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Sample records for surgery physiological capacity

  1. Growth form defines physiological photoprotective capacity in intertidal benthic diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Alexandre; Méléder, Vona; Blommaert, Lander; Lepetit, Bernard; Gaudin, Pierre; Vyverman, Wim; Sabbe, Koen; Dupuy, Christine; Lavaud, Johann

    2015-01-01

    In intertidal marine sediments, characterized by rapidly fluctuating and often extreme light conditions, primary production is frequently dominated by diatoms. We performed a comparative analysis of photophysiological traits in 15 marine benthic diatom species belonging to the four major morphological growth forms (epipelon (EPL), motile epipsammon (EPM-M) and non-motile epipsammon (EPM-NM) and tychoplankton (TYCHO)) found in these sediments. Our analyses revealed a clear relationship between growth form and photoprotective capacity, and identified fast regulatory physiological photoprotective traits (that is, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and the xanthophyll cycle (XC)) as key traits defining the functional light response of these diatoms. EPM-NM and motile EPL showed the highest and lowest NPQ, respectively, with EPM-M showing intermediate values. Like EPL, TYCHO had low NPQ, irrespective of whether they were grown in benthic or planktonic conditions, reflecting an adaptation to a low light environment. Our results thus provide the first experimental evidence for the existence of a trade-off between behavioural (motility) and physiological photoprotective mechanisms (NPQ and the XC) in the four major intertidal benthic diatoms growth forms using unialgal cultures. Remarkably, although motility is restricted to the raphid pennate diatom clade, raphid pennate species, which have adopted a non-motile epipsammic or a tychoplanktonic life style, display the physiological photoprotective response typical of these growth forms. This observation underscores the importance of growth form and not phylogenetic relatedness as the prime determinant shaping the physiological photoprotective capacity of benthic diatoms.

  2. Physiological capacity and physical testing in male elite team handball.

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    Michalsik, L B; Madsen, K; Aagaard, P

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the physical demands placed on male elite team handball players in relation to playing position. Male elite team handball field players were evaluated during match-play over a six season time span using physiological measurements and by subsequent physical testing. Mean heart rate and relative workload during match-play (N.=41) were 163 ± 5 beats·min⁻¹ (group means±SD) and 70.9 ± 6.0% of VO(2-max), respectively. Relative workload was lower (Pjumping height in "Jump and Reach" testing was 0.71 ± 0.08 m (range: 0.61-0.86 m). Maximal ball throwing speed was observed using the set shot with 3-step run-up (92.8 ± 5.3 km·h⁻¹, range: 75.8-108.2 km·h⁻¹). Modern male elite team handball imposes moderate-to-high demands on the aerobic energy system and high demands on the anaerobic energy systems during certain periods of the match. Indications of temporary fatigue and a subsequent decline in performance were observed, since the relative workload decreased both in the first and in the second half of the match. Physiological profiles and physical test results differed between playing positions, with wing players covering a greater total distance in the Yo-Yo test and showing superior jumping performance and repeated sprint running capacity than backcourt players and pivots.

  3. Functional capacity and mental state of patients undergoing cardiac surgery

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    Bruna Corrêa

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases are a serious public health problem in Brazil. Myocardial revascularization surgery (MRS as well as cardiac valve replacement and repair are procedures indicated to treat them. Thus, extracorporeal circulation (ECC is still widely used in these surgeries, in which patients with long ECC times may have greater neurological deficits. Neurological damage resulting from MRS can have devastating consequences such as loss of independence and worsening of quality of life. Objective: To assess the effect of cardiac surgery on a patient’s mental state and functional capacity in both the pre- and postoperative periods. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study with convenience sampling of subjects undergoing MRS and valve replacement. Participants were administered the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE and the Duke Activity Status Index (DASI in the pre- and postoperative periods, as well as before their hospital discharge. Results: This study assessed nine patients (eight males aged 62.4 ± 6.3 years with a BMI of 29.5 ± 2.3 kg/m2. There was a significant decrease in DASI scores and VO2 from preoperative to postoperative status (p = 0.003 and p = 0.003, respectively. Conclusion: This study revealed a loss of cognitive and exercise capacity after cardiac surgery. A larger sample however is needed to consolidate these findings.

  4. Cardiac surgery capacity in sub-saharan Africa: quo vadis?

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    Yankah, Charles; Fynn-Thompson, Francis; Antunes, Manuel; Edwin, Frank; Yuko-Jowi, Christine; Mendis, Shanthi; Thameur, Habib; Urban, Andreas; Bolman, Ralph

    2014-08-01

    Current data on cardiac surgery capacity on which to base effective concepts for developing sustainable cardiac surgical programs in Africa are lacking or of low quality. A questionnaire concerning cardiac surgery in Africa was sent to 29 colleagues-26 cardiac surgeons and 3 cardiologists in 16 countries. Further, data on numbers of surgeons practicing in Africa were retrieved from the Cardiothoracic Surgery Network (CTSNet). There were 25 respondents, yielding a response rate of 86.2%. Three models emerged: the Ghanaian/German model with a senior local consultant surgeon (Model 1); surgeons visiting for a short period to perform humanitarian surgery (Model 2); and expatriate surgeons on contract to develop cardiac programs (Model 3). The 933 cardiothoracic surgeons listed by CTSNet translated into one surgeon per 1.3 million people. In North Africa, the figure was three surgeons per 1 million and in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), one surgeon per 3.3 million people. The identified 156 cardiac surgeons represented a surgeon to population ratio of 1:5.9 million people. In SSA, the ratio was one surgeon per 14.3 million. In North Africa, it was one surgeon per 1.1 million people. Open heart operations were approximately 12 per million in Africa, 2 per million in SSA, and 92 per million people in North Africa. Cardiothoracic health care delivery would worsen in SSA without the support of humanitarian surgery. Although all three models have potential for success, the Ghanaian/German model has proved to be successful in the long term and could inspire health care policy makers and senior colleagues planning to establish cardiac programs in Africa. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Effects of maxillary sinus floor elevation surgery on maxillary sinus physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmenga, NM; Raghoebar, GM; Liem, RSB; van Weissenbruch, R; Manson, WL; Vissink, A

    In a prospective study, the effects of elevation surgery of the maxillary sinus floor on maxillary sinus physiology were assessed. Seventeen consecutive patients without preoperative anamnestic, clinical and radiological signs of maxillary sinusitis underwent sinus floor elevation surgery with iliac

  6. Physiological capacity and physical testing in male elite team handball

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michalsik, Lars Bojsen; Madsen, K.; Aagaard, P.

    2015-01-01

    and by subsequent physical testing. RESULTS: Mean heart rate and relative workload during match-play (N.=41) were 163 ± 5 beats·min⁻¹ (group means±SD) and 70.9 ± 6.0% of VO(2-max), respectively. Relative workload was lower (P... and high demands on the anaerobic energy systems during certain periods of the match. Indications of temporary fatigue and a subsequent decline in performance were observed, since the relative workload decreased both in the first and in the second half of the match. Physiological profiles and physical test......AIM: The aim of the present study was to examine the physical demands placed on male elite team handball players in relation to playing position. METHODS: Male elite team handball field players were evaluated during match-play over a six season time span using physiological measurements...

  7. Physiological capacity and physical testing in male elite team handball

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michalsik, Lars Bojsen; Madsen, K; Aagaard, Per

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine the physical demands placed on male elite team handball (TH) players in relation to playing position. Methods: Male elite TH field players were evaluated during match-play over a six season time span using physiological measurements and by subseque...... physical testing. Results: Mean heart rate and relative workload during match-play (n=41) were 163±5 beats·min-1 (group means±SD) and 70.9±6.0 % of VO2-max, respectively. Relative workload was lower (p......Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine the physical demands placed on male elite team handball (TH) players in relation to playing position. Methods: Male elite TH field players were evaluated during match-play over a six season time span using physiological measurements and by subsequent...

  8. Towards an improved Global Antioxidant Response method (GAR+): Physiological-resembling in vitro antioxidant capacity methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Burillo, S; Rufián-Henares, J A; Pastoriza, S

    2018-01-15

    Many methods have been developed to measure the antioxidant capacity of foods under non physiological-relevant conditions. In this study, three methods (TEAC OH , GEAC RED and TEAC AAPH ) are developed to measure antioxidant capacity at physiological pH, using indigo carmine as a redox dye. TEAC OH and TEAC AAPH determine foodstuffs' scavenging capacity against hydroxyl (OH) and AAPH radicals, while the third method measures the global reducing capacity of the sample. The results obtained for commercial teas, commercial beverages containing tea as the main ingredient and different solid foods (spinach, onion, salami, etc.) were compared with well-established protocols. The new methods demonstrated good linearity-reproducibility, providing reliable data about the antioxidant capacity of foods under physiological-resembling conditions. The new methods were also useful for evaluating the antioxidant capacity of human plasma after acute intake of tea. The physiological-resembling conditions of these assays and the use of absorbance readings make them suitable for application by any laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Review of post bariatric surgery effects on common genitourinary physiology.

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    Yacoubian, Aline A; Nasr, Rami

    2018-02-08

    Obesity is a worldwide challenging health problem. Weight loss through medical management of obesity has not always been successful, thus, giving rise to the need for surgical intervention. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be helpful for morbidly obese patients. However, studies have also shown the effect of surgery on stone formation, fertility and erectile function. This review summarizes the main findings of several studies that analyze stone formation and fertility in men as well as erectile function post bariatric surgery. The underlying pathophysiologic alterations post bariatric surgery include increased absorption of oxalate leading to hyperoxaluria, hypocitraturia and increased urinary calcium oxalate supersaturation. Contradicting data exist on the effect of bariatric surgery on fertility and erectile function. Further studies are needed to analyze the mechanisms. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  10. Effect of essential oil jasmine inhalation on physiological index of laparotomy patients in general surgery department.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad yadegary

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: The physiologic parameters were markedly improved in intervention group after Jasmine essential oil inhalation compared to the control group, which prevented sudden and severe changes in patients waiting for surgery. Therefore, Jasmine essential oil inhalation may be an effective factor in reducing the anxiety and avoiding extreme changes in physiological parameters in patients which could be recommended in clinical situations.

  11. Anatomical and physiological changes in pelvic diaphragm in patients with chagasic megacolon submitted to Duhamel surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira Júnior,Hélio; Moreira,José P. T.; Isaac,Raniere R.; Almeida,Arminda C. de; Moreira,Hélio; Klug,Wilmar A.

    2013-01-01

    ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION: understand the reasons why Duhamel surgery results in clinical improvement of constipation in patients with Chagasic colopathy. BACKGROUND: Duhamel surgery is one of the most widespread techniques for the treatment of Chagasic megacolon, with low rates of recurrence of constipation. OBJECTIVE: evaluate the anatomical and physiological changes in the pelvic diaphragm of patients with chagasic colopathy, as well as changes occurring after undergoing Duhamel surgery. DESIG...

  12. Anatomical and physiological changes in pelvic diaphragm in patients with chagasic megacolon submitted to Duhamel surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hélio Moreira Júnior; José P.T. Moreira; Raniere R. Isaac; Arminda C. de Almeida; Hélio Moreira; Wilmar A. Klug

    2013-01-01

    Original contribution: understand the reasons why Duhamel surgery results in clinical improvement of constipation in patients with Chagasic colopathy. Background: Duhamel surgery is one of the most widespread techniques for the treatment of Chagasic megacolon, with low rates of recurrence of constipation. Objective: evaluate the anatomical and physiological changes in the pelvic diaphragm of patients with chagasic colopathy, as well as changes occurring after undergoing Duhamel surgery. Desig...

  13. Physiologic, psychologic, and metabolic consequences of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Victoria L; Frishman, William H

    2006-01-01

    The successful management of obesity is essential to treat effectively its associated comorbidities such as systemic hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemias, and obstructive sleep apnea. Current weight loss recommendations include reduced caloric intake, exercise, and pharmacologic treatments that often result in a minimal weight loss that is rarely maintained. Conversely, surgical procedures such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, adjustable gastric banding, vertical banded gastroplasty, or biliopancreatic diversion result in a more successful and maintained long-term weight loss. Bariatric surgery-induced weight loss is associated with improvements in cardiovascular risk factors such as systemic hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, hypercholesterolemia does not appear to benefit from surgically induced weight loss. Patients also note improvement in associated respiratory comorbidities such as asthma and obstructive sleep apnea as well as diabetes. Although the risks of bariatric surgery are numerous, including gastrointestinal and respiratory complications and associated nutritional deficiencies, in an appropriately selected surgical candidate, as detailed by National Institutes of Health guidelines, the surgical treatment of obesity warrants serious consideration.

  14. Physiological and molecular responses to bariatric surgery: markers or mechanisms underlying T2DM resolution?

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    Hutch, Chelsea R; Sandoval, Darleen A

    2017-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment for obesity and associated comorbidities, including rapid resolution of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although the weight loss itself has substantial impact, bariatric surgery also has weight loss-independent effects on T2DM. Several variations of bariatric surgery exist, including the widely studied Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and vertical sleeve gastrectomy. The success of both of these bariatric surgeries was originally attributed to restrictive and malabsorptive modes of action; however, mounting evidence from both human and animal studies implicates mechanisms beyond surgery-induced mechanical changes to the gastrointestinal (GI) system. In fact, with bariatric surgery comes a spectrum of physiological responses, including postprandial enhancement of gut peptide and bile acids levels, restructuring of microbial composition, and changes in GI function and morphology. Although many of these processes are also essential for glucoregulation, the independent role of each in the success of surgery is still an open question. In this review, we explore whether these changes are necessary for the improvements in body mass and glucose homeostasis or whether they are simply markers of the physiological effect of surgery. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Altered male physiologic function after surgery for prostate cancer: couple perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Tsivian,Matvey; Janice M.,Mayes; Krupski,Tracey L.; Mouraviev,Vladimir; Donatucci,Craig F.; Polascik,Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Both the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) and the physiologic outcomes of surgical treatment impact the male’s psychological sphere. However, current research advocates a refocusing of outcomes directed to the PCa “couple”. Herein we acquire insight into perspective and concordance regarding male physiological function from the standpoint of a couple recovering from PCa surgery. Materials and methods: Couples whereby the male partner had undergone primary surgical...

  16. Influence of Music on Preoperative Anxiety and Physiologic Parameters in Women Undergoing Gynecologic Surgery.

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    Labrague, Leodoro J; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise M

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of music on anxiety levels and physiologic parameters in women undergoing gynecologic surgery. This study employed a pre- and posttest experimental design with nonrandom assignment. Ninety-seven women undergoing gynecologic surgery were included in the study, where 49 were allocated to the control group (nonmusic group) and 48 were assigned to the experimental group (music group). Preoperative anxiety was measured using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) while noninvasive instruments were used in measuring the patients' physiologic parameters (blood pressure [BP], pulse [P], and respiration [R]) at two time periods. Women allocated in the experimental group had lower STAI scores (t = 17.41, p control group. This study provides empirical evidence to support the use of music during the preoperative period in reducing anxiety and unpleasant symptoms in women undergoing gynecologic surgery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Visuospatial Working Memory Capacity Predicts Physiological Arousal in a Narrative Task.

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    Smithson, Lisa; Nicoladis, Elena

    2016-06-01

    Physiological arousal that occurs during narrative production is thought to reflect emotional processing and cognitive effort (Bar-Haim et al. in Dev Psychobiol 44:238-249, 2004). The purpose of this study was to determine whether individual differences in visuospatial working memory and/or verbal working memory capacity predict physiological arousal in a narrative task. Visuospatial working memory was a significant predictor of skin conductance level (SCL); verbal working memory was not. When visuospatial working memory interference was imposed, visuospatial working memory was no longer a significant predictor of SCL. Visuospatial interference also resulted in a significant reduction in SCL. Furthermore, listener ratings of narrative quality were contingent upon the visuospatial working memory resources of the narrator. Potential implications for educators and clinical practitioners are discussed.

  18. [Evaluation of the capacity of work using upper limbs after radical latero-cervical surgery].

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    Capodaglio, P; Strada, M R; Grilli, C; Lodola, E; Panigazzi, M; Bernardo, G; Bazzini, G

    1998-01-01

    Evaluation of arm work capacity after radical neck surgery. The aim of this paper is to describe an approach for the assessment of work capacity in patients who underwent radical neck surgery, including those treated with radiation therapy. Nine male patients, who underwent radical neck surgery 2 months before being referred to our Unit, participated in the study. In addition to manual muscle strength test, we performed the following functional evaluations: 0-100 Constant scale for shoulder function; maximal shoulder strength in adduction/abduction and intrarotation/extrarotation; instrumental. We measured maximal isokinetic strength (10 repetitions) with a computerized dynamometer (Lido WorkSET) set at 100 degrees/sec. During the rehabilitation phase, the patients' mechanical parameters, the perception of effort, pain or discomfort, and the range of movement were monitored while performing daily/occupational task individually chosen on the simulator (Lido WorkSET) under isotonic conditions. On this basis, patients were encouraged to return to levels of daily physical activities compatible with the individual tolerable work load. The second evaluation at 2 month confirmed that the integrated rehabilitation protocol successfully increased patients' capacities and "trust" in their physical capacity. According to the literature, the use of isokinetic and isotonic exercise programs appears to decrease shoulder rehabilitation time. In our experience an excellent compliance has been noted. One of the advantages of the method proposed is to provide quantitative reports of the functional capacity and therefore to facilitate return-to-work of patients who underwent radical neck surgery.

  19. Impact of respiratory therapy in vital capacity and functionality of patients undergoing abdominal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Shanlley Cristina da Silva; Santos, Rafaella Souza dos; Giovanetti, Erica Albanez; Taniguchi, Corinne; Silva, Cilene Saghabi de Medeiros; Eid, Raquel Afonso Caserta; Timenetsky, Karina Tavares; Carnieli-Cazati, Denise

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the vital capacity after two chest therapy techniques in patients undergoing abdominal surgical. Methods A prospective randomized study carried out with patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit after abdominal surgery. We checked vital capacity, muscular strength using the Medical Research Council scale, and functionality with the Functional Independence Measure the first time the patient was breathing spontaneously (D1), and also upon discharge from the...

  20. A comprehensive simulation for wait time reduction and capacity planning applied in general surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanberkel, P.T.; Blake, John T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the use of operational research techniques to analyze the wait list for the Division of General Surgery at the Capital District Health Authority in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. A discrete event simulation model was developed to aid capacity planning decisions and to analyze the

  1. Survey of the capacity for essential surgery and anaesthesia services in Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Janet; Tau, Goa; Cherian, Meena Nathan; Vergel de Dios, Jennifer; Mills, David; Fitzpatrick, Jane; Adu-Krow, William; Cheng, Davy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess capacity to provide essential surgical services including emergency, obstetric and anaesthesia care in Papua New Guinea (PNG) in order to support planning for relevant post-2015 sustainable development goals for PNG. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Hospitals and health facilities in PNG. Participants 21 facilities including 3 national/provincial hospitals, 11 district/rural hospitals, and 7 health centres. Outcome measures The WHO Situational Analysis Tool to Assess Emergency and Essential Surgical Care (WHO-SAT) was used to measure each participating facility's capacity to deliver essential surgery and anaesthesia services, including 108 items related to relevant infrastructure, human resources, interventions and equipment. Results While major surgical procedures were provided at each hospital, fewer than 30% had uninterrupted access to oxygen, and 57% had uninterrupted access to resuscitation bag and mask. Most hospitals reported capacity to provide general anaesthesia, though few hospitals reported having at least one certified surgeon, obstetrician and anaesthesiologist. Access to anaesthetic machines, pulse oximetry and blood bank was severely limited. Many non-hospital health centres providing basic surgical procedures, but almost none had uninterrupted access to electricity, running water, oxygen and basic supplies for resuscitation, airway management and obstetric services. Conclusions Capacity for essential surgery and anaesthesia services is severely limited in PNG due to shortfalls in physical infrastructure, human resources, and basic equipment and supplies. Achieving post-2015 sustainable development goals, including universal healthcare, will require significant investment in surgery and anaesthesia capacity in PNG. PMID:26674504

  2. Animal models in bariatric surgery--a review of the surgical techniques and postsurgical physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Raghavendra S; Rao, Venkatesh; Kini, Subhash

    2010-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is considered the most effective current treatment for morbid obesity. Since the first publication of an article by Kremen, Linner, and Nelson, many experiments have been performed using animal models. The initial experiments used only malabsorptive procedures like intestinal bypass which have largely been abandoned now. These experimental models have been used to assess feasibility and safety as well as to refine techniques particular to each procedure. We will discuss the surgical techniques and the postsurgical physiology of the four major current bariatric procedures (namely, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy, and biliopancreatic diversion). We have also reviewed the anatomy and physiology of animal models. We have reviewed the literature and presented it such that it would be a reference to an investigator interested in animal experiments in bariatric surgery. Experimental animal models are further divided into two categories: large mammals that include dogs, cats, rabbits, and pig and small mammals that include rats and mice.

  3. Inspiratory Muscle Training and Functional Capacity in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

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    André Luiz Lisboa Cordeiro

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Cardiac surgery is a highly complex procedure which generates worsening of lung function and decreased inspiratory muscle strength. The inspiratory muscle training becomes effective for muscle strengthening and can improve functional capacity. Objective: To investigate the effect of inspiratory muscle training on functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods: This is a clinical randomized controlled trial with patients undergoing cardiac surgery at Instituto Nobre de Cardiologia. Patients were divided into two groups: control group and training. Preoperatively, were assessed the maximum inspiratory pressure and the distance covered in a 6-minute walk test. From the third postoperative day, the control group was managed according to the routine of the unit while the training group underwent daily protocol of respiratory muscle training until the day of discharge. Results: 50 patients, 27 (54% males were included, with a mean age of 56.7±13.9 years. After the analysis, the training group had significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure (69.5±14.9 vs. 83.1±19.1 cmH2O, P=0.0073 and 6-minute walk test (422.4±102.8 vs. 502.4±112.8 m, P=0.0031. Conclusion: We conclude that inspiratory muscle training was effective in improving functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in this sample of patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  4. Inspiratory Muscle Training and Functional Capacity in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, André Luiz Lisboa; de Melo, Thiago Araújo; Neves, Daniela; Luna, Julianne; Esquivel, Mateus Souza; Guimarães, André Raimundo França; Borges, Daniel Lago; Petto, Jefferson

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac surgery is a highly complex procedure which generates worsening of lung function and decreased inspiratory muscle strength. The inspiratory muscle training becomes effective for muscle strengthening and can improve functional capacity. To investigate the effect of inspiratory muscle training on functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. This is a clinical randomized controlled trial with patients undergoing cardiac surgery at Instituto Nobre de Cardiologia. Patients were divided into two groups: control group and training. Preoperatively, were assessed the maximum inspiratory pressure and the distance covered in a 6-minute walk test. From the third postoperative day, the control group was managed according to the routine of the unit while the training group underwent daily protocol of respiratory muscle training until the day of discharge. 50 patients, 27 (54%) males were included, with a mean age of 56.7±13.9 years. After the analysis, the training group had significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure (69.5±14.9 vs. 83.1±19.1 cmH2O, P=0.0073) and 6-minute walk test (422.4±102.8 vs. 502.4±112.8 m, P=0.0031). We conclude that inspiratory muscle training was effective in improving functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in this sample of patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  5. Quality of Life and Work Capacity Are Unrelated to Approach or Complications After Pituitary Surgery.

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    Uvelius, Erik; Castelo, Nazia; Kahlon, Babar; Svensson, Christer; Cervin, Anders; Höglund, Peter; Valdemarsson, Stig; Siesjö, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Endoscopic pituitary surgery has shown favorable clinical outcomes. Less is known about the impact of surgical approaches on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and work capacity. The present study was undertaken to compare transsphenoidal microscope-assisted surgery with endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery regarding preoperative and surgical factors for the final outcome of HRQoL and work capacity. In a retrospective study of patients operated on for pituitary adenoma, outcome was compared between those operated on before and after transition with endoscopic surgery at our department. Data were gathered via patient questionnaires and patients' files. After exclusions, 235 patients were included (99 microsurgical and 136 endoscopic). Frequency of complications was similar but tumor size was significantly larger in the endoscopic group. Complications did not affect HRQoL or work capacity. HRQoL was not affected by surgical technique but showed an overall trend toward lower values compared with the general population. Sick leave, return to work frequency, and permanent sick leave were not affected by surgical technique. Female gender was a factor for lower ratings in all outcome variables. Surgical technique does not influence HRQoL or work capacity in this long-term follow-up although both are decreased compared with the general population. We conclude that fully endoscopic pituitary surgery, despite including larger tumors, bears the same risk for complications as microsurgery. In addition, females have a greater risk for decrease in HRQoL and work ability. This factor should be taken into account when informing patients and appreciating expectations of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Altered male physiologic function after surgery for prostate cancer: couple perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matvey Tsivian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Both the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa and the physiologic outcomes of surgical treatment impact the male’s psychological sphere. However, current research advocates a refocusing of outcomes directed to the PCa “couple”. Herein we acquire insight into perspective and concordance regarding male physiological function from the standpoint of a couple recovering from PCa surgery. Materials and methods: Couples whereby the male partner had undergone primary surgical treatment for PCa were mailed a Retrospective Sexual Survey (RSS packet consisting of male and female partner questionnaires. RSS questions surveyed physiological changes in libido, foreplay, erection and arousal, orgasm and ejaculation in addition to perceived psychological impact. Patients’ and partners’ scores were evaluated to determine the concordance of both individual items as well as domain sums. Results: Twenty-eight couples completed the questionnaires. Only about 40% of men and women were happy with their levels of sexual interest with 82% concordance. Urine loss during orgasm was reported by 43% of men; the majority of participants were bothered by it. Ejaculation changes were observed by 96% of men (concordance 96% with most reporting anejaculation. A change in orgasm experience was noted by 86% of men (and 36% of their female partners, p < 0.0001. Despite the change, the majority of men and women reported being satisfied with their ability to climax. Conclusion: Our results indicate that patients and their female partners may interpret differently the same physiological outcomes of PCa surgery. This information could be useful to better counsel the PCa couple and help patients and partners adjust after surgery.

  7. Effects of preoperative administration of butorphanol or meloxicam on physiologic responses to surgery in ball pythons.

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    Olesen, Mette G; Bertelsen, Mads F; Perry, Steve F; Wang, Tobias

    2008-12-15

    To characterize physiologic responses of ball pythons (Python regius) following a minor surgical procedure and investigate the effects of 2 commonly used analgesics on this response. 15 healthy ball pythons. Snakes were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 3 treatments: meloxicam (0.3 mg/kg [0.14 mg/lb]; n = 5), butorphanol (5 mg/kg [2.3 mg/lb]; 5), or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (5) before catheterization of the vertebral artery. Plasma concentrations of catecholamines and cortisol, blood pressure, heart rate, and blood gas values were measured at various times for 72.5 hours after catheterization. The 72.5-hour point was defined as baseline. Heart rate of ball pythons increased significantly during the first hour following surgery. Mean plasma epinephrine concentration increased slightly at 2.5 hours after surgery, whereas mean plasma cortisol concentration increased beginning at 1.5 hours, reaching a maximum at 6.5 hours. Mean blood pressure increased within the first hour but returned to the baseline value at 2.5 hours after surgery. After 24.5 hours, blood pressure, heart rate, and plasma hormone concentrations remained stable at baseline values. There were no significant differences in values for physiologic variables between snakes that received saline solution and those that received meloxicam or butorphanol. Measurement of physiologic variables provides a means of assessing postoperative pain in snakes. Meloxicam and butorphanol at the dosages used did not decrease the physiologic stress response and did not appear to provide analgesic effects in ball pythons.

  8. Patients with single ventricle physiology undergoing noncardiac surgery are at high risk for adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Morgan L; DiNardo, James A; Odegard, Kirsten C

    2015-08-01

    Patients with single ventricle physiology are at increased anesthetic risk when undergoing noncardiac surgery. To review the outcomes of anesthetics for patients with single ventricle physiology undergoing noncardiac surgery. This study is a retrospective chart review of all patients who underwent a palliative procedure for single ventricle physiology between January 1, 2007 and January 31, 2014. Anesthetic and surgical records were reviewed for noncardiac operations that required sedation or general anesthesia. Any noncardiac operation occurring prior to completion of a bidirectional Glenn procedure was included. Diagnostic procedures, including cardiac catheterization, insertion of permanent pacemaker, and procedures performed in the ICU, were excluded. During the review period, 417 patients with single ventricle physiology had initial palliation. Of these, 70 patients (16.7%) underwent 102 anesthetics for 121 noncardiac procedures. The noncardiac procedures included line insertion (n = 23); minor surgical procedures such as percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy or airway surgery (n = 38); or major surgical procedures including intra-abdominal and thoracic operations (n = 41). These interventions occurred on median day 60 of life (1-233 days). The procedures occurred most commonly in the operating room (n = 79, 77.5%). Patients' median weight was 3.4 kg (2.4-15 kg) at time of noncardiac intervention. In 102 anesthetics, 26 patients had an endotracheal tube or tracheostomy in situ, 57 patients underwent endotracheal intubation, and 19 patients had a natural or mask airway. An intravenous induction was performed in 77 anesthetics, an inhalational induction in 17, and a combination technique in 8. The median total anesthetic time was 126 min (14-594 min). In 22 anesthetics (21.6%), patients were on inotropic support upon arrival; an additional 24 patients required inotropic support (23.5%), of which dopamine was the most common medication. There were 10

  9. Survey of the capacity for essential surgery and anaesthesia services in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Janet; Tau, Goa; Cherian, Meena Nathan; Vergel de Dios, Jennifer; Mills, David; Fitzpatrick, Jane; Adu-Krow, William; Cheng, Davy

    2015-12-16

    To assess capacity to provide essential surgical services including emergency, obstetric and anaesthesia care in Papua New Guinea (PNG) in order to support planning for relevant post-2015 sustainable development goals for PNG. Cross-sectional survey. Hospitals and health facilities in PNG. 21 facilities including 3 national/provincial hospitals, 11 district/rural hospitals, and 7 health centres. The WHO Situational Analysis Tool to Assess Emergency and Essential Surgical Care (WHO-SAT) was used to measure each participating facility's capacity to deliver essential surgery and anaesthesia services, including 108 items related to relevant infrastructure, human resources, interventions and equipment. While major surgical procedures were provided at each hospital, fewer than 30% had uninterrupted access to oxygen, and 57% had uninterrupted access to resuscitation bag and mask. Most hospitals reported capacity to provide general anaesthesia, though few hospitals reported having at least one certified surgeon, obstetrician and anaesthesiologist. Access to anaesthetic machines, pulse oximetry and blood bank was severely limited. Many non-hospital health centres providing basic surgical procedures, but almost none had uninterrupted access to electricity, running water, oxygen and basic supplies for resuscitation, airway management and obstetric services. Capacity for essential surgery and anaesthesia services is severely limited in PNG due to shortfalls in physical infrastructure, human resources, and basic equipment and supplies. Achieving post-2015 sustainable development goals, including universal healthcare, will require significant investment in surgery and anaesthesia capacity in PNG. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Cardiac rehabilitation increases physical capacity but not mental health after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, Kirstine Lærum; Berg, Selina Klikkenborg; Rasmussen, Trine Bernholdt

    2016-01-01

    -educational consultations (intervention) versus usual care without structured physical exercise or psycho-educational consultations (control). Primary outcome was physical capacity measured by VO2 peak and secondary outcome was self-reported mental health measured by Short Form-36. Results: 76% were men, mean age 62 years.......40) or the exploratory physical and mental outcomes. Cardiac rehabilitation increased the occurrence of self-reported non-serious adverse events (11/72 vs 3/75, p=0.02). Conclusions: Cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery significantly improves VO2 peak at 4 months but has no effect on mental health and other......Objective: The evidence for cardiac rehabilitation after valve surgery remains sparse. Current recommendations are therefore based on patients with ischaemic heart disease. The aim of this randomised clinical trial was to assess the effects of cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care after heart...

  11. POSTOPERATIVE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY RELATED TO FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY AND RESPIRATORY MUSCLE STRENGTH IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVEIRA, Josélia Jucirema Jarschel de; FREITAS, Alexandre Coutinho Teixeira de; ALMEIDA, Andréa Adriana de

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Respiratory physiotherapy plays an important role preventing complications in bariatric surgery. Aim: To assess the effects of out-patient physiotherapy during post-operative period through respiratory pressures and functional capacity in individuals submitted to bariatric surgery. Method: A prospective longitudinal and controlled study was done in adults with body mass index (BMI) equal or greater than 40 kg/m², who have been submitted to bariatric surgery. They were ...

  12. Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  13. Conservation physiology of marine fishes: advancing the predictive capacity of models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Christian; Peck, Myron A; Antognarelli, Fabio; Azzurro, Ernesto; Burrows, Michael T; Cheung, William W L; Cucco, Andrea; Holt, Rebecca E; Huebert, Klaus B; Marras, Stefano; McKenzie, David; Metcalfe, Julian; Perez-Ruzafa, Angel; Sinerchia, Matteo; Fleng Steffensen, John; Teal, Lorna R; Domenici, Paolo

    2012-12-23

    At the end of May, 17 scientists involved in an EU COST Action on Conservation Physiology of Marine Fishes met in Oristano, Sardinia, to discuss how physiology can be better used in modelling tools to aid in management of marine ecosystems. Current modelling approaches incorporate physiology to different extents, ranging from no explicit consideration to detailed physiological mechanisms, and across scales from a single fish to global fishery resources. Biologists from different sub-disciplines are collaborating to rise to the challenge of projecting future changes in distribution and productivity, assessing risks for local populations, or predicting and mitigating the spread of invasive species.

  14. Venostasis test as a method of choice to evaluate blood fibrinolytic capacity during third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimova, C; Evrosimovska, B; Kovacevska, I

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our research was to evaluate the fibrinolytic capacity during oral surgical interventions - operative extraction of semi-impacted third molars having caused blood fibrinolysis activity. With the intention of establishing the condition of the blood vessels' endothelium before oral surgical interventions, the influence of surgical procedures upon the endothelium, and the response of the endothelium after interventions, the venostasis test (venous stasis) was conducted in all the subjects. This test measures the global fibrinolytic activity of the plasma, caused by anoxia. In order to realize the aim, the first blood sample was taken before the beginning of the test, and then the indicated oral surgical intervention was performed. Immediately after the completion of the surgery, the venostasis test was carried out, lasting for five minutes, and right after the test a second sample of blood was taken. Using the method of fibrin plates, the level of the activators and inhibitors of the plasminogen was established afterwards. The average values of the pro activators and inhibitors of fibrinolysis from the venostasis test, in all subjects, showed increased values compared to the same ones in the control group, in all researched relations. Statistically, a significant difference was established after interventions were performed. These findings support the fact of possible damage to the blood vessels' endothelium and a change of the fibrinolytic capacity in the perioperative period of third molar surgery.

  15. Functional residual capacity increase during laparoscopic surgery with abdominal wall lift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Ueda

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: The number of laparoscopic surgeries performed is increasing every year and in most cases the pneumoperitoneum method is used. One alternative is the abdominal wall lifting method and this study was undertaken to evaluate changes of functional residual capacity during the abdominal wall lift procedure. Methods: From January to April 2013, 20 patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy at a single institution. All patients were anesthetized using propofol, remifentanil and rocuronium. FRC was measured automatically by Engstrom Carestation before the abdominal wall lift and again 15 minutes after the start of the procedure. Results: After abdominal wall lift, there was a significant increase in functional residual capacity values (before abdominal wall lift 1.48 × 103 mL, after abdominal wall lift 1.64 × 103 mL (p < 0.0001. No complications such as desaturation were observed in any patient during this study. Conclusions: Laparoscopic surgery with abdominal wall lift may be appropriate for patients who have risk factors such as obesity and respiratory disease.

  16. Physiological Motion and Registration of Abnormalities in Liver During Focused Ultrasound Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Sunita; Rh, Abhilash

    Continuous deformation and dislocation of soft tissues in the abdominal and thoracic region presents a major issue for effective targeting of all non-invasive ablative modalities such as radiotherapy/surgery and Focused Ultrasound Surgery. Most significant among these is the movement of the target organs due to physiological processes such as respiration. The movement is found to be most significant for liver and kidneys. We studied movement and compensation strategies with the aim to implement them during ultrasound ablation using our robotic system for targeted FUS dose delivery. The motion pattern of the liver can be assumed to be in a single plane as it closely follows the movement of the diaphragm. However, the movement of kidneys is three dimensional and follows complicated patterns. Kidney motion is highly subject specific and has poor repeatability. In our research, we quantify the relation of liver movement and the breathing pattern so as to achieve real-time movement compensation using a prediction-correlation approach.

  17. Preexisting cognitive status is associated with reduced behavioral functional capacity in patients 3 months after cardiac surgery: an extension study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerotti Benvenuti, Simone; Patron, Elisabetta; Zanatta, Paolo; Polesel, Elvio; Palomba, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    To examine whether preexisting cognitive status rather than short- and middle-term postoperative cognitive decline (POCD) may differentially account for behavioral functional capacity 3 months after cardiac surgery. Seventy-nine patients completed a psychological evaluation, including the Trail Making Test Part B, the memory with 10-s interference, the phonemic fluency and the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs) questionnaire for cognitive functions and behavioral functional capacity, respectively, before surgery, at discharge and at 3-month follow-up. Thirty-one (39%) and 22 (28%) patients showed POCD at discharge and at 3-month follow-up, respectively. Preoperative cognitive status was significantly associated with change in behavioral functional capacity 3 months after surgery (Ps.095). Preexisting cognitive deficit, especially working memory deficit, rather than short- and middle-term POCD related to intraoperative risk factors is associated with poor behavioral functional capacity 3 months after cardiac surgery. The present study therefore suggests that a preoperative cognitive evaluation is essential to anticipate which patients are likely to show a decline in behavioral functional capacity after cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mitochondrial Physiology in the Major Arbovirus Vector Aedes aegypti: Substrate Preferences and Sexual Differences Define Respiratory Capacity and Superoxide Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Juliana B. R. Correa; Gaviraghi, Alessandro; Oliveira, Marcus F.

    2015-01-01

    Adult females of Aedes aegypti are facultative blood sucking insects and vectors of Dengue and yellow fever viruses. Insect dispersal plays a central role in disease transmission and the extremely high energy demand posed by flight is accomplished by a very efficient oxidative phosphorylation process, which take place within flight muscle mitochondria. These organelles play a central role in energy metabolism, interconnecting nutrient oxidation to ATP synthesis, but also represent an important site of cellular superoxide production. Given the importance of mitochondria to cell physiology, and the potential contributions of this organelle for A. aegypti biology and vectorial capacity, here, we conducted a systematic assessment of mitochondrial physiology in flight muscle of young adult A. aegypti fed exclusively with sugar. This was carried out by determining the activities of mitochondrial enzymes, the substrate preferences to sustain respiration, the mitochondrial bioenergetic efficiency and capacity, in both mitochondria-enriched preparations and mechanically permeabilized flight muscle in both sexes. We also determined the substrates preferences to promote mitochondrial superoxide generation and the main sites where it is produced within this organelle. We observed that respiration in A. aegypti mitochondria was essentially driven by complex I and glycerol 3 phosphate dehydrogenase substrates, which promoted distinct mitochondrial bioenergetic capacities, but with preserved efficiencies. Respiration mediated by proline oxidation in female mitochondria was strikingly higher than in males. Mitochondrial superoxide production was essentially mediated through proline and glycerol 3 phosphate oxidation, which took place at sites other than complex I. Finally, differences in mitochondrial superoxide production among sexes were only observed in male oxidizing glycerol 3 phosphate, exhibiting higher rates than in female. Together, these data represent a significant step

  19. Ecology of Exercise in Wild Fish: Integrating Concepts of Individual Physiological Capacity, Behavior, and Fitness Through Diverse Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownscombe, Jacob W; Cooke, Steven J; Algera, Dirk A; Hanson, Kyle C; Eliason, Erika J; Burnett, Nicholas J; Danylchuk, Andy J; Hinch, Scott G; Farrell, Anthony P

    2017-08-01

    Wild animals maximize fitness through certain behaviors (e.g., foraging, mating, predator avoidance) that incur metabolic costs and often require high levels of locomotor activity. Consequently, the ability of animals to achieve high fitness often relies on their physiological capacity for exercise (aerobic scope) and/or their ability to acquire and utilize energy judiciously. Here, we explore how environmental factors and physiological limitations influence exercise and metabolism in fish while foraging, migrating to spawning grounds, and providing parental care. We do so with three case studies that use a number of approaches to studying exercise in wild fish using biologging and biotelemetry platforms. Bonefish (Albula vulpes) selectively use shallow water tropical marine environments to forage when temperatures are near optimal for aerobic scope and exercise capacity. Bonefish energy expenditure at upper thermal extremes is maximal while activity levels diminish, likely caused by reduced aerobic scope. Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) reproductive migrations frequently involve passage through hydraulically challenging areas, and their ability to successfully pass these regions is constrained by their physiological capacity for exercise. Aerobic scope and swim performance are correlated with migration difficulty among sockeye salmon (O. nerka) populations; however, depletion of endogenous energy stores can also limit migration success. In another example, male smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) allocate a significant amount of energy to nest-guarding behaviors to protect their developing brood. Smallmouth bass body size, endogenous energy reserves, and physiological state influence nest-guarding behaviors and reproductive success. We suggest that in some scenarios (e.g., bonefish foraging, Pacific salmon dam passage) metabolic capacity for exercise may be the strongest determinant of biological fitness, while in others (e.g., long distance salmon migration

  20. Physiological Capacity and Training Routines of Elite Cross-Country Skiers: Approaching the Upper Limits of Human Endurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandbakk, Øyvind; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2017-09-01

    Cross-country (XC) skiing is one of the most demanding of endurance sports, involving protracted competitions on varying terrain employing a variety of skiing techniques that require upper- and/or lower-body work to different extents. Through more effective training and extensive improvements in equipment and track preparation, the speed of cross-country ski races has increased more than that of any other winter Olympic sport, and, in addition, new types of racing events have been introduced. To a certain extent this has altered the optimal physiological capacity required to win, and the training routines of successful skiers have evolved accordingly. The long-standing tradition of researchers working closely with XC-ski coaches and athletes to monitor progress, improve training, and refine skiing techniques has provided unique physiological insights revealing how these athletes are approaching the upper limits of human endurance. This review summarizes current scientific knowledge concerning the demands involved in elite XC skiing, as well as the physiological capacity and training routines of the best athletes.

  1. Experimental evaluation of work capacity as related to chronological and physiological aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-09-01

    Research statistics has establish the fact that physical work capacity declines as a consequence of aging. The question has been raised, however, if this decline is the inevitable result of senescence or merely due to change in living habits. Great n...

  2. Anatomical and physiological changes in pelvic diaphragm in patients with chagasic megacolon submitted to Duhamel surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Moreira Júnior

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Original contribution: understand the reasons why Duhamel surgery results in clinical improvement of constipation in patients with Chagasic colopathy. Background: Duhamel surgery is one of the most widespread techniques for the treatment of Chagasic megacolon, with low rates of recurrence of constipation. Objective: evaluate the anatomical and physiological changes in the pelvic diaphragm of patients with chagasic colopathy, as well as changes occurring after undergoing Duhamel surgery. Design: clinical data and results of cinedefecography, electromanometry and anorectal ultrasound of the anal canal were evaluated in patients with Chagasic colopathy, before and after Duhamel surgery. Location: Service of Coloproctology – Departament of Surgery, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal de Goiás. Patients: patients with positive serology for Chagas Disease, with constipation and radiological megacolon, who presented consecutively to the Chagas outpatient clinic and freely agreed to participate in this study, were prospectively included. Results: a total of 20 patients were included, with a mean age of 53.2 years, of which 16 were women. The following parameters were observed in the postoperative period: change in bowel frequency, of, on average, one evacuation every ten days to daily bowel movement; 16 patients used laxatives preoperatively and only one did, intermittently, in postoperative period. Electromanometry showed, postoperatively, a decrease in anal resting pressure (60.88 to 37.2 mmHg p < 0.001 and anal squeeze pressures (244.3 mL to 161.25 p = 0.01, whereas ultrasound showed that 75% of the patients had abnormalities of the internal anal sphincter in the posterior anal canal juxtaposed to the pulled-through colon. Postoperative rectal emptying observed in cinedefecographic tests occurred more quickly and with less effort when compared with the preoperative findings. There was a change in the anorectal angle postoperatively

  3. Heart Rate Variability: New Perspectives on Physiological Mechanisms, Assessment of Self-regulatory Capacity, and Health risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCraty, Rollin; Shaffer, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability, the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operates on different time scales to adapt to environmental and psychological challenges. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart and offers some new perspectives on mechanisms underlying the very low frequency rhythm of heart rate variability. Interpretation of heart rate variability rhythms in the context of health risk and physiological and psychological self-regulatory capacity assessment is discussed. The cardiovascular regulatory centers in the spinal cord and medulla integrate inputs from higher brain centers with afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. We also discuss the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection pathways, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical, frontocortical, and motor cortex areas. In addition, the use of real-time HRV feedback to increase self-regulatory capacity is reviewed. We conclude that the heart's rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales that reflect both physiological and psychological functional status of these internal self-regulatory systems.

  4. Heart Rate Variability: New Perspectives on Physiological Mechanisms, Assessment of Self-regulatory Capacity, and Health risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability, the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operates on different time scales to adapt to environmental and psychological challenges. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart and offers some new perspectives on mechanisms underlying the very low frequency rhythm of heart rate variability. Interpretation of heart rate variability rhythms in the context of health risk and physiological and psychological self-regulatory capacity assessment is discussed. The cardiovascular regulatory centers in the spinal cord and medulla integrate inputs from higher brain centers with afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. We also discuss the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection pathways, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical, frontocortical, and motor cortex areas. In addition, the use of real-time HRV feedback to increase self-regulatory capacity is reviewed. We conclude that the heart's rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales that reflect both physiological and psychological functional status of these internal self-regulatory systems. PMID:25694852

  5. Exercise capacity in the Bidirectional Glenn physiology: Coupling cardiac index, ventricular function and oxygen extraction ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecilla, Carolina; Khiabani, Reza H; Trusty, Phillip; Sandoval, Néstor; Fogel, Mark; Briceño, Juan Carlos; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2015-07-16

    In Bi-directional Glenn (BDG) physiology, the superior systemic circulation and pulmonary circulation are in series. Consequently, only blood from the superior vena cava is oxygenated in the lungs. Oxygenated blood then travels to the ventricle where it is mixed with blood returning from the lower body. Therefore, incremental changes in oxygen extraction ratio (OER) could compromise exercise tolerance. In this study, the effect of exercise on the hemodynamic and ventricular performance of BDG physiology was investigated using clinical patient data as inputs for a lumped parameter model coupled with oxygenation equations. Changes in cardiac index, Qp/Qs, systemic pressure, oxygen extraction ratio and ventricular/vascular coupling ratio were calculated for three different exercise levels. The patient cohort (n=29) was sub-grouped by age and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at rest. It was observed that the changes in exercise tolerance are significant in both comparisons, but most significant when sub-grouped by PVR at rest. Results showed that patients over 2 years old with high PVR are above or close to the upper tolerable limit of OER (0.32) at baseline. Patients with high PVR at rest had very poor exercise tolerance while patients with low PVR at rest could tolerate low exercise conditions. In general, ventricular function of SV patients is too poor to increase CI and fulfill exercise requirements. The presented mathematical model provides a framework to estimate the hemodynamic performance of BDG patients at different exercise levels according to patient specific data. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Physiologic Levels of Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide Maintain the Proliferation and Differentiation Capacity of Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yingying; Liu, Dayong; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Chunmei; Wang, Jinsong; Wang, Songlin

    2015-11-01

    Many invading oral bacteria are known to produce considerable amounts of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). The toxic activity of exogenous H2S in periodontal tissue has been demonstrated, but the role of endogenous H2S in the physiologic function of periodontal tissue remains poorly understood. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the biologic functions of H2S in the proliferation and differentiation of human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs). PDLSCs were isolated from periodontal ligament tissues of periodontally healthy volunteers or patients with periodontitis. Immunocytochemical staining, flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis were used to examine the expression of H2S-synthesizing enzymes cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). The proliferation capacity of PDLSCs was determined by cell counting kit-8 assay, carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester analysis, and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine assay. The osteogenic potential of PDLSCs was tested using alkaline phosphatase staining, Alizarin Red staining, and in vivo transplantation experiments. Oil Red O staining was used to analyze adipogenic ability. The results show that human PDLSCs express both CBS and CSE and produce H2S. Blocking the generation of endogenous H2S with CBS inhibitor hydroxylamine significantly attenuated PDLSC proliferation and reduced the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation capacity of PDLSCs. In contrast, CSE inhibitor DL-propargylglycine had no effect on PDLSC function. Exogenous H2S could inhibit the production of endogenous H2S and impair PDLSC function in a dose-dependent manner. Physiologic levels of endogenous H2S maintain the proliferation and differentiation capacity of PDLSCs, and CBS may be the main source of endogenous H2S in PDLSCs.

  7. A case study of infant physiologic response to skin-to-skin contact following surgery for complex congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Tondi M.; Ludington-Hoe, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Background Infants with complex congenital heart disease requiring surgical intervention within the first days or weeks of life may be the most seriously ill infants needing intensive nursing and medical care immediately after birth. Skin to skin contact (SSC) is well-accepted and practiced as a positive therapeutic intervention in premature infants, but is not routinely offered to infants in cardiac intensive care units. Physiologic effects of SSC in the congenital heart disease population must be examined before recommending incorporation of SSC into standard care routines. Objective The purpose of this case study was to describe the physiologic response to a single session of SSC in an 18-day-old infant with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Methods Repeated measures of heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, blood pressure, and temperature were recorded 30 minutes prior to SSC, during SSC (including interruptions for bottle and breast feedings), and 10 minutes after SSC was completed. Results All physiologic parameters were clinically acceptable throughout the 135-minute observation. Conclusion This case study provides beginning evidence that SSC is safe in full-term infants following surgery for complex congenital heart disease. Further research with a larger sample is needed to examine effects of SSC on infant physiology before surgery and earlier in the postoperative time period as well as on additional outcomes such as length of stay, maternal-infant interaction, and neurodevelopment. PMID:25325374

  8. Resistance training improves cardiac output, exercise capacity and tolerance to positive airway pressure in Fontan physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordina, Rachael L; O'Meagher, Shamus; Karmali, Alia; Rae, Caroline L; Liess, Carsten; Kemp, Graham J; Puranik, Raj; Singh, Nalin; Celermajer, David S

    2013-09-30

    Subjects with Fontan-type circulation have no sub-pulmonary ventricle and thus depend exquisitely on the respiratory bellows and peripheral muscle pump for cardiac filling. We hypothesised that resistance training to augment the peripheral muscle pump might improve cardiac filling, reduce inspiratory-dependence of IVC return to the heart and thus improve exercise capacity and cardiac output on constant positive airway pressure (CPAP). Eleven Fontan subjects (32+/-2 years, mean+/-SEM) had cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and exercise testing (CPET); six underwent 20 weeks of high-intensity resistance training; others were non-exercising controls. After training, CPET was repeated. Four trainers had MRI with real-time flow measurement at rest, exercise and on CPAP in the trained state and following a 12-month detrain. In the trained state, muscle strength increased by 43% (p=0.002), as did total muscle mass (by 1.94 kg, p=0.003) and peak VO2 (by 183 ml/min, p=0.02). After detraining, calf muscle mass and peak workload had fallen significantly (pexercise (by 16 ml, p=0.04); inspiratory-dependent IVC blood return during exercise was 40% higher (p=0.02). On CPAP, cardiac output was lower in the detrained state (101 vs. 77 ml/s, p=0.03). Resistance muscle training improves muscle mass, strength and is associated with improved cardiac filling, stroke volume, exercise capacity and cardiac output on CPAP, in adults with Fontan-type circulation. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of respiratory therapy in vital capacity and functionality of patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Shanlley Cristina da Silva; Santos, Rafaella Souza Dos; Giovanetti, Erica Albanez; Taniguchi, Corinne; Silva, Cilene Saghabi de Medeiros; Eid, Raquel Afonso Caserta; Timenetsky, Karina Tavares; Carnieli-Cazati, Denise

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the vital capacity after two chest therapy techniques in patients undergoing abdominal surgical. A prospective randomized study carried out with patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit after abdominal surgery. We checked vital capacity, muscular strength using the Medical Research Council scale, and functionality with the Functional Independence Measure the first time the patient was breathing spontaneously (D1), and also upon discharge from the Intensive Care Unit (Ddis). Between D1 and Ddis, respiratory therapy was carried out according to the randomized group. We included 38 patients, 20 randomized to Positive Intermittent Pressure Group and 18 to Volumetric Incentive Spirometer Group. There was no significant gain related to vital capacity of D1 and Ddis of Positive Intermittent Pressure Group (mean 1,410mL±547.2 versus 1,809mL±692.3; p=0.979), as in the Volumetric Incentive Spirometer Group (1,408.3mL±419.1 versus 1,838.8mL±621.3; p=0.889). We observed a significant improvement in vital capacity in D1 (pTerapia Intensiva após cirurgia abdominal. Verificamos a capacidade vital, a força muscular por meio da escala do Medical Research Council e funcionalidade pela Medida de Independência Funcional no primeiro momento em que o paciente encontrava-se em respiração espontânea (D1) e na alta da Unidade de Terapia Intensiva (Dalta). Entre D1 e Dalta, foi realizada a fisioterapia respiratória, conforme o grupo randomizado. Foram incluídos 38 pacientes, sendo 20 randomizados para Grupo Pressão Positiva Intermitente e 18 para o Grupo Incentivador Inspiratório a Volume. A capacidade vital entre o D1 e Dalta do Grupo Pressão Positiva Intermitente não teve ganho significativo (média de 1.410mL±547,2 versus 1.809mL±692,3; p=0,979), assim como no Grupo Incentivador Inspiratório a Volume (1.408,3mL±419,1 versus 1.838,8mL±621,3; p=0,889). Houve melhora significativa da capacidade vital no D1 (p<0,001) e na Dalta (p<0,001) e da Medida de

  10. Physiologic capacity of well-developed collaterals in patients with isolated left anterior descending artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Ono, Norihisa; Ohtani, Seiji; Mori, Noriko; Yokoyama, Shoichi; Hoshino, Tsuneo; Kaburagi, Tsuneo; Kurata, Chinori.

    1992-01-01

    To assess the physiologic significance of well-developed collaterals, 34 patients, with isolated left anterior descending artery disease (LAD) and without overt prior myocardial infarction, underwent cardiac catheterization and exercise thallium-201 emission computed tomography. The patients were divided into 3 groups: 11 patients with 90% stenosis of the proximal LAD and without collaterals (group 1), 11 with 99% stenosis of the proximal LAD, and without collaterals (group 2) and 12 with a total occlusion of the proximal LAD which was completely filled by well-developed collaterals (group 3). On left ventriculography, shortening fractions of the anterior wall were significantly reduced in group 2 as compared to groups 1 and 3 (group 1 vs group 2: p<0.01, group 2 vs group 3: p<0.05), which reflected the lower ejection fraction of group 2 (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively). The perfusion defects of the anterior wall on both the initial and the delayed images were severer in groups 2 and 3 than in group 1 (group 1 vs group 2 and group 1 vs group 3 on the initial image: p<0.01, for both, group 1 vs group 2 and group 1 vs group 3 on the delayed image: p<0.05, for both). However, recovery of the perfusion defects from the initial image to the delayed image was better in group 3 than in groups 1 and 2 (group 1 vs group 2 and group 1 vs group 3: p<0.05, for both). Therefore, coronary blood flow through well-developed collaterals was considered to be comparable to the flow through a diseased vessel with 90% stenosis at rest. During maximal exercise, blood flow through well-developed collaterals was considered to be comparable to the flow through a diseased vessel with 99% stenosis, although the blood flow through well-developed collaterals was considered to be better than that through 99% stenosis during the recovery period. These findings suggest that patients with well-developed collaterals must be treated like those with severe stenosis. (author)

  11. Seawater acidification affects the physiological energetics and spawning capacity of the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum during gonadal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xian; Yang, Feng; Zhao, Liqiang; Yan, Xiwu

    2016-06-01

    Ocean acidification is predicted to have widespread implications for marine bivalve mollusks. While our understanding of its impact on their physiological and behavioral responses is increasing, little is known about their reproductive responses under future scenarios of anthropogenic climate change. In this study, we examined the physiological energetics of the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum exposed to CO 2 -induced seawater acidification during gonadal maturation. Three recirculating systems filled with 600 L of seawater were manipulated to three pH levels (8.0, 7.7, and 7.4) corresponding to control and projected pH levels for 2100 and 2300. In each system, temperature was gradually increased ca. 0.3°C per day from 10 to 20°C for 30days and maintained at 20°C for the following 40days. Irrespective of seawater pH levels, clearance rate (CR), respiration rate (RR), ammonia excretion rate (ER), and scope for growth (SFG) increased after a 30-day stepwise warming protocol. When seawater pH was reduced, CR, ratio of oxygen to nitrogen, and SFG significantly decreased concurrently, whereas ammonia ER increased. RR was virtually unaffected under acidified conditions. Neither temperature nor acidification showed a significant effect on food absorption efficiency. Our findings indicate that energy is allocated away from reproduction under reduced seawater pH, potentially resulting in an impaired or suppressed reproductive function. This interpretation is based on the fact that spawning was induced in only 56% of the clams grown at pH 7.4. Seawater acidification can therefore potentially impair the physiological energetics and spawning capacity of R. philippinarum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Estimation of lung vital capacity before and after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery: a comparison of incentive spirometer and ventilometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Souza Rodrigues Erenaldo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measurement of vital capacity (VC by spirometry is the most widely used technique for lung function evaluation, however, this form of assessment is costly and further investigation of other reliable methods at lower cost is necessary. Objective: To analyze the correlation between direct vital capacity measured with ventilometer and with incentive inspirometer in patients in pre and post cardiac surgery. Methodology Cross-sectional comparative study with patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Respiratory parameters were evaluated through the measurement of VC performed by ventilometer and inspirometer. To analyze data normality the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was applied, for correlation the Pearson correlation coefficient was used and for comparison of variables in pre and post operative period Student's t test was adopted. We established a level of ignificance of 5%. Data was presented as an average, standard deviation and relative frequency when needed. The significance level was set at 5%. Results We studied 52 patients undergoing cardiac surgery, 20 patients in preoperative with VC-ventilometer: 32.95 ± 11.4 ml/kg and VC-inspirometer: 28.9 ± 11 ml/Kg, r = 0.7 p Conclusion There was a high correlation between DVC measures with ventilometer and incentive spirometer in pre and post CABG surgery. Despite this, arises the necessity of further studies to evaluate the repercussion of this method in lowering costs at hospitals.

  13. Systemic physiology and neuroapoptotic profiles in young and adult rats exposed to surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Rami Mossad; Krammer, Caspar Weel; Hansen, Tom Giedsing

    2015-01-01

    to one of four anaesthetics regimens: (i) sevoflurane/dexmedetomidine, (ii) sevoflurane/fentanyl; (iii) propofol/dexmedetomidine, and (iv) propofol/fentanyl. Animals underwent a dorsal skin flap procedure while physiologic, metabolic and biochemical parameters were closely monitored. Neuroapoptotic...

  14. Visualization and simulated surgery of the left ventricle in the virtual pathological heart of the Virtual Physiological Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, N. J. B.; Lin, X.; Zhao, Y.; Clapworthy, G. J.; Dong, F.; Redaelli, A.; Parodi, O.; Testi, D.

    2011-01-01

    Ischaemic heart failure remains a significant health and economic problem worldwide. This paper presents a user-friendly software system that will form a part of the virtual pathological heart of the Virtual Physiological Human (VPH2) project, currently being developed under the European Commission Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) programme. VPH2 is an integrated medicine project, which will create a suite of modelling, simulation and visualization tools for patient-specific prediction and planning in cases of post-ischaemic left ventricular dysfunction. The work presented here describes a three-dimensional interactive visualization for simulating left ventricle restoration surgery, comprising the operations of cutting, stitching and patching, and for simulating the elastic deformation of the ventricle to its post-operative shape. This will supply the quantitative measurements required for the post-operative prediction tools being developed in parallel in the same project. PMID:22670207

  15. Subjective well-being, body image, and functional capacity in people candidate for or undergoing bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Juliana Galvis-Aparicio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two studies that aimed (1 at assessing and comparing the subjective well-being (SWB, and functional capacity and body image of people with morbid obesity, candidate for or undergoing bariatric surgery (BS, and (2 at identifying the relationship among the components of SWB, BMI, functional capacity, and body image. The sample was composed by 48 patients in pre-surgery period, and 29 in post-surgery. Instruments used were the Life Satisfaction Scale, the Positive and Negative Affect Scale, WHODAS 2.0, the Brazilian scale of figures and silhouettes, and thebateria fatorial da personalidade. Statistically significant differences were found between both groups in all the variables, except positive affect, comprehension and communication, and relationships with others. FC was correlated to all the components of SWB and contributed to explaining the variance of life satisfaction and negative affect. Personality traits turned out to be more important than other variables for explaining the variance of positive affect.

  16. Fast-track surgery-an update on physiological care principles to enhance recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The concept of fast-track surgery (enhanced recovery programs) has been evolved and been documented to be successful by decreasing length of stay, morbidity and convalescence across procedures. FUTURE STRATEGIES: However, there are several possibilities for further improvement of mo...

  17. Eccentric Contraction-Induced Muscle Injury: Reproducible, Quantitative, Physiological Models to Impair Skeletal Muscle’s Capacity to Generate Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Jarrod A.; Lowe, Dawn A.

    2018-01-01

    In order to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms of muscle regeneration an experimental injury model is required. Advantages of eccentric contraction-induced injury are that it is a controllable, reproducible, and physiologically relevant model to cause muscle injury, with injury being defined as a loss of force generating capacity. While eccentric contractions can be incorporated into conscious animal study designs such as downhill treadmill running, electrophysiological approaches to elicit eccentric contractions and examine muscle contractility, for example before and after the injurious eccentric contractions, allows researchers to circumvent common issues in determining muscle function in a conscious animal (e.g., unwillingness to participate). Herein, we describe in vitro and in vivo methods that are reliable, repeatable, and truly maximal because the muscle contractions are evoked in a controlled, quantifiable manner independent of subject motivation. Both methods can be used to initiate eccentric contraction-induced injury and are suitable for monitoring functional muscle regeneration hours to days to weeks post-injury. PMID:27492161

  18. Eccentric Contraction-Induced Muscle Injury: Reproducible, Quantitative, Physiological Models to Impair Skeletal Muscle's Capacity to Generate Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Jarrod A; Lowe, Dawn A

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms of muscle regeneration an experimental injury model is required. Advantages of eccentric contraction-induced injury are that it is a controllable, reproducible, and physiologically relevant model to cause muscle injury, with injury being defined as a loss of force generating capacity. While eccentric contractions can be incorporated into conscious animal study designs such as downhill treadmill running, electrophysiological approaches to elicit eccentric contractions and examine muscle contractility, for example before and after the injurious eccentric contractions, allows researchers to circumvent common issues in determining muscle function in a conscious animal (e.g., unwillingness to participate). Herein, we describe in vitro and in vivo methods that are reliable, repeatable, and truly maximal because the muscle contractions are evoked in a controlled, quantifiable manner independent of subject motivation. Both methods can be used to initiate eccentric contraction-induced injury and are suitable for monitoring functional muscle regeneration hours to days to weeks post-injury.

  19. Endoscopic Ear Surgery: Critical Review of Anatomy and Physiology of Normal and Reconstructive Middle Ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udagatti, Vithal D; Dinesh Kumar, Rajendran

    2016-06-01

    Middle ear anatomy is complex hence it is difficult to study the microscopic vibration of tympanic membrane and ossicles. The basic research has been done in few centres. Our experience is based on clinical data. The lack of quantitative understanding of structural and functional relationship in the mechanical response of the normal and reconstructed middle ear is major factor in poor hearing results after surgery (Merchant et al. in J Laryngol Otol 112:715-731, 1998). The vibration pattern of tympanic membrane changes with different frequencies. It depends upon shape, position and tension of tympanic membrane. Sometimes reconstructed tympanic membrane loses its shape and tension and thus its vibratory response (Pusalkar and Steinbach in Transplants and implants in otology II, 1992). Then what should be the shape, position, tension of the tympanic membrane and the ossicles. In order to have a serviceable hearing, dry and safe ear, there is a necessity of answering all these queries by us.

  20. Exercise Capacity and Selected Physiological Factors by Ancestry and Residential Altitude: Cross-Sectional Studies of 9–10-Year-Old Children in Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsen, Sveinung; Andersen, Lars Bo; Stigum, Hein; Ouzhuluobu; Nafstad, Per; Wu, Tianyi; Bjertness, Espen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bianba, Sveinung Bernsten, Lars Bo Andersen, Hein Stegum, Ouzhuluobu, Per Nafstad, Tianyi Wu, and Espen Bjertness. Exercise capacity and selected physiological factors by ancestry and residential altitude—Cross-sectional studies of 9–10-year-old children in Tibet. High Alt Med Biol. 15:162–169, 2014.—Aim: Several physiological compensatory mechanisms have enabled Tibetans to live and work at high altitude, including increased ventilation and pulmonary diffusion capacity, both of which serve to increase oxygen transport in the blood. The aim of the present study was to compare exercise capacity (maximal power output) and selected physiological factors (arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate at rest and during maximal exercise, resting hemoglobin concentration, and forced vital capacity) in groups of native Tibetan children living at different residential altitudes (3700 vs. 4300 m above sea level) and across ancestry (native Tibetan vs. Han Chinese children living at the same altitude of 3700 m). Methods: A total of 430 9–10-year-old native Tibetan children from Tingri (4300 m) and 406 native Tibetan- and 406 Han Chinese immigrants (77% lowland-born and 33% highland-born) from Lhasa (3700 m) participated in two cross-sectional studies. The maximal power output (Wmax) was assessed using an ergometer cycle. Results: Lhasa Tibetan children had a 20% higher maximal power output (watts/kg) than Tingri Tibetan and 4% higher than Lhasa Han Chinese. Maximal heart rate, arterial oxygen saturation at rest, lung volume, and arterial oxygen saturation were significantly associated with exercise capacity at a given altitude, but could not fully account for the differences in exercise capacity observed between ancestry groups or altitudes. Conclusions: The superior exercise capacity in native Tibetans vs. Han Chinese may reflect a better adaptation to life at high altitude. Tibetans at the lower residential altitude of 3700 m demonstrated a better

  1. POSTOPERATIVE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY RELATED TO FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY AND RESPIRATORY MUSCLE STRENGTH IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Josélia Jucirema Jarschel de; Freitas, Alexandre Coutinho Teixeira de; Almeida, Andréa Adriana de

    Respiratory physiotherapy plays an important role preventing complications in bariatric surgery. To assess the effects of out-patient physiotherapy during post-operative period through respiratory pressures and functional capacity in individuals submitted to bariatric surgery. A prospective longitudinal and controlled study was done in adults with body mass index (BMI) equal or greater than 40 kg/m², who have been submitted to bariatric surgery. They were divided into two groups: intervention-group, who performed out-patient physiotherapy twice a week, from thirty to sixty days after surgery; and the control-group, who only followed home instructions. Both groups were evaluated before surgery and sixty days after surgery through manovacuometry, six-minute walk test and the Borg Scale of perceived exertion. Twenty participants were included the intervention-group and twenty-three in the control-group. Both groups had significant and similar weight loss after surgery. The manovacuometry presented no differences comparing pre- and post-surgery and in the comparison between the groups. The result of the six-minute walk test for the intervention-group increased by 10.1% in the post-operative period in relation to pre-. The Borg scale of perceived exertion in the intervention-group in pre-surgery decreased by 13.5% in the post-surgery compared to pre-surgery. In the control-group there was no difference comparing pre- and post-operative values, as in the comparison with the intervention-group. The low-intensity exercise program, carried out between the 30th and the 60th day after bariatric surgery provided better functional capacity; did not change respiratory muscle strength; and improved the perceived exertion rate. A fisioterapia respiratória tem papel importante na prevenção das complicações da cirurgia bariátrica. Avaliar os efeitos da fisioterapia ambulatorial no pós-operatório através das pressões respiratórias e da capacidade funcional dos indiv

  2. The Role of Physical and Physiological Capacities and Their Modification on the Tolerance to Various Stress Experienced by Air Force Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-30

    training program. This bimodal approach to the training is based on prior observation in this lab that strength training such as weightlifting increases... training appears to reduce orthostatic tolerance to passive head-up tilt while strength training increases tolerance, we proposed to select individuals...physiological capacities. This matching would allow a more direct assessment of the effects of a strength training program. The strength training

  3. Correlation between Surgeon's experience, surgery complexity and the alteration of stress related physiological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrelli, Massimo; Gentile, Stefano; Palmieri, Francesca; Paduano, Francesco; Tatullo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we analyzed the hormonal (salivary Cortisol; sC), immune (salivary Immunoglobulin A; sIgA) and cardiovascular (Heart rate, HR, and systolic blood pressure, SBP) responses induced by stress conditions in oral surgeons, randomly recruited according to their expertise level. Each surgeon performed three different surgical procedures with increasing degrees of technical difficulty and under time-limited conditions, to assess whether these variants may influence the risks of stress-induced secondary hypertension among the involved health professionals. sC and sIgA samples and cardiovascular function measurements were taken up before, during, and two hours after every surgery. Salivary samples and cardiovascular measurements were taken also during non-surgical days, as baseline controls. We observed that more experienced surgeons showed a higher stress management ability compared to those with less experience or, generally, younger, which are more exposed to the risks of developing secondary hypertension. Nevertheless, indipendently of sex and experience, oral surgeons are constantly exposed to high risks of developing stress-related diseases. On the basis of the issues addressed and the results obtained, we have highlighted the importance of the investigated stress biomarkers to monitor and to prevent stress-related pathologies among oral surgeons. This approach is aimed to emphasize the significance of these specific stress-biomarkers, which represent a powerful instrument to evaluate stress levels in oral surgeons, and that may help to reduce the most severe life-threatening risks to which they are daily exposed. In conclusion, final goal of this study is to suggest an useful guideline to monitor the stress levels of oral and maxillofacial surgeons in order to improve their quality of life, which is inevitably reflected on the quality of the performances provided and, finally, to prevent possible mistakes in their daily activities.

  4. Correlation between Surgeon's experience, surgery complexity and the alteration of stress related physiological parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Marrelli

    Full Text Available In the present work we analyzed the hormonal (salivary Cortisol; sC, immune (salivary Immunoglobulin A; sIgA and cardiovascular (Heart rate, HR, and systolic blood pressure, SBP responses induced by stress conditions in oral surgeons, randomly recruited according to their expertise level.Each surgeon performed three different surgical procedures with increasing degrees of technical difficulty and under time-limited conditions, to assess whether these variants may influence the risks of stress-induced secondary hypertension among the involved health professionals. sC and sIgA samples and cardiovascular function measurements were taken up before, during, and two hours after every surgery. Salivary samples and cardiovascular measurements were taken also during non-surgical days, as baseline controls.We observed that more experienced surgeons showed a higher stress management ability compared to those with less experience or, generally, younger, which are more exposed to the risks of developing secondary hypertension. Nevertheless, indipendently of sex and experience, oral surgeons are constantly exposed to high risks of developing stress-related diseases.On the basis of the issues addressed and the results obtained, we have highlighted the importance of the investigated stress biomarkers to monitor and to prevent stress-related pathologies among oral surgeons. This approach is aimed to emphasize the significance of these specific stress-biomarkers, which represent a powerful instrument to evaluate stress levels in oral surgeons, and that may help to reduce the most severe life-threatening risks to which they are daily exposed. In conclusion, final goal of this study is to suggest an useful guideline to monitor the stress levels of oral and maxillofacial surgeons in order to improve their quality of life, which is inevitably reflected on the quality of the performances provided and, finally, to prevent possible mistakes in their daily activities.

  5. Using Castration Surgery in Male Rats to Demonstrate the Physiological Effects of Testosterone on Seminal Vesicle Anatomy in an Undergraduate Laboratory Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Rachelle M.; Conant, Stephanie B.; Grabowski, Gregory M.

    2013-01-01

    Rats can be used as a model organism to teach physiological concepts in a laboratory setting. This article describes a two-part laboratory that introduces students to hypothesis testing, experimental design, the appropriate use of controls and surgical techniques. Students perform both a castration and sham-control surgery on male rats and test…

  6. Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and sterile gloves. Before the surgery begins, a time out is held during which the surgical team confirms ... the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version What Participants Need to Know About Clinical ...

  7. Analytical traceability of melon (Cucumis melo var reticulatus): proximate composition, bioactive compounds, and antioxidant capacity in relation to cultivar, plant physiology state, and seasonal variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maietti, Annalisa; Tedeschi, Paola; Stagno, Caterina; Bordiga, Matteo; Travaglia, Fabiano; Locatelli, Monica; Arlorio, Marco; Brandolini, Vincenzo

    2012-06-01

    Two morphologically different cultivars of Italian melons (Baggio and Giusto) were characterized considering samples harvested in different times, at the beginning (BPP) and at the end of the physiological plant production period (EPP). Proximate composition, protein, minerals, pH, phenolic content, antioxidant capacity, ascorbic acid, carotenoids, condensed tannins, and flavonoids were measured, showing a significant decrease in EPP samples (phenolics, antioxidant capacity, condensed tannins, and flavonoids); ascorbic acid decreased in Giusto cv, carotenoids in Baggio cv. Mineral content increased in either the cultivars (EPP samples). Year-to-year difference was significantly highlighted; the plant growing cycle significantly affected the chemotype. Despite these effects, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) permitted the discrimination of Baggio from Giusto cv, and the discrimination of BPP from EPP samples as well. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Utilizing Forced Vital Capacity to Predict Low Lung Compliance and Select Intraoperative Tidal Volume During Thoracic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoftman, Nir; Eikermann, Eric; Shin, John; Buckley, Jack; Navab, Kaveh; Abtin, Fereidoun; Grogan, Tristan; Cannesson, Maxime; Mahajan, Aman

    2017-12-01

    Tidal volume selection during mechanical ventilation utilizes dogmatic formulas that only consider a patient's predicted body weight (PBW). In this study, we investigate whether forced vital capacity (FVC) (1) correlates better to total lung capacity (TLC) than PBW, (2) predicts low pulmonary compliance, and (3) provides an alternative method for tidal volume selection. One hundred thirty thoracic surgery patients had their preoperative TLC calculated via 2 methods: (1) pulmonary function test (PFT; TLCPFT) and (2) computed tomography 3D reconstruction (TLCCT). We compared the correlation between TLC and PBW with the correlation between TLC and FVC to determine which was stronger. Dynamic pulmonary compliance was then calculated from intraoperative ventilator data and logistic regression models constructed to determine which clinical measure best predicted low compliance. Ratios of tidal volume/FVC plotted against peak inspiratory pressure were utilized to construct a new model for tidal volume selection. Calculated tidal volumes generated by this model were then compared with those generated by the standard lung-protective formula Vt = 7 cc/kg. The correlation between FVC and TLC (0.82 for TLCPFT and 0.76 for TLCCT) was stronger than the correlation between PBW and TLC (0.65 for TLCPFT and 0.58 for TLCCT). Patients with very low compliance had significantly smaller lung volumes (forced expiratory volume at 1 second, FVC, TLC) and lower diffusion capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide when compared with patients with normal compliance. An FVC cutoff of 3470 cc was 100% sensitive and 51% specific for predicting low compliance. The proposed equation Vt = FVC/8 significantly reduced calculated tidal volume by a mean of 22.5% in patients with low pulmonary compliance without affecting the mean tidal volume in patients with normal compliance (mean difference 0.9%). FVC is more strongly correlated to TLC than PBW and a cutoff of about 3.5 L can be utilized to predict

  9. Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery has several common causes, including the following: Infections at the operative site Lung problems such as pneumonia or collapsed lung ... the trauma of an operation. The risk of infections at the operative site, DVTs, and UTIs can be decreased by meticulous ...

  10. The Effect of Aerobic or Aerobic-Strength Exercise on Body Composition and Functional Capacity in Patients with BMI ≥35 after Bariatric Surgery: a Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassannejad, Alireza; Khalaj, Alireza; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali; Rajabian Tabesh, Mastaneh; Alizadeh, Zahra

    2017-11-01

    Although previous studies suggested that bariatric surgery is the most effective and sustainable treatment method for morbid obesity in long term, but without changing in lifestyle, maintaining optimal weight loss is almost impossible. Sixty morbid obese patients (BMI ≥ 35) were evaluated before and after 12 weeks of bariatric surgery in order to compare the impact of two different exercise programs on body composition and functional capacity outcomes. Participants were divided into three groups: aerobic (A), aerobic-strength (AS), and control (C) group. Aerobic capacity was assessed with 12-min walk-run test (12MWRT). One-repetition maximum (1RM) test was performed to evaluation upper limb muscle strength. Lower extremity functional capacity was assessed by sit-to-stand test. Weight, percent body fat (PBF), and fat mass (FM) reduced greater in the trial groups in comparison to the C group (P exercise on weight and PBF decrease after surgery, and it leads to significant improvement on aerobic capacity. Moreover, doing resisted exercise caused greater preserving of lean mass.

  11. In vitro validation of a novel mechanical model for testing the anchorage capacity of pedicle screws using physiological load application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebsch, Christian; Zimmermann, Julia; Graf, Nicolas; Schilling, Christoph; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Kienle, Annette

    2018-01-01

    Biomechanical in vitro tests analysing screw loosening often include high standard deviations caused by high variabilities in bone mineral density and pedicle geometry, whereas standardized mechanical models made of PU foam often do not integrate anatomical or physiological boundary conditions. The purpose of this study was to develop a most realistic mechanical model for the standardized and reproducible testing of pedicle screws regarding the resistance against screw loosening and the holding force as well as to validate this model by in vitro experiments. The novel mechanical testing model represents all anatomical structures of a human vertebra and is consisting of PU foam to simulate cancellous bone, as well as a novel pedicle model made of short carbon fibre filled epoxy. Six monoaxial cannulated pedicle screws (Ø6.5 × 45mm) were tested using the mechanical testing model as well as human vertebra specimens by applying complex physiological cyclic loading (shear, tension, and bending; 5Hz testing frequency; sinusoidal pulsating forces) in a dynamic materials testing machine with stepwise increasing load after each 50.000 cycles (100.0N shear force + 20.0N per step, 51.0N tension force + 10.2N per step, 4.2Nm bending moment + 0.8Nm per step) until screw loosening was detected. The pedicle screw head was fixed on a firmly clamped rod while the load was applied in the vertebral body. For the in vitro experiments, six human lumbar vertebrae (L1-3, BMD 75.4 ± 4.0mg/cc HA, pedicle width 9.8 ± 0.6mm) were tested after implanting pedicle screws under X-ray control. Relative motions of pedicle screw, specimen fixture, and rod fixture were detected using an optical motion tracking system. Translational motions of the mechanical testing model experiments in the point of load introduction (0.9-2.2mm at 240N shear force) were reproducible within the variation range of the in vitro experiments (0.6-3.5mm at 240N shear force). Screw loosening occurred continuously in

  12. Capacity of the aquatic fern (Salvinia minima Baker) to accumulate high concentrations of nickel in its tissues, and its effect on plant physiological processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, Ignacio I.; Espadas-Gil, Francisco; Talavera-May, Carlos; Fuentes, Gabriela; Santamaría, Jorge M., E-mail: jorgesm@cicy.mx

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We document the capacity of an aquatic fern to hyper-accumulate Ni. • Effects of high Ni concentrations uptake on plant performance is documented. • High concentration of Ni in tissues damage photosynthesis. • Damage is related to carboxylation mechanisms than to electron transfer efficiency. • S. minima is a good candidate for remediation of water bodies contaminated with Ni. - Abstract: An experiment was designed to assess the capacity of Salvinia minima Baker to uptake and accumulate nickel in its tissues and to evaluate whether or not this uptake can affect its physiology. Our results suggest that S. minima plants are able to take up high amounts of nickel in its tissues, particularly in roots. In fact, our results support the idea that S. minima might be considered a hyper-accumulator of nickel, as it is able to accumulate 16.3 mg g{sup −1} (whole plant DW basis). Our results also showed a two-steps uptake pattern of nickel, with a fast uptake of nickel at the first 6 to 12 h of being expose to the metal, followed by a slow take up phase until the end of the experiment at 144 h. S. minima thus, may be considered as a fern useful in the phytoremediation of residual water bodies contaminated with this metal. Also from our results, S. minima can tolerate fair concentrations of the metal; however, at concentrations higher than 80 μM Ni (1.5 mg g{sup −1} internal nickel concentration), its physiological performance can be affected. For instance, the integrity of cell membranes was affected as the metal concentration and exposure time increased. The accumulation of high concentrations of internal nickel did also affect photosynthesis, the efficiency of PSII, and the concentration of photosynthetic pigments, although at a lower extent.

  13. Genome-guided analysis of physiological capacities of Tepidanaerobacter acetatoxydans provides insights into environmental adaptations and syntrophic acetate oxidation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Müller

    Full Text Available This paper describes the genome-based analysis of Tepidanaerobacter acetatoxydans strain Re1, a syntrophic acetate-oxidising bacterium (SAOB. Principal issues such as environmental adaptations, metabolic capacities, and energy conserving systems have been investigated and the potential consequences for syntrophic acetate oxidation discussed. Briefly, in pure culture, T. acetatoxydans grows with different organic compounds and produces acetate as the main product. In a syntrophic consortium with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, it can also reverse its metabolism and instead convert acetate to formate/H2 and CO2. It can only proceed if the product formed is continuously removed. This process generates a very small amount of energy that is scarcely enough for growth, which makes this particular syntrophy of special interest. As a crucial member of the biogas-producing community in ammonium-rich engineered AD processes, genomic features conferring ammonium resistance, bacterial defense, oxygen and temperature tolerance were found, as well as attributes related to biofilm formation and flocculation. It is likely that T. acetatoxydans can form an electrochemical gradient by putative electron-bifurcating Rnf complex and [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases, as observed in other acetogens. However, genomic deficiencies related to acetogenic metabolism and anaerobic respiration were discovered, such as the lack of formate dehydrogenase and F1F0 ATP synthase. This has potential consequences for the metabolic pathways used under SAO and non-SAO conditions. The two complete sets of bacteriophage genomes, which were found to be encoded in the genome, are also worthy of mention.

  14. Physiologic effects of bowel preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Nielsen, Kristine Grubbe; Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2004-01-01

    , plasma and extracellular volume, balance function, and biochemical parameters were measured. RESULTS: Bowel preparation led to a significant decrease in exercise capacity (median, 9 percent) and weight (median, 1.2 kg). Plasma osmolality was significantly increased from 287 to 290 mmol kg(-1), as well......PURPOSE: Despite the universal use of bowel preparation before colonoscopy and colorectal surgery, the physiologic effects have not been described in a standardized setting. This study was designed to investigate the physiologic effects of bowel preparation. METHODS: In a prospective study, 12...... healthy volunteers (median age, 63 years) underwent bowel preparation with bisacodyl and sodium phosphate. Fluid and food intake were standardized according to weight, providing adequate calorie and oral fluid intake. Before and after bowel preparation, weight, exercise capacity, orthostatic tolerance...

  15. A zero phase adaptive fuzzy Kalman filter for physiological tremor suppression in robotically assisted minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Hongqiang; Yang, Chenghao; Liu, Fen; Yun, Jintian; Jin, Guoguang; Chen, Fa

    2016-12-01

    Hand physiological tremor of surgeons can cause vibration at the surgical instrument tip, which may make it difficult for the surgeon to perform fine manipulations of tissue, needles, and sutures. A zero phase adaptive fuzzy Kalman filter (ZPAFKF) is proposed to suppress hand tremor and vibration of a robotic surgical system. The involuntary motion can be reduced by adding a compensating signal that has the same magnitude and frequency but opposite phase with the tremor signal. Simulations and experiments using different filters were performed. Results show that the proposed filter can avoid the loss of useful motion information and time delay, and better suppress minor and varying tremor. The ZPAFKF can provide less error, preferred accuracy, better tremor estimation, and more desirable compensation performance, to suppress hand tremor and decrease vibration at the surgical instrument tip. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Physiological responses to brain stimulation during limbic surgery: further evidence of anterior cingulate modulation of autonomic arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, André Felix; Eskandar, Emad N; Marci, Carl David; Evans, Karleyton Conroy; Dougherty, Darin Dean

    2009-10-01

    In view of conflicting neuroimaging results regarding autonomic-specific activity within the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), we investigated autonomic responses to direct brain stimulation during stereotactic limbic surgery. Skin conductance activity and accelerative heart rate responses to multi-voltage stimulation of the ACC (n = 7) and paralimbic subcaudate (n = 5) regions were recorded during bilateral anterior cingulotomy and bilateral subcaudate tractotomy (in patients that had previously received an adequate lesion in the ACC), respectively. Stimulations in both groups were accompanied by increased autonomic arousal. Skin conductance activity was significantly increased during ACC stimulations compared with paralimbic targets at 2 V (2.34 +/- .68 [score in microSiemens +/- SE] vs. .34 +/- .09, p = .013) and 3 V (3.52 +/- .86 vs. 1.12 +/- .37, p = .036), exhibiting a strong "voltage-response" relationship between stimulus magnitude and response amplitude (difference from 1 to 3 V = 1.15 +/- .90 vs. 3.52 +/- .86, p = .041). Heart rate response was less indicative of between-group differences. This is the first study of its kind aiming at seeking novel insights into the mechanisms responsible for central autonomic modulation. It supports a concept that interregional interactions account for the coordination of autonomic arousal.

  17. [Regional differences in ikigai (reason(s) for living) in elderly people--relationship between ikigai and family structure, physiological situation and functional capacity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akihiro; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Hoshi, Tanji; Shinkai, Shoji

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is a) to make a comparative study of the existence of ikigai (reason(s) for living) in elderly people and its relevance to their family structure, physiological situation and functional capacity in both rural areas and metropolitan suburban areas, and b) position basic research into the structure of ikigai in the near future, by clarifying several related factors, from which the concept of ikigai may be defined. The meaning of the word "ikigai" in Japanese is difficult to express exactly, and specialists in gerontology have varying definitions. If ikigai were translated from Japanese into English, it could be "reason(s) for living", "self-actualization", "meaning of life" and/or "purpose in life". In this paper, ikigai is used to mean "feeling of being alive now and/or individual motivation for living". As of October 2000, we studied 1,544 people aged 65 years and over living in town Y of Niigata Prefecture (rural area), and as of January 2001, we studied 1,002 people in the same age group in town H of Saitama Prefecture (metropolitan suburban area). The above investigations revealed the following characteristics:--(a) Regarding the percentages of persons having or not having ikigai, there were no significant differences between the rural area and the metropolitan suburban area. (b) In both areas, the 3 factors of self-rated level of health, intellectual activeness and social roles, were associated with having ikigai. (c) In the rural area, the family structure was strongly associated with having ikigai, but gender or generation were irrelevant. (d) In the metropolitan suburban area, the hospitalization experience of men was strongly associated with ikigai. Furthermore, there was a strong correlation with generation. In this regard, while the contents of ikigai are seldom examined in detail, clarification of the structure of ikigai should be worked out in the next stage of the study, using covariance structure analysis. In addition the

  18. High-intensity interval training combined with resistance training improves physiological capacities, strength and quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaenker, Pierre; Favret, Fabrice; Lonsdorfer, Evelyne; Muff, Guillaume; de Seze, Jérôme; Isner-Horobeti, Marie-Eve

    2018-02-01

    Numerous studies have shown that mild-to-moderate intensity or resistance exercise training improves physical capacities such as, peak oxygen consumption, maximal tolerated power and strength in multiple sclerosis patients. However, few studies have evaluated the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) associated to with resistance training. Only few studies have analyzed difference between men and women before and after combined training. Moreover, the evaluation of exercise between ambulatory multiple sclerosis patients without disability (Expanded Disability Status Score [EDSS] 0-3) and patients with disabilities (EDSS 3.5-5) was not largely published. The main objective of our study was to determine if HIIT combined with resistance training improved aerobic and strength capacities as well as quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients and if gender and disabilities play a role in these changes. This study was an open-label uncontrolled study. The study was performed outside from conventional care facilities and including homebased training. Twenty-six multiple sclerosis patients have completed the program (19 women, 7 men; mean age 44.6±7.9 years, EDSS 2 [0-5]). We conducted a 12-week program of high-intensity interval training combined with resistance training at body weight. Peak oxygen consumption, maximal tolerated power, lactates, isokinetic strength of quadriceps and hamstrings (at 90°/s, 180°/s, and 240°/s) and quality of life were evaluated before and after the program. Peak oxygen consumption and maximum tolerated power improved by 13.5% and 9.4%, respectively. Isokinetic muscle strength increased in both quadriceps and hamstrings at each speed, with a rebalancing of strength between the two legs in quadriceps. Quality of life was also enhanced in three domains. Women showed better improvements than men in V̇O2peak, maximal tolerated power, lactates at the end of test, and heart rate peak, strength in both quadriceps and hamstrings

  19. Expression of the citrus CsTIP2;1 gene improves tobacco plant growth, antioxidant capacity and physiological adaptation under stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Cristina P S; Neves, Diana M; Cidade, Luciana C; Mendes, Amanda F S; Silva, Delmira C; Almeida, Alex-Alan F; Coelho-Filho, Mauricio A; Gesteira, Abelmon S; Soares-Filho, Walter S; Costa, Marcio G C

    2017-05-01

    Overexpression of the citrus CsTIP2;1 improves plant growth and tolerance to salt and drought stresses by enhancing cell expansion, H 2 O 2 detoxification and stomatal conductance. Tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) are a subfamily of aquaporins, belonging to the major intrinsic protein family. In a previous study, we have shown that a citrus TIP isoform, CsTIP2;1, is highly expressed in leaves and also transcriptionally regulated in leaves and roots by salt and drought stresses and infection by 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', the causal agent of the Huanglongbing disease, suggesting its involvement in the regulation of the flow of water and nutrients required during both normal growth and stress conditions. Here, we show that the overexpression of CsTIP2;1 in transgenic tobacco increases plant growth under optimal and water- and salt-stress conditions and also significantly improves the leaf water and oxidative status, photosynthetic capacity, transpiration rate and water use efficiency of plants subjected to a progressive soil drying. These results correlated with the enhanced mesophyll cell expansion, midrib aquiferous parenchyma abundance, H 2 O 2 detoxification and stomatal conductance observed in the transgenic plants. Taken together, our results indicate that CsTIP2;1 plays an active role in regulating the water and oxidative status required for plant growth and adaptation to stressful environmental conditions and may be potentially useful for engineering stress tolerance in citrus and other crop plants.

  20. Mercury species, selenium, metallothioneins and glutathione in two dolphins from the southeastern Brazilian coast: Mercury detoxification and physiological differences in diving capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrig, Helena A; Hauser-Davis, Rachel A; Seixas, Tercia G; Pinheiro, Ana Beatriz; Di Beneditto, Ana Paula M

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, the concentration of trace elements, total mercury (Hg) and selenium (Se) and mercury forms (MeHg, Hginorg and HgSe) in the vulnerable coastal dolphins Pontoporia blainvillei and Sotalia guianensis were appraised and compared, using metallothioneins (MT) and glutathione (GSH) as biomarkers for trace element exposure. The trace element concentrations varied between muscle and liver tissues, with liver of all dolphin specimens showing higher Hg and Se concentrations than those found in muscle. Hg, MeHg and Hginorg molar concentrations showed a clear increase with Se molar concentrations in the liver of both dolphins, and Se concentrations were higher than those of Hg on a molar basis. Se plays a relevant role in the detoxification of MeHg in the hepatic tissue of both dolphins, forming Hg-Se amorphous crystals in liver. In contrast, MT were involved in the detoxification process of Hginorg in liver. GSH levels in P. blainvillei and S. guianensis muscle tissue suggest that these dolphins have different diving capacities. Muscle Hg concentrations were associated to this tripeptide, which protects dolphin cells against Hg stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Physiological mechanisms for high salt tolerance in wild soybean (Glycine soja) from Yellow River Delta, China: photosynthesis, osmotic regulation, ion flux and antioxidant capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Yan, Kun; Shao, Hongbo; Zhao, Shijie

    2013-01-01

    Glycine soja (BB52) is a wild soybean cultivar grown in coastal saline land in Yellow River Delta, China. In order to reveal the physiological mechanisms adapting to salinity, we examined photosynthesis, ion flux, antioxidant system and water status in Glycine soja under NaCl treatments, taking a cultivated soybean, ZH13, as control. Upon NaCl exposure, higher relative water content and water potential were maintained in the leaf of BB52 than ZH13, which might depend on the more accumulation of osmotic substances such as glycinebetaine and proline. Compared with ZH13, activities of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and contents of ascorbate, glutathione and phenolics were enhanced to a higher level in BB52 leaf under NaCl stress, which could mitigate the salt-induced oxidative damage in BB52. Consistently, lipid peroxidation indicated by malondialdehyde content was lower in BB52 leaf. Photosynthetic rate (Pn) was decreased by NaCl stress in BB52 and ZH13, and the decrease was greater in ZH13. The decreased Pn in BB52 was mainly due to stomatal limitation. The inhibited activation of rubisco enzyme in ZH13 due to the decrease of rubisco activase content became an important limiting factor of Pn, when NaCl concentration increased to 200 mM. Rubisco activase in BB52 was not affected by NaCl stress. Less negative impact in BB52 derived from lower contents of Na(+) and Cl(-) in the tissues, and non-invasive micro-test technique revealed that BB52 roots had higher ability to extrude Na(+) and Cl(-). Wild soybean is a valuable genetic resource, and our study may provide a reference for molecular biologist to improve the salt tolerance of cultivated soybean in face of farmland salinity.

  2. Swimming physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmér, I

    1992-05-01

    Swimming takes place in a medium, that presents different gravitational and resistive forces, respiratory conditions and thermal stress compared to air. The energy cost of propulsion in swimming is high, but a considerable reduction occurs at a given velocity as result of regular swim training. In medley swimmers the energy cost is lowest for front crawl, followed by backstroke, butterfly and breast-stroke. Cardiac output is probably not limiting for performance since swimmers easily achieve higher values during running. Maximal heart rate, however, is lowered by approx. 10 beats/min during swimming compared to running. Most likely active muscle mass is smaller and rate of power production lesser in swimming. Local factors, such as peripheral circulation, capillary density, perfusion pressure and metabolic capacity of active muscles, are important determinants of the power production capacity and emphasize the role of swim specific training movements. Improved swimming technique and efficiency are likely to explain much of the continuous progress in performance. Rational principles based on improved understanding of the biomechanics and physiology of swimming should be guidelines for swimmers and coaches in their efforts to explore the limits of human performance.

  3. Railway capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Lavrič, Tadeja

    2012-01-01

    In the first part of the thesis, the concepts of railway capacity and capacity consumption are defined. Experts have in the past defined railway capacity in many different ways. This thesis outlines some definitions of railway capacity and capacity consumption, including the definition of railway capacity in accordance with the UIC code 406 (2004), given by the International Union of Railways in order to standardize the definition of railway capacity. Capacity and capacity consumption are dir...

  4. Expectations of Sinus Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ARS HOME ANATOMY Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ... reduce the pressure in your nose. Avoid strenuous exercise for the first 2 weeks after surgery. Also ...

  5. Nasal Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Nasal Physiology Jeremiah A. Alt, MD, PhD Noam Cohen, MD, ... control the inflammation. CONCLUSION An understanding of the physiology of the nose is critical to understand nasal ...

  6. Prehabilitation Before Major Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Francis

    2018-01-01

    Prehabilitation is a new term for preoperative rehabilitation before major surgery. Some authors use the short form 'Prehab', though it is not so widely used. Prehabilitation involves measures to improve the physical, physiological, metabolic and psychosocial reserves in preparation for an elective surgery. This involves exercise, nutrition, education and psychosocial interventions.

  7. Bone biology and physiology: Part I. The fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Donald W; Dumanian, Gregory A

    2012-06-01

    The principles of bone biology and physiology permeate all subspecialty practices in plastic and reconstructive surgery from hand surgery to aesthetic surgery. Despite its importance in our practices, the biology of bone healing and bone physiology rarely surfaces within textbooks, literature reviews, or residency curricula. In this article, the authors present the first of a two-part series reviewing the important concepts of bone biology and bone physiology relevant to plastic surgery in an effort to ameliorate this educational gap.

  8. Rice Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.A. Counce; Davidi R. Gealy; Shi-Jean Susana Sung

    2002-01-01

    Physiology occurs tn physical space through chemical reactions constrained by anatomy and morphology, yet guided by genetics. Physiology has been called the logic of life. Genes encode structural and fimcdonal proteins. These proteins are subsequently processed to produce enzymes that direct and govern the biomechanical processes involved in the physiology of the...

  9. Evaluation of the cerebral vasodilatory capacity by the acetazolamide test before EC-IC bypass surgery in patients with occlusion of the internal carotid artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorstrup, S; Brun, B; Lassen, N A

    1986-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by xenon-133 inhalation tomography in 18 patients with cerebrovascular disease before and 4 months after extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery. Only patients who showed a reduced CBF in areas that were intact on the CT scan and relevant to the clinical...... the patients with a compromised collateral circulation and hence reduced CBF due to reduced perfusion pressure, a cerebral vasodilatory stress test was performed using acetazolamide (Diamox). In normal subjects, Diamox has been shown to increase tomographic CBF without change of the flow distribution...

  10. Robotic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... Robotic surgery is similar to laparoscopic surgery. It can be performed through smaller cuts than open surgery. ...

  11. Emergency surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoneham, M; Murray, D; Foss, N

    2014-01-01

    undertaken on elderly patients with limited physiological reserve. National audits have reported variations in care quality, data that are increasingly being used to drive quality improvement through professional guidance. Given that the number of elderly patients presenting for emergency surgery is likely...... to rise as the population ages, this review summarises the evidence on which such guidance is based, and provides information about how anaesthetists might participate in audit and research aimed at improving local and national outcomes for these most vulnerable of patients....

  12. Robust surgery loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans, Elias W.; Wullink, Gerhard; van Houdenhoven, Mark; Kazemier, Geert

    2008-01-01

    We consider the robust surgery loading problem for a hospital’s operating theatre department, which concerns assigning surgeries and sufficient planned slack to operating room days. The objective is to maximize capacity utilization and minimize the risk of overtime, and thus cancelled patients. This

  13. Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Body Looking and feeling your best Cosmetic surgery Cosmetic surgery Teens might have cosmetic surgery for a number ... about my body? What are the risks of cosmetic surgery? top People who have cosmetic surgery face many ...

  14. Physiological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natera, E.S.

    1998-01-01

    The physiological characteristics of man depend on the intake, metabolism and excretion of stable elements from food, water, and air. The physiological behavior of natural radionuclides and radionuclides from nuclear weapons testing and from the utilization of nuclear energy is believed to follow the pattern of stable elements. Hence information on the normal physiological processes occurring in the human body plays an important role in the assessment of the radiation dose received by man. Two important physiological parameters needed for internal dose determination are the pulmonary function and the water balance. In the Coordinated Research Programme on the characterization of Asian population, five participants submitted data on these physiological characteristics - China, India, Japan, Philippines and Viet Nam. During the CRP, data on other pertinent characteristics such as physical and dietary were simultaneously being collected. Hence, the information on the physiological characteristics alone, coming from the five participants were not complete and are probably not sufficient to establish standard values for the Reference Asian Man. Nonetheless, the data collected is a valuable contribution to this research programme

  15. Mathematical physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Sneyd, James

    2009-01-01

    There has been a long history of interaction between mathematics and physiology. This book looks in detail at a wide selection of mathematical models in physiology, showing how physiological problems can be formulated and studied mathematically, and how such models give rise to interesting and challenging mathematical questions. With its coverage of many recent models it gives an overview of the field, while many older models are also discussed, to put the modern work in context. In this second edition the coverage of basic principles has been expanded to include such topics as stochastic differential equations, Markov models and Gibbs free energy, and the selection of models has also been expanded to include some of the basic models of fluid transport, respiration/perfusion, blood diseases, molecular motors, smooth muscle, neuroendrocine cells, the baroreceptor loop, turboglomerular oscillations, blood clotting and the retina. Owing to this extensive coverage, the second edition is published in two volumes. ...

  16. Regulatory Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  17. Maze Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center > Maze Surgery Menu Topics Topics FAQs Maze Surgery Article Info En español Electrical impulses in your ... called an arrhythmia. Why do I need Maze surgery? Maze surgery is also called the Maze procedure. ...

  18. Exercise physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    The passing of Professor Bengt Saltin on September 12, 2014 truly marks the end of an era. As editor of the Journal of Applied Physiology and one of Bengt’s many collaborators and colleagues, I wanted the Journal to celebrate his many seminal contributions by means of an Editorial. Professor Bente...

  19. Environmental physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Summaries of research projects conducted during 1978 and 1979 are presented. Subject areas include: the effects of environmental pollutants on homeostasis of the hematopoietic system; pollutant effects on steroid metabolism; pollutant effects on pulmonary macrophages; effects of toxic gases on lung cells; the development of immunological methods for assessing lung damage at the cellular level; the response of erythropoietin concentration to various physiological changes; and the study of actinide metabolism in monkey skeletons

  20. The alcohol patient and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, H

    1999-01-01

    Alcohol abusers have a threefold increased risk of post-operative morbidity after surgery. The most frequent complications are infections, cardiopulmonary insufficiency, and bleeding episodes. Pathogenesis is suppressed immune capacity, subclinical cardiac dysfunction, and haemostatic imbalance...

  1. Carrying Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, Henning; Andersen, Jan; Kjærgård, Bente

    2012-01-01

    A spatial planning act was introduced inIndonesia 1992 and renewed in 2008. It emphasised the planning role of decentralised authorities. The spatial planning act covers both spatial and environmental issues. It defines the concept of carrying capacity and includes definitions of supportive....../cities. Four different sectors (water, food production, waste, and forests) were selected as core areas for decentralised spatial planning. Indicators for SCC and ACC were identified and assessed with regard to relevance and quantifiability. For each of the indicators selected, a legal threshold or guiding...... was introduced inIndonesia 1992 and renewed in 2008. It emphasised the planning role of decentralised authorities. The spatial planning act covers both spatial and environmental issues. It defines the concept of carrying capacity and includes definitions of supportive carrying capacity (SCC) and assimilative...

  2. Occupational physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Toomingas, Allan; Tornqvist, Ewa Wigaeus

    2011-01-01

    In a clear and accessible presentation, Occupational Physiology focuses on important issues in the modern working world. Exploring major public health problems-such as musculoskeletal disorders and stress-this book explains connections between work, well-being, and health based on up-to-date research in the field. It provides useful methods for risk assessment and guidelines on arranging a good working life from the perspective of the working individual, the company, and society as a whole.The book focuses on common, stressful situations in different professions. Reviewing bodily demands and r

  3. Turbinate surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery; Nasal obstruction - turbinate surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or ... This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  4. Station Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex

    2011-01-01

    the probability of conflicts and the minimum headway times into account. The last method analyzes how optimal platform tracks are used by examining the arrival and departure pattern of the trains. The developed methods can either be used separately to analyze specific characteristics of the capacity of a station...

  5. Exerting Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, J Michael; Phillips, Carolyn A

    2017-05-01

    Patient safety has been at the forefront of nursing research since the release of the Institute of Medicine's report estimating the number of preventable adverse events in hospital settings; yet no research to date has incorporated the perspectives of bedside nurses using classical grounded theory (CGT) methodology. This CGT study explored the perceptions of bedside registered nurses regarding patient safety in adult acute care hospitals. Data analysis used three techniques unique to CGT-the constant comparative method, coding, and memoing-to explore the values, realities, and beliefs of bedside nurses about patient safety. The analysis resulted in a substantive theory, Exerting Capacity, which explained how bedside nurses balance the demands of keeping their patients safe. Exerting Capacity has implications for health care organization leaders, nursing leaders, and bedside nurses; it also has indications for future research into the concept of patient safety.

  6. Space Physiology within an Exercise Physiology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jason R.; West, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Compare and contrast strategies remain common pedagogical practices within physiological education. With the support of an American Physiological Society Teaching Career Enhancement Award, we have developed a junior- or senior-level undergraduate curriculum for exercise physiology that compares and contrasts the physiological adaptations of…

  7. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  10. Capacity Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloy, Brian; Mallick, Shahid

    2014-01-01

    Outcomes & Recommendations: • Significant increase needed in the nuclear workforce both to replace soon-to-retire current generation and to staff large numbers of new units planned • Key message, was the importance of an integrated approach to workforce development. • IAEA and other International Organisations were asked to continue to work on Knowledge Management, Networks and E&T activities • IAEA requested to conduct Global Survey of HR needs – survey initiated but only 50% of operating countries (30% of capacity) took part, so results inconclusive

  11. Environmental physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, P.H.; Sacher, G.A.; Staffeldt, E.F.

    1977-01-01

    The analysis of lifetime effects of ionizing radiation was at first directed almost exclusively toward effects on disease incidence and life-span, because these kinds of cumulative damage were the most prominent and serious late effects of ionizing radiation. The experimental program of our team on the effects of life-time gamma-ray exposure on the survival of mice and other rodent species was completed several years ago, but important analysis and modeling efforts continue. A report of one aspect of this analytical effort is included here. A life is measured better by a lifetime productivity score than by years alone. The importance of productivity measures of the toxic action of energy by-products is increased now that the fossil fuel products are receiving attention, because the inhaled combustion products, in particular, have their major effect on work performance and low-level chronic disease, instead of on life shortening by terminal cancer. The first stages of a program to develop simple measures of performance capacity in rodents, based on indices of energy metabolism, motor activity, and body temperature, are described. The quadratic relation of survival time to daily dose was studied for 15 mammalian species

  12. Capacity and Capacity Utilization in Fishing Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkley, James E; Squires, Dale

    1999-01-01

    Excess capacity of fishing fleets is one of the most pressing problems facing the world's fisheries and the sustainable harvesting of resource stocks. Considerable confusion persists over the definition and measurement of capacity and capacity utilization in fishing. Fishing capacity and capacity utilization, rather than capital (or effort) utilization, provide the appropriate framework. This paper provides both technological-economic and economic definitions of capacity and excess capacity i...

  13. Physiologic effects of bowel preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Nielsen, Kristine Grubbe; Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2004-01-01

    healthy volunteers (median age, 63 years) underwent bowel preparation with bisacodyl and sodium phosphate. Fluid and food intake were standardized according to weight, providing adequate calorie and oral fluid intake. Before and after bowel preparation, weight, exercise capacity, orthostatic tolerance...... preparation has significant adverse physiologic effects, which may be attributed to dehydration. The majority of these findings is small and may not be of clinical relevance in otherwise healthy patients undergoing bowel preparation and following recommendations for oral fluid intake....

  14. Hemorrhoid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery. Hemorrhoid surgery may involve: Putting a small rubber band around a hemorrhoid to shrink it by blocking blood flow. Stapling a hemorrhoid to block blood flow, causing it to shrink. Using a ...

  15. Bariatric Surgery and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jonathan G; Yazdi, Farshid; Reisin, Efrain

    2017-12-08

    Obesity continues to increase in prevalence worldwide. Hypertension has long been associated with obesity, and weight loss continues to be a first-line therapy in the treatment of hypertension. Lifestyle modification and pharmacologic therapy, however, often meet with treatment failure. Bariatric surgery continues to be the most successful approach to sustained weight loss. This review focuses on the underlying physiologic mechanisms of obesity-hypertension, and the impact of bariatric surgery on the treatment of hypertension. Current available literature on the physiologic mechanisms of obesity-hypertension, and the major trials, meta-analyses and systematic reviews of the impact of bariatric surgery procedures on hypertension are reviewed. Evidence suggests significant improvement in obesity-hypertension in patients who undergo surgical weight-reduction procedures. Malabsorptive techniques such as the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or surgical resection techniques such as laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy appear to offer superior results in regards to hypertension control over restrictive techniques such as Gastric Banding. Though long-term control of hypertension following surgery remains a concern, available follow-up post-operative data of up to 10 years suggests a sustained, if lessened, effect on hypertension control over time. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2017. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. [Human physiology: kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natochin, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    The content of human physiology as an independent part of current physiology is discussed. Substantiated is the point that subjects of human physiology are not only special sections of physiology where functions are inherent only in human (physiology of intellectual activity, speech, labor, sport), but also in peculiarities of functions, specificity of regulation of each of physiological systems. By the example of physiology of kidney and water-salt balance there are shown borders of norm, peculiarities of regulation in human, new chapters of renal physiology which have appeared in connection with achievements of molecular physiology.

  17. Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... idea for teens? As with everything, there are right and wrong reasons to have surgery. Cosmetic surgery is unlikely to change your life. Most board-certified plastic surgeons spend a lot of time ... the right reasons. Many plastic surgery procedures are just that — ...

  18. Applied physiology of rugby league.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbett, Tim; King, Trish; Jenkins, David

    2008-01-01

    Rugby league football is played in several countries worldwide. A rugby league team consists of 13 players (6 forwards and 7 backs), with matches played over two 40-minute halves separated by a 10-minute rest interval. Several studies have documented the physiological capacities of rugby league players and the physiological demands of competition, with the physiological capacities of players and the physiological demands of competition increasing as the playing level is increased. However, there is also evidence to suggest that the physiological capacities of players may deteriorate as the season progresses, with reductions in muscular power and maximal aerobic power and increases in skinfold thickness occurring towards the end of the rugby league season, when training loads are lowest and match loads and injury rates are at their highest. Player fatigue and playing intensity have been suggested to contribute to injuries in rugby league, with a recent study reporting a significant correlation (r=0.74) between match injury rates and playing intensity in semi-professional rugby league players. Studies have also reported a higher risk of injury in players with low 10-m and 40-m speed, while players with a low maximal aerobic power had a greater risk of sustaining a contact injury. Furthermore, players who completed injury were at greater risk of sustaining a subsequent injury. These findings provide some explanation for the high incidence of fatigue-related injuries in rugby league players and highlight the importance of speed and endurance training to reduce the incidence of injury in rugby league players. To date, most, but not all, studies have investigated the movement patterns and physiological demands of rugby league competition, with little emphasis on how training activities simulate the competition environment. An understanding of the movement patterns and physiological demands of specific individual positions during training and competition would allow the

  19. Controlled hypotension for spinal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Dutton, Richard P.

    2004-01-01

    Controlled, deliberate hypotension during anesthesia for major spinal surgery reduces intraoperative blood loss and transfusion requirement. Hypotension may be achieved with increased doses of volatile anesthetic agents or by continuous infusion of vasodilating drugs. Safe application of this technique requires knowledge of the physiology of hemorrhagic shock and close intraoperative monitoring to avoid vasoconstriction and end-organ ischemia.

  20. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3 Department of Paediatric Surgery, Sophia's Children Hospital/Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. 4 Department of Paediatric Surgery, Emma's Children Hospital/Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. 5 Department of Radiology, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, ...

  1. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastroschisis in a developing country: poor resuscitation is a more significant predictor of mortality than postnatal transfer time. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY. P Stevens,1 E Muller,1 P Becker2. 1 Department of Paediatric Surgery, Steve Biko Academic Hospital, University of Pretoria. 2 South African Medical Research Council.

  2. Perioperative functional residual capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahba, R W

    1991-04-01

    The literature dealing with the magnitude, mechanism and effects of reduced FRC in the perioperative period is reviewed. During general anaesthesia FRC is reduced by approximately 20%. The reduction is greater in the obese and in patients with COPD. The most likely mechanism is the loss of inspiratory muscle tone of the muscles acting on the rib cage. Gas trapping is an additional mechanism. Lung compliance decreases and airways resistance increases, in large part, due to decreased FRC. The larynx is displaced anteriorly and elongated, making laryngoscopy and intubation more difficult. The change in FRC creates or increases intrapulmonary shunt and areas of low ventilation to perfusion. This is due to the occurrence of compression atelectasis, and to regional changes in mechanics and airway closure which tend to reduce ventilation to dependent lung zones which are still well perfused. Abdominal and thoracic operations tend to increase shunting further. Large tidal volume but not PEEP will improve oxygenation, although both increase FRC. Both FRC and vital capacity are reduced following abdominal and thoracic surgery in a predictable pattern. The mechanism is the combined effect of incisional pain and reflex dysfunction of the diaphragm. Additional effects of thoracic surgery include pleural effusion, cooling of the phrenic nerve and mediastinal widening. Postoperative hypoxaemia is a function of reduced FRC and airway closure. There is no real difference among the various methods of active lung expansion in terms of the speed of restoration of lung function, or in preventing postoperative atelectasis/pneumonia. Epidural analgesia does not influence the rate of recovery of lung function, nor does it prevent atelectasis/pneumonia.

  3. Exercise-induced physiological lubrication mechanisms dissipating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arthritis is a painful inflammatory joint disease that limits the affected joint's range of motion (ROM), muscle strength and endurance. As a result, cardiorespiratory capacity, physical functioning and quality of life of an individual are negatively affected. Certain physiological interventions do help alleviate joint pain and stiffness ...

  4. The alcohol patient and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, H

    1999-01-01

    Alcohol abusers have a threefold increased risk of post-operative morbidity after surgery. The most frequent complications are infections, cardiopulmonary insufficiency, and bleeding episodes. Pathogenesis is suppressed immune capacity, subclinical cardiac dysfunction, and haemostatic imbalance....... The economic implications of alcohol abuse in surgical patients are tremendous. Interventional studies are required to reduce future increases in post-operative morbidity....

  5. Physiological Information Database (PID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has developed a physiological information database (created using Microsoft ACCESS) intended to be used in PBPK modeling. The database contains physiological parameter values for humans from early childhood through senescence as well as similar data for laboratory animal spec...

  6. Biological properties of extracellular vesicles and their physiological functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yáñez-Mó, María; Siljander, Pia R-M; Andreu, Zoraida; Zavec, Apolonija Bedina; Borràs, Francesc E; Buzas, Edit I; Buzas, Krisztina; Casal, Enriqueta; Cappello, Francesco; Carvalho, Joana; Colás, Eva; Cordeiro-da Silva, Anabela; Fais, Stefano; Falcon-Perez, Juan M; Ghobrial, Irene M; Giebel, Bernd; Gimona, Mario; Graner, Michael; Gursel, Ihsan; Gursel, Mayda; Heegaard, Niels H H; Hendrix, An; Kierulf, Peter; Kokubun, Katsutoshi; Kosanovic, Maja; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Laitinen, Saara; Lässer, Cecilia; Lener, Thomas; Ligeti, Erzsébet; Linē, Aija; Lipps, Georg; Llorente, Alicia; Lötvall, Jan; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Marcilla, Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria; Nazarenko, Irina; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; Nyman, Tuula A; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Olivan, Mireia; Oliveira, Carla; Pállinger, Éva; Del Portillo, Hernando A; Reventós, Jaume; Rigau, Marina; Rohde, Eva; Sammar, Marei; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Santarém, N; Schallmoser, Katharina; Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe; Stoorvogel, Willem|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074352385; Stukelj, Roman; Van der Grein, Susanne G|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412755211; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Wauben, Marca H M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/112675735; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been recognized as potent vehicles of intercellular communication, both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This is due to their capacity to transfer proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, thereby influencing various physiological and pathological

  7. Rodding Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usually undertaken as a scheduled elective procedure. An optimal age for a first rodding surgery has not ... which may prevent or postpone the need for replacement. The smallest diameter expanding rods are still too ...

  8. Lung surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the pulmonary artery ( pulmonary embolism ) Treat complications of tuberculosis Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery can be used to ... Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed ...

  9. Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... action of certain hormones, such as ghrelin —“the hunger hormone.” People have these types of surgery if ... organizations to further patient education on hormone related issues. Network Sponsors The Hormone Health Network is supported ...

  10. Epilepsy Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and the portion of your brain that's involved: Memory problems. The temporal lobe handles memory and language functions, so surgery on this part ... computerized tomography (SPECT). The scan image varies in color depending on the amount of blood flow in ...

  11. After Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    After any operation, you'll have some side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There ... anesthesia, or accidental injury. Some people have a greater risk of complications because of other medical conditions. ...

  12. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... Barnett J, Mohanty A, Desai SK, Patterson JT. Neurosurgery. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, ...

  13. Female genital cosmetic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Dorothy; Lefebvre, Guylaine; Bouchard, Celine; Shapiro, Jodi; Blake, Jennifer; Allen, Lisa; Cassell, Krista

    2013-12-01

    To provide Canadian gynaecologists with evidence-based direction for female genital cosmetic surgery in response to increasing requests for, and availability of, vaginal and vulvar surgeries that fall well outside the traditional realm of medically-indicated reconstructions. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed or MEDLINE, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library in 2011 and 2012 using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words (female genital cosmetic surgery). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to May 2012. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table). Recommendations 1. The obstetrician and gynaecologist should play an important role in helping women to understand their anatomy and to respect individual variations. (III-A) 2. For women who present with requests for vaginal cosmetic procedures, a complete medical, sexual, and gynaecologic history should be obtained and the absence of any major sexual or psychological dysfunction should be ascertained. Any possibility of coercion or exploitation should be ruled out. (III-B) 3. Counselling should be a priority for women requesting female genital cosmetic surgery. Topics should include normal variation and physiological changes over the lifespan, as well as the possibility of unintended consequences of cosmetic surgery to the genital area. The lack of evidence regarding outcomes and the lack of data on the

  14. Plant Physiology in Greenhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvelink, E.; Kierkels, T.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2004 Ep Heuvelink and Tijs Kierkels have been writing a continuing series of plant physiology articles for the Dutch horticultural journal Onder Glas and the international edition In Greenhouses. The book Plant Physiology in Greenhouses consists of 50 of their plant physiology articles. The

  15. Bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmali, Shahzeer; Stoklossa, Carlene Johnson; Sharma, Arya; Stadnyk, Janet; Christiansen, Sandra; Cottreau, Danielle; Birch, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To review the management of bariatric surgical patients. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched, as well as PubMed US National Library, from January 1950 to December 2009. Evidence was levels I, II, and III. MAIN MESSAGE Bariatric surgery should be considered for obese patients at high risk of morbidity and mortality who have not achieved adequate weight loss with lifestyle and medical management and who are suffering from the complications of obesity. Bariatric surgery can result in substantial weight loss, resolution of comorbid conditions, and improved quality of life. The patient’s weight-loss history; his or her personal accountability, responsibility, and comprehension; and the acceptable level of risk must be taken into account. Complications include technical failure, bleeding, abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting, excess loose skin, bowel obstruction, ulcers, and anastomotic stricture. Lifelong monitoring by a multidisciplinary team is essential. CONCLUSION Limited long-term success of behavioural and pharmacologic therapies in severe obesity has led to renewed interest in bariatric surgery. Success with bariatric surgery is more likely when multidisciplinary care providers, in conjunction with primary care providers, assess, treat, monitor, and evaluate patients before and after surgery. Family physicians will play a critical role in counseling patients about bariatric surgery and will need to develop skills in managing these patients in the long-term. PMID:20841586

  16. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is ...

  17. Análise pré e pós-operatória da capacidade funcional e qualidade de vida de pacientes portadores de Osteoartrose de quadril submetidos à Artroplastia Total Pre- and Post-Surgery analysis of functional capacity and quality of life of patienst with Osteoarthritis submitted to Total Hip Artroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lislei Jorge Patrizzi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a capacidade funcional da articulação do quadril e a qualidade de vida de pacientes portadores de osteoartrose submetidos à artroplastia total. MÉTODOS: foram avaliados 12 pacientes através do questionário Harris Hip Score (modificado/ escala de 0-95 pontos e goniometria no pré e pós-operatório de artroplastia total de quadril. RESULTADOS: a amplitude de movimento mostrou-se incompleta em todos os arcos de movimento no pré-operatório. No pós-operatório os valores aumentaram significativamente na flexão (p=0,007, extensão (p=0,02, abdução (p=0,001, rotação medial (p=0,0002 e lateral (p=0,01, apenas o aumento do movimento de adução de quadril não foi significativo (p=0,08. A medida do escore obtido através do questionário no pré-operatório foi 39,7 pontos e no pós-operatório 74,1 pontos (POBJECTIVE: To evaluate the functional capacity of the hip articulation and the quality of life of patients with osteoarthritis submitted to total artroplasty. METHODS: 12 patients were assessed through the questionnaire Harris Hip Score (modified/scale of 0-95 points and goniometry in the pre- and post-surgery of total hip artroplasty. RESULTS: The pre-surgery questionnaire score was 39.7 and in the post-surgery the average score reached 74.1 points (p = 0.000001. The range of motion of the hip was incomplete in all the movement arches in the pre-surgery, but in the post-surgery this value increased significantly in flexion (p = 0.007, extension (p = 0.02, abduction (p = 0.001, medial rotation (p = 0.0002 and lateral rotation (p = 0.01; only the aduction movement was not significantly increased (p = 0.08. CONCLUSIONS: Total hip artroplasty reliefs patients pain, improves daily life activities and increases the hip range of motion; patients, however, relate fear and insecurity in the accomplishment of those activities.

  18. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  19. Mohs micrographic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Basal cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Squamous cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery ... Mohs surgery usually takes place in the doctor's office. The surgery is started early in the morning and is ...

  20. Doppler radar physiological sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lubecke, Victor M; Droitcour, Amy D; Park, Byung-Kwon; Singh, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive description of the theory and practical implementation of Doppler radar-based physiological monitoring. This book includes an overview of current physiological monitoring techniques and explains the fundamental technology used in remote non-contact monitoring methods. Basic radio wave propagation and radar principles are introduced along with the fundamentals of physiological motion and measurement. Specific design and implementation considerations for physiological monitoring radar systems are then discussed in detail. The authors address current research and commercial development of Doppler radar based physiological monitoring for healthcare and other applications.

  1. Physiologic time: A hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Damien; West, Bruce J.

    2013-06-01

    The scaling of respiratory metabolism with body size in animals is considered by many to be a fundamental law of nature. One apparent consequence of this law is the scaling of physiologic time with body size, implying that physiologic time is separate and distinct from clock time. Physiologic time is manifest in allometry relations for lifespans, cardiac cycles, blood volume circulation, respiratory cycle, along with a number of other physiologic phenomena. Herein we present a theory of physiologic time that explains the allometry relation between time and total body mass averages as entailed by the hypothesis that the fluctuations in the total body mass are described by a scaling probability density.

  2. Restoration of the jawline and the neck after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclafani, Anthony P

    2005-02-01

    Bariatric surgery can result in massive, rapid weight loss. Patients who undergo this surgery can be left with significant facial and neck skin redundancy and may request restorative facial plastic surgery. Optimal results require a thorough understanding of the unique physiologic, metabolic, and anatomic findings in these patients. Modifications of standard rhytidectomy techniques are necessary to suit the specific features of the patient after bariatric surgery.

  3. A review of the physiological and anthropometrical characteristics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amateur forwards had a higher estimated body fat percentage (19.9%), lower body mass (90.8 kg), lower vertical jump height (38.1 cm) and lower estimated VO2MAX (38.1 ml.kg-1.min-1) than semi-professional and professional players. Anthropometric and physiologic capacities of rugby league players and the physiologic ...

  4. Antioxidant capacity and physical exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Marciniak

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is a presentation of current knowledge regarding the changes of plasma antioxidant capacity observed in response to physical exercise. Human body created the enzymatic and non-enzymatic systems, which play a protective role in the harmful impact of free radicals. Those two systems constitute what is known as the plasma total antioxidant capacity. The amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (NOS in combination with oxidation processes increases in some tissues during physiological response to physical exercise. These changes are observed after single bout of exercise as well as after regular training. The response of human body to physical exercise can be analysed using various models of exercise test. Application of repeated type of exhaustion allows for characterizing the ability of human body to adjust to the increased energy loss and increased oxygen consumption. This article presents the characteristics of components of plasma antioxidant capacity, the mechanisms of free radicals production and their role in human body. It discusses also the currently used methods of detecting changes in total antioxidant capacity and its individual elements in response to single bout of exercise and regular training. It presents the review of literature about research performed in groups of both regularly training and low exercise activity individuals as well as in group of healthy subjects and patients with circulation diseases.

  5. Sexual and psychological functioning in women after pelvic surgery for gynaecological cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, L.; Enzlin, P.; Verhaeghe, J.; Vergote, I.; Amant, F.

    2009-01-01

    Pelvic surgery for gynecological cancer can affect sexuality through a number of anatomical, physiological and psychological mechanisms. We aimed to examine the prevalence Of Sexual dysfunction and psychological functioning in women who underwent pelvic surgery for gynecological cancer. Fifty women

  6. Effects of types of media and NPK fertilizer on the rooting capacity of chrysanthemum cuttings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budiarto, K.; Sulyo, Y.; Dwi, E.; Maaswinkel, R.H.M.

    2006-01-01

    Physiological status of chrysanthemum cuttings during rooting process highly influences plant growth and flower production. Amongst other aspects, rooting capacity of the cuttings is the most important. Rooting capacity is influenced by environmental conditions such as growing medium and nutrition.

  7. Bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: In almost six decades different surgical techniques have been developed to treat patients with morbid obesity. Various surgical techniques are generally divided with respect to their effect into restrictive, malabsorbtive and humoral and a combination of these. Surgically modified human metabolism ameliorates metabolic diseases, particularly diabetes, even in nonobese patients. The understanding of metabolic effects changed the traditional paradigm of bariatric surgery from simple weight-loss procedure to metabolic surgery affecting whole-body metabolism. Proper surgical technique for individual patient is the most important factor influencing long- term results, comorbidities and quality of life. Recommendations for patient selection, surgical methods and pre- and postoperative patient management are to be respected. Metabolic surgery principles and current concepts are presented.

  8. SUSPENSION MICROLARYNGOSCOPIC SURGERY AND INDIRECT MICROLARYNGOSTROBOSCOPIC SURGERY FOR BENIGN LESIONS OF THE VOCAL FOLDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIKKERS, FG; SULTER, AM

    1994-01-01

    A prospective study was designed to compare the effects on voice capacities after either suspension microlaryngoscopic surgery or indirect microlaryngostroboscopic surgery. Patients where the clinical diagnosis 'dysphonia due to a benign lesion of the vocal fold' was made, and who could be operated

  9. Endocrine Function after Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Suk; Sandoval, Darleen A

    2017-06-18

    Obesity increases the risks of metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Bariatric surgery is the most successful therapeutic option that causes sustained weight loss and improvements in obesity comorbidities. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) are two of the most frequently performed bariatric surgeries. Despite their different anatomical rearrangement, they have remarkably similar success in both weight loss and T2DM remission. Interestingly, they also both cause a wide range of endocrine changes. Many of these endocrine changes are reflected specifically within the intestine and are implicated as mechanisms for the metabolic success of surgery. However, while most of the work shows that these hormonal changes are associated with the metabolic changes after surgery, causation has been difficult to ascertain. Here, we review the endocrine changes after RYGB and VSG and explore their mechanistic role in the success of bariatric surgery. Further, we explore important changes in gastrointestinal function and the role of these changes in the increase in postprandial endocrine responses after bariatric surgery. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:783-798, 2017. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Cosmetic surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The psychotherapeutic nature of cosmetic surgery is emphasised by outlining the range of symptoms from which patients suffer and by explaining the sequence of psychological reactions which cause them. The principles which govern the selection of patients are defined. A brief account of each of the main cosmetic operations is given together with notes on their limitations and risks.

  11. PLASTIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surgery or subcutaneous mastectomy utilizing a periareolar or circumareolar ... old. Informed consent was obtained. The height of the patients was measured from heel to vertex with a standard height measuring device. The chest circumference was ... The procedure was followed with liposuction 3-6 months later if required.

  12. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: The multidisciplinary management of Breast Cancer (BC) has evolved over the past 50 years: the patient is offered a choice of .... Choice of procedure. – For women with early BC, there is essentially a choice between 2 procedures: mastectomy or breast conserving surgery with radiation (BCT). The standard.

  13. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schwab , using a three-phase approach.5 In 1998, Moore et al. extended the concept and described the five-stage approach.6. The aim of damage control surgery is to prevent severely injured patients from developing the “lethal triad” of hypothermia, coagulopathy and worsening acidosis, as this confers a dismal prognosis ...

  14. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We plan to protocolise earlier surgery and blood conservation strategies intraoperatively in addition to a restrictive strategy in ..... Marshall JC. Review Transfusion trigger: when to transfuse? Crit Care. 2004;8(Suppl 2):S31-3. 11. Hofmann A, Farmer S, Towler SC. Strategies to preempt and reduce the use of blood products: ...

  15. Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cosmetic-surgery/SN00006 Medical Tourism (Copyright © American Society of Plastic Surgeons) — People considering ... in exotic vacation spots. This publication talks about "medical tourism" and whether it's safe. http://www.plasticsurgery.org/ ...

  16. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Surgery, University of Cape Town Health Sciences Faculty, Groote Schuur Hospital, Observatory, Cape Town,. South Africa ... included all district, regional and tertiary hospitals in the nine provinces. Clinics and so-called ..... large contingency of senior general surgeons from countries such as Cuba, who have ...

  17. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. J Surg Oncol. 2016;113(2):188-193. http:// dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.24125. 2. Wente MN, Veit JA, Bassi C, et al. Postpancreatectomy hemorrhage (PPH): An international study group of pancreatic surgery (ISGPS) definition. Surg. 2007;142(1):20-25. http://.

  18. Metabolic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Manan; Schauer, Philip R; Kaplan, Lee M

    2018-01-01

    the superiority of surgery over medical treatment alone in achieving improved glycemic control, as well as a reduction in cardiovascular risk factors. The mechanisms seem to extend beyond the magnitude of weight loss alone and include improvements in incretin profiles, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity...

  19. TRAUMA SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    deaths due to other trauma types (gunshot wounds, road traffic fatalities and assault) ... the axillary artery was ligated during surgery. Type of ... Left axillary artery. Ischaemic left upper limb. 3. Fifth intercostal space on the left. Bilateral pneumothorax and haemothorax still present at autopsy. (intercostal drain only inserted on ...

  20. Cell response to surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the profound alterations in host immunity that are produced by major surgery as demonstrated by experimental and clinical studies, and to evaluate the benefits of therapeutic strategies aimed at attenuating perioperative immune dysfunction. DATA SOURCES: A review of the English-language literature was conducted, incorporating searches of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane collaboration databases to identify laboratory and clinical studies investigating the cellular response to surgery. STUDY SELECTION: Original articles and case reports describing immune dysfunction secondary to surgical trauma were included. DATA EXTRACTION: The results were compiled to show outcomes of different studies and were compared. DATA SYNTHESIS: Current evidence indicates that the early systemic inflammatory response syndrome observed after major surgery that is characterized by proinflammatory cytokine release, microcirculatory disturbance, and cell-mediated immune dysfunction is followed by a compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome, which predisposes the patient to opportunistic infection, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and death. Because there are currently no effective treatment options for multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, measures to prevent its onset should be initiated at an early stage. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that targeted therapeutic strategies involving immunomodulatory agents such as interferon gamma, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, the prostaglandin E(2) antagonist, indomethacin, and pentoxifylline may be used for the treatment of systemic inflammatory response syndrome to prevent the onset of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical trauma produces profound immunological dysfunction. Therapeutic strategies directed at restoring immune homeostasis should aim to redress the physiological proinflammatory-anti-inflammatory cell imbalance associated with major surgery.

  1. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  2. Cancer Surgery in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal C. Kowdley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The proportions both of elderly patients in the world and of elderly patients with cancer are both increasing. In the evaluation of these patients, physiologic age, and not chronologic age, should be carefully considered in the decision-making process prior to both cancer screening and cancer treatment in an effort to avoid ageism. Many tools exist to help the practitioner determine the physiologic age of the patient, which allows for more appropriate and more individualized risk stratification, both in the pre- and postoperative periods as patients are evaluated for surgical treatments and monitored for surgical complications, respectively. During and after operations in the oncogeriatric populations, physiologic changes occuring that accompany aging include impaired stress response, increased senescence, and decreased immunity, all three of which impact the risk/benefit ratio associated with cancer surgery in the elderly.

  3. Advances in physiological computing

    CERN Document Server

    Fairclough, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    This edited collection will provide an overview of the field of physiological computing, i.e. the use of physiological signals as input for computer control. It will cover a breadth of current research, from brain-computer interfaces to telemedicine.

  4. Phun Week: Understanding Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limson, Mel; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2009-01-01

    Topics such as sports, exercise, health, and nutrition can make the science of physiology relevant and engaging for students. In addition, many lessons on these topics, such as those on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems, align with national and state life science education standards. Physiology Understanding Week (PhUn…

  5. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  6. Responsibility and Capacities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    That responsible moral agency presupposes certain mental capacities, constitutes a widely accepted view among theorists. Moreover, it is often assumed that degrees in the development of the relevant capacities co-vary with degrees of responsibility. In this article it is argued that, the move from...... the view that responsibility requires certain mental capacities to the position that degrees of responsibility co-vary with degrees of the development of the mental capacities, is premature....

  7. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries depending on the extent of ... and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries depending on the extent of ...

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  9. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateral epicondylitis surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... Soon after surgery, severe pain will decrease, but you may have mild soreness for 3 to 6 months.

  10. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving ...

  11. Orthognathic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard Larsen, Marie; Thygesen, Torben Henrik

    2016-01-01

    on the level of satisfaction was studied. The social-networking web site Facebook was used to identify the study population. An online questionnaire was performed using the website SurveyMonkey. In all, 105 (9%) respondents from the Danish Facebook group about OS, called Kaebeoperation (jaw surgery), were......The literature shows that the indications for orthognathic surgery (OS) are often functional problems and unsatisfactory facial esthetics. This study investigated the esthetic outcomes and overall satisfaction following OS. Somatosensory change is a relatively common complication and its influence...... to sex, age, and somatosensory change. High satisfaction and improvement in facial esthetic after OS were seen. Young patients (16-25 years) and men indicated a higher degree of satisfaction than old (>25 years) patients and women. The use of social media seems to be an interesting platform...

  12. CDMA systems capacity engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kiseon

    2004-01-01

    This new hands-on resource tackles capacity planning and engineering issues that are crucial to optimizing wireless communication systems performance. Going beyond the system physical level and investigating CDMA system capacity at the service level, this volume is the single-source for engineering and analyzing systems capacity and resources.

  13. Volumetric, planar, and linear analyses of pharyngeal airway change on computed tomography and cephalometry after mandibular setback surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Woo; Kim, Nam-Kug; Kim, Jong-Wan; Kim, Myung-Jin; Chang, Young-Il

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to use lateral cephalometry and computed tomography (CT) to examine the volumetric, planar, and linear changes in the pharyngeal airway after mandibular setback surgery. The pharyngeal airways of 12 subjects who underwent mandibular setback surgery at Seoul National University Dental Hospital were assessed linearly and volumetrically on lateral cephalometric radiographs and CT before surgery and 6 months after surgery. The pharynx, nasopharynx, and oropharynx were evaluated by volumetric analysis. Pharyngeal depth, airway space, pharyngeal soft-tissue thickness, and hyoid bone position were measured by linear analysis. The axial section area of the airway was measured by area analysis. From the linear analysis, a significant decrease in pharyngeal depth and a significant posterior movement of the hyoid bone (P 0.05). Although the structures around the mandible inevitably moved backward after mandibular setback surgery on linear analysis, physiologic deformation could occur to preserve the airway capacity after sagittal compression. 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Physiological mechanisms underlying animal social behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebacher, Frank; Krause, Jens

    2017-08-19

    Many species of animal live in groups, and the group represents the organizational level within which ecological and evolutionary processes occur. Understanding these processes, therefore, relies on knowledge of the mechanisms that permit or constrain group formation. We suggest that physiological capacities and differences in physiology between individuals modify fission-fusion dynamics. Differences between individuals in locomotor capacity and metabolism may lead to fission of groups and sorting of individuals into groups with similar physiological phenotypes. Environmental impacts such as hypoxia can influence maximum group sizes and structure in fish schools by altering access to oxygenated water. The nutritional environment determines group cohesion, and the increase in information collected by the group means that individuals should rely more on social information and form more cohesive groups in uncertain environments. Changing environmental contexts require rapid responses by individuals to maintain group coordination, which are mediated by neuroendocrine signalling systems such as nonapeptides and steroid hormones. Brain processing capacity may constrain social complexity by limiting information processing. Failure to evaluate socially relevant information correctly limits social interactions, which is seen, for example, in autism. Hence, functioning of a group relies to a large extent on the perception and appropriate processing of signals from conspecifics. Many if not all physiological systems are mechanistically linked, and therefore have synergistic effects on social behaviour. A challenge for the future lies in understanding these interactive effects, which will improve understanding of group dynamics, particularly in changing environments.This article is part of the themed issue 'Physiological determinants of social behaviour in animals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Anaesthetic Management of Conjoined Twins′ Separation Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolli S Chalam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaesthesia for conjoined twins, either for separation surgery, or for MRI or other evaluation procedures is an enormous challenge to the paediatric anaesthesiologist. This is an extra challenging surgery because we the anaesthesiologists need to care for two patients at the same time instead of just one. Anaesthesia for conjoined twins ′separation surgery mainly centered on the following concerns: 1.Conjoined Twins′ physiology like crossed circulation. distribution of blood volume and organ sharing with their anaesthetic implications. 2.Long marathon surgery with massive fluid shifts and loss of blood & blood components and their rapid replenishment. 3.Meticulous planning for organized management of long hours of anaesthetic administration in two paediatric subjects simultaneously with multi surgical specialties involvement and their unique requirements.We report the anaesthetic and intensive care management of one pair of Pygopagus separation surgery and also the review of literature and world statistics.

  16. Reproduction, physiology and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter summarizes fundamental knowledge and recent discoveries about the reproduction, physiology and biochemistry of plant-parasitic nematodes. Various types of reproduction are reviewed, including sexual reproduction and mitotic and meiotic parthenogenesis. Although much is known about the p...

  17. Plant Physiology and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taiz, Lincoln; Zeiger, Eduardo; Møller, Ian Max

    Throughout its twenty-two year history, the authors of Plant Physiology have continually updated the book to incorporate the latest advances in plant biology and implement pedagogical improvements requested by adopters. This has made Plant Physiology the most authoritative, comprehensive...... Physiology and Development. As before, Unit III begins with updated chapters on Cell Walls and Signals and Signal Transduction. The latter chapter has been expanded to include a discussion of major signaling molecules, such as calcium ions and plant hormones. A new, unified chapter entitled Signals from...... to describing the stages of development from embryogenesis to senescence and the many physiological and environmental factors that regulate them. The result provides students with an improved understanding of the integration of hormones and other signaling agents in developmental regulation...

  18. Physiology of Ramadan fasting

    OpenAIRE

    Shokoufeh Bonakdaran

    2016-01-01

    Considering the emphasis of Islam on the importance of fasting, Muslims attempt to fast from dawn until sunset during the holy month of Ramadan. Fasting is associated with several benefits for normal and healthy individuals. However, it could pose high risks to the health of diabetic patients due to certain physiological changes. This study aimed to compare the physiological changes associated with fasting in healthy individuals and diabetic patients during Ramadan. Furthermore, we reviewed t...

  19. Antifibrinolytics in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achal Dhir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery exerts a significant strain on the blood bank services and is a model example in which a multi-modal blood-conservation strategy is recommended. Significant bleeding during cardiac surgery, enough to cause re-exploration and/or blood transfusion, increases morbidity and mortality. Hyper-fibrinolysis is one of the important contributors to increased bleeding. This knowledge has led to the use of anti-fibrinolytic agents especially in procedures performed under cardiopulmonary bypass. Nothing has been more controversial in recent times than the aprotinin controversy. Since the withdrawal of aprotinin from the world market, the choice of antifibrinolytic agents has been limited to lysine analogues either tranexamic acid (TA or epsilon amino caproic acid (EACA. While proponents of aprotinin still argue against its non-availability. Health Canada has approved its use, albeit under very strict regulations. Antifibrinolytic agents are not without side effects and act like double-edged swords, the stronger the anti-fibrinolytic activity, the more serious the side effects. Aprotinin is the strongest in reducing blood loss, blood transfusion, and possibly, return to the operating room after cardiac surgery. EACA is the least effective, while TA is somewhere in between. Additionally, aprotinin has been implicated in increased mortality and maximum side effects. TA has been shown to increase seizure activity, whereas, EACA seems to have the least side effects. Apparently, these agents do not differentiate between pathological and physiological fibrinolysis and prevent all forms of fibrinolysis leading to possible thrombotic side effects. It would seem prudent to select the right agent knowing its risk-benefit profile for a given patient, under the given circumstances.

  20. The Effect of Prolapse Surgery on Vaginal Sensibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakeman, Mariëlle M. E.; van der Vaart, C. Huub; Laan, Ellen; Roovers, Jan-Paul W. R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Prolapse surgery has been shown to have major impact on sexual function. Since prolapse surgery not only influences psychological factors but might also influence physiological conditions such as vaginal innervation, there is a need for objective outcome measurements to better

  1. The Effect of Prolapse Surgery on Vaginal Sensibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakeman, Marielle M. E.; van der Vaart, C. Huub; Laan, Ellen; Roovers, Jan-Paul W. R.

    Introduction. Prolapse surgery has been shown to have major impact on sexual function. Since prolapse surgery not only influences psychological factors but might also influence physiological conditions such as vaginal innervation, there is a need for objective outcome measurements to better

  2. [Braking capacity after hip arthroplasty - effect of prosthesis design and preoperative status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, A; Mannel, H; Brüggemann, G-P; Schmidt, J

    2012-10-01

    Driving a car is an important everyday activity. However, the patients' desire to resume driving at an early stage after hip arthroplasty is often faced by the uncertainty about their driving ability. Only little evidence is available to support the clinical decision-making with regard to driving competence after conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, there is no proof that the results observed after THA can be transferred to hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) patients. Due to physiological advantages, i.e., patient age and activity, as well as the special biomechanical implant characteristics, HRA patients could be expected to achieve normal braking capacity at an earlier stage in the rehabilitation process than THA patients. This could be achieved by an accelerated postoperative recovery or could depend on the preoperative vantage point concerning the patients' braking capacity. To verify this hypothesis HRA and THA patients were compared to healthy subjects concerning their ability to perform an emergency braking manoeuvre in a car simulator before surgery, and at 6 weeks and 3 months after operation. Furthermore, postoperative recovery rates were compared between the two groups of patients. In addition, correlations between pre- and postoperative braking capacity were tested. Reaction time, movement time and force-time integral on the brake pedal were analysed. Except for a deficient preoperative force-time integral, no significant differences were detected in HRA patients compared to healthy controls. In contrast THA patients required, pre- as well as postoperatively, a longer movement time and exhibited a smaller force-time integral. The two patient groups did not show any significant difference in recovery rates of movement time and force-time integral. However, considering the two patient groups as a whole, a significant correlation was detected between existing pre- and postoperative deficits. In conclusion, it can be confirmed that HRA

  3. Capacity Statement for Railways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex

    2007-01-01

    The subject “Railway capacity” is a combination of the capacity consumption and how the capacity is utilized. The capacity utilization of railways can be divided into 4 core elements: The number of trains; the average speed; the heterogeneity of the operation; and the stability. This article desc...... trains. This is due to network effects in the railway system and due to the fact that more trains results in lower punctuality....

  4. The French capacity mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The French capacity mechanism has been design to ensure security of supply in the context of the energy transition. This energy transition challenges the electricity market design with several features: peak load growth, the development of renewables, demand response,... To ensure security of supply in this context, a capacity mechanism is being implemented in France. It is a market wide capacity obligation on electricity suppliers, based on market principles. Suppliers are responsible for forecasting their obligation, which corresponds to their contribution to winter peak load, and must procure enough capacity certificates to meet their obligations. Capacity certificates are granted to capacities through a certification process, which assesses their contribution to security of supply on the basis of availability commitments. This certification process is technology neutral and performance based, associated with controls and penalties in case of non compliance. Demand Side is fully integrated in the market, either through the reduction of suppliers' capacity obligation or direct participation after certification. In addition to the expected benefits in terms of security of supply, the French capacity market will foster the development of demand response. The participation of foreign capacities will require adaptations which are scheduled in a road-map, and could pave the way for further European integration of energy policies. (authors)

  5. LEUKOCYTE COPING CAPACITY AS A TOOL TO ASSESS CAPTURE- AND HANDLING-INDUCED STRESS IN SCANDINAVIAN BROWN BEARS (URSUS ARCTOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteruelas, Núria Fandos; Huber, Nikolaus; Evans, Alina L; Zedrosser, Andreas; Cattet, Marc; Palomares, Francisco; Angel, Martine; Swenson, Jon E; Arnemo, Jon M

    2016-04-01

    Brown bears (Ursus arctos) are often captured and handled for research and management purposes. Although the techniques used are potentially stressful for the animals and might have detrimental and long-lasting consequences, it is difficult to assess their physiological impact. Here we report the use of the leukocyte coping capacity (LCC) technique to quantify the acute stress of capture and handling in brown bears in Scandinavia. In April and May 2012 and 2013, we collected venous blood samples and recorded a range of physiological variables to evaluate the effects of capture and the added impact of surgical implantation or removal of transmitters and sensors. We studied 24 brown bears, including 19 that had abdominal surgery. We found 1) LCC values following capture were lower in solitary bears than in bears in family groups suggesting capture caused relatively more stress in solitary bears, 2) ability to cope with handling stress was better (greater LCC values) in bears with good body condition, and 3) LCC values did not appear to be influenced by surgery. Although further evaluation of this technique is required, our preliminary results support the use of the LCC technique as a quantitative measure of stress.

  6. Reduced collagen accumulation after major surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, L N; Kallehave, F; Karlsmark, T

    1996-01-01

    The preoperative and postoperative wound-healing capacity of 23 patients undergoing elective major abdominal, thoracic or urological surgery was tested objectively by the subcutaneous accumulation of hydroxyproline and proline in an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) tube. Before scheduled...... surgery two ePTFE tubes were implanted for removal after 5 and 10 days. This was repeated for each patient immediately after surgery. After 10 days a higher amount of hydroxyproline was measured before than after operation (median 2.91 (range 0.37-14.45) versus 1.45 (range 0.26-6.94) micrograms/cm, P = 0...

  7. Heat Capacity Analysis Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findikakis, A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide heat capacity values for the host and surrounding rock layers for the waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The heat capacity representations provided by this analysis are used in unsaturated zone (UZ) flow, transport, and coupled processes numerical modeling activities, and in thermal analyses as part of the design of the repository to support the license application. Among the reports that use the heat capacity values estimated in this report are the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' report, the ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' report, the ''Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, the Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms'' report, the ''Dike/Drift Interactions report, the Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'' report, and the ''In-Drift Natural Convection and Condensation'' report. The specific objective of this study is to determine the rock-grain and rock-mass heat capacities for the geologic stratigraphy identified in the ''Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170031], Table 1-1). This report provides estimates of the heat capacity for all stratigraphic layers except the Paleozoic, for which the mineralogic abundance data required to estimate the heat capacity are not available. The temperature range of interest in this analysis is 25 C to 325 C. This interval is broken into three separate temperature sub-intervals: 25 C to 95 C, 95 C to 114 C, and 114 C to 325 C, which correspond to the preboiling, trans-boiling, and postboiling regimes. Heat capacity is defined as the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of a unit mass of material by one degree (Nimick and Connolly 1991 [DIRS 100690], p. 5). The rock-grain heat capacity is defined as the heat capacity of the rock solids (minerals), and does not include the effect of water that exists in the rock pores. By comparison, the rock-mass heat capacity considers the heat capacity of both solids and pore

  8. Surgery for transposition of great arteries: A historical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreet P Marathe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The history of surgery for transposition of great arteries (TGA has paralleled the history of cardiac surgery. In fact, it began before the birth of open heart surgery when the palliative Blalock-Hanlon septectomy was first performed in 1948. The atrial switch, which was an attempt to correct the physiology of transposition, had significant shortcomings. The arterial switch sought to address them. This has emerged as an anatomically as well as physiologically appropriate solution. Today we continue to pursue technical refinements as well as try to expand the indications of the arterial switch. This review traces the various milestones in this perpetual journey.

  9. Choosing surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstensson, Carina; Lohmander, L; Frobell, Richard

    2009-01-01

    -depth qualitative interviews were conducted with young (aged 18-35), physically active individuals with ACL rupture who were participating in a RCT comparing training and surgical reconstruction with training only. 22/34 were randomised to training only but crossed over to surgery. Of these, 11 were interviewed...... and many patients said that they joined the RCT in order to bypass waiting lists. Patients who chose to cross-over described training as time consuming, boring and as unable to provide sufficient results within a reasonable timeframe. Some said their injured knees had given-way; others experienced new knee...... a variety of views and beliefs about those treatments, and trial participation happens in the absence of equipoise. Furthermore, opting for surgical reconstruction does not necessarily provide patients with satisfactory outcomes. Definition of successful outcome may require an individualised approach...

  10. Prospects for OPEC capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelman, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    OPEC capacity is not exogenous, but responds to demand. Price increases have not been caused by capacity shortages. OPEC nations find it hard to set aside even very small portions of their revenues for oil investment, despite its extreme profitability. Foreign investors face high risks. Production sharing makes their after-tax return even more unstable. (author)

  11. Human physiology in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernikos, J.

    1996-01-01

    The universality of gravity (1 g) in our daily lives makes it difficult to appreciate its importance in morphology and physiology. Bone and muscle support systems were created, cellular pumps developed, neurons organised and receptors and transducers of gravitational force to biologically relevant signals evolved under 1g gravity. Spaceflight provides the only microgravity environment where systematic experimentation can expand our basic understanding of gravitational physiology and perhaps provide new insights into normal physiology and disease processes. These include the surprising extent of our body's dependence on perceptual information, and understanding the effect and importance of forces generated within the body's weightbearing structures such as muscle and bones. Beyond this exciting prospect is the importance of this work towards opening the solar system for human exploration. Although both appear promising, we are only just beginning to taste what lies ahead.

  12. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - surgery; Congestive heart failure - surgery; Cardiomyopathy - surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure

  13. Pattern of Nerve Blocks for Upper Limb Surgery at the University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Central and peripheral neural blockade techniques are popular for lower and upper limb surgeries respectively. Lower limb surgery is amenable to central neural blockade techniques, anatomical and physiological imperatives makes peripheral neural blockade more suited for upper limb surgeries. We looked ...

  14. Nutritional consequences of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthakos, Stavra A; Inge, Thomas H

    2006-07-01

    Bariatric surgery is being increasingly used to help treat morbidly obese adults and adolescents. As a greater percentage of this population faces a lifetime of living with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology, increased awareness of the nutritional consequences is critical for all health care practitioners, as many of these patients may be lost to follow-up and can present with significant nutritional complications years after surgery. Nutritional deficiencies can occur after bariatric surgery, although to a lesser degree after restrictive procedures. Risk may increase over time, perhaps due to poor compliance with supplementation, continued inadequate intake and/or ongoing malabsorption. Adolescent patients may be at greater risk due to poor compliance and longer life span. Nutritional monitoring and supplementation among bariatric programs has been widely variable and few prospective studies of outcomes exist. Bariatric surgery can carry significant risk of nutritional complications. Compliance with dietary recommendations should be monitored and encouraged, with annual screening for selected deficiencies. Prospective longitudinal research is needed to identify the true prevalence and significance of nutritional deficiency in these patients and to determine optimum dietary recommendations.

  15. Computational Modeling in Liver Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Christ

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The need for extended liver resection is increasing due to the growing incidence of liver tumors in aging societies. Individualized surgical planning is the key for identifying the optimal resection strategy and to minimize the risk of postoperative liver failure and tumor recurrence. Current computational tools provide virtual planning of liver resection by taking into account the spatial relationship between the tumor and the hepatic vascular trees, as well as the size of the future liver remnant. However, size and function of the liver are not necessarily equivalent. Hence, determining the future liver volume might misestimate the future liver function, especially in cases of hepatic comorbidities such as hepatic steatosis. A systems medicine approach could be applied, including biological, medical, and surgical aspects, by integrating all available anatomical and functional information of the individual patient. Such an approach holds promise for better prediction of postoperative liver function and hence improved risk assessment. This review provides an overview of mathematical models related to the liver and its function and explores their potential relevance for computational liver surgery. We first summarize key facts of hepatic anatomy, physiology, and pathology relevant for hepatic surgery, followed by a description of the computational tools currently used in liver surgical planning. Then we present selected state-of-the-art computational liver models potentially useful to support liver surgery. Finally, we discuss the main challenges that will need to be addressed when developing advanced computational planning tools in the context of liver surgery.

  16. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ... to find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring ...

  17. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  18. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons ...

  19. Hip Replacement Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Hip Replacement Surgery Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download ... What is it? Points To Remember About Hip Replacement Surgery Hip replacement surgery removes damaged or diseased ...

  20. Lung surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung biopsy - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - discharge; VATS - discharge ... milk) for 2 weeks after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and 6 to 8 weeks after open surgery. ...

  1. Laser surgery - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery using a laser ... used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue ... Laser surgery can be used to: Close small blood vessels to reduce blood loss Remove warts , moles , sunspots, and ...

  2. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new path for blood to flow ... more than one bypass. The results of the surgery usually are excellent. Many people remain symptom-free ...

  3. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Obstructive Sleep Apnea TMJ and Facial Pain Treatment of Facial Injury Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures ...

  4. Pediatric heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... Ginther RM, Forbess JM. Pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass. In: ... Care . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 37. LeRoy S, ...

  5. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and ... Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries ...

  6. What Is Refractive Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Glaucoma Education Center Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic ... Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  7. LASIK - Laser Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Glaucoma Education Center Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic ... Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... surgery, orthognathic surgery is performed to correct functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on ... without straining Chronic mouth breathing Sleep apnea (breathing problems when sleeping, including snoring) Your dentist, orthodontist and ...

  9. Nigerian Journal of Physiological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Physiological Sciences (Niger. J. Physiol. Sci.) is a biannual publication of the Physiological Society of Nigeria. It covers diverse areas of research in physiological sciences, publishing reviews in current research areas and original laboratory and clinical research in physiological sciences. Other websites ...

  10. Treinamento muscular melhora o volume corrente e a capacidade vital no pós-operatório de revascularização do miocárdio Inspiratory muscle training improves tidal volume and vital capacity after CABG surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Bertolini Matheus

    2012-09-01

    (peak flow preoperatively (Pre-OP, 1st (PO1 and 3rd (PO3 postoperative day. RESULTS: There was a significant reduction in all variables measured on PO1 compared to preoperative values in both groups, MIP (P <0.0001, MEP (P <0.0001, TV SG (P <0.0004 and CG (P <0.0001 and VC SG (P <0.0001 and CG (P <0.0001 and peak flow (P <0.0001. At PO3, SG presented higher value of VC, GE 1230.4 ± 477.86 ml vs. GC 919.17 ± 394.47 ml (P=0.0222 and TV SG 608.09 ± 178.24 ml vs. CG 506.96 ± 168.31 ml (P= 0.0490. CONCLUSION: Patients undergoing cardiac surgery experience reduced ventilatory capacity and respiratory muscle strength after surgery. Muscle training was performed to retrieve TV and VC in the PO3, in the trained group.

  11. Physiology of Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, David W; Farabi, Sarah S

    2016-02-01

    IN BRIEF Far from a simple absence of wakefulness, sleep is an active, regulated, and metabolically distinct state, essential for health and well-being. In this article, the authors review the fundamental anatomy and physiology of sleep and its regulation, with an eye toward interactions between sleep and metabolism.

  12. Physiology of Breastfeeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    This powerpoint presentation summaries physiology of lactation and the impact of a variety of clinical practices on lactation from delivery through weaning. Factors that inhibit lactogenesis stage II are explained, including retained placenta, excess blood loss during delivery, and hypoplastic brea...

  13. The Face of Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul White

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the relationship between the physiology of the emotions and the display of character in Victorian Britain. Charles Bell and others had begun to link certain physiological functions, such as respiration, with the expression of feelings such as fear, regarding the heart and other internal organs as instruments by which the emotions were made visible. But a purely functional account of the emotions, which emerged through the development of reflex physiology during the second half of the century, would dramatically alter the nature of feelings and the means of observing them. At the same time, instinctual or acquired sympathy, which had long underpinned the accurate reading of expressions, became a problem to be surmounted by new 'objectively'. Graphic recording instruments measuring a variety of physiological functions and used with increasing frequency in clinical diagnostics became of fundamental importance for tracing the movement of feelings during the period prior to the development of cinematography. They remained, in the form of devices such as the polygraph, a crucial and controversial means of measuring affective states, beneath the potentially deceptive surface of the body.

  14. Physiology Flies with Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Amita

    2017-11-30

    The 2017 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology has been awarded to Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael Young for elucidating molecular mechanisms of the circadian clock. From studies beginning in fruit flies, we now know that circadian regulation pervades most biological processes and has strong ties to human health and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Human exercise physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volianitis, Stefanos; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    The functional anatomy of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems and the neuro-anatomy and neuro-physiology of the systems that are implicated in the co-ordination of cardiac output with ventilation are reviewed in fish, including air-breathing fish, amphibians and reptiles. Recent data...

  16. Vedr.: Military capacity building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Josefine Kühnel; Struwe, Lars Bangert

    2013-01-01

    Military capacity building has increasingly become an integral part of Danish defence. Military capacity is a new way of thinking Danish defence and poses a new set of challenges and opportunities for the Danish military and the Political leadership. On the 12th of december, PhD. Candidate Josefine...... Kühnel Larsen and researcher Lars Bangert Struwe of CMS had organized a seminar in collaboration with Royal Danish Defense Colleg and the East African Security Governance Network. The seminar focused on some of the risks involved in Military capacity building and how these risks are dealt with from...

  17. Avian reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Gibbons, Edward F.; Durrant, Barbara S.; Demarest, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the many physiological factors associated with egg production , fertility, incubation, and brooding in nondomestic birds is limited. Science knows even less about reproduction in most of the 238 endangered or threatened birds. This discussion uses studies of nondomestic and, when necessary, domestic birds to describe physiological control of reproduction. Studies of the few nondomestic avian species show large variation in physiological control of reproduction. Aviculturists, in order to successfully propagate an endangered bird, must understand the bird's reproductive peculiarities. First, investigators can do studies with carefully chosen surrogate species, but eventually they need to confirm the results in the target endangered bird. Studies of reproduction in nondomestic birds increased in the last decade. Still, scientists need to do more comparative studies to understand the mechanisms that control reproduction in birds. New technologies are making it possible to study reproductive physiology of nondomestic species in less limiting ways. These technologies include telemetry to collect information without inducing stress on captives (Howey et al., 1987; Klugman, 1987), new tests for most of the humoral factors associated with reproduction, and the skill to collect small samples and manipulate birds without disrupting the physiological mechanisms (Bercovitz et al., 1985). Managers are using knowledge from these studies to improve propagation in zoological parks, private and public propagation facilities, and research institutions. Researchers need to study the control of ovulation, egg formation, and oviposition in the species of nondomestic birds that lay very few eggs in a season, hold eggs in the oviduct for longer intervals, or differ in other ways from the more thoroughly studied domestic birds. Other techniques that would enhance propagation for nondomestlc birds include tissue culture of cloned embryonic cells, cryopreservation of embryos

  18. A biomechanical approach to the analysis of methods and procedures of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniel, Emanuele Luigi; Frigo, Alessandro; Fontanella, Chiara Giulia; De Benedictis, Giulia Maria; Rubini, Alessandro; Barp, Luca; Pluchino, Gioela; Sabbadini, Beatrice; Polese, Lino

    2017-05-03

    Bariatric surgery includes a variety of procedures that are performed on obese people and aim at decreasing the intake of food and calories. This goal is usually pursued by reducing stomach capacity and/or absorbing capability. Adjustable gastric banding is the most common and successful operation. In general, bariatric surgical procedures are effective, but are often associated with major complications. Surgical procedure and post-surgical conformation of the stomach are usually defined on clinical and surgical basis only. Instead, the optimal configuration should be identified by analyzing the mechanical functionality of the stomach and the surrounding structures, and the relationship between food intake, nutrient adsorption, mechanical stimulation of stomach wall and feeling of satiety. A novel approach to bariatric surgery is required, integrating competences in the areas of biomechanics, physiology and surgery, based on a strong interaction between engineers and clinicians. Preliminary results from coupled experimental and computational investigations are here reported. The analyses aim to develop computational tools for the investigation of stomach mechanical functionality in pre- and post-surgical conformations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Challenges and opportunities in developmental integrative physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, C A; Eme, J; Burggren, W W; Roghair, R D; Rundle, S D

    2015-06-01

    This review explores challenges and opportunities in developmental physiology outlined by a symposium at the 2014 American Physiological Society Intersociety Meeting: Comparative Approaches to Grand Challenges in Physiology. Across animal taxa, adverse embryonic/fetal environmental conditions can alter morphological and physiological phenotypes in juveniles or adults, and capacities for developmental plasticity are common phenomena. Human neonates with body sizes at the extremes of perinatal growth are at an increased risk of adult disease, particularly hypertension and cardiovascular disease. There are many rewarding areas of current and future research in comparative developmental physiology. We present key mechanisms, models, and experimental designs that can be used across taxa to investigate patterns in, and implications of, the development of animal phenotypes. Intraspecific variation in the timing of developmental events can be increased through developmental plasticity (heterokairy), and could provide the raw material for selection to produce heterochrony--an evolutionary change in the timing of developmental events. Epigenetics and critical windows research recognizes that in ovo or fetal development represent a vulnerable period in the life history of an animal, when the developing organism may be unable to actively mitigate environmental perturbations. 'Critical windows' are periods of susceptibility or vulnerability to environmental or maternal challenges, periods when recovery from challenge is possible, and periods when the phenotype or epigenome has been altered. Developmental plasticity may allow survival in an altered environment, but it also has possible long-term consequences for the animal. "Catch-up growth" in humans after the critical perinatal window has closed elicits adult obesity and exacerbates a programmed hypertensive phenotype (one of many examples of "fetal programing"). Grand challenges for developmental physiology include

  20. [Andreas Vesalius and surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hee, R

    1993-01-01

    By publishing De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem in 1543, Andries van Wesel (1514-1564) gave surgical science an immense impulse. The revolutionary renovation in the knowledge of man's anatomical structure changed slowly and progressively into topographical and physiological understanding of surgical diseases. At the same time, this made better aimed and more secure operations possible. Apart from the importance of this anatomical publication, Andreas Vesalius also won his spurs as a surgeon. He taught surgery in Padua for many years. He was appointed court physician and surgeon at the Habsburg Court of Charles V and Philip II. He personally performed lots of operations known at the time as major ones. He not only quickly adopted the surgical innovations of his fellow-surgeon Ambroise Paré, but he even performed operations that had been forgotten during several centuries, among which thoracocentesis for pleural empyema. His clinical perspicacity in discovering the indication for some operations was staggering and was appreciated by all great monarchs of Europe in the 16th century. In his several consilia, numerous pieces of advice were given for the treatment of surgical patients. The surgical practice which Vesalius had in Brussels for many years, consequently became most successful. Many publications by Vesalius about surgery and blood-letting are well-known. His Chirurgia magna in septem Libros digesta still remains controversial; these books were published by Prospero Borgarruccio (1560) in 1568 by the Venetian editor Valgrisi. This book gives an excellent survey of surgical pathology as it was taught and treated in the 16th century. The scientific method that Vesalius used, not only in his anatomical studies but also in his surgical practice, deserves not only our full appraisal but should still be studied in our own time.

  1. Capacity at Railway Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex

    2011-01-01

    zone(s) the possible conflicts with other trains (also in the opposite direction) are taken into account leading to more trustworthy results. Although the UIC 406 methodology proposes that the railway network should be divided into line sections when trains turn around and when the train order...... is changed, this paper recommends that the railway lines are not always be divided. In case trains turn around on open (single track) line, the capacity consumption may be too low if a railway line is divided. The same can be the case if only few trains are overtaken at an overtaking station. For dead end......Stations do have other challenges regarding capacity than open lines as it is here the traffic is dispatched. The UIC 406 capacity method that can be used to analyse the capacity consumption can be exposed in different ways at stations which may lead to different results. Therefore, stations need...

  2. Visual attention capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habekost, Thomas; Starrfelt, Randi

    2009-01-01

    Psychophysical studies have identified two distinct limitations of visual attention capacity: processing speed and apprehension span. Using a simple test, these cognitive factors can be analyzed by Bundesen's Theory of Visual Attention (TVA). The method has strong specificity and sensitivity...

  3. Revisiting Absorptive Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Araújo, Ana Luiza Lara; Ulhøi, John Parm; Lettl, Christopher

    learning processes of absorptive capacity, which comprise combinative and adaptive capabilities. Drawing on survey data (n=169), the study concludes that combinative capabilities primarily enhance transformative and exploratory learning processes, while adaptive capabilities strengthen all three learning......Absorptive capacity has mostly been perceived as a 'passive' outcome of R&D investments. Recently, however, a growing interest into its 'proactive' potentials has emerged. This paper taps into this development and proposes a dynamic model for conceptualizing the determinants of the complementary...

  4. The effect of prolapse surgery on vaginal sensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakeman, Mariëlle M E; van der Vaart, C Huub; Laan, Ellen; Roovers, Jan-Paul W R

    2011-04-01

    Prolapse surgery has been shown to have major impact on sexual function. Since prolapse surgery not only influences psychological factors but might also influence physiological conditions such as vaginal innervation, there is a need for objective outcome measurements to better understand the effects of prolapse surgery on sexual function. To assess the effects of prolapse surgery with or without stress incontinence surgery on vaginal sensibility and to assess the relationship between vaginal wall sensibility and sexual well-being. This study was performed parallel to a randomized controlled trial comparing vaginal and abdominal prolapse surgery with or without incontinence surgery in women with uterine prolapse stage 2 or more. Vaginal wall sensibility was defined as mean sensation threshold to electrical stimulation of the vaginal wall at four standardized places, measured before and 6 months after surgery. Higher sensation thresholds postsurgery relative to presurgery indicate diminished vaginal wall sensibility. Sexual function was assessed at the same time points using a questionnaire. Data on vaginal wall sensibility were obtained from 65 patients. The sensibility of the distal posterior (P = 0.02) and distal anterior (P = 0.10) vaginal wall decreased after vaginal surgery compared to abdominal surgery. Abdominal prolapse surgery with incontinence surgery decreased sensibility of the distal part of the anterior vaginal wall significantly more than abdominal prolapse surgery only (P = 0.01). Before surgery, vaginal wall sensibility was lower in women who reported vaginal dryness or anorgasmia. The presence of genital pain was associated with higher vaginal wall sensibility. Postoperative vaginal wall sensibility was similar in women with and without sexual problems. Vaginal prolapse surgery as well as abdominal prolapse surgery with additional incontinence surgery resulted in decreased vaginal wall sensibility. This pilot study shows no influence of the

  5. Psychiatric and Psychosocial Aspects of Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzin Mukaddes Sevincer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery is a treatment modality which is becoming increasingly popular in the last decade in our country and around the world. Patients who treated with a conventional methods are unable to loose sufficient weight and even they regained most of their lost weight easily. The number of patients undergoing bariatric surgery are increasing day by day considering the success of bariatric surgery with regard to lose weight fast and the improvement in co-morbid conditions. Obesity and bariatric surgery are in a reciprocal relationship both with psychiatric disorders and psychosocial variables. Relations are begin with the evaluation of a patients eligibility for surgery in terms of psychiatric and psychosocial issues at a very early stage of the process. Presence of psychopathology, level of knowledge related to the surgical procedure and patients expectations about physical, psychological and social changes that may occur after surgery are the significant parts of the evaluation of bariatric surgery patients. These components should be considered in assessing capacity of patients to comply with medical advice in post-operative stage. In this article the needs for assesment of psychiatric and psychosocial aspects of obese patients who will undergo bariatric surgery is reviewed in the light of current literature . Possible medical, psychiatric and psychosocial complications of bariatric surgery and related issues are reviewed and psycosocial factors that may be predictors of the successful outcome of bariatric surgery are discussed.Discussions around the nature of specific eating disorders seen frequently in bariatric surgery patients, wheter it is a separate entities from well known eating disorders and controversial issues such as presence or absence of psychopathology like suicide as directly consequence of the surgical procedures are summarized. Discussions about performing of psychiatric and psychosocial assesment (i.e by whom, how and

  6. The Physiology of Glucagon

    OpenAIRE

    Taborsky, Gerald J

    2010-01-01

    This short review outlines the physiology of glucagon in vivo, with an emphasis on its neural control, the author’s area of interest. Glucagon is secreted from alpha cells, which are a minority of the pancreatic islet. Anatomically, they are down stream from the majority islet beta cells. Beta-cell secretory products restrain glucagon secretion. Activation of the autonomic nerves, which innervate the islet, increases glucagon secretion.

  7. Renal phosphate handling: Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus is a common anion. It plays an important role in energy generation. Renal phosphate handling is regulated by three organs parathyroid, kidney and bone through feedback loops. These counter regulatory loops also regulate intestinal absorption and thus maintain serum phosphorus concentration in physiologic range. The parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, Fibrogenic growth factor 23 (FGF23 and klotho coreceptor are the key regulators of phosphorus balance in body.

  8. The future of robotics in hand surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liverneaux, P; Nectoux, E; Taleb, C

    2009-10-01

    Robotics has spread over many surgical fields over the last decade: orthopaedic, cardiovascular, urologic, gynaecologic surgery and various other types of surgery. There are five different types of robots: passive, semiactive and active robots, telemanipulators and simulators. Hand surgery is at a crossroad between orthopaedic surgery, plastic surgery and microsurgery; it has to deal with fixing all sorts of tissues from bone to soft tissues. To our knowledge, there is not any paper focusing on potential clinical applications in this realm, even though robotics could be helpful for hand surgery. One must point out the numerous works on bone tissue with regard to passive robots (such as fluoroscopic navigation as an ancillary for percutaneous screwing in the scaphoid bone). Telemanipulators, especially in microsurgery, can improve surgical motion by suppressing physiological tremor thanks to movement demultiplication (experimental vascular and nervous sutures previously published). To date, the robotic technology has not yet become simple-to-use, cheap and flawless but in the future, it will probably be of great technical help, and even allow remote-controlled surgery overseas.

  9. Nontrauma emergency surgery: optimal case mix for general surgery and acute care surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry-Bukowiec, Jill R; Miller, Barbra S; Doherty, Gerard M; Brunsvold, Melissa E; Hemmila, Mark R; Park, Pauline K; Raghavendran, Krishnan; Sihler, Kristen C; Wahl, Wendy L; Wang, Stewart C; Napolitano, Lena M

    2011-11-01

    To examine the case mix and patient characteristics and outcomes of the nontrauma emergency (NTE) service in an academic Division of Acute Care Surgery. An NTE service (attending, chief resident, postgraduate year-3 and postgraduate year-2 residents, and two physician assistants) was created in July 2005 for all urgent and emergent inpatient and emergency department general surgery patient consults and admissions. An NTE database was created with prospective data collection of all NTE admissions initiated from November 1, 2007. Prospective data were collected by a dedicated trauma registrar and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-intensive care unit (ICU) coordinator daily. NTE case mix and ICU characteristics were reviewed for the 2-year time period January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2009. During the same time period, trauma operative cases and procedures were examined and compared with the NTE case mix. Thousand seven hundred eight patients were admitted to the NTE service during this time period (789 in 2008 and 910 in 2009). Surgical intervention was required in 70% of patients admitted to the NTE service. Exploratory laparotomy or laparoscopy was performed in 449 NTE patients, comprising 37% of all surgical procedures. In comparison, only 118 trauma patients (5.9% of admissions) required a major laparotomy or thoracotomy during the same time period. Acuity of illness of NTE patients was high, with a significant portion (13%) of NTE patients requiring ICU admission. NTE patients had higher admission Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III scores [61.2 vs. 58.8 (2008); 58.2 vs. 55.8 (2009)], increased mortality [(9.71% vs. 4.89% (2008); 6.78% vs. 5.16% (2009)], and increased readmission rates (15.5% vs. 7.4%) compared with the total surgical ICU (SICU) admissions. In an era of declining operative caseload in trauma, the NTE service provides ample opportunity for complex general surgery decision making and operative procedures for

  10. Gastric Bypass Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gastrointestinal system Death (rare) Longer term risks and complications of weight-loss surgery vary depending on the type of surgery. They ... room, where medical staff monitors you for any complications. Your hospital stay may ... of bariatric surgery Each type of bariatric surgery has pros and ...

  11. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ...

  12. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ...

  13. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ...

  14. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We Are Find a Surgeon News Videos Contact Anesthesia Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic ...

  15. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the ... and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the ...

  16. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Who is a Candidate for Bariatric Surgery? Childhood and Adolescent Obesity Find a Provider Benefits of Bariatric Surgery Life ... Bariatric Surgery FAQs Bariatric Surgery Procedures BMI Calculator Childhood and Adolescent Obesity 100 SW 75th Street, Suite 201, Gainesville, FL, ...

  17. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ...

  18. pulmonary indices in post—abdominal surgery patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apical; lateral—costal; postero-basal and diaphragmatic breathing exercises. The elective ... Vital capacity and peak expiratory flow rates were measured daily after each exercise training session. ... that breathing exercise training improved vital capacity and peak expiratory flow rate of the abdominal surgery patients. It was.

  19. Limited-Access Heart Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery Menu Topics Topics FAQs Limited-Access Heart Surgery Article Info En español Thousands of heart surgeries ... with cardiovascular disease. What is minimally invasive heart surgery? In minimally invasive heart surgery, surgeons take steps ...

  20. Lateral canthal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Kelvin Kam-Lung; Goldberg, Robert A

    2010-08-01

    The lateral canthus is a delicate and complicated three-dimensional structure with function relevant to the health of the ocular surface. Dysfunction of the lateral canthus, due to aging changes or iatrogenic trauma, results in ocular morbidity ranging from chronic irritation to tearing to recalcitrant keratopathy. From an aesthetic standpoint, symmetric, normally positioned lateral canthi are cornerstones of youthful periorbital appearance, disruption of which leads to cosmetically significant deformity or asymmetry. Reconstruction of the lateral canthus is important in the rehabilitation of the aging eyelid and an unfortunate necessity after failed lateral canthal surgery. The common methods for improving or maintaining position, tone, and shape of the lower eyelid and lateral canthus use tightening or shortening the lower eyelid horizontally, keeping the canthal angle in an appropriate vertical level, and hugging the ocular surface. Many techniques have been described for the reconstruction of the lateral canthus in functional conditions or for aesthetic purposes. These methods have met with varying success. In this article, we begin with a discussion of the anatomy and physiology of the lateral canthus, followed by clinical examples of lateral canthal abnormalities and underlying pathophysiologies. A review of surgical options for the lateral canthus is presented with concluding remarks on postoperative complications.

  1. Thoracic damage control surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Roberto; Saad, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The damage control surgery came up with the philosophy of applying essential maneuvers to control bleeding and abdominal contamination in trauma patients who are within the limits of their physiological reserves. This concept was extended to thoracic injuries, where relatively simple maneuvers can shorten operative time of in extremis patients. This article aims to revise the various damage control techniques in thoracic organs that must be known to the surgeon engaged in emergency care. RESUMO A cirurgia de controle de danos surgiu com a filosofia de se aplicar manobras essenciais para controle de sangramento e contaminação abdominal, em doentes traumatizados, nos limites de suas reservas fisiológicas. Este conceito se estendeu para as lesões torácicas, onde manobras relativamente simples, podem abreviar o tempo operatório de doentes in extremis. Este artigo tem como objetivo, revisar as diversas técnicas de controle de dano em órgãos torácicos, que devem ser de conhecimento do cirurgião que atua na emergência.

  2. Cosmetic genital surgery in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Paul L

    2017-08-11

    Clinicians are faced with increasing requests for female cosmetic genital surgery and prominent amongst these is labiaplasty. The implications of labiaplasty in adolescence are explored with emphasis on what is known about normal genital appearances, pubertal development, anatomy and physiology and the options for surgical intervention including risks and implications. Faced with what is known to date on female cosmetic genital surgery then such interventions should be avoided in adolescence in the absence of defined medical indications until at least the age of 18 years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Relationship of Physiological Parameters and Achievement in Wheelchair Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Judith A.

    The relationship between achievement in track and field events (60, 100, 200, 400 meter runs and shotput, discus, and javelin throws) and selected physiological parameters (grip strength, body fat, vital lung capacity, and cardiovascular efficiency) of 20 wheelchair athletes was investigated. Results of track and field events were obtained from…

  4. Physiological responses to acute experimental hypoxia in the air ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    When C. batrachus was exposed for different periods at experimental hypoxia level (0.98±0.1 mg/L, DO), hemoglobin and hematocrit concentrations were increased, along with decrease in mean cellular hemoglobin concentration, which reflected a physiological adaptation to enhance oxygen transport capacity. Significant ...

  5. Physiological responses to acute experimental hypoxia in the air ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-03-05

    Mar 5, 2013 ... respond through increase in the oxygen carrying capacity, metabolic depression and efficient antioxidant defense system to survive periods of ... some species have evolved additional physiological or http://www.ias.ac.in/jbiosci .... method that uses glucose oxidase and peroxidase reaction to form a red ...

  6. Weather and road capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Christian

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents estimations of the effect of bad weather on the observed speed on a Danish highway section; Køge Bugt Motorvejen. The paper concludes that weather, primarily precipitation and snow, has a clear negative effect on speed when the road is not in hypercongestion mode. Furthermore......, the capacity of the highway seems to be reduced in bad weather and there are indications that travel time variability is also increased, at least in free-flow conditions. Heavy precipitation reduces speed and capacity by around 5-8%, whereas snow primarily reduces capacity. Other weather variables......-parametrically against traffic density and in step 2 the residuals from step 1 are regressed linearly against the weather variables. The choice of a non-parametric method is made to avoid constricting ties from a parametric specification and because the focus here is not on the relationship between traffic flow...

  7. Dual capacity reciprocating compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Robert W.

    1984-01-01

    A multi-cylinder compressor 10 particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor 16 rotation is provided with an eccentric cam 38 on a crank pin 34 under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180.degree. apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons 24 whose connecting rods 30 ride on a crank pin 36 without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation.

  8. Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg Mines; Jay Nathwani; Christopher Richard; Hillary Hanson; Rachel Wood

    2015-01-01

    The capacity factors recently provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) indicated this plant performance metric had declined for geothermal power plants since 2008. Though capacity factor is a term commonly used by geothermal stakeholders to express the ability of a plant to produce power, it is a term frequently misunderstood and in some instances incorrectly used. In this paper we discuss how this capacity factor is defined and utilized by the EIA, including discussion on the information that the EIA requests from operations in their 923 and 860 forms that are submitted both monthly and annually by geothermal operators. A discussion is also provided regarding the entities utilizing the information in the EIA reports, and how those entities can misinterpret the data being supplied by the operators. The intent of the paper is to inform the facility operators as the importance of the accuracy of the data that they provide, and the implications of not providing the correct information.

  9. Effects of environmental temperature on physiological responses during submaximal and maximal exercises in soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MiHyun No

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: It is concluded that physiological responses and endurance exercise capacity are impaired under cool or hot conditions compared with moderate conditions, suggesting that environmental temperature conditions play an important role for exercise performance.

  10. Value for railway capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sameni, Melody Khadem; Preston, John M.

    2012-01-01

    to analyze the efficiency of operators in transforming inputs of allocated capacity of infrastructure and franchise payments into valuable passenger service outputs while avoiding delays. By addressing operational and economic aspects of capacity utilization simultaneously, the paper deviates from existing...... DEA work on the economic efficiency of railways by considering a new combination of input-output that also incorporates quality of service. The constant and variable returns to scale models are applied to the case study of franchised passenger operators in Great Britain. The follow-up Tobit regression...

  11. The emergence of Applied Physiology within the discipline of Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Charles M

    2016-08-01

    Despite the availability and utilization of the physiology textbooks authored by Albrecht von Haller during the 18th century that heralded the modern age of physiology, not all physicians or physiologists were satisfied with its presentation, contents, or application to medicine. Initial reasons were fundamental disagreements between the "mechanists," represented by Boerhaave, Robinson, and von Haller, and the "vitalists," represented by the faculty and graduates of the Montpellier School of Medicine in France, notably, Bordeu and Barthez. Subsequently, objections originated from Europe, United Kingdom, and the United States in publications that focused not only on the teaching of physiology to medical and secondary students, but on the specific applications of the content of physiology to medicine, health, hygiene, pathology, and chronic diseases. At the turn of the 20th century, texts began to appear with applied physiology in their titles and in 1926, physician Samson Wright published a textbook entitled Applied Physiology that was intended for both medical students and the medical profession. Eleven years later, physicians Best and Taylor published The Physiological Basis of Medical Practice: A University of Toronto Texbook in Applied Physiology Although both sets of authors defined the connection between applied physiology and physiology, they failed to define the areas of physiology that were included within applied physiology. This was accomplished by the American Physiological Society (APS) Publications Committee in 1948 with the publication of the Journal of Appplied Physiology, that stated the word "applied" would broadly denote human physiology whereas the terms stress and environment would broadly include work, exercise, plus industrial, climatic and social factors. NIH established a study section (SS) devoted to applied physiology in 1964 which remained active until 2001 when it became amalgamated into other SSs. Before the end of the 20th century when

  12. Sex differences in the physiology of eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarian, Lori

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis function fundamentally affects the physiology of eating. We review sex differences in the physiological and pathophysiological controls of amounts eaten in rats, mice, monkeys, and humans. These controls result from interactions among genetic effects, organizational effects of reproductive hormones (i.e., permanent early developmental effects), and activational effects of these hormones (i.e., effects dependent on hormone levels). Male-female sex differences in the physiology of eating involve both organizational and activational effects of androgens and estrogens. An activational effect of estrogens decreases eating 1) during the periovulatory period of the ovarian cycle in rats, mice, monkeys, and women and 2) tonically between puberty and reproductive senescence or ovariectomy in rats and monkeys, sometimes in mice, and possibly in women. Estrogens acting on estrogen receptor-α (ERα) in the caudal medial nucleus of the solitary tract appear to mediate these effects in rats. Androgens, prolactin, and other reproductive hormones also affect eating in rats. Sex differences in eating are mediated by alterations in orosensory capacity and hedonics, gastric mechanoreception, ghrelin, CCK, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucagon, insulin, amylin, apolipoprotein A-IV, fatty-acid oxidation, and leptin. The control of eating by central neurochemical signaling via serotonin, MSH, neuropeptide Y, Agouti-related peptide (AgRP), melanin-concentrating hormone, and dopamine is modulated by HPG function. Finally, sex differences in the physiology of eating may contribute to human obesity, anorexia nervosa, and binge eating. The variety and physiological importance of what has been learned so far warrant intensifying basic, translational, and clinical research on sex differences in eating. PMID:23904103

  13. Sex differences in the physiology of eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarian, Lori; Geary, Nori

    2013-12-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis function fundamentally affects the physiology of eating. We review sex differences in the physiological and pathophysiological controls of amounts eaten in rats, mice, monkeys, and humans. These controls result from interactions among genetic effects, organizational effects of reproductive hormones (i.e., permanent early developmental effects), and activational effects of these hormones (i.e., effects dependent on hormone levels). Male-female sex differences in the physiology of eating involve both organizational and activational effects of androgens and estrogens. An activational effect of estrogens decreases eating 1) during the periovulatory period of the ovarian cycle in rats, mice, monkeys, and women and 2) tonically between puberty and reproductive senescence or ovariectomy in rats and monkeys, sometimes in mice, and possibly in women. Estrogens acting on estrogen receptor-α (ERα) in the caudal medial nucleus of the solitary tract appear to mediate these effects in rats. Androgens, prolactin, and other reproductive hormones also affect eating in rats. Sex differences in eating are mediated by alterations in orosensory capacity and hedonics, gastric mechanoreception, ghrelin, CCK, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucagon, insulin, amylin, apolipoprotein A-IV, fatty-acid oxidation, and leptin. The control of eating by central neurochemical signaling via serotonin, MSH, neuropeptide Y, Agouti-related peptide (AgRP), melanin-concentrating hormone, and dopamine is modulated by HPG function. Finally, sex differences in the physiology of eating may contribute to human obesity, anorexia nervosa, and binge eating. The variety and physiological importance of what has been learned so far warrant intensifying basic, translational, and clinical research on sex differences in eating.

  14. Less extensive surgery compared to extensive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauszus, Finn F; Petersen, Astrid Christine; Neumann, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    in postmenopausal women was associated with surgery including hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy (pcarcinoma was found 138 times (95% CI: 48, 275) more prevalent than the expected rate. CONCLUSION......: The survival of women was better in AGCT than in epithelial ovarian tumor. Age and type of surgery, besides stage, influenced survival. Total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy is the recommended treatment with advancing age. At younger age less extensive surgery was associated...

  15. The use of rat and mouse models in bariatric surgery experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Alexander Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Animal models have been proven to be a crucial tool for investigating the physiological mechanisms underlying bariatric surgery in general and individual techniques in particular. By using a translational approach most of these studies have been performed in rodents and have helped to understand how bariatric surgery may or may not work. However, data from studies using animal models should always be critically evaluated for their transferability to the human physiology. It is therefore the aim of this review to summarize both advantages and limitations of data generated by animal based experiments designed to investigate and understand the physiological mechanisms at the root of bariatric surgery.

  16. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T

    2013-05-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients' experience and surgical outcome.

  17. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Sankar Nath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist′s concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients′ experience and surgical outcome.

  18. Cardiac surgery in the parturient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Shobana; Cook, Christopher R; Collard, Charles D

    2009-03-01

    Heart disease is the primary cause of nonobstetric mortality in pregnancy, occurring in 1%-3% of pregnancies and accounting for 10%-15% of maternal deaths. Congenital heart disease has become more prevalent in women of childbearing age, representing an increasing percentage (up to 75%) of heart disease in pregnancy. Untreated maternal heart disease also places the fetus at risk. Independent predictors of neonatal complications include a maternal New York Heart Association heart failure classification >2, anticoagulation use during pregnancy, smoking, multiple gestation, and left heart obstruction. Because cardiac surgical morbidity and mortality in the parturient is higher than nonpregnant patients, most parturients with cardiac disease are first managed medically, with cardiac surgery being reserved when medical management fails. Risk factors for maternal mortality during cardiac surgery include the use of vasoactive drugs, age, type of surgery, reoperation, and maternal functional class. Risk factors for fetal mortality include maternal age >35 yr, functional class, reoperation, emergency surgery, type of myocardial protection, and anoxic time. Nonetheless, acceptable maternal and fetal perioperative mortality rates may be achieved through such measures as early preoperative detection of maternal cardiovascular decompensation, use of fetal monitoring, delivery of a viable fetus before the operation and scheduling surgery on an elective basis during the second trimester. Additionally, fetal morbidity may be reduced during cardiopulmonary bypass by optimizing maternal oxygen-carrying capacity and uterine blood flow. Current maternal bypass recommendations include: 1) maintaining the pump flow rate >2.5 L x min(-1) x m(-2) and perfusion pressure >70 mm Hg; 2) maintaining the hematocrit > 28%; 3) using normothermic perfusion when feasible; 4) using pulsatile flow; and 5) using alpha-stat pH management.

  19. Success stories and emerging themes in conservation physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madliger, Christine L; Cooke, Steven J; Crespi, Erica J; Funk, Jennifer L; Hultine, Kevin R; Hunt, Kathleen E; Rohr, Jason R; Sinclair, Brent J; Suski, Cory D; Willis, Craig K R; Love, Oliver P

    2016-01-01

    The potential benefits of physiology for conservation are well established and include greater specificity of management techniques, determination of cause-effect relationships, increased sensitivity of health and disturbance monitoring and greater capacity for predicting future change. While descriptions of the specific avenues in which conservation and physiology can be integrated are readily available and important to the continuing expansion of the discipline of 'conservation physiology', to date there has been no assessment of how the field has specifically contributed to conservation success. However, the goal of conservation physiology is to foster conservation solutions and it is therefore important to assess whether physiological approaches contribute to downstream conservation outcomes and management decisions. Here, we present eight areas of conservation concern, ranging from chemical contamination to invasive species to ecotourism, where physiological approaches have led to beneficial changes in human behaviour, management or policy. We also discuss the shared characteristics of these successes, identifying emerging themes in the discipline. Specifically, we conclude that conservation physiology: (i) goes beyond documenting change to provide solutions; (ii) offers a diversity of physiological metrics beyond glucocorticoids (stress hormones); (iii) includes approaches that are transferable among species, locations and times; (iv) simultaneously allows for human use and benefits to wildlife; and (v) is characterized by successes that can be difficult to find in the primary literature. Overall, we submit that the field of conservation physiology has a strong foundation of achievements characterized by a diversity of conservation issues, taxa, physiological traits, ecosystem types and spatial scales. We hope that these concrete successes will encourage the continued evolution and use of physiological tools within conservation-based research and management

  20. Evaluation of railway capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex; Kaas, Anders H.; Schittenhelm, Bernd

    2006-01-01

    capacity consumptions. This paper describes the UIC 406 method and how it is expounded in Denmark. The paper describes the importance of choosing the right length of the line sections examined and how line sections with multiple track sections are examined. Furthermore, the possibility of using idle...

  1. Building capacity in Benin

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    sigp1. Building capacity in. Benin. Training of technical staff of municipalities in the Okpara Basin of Benin in the use of GIS tools for water management, hydrological .... Practical exercises allowed participants to define the catchment area of the ...

  2. Activation capacity of the alternative and classic complement pathways in patients operated on for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann-Nielsen, Erik; Iversen, Lene H; Svehag, Sven-Erik

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Tumor cells may suppress activation of the host's complement system, and the functional state of the complement system may be a prognostic marker of outcome in patients with malignancies. Serial plasma samples from patients undergoing intended curative surgery for colorectal cancer were...... analyzed for complement factor C3 activation capacity. METHODS: Samples were collected from 91 patients with colorectal cancer and 13 with benign colorectal diseases before surgery and 1, 2, and 7 days after surgery, between 8 and 13 days after surgery, and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months after...... surgery. The samples were analyzed with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that measured C3 activation capacity by the alternative and classic complement pathways. Cancer patients were compared according to Dukes stage, type of surgery performed, transfusion of blood, development of infection, venous...

  3. Starting physiology: bioelectrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Vander

    2015-12-01

    From a Cartesian perspective of rational analysis, the electric potential difference across the cell membrane is one of the fundamental concepts for the study of physiology. Unfortunately, undergraduate students often struggle to understand the genesis of this energy gradient, which makes the teaching activity a hard task for the instructor. The topic of bioelectrogenesis encompasses multidisciplinary concepts, involves several mechanisms, and is a dynamic process, i.e., it never turns off during the lifetime of the cell. Therefore, to improve the transmission and acquisition of knowledge in this field, I present an alternative didactic model. The design of the model assumes that it is possible to build, in a series of sequential steps, an assembly of proteins within the membrane of an isolated cell in a simulated electrophysiology experiment. Initially, no proteins are inserted in the membrane and the cell is at a baseline energy state; the extracellular and intracellular fluids are at thermodynamic equilibrium. Students are guided through a sequence of four steps that add key membrane transport proteins to the model cell. The model is simple at the start and becomes progressively more complex, finally producing transmembrane chemical and electrical gradients. I believe that this didactic approach helps instructors with a more efficient tool for the teaching of the mechanisms of resting membrane potential while helping students avoid common difficulties that may be encountered when learning this topic. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  4. Physiological Employment Standards III: physiological challenges and consequences encountered during international military deployments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nindl, Bradley C; Castellani, John W; Warr, Bradley J; Sharp, Marilyn A; Henning, Paul C; Spiering, Barry A; Scofield, Dennis E

    2013-11-01

    Modern international military deployments in austere environments (i.e., Iraq and Afghanistan) place considerable physiological demands on soldiers. Significant physiological challenges exist: maintenance of physical fitness and body composition, rigors of external load carriage, environmental extremes (heat, cold, and altitude), medical illnesses, musculoskeletal injuries, traumatic brain injuries, post-traumatic stress disorder, and environmental exposure hazards (i.e., burn pits, vehicle exhaust, etc.). To date there is very little published research and no comprehensive reviews on the physiological effects of deployments. The purpose of this paper is to overview what is currently known from the literature related mainly to current military conflicts with regard to the challenges and consequences from deployments. Summary findings include: (1) aerobic capacity declines while muscle strength, power and muscular endurance appear to be maintained, (2) load carriage continues to tax the physical capacities of the Soldier, (3) musculoskeletal injuries comprise the highest proportion of all injury categories, (4) environmental insults occur from both terrestrial extremes and pollutant exposure, and (5) post-deployment concerns linger for traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder. A full understanding of these responses will assist in identifying the most effective risk mitigation strategies to ensure deployment readiness and to assist in establishment of military employment standards.

  5. Fast-track surgery in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanavati, Aditya J; Nagral, Sanjay; Prabhakar, Subramaniam

    2014-01-01

    Fast-track surgery or 'enhanced recovery after surgery' or 'multimodal rehabilitation after surgery' is a form of protocol-based perioperative care programme. It is an amalgamation of evidence-based practices that have been proven to improve patient outcome independently and exert a synergistic effect when applied together. The philosophy is to treat the patient's pathology with minimal disturbance to the physiology. Several surgical subspecialties have now adopted such protocols with good results. The role of fast-track surgery in colorectal procedures has been well demonstrated. Its application to other major abdominal surgical procedures is not as well defined but there are encouraging results in the few studies conducted. There has been resistance to several aspects of this programme among gastrointestinal and general surgeons. There is little data from India in the available literature on the application of fast-tracking in gastrointestinal surgery. In a country such as India the existing healthcare structure stands to gain the most by widespread adoption of fast-track methods. Early discharge, early ambulation, earlier return to work and increased hospital efficiency are some of the benefits. The cost gains derived from this programme stand to benefit the patient, doctor and government as well. The practice and implementation of fast-track surgery involves a multidisciplinary team approach. It requires policy formation at an institutional level and interdepartmental coordination. More research is required in areas like implementation of such protocols across India to derive the maximum benefit from them. Copyright 2014, NMJI.

  6. Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Patient Education FAQs Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Patient Education ...

  7. [Thymus surgery in a general surgery department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Raquel; Coelho, Fátima; Pimentel, Teresa; Ribero, Rui; Matos, Novo de; Araújo, António

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of thymectomy cases between 1990-2003, in a General Surgery Department. Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy in Miastenia Gravis patients. Retrospective study based on evaluation of data from Serviço de Cirurgia, Neurologia and Consult de Neurology processes, between 1990-2003, of 15 patients submitted to total thymectomy. 15 patients, aged 17 to 72, 11 female and 4 male. Miastenia Gravis was the main indication for surgery, for uncontrollable symptoms or suspicion of thymoma. In patients with myasthenia, surgery was accomplish after compensation of symptoms. There weren't post-surgery complications. Pathology were divided in thymic hyperplasia and thymoma. Miastenia patients have there symptoms diminished or stable with reduction or cessation of medical therapy. Miastenia was the most frequent indication for thymectomy. Surgery was good results, with low morbimortality, as long as the protocols are respected.

  8. Home geriatric physiological measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Toshiyo

    2012-01-01

    In an ageing society, the elderly can be monitored with numerous physiological, physical and passive devices. Sensors can be installed in the home for continuous mobility assistance and unobtrusive disease prevention. This review presents several modern sensors, which improve the quality of life and assist the elderly, disabled people and their caregivers. The main concept of geriatric sensors is that they are capable of providing assistance without limiting or disturbing the subject's daily routine, giving him or her greater comfort, pleasure and well-being. Furthermore, this review includes associated technologies of wearable/implantable monitoring systems and the ‘smart-house’ project. This review concludes by discussing future challenges of the future aged society. (topical review)

  9. Physiology for engineers applying engineering methods to physiological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chappell, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to qualitative and quantitative aspects of human physiology. It looks at biological and physiological processes and phenomena, including a selection of mathematical models, showing how physiological problems can be mathematically formulated and studied. It also illustrates how a wide range of engineering and physics topics, including electronics, fluid dynamics, solid mechanics and control theory can be used to describe and understand physiological processes and systems. Throughout the text there are introductions to measuring and quantifying physiological processes using both signal and imaging technologies. Physiology for Engineers describes the basic structure and models of cellular systems, the structure and function of the cardiovascular system, the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart and provides an overview of the structure and function of the respiratory and nervous systems. It also includes an introduction to the basic concepts and applications of reacti...

  10. Weight Loss Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight loss surgery helps people with extreme obesity to lose weight. It may be an option if you ... caused by obesity. There are different types of weight loss surgery. They often limit the amount of food ...

  11. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... administer local anesthesia, all forms of sedation and general anesthesia. Click here to find out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft ...

  12. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. Extractions and ... more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, ...

  13. Preparing for Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQs Preparing for Surgery Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Preparing for Surgery Patient Education FAQs Preparing for ... the person who is in charge of giving anesthesia and checking its effects. What can I do ...

  14. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Global Affairs and Humanitarian Efforts Log In Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Download PDF Find a SAGES Surgeon Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Your spine surgeon has determined that you ...

  15. Heart valve surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... techniques are used: Percutaneous surgery (through the skin) Robot-assisted surgery If your surgeon can repair your ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  16. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. Extractions and ... Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and ...

  17. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more surgeries depending on the extent of the repair needed. Click here to find out more. Corrective ... more surgeries depending on the extent of the repair needed. Click here to find out more. Corrective ...

  18. Cosmetic ear surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoplasty; Ear pinning; Ear surgery - cosmetic; Ear reshaping; Pinnaplasty ... Cosmetic ear surgery may be done in the surgeon's office, an outpatient clinic, or a hospital. It can be performed under ...

  19. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Jaw Surgery Download Download the ebook for further information Corrective jaw, or orthognathic surgery is performed by ... your treatment. Correction of Common Dentofacial Deformities ​ ​ The information provided here is not intended as a substitute ...

  20. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, ...

  1. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries depending on the ... are not uncommon. Individuals with a TMJ disorder may experience a variety of symptoms, such as earaches, ...

  2. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Facial trauma injuries include fractures of the upper and lower jaws and the ... Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Facial trauma injuries include fractures of the upper and lower jaws and the ...

  3. Abdominal wall surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosmetic surgery of the abdomen; Tummy tuck; Abdominoplasty ... Most of the time, this surgery is an elective or cosmetic procedure because it is an operation you choose to have. It is not usually needed for health reasons. Cosmetic abdomen repair ...

  4. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 434. ...

  5. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. ... more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, ...

  6. Refractive corneal surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after surgery, it should be OK to use artificial tears. Check with your provider. DO NOT wear contact lenses on the eye that had surgery, even if you have blurry vision. DO NOT use any makeup, creams, or lotions ...

  7. Smoking and surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery - quitting smoking; Surgery - quitting tobacco; Wound healing - smoking ... Tar, nicotine, and other chemicals from smoking can increase your risk of many health problems. These include heart and blood vessel problems, such as: Blood clots and aneurysms in ...

  8. Seismic capacity of switchgear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Hofmayer, C.; Kassir, M.; Pepper, S.

    1989-01-01

    As part of a component fragility program sponsored by the USNRC, BNL has collected existing information on the seismic capacity of switchgear assemblies from major manufacturers. Existing seismic test data for both low and medium voltage switchgear assemblies have been evaluated and the generic results are presented in this paper. The failure modes are identified and the corresponding generic lower bound capacity levels are established. The test response spectra have been used as a measure of the test vibration input. The results indicate that relays chatter at a very low input level at the base of the switchgear cabinet. This change of state of devices including relays have been observed. Breaker tripping occurs at a higher vibration level. Although the structural failure of internal elements have been noticed, the overall switchgear cabinet structure withstands a high vibration level. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Absorptive Capacity and Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristinsson, Kári

    international business, organizational economics, strategic management, technology management and last but not least neo-Schumpeterian economics. The goal of this dissertation is to examine what many consider as neglected arguments from the work by Cohen and Levinthal and thereby illuminate an otherwise......One of the most influential contributions to neo-Schumpeterian economics is Cohen and Levinthal‘s papers on absorptive capacity. Since their publication in the late 1980s and early 1990s the concept absorptive capacity has had substantial impact on research in economics and management, including...... overlooked area of research. Although research based on Cohen and Levinthal‘s work has made considerable impact, there is scarcity of research on certain fundamental points argued by Cohen and Levinthal. Among these is the importance of employee diversity as well as the type and nature of interaction between...

  10. Early Assessment of Delirium in Elderly Patients after Hip Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyo Jin; Hwang, Deuk Soo; Wang, Seong Keun; Chee, Ik Seung; Baeg, Sengmi; Kim, Jeong Lan

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study is intended to identify predictive factors of delirium, including risk factors and prodromal symptoms. Methods This study included sixty-five patients aged 65 years or older who had undergone hip surgery. Baseline assessments included age; gender; admission type (acute/elective); reason for surgery (fracture/replacement); C-reactive protein (CRP); Acute Physiology, Age, Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE III); and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The Korean versio...

  11. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, C. S.; Andrews, J. C.; Scully-Power, P.; Ball, S.; Speechley, G.; Latham, A. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The Tasman Front was delineated by airborne expendable bathythermograph survey; and an Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) IR image on the same day shows the same principal features as determined from ground-truth. It is clear that digital enhancement of HCMM images is necessary to map ocean surface temperatures and when done, the Tasman Front and other oceanographic features can be mapped by this method, even through considerable scattered cloud cover.

  12. CSTI High Capacity Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY-86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase 1 of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY-88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA's new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed

  13. Robotic liver surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Universe

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an evolving technology that has been successfully applied to a number of surgical specialties, but its use in liver surgery has so far been limited. In this review article we discuss the challenges of minimally invasive liver surgery, the pros and cons of robotics, the evolution of medical robots, and the potentials in applying this technology to liver surgery. The current data in the literature are also presented. PMID:25392840

  14. Success stories and emerging themes in conservation physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madliger, Christine L.; Cooke, Steven J.; Crespi, Erica J.; Funk, Jennifer L.; Hultine, Kevin R.; Hunt, Kathleen E.; Rohr, Jason R.; Sinclair, Brent J.; Suski, Cory D.; Willis, Craig K. R.; Love, Oliver P.

    2016-01-01

    The potential benefits of physiology for conservation are well established and include greater specificity of management techniques, determination of cause–effect relationships, increased sensitivity of health and disturbance monitoring and greater capacity for predicting future change. While descriptions of the specific avenues in which conservation and physiology can be integrated are readily available and important to the continuing expansion of the discipline of ‘conservation physiology’, to date there has been no assessment of how the field has specifically contributed to conservation success. However, the goal of conservation physiology is to foster conservation solutions and it is therefore important to assess whether physiological approaches contribute to downstream conservation outcomes and management decisions. Here, we present eight areas of conservation concern, ranging from chemical contamination to invasive species to ecotourism, where physiological approaches have led to beneficial changes in human behaviour, management or policy. We also discuss the shared characteristics of these successes, identifying emerging themes in the discipline. Specifically, we conclude that conservation physiology: (i) goes beyond documenting change to provide solutions; (ii) offers a diversity of physiological metrics beyond glucocorticoids (stress hormones); (iii) includes approaches that are transferable among species, locations and times; (iv) simultaneously allows for human use and benefits to wildlife; and (v) is characterized by successes that can be difficult to find in the primary literature. Overall, we submit that the field of conservation physiology has a strong foundation of achievements characterized by a diversity of conservation issues, taxa, physiological traits, ecosystem types and spatial scales. We hope that these concrete successes will encourage the continued evolution and use of physiological tools within conservation-based research and

  15. Comparative Fecal Metagenomics Unveils Unique Functional Capacity of the Swine Gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncovering the taxonomic composition and functional capacity within the swine gut microbial consortia is of great importance to animal physiology and health and to food and water safety due to the presence of human pathogens in pig feces. Limited information on the physiological...

  16. Micronutrient and physiologic parameters before and 6 months after RYGB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobato, Renata Cristina; Seixas Chaves, Daniela Fojo; Chaim, Elinton Adami

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is considered an effective method for sustained weight loss, but may cause various nutritional complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional status of minerals and vitamins, food consumption, and to monitor physiologic parameters in patients with obesity before and 6 months after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB). Thirty-six patients who had undergone RYGB were prospectively evaluated before and 6 months after surgery. At each phase their weight, height, body mass index (BMI), Electro Sensor Complex (ES Complex) data, food consumption, and total protein serum levels, albumin, prealbumin, parathyroid hormone (PTH), zinc (Zn), B12 vitamin (VitB12), iron (Fe), ferritin, copper (Cu), ionic calcium (CaI), magnesium (Mg), and folic acid were assessed. The mean weight loss from baseline to 6 months after surgery was 35.34±4.82%. Markers of autonomic nervous system balance (Pmicronutrients measured, 34 patients demonstrated some kind of deficiency. There was a high percentage of Zn deficiency in both pre- (55.55%) and postoperative (61.11%) patients, and 33.33% of the patients were deficient in prealbumin postoperatively. The protein intake after 6 months of surgery was below the recommended intake (deficiencies for Mg (Pprevalence of hypozincemia at 6 months post-RYGB. Furthermore, protein supplements were needed to maintain an adequate protein intake up to 6 months postsurgery. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. RADIATION AND SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. S.A. Adewuyi

    of radical surgical procedures, surgery remains the only potential curative treatment for many cancer patients ... catheter, 'Toilet' procedure, e.g. simple mastectomy or amputation of a limb, for fungating tumours. Debulking .... that tumour is irradiated prior to surgery and post- operative implies after surgery. 10. Pre-operative.

  18. Cavus Foot Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Toes All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Treatments Cavus Foot Surgery Page Content What is a cavus foot? A cavus or high-arched foot may have ... related problems. What are the goals of cavus foot surgery? The main goal of surgery is to ...

  19. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their surgery, orthognathic surgery is performed to correct functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on many aspects of life. Following are some of the conditions that may ... front, or side Facial injury Birth defects Receding lower jaw and ...

  20. Breast Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  1. Physiologic assessment of coronary artery fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, N.C.; Beauvais, J. (Creighton Univ., Omaha, NE (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Coronary artery fistula is an uncommon clinical entity. The most common coronary artery fistula is from the right coronary artery to the right side of the heart, and it is less frequent to the pulmonary artery. The effect of a coronary artery fistula may be physiologically significant because of the steal phenomenon resulting in coronary ischemia. Based on published reports, it is recommended that patients with congenital coronary artery fistulas be considered candidates for elective surgical correction to prevent complications including development of congestive heart failure, angina, subacute bacterial endocarditis, myocardial infarction, and coronary aneurysm formation with rupture or embolization. A patient is presented in whom treadmill-exercise thallium imaging was effective in determining the degree of coronary steal from a coronary artery fistula, leading to successful corrective surgery.

  2. Physiologic assessment of coronary artery fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.C.; Beauvais, J.

    1991-01-01

    Coronary artery fistula is an uncommon clinical entity. The most common coronary artery fistula is from the right coronary artery to the right side of the heart, and it is less frequent to the pulmonary artery. The effect of a coronary artery fistula may be physiologically significant because of the steal phenomenon resulting in coronary ischemia. Based on published reports, it is recommended that patients with congenital coronary artery fistulas be considered candidates for elective surgical correction to prevent complications including development of congestive heart failure, angina, subacute bacterial endocarditis, myocardial infarction, and coronary aneurysm formation with rupture or embolization. A patient is presented in whom treadmill-exercise thallium imaging was effective in determining the degree of coronary steal from a coronary artery fistula, leading to successful corrective surgery

  3. Development of diving capacity in emperor penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponganis, P J; Starke, L N; Horning, M; Kooyman, G L

    1999-04-01

    To compare the diving capacities of juvenile and adult emperor penguins Aptenodytes forsteri, and to determine the physiological variables underlying the diving ability of juveniles, we monitored diving activity in juvenile penguins fitted with satellite-linked time/depth recorders and examined developmental changes in body mass (Mb), hemoglobin concentration, myoglobin (Mb) content and muscle citrate synthase and lactate dehydrogenase activities. Diving depth, diving duration and time-at-depth histograms were obtained from two fledged juveniles during the first 2.5 months after their depature from the Cape Washingon colony in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. During this period, values of all three diving variables increased progressively. After 8-10 weeks at sea, 24-41 % of transmitted maximum diving depths were between 80 and 200 m. Although most dives lasted less than 2 min during the 2 month period, 8-25 % of transmitted dives in the last 2 weeks lasted 2-4 min. These values are lower than those previously recorded in adults during foraging trips. Of the physiological variables examined during chick and juvenile development, only Mb and Mb content did not approach adult values. In both near-fledge chicks and juveniles, Mb was 50-60 % of adult values and Mb content was 24-31 % of adult values. This suggests that the increase in diving capacity of juveniles at sea will be most dependent on changes in these factors.

  4. Competence building capacity shortage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doorman, Gerard; Wangensteen, Ivar; Bakken, Bjoern

    2005-02-01

    The objective of the project 'Competence Building Capacity Shortage' has been 'to increase knowledge about central approaches aimed at solving the peaking capacity problem in restructured power systems'. With respect to reserve markets, a model was developed in the project to analyze the relations between reserve requirements and prices in the spot and reserve markets respectively. A mathematical model was also developed and implemented, which also includes the balance market, and has a good ability to predict the relations between these markets under various assumptions. With some further development, this model can be used fore realistic analyses of these markets in a Nordic context. It was also concluded that certain system requirements with respect to frequency and time deviation can be relaxed without adverse effects. However, the requirements to system bias, Frequency Activated Operating Reserves and Frequency Activated Contingency Reserves cannot be relaxed, the latter because they must cover the dimensioning fault in the system. On the other hand, Fast Contingency Reserves can be reduced by removing requirements to national balances. Costs can furthermore be reduced by increasingly adapting a Nordic as opposed to national approach. A model for stepwise power flow was developed in the project, which is especially useful to analyze slow power system dynamics. This is relevant when analysing the effects of reserve requirements. A model for the analysis of the capacity balance in Norway and Sweden was also developed. This model is useful for looking at the future balance under various assumptions regarding e.g. weather conditions, demand growth and the development of the generation system. With respect to the present situation, if there is some price flexibility on the demand side and system operators are able to use reserves from the demand side, the probability for load shedding during the peak load hour is close to zero under the weather conditions after

  5. Use of a physiological profile to document motor impairment in ageing and in clinical groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, S R; Delbaere, K; Gandevia, S C

    2016-08-15

    Ageing decreases exercise performance and is frequently accompanied by reductions in cognitive performance. Deterioration in the physiological capacity to stand, locomote and exercise can manifest itself as falling over and represents a significant deterioration in sensorimotor control. In the elderly, falling leads to serious morbidity and mortality with major societal costs. Measurement of a suite of physiological capacities that are required for successful motor performance (including vision, muscle strength, proprioception and balance) has been used to produce a physiological profile assessment (PPA) which has been tracked over the age spectrum and in different diseases (e.g. multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease). As well as measures of specific physiological capacities, the PPA generates an overall 'score' which quantitatively measures an individual's cumulative risk of falling. The present review collates data from the PPA (and the physiological capacities it measures) as well as its use in strategies to reduce falls in the elderly and those with different diseases. We emphasise that (i) motor impairment arises via reductions in a wide range of sensorimotor abilities; (ii) the PPA approach not only gives a snapshot of the physiological capacity of an individual, but it also gives insight into the deficits among groups of individuals with particular diseases; and (iii) deficits in seemingly restricted and disparate physiological domains (e.g. vision, strength, cognition) are funnelled into impairments in tasks requiring upright balance. Motor impairments become more prevalent with ageing but careful physiological measurement and appropriate interventions offer a way to maximise health across the lifespan. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  6. Evaluation of liquid ingestion after bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Oliveira Dantas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for obesity; however, after surgery the patient may have difficulty in swallowing liquid and solid foods. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate liquid ingestion in patients who had undergone bariatric surgery. METHOD: We studied 43 volunteers with normal body mass index (BMI (BMI: 18.5-24.9 kg/m², 55 subjects with class III obesity (BMI: >40.0 kg/m², and 48 subjects with bariatric surgery for treatment of class III obesity. The method chosen for evaluation was the water swallowing test. The subjects drank in triplicate 50 mL of water while being precisely timed and the number of swallows were counted. RESULTS: There was no difference between subjects with normal BMI and subjects with class III obesity. During the first 2 months after bariatric surgery the patients showed an increase in the time needed to drink the entire volume, in the number of swallows, and in the inter-swallow interval, and a decrease in the volume swallowing capacity (volume/swallowing and swallowing flow rate (volume swallowed/second. After 2 months, the results of the swallowing measurements moved in the direction of normal values. CONCLUSION: Bariatric surgery may cause more intense alterations of liquid bolus swallowing within 2 months after the procedure, which moved to normal values after this time.

  7. Procedures of Exercise Physiology Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Phillip A.; Fortney, Suzanne; Greenisen, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Squires, William

    1998-01-01

    This manual describes the laboratory methods used to collect flight crew physiological performance data at the Johnson Space Center. The Exercise Countermeasures Project Laboratory is a standard physiology laboratory; only the application to the study of human physiological adaptations to spaceflight is unique. In the absence of any other recently published laboratory manual, this manual should be a useful document staffs and students of other laboratories.

  8. Conservation physiology of marine fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian; Peck, Myron A.; Antognarelli, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    At the end of May, 17 scientists involved in an EU COST Action on Conservation Physiology of Marine Fishes met in Oristano, Sardinia, to discuss how physiology can be better used in modelling tools to aid in management of marine ecosystems. Current modelling approaches incorporate physiology...... to different extents, ranging from no explicit consideration to detailed physiological mechanisms, and across scales from a single fish to global fishery resources. Biologists from different sub-disciplines are collaborating to rise to the challenge of projecting future changes in distribution and productivity...

  9. The Use of Rat and Mouse Models in Bariatric Surgery Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Lutz, Thomas A.; Bueter, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Animal models have been proven to be a crucial tool for investigating the physiological mechanisms underlying bariatric surgery in general and individual techniques in particular. By using a translational approach, most of these studies have been performed in rodents and have helped to understand how bariatric surgery may or may not work. However, data from studies using animal models should always be critically evaluated for their transferability to the human physiology. It is, therefore, th...

  10. 1992 Annual Capacity Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The Standard Contract for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste (10 CFR Part 961) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to issue an Annual Capacity Report (ACR) for planning purposes. This report is the fifth in the series published by DOE. In May 1993, DOE published the 1992 Acceptance Priority Ranking (APR) that established the order in which DOE will allocate projected acceptance capacity. As required by the Standard Contract, the acceptance priority ranking is based on the date the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) was permanently discharged, with the owners of the oldest SNF, on an industry-wide basis, given the highest priority. The 1992 ACR applies the projected waste acceptance rates in Table 2.1 to the 1992 APR, resulting in individual allocations for the owners and generators of the SNF. These allocations are listed in detail in the Appendix, and summarized in Table 3.1. The projected waste acceptance rates for SNF presented in Table 2.1 are nominal and assume a site for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility will be obtained; the facility will initiate operations in 1998; and the statutory linkages between the MRS facility and the repository set forth in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA), will be modified. During the first ten years following projected commencement of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) operation, the total quantity of SNF that could be accepted is projected to be 8,200 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This is consistent with the storage capacity licensing conditions imposed on an MRS facility by the NWPA. The annual acceptance rates provide an approximation of the system throughput and are subject to change as the program progresses

  11. Quantum reading capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirandola, Stefano; Braunstein, Samuel L; Lupo, Cosmo; Mancini, Stefano; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    The readout of a classical memory can be modelled as a problem of quantum channel discrimination, where a decoder retrieves information by distinguishing the different quantum channels encoded in each cell of the memory (Pirandola 2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 090504). In the case of optical memories, such as CDs and DVDs, this discrimination involves lossy bosonic channels and can be remarkably boosted by the use of nonclassical light (quantum reading). Here we generalize these concepts by extending the model of memory from single-cell to multi-cell encoding. In general, information is stored in a block of cells by using a channel-codeword, i.e. a sequence of channels chosen according to a classical code. Correspondingly, the readout of data is realized by a process of ‘parallel’ channel discrimination, where the entire block of cells is probed simultaneously and decoded via an optimal collective measurement. In the limit of a large block we define the quantum reading capacity of the memory, quantifying the maximum number of readable bits per cell. This notion of capacity is nontrivial when we suitably constrain the physical resources of the decoder. For optical memories (encoding bosonic channels), such a constraint is energetic and corresponds to fixing the mean total number of photons per cell. In this case, we are able to prove a separation between the quantum reading capacity and the maximum information rate achievable by classical transmitters, i.e. arbitrary classical mixtures of coherent states. In fact, we can easily construct nonclassical transmitters that are able to outperform any classical transmitter, thus showing that the advantages of quantum reading persist in the optimal multi-cell scenario. (paper)

  12. Smolt physiology and endocrinology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Stephen D.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Farrell, Anthony Peter; Brauner, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    Hormones play a critical role in maintaining body fluid balance in euryhaline fishes during changes in environmental salinity. The neuroendocrine axis senses osmotic and ionic changes, then signals and coordinates tissue-specific responses to regulate water and ion fluxes. Rapid-acting hormones, e.g. angiotensins, cope with immediate challenges by controlling drinking rate and the activity of ion transporters in the gill, gut, and kidney. Slow-acting hormones, e.g. prolactin and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1, reorganize the body for long-term acclimation by altering the abundance of ion transporters and through cell proliferation and differentiation of ionocytes and other osmoregulatory cells. Euryhaline species exist in all groups of fish, including cyclostomes, and cartilaginous and teleost fishes. The diverse strategies for responding to changes in salinity have led to differential regulation and tissue-specific effects of hormones. Combining traditional physiological approaches with genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analyses will elucidate the patterns and diversity of the endocrine control of euryhalinity.

  13. Polyamines in plant physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galston, A. W.; Sawhney, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The diamine putrescine, the triamine spermidine, and the tetramine spermine are ubiquitous in plant cells, while other polyamines are of more limited occurrence. Their chemistry and pathways of biosynthesis and metabolism are well characterized. They occur in the free form as cations, but are often conjugated to small molecules like phenolic acids and also to various macromolecules. Their titer varies from approximately micromolar to more than millimolar, and depends greatly on environmental conditions, especially stress. In cereals, the activity of one of the major polyamine biosynthetic enzymes, arginine decarboxylase, is rapidly and dramatically increased by almost every studied external stress, leading to 50-fold or greater increases in putrescine titer within a few hours. The physiological significance of this increase is not yet clear, although most recent work suggests an adaptive, protective role. Polyamines produced through the action of ornithine decarboxylase, by contrast, seem essential for DNA replication and cell division. The application of exogenous polyamines produces effects on patterns of senescence and morphogenesis, suggesting but not proving a regulatory role for polyamines in these processes. The evidence for such a regulatory role is growing.

  14. Physiology in Modelica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Mateják

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Modelica is an object-oriented language, in which models can be created and graphically represented by connecting instances of classes from libraries. These connections are not only assignments of values; they can also represent acausal equality. Even more, they can model Kirchhoff’s laws of circuits. In Modelica it is possible to develop library classes which are an analogy of electrical circuit components. The result of our work in this field is Physiolibrary (www.physiolibrary.org – a free, open-source Modelica library for human physiology. By graphical joining instances of Physiolibrary classes, user can create models of cardiovascular circulation, thermoregulation, metabolic processes, nutrient distribution, gas transport, electrolyte regulation, water distribution, hormonal regulation and pharmacological regulation. After simple setting of the parameters, the models are ready to simulate. After simulation, the user can examine variables as their values change over time. Representing the model as a diagram has also great educational advantages, because students are able to better understand physical principles when they see them modeled graphically.

  15. Geostationary orbit capacity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansell, P. S.; Norris, P.; Walton, R.

    1982-04-01

    Factors influencing the communications satellite capacity of the geostationary orbit were analyzed to derive an interference model of the orbit environment. Comparison of the total orbit arc length required by each proposed planning method or by using different technology developments indicates that the orbit arc of most interest to Western Europe will not be saturated by the year 2000. The orbit arc occupied in the year 2000 by the satellites in the West European arc of interest can be approximately halved by using digital modulation techniques for TV program transfers which use FM at present, or by adopting an orbital planning method which assigns FM TV services to predefined orbit or spectrum segments.

  16. Photoacoustic monitoring of clot formation during surgery and tumor surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Suen, James Y.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-03-01

    When a blood vessel is injured, the normal physiological response of the body is to form a clot (thrombus) to prevent blood loss. Alternatively, even without injury to the blood vessel, the pathological condition called thromboembolism may lead to the formation of circulating blood clots (CBCs), also called emboli, which can clog blood vessels throughout the body. Veins of the extremities (venous thromboembolism), lungs (pulmonary embolism ), brain (embolic stroke), heart (myocardial infarction), kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract are often affected. Emboli are also common complications of infection, inflammation, cancer, surgery, radiation and coronary artery bypass grafts. Despite the clear medical significance of CBCs, however, little progress has been made in the development of methods for real-time detection and identification of CBCs. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new modification of in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for real-time detection of white, red, and mixed clots through a transient decrease, increase or fluctuation of PA signal amplitude, respectively. In this work, using PAFC and mouse models, we present for the first time direct evidence that some medical procedures, such as conventional or cancer surgery may initiate the formation of CBCs. In conclusion, the PA diagnostic platform can be used in real-time to define risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, assist in the prognosis and potential prevention of stroke by using a well-timed therapy or as a clot count as a marker of therapy efficacy.

  17. Surgery Scheduling Using Simulation with Arena

    OpenAIRE

    J. A. López; C.I. López; J.E. Olguín; C. Camargo; J. M. López

    2013-01-01

    The institutions seek to improve their performance and quality of service, so that their patients are satisfied. This research project aims, conduct a time study program in the area of gynecological surgery, to determine the current level of capacity and optimize the programming time in order to adequately respond to demand. The system is analyzed by waiting lines and uses the simulation using ARENA to evaluate proposals for improvement and optimization programming time e...

  18. Deficiency of employability capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelse I.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Young unemployed people have comprised one of the significantly largest groups of the unemployed people in Latvia in recent years. One of the reasons why young people have difficulty integrating into the labour market is the “expectation gap” that exists in the relations between employers and the new generation of workers. Employers focus on capacity-building for employability such individual factors as strength, patience, self-discipline, self-reliance, self-motivation, etc., which having a nature of habit and are developed in a long-term work socialization process, which begins even before the formal education and will continue throughout the life cycle. However, when the socialization is lost, these habits are depreciated faster than they can be restored. Currently a new generation is entering the labour market, which is missing the succession of work socialization. Factors, such as rising unemployment and poverty in the background over the past twenty years in Latvia have created a very unfavourable employability background of “personal circumstances” and “external factors”, which seriously have impaired formation of the skills and attitudes in a real work environment. The study reveals another paradox – the paradox of poverty. Common sense would want to argue that poverty can be overcome by the job. However, the real state of affairs shows that unfavourable coincidence of the individual, personal circumstances and external factors leads to deficit of employability capacity and possibility of marked social and employment deprivation.

  19. Does bariatric surgery improve adipose tissue function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frikke-Schmidt, H.; O’Rourke, R. W.; Lumeng, C. N.; Sandoval, D. A.; Seeley, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment for obesity. Not only do these types of surgeries produce significant weight loss but also they improve insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolic function. The aim of this review is to explore how altered physiology of adipose tissue may contribute to the potent metabolic effects of some of these procedures. This includes specific effects on various fat depots, the function of individual adipocytes and the interaction between adipose tissue and other key metabolic tissues. Besides a dramatic loss of fat mass, bariatric surgery shifts the distribution of fat from visceral to the subcutaneous compartment favoring metabolic improvement. The sensitivity towards lipolysis controlled by insulin and catecholamines is improved, adipokine secretion is altered and local adipose inflammation as well as systemic inflammatory markers decreases. Some of these changes have been shown to be weight loss independent, and novel hypothesis for these effects includes include changes in bile acid metabolism, gut microbiota and central regulation of metabolism. In conclusion bariatric surgery is capable of improving aspects of adipose tissue function and do so in some cases in ways that are not entirely explained by the potent effect of surgery. PMID:27272117

  20. Analyzing Physiologic occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Emamie

    1987-08-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, when preserving and restoring the gnathostomatic system the dentist controls tooth morphology to insure proper distribution of stress. So, we restore a portion of a tooth or all the teeth in such a manner as to subject the associated parts of the system to the least stress. We evaluate our diagnosis and control it in our treatment. The treatment should be based on the scientific method. We create optimal occlusion or a desirable functional state of the masticatory system.  Many persons with occlusal imperfections will not have symptoms of functional disorders. This is the psychological adaptive capacity of the neuromuscular system, teeth, dental arches, and periodontal tissues.Recent developments in dental material, technology and instruments however, have simplified the taskaf restoring rebuilding and rehabilitating diseased mouths. So, optimum oral health and function should be the prime objective of all treatment procedures. Because the ultimate aim will always be to restore the mouth to health and preserve this status throughout the life of a patient.

  1. Workshop on moisture buffer capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    Summary report of a Nordtest workshop on moisture buffer capacity held at Copenhagen August 21-22 2003......Summary report of a Nordtest workshop on moisture buffer capacity held at Copenhagen August 21-22 2003...

  2. Building a capacity building manual

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Clinton, DD

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available ? Capacity building in developed nations ? renewal stage HOW can capacity be developed and maintained? Through mentoring , training, education, physical projects, the infusion of financial and other resources and more importantly the motivation...

  3. Saturation diving; physiology and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubakk, Alf O; Ross, John A S; Thom, Stephen R

    2014-07-01

    In saturation diving, divers stay under pressure until most of their tissues are saturated with breathing gas. Divers spend a long time in isolation exposed to increased partial pressure of oxygen, potentially toxic gases, bacteria, and bubble formation during decompression combined with shift work and long periods of relative inactivity. Hyperoxia may lead to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that interact with cell structures, causing damage to proteins, lipids, and nucleic acid. Vascular gas-bubble formation and hyperoxia may lead to dysfunction of the endothelium. The antioxidant status of the diver is an important mechanism in the protection against injury and is influenced both by diet and genetic factors. The factors mentioned above may lead to production of heat shock proteins (HSP) that also may have a negative effect on endothelial function. On the other hand, there is a great deal of evidence that HSPs may also have a "conditioning" effect, thus protecting against injury. As people age, their ability to produce antioxidants decreases. We do not currently know the capacity for antioxidant defense, but it is reasonable to assume that it has a limit. Many studies have linked ROS to disease states such as cancer, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, and atherosclerosis as well as to old age. However, ROS are also involved in a number of protective mechanisms, for instance immune defense, antibacterial action, vascular tone, and signal transduction. Low-grade oxidative stress can increase antioxidant production. While under pressure, divers change depth frequently. After such changes and at the end of the dive, divers must follow procedures to decompress safely. Decompression sickness (DCS) used to be one of the major causes of injury in saturation diving. Improved decompression procedures have significantly reduced the number of reported incidents; however, data indicate considerable underreporting of injuries

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF PLASTIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećanac, Marija Đ

    2015-01-01

    Plastic surgery is a medical specialty dealing with corrections of defects, improvements in appearance and restoration of lost function. Ancient times. The first recorded account of reconstructive plastic surgery was found in ancient Indian Sanskrit texts, which described reconstructive surgeries of the nose and ears. In ancient Greece and Rome, many medicine men performed simple plastic cosmetic surgeries to repair damaged parts of the body caused by war mutilation, punishment or humiliation. In the Middle Ages, the development of all medical braches, including plastic surgery was hindered. New age. The interest in surgical reconstruction of mutilated body parts was renewed in the XVIII century by a great number of enthusiastic and charismatic surgeons, who mastered surgical disciplines and became true artists that created new forms. Modern era. In the XX century, plastic surgery developed as a modern branch in medicine including many types of reconstructive surgery, hand, head and neck surgery, microsurgery and replantation, treatment of burns and their sequelae, and esthetic surgery. Contemporary and future plastic surgery will continue to evolve and improve with regenerative medicine and tissue engineering resulting in a lot of benefits to be gained by patients in reconstruction after body trauma, oncology amputation, and for congenital disfigurement and dysfunction.

  5. 1990s: High Capacity Backbones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. 1990s: High Capacity Backbones. Backbone capacities increased from 2.5 Gb/s to 100s of Gb/s during the 1990's. Wavelength division multiplexing with 160 waves of 10 Gb/s was commercially available. Several high-capacity backbones built in the US and Europe.

  6. Landfill Construction and Capacity Expansion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andre, F.J.; Cerda, E.

    2003-01-01

    We study the optimal capacity and lifetime of landfills taking into account their sequential nature.Such an optimal capacity is characterized by the so-called Optimal Capacity Condition.Particular versions of this condition are obtained for two alternative settings: first, if all the landfills are

  7. 133 East and Central African Journal of Surgery Volume 12 Number ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Josephine Nakato

    Background: Prediction of complications is an essential part of risk management in surgery. Knowing which patient to operate and those at high risk of developing complications contributes significantly to the quality of surgical care and cost reduction in surgery. The physiological and operative severity score for the ...

  8. A conceptual framework for the emerging discipline of conservation physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coristine, Laura E.; Robillard, Cassandra M.; Kerr, Jeremy T.; O'Connor, Constance M.; Lapointe, Dominique; Cooke, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Current rates of biodiversity decline are unprecedented and largely attributed to anthropogenic influences. Given the scope and magnitude of conservation issues, policy and management interventions must maximize efficiency and efficacy. The relatively new field of conservation physiology reveals the physiological mechanisms associated with population declines, animal–environment relationships and population or species tolerance thresholds, particularly where these relate to anthropogenic factors that necessitate conservation action. We propose a framework that demonstrates an integrative approach between physiology, conservation and policy, where each can inform the design, conduct and implementation of the other. Each junction of the conservation physiology process has the capacity to foster dialogue that contributes to effective implementation, monitoring, assessment and evaluation. This approach enables effective evaluation and implementation of evidence-based conservation policy and management decisions through a process of ongoing refinement, but may require that scientists (from the disciplines of both physiology and conservation) and policy-makers bridge interdisciplinary knowledge gaps. Here, we outline a conceptual framework that can guide and lead developments in conservation physiology, as well as promote innovative research that fosters conservation-motivated policy. PMID:27293654

  9. Physiology of Sedentary Behavior and Its Relationship to Health Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyfault, John P; Du, Mengmeng; Kraus, William E; Levine, James A; Booth, Frank W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This paper reports on the findings and recommendations of the “Physiology of Sedentary Behavior and its Relationship to Health Outcomes” group, a part of a larger workshop entitled Sedentary Behavior: Identifying Research Priorities sponsored by the National Heart, and Lung and Blood Institute and the National Institute on Aging, which aimed to establish sedentary behavior research priorities. Methods The discussion within our workshop lead to the formation of critical physiological research objectives related to sedentary behaviors, that if appropriately researched would greatly impact our overall understanding of human health and longevity. Results and Conclusions Primary questions are related to physiological “health outcomes” including the influence of physical activity vs. sedentary behavior on function of a number of critical physiological systems (aerobic capacity, skeletal muscle metabolism and function, telomeres/genetic stability, and cognitive function). The group also derived important recommendations related to the “central and peripheral mechanisms” that govern sedentary behavior and how energy balance has a role in mediating these processes. General recommendations for future sedentary physiology research efforts include that studies of sedentary behavior, including that of sitting time only, should focus on the physiological impact of a “lack of human movement” in contradistinction to the effects of physical movement and that new models or strategies for studying sedentary behavior induced adaptations and links to disease development are needed to elucidate underlying mechanism(s). PMID:25222820

  10. Capacity Ten-Seven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-05-04

    The study was initiated to assemble UK solar experts who would define the parameters for the design of solar cell process plant with a capacity of about 10MWp per annum and establish the optimum substrate size, cell configuration and junction structure and show that these characteristics are suited to high volume low cost production. The study focused on proven materials and techniques rather than on innovative materials and processes. Peak production should deliver panels at a cost of less than $1 per peak watt. The study was reported under the headings of fundamental studies, front contact deposition, semiconductor deposition, rear contact deposition, cell isolation and initial design study. Since much of the work is commercially sensitive, not all findings are divulged in the report. The work, which achieved all its targets, was carried out by ICP Solar Technologies UK Ltd under contract to the DTI.

  11. Physiologic Status Monitoring via the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Traverso

    Full Text Available Reliable, real-time heart and respiratory rates are key vital signs used in evaluating the physiological status in many clinical and non-clinical settings. Measuring these vital signs generally requires superficial attachment of physically or logistically obtrusive sensors to subjects that may result in skin irritation or adversely influence subject performance. Given the broad acceptance of ingestible electronics, we developed an approach that enables vital sign monitoring internally from the gastrointestinal tract. Here we report initial proof-of-concept large animal (porcine experiments and a robust processing algorithm that demonstrates the feasibility of this approach. Implementing vital sign monitoring as a stand-alone technology or in conjunction with other ingestible devices has the capacity to significantly aid telemedicine, optimize performance monitoring of athletes, military service members, and first-responders, as well as provide a facile method for rapid clinical evaluation and triage.

  12. Cassava biology and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawy, Mabrouk A

    2004-11-01

    Cassava or manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz), a perennial shrub of the New World, currently is the sixth world food crop for more than 500 million people in tropical and sub-tropical Africa, Asia and Latin America. It is cultivated mainly by resource-limited small farmers for its starchy roots, which are used as human food either fresh when low in cyanogens or in many processed forms and products, mostly starch, flour, and for animal feed. Because of its inherent tolerance to stressful environments, where other food crops would fail, it is often considered a food-security source against famine, requiring minimal care. Under optimal environmental conditions, it compares favorably in production of energy with most other major staple food crops due to its high yield potential. Recent research at the Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT) in Colombia has demonstrated the ability of cassava to assimilate carbon at very high rates under high levels of humidity, temperature and solar radiation,which correlates with productivity across all environments whether dry or humid. When grown on very poor soils under prolonged drought for more than 6 months, the crop reduce both its leaf canopy and transpiration water loss, but its attached leaves remain photosynthetically active, though at greatly reduced rates. The main physiological mechanism underlying such a remarkable tolerance to drought was rapid stomatal closure under both atmospheric and edaphic water stress, protecting the leaf against dehydration while the plant depletes available soil water slowly during long dry periods. This drought tolerance mechanism leads to high crop water use efficiency values. Although the cassava fine root system is sparse, compared to other crops, it can penetrate below 2 m soil,thus enabling the crop to exploit deep water if available. Leaves of cassava and wild Manihot possess elevated activities of the C4 enzyme PEP carboxylase but lack the leaf Kranz anatomy typical of C4

  13. Physiology of Alpine skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, R E; Montgomery, D L

    1988-10-01

    Physiological profiles of elite Alpine skiers reveal the importance of muscular strength, anaerobic power, anaerobic endurance, aerobic endurance, coordination, agility, balance, and flexibility. On-hill snow training and dryland training programmes should focus on the elevation of these fitness components. Physical characteristics of elite skiers reveal an average height and body mass. Today, successful skiers are taller and heavier than their predecessors. Slalom skiers tend to be leaner than skiers in other events while the downhill racers are the heaviest. Elite skiers have strong legs when peak torque is measured during isometric and isokinetic conditions involving knee extension, which may be a specific adaptation since the skier is in a crouched position for a prolonged period when racing. Leg strength correlates significantly with performance in the downhill and giant slalom events. The glycolytic contribution in the slalom and giant slalom events is about 40% of the total energy cost. Following a race, blood lactate concentration averages 9 to 13 mmol/L. A muscle lactate concentration of 24 mmol/kg wet muscle tissue has been reported. Elite skiers have higher lactate values than advanced or novice skiers. The aerobic demands of competitive Alpine skiing may approach (90 to 95%) of the athlete's maximal aerobic power. Maximal heart rate is achieved during the latter part of the race. Elite skiers have a high VO2max. This may reflect their training programme and not the actual demands of the sport. When turning, muscular activity acts to impede blood flow and oxygen delivery. As a consequence, anaerobic metabolism is increased. Glycogen studies show significant utilisation from both slow and fast twitch muscle fibres. Skilled and unskilled skiers differ with respect to glycogen utilisation. Skilled skiers have greater glycogen depletion in the slow twitch fibres compared to unskilled skiers. Muscle glycogen decreases by about 32 mmol/kg wet muscle tissue

  14. [Breast cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Georges; Berclaz, Gilles; Langer, Igor; Pittet-Cuenod, Brigitte; Delaloye, Jean-François

    2007-10-24

    Breast conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy is the treatment of choice for early breast cancer. For patients who choice or need a mastectomy, breast reconstruction provides an acceptable alternative. Breast cancer surgery has been evolving through minimally invasive approaches. Sentinel node biopsy has already remplaced axillary lymph node dissection in the evaluation of the axilla. Local ablation of the tumor may be a valuable alternative to surgery in the future.

  15. Gastric and intestinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Theresa W; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2003-09-01

    Gastric surgery is commonly performed to remove foreign bodies and correct gastric dilatation-volvulus and is less commonly performed to treat gastric ulceration or erosion, neoplasia, and benign gastric outflow obstruction. Intestinal surgery, although commonly performed by veterinarians, should never be considered routine. The most common procedures of the small intestinal tract performed in dogs and cats include enterotomy and resection/anastomosis. Surgery of the large intestine is indicated for lesions causing obstruction, perforations, colonic inertia, or chronic inflammation.

  16. North American fertilizer capacity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This listing of producers and their fertilizer production capacities was compiled in January 1991 with the cooperation of the US and Canadian fertilizer industry. Capacity is only an indicator of supply. Nameplate capacity differs from planned production levels or actual production because plants often operate above or below design capacity. Unless reported otherwise, plant capacities are based on 340 days per year of operation. No adjustment is made for partial year operation. Numerical data for the production of ammonia, ammonium nitrate, nitrogen solutions, urea, phosphate rock, phosphoric acid and ammonium phosphates is included.

  17. Physiological and genetic responses of bacteria to osmotic stress.

    OpenAIRE

    Csonka, L N

    1989-01-01

    The capacity of organisms to respond to fluctuations in their osmotic environments is an important physiological process that determines their abilities to thrive in a variety of habitats. The primary response of bacteria to exposure to a high osmotic environment is the accumulation of certain solutes, K+, glutamate, trehalose, proline, and glycinebetaine, at concentrations that are proportional to the osmolarity of the medium. The supposed function of these solutes is to maintain the osmolar...

  18. Annals of surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1885-01-01

    Includes the transactions of the American Surgical Association, New York Surgical Society, Philadelphia Academy of Surgery, Southern Surgical Association, Central Surgical Association, and at various...

  19. [Surgery of adrenal tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, V O; Ermolov, A S; Kovalenko, T I; Kondratiev, A V

    2004-01-01

    From 1983 to 2003 examination and surgical treatment were performed in 463 patients with different adrenal tumors. Hormone-active tumors were revealed in 249 of them, non-active - in 214. Combination of CT or MRT with study of adrenal hormones is the basis of the diagnosis. In different cases multispiral computed tomography, angiography, selected taking of blood from inferior caval vein, US- or CT-guided biopsy were used. Open surgery through thoracofrenolumbotomy was performed in 392 patients, videolaparoscopic surgery - in 71. Expediency of laparoscopic surgery in line with open surgery is demonstrated.

  20. Hyperoxaluria and Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplin, John R.

    2007-04-01

    Bariatric surgery as a means to treat obesity is becoming increasingly common in the United States. An early form of bariatric surgery, the jejunoileal bypass, had to be abandoned in 1980 due to numerous complications, including hyperoxaluria and kidney stones. Current bariatric procedures have not been systematically evaluated to determine if they cause hyperoxaluria. Presented here are data showing that hyperoxaluria is the major metabolic abnormality in patients with bariatric surgery who form kidney stones. Further studies are needed to assess the prevalence of hyperoxaluria in all patients with bariatric surgery.

  1. Oncoplastic breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillarisetti, Raghu Ram; Querci Della Rovere, Guidubaldo

    2012-06-01

    Breast Surgery is now a recognized subspecialty of General Surgery abroad with structured training for designated 'Oncoplastic Breast Surgeons'. Oncoplastic Breast surgery is probably one of the most interesting and challenging new developments over the past 20 years. The aims of Oncoplastic surgery are wide local excision of the cancer coupled with partial reconstruction of the defect to achieve a cosmetically acceptable result. Avoidance of mastectomy and consequent reduction of psychological morbidity are the principal goals in the development of various oncoplastic techniques. The use of plastic surgical techniques not only ensures good cosmetic outcome, but also allows the cancer surgeon to remove the tumour with greater volume of surrounding tissue, thus extending the boundaries of breast conserving surgery. Proper patient selection and careful planning after proper radiological and clinical assessment are the two essential prerequisites before undertaking oncoplastic breast surgery. Oncoplastic surgery involves both volume displacement and volume replacement techniques. Some commonly used volume displacement procedures are described in the article. The need for adjustment of contralateral breast should also be anticipated at the time of planning breast conserving surgery, which can be done either at the same time as breast cancer surgery or as a delayed setting.

  2. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553......, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems....

  3. Annals of surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Includes the transactions of the American Surgical Association, New York Surgical Society, Philadelphia Academy of Surgery, Southern Surgical Association, Central Surgical Association, and at various...

  4. [Crohn's disease surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, Zdeněk; Marek, Filip; Válek, Vlastimil A; Bartušek, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Surgery of Crohns disease is an important part of the general treatment algorithm. The role of surgery is changing with the development of conservative procedures. The recent years have seen the return to early treatment of patients with Crohns disease. Given the character of the disease and its intestinal symptoms, a specific approach to these patients is necessary, especially regarding the correct choice of surgery. The paper focuses on the luminal damage of the small and large intestine including complications of the disease. We describe the individual indications for a surgical solution, including the choice of anastomosis or multiple / repeated surgeries.

  5. Radio-capacity of ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kultakhmedov, Yu.; Kultakhmedova-Vyshnyakova, V.

    1997-01-01

    This paper consider a universal approach to ecosystems of different types, based on representation of their radio-capacity. The concept of ecosystem includes reproduction of components (bio-productivity) and conditions such as maintaining of environment quality. Radio-capacity in the case of radionuclide pollution appears in accumulation and redistribution of radionuclides in the ecosystem. As a result the radionuclides are redistributed and buried in soil or lake bottom sediments. Estimation models for the radio-capacity of water and terrestrial ecosystems are represented. The calculations of the radio-capacity factor of water ecosystems are performed, and the high radio-capacity of a freshwater reservoir (F=0.6-0.8) and extremely high radio-capacity of a reservoir cascade (F c =0.99) is shown material from the Dnieper's cascade reservoirs. The methods of radio-capacity estimation of agroecosystems, wood and marine ecosystems are developed. (authors)

  6. STUDY OF PHYSIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF INDIAN BOXERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulshan Lal Khanna

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to study the morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics of Indian National boxers as well as to assess the cardiovascular adaptation to graded exercise and actual boxing round. Two different studies were conducted. In the first study [N = 60, (junior boxers below-19 yrs, n = 30, (senior boxers-20-25 yrs, n = 30] different morphological, physiological and biochemical parameters were measured. In the second study (N = 21, Light Weight category- <54 kg, n = 7; Medium weight category <64 kg, n = 7 and Medium heavy weight category <75 kg, n = 7 cardiovascular responses were studied during graded exercise protocol and actual boxing bouts. Results showed a significantly higher (p < 0.05 stature, body mass, LBM, body fat and strength of back and grip in senior boxers compared to juniors. Moreover, the senior boxers possessed mesomorphic body conformation where as the juniors' possessed ectomorphic body conformation. Significantly lower (p < 0.05 aerobic capacity and anaerobic power were noted in junior boxers compared to seniors. Further, significantly higher (p < 0.05 maximal heart rates and recovery heart rates were observed in the seniors as compared to the juniors. Significantly higher maximum heart rates were noted during actual boxing compared to graded exercise. Blood lactate concentration was found to increase with the increase of workload during both graded exercise and actual boxing round. The senior boxers showed a significantly elevated (p < 0.05 levels of hemoblobin, blood urea, uric acid and peak lactate as compared to junior boxers. In the senior boxers significantly lower levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride and LDLC were observed as compared to junior boxers. No significant change has been noted in HDLC between the groups. The age and level of training in boxing has significant effect on Aerobic, anaerobic component. The study of physiological responses during graded exercise

  7. Physiological responses in barley to applications of lanthanum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, N.; Maheswaran, J.; Peverill, K.; Meehan, B.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Chinese research and glasshouse investigations carried out in Victoria by the authors have shown that several plant species, when treated with Rare Earth Elements (REEs), retain greater amounts of moisture under water stressed conditions. The physiological adaptation of the plant to retain moisture in response to REE treatment however, has not been investigated. A glasshouse trial is currently in progress to study the physiological and agronomic responses of barley (cv. Schooner) grown in pots to application of lanthanum (0, 5 and 10 kg/ha), at a concentration of 0.05%, under well-watered (field capacity) and water-deficit (25 - 30% field capacity) conditions. Lanthanum was applied both directly to the soil and as a foliar spray. The physiological measurements include, photosynthetic rate, leaf water potential, osmotic potential, relative water content, stomatal conductance and water use efficiency. Measured agronomic parameters include plant height, tiller production, leaf area development, total grain weight, total biomass, root and shoot ratio and harvest index. Analysis of plant tissue for N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Zn and La to study the relationship between application of REE and nutrient uptake is also being carried out. The paper discusses physiological and agronomic changes in barley plants in response to treatment with lanthanum, under conditions of water stress

  8. Working Memory Capacity and Surgical Performance While Exposed to Mild Hypoxic Hypoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Paul J; Manley, Andrew J; Shand, Ross; O'Hara, John P; Mellor, Adrian

    2017-10-01

    Medical Emergency Response Team (MERT) helicopters fly at altitudes of 3000 m in Afghanistan (9843 ft). Civilian hospitals and disaster-relief surgical teams may have to operate at such altitudes or even higher. Mild hypoxia has been seen to affect the performance of novel tasks at flight levels as low as 5000 ft. Aeromedical teams frequently work in unpressurized environments; it is important to understand the implications of this mild hypoxia and investigate whether supplementary oxygen systems are required for some or all of the team members. Ten UK orthopedic surgeons were recruited and in a double blind randomized experimental protocol, were acutely exposed for 45 min to normobaric hypoxia [fraction of inspired oxygen (FIo2) ∼14.1%, equivalent to 3000 m (10,000 ft)] or normobaric normoxia (sea-level). Basic physiological parameters were recorded. Subjects completed validated tests of verbal working memory capacity (VWMC) and also applied an orthopedic external fixator (Hoffmann® 3, Stryker, UK) to a plastic tibia under test conditions. Significant hypoxia was induced with the reduction of FIo2 to ∼14.1% (Spo2 87% vs. 98%). No effect of hypoxia on VWMC was observed. The pin-divergence score (a measure of frame asymmetry) was significantly greater in hypoxic conditions (4.6 mm) compared to sea level (3.0 mm); there was no significant difference in the penetrance depth (16.9 vs. 17.2 mm). One hypoxic frame would have failed early. We believe that surgery at an altitude of 3000 m, when unacclimated individuals are acutely exposed to atmospheric hypoxia for 45 min, can likely take place without supplemental oxygen use but further work is required.Parker PJ, Manley AJ, Shand R, O'Hara JP, Mellor A. Working memory capacity and surgical performance while exposed to mild hypoxic hypoxemia. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(10):918-923.

  9. Critical differences between elective and emergency surgery: identifying domains for quality improvement in emergency general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbus, Alexandra B; Morris, Megan A; Lilley, Elizabeth J; Harlow, Alyssa F; Haider, Adil H; Salim, Ali; Havens, Joaquim M

    2018-04-01

    The objective of our study was to characterize providers' impressions of factors contributing to disproportionate rates of morbidity and mortality in emergency general surgery to identify targets for care quality improvement. Emergency general surgery is characterized by a high-cost burden and disproportionate morbidity and mortality. Factors contributing to these observed disparities are not comprehensively understood and targets for quality improvement have not been formally developed. Using a grounded theory approach, emergency general surgery providers were recruited through purposive-criterion-based sampling to participate in semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Participants were asked to identify contributors to emergency general surgery outcomes, to define effective care for EGS patients, and to describe operating room team structure. Interviews were performed to thematic saturation. Transcripts were iteratively coded and analyzed within and across cases to identify emergent themes. Member checking was performed to establish credibility of the findings. A total of 40 participants from 5 academic hospitals participated in either individual interviews (n = 25 [9 anesthesia, 12 surgery, 4 nursing]) or focus groups (n = 2 [15 nursing]). Emergency general surgery was characterized by an exceptionally high level of variability, which can be subcategorized as patient-variability (acute physiology and comorbidities) and system-variability (operating room resources and workforce). Multidisciplinary communication is identified as a modifier to variability in emergency general surgery; however, nursing is often left out of early communication exchanges. Critical variability in emergency general surgery may impact outcomes. Patient-variability and system-variability, with focus on multidisciplinary communication, represent potential domains for quality improvement in this field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Physiological employment standards IV: integration of women in combat units physiological and medical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Yoram; Yanovich, Ran; Moran, Daniel S; Heled, Yuval

    2013-11-01

    Anthropometric and physiological factors place the average female soldier at a disadvantage relative to male soldiers in most aspects of physical performance. Aerobic and anaerobic fitness levels are lower in women than in men. Thus, women have a lower overall work capacity and must therefore exert themselves more than men to achieve the same output. The lower weight and fat-free mass and the higher body fat of women are associated with lower muscle strength and endurance, placing them at disadvantage compared with men in carrying out military tasks such as lifting and carrying weights or marching with a load. Working at a higher percentage of their maximal capacity to achieve the same performance levels as men, women tire earlier and are at increased risk of overuse injuries. Their smaller size, different bone geometry and lower bone strength also predispose women to a higher incidence of stress fractures. Although training in gender-integrated groups narrows the gaps in fitness, significant differences between the genders after basic training still remain. Nevertheless, integration of women into military combat professions is feasible in many cases. Some 'close combat roles' will still be an exception, mainly because of the extreme physical demands that are required in those units that are beyond the physiological adaptability capacities of an average female. There is no direct evidence that women have a negative impact on combat effectiveness. Once the gender differences are acknowledged and operational doctrines adjusted accordingly, female soldiers in mixed-gender units can meet the physical standards for the assigned missions.

  11. Olfaction: anatomy, physiology and behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Benignus, Vernon A.; Prah, James D.

    1982-01-01

    The anatomy, physiology and function of the olfactory system are reviewed, as are the normal effects of olfactory stimulation. It is speculated that olfaction may have important but unobtrusive effects on human behavior.

  12. Contemporary endodontic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Richard; Torabinejad, Mahmoud

    2004-06-01

    During the past decade, endodontics has seen a dramatic shift in the application of periradicular surgery and the role it plays in endodontic treatment. With the introduction of enhanced magnification, periradicular ultrasonics and other associative technologies, teeth that might otherwise be extracted now have a chance for retention. This article describes the role of these advances in contemporary endodontic surgery.

  13. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Annals of Pediatric Surgery is striving to fill an important niche that provides focus to clinical care, technical innovation and clinical research. The Annals of Pediatric Surgery has the responsibility to serve not only pediatric surgeons in the Middle East and North Africa but also should be an important conduit for scientific ...

  14. Safety in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siregar, S.

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of safety in cardiac surgery is a complex process, which involves many clinical, practical, methodological and statistical issues. The objective of this thesis was to measure and to compare safety in cardiac surgery in The Netherlands using the Netherlands Association for

  15. Annals of African Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of the Annals of African Surgery is to provide a medium for the exchange of current information between surgeons in the African region. The journal embraces surgery in all its aspects; basic science, clinical research, experimental research, surgical education. It will assist surgeons in the region to keep abreast of ...

  16. Economics of epilepsy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatraman Sadanand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Surgical decision-making is a complex process. First, a medical decision is made to determine if surgery is necessary. Second, another medical decision is made to determine the type of surgery. Third, a corporate decision is made if such a surgery is financially feasible. Finally, a legal decision is made to proceed or refuse the chosen surgery. This paper examines these issues in the case of surgery for medically intractable epilepsy and proposes a method of decision analysis to guide epilepsy surgery. Materials and Methods: A stochastic game of imperfect information using techniques of game theory and decision analysis is introduced as an analytical tool for surgical decision-making. Results: Surgery for appropriately chosen patients suffering from medically intractable epilepsy may not only be feasible, but may be the best medical option and the best financial option for the patient, families, society and the healthcare system. Such a situation would then make it legally or ethically difficult to reject or postpone surgery for these patients. Conclusions: A process to collect data to quantify the parameters used in the decision analysis is hereby proposed.

  17. Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000273.htm Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Plastic and Cosmetic Surgery Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  18. [Cognitive deterioration after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmetz, J.; Rasmussen, L.S.

    2008-01-01

    Delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction are important and common complications after surgery. Risk factors are first of all increasing age and type of surgery, whereas the type of anaesthesia does not seem to play an important role. Mortality is higher among patients with cognitive...

  19. Bariatric surgery and fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Divya K; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S

    2010-06-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most reliable way to sustain weight loss in the morbidly obese. Reproductive age women comprise the majority of bariatric patients, and many may be interested in conceiving after surgery. The purpose of this review is to synthesize the recent literature on bariatric surgery and fertility to assist providers in patient counseling. Obesity adversely impacts fecundability and IVF outcomes through a variety of mechanisms. The body of literature on reproductive outcome after bariatric surgery is sparse and of mixed quality. Bariatric surgery has been shown to improve menstrual cyclicity in anovulatory women, but little is published on the impact of surgical weight loss on spontaneous or IVF-treatment-related pregnancy rates. The increased risk of miscarriage in obese women may decline after bariatric surgery. There are currently insufficient data to support recommendations regarding the ideal timing for pregnancy after bariatric surgery. Obesity has been shown to adversely impact fertility, and weight loss is associated with significant improvement in many parameters of reproductive function. Further research is required as to the specific impact of surgical weight loss on pregnancy and miscarriage rates, as well as the optimal timing of pregnancy after bariatric surgery.

  20. Feasibility of Exercise Training in Cancer Patients Scheduled for Elective Gastrointestinal Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenet, Karin; Trappenburg, Jaap C A; Schippers, Carlo C; Wanders, Lisa; Lemmens, Lidwien; Backx, Frank J G; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: This study examines the feasibility of a preoperative exercise program to improve the physical fitness of a patient before gastrointestinal surgery. METHODS: An outpatient exercise program was developed to increase preoperative aerobic capacity, peripheral muscle endurance and

  1. Desempeño fisiológico, estacionalidad y plasticidad fenotípica en pequeños mamíferos: microevolución de la capacidad de cambio en rasgos termorregulatorios Physiological performance, seasonality and phenotypic plasticity in small mammals: microevolution of change capacity in thermoregulatory characters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROBERTO F. NESPOLO

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Los ajustes fisiológicos que por aclimatación térmica modifican el fenotipo a corto plazo tendrían una importancia central en aquellos pequeños mamíferos que habitan ambientes térmicamente fluctuantes. Bajo la premisa de que esta capacidad de cambio es adaptativa, en las últimas décadas un gran número de trabajos ha reportado y discutido el patrón desde variadas perspectivas. Sin embargo, esta premisa ha estado siempre relegada a las discusiones y muy pocas veces se ha puesto a prueba teórica o empíricamente, a pesar de que la biología evolutiva y la genética cuantitativa han desarrollado extensamente las herramientas para hacerlo. Creo que esta desconexión histórica se debe a un número de factores ya mencionado previamente por varios autores, que se discuten aquí brevemente. El área ha alcanzado la madurez suficiente como para experimentar un cambio de paradigma en dirección a cuantificar y probar cuantitativamente hipótesis adaptativas en torno a la ecofisiología de la aclimatación. En este ensayo se exponen y desarrollan los recursos que permitirían en último término modelar la evolución de los caracteres termorregulatorios claves de los pequeños endotermos que habitan ambientes estacionales. Esto es, determinando la plasticidad fenotípica asociada a estas variables, usando la norma de reacción como caracter y estimando sus varianzas genéticas aditivas y covarianzas, para construir la matriz de varianza-covarianza genética aditiva. Estos elementos, junto con la estimación del gradiente de selección como un índice de la presión de selección natural permitiría completar el modelo que predice la respuesta evolutiva a la selección natural en una población.Physiological adjustments that change the short term phenotype due thermal acclimation should be of central importance in small mammals that inhabit seasonal thermal environments. Under the premise of adaptation, a great number of works have reported and

  2. Sinus surgery: optimal surgery, optimal outcome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkens, Wytske J.

    2016-01-01

    Sinus surgery remains an issue of discussion. We lack data on a number of important issues. In this issue of the journal Jiang et al. show that 67 % of their patients who underwent FESS for CRS had OSAS (of which more than half moderate to severe) but only 38% complained of daytime sleepiness

  3. Available transmission capacity assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škokljev Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective power system operation requires the analysis of vast amounts of information. Power market activities expose power transmission networks to high-level power transactions that threaten normal, secure operation of the power system. When there are service requests for a specific sink/source pair in a transmission system, the transmission system operator (TSO must allocate the available transfer capacity (ATC. It is common that ATC has a single numerical value. Additionally, the ATC must be calculated for the base case configuration of the system, while generation dispatch and topology remain unchanged during the calculation. Posting ATC on the internet should benefit prospective users by aiding them in formulating their requests. However, a single numerical value of ATC offers little for prospect for analysis, planning, what-if combinations, etc. A symbolic approach to the power flow problem (DC power flow and ATC offers a numerical computation at the very end, whilst the calculation beforehand is performed by using symbols for the general topology of the electrical network. Qualitative analysis of the ATC using only qualitative values, such as increase, decrease or no change, offers some new insights into ATC evaluation, multiple transactions evaluation, value of counter-flows and their impact etc. Symbolic analysis in this paper is performed after the execution of the linear, symbolic DC power flow. As control variables, the mathematical model comprises linear security constraints, ATC, PTDFs and transactions. The aim is to perform an ATC sensitivity study on a five nodes/seven lines transmission network, used for zonal market activities tests. A relatively complicated environment with twenty possible bilateral transactions is observed.

  4. Revision endoscopic sinonasal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantillano, Pablo; Rubio, Fabián; Naser, Alfredo; Nazar, Rodolfo

    Endoscopic sinonasal surgery is the procedure of choice in the treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis and sinonasal polyposis refractory to medical treatment, with high rates of success (76% to 97.5%). However, 2.5%-24% of those patients will require revision surgery (RESS). In this study, we present the clinical, anatomical, radiological and histological features of patients receiving RESS in our centre during a 3-year period. A retrospective review of clinical, anatomical, radiological and histopathological data of patients receiving revision endoscopic sinonasal surgery between 2012 and 2014 was carried out. From 299 surgery procedures performed, 27 (9%) were revision surgeries. The mean patient age was 46 years, with a male/female ratio of 1.4/1. The most frequent preoperative and postoperative diagnosis was chronic polypoid rhinosinusitis. The mean time since the previous surgery was 6.1 years, with 11.9 months of mean follow-up since that surgery. Stenotic antrostomy was found during revision in 81.5% of the patients and incomplete anterior ethmoidectomy and persistent uncinate process, in 59.3%. In radiology, 70.4% of patients had persistent anterior ethmoidal cells. Antrostomy or widening of antrostomy was performed in 96.3% of cases and anterior ethmoidectomy or completion of it was performed in 66.7%. Polyps, stenotic antrostomy and incomplete ethmoidectomy were the most frequent causes of revision surgery, in concordance with the procedures performed. The patients had long periods of time without follow-up between surgeries. Further investigation is necessary to generate measures to reduce the number of revision surgeries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  5. Glucoregulation after canine islet transplantation : Contribution of insulin secretory capacity, insulin action, and the entero-insular axis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderBurg, MPM; vanSuylichem, PTR; Guicherit, OR; Frolich, M; Lemkes, HHPJ; Gooszen, HG

    1997-01-01

    The physiological glucoregulatory mechanisms after islet transplantation have been incompletely investigated, We studied the insulin secretory capacity (ISC) by intravenous arginine stimulation during 35-mM glucose clamps, insulin action during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps, and mixed-meal

  6. Digestive capacity predicts diet diversity in Neotropical frugivorous bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña-Vázquez, Romeo A; Ruiz-Sanchez, Eduardo; Herrera-Alsina, Leonel; Schondube, Jorge E

    2015-09-01

    1. Predicting the diet diversity of animals is important to basic and applied ecology. Knowledge of diet diversity in animals helps us understand niche partitioning, functional diversity and ecosystem services such as pollination, pest control and seed dispersal. 2. There is a negative relationship between the length of the digestive tract and diet diversity in animals; however, the role of digestive physiology in determining diet diversity has been ignored. This is especially important in vertebrates with powered flight because, unlike non-flying vertebrates, they have limitations that may constrain gut size. 3. Here, we evaluate the relationship between digestive capacity and diet diversity in Carollinae and Stenodermatinae frugivorous bats. These bats disperse the seeds of plants that are key to Neotropical forest regeneration. 4. Our results show that digestive capacity is a good predictor of diet diversity in Carollinae and Stenodermatinae frugivorous bats (R(2) = 0·77). 5. Surprisingly, the most phylogenetically closely related species were not similar in their digestive capacity or diet diversity. The lack of a phylogenetic signal for the traits evaluated implies differences in digestive physiology and diet in closely related species. 6. Our results highlight the predictive usefulness of digestive physiology for understanding the feeding ecology of animals. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2015 British Ecological Society.

  7. Piezoelectric surgery in implant dentistry: clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Masako Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pizosurgery has therapeutic characteristics in osteotomies, such as extremely precise, selective and millimetric cuts and a clear operating field. Piezoelectricity uses ultrasonic frequencies, which cause the points specially designed for osteotomy to vibrate. The points of the instrument oscillate, allowing effective osteotomy with minimal or no injury to the adjacent soft tissues, membranes and nerve tissues. This article presents the various applications of piezoelectricity in oral implant surgery such as: removal of autogenous bone; bone window during elevation of the sinus membrane and removal of fractured implants. The cavitational effect caused by the vibration of the point and the spray of physiological solution, provided a field free of bleeding and easy to visualize. The study showed that the piezoelectric surgery is a new surgical procedurethat presents advantages for bone cutting in many situations in implant dentistry, with great advantages in comparison with conventional instrumentation. Operating time is longer when compared with that of conventional cutters.

  8. A parallel robot to assist vitreoretinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Taiga; Sugita, Naohiko; Mitsuishi, Mamoru [University of Tokyo, School of Engineering, Tokyo (Japan); Ueta, Takashi; Tamaki, Yasuhiro [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of a parallel prototype robot for vitreoretinal surgery where physiological hand tremor limits performance. The manipulator was specifically designed to meet requirements such as size, precision, and sterilization; this has six-degree-of-freedom parallel architecture and provides positioning accuracy with micrometer resolution within the eye. The manipulator is controlled by an operator with a ''master manipulator'' consisting of multiple joints. Results of the in vitro experiments revealed that when compared to the manual procedure, a higher stability and accuracy of tool positioning could be achieved using the prototype robot. This microsurgical system that we have developed has superior operability as compared to traditional manual procedure and has sufficient potential to be used clinically for vitreoretinal surgery. (orig.)

  9. Clinical innovations in Philippine thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danguilan, Jose Luis J

    2016-08-01

    Thoracic surgery in the Philippines followed the development of thoracic surgery in the United States and Europe. With better understanding of the physiology of the open chest and refinements in thoracic anesthetic and surgical approaches, Filipino surgeons began performing thoracoplasties, then lung resections for pulmonary tuberculosis and later for lung cancer in specialty hospitals dealing with pulmonary diseases-first at the Quezon Institute (QI) and presently at the Lung Center of the Philippines although some university and private hospitals made occasional forays into the chest. Esophageal surgery began its early attempts during the post-World War II era at the Philippine General Hospital (PGH), a university hospital affiliated with the University of the Philippines. With the introduction of minimally invasive thoracic surgical approaches, Filipino thoracic surgeons have managed to keep up with their Asian counterparts although the problems of financial reimbursement typical of a developing country remain. The need for creative innovative approaches of a focused multidisciplinary team will advance the boundaries of thoracic surgery in the Philippines.

  10. Aortic valve surgery - minimally invasive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valve surgery. Techniques include min-thoracotomy, min-sternotomy, robot-assisted surgery, and percutaneous surgery. To perform the ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  11. Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery. Cleft Lip / Palate and Craniofacial Surgery This type of surgery is ... the carefully orchestrated, multiple-stage correctional program for cleft lip and palate patients. The goal is to help restore the ...

  12. Tests and visits before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before surgery - tests; Before surgery - doctor visits ... Pre-op is the time before your surgery. It means "before operation." During this time, you will meet with one of your doctors. This may be your surgeon or primary care ...

  13. Gamma knife surgery for craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, D.; Steiner, M.; Steiner, L.

    1995-01-01

    We present our results of Gamma Knife surgery for craniopharyngioma in nine patients. The current status of surgery, radiation therapy, intracavitary instillation of radionuclides and Gamma Knife surgery in the management of craniopharyngiomas is discussed. (author)

  14. Getting yourself healthy before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3 months after certain surgeries (joint replacement or heart valve surgery). So be sure to schedule your dental ... Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern Surgical Practice . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  15. Algorithmic complexity of quantum capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskouei, Samad Khabbazi; Mancini, Stefano

    2018-04-01

    We analyze the notion of quantum capacity from the perspective of algorithmic (descriptive) complexity. To this end, we resort to the concept of semi-computability in order to describe quantum states and quantum channel maps. We introduce algorithmic entropies (like algorithmic quantum coherent information) and derive relevant properties for them. Then we show that quantum capacity based on semi-computable concept equals the entropy rate of algorithmic coherent information, which in turn equals the standard quantum capacity. Thanks to this, we finally prove that the quantum capacity, for a given semi-computable channel, is limit computable.

  16. Manual hyperinflation partly prevents reductions of functional residual capacity in cardiac surgical patients--a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulus, Frederique; Veelo, Denise P.; de Nijs, Selma B.; Beenen, Ludo F. M.; Bresser, Paul; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Binnekade, Jan M.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac surgery is associated with post-operative reductions of functional residual capacity (FRC). Manual hyperinflation (MH) aims to prevent airway plugging, and as such could prevent the reduction of FRC after surgery. The main purpose of this study was to determine the effect of MH on

  17. Capacity Measurement with the UIC 406 Capacity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex; Schittenhelm, Bernd; Kaas, Anders H.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the fast and effective UIC 406 method for calculating capacity consumption on railway lines. It is possible to expound the UIC 406 method in different ways which can lead to different capacity consumptions. Therefore, this article describes how the methodology is expounded...

  18. Biomarkers of Lung Injury in Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Gerwin Erik; van Oeveren, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of pulmonary dysfunction is currently almost entirely based on a vast series of physiological changes, but comprehensive research is focused on determining biomarkers for early diagnosis of pulmonary dysfunction. Here we discuss the use of biomarkers of lung injury in cardiothoracic surgery and their ability to detect subtle pulmonary dysfunction in the perioperative period. Degranulation products of neutrophils are often used as biomarker since they have detrimental effects on the pulmonary tissue by themselves. However, these substances are not lung specific. Lung epithelium specific proteins offer more specificity and slowly find their way into clinical studies. PMID:25866435

  19. Conservation physiology of animal migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Robert J; Chapman, Jacqueline M; Souliere, Christopher M; Tudorache, Christian; Wikelski, Martin; Metcalfe, Julian D; Cooke, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a widespread phenomenon among many taxa. This complex behaviour enables animals to exploit many temporally productive and spatially discrete habitats to accrue various fitness benefits (e.g. growth, reproduction, predator avoidance). Human activities and global environmental change represent potential threats to migrating animals (from individuals to species), and research is underway to understand mechanisms that control migration and how migration responds to modern challenges. Focusing on behavioural and physiological aspects of migration can help to provide better understanding, management and conservation of migratory populations. Here, we highlight different physiological, behavioural and biomechanical aspects of animal migration that will help us to understand how migratory animals interact with current and future anthropogenic threats. We are in the early stages of a changing planet, and our understanding of how physiology is linked to the persistence of migratory animals is still developing; therefore, we regard the following questions as being central to the conservation physiology of animal migrations. Will climate change influence the energetic costs of migration? Will shifting temperatures change the annual clocks of migrating animals? Will anthropogenic influences have an effect on orientation during migration? Will increased anthropogenic alteration of migration stopover sites/migration corridors affect the stress physiology of migrating animals? Can physiological knowledge be used to identify strategies for facilitating the movement of animals? Our synthesis reveals that given the inherent challenges of migration, additional stressors derived from altered environments (e.g. climate change, physical habitat alteration, light pollution) or interaction with human infrastructure (e.g. wind or hydrokinetic turbines, dams) or activities (e.g. fisheries) could lead to long-term changes to migratory phenotypes. However, uncertainty remains

  20. Conservation physiology of animal migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Robert J.; Chapman, Jacqueline M.; Souliere, Christopher M.; Tudorache, Christian; Wikelski, Martin; Metcalfe, Julian D.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a widespread phenomenon among many taxa. This complex behaviour enables animals to exploit many temporally productive and spatially discrete habitats to accrue various fitness benefits (e.g. growth, reproduction, predator avoidance). Human activities and global environmental change represent potential threats to migrating animals (from individuals to species), and research is underway to understand mechanisms that control migration and how migration responds to modern challenges. Focusing on behavioural and physiological aspects of migration can help to provide better understanding, management and conservation of migratory populations. Here, we highlight different physiological, behavioural and biomechanical aspects of animal migration that will help us to understand how migratory animals interact with current and future anthropogenic threats. We are in the early stages of a changing planet, and our understanding of how physiology is linked to the persistence of migratory animals is still developing; therefore, we regard the following questions as being central to the conservation physiology of animal migrations. Will climate change influence the energetic costs of migration? Will shifting temperatures change the annual clocks of migrating animals? Will anthropogenic influences have an effect on orientation during migration? Will increased anthropogenic alteration of migration stopover sites/migration corridors affect the stress physiology of migrating animals? Can physiological knowledge be used to identify strategies for facilitating the movement of animals? Our synthesis reveals that given the inherent challenges of migration, additional stressors derived from altered environments (e.g. climate change, physical habitat alteration, light pollution) or interaction with human infrastructure (e.g. wind or hydrokinetic turbines, dams) or activities (e.g. fisheries) could lead to long-term changes to migratory phenotypes. However, uncertainty remains

  1. Anesthesia for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Tomoki; Kohno, Yumiko; Koishi, Keiko

    2012-02-01

    Bariatric surgery has a lot of problems in anesthesia. We retrospectively compared anesthesia for bariatric surgery in yellow race with that in normal weight patients. Twenty patients who received bariatric surgery and 20 normal body weight patients who received abdominal surgery in Japan were enrolled. Induction condition, depth of epidural space, dose of anesthetics, duration of the effects of muscle relaxants, ventilation, and fluid management in bariatric surgery were analyzed and compared with those in normal body weight patients. An epidural catheterization was successful under ultrasound guide in the bariatric group. The depth epidural space was significantly larger in the bariatric group. Cormack and Lehane classification and the number of intubation attempt were not different between the two groups, while one bariatric case was once awakened to intubate blindly. Pressure-controlled ventilation was used in the bariatric group. Four bariatric patients were continuously ventilated after surgery. The doses of anesthetics and fluid infusion rate were not different between the two groups when calculated by ideal body weight in the bariatric group. The duration of the effects of rocuronium and pancuronium were shorter in the bariatric group. For anesthesia of yellow race patients undergoing bariatric surgery, intravenous anesthetics and acetate Ringer's solution with 1% glucose could be administered per ideal body weight, the effects of muscle relaxants lasted shorter, pressure-controlled ventilation could keep oxygenation with adequate carbon dioxide, and ultrasound assist was useful in epidural catheterization in the bariatric patients.

  2. Effects of a surgical ward care protocol following open colon surgery as part of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, BoYeoul; Park, SungHee; Park, KyuJoo; Ryoo, SeungBum

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the effects of a standardised care protocol as part of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme on the management of patients who underwent open colon surgery at the University Hospital, South Korea. Patients who undergo open colon surgery often have concerns about their care as they prepare for hospitalisation. By shortening hospital stay lengths, enhanced recovery after surgery programmes could reduce the number of opportunities for patient education and communication with nurses. Therefore, our surgical team developed an enhanced recovery after surgery programme, applied using a care protocol for patients with colorectal cancer, that spans the entire recovery process. A retrospective, comparative study was conducted using a care protocol as part of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme. Comparisons were made before and after the implementation of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme with a care protocol. Records of 219 patients who underwent open colon surgery were retrospectively audited. The records were grouped according to the care protocol used (enhanced recovery after surgery programme with a care protocol or traditional care programme). The outcomes, including postoperative bowel function recovery, postoperative pain control, recovery time and postoperative complications, were compared between two categories. Patients who were managed using the programme with a care protocol had shorter hospital stays, fewer complications, such as postoperative ileus wound infections, and emergency room visits than those who were managed using the traditional care programme. The findings can be used to facilitate the implementation of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme with a care protocol following open colon surgery. We present a care protocol that enables effective management using consistent and standardised education providing bedside care for patients who undergo open colon surgery. This care protocol empowers long

  3. Disparities in access to emergency general surgery care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khubchandani, Jasmine A; Shen, Connie; Ayturk, Didem; Kiefe, Catarina I; Santry, Heena P

    2018-02-01

    As fewer surgeons take emergency general surgery call and hospitals decrease emergency services, a crisis in access looms in the United States. We examined national emergency general surgery capacity and county-level determinants of access to emergency general surgery care with special attention to disparities. To identify potential emergency general surgery hospitals, we queried the database of the American Hospital Association for "acute care general hospital," with "surgical services," and "emergency department," and ≥1 "operating room." Internet search and direct contact confirmed emergency general surgery services that covered the emergency room 7 days a week, 24 hours a day. Geographic and population-level emergency general surgery access was derived from Geographic Information Systems and US Census. Of the 6,356 hospitals in the 2013 American Hospital Association database, only 2,811 were emergency general surgery hospitals. Counties with greater percentages of black, Hispanic, uninsured, and low-education individuals and rural counties disproportionately lacked access to emergency general surgery care. For example, counties above the 75th percentile of African American population (10.2%) had >80% odds of not having an emergency general surgery hospital compared with counties below the 25th percentile of African American population (0.6%). Gaps in access to emergency general surgery services exist across the United States, disproportionately affecting underserved, rural communities. Policy initiatives need to increase emergency general surgery capacity nationwide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Lung volume reduction surgery for emphysema and bullous pulmonary emphysema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pimpec-Barthes, F; Das Neves-Pereira, J-C; Cazes, A; Arame, A; Grima, R; Hubsch, J-P; Zukerman, C; Hernigou, A; Badia, A; Bagan, P; Delclaux, C; Dusser, D; Riquet, M

    2012-04-01

    The improvement of respiratory symptoms for emphysematous patients by surgery is a concept that has evolved over time. Initially used for giant bullae, this surgery was then applied to patients with diffuse microbullous emphysema. The physiological and pathological concepts underlying these surgical procedures are the same in both cases: improve respiratory performance by reducing the high intrapleural pressure. The functional benefit of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) in the severe diffuse emphysema has been validated by the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) and the later studies which allowed to identify prognostic factors. The quality of the clinical, morphological and functional data made it possible to develop recommendations now widely used in current practice. Surgery for giant bullae occurring on little or moderately emphysematous lung is often a simpler approach but also requires specialised support to optimize its results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Surveys on surgery theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cappell, Sylvain; Rosenberg, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Surgery theory, the basis for the classification theory of manifolds, is now about forty years old. There have been some extraordinary accomplishments in that time, which have led to enormously varied interactions with algebra, analysis, and geometry. Workers in many of these areas have often lamented the lack of a single source that surveys surgery theory and its applications. Indeed, no one person could write such a survey. The sixtieth birthday of C. T. C. Wall, one of the leaders of the founding generation of surgery theory, provided an opportunity to rectify the situation and produce a

  6. Surveys on surgery theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cappell, Sylvain; Rosenberg, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Surgery theory, the basis for the classification theory of manifolds, is now about forty years old. The sixtieth birthday (on December 14, 1996) of C.T.C. Wall, a leading member of the subject''s founding generation, led the editors of this volume to reflect on the extraordinary accomplishments of surgery theory as well as its current enormously varied interactions with algebra, analysis, and geometry. Workers in many of these areas have often lamented the lack of a single source surveying surgery theory and its applications. Because no one person could write such a survey, the editors ask

  7. Keratomycosis after cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendicute, J; Orbegozo, J; Ruiz, M; Sáiz, A; Eder, F; Aramberri, J

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate cases and results of keratomycosis that developed after cataract surgery. Hospital de Guipúzcoa, San Sebastián, Spain. This retrospective study comprised 8 patients who developed keratomycosis soon after cataract surgery. Culture analysis revealed 7 cases of Aspergillus fumigatus and 1 of Aspergillus flavus. After medical treatment with antifungal agents, 6 cases resolved and 2 required evisceration. The presence of fungi in corneal ulcers that develop after cataract surgery should be considered. Initiation of early treatment determines the prognosis. Among the therapeutic options, collagen shields soaked in amphotericin B may be effective.

  8. Single port laparoscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Henrik; Istre, Olav

    2012-01-01

    potential benefits. Theoretically, cosmetic outcomes, postoperative pain and complication rates could be improved with use of single site surgery. This study describes introduction of the method in a private hospital in Denmark, in which 40 patients have been treated for benign gynecologic conditions......LESS, or laparo-endoscopic single site surgery, is a promising new method in minimally invasive surgery. An increasing number of surgical procedures are being performed using this technique, however, its large-scale adoption awaits results of prospective randomized controlled studies confirming...

  9. Attenuation of acute systemic inflammatory response after valve surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najah R. Hadi

    2017-09-01

    Keywords montelukast, mitral and aortic valve replacement surgery, ischemia reperfusion injury, interleukin-6, cardiac troponin 1, tumor necrotic factor-alpha, alpha 2 macroglobulin/creatinine, ejection fraction, forced vital capacity (FVC, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1, FEV1/FVC ratio

  10. Affordability of cataract surgery using the Big Mac prices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van C. Lansingh

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The price of cataract surgery does not consider the patient's capacity to pay, based on a simple tool such as the BMcI. This suggests affordability issues, particularly when patients work for minimum wages and/or do not have access to free health care.

  11. Installed capacity in New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation discussed capacity issues related to the New York Independent System Operator (NYISO). The NYISO's market volume was approximately $11 billion in 2005, and it was responsible for providing 32,075 MW of electricity at peak load to its users. Regulatory uncertainty is currently discouraging investment in new generating resources. All load serving entities are required to contract for sufficient capacity in order to meet their capacity obligations. Market participants currently determine capacity and energy revenues. The NYISO market allows suppliers to recover variable costs for providing ancillary services, and the economic value of the revenue source governs decisions made in the wholesale electricity market. The installed capacity market was designed as a spot auction deficiency auction. Phased-in demand curves are used to modify the installed capacity market's design. A sloped demand curve mechanism is used to value capacity above the minimum requirement for both reliability and competition. Participation in the day-ahead market enhances competition and exerts downward pressure on energy and ancillary service market prices. It was concluded that the market structures and design features of the installed capacity markets recognize the need for system reliability in addition to encouraging robust competition and recognizing energy price caps and regulatory oversights. tabs., figs

  12. Checking Capacity for MIMO Configurations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jesper; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2007-01-01

    Wireless system capacity can be added by increasing the number of antennas in a MIMO setup or by carefully optimizing the performance of a smaller number of antennas.......Wireless system capacity can be added by increasing the number of antennas in a MIMO setup or by carefully optimizing the performance of a smaller number of antennas....

  13. Estimation of capacities on Florida freeways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Current capacity estimates within Floridas travel time reliability tools rely on the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM 2010) to : estimate capacity under various conditions. Field measurements show that the capacities of Florida freeways are noticeably...

  14. Investigation on maternal physiological and psychological factors of cheilopalatognathus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J; Zhao, W; Ma, R M; Li, X J; Wen, Z H; Liu, X F; Hu, W D; Zhang, C B

    2013-01-01

    Case-control study on mothers of cheilopalatognathus children was conducted, to investigate the maternal physiological and psychological factors for occurrence of cheilopalatognathus. One hundred ten mothers of cheilopalatognathus children who were scheduled for one-stage surgery were selected as a research group, and 110 mothers of normal children served as a normal control group at the same time. Trait Anxiety Inventory (T-AI), Life Events Scale (LES), Trait Coping Style Questionnaire (TCSQ), Type C Behavior Scale (CBS), adult Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), and homemade general questionnaire survey were employed for the investigation. Compared with the control group, the scores for negative event tension value, anxiety, and depressive factors were higher in the study group (p introvert and extrovert personalities. The study results suggest that pregnant women's physiological and psychological factors can cause changes in cheilopalatognathus incidence, which is expected to be guidance for healthcare during pregnancy, to prevent the occurrence of cheilopalatognathus.

  15. North American fertilizer capacity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-01

    This listing of fertilizer producers and their production capacities was compiled in February 1993 with the cooperation of the US and Canadian fertilizer industry. TVA does not guarantee the completeness or accuracy of the information. Capacity is only an indicator of supply. Nameplate capacity differs from planned production levels or actual production because plants often operate above or below design capacity. Unless reported otherwise, plant capacities are based on 340 days per year of operation. No adjustment is made for partial year operation. Information is given on the following types of fertilizers: ammonia, ammonium nitrate, nitrogen solutions, urea, ammonium sulfate, phosphate rock, wet-process phosphoric acid, ammonium phosphates, concentrated superphosphates, potash, nitric acid, superphosphoric acid, upgraded phosphoric acids, normal superphosphate, elemental phosphorus, potassium sulfate, and sulfate of potash/magnesia.

  16. Capacity Building in Land Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig; Williamson, I

    2004-01-01

    Capacity building increasingly seen as a key component of land administration projects in developing and countries in transition undertaken by the international development banks and individual country development assistance agencies. However, the capacity building concept is often used within...... infrastructures for implementing land policies in a sustainable way. Where a project is established to create land administration infrastructures in developing or transition countries, it is critical that capacity building is a mainstream component, not as an add-on, which is often the case. In fact such projects...... should be dealt with as capacity building projects in themselves.    The article introduces a conceptual analytical framework that provides some guidance when dealing with capacity building for land administration in support of a broader land policy agenda....

  17. [Cosmetic surgery among Norwegian women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Soest, Tilmann; Kvalem, Ingela Lundin; Roald, Helge Einar; Skolleborg, Knut Chr

    2004-07-01

    There are few data on the frequency of cosmetic surgery among Norwegian women. A random sample of 2000 Norwegian women aged 22 to 55 received a questionnaire on cosmetic surgery, demographic data, self-esteem, and to what extent people around them accepted cosmetic surgery. The response rate was 46% (907 women). Of these, 7.7% indicated that they had undergone cosmetic surgery, while 22.6% wished to do so. Other people's degree of acceptance predicted both the wish to undergo cosmetic surgery and already conducted surgery. Low self-esteem was correlated with a wish to undergo surgery, though women who had done surgery had no lower self-esteem than non-patients. Although the response rate was relatively low, this study gives the first reliable data on the frequency of cosmetic surgery in Norway. The results indicate that other people's degree of acceptance of cosmetic surgery is a predictor of such surgery being chosen.

  18. Effect of gamma irradiation on lifespan and offspring physiology of male drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Jiangyu; Gu Wei; Jiang Fangping; Han Hetong

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of γ-rays irradiation on adult longevity and physiological changes in F 1 generation.Male Drosophila melanogaster at 1 ∼ 2 days old were irradiated by γ-rays with doses of 5, 10, 15 and 30 Gy. In all experimental groups, mean lifespan, maximum lifespan and 90% of lethaldeath irradiated flies were reduced(at P 1 generation of irradiated group, body weight increased, but the capacity of physiological stress declined. (authors)

  19. Stimulating Student Interest in Physiology: The Intermedical School Physiology Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hwee-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The Intermedical School Physiology Quiz (IMSPQ) was initiated in 2003 during the author's last sabbatical from the University of Malaya. At this inaugural event, there were just seven competing teams from Malaysian medical schools. The challenge trophy for the IMSPQ is named in honor of Prof. A. Raman, who was the first Malaysian Professor of…

  20. Repetitive endoscopic sinus surgery failure: a role for radical surgery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, Ward J. M.; Wreesmann, Volkert B.; van der Meulen, Freerk W.; Knegt, Paul P.; Fokkens, Wytske J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is considered to be the golden standard for surgery in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. However, there is still a small group of patients unresponsive despite repetitive surgery. Radical surgery aimed at reduction of the

  1. Cosmetic surgery: medicolegal considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Mauro; Delbon, Paola; Conti, Adelaide; Graziano, Vincenzo; Capasso, Emanuele; Niola, Massimo; Bin, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Cosmetic surgery is one of the two branches of plastic surgery. The characteristic of non-necessity of this surgical speciality implies an increased severity in the evaluation of the risk-benefit balance. Therefore, great care must be taken in providing all the information necessary in order to obtain valid consent to the intervention. We analyzed judgments concerning cosmetic surgery found in national legal databases. A document of National Bioethics Committee (CNB) was also analyzed. The receipt of valid, informed consent is of absolute importance not only to legitimise the medical-surgical act, but it also represents the key element in the question concerning the existence of an obligation to achieve certain results/use of certain methods in the cosmetic surgery.

  2. [Pregnancy after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzur, Tamar; Sheiner, Eyal

    2011-06-01

    Recent research has put the spotlight on two different aspects of pregnancy after bariatric surgery: safety of the mother and fetus, and the procedure's effectiveness in preventing the complications surrounding reproduction and pregnancy often seen in the obese woman. To evaluate the pregnancy outcome foLlowing bariatric surgery. Although there are severaL reports documenting poor perinatal outcomes and late surgical complications during pregnancies subsequent to bariatric surgery, systematic studies have generaLLy not proven such an association. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery appears to be safe, and in general perinatal outcome is better when compared to pregnancies of obese women. Providers should be familiar with potential complications related to postoperative pregnancies and be prepared to provide appropriate interventions such as nutritional supplementation and band adjustment when necessary.

  3. Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regular exercise has family members who will provide emotional and practical support (like driving to every doctor's visit or buying healthy food ) Preparing for Gastric Sleeve Surgery Preparing for this ...

  4. Breast augmentation surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care - open Images Breast lift (mastopexy) - series Breast reduction (mammoplasty) - series Breast augmentation - series References Maxwell GP, Gabriel A. Breast augmentation. In: Neligan PC, ed. Plastic Surgery . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013: ...

  5. Oophorectomy (Ovary Removal Surgery)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms, such as hot flashes and vaginal dryness Depression or anxiety Heart disease Memory problems Decreased sex drive Osteoporosis Premature death Taking low doses of hormone replacement drugs after surgery and until about age ...

  6. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 10, No 1 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  7. [Pregnancy after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Franco; DE Luca, Francesco; Stracquadanio, Mariagrazia; Garraffo, Claudia; Santonocito, Veronica C; Privitera, Agata

    2017-04-01

    Pregnancy after bariatric surgery has some peculiarities related to obesity, type of surgery, amount of weight loss, time elapsed from the surgery and adherence to medical prescriptions. Pregnant woman is at risk of nutritional deficiencies and it is unclear whether there is an increased incidence of intestinal complications during pregnancy after bariatric surgery and whether this kind of complications are more frequent during cesarean section. The fetus is at high risk of prematurity and fetal growth restriction, but they seem not at increased risk of birth defects (DTN) except in individual cases of folic acid deficiency (DTN) or vitamin K defect (similar abnormalities in patients receiving oral anticoagulants). In addition, the incidence of gestational diabetes and hypertension results to be decreased. Other postnatal outcomes from possible epigenetic modifications need to be evaluated in the long-term postnatal follow-up.

  8. Bariatric Surgery Misconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... quality of life than someone who is normal weight. Bariatric surgery results in highly significant improvement in psychosocial well- ... affecting an individual’s weight, such as psychological issues. Weight gain generally occurs when there is an energy imbalance ...

  9. Deep breathing after surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000440.htm Deep breathing after surgery To use the sharing features on ... way to do so is by doing deep breathing exercises. Deep breathing keeps your lungs well-inflated ...

  10. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and teeth. Surgery can improve chewing, speaking and breathing. While the patient's appearance may be dramatically enhanced ... make the lips meet without straining Chronic mouth breathing Sleep apnea (breathing problems when sleeping, including snoring) ...

  11. Art and Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Julio Wilson; Metka, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    The roots of science and art of plastic surgery are very antique. Anatomy, drawing, painting, and sculpting have been very important to the surgery and medicine development over the centuries. Artistic skills besides shape, volume, and lines perception can be a practical aid to the plastic surgeons' daily work. An overview about the interactions between art and plastic surgery is presented, with a few applications to rhinoplasty, cleft lip, and other reconstructive plastic surgeries. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  12. Blood donation before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... very safe, some people choose to use a method called autologous blood donation. Autologous blood is blood donated by you, which you later receive if you need a transfusion during or after surgery. You can have blood ...

  13. Nigerian Journal of Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative efficacy of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and levofloxacin in the reduction of postsurgical sequelae after third molar surgery: A randomized, double blind, clinical trial in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital.

  14. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and orthodontist understand that this is a long-term commitment for you and your family, and will ... face, mouth and jaw surgery Contact Us Sitemap Terms of Use Privacy Policy © Copyright AAOMS 2008-2018 ...

  15. Retrosternal thyroid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007558.htm Retrosternal thyroid surgery To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The thyroid gland is normally located at the front of ...

  16. Surgery - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 简体中文) Expand Section Biopsy - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Getting Your Skin Ready for Surgery - 简体中文 (Chinese, ...

  17. Heart Surgery - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Pacemaker - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF ...

  18. After Surgery - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After Total Joint Replacement - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Home Care Instructions After Surgery - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified ( ...

  19. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ ...

  20. Robotics in Colorectal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Allison; Steele, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, robotic surgery has developed from a futuristic dream to a real, widely used technology. Today, robotic platforms are used for a range of procedures and have added a new facet to the development and implementation of minimally invasive surgeries. The potential advantages are enormous, but the current progress is impeded by high costs and limited technology. However, recent advances in haptic feedback systems and single-port surgical techniques demonstrate a clear role for robotics and are likely to improve surgical outcomes. Although robotic surgeries have become the gold standard for a number of procedures, the research in colorectal surgery is not definitive and more work needs to be done to prove its safety and efficacy to both surgeons and patients.

  1. Blepharoplasty (Eyelid Surgery)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lid blepharoplasty is almost always done just for cosmetic reasons. Risks Possible risks of eyelid surgery include: Infection and bleeding Dry, irritated eyes Difficulty closing your eyes or other eyelid problems Noticeable scarring Injury to eye muscles Skin discoloration ...

  2. Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the epithelial cells. Once the epithelial flap is created and moved aside, the procedure is the same ... Sites EyeWiki International Society of Refractive Surgery * Required * First Name: * Last Name: Member ID: * Phone Number: * Email: * ...

  3. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do ... out more. Who We Are Find a Surgeon News Videos Contact Administration of Anesthesia Cleft Lip/Palate ...

  4. LASIK Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your eye. Overcorrections may be more difficult to fix than undercorrections. Astigmatism. Astigmatism can be caused by ... back into place. The flap usually heals without stitches. During the surgery, you'll be asked to ...

  5. Orthopaedics in day surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    emergency patients for a surgical procedure, returning home the same day (1). Ambulatory orthopaedics happens to have double meaning, so in this communication day surgery will be the preferred term. In Kenya the three models of day.

  6. Cosmetic surgery: medicolegal considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piras Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetic surgery is one of the two branches of plastic surgery. The characteristic of non-necessity of this surgical speciality implies an increased severity in the evaluation of the risk-benefit balance. Therefore, great care must be taken in providing all the information necessary in order to obtain valid consent to the intervention. We analyzed judgments concerning cosmetic surgery found in national legal databases. A document of National Bioethics Committee (CNB was also analyzed. Conclusion: The receipt of valid, informed consent is of absolute importance not only to legitimise the medical-surgical act, but it also represents the key element in the question concerning the existence of an obligation to achieve certain results/use of certain methods in the cosmetic surgery.

  7. Breast Reduction Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast reduction surgery might also help improve your self-image and your ability to participate in physical activities. ... under the breasts Nerve pain Restricted activity Poor self-image related to large breasts Difficulty fitting into bras ...

  8. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  9. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 14, No 1 (2018) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  10. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively ...

  11. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available AAOMS - Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who ... surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and ...

  12. Shoulder surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repair Shoulder arthroscopy Shoulder CT scan Shoulder MRI scan Shoulder ... by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. ...

  13. Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitamins, herbal remedies, and spices including vitamin E, garlic, ginger, gingko, and ginseng may increase the risk of bleeding. Some patients may be asked to take antibiotics and/or steroids prior to sinus surgery. This ...

  14. The Limits of Exercise Physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabriel, Brendan M; Zierath, Juleen R

    2017-01-01

    Many of the established positive health benefits of exercise have been documented by historical discoveries in the field of exercise physiology. These investigations often assess limits: the limits of performance, or the limits of exercise-induced health benefits. Indeed, several key findings have...... been informed by studying highly trained athletes, in addition to healthy or unhealthy people. Recent progress has been made in regard to skeletal muscle metabolism and personalized exercise regimes. In this perspective, we review some of the historical milestones of exercise physiology, discuss how...

  15. Bariatric Surgery for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, Carel W; Heneghan, Helen M

    2018-01-01

    In this review, the authors discuss the indications for and the published outcomes of commonly performed bariatric procedures, including weight loss, perioperative morbidity and mortality, late complications, as well as the impact of bariatric surgery on comorbidities, cardiovascular risk, and mortality. They also briefly discuss the mechanisms by which bariatric/metabolic surgery causes such significant weight loss and health gain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Is day surgery safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majholm, Birgitte; Engbæk, J; Bartholdy, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Day surgery is expanding in several countries, and it is important to collect information about quality. The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and unanticipated hospital visits 0-30 days post-operatively in a large cohort.......Day surgery is expanding in several countries, and it is important to collect information about quality. The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and unanticipated hospital visits 0-30 days post-operatively in a large cohort....

  17. Robotics in General Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, James; Chandra, Venita; Krummel, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In summary, robotics has made a significant contribution to General Surgery in the past 20 years. In its infancy, surgical robotics has seen a shift from early systems that assisted the surgeon to current teleoperator systems that can enhance surgical skills. Telepresence and augmented reality surgery are being realized, while research and development into miniaturization and automation is rapidly moving forward. The future of surgical robotics is bright. Researchers are working to address th...

  18. Plastic surgery pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorney, M

    1999-01-01

    As a founding member of the physician-owned insurance carrier The Doctors' Company, the author has reviewed many plastic surgery policy claims. In this article, he presents an overview of the plastic surgery procedures that produce the most severe losses. He then offers suggestions on how to proceed with these "medical malpractice favorites." The author discusses potential antitrust traps and legal recourse for plastic surgeons.

  19. Minimally Invasive Abdominal Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, William S.; Carter, Kristine M.; Fuhrman, George M.; Bolton, John S.; Bowen, John C.

    2000-01-01

    In the last decade, laparoscopy has been the most innovative surgical movement in general surgery. Minimally invasive surgery performed through a few small incisions, laparoscopy is the standard of care for the treatment of gallbladder disease and the gold standard for the treatment of reflux disease. The indications for a laparoscopic approach to abdominal disease continue to increase, and many diseases may be treated with laparoscopic techniques. At Ochsner, laparoscopic techniques have dem...

  20. Surgery for Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Navadgi, Suresh; Pandanaboyana, Sanjay; Windsor, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery for acute pancreatitis has undergone significant changes over the last 3 decades. A better understanding of the pathophysiology has contributed to this, but the greatest driver for change has been the rise of less invasive interventions in the fields of laparoscopy, endoscopy and radiology. Surgery has a very limited role in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. The most common indication for intervention in acute pancreatitis is for the treatment of complications and most notably the ...

  1. Cancer-related fatigue in breast cancer patients after surgery: a multicomponent model using partial least squares-path modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolon, Catherine; Krikorian, Alicia; Carayol, Marion; Brouillet, Denis; Romieu, Gilles; Ninot, Gregory

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study is to examine factors contributing to cancer-related fatigue (CRF) in breast cancer patients who have undergone surgery. Sixty women (mean age: 50.0) completed self-rated questionnaires assessing components of CRF, muscular and cognitive functions. Also, physiological and subjective data were gathered. Data were analyzed using partial least squares variance-based structural equation modeling in order to examine factors contributing to CRF after breast surgery. The tested model was robust in terms of its measurement quality (reliability and validity). According to the structural model results, emotional distress (β = 0.59; p accounting for 61% of the explained variance. Also, emotional distress (β = 0.41; p accounted for 41% of the explained variance. However, the relationship between low physical function and CRF was weak and nonsignificant (β = 0.01; p > 0.05). Emotional distress, altered vigilance capacity, and pain are associated with CRF in postsurgical breast cancer. In addition, emotional distress and pain are related to diminished physical function, which, in turn, has no significant impact on CRF. The current model should be examined in subsequent phases of the treatment (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy) when side effects are more pronounced and may lead to increased intensity of CRF and low physical function. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Day surgery in Bristol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, S

    1993-02-01

    As in the rest of the United Kingdom, day surgery in Bristol is on the increase. In the Bristol Royal Infirmary day surgery unit (DSU) we treat approximately 3,500 patients a year. We have recently opened a second operating theatre. This has shifted the proportion of cases from our general theatres. This has also improved our case mix, less minor surgery under local anaesthetics, to more of the recommended 'basket type' surgery ie hernia repair, varicose vein surgery, excision of breast lumps etc. We have recently introduced an appointment booking system that is progressing. Such changes have to be introduced with good preparation, communication and a lot of diplomacy. I would like to outline the management aspects that help to expand and improve on the service we give, including patient selection and the appointment booking system we have introduced. I will describe how we drew up a policy involving the organisation of operation lists and staff involvement in day surgery management and accountability for patient care from admission through to discharge including our latest care plan. Finally I will outline the methods we have developed for evaluating the care we give.

  3. Innovations in robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettman, Matthew; Rivera, Marcelino

    2016-05-01

    Developments in robotic surgery have continued to advance care throughout the field of urology. The purpose of this review is to evaluate innovations in robotic surgery over the past 18 months. The release of the da Vinci Xi system heralded an improvement on the Si system with improved docking, the ability to further manipulate robotic arms without clashing, and an autofocus universal endoscope. Robotic simulation continues to evolve with improvements in simulation training design to include augmented reality in robotic surgical education. Robotic-assisted laparoendoscopic single-site surgery continues to evolve with improvements on technique that allow for tackling previously complex pathologic surgical anatomy including urologic oncology and reconstruction. Last, innovations of new surgical platforms with robotic systems to improve surgeon ergonomics and efficiency in ureteral and renal surgery are being applied in the clinical setting. Urologic surgery continues to be at the forefront of the revolution of robotic surgery with advancements in not only existing technology but also creation of entirely novel surgical systems.

  4. Metabolic surgery: quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Rubio Herrera, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The impact of bariatric surgery beyond its effect on weight loss has entailed a change in the way of regarding it. The term metabolic surgery has become more popular to designate those interventions that aim at resolving diseases that have been traditionally considered as of exclusive medical management, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Recommendations for metabolic surgery have been largely addressed and discussed in worldwide meetings, but no definitive consensus has been reached yet. Rates of diabetes remission after metabolic surgery have been one of the most debated hot topics, with heterogeneity being a current concern. This review aims to identify and clarify controversies regarding metabolic surgery, by focusing on a critical analysis of T2D remission rates achieved with different bariatric procedures, and using different criteria for its definition. Indications for metabolic surgery for patients with T2D who are not morbidly obese are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. [Lung volume reduction surgery for severe pulmonary emphysema in Iceland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Sverrir I; Johannsson, Kristinn B; Guðjónsdóttir, Marta; Jónsson, Steinn; Beck, Hans J; Magnusson, Bjorn; Gudbjartsson, Tomas

    2011-12-01

    Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) can benefit patients with severe emphysema. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of LVRS performed in Iceland. A prospective study of 16 consecutive patients who underwent bilateral LVRS through median sternotomy between January 1996 and December 2008. All patients had disabling dyspnea, lung hyperinflation, and emphysema with upper lobe predominance. Preoperatively all patients underwent pulmonary rehabilitation. Spirometry, lung volumes, arterial blood gases and exercise capacity were measured before and after surgery. Mean follow-up time was 8.7 years. Mean age was 59.2 ± 5.9 years. All patients had a history of heavy smoking. There was no perioperative mortality and survival was 100%, 93%, and 63% at 1, 5, and 10 years, respectively. The forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and the forced vital capacity (FVC) improved significantly after surgery by 35% (plung capacity, residual volume and partial pressure of CO2 also showed statistically significant improvements but exercise capacity, O2 consumption and diffusing capacity of the lung for CO did not change. Prolonged air leak (≥ 7 days) was the most common complication (n=7). Five patients required reoperation, most commonly for sternal dehiscence (n=4). In this small prospective study, FEV1 and FVC increased and lung volumes and PaCO2 improved after LVRS. Long term survival was satisfactory although complications such as reoperations for sternal dehiscence were common and hospital stay therefore often prolonged.

  6. Clinical experience of a new reference material for exercise capacity in exercise stress testing in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindow, Thomas; Mosén, Henrik; Engblom, Henrik

    2017-09-21

    In 2014, the Swedish Association of Clinical Physiology recommended the use of a new reference material for exercise capacity in bicycle exercise stress testing, 'the Kalmar material'. Compared to the formerly used reference material, 'the Kristianstad material', an increase in the amount of patients being classified as having decreased exercise capacity was expected, but the extent of this in clinical practice is not known. Results of exercise capacity from 1449 bicycle exercise tests, in patients aged ≥20 years (656 women, 793 men) performed at two departments of Clinical Physiology before and after change of reference materials, were collected. Maximal workload was related to the predicted values of both reference materials. If made, recommendations for supplemental nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging study by the attending physician were noted. Using the new reference material, 31% of all patients were classified as having a decreased exercise capacity, compared to 17% using the formerly used reference material. The difference between the two reference materials was largest in the older age groups. In one of the departments, an increase in recommendations of supplemental myocardial perfusion studies was seen after introduction of the new reference material, whereas the opposite was seen at the other department. A large amount of patients are being classified as having decreased exercise capacity and very few as having good exercise capacity using the new reference material for exercise capacity. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Cardiac Rehabilitation After Heart Valve Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pollmann, Agathe Gerwina Elena; Frederiksen, Marianne; Prescott, Eva

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Evidence of the effect of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after heart valve surgery is scarce, but nevertheless CR is recommended for this group of patients. Therefore, this study assessed the effect of CR on exercise capacity, cardiovascular risk factors, and long-term mortality and morbidity......, as well as predictors for enrolment in or failing to complete CR. METHODS: A review of medical records identified 250 patients who underwent heart valve surgery between January 2009 and August 2013. Of these, 211 patients eligible for CR were identified. Effect of CR was assessed by peak oxygen uptake...... ((Equation is included in full-text article.)O2peak) or 6-minute walk test (6MWT). A composite endpoint of all-cause mortality and hospital admission due to myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, endocarditis, revascularization, or reoperation was used to assess the hazard ratio between CR attenders...

  8. Applied physiology of female soccer: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datson, Naomi; Hulton, Andrew; Andersson, Helena; Lewis, Tracy; Weston, Matthew; Drust, Barry; Gregson, Warren

    2014-09-01

    The popularity and professionalism of female soccer has increased markedly in recent years, with elite players now employed on either a professional or semi-professional basis. The previous review of the physiological demands of female soccer was undertaken two decades ago when the sport was in its relative infancy. Increased research coupled with greater training and competition demands warrants an updated review to consider the effect on physical performance and injury patterns. The physical demands of match-play along with the influence of factors such as the standard of competition, playing position and fatigue have been explored. Total distance covered for elite female players is approximately 10 km, with 1.7 km completed at high speed (>15 kmh(-1)) [corrected].Elite players complete 28% more high-speed running and 24 % more sprinting than moderate-level players. Decrements in high-speed running distance have been reported between and within halves, which may indicate an inability to maintain high-intensity activity. Although the physical capacity of female players is the most thoroughly researched area, comparisons are difficult due to differing protocols. Elite players exhibit maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) values of 49.4-57.6 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), Yo Yo Intermittent Endurance test level 2 (YYIE2) scores of 1,774 ± 532 m [mean ± standard deviation (SD)] and 20 m sprint times of 3.17 ± 0.03 s (mean ± SD). Reasons for the increased prevalence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in females (2-6 times greater than males) are discussed, with anatomical, biomechanical loading and neuromuscular activation differences being cited in the literature. This review presents an in-depth contemporary examination of the applied physiology of the female soccer player.

  9. NASA Exercise Physiology and Countermeasures Project Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerch, Linda; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Efficient exercise countermeasures are necessary to offset or minimize spaceflight-induced deconditioning and to maximize crew performance of mission tasks. These countermeasure protocols should use the fewest crew and vehicle resources. NASA s Exercise Physiology and Countermeasures (ExPC) Project works to identify, collect, interpret, and summarize evidence that results in effective exercise countermeasure protocols which protect crew health and performance during International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions. The ExPC and NASA s Human Research Program are sponsoring multiple studies to evaluate and improve the efficacy of spaceflight exercise countermeasures. First, the Project will measure maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) during cycle ergometry before, during, and after ISS missions. Second, the Project is sponsoring an evaluation of a new prototype harness that offers improved comfort and increased loading during treadmill operations. Third, the Functional Tasks Test protocol will map performance of anticipated lunar mission tasks with physiologic systems before and after short and long-duration spaceflight, to target system contributions and the tailoring of exercise protocols to maximize performance. In addition to these studies that are actively enrolling crewmember participants, the ExPC is planning new studies that include an evaluation of a higher-intensity/lower-volume exercise countermeasure protocol aboard the ISS using the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device and second-generation treadmill, studies that evaluate bone loading during spaceflight exercise, and ground-based studies that focus on fitness for duty standards required to complete lunar mission tasks and for which exercise protocols need to protect. Summaries of these current and future studies and strategies will be provided to international colleagues for knowledge sharing and possible collaboration.

  10. Functional capacity and postural pain outcomes after reduction mammaplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Marcia; Neto, Miguel Sabino; Garcia, Elvio Bueno; Quaresma, Marina Rodrigues; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2007-04-01

    Neck, shoulder, and lower back pain and reduction of functional capacity can be caused by breast hypertrophy. Reduction mammaplasty appears to improve these aspects. After a systematic review of the literature, no scientific evidence was found to confirm this hypothesis. The authors' objective was to evaluate the impact of reduction mammaplasty on pain and functional capacity of patients with mammary hypertrophy. One hundred patients with mammary hypertrophy, between 18 and 55 years old, with no previous mammary surgery, were consecutively selected from the Plastic Surgery Outpatient Clinic of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo-Escola Paulista de Medicina and randomly allocated into two groups. Group A (n = 50) underwent mammaplasty reduction immediately, whereas group B patients (n = 50) were placed on a waiting list (control group). All patients were interviewed for clinical and demographic data and evaluated to measure pain and functional capacity. To measure shoulder, neck, and lower back pain, a visual analogue scale (0 = no pain, 10 = unbearable pain) was used. The Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ-20), Brazilian validated version (0 = best, 3 = worst), was applied to assess functional capacity. Pain and functional capacity were measured at baseline and 6 months after surgery. Forty-six of 50 patients, from both groups, completed the study. The mean (+/-SD) patient age in groups A and B was 31.6 +/- 11 and 32.3 +/- 10 years, respectively. The mean breast tissue weight was 1052 +/- 188 g. Functional capacity in group A was improved 6 months after reduction mammaplasty, compared with group B (control), in the following aspects: getting dressed, getting up, walking, maintaining personal hygiene, reaching, and grasping objects. The mean pain intensity dropped in the lower back, from 5.7 to 1.3; in the shoulders, from 6.1 to 1.1; and in the neck, from 5.2 to 0.9. Reduction mammaplasty improved functional capacity and relieved pain in the lower back

  11. Nigerian Journal of Physiological Sciences: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. Nigerian Journal of Physiological Sciences (Niger. J. Physiol. Sci.) is a biannual publication of the Physiological Society of Nigeria. It covers diverse areas of research in physiological sciences, publishing reviews in current research areas and original laboratory and clinical research in physiological ...

  12. Toward the art of robotic-assisted vitreoretinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Molaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New technological progress in robotics has brought many beneficial clinical applications. Currently, computer integrated robotic surgery has gained clinical acceptance for several surgical procedures. Robotically assisted eye surgery is envisaged as a promising solution to overcome the shortcomings inherent to conventional surgical procedures as in vitreoretinal surgeries. Robotics by its high precision and fine mechanical control can improve dexterity, cancel tremor, and allow highly precise remote surgical capability, delicate vitreoretinal manipulation capabilities. Combined with magnified three-dimensional imaging of the surgical site, it can enhance surgical precision. Tele-manipulation can provide the ability for tele-surgery or haptic feedback of forces generated by the manipulation of intraocular tissues. It presents new solutions for some sight-threatening conditions such as retinal vein cannulation where, due to physiological limitations of the surgeon's hand, the procedure cannot be adequately performed. In this paper, we provide an overview of the research and advances in robotically assisted vitreoretinal eye surgery. Additionally the barriers to the integration of this method in the field of ocular surgery are summarized. Finally, we discuss the possible applications of the method in the area of vitreoretinal surgery.

  13. Capacity Measurement with the UIC 406 Capacity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex; Schittenhelm, Bernd; Kaas, Anders H.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the fast and effective UIC 406 method for calculating capacity consumption on railway lines. It is possible to expound the UIC 406 method in different ways which can lead to different capacity consumptions. Therefore, this article describes how the methodology is expounded...... in Denmark. This includes how and where to divide the railway lines into line sections, how to analyze stations and junctions, and how to examine line sections with different amounts of tracks....

  14. Regular capacities on metrizable spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Cherkovskyi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It is proved that for a (not necessarily compact metric space: the metrics on the space of capacities in the sense of Zarichnyi and Prokhorov are equal; completeness of the space of capacities is equivalent to completeness of the original space. It is shown that for the capacities on metrizable spaces the properties of $\\omega$-smoothness and of $\\tau$-smoothness are equivalent precisely on the separable spaces, and the properties of $\\omega$-smoothness and of regularity w.r.t. some (then w.r.t. any admissible metric are equivalent precisely on the compact spaces.

  15. Electronic Textbook in Human Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broering, Naomi C.; Lilienfield, Lawrence S.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the development of an electronic textbook in human physiology at the Georgetown University Medical Center Library that was designed to enhance learning and visualization through a prototype knowledge base of core instructional materials stored in digital format on Macintosh computers. The use of computers in the medical curriculum is…

  16. Physiology Of Prolonged Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes physiological effects of prolonged bed rest. Rest for periods of 24 hours or longer deconditions body to some extent; healing proceeds simultaneously with deconditioning. Report provides details on shifts in fluid electrolytes and loss of lean body mass, which comprises everything in body besides fat - that is, water, muscle, and bone. Based on published research.

  17. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger David John

    2012-01-01

    Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. It can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress, and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged ...

  18. Physiological adaptation in desert birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, JB; Tieleman, BI; Williams, Joseph B.

    We call into question the idea that birds have not evolved unique physiological adaptations to desert environments. The rate at which desert larks metabolize energy is lower than in mesic species within the same family, and this lower rate of living translates into a lower overall energy requirement

  19. Physiological aspects of paired stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.; Durrer, D.

    1965-01-01

    In this paper some physiological and clinical aspects of paired stimulation are discussed. I) The augmenting effect of paired stimulation on rnyocardial contractility is due to potentiation (increase in speed of restitution) and fusion of two contractions. 2) While using paired stimulation the

  20. Exercise Effects on Sleep Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunao eUchida

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review focuses on the effects of exercise on sleep. In its early days, sleep research largely focused on central nervous system (CNS physiology using standardized tabulations of several sleep-specific landmark electroencephalogram (EEG waveforms. Though coarse, this method has enabled the observation and inspection of numerous uninterrupted sleep phenomena. Thus, research on the effects of exercise on sleep began, in the 1960’s, with a focus primarily on sleep EEG (CNS sleep changes. Those early studies found only small effects of exercise on sleep. More recent sleep research has explored not only CNS functioning, but somatic physiology as well. As physical exercise mostly affects somatic functions, endocrine and autonomic nervous system (ANS changes that occur during sleep should be affected by daytime exercise. Since endocrinological, metabolic and autonomic changes can be measured during sleep, it should be possible to assess exercise effects on somatic physiology in addition to CNS sleep quality, building from standard polysomnographic (PSG techniques. Incorporating measures of somatic physiology in the quantitative assessment of sleep could further our understanding of sleep's function as an auto-regulatory, global phenomenon.

  1. Understanding Antegrade Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery Antegrade Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery Antegrade colonic enema surgery (ACE) is a procedure ... Risks / Benefits What is antegrade colonic enema (ACE) surgery? Antegrade colonic enema surgery (ACE) or Malone antegrade ...

  2. Rowing, the ultimate challenge to the human body - implications for physiological variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volianitis, S.; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical diagnoses depend on a variety of physiological variables but the full range of these variables is seldom known. With the load placed on the human body during competitive rowing, the physiological range for several variables is illustrated. The extreme work produced during rowing...... is explained by the seated position and the associated ability to increase venous return and, thus, cardiac output. This review highlights experimental work on Olympic rowing that presents a unique challenge to the human capacities, including cerebral metabolism, to unprecedented limits, and provides a unique...... opportunity to reveal the extreme range of many physiological variables Udgivelsesdato: 2009/7...

  3. Physiological and anthropometric determinants of rhythmic gymnastics performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douda, Helen T; Toubekis, Argyris G; Avloniti, Alexandra A; Tokmakidis, Savvas P

    2008-03-01

    To identify the physiological and anthropometric predictors of rhythmic gymnastics performance, which was defined from the total ranking score of each athlete in a national competition. Thirty-four rhythmic gymnasts were divided into 2 groups, elite (n = 15) and nonelite (n = 19), and they underwent a battery of anthropometric, physical fitness, and physiological measurements. The principal-components analysis extracted 6 components: anthropometric, flexibility, explosive strength, aerobic capacity, body dimensions, and anaerobic metabolism. These were used in a simultaneous multiple-regression procedure to determine which best explain the variance in rhythmic gymnastics performance. Based on the principal-component analysis, the anthropometric component explained 45% of the total variance, flexibility 12.1%, explosive strength 9.2%, aerobic capacity 7.4%, body dimensions 6.8%, and anaerobic metabolism 4.6%. Components of anthropometric (r = .50) and aerobic capacity (r = .49) were significantly correlated with performance (P gymnasts, 92.5% of the variation was explained by VO2max (58.9%), arm span (12%), midthigh circumference (13.1%), and body mass (8.5%). Selected anthropometric characteristics, aerobic power, flexibility, and explosive strength are important determinants of successful performance. These findings might have practical implications for both training and talent identification in rhythmic gymnastics.

  4. Robotic Surgery for Thyroid Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2013-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an innovation in thyroid surgery that may compensate for the drawbacks of conventional endoscopic surgery. A surgical robot provides strong advantages, including three-dimensional imaging, motion scaling, tremor elimination, and additional degrees of freedom. We review here recent adaptations, experience and applications of robotics in thyroid surgery. Robotic thyroid surgeries include thyroid lobectomy, total thyroidectomy, central compartment neck dissection, and radical ...

  5. Benefits of Bariatric Surgery and Perioperative Surgical Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chung Tham

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a worldwide problem with numerous associated health problems. The number of patients eligible for surgery outnumber surgical capacity and so patients need to be prioritised based on their obesity- related health burden and comorbidities. Weight loss as a result of bariatric surgery is significant and maintained in the long term. In addition to weight loss, patient health improves in terms of metabolic, macrovascular, and microvascular disease. As a result, quality of life is better, along with psychosocial wellbeing. Bariatric surgery is associated with a relatively low number of complications and appears to result in a reduction in mortality risk due to the resolution of comorbidities. Hence, surgery can now be routinely considered as an adjunct to medical therapy in the management of obesity.

  6. Capacity Building in Land Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig; Ahene, Rexford

    2003-01-01

    There is a significant need for capacity building in the interdisciplinary area of land management especially in developing countries and countries in transition, to deal with the complex issues of building efficient land information systems and sustainable institutional infrastructures. Capacity...... development in this area. Furthermore, capacity building should ensure that the focus is on building sound institutions and governance rather than just high-level IT-infrastructures.    This overall approach to capacity building in land management is used for implementing a new land policy reform in Malawi...... building in land management is not only a question of establishing a sufficient technological level or sufficient economic resources. It is mainly a question of understanding the interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral nature of land administration systems, and understanding the need for human resource...

  7. Building Capacity in Ethical Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglas-Jones, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Capacity building in biomedical research ethics review has been a European priority since the early 2000s. Prompted by the increase in data originating in internationally sponsored trials in emerging economies, a range of capacity building initiatives were put in place in the field of ethical...... review to ensure the protection of human subjects participating in research. Drawing on fieldwork with the Forum for Ethical Review Committees in the Asian and Western Pacific Region, I explore two distinct forms taken by capacity building within that organization to support and train members of ethics...... review committees. The first, with an emphasis on standards and measurability, takes as its priority international accountability for clinical trial research. e second explores how the organization goes about persuading trainees to see and do ‘ethics’ differently. is distinction between forms of capacity...

  8. Capacity Markets and Market Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauffer, Hoff

    2006-01-01

    The good news is that market stability can be achieved through a combination of longer-term contracts, auctions for far enough in the future to permit new entry, a capacity management system, and a demand curve. The bad news is that if and when stable capacity markets are designed, the markets may seem to be relatively close to where we started - with integrated resource planning. Market ideologues will find this anathema. (author)

  9. Research projects and capacity building

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Breen, CM

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available - knowledged as necessary and urgent, but is this sufficient? Are ?head counts? and/or ?degree counts? of individuals from marginalised sectors, including gender, participating in research projects appro- priate measures for capacity building? Much depends... numbers of people (including race and gender) gaining higher degrees and papers published in peer-reviewed journals may provide some measure of capacity building, they do not measure the extent to which fundamental enabling conditions have been fostered...

  10. Maximizing the optical network capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayvel, Polina; Maher, Robert; Xu, Tianhua; Liga, Gabriele; Shevchenko, Nikita A; Lavery, Domaniç; Alvarado, Alex; Killey, Robert I

    2016-03-06

    Most of the digital data transmitted are carried by optical fibres, forming the great part of the national and international communication infrastructure. The information-carrying capacity of these networks has increased vastly over the past decades through the introduction of wavelength division multiplexing, advanced modulation formats, digital signal processing and improved optical fibre and amplifier technology. These developments sparked the communication revolution and the growth of the Internet, and have created an illusion of infinite capacity being available. But as the volume of data continues to increase, is there a limit to the capacity of an optical fibre communication channel? The optical fibre channel is nonlinear, and the intensity-dependent Kerr nonlinearity limit has been suggested as a fundamental limit to optical fibre capacity. Current research is focused on whether this is the case, and on linear and nonlinear techniques, both optical and electronic, to understand, unlock and maximize the capacity of optical communications in the nonlinear regime. This paper describes some of them and discusses future prospects for success in the quest for capacity. © 2016 The Authors.

  11. Self-esteem and functional capacity outcomes following reduction mammaplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino Neto, Miguel; Demattê, Maria Fernanda; Freire, Marcia; Garcia, Elvio Bueno; Quaresma, Marina; Ferreira, Lydia M

    2008-01-01

    Both physical health and psychosocial outcomes are important issues in the evaluation of medical treatment. Women with breast hypertrophy may suffer from low self-esteem and reduced functional capacity because of the size of their breasts. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of reduction mammaplasty on self-esteem and functional capacity in patients with breast hypertrophy. One hundred patients with breast hypertrophy who ranged in age from 18 to 55 years and who had undergone no previous mammary surgery were selected from the Plastic Surgery Outpatient Clinic of the Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM). They were randomly allocated into two groups (A and B) of 50 patients each. Patients from group A were submitted for reduction mammaplasty while those from group B were placed on the waiting list and used as a control group. At the beginning of the study, all patients were interviewed to collect clinical and demographic data and to have their self-esteem and functional capacity measured. Two Brazilian-validated versions of quality of life measurement instruments were chosen: the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Rolland-Morris (to assess functional capacity). A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to evaluate pain intensity. Six months after the beginning of the study, these instruments were again administered to both groups. Forty-six out of 50 patients from each group (A and B) completed the study. The mean age of group A was 31.6 years (SD, 11 yrs), and that of group B was 32.3 years (SD, 10 yrs). The mean weight of removed breast tissue from group A patients was 1052 g (SD, 188 g). A decrease on the score of Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale of patients from group A indicated an improvement of self-esteem (P self-esteem and functional capacity and relieved pain in the lower back region in patients with breast hypertrophy.

  12. Innovations in Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Catherine; Pryor, Aurora D

    2015-11-01

    Surgery has consistently been demonstrated to be the most effective long-term therapy for the treatment of obesity. However, despite excellent outcomes with current procedures, most patients with obesity- and weight-related comorbidities who meet criteria for surgical treatment choose not to pursue surgery out of fear of operative risks and complications or concerns about high costs. Novel minimally invasive procedures and devices may offer alternative solutions for patients who are hesitant to pursue standard surgical approaches. These procedures may be used for primary treatment of obesity, early intervention for patients approaching morbid obesity, temporary management prior to bariatric surgery, or revision of bypass surgery associated with weight regain. Novel bariatric procedures can in general be divided into four categories: endoluminal space-occupying devices, gastric suturing and restrictive devices, absorption-limiting devices, and neural-hormonal modulating devices. Many of these are only approved as short-term interventions, but these devices may be effective for patients desiring low-risk procedures or a transient effect. We will see the expansion of indications and alternatives for metabolic surgery as these techniques gain approval.

  13. Robotic surgery in gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkatout, Ibrahim; Mettler, Liselotte; Maass, Nicolai; Ackermann, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgery is the most dynamic development in the sector of minimally invasive operations currently. It should not be viewed as an alternative to laparoscopy, but as the next step in a process of technological evolution. The advancement of robotic surgery, in terms of the introduction of the Da Vinci Xi, permits the variable use of optical devices in all four trocars. Due to the new geometry of the "patient cart," an operation can be performed in all spatial directions without re-docking. Longer instruments and the markedly narrower mechanical elements of the "patient cart" provide greater flexibility as well as access similar to those of traditional laparoscopy. Currently, robotic surgery is used for a variety of indications in the treatment of benign gynecological diseases as well as malignant ones. Interdisciplinary cooperation and cooperation over large geographical distances have been rendered possible by telemedicine, and will ensure comprehensive patient care in the future by highly specialized surgery teams. In addition, the second operation console and the operation simulator constitute a new dimension in advanced surgical training. The disadvantages of robotic surgery remain the high costs of acquisition and maintenance as well as the laborious training of medical personnel before they are confident with using the technology.

  14. An experimental approach to estimate operator’s information processing capacity for diagnosing tasks in NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Tae; Shin, Seung Ki; Kim, Jong Hyun; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Main control room operator’s information processing capacity is determined. • The relationship between the information processing capacity and human factors is described. • The information processing capacity results from the subjective and physiological measures are nearly identical. - Abstract: The objectives of this research are: (1) to determine information processing capacity of an operator in a main control room and (2) to describe the relationship between the information processing capacity and human factors. This research centers on the relationship, as experimentally determined, between an operator’s mental workload and information flow during accident diagnosis tasks at nuclear power plants. Based on this relationship, the operator’s information processing capacity is established. In this paper, the information processing capacity is defined as the operator’s ability to manage the amount of bits in a second when diagnosing tasks or accidents. If the operator’s performance decreases rapidly as the information flow rate (bit/s) increases, it is possible to determine the operator’s information processing capacity. The cognitive information of a diagnosis task can be quantified using an information flow model and the operator’s mental workload is measured by subjective and physiological measures. NASA-TLX (Task Load indeX) is selected as the subjective method and an eye tracking system is used as the physiological measure for the workload. In addition, the information processing capacity related to human factors is investigated. Once the information processing capacity of operators is known, then it will be possible to apply it to predict the operators’ performance, design diagnosis tasks, and design human–machine interface

  15. Biological properties of extracellular vesicles and their physiological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Yáñez-Mó

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, extracellular vesicles (EVs have been recognized as potent vehicles of intercellular communication, both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This is due to their capacity to transfer proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, thereby influencing various physiological and pathological functions of both recipient and parent cells. While intensive investigation has targeted the role of EVs in different pathological processes, for example, in cancer and autoimmune diseases, the EV-mediated maintenance of homeostasis and the regulation of physiological functions have remained less explored. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current understanding of the physiological roles of EVs, which has been written by crowd-sourcing, drawing on the unique EV expertise of academia-based scientists, clinicians and industry based in 27 European countries, the United States and Australia. This review is intended to be of relevance to both researchers already working on EV biology and to newcomers who will encounter this universal cell biological system. Therefore, here we address the molecular contents and functions of EVs in various tissues and body fluids from cell systems to organs. We also review the physiological mechanisms of EVs in bacteria, lower eukaryotes and plants to highlight the functional uniformity of this emerging communication system.

  16. Biological properties of extracellular vesicles and their physiological functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez-Mó, María; Siljander, Pia R.-M.; Andreu, Zoraida; Zavec, Apolonija Bedina; Borràs, Francesc E.; Buzas, Edit I.; Buzas, Krisztina; Casal, Enriqueta; Cappello, Francesco; Carvalho, Joana; Colás, Eva; Silva, Anabela Cordeiro-da; Fais, Stefano; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.; Ghobrial, Irene M.; Giebel, Bernd; Gimona, Mario; Graner, Michael; Gursel, Ihsan; Gursel, Mayda; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Hendrix, An; Kierulf, Peter; Kokubun, Katsutoshi; Kosanovic, Maja; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Laitinen, Saara; Lässer, Cecilia; Lener, Thomas; Ligeti, Erzsébet; Linē, Aija; Lipps, Georg; Llorente, Alicia; Lötvall, Jan; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Marcilla, Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria; Nazarenko, Irina; Hoen, Esther N.M. Nolte-‘t; Nyman, Tuula A.; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Olivan, Mireia; Oliveira, Carla; Pállinger, Éva; del Portillo, Hernando A.; Reventós, Jaume; Rigau, Marina; Rohde, Eva; Sammar, Marei; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Santarém, N.; Schallmoser, Katharina; Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe; Stoorvogel, Willem; Stukelj, Roman; Van der Grein, Susanne G.; Vasconcelos, M. Helena; Wauben, Marca H. M.; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been recognized as potent vehicles of intercellular communication, both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This is due to their capacity to transfer proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, thereby influencing various physiological and pathological functions of both recipient and parent cells. While intensive investigation has targeted the role of EVs in different pathological processes, for example, in cancer and autoimmune diseases, the EV-mediated maintenance of homeostasis and the regulation of physiological functions have remained less explored. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current understanding of the physiological roles of EVs, which has been written by crowd-sourcing, drawing on the unique EV expertise of academia-based scientists, clinicians and industry based in 27 European countries, the United States and Australia. This review is intended to be of relevance to both researchers already working on EV biology and to newcomers who will encounter this universal cell biological system. Therefore, here we address the molecular contents and functions of EVs in various tissues and body fluids from cell systems to organs. We also review the physiological mechanisms of EVs in bacteria, lower eukaryotes and plants to highlight the functional uniformity of this emerging communication system. PMID:25979354

  17. Urban plant physiology: adaptation-mitigation strategies under permanent stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calfapietra, Carlo; Peñuelas, Josep; Niinemets, Ülo

    2015-02-01

    Urban environments that are stressful for plant function and growth will become increasingly widespread in future. In this opinion article, we define the concept of 'urban plant physiology', which focuses on plant responses and long term adaptations to urban conditions and on the capacity of urban vegetation to mitigate environmental hazards in urbanized settings such as air and soil pollution. Use of appropriate control treatments would allow for studies in urban environments to be comparable to expensive manipulative experiments. In this opinion article, we propose to couple two approaches, based either on environmental gradients or manipulated gradients, to develop the concept of urban plant physiology for assessing how single or multiple environmental factors affect the key environmental services provided by urban forests. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bio-logging of physiological parameters in higher marine vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponganis, Paul J.

    2007-02-01

    Bio-logging of physiological parameters in higher marine vertebrates had its origins in the field of bio-telemetry in the 1960s and 1970s. The development of microprocessor technology allowed its first application to bio-logging investigations of Weddell seal diving physiology in the early 1980s. Since that time, with the use of increased memory capacity, new sensor technology, and novel data processing techniques, investigators have examined heart rate, temperature, swim speed, stroke frequency, stomach function (gastric pH and motility), heat flux, muscle oxygenation, respiratory rate, diving air volume, and oxygen partial pressure (P) during diving. Swim speed, heart rate, and body temperature have been the most commonly studied parameters. Bio-logging investigation of pressure effects has only been conducted with the use of blood samplers and nitrogen analyses on animals diving at isolated dive holes. The advantages/disadvantages and limitations of recording techniques, probe placement, calibration techniques, and study conditions are reviewed.

  19. The effects of sleep loss on capacity and effort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindy Engle-Friedman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sleep loss appears to affect the capacity for performance and access to energetic resources. This paper reviews research examining the physical substrates referred to as resource capacity, the role of sleep in protecting that capacity and the reaction of the system as it attempts to respond with effort to overcome the limitations on capacity caused by sleep loss. Effort is the extent to which an organism will exert itself beyond basic levels of functioning or attempt alternative strategies to maintain performance. The purpose of this review is to bring together research across sleep disciplines to clarify the substrates that constitute and influence capacity for performance, consider how the loss of sleep influences access to those resources, examine cortical, physiological, perceptual, behavioral and subjective effort responses and consider how these responses reflect a system reacting to changes in the resource environment. When sleep deprived, the ability to perform tasks that require additional energy is impaired and the ability of the system to overcome the deficiencies caused by sleep loss is limited. Taking on tasks that require effort including school work, meal preparation, pulling off the road to nap when driving drowsy appear to be more challenging during sleep loss. Sleep loss impacts the effort-related choices we make and those choices may influence our health and safety.

  20. SURGERY AND CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY JOURNALS ANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanaider, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    To analyze critically the effectiveness and value of bibliometric indicators in journals of Surgery or Cardiovacular Surgery in the context of the postgraduate programs of CAPES Medicine III. A sampling with 16 academic programs and one professional master of Medicine III, encompassing the General and Digestive System Surgery, Cardiovascular Surgery and Multidisciplinary courses with such contents, was evaluated. Thomson Reuters/ISI (JCR), Elsevier/Scopus (SJR), and also Scielo databases were used. Only in seven programs, the teachers had an average of Qualis A1 articles greater than the others strata. Eleven journals in the surgical area are in stratum A1 (5%) and it reaches 25% in Cardiovascular Surgery. Among the six journals with the largest number of publications Qualis A1 in area Medicine III, five are from non-specific areas. The Acta Cirúrgica Brasileira represented 58% of the publications in the stratum A2. There are some obstacles in the Qualis classification with little uniformity among the Medicine areas I, II and III. A permanent committee should be set to update the Qualis, composed by the three medical areas. It should be considered using other index databases and the unification of the Qualis criteria for journals in medicine. Rating criteria of multi and transdisciplinary journals need to be reviewed. It is essential an institutional financial support for national journals chosen by peers aiming to provide a full computerization process and a professional reviewer of the English language, in order to increase the impact factor. Analisar criticamente a eficácia e valor de indicadores bibliométricos dos periódicos da Cirurgia e Cirurgia Cardiovascular no contexto dos Programas de Pós-Graduação da área Medicina III da CAPES. Foi avaliada uma amostragem com 16 programas acadêmicos e um mestrado profissional da área de Medicina III, compreendendo a Cirurgia Geral e do Aparelho Digestivo, a Cirurgia Cardiovascular e Cursos Multidisciplinares

  1. Exercise capacity and selected physiological factors by ancestry and residential altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianba; Berntsen, Sveinung; Andersen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    level) and across ancestry (native Tibetan vs. Han Chinese children living at the same altitude of 3700 m). METHODS: A total of 430 9-10-year-old native Tibetan children from Tingri (4300 m) and 406 native Tibetan- and 406 Han Chinese immigrants (77% lowland-born and 33% highland-born) from Lhasa (3700...

  2. Match Performance and Physiological Capacity of Female Elite Team Handball Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michalsik, L B; Madsen, K; Aagaard, Per

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the physical demands imposed on female elite team handball players in relation to playing position. Female elite team handball field players were examined during match-play over a 5-year period using video based computerized locomotion analysis of tournament matches...

  3. Physiological adaptations to weight loss and factors favouring weight regain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, F L

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem and predisposes individuals to several comorbidities that can affect life expectancy. Interventions based on lifestyle modification (for example, improved diet and exercise) are integral components in the management of obesity. However, although weight loss can be achieved through dietary restriction and/or increased physical activity, over the long term many individuals regain weight. The aim of this article is to review the research into the processes and mechanisms that underpin weight regain after weight loss and comment on future strategies to address them. Maintenance of body weight is regulated by the interaction of a number of processes, encompassing homoeostatic, environmental and behavioural factors. In homoeostatic regulation, the hypothalamus has a central role in integrating signals regarding food intake, energy balance and body weight, while an ‘obesogenic' environment and behavioural patterns exert effects on the amount and type of food intake and physical activity. The roles of other environmental factors are also now being considered, including sleep debt and iatrogenic effects of medications, many of which warrant further investigation. Unfortunately, physiological adaptations to weight loss favour weight regain. These changes include perturbations in the levels of circulating appetite-related hormones and energy homoeostasis, in addition to alterations in nutrient metabolism and subjective appetite. To maintain weight loss, individuals must adhere to behaviours that counteract physiological adaptations and other factors favouring weight regain. It is difficult to overcome physiology with behaviour. Weight loss medications and surgery change the physiology of body weight regulation and are the best chance for long-term success. An increased understanding of the physiology of weight loss and regain will underpin the development of future strategies to support overweight and obese individuals in their

  4. Smolt physiology and endocrinology: Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Stephen D.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Farrell, Anthony Peter; Brauner, Colin J.

    2012-01-01

    The parr-smolt transformation of anadromous salmonids is a suite of behavioral, morphological, and physiological changes that are preparatory for downstream migration and seawater entry. The timing of smolt development varies among species, occurring soon after hatching in pink and chum salmon and after one to several years in Atlantic salmon. In many species the transformation is size dependent and occurs in spring, mediated through photoperiod and temperature cues. Smolt development is stimulated by several hormones including growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, cortisol, and thyroid hormones, whereas prolactin is generally inhibitory. Increased salinity tolerance is one of the most important and tractable changes, and is caused by alteration in the function of the major osmoregulatory organs, the gill, gut, and kidney. Increased abundance of specific ion transporters (Na+/K+-ATPase, Na+/K+/Cl− cotransporter and apical Cl− channel) in gill ionocytes results in increased salt secretory capacity, increased growth and swimming performance in seawater, and higher marine survival.

  5. Physical and physiological demands of futsal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Naser

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Futsal, the 5-a-side version of soccer (i.e. 1 goalkeeper and 4 outfield players, was introduced in 1930 and continues to grow in popularity around the world. Competitive games comprise of two 20-min periods of high-intensity and intermittent activities requiring substantial physical, tactical, and technical efforts from the players. A greater understanding of the physical and skill requirements will aid the development of futsal and enable practitioners to undertake appropriate training regimes for the demands of the sport. The objective of this review is to examine key aspects of futsal such as match analysis, physiological demands, energy requirements, fitness measurements, and skill requirements. Futsal players experience fatigue as the game progresses due to the high-intensity nature of the game and the repeated maximal sprint efforts required. The intermittent nature of the sport necessitates the use of aerobic and anaerobic energy pathways throughout exercise. Therefore, a futsal player needs to have a great capacity of intermittent endurance, repeated sprint ability, and leg power, while technical aspects include the ability of high level shooting and passing skills, agility and coordination. Future research is warranted to help practitioners develop more specific tests into futsal performance, especially with regards skill.

  6. Viscoless microincision cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Sallet

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Guy SalletDepartment of Opthamology, Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, BelgiumAbstract: A cataract surgery technique is described in which incisions, continuous circular capsulorhexis and hydrodissection are made without the use of any viscoelastics. Two small incisions are created through which the different parts of the procedure can take place, maintaining a stable anterior chamber under continuous irrigation. Subsequent bimanual phacoemulsification can be done through these microincisions. At the end of the procedure, an intraocular lens can be inserted through the self-sealing incision under continuous irrigation. 50 consecutive cataract patients were operated on without the use of viscoelastics and then compared with a group of 50 patients who had been helped with viscoelastics. No difference in outcome, endothelial cell count or pachymetry was noted between the two groups. No intraoperative complication was encountered. Viscoless cataract surgery was a safe procedure with potential advantages.Keywords: ophthalmic visco-surgical device, viscoless cataract surgery, microincision

  7. PHYSIOLOGY OF ACID BASE BALANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acid-base, electrolyte, and metabolic disturbances are common in the intensive care unit. Almost all critically ill patients often suffer from compound acid-base and electrolyte disorders. Successful evaluation and management of such patients requires recognition of common patterns (e.g., metabolic acidosis and the ability to dissect one disorder from another. The intensivists needs to identify and correct these condition with the easiest available tools as they are the associated with multiorgan failure. Understanding the elements of normal physiology in these areas is very important so as to diagnose the pathological condition and take adequate measures as early as possible. Arterial blood gas analysis is one such tool for early detection of acid base disorder. Physiology of acid base is complex and here is the attempt to simplify it in our day to day application for the benefit of critically ill patients.

  8. Altered Respiratory Physiology in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Parameswaran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The major respiratory complications of obesity include a heightened demand for ventilation, elevated work of breathing, respiratory muscle inefficiency and diminished respiratory compliance. The decreased functional residual capacity and expiratory reserve volume, with a high closing volume to functional residual capacity ratio of obesity, are associated with the closure of peripheral lung units, ventilation to perfusion ratio abnormalities and hypoxemia, especially in the supine position. Conventional respiratory function tests are only mildly affected by obesity except in extreme cases. The major circulatory complications are increased total and pulmonary blood volume, high cardiac output and elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. Patients with obesity commonly develop hypoventilation and sleep apnea syndromes with attenuated hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responsiveness. The final result is hypoxemia, pulmonary hypertension and progressively worsening disability. Obese patients have increased dyspnea and decreased exercise capacity, which are vital to quality of life. Decreased muscle, increased joint pain and skin friction are important determinants of decreased exercise capacity, in addition to the cardiopulmonary effects of obesity. The effects of obesity on mortality in heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have not been definitively resolved. Whether obesity contributes to asthma and airway hyper-responsiveness is uncertain. Weight reduction and physical activity are effective means of reversing the respiratory complications of obesity.

  9. Recent advances in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Jei; Chan, Chien-Pin; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2013-02-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has been widely adopted and new technical innovation, procedures and evidence based knowledge are persistently emerging. This review documents recent major advancements in laparoscopic surgery. A PubMed search was made in order to identify recent advances in this field. We reviewed the recent data on randomized trials in this field as well as papers of systematic review. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the most frequently performed procedure, followed by laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Although bile duct injuries are relatively uncommon (0.15%-0.6%), intraoperative cholangiography still plays a role in reducing the cost of litigation. Laparoscopic bariatric surgery is the most commonly performed laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery in the USA, and laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is the treatment of choice for intractable gastroesophageal reflux disease. Recent randomized trials have demonstrated that laparoscopic gastric and colorectal cancer resection are safe and oncologically correct procedures. Laparoscopic surgery has also been widely developed in hepatic, pancreatic, gynecological and urological surgery. Recently, SILS and robotic surgery have penetrated all specialties of abdominal surgery. However, evidence-based medicine has failed to show major advantages in SILS, and the disadvantage of robotic surgery is the high costs related to purchase and maintenance of technology. Laparoscopic surgery has become well developed in recent decades and is the choice of treatment in abdominal surgery. Recently developed SILS techniques and robotic surgery are promising but their benefits remain to be determined. © 2012 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Anatomy and physiology of cisternostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Iype; Grasso, Giovanni; Bernardo, Antonio; Munakomi, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Cisternostomy is defined as opening the basal cisterns to atmospheric pressure. This technique helps to reduce the intracranial pressure in severe head trauma as well as other conditions when the so-called sudden "brain swelling" troubles the surgeon. We elaborated the surgical anatomy of this procedure as well as the proposed physiology of how cisternostomy works. This novel technique may change the current trends in neurosurgery.

  11. Exercise Effects on Sleep Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Uchida, Sunao; Shioda, Kohei; Morita, Yuko; Kubota, Chie; Ganeko, Masashi; Takeda, Noriko

    2012-01-01

    This mini-review focuses on the effects of exercise on sleep. In its early days, sleep research largely focused on central nervous system (CNS) physiology using standardized tabulations of several sleep-specific landmark electroencephalogram (EEG) waveforms. Though coarse, this method has enabled the observation and inspection of numerous uninterrupted sleep phenomena. The research on the effects of exercise on sleep began, in the 1960s, with a focus primarily on sleep related EEG changes (CN...

  12. Exercise Effects on Sleep Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Sunao eUchida; Kohei eShioda; Yuko eMorita; Chie eKubota; Masashi eGaneko; Noriko eTakeda; Noriko eTakeda

    2012-01-01

    This mini-review focuses on the effects of exercise on sleep. In its early days, sleep research largely focused on central nervous system (CNS) physiology using standardized tabulations of several sleep-specific landmark electroencephalogram (EEG) waveforms. Though coarse, this method has enabled the observation and inspection of numerous uninterrupted sleep phenomena. Thus, research on the effects of exercise on sleep began, in the 1960’s, with a focus primarily on sleep EEG (CNS sleep) c...

  13. Surgery in Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Norin

    2016-01-01

    Amphibian surgery has been especially described in research. Since the last decade, interest for captive amphibians has increased, so have the indications for surgical intervention. Clinicians should not hesitate to advocate such manipulations. Amphibian surgeries have no overwhelming obstacles. These patients heal well and tolerate blood loss more than higher vertebrates. Most procedures described in reptiles (mostly lizards) can be undertaken in most amphibians if equipment can be matched to the patients' size. In general, the most difficult aspect would be the provision of adequate anesthesia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Simulation in pediatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becmeur, François; Lacreuse, Isabelle; Soler, Luc

    2011-11-01

    Simulation in paediatric surgery is essential for educational, ethical, medicolegal and economic reasons, and is particularly important for rare procedures. There are three different levels of simulation:--simulation of basic techniques in order to learn or improve surgical skills (dissection, intracorporeal knots, etc.);--preparation for surgery using virtual reality, to perfect and test various procedures on a virtual patient, and to determine the best approaches for individual cases;--behavioral simulation underlines the importance of the preoperative check-list and facilitates crisis management (complications, conversion, etc.).

  15. Surgery in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trias, M; Targarona, E M; Moral, A; Pera, C

    1998-02-01

    The Iberian Peninsula-the southwestern point of Europe, between the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean-was visited and settled in ancient times by a variety of peoples. Phoenicians, Carthaginians, Celts, Greeks, Romans, Visigoths, and Arabs all left their mark on the peninsula, and their cultures blended together to found, among other things, a rich tradition in medicine and surgery. During the Renaissance, the fluid exchange of technical skills and knowledge with the rest of Europe and the emergence of universities ensured the development of a high level of medical expertise. Today, surgery in Spain is at the forefront of innovations in the field.

  16. Standing equine dental surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Robert A; Easley, Jack

    2014-04-01

    Dental surgeries refer to procedures that affect the dental tissues or their supporting structures. With the development of specific, efficacious, and conservative treatments, morbidity risks have been lowered and chances of benefiting the health of equids improved. Advances in quality of sedation, analgesia, and locoregional anesthesia allow a majority of dental surgeries to be performed in the standing patient. This update focuses on an orthograde endodontic technique, a minimally invasive buccotomy technique, with the potential to combine it with a transbuccal screw extraction technique, and revisits the AO pinless external fixator for fractures of the body of the mandible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Bariatric surgery in Denmark.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, P.; Iversen, M.G.; Kehlet, H.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2005 the National Board of Health (NBH) published guidelines on bariatric surgery in Denmark. The aim of the present study was to shed light on the national bariatric effort in relation to these guidelines. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The analysis is based on extraction of the following......, a tendency which was attributable to the activities of one of the private clinics. CONCLUSION: The frequency with which bariatric surgery is performed follows a strongly increasing trend and the procedures are only performed at the public departments selected by the National Board of Health...

  18. Epiretinal membrane surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamoudi, Hassan; Correll Christensen, Ulrik; La Cour, Morten

    2017-01-01

    and subsequent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) (CAT group), (2) PPV and subsequent cataract surgery (VIT group) or (3) phaco-vitrectomy (COMBI group). Examinations were at baseline, one month after each surgery, and at 3 months and 12 months of follow-up. Primary outcome was the RE (the difference between predicted...... and achieved spherical equivalent); secondary outcomes were best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and incidence of cystoid macular oedema (CME) defined as >10% increment of central subfield macular thickness (CSMT). Results: Sixty-two eyes were enrolled. The mean RE showed a small myopic shift of -0.36D in all...

  19. Physiology of in vitro culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jesús Cañal

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The culture procedures described up to the eighties, did not made any mention to the environmental control of in vitro plant development. However, growth rate, development and many of the physiologic-morphologic features of the in vitro grown plants are influenced by the culture vessel. The increasing knowledge about the environmental control of culture vessels under sterile conditions, is helping to change micorpropagation procedures. The in vitro environment with lower rate ventilation, brings about low flow rates of matter and energy, with minimum variations of temperature, high relative humidity and large daily changes of the concentration of CO2 inside the culture vessel. The type of culture vessel (size, shape, fabric and closing system can influence the evolution of the atmosphere along the time of culture. Although submitted to different stresses factors plant can be grown in vitro, but plants can be faulty in their anatomy, morphology and physiology. As a consequence, these plants shown a phenotype unable to survive to ex vitro conditions. Different strategies can be used to control the atmosphere along the different phases of micropropagation, in heterotrophic, mixotrophic or autotrophic cultures. The election of the best strategy will be based on different factors as species, number of transplantes required, or quality-price relationship. enviromental control, tissue culture, micropropagation Keywords: in vitro enviromental, characteristic physiology,

  20. The effects of weight loss surgery on blood rheology in severely obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiewiora, Maciej; Piecuch, Jerzy; Glűck, Marek; Slowinska-Lozynska, Ludmila; Sosada, Krystyn

    2015-01-01

    The effects of dieting on blood rheology in obese individuals suggest that improving the rheologic profiles depends on the amount of weight lost and its long-term maintenance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of weight loss after surgery on blood rheology at 12-month follow-up. We studied 38 obese patients who underwent laparoscopic weight loss surgery, 22 of whom had sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and 16 of whom had gastric banding (LAGB). We evaluated rheologic parameters such as blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, and erythrocyte deformability (as measured by elongation index [EI]) preoperatively and 12 months after surgery. Whole blood viscosity at 150 s(-1) shear rate (Prheology in obese patients at 12 months after surgery. The increased red blood cell rigidity after surgery requires further study because the physiologic importance of this change has not yet been established. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.