 50%, 25% and 12%, respectively, for locomotion, 40%, 25% and 20%, respectively, for mobility and 27%, 17% and 15%, respectively, for self care (p loss of independence in the first year after a hip fracture is substantial for specific activities. Recovery mainly takes place during the first three months after surgery. Change of residence mostly involved those patients who lived alone in their own home at pre-fracture. Implications for Rehabilitation One year after fracture, patients did not recover their previous function, and the activities most affected at the one-year follow-up were: dressing lower body, bathing/showering, transfer bathtub/shower and walking up/down stairs. After a hip fracture, most recovery of the function happens within the first three months, though some functional activities continue recovering over the first year. Rehabilitation programs cannot be based only on mobility activities, the recovery of other daily living activities should also be included.

  16. Catheter-Based Educational Experiences: A Canadian Survey of Current Residents and Recent Graduates in Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanda, Nadzir; Chan, Vincent; Chan, Ryan; Rubens, Fraser D

    2016-03-01

    The past decade has witnessed significant developments in the use of catheter-based therapies in cardiovascular medicine. We sought to assess the educational opportunities for cardiac surgery trainees to determine their readiness for participation in these strategies. A web-based survey was distributed to current residents, recent graduates, and program directors in Canadian cardiac surgery residency programs from 2008-2013. The survey was distributed to 110 residents and graduates. Forty-five percent completed the survey. Thirty-five percent expressed that they experienced resistance organizing their rotations because they had to compete with non-cardiac surgery colleagues, and 6 were denied local cardiac catheterization rotations. By the end of the rotation, 56% were comfortable performing a diagnostic cardiac catheterization independently. Exposure to being the operator performing diagnostic catheterization was significantly associated with the positive perception of being able to perform a diagnostic catheterization independently (odds ratio [OR], 5.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-19.81; P = 0.017). Eighty-eight percent of respondents expressed the need for more exposure in catheter-based rotations. Seven of 11 program directors completed the survey. All believed such rotations should be mandatory and foresaw a bigger role for hybrid catheter-based/cardiac surgery procedures in the future. Trainees and program directors perceive that increased exposure to catheter-based therapies is important to career development as a cardiac surgeon. This survey will contribute to the development of a cardiac surgery training curriculum as we foresee more hybrid and team procedures.

  17. Factors Influencing Residency Program Selection by Medical Students Pursuing Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Meredith J; Metz, Torri D; Fothergill, Russell; Meg Autry, Amy; Wagner, Sarah A; Allshouse, Amanda A; Stephenson-Famy, Alyssa

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about the factors that influence medical student selection of obstetrics and gynecology (ob-gyn) residency programs. We assessed the factors influencing residency program selection by fourth-year medical students pursuing ob-gyn training. A voluntary, anonymous, 19-question survey of residency selection factors was distributed to all fourth-year medical students interviewing at 1 of 5 academic ob-gyn departments for a residency position during the 2013-2014 interview season. Participants were surveyed about the relative importance (not important, somewhat important, important) of various residency selection factors, including operative experience, exposure to subspecialties, curricular experience, access to fellowships, and administrative aspects of residency, including adherence to duty hour restrictions. Of 322 potential respondents, 262 (81%) completed the survey. Surgical training and training in laparoscopic surgery were deemed "important" by nearly all respondents (98%, 258 of 262, and 97%, 253 of 262, respectively). Factors that were considered "not important" by a significant group of respondents included maternity/paternity leave policies (22%, 58 of 259); opportunity for international rotations/electives (20%, 51 of 259); exposure to quality and safety initiatives (13%, 34 of 259); and training in abortion (13%, 34 of 262). Fourth-year medical students identified surgical training as the most important factor in selecting an ob-gyn residency, a finding that is particularly relevant as decreasing and changing surgical volumes affect residency training in this specialty.

  18. Global Health Education in US Pediatric Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butteris, Sabrina M; Schubert, Charles J; Batra, Maneesh; Coller, Ryan J; Garfunkel, Lynn C; Monticalvo, David; Moore, Molly; Arora, Gitanjli; Moore, Melissa A; Condurache, Tania; Sweet, Leigh R; Hoyos, Catalina; Suchdev, Parminder S

    2015-09-01

    Despite the growing importance of global health (GH) training for pediatric residents, few mechanisms have cataloged GH educational opportunities offered by US pediatric residency programs. We sought to characterize GH education opportunities across pediatric residency programs and identify program characteristics associated with key GH education elements. Data on program and GH training characteristics were sought from program directors or their delegates of all US pediatric residency programs during 2013 to 2014. These data were used to compare programs with and without a GH track as well as across small, medium, and large programs. Program characteristics associated with the presence of key educational elements were identified by using bivariate logistic regression. Data were collected from 198 of 199 active US pediatric residency programs (99.5%). Seven percent of pediatric trainees went abroad during 2013 to 2014. Forty-nine programs (24.7%) reported having a GH track, 66.1% had a faculty lead, 58.1% offered international field experiences, and 48.5% offered domestic field experiences. Forty-two percent of programs reported international partnerships across 153 countries. Larger programs, those with lead faculty, GH tracks, or partnerships had significantly increased odds of having each GH educational element, including pretravel preparation. The number of pediatric residency programs offering GH training opportunities continues to rise. However, smaller programs and those without tracks, lead faculty, or formal partnerships lag behind with organized GH curricula. As GH becomes an integral component of pediatric training, a heightened commitment is needed to ensure consistency of training experiences that encompass best practices in all programs. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Benchmarks of support in internal medicine residency training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfsthal, Susan D; Beasley, Brent W; Kopelman, Richard; Stickley, William; Gabryel, Timothy; Kahn, Marc J

    2002-01-01

    To identify benchmarks of financial and staff support in internal medicine residency training programs and their correlation with indicators of quality. A survey instrument to determine characteristics of support of residency training programs was mailed to each member program of the Association of Program Directors of Internal Medicine. Results were correlated with the three-year running average of the pass rates on the American Board of Internal Medicine certifying examination using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Of 394 surveys, 287 (73%) were completed: 74% of respondents were program directors and 20% were both chair and program director. The mean duration as program director was 7.5 years (median = 5), but it was significantly lower for women than for men (4.9 versus 8.1; p =.001). Respondents spent 62% of their time in educational and administrative duties, 30% in clinical activities, 5% in research, and 2% in other activities. Most chief residents were PGY4s, with 72% receiving compensation additional to base salary. On average, there was one associate program director for every 33 residents, one chief resident for every 27 residents, and one staff person for every 21 residents. Most programs provided trainees with incremental educational stipends, meals while oncall, travel and meeting expenses, and parking. Support from pharmaceutical companies was used for meals, books, and meeting expenses. Almost all programs provided meals for applicants, with 15% providing travel allowances and 37% providing lodging. The programs' board pass rates significantly correlated with the numbers of faculty fulltime equivalents (FTEs), the numbers of resident FTEs per office staff FTEs, and the numbers of categorical and preliminary applications received and ranked by the programs in 1998 and 1999. Regression analyses demonstrated three independent predictors of the programs' board pass rates: number of faculty (a positive predictor), percentage of clinical work

  20. Otolaryngology Residency Program Research Resources and Scholarly Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villwock, Jennifer A; Hamill, Chelsea S; Nicholas, Brian D; Ryan, Jesse T

    2017-06-01

    Objective To delineate research resources available to otolaryngology residents and their impact on scholarly productivity. Study Design Survey of current otolaryngology program directors. Setting Otolaryngology residency programs. Subjects and Methods An anonymous web-based survey was sent to 98 allopathic otolaryngology training program directors. Fisher exact tests and nonparametric correlations were used to determine statistically significant differences among various strata of programs. Results Thirty-nine percent (n = 38) of queried programs responded. Fourteen (37%) programs had 11 to 15 full-time, academic faculty associated with the residency program. Twenty (53%) programs have a dedicated research coordinator. Basic science lab space and financial resources for statistical work were present at 22 programs (58%). Funding is uniformly provided for presentation of research at conferences; a minority of programs (13%) only funded podium presentations. Twenty-four (63%) have resident research requirements beyond the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) mandate of preparing a "manuscript suitable for publication" prior to graduation. Twenty-five (67%) programs have residents with 2 to 3 active research projects at any given time. None of the investigated resources were significantly associated with increased scholarly output. There was no uniformity to research curricula. Conclusions Otolaryngology residency programs value research, evidenced by financial support provided and requirements beyond the ACGME minimum. Additional resources were not statistically related to an increase in resident research productivity, although they may contribute positively to the overall research experience during training. Potential future areas to examine include research curricula best practices, how to develop meaningful mentorship and resource allocation that inspires continued research interest, and intellectual stimulation.

  1. Surgery and Medicine Residents' Perspectives of Morbidity and Mortality Conference: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Improve ACGME Core Competency Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn-O'Brien, Katherine T; Mandell, Samuel P; Eaton, Erik Van; Schleyer, Anneliese M; McIntyre, Lisa K

    2015-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality conferences (MMCs) are often used to fulfill the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) competency, but there is variation among institutions and disciplines in their approach to MMCs. The objective of this study is to examine the trainees' perspective and experience with MMCs and adverse patient event (APE) reporting across disciplines to help guide the future implementation of an institution-wide, workflow-embedded, quality improvement (QI) program for PBLI. Between April 1, 2013, and May 8, 2013, surgical and medical residents were given a confidential survey about APE reporting practices and experience with and attitudes toward MMCs and other QI/patient safety initiatives. Descriptive statistics and univariate analyses using the chi-square test for independence were calculated for all variables. Logistic regression and ordered logistic regression were used for nominal and ordinal categorical dependent variables, respectively, to calculate odds of reporting APEs. Qualitative content analysis was used to code free-text responses. A large, multihospital, tertiary academic training program in the Pacific Northwest. Residents in all years of training from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited programs in surgery and internal medicine. Survey response rate was 46.2% (126/273). Although most respondents agreed or strongly agreed that knowledge of and involvement in QI/patient safety activities was important to their training (88.1%) and future career (91.3%), only 10.3% regularly or frequently reported APEs to the institution's established electronic incident reporting system. Senior-level residents in both surgery and medicine were more likely to report APEs than more junior-level residents were (odds ratio = 4.8, 95% CI: 3.1-7.5). Surgery residents had a 4.9 (95% CI: 2.3-10.5) times higher odds than medicine residents had to have reported an APE to

  2. Intraoperative flap complications in lasik surgery performed by ophthalmology residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Romero-Diaz-de-Leon

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Flap-related complications are common intraoperative event during LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmologists. Keratometries and surgeon's first procedure represent a higher probability for flap related complications than some other biometric parameters of patient's eye.

  3. Penn State Diversity Residency Program Celebrates First Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara I. Dewey

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Two librarians reflect on their experiences as participants in Penn State's Diversity Residency Program. An introduction is provided by Barbara Dewey, Dean of University Libraries & Scholarly Communications.

  4. Parental leave for residents and pediatric training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is committed to the development of rational, equitable, and effective parental leave policies that are sensitive to the needs of pediatric residents, families, and developing infants and that enable parents to spend adequate and good-quality time with their young children. It is important for each residency program to have a policy for parental leave that is written, that is accessible to residents, and that clearly delineates program practices regarding parental leave. At a minimum, a parental leave policy for residents and fellows should conform legally with the Family Medical Leave Act as well as with respective state laws and should meet institutional requirements of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education for accredited programs. Policies should be well formulated and communicated in a culturally sensitive manner. The AAP advocates for extension of benefits consistent with the Family Medical Leave Act to all residents and interns beginning at the time that pediatric residency training begins. The AAP recommends that regardless of gender, residents who become parents should be guaranteed 6 to 8 weeks, at a minimum, of parental leave with pay after the infant's birth. In addition, in conformance with federal law, the resident should be allowed to extend the leave time when necessary by using paid vacation time or leave without pay. Coparenting, adopting, or fostering of a child should entitle the resident, regardless of gender, to the same amount of paid leave (6-8 weeks) as a person who takes maternity/paternity leave. Flexibility, creativity, and advanced planning are necessary to arrange schedules that optimize resident education and experience, cultivate equity in sharing workloads, and protect pregnant residents from overly strenuous work experiences at critical times of their pregnancies.

  5. Teaching the Surgical Craft: Surgery Residents Perception of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    teaching methods including supervised exposure to graded operative experience and ... residents evaluated 33 variables that might have an impact on ... using Mann‑Whitney test. Statistical ... Operating theater atmosphere subscale had the highest score of 79.2% while .... In the operating theater I don't like being corrected.

  6. Food and Wine Value Chains: The Fearne Residency in the Adelaide Thinkers in Residence Program

    OpenAIRE

    Ronan, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    Andrew Fearne, Professor of Food Marketing and Supply Chain Management and a Director of the dunnhumby Academy of Consumer Research at Kent University, UK, is a current Thinker in the Adelaide Thinkers in Residence (ATIR) program. Professor Fearne is the 14th person to undertake a Thinkers appointment. The residency theme, Food and Wine Value Chains: Prosperity through Collaboration, has provided a timely opportunity for partners, including wine companies, government agencies, universities, a...

  7. A Comparison of Training Experience, Training Satisfaction, and Job Search Experiences between Integrated Vascular Surgery Residency and Traditional Vascular Surgery Fellowship Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvard, Benjamin; Shames, Murray; Schanzer, Andres; Rectenwald, John; Chaer, Rabih; Lee, Jason T

    2015-10-01

    The first 2 integrated vascular residents in the United States graduated in 2012, and in 2013, 11 more entered the job market. The purpose of this study was to compare the job search experiences of the first cohort of integrated 0 + 5 graduates to their counterparts completing traditional 5 + 2 fellowship programs. An anonymous, Web-based, 15-question survey was sent to all 11 graduating integrated residents in 2013 and to the 25 corresponding 5 + 2 graduating fellows within the same institution. Questions focused on the following domains: training experience, job search timelines and outcomes, and overall satisfaction with each training paradigm. Survey response was nearly 81% for the 0 + 5 graduates and 64% for the 5 + 2 graduates. Overall, there was no significant difference between residents and fellows in the operative experience obtained as measured by the number of open and endovascular cases logged. Dedicated research time during the entire training period was similar between residents and fellows. Nearly all graduates were extremely satisfied with their training and had positive experiences during their job searches with respect to starting salaries, numbers of offers, and desired practice type. More 0 + 5 residents chose academic and mixed practices over private practices compared with 5 + 2 fellowship graduates. Although longer term data are needed to understand the impact of the addition of 0 + 5 graduating residents to the vascular surgery work force, preliminary survey results suggest that both training paradigms (0 + 5 and 5 + 2) provide positive training experiences that result in excellent job search experiences. Based on the current and future need for vascular surgeons in the work force, the continued growth and expansion of integrated 0 + 5 vascular surgery residency positions as an alternative to traditional fellowship training is thus far justified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Academic Productivity of US Neurosurgery Residents as Measured by H-Index: Program Ranking with Correlation to Faculty Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkiss, Christopher A; Riley, Kyle J; Hernandez, Christopher M; Oermann, Eric K; Ladner, Travis R; Bederson, Joshua B; Shrivastava, Raj K

    2017-03-29

    resident and faculty level (average h-index 1.6, 1.9, 3.9 for 1, 2, and 3 resident per year programs, respectively, P < .001). Resident first-author publications correlated with recently described academic departmental productivity. Subspecialty resident publications are highest in cerebrovascular surgery. Resident research and publication is a key metric for assessing the productivity of academic neurosurgery programs and is consistent with one of the core foci of neurosurgical training.

  9. Emergency Medicine Resident Orientation: How Training Programs Get Their Residents Started

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Jillian; Barrie, Michael; Way, David P.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The first formal orientation program for incoming emergency medicine (EM) residents was started in 1976. The last attempt to describe the nature of orientation programs was by Brillman in 1995. Now almost all residencies offer orientation to incoming residents, but little is known about the curricular content or structure of these programs. The purpose of this project was to describe the current composition and purpose of EM resident orientation programs in the United States. Methods In autumn of 2014, we surveyed all U.S. EM residency program directors (n=167). We adapted our survey instrument from one used by Brillman (1995). The survey was designed to assess the orientation program’s purpose, structure, content, and teaching methods. Results The survey return rate was 63% (105 of 167). Most respondents (77%) directed three-year residencies, and all but one program offered intern orientation. Orientations lasted an average of nine clinical (Std. Dev.=7.3) and 13 non-clinical days (Std. Dev.=9.3). The prototypical breakdown of program activities was 27% lectures, 23% clinical work, 16% skills training, 10% administrative activities, 9% socialization and 15% other activities. Most orientations included activities to promote socialization among interns (98%) and with other members of the department (91%). Many programs (87%) included special certification courses (ACLS, ATLS, PALS, NRP). Course content included the following: use of electronic medical records (90%), physician wellness (75%), and chief complaint-based lectures (72%). Procedural skill sessions covered ultrasound (94%), airway management (91%), vascular access (90%), wound management (77%), splinting (67%), and trauma skills (62%). Conclusion Compared to Brillman (1995), we found that more programs (99%) are offering formal orientation and allocating more time to them. Lectures remain the most common educational activity. We found increases in the use of skills labs and specialty

  10. Are general surgery residents adequately prepared for hepatopancreatobiliary fellowships? A questionnaire-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Houssam; Parikh, Janak; Patel, Shirali; Jeyarajah, D Rohan

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study was conducted to assess the preparedness of hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB) fellows upon entering fellowship, identify challenges encountered by HPB fellows during the initial part of their HPB training, and identify potential solutions to these challenges that can be applied during residency training. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to all HPB fellows in accredited HPB fellowship programmes in two consecutive academic years (n = 42). Reponses were then analysed. Results A total of 19 (45%) fellows responded. Prior to their fellowship, 10 (53%) were in surgical residency and the rest were in other surgical fellowships or surgical practice. Thirteen (68%) were graduates of university-based residency programmes. All fellows felt comfortable in performing basic laparoscopic procedures independently at the completion of residency and less comfortable in performing advanced laparoscopy. Eight (42%) fellows cited a combination of inadequate case volume and lack of autonomy during residency as the reasons for this lack of comfort. Thirteen (68%) identified inadequate preoperative workup and management as their biggest fear upon entering practice after general surgery training. A total of 17 (89%) fellows felt they were adequately prepared to enter HPB fellowship. Extra rotations in transplant, vascular or minimally invasive surgery were believed to be most helpful in preparing general surgery residents pursing HPB fellowships. Conclusions Overall, HPB fellows felt themselves to be adequately prepared for fellowship. Advanced laparoscopic procedures and the perioperative management of complex patients are two of the challenges facing HPB fellows. General surgery residents who plan to pursue an HPB fellowship may benefit from spending extra rotations on certain subspecialties. Focus on perioperative workup and management should be an integral part of residency and fellowship training. PMID:25387852

  11. Evaluation of ethics education in obstetrics and gynecology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, John; Straub, Heather; DiGiovanni, Laura; Chor, Julie

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the current status of ethics education in obstetrics-gynecology residency programs. A cross-sectional, web-based survey was designed in conjunction with a professional survey laboratory at the University of Chicago. The survey was piloted with a convenience sample of clinical medical ethics fellows to assess question content and clarity. The survey was deployed by e-mail to all obstetrics-gynecology residency program directors. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze participant responses. The University of Chicago's Institutional Review Board deemed this study exempt from institutional review board formal review. Of 242 eligible obstetrics-gynecology residency program directors, 118 (49%) completed the survey. Most respondents were from university-based programs (n = 78, 66%) that were not religiously affiliated (n = 98, 83%) and trained 4-6 residents per postgraduate year (n = 64, 70%). Although 50% of program directors (n = 60) reported having ethics as part of their core curriculum, most programs teach ethics in an unstructured manner. Fifty-seven percent of respondents (n = 66) stated their program dedicated 5 or fewer hours per year to ethics. The majority of program directors (n = 80, 73%) responded they would like more to a lot more ethics education and believed that ethics education should be required (n = 93, 85%) for residents to complete their training. Respondents identified that crowding in the curriculum was a significant barrier to increased ethics training (n = 50, 45%) and two-thirds (n = 74, 67%) reported a lack of faculty expertise as a moderate barrier to providing ethics education in the residency curriculum. This study found that a lack of structured curricula, inadequate faculty expertise, and limited time were important barriers for ethics education in obstetrics-gynecology programs across the nation. Despite these existing challenges, program directors have a strong interest in increasing ethics

  12. Learning on human resources management in the radiology residency program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Aparecido Ferreira de; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Batista, Nildo Alves, E-mail: aparecidoliveira@ig.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina

    2014-03-15

    Objective: to investigate the process of learning on human resource management in the radiology residency program at Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, aiming at improving radiologists' education. Materials and methods: exploratory study with a quantitative and qualitative approach developed with the faculty staff, preceptors and residents of the program, utilizing a Likert questionnaire (46), taped interviews (18), and categorization based on thematic analysis. Results: According to 71% of the participants, residents have clarity about their role in the development of their activities, and 48% said that residents have no opportunity to learn how to manage their work in a multidisciplinary team. Conclusion: Isolation at medical records room, little interactivity between sectors with diversified and fixed activities, absence of a previous culture and lack of a training program on human resources management may interfere in the development of skills for the residents' practice. There is a need to review objectives of the medical residency in the field of radiology, incorporating, whenever possible, the commitment to the training of skills related to human resources management thus widening the scope of abilities of the future radiologists. (author)

  13. Learning on human resources management in the radiology residency program*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Aparecido Ferreira; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Batista, Nildo Alves

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the process of learning on human resource management in the radiology residency program at Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, aiming at improving radiologists' education. Materials and Methods Exploratory study with a quantitative and qualitative approach developed with the faculty staff, preceptors and residents of the program, utilizing a Likert questionnaire (46), taped interviews (18), and categorization based on thematic analysis. Results According to 71% of the participants, residents have clarity about their role in the development of their activities, and 48% said that residents have no opportunity to learn how to manage their work in a multidisciplinary team. Conclusion Isolation at medical records room, little interactivity between sectors with diversified and fixed activities, absence of a previous culture and lack of a training program on human resources management may interfere in the development of skills for the residents' practice. There is a need to review objectives of the medical residency in the field of radiology, incorporating, whenever possible, the commitment to the training of skills related to human resources management thus widening the scope of abilities of the future radiologists. PMID:25741056

  14. Learning on human resources management in the radiology residency program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecido Ferreira de Oliveira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the process of learning on human resource management in the radiology residency program at Escola Paulista de Medicina – Universidade Federal de São Paulo, aiming at improving radiologists' education. Materials and Methods Exploratory study with a quantitative and qualitative approach developed with the faculty staff, preceptors and residents of the program, utilizing a Likert questionnaire (46, taped interviews (18, and categorization based on thematic analysis. Results According to 71% of the participants, residents have clarity about their role in the development of their activities, and 48% said that residents have no opportunity to learn how to manage their work in a multidisciplinary team. Conclusion Isolation at medical records room, little interactivity between sectors with diversified and fixed activities, absence of a previous culture and lack of a training program on human resources management may interfere in the development of skills for the residents' practice. There is a need to review objectives of the medical residency in the field of radiology, incorporating, whenever possible, the commitment to the training of skills related to human resources management thus widening the scope of abilities of the future radiologists.

  15. Association Between Flexible Duty Hour Policies and General Surgery Resident Examination Performance: A Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blay, Eddie; Hewitt, D Brock; Chung, Jeanette W; Biester, Thomas; Fiore, James F; Dahlke, Allison R; Quinn, Christopher M; Lewis, Frank R; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2017-02-01

    Concerns persist about the effect of current duty hour reforms on resident educational outcomes. We investigated whether a flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policy (Flexible Policy) was associated with differential general surgery examination performance compared with current ACGME duty hour policy (Standard Policy). We obtained examination scores on the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination, Qualifying Examination (written boards), and Certifying Examination (oral boards) for residents in 117 general surgery residency programs that participated in the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial. Using bivariate analyses and regression models, we compared resident examination performance across study arms (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) for 2015 and 2016, and 1 year of the Qualifying Examination and Certifying Examination. Adjusted analyses accounted for program-level factors, including the stratification variable for randomization. In 2016, FIRST trial participants were 4,363 general surgery residents. Mean American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination scores for residents were not significantly different between study groups (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) overall (Flexible Policy: mean [SD] 502.6 [100.9] vs Standard Policy: 502.7 [98.6]; p = 0.98) or for any individual postgraduate year level. There was no difference in pass rates between study arms for either the Qualifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 90.4% vs Standard Policy: 90.5%; p = 0.99) or Certifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 86.3% vs Standard Policy: 88.6%; p = 0.24). Results from adjusted analyses were consistent with these findings. Flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policies were not associated with differences in general surgery resident performance on examinations during the FIRST Trial. However, more years under flexible duty hour policies might be needed to observe an effect. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons

  16. Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasse, Miriam; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To review the literature on teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents and to identify formats and content of these programs and their effects. DATA SOURCES Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to mid-July 2008) and the Education Resources Information Center database (pre-1966 to mid-July 2008) were searched using and combining the MeSH terms teaching, internship and residency, and family practice; and teaching, graduate medical education, and family practice. STUDY SELECTION The initial MEDLINE and Education Resources Information Center database searches identified 362 and 33 references, respectively. Titles and abstracts were reviewed and studies were included if they described the format or content of a teaching-skills program or if they were primary studies of the effects of a teaching-skills program for family medicine residents or family medicine and other specialty trainees. The bibliographies of those articles were reviewed for unidentified studies. A total of 8 articles were identified for systematic review. Selection was limited to articles published in English. SYNTHESIS Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents vary from half-day curricula to a few months of training. Their content includes leadership skills, effective clinical teaching skills, technical teaching skills, as well as feedback and evaluation skills. Evaluations mainly assessed the programs’ effects on teaching behaviour, which was generally found to improve following participation in the programs. Evaluations of learner reactions and learning outcomes also suggested that the programs have positive effects. CONCLUSION Family medicine residency training programs differ from all other residency training programs in their shorter duration, usually 2 years, and the broader scope of learning within those 2 years. Few studies on teaching-skills training, however, were designed specifically for family medicine residents. Further studies assessing the

  17. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by other documentation. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public...here that Belgium is more than just about chocolate , beers and waffles. 18) APPRAISAL OF RESEARCH ASSOCIATESHIP PROGRAM On a scale of 1 – 10 (poor

  18. The learning styles of orthopedic residents, faculty, and applicants at an academic program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Raveesh Daniel; Deegan, Brian Francis; Klena, Joel Christian

    2014-01-01

    To train surgeons effectively, it is important to understand how they are learning. The Kolb Learning Style Inventory (LSI) is based on the theory of experiential learning, which divides the learning cycle into 4 stages: active experimentation (AE), abstract conceptualization (AC), concrete experience, and reflective observation. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the learning styles of orthopedic residents, faculty, and applicants at an east-coast residency program. A total of 90 Kolb LSI, Version 3.1 surveys, and demographic questionnaires were distributed to all residency applicants, residents, and faculty at an academic program. Data collected included age, sex, type of medical school (MD or DO), foreign medical graduate status, and either year since college graduation, postgraduate year level (residents only), or years since completion of residency (faculty only). Seventy-one completed Kolb LSI surveys (14 residents, 14 faculty members, and 43 applicants) were recorded and analyzed for statistical significance. The most prevalent learning style among all participants was converging (53.5%), followed by accommodating (18.3%), diverging (18.3%), and assimilating (9.9%) (p = 0.13). The applicant and resident groups demonstrated a high tendency toward AE followed by AC. The faculty group demonstrated a high tendency toward AC followed by AE. None of the 24 subjects who were 26 years or under had assimilating learning styles, in significant contrast to the 12% of 27- to 30-year-olds and 18% of 31 and older group (p learning style involves problem solving and decision making, with the practical application of ideas and the use of hypothetical-deductive reasoning. Learning through AE decreased with age, whereas learning through AC increased. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Firearm injury prevention training in Preventive Medicine Residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, James H; Dake, Joseph A

    2009-08-01

    Preventive medicine plays a central role in the reducing the number of deaths due to preventable causes of premature deaths. General Preventive Medicine Residency programs have not been studied in relation to training in this area. A three-wave mail survey was conducted with email and telephone follow-ups. The outcome measures were the portion of program directors involved in training residents on firearm injury prevention issues and their perceived benefits and barriers of training residents on firearm injury prevention issues. Only 25% of the programs provided formal training on firearm injury prevention. Program directors who provided formal training perceived significantly higher number of benefits to offering such training than did directors who did not provide such training but no significant difference was found between the two for number of perceived barriers. If preventive medicine residency graduates are to play a role in reducing premature morbidity and mortality from firearms it will require more residencies to offer formal training in this area. The Association for Prevention Teaching and Research needs to develop guidelines on specific curriculum topics regarding firearm injury prevention.

  20. Program director and resident perspectives of a competency-based medical education anesthesia residency program in Canada: a needs assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Boet

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In July 2015, the University of Ottawa introduced a competency-based medical education (CBME postgraduate program for anesthesia. Prior to program implementation, this study aimed to identify Canadian anesthesiology program directors perceptions of CBME and residents’ opinion on how the program should be designed and perceived consequences of CBME. Methods: This two-phase, qualitative study included semi-structured interviews with Canadian anesthesia program directors (Phase I and a focus group interview with residents enrolled in the University of Ottawa time-based anesthesia program (Phase II. Both phases sought to gauge participant’s perceptions of CBME. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed. Results: Data was combined to protect anonymity of the six participants (three program directors and three residents. Participants spoke about the perceived advantages of CBME, the need to establish definitions, and challenges to a CBME program highlighting logistical factors, implications for trainees and the role assessment plays in CBME. Conclusion: These findings will inform CBME implementation strategies in anesthesia programs across the country, and may assist other residency programs in the design of their programs. Furthermore, our findings may help identify potential challenges and issues that other postgraduate specialties may face as they transition to a CBME model.

  1. Protected Resident Research Time Does Not Increase the Quantity or Quality of Residency Program Research Publications: A Comparison of 3 Orthopedic Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Chad A; Hoffman, Jeffery D; Balazs, George C; Johnson, Anthony E; Potter, Benjamin K; Belmont, Philip J

    The effect of dedicated resident research time in terms of residency program research productivity remains largely unknown. We hypothesize that the quantity and quality of a residency program's peer-reviewed publications (PRPs) increase proportionately with the amount of dedicated research time given to residents. Three residency programs (P1, P2, and P3) were examined. P1 has a mandatory research year for all residents between postgraduate years 3 and 4. P2 has an elective research year for 1 resident between postgraduate years 2 and 3. P3 has no dedicated research time for residents. All publications produced by residents and staff at each program from January 2007 through December were recorded from PUBMED. SCImago Journal Rankings were used as a proxy to measure research quality. There was no significant difference in the number of publications produced between the institutions on a per-staff (p = 0.27) and per-resident (p = 0.80) basis. There were no residents at P3 who graduated without at least 1 PRP, whereas there were 7 residents from P1 and 8 residents from P2 who graduated without a PRP. There were no significant differences between programs in terms of the SCImago Journal Ranking for the journals containing their publications (p = 0.135). Residency programs with dedicated research time did not produce significantly (p > 0.05) more, or higher quality, PRPs than residencies without dedicated research time. It may be that the quantity and quality of PRPs is related more to faculty engagement, research interest, and mentorship at individual programs rather than the number of residents given dedicated time to complete research. Level 3. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Bridging the Otolaryngology Peer Review Knowledge Gap: A Call for a Residency Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalbach, Cecelia E

    2016-07-01

    Current otolaryngology literature and future scientific direction rely heavily on a rigorous peer review process. Just as manuscripts warrant thoughtful review with constructive feedback to the authors, the same can be said for critiques written by novice peer reviewers. Formal scientific peer review training programs are lacking. Recognizing this knowledge gap, Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery is excited to offer its new Resident Reviewer Development Program. All otolaryngology residents who are postgraduate year 2 and above and in excellent academic standing are eligible to participate in this mentored program, during which they will conduct 6 manuscript reviews under the direction of a seasoned reviewer in his or her subspecialty area of interest. By completing reviews alongside a mentor, participants gain the required skills to master the peer review process-a first step that often leads to journal editorial board and associate editor invitations.

  3. Identification of Best Practices for Resident Aesthetic Clinics in Plastic Surgery Training: The ACAPS National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Scott Hultman, MD, MBA, FACS

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: RACs are an important component of plastic surgery education. Most clinics are financially viable but carry high malpractice risk and consume significant resources. Best practices, to maximize patient safety and optimize resident education, include use of accredited procedural rooms and direct faculty supervision of all components of care.

  4. Confidence Crisis Among General Surgery Residents: A Systematic Review and Qualitative Discourse Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfenbein, Dawn M

    2016-12-01

    In the surgical community, there is concern that general surgery residents are choosing subspecialty training in large numbers because of a crisis in confidence at the end of training. Confidence is an essential quality of surgeons, and recent studies have attempted to quantify and measure it in graduating general surgery residents. To systematically review the quality of evidence provided and to critically analyze the language used to describe the findings using quantitative methods. A systematic review of the PubMed indexed literature on general surgery resident confidence was performed in March 2015. A summative table of each study's hypothesis, definition of confidence, quality using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument, influence using Web of Science citations, results, and conclusions was created, and qualitative coding was applied to identify emerging themes. No date restrictions were used in the search. Fifteen survey studies have been performed that measure confidence or readiness to practice. Although 5 studies had neutral or positive conclusions, most studies reported low confidence in general surgery graduates. There are conflicting data about definitions of confidence. The relationships between confidence, autonomy, and competence are varied and complex. Comparisons with the past are frequent. Confidence is difficult to define and measure. Despite limitations, survey studies are used to shape discourse and influence policies. Social and cultural factors influence self-efficacy, and focusing on operative volume and autonomy alone may not address all of the reasons that some residents express concerns about readiness to practice.

  5. Weekly e-mailed teaching tips and reading material influence teaching among general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ammara A; Gondek, Stephen P; Lagisetty, Kiran H; Castillo-Angeles, Manuel; Gangadharan, Sidharta P; Cahalane, Michael J; Kent, Tara S

    2017-01-01

    A nonintrusive e-mail reminder incorporating teaching tips and manuscripts was developed to supplement resident-as-teacher curricula. Ten high-yield manuscripts and 10 teaching tips exemplifying the themes of mentorship or role modeling, teaching methods, adult learning theory, feedback, and the resident role of teaching were distributed to general surgery house staff through a weekly e-mail series. House staff completed surveys before and after the 20-week e-mail series. Thirty (43%) and 28 (40%) respondents completed the pre-e-mail and post-e-mail survey, respectively. Residents found teaching tips to be more helpful than manuscripts. Weekly e-mail reminders were "just right" in frequency according to 74% of respondents. Forty percent of residents felt the weekly e-mails helped them teach more often and 50% of residents changed their teaching style. Weekly reminders are an easy way to encourage resident teaching without a significant resident time commitment. Residents typically find teaching tips to be more useful than manuscripts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A dedicated scholarly research program in an adult and pediatric neurology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Matthew S; Haut, Sheryl R; Lipton, Richard B; Milstein, Mark J; Ocava, Lenore C; Ballaban-Gil, Karen; Moshé, Solomon L; Mehler, Mark F

    2017-04-04

    To describe and assess the effectiveness of a formal scholarly activity program for a highly integrated adult and pediatric neurology residency program. Starting in 2011, all graduating residents were required to complete at least one form of scholarly activity broadly defined to include peer-reviewed publications or presentations at scientific meetings of formally mentored projects. The scholarly activity program was administered by the associate residency training director and included an expanded journal club, guided mentorship, a required grand rounds platform presentation, and annual awards for the most scholarly and seminal research findings. We compared scholarly output and mentorship for residents graduating within a 5-year period following program initiation (2011-2015) and during the preceding 5-year preprogram baseline period (2005-2009). Participation in scholarship increased from the preprogram baseline (24 of 53 graduating residents, 45.3%) to the postprogram period (47 of 57 graduating residents, 82.1%, p Neurology.

  7. Training of Hysteroscopic Skills in Residency Program : The Dutch Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, Julienne A.; Driessen, Sara R. C.; Veersema, Sebastiaan; Broekmans, Frank J. M.; Jansen, Frank W.; Schreuder, HWR

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective To evaluate whether hysteroscopy training in the Dutch gynecological residency program is judged as sufficient in daily practice, by assessment of the opinion on hysteroscopy training and current performance of hysteroscopic procedures. In addition, the extent of progress in comparis

  8. A survey assessing the impact of a hospital-based general practice residency program on dentists and dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejani, Asif; Epstein, Joel B; Gibson, Gary; Le, Nhu

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to evaluate the outcome of completing a general practice hospital-based dental residency program. A survey was mailed to all individuals who had completed a general practice residency program (resident) between 1980 and 1996 and to dentists who had not completed a hospital program (undergraduate). The responses were evaluated by Fisher's exact test. Seventy-four percent of the resident group and 68% from the undergraduate sample group returned the questionnaire. Approximately half the residents were in general dental practice. Twenty-six percent were involved in specialty dentistry, 7% in hospital dentistry, and 20% in teaching at a dental school. Of the undergraduate dentists, more than three-quarters were in general practice, 5% were entered into specialty programs, 1% were involved in hospital dentistry, and 15% taught at a dental school. Half of the residents held staff privileges in a hospital or ambulatory setting, compared with 16% of undergraduates. Forty-three percent of the residents provided consultation in a hospital or long-term-care facility, compared with 21% of the undergraduates. Practice characteristics suggested enhanced clinical skills in oral surgery, periodontics, emergency dental care, and oral medicine/pathology in those completing the hospital program. The findings of this study confirm that the outcome of completing a hospital program is a change in practice profile, site of practice, services for complex patients, and continuing involvement in teaching.

  9. The Perry Initiative's Medical Student Outreach Program Recruits Women Into Orthopaedic Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanza, Lisa L; Meszaros-Dearolf, Laurie; O'Connor, Mary I; Ladd, Amy; Bucha, Amy; Trauth-Nare, Amy; Buckley, Jenni M

    2016-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgery lags behind other surgical specialties in terms of gender diversity. The percentage of women entering orthopaedic residency persistently remains at 14% despite near equal ratios of women to men in medical school classes. This trend has been attributed to negative perceptions among women medical students of workplace culture and lifestyle in orthopaedics as well as lack of exposure, particularly during medical school when most women decide to enter the field. Since 2012, The Perry Initiative, a nonprofit organization that is focused on recruiting and retaining women in orthopaedics, had conducted extracurricular outreach programs for first- and second-year female medical students to provide exposure and mentoring opportunities specific to orthopaedics. This program, called the Medical Student Outreach Program (MSOP), is ongoing at medical centers nationwide and has reached over 300 medical students in its first 3 program years (2012-2014). (1) What percentage of MSOP participants eventually match into orthopaedic surgery residency? (2) Does MSOP impact participants' perceptions of the orthopaedics profession as well as intellectual interest in the field? The percentage of program alumnae who matched into orthopaedics was determined by annual followup for our first two cohorts who graduated from medical school. All program participants completed a survey immediately before and after the program that assessed the impact of MSOP on the student's intention to pursue orthopaedics as well as perceptions of the field and intellectual interest in the discipline. The orthopaedic surgery match rate for program participants was 31% in our first graduating class (five of 16 participants in 2015) and 28% in our second class (20 of 72 participants in 2016). Pre/post program comparisons showed that the MSOP influenced students' perceptions of the orthopaedics profession as well as overall intellectual interest in the field. The results of our study suggest that

  10. Assessment of moral reasoning skills in the orthopaedic surgery resident applicant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Kyle C; Van Heest, Tyler; Gioe, Terence J; Agel, Julie; Johnson, Todd C; Van Heest, Ann

    2014-09-03

    Assessing orthopaedic surgery residency applicants is a complex process. One important applicant characteristic not commonly measured during the interview process is moral behavior, a key component of the guidelines of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education for professionalism competency. We sought to determine whether a relationship exists between the results of residency selection interviews, as measured by match rank order, and moral reasoning skills, as measured by the revised version of the Defining Issues Test (DIT-2). The DIT-2, a psychological tool that has been validated in assessing moral reasoning in >30,000 subjects, was administered to orthopaedic surgery residency candidates on a voluntary basis during their interview day. Data were collected annually from four applicant classes (2009 to 2012) at one institution. Each candidate was interviewed by an orthopaedic faculty team and was ranked comparatively with the other interviewing applicants. The five-part aggregate interview method for ranking applicants for the match list included a focused interview station presenting ethical dilemmas as one part of determining rank order. One hundred and twenty-four fourth-year medical students interviewing for orthopaedic surgery residency were assessed with the DIT-2. The results from the DIT-2 produced a postconventional score, which correlates with various levels of moral development. Each applicant's postconventional score was then compared with the patient's overall rank order. Applicants had highly variable moral reasoning skills, with no relationship to the final rank list. Despite a wide range of DIT-2 scores, the interview process did not differentiate applicants based on moral reasoning skills. It remains unclear whether the DIT-2 could (or should) be used as an additional data point to help stratify orthopaedic residency applicants and to predict their performance. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery

  11. The graduate nurse experience: qualitative residency program outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Regina; Krugman, Mary; Casey, Kathy; Goode, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    Graduate nurses experience role conflict and stress as they begin practice in work environments of high complexity, nurse shortages, and expectations to become competent rapidly. The authors report outcomes from a study that evaluated qualitative responses to the Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience Survey administered to graduate nurse residents in the University HealthSystem Consortium/American Association of Colleges of Nursing postbaccalaureate nurse residency program at 12 academic hospital sites. Qualitative analysis provided sufficient evidence to convert specific open-ended questions on the Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience Survey instrument to a quantitative format for ease of administration and analysis.

  12. The effect of residency and fellowship type on hand surgery clinical practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Karan; Pierce, Paul; Chiu, David T W; Thanik, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires accredited fellowship programs to exhibit proficiency in six broadly defined domains; however, core competencies specifically mandated for hand surgery training have yet to be established. Several studies have demonstrated significant disparities in exposure to essential skills and knowledge between orthopedic surgery- and plastic surgery-based hand surgery fellowship programs. To determine whether significant discrepancies also exist after fellowship between hand surgeons trained in orthopedic surgery and those trained in plastic surgery, clinical practice patterns were evaluated. A 20-question survey was created and distributed electronically to American Society for Surgery of the Hand and American Association for Hand Surgery members. Responses were compared using descriptive statistics. Nine hundred eighty-two hand surgeons (76 percent orthopedic and 24 percent plastic) responded, representing a 39 percent response rate. Most plastic surgery hand practices were academic-based (41 percent), whereas orthopedic practices were private (67 percent). More orthopedic hand surgeons worked in multipractitioner practices than plastic surgeons (54 percent versus 30 percent; p digital replantation cases (53 percent versus 22 percent; p < 0.05) but treated significantly fewer open reduction and internal fixation distal radius fractures. Orthopedic and plastic surgery hand surgeons differ significantly in their clinical practice patterns. Differences in clinical exposure during training are reflected in practice and persist over time. Referral patterns and practice situations are also contributors to ultimate practice patterns.

  13. Implementing a robotics curriculum at an academic general surgery training program: our initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Joshua S; Juza, Ryan M; Sasaki, Jennifer; Rogers, Ann M; Pauli, Eric M; Haluck, Randy S; Estes, Stephanie J; Lyn-Sue, Jerome R

    2016-09-01

    The robotic surgical platform is being utilized by a growing number of hospitals across the country, including academic medical centers. Training programs are tasked with teaching their residents how to utilize this technology. To this end, we have developed and implemented a robotic surgical curriculum, and share our initial experience here. Our curriculum was implemented for all General Surgical residents for the academic year 2014-2015. The curriculum consisted of online training, readings, bedside training, console simulation, participating in ten cases as bedside first assistant, and operating at the console. 20 surgical residents were included. Residents were provided the curriculum and notified the department upon completion. Bedside assistance and operative console training were completed in the operating room through a mix of biliary, foregut, and colorectal cases. During the fiscal years of 2014 and 2015, there were 164 and 263 robot-assisted surgeries performed within the General Surgery Department, respectively. All 20 residents completed the online and bedside instruction portions of the curriculum. Of the 20 residents trained, 13/20 (65 %) sat at the Surgeon console during at least one case. Utilizing this curriculum, we have trained and incorporated residents into robot-assisted cases in an efficient manner. A successful curriculum must be based on didactic learning, reading, bedside training, simulation, and training in the operating room. Each program must examine their caseload and resident class to ensure proper exposure to this platform.

  14. Effectiveness of a Core-Competency-based Program on Residents' Learning and Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean; Dobbs, Bonnie; Tian, Peter George; Babenko, Oksana

    2016-06-01

    The Care of the Elderly (COE) Diploma Program is a six-to-twelve-month enhanced skills program taken after two years of core residency training in Family Medicine. In 2010, we developed and implemented a core-competency-based COE Diploma program (CC), in lieu of one based on learning objectives (LO). This study assessed the effectiveness of the core-competency-based program on residents' learning and their training experience as compared to residents trained using learning objectives. The data from the 2007-2013 COE residents were used in the study, with nine and eight residents trained in the LO and CC programs, respectively. Residents' learning was measured using preceptors' evaluations of residents' skills/abilities throughout the program (118 evaluations in total). Residents' rating of training experience was measured using the Graduate's Questionnaire which residents completed after graduation. For residents' learning, overall, there was no significant difference between the two programs. However, when examined as a function of the four CanMEDS roles, there were significant increases in the CC residents' scores for two of the CanMEDS roles: Communicator/Collaborator/Manager and Scholar compared to residents in the LO program. With respect to residents' training experience, seven out of ten program components were rated by the CC residents higher than by the LO residents. The implementation of a COE CC program appears to facilitate resident learning and training experience.

  15. Orthopedic surgery fellowships: the effects of interviewing and how residents establish a rank list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesen, Matthew C; Wong, Jeffrey; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Sangiorgio, Sophia; SooHoo, Nelson Fong; Luck, James V; Eckardt, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    The Orthopaedic Fellowship Match was established in 2008 to streamline and improve the process of matching residents and fellowships. The purpose of this study was to quantify the factors that affect the application process and to determine how residents establish a rank list. The Orthopaedic Fellowship Match has improved the ability of residents and programs to consider their options more carefully and to focus on finding the best match. However, this process introduces new factors for all parties involved to consider. The costs of the interview process and time away from service for residents may be larger than anticipated. Ultimately, residents value operative experience and staff members at a fellowship more than all other factors when selecting a fellowship.

  16. [Training of residents in obstetrics and gynecology: Assessment of an educational program including formal lectures and practical sessions using simulators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, A; El Haloui, O; Breaud, J; Chevalier, D; Antomarchi, J; Bongain, A; Boucoiran, I; Delotte, J

    2015-01-01

    Evaluate an educational program in the training of residents in gynecology-obstetrics (GO) with a theory session and a practical session on simulators and analyze their learning curve. Single-center prospective study, at the university hospital (CHU). Two-day sessions were leaded in April and July 2013. An evaluation on obstetric and gynecological surgery simulator was available to all residents. Theoretical knowledge principles of obstetrics were evaluated early in the session and after formal lectures was taught to them. At the end of the first session, a satisfaction questionnaire was distributed to all participants. Twenty residents agreed to participate to the training sessions. Evaluation of theoretical knowledge: at the end of the session, the residents obtained a significant improvement in their score on 20 testing knowledge. Obstetrical simulator: a statistically significant improvement in scores on assessments simulator vaginal delivery between the first and second session. Subjectively, a larger increase feeling was seen after breech delivery simulation than for the cephalic vaginal delivery. However, the confidence level of the resident after breech delivery simulation has not been improved at the end of the second session. Simulation in gynecological surgery: a trend towards improvement in the time realized on the peg-transfer between the two sessions was noted. In the virtual simulation, no statistically significant differences showed, no improvement for in salpingectomy's time. Subjectively, the residents felt an increase in the precision of their gesture. Satisfaction: All residents have tried the whole program. They considered the pursuit of these sessions on simulators was necessary and even mandatory. The approach chosen by this structured educational program allowed a progression for the residents, both objectively and subjectively. This simulation program type for the resident's training would use this tool in assessing their skills and develop

  17. Is current surgery resident and GI fellow training adequate to pass FES?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Aimee K; Scott, Daniel J; Willis, Ross E; Van Sickle, Kent; Truitt, Michael S; Uecker, John; Brown, Kimberly M; Marks, Jeffrey M; Dunkin, Brian J

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the adequacy of current surgical residency and gastroenterology (GI) fellowship flexible endoscopy training as measured by performance on the FES examination. Fifth-year general surgery residents and GI fellows across six institutions were invited to participate. All general surgery residents had met ACGME/ABS case volume requirements as well as additional institution-specific requirements for endoscopy. All participants completed FES testing at the end of their respective academic year. Procedure volumes were obtained from ACGME case logs. Curricular components for each specialty and institution were recorded. Forty-eight (28 surgery and 20 GI) trainees completed the examination. Average case numbers for residents were 76 ± 26 colonoscopies and 45 ± 12 EGDs. Among GI fellows, PGY4 s (N = 10) reported 99 ± 64 colonoscopies and 147 ± 79 EGDs. PGY5 s (N = 3) reported 462 ± 307 colonoscopies and 411 ± 260 EGDs. PGY6 GI fellows (N = 7) reported 515 ± 111 colonoscopies and 418 ± 146 EGDs. The overall pass rate for all participants was 75 %, with 68 % of residents and 85 % of fellows passing both the cognitive and skills components. For surgery residents, pass rates were 75 % for manual skills and 85.7 % for cognitive. On the skills examination, Task 2 (loop reduction) was associated with the lowest performance. Skills scores correlated with both colonoscopy (r = 0.46, p < 0.001) and EGD experience (r = 0.46, p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristics curves were examined among the resident cohort. The minimum number of total cases associated with passing the FES skills component was 103. Significant variability existed in curricular components across institutions. These data suggest that current flexible endoscopy training may not be sufficient for all trainees to pass the examination. Implementing additional components of the FEC may prove beneficial in achieving more uniform pass

  18. A comparison of pop and chop to divide and conquer in resident cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Fredric J; Garcia-Zalisnak, Debra E; Bovee, Courtney E; Strawn, Joy D

    2016-01-01

    In this randomized prospective study, the cumulative dissipated energy and case time of pop and chop and of traditional four-quadrant divide and conquer in the first 60 cases (in total 120 eyes) of cataract surgery performed by two residents at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Hampton, Virginia, were compared. Overall and individually, the residents had significantly shorter case times and used significantly less cumulative dissipated energy for performing pop and chop than that for divide and conquer technique. There was no difference in complication rates or visual outcomes between these two techniques. The results of this study suggest that pop and chop is a more time- and energy-efficient method of nucleofractis than divide and conquer for novice resident surgeons.

  19. Nurse manager residency program: an innovative leadership succession plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Amy; Wagner, Jennifer; Martin, Christina; Grant, Brandy; Maule, Katrina; Resh, Kimberly; King, Lisa; Eaton, Holly; Fetter, Katrina; King, Stacey L; Thompson, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    To ensure succession planning within the ranks of nurse managers meet current and projected nursing management needs and organizational goals, we developed and implemented a nurse manager residency program at our hospital. By identifying, supporting, and mentoring clinical experts who express a desire and display an aptitude for nursing leadership, we are graduating individuals who can transition to a nurse manager position with greater ease and competence.

  20. Risk Factors for Return to the Operating Room after Resident-Performed Cataract Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menda, Shivali A; Driver, Todd H; Neiman, Alexandra E; Blumberg, Seth; Naseri, Ayman; Stewart, Jay M

    2016-09-29

    Investigate risk factors for unplanned return to the operating room after resident-performed cataract surgery. Retrospective case-control study. Institutional. Study population: All patients with reoperation within 90 days of resident-performed phacoemulsification were matched to four control eyes which had surgery within 30 days of the reoperation at the same institution. Billing codes were used to identify all patients who underwent resident-performed intended phacoemulsification with intraocular lens placement from January 2005 to December 2010. Investigated risk factors for reoperation included cataract characteristics and preexisting ocular co-morbidities, including diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment history, glaucoma, corneal pathology, and uveitis. Additional preoperative risk factors studied included resident training year, history of tamsulosin use, phacodonesis, pupillary dilation, presence of pseudoexfoliation, myopia, history of trauma, visual acuity, and monocular status. Intraoperative variables were the use of iris expansion devices, use of capsular stain, attending type, incision type, use of sutures, vitreous loss, anesthesia type, and phacoemulsification technique. There were 67 returns to the operating room (i.e., cases) over five years that were assigned to 268 control eyes. In preoperative multivariate analysis, phacoemulsification done by a first- or second-year resident (OR 3.2, 95% CI: 1.7-6.0, p risk of reoperation. In postoperative multivariate analysis, only the use of the divide-and-conquer technique (OR 4.0, 95% CI:1.7-9.2, p = 0.001) was associated with an increased risk of reoperation. Phacoemulsification done by a junior resident or using the divide-and-conquer technique had the highest risk of reoperation.

  1. Age, gender, lateral dominance, and prediction of operative skill among general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueneman, A L; Pickleman, J; Freeark, R J

    1985-09-01

    Ability patterns and surgical proficiency were examined in matched groups of general surgery residents selected on the basis of age, gender, or hand preference from a population of 141 residents who had completed neuropsychologic tests of visuospatial, psychomotor, and stress tolerance abilities and had been rated on 12 aspects of technical skill exhibited during 1480 operative procedures. Older residents (ages 28 to 42 years) exhibited less motor speed (p less than 0.05) and coordination (p less than 0.005) and more caution in avoiding psychomotor errors (p less than 0.05) than did their younger counterparts. No differences were found for visuospatial abilities, stress tolerance, or rated surgical skill. These findings indicate that although age does appear to adversely affect pure motor skills, these are not important components of operative proficiency. Female residents exhibited superior (p less than 0.05) academic achievement (MCAT, Verbal and National Boards Part II) as compared with their male counterparts. They also excelled on a signal detection task requiring identification of visual patterns. However, the women scored less well (p less than 0.05) than men on a visuomotor task demonstrated to be a significant predictor of operative skill. Greater cautiousness in avoiding errors may be a contributing factor to their reduced efficiency on this task. In comparison to male controls, female residents received consistently lower surgical skills ratings, particularly on items measuring confidence and task organization. Left-handed residents were more reactive to stress (p less than 0.03), more cautious (p less than 0.04), and more proficient on a neuropsychologic test of tactile-spatial abilities (p less than 0.03) than right-handed counterparts. Although these traits correlated positively (p less than 0.05) with rated operative skill within the left-handed group, the group received consistently lower ratings than did right-handed residents. The inconvenience of

  2. [French resident's performance on laparoscopic surgery box trainer: 7-year results of pelvitrainer contests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madec, F-X; Dariane, C; Pradere, B; Amadane, N; Bergerat, S; Gryn, A; Lebacle, C; Matillon, X; Olivier, J; Nouhaud, F-X; Panayotopoulos, P; Peyronnet, B; Rizk, J; Sanson, S; Seisen, T; Salomon, L; Fiard, G

    2016-12-01

    The study objectives were to analyze the resident's laparoscopic surgery performance in order to build a self-assessment data set, to identify discriminatory exercises and to investigate the suturing time changes. From 2007 to 2014, the French Association of Urologist in Training (AFUF) organized 7 pelvitrainer contests. Participant scores on 11 laparoscopic surgery exercises were evaluated. Sixty-six residents participated to these contests and performed 11 exercises each. Twenty-two (33.3 %) participants were beginners, 26 (39.4 %) intermediates et 18 (27.3 %) experienced. The participant scores were gathered into a data set including the average time per exercise. We found a time scoring improvement related to the resident experience for all exercises. A significant decline in time was noted for exercise 8 and 9 between beginners and intermediates (139s [±71]), (173.9s [±118.3]) and between beginners and experienced (80.6s [±26.7]), (94,1s [±42.7]) with a P<0.05. The correlation coefficient for the exercise 11 duration (vesico-uretral anastomosis) was 0.04 over a 7-year period (P=0.44). The study provided a data set on 11 laparoscopic surgery tasks which can be consulted by all residents as a reference in a self-assessment process. Two exercises (8 and 9) discriminated beginners from intermediates and experienced groups and could be used as a benchmark ahead of an operating room procedure. The vesico-uretral anastomosis duration (exercise 11) did not improve significantly between 2006 and 2014. 4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. A Systematic Review of the Effects of Resident Duty Hour Restrictions in Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Katharine S.; Keshet, Itay; Spicer, Jonathan; Imrie, Kevin; Feldman, Liane; Cools-Lartigue, Jonathan; Kayssi, Ahmed; Lipsman, Nir; Elmi, Maryam; Kulkarni, Abhaya V.; Parshuram, Chris; Mainprize, Todd; Warren, Richard J.; Fata, Paola; Gorman, M. Sean; Feinberg, Stan; Rutka, James

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) mandated 80-hour resident duty limits. In 2011 the ACGME mandated 16-hour duty maximums for PGY1 (post graduate year) residents. The stated goals were to improve patient safety, resident well-being, and education. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to evaluate the impact of resident duty hours (RDH) on clinical and educational outcomes in surgery. Methods: A systematic review (1980–2013) was executed on CINAHL, Cochrane Database, Embase, Medline, and Scopus. Quality of articles was assessed using the GRADE guidelines. Sixteen-hour shifts and night float systems were analyzed separately. Articles that examined mortality data were combined in a random-effects meta-analysis to evaluate the impact of RDH on patient mortality. Results: A total of 135 articles met the inclusion criteria. Among these, 42% (N = 57) were considered moderate-high quality. There was no overall improvement in patient outcomes as a result of RDH; however, some studies suggest increased complication rates in high-acuity patients. There was no improvement in education related to RDH restrictions, and performance on certification examinations has declined in some specialties. Survey studies revealed a perception of worsened education and patient safety. There were improvements in resident wellness after the 80-hour workweek, but there was little improvement or negative effects on wellness after 16-hour duty maximums were implemented. Conclusions: Recent RDH changes are not consistently associated with improvements in resident well-being, and have negative impacts on patient outcomes and performance on certification examinations. Greater flexibility to accommodate resident training needs is required. Further erosion of training time should be considered with great caution. PMID:24662409

  4. Dermatology Residency Selection Criteria with an Emphasis on Program Characteristics: A National Program Director Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzam Gorouhi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dermatology residency programs are relatively diverse in their resident selection process. The authors investigated the importance of 25 dermatology residency selection criteria focusing on differences in program directors’ (PDs’ perception based on specific program demographics. Methods. This cross-sectional nationwide observational survey utilized a 41-item questionnaire that was developed by literature search, brainstorming sessions, and online expert reviews. The data were analyzed utilizing the reliability test, two-step clustering, and K-means methods as well as other methods. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in PDs’ perception regarding the importance of the selection criteria based on program demographics. Results. Ninety-five out of 114 PDs (83.3% responded to the survey. The top five criteria for dermatology residency selection were interview, letters of recommendation, United States Medical Licensing Examination Step I scores, medical school transcripts, and clinical rotations. The following criteria were preferentially ranked based on different program characteristics: “advanced degrees,” “interest in academics,” “reputation of undergraduate and medical school,” “prior unsuccessful attempts to match,” and “number of publications.” Conclusions. Our survey provides up-to-date factual data on dermatology PDs’ perception in this regard. Dermatology residency programs may find the reported data useful in further optimizing their residency selection process.

  5. Validity of NBME Parts I and II for the Selection of Residents: The Case of Orthopaedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Susan M.

    The predictive validity of scores on the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Part I and Part II examinations for the selection of residents in orthopaedic surgery was investigated. Use of NBME scores has been criticized because of the time lag between taking Part I and entering residency and because Part I content is not directly linked to…

  6. Evaluation of resident's training for endoscopic sinus surgery using a sheep's head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Vargas, Beatriz; Romero-Salazar, Azucena Lloris; Reyes Burneo, Pablo M; Vásquez Hincapie, Catalina; de Los Santos Granado, Gonzalo; Del Castillo López, Raúl; Frágola Arnau, Claudio; Cobeta Marco, Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    Training in functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) is an essential part of each ENT resident and it takes place on a very fragile area. This study focus on showing the learning curve of FESS, using an anatomical model such as the sheep's head. Four residents in our centre performed dissections. Each of these residents operated eight sheep's head. They performed an endoscopic septoplasty followed by maxillary antrostomy, total ethmoidectomy and frontal sinusotomy on every head. A staff member guided all procedures and checked for the appropriate dissection and complications occurred. Analysis was made upon the residents' performance of their first four septoplasties and eight nasal sides against their subsequent performance of the same. Final procedures presented better outcomes than the initial ones on every step of them. Results were measured by means of decrease of time (P < 0.0001) and complications, showing no major complications on the latest ones. Sheep's head is a suitable substitute for the cadaveric human head, to obtain the surgical skills needed for FESS procedures. Sheep's nasal cavity allows gaining dexterity and it is an easy model to obtain.

  7. Program Factors That Influence American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination Performance: A Multi-Institutional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jerry J; Gifford, Edward D; Moazzez, Ashkan; Sidwell, Richard A; Reeves, Mark E; Hartranft, Thomas H; Inaba, Kenji; Jarman, Benjamin T; Are, Chandrakanth; Galante, Joseph M; Amersi, Farin; Smith, Brian R; Melcher, Marc L; Nelson, M Timothy; Donahue, Timothy; Jacobsen, Garth; Arnell, Tracey D; Lee, Steven; Neville, Angela; de Virgilio, Christian

    2015-01-01

    To determine the influence of program strategies, such as program directors' (PD) attitudes about the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) and approach to ABSITE preparation, on residents' ABSITE performance. A 17-item questionnaire was sent to PDs at surgical residency programs. The questions were designed to elicit information regarding the educational curriculum, remediation protocols, and opinions relating to the ABSITE. Main outcome measure was categorical resident ABSITE percentile scores from the January 2014 examination. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student t-test, analysis of variance, and linear regression as appropriate. The study was carried out at general surgery residency programs across the country. In total, 15 general surgery residency PDs participated in the study. The PD response rate was 100%. All 460 resident ABSITE scores from the 15 programs were obtained. In total, 10 programs (67%) identified as university affiliated, 4 programs (27%) as independent academic, and 1 program (7%) as hybrid. The mean number of residents per program was 30.7 (range: 15-57). In total, 14 PDs (93%) indicated that an ABSITE review curriculum was in place and 13 PDs (87%) indicated they had a remediation protocol for residents with low ABSITE scores (with differing thresholds of factors associated with higher ABSITE scores included tracking resident reading throughout the year (median 63rd percentile with tracking vs 59th percentile without, p = 0.040) and the type of remediation (by PD: 77th percentile, by PD and faculty: 57th percentile, faculty only: 64th percentile, with Surgical Education and Self-Assessment Program (SESAP): 63rd percentile, outside review course: 43rd percentile; p Factors not significantly associated with ABSITE performance included number of structured educational hours per week and frequency of ABSITE review sessions. Program factors appear to significantly influence ABSITE performance. Programs where

  8. The development of a TED-Ed online resident research training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Katherine A; Pound, Catherine M; Peddle, Beth; Tokarewicz, Jaclyn; Eady, Kaylee

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric health research is important for improving the health and well-being of children and their families. To foster the development of physicians' research competencies, it is vital to integrate practical and context-specific research training into residency programs. To describe the development of a resident research training program at one tertiary care pediatric academic health sciences center in Ontario, Canada. We surveyed residents and pediatricians/research staff to establish the need and content for a resident research training program. Residents and resident research supervisors agreed or strongly agreed that research training is important for residents. However, few residents and supervisors believed that their academic health sciences center provided adequate training and resources to support resident research. As such, an online resident research training program was established. Residents and supervisors agreed that the program should focus on the following topics: 1) critically evaluating research literature, 2) writing a research proposal, 3) submitting an application for research funding, and 4) writing a manuscript. This highly accessible, context-specific, and inexpensive online program model may be of interest and benefit to other residency programs as a means to enhance residents' scholarly roles. A formal evaluation of the research training program is now underway.

  9. The First International Residency Program Accredited by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Qadheeb, Nada S.; Alissa, Dema A.; Al-Jedai, Ahmed; Ajlan, Aziza; Al-Jazairi, Abdulrazaq S.

    2012-01-01

    The processes by which the pharmacy residency program at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre-Riyadh, Saudi Arabia became the first American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) accredited program outside the United States is described. This article provides key points for a successful program for other pharmacy residency programs around the world. Additionally, it points out the need for establishing international standards for pharmacy residency programs.

  10. Enhancing pediatric residents' scholar role: the development of a Scholarly Activity Guidance and Evaluation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Catherine M; Moreau, Katherine A; Ward, Natalie; Eady, Kaylee; Writer, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    Research training is essential to the development of well-rounded physicians. Although many pediatric residency programs require residents to complete a research project, it is often challenging to integrate research training into educational programs. We aimed to develop an innovative research program for pediatric residents, called the Scholarly Activity Guidance and Evaluation (SAGE) program. We developed a competency-based program which establishes benchmarks for pediatric residents, while providing ongoing academic mentorship. Feedback from residents and their research supervisors about the SAGE program has been positive. Preliminary evaluation data have shown that all final-year residents have met or exceeded program expectations. By providing residents with this supportive environment, we hope to influence their academic career paths, increase their research productivity, promote evidence-based practice, and ultimately, positively impact health outcomes.

  11. Equipping orthodontic residency programs for interactive distance learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engilman, William D; Cox, Thomas H; Bednar, Eric D; Proffit, William R

    2007-05-01

    Equipment for distance learning can be used to improve the quality of instruction in orthodontic programs. All departments now should have at least a point-to-point system to allow clinical faculty to provide instruction without being physically present on all occasions. For more instruction to be shared with other residency programs, a dual-streaming multipoint video conferencing system is needed. A basic system allows reception of this type of instruction, and an optimal system would allow originating and receiving such conferences. Recording interactive seminars so that they can be viewed later requires additional equipment so that postproduction editing and refinement can be accomplished. Lists of appropriate equipment for each level are provided.

  12. The development of a TED-Ed online resident research training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Moreau

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pediatric health research is important for improving the health and well-being of children and their families. To foster the development of physicians’ research competencies, it is vital to integrate practical and context-specific research training into residency programs. Purpose: To describe the development of a resident research training program at one tertiary care pediatric academic health sciences center in Ontario, Canada. Methods: We surveyed residents and pediatricians/research staff to establish the need and content for a resident research training program. Results: Residents and resident research supervisors agreed or strongly agreed that research training is important for residents. However, few residents and supervisors believed that their academic health sciences center provided adequate training and resources to support resident research. As such, an online resident research training program was established. Residents and supervisors agreed that the program should focus on the following topics: 1 critically evaluating research literature, 2 writing a research proposal, 3 submitting an application for research funding, and 4 writing a manuscript. Discussion: This highly accessible, context-specific, and inexpensive online program model may be of interest and benefit to other residency programs as a means to enhance residents’ scholarly roles. A formal evaluation of the research training program is now underway.

  13. Trends in Pediatric Surgery Operative Volume among Residents and Fellows: Improving the Experience for All.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talutis, Stephanie; McAneny, David; Chen, Catherine; Doherty, Gerard; Sachs, Teviah

    2016-06-01

    The ACGME requires general surgery residents (GSR) to perform 20 pediatric surgery cases as part of the total 750 cases before graduation. We queried the ACGME General Surgery (1999 to 2014) and Pediatric Surgery (2003 to 2014) Case Logs for all pediatric operations performed during training. Means (±SD) and medians (10(th):90(th) percentiles) were compared, and R(2) was calculated for all trends. The number of pediatric surgery fellows (PSF) increased 63% (23 to 39; R(2) = 0.82), while GSR numbers increased 12% (989 to 1,105; R(2) = 0.77). Total and average pediatric surgery case volume for GSR decreased from 39,309 to 32,156 (R(2) = 0.90) and 39.7 ± 13 to 29.1 ± 10 (R(2) = 0.91), respectively. Meanwhile, average PSF case volume increased from 980 ± 208 to 1,137 ± 202 (R(2) = 0.83). These trends persisted for inguinal/umbilical hernia (GSR 22.1 ± 13 to 15.6 ± 10; R(2) = 0.93; PSF 90.5 ± 17.6 to 104.4 ± 20.7; R(2) = 0.34), pyloric stenosis (GSR 3.9 ± 3 to 2.8 ± 3; R(2) = 0.60; PSF 29.6 ± 15 to 39.7 ± 16.8; R(2) = 0.69), and intestinal atresia (GSR 1.3 ± 2 to 1.1 ± 2; R(2) = 0.34; PSF 4.3 ± 4 to 11.8 ± 8; R(2) = 0.21). The mean number of GSR pediatric operations diminished for both junior (37.1 ± 20 to 27.3 ± 16; R(2) = 0.88) and chief (2.6 ± 5 to 1.7 ± 5; R(2) = 0.75) years. Teaching cases in pediatric surgery decreased at all levels. Although the percentage of GSR teaching cases performed during chief years fell modestly (6.6% to 4.7%; R(2) = 0.53), median teaching cases dropped from 2 (0:11 [10(th):90(th) percentiles]) to zero (0:0 [10(th):90(th) percentiles]). Mean PSF teaching cases declined (100.7 ± 396 to 44.5 ± 42; R(2) = 0.72), while the percentage of operations that were teaching cases decreased more sharply (10.3% to 3.5%; R(2) = 0.82). Total pediatric surgery cases and PSF operative volume have increased, while GSR operative volume has decreased. Opportunities may exist to increase resident participation while

  14. Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism: a comparative assessment of virtue-based leadership development in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Schulz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism (STEPP was developed in 2011 to train tomorrow's leaders during residency. It is based on virtue ethics and takes an approach similar to West Point military academy. The purpose of this research was: (i to compare the virtue profiles of our residents with that of the military cohort using a standardized virtue assessment tool; and (ii to assess the value of virtue education on residents. Methods: As part of STEPP, otolaryngology residents participated in a virtue-based validated assessment tool called Virtue in Action (VIA Inventory. This was completed at the initiation of STEPP in July 2011 as well as 1 year later in June 2012. Comparison of the VIA to a military cohort was performed. Leadership ‘Basic Training’ is a series of forums focused on virtues of initiative, integrity, responsibility, self-discipline, and accountability. A pre- and post-test was administered assessing resident perceptions of the value of this ‘Basic Training’. Results: Virtues are shared between otolaryngology residents (n=9 and military personnel (n=2,433 as there were no significant differences in strength scores between two military comparison groups and otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS residents. There was a significant improvement (p<0.001 in the understanding of components of the leadership vision and a significant improvement in the understanding of key leadership concepts based on ‘Basic Training’. All residents responded in the post-test that the STEPP program was valuable, up from 56%. Conclusions: A virtue-based approach is valued by residents as a part of leadership training during residency.

  15. Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism: a comparative assessment of virtue-based leadership development in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kristine; Puscas, Liana; Tucci, Debara; Woodard, Charles; Witsell, David; Esclamado, Ramon M.; Lee, Walter T.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism (STEPP) was developed in 2011 to train tomorrow's leaders during residency. It is based on virtue ethics and takes an approach similar to West Point military academy. The purpose of this research was: (i) to compare the virtue profiles of our residents with that of the military cohort using a standardized virtue assessment tool; and (ii) to assess the value of virtue education on residents. Methods As part of STEPP, otolaryngology residents participated in a virtue-based validated assessment tool called Virtue in Action (VIA) Inventory. This was completed at the initiation of STEPP in July 2011 as well as 1 year later in June 2012. Comparison of the VIA to a military cohort was performed. Leadership ‘Basic Training’ is a series of forums focused on virtues of initiative, integrity, responsibility, self-discipline, and accountability. A pre- and post-test was administered assessing resident perceptions of the value of this ‘Basic Training’. Results Virtues are shared between otolaryngology residents (n=9) and military personnel (n=2,433) as there were no significant differences in strength scores between two military comparison groups and otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) residents. There was a significant improvement (p<0.001) in the understanding of components of the leadership vision and a significant improvement in the understanding of key leadership concepts based on ‘Basic Training’. All residents responded in the post-test that the STEPP program was valuable, up from 56%. Conclusions A virtue-based approach is valued by residents as a part of leadership training during residency. PMID:24172053

  16. Administrative Restructuring of a Residency Training Program for Improved Efficiency and Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zyl, Louis T.; Finch, Susan J.; Davidson, Paul R.; Arboleda-Florez, Julio

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Canadian residency training programs (RTP) have a program director (PD) and a residency program committee (RPC) overseeing program administration. Limited guidance is available about the ideal administrative structure of an RTP. This article describes administrative load in Canadian RTPs, presents a novel approach to delegating core…

  17. 整形外科住院医师医患沟通能力的培养%Experience of resident-patient communication training in plastic surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杨; 马显杰; 宋保强; 郭树忠

    2016-01-01

    Objective To discuss the resident-patient communication training methods based on the problems of the residents in clinical work of plastic surgery .Methods According to the characteristics of plastic surgery , we analyzed the problems and reasons of the residents in the resident-patient communication.Based on the experience of the faculty in the department of plastic surgery , we proposed the methods of resident-patient communication training. Results Several dos and don'ts were proposed for the problems of the resident-patient communication.And a series of training methods were suggested from the aspects of residents , attending surgeons and the department programs . Conclusion It is vital of the ability of the resident-patient communication in the complicated modern medical environment in China.The discussion of the training methods in this paper is mainly based on the experience of the faculty in our department.A perfect resident-patient training program should be formulated with the experience of developed country and scientific methods.%目的:结合整形外科临床工作中住院医师在医患沟通中存在的问题,探讨医患沟通能力培养方案。方法根据整形外科的执业特点,分析目前住院医师在医患沟通中存在的问题及原因,结合本科室多年的经验,探讨医患沟通能力的培养方案。结果针对医患沟通的问题及原因,提出了注意事项,并从住院医师、上级医师及科室制度层面等多角度提出一系列培养方案。结论整形外科住院医师医患沟通能力在当代复杂的医疗环境下尤为重要,本文对培养方案的探讨是本科室多年经验的总结,为进一步完善培养方案的制定,需要借鉴发达国家的经验,并通过科学方法逐步建立一整套完善的医患沟通培养方案,以适应临床工作的需要。

  18. Factors influencing job satisfaction of new graduate nurses participating in nurse residency programs: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Patrice S; Viscardi, Molly Kreider; McHugh, Matthew D

    2014-10-01

    Nurse residency programs are designed to increase competence and skill, and ease the transition from student to new graduate nurse. These programs also offer the possibility to positively influence the job satisfaction of new graduate nurses, which could decrease poor nursing outcomes. However, little is known about the impact of participation in a nurse residency program on new graduate nurses' satisfaction. This review examines factors that influence job satisfaction of nurse residency program participants. Eleven studies were selected for inclusion, and seven domains influencing new graduate nurses' satisfaction during participation in nurse residency programs were identified: extrinsic rewards, scheduling, interactions and support, praise and recognition, professional opportunities, work environment, and hospital system. Within these domains, the evidence for improved satisfaction with nurse residency program participation was mixed. Further research is necessary to understand how nurse residency programs can be designed to improve satisfaction and increase positive nurse outcomes.

  19. Relationships Between Program Size, Training Experience, and Career Intentions: Pediatrics Resident Reports From 2010 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Daniel J; Frintner, Mary Pat; Cull, William

    2016-01-01

    To determine the relationship between pediatric residency program size and resident demographic characteristics, career intentions, and training experiences. Annual national random samples of 1000 graduating pediatrics residents were surveyed between 2010 and 2014. Response years were pooled for analysis, and trends in resident demographic characteristics, career intentions and job search, and training experiences were compared across program class size: small (training as program size decreases. These findings suggest that the training experiences of some residents do not optimally align with their future practice. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Balancing Privacy and Professionalism: A Survey of General Surgery Program Directors on Social Media and Surgical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenfeld, Sean J; Vargo, Daniel J; Schenarts, Paul J

    Unprofessional behavior is common among surgical residents and faculty surgeons on Facebook. Usage of social media outlets such as Facebook and Twitter is growing at exponential rates, so it is imperative that surgery program directors (PDs) focus on professionalism within social media, and develop guidelines for their trainees and surgical colleagues. Our study focuses on the surgery PDs current approach to online professionalism within surgical education. An online survey of general surgery PDs was conducted in October 2015 through the Association for Program Directors in Surgery listserv. Baseline PD demographics, usage and approach to popular social media outlets, existing institutional policies, and formal curricula were assessed. A total of 110 PDs responded to the survey (110/259, 42.5% response rate). Social media usage was high among PDs (Facebook 68% and Twitter 40%). PDs frequently viewed the social media profiles of students, residents, and faculty. Overall, 11% of PDs reported lowering the rank or completely removing a residency applicant from the rank order list because of online behavior, and 10% reported formal disciplinary action against a surgical resident because of online behavior. Overall, 68% of respondents agreed that online professionalism is important, and that residents should receive instruction on the safe use of social media. However, most programs did not have formal didactics or known institutional policies in place. Use of social media is high among PDs, and they often view the online behavior of residency applicants, surgical residents, and faculty surgeons. Within surgical education, there needs to be an increased focus on institutional policies and standardized curricula to help educate physicians on social media and online professionalism. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Designing and Implementing a Competency-Based Training Program for Anesthesiology Residents at the University of Ottawa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J. Stodel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Competency-based medical education is gaining traction as a solution to address the challenges associated with the current time-based models of physician training. Competency-based medical education is an outcomes-based approach that involves identifying the abilities required of physicians and then designing the curriculum to support the achievement and assessment of these competencies. This paradigm defies the assumption that competence is achieved based on time spent on rotations and instead requires residents to demonstrate competence. The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC has launched Competence by Design (CBD, a competency-based approach for residency training and specialty practice. The first residents to be trained within this model will be those in medical oncology and otolaryngology-head and neck surgery in July, 2016. However, with approval from the RCPSC, the Department of Anesthesiology, University of Ottawa, launched an innovative competency-based residency training program July 1, 2015. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the program and offer a blueprint for other programs planning similar curricular reform. The program is structured according to the RCPSC CBD stages and addresses all CanMEDS roles. While our program retains some aspects of the traditional design, we have made many transformational changes.

  2. Association of Otolaryngology Resident Duty Hour Restrictions With Procedure-Specific Outcomes in Head and Neck Endocrine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron; Braden, Lauren; Wan, Jim; Sebelik, Merry

    2017-06-01

    Graduate medical education has undergone a transformation from traditional long work hours to a restricted plan to allow adequate rest for residents. The initial goal of this restriction is to improve patient outcomes. To determine whether duty hour restrictions had any impact on surgery-specific outcomes by analyzing complications following thyroid and parathyroid procedures performed before and after duty hour reform. Retrospective cross-sectional analysis of the National Inpatient Sample (NIS).The NIS was queried for procedure codes associated with thyroid and parathyroid procedures for the years 2000 to 2002 and 2006 to 2008. Hospitals were divided based on teaching status into 3 groups: nonteaching hospitals (NTHs), teaching hospitals without otolaryngology programs (THs), and teaching hospitals with otolaryngology programs (THs-OTO). Procedure-specific complication rates, length of stay, and mortality rates were collected. SAS statistical software (version 9.4) was used for analysis with adjustment using Charlson comorbidity index. Total numbers of head and neck endocrine procedures were 34 685 and 39 770 (a 14.7% increase), for 2000 to 2002 and 2006 to 2008, respectively. THs-OTO contributed a greater share of procedures in 2006 to 2008 (from 18% to 25%). With the earlier period serving as the reference, length of stay remained constant (2.1 days); however, total hospital charges increased (from $12 978 to $23 708; P otolaryngology programs.

  3. Hand Society and Matching Program Web Sites Provide Poor Access to Information Regarding Hand Surgery Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Richard M; Klifto, Christopher S; Naik, Amish A; Sapienza, Anthony; Capo, John T

    2016-08-01

    The Internet is a common resource for applicants of hand surgery fellowships, however, the quality and accessibility of fellowship online information is unknown. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the accessibility of hand surgery fellowship Web sites and to assess the quality of information provided via program Web sites. Hand fellowship Web site accessibility was evaluated by reviewing the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) on November 16, 2014 and the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) fellowship directories on February 12, 2015, and performing an independent Google search on November 25, 2014. Accessible Web sites were then assessed for quality of the presented information. A total of 81 programs were identified with the ASSH directory featuring direct links to 32% of program Web sites and the NRMP directory directly linking to 0%. A Google search yielded direct links to 86% of program Web sites. The quality of presented information varied greatly among the 72 accessible Web sites. Program description (100%), fellowship application requirements (97%), program contact email address (85%), and research requirements (75%) were the most commonly presented components of fellowship information. Hand fellowship program Web sites can be accessed from the ASSH directory and, to a lesser extent, the NRMP directory. However, a Google search is the most reliable method to access online fellowship information. Of assessable programs, all featured a program description though the quality of the remaining information was variable. Hand surgery fellowship applicants may face some difficulties when attempting to gather program information online. Future efforts should focus on improving the accessibility and content quality on hand surgery fellowship program Web sites.

  4. Endovascular procedures, carotid endarterectomies, and aortic surgery should preferentially be done by a vascular trainee rather than a general surgery resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabrook, Gary R; Sharp, John

    2005-03-01

    This article is the result of a debate. The motion proposed was that "endovascular procedures, carotid endarterectomies, and aortic surgery should be done preferentially by a vascular trainee rather than a general surgery resident.'' Arguments in favor of the motion were that with the development of endovascular surgery, there are now less open vascular procedures to perform and hence, vascular trainees needed to hone their skills on these limited cases rather than waste that experience on a general surgery resident. This focused training experience would allow vascular fellows to be become more highly skilled vascular surgeons. Additionally, endovascular procedures are an important component of modern vascular surgery, and it is important for the vascular fellow to develop significant experience with and acquire the appropriate numbers of endovascular cases to get the necessary credentials when going into a vascular practice. Arguments against the motion were that exposure to vascular cases will make a better general surgeon, one who will also be well equipped to deal with trauma cases and situations where the control of bleeding might be life saving. Additionally, the issue of exposure of general surgery residents to vascular cases might be a positive recruitment strategy for future vascular fellows. The motion was carried by a small majority vote.

  5. Child Welfare Training in Child Psychiatry Residency: A Program Director Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terry G.; Cox, Julia R.; Walker, Sarah C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study surveys child psychiatry residency program directors in order to 1) characterize child welfare training experiences for child psychiatry residents; 2) evaluate factors associated with the likelihood of program directors' endorsing the adequacy of their child welfare training; and 3) assess program directors'…

  6. Nurse residency programs and the transition to child health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delack, Sandi; Martin, Jean; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Sperhac, Arlene M

    2015-06-01

    Nurse residency programs for newly licensed RNs are a critical component in bridging the clinical practice gap between education and practice. In May 2013, the Institute of Pediatric Nursing invited leaders from pediatric nursing organizations and children's hospitals to attend a forum on nurse residency programs for pediatric nurses. This article presents a summary of the discussions that occurred during the forum and makes recommendations for addressing issues related to nurse residency programs.

  7. Factors that influence medical student selection of an emergency medicine residency program: implications for training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey N; Howell, John M; Hegarty, Cullen B; McLaughlin, Steven A; Coates, Wendy C; Hopson, Laura R; Hern, Gene H; Rosen, Carlo L; Fisher, Jonathan; Santen, Sally A

    2012-04-01

    An understanding of student decision-making when selecting an emergency medicine (EM) training program is essential for program directors as they enter interview season. To build upon preexisting knowledge, a survey was created to identify and prioritize the factors influencing candidate decision-making of U.S. medical graduates. This was a cross-sectional, multi-institutional study that anonymously surveyed U.S. allopathic applicants to EM training programs. It took place in the 3-week period between the 2011 National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) rank list submission deadline and the announcement of match results. Of 1,525 invitations to participate, 870 candidates (57%) completed the survey. Overall, 96% of respondents stated that both geographic location and individual program characteristics were important to decision-making, with approximately equal numbers favoring location when compared to those who favored program characteristics. The most important factors in this regard were preference for a particular geographic location (74.9%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 72% to 78%) and to be close to spouse, significant other, or family (59.7%, 95% CI = 56% to 63%). Factors pertaining to geographic location tend to be out of the control of the program leadership. The most important program factors include the interview experience (48.9%, 95% CI = 46% to 52%), personal experience with the residents (48.5%, 95% CI = 45% to 52%), and academic reputation (44.9%, 95% CI = 42% to 48%). Unlike location, individual program factors are often either directly or somewhat under the control of the program leadership. Several other factors were ranked as the most important factor a disproportionate number of times, including a rotation in that emergency department (ED), orientation (academic vs. community), and duration of training (3-year vs. 4-year programs). For a subset of applicants, these factors had particular importance in overall decision-making. The vast majority

  8. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources in Surgical Education ACS Fundamentals of Surgery Curriculum Transition to Practice Program ACS/APDS Surgery Resident Skills Curriculum ACS/APDS/ASE Resident Prep Curriculum ACS/ASE ...

  9. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... SESAP SESAP Sampler SRGS ACS Fundamentals of Surgery Curriculum Transition to Practice Program ACS/APDS Surgery Resident Skills Curriculum ACS/APDS/ASE Resident Prep Curriculum Medical Student ...

  10. Prosthodontic program directors' perceptions regarding implant placement by prosthodontic residents: a 2004 survey conducted by the Educational Policy Subcommittee of the American College of Prosthodontists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukotjo, Cortino; Arbree, Nancy S

    2008-12-01

    In 2004, a survey regarding implant placement by prosthodontic residents was conducted by the Educational Policy Subcommittee of the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP). The aim of the survey was to assess the current trends in implant curricula at advanced graduate prosthodontics programs in the United States and Canada and determine the issues surrounding surgical implant training for prosthodontic residents. The survey was mailed to the prosthodontic/maxillofacial prosthetic program directors of the 59 prosthodontic graduate programs in the United States and Canada in 2004. Of these, 27 program directors replied, yielding a response rate of 46%. Of the replying programs, 43% either required residents to place or offered the option to have residents place implants. Forty-four percent reported that residents participate by functioning as first assistants for some of their implant patients, 40% have a specific curriculum to train residents in implant placement, 50% reported not having any institutional barriers that prevent program directors from training prosthodontic residents in implant placement, 51% provide implant training using plastic jaws, and 66% of the programs required residents to observe implant surgery in the clinic before they are permitted to place implants. Of prosthodontic residents who treated implant-related patients, the majority treated 11 to 20 patients during their residency. In 2004, 40% of program directors were not trained in the placement of dental implants, and if they did have the implant training, the majority (82%) stated that the nature of their training was 1- to 3-day course(s). This survey showed that implant dentistry has become an integral part of the postgraduate prosthodontic curriculum. The trends to incorporate implant placement into the postgraduate prosthodontic curriculum were already evident prior to 2004. To address the demand for implant treatment in patient care and enhance surgical implant knowledge, the ACP

  11. A Survey of the Interactions between Psychiatry Residency Programs and the Pharmaceutical Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Christopher K.; Jibson, Michael D.; McCarthy, Mary; Benjamin, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors report a survey of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training (AADPRT) on interactions between the pharmaceutical industry and psychiatry residency programs. METHODS: American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training membership was anonymously surveyed by e-mail and by paper…

  12. A Survey of the Interactions between Psychiatry Residency Programs and the Pharmaceutical Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Christopher K.; Jibson, Michael D.; McCarthy, Mary; Benjamin, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors report a survey of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training (AADPRT) on interactions between the pharmaceutical industry and psychiatry residency programs. METHODS: American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training membership was anonymously surveyed by e-mail and by paper…

  13. Pennsylvania SBIRT Medical and Residency Training: Developing, Implementing, and Evaluating an Evidenced-Based Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Janice L.; Melczak, Michael; Johnjulio, William; Campopiano, Melinda; Gordon, Adam J.; Costlow, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Medical residents do not receive adequate training in screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for alcohol and other drug use disorders. The federally funded Pennsylvania SBIRT Medical and Residency Training program (SMaRT) is an evidence-based curriculum with goals of training residents in SBIRT knowledge and skills and…

  14. Implementation of a heart failure readmission reduction program: a role for medical residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M. Pearson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congestive heart failure (CHF is one of the leading causes of hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. Due to the substantial costs associated with these readmissions, several interventions to reduce CHF readmissions have been developed and implemented. Methods:To reduce CHF readmissions at our community teaching hospital, the Smooth Transitions Equal Less Readmission (STELR program was developed. Utilizing the Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle for quality improvement, resident physicians tracked patients enrolled in the STELR program. The resident contribution to the program was substantial in that they were able to quantify the improvement in both physician practices and patient readmissions. This provided insight into program areas requiring further modification, which the hospital would not have obtained without resident participation. Results: The readmission rate for patients diagnosed with heart failure decreased from 32% prior to program implementation, to 24% hospital wide (including patients who were not tracked in the STELR program, and 21% among patients tracked by the residents. Conclusion: This effective CHF readmission reduction program requires less financial resources compared to government funded programs. The resident involvement in the STELR program helped to assess and improve the program and also allowed the residents to gain an awareness of the resources available to their patients to facilitate their transition home. The program exposed the residents to systems-based practice, a fundamental element of their residency training and, more generally, community care.

  15. Effect of the 80-hour work week on cases performed by general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElearney, Shannon Tierney; Saalwachter, Alison R; Hedrick, Traci L; Pruett, Timothy L; Sanfey, Hilary A; Sawyer, Robert G

    2005-07-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) implemented mandatory work week hours restrictions in 2003. Due to the traditionally long hours in general surgery, the effect of restrictions on surgical training and case numbers was a matter of concern. Data was compiled retrospectively from ACGME logs and operating room (OR) records at a university hospital for 2002 and 2003. Work week restrictions began in January 2003. This data was reviewed to determine resident case numbers, both in whole and by postgraduate year (PGY). Mean case numbers per resident-month in 2002 were 8.8 +/- 8.2 for PGY1s, 16.2 +/- 15.7 for PGY2s, 31.4 +/- 12.9 for PGY3s, 31.5 +/- 17.6 for PGY4s, and 31.5 +/- 17.6 for PGY5s. In 2003, they were 8.8 +/- 5.2 for PGY1s, 16.6 +/- 13.9 for PGY2s, 27.8 +/- 12.5 for PGY3s, 38.2 +/- 18.8 for PGY4s, and 26.1 +/- 9.6 for PGY5s. PGY1s, PGY2s, PGY3s, PGY4s, or all classes were not statistically different. PGY5s did have statistically fewer cases in 2003 (P = 0.03). PGY5s did have statistically fewer cases after the work-hours restriction, which likely represented shifting of postcall afternoon cases to other residents. Comparing other classes and all PGYs, case numbers were not statistically different. Operative training experience does not appear to be hindered by the 80-hour work week.

  16. Business Education for Plastic Surgeons: A Systematic Review, Development, and Implementation of a Business Principles Curriculum in a Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Bahar; Burce, Karen K; Seal, Stella M; Lifchez, Scott D; Redett, Richard J; Frick, Kevin D; Dorafshar, Amir H; Cooney, Carisa M

    2017-05-01

    Rising health care costs, decreasing reimbursement rates, and changes in American health care are forcing physicians to become increasingly business-minded. Both academic and private plastic surgeons can benefit from being educated in business principles. The authors conducted a systematic review to identify existing business curricula and integrated a business principles curriculum into residency training. The authors anonymously surveyed their department regarding perceived importance of business principles and performed a systematic literature review from 1993 to 2013 using PubMed and Embase to identify residency training programs that had designed/implemented business curricula. Subsequently, the authors implemented a formal, quarterly business curriculum. Thirty-two of 36 physicians (88.9 percent; 76.6 percent response rate) stated business principles are either "pretty important" or "very important" to being a doctor. Only 36 percent of faculty and 41 percent of trainees had previous business instruction. The authors identified 434 articles in the systematic review: 29 documented formal business curricula. Twelve topics were addressed, with practice management/administration (n = 22) and systems-based practice (n = 6) being the most common. Four articles were from surgical specialties: otolaryngology (n = 1), general surgery (n = 2), and combined general surgery/plastic surgery (n = 1). Teaching formats included lectures and self-directed learning modules; outcomes and participant satisfaction were reported inconsistently. From August of 2013 to June of 2015, the authors held eight business principles sessions. Postsession surveys demonstrated moderately to extremely satisfied responses in 75 percent or more of resident/fellow respondents (n = 13; response rate, 48.1 percent) and faculty (n = 9; response rate, 45.0 percent). Business principles can be integrated into residency training programs. Having speakers familiar with the physician audience and a

  17. Perceptions of pediatric chief residents on minority house staff recruitment and retention in large pediatric residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, A P; Cooper, M C

    1999-08-01

    This study examined methods of recruiting and retaining minority house staff at US residency training programs. A 28-item questionnaire was mailed to pediatric chief residents at 78 US training programs with more than 35 residents. The response rate was 74%. Programs were characterized by patient populations served, number of ethnic/racial minority house staff and faculty, and the presence of minority house staff support systems within the institution. In this largely urban sample, minority recruitment and retention was reported as an explicit priority by 40% of pediatric chief residents. The majority (71%) reported that their house staff recruitment committees had no explicitly defined recruitment goals regarding minority house staff. Seventy-seven percent reported that within their departments, recruitment efforts toward minorities were no different than for nonminorities. Overall, few minority house staff and minority faculty were identified in the responding institutions. The most frequently reported intra-institutional support systems for minority house staff included individual pairing with faculty advisors from the same minority group (29%), an affirmative-action office located at the institution (8%), and the existence of a minority faculty support group (4%). These results indicate that pediatric chief residents may not be fully aware of the specific challenges related to the recruitment and retention of minority physicians, and most house staff recruitment committees do not have explicit goals in this regard.

  18. Non-Family Medicine Resident Training for Primary Care: A Comparative Evaluation of Federally and Non-Federally Supported Primary Care Oriented Medical Residency Programs. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, Edwin F.; Dagenais, Fred

    Data collected as part of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation study of residency programs for training in primary medicine and pediatrics are analyzed. The seven residencies supported by the federal government and the nine residencies supported by the Foundation are compared. A brief description of the programs as they existed in 1978 are…

  19. Career and Professional Satisfaction of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residents, Academic Surgeons, and Private Practitioners: Does Gender Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Kyriaki C; Lanzon, Jesse; Edwards, Sean P; Inglehart, Marita R

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether male vs. female oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) residents, academic surgeons (i.e., faculty members), and private practitioners in the U.S. differed in their general career satisfaction and job/professional satisfaction. Survey data were collected in 2011-12 from 267 OMS residents (response rate 55%), 271 OMS academic surgeons (response rate 31%), and 417 OMS private practitioners (response rates 13% web-based survey and 29% postal mail survey). The results showed that while the male vs. female OMS private practitioners and academic surgeons did not differ in their career satisfaction, the female residents had a lower career satisfaction than the male residents (on four-point scale with 4=most satisfied: 3.03 vs. 3.65; pcareer, and were more likely to consider a career change in the next five years than the male residents. While these male and female oral and maxillofacial surgeons in private practice and academia did not differ in their career and job satisfaction, the male and female residents differed significantly, with female residents reporting a significantly poorer career and job satisfaction than male residents. Future research needs to explore ways to improve career and professional satisfaction of female OMS residents.

  20. Neurocritical care education during neurology residency: AAN survey of US program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, K N; Drogan, O; Manno, E; Geocadin, R G; Ziai, W

    2012-05-29

    Limited information is available regarding the current state of neurocritical care education for neurology residents. The goal of our survey was to assess the need and current state of neurocritical care training for neurology residents. A survey instrument was developed and, with the support of the American Academy of Neurology, distributed to residency program directors of 132 accredited neurology programs in the United States in 2011. A response rate of 74% (98 of 132) was achieved. A dedicated neuroscience intensive care unit (neuro-ICU) existed in 64%. Fifty-six percent of residency programs offer a dedicated rotation in the neuro-ICU, lasting 4 weeks on average. Where available, the neuro-ICU rotation was required in the vast majority (91%) of programs. Neurology residents' exposure to the fundamental principles of neurocritical care was obtained through a variety of mechanisms. Of program directors, 37% indicated that residents would be interested in performing away rotations in a neuro-ICU. From 2005 to 2010, the number of programs sending at least one resident into a neuro-ICU fellowship increased from 14% to 35%. Despite the expansion of neurocritical care, large proportions of US neurology residents have limited exposure to a neuro-ICU and neurointensivists. Formal training in the principles of neurocritical care may be highly variable. The results of this survey suggest a charge to address the variability of resident education and to develop standardized curricula in neurocritical care for neurology residents.

  1. Teaching Surgery Residents the Skills to Communicate Difficult News to Patient and Family Members: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamba, Sangeeta; Tyrie, Leslie S; Bryczkowski, Sarah; Nagurka, Roxanne

    2016-01-01

    Trainees and practicing physicians alike find breaking bad, sad, or difficult news to a patient or family member as one of the most challenging communication tasks they perform. Interpersonal and communication skills are a core competency for resident training. However, in disciplines where technical skills have a major emphasis, such as surgery, the teaching of communication skills may not be a priority. The objective of our study is to review literature in order to identify best practices and learning modalities used to teach surgery trainees the communication skills regarding delivery of difficult news to patients and family members. The criteria for inclusion in this literature review were that the study (1) addresses surgeons' training (nontechnical skills) in breaking difficult news to patient and/or families, (2) describes a teaching modality or intervention targeted to teach surgery residents how to deliver difficult news to patient/family, and (3) is published in English. Articles (n = 225) were screened for final eligibility. After discarding duplicates and noneligible studies, and after abstract/full-text review, 18 articles were included in the final analysis. Most studies are single site; address general surgery residents at varying training levels; and include case-specific, outpatient, and intensive care unit (ICU) settings. There is a paucity of studies in the trauma and unexpected death setting. There is a recent trend to use Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) both to teach and assess communication skills. Variable tools are used to assess this competency as described. Simulation and OSCE format have emerged as modalities of choice both to teach surgery residents how to deliver difficult news and to assess achievement of this competency. There is a gap in the literature regarding teaching and assessing surgery resident communication skills in delivering difficult news after unexpected events in the trauma and operating room

  2. Integrative Medicine in a Preventive Medicine Residency: A Program for the Urban Underserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berz, Jonathan P B; Gergen Barnett, Katherine A; Gardiner, Paula; Saper, Robert B

    2015-11-01

    The Preventive Medicine Residency Program collaborated with the Department of Family Medicine's Program for Integrative Medicine and Health Disparities at Boston Medical Center to create a new rotation for preventive medicine residents starting in autumn 2012. Residents participated in integrative medicine group visits and consults, completed an online curriculum in dietary supplements, and participated in seminars all in the context of an urban safety net hospital. This collaboration was made possible by a federal Health Resources and Services Administration grant for integrative medicine in preventive medicine residencies and helped meet a need of the program to increase residents' exposure to clinical preventive medicine and integrative health clinical skills and principles. The collaboration has resulted in a required rotation for all residents that continues after the grant period and has fostered additional collaborations related to integrative medicine across the programs.

  3. Proposal for a unified selection to medical residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toffoli, Sônia Ferreira Lopes; Ferreira Filho, Olavo Franco; Andrade, Dalton Francisco de

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes the unification of entrance exams to medical residency programs (MRP) in Brazil. Problems related to MRP and its interface with public health problems in Brazil are highlighted and how this proposal are able to help solving these problems. The proposal is to create a database to be applied in MRP unified exams. Some advantages of using the Item Response Theory (IRT) in this database are highlighted. The MRP entrance exams are developed and applied decentralized where each school is responsible for its examination. These exams quality are questionable. Reviews about items quality, validity and reliability of appliances are not common disclosed. Evaluation is important in every education system bringing on required changes and control of teaching and learning. The proposal of MRP entrance exams unification, besides offering high quality exams to institutions participants, could be as an extra source to rate medical school and cause improvements, provide studies with a database and allow a regional mobility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Experience of health-system pharmacy administration residents in a longitudinal human resource management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerine, Lindsey B Poppe; Granko, Robert P; Savage, Scott W; Daniels, Rowell; Eckel, Stephen F

    2014-12-15

    The experience of health-system pharmacy administration (HSPA) residents in a longitudinal human resource (HR) management program is described. The subsequent benefits to the residents, department, and profession are also discussed. Postgraduate year 2 HSPA residents at an academic medical center desired more responsibility for managing an operational area. To this end, a program was created in which these residents directly manage a small group of pharmacy technicians and report to a clinical manager or assistant director with oversight responsibility. These "resident managers" are responsible, under the direction of the area's clinical manager, for the personnel, schedule, time and attendance, and HR activities of the area. Resident managers have led and sustained operational improvement projects in their areas. In addition to providing learning experiences to residents, the HSPA residency program has also improved the operations of the areas in which these residents work. Benefits to the residents include conducting annual performance evaluations for employees with whom they have a relationship as it is a task every administrator completes. Resident managers at UNC have consistently stated that this longitudinal HR experience is one of the most rewarding and most challenging experiences offered in the two-year HSPA residency. The involvement of HSPA residents in longitudinal management responsibilities furthers residents' leadership success by providing trained managers who are ready to immerse themselves into practice postresidency, having employee engagement and HR skills as well as experiences with leading operational improvements. A longitudinal HR management experience was successfully incorporated into an HSPA residency combined Master of Science degree program. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effecting Change in an Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum: Librarians' Role in a Pediatric Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeblisky, Kathy; Birr, Rebecca A; Sjursen Guerrero, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Librarians for the joint Phoenix Children's Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency Program were asked to assist on the Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Subcommittee for the program. Faculty was open to recommendations for revising and improving the curriculum and desired librarian assistance in completing the task. The annual program review and conference evaluations revealed a gap between the objectives of the EBM curriculum and the residents' perceived abilities to integrate knowledge into meaningful literature searches. This column demonstrates how librarians can collaborate with their residency programs to revise and improve processes to effect change in their program's EBM curriculum.

  6. A Training Program for College Residence Hall Advisors: Rincon Hall, California State University, Northridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, Ruth

    This program was devised in an attempt to train more effective resident advisors for the 1972-73 school year at a dormitory at California State University. The special characteristics of the dormitory--racially mixed and discordant--seemed to indicate a need for a special kind of resident advisor training program, one that attempted to better…

  7. Residency Programs and Clinical Leadership Skills Among New Saudi Graduate Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dossary, Reem Nassar; Kitsantas, Panagiota; Maddox, P J

    2016-01-01

    Nurse residency programs have been adopted by health care organizations to assist new graduate nurses with daily challenges such as intense working environments, increasing patient acuity, and complex technologies. Overall, nurse residency programs are proven beneficial in helping nurses transition from the student role to independent practitioners and bedside leaders. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of residency programs on leadership skills of new Saudi graduate nurses who completed a residency program compared to new Saudi graduate nurses who did not participate in residency programs. The study design was cross-sectional involving a convenience sample (n = 98) of new graduate nurses from three hospitals in Saudi Arabia. The Clinical Leadership Survey was used to measure the new graduate nurses' clinical leadership skills based on whether they completed a residency program or not. Descriptive statistics, correlation, and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to examine leadership skills in this sample of new Saudi graduate nurses. A significant difference was found between residents and nonresidents in their leadership skills (t = 10.48, P = .000). Specifically, residents were significantly more likely to show higher levels of leadership skills compared to their counterparts. Attending a residency program was associated with a significant increase in clinical leadership skills. The findings of this study indicate that there is a need to implement more residency programs in hospitals of Saudi Arabia. It is imperative that nurse managers and policy makers in Saudi Arabia consider these findings to improve nurses' leadership skills, which will in turn improve patient care. Further research should examine how residency programs influence new graduate nurses' transition from student to practitioner with regard to clinical leadership skills in Saudi Arabia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Interview Day Environment May Influence Applicant Selection of Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the interview day affects applicant interactions with faculty and residents, which can influence the applicant’s rank list decision. We aimed to determine if there was a difference in matched residents between those interviewing on a day on which didactics were held and had increased resident and faculty presence (didactic day versus an interview day with less availability for applicant interactions with residents and faculty (non-didactic day. This was a retrospective study reviewing interview dates of matched residents from 2009-2015. Forty-two (61.8% matched residents interviewed on a didactic day with increased faculty and resident presence versus 26 (38.2% on a non-didactic interview day with less availability for applicant interactions (p = 0.04. There is an association between interviewing on a didactic day with increased faculty and resident presence and matching in our program.

  9. Resident selection criteria for advanced education in prosthodontic programs: program directors' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Lee, Damian J; Knoernschild, Kent L; Campbell, Stephen D; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the criteria used by advanced education in prosthodontic program (AEPP) directors to select their residents, to rank them by perceived importance, and further assist prospective candidates with the application process for AEPP. Questionnaires were distributed to all prosthodontic program directors (N = 46). The program directors were requested to respond in five sections: (1) general information, (2) information obtained from applications and letters of recommendation, (3) interview process, (4) decision process, and (5) retrospective view of the selection process. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Data were collected and compiled into mean, standard deviation, and range. Results were tabulated and ranked. Thirty-eight responses (82.61%) were returned and analyzed. Most of the programs (75.77%) indicated that a combination of the program director, current residents, prosthodontic faculty, and staff members were involved in conducting the interview process. Factors considered very important when choosing applicants to the prosthodontic program were (1) interview process, (2) dental school class rank, (3) dental school grades (prosthodontics), (4) letters of recommendation, (5) dental school grades (clinical). Letters from the prosthodontic post-doc program director and prosthodontic faculty were considered the most important source of recommendation. Honesty, organization, and energy were ranked as the most positive characteristics of the applicants during the interview. Almost all respondents (97%) were satisfied with the current selection process. When asked about the current applicant pool, most program directors (91.67%) were satisfied. The most and least important factors in selecting applicants by the program directors were described and ranked. This study was intended to provide the profession with some insight on how advanced Prosthodontic programs select their applicants. It may also serve as a

  10. Development and implementation of a writing program to improve resident authorship rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmons, Amber Bradley; Hoge, Stephanie C; Cribb, Ashley; Manasco, Kalen B

    2015-09-01

    The development, implementation, and evaluation of a writing program with a formalized writing project as a component of postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) and postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) pharmacy residencies are described. The writing program at Georgia Regents Medical Center/University of Georgia College of Pharmacy, a collaborative and jointly funded program, was initiated in the 2010-11 residency year. The goals of the program are to teach residents to communicate effectively, apply leadership skills, employ project management skills, and provide medication- and practice- related education and training. The program combines both writing experiences and mentorship. At the beginning of the residency year, trainees are presented with opportunities to participate in both research projects and writing projects. Specifically, opportunities within the writing program include involvement in review articles, case reports, drug information rounds, book chapters, letters to the editor, and high-quality medication-use evaluations for potential publication. The writing project is highly encouraged, and completion of a manuscript to be submitted for publication is expected by graduation. Nine papers were published by 8 of 18 PGY1 and PGY2 residents in the four years before program implementation. A total of 23 publications were published by 18 (72%) of the 25 PGY1 and PGY2 residents in the four years after implementation of the writing program. Implementation of a formal writing program increased the overall publication rate of residents. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Leadership training in a family medicine residency program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Erin; Moore, Ainsley; Schabort, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the current status of leadership training as perceived by family medicine residents to inform the development of a formal leadership curriculum. Design Cross-sectional quantitative survey. Setting Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, in December 2013. Participants A total of 152 first- and second-year family medicine residents. Main outcome measures Family medicine residents’ attitudes toward leadership, perceived level of training in various leadership domains, and identified opportunities for leadership training. Results Overall, 80% (152 of 190) of residents completed the survey. On a Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 4 = neutral, 7 = strongly agree), residents rated the importance of physician leadership in the clinical setting as high (6.23 of 7), whereas agreement with the statement “I am a leader” received the lowest rating (5.28 of 7). At least 50% of residents desired more training in the leadership domains of personal mastery, mentorship and coaching, conflict resolution, teaching, effective teamwork, administration, ideals of a healthy workplace, coalitions, and system transformation. At least 50% of residents identified behavioural sciences seminars, a lecture and workshop series, and a retreat as opportunities to expand leadership training. Conclusion The concept of family physicians as leaders resonated highly with residents. Residents desired more personal and system-level leadership training. They also identified ways that leadership training could be expanded in the current curriculum and developed in other areas. The information gained from this survey might facilitate leadership development among residents through application of its results in a formal leadership curriculum. PMID:28292816

  12. Comparison of pediatric appendectomy outcomes between pediatric surgeons and general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Ido; Mazeh, Haggi; Levy, Yair; Karavani, Gilad; Ghanem, Muhammad; Armon, Yaron; Vromen, Amos; Eid, Ahmed; Udassin, Raphael

    2013-04-01

    Appendectomy is the most common urgent procedure in children, and surgical outcomes may be affected by the surgeon's experience. This study's aim is to compare appendectomy outcomes performed by pediatric surgeons (PSs) and general surgery residents (GSRs). A retrospective review of all patients younger than 16y treated for appendicitis at two different campuses of the same institution during the years 2008-2009 was performed. Appendectomies were performed by PS in one campus and GSR in the other. Primary end points included postoperative morbidity and hospital length of stay. During the study period, 246 (61%) patients were operated by senior GSR (postgraduate year 5-7) versus 157 (39%) patients by PS. There was no significant difference in patients' characteristics at presentation to the emergency room and the rate of appendeceal perforation (11% versus 15%, P=0.32), and noninfectious appendicitis (5% versus 5% P=0.78) also was similar. Laparoscopic surgery was performed more commonly by GSR (16% versus 9%, P=0.02) with shorter operating time (54±1.5 versus 60±2.1, P=0.01). Interestingly, the emergency room to operating room time was shorter for GSR group (419±14 versus 529±24min, P<0.001). The hospital length of stay was shorter for the GSR group (4.0±0.2 versus 4.5±0.2, P=0.03), and broad-spectrum antibiotics were used less commonly (20% versus 53%, P<0.0001) and so was home antibiotics continuation (13% versus 30%, P<0.0001). Nevertheless, postoperative complication rate was similar (5% versus 7%, P=0.29) and so was the rate of readmissions (2% versus 5%, P=0.52). The results of this study suggest that the presence of a PS does not affect the outcomes of appendectomies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sandarbh UK International Artist Residency Program Belper Derbyshire

    OpenAIRE

    White, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Sandarbh Artist Residency. Laura White participated in this residency. 2009. She was one of 13 international artists working in location together over 2 weeks. Each artist developed a separate project. Participating artists included: Ivan Smith UK, Laura White UK, Francis Gomila UK/GER, Lata Upadhyaya UK/IND, Istvan Eross HUN, Chintan Upadhyay IND, Liu Po-Chun TW, Tsai Kung-Lin TW, Dong-Hun Sung KR, Alvaro Verduzcos MEX, Abby Manock US, Anke Mellin, GER. Concept of Resi...

  14. A program to improve communication and collaboration between nurses and medical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Ruth G; Hayes, Rosemarie; Stuart, Wendy; Cassell, Asenath; Farrell, Cheryl; Miller-Reyes, Charmin; Donaldson, Audeanne

    2010-04-01

    A program was implemented for nurses and medical residents to improve communication and collaboration. It has been noted that communication and collaboration between members of the health care team improve patient outcomes and job satisfaction among nurses. Nurses on the unit where medical residents trained attended a 2-hour educational program that reviewed effective communication styles and positive aspects of collaboration, including role-playing examples. Medical residents received a self-learning packet with a posttest that was returned to researchers when completed. Focus groups, including both nurses and medical residents, were held twice a month for 6 months after the educational program. Overall improvements in communication, collaboration, patient outcomes, and job satisfaction were noted from the focus group data. The educational program proved to be successful in improving collaboration and communication between nurses and medical residents, which in turn improved patient care.

  15. Neurology training program to the education of residents in psychiatry in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Wilkins Pereira Souza

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychiatry and neurology are intertwined specialties. The advance of neuropsychiatry allowed the incision of the functional-organic dichotomy, as well as the need to include contents of neurology discipline in training the psychiatrist. Objectives: To determine the content and methodology of neurology discipline in the formation of psychiatry residents. Methods: In 2011 to 2013 a theoretical and reflective research was held on the websites of the Brazilian Psychiatric Association (BPA, residencies in psychiatry in Brazil, PubMed and SciELO. The terms used were: medical residency program and residency in psychiatry; neurology and residency in psychiatry. We searched for skills, workload, hospital care or outpatient, supervisor, teaching method, thematic content, evaluation, research and recommended literature. Results and discussion: In Brazil, there are 66 residencies in psychiatry, concentrated in the Southeast and South regions (71.1%. Of the 840 residency positions, 80.1% are located in these regions. Only 8% of residencies publish their programs, even partial. Psychiatry residents accompany the service of neurology at specialized clinics as neurogeriatrics, headache and epilepsy. No residency discloses the thematic content and recommended literature. An internship reported the need for evaluation to completion. Conclusions: In Brazil, there is not a full program of neurology to form the psychiatrist. It is necessary that the residencies publish their programs and experiences. It is suggested that the BPA structure a national program so the institutions can adapt it to their reality. It is proposed that the preceptor of neurology be part of the psychiatry service, and not the resident pass by neurology subspecialty outpatients.

  16. A Survey of Simulation Utilization in Anesthesiology Residency Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochlen, Lauryn R; Housey, Michelle; Gannon, Ian; Tait, Alan R; Naughton, Norah; Kheterpal, Sachin

    2016-06-01

    Given the evolution of competency-based education and evidence supporting the benefits of incorporating simulation into anesthesiology residency training, simulation will likely play an important role in the training and assessment of anesthesiology residents. Currently, there are little data available regarding the current status of simulation-based curricula across US residency programs. In this study, we assessed simulation-based training and assessment in US anesthesiology programs using a survey designed to elicit information regarding the type, frequency, and content of the simulation courses offered at the 132 Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-certified anesthesiology training programs. The response rate for the survey was 66%. Although most of the responding programs offered simulation-based courses for interns and residents and during CA-1 orientation, the curriculum varied greatly among programs. Approximately 40% of responding programs use simulation for resident assessment and remediation. The majority of responding programs favored standard simulation-based training as part of residency training (89%), and the most common perceived obstacles to doing so were time, money, and human resources. The results from this survey highlight that there are currently large variations in simulation-based training and assessment among training programs. It also confirms that many program directors feel that standardizing some components of simulation-based education and assessment would be beneficial. Given the positive impact simulation has on skill retention and operating room preparedness, it may be worthwhile to consider developing a standard curriculum.

  17. Assessing Interpersonal and Communication Skills in Radiation Oncology Residents: A Pilot Standardized Patient Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Melody [Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Berman, Abigail T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hwang, Wei-Ting [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); LaMarra, Denise [Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Baffic, Cordelia; Suneja, Gita [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Vapiwala, Neha, E-mail: Neha.Vapiwala@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: There is a lack of data for the structured development and evaluation of communication skills in radiation oncology residency training programs. Effective communication skills are increasingly emphasized by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and are critical for a successful clinical practice. We present the design of a novel, pilot standardized patient (SP) program and the evaluation of communication skills among radiation oncology residents. Methods and Materials: Two case scenarios were developed to challenge residents in the delivery of “bad news” to patients: one scenario regarding treatment failure and the other regarding change in treatment plan. Eleven radiation oncology residents paired with 6 faculty participated in this pilot program. Each encounter was scored by the SPs, observing faculty, and residents themselves based on the Kalamazoo guidelines. Results: Overall resident performance ratings were “good” to “excellent,” with faculty assigning statistically significant higher scores and residents assigning lower scores. We found inconsistent inter rater agreement among faculty, residents, and SPs. SP feedback was also valuable in identifying areas of improvement, including more collaborative decision making and less use of medical jargon. Conclusions: The program was well received by residents and faculty and regarded as a valuable educational experience that could be used as an annual feedback tool. Poor inter rater agreement suggests a need for residents and faculty physicians to better calibrate their evaluations to true patient perceptions. High scores from faculty members substantiate the concern that resident evaluations are generally positive and nondiscriminating. Faculty should be encouraged to provide honest and critical feedback to hone residents' interpersonal skills.

  18. A novel flight surgeon training model at a joint military and civilian surgical residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSoucy, Erik S; Zakaluzny, Scott A; Galante, Joseph M

    2017-07-01

    Graduating military preliminary interns are often required to fill flight surgeon billets. General surgery preliminary interns get experience evaluating surgical and trauma patients, but receive very little training in primary care and flight medicine. At a joint military and civilian training program, we developed a supplemental curriculum to help transition our interns into flight medicine. From 2013 to 2016, we developed a lecture series focused on aerospace medicine, primary care, and specialty topics including dermatology, ophthalmology, orthopedics, pediatrics, psychiatry, and women's health. During the 2016 iteration attended by 10 interns, pre- and post-participation 10-item Likert scale surveys were administered. Questions focused on perceived preparedness for primary care role and overall enthusiasm for flight medicine. Open-ended surveys from 2013 to 2016 were also used to gauge the effect of the curriculum. The composite number of agreement responses (indicating increased comfort with presented material) increased 63% after course completion. Disagreement responses and neutral responses decreased 78% and 30%, respectively. Open-ended surveys from 14 participants showed an overall positive impression of the curriculum with all indicating it aided their transition to flight medicine. Survey responses indicate an overall perceived benefit from participation in the curriculum with more confidence in primary care topics and improved transition to a flight medicine tour. This model for supplemental aerospace medicine and primary care didactics should be integrated into any residency program responsible for training military preliminary interns who may serve as flight surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Long-acting reversible contraception use among residents in obstetrics/gynecology training programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zigler RE

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rachel E Zigler,1 Jeffrey F Peipert,1,2 Qiuhong Zhao,1 Ragini Maddipati,1 Colleen McNicholas1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Clinical Research and Family Planning, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA Background: The objective of the study was to estimate the personal usage of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC among obstetrics and gynecology (Ob/Gyn residents in the United States and compare usage between programs with and without a Ryan Residency Training Program (Ryan Program, an educational program implemented to enhance resident training in family planning. Materials and methods: We performed a web-based, cross-sectional survey to explore contraceptive use among Ob/Gyn residents between November and December 2014. Thirty-two Ob/Gyn programs were invited to participate, and 24 programs (75% agreed to participate. We divided respondents into two groups based on whether or not their program had a Ryan Program. We excluded male residents without a current female partner as well as residents who were currently pregnant or trying to conceive. We evaluated predictors of LARC use using bivariate analysis and multivariable Poisson regression. Results: Of the 638 residents surveyed, 384 (60.2% responded to our survey and 351 were eligible for analysis. Of those analyzed, 49.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 44.1%, 54.5% reported current LARC use: 70.0% of residents in Ryan Programs compared to 26.8% in non-Ryan Programs (RRadj 2.14, 95% CI 1.63–2.80. Residents reporting a religious affiliation were less likely to use LARC than those who described themselves as non-religious (RRadj 0.76, 95% CI 0.64–0.92. Of residents reporting LARC use, 91% were using the levonorgestrel intrauterine device. Conclusion: LARC use in this population of women’s health specialists is substantially

  20. Trends in workforce diversity in vascular surgery programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Katherine; Rosero, Eric B; Clagett, G Patrick; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Timaran, Carlos H

    2009-06-01

    U.S. black and Hispanic populations are growing at a steady pace. In contrast, the medical profession lacks the same minority growth and representation. Women are also under-represented in many surgical disciplines. The purpose of this study was to assess trends in the proportion of women, blacks, and Hispanics admitted to vascular surgery (VS) and related specialties, and to compare them with each other and with a surgical specialty, orthopedic surgery (OS), with a formal diversity initiative. Data on the fellowship pool of VS, interventional radiology (IR), and interventional cardiology (IC), as well as the resident pools of general surgery (GS) and orthopedic surgery (OS), were obtained from U.S. graduate medical education reports for 1999 through 2005. Cochrane-Armitage trend tests were used to assess trends in the proportion of females, blacks, and Hispanics in relation to the total physician workforce for each subspecialty. No significant trends in the proportion of females, blacks, or Hispanics accepted into VS and IC fellowship programs occurred during the study period. In contrast, IR, GS, and OS programs revealed significant trends for increasing proportions of at least one of the underrepresented study groups. In particular, OS, which has implemented a diversity awareness program, showed a positive trend in female and Hispanic trainees (P workforce diversity.

  1. Minerva: using a software program to improve resident performance during independent call

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itri, Jason N.; Redfern, Regina O.; Cook, Tessa; Scanlon, Mary H.

    2010-03-01

    We have developed an application called Minerva that allows tracking of resident discrepancy rates and missed cases. Minerva mines the radiology information system (RIS) for preliminary interpretations provided by residents during independent call and copies both the preliminary and final interpretations to a database. Both versions are displayed for direct comparison by Minerva and classified as 'in agreement', 'minor discrepancy' or 'major discrepancy' by the resident program director. Minerva compiles statistics comparing minor, major and total discrepancy rates for individual residents relative to the overall group. Discrepant cases are categorized according to date, modality and body part and reviewed for trends in missed cases. The rate of minor, major and total discrepancies for residents on-call at our institution was similar to rates previously published, including a 2.4% major discrepancy rate for second year radiology residents in the DePICTORS study and a 2.6% major discrepancy rate for resident at a community hospital. Trend analysis of missed cases was used to generate a topic-specific resident missed case conference on acromioclavicular (AC) joint separation injuries, which resulted in a 75% decrease in the number of missed cases related to AC separation subsequent to the conference. Using a software program to track of minor and major discrepancy rates for residents taking independent call using modified RadPeer scoring guidelines provides a competency-based metric to determine resident performance. Topic-specific conferences using the cases identified by Minerva can result in a decrease in missed cases.

  2. Outcomes From an Enhanced Recovery Program for Laparoscopic Gastric Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong-Chong, Nathalie; Kehlet, Henrik; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the outcomes from an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program for laparoscopic gastric surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective study of patients undergoing elective laparoscopic gastric resection in an ERAS protocol at a single institution between 2008...... (range, 9 to 47). The median length of hospital stay was 4 (range, 1 to 44) days. The conversion rate to open surgery was 11.6%. Four patients (4.7%) had an anastomotic leak. Three patients had postoperative bleeding (4.7%). About 4.7% (n=4) of the patients required readmission and 8.1% required...

  3. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  4. The Artist Residency Program in Eastern Oregon: Emphasizing the Rural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Doug

    During a 1979-1980 pilot project, 13 nine-week residencies by professional artists were sponsored in 10 eastern Oregon school districts with Eastern Oregon State College serving as liaison, the Northwest Area Foundation of St. Paul (Minnesota) contributing $33,500, and participating school districts adding a total of $8,000 in funding. This low…

  5. Impact of an enhanced recovery program on colorectal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohsiriwat, Varut

    2014-01-01

    Surgical outcomes of colorectal cancer treatment depend not only on good surgery and tumor biology but also on an optimal perioperative care. The enhanced recovery program (ERP) - a multidisciplinary and multimodal approach, or so called 'fast-track surgery' - has been designed to minimize perioperative and intraoperative stress responses, and to support the recovery of organ function aiming to help patients getting better sooner after surgery. Compared with conventional postoperative care, the enhanced recovery program results in quicker patient recovery, shorter length of hospital stay, faster recovery of gastrointestinal function, and a lower incidence of postoperative complications. Although not firmly established as yet, the enhanced recovery program after surgery could be of oncological benefit in colorectal cancer patients because it can enhance recovery, maintain integrity of the postoperative immune system, increase feasibility of postoperative chemotherapy, and shorten the time interval from surgery to chemotherapy. This commentary summarizes short-term outcomes and potential long-term benefits of enhanced recovery programs in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  6. Four-year experience with a regional program providing simulation-based endovascular training for vascular surgery fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, David L; Lee, Eugene S; Hedayati, Nasim; Pevec, William C

    2009-01-01

    High-fidelity procedure simulation has been found useful for training vascular surgery residents in endovascular procedures, but the costs of acquiring, maintaining, and operating simulators represent a barrier to routine use of endovascular simulation in vascular surgery programs. Providing simulation training opportunities through regional centers may make simulation more cost effective, but the costs and benefits of this approach have not been reported previously. We reviewed participation costs in a regional simulation program to provide a benchmark for comparison with other training options. Simulation-based training was offered annually from 2004 to 2007 to the 11 vascular surgery fellowships in Washington, Oregon, California, Arizona, and Utah. Participation was at the discretion of the program directors and fellows. Sessions were designed to offer individualized, hands-on training with 2-4 participants per 2-day session. SimSuite (Medical Simulation Corporation, Denver, Colorado) simulators were used. During the 4-year period, participation by invited programs averaged 75%. Ten of 11 programs in the western United States region participated, with 34 fellows participating during the 4 years of the program. In addition, 2 program directors or faculty attended sessions to participate as learners, and 8 other individuals were allowed to participate (including 7 senior surgery residents and 1 vascular surgery fellow from out of the region). The average participant costs for travel, which include transportation, lodging, and meals, were $571. Simulation facility expenses, which included use of the simulator, computer-based training modules, and instructional support by an educational specialist, averaged $1055 per participant. Surgical faculty spent 12 hours per 2-day session instructing and in other direct educational activities. Costs for this time were not calculated separately. Vascular surgery fellows' participation in simulation training at regional centers

  7. Can teenage novel users perform as well as General Surgery residents upon initial exposure to a robotic surgical system simulator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, A; Patel, S; Robison, W; Senkowski, T; Allen, J; Shaw, E; Senkowski, C

    2017-06-05

    New techniques in minimally invasive and robotic surgical platforms require staged curricula to insure proficiency. Scant literature exists as to how much simulation should play a role in training those who have skills in advanced surgical technology. The abilities of novel users may help discriminate if surgically experienced users should start at a higher simulation level or if the tasks are too rudimentary. The study's purpose is to explore the ability of General Surgery residents to gain proficiency on the dVSS as compared to novel users. The hypothesis is that Surgery residents will have increased proficiency in skills acquisition as compared to naive users. Six General Surgery residents at a single institution were compared with six teenagers using metrics measured by the dVSS. Participants were given two 1-h sessions to achieve an MScoreTM in the 90th percentile on each of the five simulations. MScoreTM software compiles a variety of metrics including total time, number of attempts, and high score. Statistical analysis was run using Student's t test. Significance was set at p value technology.

  8. A Four-Year Program to Train Residents in Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Edward J.; Zink, Brian J.

    1989-01-01

    The University of Cincinnati's comprehensive emergency medicine residency curriculum provides significant practical training in ground and aeromedical transport, disaster work, telemetry communications, and administrative matters. Initial program feedback has been very positive. (MSE)

  9. Teaching and Assessing Systems-based Competency in Ophthalmology Residency Training Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Andrew G.; Beaver, Hilary A.; Greenlee, Emily; Oetting, Thomas A.; Boldt, H. Culver; Olson, Richard; Abramoff, Michael; Carter, Keith

    2007-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has mandated that residency programs, including ophthalmology, teach and assess specific competencies, including systems-based learning. We review the pertinent literature on systems-based learning for ophthalmology and recommend speci

  10. Success and Failure in a Family-Centered Comprehensive Care Teaching Program for Pediatric Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teberg, Annabel; Friedman, David Belais

    1970-01-01

    This Well Baby Clinic was designed to augment residency teaching program in evaluation of physical and emotional growth, in family counseling, and to gain data on response to varying immunizations. (IR)

  11. Description of a medical writing rotation for a postgraduate pharmacy residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jamie N; Tiemann, Kelsey A; Ostroff, Jared L

    2014-04-01

    To provide a description of a pharmacy residency rotation dedicated to medical writing developed at a tertiary care academic medical center. Contribution to the medical literature is an important component of professional pharmacy practice, and there are many benefits seen by practitioners actively involved in scholarly activities. Residency programs have an opportunity to expand beyond the standard roles of postgraduate pharmacist training but rarely is there formal instruction on medical writing skills or are scholarship opportunities provided to residents. In order to address this deficiency, a residency program may consider the implementation of a formal Medical Writing rotation. This rotation is designed to introduce the resident to medical writing through active discussion on medical writing foundational topics, engage the resident in a collaborative review of a manuscript submitted to a peer-reviewed professional journal, and support the resident in the design and composition of manuscript of publishable quality. A structured Medical Writing rotation during a pharmacy resident's training can help develop the skills necessary to promote scholarly activities and foster resident interest in future pursuit of professional medical writing.

  12. Geriatrics Education in Psychiatric Residencies: A National Survey of Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshaw, Gregg A.; Bragg, Elizabeth J.; Layde, Joseph B.; Meganathan, Karthikeyan; Brewer, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the current characteristics of geriatrics training within general psychiatry training programs. Methods: In the fall of 2006, a survey was mailed and made available online to all U.S. psychiatric residency program directors (N=181). Results: The response rate was 54% (n=97). Of the responding psychiatry programs,…

  13. Trends in the Medical Knowledge and Clinical Competence of Graduates of Internal Medicine Residency Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcini, John J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study assessed the effectiveness of medical resident training programs during 1983-88 by evaluating students' certification scores and comparing them to the program's evaluation of students' clinical competence. Results are reported and analyzed for top-rated, university-affiliated, and non-university-affiliated programs, focusing on trends over…

  14. Listening to Students: How I Came to Love My Low-Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Megan

    2009-01-01

    Finding an academic program that caters to children's literature is hard. Many people consider children's literature no more sophisticated than its audience--an arena for those who cannot hack it either as writers or as teachers of adult literature. This author, however, found a new program--a "low residency program"--at Hamline…

  15. The resident scholar program: a research training opportunity for internal medicine house staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Abigail B; McCormack, Francis X; Diers, Tiffiny; Jazieh, Abdul-Rahman

    2007-01-01

    Housestaff research training is a challenging task that is complicated by the lack of a structured process and dedicated time. The Resident Scholar Program (RSP) at the University of Cincinnati, Department of Internal Medicine was created to overcome these challenges. Interested internal medicine house staff are required to submit an application to the residency research director including a project description signed by a faculty mentor. If the project is approved, a 4-month elective rotation is scheduled for the following year. Residents spend the first month on a consult service in the subspecialty area of their research and the remaining 3 months performing their research project. The RSP was launched in July 2003. The percentage of residents participating in research more than tripled. The subspecialty areas represented by RSP research were more diverse than those represented in prior years. Most participants participated in clinical research projects (84%), with 63% of projects being prospective in design. The RSP residents were twice as likely to obtain subspecialty fellowship positions compared to non-RSP residents (89% vs 46%, respectively). The RSP enables house staff to participate in research opportunities in their areas of interest. Development of a more systematic assessment method to study the impact of the program is underway, but the high participation rate reflects resident interest in such a program, particularly for residents with aspirations in pursuing fellowship training.

  16. The triumvirate: a new model for residency program directorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiselle, Phillip M; Donohoe, Kevin; Graham, David; Siewert, Bettina; Jennette, Richard; Hatabu, Hiroto; Kressel, Herbert Y

    2007-12-01

    The authors describe their initial 5-year experience with a new model of residency directorship: a triumvirate of shared leadership consisting of a director and 2 associate directors with specific areas of expertise and assigned responsibility. The major appeal of this model is its potential to draw on the diverse talents of 3 individuals with responsibilities matched to their specific areas of strength. A major benefit of the model is that each director has more time and energy to devote to specific duties, resulting in a greater opportunity for innovation and creativity. In this article, the authors describe the roles, responsibilities, and accomplishments of each of the 3 directors. They also discuss potential benefits of the triumvirate model in comparison with a traditional residency directorship and potential pitfalls to avoid when implementing this model.

  17. Role of journal club in Canadian ophthalmology residency training: a national survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Sarah J; Sabri, Kourosh

    2016-06-01

    To conduct a national survey of journal club curricula in Canadian ophthalmology residency programs. Cross-sectional web-based survey. Fifteen Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) ophthalmology residency program directors. The 15 RCPSC ophthalmology residency program directors were invited to participate in a 31-item online survey. The survey inquired about the purpose, educational goals, and structure of journal club. Basic statistics were performed to compare responses across institutions. Thirteen of the 15 program directors replied, representing an 87% response rate. Twelve (92%) institutions maintained a journal club. All of the program directors surveyed felt that journal club had educational value. Resident attendance was typically mandatory (75%) and correspondingly high across programs. There was 100% agreement that randomized controlled trials were most often selected for review. The primary journal club objectives were for residents to develop critical appraisal skills and to conduct a literature search (67%). Formal teaching and evaluation of these skills were not prioritized by any program. Seventeen percent felt the most important objective was to impact clinical practice. Canadian ophthalmology program directors expressed high levels of satisfaction that journal club was effective in meeting its stated objectives. This indicates that the teaching model promoted resident critical appraisal skills; however, objective evaluation methods to assess resident competence in evidence-based medicine were not described by any respondents. As RCSPC ophthalmology programs transition to competency-based medical education, program directors may consider modifying journal club curriculum, broadening its utility toward a means of outcome assessment. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Assessment of a residency training program in endocrinology and nutrition by physicians: results of a survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Fernández, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Alcántara, Carmen; Palomares-Ortega, Rafael; García-Manzanares, Alvaro; Benito-López, Pedro

    2011-12-01

    The current training program for resident physicians in endocrinology and nutrition (EN) organizes their medical learning. Program evaluation by physicians was assessed using a survey. The survey asked about demographic variables, EN training methods, working time and center, and opinion on training program contents. Fifty-one members of Sociedad Castellano-Manchega de Endocrinología, Nutrición y Diabetes, and Sociedad Andaluza de Endocrinología y Nutrición completed the survey. Forty-percent of them disagreed with the compulsory nature of internal medicine, cardiology, nephrology and, especially, neurology rotations (60%); a majority (>50%) were against several recommended rotations included in the program. The fourth year of residence was considered by 37.8% of respondents as the optimum time for outpatient and inpatient control and monitoring without direct supervision. The recommended monthly number of on-call duties was 3.8±1.2. We detected a positive opinion about extension of residence duration to 4.4±0.5 years. Doctoral thesis development during the residence period was not considered convenient by 66.7% of physicians. Finally, 97.8% of resident physicians would recommend residency in EN to other colleagues. Endocrinologists surveyed disagreed with different training program aspects such as the rotation system, skill acquisition timing, and on-call duties. Therefore, an adaptation of the current training program in EN would be required. Copyright © 2011 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. A survey of formal training in the care of children in family practice residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldor, R A; Luckmann, R

    1992-08-01

    Declining hospitalization rates for children and an increased emphasis on ambulatory care may be affecting the way family practice residency programs train their residents in the care of children. We surveyed all US family practice residency program directors to determine the nature of the child care training that programs currently provide to residents. Responses were received from 78% of the programs. Residencies required a mean of 5.2 months of formal pediatric training (range: 1 to 11 months). Thirty percent of programs noted a declining inpatient census on inpatient pediatric teaching services, but since 1978, the mean duration of inpatient pediatric training increased by 0.4 months to a required mean of 2.7 months of general pediatric inpatient training (range: 0 to 6 months). The mean time devoted to structured outpatient pediatric training was only 1.6 months (range: 0 to 6 months). Nine percent of responding programs required no formal pediatric outpatient training other than family health center experience. Despite declining inpatient census and increased emphasis on comprehensive ambulatory care, family practice residencies require more formal inpatient pediatric training than formal outpatient training.

  20. Methods and resources for physics education in radiology residency programs: survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresolin, Linda; Bisset, George S; Hendee, William R; Kwakwa, Francis A

    2008-11-01

    Over the past 2 years, ongoing efforts have been made to reevaluate and restructure the way physics education is provided to radiology residents. Program directors and faculty from North American radiology residency programs were surveyed about how physics is being taught and what resources are currently being used for their residents. Substantial needs were identified for additional educational resources in physics, better integration of physics into clinical training, and a standardized physics curriculum closely linked to the initial certification examination of the American Board of Radiology.

  1. Alternative Strategies for Funding a General Dentistry Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralewski, John E.; Wiggins, Carla

    1987-01-01

    Three alternative program funding approaches used in other professions are examined: (1) the reorientation of selected dental schools toward graduate education, (2) emphasizing and marketing the service aspects of the programs, and (3) developing education programs as in-house training for large organizations. (MSE)

  2. Establishing a pediatric robotic surgery program in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bütter, Andreana; Merritt, Neil; Dave, Sumit

    2016-10-26

    Despite the introduction of robotic surgery in 2000, few pediatric surgeons outside the United States have embraced this technology. We discuss our experience with establishing the first Canadian pediatric robotic surgery program. After simulator training, live animal surgery and observation of robotically assisted cases at an outside institution, we performed our first pediatric da Vinci(®) surgery in July 2013. A prospective database was established to assess outcomes. Forty one children have undergone robotically assisted surgery for the following 42 procedures: (a) pyeloplasty (17), (b) ureteral reimplantations (12), (c) uretero-uretostomy (1), (d) cholecystectomies (10), (e) interval appendectomy (1) and (f) distal pancreatectomy (1). The average age was 9.7 years (range 1.6-17.9) and 66% of patients were female. Average operative time was 174 min (range 47-301). Length of stay was 3 days (range 0-20). All procedures were completed without conversion to open or laparoscopy. There were no technical failures. Two post re-implantation patients had urine leaks which required conservative treatment. Despite the lack of haptic feedback, we have noted that the markedly enhanced three-dimensional visualization and instrument dexterity offer significant advantages for complex reconstructive pediatric surgery. This platform may also enable trainees to perform more advanced minimally invasive pediatric surgery. We have successfully established the first pediatric robotic surgery program in Canada. Our da Vinci(®) system is shared with our adult colleagues, which enables more frequent use as well as some cost sharing. A dedicated group of operative nurses and surgeons are required to allow adoption of this new technology.

  3. The Flipped Classroom: A Modality for Mixed Asynchronous and Synchronous Learning in a Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P. Young

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A “flipped classroom” educational model exchanges the traditional format of a classroom lecture and homework problem set. We piloted two flipped classroom sessions in our emergency medicine (EM residency didactic schedule. We aimed to learn about resident and faculty impressions of the sessions, in order to develop them as a regular component of our residency curriculum. Methods: We evaluated residents’ impression of the asynchronous video component and synchronous classroom component using four Likert items. We used open-ended questions to inquire about resident and faculty impressions of the advantages and disadvantages of the format. Results: For the Likert items evaluating the video lectures, 33/35 residents (94%, 95% CI 80%-99% responded that the video lecture added to their knowledge about the topic, and 33/35 residents felt that watching the video was a valuable use of their time. For items evaluating the flipped classroom format, 36/38 residents (95%, 95% CI 82%-99% preferred the format to a traditional lecture on the topic, and 38/38 residents (100%, 95% CI 89%-100% felt that the small group session was effective in helping them learn about the topic. Most residents preferred to see the format monthly in our curriculum and chose an ideal group size of 5.5 (first session and 7 (second session. Residents cited the interactivity of the sessions and access to experts as advantages of the format. Faculty felt the ability to assess residents’ understanding of concepts and provide feedback were advantages. Conclusion: Our flipped classroom model was positively received by EM residents. Residents preferred a small group size and favored frequent use of the format in our curriculum. The flipped classroom represents one modality that programs may use to incorporate a mixture of asynchronous and interactive synchronous learning and provide additional opportunities to evaluate residents. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:-0.

  4. A new model for accreditation of residency programs in internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goroll, Allan H; Sirio, Carl; Duffy, F Daniel; LeBlond, Richard F; Alguire, Patrick; Blackwell, Thomas A; Rodak, William E; Nasca, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    A renewed emphasis on clinical competence and its assessment has grown out of public concerns about the safety, efficacy, and accountability of health care in the United States. Medical schools and residency training programs are paying increased attention to teaching and evaluating basic clinical skills, stimulated in part by these concerns and the responding initiatives of accrediting, certifying, and licensing bodies. This paper, from the Residency Review Committee for Internal Medicine of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, proposes a new outcomes-based accreditation strategy for residency training programs in internal medicine. It shifts residency program accreditation from external audit of educational process to continuous assessment and improvement of trainee clinical competence.

  5. Medical Education About the Care of Addicted Incarcerated Persons: A National Survey of Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Mark L.; Isaacson, J. Harry; Kahn, Ruth; Mundt, Marlon P.; Manwell, Linda Baier

    2001-06-01

    In June 1998, there were 1.8 million inmates in correctional facilities for adults; 1.2 million in state and federal prisons and 600,000 in municipal/county jails (668 persons per 100,000 U.S. population). Rates of TB, AIDS, mental illness, and substance abuse are 2-13 times higher in persons living in jails and prisons. This study was designed to assess the level of training offered to residents in seven medical specialties in the care of addicted incarcerated persons. The study design involved two stages. The first entailed a mailed survey to 1,831 residency directors in family medicine, internal medicine, osteopathic medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and emergency medicine. The second stage was a telephone interview, about substance use disorders, of faculty listed by the residency directors as teaching residents. The mailed survey was completed by 1,205 residency directors (66%). The 769 faculty from those identified programs, who participated in the telephone interview, reported that only 14% of their residency programs offered lectures or conferences on the care of incarcerated persons, yet 44% of the programs had residents caring for incarcerated persons with substance abuse problems, in a clinical setting. Only 22% offered clinical experiences for residents in a correctional facility.We recognize that our survey of correctional health and substance abuse training is limited, but as such, a greater number of respondents to our survey do not teach residents addiction medicine topics pertaining to prevention, evaluation, intervention, and management of the addicted criminal offender/patient in a correctional setting or give adequate clinical exposure to this special population. The data suggests a need to develop and implement educational programs on medical care for this high-risk and expanding population.

  6. Cirurgia no câncer colorretal: abordagem cirúrgica de 74 pacientes do SUS portadores de câncer colorretal em programa de pós-graduação lato sensu em coloproctologia Surgery in colorectal cancer: surgical approach of 74 patients from the Brazilian National Health System with colorectal cancer in a postgraduate program (residency in coloproctology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Guimarães Oliveira

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A análise retrospectiva de 74 prontuários de pacientes do Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS, operados de câncer colorretal pelo Residente R2 supervisionado e auxiliado por preceptores, permitiu as seguintes conclusões: a média etária dos pacientes foi 57,2, sendo as sexta e sétima décadas responsáveis por 51,4% dos pacientes. O câncer retal foi preponderante nas mulheres (54,1%. As localizações mais comuns dos tumores foram no sigmoide (31,1%, reto alto (24,3% e ceco (17,6%. As cirurgias mais realizadas foram a retossigmoidectomia com anastomose colorretal (36,6%, e hemicolectomia direita com anastomose íleo-transverso (21,7%. As características anatômicas dos tumores, baseadas na classificação TNM, mais comuns foram: T3 (62,1%, N0 (59,5% e M0 (77,0% (pIn the framework of postgraduate Coloproctology for 2009, two graduate students conducted the second year as principal surgeons, 129 major surgeries, always assisted effectively by one or two tutors. All surgeries were performed on public patients in Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte, with absolute presence of members of the Grupo de Coloproctologia da Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte e Faculdade de Ciências Médicas de Minas Gerais (GCP-CBHS-FCMMG. A retrospective analysis of 74 medical records of patients from the Brazilian National Health System, resected of colorectal cancer by Resident R2, supervised and assisted by mentors, could get into the following conclusions: the average age of patients was 57.2, and the sixth and seventh decades accounted for 51.4% of the patients. The rectal cancer was predominant in women (54.1%. The most common sites of tumors were in the sigmoid (31.1%, rectum (24.3%, and cecum (17.6%. The most commonly performed procedures were retossigmoidectomy with colorectal anastomosis (36.6% and right hemicolectomy with ileo-transverse anastomosis (21.7%. The anatomical characteristics of the tumors based on TNM classification findings were: T3 (62.1%, N0 (59.5%, and M

  7. Current status of obstetrics and gynecology resident medical-legal education: a survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Hunt, Carey; Gilbert, William M

    2005-12-01

    To assess the level and type of medical-legal education offered to obstetrics and gynecology residents and medical students. All obstetrics and gynecology program directors (n = 252) were asked to complete a survey questioning the availability of, type of, and desire for medical-legal education within their programs. Seventy-eight percent of the program directors answered the survey with 86% reporting some degree of formal medical-legal education. The most common formats were didactic lectures (38%), grand rounds (30%), case conferences (19%), mock trials (9%), and other (4%). These sessions most commonly contained information on proper documentation (48%), testifying (25%), and giving a deposition (24%). The average number of sessions per year was 4.1 with a median of 3 sessions per year. Despite this high percentage of some formal education, 88% expressed an interest in pursuing other educational options on these topics. Most obstetrics and gynecology residency programs provide some form of medical-legal instruction to residents, but the small number of sessions suggests that this is inadequate. Residency programs may benefit from a larger and more formal resident education program on medical-legal issues.

  8. Developing criteria for pediatric/adolescent bariatric surgery programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsky, Marc; Kramer, Robert E; Fullmer, Michelle A; Polfuss, Michele; Porter, Renee; Ward-Begnoche, Wendy; Getzoff, Elizabeth A; Dreyer, Meredith; Stolzman, Stacy; Reichard, Kirk W

    2011-09-01

    The prevalence of morbid obesity in adolescents is rising at an alarming rate. Comorbidities known to predispose to cardiovascular disease are increasingly being diagnosed in these children. Bariatric surgery has become an acceptable treatment alternative for morbidly obese adults, and criteria have been developed to establish center-of-excellence designation for adult bariatric surgery programs. Evidence suggests that bariatric surgical procedures are being performed with increasing numbers in adolescents. We have examined and compiled the current expert recommendations for guidelines and criteria that are needed to deliver safe and effective bariatric surgical care to adolescents.

  9. A perioperative rehabilitation program for anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, T; Shelbourne, K D

    2000-01-01

    Rehabilitation programs have progressed alongside surgical advances in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A perioperative program has been successfully used at our clinic for more than 10 years to reduce postoperative complications and return patients to activity safely and quickly. The four-phase program starts at the time of injury and preoperatively includes aggressive swelling reduction, hyperextension exercises, gait training, and mental preparation. Goals after surgery are to control swelling while regaining full knee range of motion. After quadriceps strengthening goals are reached, patients can shift to sport-specific exercises.

  10. A survey of pediatric resident training programs 5 years after the Task Force report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, H L; Oski, F A

    1984-10-01

    Twenty-nine pediatric residency training programs responded to a survey with detailed descriptions of the scheduled rotations before and after the Report of the Task Force on Pediatric Education. This survey documented some changes in the overall structure of residency programming in that all programs demand 3 years of general pediatric training. Little if any changes were noted in the traditional emphasis on inpatient and neonatal training. Some changes in content area have been noted, namely a modest increase in the experiences in adolescent medicine. The survey failed to demonstrate any trend indicating increased emphasis on training experiences in the "new morbidity."

  11. Minimally invasive pediatric surgery: Increasing implementation in daily practice and resident's training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.T. Velde (Te); N.M.A. Bax (Klaas); S.H.A.J. Tytgat; J.R. de Jong (Justin); D.V. Travassos (Vieira); W.L.M. Kramer; D.C. van der Zee (David)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In 1998, the one-year experience in minimally invasive abdominal surgery in children at a pediatric training center was assessed. Seven years later, we determined the current status of pediatric minimally invasive surgery in daily practice and surgical training. Methods: A

  12. Minimally invasive pediatric surgery : Increasing implementation in daily practice and resident's training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, E. A. te; Bax, N. M. A.; Tytgat, S. H. A. J.; de Jong, J. R.; Travassos, D. Vieira; Kramer, W. L. M.; van der Zee, D. C.

    Background: In 1998, the one-year experience in minimally invasive abdominal surgery in children at a pediatric training center was assessed. Seven years later, we determined the current status of pediatric minimally invasive surgery in daily practice and surgical training. Methods: A retrospective

  13. Voluntary autonomous simulator based training in minimally invasive surgery, residents' compliance and reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Empel, P.J.; Verdam, M.G.E.; Strypet, M.; van Rijssen, L.B.; Huirne, J. A.; Scheele, F.; Bonjer, H.J.; Meijerink, W.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Knot tying and suturing skills in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) differ markedly from those in open surgery. Appropriate MIS training is mandatory before implementation into practice. The Advanced Suturing Course (ASC) is a structured simulator based training course that includes a 6-w

  14. Resident Development via Progress Testing and Test-Marking: An Innovation and Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Karen; Williams, D. Josh; Pardhan, Alim; Preyra, Ian; Li, Shelly-Anne

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Since 2008, the McMaster University Royal College Emergency Medicine residency training program has run practice Short Answer Question (SAQ) examinations to help residents test their knowledge and gain practice in answering exam-style questions. However, marking this type of SAQ exam is time-consuming. Methods To help address this problem, we require that senior residents help mark at least one exam per year alongside faculty members. Examinees’ identities are kept anonymous by assigning a random number to each resident, which is only decoded after marking. Aggregation of marks is done by faculty only. The senior residents and faculty members all share sequential marking of each question. Each question is reviewed, and exemplar “best practice” answers are discussed. As novel/unusual answers appear, instantaneous fact-checking (via textbooks, or the internet) and discussions occur allowing for real-time modification to the answer keys as needed. Results A total of 22 out of 37 residents (post graduate year 1 to post graduate year 5 (PGY1 to PGY5)) participated in a recent program evaluation focus group. This evaluation showed that residents feel quite positive about this process. With the anonymization process, residents do not object to their colleagues seeing and marking their answers. Senior residents have found this process informative and have felt that this process helps them gain insight into better “examsmanship.” Conclusions Involving residents in marking short-answer exams is acceptable and perceived as useful experience for improving exam-taking skills. More studies of similar innovations would be required to determine to what extent this may be the case. PMID:28265528

  15. Transfer of communication skills to the workplace during clinical rounds: impact of a program for residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liénard, Aurore; Merckaert, Isabelle; Libert, Yves; Bragard, Isabelle; Delvaux, Nicole; Etienne, Anne-Marie; Marchal, Serge; Meunier, Julie; Reynaert, Christine; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Razavi, Darius

    2010-08-26

    Communication with patients is a core clinical skill in medicine that can be acquired through communication skills training. Meanwhile, the importance of transfer of communication skills to the workplace has not been sufficiently studied. This study aims to assess the efficacy of a 40-hour training program designed to improve patients' satisfaction and residents' communication skills during their daily clinical rounds. Residents were randomly assigned to the training program or to a waiting list. Patients' satisfaction was assessed with a visual analog scale after each visit. Transfer of residents' communication skills was assessed in audiotaped actual inpatient visits during a half-day clinical round. Transcripted audiotapes were analyzed using content analysis software (LaComm). Training effects were tested with Mann-Whitney tests and generalized linear Poisson regression models. Eighty-eight residents were included. First, patients interacting with trained residents reported a higher satisfaction with residents' communication (Median=92) compared to patients interacting with untrained residents (Median=88) (p=.046). Second, trained residents used more assessment utterances (Relative Risk (RR)=1.17; 95% Confidence intervals (95%CI)=1.02-1.34; p=.023). Third, transfer was also observed when residents' training attendance was considered: residents' use of assessment utterances (RR=1.01; 95%CI=1.01-1.02; p=.018) and supportive utterances (RR=0.99; 95%CI=0.98-1.00; p=.042) (respectively 1.15 (RR), 1.08-1.23 (95%CI), pcommunication skills learning to the workplace. Transfer was directly related to training attendance but remained limited. Future studies should therefore focus on the improvement of the efficacy of communication skills training in order to ensure a more important training effect size on transfer.

  16. Transfer of Communication Skills to the Workplace during Clinical Rounds: Impact of a Program for Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liénard, Aurore; Merckaert, Isabelle; Libert, Yves; Bragard, Isabelle; Delvaux, Nicole; Etienne, Anne-Marie; Marchal, Serge; Meunier, Julie; Reynaert, Christine; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Razavi, Darius

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Communication with patients is a core clinical skill in medicine that can be acquired through communication skills training. Meanwhile, the importance of transfer of communication skills to the workplace has not been sufficiently studied. This study aims to assess the efficacy of a 40-hour training program designed to improve patients' satisfaction and residents' communication skills during their daily clinical rounds. Methods Residents were randomly assigned to the training program or to a waiting list. Patients' satisfaction was assessed with a visual analog scale after each visit. Transfer of residents' communication skills was assessed in audiotaped actual inpatient visits during a half-day clinical round. Transcripted audiotapes were analyzed using content analysis software (LaComm). Training effects were tested with Mann-Whitney tests and generalized linear Poisson regression models. Results Eighty-eight residents were included. First, patients interacting with trained residents reported a higher satisfaction with residents' communication (Median = 92) compared to patients interacting with untrained residents (Median = 88) (p = .046). Second, trained residents used more assessment utterances (Relative Risk (RR)  = 1.17; 95% Confidence intervals (95%CI)  = 1.02–1.34; p = .023). Third, transfer was also observed when residents' training attendance was considered: residents' use of assessment utterances (RR = 1.01; 95%CI = 1.01–1.02; p = .018) and supportive utterances (RR = 0.99; 95%CI = 0.98–1.00; p = .042) (respectively 1.15 (RR), 1.08–1.23 (95%CI), pcommunication skills learning to the workplace. Transfer was directly related to training attendance but remained limited. Future studies should therefore focus on the improvement of the efficacy of communication skills training in order to ensure a more important training effect size on transfer. PMID:20865055

  17. A Practical Approach to Implementing the Core Competencies in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Arden D.; Sexson, Sandra B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the development and implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's core competencies in a child and adolescent psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors identify the program's organizational approach and participants and detail various strategies and methods of defining,…

  18. A Practical Approach to Implementing the Core Competencies in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Arden D.; Sexson, Sandra B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the development and implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's core competencies in a child and adolescent psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors identify the program's organizational approach and participants and detail various strategies and methods of defining,…

  19. Finding an Analytic Frame for Faculty-Student Interaction within Faculty-in-Residence Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mara, Miriam; Mara, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In this article we describe a case study analyzing how a Faculty-in-Residence program fosters student engagement. Using Cox & Orehovec's typology to add granularity to the National Study on Student Engagement's criteria for student engagement, we suggest best practices for the implementation of these in-situ faculty engagement programs.

  20. A Grounded Theory of Connectivity and Persistence in a Limited Residency Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Steven R.; Snyder, Martha M.; Dringus, Laurie P.; Maddrey, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Limited-residency and online doctoral programs have an attrition rate significantly higher than traditional programs. This grounded-theory study focused on issues pertaining to communication between students, their peers and faculty and how interpersonal communication may affect persistence. Data were collected from 17 students actively working on…

  1. Instruction in teaching and teaching opportunities for residents in US dermatology programs: Results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, Susan; Homayounfar, Gelareh; Newman, Lori R; Sullivan, Amy

    2017-04-01

    Dermatology residents routinely teach junior co-residents and medical students. Despite the importance of teaching skills for a successful academic career, no formal teaching instruction programs for dermatology residents have been described to our knowledge, and the extent of teaching opportunities for dermatology residents is unknown. We sought to describe the range of teaching opportunities and instruction available to dermatology residents and to assess the need for additional teaching training from the perspective of dermatology residency program directors nationwide. A questionnaire was administered to 113 US dermatology residency program directors or their designees. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze questionnaire item responses. The response rate was 55% (62/113). All program directors reported that their residents teach; 59% (33/56) reported offering trainees teaching instruction; 11% (7/62) of programs offered a short-term series of formal sessions on teaching; and 7% (4/62) offered ongoing, longitudinal training. Most program directors (74%, 40/54) believed that their residents would benefit from more teaching instruction. Response rate and responder bias are potential limitations. Dermatology residents teach in a broad range of settings, over half receive some teaching instruction, and most dermatology residency program directors perceive a need for additional training for residents as teachers. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Out of the wilderness: flipping the classroom to advance scholarship in an internal medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Dale S

    2014-11-01

    Residents in an internal medicine residency program "flipped the classroom" in a series of learner-centered activities which included the creation of a medical student interest group, a continuing medical education symposium, and a journal supplement focused on wilderness medicine topics in Hawai'i and Asia Pacific. The project encompassed both scholarly activities (discovery, integration, application, and teaching) as well as scholarship (writing for publication). The project advanced the professional formation of residents by developing competencies and producing outcomes that are key features of the ACGME Next Accreditation System.

  3. Differential Factors That Influence Applicant Selection of a Prosthodontic Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blissett, Ryan; Lee, Meng-Chieh; Jimenez, Monik; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The main objectives of this study were to identify current prosthodontic resident demographics and to analyze factors that may influence applicants in selecting prosthodontics as a career, as well as a specific prosthodontic program. We also investigated the influence of age, gender, relationship status, and year in program on applicant decisions. Materials and Methods Two questionnaires were mailed to all prosthodontic residents (N = 304) registered with the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) Central Office. Part I assessed resident demographics and factors influencing choice of specialty. Part II assessed factors influencing the selection of a specific prosthodontic program. Results Completed surveys were obtained from 193 of 304 (63.4%) of all prosthodontic residents registered at the ACP Central Office. The completed surveys represented approximately 48% of the total population of prosthodontic residents in the United States. Demographic data revealed that 37% and 62% of the respondents were female and male, respectively (1% did not report gender). The mean age of the respondents was 30.3 years. More residents reported being married than either single or in a relationship. Most residents were accepted to their top choice program. Part I of the survey revealed that the complexity and challenge of treatment planning/treatment, ability to lead multidisciplinary cases, possession of skills/talents suited to the specialty, enjoyment of clinical work, and the intellectual content of the specialty were reported to be the five most influential factors in choosing prosthodontics as a career. Part II demonstrated that applicants place a high emphasis on clinical education, their impression of the program director, advice from predoctoral mentors, their impression of resident satisfaction and happiness, and the opportunity to place dental implants. The factors of least importance are climate and opportunities to moonlight, teach, and conduct research

  4. Effectiveness of a Formal Mentorship Program in Family Medicine Residency: The Residents’ Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Andrades

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mentoring is a recognized form of teaching learning strategy in postgraduate medical education. This paper describes the effectiveness of a formal mentorship program from the residents’ perspective after a year of implementation. Methods. The Aga Khan University Family Medicine Residency Program is the first program in Pakistan to our knowledge to implement formal mentorship for all four years of residency. A mentorship program was developed, implemented, and evaluated a year later using a rating scale. The 10-point Likert scale consisted of questions on academics, clinical work, research, administrative issues, and personal/social issues. Results. The response rate was 95% (. Eighty percent ( were women. Satisfaction level in seeking help was the highest for academics (75%. Residents scored mentorship as low in helping to tackle their personal problems (20%. Barriers reported in rapport building with mentor were time constraints and gender difference. The most useful attributes of the mentor which helped rapport building were accessibility, active listening, support for emotional needs, and trustworthiness. Conclusion. Mentoring has a role in trainees’ personal and professional growth especially when their needs are addressed. The effectiveness of the mentorship program in residency can improve if the residents are allowed to choose their own mentors.

  5. Improving quality in an internal medicine residency program through a peer medical record audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Keiko; Mansi, Ishak A; Banks, Daniel

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a quality improvement project of a limited didactic session, a medical record audit by peers, and casual feedback within a residency program. Residents audited their peers' medical records from the clinic of a university hospital in March, April, August, and September 2007. A 24-item quality-of-care score was developed for five common diagnoses, expressed from 0 to 100, with 100 as complete compliance. Audit scores were compared by month and experience of the resident as an auditor. A total of 469 medical records, audited by 12 residents, for 80 clinic residents, were included. The mean quality-of-care score was 89 (95% CI = 88-91); the scores in March, April, August, and September were 88 (95% CI = 85-91), 94 (95% CI = 90-96), 87 (95% CI = 85-89), and 91 (95% CI = 89-93), respectively. The mean score of 58 records of residents who had experience as auditors was 94 (95% CI = 89-96) compared with 89 (95% CI = 87-90) for those who did not. The score significantly varied (P = .0009) from March to April and from April to August, but it was not significantly associated with experience as an auditor with multivariate analysis. Residents' compliance with the standards of care was generally high. Residents responded to the project well, but their performance dropped after a break in the intervention. Continuation of the audit process may be necessary for a sustained effect on quality.

  6. Clinical skills assessment of procedural and advanced communication skills: performance expectations of residency program directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik E. Langenau

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: High stakes medical licensing programs are planning to augment and adapt current examinations to be relevant for a two-decision point model for licensure: entry into supervised practice and entry into unsupervised practice. Therefore, identifying which skills should be assessed at each decision point is critical for informing examination development, and gathering input from residency program directors is important. Methods: Using data from previously developed surveys and expert panels, a web-delivered survey was distributed to 3,443 residency program directors. For each of the 28 procedural and 18 advanced communication skills, program directors were asked which clinical skills should be assessed, by whom, when, and how. Descriptive statistics were collected, and Intraclass Correlations (ICC were conducted to determine consistency across different specialties. Results: Among 347 respondents, program directors reported that all advanced communication and some procedural tasks are important to assess. The following procedures were considered ‘important’ or ‘extremely important’ to assess: sterile technique (93.8%, advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS (91.1%, basic life support (BLS (90.0%, interpretation of electrocardiogram (89.4% and blood gas (88.7%. Program directors reported that most clinical skills should be assessed at the end of the first year of residency (or later and not before graduation from medical school. A minority were considered important to assess prior to the start of residency training: demonstration of respectfulness (64%, sterile technique (67.2%, BLS (68.9%, ACLS (65.9% and phlebotomy (63.5%. Discussion: Results from this study support that assessing procedural skills such as cardiac resuscitation, sterile technique, and phlebotomy would be amenable to assessment at the end of medical school, but most procedural and advanced communications skills would be amenable to assessment at the end of the

  7. Clinical skills assessment of procedural and advanced communication skills: performance expectations of residency program directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenau, Erik E.; Zhang, Xiuyuan; Roberts, William L.; DeChamplain, Andre F.; Boulet, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Background High stakes medical licensing programs are planning to augment and adapt current examinations to be relevant for a two-decision point model for licensure: entry into supervised practice and entry into unsupervised practice. Therefore, identifying which skills should be assessed at each decision point is critical for informing examination development, and gathering input from residency program directors is important. Methods Using data from previously developed surveys and expert panels, a web-delivered survey was distributed to 3,443 residency program directors. For each of the 28 procedural and 18 advanced communication skills, program directors were asked which clinical skills should be assessed, by whom, when, and how. Descriptive statistics were collected, and Intraclass Correlations (ICC) were conducted to determine consistency across different specialties. Results Among 347 respondents, program directors reported that all advanced communication and some procedural tasks are important to assess. The following procedures were considered ‘important’ or ‘extremely important’ to assess: sterile technique (93.8%), advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) (91.1%), basic life support (BLS) (90.0%), interpretation of electrocardiogram (89.4%) and blood gas (88.7%). Program directors reported that most clinical skills should be assessed at the end of the first year of residency (or later) and not before graduation from medical school. A minority were considered important to assess prior to the start of residency training: demonstration of respectfulness (64%), sterile technique (67.2%), BLS (68.9%), ACLS (65.9%) and phlebotomy (63.5%). Discussion Results from this study support that assessing procedural skills such as cardiac resuscitation, sterile technique, and phlebotomy would be amenable to assessment at the end of medical school, but most procedural and advanced communications skills would be amenable to assessment at the end of the first

  8. National Research Council Resident Research Associateship (NRC-RRA) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    ASSOCIATESHIP PROGRAMS REVIEW Expected/Actual Associates Adv’sers Laboratory S§tarting Date NEKKANTI, Rama Manohara D. Dimiduck AFML July 1, 1988 PILLAI, P...da Idrogeno Neutro," Societa Italiana, di Fisica LXXII Corigresso C oae Padova 2-7 Oct. 1986. * 17. N/A 18. Researcher Dipartimerito di Fisica dell

  9. Evaluation of a Nutrition Education Program for Family Practice Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A nutrition education program at the University of South Alabama Medical Center that was based on the "co-counseling model" as described by Moore and Larsen is described. Patients with one of three problem areas were selected for evaluation: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and pregnancy. (MLW)

  10. Perceptions of professional practice and work environment of new graduates in a nurse residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, Marilyn Meyer; Felzer, Holly M

    2011-12-01

    New nurses continue to face challenging work environments and high expectations for professional competence as they enter practice. Nurse residency programs are gaining prominence as a mechanism to ease new graduates' transition to practice. This study examined new graduates' perceptions of their professional practice competence and work environment throughout a yearlong nurse residency program. Employing a repeated measures design, data were collected at baseline, at 6 months, and at 12 months. Results showed that job satisfaction was significantly lowest at 6 months and highest at 12 months. Job stress was found to be lowest at 12 months and organizational commitment was highest at baseline. Of the variables related to professional practice, clinical decision-making was highest at 12 months and quality of nursing performance significantly increased at each measurement point. These data add to the growing evidence supporting the efficacy of nurse residency programs.

  11. Duck Valley Resident Fish Stocking Program, 2000 Final Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodson, Guy; Pero, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    The Shoshone-Paiute Tribes fish-stocking program was begun in 1988 and is intended to provide a subsistence fishery for the tribal members. The program stocks catchable and fingerling size trout in Mt. View and Sheep Creek Reservoirs. Rainbow trout are purchased from only certified disease-free facilities to be stocked in our reservoirs. This project will help restore a fishery for tribal members that historically depended on wild salmon and steelhead in the Owyhee and Bruneau Rivers and their tributaries for their culture as well as for subsistence. This project is partial substitution for loss of anadromous fish production due to construction and operation of hydroelectric dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. Until anadromous fish can be returned to the Owyhee and Bruneau Rivers this project will continue indefinitely. As part of this project the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes will also receive income in the form of fees from non-tribal members who come to fish these reservoirs. Regular monitoring and evaluation of the fishery will include sampling for length/weight/condition and for signs of disease. A detailed Monitoring and evaluation plan has been put in place for this project. However due to budget limitations on this project only the fishery surveys and limited water quality work can be completed. A creel survey was initiated in 1998 and we are following the monitoring and evaluation schedule for this program (as budget allows) as well as managing the budget and personnel. This program has been very successful in the past decade and has provided enjoyment and sustenance for both tribal and non-tribal members. All biological data and stocking rates will be including in the Annual reports to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  12. A systematic review of prehabilitation programs in abdominal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, Yasser; Gondal, Umair; Aziz, Omer

    2017-03-01

    Prehabilitation programs aim to optimise patients in order to enhance post-operative recovery. This study aims to review the composition of prehabilitation programs for patients undergoing major abdominal cancer surgery and define the outcome measures that are used to evaluate this intervention. A systematic literature review of all comparative studies on prehabilitation versus standard care in patients undergoing abdominal cancer surgery was performed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Literature search was performed using Medline, OVID, EMBASE, Google Scholar, and Cochrane databases. Outcomes of interest included prehabilitation program composition (exercise, nutritional, and psychological interventions), duration, mode of delivery, and outcome measures used to determine impact of prehabilitation versus standard care. 9 studies (7 randomised controlled and 2 prospective non-randomised trials) comprising of 549 patients (281 prehabilitation versus 268 standard care) were included in this review. 5 studies reported patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer, 2 for bladder tumours, 1 for liver resections, and 1 involving unspecified abdominal oncological operations. The 6 min walk test (6MWT) was used in 4 studies to measure functional capacity with a threshold of >20 m improvement at 4-8 weeks post-operatively deemed significant (distance range from 278 to 560 m). Changes in anaerobic threshold and VO2(max) with prehabilitation were evaluated in 5 studies (ml/kg/min). Health-related quality of life was evaluated using SF-36 system, anxiety assessed using hospital anxiety and depression score (HADS). Post-operative complications were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo classification with no significant difference between prehabilitation and standard care groups. Prehabilitation programs in patients undergoing abdominal cancer surgery remain heterogeneous in their composition, mode of administration, outcome measures of functional capacity that

  13. Reoperations after first lumbar disc herniation surgery; a special interest on residives during a 5-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kautiainen Hannu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The overall rate of operations after recurrent lumbar disc herniation has been shown to be 3–11%. However, little is known about the rate of residives. Thus the aim of this study was to explore the cumulative rates of re-operations and especially residive disc herniations at the same side and level as the primary disc herniation after first lumbar disc herniation surgery and the factors that influence the risk of re-operations over a five year follow-up study. Methods 166 virgin lumbar disc herniation patients (mean age 42 years, 57% males were studied. Data on patients' initial disc operations and type and timing of re-operations during the follow-up were collected from patient files. Back and leg pain on visual analog scale and employment status were collected by questionnaires. Results The cumulative rate of re-operations for lumbar disc herniation was 10.2% (95% Cl 6.0 to 15.1. The rate of residives at initial site was 7.4% (95% Cl 3.7 to 11.3 and rate of lumbar disc herniations at other sites was 3.1% (95% Cl 0.6 to 6.2. The occurrence of residive lumbar disc herniations was evenly distributed across the 5 years. Neither age, gender, preoperative symptoms, physical activity nor employment had effect on the probability of re-operation. Conclusion Seven percent of the lumbar disc patients had a residive lumbar disc operation within five years of their first operation. No specific factors influencing the risk for re-operation were found.

  14. Teaching the surgical craft: Surgery residents perception of the operating theater educational environment in a tertiary institution in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrasheed Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The transformation of a surgical trainee into a surgeon is strongly influenced by the quality of teaching in the operating theater. This study investigates the perceptions of residents about the educational environment of the operating theater and identifies variables that may improve the operating theater education of our trainees. Materials and Methods: Residents in the department of surgery anonymously evaluated teaching in the operating room using the operating theater education environment measure. The residents evaluated 33 variables that might have an impact on their surgical skills within the operating theater. The variables were grouped into four subscales; teaching and training, learning opportunities, operating theater atmosphere and workload/supervision/support. Differences between male and female residents and junior and senior registrars were assessed using Mann-Whitney test. Statistical analysis was completed with the statistics package for the social sciences version 17. Results: A total of 33 residents were participated in this study. Twenty nine (88% males and 4 (12% females. 30 (90% were junior registrars. The mean total score was 67.5%. Operating theater atmosphere subscale had the highest score of 79.2% while workload/supervision/support subscale had the least score of 48.3%. There were significant differences between male and female resident′s perception of workload/supervision/support P 0.05. Conclusion: This study has shown a satisfactory teaching environment based on the existing local realities of means, resources and tools and highlighted the need for improvement in workload/supervision/support in our institution. An acceptable learning environment in the operating theatre will produce surgeons that are technically competent to bridge the gap in the enormous unmet need for surgical care in Nigeria.

  15. The link between quality and accreditation of residency programs: the surveyors' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Renato Antunes; Snell, Linda; Tenorio Nunes, Maria do Patrocinio

    2017-01-01

    Accreditation of medical residency programs has become globally important. Currently it is moving from the goal of attaining minimal standards to a model of continuous improvement. In some countries, the accreditation system engages peers (physicians) to survey residency programs. The surveyors are sometimes volunteers, usually engaged in multiple clinical and education activities. Few studies have investigated the benefits of residency program evaluation and accreditation from the perspective of the surveyors. As peers they both conduct and receive accreditation surveys, which puts them in a privileged position in that it provides the surveyor with an opportunity to share experiences and knowledge and apply what is learned in their own context. The objective of this study is to obtain the perceptions of these surveyors about the impact of an accreditation system on residency programs. Surveyors participated in semi-structured interviews. A thematic analysis was performed on the interview data, and resulting topics were grouped into five themes: Burden (of documentation and of time needed); Efficiency and efficacy of the accreditation process; Training and experience of surveyors; Being a peer; Professional skills and recognition of surveyors. These categories were organized into two major themes: 'Structure and Process' and 'Human Resources'. The study participants proposed ways to improve efficiency including diminish the burden of documentation to the physicians involved in the process and to increase efforts on training programs and payment for surveyors and program directors. Based on the results we propose a conceptual framework to improve accreditation systems.

  16. Development of a residency program in radiation oncology physics: an inverse planning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rao F H; Dunscombe, Peter B

    2016-03-08

    Over the last two decades, there has been a concerted effort in North America to organize medical physicists' clinical training programs along more structured and formal lines. This effort has been prompted by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Education Programs (CAMPEP) which has now accredited about 90 residency programs. Initially the accreditation focused on standardized and higher quality clinical physics training; the development of rounded professionals who can function at a high level in a multidisciplinary environment was recognized as a priority of a radiation oncology physics residency only lately. In this report, we identify and discuss the implementation of, and the essential components of, a radiation oncology physics residency designed to produce knowledgeable and effective clinical physicists for today's safety-conscious and collaborative work environment. Our approach is that of inverse planning, by now familiar to all radiation oncology physicists, in which objectives and constraints are identified prior to the design of the program. Our inverse planning objectives not only include those associated with traditional residencies (i.e., clinical physics knowledge and critical clinical skills), but also encompass those other attributes essential for success in a modern radiation therapy clinic. These attributes include formal training in management skills and leadership, teaching and communication skills, and knowledge of error management techniques and patient safety. The constraints in our optimization exercise are associated with the limited duration of a residency and the training resources available. Without compromising the knowledge and skills needed for clinical tasks, we have successfully applied the model to the University of Calgary's two-year residency program. The program requires 3840 hours of overall commitment from the trainee, of which 7%-10% is spent in obtaining formal training in nontechnical "soft skills".

  17. Starting a new residency program: a step-by-step guide for institutions, hospitals, and program directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajaz, Michelle; Turner, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Although our country faces a looming shortage of doctors, constraints of space, funding, and patient volume in many existing residency programs limit training opportunities for medical graduates. New residency programs need to be created for the expansion of graduate medical education training positions. Partnerships between existing academic institutions and community hospitals with a need for physicians can be a very successful means toward this end. Baylor College of Medicine and The Children's Hospital of San Antonio were affiliated in 2012, and subsequently, we developed and received accreditation for a new categorical pediatric residency program at that site in 2014. We share below a step-by-step guide through the process that includes building of the infrastructure, educational development, accreditation, marketing, and recruitment. It is our hope that the description of this process will help others to spur growth in graduate medical training positions. PMID:27507541

  18. SU-F-E-12: Elective International Rotations in Medical Physics Residency Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D; Mundt, A; Einck, J; Pawlicki, T [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this educational program is to motivate talented, intelligent individuals to become stakeholders in the global effort to improve access to radiotherapy. Methods: The need to improve global access to radiotherapy has been clearly established and several organizations are making substantial progress in securing funding and developing plans to achieve this worthwhile goal. The incorporation of elective international rotations in residency programs may provide one possible mechanism to promote and support this future investment. We recently incorporated an elective 1-month international rotation into our CAMPEP accredited Medical Physics residency program, with our first rotation taking place in Vietnam. A unique aspect of this rotation was that it was scheduled collaboratively with our Radiation Oncology residency program such that Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics residents traveled to the same clinic at the same time. Results: We believe the international rotation substantially enhances the educational experience, providing additional benefits to residents by increasing cross-disciplinary learning and offering a shared learning experience. The combined international rotation may also increase benefit to the host institution by modeling positive multidisciplinary working relationships between Radiation Oncologists and Medical Physicists. Our first resident returned with several ideas designed to improve radiotherapy in resource-limited settings – one of which is currently being pursued in collaboration with a vendor. Conclusion: The elective international rotation provides a unique learning experience that has the potential to motivate residents to become stakeholders in the global effort to improve access to radiotherapy. What better way to prepare the next generation of Medical Physicists to meet the challenges of improving global access to radiotherapy than to provide them with training experiences that motivate them to be socially

  19. The implementation of the UHC/AACN new graduate nurse residency program in a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Karen L

    2011-03-01

    Transition into the workforce for the new graduate nurse is affected by many factors. New graduate nurses can benefit from support provided through participation in the UHC/AACN Residency Program. The retention of even one graduate nurse saves the employing institution up to an estimated $80,000 annually. St Joseph's Hospital has improved the retention of new graduate nurses from approximately 40% to 100% with the addition of the UHC/AACN Residency Program alongside other system changes. Data are being monitored at St Joseph's and on a national level through this multisite collaborative aimed at improving patient care and increasing nurse retention.

  20. Implementation of a Multifaceted Interactive Electrodiagnostic Medicine Workshop in a Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Jayne; van de Rijn, Marc; McCabe, Elizabeth L; Shih, Shirley; Paganoni, Sabrina

    2017-09-25

    Electrodiagnostic medicine is a required component of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation residency education, but limited resources exist to guide curriculum development. Our objective was to create a focused workshop to enhance our residency program's electrodiagnostic curriculum. We created two separate 1.5-day workshops, one basic and one advanced, for all residents. Each workshop included didactic sessions, case discussion, question and answer sessions, demonstrations, and hands-on participation with direct supervision and feedback. Presurveys and postsurveys were administered to evaluate the value of the workshops. We also assessed trends in electrodiagnostic self-assessment examination scores. Residents reported clinical electrodiagnostic rotations to be more valuable to their education than previous didactic sessions and independent learning. Self-reported knowledge of electrodiagnostic concepts, resident comfort level in planning, performing, and interpreting studies, and perceived value in independent learning of electrodiagnostic medicine improved after implementation of the workshops. There was a 7% improvement in the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine electrodiagnostic self-assessment examination score compared with the previous year and a 15% improvement in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation self-assessment examination electrodiagnostic subscore compared with the previous 5 yrs. All participants recommended similar educational experience for other residents. This successful workshop may serve as a resource for other training programs.

  1. Effectiveness of iterative interventions to increase research productivity in one residency program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Alweis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires residency programs to expose residents to research opportunities. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a series of iterative interventions to increase scholarly activity in one internal medicine residency. Methods: Retrospective analysis of the effectiveness of a series of interventions to increase resident and faculty scholarly productivity over a 14-year period was performed using quality improvement methodology. Outcomes measured were accepted regional and national abstracts and PubMed indexed manuscripts of residents and faculty. Results: Initially, regional meeting abstracts increased and then were supplanted by national meeting abstracts. Sustained gains in manuscript productivity occurred in the eighth year of interventions, increasing from a baseline of 0.01 publications/FTE/year to 1.57 publications/FTE/year in the final year measured. Run chart analysis indicated special cause variation associated with the interventions performed. Conclusions: Programs attempting to stimulate research production among faculty and residents can choose among many interventions cited in the literature. Since success of any group of interventions is likely additive and may take years to show benefit, measuring outcomes using quality improvement methodology may be an effective way to determine success.

  2. Transfer of communication skills to the workplace during clinical rounds: impact of a program for residents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Liénard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Communication with patients is a core clinical skill in medicine that can be acquired through communication skills training. Meanwhile, the importance of transfer of communication skills to the workplace has not been sufficiently studied. This study aims to assess the efficacy of a 40-hour training program designed to improve patients' satisfaction and residents' communication skills during their daily clinical rounds. METHODS: Residents were randomly assigned to the training program or to a waiting list. Patients' satisfaction was assessed with a visual analog scale after each visit. Transfer of residents' communication skills was assessed in audiotaped actual inpatient visits during a half-day clinical round. Transcripted audiotapes were analyzed using content analysis software (LaComm. Training effects were tested with Mann-Whitney tests and generalized linear Poisson regression models. RESULTS: Eighty-eight residents were included. First, patients interacting with trained residents reported a higher satisfaction with residents' communication (Median=92 compared to patients interacting with untrained residents (Median=88 (p=.046. Second, trained residents used more assessment utterances (Relative Risk (RR=1.17; 95% Confidence intervals (95%CI=1.02-1.34; p=.023. Third, transfer was also observed when residents' training attendance was considered: residents' use of assessment utterances (RR=1.01; 95%CI=1.01-1.02; p=.018 and supportive utterances (RR=0.99; 95%CI=0.98-1.00; p=.042 (respectively 1.15 (RR, 1.08-1.23 (95%CI, p<.001 for empathy and 0.95 (RR, 0.92-0.99 (95%CI, p=.012 for reassurance was proportional to the number of hours of training attendance. CONCLUSION: The training program improved patients' satisfaction and allowed the transfer of residents' communication skills learning to the workplace. Transfer was directly related to training attendance but remained limited. Future studies should therefore focus on

  3. Cirurgia de catarata realizada por residentes: avaliação dos riscos Cataract surgery performed by residents: risk analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Barreto Junior

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a frequência de complicações nas cirurgias de catarata realizada por residentes de um hospital universitário (segundo e terceiro anos, comparado com as realizadas por cirurgiões experientes (assistentes. MÉTODOS: Análise retrospectiva dos prontuários de todos pacientes submetidos à cirurgia de catarata realizadas nas primeiras quinzenas de março (época do início do aprendizado da técnica cirúrgica e de novembro (meados do aprendizado da técnica. Foram analisados a época da realização da cirurgia; graduação do cirurgião (residente ou médico assistente; técnica cirúrgica empregada (extração extracapsular ou facoemulsificação e a ocorrência de complicações per-operatórias e pós-operatórias. RESULTADOS: Foram analisadas 481 cirurgias, destas, 194 (40% foram realizadas pelos residentes do terceiro ano, 165 (34% pelos residentes do segundo ano e 116 (26% pelos assistentes. A complicação mais frequentemente encontrada em todas as cirurgias foi a rotura de cápsula posterior (4,8%. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa de complicações entre as cirurgias realizadas em março e novembro (p=0,97, bem como entre os residentes sob supervisão e os assistentes (p=0,08. CONCLUSÃO: A rotura de cápsula posterior continua sendo a complicação mais frequentemente encontrada nas cirurgias de residentes em treinamento. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa entre as taxas de complicação destes residentes e os assistentes, o que demonstra o importante papel de uma supervisão adequada.PURPOSE: To evaluate the complication's rate of cataract surgery performed by ophthalmology residents (second and third-year and experienced surgeons at a public teaching hospital. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of all patients who had cataract surgery between March (begin of the technique practice and November (end of the technique practice was conducted. RESULTS: In 481 cataracts surgeries

  4. Change of residence and functional status within three months and one year following hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariza-Vega, Patrocinio; Jiménez-Moleón, José Juan; Kristensen, Morten Tange

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the recovery of patients in terms of 18 activities of daily living and change of residence within the year following a hip fracture. METHOD: This prospective cohort study was carried out in a trauma service of an acute hospital in southern Spain including 159 patients with a hip...

  5. Promoting self-directed learning skills in residency: a case study in program development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothnagle, Melissa; Goldman, Roberta; Quirk, Mark; Reis, Shmuel

    2010-12-01

    Self-directed learning (SDL) skills are essential for the formation and ongoing competence of today's physicians who work in the context of expanding scientific knowledge and changing health care systems. In 2007-2008, the authors developed a program to promote SDL in the Brown University Family Medicine Residency. Through an iterative process, the project team juggled learning theories (i.e., Knowles' SDL model, Collins' cognitive apprenticeship model, and Quirk's expertise development model) with curricular goals, instructional options, and local constraints to design a practical and theoretically robust intervention.The intervention that emerged from this process features a faculty physician serving as a learning coach who meets individually each month with all second-year residents to assist them in generating learning goals, reflecting on their learning experiences, and practicing evidence-based medicine (EBM) skills. An electronic portfolio serves as a documentation tool that supports reflection; residents record their goals and reflections in the portfolio, which also contains their formative assessments, procedure logs, and special projects. To address the hidden curriculum, the program designers took special care to avoid increasing faculty and resident workload and created a forum for discussion and group reflection. Program evaluation combines qualitative and quantitative methods, such as surveys of and interviews with residents and faculty, to assess changes in residents' SDL and EBM skills and in the program's educational culture. The authors use Kern and colleagues' six-step model for curriculum development to describe both the unfolding of this complex project and the choices that resulted in the current program design.

  6. Describing a residency program developed for newly graduated nurse practitioners employed in retail health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabault, Paulette; Mylott, Laura; Patterson, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Retail health clinics are an expanding health care delivery model and an emerging new practice site for nurse practitioners (NPs). Critical thinking skills, clinical competence, interprofessional collaboration, and business savvy are necessary for successful practice in this highly independent and autonomous setting. This article describes a pilot residency partnership program aimed at supporting new graduate NP transition to practice, reducing NP turnover, and promoting academic progression. Eight new graduate NPs were recruited to the pilot and paired with experienced clinical NP preceptors for a 12-month program that focused on increasing clinical and business competence in the retail health setting. The residency program utilized technology to facilitate case conferences and targeted Webinars to enhance learning and peer-to-peer sharing and support. An on-line doctoral-level academic course that focused on interprofessional collaboration in health care, population health, and business concepts was offered. Both NPs and preceptors were highly satisfied with the academic-service residency program between MinuteClinic and Northeastern University School of Nursing in Boston, MA. New NPs particularly valued the preceptor model, the clinical case conferences, and business Webinars. Because their priority was in gaining clinical experience and learning the business acumen relevant to managing the processes of care, they did not feel ready for the doctoral course and would have preferred to take later in their practice. The preceptors valued the academic course and felt that it enhanced their precepting and leadership skills. At the time of this article, 6 months post completion of the residency program, there has been no turnover. Our experience supports the benefits for residency programs for newly graduated NPs in retail settings. The model of partnering with academia by offering a course within a service organization's educational programs can enable academic

  7. Neurology Didactic Curricula for Psychiatry Residents: A Review of the Literature and a Survey of Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Claudia L.; Walaszek, Art

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Minimal literature exists on neurology didactic instruction offered to psychiatry residents, and there is no model neurology didactic curriculum offered for psychiatry residency programs. The authors sought to describe the current state of neurology didactic training in psychiatry residencies. Methods: The authors electronically…

  8. Neurology Didactic Curricula for Psychiatry Residents: A Review of the Literature and a Survey of Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Claudia L.; Walaszek, Art

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Minimal literature exists on neurology didactic instruction offered to psychiatry residents, and there is no model neurology didactic curriculum offered for psychiatry residency programs. The authors sought to describe the current state of neurology didactic training in psychiatry residencies. Methods: The authors electronically…

  9. The Medical Mission and Modern Core Competency Training: A 10-Year Follow-Up of Resident Experiences in Global Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Caroline A; Swanson, Jordan; McCullough, Meghan; Taro, Trisa B; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Bradshaw, Allison; Campbell, Alex; Magee, William P; Magee, William P

    2016-09-01

    The emphasis on cultural competency for physicians and surgeons is increasingly important, as communication with both patients and other providers significantly affects individual and system-wide outcomes. International surgical training has been shown to improve leadership skills, cultural competency, and technical proficiency of participants in short-term follow-up. This study explores the long-term impact of international surgical mission experiences on developing participants' core competencies, professional outcomes, and commitment to global health. All 208 plastic and reconstructive surgeons who completed the Operation Smile Regan/Stryker fellowship programs between 2006 and 2015 were surveyed electronically. One hundred sixty-five surveys were returned, for an overall response rate of 79.3 percent. The majority of participants reported that the fellowship positively impacted all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. Most participants who were attending physicians at the time of the survey were practicing general plastic surgery, with 42 percent in an academic/teaching environment, 32 percent in assistant/associate professor positions, and 6 percent in either a program director or department chairman position. The majority currently volunteer on local or international missions, and all respondents would consider volunteering again. Carefully structured and rigorously proctored programs such as the Regan/Stryker Fellowship offer plastic surgery residents the opportunity to gain valuable professional and personal experiences that benefit them long after their service experience. Programs of this nature can not only effectively improve cultural competency of physicians, but also positively influence their attitudes toward leadership and direct that potential to meet the growing need for surgical care in low- and middle-income countries.

  10. Permanent health education based on research with professionals of a multidisciplinary residency program: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Trivisiol da Silva

    Full Text Available This research aims to identify the perception of professional members of a multi-professional residency program on Permanent Health Education. It is a case study research using a qualitative approach, with sixteen members of a multi-professional residency program. The data were collected from January to May 2012, through semi-structured interviews, document analysis and systematic observation, and analyzed according to Thematic Content Analysis. Two categories were identified: Permanent Health Education establishing collective spaces of reflection of practices and Permanent Health Education that promotes integration between disciplines. The members of the multiprofessional residency team were found to be aware that permanent education permeates their training and enables reflection on their clinical practices and multidisciplinary action as producers of health actions.

  11. Design and Implementation of an Educational Program in Advanced Airway Management for Anesthesiology Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zana Borovcanin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Education and training in advanced airway management as part of an anesthesiology residency program is necessary to help residents attain the status of expert in difficult airway management. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME emphasizes that residents in anesthesiology must obtain significant experience with a broad spectrum of airway management techniques. However, there is no specific number required as a minimum clinical experience that should be obtained in order to ensure competency. We have developed a curriculum for a new Advanced Airway Techniques rotation. This rotation is supplemented with a hands-on Difficult Airway Workshop. We describe here this comprehensive advanced airway management educational program at our institution. Future studies will focus on determining if education in advanced airway management results in a decrease in airway related morbidity and mortality and overall better patients’ outcome during difficult airway management.

  12. Design and implementation of an educational program in advanced airway management for anesthesiology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovcanin, Zana; Shapiro, Janine R

    2012-01-01

    Education and training in advanced airway management as part of an anesthesiology residency program is necessary to help residents attain the status of expert in difficult airway management. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) emphasizes that residents in anesthesiology must obtain significant experience with a broad spectrum of airway management techniques. However, there is no specific number required as a minimum clinical experience that should be obtained in order to ensure competency. We have developed a curriculum for a new Advanced Airway Techniques rotation. This rotation is supplemented with a hands-on Difficult Airway Workshop. We describe here this comprehensive advanced airway management educational program at our institution. Future studies will focus on determining if education in advanced airway management results in a decrease in airway related morbidity and mortality and overall better patients' outcome during difficult airway management.

  13. Variations in the diagnosis and treatment of somatic dysfunction between 4 osteopathic residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Gregory A; Snider, Karen T; Johnson, Jane C

    2015-05-01

    The American Osteopathic Association requires the integration of osteo-pathic principles and practice in all specialty residency training programs that it accredits, but the 4 residencies with the most integration of osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM) have differences in training and emphasis on OMM as a primary treatment modality. To study differences in OMM use for spinal pain between the neuro-musculoskeletal medicine/OMM (NMM/OMM), the family practice/osteopath-ic manipulative treatment (FP/OMT), the integrated FP/OMT and NMM/OMM (FP/NMM), and the internal medicine and NMM/OMM (IM/NMM) specialty residency training programs. Medical records were reviewed for patient encounters from September 2011 through October 2013 at NMM/OMM, FP/OMT, FP/NMM, and IM/NMM residencies in a family medicine and OMM specialty clinic. Records were screened for a diagnosis of cervicalgia, thoracalgia, lumbago, or backache. The identifed encounters were compared to determine between-specialty differences in the number of chief complaints, non-somatic dysfunction assessments, body regions with diagnosed somatic dysfunction, body regions managed with OMT, and number and type of OMT techniques used. Eighteen residents had 2925 patient encounters that included 1 or more spinal pain diagnoses. Overall, 2767 patients (95%) received OMT. The probability (95% CI) of residents using OMT was 0.99 (0.98-0.99) for the NMM/OMM residents, 0.66 (0.55-0.77) for the FP/OMT residents, 0.94 (0.88-0.97) for the FP/NMM residents, and 0.997 (0.98-1.0) for the IM/NMM residents. The FP/OMT residents were less likely to manage spinal pain using OMT (P<.001) and documented fewer somatic dysfunction assessments and fewer musculoskeletal assessments (P<.001), but they documented significantly more non-somatic dysfunction assessments (P<.001). When using OMT, the FP/OMT residents diagnosed somatic dysfunction in fewer mean (95% CI) body regions (2.9 [2.4-3.5]) than the NMM/OMM (5.5 [4.9-6.2]), the FP/NMM (5

  14. Scope of global health training in U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kristin J; Tsai, Alexander C; Johnson, Timothy R B; Walensky, Rochelle P; Bangsberg, David R; Kerry, Vanessa B

    2013-11-01

    To enumerate global health training activities in U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residency programs and to examine the worldwide distribution of programmatic activity relative to the maternal and perinatal disease burden. Using a systematic, web-based protocol, we searched for global health training opportunities at all U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residency programs. Country-level data on disability-adjusted life-years resulting from maternal and perinatal conditions were obtained from the Global Burden of Disease study. We calculated Spearman's rank correlation coefficients to estimate the cross-country association between programmatic activity and disease burden. Of the 243 accredited U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residency programs, we identified 41 (17%) with one of several possible predefined categories of programmatic activity. Thirty-three residency programs offered their residents opportunities to participate in one or more elective-based rotations, eight offered extended field-based training, and 18 offered research activities. A total of 128 programmatic activities were dispersed across 64 different countries. At the country level, the number of programmatic activities had a statistically significant association with the total disease burden resulting from maternal (Spearman's ρ=0.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14-0.57) and perinatal conditions (ρ=0.34, 95% CI 0.10-0.54) but not gynecologic cancers (ρ=-0.24, 95% CI -0.46 to 0.01). There are few global health training opportunities for U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residents. These activities are disproportionately distributed among countries with greater burdens of disease. II.

  15. The Scope of Global Health Training in U.S. Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kristin J.; Tsai, Alexander C.; Johnson, Timothy R.B.; MD, MPH, Rochelle P.; Bangsberg, David R.; Kerry, Vanessa B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To enumerate global health training activities in U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residency programs, and to examine the worldwide distribution of programmatic activity relative to the maternal and perinatal disease burden. Methods Using a systematic, Web-based protocol, we searched for global health training opportunities at all U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residency programs. Country-level data on disability-adjusted life years due to maternal and perinatal conditions were obtained from the Global Burden of Disease study. We calculated Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients to estimate the cross-country association between programmatic activity and disease burden. Results Of the 243 accredited U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residency programs, we identified 41 (17%) with one of several possible predefined categories of programmatic activity. Thirty-three residency programs offered their residents opportunities to participate in one or more elective-based rotations, eight offered extended field-based training, and 18 offered research activities. A total of 128 programmatic activities were dispersed across 64 different countries. At the country level, the number of programmatic activities had a statistically significant association with the total disease burden due to maternal (Spearman’s ρ=0.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.14-0.57) and perinatal conditions (ρ=0.34; 95% CI, 0.10-0.54) but not gynecologic cancers (ρ=−0.24; 95% CI, −0.46 to 0.01). Conclusions There are few global health training opportunities for U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residents. These activities are disproportionately distributed among countries with greater burdens of disease. PMID:24104785

  16. Academic Productivity of Faculty Associated With Craniofacial Surgery Fellowship Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Qing Zhao; Ricci, Joseph A; Silvestre, Jason; Ho, Olivia A; Ganor, Oren; Lee, Bernard T

    2017-03-29

    The H-index is increasingly being used as a measure of academic productivity and has been applied to various surgical disciplines. Here the authors calculate the H-index of craniofacial surgery fellowship faculty in North America in order to determine its utility for academic productivity among craniofacial surgeons. A list of fellowship programs was obtained from the website of the American Society of Craniofacial Surgery. Faculty demographics and institution characteristics were obtained from official program websites and the H-index was calculated using Scopus (Elsevier, USA). Data were assessed using bivariate analysis tools (Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests) to determine the relationship between independent variables and career publications, H-index and 5-year H-index (H5-index) of faculty. Dunn test for multiple comparisons was also calculated. A total of 102 faculty members from 29 craniofacial surgery fellowship programs were identified and included. Faculty demographics reflected a median age of 48 (interquartile range [IQR] 13), a predominantly male sample (88/102, 89.7%), and the rank of assistant professor being the most common among faculty members (41/102, 40.2%). Median of career publications per faculty was 37 (IQR 52.5) and medians of H-index and H5-index were 10.0 (IQR 13.75) and 3.5 (IQR 3.25), respectively. Greater age, male gender, Fellow of the American College of Surgeons membership, higher academic rank, and program affiliation with ranked research medical schools were significantly associated with higher H-indices. Variables associated with seniority were positively associated with the H-index. These results suggest that the H-index may be used as an adjunct in determining academic productivity for promotions among craniofacial surgeons.

  17. Pilot Study Evaluating the Impact of Otology Surgery Videos on Otolaryngology Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Charles; Stevens, Shawn M; Golub, Justin S; Pensak, Myles L; Samy, Ravi N

    2017-03-01

    Use of videos as educational tools is not a novel concept; however, there is a paucity of high-quality video resources available to otolaryngology trainees. We hypothesized that residents would deem surgical-videos using a multimedia-style format more valuable as preparatory tools. Aims of this study: 1) develop portfolio of otology/neurotology videos overviewing key steps, anatomy, and pearls by a senior surgeon; 2) have residents rate the effectiveness of the videos as a preoperative tool. Prospective study. A video-library of procedures at (https://www.youtube.com/user/cisurgeon) was formatted via time-stamping to coincide expert level narration with closed captioning, critical procedural steps, relevant instrumentation, radiographic pictures, orientation cues, and anatomical highlights. Otolaryngology trainees of postgraduate years 2 through 5 (n = 13) watched a minimum of three videos and completed an assessment addressing: current resource identification/usefulness comparison, self-efficacy, impact on preparation time, and prioritization of resources. The videos rated as highly useful compared with current resources (p = 0.002) and capable of promoting self-efficacy. Residents reported moderate-high prioritization of our multi-media formatted resource (scores >6) among their current preoperative regimen. The varied videos were rated highly in terms of usefulness, promoting self-efficacy and as a high-priority for a resident's surgical preparation. Multimedia-formatted training videos should be further explored for this generation of electronic-learners. Future studies with a larger cohort, objective approaches, and multidisciplinary involvement are needed to determine the full impact of this education medium on surgical-training.

  18. Orientation of Medical Residents to the Psychosocial Aspects of Primary Care: Influence of Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenthal, Sherman; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 63 general medical residents found most accepted the psychosocial role of the primary care physician, found it most appropriate in ambulatory care settings, felt ambivalent about their ability to perform it, and assigned it secondary priority in patient care. More attention by training programs to ambulatory care and psychosocial…

  19. Effects of intergenerational Montessori-based activities programming on engagement of nursing home residents with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Lee

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Michelle M Lee1, Cameron J Camp2, Megan L Malone21Midwestern University, Department of Behavioral Medicine, Downers Grove, IL , USA; 2Myers Research Institute of Menorah Park Center for Senior Living, Beachwood, OH, USA Abstract: Fourteen nursing home residents on a dementia special care unit at a skilled nursing facility took part in one-to-one intergenerational programming (IGP with 15 preschool children from the facility’s on-site child care center. Montessori-based activities served as the interface for interactions between dyads. The amount of time residents demonstrated positive and negative forms of engagement during IGP and standard activities programming was assessed through direct observation using a tool developed for this purpose – the Myers Research Institute Engagement Scale (MRI-ES. These residents with dementia displayed the ability to successfully take part in IGP. Most successfully presented “lessons” to the children in their dyads, similar to the way that Montessori teachers present lessons to children, while persons with more severe cognitive impairment took part in IGP through other methods such as parallel play. Taking part in IGP was consistently related with higher levels of positive engagement and lower levels of negative forms of engagement in these residents with dementia than levels seen in standard activities programming on the unit. Implications of using this form of IGP, and directions for future research, are discussed.Keywords: Montessori-based activities, intergenerational programming, engagement, dementia

  20. Evaluation of an Evidence-Based Tobacco Treatment Curriculum for Psychiatry Residency Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Judith J.; Fromont, Sebastien C.; Leek, Desiree; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Louie, Alan K.; Jacobs, Marc H.; Hall, Sharon M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Smokers with mental illness and addictive disorders account for nearly one in two cigarettes sold in the United States and are at high risk for smoking-related deaths and disability. Psychiatry residency programs provide a unique arena for disseminating tobacco treatment guidelines, influencing professional norms, and increasing access…

  1. Improving the Quality of Artists' Residency Programs: A Rubric for Teaching Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Janis

    2004-01-01

    How do you make something better? This is a fundamental question of professional development the national network of Young Audiences (YA) undertook to answer about its artist residency programs. The basic question assumes that those asking the question know what the "something" is, how effective it is in its current state, and what "it" is…

  2. Unpacking the Clinical and Participatory Dimensions of the Trump Math-Teacher-Residency-Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanuel-Noy, Dalia; Wagner, Tili

    2016-01-01

    The research presents a Residency Math teacher education program that has been developed in Israel in search of transforming initial teacher preparation on the Clinical-Participatory continuum. It is a "multi-phase" mixed-method research aiming to present the clinical and participatory dimensions of the TMR: the way in which they are…

  3. Impact of Nursing Educational Program on Reducing or Preventing Postoperative Complications for Patients after Intracranial Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmowla, Rasha Ali Ahmed Abd; El-Lateef, Zienab Abd; El-khayat, Roshdy

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial surgery means any surgery performed inside the skull to treat problems in the brain and surrounding structures. Aim: Evaluate the impact of nursing educational program on reducing or preventing postoperative complications for patients after intracranial surgery. Subjects and methods: Sixty adult patients had intracranial surgery (burr…

  4. United States medical school graduate interest in radiology residency programs as depicted by online search tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Nora M; Kinsella, Stuart D; Morey, José M

    2014-02-01

    Recent media publications have indicated a tough job market in medical specialty positions for medical school graduates, specifically in the field of radiology. Internet search tools, such as Google Trends, have proved useful in the prediction of certain diseases on the basis of the search volume index for a specific term. The authors hypothesized that online search tools might be useful in the prediction of US medical school graduates' interest in residency positions in radiology. Google Trends indicated an increase over time in searches for "radiology salary" and a decrease over time in searches for "radiology residency." National Resident Matching Program results for diagnostic radiology showed an increase from 2004 to 2009 in the percentage of US graduates entering radiology but a dramatic drop from 2010 to 2013. This occurred even while the total number of US graduates active in the National Resident Matching Program increased. This finding might have been foretold on the basis of online query result trends. Online search data may be a useful insight into the interests of US medical school graduates and may be predictive of unfilled radiology residency positions and eventual increased shortages of community radiologists coming from US medical schools.

  5. Comparison of ultrasound and nerve stimulation techniques for interscalene brachial plexus block for shoulder surgery in a residency training environment: a randomized, controlled, observer-blinded trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Leslie C; Graham, Sean K; Osteen, Kristie D; Porter, Heather Scuderi; Nossaman, Bobby D

    2011-01-01

    The ability to provide adequate intraoperative anesthesia and postoperative analgesia for orthopedic shoulder surgery continues to be a procedural challenge. Anesthesiology training programs constantly balance the time needed for procedural education versus associated costs. The administration of brachial plexus anesthesia can be facilitated through nerve stimulation or by ultrasound guidance. The benefits of using a nerve stimulator include a high incidence of success and less cost when compared to ultrasonography. Recent studies with ultrasonography suggest high success rates and decreased procedural times, but less is known about the comparison of these procedural times in training programs. We conducted a prospective, randomized, observer-blinded study with inexperienced clinical anesthesia (CA) residents-CA-1 to CA-3-to compare differences in these 2 guidance techniques in patients undergoing interscalene brachial plexus block for orthopedic surgery. In this study, 41 patients scheduled for orthopedic shoulder surgery were randomly assigned to receive an interscalene brachial plexus block guided by either ultrasound (US group) or nerve stimulation (NS group). Preoperative analgesics and sedatives were controlled in both groups. The US group required significantly less time to conduct the block (4.3 ± 1.5 minutes) than the NS group (10 ± 1.5 minutes), P  =  .009. Moreover, the US group achieved a significantly faster onset of sensory block (US group, 12 ± 2 minutes; NS group, 19 ± 2 minutes; P  =  .02) and motor block (US group, 13.5 ± 2.3 minutes; NS group, 20.2 ± 2.1 minutes; P  =  .03). Success rates were high for both techniques and were not statistically different (US group, 95%; NS group, 91%). No differences were found in operative times, postoperative pain scores, need for rescue analgesics, or incidences of perioperative or postdischarge side effects. On the basis of our results with inexperienced residents, we

  6. Lifestyle medicine curriculum for a preventive medicine residency program: implementation and outcomes

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    Haq Nawaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The vast majority of the healthcare problems burdening our society today are caused by disease-promoting lifestyles (e.g., physical inactivity and unhealthy eating. Physicians report poor training and lack of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes. Objective: To evaluate a new curriculum and rotation in lifestyle medicine for preventive medicine residents. Methods: Training included didactics (six sessions/year, distance learning, educational conferences, and newly developed lifestyle medicine rotations at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and the Integrative Medicine Center. We used a number of tools to assess residents’ progress including Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs, self-assessments, and logs of personal health habits. Results: A total of 20 residents participated in the lifestyle medicine training between 2010 and 2013. There was a 15% increase in residents’ discussions of lifestyle issues with their patients based on their baseline and follow-up surveys. The performance of preventive medicine residents on OSCEs increased each year they were in the program (average OSCE score: PGY1 73%, PGY2 83%, PGY3 87%, and PGY4 91%, p=0.01. Our internal medicine and preliminary residents served as a control, since they did participate in didactics but not in lifestyle medicine rotations. Internal medicine and preliminary residents who completed the same OSCEs had a slightly lower average score (76% compared with plural for resident, preventive medicine residents (80%. However, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.11. Conclusion: Incorporating the lifestyle medicine curriculum is feasible for preventive medicine training allowing residents to improve their health behavior change discussions with patients as well as their own personal health habits.

  7. Lifestyle medicine curriculum for a preventive medicine residency program: implementation and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Haq; Petraro, Paul V.; Via, Christina; Ullah, Saif; Lim, Lionel; Wild, Dorothea; Kennedy, Mary; Phillips, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The vast majority of the healthcare problems burdening our society today are caused by disease-promoting lifestyles (e.g., physical inactivity and unhealthy eating). Physicians report poor training and lack of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes. Objective To evaluate a new curriculum and rotation in lifestyle medicine for preventive medicine residents. Methods Training included didactics (six sessions/year), distance learning, educational conferences, and newly developed lifestyle medicine rotations at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and the Integrative Medicine Center. We used a number of tools to assess residents’ progress including Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), self-assessments, and logs of personal health habits. Results A total of 20 residents participated in the lifestyle medicine training between 2010 and 2013. There was a 15% increase in residents’ discussions of lifestyle issues with their patients based on their baseline and follow-up surveys. The performance of preventive medicine residents on OSCEs increased each year they were in the program (average OSCE score: PGY1 73%, PGY2 83%, PGY3 87%, and PGY4 91%, p=0.01). Our internal medicine and preliminary residents served as a control, since they did participate in didactics but not in lifestyle medicine rotations. Internal medicine and preliminary residents who completed the same OSCEs had a slightly lower average score (76%) compared with plural for resident, preventive medicine residents (80%). However, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.11). Conclusion Incorporating the lifestyle medicine curriculum is feasible for preventive medicine training allowing residents to improve their health behavior change discussions with patients as well as their own personal health habits. PMID:27507540

  8. Measuring Nontechnical Aspects of Surgical Clinician Development in an Otolaryngology Residency Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jennifer J; Cunningham, Michael J; Emerick, Kevin G; Gray, Stacey T

    2016-05-01

    Surgical competency requires sound clinical judgment, a systematic diagnostic approach, and integration of a wide variety of nontechnical skills. This more complex aspect of clinician development has traditionally been difficult to measure through standard assessment methods. This study was conducted to use the Clinical Practice Instrument (CPI) to measure nontechnical diagnostic and management skills during otolaryngology residency training; to determine whether there is demonstrable change in these skills between residents who are in postgraduate years (PGYs) 2, 4, and 5; and to evaluate whether results vary according to subspecialty topic or method of administration. Prospective study using the CPI, an instrument with previously established internal consistency, reproducibility, interrater reliability, discriminant validity, and responsiveness to change, in an otolaryngology residency training program. The CPI was used to evaluate progression in residents' ability to evaluate, diagnose, and manage case-based clinical scenarios. A total of 248 evaluations were performed in 45 otolaryngology resident trainees at regular intervals. Analysis of variance with nesting and postestimation pairwise comparisons were used to evaluate total and domain scores according to training level, subspecialty topic, and method of administration. Longitudinal residency educational initiative. Assessment with the CPI during PGYs 2, 4, and 5 of residency. Among the 45 otolaryngology residents (248 CPI administrations), there were a mean (SD) of 5 (3) administrations (range, 1-4) during their training. Total scores were significantly different among PGY levels of training, with lower scores seen in the PGY-2 level (44 [16]) compared with the PGY-4 (64 [13]) or PGY-5 level (69 [13]) (P otolaryngology (mean [SD], 72 [14]) than in subspecialties (range, 55 [12], P = .003, to 56 [19], P < .001). Neither administering the examination with an electronic scoring system, rather than a

  9. The link between quality and accreditation of residency programs: the surveyors’ perceptions

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    dos Santos, Renato Antunes; Snell, Linda; Tenorio Nunes, Maria do Patrocinio

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accreditation of medical residency programs has become globally important. Currently it is moving from the goal of attaining minimal standards to a model of continuous improvement. In some countries, the accreditation system engages peers (physicians) to survey residency programs. The surveyors are sometimes volunteers, usually engaged in multiple clinical and education activities. Few studies have investigated the benefits of residency program evaluation and accreditation from the perspective of the surveyors. As peers they both conduct and receive accreditation surveys, which puts them in a privileged position in that it provides the surveyor with an opportunity to share experiences and knowledge and apply what is learned in their own context. The objective of this study is to obtain the perceptions of these surveyors about the impact of an accreditation system on residency programs. Surveyors participated in semi-structured interviews. A thematic analysis was performed on the interview data, and resulting topics were grouped into five themes: Burden (of documentation and of time needed); Efficiency and efficacy of the accreditation process; Training and experience of surveyors; Being a peer; Professional skills and recognition of surveyors. These categories were organized into two major themes: ‘Structure and Process’ and ‘Human Resources’. The study participants proposed ways to improve efficiency including diminish the burden of documentation to the physicians involved in the process and to increase efforts on training programs and payment for surveyors and program directors. Based on the results we propose a conceptual framework to improve accreditation systems. Abbreviations: PD: Program director PMID:28178919

  10. Goals of care conversation teaching in residency - a cross-sectional survey of postgraduate program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roze des Ordons, Amanda; Kassam, Aliya; Simon, Jessica

    2017-01-06

    Residents are commonly involved in establishing goals of care for hospitalized patients. While education can improve the quality of these conversations, whether and how postgraduate training programs integrate such teaching into their curricula is not well established. The objective of this study was to characterize perceptions of current teaching and assessment of goals of care conversations, and program director interest in associated curricular integration. An electronic survey was sent to all postgraduate program directors at the University of Calgary. Quantitative data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative comments were analyzed using thematic analysis. The survey response rate was 34% (22/64). Formal goals of care conversation teaching is incorporated into 63% of responding programs, and most commonly involves lectures. Informal teaching occurs in 86% of programs, involving discussion, direct observation and role modeling in the clinical setting. Seventy-three percent of programs assess goals of care conversation skills, mostly in the clinical setting through feedback. Program directors believe that over two-thirds of clinical faculty are prepared to teach goals of care conversations, and are interested in resources to teach and assess goals of care conversations. Themes that emerged include 1) general perceptions, 2) need for teaching, 3) ideas for teaching, and 4) assessment of goals of care conversations. The majority of residency training programs at the University of Calgary incorporate some goals of care conversation teaching and assessment into their curricula. Program directors are interested in resources to improve teaching and assessment of goals of care conversations.

  11. Effects of intergenerational Montessori-based activities programming on engagement of nursing home residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle M; Camp, Cameron J; Malone, Megan L

    2007-01-01

    Fourteen nursing home residents on a dementia special care unit at a skilled nursing facility took part in one-to-one intergenerational programming (IGP) with 15 preschool children from the facility's on-site child care center. Montessori-based activities served as the interface for interactions between dyads. The amount of time residents demonstrated positive and negative forms of engagement during IGP and standard activities programming was assessed through direct observation using a tool developed for this purpose--the Myers Research Institute Engagement Scale (MRI-ES). These residents with dementia displayed the ability to successfully take part in IGP. Most successfully presented "lessons" to the children in their dyads, similar to the way that Montessori teachers present lessons to children, while persons with more severe cognitive impairment took part in IGP through other methods such as parallel play. Taking part in IGP was consistently related with higher levels of positive engagement and lower levels of negative forms of engagement in these residents with dementia than levels seen in standard activities programming on the unit. Implications of using this form of IGP, and directions for future research, are discussed.

  12. Cirurgia do estapédio na residência: experiência do Hospital de Clínicas/UFPR Stapes surgery in residency: the ufpr clinical hospital experience

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    Adriano Ulisses Caldart

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A cirurgia do estapédio permanece como tratamento consagrado para a otosclerose. Recentes publicações têm demonstrado que o sucesso cirúrgico nas cirurgias realizadas por médicos residentes tem diminuído e que os resultados audiológicos tem sido piores que os obtidos por cirurgiões experientes. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a experiência do serviço de otorrinolaringologia do Hospital de Clínicas/UFPR na realização de cirurgias do estapédio no programa de residência médica. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo de 114 cirurgias do estapédio realizadas nos últimos 9 anos, em 96 pacientes. Os resultados audiométricos foram analisados conforme orientação do Committee on Hearing and Equilibrium e através do Amsterdam Hearing Evaluation Plots, considerando a melhora do gap pós-operatório e de limiares da via aérea. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos 96 pacientes, na maioria adultos, do sexo feminino (67,7% e caucasianos (93,7%. Em 50,9% dos casos foi realizada estapedectomia, sendo a grande maioria sob anestesia local e sedação (96,5% e utilizando principalmente a prótese de Teflon (37,7%. A taxa de sucesso cirúrgico foi de 50,88%, com 11,4% de complicações. CONCLUSÃO: Os ganhos de audição pós-operatórios considerados como sucesso cirúrgico foram inferiores aos publicados na literatura por cirurgiões experientes.Surgery of the stapedius remains the established treatment for otosclerosis. Recent publications have showed that success in surgeries done by residents have decreased and hearing results are worse than those obtained by experienced otologic surgeons. AIM: To evaluate the experience of the otorhinolaryngology unit, Parana University, relative to stapes surgery done in the residency training program. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A retrospective study of 114 stapes surgeries done in the past 9 years in 96 patients. Audiometric results were analysed according to the Commitee on Hearing and Equilibrium guidelines and the Amsterdam

  13. Assessment of laparoscopic skills of Gynecology and Obstetrics residents after a training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Carla Ferreira Kikuchi; Ruano, José Maria Cordeiro; Kati, Lea Mina; Noguti, Alberto Sinhiti; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Sartori, Marair Gracio Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate laparoscopic skills of third-year Gynecology and Obstetrics residents after training at a training and surgical experimentation center. Use of a prospective questionnaire analyzing demographic data, medical residency, skills, competences, and training in a box trainer and in pigs. After the training, there was significant improvement in laparoscopic skills according to the residents (before 1.3/after 2.7; p=0.000) and preceptors (before 2.1/after 4.8; p=0.000). There was also significant improvement in the feeling of competence in surgeries with level 1 and 2 of difficulty. All residents approved the training. The training was distributed into 12 hours in the box trainer and 20 hours in animals, and led to better laparoscopic skills and a feeling of more surgical competence in laparoscopic surgery levels 1 and 2. Avaliar a habilidade laparoscópica dos residentes do terceiro ano de residência médica em Ginecologia e Obstetrícia após treinamento em um centro de treinamento e experimentação cirúrgica. Aplicação de questionário de forma prospectiva analisando dados demográficos, da residência médica, da habilidade, da competência e do treinamento em caixa preta e em porcas. Após o treinamento, houve melhora da habilidade em laparoscopia de forma significativa na avaliação dos residentes (antes 1,3/depois 2,7; p=0,000) e preceptores (antes 2,1/depois 4,8; p=0,000). Houve melhora significativa na sensação de competência em cirurgias de níveis 1 e 2 de dificuldade. Todos os residentes aprovaram o treinamento. O treinamento dividido em 12 horas de caixa preta e 20 horas em animais trouxe melhora na habilidade em laparoscopia e na sensação de melhora na competência cirúrgica em cirurgias laparoscópicas de níveis 1 e 2.

  14. Advancing geriatrics fellowship programs through a community-based residency network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kevin; Neuberger, Marolee; Noel, Mary; Sleight, Deborah; vanSchagen, John; Wadland, William

    2013-01-01

    Our nation faces unprecedented challenges in caring for older adults. Geriatricians who provide care and teach geriatrics are underrepresented in the workforce, especially in non-metropolitan communities. In Michigan, geriatricians and geriatrics fellowship (GF) programs are clustered in the Southeast, suggesting that training site demographics may influence fellows' career location decisions. A project was undertaken at Michigan State University to determine if an established family medicine residency network (FMRN) could facilitate the accreditation of new GF programs in non-metropolitan communities, recruit fellows, and retain graduates to practice and teach in neighboring areas. A team (department chair, appointed GF network director, site program directors, and education specialists) conducted participating site needs and readiness assessments, facilitated collaboration between GF programs, assisted with completion of new program applications, led development of a curriculum utilizing shared instructional resources and evaluation tools, and provided career counseling to fellows. Two GF programs were accredited and accepted applicants. Ongoing cooperative efforts resulted in the writing of a GF curriculum, organization of a joint Observed Structured Clinical Evaluation (OSCE), and monthly information-sharing teleconferences with program directors. Following training, graduates have chosen to practice in areas underserved by geriatricians in Michigan and elsewhere. Early experience with this model of GF development indicates that new fellowships can be established in community-based residencies that competitively recruit and train fellows who are inclined to practice in areas of greatest need. Creation of more non-metropolitan GF programs could provide a means to stabilize and redistribute the geriatrician workforce.

  15. Use and teaching of pneumatic otoscopy in a family medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, Eva; Labrecque, Michel; Côté, Luc; Charbonneau, Katerine; Légaré, France

    2013-09-01

    To determine to what extent FPs teach and use pneumatic otoscopy and to identify the chief influences on this behaviour. Mixed-methods descriptive study conducted between March and May 2011. The family medicine residency program at Laval University in Quebec city, Que. Directors of the family medicine teaching units (FMTUs), teachers, and residents. We used questionnaires to assess the availability of pneumatic otoscopy equipment in 12 FMTUs, current behaviour and behavioural intention among physicians (residents and teachers) to use or teach pneumatic otoscopy, and facilitators and barriers to these practices. We also conducted 2 focus groups to further explore the facilitators of and barriers to using pneumatic otoscopy. We used descriptive statistics for quantitative data, transcribed the qualitative material, and performed content analysis. Eight of the 12 FMTUs reported having pneumatic otoscopy equipment. Four had it in all of their consulting rooms, and 2 formally taught it. Nine (4%) of 211 physicians reported regular use of pneumatic otoscopy. Mean (SD) intention to teach or use pneumatic otoscopy during the next year was low (2.4 [1.0] out of 5). Teachers identified improved diagnostic accuracy as the main facilitator both for use and for teaching, while residents identified recommendation by practice guidelines as the main facilitator for use. All physicians reported lack of availability of equipment as the main barrier to use. The main barrier to teaching pneumatic otoscopy reported by teachers was that they did not use it themselves. In focus groups, themes of consequences, capabilities, and socioprofessional influences were most dominant. Residents clearly identified role modeling by teachers as facilitating the use of pneumatic otoscopy. Pneumatic otoscopy is minimally used and taught in the family medicine residency program studied. Interventions to increase its use should target identified underlying beliefs and facilitators of and barriers to its

  16. POST-OPERATIVE REHABILITATION PROGRAM AFTER SURGERY ACL RECONSTRUCTION

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    Zoran Đokić

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ACL (anterior cruciate ligament are small ligaments inside the knee capsule that connect the femur tibia, main function is to prevent movement of the femur in front of tibia and to provide stability, it also helps in controlling the movement of the knee, in direction back-forward. Injuries of ACL appear in an increasing number of athletes. Per year, from 100,000 people who have an injury of the knee joint, 30% have the reconstruction surgery of ACL. ACL injury accounts about 40% of all sports injuries. The greatest number of injuries just happens in the most popular sports, such as: basketball, football and handball, often in female athlete. After the injury, about 25% of athletes fail to return to the sport. Recovery time after surgery is usually 6-12 months, depending on individual characteristics, as well as technical and tactical demands of specific sports activities. Choosing an appropriate and efficient rehabilitation protocols, and training is of great importance. The aim of this paper is to present training protocol of 60 days, 3 months after ACL reconstruction surgery, of top handball female athletes. In the first 30 days, a total of 74 training sessions were done, 39 trainings and 21 EMS (Electrical Muscle Stimulation treatments, at the end of each workout. Functional abilities and morphological status were measured at the beginning and end of the treatment program. After the training protocol athlete got individual exercise program of 26 days (30 training sessions. After 20 days began with normal training, the 26th day of the first game played. The applied protocol has proven successful, as the third competition season there is no problem with an injury.

  17. Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism: a comparative assessment of virtue-based leadership development in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kristine; Puscas, Liana; Tucci, Debara; Woodard, Charles; Witsell, David; Esclamado, Ramon M; Lee, Walter T

    2013-10-29

    Surgical Training and Education in Promoting Professionalism (STEPP) was developed in 2011 to train tomorrow's leaders during residency. It is based on virtue ethics and takes an approach similar to West Point military academy. The purpose of this research was: (i) to compare the virtue profiles of our residents with that of the military cohort using a standardized virtue assessment tool; and (ii) to assess the value of virtue education on residents. As part of STEPP, otolaryngology residents participated in a virtue-based validated assessment tool called Virtue in Action (VIA) Inventory. This was completed at the initiation of STEPP in July 2011 as well as 1 year later in June 2012. Comparison of the VIA to a military cohort was performed. Leadership 'Basic Training' is a series of forums focused on virtues of initiative, integrity, responsibility, self-discipline, and accountability. A pre- and post-test was administered assessing resident perceptions of the value of this 'Basic Training'. Virtues are shared between otolaryngology residents (n=9) and military personnel (n=2,433) as there were no significant differences in strength scores between two military comparison groups and otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) residents. There was a significant improvement (pvirtue-based approach is valued by residents as a part of leadership training during residency.

  18. Lessons learned in developing family medicine residency training programs in Japan

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    Kitamura Kazuya

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While family medicine is not well established as a discipline in Japan, a growing number of Japanese medical schools and training hospitals have recently started sougoushinryoubu (general medicine departments. Some of these departments are incorporating a family medicine approach to residency training. We sought to learn from family medicine pioneers of these programs lessons for developing residency training. Methods This qualitative project utilized a long interview research design. Questions focused on four topics: 1 circumstances when becoming chair/faculty member; 2 approach to starting the program; 3 how Western ideas of family medicine were incorporated; and 4 future directions. We analyzed the data using immersion/crystallization to identify recurring themes. From the transcribed data, we selected representative quotations to illustrate them. We verified the findings by emailing the participants and obtaining feedback. Results Participants included: five chairpersons, two program directors, and three faculty members. We identified five lessons: 1 few people understand the basic concepts of family medicine; 2 developing a core curriculum is difficult; 3 start with undergraduates; 4 emphasize clinical skills; and 5 train in the community. Conclusion While organizational change is difficult, the identified lessons suggest issues that merit consideration when developing a family medicine training program. Lessons from complexity science could inform application of these insights in other countries and settings newly developing residency training.

  19. Current trends in pulp therapy: a survey analyzing pulpotomy techniques taught in pediatric dental residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Laquia A; Sanders, Brian J; Jones, James E; Williamson, C Andrew; Dean, Jeffrey A; Legan, Joseph J; Maupome, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    The study's purpose was to survey directors of pediatric dental residency programs in order to evaluate the materials currently being taught and used for pulpotomy procedures for primary teeth in educational and clinical settings. A web-based survey was emailed to all graduate pediatric dental residency program directors in the United States. Seventy one emails were sent to program directors, 47 responded but only 39 respondents (55%) were included in the study. Results suggested a slight decrease in utilization of formocresol 1:5 dilution (Pformocresol (18% of respondents) were systemic health concerns and carcinogenicity, in addition to evidence-based literature. Even though 25% of respondents have begun to use MTA for primary pulpotomy procedures, the most common reason for utilization of other medicaments over MTA was its higher cost. With 82% of graduate pediatric dental residency programs still utilizing formocresol 1:5 dilution for pulpotomy procedures in primary teeth, there has been no major shift away from its clinical use, in spite of increased usage of newer medicaments over the last 5 years.

  20. A meta-analysis of studies of publication misrepresentation by applicants to residency and fellowship programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Michael N

    2010-09-01

    Many studies from various fields of medicine about the accuracy of residency and fellowship applications have reported disturbing percentages of candidates with publication misrepresentation on their applications. However, other similar studies have found much lower percentages. No evaluation of these types of studies is currently available to explain this disparity. Therefore, this study evaluated the wide range of percentages of applicants with publication misrepresentation reported in the literature. Studies of residency and fellowship applicant misrepresentation were identified and reviewed. Using uniform inclusion criteria, the data reported by each study were recalculated to determine the percentage of candidates with misrepresentation. Thirteen out of 18 studies (eight residency and five fellowship) found in the literature from 1995 to 2008 reported sufficient details to perform a recalculation. The most common type of misrepresentation reported was listing nonexistent articles, followed by errors in authorship order and nonauthorship. After recalculation, the mean percentage of candidates with misrepresentation per applicant pool decreased significantly (7.2% to 4.9%, P = .03048). No study characteristic, such as sample size, was found to be predictive of the percentage of applicants with misrepresentation. No difference was found in the percentage of applicants with misrepresentation in residency versus fellowship programs. The variance in study results of misrepresentation decreases when uniform inclusion criteria are applied. Caution must be used in directly comparing the results of these studies as originally reported. Program directors should be aware that self-promotion in the authorship list is a common form of misrepresentation.

  1. Teaching maternity care in family medicine residencies: what factors predict graduate continuation of obstetrics? A 2013 CERA program directors study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Mary Beth; Prasad, Ramakrishna; Roberts, Mary B; Magee, Susanna R

    2015-06-01

    Maternity care is an essential component of family medicine, yet the number of residency graduates providing this care continues to decline. Residency programs have struggled to identify strategies to increase continuation of obstetric practice among graduates. Leaders in family medicine obstetrics previously proposed a tiered model of training to ensure adequate volume for those desiring to continue maternity care upon graduation. However, whether this approach will be successful is unknown. This study aimed to identify program characteristics and teaching methods that may influence residents to continue obstetrics practice upon graduation. A nationwide survey of family medicine residency program directors (PDs) was conducted as part of the 2013 CERA survey to characterize teaching in maternity care and identify program-level predictors of graduate continuation of obstetrics (OB). Family medicine programs, which were community-based, university-affiliated programs in the Midwest and West, contributed more trainees who continued to provide OB care upon graduation. Trainees at these programs received greater supervision by family medicine faculty preceptors on labor and delivery, reported at least 80 deliveries by graduates during residency, and experienced greater autonomy in decision-making during OB rotations. This study supports a targeted approach to teaching maternity care in family medicine residency programs. Prioritizing continuity delivery experiences and fostering resident independence are strategies toward promoting increased provision of obstetric care by family medicine graduates. Further research is needed to evaluate the impact of tiered or track systems in practice.

  2. Understanding the current anatomical competence landscape: Comparing perceptions of program directors, residents, and fourth-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmore, Erin P; Brokaw, James J; Kochhar, Komal; Nalin, Peter M

    2016-07-08

    A mixed methods survey of fourth-year medical students, resident physicians, and residency program directors at the Indiana University School of Medicine gathered perceptions of anatomical competence-defined as the anatomical education necessary for effective clinical practice. The survey items explored numerous aspects of anatomical competence, including the most effective modes of instruction, perceptions of readiness for clinical practice, and specific suggestions for improving anatomical education during medical school and residency. The response rate was 46% for fourth-year medical students, 47% for residents (as graduates from 137 medical schools), and 71% for program directors. A majority of students and residents reported that their course in Gross Anatomy prepared them well for clinical practice; that cadaveric dissection was important in the early development of their anatomical competence; and that placing a greater emphasis on clinical relevance in medical school would have improved their anatomical competence even further. However, in terms of anatomical preparedness upon entering residency, the program directors rated their residents less prepared than the residents rated themselves. All three groups agreed that there is need for additional opportunities for anatomical educational during medical school and residency. Suggestions for improving anatomical education included the following: providing more opportunities for cadaveric dissection during medical school and residency; more consistent teaching of anatomy for clinical practice; more workshops that review anatomy; and better integration of anatomy with the teaching of other subjects during medical school. Anat Sci Educ 9: 307-318. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  3. Promoting the Congregate Meal Program to the Next Generation of Rural-Residing Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerr, Kara A; Francis, Sarah L; Margrett, Jennifer A; Peterson, Marc; Franke, Warren D

    2016-01-01

    Despite a growing older adult population, Iowa Congregate Meal Program (CMP) participation has declined. Motivators and barriers to congregate mealsite participation and wellness programming preferences of baby boomers and older adults were examined to provide insight to how to revise and better promote the CMP for the next generation of older adults. Four focus group sessions were conducted with 27 primarily White, rural-residing adults, ages 48-88 years. Participation motivators included educational programs, food, and socialization while barriers included negative perceptions and stereotypes associated with congregate mealsites. Desired wellness programs were viewed as interactive and relevant. Healthcare was the leading wellness need with financial management and physical activity cited as the most-wanted topics of wellness programs. These results provide insight on factors, aside from funding, that may be adversely impacting CMP participation and identifies areas for further investigation.

  4. Review of the training program of pediatric residents: is it appropriate for their future careers?

    OpenAIRE

    Moravej, Hossein; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Background Training of pediatric residents is a dynamic process which should be changed as the nature andepidemiology of pediatric diseases change. In this study, we compared the training program of the pediatric residentswith the disorders of the pediatric patients who had referred to pediatric offices. Methods The study was conducted in pediatric offices in Shiraz, South of Iran. The main complaints of all thepatients who were referred to these offices in the first 3 days of the four season...

  5. Predictors of new graduate nurses' organizational commitment during a nurse residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, Marilyn Meyer; Felzer, Holly M

    2012-01-01

    Retaining newly graduated nurses is critical for organizations because of the significant cost of turnover. Since commitment to an organization is associated with decreased turnover intent, understanding factors that influence new graduates' organizational commitment is important. In a sample of nurse residency program participants, predictors of organizational commitment over time were explored. Perceptions of the work environment, particularly job satisfaction and job stress, were found to be most influential.

  6. Career prospects for graduating nuclear medicine residents: survey of nuclear medicine program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A; Guiberteau, Milton J; Metter, Darlene F; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    There has been much consternation in the nuclear medicine (NM) community in recent years regarding the difficulty many NM graduates experience in securing initial employment. A survey designed to determine the extent and root causes behind the paucity of career opportunities was sent to all 2010-2011 NM residency program directors. The results of that survey and its implications for NM trainees and the profession are presented and discussed in this article.

  7. Program planning for a community pharmacy residency support service using the nominal group technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Michael T

    2002-01-01

    To define programmatic objectives and initial operational priorities for CommuniRes, a university-based education and support service designed to help community pharmacists successfully implement and sustain community pharmacy residency programs (CPRPs). Advisory committee of nationally recognized experts in CPRPs in a small-group planning session. CPRPs are postgraduate clinical training experiences conducted in chain and independent community pharmacies. The nominal group technique (NGT), a structured approach to group planning and decision making, was used to identify and prioritize the needs of CPRPs. Results of the NGT exercise were used as input to a brainstorming session that defined specific CommuniRes services and resources that must be developed to meet high priority needs of CPRPs. Group consensus on the priority needs of CPRPs was determined through rank order voting. The advisory committee identified 20 separate CPRP needs that it believed must be met to ensure that CPRPs will be successful and sustainable. Group voting resulted in the selection of six needs that were considered to be consensus priorities for services and resources provided through CommuniRes: image parity for CPRPs; CPRP marketing materials; attractive postresidency employment opportunities; well-defined goals, objectives, and residency job descriptions; return on investment and sources of ongoing funding for the residency; and opportunities and mechanisms for communicating/networking with other residents and preceptors. The needs-based programmatic priorities defined by the advisory committee are now being implemented through a tripartite program consisting of live training seminars for CPRP preceptors and directors, an Internet site (www.communires.com), and a host of continuing support services available to affiliated CPRP sites. Future programmatic planning will increasingly involve CPRP preceptors, directors, and former residents to determine the ongoing needs of CPRPs.

  8. Nurse residency programs: an evidence-based review of theory, process, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gwen; Hair, Carole; Todero, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Nursing shortages exist worldwide while job stress, dissatisfaction, lack of peer support and limited professional opportunities still contribute to attrition. The aim of this systematic review is to describe and evaluate the quality of the science, report recommendations and lessons learned about implementing and evaluating nurse residency programs (NRPs) designed to improve new graduate transitioning. Databases were searched between 1980 and 2010 using five search terms: nurse, intern, extern, transition and residency programs. Twenty studies reporting programs for new RNs fit the inclusion criteria. Three major discoveries include: 1. Wide variation in content, teaching and learning strategies make comparison across programs difficult; 2. Lack of theory in designing the educational intervention has limited the selection and development of new instruments to measure program effectiveness; and 3. Well designed quasi-experimental studies are needed. As a major nursing education redesign, NRPs could be used to test the principles, concepts and strategies of organizational transformation and experiential-interactive learning theory. By focusing on fiscal outcomes, current administrators of NRPs are missing the opportunity to implement an organizational strategy that could improve workplace environments. Healthcare organizations need to envision NRPs as a demonstration of positive clinical learning environments that can enhance intra- and interprofessional education and practice.

  9. Using corneal topography design personalized cataract surgery programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ou Huang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate how to design personalized cataract surgery programs to achieve surgical correction of preoperative corneal astigmatism with surgical astigmatism under the guidance of corneal topography, improve postoperative visual quality and reduce the cost of treatment. METHODS: Totally 202 cases(226 eyescataract patients were divided into randomized treatment group and individualized treatment group. According to the method and location of the incision, randomized treatment group were divided into 8 groups. Surgical astigmatism after different incision were calculated with the use of preoperative and postoperative corneal astigmatism through vector analysis method. Individualized treatment groups were designed personably for surgical method with reference of every surgically induced astigmatism, the surgical method chooses the type of surgical incision based on close link between preoperative corneal astigmatism and surgically induced astigmatism, and the incision was located in the steep meridian. The postoperative corneal astigmatism of individualized treatment group was observed. RESULTS: Postoperative corneal astigmatism of individualized treatment group were lower than that of 3.0mm clear corneal tunnel incision in the randomized treatment group, there were statistically significance difference, while with 3.0mm sclera tunnel incision group there were no statistically significance difference. After 55.8% of patients with the use of individualized surgical plan could undergo the operation of extracapsular cataract extraction with relatively low cost and rigid intraocular lens implantation, the per capita cost of treatment could be reduced. CONCLUSION: Personalized cataract surgery programs are designed to achieve surgical correction of preoperative corneal astigmatism under the use of corneal topography, improve postoperative visual quality and reduce the cost of treatment.

  10. Encouraging Reflexivity in a Residency Leadership Development Program: Expanding Outside the Competency Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Justin T; Gordon, Emily K B; Baranov, Dimitry J; Trey, Beulah; Tilin, Felice Y; Fleisher, Lee A

    2017-09-14

    While leadership development is increasingly a goal of academic medicine, it is typically framed as competency acquisition, which can limit its focus to a circumscribed set of social behaviors. This orientation may also reinforce the cultural characteristics of academic medicine that can make effective leadership difficult, rather than training leaders capable of examining and changing this culture. Expanding leadership development so it promotes social reflexivity presents a way to bolster some of the weaknesses of the competency paradigm. In 2013-2016, the University of Penns-ylvania's Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care (DACC) carried out a leadership development program for residents, which included seminars focused on developing particular leadership skills and annual capstone sessions facilitating discussion between residents and attending physicians about topics chosen by residents. The capstone sessions proved to be most impactful, serving as forums for open conversation about how these groups interact when engaged in social behaviors such as giving/receiving feedback, offering support after an adverse event, and teaching/learning in the clinic. The success of the capstone sessions led to a 2016 DACC-wide initiative to facilitate transparency among all professional roles (faculty, residents, nurse anesthetists, administrative staff) and encourage widespread reflexive examination about how the manner in which these groups interact encourages or impedes leadership and teamwork. Further work is necessary to describe how leadership program formats can be diversified to better encourage reflexivity. There is also a need to develop mechanisms for assessing outcomes of leadership programs that expand outside the competency-based system.

  11. Comparing the Quality and Complications of Tube Thoracostomy by Emergency Medicine and Surgery Residents; a Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Parvin; Harati, Sepideh; Shirafkan, Ali; Amirbeigi, Alireza; Hatamabadi, Hamid Reza

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Tube thoracostomy complications depend on the operator’s skill, patients’ general condition and the place in which the procedure is done. The present study aimed to compare the quality and complications of tube thoracostomy carried out by emergency medicine residents (EMRs) and surgery residents (SRs). Methods: This cohort study was conducted on 18-60 years old trauma patients in need of tube thoracostomy presenting to two academic emergency departments. Quality of tube placement and its subsequent complications until tube removal were compared between SRs and EMRs using SPSS 20. Results: 72 patients with the mean age of 37.1 ± 14.1 years were studied (86.1% male). 23 (63.8%) cases were complicated in SRs and 22 (61.1%) cases in EMRs group (total= 62.5%). Chest drain dislodgement (22.2% in SRs vs. 22.2% EMRs; p>0.99), drainage failure (19.4% in SRs vs. 16.7% EMRs; p=0.50), and surgical site infection (11.1% in SRs vs. 19.4% EMRs; p=0.25) were among the most common observed complications. The overall odds ratio of complication development was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.35-2.25, p = 0.814) for SRs and 1.12 (95% CI: 0.28-4.53, p = 0.867) for EMRs. Conclusion: The findings of the present study showed no significant difference between SRs and EMRs regarding quality of tube thoracostomy placement and its subsequent complications for trauma patients. The rate of complications were interestingly high (>60%) for both groups. PMID:28286840

  12. Resident resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J L; Cleary, B

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, faculty must work hard with residents to explore the nature of their resistance to a program's learning and growth opportunities. Initial steps to a deeper, more effective, and longer-lasting change process must be pursued. If resident resistance is mishandled or misunderstood, then learning and professional growth may be sidetracked and the purposes of residency training defeated. Listening to the whole person of the resident and avoiding the trap of getting caught up in merely responding to select resident behaviors that irritate us is critical. Every faculty member in the family practice residency program must recognize resistance as a form of defense that cannot immediately be torn down or taken away. Resident defenses have important purposes to play in stress reduction even if they are not always healthy. Residents, especially interns, use resistance to avoid a deeper and more truthful look at themselves as physicians. A family practice residency program that sees whole persons in their residents and that respects resident defenses will effectively manage the stress and disharmony inherent to the resistant resident.

  13. Ready for Discharge? A Survey of Discharge Transition-of-Care Education and Evaluation in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallahue, Fiona E; Betz, Amy E; Druck, Jeffrey; Jones, Jonathan S; Burns, Boyd; Hern, Gene

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to assess current education and practices of emergency medicine (EM) residents as perceived by EM program directors to determine if there are deficits in resident discharge handoff training. This survey study was guided by the Kern model for medical curriculum development. A six-member Council of EM Residency Directors (CORD) Transitions of Care task force of EM physicians performed these steps and constructed a survey. The survey was distributed to program residency directors via the CORD listserve and/or direct contact. There were 119 responses to the survey, which were collected using an online survey tool. Over 71% of the 167 American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited EM residency programs were represented. Of those responding, 42.9% of programs reported formal training regarding discharges during initial orientation and 5.9% reported structured curriculum outside of orientation. A majority (73.9%) of programs reported that EM residents were not routinely evaluated on their discharge proficiency. Despite the ACGME requirements requiring formal handoff curriculum and evaluation, many programs do not provide formal curriculum on the discharge transition of care or evaluate EM residents on their discharge proficiency.

  14. Internal Medicine Residency Program Directors' Views of the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency: An Opportunity to Enhance Communication of Competency Along the Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Steven V; Vu, T Robert; Willett, Lisa L; Call, Stephanie; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Chaudhry, Saima

    2017-06-01

    To examine internal medicine (IM) residency program directors' (PDs') perspectives on the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency (Core EPAs)-introduced into undergraduate medical education to further competency-based assessment-and on communicating competency-based information during transitions. A spring 2015 Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine survey asked PDs of U.S. IM residency programs for their perspectives on which Core EPAs new interns must or should possess on day 1, which are most essential, and which have the largest gap between expected and observed performance. Their views and preferences were also requested regarding communicating competency-based information at transitions from medical school to residency and residency to fellowship/employment. The response rate was 57% (204/361 programs). The majority of PDs felt new interns must/should possess 12 of the 13 Core EPAs. PDs' rankings of Core EPAs by relative importance were more varied than their rankings by the largest gaps in performance. Although preferred timing varied, most PDs (82%) considered it important for medical schools to communicate Core EPA-based information to PDs; nearly three-quarters (71%) would prefer a checklist format. Many (60%) would be willing to provide competency-based evaluations to fellowship directors/employers. Most (> 80%) agreed that there should be a bidirectional communication mechanism for programs/employers to provide feedback on competency assessments. The gaps identified in Core EPA performance may help guide medical schools' curricular and assessment tool design. Sharing competency-based information at transitions along the medical education continuum could help ensure production of competent, practice-ready physicians.

  15. A multimethod approach for cross-cultural training in an internal medicine residency program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J. Staton

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cultural competence training in residency is important to improve learners’ confidence in cross-cultural encounters. Recognition of cultural diversity and avoidance of cultural stereotypes are essential for health care providers. Methods: We developed a multimethod approach for cross-cultural training of Internal Medicine residents and evaluated participants’ preparedness for cultural encounters. The multimethod approach included (1 a conference series, (2 a webinar with a national expert, (3 small group sessions, (4 a multicultural social gathering, (5 a Grand Rounds presentation on cross-cultural training, and (6 an interactive, online case-based program. Results: The program had 35 participants, 28 of whom responded to the survey. Of those, 16 were white (62%, and residents comprised 71% of respondents (n=25. Following training, 89% of participants were more comfortable obtaining a social history. However, prior to the course only 27% were comfortable caring for patients who distrust the US system and 35% could identify religious beliefs and customs which impact care. Most (71% believed that the training would help them give better care for patients from different cultures, and 63% felt more comfortable negotiating a treatment plan following the course. Conclusions: Multimethod training may improve learners’ confidence and comfort with cross-cultural encounters, as well as lay the foundation for ongoing learning. Follow-up is needed to assess whether residents’ perceived comfort will translate into improved patient outcomes.

  16. Program Directors' Responses to a Survey on Variables Used To Select Residents in a Time of Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Norma E.; Suriano, J. Robert

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 794 program directors in 14 specialties assessed actual and projected changes in the selection process for medical residents and determined the relative weights the directors assigned to personal and academic criteria. Results indicate significant changes in the selection process, including a continuing decrease in residency positions…

  17. Cirurgia colorretal videolaparoscópica: experiência inicial na abordagem de 90 pacientes, no Programa de Pós-graduação sensu lato (residência e especialização em Coloproctologia, pelo Grupo de Coloproctologia de Belo Horizonte Videolaparoscopic colorectal surgery: initial report of surgical approach of 90 patients in a Postgraduate Program (residency in Coloproctology by the Group of Coloproctology of Belo Horizonte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Barros Lima Junior

    2011-06-01

    comorbidades (22 casos; 24,4%. A liberação de dieta oral foi de um dia para 49 pacientes (54,5%. Os autores comparam os resultados com a bibliografia correlata.The objective was to undertake a careful review of a sample of 90 patients who underwent laparoscopic colorectal resections through the course of 12 months (May 2009 to May 2010. The average age was 62.1 years, with extremes of 20 and 93 years, mostly female (52 patients; 57.8%. Bowel preparation was performed with Picolax in 53 patients (58.9%; 76 patients underwent colonoscopy and biopsy (84.4%. Colorectal cancer was the most common disease (60 cases; 66.7%, followed by polyps (12 cases; 13.4%, diverticular disease (7 cases; 7.8% and other diseases (11 cases; 12,1%. The surgeries performed were retosigmoidectomy (54 cases; 60.0%, followed by right hemicolectomy (20 cases; 22.2% and others. Most of the surgeries were carried out between 2 and 3 hours (34 cases; 37.8% and between 3 and 4 hours (24 cases; 26.7%, with an average of 203 minutes. In 81 cases, there were anastomosis (90.0%, most mechanical intra-abdominal (55.6% and manual extra-abdominal (25 cases, 27.8%, being the set of circular and linear articulated staplers the most commonly used features (50 cases, 55.6%. Electrocautery was used in 68 patients (75.6%. The most used abdominal incision was Mallard incision (39 cases; 43.4% and median incision (22 cases; 24.4%, being the most common extensions between 6.0 and 10.0 cm (55 cases; 78.6%. There were 12 postoperative complications (13.2%, leading to conversions to laparotomy. The average size of surgical specimens was 33.2 cm, mostly between 21 and 30 cm (51 cases; 56.8%. There were 13 postoperative complications (14.4%, being 11 surgical (12.2% and two clinics (2.2% of which took place three deaths, being two from surgery and one from comorbidities. The mean length of hospital stay was 5.3 days, and 57 patients (63.3% up to 5 days. 28 patients were admitted in the ICU (31.1%, mainly because of

  18. Developing a Communication Curriculum and Workshop for an Internal Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salib, Sherine; Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Chilek, Lindsay A; Mackert, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Learning effective communication is essential for physicians. Effective communication has been shown to affect healthcare outcomes, including patient safety, adherence rates, patient satisfaction, and enhanced teamwork. The importance of these skills has become even more apparent in recent years, with value-based purchasing programs and federal measures of patient satisfaction in the form of Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores becoming an important part of measuring the performance of a healthcare facility. We conducted a communication workshop for internal medicine residents at the University of Texas. Topics covered included the Acknowledge, Introduce, Duration, Explanation, Thank You framework; managing up; resolving conflicts; error disclosure; new medication and discharge counseling; intercultural communication; understanding Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores; and avoiding burnout. Because it would have been logistically difficult to block whole days for the workshop, the various topics were offered to residents during their regular noon conference hour for several consecutive days. After the workshop, the residents completed an anonymous questionnaire regarding their perception of the importance of various aspects of communication in patient care. The majority of the participating residents perceived the various communication skills explored during the workshop to be highly important in patient care. Concurrently, however, most residents believed that they had initially overestimated their knowledge about these various communication issues. Some demographic differences in the responses also were noted. Our findings demonstrate a needs gap and an area of potential improvement in medical education. We anticipate that with the growing understanding of the importance of communication skills in the healthcare setting, there will be an enhanced role for teaching these skills at all levels of

  19. Win/win: creating collaborative training opportunities for behavioral health providers within family medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Nancy Breen; Borresen, Dorothy; Myerholtz, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Integrating behavioral health into primary healthcare offers multiple advantages for patients and health professionals. This model requires a new skill set for all healthcare professionals that is not emphasized in current educational models. The new skills include interprofessional team-based care competencies and expanded patient care competencies. Health professionals must learn new ways to efficiently and effectively address health behavior change, and manage behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety. Learning environments that co-train mental health and primary care professionals facilitate acquisition of both teamwork and patient care competencies for mental health and primary care professional trainees. Family Medicine Residency programs provide an excellent opportunity for co-training. This article serves as a "how to" guide for residency programs interested in developing a co-training program. Necessary steps to establish and maintain a program are reviewed, as well as goals and objectives for a co-training curriculum and strategies to overcome barriers and challenges in co-training models.

  20. Preferences of Residents in Four Northern Alberta Communities Regarding Local Post-Secondary Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Fahy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The western Canadian province of Alberta has used some of the proceeds from exploitation of its extraordinary natural resources to make available a range of post-secondary training and education opportunities to residents. While these provisions appear comprehensive, this study examined how well they actually suit the express needs of the residents of remote, Northern areas of the province, many of them Aboriginal. The literature shows that while Aboriginal people are underrepresented in Canada in university enrollments, they are no longer underrepresented in college or other institutions, suggesting that gains have been made for some residents of rural and remote parts of Canada. Further, when Northern residents (especially Aboriginal males complete advanced training, Statistics Canada reports they are highly successful in employment and income. Access is the pivotal issue, however: leaving the local community to attend training programs elsewhere is often disruptive and unsuccessful. As will be seen, the issue of access arose in this study’s findings with direct implications for distance delivery and support.This study was conducted as part of Athabasca University’s Learning Communities Project (LCP, which sought information about the views and experiences of a broad range of northern Alberta residents concerning their present post-secondary training and education opportunities. The study addresses an acknowledged gap in such information in relation to Canada in comparison with other OECD countries.Results are based on input from 165 individuals, obtained through written surveys (some completed by the researchers in face-to-face exchanges with the respondents, interviews, discussions, and observations, conducted with full-time or part-time residents of the study communities during 2007 and 2008. The four northern Alberta communities studied were Wabasca, Fox Lake, Ft. McKay (sometimes MacKay, and Ft. Chipewyan, totaling just over 6

  1. An Electronic Mail List for a Network of Family Practice Residency Programs: A Good Idea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers Holtrop, Jodi

    2001-12-01

    The use of an electronic mailing list as a means of communication among faculty in a network of university-affiliated family practice residency programs was evaluated. Faculty were automatically subscribed to the list by the list owner. Messages were tracked for one year and a written evaluation survey was sent. Ninety two messages were sent, with 52% of the messages being posted information. While most (65%) survey respondents reported reading 61% or more of the messages, with only 33% ever actually posted at least one message to the list. Given that faculty were automatically subscribed and that there were only 84 total members, the list may have failed to reach a critical mass of active participants. It is concluded that an email list for network faculty did not function as an online discussion group, although it was extremely beneficial as a way of posting information to affiliated residency faculty.

  2. An Electronic Mail List for a Network of Family Practice Residency Programs: A Good Idea?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi Summers Holtrop

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of an electronic mailing list as a means of communication among faculty in a network of university-affiliated family practice residency programs was evaluated. Faculty were automatically subscribed to the list by the list owner. Messages were tracked for one year and a written evaluation survey was sent. Ninety two messages were sent, with 52% of the messages being posted information. While most (65% survey respondents reported reading 61% or more of the messages, with only 33% ever actually posted at least one message to the list. Given that faculty were automatically subscribed and that there were only 84 total members, the list may have failed to reach a critical mass of active participants. It is concluded that an email list for network faculty did not function as an online discussion group, although it was extremely beneficial as a way of posting information to affiliated residency faculty.

  3. Efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin chemotherapy programs as adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer after surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨莉萍

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of 5-fluorouracil and calcium folinatc combined with oxaliplatin(FOLFOX) program with capecitabine regimen combined oxaliplatin(XELOX) program as adjuvant chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer after surgery.

  4. Level of billing as a function of resident documentation and orthopedic subspecialty at an academic multispecialty orthopedic surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, Bobby; Smith, Jordan L

    2012-11-01

    Documentation, coding, and billing for physician-patient encounters have evolved over time and have significant variability. Appropriate and complete documentation of these encounters can contribute to the financial viability of private and academic medical centers. The objectives of this study were to assess the financial effect of documentation on billing and to compare the authors' institution's distribution of billing level compared with Medicare normative data. Four orthopedic surgery subspecialty clinics were evaluated at a university outpatient clinic over a 1-year period. A single full-day clinic per week was used for each subspecialty. Residents dictated the majority of the reports. All reports were transcribed by medical transcriptionists and coded by certified professional coders. The sports medicine subspecialty generated the highest volume of patient clinic visits, followed by foot and ankle, trauma, and spine (Porthopedic practice (P<.01). The estimated loss of revenue from the fewer level 4 reports was $81,281.11 for 1 year. These findings highlight the need for greater educational interventions to improve provider documentation, coding, and billing. The effect of new electronic medical record systems that prompt providers to include key evaluation and management components will likely affect practices and warrant further analysis.

  5. Development of a new valid, reliable, and internationally applicable assessment tool of residents' competence in ophthalmic surgery (an American Ophthalmological Society thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, C; Beaver, Hilary; Gauba, Vinod; Lee, Andrew G; Mayorga, Eduardo; Palis, Gabriela; Saleh, George M

    2013-09-01

    To test the validity and reliability of a new tool for assessing residents' competence in ophthalmic surgery. Changing paradigms of ophthalmic education in the United States have influenced worldwide ophthalmic education and necessitated new methods of assessing resident competence. Accordingly, a new tool for assessing residents' competence in ophthalmic surgery (phacoemulsification) that could be applicable internationally was developed. We hypothesize that this instrument is valid and reliable. A panel of six international content experts adapted a previously published tool for assessing phacoemulsification. The tool (called the International Council of Ophthalmology's Ophthalmology Surgical Competency Assessment Rubric, or ICO-OSCAR:phaco) was reviewed by 12 international content experts for their constructive comments, which were incorporated to ensure content validity. Ten expert cataract surgery teachers then graded six recorded phacoemulsification surgeries with the ICO-OSCAR:phaco to investigate inter-rater reliability. The coefficient alpha statistic (a measure of reliability/internal consistency) for the ICO-OSCAR:phaco as a whole was 0.92, and 17 of its 20 dimensions had alpha coefficients greater than 0.70. The ICO-OSCAR:phaco is a valid and reliable assessment tool that could be applied internationally to satisfy the global need of new instruments to comply with emerging trends in ophthalmic education. A toolbox of similar surgical competency assessment tools is being developed.

  6. The Center for the Holographic Arts Begins a New Artist Workshop and Residency Program in Conjunction with Ohio State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrongovius, Martina; Kagan, Harris; Moree, Sam

    2013-02-01

    This year the Center for the Holographic Arts (Holocenter) kicked off a new Artist Workshop and Residency Program in conjunction with Ohio State University. The newly renovated holography facility houses the Holocenter's pulse laser camera and two recording tables with continuous wave lasers. This facility is being utilized for undergraduate and postgraduate courses in Art and Technology as well as the Artist Workshop and Residency Program.

  7. A Case Study of the Impact of a Sytematic Evaluation Process in a Graduate Medical Education Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromrei, Heidi T.

    2014-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has charged institutions that sponsor accredited Graduate Medical Education programs (residency and fellowship specialty programs) with overseeing implementation of mandatory annual program evaluation efforts to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. Physicians receive scant, if…

  8. Something Larger than Ourselves: Redefining the Young Artists at Work Program as an Art-as-Activism Residency for Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Laurel

    2014-01-01

    The Young Artists at Work Program at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA) recently shifted its model from an afterschool arts program to a young artists' residency. This decision arose from a desire to reposition the youth program as a priority within the larger organization, coupled with a commitment to deepening the pedagogical values of…

  9. The Influence of an Orthopedic, Manual Therapy Residency Program on Improved Knowledge, Psychomotor Skills, and Clinical Reasoning in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Shala; McFelea, Joni

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the influence of a post-graduate orthopedic manual therapy residency program in Kenya on the development of physical therapists' (PTs) knowledge and clinical reasoning related to the performance of a musculoskeletal examination and evaluation as compared to an experience-matched control group of PTs waiting to enter the program. A cross-sectional design was utilized in which 12 graduating residents and 10 PTs entering the residency program completed a live-patient practical examination to assess the knowledge, clinical reasoning, and psychomotor skills related to the examination and evaluation of musculoskeletal conditions. The assessment utilized was based on the tasks, procedures, and knowledge areas identified as important to advanced clinicians in the US as outlined by the Orthopaedic Description of Specialty Practice. Inclusion criteria included participation in or acceptance to the residency program, practice as a PT between 3 and 25 years, and 50% of workday being involved in direct patient care. Overall pass rates were analyzed using the Pearson chi-square and Fisher's exact tests to determine if the graduating residents achieved significantly higher scores than experience-matched controls consisting of PTs entering the residency program. PTs completing a post-graduate orthopedic manual therapy residency in Nairobi, Kenya, achieved higher scores and passing rates compared to their colleagues who had not completed a residency program as determined by a live-patient practical examination. Graduating residents demonstrated statistically significant higher scores in the categories of examination, evaluation, and diagnosis. The average live-patient practical examination score for PTs without residency training was 38.2%, and their pass rate was 0.0%. The average live-patient practical examination score for residency-trained PTs was 83.4%, and their pass rate was 92.3%. These findings are statistically significant (p

  10. Integrity of the National Resident Matching Program for Radiation Oncology: National Survey of Applicant Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holliday, Emma B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Thomas, Charles R., E-mail: thomasch@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Kusano, Aaron S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the experiences of radiation oncology applicants and to evaluate the prevalence of behaviors that may be in conflict with established ethical standards. Methods and Materials: An anonymous survey was sent to all 2013 applicants to a single domestic radiation oncology residency program through the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). Questions included demographics, survey of observed behaviors, and opinions regarding the interview and matching process. Descriptive statistics were presented. Characteristics and experiences of respondents who matched were compared with those who did not match. Results: Questionnaires were returned by 87 of 171 applicants for a 51% response rate. Eighty-two questionnaires were complete and included for analysis. Seventy-eight respondents (95.1%) reported being asked at least 1 question in conflict with the NRMP code of conduct. When asked where else they were interviewing, 64% stated that this query made them uncomfortable. Forty-five respondents (54.9%) reported unsolicited post-interview contact by programs, and 31 (37.8%) felt pressured to give assurances. Fifteen respondents (18.3%) reported being told their rank position or that they were “ranked to match” prior to Match day, with 27% of those individuals indicating this information influenced how they ranked programs. Half of respondents felt applicants often made dishonest or misleading assurances, one-third reported that they believed their desired match outcome could be improved by deliberately misleading programs, and more than two-thirds felt their rank position could be improved by having faculty from their home institutions directly contact programs on their behalf. Conclusions: Radiation oncology applicants report a high prevalence of behaviors in conflict with written NRMP policies. Post-interview communication should be discouraged in order to enhance fairness and support the professional development of future

  11. Perceived realism and Twitter use are associated with increased acceptance of cosmetic surgery among those watching reality television cosmetic surgery programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Joshua; King, Kahlil

    2014-08-01

    Reality television programming is a popular type of television programming, and features shows about cosmetic surgery. Social media such as Facebook and Twitter are increasingly popular methods of sharing information. The authors surveyed college students to determine among those watching reality television cosmetic surgery programs whether perceived realism or social media use was associated with attitudes toward cosmetic surgery. Participants (n=126) were surveyed about their reality television cosmetic surgery program viewing habits, their perception of the realism of reality television programming, and social media topics of Twitter and Facebook. Outcome variables were the Acceptance of Cosmetic Surgery Scales of social, intrapersonal, and consider. Perceived realism was significantly associated with increased scores on the Acceptance of Cosmetic Surgery Scale subscales of social (p=0.004), intrapersonal (p=0.03), and consider (p=0.03). Following a character from a reality television program on Twitter was significantly associated with increased social scores (p=0.04). There was no significant association of Facebook behavior with attitudes toward cosmetic surgery. Cosmetic plastic surgeons may benefit by advertising their services on cosmetic surgery reality television programs. These reality television programs portray cosmetic surgery in a positive manner, and viewers with increased perceived realism will be a potential receptive audience toward such advertising. Also, advertising cosmetic surgery services on Twitter feeds that discuss cosmetic surgery reality television programs would be potentially beneficial.

  12. An economic analysis of a safe resident handling program in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Supriya; Latif, Saira; Punnett, Laura

    2013-04-01

    Occupational injuries, especially back problems related to resident handling, are common in nursing home employees and their prevention may require substantial up-front investment. This study evaluated the economics of a safe resident handling program (SRHP), in a large chain of skilled nursing facilities, from the corporation's perspective. The company provided data on program costs, compensation claims, and turnover rates (2003-2009). Workers' compensation and turnover costs before and after the intervention were compared against investment costs using the "net-cost model." Among 110 centers, the overall benefit-to-cost ratio was 1.7-3.09 and the payback period was 1.98-1.06 year (using alternative turnover cost estimates). The average annualized net savings per bed for the 110 centers (using company based turnover cost estimates) was $143, with a 95% confidence interval of $22-$264. This was very similar to the average annualized net savings per full time equivalent (FTE) staff member, which was $165 (95% confidence interval $22-$308). However, at 49 centers costs exceeded benefits. Decreased costs of worker injury compensation claims and turnover appear at least partially attributable to the SRHP. Future research should examine center-specific factors that enhance program success, and improve measures of turnover costs and healthcare productivity. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Development of a diabetes care management curriculum in a family practice residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuovo, Jim; Balsbaugh, Thomas; Barton, Sue; Davidson, Ellen; Fox-Garcia, Jane; Gandolfo, Angela; Levich, Bridget; Seibles, Joann

    2004-01-01

    Improving the quality of care for patients with chronic illness has become a high priority. Implementing training programs in disease management (DM) so the next generation of physicians can manage chronic illness more effectively is challenging. Residency training programs have no specific mandate to implement DM training. Additional barriers at the training facility include: 1) lack of a population-based perspective for service delivery; 2) weak support for self-management of illness; 3) incomplete implementation due to physician resistance or inertia; and 4) few incentives to change practices and behaviors. In order to overcome these barriers, training programs must take the initiative to implement DM training that addresses each of these issues. We report the implementation of a chronic illness management curriculum based on the Improving Chronic Illness Care (ICIC) Model. Features of this process included both patient care and learner objectives. These were: development of a multidisciplinary diabetes DM team; development of a patient registry; development of diabetes teaching clinics in the family practice center (nutrition, general management classes, and one-on-one teaching); development of a group visit model; and training the residents in the elements of the ICIC Model, ie, the community, the health system, self-management support, delivery system design, decision support, and clinical information systems. Barriers to implementing these curricular changes were: the development of a patient registry; buy-in from faculty, residents, clinic leadership, staff, and patients for the chronic care model; the ability to bill for services and maintain clinical productivity; and support from the health system key stakeholders for sustainability. Unique features of each training site will dictate differences in emphasis and structure; however, the core principles of the ICIC Model in enhancing self-management may be generalized to all sites.

  14. Required and Elective Experiences During the 4th Year: An Analysis of ACGME Accredited Psychiatry Residency Program Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestal, Heather S; Belitsky, Richard; Bernstein, Carol A; Chaukos, Deanna; Cohen, Mitchell B; Dickstein, Leah J; Hilty, Donald M; Hutner, Lucy; Sakman, Ferda; Scheiber, Stephen C; Wrzosek, Marika I; Silberman, Edward K

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess and describe required and elective components of the 4th post-graduate year (PGY4) in psychiatry residency programs. We reviewed the websites of all 193 2014-2015 ACGME accredited psychiatry residency programs for content describing the specific components of the PGY4 year. Nearly all residency programs (99 %) had some form of required experiences during the PGY4 year. Ninety-four percent had clinical requirements for PGY4 residents, with longitudinal outpatient clinic being the most common (77 %). All programs offered some elective time during PGY4, but the amount of time ranged from 2 months to 100 %. Virtually all residency programs include some requirements in the 4th year (most commonly didactics and outpatient clinic) in addition to a broad array of elective experiences. Although 3 years may suffice for residents to complete ACGME requirements, a variety of factors may motivate programs to include required 4th year curricula. Future studies should explore the rationales for and possible benefits of programmatic requirements throughout 4 versus only 3 years of psychiatric training.

  15. In the SOAP: the Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program (SOAP) from the perspective of a Community Hospital Residency

    OpenAIRE

    Detterline, Stephanie; Ferguson, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    The Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program (SOAP) was developed by the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) as a way to modernize and streamline the ‘Scramble’ process for unfilled positions during Match Week of the Main Residency Match. As we all know, competition for residency spots is becoming more fierce, and the number of total unmatched applicants to PGY-1 positions (8,794 in 2010) continues to rise as unfilled PGY-1 positions (1,060 in 2010) continue to fall (1). Historically,...

  16. A framework for quality improvement and patient safety education in radiation oncology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Anamaria; Greenwalt, Julie

    2015-01-01

    In training future radiation oncologists, we must begin to focus on training future QI specialists. Our patients are demanding better quality and safer care, and accrediting bodies are requiring it. We must equip radiation oncology trainees to be leaders in this new world. To that end, a QI/PS educational program should contain 2 components: a didactic portion focused on teaching basic QI tools as well as an overview of the quality and safety goals of the institution, and an experiential component, ideally a resident-led QI project mentored by an expert faculty member and that is linked to the department's and institution's goals.

  17. An art therapy in-service program model for medical students and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rebecca Beers

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the author's experience implementing an art therapy in-service program into the training of medical students and residents in an urban hospital teaching facility. Emphasis is placed on specific aspects of planning and implementation, including formal and informal assessment, as well as methods of engaging medical students in art therapy experientials relevant to their experience as helping professionals. Benefits and challenges encountered throughout the process are also discussed. This paper is based on a presentation given at the 36th annual American Art Therapy Association conference.

  18. Open-heart Surgery Complications Following Programmed Education and Nurses' Clinical Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Rakhshan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart surgery can lead to certain complications that, if not diagnosed and treated on time, can be fatal. In view of the fact that nurses' clinical competence affects the quality of clinical judgment, the present study aimed to explore the effect of programmed education and nurses' clinical competence on complications following open-heart surgeries. The results of the present study showed that a closer attention to regular and programmed education and informing of open-heart surgery patients, especially before surgery and at the time of discharge, along with the clinical competence of nurses in ICUs, can reduce the incidence of post-surgery complications. Since the nurses' clinical competence greatly affects their clinical judgments and quality of care, paying greater attention to the nurses' education through systematic programs and increasing the clinical competence can lead to fewer post-heart-surgery complications; this, in turn, reduces the length of stay and the ensuing costs.

  19. Taking a unified approach to teaching and implementing quality improvements across multiple residency programs: the Atlantic Health experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Donna M; Casey, Donald E; Levine, Jeffrey L; Kaye, Susan T; Dardik, Raquel B; Varkey, Prathibha; Pierce-Boggs, Kimberly

    2009-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education recently emphasized the importance of systems-based practice and systems-based learning; however, successful models of collaborative quality improvement (QI) initiatives in residency training curricula are not widely available. Atlantic Health successfully conceptualized and implemented a QI collaborative focused on medication safety across eight residency training programs representing 219 residents. During a six-month period, key faculty and resident leaders from 8 (of 10) Atlantic Health residency training programs participated in three half-day collaborative learning sessions focused on improving medication reconciliation. Each session included didactic presentations from a multidisciplinary team of clinical experts as well as the application of principles that identified challenges, barriers, and solutions to QI initiatives. The learning sessions emphasized the fundamental principles of medication reconciliation, its critical importance as a vital part of patient handoff in all health care settings, and the challenges of achieving successful medication reconciliation improvement in light of work hours restrictions and patient loads. Each residency program developed a detailed implementation and measurement plan for individual "action learning" projects, using the Plan-Do-Study-Act method of improvement. Each program then implemented its QI project, and expert faculty (e.g., physicians, nurses, pharmacists, QI staff) provided mentoring between learning sessions. Several projects resulted in permanent changes in medication reconciliation processes, which were then adopted by other programs. The structure, process, and outcomes of this effort are described in detail.

  20. The American Society of Maxillofacial Surgery Preceptorship Program: A Product of the 2013 American Society of Maxillofacial Surgery Executive Board Strategy Session and Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papay, Francis; Taub, Peter J; Doumit, Gaby; Flores, Roberto L; Kuang, Anna A; Mlynek, Karolina; Tadisina, Kashyap K; Gharb, Bahar Bassiri

    2015-06-01

    One of the main goals of the American Society of Maxillofacial Surgery (ASMS) is to develop educational programs that increase expertise in maxillofacial surgery. We describe the outline of the new ASMS Preceptorship Program, a collective effort by ASMS members to increase access to all areas of maxillofacial surgery. Furthermore, we discuss the original survey pertinent to the development of this program, the results of the survey, and specifics regarding the structure of the program. We hope for the preceptorship program to be an excellent resource for members to mentor one another, develop intellectual and academic curiosity, provide avenues for collaboration, and further the ASMS's role in shaping maxillofacial surgery into the future.

  1. Ohio osteopathic residency directors' self-reported administrative knowledge and skills before and after participation in an administrative training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Olivia Ojano; Brannan, Grace

    2013-04-01

    Residency directors require myriad skills to perform their jobs efficiently. However, many residency directors receive no training prior to obtaining their positions. To determine the effectiveness of the Residency Directors Residency Administration Program (RD RAP)--a 1-year fellowship training program for Ohio osteopathic residency directors sponsored by the Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine/Centers for Osteopathic Research and Education--by measuring the administrative knowledge and skills of Ohio osteopathic residency directors before and after completion of the program. The authors administered a 54-item self-assessment instrument to RD RAP participants before and after the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 programs. The assessment asked participants to rank their knowledge and skills in administration on a 5-point Likert scale, with lower values indicating higher knowledge and skills. We analyzed data from the pre- and postprogram assessments by using the Wilcoxon signed rank nonparametric test. The 54 assessment items were categorized into 10 content domains. Ten RD RAP participants completed the assessments. Median scores were statistically significantly lower for each of the 10 content domains after the RD RAP program. The content domain with the greatest change between pre- and postprogram assessment Likert scale scores was Legal Issues in Residency Training, with a median change of 1.7 (P=.007). Role of Program Directors, Personality, and Professional Development had the smallest change in pre- and postprogram assessment Likert scores, with a median change of 0.8 (P=.011). Statistically significant improvements were found in the osteopathic residency directors' self-reported administrative knowledge and skills after participation in the RD RAP.

  2. Drug Testing Incoming Residents and Medical Students in Family Medicine Training: A Survey of Program Policies and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Paul F; Semelka, Michael W; Bigdeli, Laleh

    2015-03-01

    Despite well-established negative consequences, high rates of substance use and related disorders continue to be reported. Physicians in training are not immune from this, or the associated risks to their health and careers, while impaired physicians are a threat to patient safety. We surveyed family medicine residency programs' practices relating to drug testing of medical students and incoming residents. The survey asked about the extent to which residency programs are confronted with trainees testing positive for prohibited substances, and how they respond. The survey was sent to the directors of family medicine residency programs. A total of 205 directors (47.2%) completed the survey. A majority of the responding programs required drug testing for incoming residents (143, 68.9%). Most programs did not require testing of medical students (161, 81.7%). Few programs reported positive drug tests among incoming residents (9, 6.5%), and there was only 1 reported instance of a positive result among medical students (1, 3.3%). Respondents reported a range of responses to positive results, with few reporting that they would keep open training spots or offer supportive services for a medical student who tested positive. Changing laws legalizing certain drugs may require corresponding changes in the focus on drug testing and associated issues in medical training; however, many residency program directors were not aware of their institution's current policies. Programs will need to reexamine drug testing policies as new generations of physicians, growing up under altered legal circumstances concerning drug use, progress to clinical training.

  3. Using optimization models to demonstrate the need for structural changes in training programs for surgical medical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jonathan; Kim, Kibaek; Mehrotra, Sanjay; DaRosa, Debra A; Daskin, Mark S; Rodriguez, Heron E

    2013-09-01

    The primary goal of a residency program is to prepare trainees for unsupervised care. Duty hour restrictions imposed throughout the prior decade require that residents work significantly fewer hours. Moreover, various stakeholders (e.g. the hospital, mentors, other residents, educators, and patients) require them to prioritize very different activities, often conflicting with their learning goals. Surgical residents' learning goals include providing continuity throughout a patient's pre-, peri-, and post-operative care as well as achieving sufficient surgical experience levels in various procedure types and participating in various formal educational activities, among other things. To complicate matters, senior residents often compete with other residents for surgical experience. This paper features experiments using an optimization model and a real dataset. The experiments test the viability of achieving the above goals at a major academic center using existing models of delivering medical education and training to surgical residents. It develops a detailed multi-objective, two-stage stochastic optimization model with anticipatory capabilities solved over a rolling time horizon. A novel feature of the models is the incorporation of learning curve theory in the objection function. Using a deterministic version of the model, we identify bounds on the achievement of learning goals under existing training paradigms. The computational results highlight the structural problems in the current surgical resident educational system. These results further corroborate earlier findings and suggest an educational system redesign is necessary for surgical medical residents.

  4. Considerations for Residency Programs Regarding Accepting Undocumented Students Who Are DACA Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Sunny; Rojas Marquez, Denisse; Di Bartolo, Isha Marina; Rodriguez, Raquel

    2017-05-30

    The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) initiative provides for the temporary deferral of enforcement of immigration laws for certain undocumented individuals brought to the United States before age 16. More than 50 medical schools now consider applicants who are DACA recipients, and medical school graduates with DACA are eligible to continue their training in graduate medical education. In this article, the authors summarize current policy and provide data on DACA recipients in medical school. They then review the implications for considering DACA recipients in graduate medical education, including employment guidelines, employer responsibilities, training at Veterans Affairs facilities, research funding, and professional licensure. They conclude by discussing the future of the DACA program and best practices for supporting students who are DACA recipients.First, there are no employment restrictions for DACA recipients with valid work authorization documents as long as their employers use Form I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification. Second, unlike H-1B or J-1 visa holders, DACA recipients do not generate additional immigration-related costs for their residency programs. Next, provisions in the Civil Rights Act prohibit employers from discriminating against applicants based on national origin or, in some cases, citizenship status. Furthermore, trainees with DACA are eligible to rotate through Veterans Affairs facilities. Finally, some states, like California and New York, have adopted policies and regulations allowing trainees with DACA who meet all professional requirements to receive a medical license. Given this state of affairs, DACA recipients should have equal standing to their peers when being evaluated for residency positions.

  5. Nephrology elective experience during medical residency: a national survey of US nephrology fellowship training program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hitesh H; Adams, Nancy Day; Mattana, Joseph; Kadiyala, Aditya; Jhaveri, Kenar D

    2015-07-01

    Interest in nephrology careers continues to decline in the United States. The reasons for this declining interest are not fully understood but it is plausible that inadequate exposure to the full spectrum of what a career in nephrology encompasses may be part of the explanation. Inpatient-based nephrology electives have been a common venue for residents to gain exposure to nephrology but little is known regarding the details of such electives and how often they include outpatient experiences. We carried out a national survey of nephrology fellowship training program directors to obtain data on the content of nephrology elective experiences as well as their ideas on how to promote interest in the field. The survey revealed the majority of elective experiences to be either exclusively or heavily inpatient based, with only a small percentage having a substantial outpatient component, particularly in outpatient dialysis or transplantation. Training program directors felt that providing greater outpatient experiences to residents during elective rotations would be an effective means to promote interest in nephrology, along with structured faculty mentoring. Our findings suggest that current approaches to the nephrology elective experience are heavily inpatient-based and might benefit from incorporating much more of the rich spectrum of activities a career in nephrology entails. Hopefully such efforts can create and enhance interest in careers in nephrology and potentially begin a sustained reversal of an unfortunate and serious decline in interest.

  6. Postural balance and falls in elderly nursing home residents enrolled in a ballroom dancing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Borges, Eliane Gomes; de Souza Vale, Rodrigo Gomes; Cader, Samária Ali; Leal, Silvania; Miguel, Francisco; Pernambuco, Carlos Soares; Dantas, Estélio H M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of a ballroom dancing program on the postural balance of institutionalized elderly residents. The sample consisted of 59 sedentary elderly residents of long-stay institutions who were randomly assigned to a ballroom dancing experimental group (EG, n=30) or a control group (CG, n=29). The ballroom dancing program consisted of three 50-min sessions each week on alternate days over a 12-week period. The dances included the foxtrot, waltz, rumba, swing, samba and bolero. The medical records of the subjects were reviewed to determine the number of falls they experienced in the three months prior to the intervention. Postural static balance was assessed using a Lizard (Med. EU., Italy, 2010) stabilometric and posturometric platform. Only patients in the EG lost a significant amount of weight (Δ=-2.85 kg) when comparing the pre- and post-test postural balance assessments. The intergroup comparison revealed a reduced lower limb weight distribution difference in the EG post-test compared to the CG post-test (p=0.012). In the intragroup comparison, the EG patients experienced significantly fewer falls post-test relative to pre-test (pfalls in the EG post-test compared to the CG post-test (pfalls in this elderly population.

  7. From Blue to Green: The Development and Implementation of a Therapeutic Horticulture Program for Residents of a Battered Women's Shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzetti, Claire M; Follingstad, Diane R

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic services to clients is influenced by service providers' understanding of the "fit" of a specific program with their service mandate as well as their perceptions of the potential benefits of the program. This article discusses the development and implementation of a therapeutic horticulture (TH) program at a battered women's shelter that serves 17 counties in Central Kentucky. Through semistructured interviews, we gauge the shelter staff's perceptions of the relationship of the TH program to the shelter's overall mission; their sense of the program's benefits for residents, for the shelter as a community organization, and for themselves; and their concerns about the TH program. We consider how these findings may impact future programming at the shelter, and we discuss plans for further evaluation of the TH program in terms of its impact on shelter residents' long-term outcomes.

  8. A novel approach to assessing technical competence of colorectal surgery residents: the development and evaluation of the Colorectal Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (COSATS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Montbrun, Sandra L; Roberts, Patricia L; Lowry, Ann C; Ault, Glenn T; Burnstein, Marcus J; Cataldo, Peter A; Dozois, Eric J; Dunn, Gary D; Fleshman, James; Isenberg, Gerald A; Mahmoud, Najjia N; Reznick, Richard K; Satterthwaite, Lisa; Schoetz, David; Trudel, Judith L; Weiss, Eric G; Wexner, Steven D; MacRae, Helen

    2013-12-01

    To develop and evaluate an objective method of technical skills assessment for graduating subspecialists in colorectal (CR) surgery-the Colorectal Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (COSATS). It may be reasonable for the public to assume that surgeons certified as competent have had their technical skills assessed. However, technical skill, despite being the hallmark of a surgeon, is not directly assessed at the time of certification by surgical boards. A procedure-based, multistation technical skills examination was developed to reflect a sample of the range of skills necessary for CR surgical practice. These consisted of bench, virtual reality, and cadaveric models. Reliability and construct validity were evaluated by comparing 10 graduating CR residents with 10 graduating general surgery (GS) residents from across North America. Expert CR surgeons, blinded to level of training, evaluated performance using a task-specific checklist and a global rating scale. The mean global rating score was used as the overall examination score and a passing score was set at "borderline competent for CR practice." The global rating scale demonstrated acceptable interstation reliability (0.69) for a homogeneous group of examinees. Both the overall checklist and global rating scores effectively discriminated between CR and GS residents (P Technical Skill effectively discriminated between CR and GS residents. With further validation, the Colorectal Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill could be incorporated into the colorectal board examination where it would be the first attempt of a surgical specialty to formally assess technical skill at the time of certification.

  9. NON-MUSCULOSKELETAL SPORTS MEDICINE LEARNING IN FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENCY PROGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualino Caputo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing popularity of primary care sports medicine fellowships, as evidenced by the more than two-fold increase in family medicine sports medicine fellowships from a total of 31 accredited programs during the 1998/1999 academic year (ACGME, 1998 to 63 during the 2003/2004 academic year (ACGME, 2006, there are few empirical studies to support the efficacy of such programs. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have been conducted to assess the impact of primary care sports medicine fellowships on family medicine residents' learning of non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics. Rigorous evaluations of the outcomes of such programs are helpful to document the value of such programs to both the lay public and interested medical residents. In order to evaluate such programs, it is helpful to apply the same objective standards to residents trained across multiple programs. Hence, we would like to know if there is a learning effect with respect to non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics identified on yearly administered American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM in-training exams (ITE to family medicine residents in family medicine residency programs in the United States with and without primary care sports medicine fellowship programs. Review and approval for the research proposal was granted by the ABFM, who also allowed access to the required data. Permission to study and report only non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics excluding musculoskeletal topics was granted at the time due to other ongoing projects at the ABFM involving musculoskeletal topics. ABFM allowed us access to examinations from 1998 to 2003. We were given copies of each exam and records of responses to each item (correct or incorrect by each examinee (examinees were anonymous for each year.For each year, each examinee was classified by the ABFM as either (a belonging to a program that contained a sports medicine fellowship, or (b not belonging to a program

  10. [Video-assisted thoracic sympathectomy - the results from a center outpatient surgery program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    R Velho, Tiago; Junqueira, Nádia; Sena, André; Guerra, Nuno; Caldeira, João; Gallego, Javier; Nobre, Ângelo

    2016-01-01

    The outpatient surgery program from our department has started in 2014 to improve patient access to surgery and to reduce the surgical waitlist. Focused on the thoracic surgery, the most common intervention is the surgical treatment of primary hyperhidrosis by thoracic sympathectomy by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). It is performed according to the patient's symptoms, with section or application of surgical clips between R2-R5. Retrospective study including all the patients submitted to thoracic sympathectomy by video- -assisted thoracoscopy surgery from our department's outpatient surgery program from January 2014 to January 2016. In our outpatient program we performed 198 thoracic sympathectomy by VATS. The mean age of the patients was 32,8 years old. 63,6% of the patients were females and 36.4% were males. From the 198 endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy performed, 181 (91,4%) were performed bilatellary with section between R3-R5, 12 (6,1%) were performed with the application of surgical clips in R2-R4 and 3 (1.5%) could not be performed due to the presence of pleuropulmonary adhesions. One of the patients was re-operated due to recurrent symptoms and another patients had surgery to remove the surgical clips (bilaterally in R2) due to exaggerated abdominal compensatory hyperhidrosis. Three patients had pneumothorax. The surgical treatment of primary hyperhidrosis was the most frequent procedure in our outpatient surgery program. The procedure without the use of a thoracic drainage allowed its inclusion in the outpatient surgery program. Excluding 3 patients, all the patients were discharged within 12 hours after the surgery. The good results and the reduction of the surgical waitlist encourage the cardiothoracic outpatient surgery program.

  11. Cirurgias êntero-colorretais: abordagem cirúrgica de 129 pacientes do SUS no Programa de Pós-Graduação Sensu Lato em coloproctologia Abdominal entero-colorectal surgery: surgical approach of 129 patients from a public health service from a Post Graduate Program (Residency in coloproctology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Guimarães Oliveira

    2010-09-01

    ,7% foram decorrentes de co-morbidades.In the framework of postgraduate Coloproctology for the year 2009, the two graduate students conducted the second year as principal surgeons, 129 major surgeries, always assisted effectively by one or two tutors. All surgeries were performed on public patients in Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte, with absolute presence of members of the Coloproctology Unit of Santa Casa School of Medical Sciences of Minas Gerais (GCP-CBHS-FCMMG. A retrospective analysis of 129 medical records was carried out, allowing several important observations. The average age of patients was 56.9 years, with extremes of 25 and 87 years, while the sixth and seventh decades the most representative, with respectively 25.6% and 24.8% to 50.4% of 55 patients (p 0.05. The most common nosological entity was colorectal cancer (74 cases, 57.4%, following the ileostomies (16 cases, 12.4% and surgical complications of previous surgeries (11 cases, 8.5%. The most commonly performed procedures were abdominal rectosigmoidectomy with colorectal anastomosis (35 cases, 27.1%, the right hemicolectomy with ileo-transverse anastomosis (20 cases, 15.5% and the resumption of intestinal transit of ileostomy (16 cases, 12, 4%. Of 129 surgeries 53 (41.1% did not involve anastomosis and 76 (58.9% involved intestinal resection and anastomosis. There were eight co-morbidities (6.2% and cachexia (three cases the most common. There were 17 complications (13.2%, 11 involving the 76 resections with anastomosis (14.5% and six resections without anastomosis (11.3%. The most common complications among the 11 patients from resection and anastomosis were dehiscence (seven, 9.2%. The mechanical anastomosis (55 developed more complications (16.3% than handmade anastomosis (21 (9.5%. There were 14 deaths (10.8%, six (4.6% due to sepsis, four (3.1% due to pulmonary thromboembolic disease and four (3.1% due to multiple organ failure. Of the 14 deaths, four (3.1% were due to surgical complications and ten (7

  12. Residency Allocation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Residency Allocation Database is used to determine allocation of funds for residency programs offered by Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Information...

  13. The surgical residency baby boom: changing patterns of childbearing during residency over a 30-year span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caitlin; Galante, Joseph M; Pierce, Jonathan L; Scherer, Lynette A

    2013-12-01

    Birthrates during surgical residency appear to be rising. One assumption is that this is due to changes in the structure of surgical residencies. The purpose of our study was to explore whether an increase in birthrates has occurred and the reasons for this. We conducted an anonymous survey of current residents and alumni from 1976 to 2009 at a single university-based surgery training program. Alumni (46 of 116) and current residents (38 of 51) were surveyed, and our response rate was approximately 50% (84 of 167). Respondents were grouped into cohorts based on their residency start year. The early cohort consisted of residents starting residency between 1976 and 1999, and the late cohort consisted of residents starting residency between 2000 and 2009. The percentage of male residents with children during residency training was similar for the early and late cohorts (34% [10 of 29] versus 41% [9 of 22]). For female residents, there was a substantial increase in childbearing for the late cohort (7% [1 of 15] versus 35% [6 of 18]). Fifty-two percent (44 of 84) of the respondents who had children during residency reported that work hours and schedule had a negative effect on their decision to have children. Most respondents reported that availability or cost of child care, impact on residency, support from the program, increased length of training, or availability of family leave did not factor as concerns. Childbearing during residency has increased in female residents in our study. Surgical residency programs may need to accommodate this change if they want to continue to recruit and retain talented residents.

  14. A Graduate Program in Institutional Pharmacy Management Leading to an MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA and Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jan N.; Lipman, Arthur G.

    1981-01-01

    A combined program leading to the MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA, and Certificate of Residency in Hospital Pharmacy established at the University of Utah in 1978 is described. The program provides coursework in both hospital pharmacy and management plus practical experience in hospital pharmacy practice management. (Author/MLW)

  15. The Effects of a Life Review Program on Disorientation, Social Interaction and Self-Esteem of Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabourne, Carla E. S.

    1995-01-01

    Examined the effects on veteran and novice participants of a life review program for nursing home residents with Alzheimers disease or severe cognitive dysfunction. Results confirm the impact of the Life Review Program on level of disorientation, social interaction, and life review. Evidence suggests that life improvements may be stored in memory…

  16. A Graduate Program in Institutional Pharmacy Management Leading to an MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA and Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jan N.; Lipman, Arthur G.

    1981-01-01

    A combined program leading to the MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA, and Certificate of Residency in Hospital Pharmacy established at the University of Utah in 1978 is described. The program provides coursework in both hospital pharmacy and management plus practical experience in hospital pharmacy practice management. (Author/MLW)

  17. The Power of the Arts: Evaluating a Community Artist-in-Residence Program through the Lens of Studio Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter-Doniger, Tracey; Berlinsky, Robin

    2017-01-01

    This article takes an analytical look at Engaging Creative Minds, a pilot community program geared to enrich learning of common core standards through a local artist-in-residence partnership with public schools. This program was designed to increase the level of engagement and student growth in classes that typically relied on rote memory and…

  18. Resultados da cirurgia para otospongiose com dois tipos de prótese em procedimentos realizados por residentes Results of stapes surgery for otosclerosis with two kinds of prothesis in residency training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Dall'Igna

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A cirurgia do estapédio é um dos tratamentos indicados para a melhora da surdez condutiva secundária à otospongiose. O procedimento requer habilidade e experiência do cirurgião e faz parte do treinamento durante a residência médica. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar qual tipo de prótese (teflon ou mista de metal e aço apresenta melhores os resultados auditivos em cirurgias realizadas por residentes e a incidência de complicações. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Foram avaliadas retrospectivamente 189 intervenções cirúrgicas que tiveram participação ativa de residentes, comparando-se os dois tipos de prótese utilizados. Os resultados audiométricos foram analisados conforme orientação do Committee on Hearing and Equilibrium e segundo o Amsterdam Hearing Evaluation Plots. RESULTADOS: O gap aéreo-ósseo diminuiu em média 21,90 dB (pStapes surgery is one of the approaches indicated to treat conductive hearing loss secondary to otosclerosis. The procedures requires skill and experience from the surgeon and is part of medical residency training. AIMS: To assess which type of prosthesis (Teflon or metal/steel presents the best results in surgeries performed by residents and the incidence of complications. MATERIALS AND METHODS: we retrospectively assessed 189 interventions that counted on the active participation of resident physicians, and we compared the two types of prosthesis used. Audiometric results were analyzed following the guidelines from the Committee on Hearing and Equilibrium and also according to the Amsterdam Hearing Evaluation Plots. RESULTS: Bone-air gap reduced in an average value of 21.90 dB (p<0.05 after the surgery in the group that received the Teflon prosthesis and 21.37 dB (p<0.05 in the group that received the mixed prosthesis, and gain in SRI was of 22.33 and 26.10 dB (p<0.05, and the air-bone gap was below 20 dB in 80.6% and 85.04%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We did not see differences in the audiometry and in the incidence of

  19. Effect of six sigma program on the number of surgeries cancellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheysari, Esmat; Yousefi, Hojatollah; Soleymani, Hossain; Mojdeh, Soheila

    2016-01-01

    Today, the rate of surgeries is increasing, but surgeries are canceled due to various reasons. Unexpected cancellation of surgeries not only results in disorder in the operating room schedule, but also causes stress for patients and their family and increases costs. We determined the number and causes of surgery cancellations and areas for improvement. This outcome evaluation of Six Sigma program was conducted on 850 cases after the implementation of the program and compared to that of 850 cases which received routine care before the program. Cases were selected through easy sampling during the study. Before the implementation, the number of cancellations was recorded daily and their reasons were investigated. Then, Six Sigma program was implemented in accordance with the reasons for each category and necessary steps were taken to prevent the cancellation of surgeries. Data were collected for 3 months using a three-section data collection form. For data analysis, distribution and relative frequency and chi-square test were used. The three categories of patient, physician, and hospital system were identified as the main causes. The highest rate of cancellation was related to ENT surgeries (74.19%). No cancellations were made in orology surgeries. The implementation of the Six Sigma program caused a significant difference in surgery cancellation (P = 0.003); 31 (3.6%) cases of cancellation were reduced to 12 (1.4%) cases. The results showed that Six Sigma program is a pre-surgery care quality improvement program. Patient education and the implementation of the 6 sigma program can be effective in reducing the rate of cancellation of operations.

  20. Training Program for Cardiology Residents to Perform Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Examination with Portable Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Vicente N; Mancuso, Frederico J N; Campos, Orlando; De Paola, Angelo A; Carvalho, Antonio C; Moises, Valdir A

    2015-10-01

    Training requirements for general cardiologists without echocardiographic expertise to perform focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU) with portable devices have not yet been defined. The objective of this study was to evaluate a training program to instruct cardiology residents to perform FCU with a hand-carried device (HCD) in different clinical settings. Twelve cardiology residents were subjected to a 50-question test, 4 lectures on basic echocardiography and imaging interpretation, the supervised interpretation of 50 echocardiograms and performance of 30 exams using HCD. After this period, they repeated the written test and were administered a practical test comprising 30 exams each (360 patients) in different clinical settings. They reported on 15 parameters and a final diagnosis; their findings were compared to the HCD exam of a specialist in echocardiography. The proportion of correct answers on the theoretical test was higher after training (86%) than before (51%; P = 0.001). The agreement was substantial among the 15 parameters analyzed (kappa ranging from 0.615 to 0.891; P < 0.001). The percentage of correct interpretation was lower for abnormal (75%) than normal (95%) items, for valve abnormalities (85%) compared to other items (92%) and for graded scale (87%) than for dichotomous (95%) items (P < 0.0001, for all). For the final diagnoses, the kappa value was higher than 0.941 (P < 0.001; 95% CI [0.914, 0.955]). The training proposed enabled residents to perform FCU with HCD, and their findings were in good agreement with those of a cardiologist specialized in echocardiography. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Design and implementation of an enhanced recovery program in thoracic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Milà, Marc; Klein, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in perioperative care, major surgery is still associated with major complications. Enhanced recovery after surgery was introduced by the National Health Service in the UK with the aim of improving patient outcomes and reducing length of stay in hospital. The degree of applicability differs between surgical specialties, and in thoracic surgery it has not been developed until recently. We have therefore reviewed recent literature specific to thoracic surgery, and will discuss key elements of the design, implementation and monitoring of an enhanced recovery (ER) program based on our recent experience. The program is divided into several high impact intervention measures that involve the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative periods. Physical activity promotion and educational programs that provide information about the surgery and the surgical pathway are an essential part of the preoperative strategies. During surgery, an optimal pain control strategy, antibiotic prophylaxis and protective ventilation are important. Minimally invasive surgery and well-planned postoperative care including early drain removal and planned discharge are also important. Overall, we have shown that ER in thoracic surgery can facilitate early discharge from hospital and possibly reduce postoperative complications. Further studies are required to understand the extent of ER benefits when applied to thoracic surgery, and to test individual components in a prospective manner. PMID:26941969

  2. Measuring service-specific performance and educational value within a general surgery residency: the power of a prospective, anonymous, Web-based rotation evaluation system in the optimization of resident satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirton, O C; Antonetti, M; Morejon, O; Dobkin, E; Angelica, M D; Reilly, P J; Serebriakov, I; Horowitz, S; Civetta, J M

    2001-08-01

    We used a Web-based evaluation system to institute specific changes to various clinical teaching services in our integrated residency in an effort to optimize the overall quality of the educational experience and measured the resident satisfaction in these rotations. Residents rated 8 categories of experience on a scale of 1 to 5 (maximum summation score, 40 points). Data were analyzed by t-test for equality of means. A probability value of less than.05 was considered significant. Compliance with completion of the evaluations was 100%. The Chronbach's alpha reliability coefficient of the tool was 0.826. Tukey's estimate of power to achieve additivity was 1.5. Six under-performing services were re-engineered with prominent effects on 7 postgraduate year (PGY) rotations. On 2 general surgery services at 1 hospital, the workload was redistributed, and a dedicated team teaching time was instituted (PGY-3 [a]: before, 22 points/after, 31 points; P =.003; PGY-3 [b]: before, 25 points/after, 31 points; P =.004; PGY-1: before, 24 points/after, 29 points; P =.07). A general surgery service at another hospital redistributed coverage of the attending surgeons to create a nonteaching service (PGY-1: before, 22 points/-after, 27 points; P =.01). The transplantation service (PGY-3) was examined, and the role of the point was redefined (before, 24 points/after, 31 points; P =.01). One vascular service (PGY-2) redistributed cases and workload (before, 27 points/after, 22 points; P =.07). The vascular PGY-2 position was eliminated and replaced by a mid-level practitioner. The cardiothoracic service (PGY-1) rotation was converted into a preceptorship (before, 23 points/after, 30 points; P =.015). A web-based clinical rotation evaluation provides a means for the assessment of the impact of programmatic changes while preserving resident anonymity and maintaining accountability.

  3. Curriculum Planning for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Assistant Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mary Ann

    This project was conducted to develop a curriculum for dental auxiliary training in the dental specialty field of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Research was conducted to identify the major functions performed by an oral surgery assistant and then to organize these functions into an educational program that would provide adequate didactic and…

  4. Fast-track program in laparoscopic liver surgery: Theory or fact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Pérez, Belinda; Aranda-Narváez, José Manuel; Suárez-Muñoz, Miguel Angel; Eladel-Delfresno, Moises; Fernández-Aguilar, José Luis; Pérez-Daga, Jose Antonio; Pulido-Roa, Ysabel; Santoyo-Santoyo, Julio

    2012-11-27

    To analyze our results after the introduction of a fast-track (FT) program after laparoscopic liver surgery in our Hepatobiliarypancreatic Unit. All patients (43) undergoing laparoscopic liver surgery between March 2004 and March 2010 were included and divided into two consecutive groups: Control group (CG) from March 2004 until December 2006 with traditional perioperative cares (17 patients) and fast-track group (FTG) from January 2007 until March 2010 with FT program cares (26 patients). Primary endpoint was the influence of the program on the postoperative stay, the amount of re-admissions, morbidity and mortality. Secondarily we considered duration of surgery, use of drains, conversion to open surgery, intensive cares needs and transfusion. Both groups were homogeneous in age and sex. No differences in technique, time of surgery or conversion to open surgery were found, but more malignant diseases were operated in the FTG, and then transfusions were higher in FTG. Readmissions and morbidity were similar in both groups, without mortality. Postoperative stay was similar, with a median of 3 for CG vs 2.5 for FTG. However, the 80.8% of patients from FTG left the hospital within the first 3 d after surgery (58.8% for CG). The introduction of a FT program after laparoscopic liver surgery improves the recovery of patients without increasing complications or re-admissions, which leads to a reduction of the stay and costs.

  5. 76 FR 8294 - TRICARE Program; Surgery for Morbid Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... Surgeons (ACS), Bariatric Surgery Center Network (BSCN) and American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric... principles set forth in this Executive Order. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (Sec. 202, Pub. L. 104-4) It has...

  6. Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP): training persons with dementia to serve as group activity leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Cameron J; Skrajner, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an activity implemented by means of Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP). Four persons with early-stage dementia were trained to serve as leaders for a small-group activity played by nine persons with more advanced dementia. Assessments of leaders' ability to learn the procedures of leading a group, as well as their satisfaction with this role, were taken, as were measures of players' engagement and affect during standard activities programming and RAMP activities. Leaders demonstrated the potential to fill the role of group activity leader effectively, and they expressed a high level of satisfaction with this role. Players' levels of positive engagement and pleasure during the RAMP activity were higher than during standard group activities. This study suggests that to the extent that procedural learning is available to persons with early-stage dementia, especially when they are assisted with external cueing, these individuals can successfully fill the role of volunteers when working with persons with more advanced dementia. This can provide a meaningful social role for leaders and increase access to high quality activities programming for large numbers of persons with dementia. Copyright 2004 The Gerontological Society of America

  7. [Results of a physical therapy program in nursing home residents: A randomized clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casilda-López, Jesús; Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Garzón-Moreno, Victor Manuel; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; Valenza, Marie Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of the physical functionality is a key factor in the care of the elderly. Inactive people have a higher risk of death due to diseases associated with inactivity. In addition, the maintenance of optimal levels of physical and mental activity has been suggested as a protective factor against the development and progression of chronic illnesses and disability. The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of an 8-week exercise program with elastic bands, on exercise capacity, walking and balance in nursing home residents. A nursing home sample was divided into two groups, intervention group (n=26) and control group (n=25). The intervention group was included in an 8-week physical activity program using elastic bands, twice a week, while the control group was took part in a walking programme. Outcome measurements were descriptive variables (anthropometric characteristics, quality of life, fatigue, fear of movement) and fundamental variables (exercise capacity, walking and balance). A significant improvement in balance and walking speed was observed after the programme. Additionally, exercise capacity improved significantly (P≤.001), and the patients showed an improvement in perceived dyspnea after the physical activity programme in the intervention group. The exercise program was safe and effective in improving dyspnea, exercise capacity, walking, and balance in elderly. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of the educational environment of the Saudi family medicine residency training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah T Khoja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study was conducted to evaluate the educational environment (EE in Family Medicine Training Programs. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey, The Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM, was distributed to all residents at the four training centers in the central region. Cronbach′s alpha was used to test the reliability. The mean and standard deviation (SD for each item, the overall score and the three domains were calculated. A multiple linear regression model was developed with PHEEM scores as an outcome. The Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test was used to compare each item based on the selected factors. Results: The overall score was 67.1/160 (SD: 20.1. The PHEEM′s domains scores: 24.2/56 (SD: 7.13 for perception of role autonomy; 25.3/60 (SD: 8.88, for perception of teaching; and 17/44 (SD: 5.6, for perception of social support. Training center and Level of training were the significant outcome predictors. Centre 1 (Joint Program significantly had better scores than Centre 2. The instrument showed great reliability with a Cronbach′s alpha of 0.92. Conclusions: There are many problems in the training program. Urgent actions are needed to improve the residents′ learning experience particularly during rotations. Also, the curriculum should be restructured, and effective training methods introduced using the Best Evidence in Medical Education to meet the expectations and learning needs of family physicians.

  9. Evaluation of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residents' Operative Skills: Feasibility and Engagement Study Using SIMPL Software for a Mobile Phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaban, Leonard B; Cappetta, Alyssa; George, Brian C; Lahey, Edward T; Bohnen, Jordan D; Troulis, Maria J

    2017-06-08

    There are no universally accepted tools to evaluate operative skills of surgical residents in a timely fashion. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a smartphone application, SIMPL (System for Improving and Measuring Procedural Learning), developed by a multi-institutional research collaborative, to achieve a high rate of timely operative evaluations and resident communication and to collect performance data. The authors hypothesized that these goals would be achieved because the process is convenient and efficient. This was a prospective feasibility and engagement study using SIMPL to evaluate residents' operative skills. SIMPL requires the attending surgeon to answer 3 multiple-choice questions: 1) What level of help (Zwisch Scale) was required by the trainee? 2) What was the level of performance? 3) How complex was the case? The evaluator also can dictate a narrative. The sample was composed of 3 faculty members and 3 volunteer senior residents. Predictor variables were the surgeons, trainees, and procedures performed. Outcome variables included number and percentage of procedures performed by faculty-and-resident pairs assessed, time required to complete assessments, time lapsed to submission, percentage of assessments with narratives, and residents' response rates. From March through June 2016, 151 procedures were performed in the operating room by the faculty-and-resident teams. There were 107 assessments submitted (71%). Resident response (self-assessment) to faculty evaluations was 81%. Recorded time to complete assessments (n = 75 of 107) was shorter than 2 minutes. The time lapsed to submission was shorter than 72 hours (100%). Dictations were submitted for 35 evaluations (33%). Data for the type of help, performance, and complexity of cases were collected for each resident. SIMPL facilitates timely intraoperative evaluations of surgical skills, engagement by faculty and residents, and collection of detailed procedural

  10. Trends in cataract surgery training curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfipour, Mona; Rolius, Ramunas; Lehman, Erik B; Pantanelli, Seth M; Scott, Ingrid U

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate trends in cataract surgery training curricula and factors affecting timing of resident participation as a primary surgeon. Pennsylvania State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA. Cross-sectional study of anonymous survey results. A description of the study and link to an online survey was e-mailed to program directors of each ophthalmology residency training program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Fifty-one (44%) of the 116 program directors completed the survey. First-year, second-year, and third-year residents performed a mean of 2, 25, and 155 phacoemulsification surgeries, respectively, as a primary surgeon. Only 1 program (2%) required residents to perform extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) before performing phacoemulsification. Clear corneal phacoemulsification was the first technique taught to trainees at 91% of programs. More than two thirds (71%) of program directors indicated that their program had a cataract surgery training curriculum designed to transition residents gradually to the operating room. These curricula included structured wet laboratory (92%) and lecture (89%) components. Inadequate resident knowledge and surgical skill base (57%) and anticipation of increased surgical complication risk (37%) were the most commonly reported factors impeding earlier exposure to phacoemulsification in residency. Results show that residents today begin surgical training with phacoemulsification rather than ECCE, perform a higher number of phacoemulsification surgeries than is required by the ACGME, and begin performing phacoemulsification as early as their first or second year of residency. Despite these evolutions, 29% of respondent ACGME-accredited ophthalmology residency programs reported not having a formal cataract surgery training curriculum. Copyright © 2016 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.