WorldWideScience

Sample records for surgery pediatric surgery

  1. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 434. ...

  2. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Annals of Pediatric Surgery is striving to fill an important niche that provides focus to clinical care, technical innovation and clinical research. The Annals of Pediatric Surgery has the responsibility to serve not only pediatric surgeons in the Middle East and North Africa but also should be an important conduit for scientific ...

  3. Pediatric heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  4. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Annals of Pediatric Surgery is striving to fill an important niche that provides focus to clinical care, technical innovation and clinical research. ... Nonconventionalmesocaval prosthetic shunt interposition in refractory case with portal hypertension in a 10-kg female infant · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL ...

  5. [Robotics in pediatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, J I

    2011-10-01

    Despite the extensive use of robotics in the adult population, the use of robotics in pediatrics has not been well accepted. There is still a lack of awareness from pediatric surgeons on how to use the robotic equipment, its advantages and indications. Benefit is still controversial. Dexterity and better visualization of the surgical field are one of the strong values. Conversely, cost and a lack of small instruments prevent the use of robotics in the smaller patients. The aim of this manuscript is to present the controversies about the use of robotics in pediatric surgery.

  6. Pediatric endocrine surgery development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan I. Dedov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Department of pediatric surgery at the Endocrinology Research Centre has been around for nearly two years. During operation, surgical treatment has received more than 500 patients with various endocrine disorders. The article discusses modern diagnostic approaches and surgical options for diseases included in the new direction of pediatric surgery – endocrine surgery in children. There are discussions about options for radical treatment of Graves disease in children, positive and negative aspects of surgical and radioactive iodine treatment. Is own stats of postoperative hyperparathyroidism. Is proposed to optimize the algorithm of actions in identifying thyroid nodules in children. In primary hyperparathyroidism, the emphasis is on the complexity of the postoperative management of patients related to the feature of children’s age in determining the severity of the reactions on the water-electrolyte disorders. Separately reviewed the literature of the adrenal glands diseases in children, demonstrating their own clinical cases which required surgical intervention. The authors describe the possibilities of modern neurosurgical equipment in the Endocrinology Research Centre in operations on the pituitary gland in children. Patients of different age groups performed transnasal transsphenoidal removal of tumors of the chiasm-sellar region using endoscopic assistance. The article also cited research data of pancreas diseases and their surgical treatment. Much attention is paid to the gender section of endocrine surgery in children. Discusses the tactics in disorders of sex development, gonadal tumors in children, diseases of the breast. In conclusion outlines the prospects for the development of endocrine surgery in children.

  7. Archives: Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 32 of 32 ... Archives: Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Journal Home > Archives: Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 32 of 32 Items ...

  8. [Simulation in pediatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becmeur, François; Lacreuse, Isabelle; Soler, Luc

    2011-11-01

    Simulation in paediatric surgery is essential for educational, ethical, medicolegal and economic reasons, and is particularly important for rare procedures. There are three different levels of simulation:--simulation of basic techniques in order to learn or improve surgical skills (dissection, intracorporeal knots, etc.);--preparation for surgery using virtual reality, to perfect and test various procedures on a virtual patient, and to determine the best approaches for individual cases;--behavioral simulation underlines the importance of the preoperative check-list and facilitates crisis management (complications, conversion, etc.).

  9. Trends in pediatric epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ritesh; Botre, Abhijit; Udani, Vrajesh

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy surgery has become an accepted treatment for drug resistant epilepsy in infants and children. It has gained ground in India over the last decade. Certain epilepsy surgically remediable syndromes have been delineated and should be offered surgery earlier rather than later, especially if cognitive/behavioral development is being compromised. Advances in imaging, particularly in MRI has helped identify surgical candidates. Pre-surgical evaluation includes clinical assessment, structural and functional imaging, inter-ictal EEG, simultaneous video -EEG, with analysis of seizure semiology and ictal EEG and other optional investigations like neuropsychology and other newer imaging techniques. If data are concordant resective surgery is offered, keeping in mind preservation of eloquent cortical areas subserving motor, language and visual functions. In case of discordant data or non-lesional MRI, invasive EEG maybe useful using a two-stage approach. With multi-focal / generalized disease, palliative surgery like corpus callosotomy and vagal nerve stimulation maybe useful. A good outcome is seen in about 2/3rd of patients undergoing resective surgery with a low morbidity and mortality. This review outlines important learning aspects of pediatric epilepsy surgery for the general pediatrician.

  10. Kerala Pioneering Pediatric Surgery in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TP Joseph

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric surgeons of Kerala are very proud to have led the development of superspeciality in any branch of medicine in Kerala and also superspeciality of Pediatric surgery in whole of India. Late Prof. Raman Nair returned in 1954 after training under Dr. Everett Koop in US. Same year, in his far-sighted vision for future development of the speciality, he moved to SATH, Medical College, Trivandrum and started Pediatric surgery as a speciality attached to Paediatrics department; this was the beginning of Pediatric surgery in India. He opted for Pediatric surgery as a full time job and did not do any general surgery work in adults. He was the first full time Pediatric surgeon of India; during the next few years, 2 surgeons, one in Calcutta, Prof. UC Chakraboty and Prof. D Anjaneyulu in Hyderabad started working as full time Pediatric surgeons. In Mumbai, Delhi and Chennai, Pediatric surgery developed much later and then all over the country.

  11. Introduction-Pediatric epilepsy surgery techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydenhag, Bertil; Cukiert, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    This supplement includes the proceedings from the Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery Techniques Meeting held in Gothenburg (July 4-5, 2014), which focused on presentations and discussions regarding specific surgical technical issues in pediatric epilepsy surgery. Pediatric epilepsy neurosurgeons from all over the world were present and active in very fruitful and live presentations and discussions. These articles represent a synopsis of the areas and subjects dealt with there. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  12. [The history of pediatric plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicenstein, J

    2016-10-01

    The history of pediatric plastic surgery is linked to that of paediatrics. Until the early 19th century, there was no children's hospital. Only some operations were performed before the discovery of anesthesia, aseptic and antisepsis: cleft lip repair, amputation for polydactyly. Many operations were described in the 19th century for cleft lip and palate repair, hypospadias, syndactylies. The first operation for protruding ears was performed in 1881. Pediatric plastic surgery is diversified in the 2nd half of the 20th century: cleft lip and palate, burns, craniofacial surgery, hand surgery become separate parts of the speciality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Skill qualifications in pediatric minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaka, Tadashi; Morikawa, Yasuhide; Yamataka, Atsuyuki; Nio, Masaki; Segawa, Osamu; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Sato, Masahito; Terakura, Hirotsugu; Take, Hiroshi; Hirose, Ryuichiro; Yagi, Makoto

    2011-07-01

    In 2006, The Japanese Society of Pediatric Endoscopic Surgeons devised a plan to develop a pediatric endoscopic surgical skill qualification (ESSQ) system. This system is controlled by The Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery. The standard requirement for skills qualification is the ability of each applicant to complete common types of laparoscopic surgery. The main goal of the system is to decrease complications of laparoscopic surgery by evaluating the surgical skills of each applicant and subsequently certify surgeons with adequate skills to perform laparoscopic operations safely. A committee of pediatric ESSQ created a checklist to assess the applicant's laparoscopic surgical skills. Skills are assessed in a double-blinded fashion by evaluating an unedited video recording of a fundoplication for pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease. The initial pediatric ESSQ system was started in 2008. In 2008 and 2009, respectively, 9 out of 17 (53%) and 6 out of 12 (50%) applicants were certified as expert pediatric laparoscopic surgeons. Our ultimate goal is to provide safe and appropriate pediatric minimally invasive procedures and to avoid severe complications. To prove the predictive validity of this system, a survey of the outcomes of operations performed by certified pediatric surgeons is required.

  14. Robotics in pediatric surgery: perspectives for imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kant, Adrien J.; Klein, Michael D. [Stuart Frankel Foundation Computer-Assisted Robot-Enhanced Surgery Program, Children' s Research Center of Michigan, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Langenburg, Scott E. [Stuart Frankel Foundation Computer-Assisted Robot-Enhanced Surgery Program, Children' s Research Center of Michigan, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Pediatric Surgery, Children' s Hospital of Michigan, 3901 Beaubien, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Robotic surgery will give surgeons the ability to perform essentially tremorless microsurgery in tiny spaces with delicate precision and may enable procedures never before possible on children, neonates, and fetuses. Collaboration with radiologists, engineers, and other scientists will permit refinement of image-guided technologies and allow the realization of truly remarkable concepts in minimally invasive surgery. While robotic surgery is now in clinical use in several surgical specialties (heart bypass, prostate removal, and various gastrointestinal procedures), the greatest promise of robotics lies in pediatric surgery. We will briefly review the history and background of robotic technology in surgery, discuss its present benefits and uses and those being explored, and speculate on the future, with attention to the current and potential involvement of imaging modalities and the role of image guidance. (orig.)

  15. Robotics in pediatric surgery: perspectives for imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kant, Adrien J.; Klein, Michael D.; Langenburg, Scott E.

    2004-01-01

    Robotic surgery will give surgeons the ability to perform essentially tremorless microsurgery in tiny spaces with delicate precision and may enable procedures never before possible on children, neonates, and fetuses. Collaboration with radiologists, engineers, and other scientists will permit refinement of image-guided technologies and allow the realization of truly remarkable concepts in minimally invasive surgery. While robotic surgery is now in clinical use in several surgical specialties (heart bypass, prostate removal, and various gastrointestinal procedures), the greatest promise of robotics lies in pediatric surgery. We will briefly review the history and background of robotic technology in surgery, discuss its present benefits and uses and those being explored, and speculate on the future, with attention to the current and potential involvement of imaging modalities and the role of image guidance. (orig.)

  16. Pediatric spine imaging post scoliosis surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsharief, Alaa N. [IWK Children' s Health Center, Dalhousie University, Diagnostic Imaging Department, Halifax, NS (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); King Saud University, Department of Medical Imaging, King Abdul-Aziz Medical City, King Khaled National Guard Hospital-Western Region, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); El-Hawary, Ron [Dalhousie University, Orthopedic Surgery Department, IWK Children' s Health Center, Halifax, NS (Canada); Schmit, Pierre [IWK Children' s Health Center, Dalhousie University, Diagnostic Imaging Department, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2018-01-15

    Many orthopedic articles describe advances in surgical techniques and implants used in pediatric scoliosis surgery. However, even though postoperative spine imaging constitutes a large portion of outpatient musculoskeletal pediatric radiology, few, if any, radiology articles discuss this topic. There has been interval advancement over the last decades of the orthopedic procedures used in the treatment of spinal scoliosis in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis. The goal of treatment in these patients is to stop the progression of the curve by blocking the spinal growth and correcting the deformity as much as possible. To that end, the authors in this paper discuss postoperative imaging findings of Harrington rods, Luque rods, Luque-Galveston implants and segmental spinal fusion systems. Regarding early onset scoliosis, the guiding principles used for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis do not apply to a growing spine because they would impede lung development. As a result, other devices have been developed to correct the curve and to allow spinal growth. These include spine-based growing rods, vertically expandable prosthetic titanium rods (requiring repetitive surgeries) and magnetically controlled growing rods (with a magnetic locking/unlocking system). Other more recent systems are Shilla and thoracoscopic anterior vertebral body tethering, which allow guided growth of the spine without repetitive interventions. In this paper, we review the radiologic appearances of different orthopedic implants and techniques used to treat adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and early onset scoliosis. Moreover, we present the imaging findings of the most frequent postoperative complications. (orig.)

  17. Pediatric spine imaging post scoliosis surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsharief, Alaa N.; El-Hawary, Ron; Schmit, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    Many orthopedic articles describe advances in surgical techniques and implants used in pediatric scoliosis surgery. However, even though postoperative spine imaging constitutes a large portion of outpatient musculoskeletal pediatric radiology, few, if any, radiology articles discuss this topic. There has been interval advancement over the last decades of the orthopedic procedures used in the treatment of spinal scoliosis in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis. The goal of treatment in these patients is to stop the progression of the curve by blocking the spinal growth and correcting the deformity as much as possible. To that end, the authors in this paper discuss postoperative imaging findings of Harrington rods, Luque rods, Luque-Galveston implants and segmental spinal fusion systems. Regarding early onset scoliosis, the guiding principles used for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis do not apply to a growing spine because they would impede lung development. As a result, other devices have been developed to correct the curve and to allow spinal growth. These include spine-based growing rods, vertically expandable prosthetic titanium rods (requiring repetitive surgeries) and magnetically controlled growing rods (with a magnetic locking/unlocking system). Other more recent systems are Shilla and thoracoscopic anterior vertebral body tethering, which allow guided growth of the spine without repetitive interventions. In this paper, we review the radiologic appearances of different orthopedic implants and techniques used to treat adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and early onset scoliosis. Moreover, we present the imaging findings of the most frequent postoperative complications. (orig.)

  18. Risk of Retinal Detachment After Pediatric Cataract Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haargaard, Birgitte; Andersen, Elisabeth W; Oudin, Anna

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the long-term risk of retinal detachment following pediatric cataract surgery and to identify risk factors for retinal detachment. METHODS: We included all children (aged 0 to 17 years) who during the time period of 1977 to 2005 underwent pediatric cataract surgery in Denmark...... was based on medical chart review. RESULTS: Among 1043 eyes of 656 children undergoing surgery for pediatric cataract, 25 eyes (23 children) developed retinal detachment at a median time of 9.1 years after surgery. The overall 20-year risk of retinal detachment was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3...... (16% [95% CI: 6%-24%]). CONCLUSIONS: The estimated overall risk of retinal detachment 20 years after pediatric cataract surgery was 7%, but only 3% for isolated cataract. Particularly high risks of retinal detachment after cataract surgery were associated with mental retardation and having other...

  19. Prophylactic antibiotics in pediatric shunt surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyani, N; Grisaru-Soen, G; Steinbok, P; Sgouros, S; Constantini, S

    2006-11-01

    The optimal antibiotic prophylaxis for pediatric shunt-related procedures is not clear. There is much inconsistency among different medical centers. This paper summarizes and analyzes the various prophylactic antibiotic regiments used for shunt-related surgeries at different pediatric neurosurgery centers in the world. A survey questionnaire was distributed through the Pediatric Neurosurgery list-server (an e-mail-based special interest group in pediatric neurosurgery). Forty-five completed questionnaires were received, one per medical center, primarily from pediatric neurosurgeons with the following geographic breakdown: 25 from North America, 13 from Europe, and 7 from Asia and other countries. All centers routinely administered prophylactic antibiotics for shunt-related procedures. The drugs of choice were first-generation cephalosporins (23), second-generation cephalosporins (10), naficillin/oxacillin (4), vancomycin (3), clindamycin (1), amoxicillin (1), and mixed protocols in three centers. The initial drug administration ("first dose") was: in the department before transfer to operating room (5), upon arrival to operating room (11), at induction of anesthesia (13), and at initial skin incision (16). The duration of antibiotic dosage also varied: single dose (13), 24-h administration (26), 48-h administration (2), and longer than 48 h in four centers. Two general tendencies were noted, common to the majority of participating centers. There was a general trend to modify antibiotic treatment protocol in "high-risk" populations. The second common theme noted in more than half of responding centers was the use of long-term antibiotic treatment for externalized devices (such as externalized shunts, external ventricular drains or lumbar drains), usually till the device was in place.

  20. Aspirin resistance following pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholette, Jill M; Mamikonian, Lara; Alfieris, George M; Blumberg, Neil; Lerner, Norma B

    2010-09-01

    Aspirin is often used to prevent thrombosis in pediatric cardiac surgery. The primary study aim was to assess aspirin resistance in this context. Secondary aims were to evaluate (1) the relationship between elevated inflammatory markers and thrombosis and (2) aspirin's effect on these levels. This was a prospective observational study of children undergoing cardiac surgery managed with and without aspirin. Aspirin response was assessed using the VerifyNow system and urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 (uTxB2) measurements. Laboratory studies of inflammation were also obtained. 101 subjects were studied; 50 received aspirin. Six subjects (5.9%), 5 aspirin-treated, experienced symptomatic thrombosis. When measured by VerifyNow resistance was 43% after aspirin suppositories and 14% after additional days of oral aspirin. There was no correlation with thrombosis. Upper quartile post-operative day (POD) #5 uTxB2 was correlated with thrombosis in aspirin treated subjects (pchildren with high levels of uTxB2 despite aspirin therapy and/or those with elevated preoperative CRP are at increased risk for thrombosis. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pain prevalence and trajectories following pediatric spinal fusion surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sieberg, Christine B.; Simons, Laura E.; Edelstein, Mark R.; DeAngelis, Maria R.; Pielech, Melissa; Sethna, Navil; Hresko, M. Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Factors contributing to pain following surgery are poorly understood with previous research largely focused on adults. With approximately 6 million children undergoing surgery each year8, there is a need to study pediatric persistent postsurgical pain. The present study includes patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion surgery enrolled in a prospective, multi-centered registry examining post-surgical outcomes. The Scoliosis Research Society Questionnaire- Version...

  2. Pediatric orthopedic surgery in humanitarian aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales de Gauzy, J; Trinchero, J-F; Jouve, J-L

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric orthopedic surgery in humanitarian aid is conducted mainly in cooperation with emerging countries. Each mission is different, and depends on numerous parameters such as the country, the frequency of such missions, the pathologies encountered, the local structure and team, and the non-governmental organization (NGO) involved. Pathologies vary in etiology (tuberculosis, poliomyelitis) and severity. Each mission requires the presence of an experienced surgeon. Working conditions are often rudimentary. Surgical indications should be restricted to procedures that are going to be effective, with minimal postoperative complications, without any surgical "acrobatics". Teaching should be in association with the local university, and adapted to local needs. Mission objectives need to be realistic. Surgical indications should be adapted to local conditions, and the surgeon needs to be able to say "no" to procedures involving undue risk. The surgeon on mission should cooperate with local teams and be able to adapt to unusual situations. Assessment of results is essential to improving efficacy and evaluating the success of the mission. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Perception of undergraduate pediatric surgery clerkship in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenze, Sebastian O; Obi, Uchechukwu M

    2014-01-01

    Medical students' perception of their clerkship may influence their choice of ultimate career. In most medical schools, pediatric surgery clerkship (PSC) is not compulsory. This study evaluates the perception of PSC by students and determines the importance of this on the choice of pediatric surgery as a career. We surveyed 2009 and 2010 graduating medical classes of University of Nigeria, Nsukka, using self-administered questionnaires. The clerkship evaluation was assessed using a 3-point scale (1 = poor and 3 = excellent). Students who had PSC were analyzed to compare their rating of pediatric surgery vis-à-vis other clinical clerkships and determine the effect of the clerkship on their ultimate choice of a career. Overall response rate was 70.3% (275/391), and 119 (43.3%) had PSC. For overall quality, PSC rated (2.16) compared with general surgery (2.04), internal medicine (2.11), obstetrics and gynecology (2.13), and pediatrics (2.37). Aspects of PSC that rated poorly include opportunity to participate in direct patient care, feedback on performance during clerkship, ability to manage problem in a general medical setting, and experience in learning history-taking skills and interpretation of laboratory data. Among the students who had PSC, 14 (11.8%) selected pediatric surgery as a specialty choice compared with 13 (8.3%) who did not have PSC (p = 0.457). Of those that had PSC, pediatric surgery was selected as a career by 2 of 19 (10.5%), 6 of 63 (9.5%), and 6 of 37 (16.2%) who rated PSC as poor, just right, and excellent, respectively. The decision to select pediatric surgery was influenced mostly by clerkship experience in 37% (10/27) and personal satisfaction in 40.7% (11/27). Improvement in the quality of PSC may involve more participation of the students in direct patient care (n = 54; 45.4%) and enhancement in student-faculty interaction (n = 31; 26.1%). PSC may have a good rating in our setting. Nonetheless, improving the quality and experience of the

  4. Profile ENT surgery in a pediatric hospital in Curitiba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mocellin, Marcos

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: ENT procedures are very common in the pediatric surgery and otolaryngologists have a wide range of surgical procedures, and adenotonsillectomy most performed procedure, followed by otological. The most common complication is bleeding from tonsillectomies. Despite being the most feared complication, only a minority of patients need surgical intervention to stop the bleed. Objective: To evaluate the surgical profile in hospital pediatric otolaryngology Curitiba. Method: Retrospective Study of registered surgeries. Results: A total 2020 procedures performed in the operating room in 2009, 9.26% (187 and tests were 90.74% (1833 surgeries, being 65.14% (1316 performed by the SUS,% 32.47 (656 by covenant and 2.39% (48 individuals. The gender distribution was 1106 boys and 914 girls. Adenoidectomy with or without tonsillectomy corresponded to 62.5% (1146. Of these, only 0.96% (11 underwent revision surgery center. In second place comes the otological surgery, with results of tympanostomy, with or without ventilation tube, the most prevalent. Conclusion: The otolaryngologists are able to perform various types of ENT surgical. A procedure most frequently performed in pediatric hospital in Little Prince is adenotonsillectomy, with revision rate similar to that reported in the literature. Boys are more subjected to procedures than girls. Most ENT procedures performed in this hospital in 2009 were performed by the SUS. This shows the importance of adenotonsillectomy in the daily practice of pediatric ENT, and the weight of this problem among users of SUS is great.

  5. Nasogastric tube self-knotting | Abbas | Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 12, No 4 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load ...

  6. Letter to the Editor | Khan | Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 12, No 4 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load ...

  7. Financing pediatric surgery in low-, and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Grace; Abdullah, Fizan

    2016-02-01

    Congenital anomalies once considered fatal, are now surgically correctable conditions that now allow children to live a normal life. Pediatric surgery, traditionally thought of as a privilege of the rich, as being too expensive and impractical, and which has previously been overlooked and excluded in resource-poor settings, is now being reexamined as a cost-effective strategy to reduce the global burden of disease-particularly in low, and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, to date, global pediatric surgical financing suffers from an alarming paucity of data. To leverage valuable resources and prioritize pediatric surgical services, timely, accurate and detailed global health spending and financing for pediatric surgical care is needed to inform policy making, strategic health-sector budgeting and resource allocation. This discussions aims to characterize and highlight the evidence gaps that currently exist in global financing and funding flow for pediatric surgical care in LMICs. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. First employment characteristics for the 2011 pediatric surgery fellowship graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolar, Charles J H; Aspelund, Gudrun

    2013-01-01

    Information regarding initial employment of graduating pediatric surgery fellows is limited. More complete data could yield benchmarks of initial career environment. An anonymous survey was distributed in 2011 to 41 pediatric surgery graduates from all ACGME training programs interrogating details of initial positions and demographics. Thirty-seven of 41 (90%) fellows responded. Male to female ratio was equal. Graduates carried a median debt of $220,000 (range: $0-$850,000). The majority of fellows were married with children. 70% were university/hospital employees, and 68% were unaware of a business plan. Median starting compensation was $354,500 (range: $140,000-$506,000). Starting salary was greatest for >90% clinical obligation appointments (median $427,500 vs. $310,000; p=0.002), independent of geographic location. Compensation had no relationship to private practice vs. hospital/university/military position, coastal vs. inland location, and practice sites number. Median clinical time was 75% and research time 10%. 49% identified a formal mentor. Graduates covered 1-5 different offices (median 1) and 1-5 surgery sites (median 2). 60% were satisfied with their compensation. Recent pediatric surgery graduates are engaged mainly in clinical care. Research is not incentivized. Compensation is driven by clinical obligations. Graduates have limited knowledge of the business plan supporting their compensation, nature of malpractice coverage, and commitments to resources including research. Graduates have important fiscal and parenting obligations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cataract Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Oncology Oculoplastics/Orbit Refractive Management/Intervention Retina/Vitreous Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology ... Are Cataracts? Pediatric Cataracts Cataract Diagnosis and Treatment Cataract Surgery IOL Implants: Lens Replacement After Cataracts ...

  10. Safe pediatric surgery: development and validation of preoperative interventions checklist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paula de Oliveira Pires

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: this study was aimed at developing and validating a checklist of preoperative pediatric interventions related to the safety of surgical patients. METHOD: methodological study concerning the construction and validation of an instrument with safe preoperative care indicators. The checklist was subject to validation through the Delphi technique, establishing a consensus level of 80%. RESULTS: five professional specialists in the area conducted the validation and a consensus on the content and the construct was reached after two applications of the Delphi technique. CONCLUSION: the "Safe Pediatric Surgery Checklist", simulating the preoperative trajectory of children, is an instrument capable of contributing to the preparation and promotion of safe surgery, as it identifies the presence or absence of measures required to promote patient safety.

  11. Annals of Pediatric Surgery: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peer Review Process. We adopt a single blind system for peer review. Reviewers know the authors and institute from where the paper came, but the authors don't know the reviewers. Our peer reviewers are a fine selection of well-reputed pediatric surgeons in Egypt and Africa ...

  12. Pediatric cataract surgery in Madagascar | Randrianotahina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: In Madagascar, presentation for congenital and developmental cataract is very late, visual outcome poor and follow‑up inadequate. There is an urgent need for a childhood blindness program to effectively deal with pediatric cataract, an avoidable cause of blindness and visual disability in children on the island ...

  13. Near Infrared Spectroscopy during pediatric cardiac surgery: errors and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durandy, Y; Rubatti, M; Couturier, R

    2011-09-01

    As a result of improvements in early outcomes, long-term neurologicalal outcomes are becoming a major issue in pediatric cardiac surgery. The mechanisms of brain injury are numerous, but a vast majority of injuries are impervious to therapy and only a few are modifiable. The quality of perfusion during cardiac surgery is a modifiable factor and cerebral monitoring during bypass is the way to assess the quality of intra-operative cerebral perfusion. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), as a diagnostic tool, has gained in popularity within the perfusion community. However, NIRS is becoming the standard of care before its scientific validation. This manuscript relates four clinical cases, demonstrating the limitations of NIRS monitoring during pediatric cardiac surgery as well as uncertainties about the interpretation of the recorded values. The clinical relevance of cerebral oxymetry is needed before the use of NIRS as a decision making tool. Multimodal brain monitoring with NIRS, trans-cranial Doppler and electroencephalogram are currently under way in several pediatric centers. The benefit of this time-consuming and expensive monitoring system has yet to be demonstrated.

  14. Thyroid Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hypothyroidism in Children and Adolescents Pediatric Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Nodules in Children and Adolescents Thyroid Surgery Resources Thyroid Surgery Brochure PDF Thyroid Surgery FAQs PDF En Español Cirugia De La Tiroides El folleto de Cirugia De La Tiroides Search Thyroid ...

  15. Trypan blue-assisted posterior capsulorhexis in pediatric cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotfy A

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ayman Lotfy,1,2 Ayman Abdelrahman1,2 1Ophthalmology Department, Zagazig University Hospital, 2Alpha Vision Center, Zagazig, Egypt Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of staining the posterior capsule with trypan blue during capsulorhexis in pediatric cataract surgery.Patients and methods: This was a prospective randomized comparative study carried out at Alpha Vision Center, Zagazig, Egypt. This study included 2 groups of children with pediatric cataract randomly allocated to undergo irrigation and aspiration. In the trypan group, which included 11 eyes, trypan blue was used to stain the posterior capsule during posterior capsulorhexis. In the control group, which included 10 eyes, no staining was performed. All surgeries were performed by the same surgeon. The 2 groups were compared for criteria such as completion of capsulorhexis, disruption of vitreous face and in-the-bag intraocular lens implantation.Results: This study included 21 eyes of 16 patients (age range: 6 months–4 years. A statistically significant difference was observed for the following parameters between the 2 groups: capsulorhexis completion (P=0.04, vitreous face disruption (P=0.01 and in-the-bag intraocular lens implantation (P=0.022.Conclusion: This study suggests that staining of the posterior capsule during capsulorhexis in pediatric cataract operation gives better results than capsulorhexis without staining. The stain changes the capsule texture making capsulorhexis easier with fewer complications. Keywords: staining, capsulorhexis, pediatric, cataract, trypan

  16. Effectiveness of sub-Tenon's block in pediatric strabismus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzcu, Kasim; Coskun, Mesut; Tuzcu, Esra Ayhan; Karcioglu, Murat; Davarci, Isil; Hakimoglu, Sedat; Aydın, Suzan; Turhanoglu, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Strabismus surgery is a frequently performed pediatric ocular procedure. A frequently occurring major problem in patients receiving this treatment involves the oculocardiac reflex. This reflex is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative nausea, vomiting, and pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a sub-Tenon's block on the oculocardiac reflex, pain, and postoperative nausea and vomiting. Forty patients aged 5-16 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists status I-II undergoing elective strabismus surgery were included in this study. Patients included were randomly assigned into two groups by using a sealed envelope method. In group 1 (n=20), patients did not receive sub-Tenon's anesthesia. In group 2 (n=20), following intubation, sub-Tenon's anesthesia was performed with the eye undergoing surgery. Atropine use, pain scores, oculocardiac reflex, and postoperative nausea and vomiting incidences were compared between groups. There were no significant differences between groups with regard to oculocardiac reflex and atropine use (p>0.05). Pain scores 30min post-surgery were significantly lower in group 2 than in group 1 (p<0.05). Additional analgesic needed during the postoperative period was significantly lower in group 2 compared to group 1 (p<0.05). In conclusion, we think that a sub-Tenon's block, combined with general anesthesia, is not effective and reliable in decreasing oculocardiac reflex and postoperative nausea and vomiting. However, this method is safe for reducing postoperative pain and decreasing additional analgesia required in pediatric strabismus surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. [Effectiveness of sub-Tenon's block in pediatric strabismus surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzcu, Kasim; Coskun, Mesut; Tuzcu, Esra Ayhan; Karcioglu, Murat; Davarci, Isil; Hakimoglu, Sedat; Aydın, Suzan; Turhanoglu, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Strabismus surgery is a frequently performed pediatric ocular procedure. A frequently occurring major problem in patients receiving this treatment involves the oculocardiac reflex. This reflex is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative nausea, vomiting, and pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a sub-Tenon's block on the oculocardiac reflex, pain, and postoperative nausea and vomiting. 40 patients aged 5-16 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists status I-II undergoing elective strabismus surgery were included in this study. Patients included were randomly assigned into two groups by using a sealed envelope method. In group 1 (n=20), patients did not receive sub-Tenon's anesthesia. In group 2 (n=20), following intubation, sub-Tenon's anesthesia was performed with the eye undergoing surgery. Atropine use, pain scores, oculocardiac reflex, and postoperative nausea and vomiting incidences were compared between groups. There were no significant differences between groups with regard to oculocardiac reflex and atropine use (p>0.05). Pain scores 30min post-surgery were significantly lower in group 2 than in group 1 (p<0.05). Additional analgesic needed during the postoperative period was significantly lower in group 2 compared to group 1 (p<0.05). In conclusion, we think that a sub-Tenon's block, combined with general anesthesia, is not effective and reliable in decreasing oculocardiac reflex and postoperative nausea and vomiting. However, this method is safe for reducing postoperative pain and decreasing additional analgesia required in pediatric strabismus surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Capsular Outcomes After Pediatric Cataract Surgery Without Intraocular Lens Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xuhua; Lin, Haotian; Lin, Zhuoling; Chen, Jingjing; Tang, Xiangchen; Luo, Lixia; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate capsular outcomes 12 months after pediatric cataract surgery without intraocular lens implantation via qualitative classification and quantitative measurement. This study is a cross-sectional study that was approved by the institutional review board of Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center of Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China. Digital coaxial retro-illumination photographs of 329 aphakic pediatric eyes were obtained 12 months after pediatric cataract surgery without intraocular lens implantation. Capsule digital coaxial retro-illumination photographs were divided as follows: anterior capsule opening area (ACOA), posterior capsule opening area (PCOA), and posterior capsule opening opacity (PCOO). Capsular outcomes were qualitatively classified into 3 types based on the PCOO: Type I—capsule with mild opacification but no invasion into the capsule opening; Type II—capsule with moderate opacification accompanied by contraction of the ACOA and invasion to the occluding part of the PCOA; and Type III—capsule with severe opacification accompanied by total occlusion of the PCOA. Software was developed to quantitatively measure the ACOA, PCOA, and PCOO using standardized DCRPs. The relationships between the accurate intraoperative anterior and posterior capsulorhexis sizes and the qualitative capsular types were statistically analyzed. The DCRPs of 315 aphakic eyes (95.8%) of 191 children were included. Capsular outcomes were classified into 3 types: Type I—120 eyes (38.1%); Type II—157 eyes (49.8%); Type III—38 eyes (12.1%). The scores of the capsular outcomes were negatively correlated with intraoperative anterior capsulorhexis size (R = −0.572, P PCOA increased in size from Type I to Type II, and the PCOO increased from Type II to Type III (all P < 0.05). Capsular outcomes after pediatric cataract surgery can be qualitatively classified and quantitatively measured by acquisition, division

  19. Perfusionist strategies for blood conservation in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durandy, Yves

    2010-02-26

    There is increasing concern about the safety of homologous blood transfusion during cardiac surgery, and a restrictive transfusion practice is associated with improved outcome. Transfusion-free pediatric cardiac surgery is unrealistic for the vast majority of procedures in neonates or small infants; however, considerable progress has been made by using techniques that decrease the need for homologous blood products or even allow bloodless surgery in older infants and children. These techniques involve a decrease in prime volume by downsizing the bypass circuit with the help of vacuum-assisted venous drainage, microplegia, autologous blood predonation with or without infusion of recombinant (erythropoietin), cell salvaging, ultrafiltration and retrograde autologous priming. The three major techniques which are simple, safe, efficient, and cost-effective are: a prime volume as small as possible, cardioplegia with negligible hydric balance and circuit residual blood salvaged without any alteration. Furthermore, these three techniques can be used for all the patients, including emergencies and small babies. In every pediatric surgical unit, a strategy to decrease or avoid blood bank transfusion must be implemented. A strategy to minimize transfusion requirement requires a combined effort involving the entire surgical team with pre-, peri-, and postoperative planning and management.

  20. Incorporating Comorbidity Within Risk Adjustment for UK Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Katherine L; Rogers, Libby; Barron, David J; Tsang, Victor; Anderson, David; Tibby, Shane; Witter, Thomas; Stickley, John; Crowe, Sonya; English, Kate; Franklin, Rodney C; Pagel, Christina

    2017-07-01

    When considering early survival rates after pediatric cardiac surgery it is essential to adjust for risk linked to case complexity. An important but previously less well understood component of case mix complexity is comorbidity. The National Congenital Heart Disease Audit data representing all pediatric cardiac surgery procedures undertaken in the United Kingdom and Ireland between 2009 and 2014 was used to develop and test groupings for comorbidity and additional non-procedure-based risk factors within a risk adjustment model for 30-day mortality. A mixture of expert consensus based opinion and empiric statistical analyses were used to define and test the new comorbidity groups. The study dataset consisted of 21,838 pediatric cardiac surgical procedure episodes in 18,834 patients with 539 deaths (raw 30-day mortality rate, 2.5%). In addition to surgical procedure type, primary cardiac diagnosis, univentricular status, age, weight, procedure type (bypass, nonbypass, or hybrid), and era, the new risk factor groups of non-Down congenital anomalies, acquired comorbidities, increased severity of illness indicators (eg, preoperative mechanical ventilation or circulatory support) and additional cardiac risk factors (eg, heart muscle conditions and raised pulmonary arterial pressure) all independently increased the risk of operative mortality. In an era of low mortality rates across a wide range of operations, non-procedure-based risk factors form a vital element of risk adjustment and their presence leads to wide variations in the predicted risk of a given operation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Global general pediatric surgery partnership: The UCLA-Mozambique experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, Vanda; Martins, Deborah B; Karan, Abraar; Johnson, Brittni; Shekherdimian, Shant; Miller, Lee T; Taela, Atanasio; DeUgarte, Daniel A

    2017-09-01

    There has been increasing recognition of the disparities in surgical care throughout the world. Increasingly, efforts are being made to improve local infrastructure and training of surgeons in low-income settings. The purpose of this study was to review the first 5-years of a global academic pediatric general surgery partnership between UCLA and the Eduardo Mondlane University in Maputo, Mozambique. A mixed-methods approach was utilized to perform an ongoing needs assessment. A retrospective review of admission and operative logbooks was performed. Partnership activities were summarized. The needs assessment identified several challenges including limited operative time, personnel, equipment, and resources. Review of logbooks identified a high frequency of burn admissions and colorectal procedures. Partnership activities focused on providing educational resources, on-site proctoring, training opportunities, and research collaboration. This study highlights the spectrum of disease and operative case volume of a referral center for general pediatric surgery in sub-Saharan Africa, and it provides a context for academic partnership activities to facilitate training and improve the quality of pediatric general surgical care in limited-resource settings. Level IV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The ACGME case log: General surgery resident experience in pediatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Kenneth W.; Drake, F. Thurston; Aarabi, Shahram; Waldhausen, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Background General surgery (GS) residents in ACGME programs log cases performed during their residency. We reviewed designated pediatric surgery (PS) cases to assess for changes in performed cases over time. Methods The ACGME case logs for graduating GS residents were reviewed from academic year (AY) 1989–1990 to 2010–2011 for designated pediatric cases. Overall and designated PS cases were analyzed. Data were combined into five blocks: Period I (AY1989–90 to AY1993–94), Period II (AY1994–95 to AY1998–99), Period III (AY1999–00 to AY2002–03), Period IV (AY2003–04 to AY2006–07), and Period V (AY2007–08 to AY2010–11). Periods IV and V were delineated by implementation of duty hour restrictions. Student t-tests compared averages among the time periods with significance at P < .05. Results Overall GS case load remained relatively stable. Of total cases, PS cases accounted for 5.4% in Period I and 3.7% in Period V. Designated pediatric cases declined for each period from an average of 47.7 in Period I to 33.8 in Period V. These changes are due to a decline in hernia repairs, which account for half of cases. All other cases contributed only minimally to the pediatric cases. The only laparoscopic cases in the database were anti-reflux procedures, which increased over time. Conclusions GS residents perform a diminishing number of designated PS cases. This decline occurred before the onset of work-hour restrictions. These changes have implications on the capabilities of the current graduating workforce. However, the case log does not reflect all cases trainees may be exposed to, so revision of this list is recommended. PMID:23932601

  3. Evaluating the use of preoperative antibiotics in pediatric orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formaini, Nathan; Jacob, Paul; Willis, Leisel; Kean, John R

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the rate of infection after minimally invasive procedures on a consecutive series of pediatric orthopaedic patients. We hypothesized that the use of preoperative antibiotics for minimally invasive pediatric orthopaedic procedures does not significantly reduce the incidence of surgical site infection requiring surgical debridement within 30 days of the primary procedure. We retrospectively reviewed 2330 patients having undergone minimally invasive orthopaedic procedures at our institution between March 2008 and November 2010. Knee arthroscopy, closed reduction with percutaneous fixation, soft tissue releases, excision of bony or soft-tissue masses, and removal of hardware constituted the vast majority of included procedures. Two groups, based on whether prophylactic antibiotics were administered before surgery, were created and the incidence of a repeat procedure required for deep infection was recorded. Statistical analysis was performed to determine significance, if any, between the 2 groups. Chart review of the 2330 patients identified 1087 as having received preoperative antibiotics, whereas the remaining 1243 patients did not receive antibiotics before surgery. Only 1 patient out of the 1243 cases in which antibiotics were not given required additional surgery within 30 days of the primary procedure due to a complicated surgical site infection (an incidence of 0.0008%). No patients in the antibiotic group developed a postoperative infection within 30 days requiring a return to the operating room for management. Our data revealed no significant increase in the incidence of complicated infection requiring additional procedures when antibiotics were not administered before surgery. Though prophylactic antibiotics have been shown to confer numerous benefits for patients undergoing relatively major operations, their use in cases of minimally invasive and/or percutaneous orthopaedic surgery is not well defined. Our data suggest that the use of

  4. Single incision pediatric endoscopic surgery: advantages of relatively large incision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, E.; Afsarlar, E.; Karaman, I.

    2015-01-01

    To describe Single Incision Pediatric Endoscopic Surgery (SIPES) performed on children with various diagnoses, emphasizing its advantages. Study Design: An observational case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pediatric Surgery, Dr. Sami Ulus Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, from January 2011 to November 2014. Methodology: A review of patient charts was conducted in which SIPES was preferred as the surgical procedure. Patient demographics, operative details, operative time, clinical outcomes, postoperative pain and cosmesis were analyzed. Results: SIPES was performed on 45 patients (21 girls, 24 boys). Thirty-three appendectomies, 5 varicocelectomies, 3 oophorectomies, 2 ovarian and one paratubal cyst excision, and one fallopian tube excision were performed. All except one procedures were performed through our standard 2cm umbilical vertical or smile incision. In 18 cases, abdominal irrigation/aspiration was easily performed through the existing larger incision, as is done with open surgical technique. None of the patients had early postoperative shoulder/back pain since complete disinflation of CO/sub 2/ could be ensured. All of the patients/parents were satisfied with the cosmesis. Conclusion: SIPES has the advantages of limiting the surgical scar to within the umbilicus and providing easy disinflation of CO/sub 2/, allowing intraabdominal cleaning and extraction of large volume tissue samples through a single large umbilical incision. (author)

  5. A structured blood conservation program in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budak, A B; McCusker, K; Gunaydin, S

    2017-03-01

    The limitation of alternative transfusion practices in infants increases the benefits of blood conservation. We analyzed the efficacy of a structured program to reduce transfusions and transfusion-associated complications in cardiac surgery PATIENTS AND METHODS: Our pediatric surgery database was reviewed retrospectively, comparing outcomes from two different time periods, after the implementation of an effective blood conservation program beginning in March 2014. A total of 214 infants (8.1±3.4 months) who underwent biventricular repair utilizing CPB (Group 1 - Blood conservation) were studied in a 12-month period (March 2014-February 2015) after the implementation of the new program, and compared with 250 infants (7.91±3.2 months) (Group 2 - Control-No blood conservation) of the previous 12-month period (March 2013-February 2014). The proportion of patients transfused with red blood cells was 75.2% (N=188) in control group and reduced by 16.4% in the study group (58.8% - 126 patients, p blood products, justify blood conservation in pediatric cardiac operations. Circuit miniaturization, ultrafiltration, and reduced postoperative bleeding, presumably secondary to higher fibrinogen and other coagulation factor levels, contributed to this outcome.

  6. Innovation in Pediatric Surgical Education for General Surgery Residents: A Mobile Web Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouch, Joshua D; Wagner, Justin P; Scott, Andrew; Sullins, Veronica F; Chen, David C; DeUgarte, Daniel A; Shew, Stephen B; Tillou, Areti; Dunn, James C Y; Lee, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    General surgery residents lack a standardized educational experience in pediatric surgery. We hypothesized that the development of a mobile educational interface would provide general surgery residents broader access to pediatric surgical education materials. We created an educational mobile website for general surgery residents rotating on pediatric surgery, which included a curriculum, multimedia resources, the Operative Performance Rating Scale (OPRS), and Twitter functionality. Residents were instructed to consult the curriculum. Residents and faculty posted media using the Twitter hashtag, #UCLAPedSurg, and following each surgical procedure reviewed performance via the OPRS. Site visits, Twitter posts, and OPRS submissions were quantified from September 2013 to July 2014. The pediatric surgery mobile website received 257 hits; 108 to the homepage, 107 to multimedia, 28 to the syllabus, and 19 to the OPRS. All eligible residents accessed the content. The Twitter hashtag, #UCLAPedSurg, was assigned to 20 posts; the overall audience reach was 85 individuals. Participants in the mobile OPRS included 11 general surgery residents and 4 pediatric surgery faculty. Pediatric surgical education resources and operative performance evaluations are effectively administered to general surgery residents via a structured mobile platform. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Parental satisfaction with pediatric day-care surgery and its determinants in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenita James Sam

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Perception of quality of pediatric day-care surgery was assessed with a questionnaire and was found to be good. Variables related to surgery such as pain may be included in the questionnaire for assessing satisfaction in the day-care surgery.

  8. Minimally invasive pediatric surgery: Increasing implementation in daily practice and resident's training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.T. Velde (Te); N.M.A. Bax (Klaas); S.H.A.J. Tytgat; J.R. de Jong (Justin); D.V. Travassos (Vieira); W.L.M. Kramer; D.C. van der Zee (David)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In 1998, the one-year experience in minimally invasive abdominal surgery in children at a pediatric training center was assessed. Seven years later, we determined the current status of pediatric minimally invasive surgery in daily practice and surgical training. Methods: A

  9. Body temperature increases during pediatric full mouth rehabilitation surgery under general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Shan Chuang

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Body temperature transiently increased during pediatric full mouth rehabilitation surgery. The increase in body temperature was associated with operation duration. The etiology is uncertain. Continuous body temperature monitoring and the application of both heating and cooling devices during pediatric full mouth rehabilitation surgery should be mandatory.

  10. Increasing volume and complexity of pediatric epilepsy surgery with stable seizure outcome between 2008 and 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barba, Carmen; Specchio, Nicola; Guerrini, Renzo

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of the study was to assess common practice in pediatric epilepsy surgery in Italy between 2008 and 2014. Methods A survey was conducted among nine Italian epilepsy surgery centers to collect information on presurgical and postsurgical evaluation protocols, volumes and type...... and facilities. Significance This survey reveals an increase in volume and complexity of pediatric epilepsy surgery in Italy between 2008 and 2014, associated with a stable seizure outcome....

  11. ILAE survey of neuropsychology practice in pediatric epilepsy surgery evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berl, Madison M; Smith, Mary Lou; Bulteau, Christine

    2017-06-01

    To determine the extent to which specific neuropsychological measures are in common use around the world for the assessment of children who are candidates for epilepsy surgery. As part of the work of the International League Against Epilepsy Pediatric Surgical Task Force, a survey was developed and distributed online. The survey consisted of questions related to demographics, training experience, general practice, and specific measures used and at what frequency. Seventy-eight clinicians with an average of 13.5 years of experience from 19 countries responded to the survey; 69% were English-speaking. Pre- and post-neuropsychological evaluations were conducted with a majority of children undergoing surgical resection for epilepsy. There was high consistency (>90%) among the domains evaluated, while consistency rate among specific measures was more variable (range: 0-100%). Consistency rates were also lower among respondents in non-English-speaking countries. For English-speaking respondents, at least one measure within each domain was used by a majority (>75%) of clinicians; 19 specific measures met this criterion. There is consensus of measures used in neuropsychological studies of pediatric epilepsy patients which provides a basis for determining which measures to include in establishing a collaborative data repository to study surgical outcomes of pediatric epilepsy. Challenges include selecting measures that promote collaboration with centers in non-English-speaking countries and providing data from children under age 5.

  12. Best Practice Updates for Pediatric/Adolescent Weight Loss Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Janey S.A.; Lenders, Carine M.; Dionne, Emily A.; Hoppin, Alison G.; Hsu, George L.K.; Inge, Thomas H.; Lawlor, David F.; Marino, Margaret F.; Meyers, Alan F.; Rosenblum, Jennifer L.; Sanchez, Vivian M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to update evidence-based best practice guidelines for pediatric/adolescent weight loss surgery (WLS). We performed a systematic search of English-language literature on WLS and pediatric, adolescent, gastric bypass, laparoscopic gastric banding, and extreme obesity published between April 2004 and May 2007 in PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Library. Keywords were used to narrow the search for a selective review of abstracts, retrieval of full articles, and grading of evidence according to systems used in established evidence-based models. In light of evidence on the natural history of obesity and on outcomes of WLS in adolescents, guidelines for surgical treatment of obesity in this age group need to be updated. We recommend modification of selection criteria to include adolescents with BMI ≥ 35 and specific obesity-related comorbidities for which there is clear evidence of important short-term morbidity (i.e., type 2 diabetes, severe steatohepatitis, pseudotumor cerebri, and moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea). In addition, WLS should be considered for adolescents with extreme obesity (BMI ≥ 40) and other comorbidities associated with long-term risks. We identified >1,085 papers; 186 of the most relevant were reviewed in detail. Regular updates of evidence-based recommendations for best practices in pediatric/adolescent WLS are required to address advances in technology and the growing evidence base in pediatric WLS. Key considerations in patient safety include carefully designed criteria for patient selection, multidisciplinary evaluation, choice of appropriate procedure, thorough screening and management of comorbidities, optimization of long-term compliance, and age-appropriate fully informed consent. PMID:19396070

  13. Assessment of the Mexican Board of Pediatric Surgery Certification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras-Hernandez, Juan D; Mora-Fol, Jose R; Lezama-Del Valle, Pablo; Yanowsky-Reyes, Guillermo; Perez-Lorenzana, Hector; Ortega-Salgado, Arturo; Aguirre-Jauregui, Oscar; Bracho-Blanchet, Eduardo; Sanchez-Mendiola, Melchor

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the quality of the Mexican Board of Pediatric Surgery (MBPS) certifying system, using contemporary international guidelines. Retrospective assessment of evidence collected during the design and implementation processes of 2 consecutive applications of the MBPS certifying examination, using Cizek's checklist for evaluating credential-testing programs. It includes the relevant guidelines from the American Education Research Association, the American Psychological Association, the National Council on Measurement in Education, and the National Commission for Certifying Agencies. Four independent and previously trained raters used the checklist. They underwent a 2-week training using frame-of-reference and performance dimensions methodologies. Certification examinations of MBPS. The 2013 and 2014 MBPS certification examinations, with 111 evidence items of the processes, followed for the assessment of 86 examinees. The checklist internal consistency was 0.89. Absolute interrater agreement was 0.34 for the 2013 and 0.66 for the 2014 editions of the examination. The 2013 examination complied with 55 (64%) of the checklist 86 items, in 2014 with 72 (84%). In 2014, the certifying system reached a quality of 84%. For optimal fulfillment of its social responsibility, the MBPS is required to maintain its level of quality and attempt to improve its performance. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Minimal access surgery of pediatric inguinal hernias: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranga Bharathi, Ramanathan; Arora, Manu; Baskaran, Vasudevan

    2008-08-01

    Inguinal hernia is a common problem among children, and herniotomy has been its standard of care. Laparoscopy, which gained a toehold initially in the management of pediatric inguinal hernia (PIH), has managed to steer world opinion against routine contralateral groin exploration by precise detection of contralateral patencies. Besides detection, its ability to repair simultaneously all forms of inguinal hernias (indirect, direct, combined, recurrent, and incarcerated) together with contralateral patencies has cemented its role as a viable alternative to conventional repair. Numerous minimally invasive techniques for addressing PIH have mushroomed in the past two decades. These techniques vary considerably in their approaches to the internal ring (intraperitoneal, extraperitoneal), use of ports (three, two, one), endoscopic instruments (two, one, or none), sutures (absorbable, nonabsorbable), and techniques of knotting (intracorporeal, extracorporeal). In addition to the surgeons' experience and the merits/limitations of individual techniques, it is the nature of the defect that should govern the choice of technique. The emerging techniques show a trend toward increasing use of extracorporeal knotting and diminishing use of working ports and endoscopic instruments. These favor wider adoption of minimal access surgery in addressing PIH by surgeons, irrespective of their laparoscopic skills and experience. Growing experience, wider adoption, decreasing complications, and increasing advantages favor emergence of minimal access surgery as the gold standard for the treatment of PIH in the future. This article comprehensively reviews the laparoscopic techniques of addressing PIH.

  15. NORMOTHERMIA FOR PEDIATRIC AND CONGENITAL HEART SURGERY: AN EXPANDED HORIZON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mahir eShamsuddin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB in pediatric cardiac surgery is generally performed with hypothermia, flow reduction and hemodilution. From 10/2013 to 12/2014 55 patients, median age 6 years (range 2 months to 52 years, median weight 18.5kg (range 3.2 to 57 kg, underwent surgery with normothermic high flow CPB in a new unit.There were no early or late deaths. Fifty patients (90.9% were extubated within 3 hrs, 3 (5.5% within 24 hrs and 2 (3.6% within 48 hrs. Twentyfour patients (43.6% didn’t require inotropic support, 31 (56.4% received dopamine or dobutamine: 21 ≤5 mcg/kg/min, 8 5-10 mcg/kg/min, and 2 >10 mcg/kg/min. Two patients (6.5% required noradrenaline 0.05-0.1 mcg/kg/min.On arrival to ICU and after 3 and 6 hrs and 8:00 am the next morning, mean lactate levels were 1.9±09, 2.0±1.2, 1.6±0.8 and 1.4±0.7 mmol/L (0.6-5.2 mmol/L respectively. From arrival to ICU to 8:00 am the next morning mean urine output was 3.8±1.5 mL/kg/hr (0.7-7.6 mL/kg/hr, and mean chest drainage was 0.6±0.5 mL/kg/hr (0.1-2.3 mL/kg/hr. Mean ICU and hospital stay were 2.7±1.4 days (2-8 days and 7.2±2.2 days (4-15 days respectively. In conclusion, normothermic high flow CPB allows pediatric and congenital heart surgery with favorable outcomes even in a new unit. The immediate post-operative period is characterized by low requirement for inotropic and respiratory support, low lactate production, adequate urine output, minimal drainage from the chest drains, shorter ICU and hospital stay.

  16. Increasing Utilization Of Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery In The United States Between 1997 and 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestana Knight, Elia M.; Schiltz, Nicholas K.; Bakaki, Paul M.; Koroukian, Siran M.; Lhatoo, Samden D.; Kaiboriboon, Kitti

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY OBJECTIVE To examine national trends of pediatric epilepsy surgery usage in the United States between 1997 and 2009. METHODS We performed a serial cross-sectional study of pediatric epilepsy surgery using triennial data from the Kids’ Inpatient Database from 1997 to 2009. The rates of epilepsy surgery for lobectomies, partial lobectomies, and hemispherectomies in each study year were calculated based on the number of prevalent epilepsy cases in the corresponding year. The age-race-sex adjusted rates of surgeries were also estimated. Mann-Kendall trend test was used to test for changes in the rates of surgeries over time. Multivariable regression analysis was also performed to estimate the effect of time, age, race, and sex on the annual incidence of epilepsy surgery. RESULTS The rates of pediatric epilepsy surgery significantly increased from 0.85 epilepsy surgeries per 1,000 children with epilepsy in 1997 to 1.44 epilepsy surgeries per 1,000 children with epilepsy in 2009. An increment in the rates of epilepsy surgeries was noted across all age groups, in boys and girls, all races, and all payer types. The rate of increase was lowest in blacks and in children with public insurance. The overall number of surgical cases for each study year was lower than 35% of children who were expected to have surgery, based on the estimates from the Connecticut Study of Epilepsy. SIGNIFICANCE In contrast to adults, pediatric epilepsy surgery numbers have increased significantly in the past decade. However, epilepsy surgery remains an underutilized treatment for children with epilepsy. In addition, black children and those with public insurance continue to face disparities in the receipt of epilepsy surgery. PMID:25630252

  17. Peritoneal Drainage Versus Pleural Drainage After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Keshava Murty Narayana; Zidan, Marwan; Walters, Henry L; Delius, Ralph E; Mastropietro, Christopher W

    2014-07-01

    We aimed to determine whether infants undergoing cardiac surgery would more efficiently attain negative fluid balance postoperatively with passive peritoneal drainage as compared to traditional pleural drainage. A prospective, randomized study including children undergoing repair of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) or atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) was completed between September 2011 and June 2013. Patients were randomized to intraoperative placement of peritoneal catheter or right pleural tube in addition to the requisite mediastinal tube. The primary outcome measure was fluid balance at 48 hours postoperatively. Variables were compared using t tests or Fisher exact tests as appropriate. A total of 24 patients were enrolled (14 TOF and 10 AVSD), with 12 patients in each study group. Mean fluid balance at 48 hours was not significantly different between study groups, -41 ± 53 mL/kg in patients with periteonal drainage and -9 ± 40 mL/kg in patients with pleural drainage (P = .10). At 72 hours however, postoperative fluid balance was significantly more negative with peritoneal drainage, -52.4 ± 71.6 versus +2.0 ± 50.6 (P = .04). On subset analysis, fluid balance at 48 hours in patients with AVSD was more negative with peritoneal drainage as compared to pleural, -82 ± 51 versus -1 ± 38 mL/kg, respectively (P = .02). Fluid balance at 48 hours in patients with TOF was not significantly different between study groups. Passive peritoneal drainage may more effectively facilitate negative fluid balance when compared to pleural drainage after pediatric cardiac surgery, although this benefit is not likely universal but rather dependent on the patient's underlying physiology. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Robotic assisted surgery in pediatric gynecology: promising innovation in mini invasive surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakib, Ghassan; Calcaterra, Valeria; Scorletti, Federico; Romano, Piero; Goruppi, Ilaria; Mencherini, Simonetta; Avolio, Luigi; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2013-02-01

    Robotic assisted surgery is not yet widely applied in the pediatric field. We report our initial experience regarding the feasibility, safety, benefits, and limitations of robot-assisted surgery in pediatric gynecological patients. Descriptive, retrospective report of experience with pediatric gynecological patients over a period of 12 months. Department of Pediatric Surgery, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation. Children and adolescents, with a surgical diagnosis of ovarian and/or tubal lesions. Robot assembly time and operative time, days of hospitalization, time to cessation of pain medication, complication rate, conversion rate to laparoscopic procedure and trocar insertion strategy. Six children and adolescents (2.4-15 yrs), weighing 12-55 kg, underwent robotic assisted surgery for adnexal pathologies: 2 for ovarian cystectomy, 2 for oophorectomy, 1 for right oophorectomy and left salpingo-oophorectomy for gonadal disgenesis, 1 for exploration for suspected pelvic malformation. Mean operative time was 117.5 ± 34.9 minutes. Conversion to laparatomy was not necessary in any of the cases. No intra- or postoperative complications occurred. Initial results indicate that robotic assisted surgery is safely applicable in the pediatric gynecological population, although it is still premature to conclude that it provides better clinical outcomes than traditional laparoscopic surgery. Randomized, prospective, comparative studies will help characterize the advantages and disadvantages of this new technology in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Day-care versus inpatient pediatric surgery: a comparison of costs incurred by parents.

    OpenAIRE

    Stanwick, R S; Horne, J M; Peabody, D M; Postuma, R

    1987-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness for parents of day-care pediatric surgery was assessed by comparing time and financial costs associated with two surgical procedures, one (squint repair) performed exclusively as a day-care procedure, the other (adenoidectomy) performed exclusively as an inpatient procedure. All but 1 of 165 eligible families participated. The children underwent surgery between February and July 1981. The day-care surgery group (59 families) incurred average total time costs of 16.1 hou...

  20. [Features of skin graft in pediatric plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depoortère, C; François, C; Belkhou, A; Duquennoy-Martinot, V; Guerreschi, P

    2016-10-01

    Skin graft is a skin tissue fragment transferred from a donor site to a receiving site with a spontaneous revascularization. Basic process of plastic surgery, skin graft known in children, specific, warnings and refinements. It finds its indication in many pediatric cases: integumental diseases (neavus, hamartoma), acute burns and scars, traumatic loss of substance or surgically induced, congenital malformations of the hands and feet, etc. Specific skin graft techniques in children are developed: donor sites, sampling technique and procedure, early postoperative care. Especially in children, the scalp is a perfect site for split skin graft and technique is actively developed. Refinements and special cases are discussed: use of dermal matrices, allografts, xenografts, negative pressure therapy, prior skin expansion of the donor site. Results of skin graft in children are exposed: taking of graft, growth and shrinkage, pigmentation. Skin graft sometimes allows to stay the complex movement and get the best final benefit, permanent or at least temporary, in a growing being. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Obstruction of endotracheal tube with relevant respiratory acidosis during pediatric cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morei, N.M.; Mungroop, H. E.; Michielon, Guido; Scheeren, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of pediatric cardiac surgery in a 21- days old baby, in whom a nasal endotracheal tube (ETT) was inserted. At the end of surgery both ventilatory pressures and end-tidal CO2 increased suggesting airway obstruction. Suctioning of the ETT lumen did not relieve the problem, only ETT

  2. Current status of pediatric minimal access surgery at Sultan Qaboos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: current status, laparoscopy, minimal access surgery, thoracoscopy. Departments of ... Materials and methods ... procedures, the open technique was used for the creation ... operated for bilateral inguinal herniotomy had recurrence.

  3. Routine hemoglobin electrophoresis for pediatric surgery day case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-25

    Sep 25, 2015 ... 2016 Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow ... surgery day case in at-risk populations: Suggested algorithm for screening .... HBE is a routine preoperative investigation before a surgical ...

  4. Analysis of an In-Service Examination for Core Pediatric Craniofacial Surgery Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Chang, Benjamin; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about designing an effective residency curriculum for pediatric craniofacial surgery. This study elucidates the pediatric craniofacial curriculum of the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Examination (PSITE) to facilitate knowledge acquisition during residency. Approximately, 6 consecutive PSITEs were reviewed for pediatric craniofacial questions (2010-2015). Subjects were categorized according to topics on the American Board of Plastic Surgery written board examination. Questions were categorized using an educational taxonomy model. Answer references were categorized by source and publication lag. Of 1174 PSITE questions, 147 tested pediatric craniofacial topics (12.5%). Questions appeared predominately in the Craniomaxillofacial section (83.0%, p < 0.001). The annual representation was stable more than 6 years (range: 10.2%-14.4%, p = 0.842). Question taxonomy favored interpretation (45.6%) and decision-making (40.8%) over recall (13.6%, p < 0.001) skills, and 41 questions had an associated image (27.9%) and most were photographic (76.7%, p < 0.001). The most frequently tested categories on the American Board of Plastic Surgery written examination content outline were craniofacial anomalies (23.5%), benign and malignant tumors (17.6%), and cleft lip and palate (12.5%). Overall, 80 unique journals were cited 304 times with a mean publication lag of 9.4 ± 10.9 years. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (34.5%) was the most cited journal (p < 0.001). These data may assist in designating core knowledge competency in pediatric craniofacial surgery for plastic surgery residents. A further understanding of PSITE utility for core knowledge competency in pediatric craniofacial surgery would be the focus of future work. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. How to successfully implement a robotic pediatric surgery program: lessons learned after 96 procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lambert, Guénolée; Fourcade, Laurent; Centi, Joachim; Fredon, Fabien; Braik, Karim; Szwarc, Caroline; Longis, Bernard; Lardy, Hubert

    2013-06-01

    Both our teams were the first to implement pediatric robotic surgery in France. The aim of this study was to define the key points we brought to light so other pediatric teams that want to set up a robotic surgery program will benefit. We reviewed the medical records of all children who underwent robotic surgery between Nov 2007 and June 2011 in both departments, including patient data, installation and changes, operative time, hospital stay, intraoperative complications, and postoperative outcome. The department's internal organization, the organization within the hospital complex, and cost were evaluated. A total of 96 procedures were evaluated. There were 38 girls and 56 boys with average age at surgery of 7.6 years (range, 0.7-18 years) and average weight of 26 kg (range, 6-77 kg). Thirty-six patients had general surgery, 57 patients urologic surgery, and 1 thoracic surgery. Overall average operative time was 189 min (range, 70-550 min), and average hospital stay was 6.4 days (range, 2-24 days). The procedures of 3 patients were converted. Median follow-up was 18 months (range, 0.5-43 months). Robotic surgical procedure had an extra cost of 1934 compared to conventional open surgery. Our experience was similar to the findings described in the literature for feasibility, security, and patient outcomes; we had an overall operative success rate of 97 %. Three main actors are concerned in the implementation of a robotic pediatric surgery program: surgeons and anesthetists, nurses, and the administration. The surgeon is at the starting point with motivation for minimally invasive surgery without laparoscopic constraints. We found that it was possible to implement a long-lasting robotic surgery program with comparable quality of care.

  6. Anesthesia for Ambulatory Pediatric Surgery in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Pilot Study in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabré, Yvette B; Traoré, Idriss S S; Kaboré, Flavien A R; Ki, Bertille; Traoré, Alain I; Ouédraogo, Isso; Bandré, Emile; Wandaogo, Albert; Ouédraogo, Nazinigouba

    2017-02-01

    Long surgical wait times and limited hospital capacity are common obstacles to surgical care in many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Introducing ambulatory surgery might contribute to a solution to these problems. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of introducing ambulatory surgery into a pediatric hospital in SSA. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study that took place over 6 months. It includes all patients assigned to undergo ambulatory surgery in the Pediatric University Hospital in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Eligibility criteria for the ambulatory surgery program included >1 year of age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) 1 status, surgery with a low risk of bleeding, lasting anesthesia with halothane. Sixty-five percent also received regional or local anesthesia consisting of caudal block in 79.23% or nerve block in 20.77%. The average duration of surgery was 33 ± 17.47 minutes. No intraoperative complications were noted. All the patients received acetaminophen and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in the recovery room. Twelve (11.7%) patients had complications in recovery, principally nausea and vomiting. Eight (7.8%) patients were admitted to the hospital. No serious complications were associated with ambulatory surgery. Its introduction could possibly be a solution to improving pediatric surgical access in low-income countries.

  7. Pediatric day case surgery: Experience from a tertiary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surgical service is in great demand in developing countries, and in-patient beds and surgical supplies are insufficient. Method: A ..... Day Case Surgery in Children in Ile-Ife, Nigeria-An Audit. ... as a clinical indicator for quality assurance.

  8. Single-incision thoracoscopic surgery for spontaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aDivision of Pediatric Surgery, bDepartment of Surgery, National Defense Medical. College ... Correspondence to Akinari Hinoki, MD, PhD, Department of Surgery, Division of. Pediatric ... (Echelon60; Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Ethicon, NJ, USA).

  9. Pulmonary complications in pediatric cardiac surgery at a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Daniel Lago; Sousa, Lícia Raquel Teles; Silva, Raquel Teixeira; Gomes, Holga Cristina da Rocha; Ferreira, Fernando Mauro Muniz; Lima, Willy Leite; Borges, Lívia Christina do Prado Lui

    2010-01-01

    To identify the prevalence of pulmonary complications in children undergone cardiac surgery, as well as demographic and clinical characteristics of this population. The sample comprised 37 children of both genders, underwent cardiac surgery at the Hospital Universitário Presidente Dutra, São Luis (MA) during the year of 2007. There were not included patients who had lung disease in pre-operative period, patients with neurological disorders, intra-operative death besides lack of data in medical records. The data were obtained from general medical and nursing staff of their medical records. The population of the study was predominantly composed by female children, from the countryside and at school age. Pathologies considered low risk were the majority, especially the patent ductus arteriosus, interventricular communication and interatrial communication. It was observed that the largest share of children made use of cardiopulmonary bypass for more than 30 minutes, with a median of 80 minutes, suffered a median sternotomy, using only the mediastinal drain and made use of mechanical ventilation after surgery, with the median about 6.6 hours. Only three (8.1%) patients developed pulmonary complications, and of these, two died. Most of the sample was female, school aged and from the countryside. The low time of cardiopulmonary bypass and mechanical ventilation, and congenital heart disease with low risk, may have been factors that contributed to the low rate of pulmonary complications postoperative.

  10. Review of laparoscopic training in pediatric surgery in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stormer, Emma J; Sabharwal, Atul J

    2009-04-01

    To review the exposure pediatric surgery trainees have to laparoscopic surgery in the United Kingdom (UK). A confidential postal questionnaire was sent to all trainees working at registrar level in centers responsible for pediatric surgical training in the UK. Questions assessed the number of consultants with an interest in laparoscopic surgery, types of cases performed laparoscopically, and trainees' role in laparoscopic appendicectomy (LA). Questionnaires were sent to 112 trainees with a 55% response rate (62 replies). At least one response was received from each unit. Based on responses, 49 to 67 consultants in 21 training centers have an interest in laparoscopic surgery (0%-100% of consultants per unit). LA was offered in 20 out of 21 training centers. There was no significant difference in the proportion of appendicectomies performed laparoscopically by junior (years 1-3) and senior (years 4-6) trainees. A significantly higher proportion of junior trainees had not performed any LAs (P = 0.02). Seventy-three percent of trainees were the principal operator. For trainees who were principal operators, the cameraperson was a consultant in 52% and a junior trainee in 17%. The time of day affected the likelihood of a procedure being carried out laparoscopically in 43 (81%) responses. The majority of trainees' exposure to laparoscopic surgery could be viewed as suboptimal; however, the exposure gained varies significantly between different units throughout the UK. In an age moving in favor of minimal access surgery, all units must be in a position to offer pediatric laparoscopic surgical training.

  11. Establishing a surgical outreach program in the developing world: pediatric strabismus surgery in Guatemala City, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditta, Lauren C; Pereiras, Lilia Ana; Graves, Emily T; Devould, Chantel; Murchison, Ebony; Figueroa, Ligia; Kerr, Natalie C

    2015-12-01

    To report our experince in establishing a sustainable pediatric surgical outreach mission to an underserved population in Guatemala for treatment of strabismic disorders. A pediatric ophthalmic surgical outreach mission was established. Children were evaluated for surgical intervention by 3 pediatric ophthalmologists and 2 orthoptists. Surgical care was provided at the Moore Pediatric Surgery Center, Guatemala City, over 4 days. Postoperative care was facilitated by Guatemalan physicians during the second year. In year 1, patients 1-17 years of age were referred by local healthcare providers. In year 2, more than 60% of patients were prescreened by a local pediatric ophthalmologist. We screened 47% more patients in year 2 (132 vs 90). Diagnoses included congenital and acquired esotropia, consecutive and acquired exotropia, congenital nystagmus, Duane syndrome, Brown syndrome, cranial nerve palsy, dissociated vertical deviation, and oblique muscle dysfunction. Overall, 42% of the patients who were screened underwent surgery. We performed 21 more surgeries in our second year (58 vs 37), a 57% increase. There were no significant intra- or postoperative complications. Surgical outreach programs for children with strabismic disorders in the developing world can be established through international cooperation, a multidisciplinary team of healthcare providers, and medical equipment allocations. Coordinating care with local pediatric ophthalmologists and medical directors facilitates best practice management for sustainability. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Immunological status of the pediatric patient who has undergone heart surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela Flores, A; Wakida, G; Limón Rojas, A; Obregón, C; Orihuela, O; Romero, C

    1995-01-01

    Communication of results a study the effect of open and closed-heart surgery in the immune system of infants and children. Data collected 24 hrs before anesthesia and surgery and five days after surgery. Operating room and pediatric intensive care of Hospital Central de Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) in the South, Mexico City. Children undergoing surgery for correction of congenital heart disease (age 16 months to 14 years). A total of 16 patients. increased neutrophil counts with luymphopenia in both groups (p < 0.05), serum levels of the complement components C3 and C4 were higher after surgery, serum immunoglobulin IgG, IgA and IgM were higher after surgery, serum immunoglobulin IgG, IgA and IgM were decreased form preoperative levels (p < 0.01). Two patients had infection in the surgical wound. The effect of open and closed-heart surgery produced transitory immunodeficiency with recuperation of his immune systems and 5th day after surgery.

  13. Clinical negligence claims in pediatric surgery in England: pattern and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyoka, Mandela

    2015-02-01

    We hypothesized that there has been an increase in the number of successful litigation claims in pediatric surgery in England. Our aim was to report the incidence, causes, and costs of clinical negligence claims against the National Health Service (NHS) in relation to pediatric surgery. We queried the NHS Litigation Authority (NHSLA) on litigation claims among children undergoing pediatric surgery in England (2004-2012). We decided a priori to only examine closed cases (decision and payment made). Data included year of claim, year of payment of claim, payment per claim, paid-to-closed ratio, and severity of outcome of clinical incident. Out of 112 clinical negligence claims in pediatric surgery, 93 (83%) were finalized-73 (65%) were settled and damages paid to the claimant and 20 (18%) were closed with no payment, and 19 (17%) remain open. The median payment was £13,537 (600-500,000) and median total cost borne by NHSLA was £31,445 (600-730,202). Claims were lodged at a median interval of 2 (0-13) years from time of occurrence with 55 (75%) cases being settled within the 3 years of being received. The commonest reasons for claims were postoperative complications (n=20, 28%), delayed treatment (n=16, 22%), and/or diagnosis (n=14, 19%). Out of 73, 17 (23%) closed claims resulted in case fatality. Conclusion: Two-thirds of all claims in pediatric surgery resulted in payment to claimant, and the commonest reasons for claims were postoperative complications, delayed treatment, and/or diagnosis. Nearly a quarter of successful claims were in cases where negligence resulted in case fatality. Pediatric surgeons should be aware of common diagnostic and treatment shortfalls as high-risk areas of increased susceptibility to clinical negligence claims. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Therapeutic outcomes of transsphenoidal surgery in pediatric patients with craniopharyngiomas: a single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shozo; Fukuhara, Noriaki; Yamaguchi-Okada, Mitsuo; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Akira; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Inoshita, Naoko; Ito, Junko

    2018-03-30

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to analyze the outcomes of transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) in a single-center clinical series of pediatric craniopharyngioma patients treated with gross-total resection (GTR). METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the surgical outcomes for 65 consecutive patients with childhood craniopharyngiomas (28 girls and 37 boys, mean age 9.6 years) treated with TSS (45 primary and 20 repeat surgeries) between 1990 and 2015. Tumors were classified as subdiaphragmatic or supradiaphragmatic. Demographic and clinical characteristics, including extent of resection, complications, incidence of recurrence, pre- and postoperative visual disturbance, pituitary function, and incidence of diabetes insipidus (DI), as well as new-onset obesity, were analyzed and compared between the primary surgery and repeat surgery groups. RESULTS Of the 45 patients in the primary surgery group, 26 (58%) had subdiaphragmatic tumors and 19 had supradiaphragmatic tumors. Of the 20 patients in the repeat surgery group, 9 (45%) had subdiaphragmatic tumors and 11 had supradiaphragmatic tumors. The only statistically significant difference between the 2 surgical groups was in tumor size; tumors were larger (mean maximum diameter 30 mm) in the primary surgery group than in the repeat surgery group (25 mm) (p = 0.008). GTR was accomplished in 59 (91%) of the 65 cases; the GTR rate was higher in the primary surgery group than in the repeat surgery group (98% vs 75%, p = 0.009). Among the patients who underwent GTR, 12% experienced tumor recurrence, with a median follow-up of 7.8 years, and recurrence tended to occur less frequently in primary than in repeat surgery patients (7% vs 27%, p = 0.06). Of the 45 primary surgery patients, 80% had deteriorated pituitary function and 83% developed DI, whereas 100% of the repeat surgery patients developed these conditions. Among patients with preoperative visual disturbance, vision improved in 62% but worsened in 11%. Visual

  15. Technical aspects of pediatric epilepsy surgery: Report of a multicenter, multinational web-based survey by the ILAE Task Force on Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukiert, Arthur; Rydenhag, Bertil; Harkness, William; Cross, J Helen; Gaillard, William D

    2016-02-01

    Surgical techniques may vary extensively between centers. We report on a web-based survey aimed at evaluating the current technical approaches in different centers around the world performing epilepsy surgery in children. The intention of the survey was to establish technical standards. A request was made to 88 centers to complete a web-based survey comprising 51 questions. There were 14 questions related to general issues, 13 questions investigating the different technical aspects for children undergoing epilepsy surgery, and 24 questions investigating surgical strategies in pediatric epilepsy surgery. Fifty-two centers covering a wide geographic representation completed the questionnaire. The median number of resective procedures per center per year was 47. Some important technical practices appeared (>80% of the responses) such as the use of prophylactic antibiotics (98%), the use of high-speed drills for bone opening (88%), nonresorbable material for bone flap closure (85%), head fixation (90%), use of the surgical microscope (100%), and of free bone flaps. Other questions, such as the use of drains, electrocorticography (ECoG) and preoperative withdrawal of valproate, led to mixed, inconclusive results. Complications were noted in 3.8% of the patients submitted to cortical resection, 9.9% hemispheric surgery, 5% callosotomy, 1.8% depth electrode implantation, 5.9% subdural grids implantation, 11.9% hypothalamic hamartoma resection, 0.9% vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), and 0.5% deep brain stimulation. There were no major differences across regions or countries in any of the subitems above. The present data offer the first overview of the technical aspects of pediatric epilepsy surgery worldwide. Surprisingly, there seem to be more similarities than differences. That aside many of the evaluated issues should be examined by adequately designed multicenter randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Further knowledge on these technical issues might lead to increased

  16. Turbinate surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery; Nasal obstruction - turbinate surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or ... This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  17. Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often. Each type of surgery has advantages and disadvantages. Bariatric Surgery Benefits Bariatric surgery can improve many ... Grants & Grant History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Technology Advancement & Transfer Meetings & Workshops Health Information Diabetes Digestive ...

  18. Lung surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are thoracotomy and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Robotic surgery may also be used. Lung surgery using ... Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, ...

  19. Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Plastic Surgery KidsHealth / For Teens / Plastic Surgery What's in ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word " ...

  20. Fusion Surgery Required for Recurrent Pediatric Atlantoaxial Rotatory Fixation after Failure of Temporary Fixation with Instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Matsuyama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In cases of chronic irreducible and recurrent unstable atlantoaxial rotatory fixation (AARF, closed reduction and its maintenance are often unsuccessful, requiring surgical treatment. The purpose of the present report is to describe a rare case of pediatric AARF that required multiple treatments. A 6-year-old boy was diagnosed as having type 2 AARF. After conservative treatment, the patient was treated with temporary fixation surgery (C1-C2 Magerl without a bone graft in consideration of motion preservation after screw removal. AARF recurred after the screw removal and required fusion surgery (Magerl–Brooks with an iliac bone graft. Ultimately, bone union was achieved and the screws were removed 11 months after the surgery. We recommend surgeons be cautious when choosing temporary fixation surgery for AARF in small children. Further investigation is needed to determine the optimal time before screw removal.

  1. Recent technological advances in pediatric brain tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebian, Bassel; Vergani, Francesco; Lavrador, José Pedro; Mukherjee, Soumya; Kitchen, William John; Stagno, Vita; Chamilos, Christos; Pettorini, Benedetta; Mallucci, Conor

    2017-01-01

    X-rays and ventriculograms were the first imaging modalities used to localize intracranial lesions including brain tumors as far back as the 1880s. Subsequent advances in preoperative radiological localization included computed tomography (CT; 1971) and MRI (1977). Since then, other imaging modalities have been developed for clinical application although none as pivotal as CT and MRI. Intraoperative technological advances include the microscope, which has allowed precise surgery under magnification and improved lighting, and the endoscope, which has improved the treatment of hydrocephalus and allowed biopsy and complete resection of intraventricular, pituitary and pineal region tumors through a minimally invasive approach. Neuronavigation, intraoperative MRI, CT and ultrasound have increased the ability of the neurosurgeon to perform safe and maximal tumor resection. This may be facilitated by the use of fluorescing agents, which help define the tumor margin, and intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, which helps identify and protect eloquent brain.

  2. Comparing oncologic outcomes after minimally invasive and open surgery for pediatric neuroblastoma and Wilms tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezekian, Brian; Englum, Brian R; Gulack, Brian C; Rialon, Kristy L; Kim, Jina; Talbot, Lindsay J; Adibe, Obinna O; Routh, Jonathan C; Tracy, Elisabeth T; Rice, Henry E

    2018-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has been widely adopted for common operations in pediatric surgery; however, its role in childhood tumors is limited by concerns about oncologic outcomes. We compared open and MIS approaches for pediatric neuroblastoma and Wilms tumor (WT) using a national database. The National Cancer Data Base from 2010 to 2012 was queried for cases of neuroblastoma and WT in children ≤21 years old. Children were classified as receiving open or MIS surgery for definitive resection, with clinical outcomes compared using a propensity matching methodology (two open:one MIS). For children with neuroblastoma, 17% (98 of 579) underwent MIS, while only 5% of children with WT (35 of 695) had an MIS approach for tumor resection. After propensity matching, there was no difference between open and MIS surgery for either tumor for 30-day mortality, readmissions, surgical margin status, and 1- and 3-year survival. However, in both tumors, open surgery more often evaluated lymph nodes and had larger lymph node harvest. Our retrospective review suggests that the use of MIS appears to be a safe method of oncologic resection for select children with neuroblastoma and WT. Further research should clarify which children are the optimal candidates for this approach. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The effects of the addition of a pediatric surgery fellow on the operative experience of the general surgery resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Alexander; Garwe, Tabitha; Adeseye, Ademola; Ruiz-Elizalde, Alejandro; Churchill, Warren; Tuggle, David; Mantor, Cameron; Lees, Jason

    2015-06-01

    Adding fellows to surgical departments with residency programs can affect resident education. Our specific aim was to evaluate the effect of adding a pediatric surgery (PS) fellow on the number of index PS cases logged by the general surgery (GS) residents. At a single institution with both PS and GS programs, we examined the number of logged cases for the fellows and residents over 10 years [5 years before (Time 1) and 5 years after (Time 2) the addition of a PS fellow]. Additionally, the procedure related relative value units (RVUs) recorded by the faculty were evaluated. The fellows averaged 752 and 703 cases during Times 1 and 2, respectively, decreasing by 49 (P = 0.2303). The residents averaged 172 and 161 cases annually during Time 1 and Time 2, respectively, decreasing by 11 (P = 0.7340). The total number of procedure related RVUs was 4627 and 6000 during Times 1 and 2, respectively. The number of cases logged by the PS fellows and GS residents decreased after the addition of a PS fellow; however, the decrease was not significant. Programs can reasonably add an additional PS fellow, but care should be taken especially in programs that are otherwise static in size.

  4. YouTube as an information source for pediatric adenotonsillectomy and ear tube surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Jeffrey A; Pusz, Max D; Brietzke, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    Assess the overall quality of information on adenotonsillectomy and ear tube surgery presented on YouTube (www.youtube.com) from the perspective of a parent or patient searching for information on surgery. The YouTube website was systematically searched on select dates with a formal search strategy to identify videos pertaining to pediatric adenotonsillectomy and ear tube surgery. Only videos with at least 5 (ear tube surgery) or 10 (adenotonsillectomy) views per day were included. Each video was viewed and scored by two independent scorers. Videos were categorized by goal and scored for video/audio quality, accuracy, comprehensiveness, and procedure-specific content. Cross-sectional study. Public domain website. Fifty-five videos were scored for adenotonsillectomy and forty-seven for ear tube surgery. The most common category was educational (65.3%) followed by testimonial (28.4%), and news program (9.8%). Testimonials were more common for adenotonsillectomy than ear tube surgery (41.8% vs. 12.8%, p=0.001). Testimonials had a significantly lower mean accuracy (2.23 vs. 2.62, p=0.02), comprehensiveness (1.71 vs. 2.22, p=0.007), and TA specific content (0.64 vs. 1.69, p=0.001) score than educational type videos. Only six videos (5.9%) received high scores in both video/audio quality and accuracy/comprehensiveness of content. There was no significant association between the accuracy and comprehensive score and views, posted "likes", posted "dislikes", and likes/dislikes ratio. There was an association between "likes" and mean video quality (Spearman's rho=0.262, p=0.008). Parents/patients searching YouTube for information on pediatric adenotonsillectomy and ear tube surgery will generally encounter low quality information with testimonials being common but of significantly lower quality. Viewer perceived quality ("likes") did not correlate to formally scored content quality. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Robotic-Assisted Procedures in Pediatric Surgery: A Critical Appraisal of the Current Best Evidence in Comparison to Conventional Minimally Invasive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmacher, Florian; Till, Holger

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the use of robotic-assisted surgery (RAS) has expanded within pediatric surgery. Although increasing numbers of pediatric RAS case-series have been published, the level of evidence remains unclear, with authors mainly focusing on the comparison with open surgery rather than the corresponding laparoscopic approach. The aim of this study was to critically appraise the published literature comparing pediatric RAS with conventional minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in order to evaluate the current best level of evidence. A systematic literature-based search for studies comparing pediatric RAS with corresponding MIS procedures was performed using multiple electronic databases and sources. The level of evidence was determined using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine (OCEBM) criteria. A total of 20 studies met defined inclusion criteria, reporting on five different procedures: fundoplication (n=8), pyeloplasty (n=8), nephrectomy (n=2), gastric banding (n=1), and sleeve gastrectomy (n=1). Included publications comprised 5 systematic reviews and 15 cohort/case-control studies (OCEBM Level 3 and 4, respectively). No studies of OCEBM Level 1 or 2 were identified. Limited evidence indicated reduced operative time (pyeloplasty) and shorter hospital stay (fundoplication) for pediatric RAS, whereas disadvantages were longer operative time (fundoplication, nephrectomy, gastric banding, and sleeve gastrectomy) and higher total costs (fundoplication and sleeve gastrectomy). There were no differences reported for complications, success rates, or short-term outcomes between pediatric RAS and conventional MIS in these procedures. Inconsistency was found in study design and follow-up with large clinical heterogeneity. The best available evidence for pediatric RAS is currently OCEBM Level 3, relating only to fundoplication and pyeloplasty. Therefore, higher-quality studies and comparative data for other RAS procedures in pediatric surgery are required.

  6. Effects of midazolam on explicit vs implicit memory in a pediatric surgery setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sherry H; Buffett-Jerrott, Susan E; Finley, G Allen; Wright, Kristi D; Valois Gomez, Teresa

    2006-11-01

    Placebo-controlled studies show that midazolam impairs explicit memory in children undergoing surgery (Buffett-Jerrott et al., Psychopharmacology 168:377-386, 2003; Kain et al., Anesthesiology 93:676-684, 2000). A recent within-subjects study showed that midazolam impaired explicit memory while leaving implicit memory intact in a sample of older children undergoing painful medical procedures (Pringle et al., Health Psychol 22:263-269, 2003). We attempted to replicate and extend these findings in a randomized, placebo-controlled design with younger children undergoing surgery. Children aged 3-6 years who were undergoing ear tube (myringotomy) surgery were randomly assigned to receive midazolam (n = 12) or placebo (n = 11). After surgery, they were tested on explicit (recognition) and implicit (priming) memory for pictures encoded before surgery. Relative to placebo, the midazolam-treated children showed poorer recognition memory on the explicit task but equivalent priming on the implicit task. Overall, it appears that midazolam induces a dissociation between explicit and implicit memory in young children in the pediatric surgery setting. Theoretical and clinical implications of the findings are discussed along with directions for future research.

  7. Cirurgia da catarata infantil unilateral Unilateral pediatric cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Maria Drummond Brandão

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar os resultados visuais de uma série de crianças operadas de catarata unilateral. MÉTODOS: Um estudo retrospectivo foi realizado através da análise de 35 prontuários médicos do Serviço de Catarata Congênita da UNIFESP/EPM. RESULTADOS: Quanto à etiologia, a primeira causa de catarata foi idiopática, a segunda causa foi o trauma e a terceira foi a rubéola congênita. Em 51,4% dos olhos tinham acuidade visual pré-operatória de ausência de fixação. E em 42,8% dos casos operados a acuidade visual final foi igual ou melhor que 20/200. DISCUSSÃO: Embora a cirurgia em catarata unilateral seja motivo de controvérsias entre os oftalmologistas, obteve-se melhora de acuidade visual em número significativo de casos.PURPOSE: To analyze the results in a series of children submitted to unilateral cataract surgery. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted through the analysis of 35 patient files from the Congenital Cataract Service of UNIFESP/EPM. RESULTS: The main cause of unilateral cataract was idiopathic, the second cause was ocular trauma and the third cause was congenital rubella. Initial visual acuity was very poor in 51.4% of the cases (did not fix or follow, and the best corrected final visual acuity was better than 20/200 in 42.8% of the eyes. DISCUSSION: Although controversial, the surgical treatment of unilateral cataract, in this study, showed improvement in many cases.

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  9. Regional anesthesia for pediatric knee surgery: a review of the indications, procedures, outcomes, safety, and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhly WT

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Wallis T Muhly, Harshad G Gurnaney, Arjunan GaneshDepartment of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, PA, USAAbstract: The indications for surgery on the knee in children and adolescents share some similarity to adult practice in that there are an increasing number of sports-related injuries requiring surgical repair. In addition, there are some unique age-related conditions or congenital abnormalities that may present as indications for orthopedic intervention at the level of the knee. The efficacy and safety of peripheral nerve blocks (PNBs for postoperative analgesia following orthopedic surgery has been well established in adults. Recent studies have also demonstrated earlier functional recovery after surgery in patients who received PNBs. In children, PNB is gaining popularity, and increasing data are emerging to demonstrate the feasibility, efficacy, and safety in this population. In this paper, we will review some of the most common indications for surgery involving the knee in children and the anatomy of knee, associated dermatomal and osteotomal innervation, and the PNBs most commonly used to produce analgesia at the level of the knee. We will review the evidence in support of regional anesthesia in children in terms of both the quality conferred to the immediate postoperative care and the role of continuous PNBs in maintaining effective analgesia following discharge. Also we will discuss some of the subtle challenges in utilizing regional anesthesia in the pediatric patient including the use of general anesthesia when performing regional anesthesia and the issue of monitoring for compartment syndrome. Finally, we will offer some thoughts about areas of practice that are in need of further investigation.Keywords: pediatric surgery, regional anesthesia, analgesia, knee surgery

  10. The World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery: its mission and history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchervenkov, Christo I; Stellin, Giovanni; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Mavroudis, Constantine; Bernier, Pierre-Luc; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Kreutzer, Christian; Cicek, Sertac; Kinsley, Robin H; Nunn, Graham R; Jonas, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    The World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery (WSPCHS) was established in 2006 to assemble pediatric and congenital heart surgeons from all continents and regions of the world and their colleagues from related specialties dealing with pediatric and congenital heart disease. Since its birth, it has held a highly successful inaugural scientific meeting in 2007 in Washington, DC, and a World Summit on Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery Services, Education, and Cardiac Care for Children and Adults with Congenital Heart Disease in 2008 in Montreal. It currently has 549 members from 71 countries and in a short period of time has become the largest organization in the world of pediatric and congenital heart surgeons. Its brief history already seems to be a guarantee of a promising future. Projects in the areas of research, training and education, patient care, and community service will allow the Society to reach its goals. By bringing together professionals from every region of the world, the WSPCHS should play a significant role in the improvement of care for children and adults with congenital heart disease around the world.

  11. The two-week pediatric surgery rotation: is it time wasted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, S; Wales, P W; Fecteau, A

    2004-05-01

    With increasing medical school emphasis on generalist training and decreasing enrollment in surgical residency, the authors assessed the adequacy of a 2-week pediatric surgery rotation on meeting the learning and competency objectives outlined in The Canadian Association of Pediatric Surgeons' Self-Directed Evaluation Tool. A prospective survey was conducted of 39 clinical clerks. An anonymous self-assessment scale measuring competency objectives (medical and psychosocial) was administered pre-and postrotation. Also, exposure to pediatric surgical conditions from a list of "essential" and "nonessential" learning objectives was measured. Statistical analysis was performed using paired t test with significance at.05 level. Response rate was 77% and 54% for the competency and learning objectives, respectively. Students reported improvement in medical (P awareness of the breadth of pediatric surgical practice (P <.0001; 95% CI 2.06, 3.18). A 2-week rotation in pediatric surgery appears adequate in fulfilling most competency and learning objectives, but discussion is needed about how to best assess student competency, which topics are considered essential, and the long-term effect on recruitment to the profession.

  12. The effect of neuromuscular blockade on oxygen consumption in sedated and mechanically ventilated pediatric patients after cardiac surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemson, J.; Driessen, J.J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the effect of intense neuromuscular blockade (NMB) on oxygen consumption (VO(2)) in deeply sedated and mechanically ventilated children on the first day after complex congenital cardiac surgery. DESIGN: Prospective clinical interventional study. SETTING: Pediatric intensive

  13. Three-dimensional modelling and three-dimensional printing in pediatric and congenital cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Laszlo

    2018-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) modelling and printing methods greatly support advances in individualized medicine and surgery. In pediatric and congenital cardiac surgery, personalized imaging and 3D modelling presents with a range of advantages, e.g., better understanding of complex anatomy, interactivity and hands-on approach, possibility for preoperative surgical planning and virtual surgery, ability to assess expected results, and improved communication within the multidisciplinary team and with patients. 3D virtual and printed models often add important new anatomical findings and prompt alternative operative scenarios. For the lack of critical mass of evidence, controlled randomized trials, however, most of these general benefits remain anecdotal. For an individual surgical case-scenario, prior knowledge, preparedness and possibility of emulation are indispensable in raising patient-safety. It is advocated that added value of 3D printing in healthcare could be raised by establishment of a multidisciplinary centre of excellence (COE). Policymakers, research scientists, clinicians, as well as health care financers and local entrepreneurs should cooperate and communicate along a legal framework and established scientific guidelines for the clinical benefit of patients, and towards financial sustainability. It is expected that besides the proven utility of 3D printed patient-specific anatomical models, 3D printing will have a major role in pediatric and congenital cardiac surgery by providing individually customized implants and prostheses, especially in combination with evolving techniques of bioprinting.

  14. [Laparoscopic training--the guarantee of a future in pediatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drăghici, I; Drăghici, L; Popescu, M; Copăescu, C; Mitoiu, D; Dragomirescu, C

    2009-01-01

    Laparoscopy is considered today the highlight of modern surgery, the forerunner of the fascinating world of video and robotic surgery, both of them derived from the sophisticated areas of aeronautic industry. Remarkably, Romanian specialists keep up with the pace of worldwide technological developments, assimilating one by one each and every video endoscopic procedure. In the early 90s, the Romanian laparos-copic school was founded with the contribution of many important personalities; their activities and achievements have been an inspiration for the following generation of laparoscopic surgeons. In this last decade, the newest branch of laparoscopic surgery in our country, pediatric laparoscopy, managed to evolve from its "shy" beginnings to become an important method of improving the quality of surgical procedures, to the benefit of our "small patients". The purpose of this article is to encourage and promote minimally invasive video endoscopic surgery training, emphasizing its crucial role in the education and professional development of the next generation of pediatric surgeons, and not only. The modem concept of laparoscopic training includes experimental scientific practices, as well as the newest technical acquisitions such as virtual reality video-electronic simulation.

  15. Cerebellar language mapping and cerebral language dominance in pediatric epilepsy surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer N. Gelinas, MD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Cerebellar language activation occurs in homologous regions of Crus I/II contralateral to cerebral language activation in patients with both right and left cerebral language dominance. Cerebellar language laterality could contribute to comprehensive pre-operative evaluation of language lateralization in pediatric epilepsy surgery patients. Our data suggest that patients with atypical cerebellar language activation are at risk for having atypical cerebral language organization.

  16. Robotic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with this type of surgery give it some advantages over standard endoscopic techniques. The surgeon can make ... Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 87. Muller CL, Fried GM. Emerging technology in surgery: Informatics, electronics, robotics. In: ...

  17. Nose Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Health Home Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery. Reproduction or republication strictly ... Terms of Use © Copyright 2018. American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery 1650 Diagonal Rd Alexandria, ...

  18. After Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There may also be swelling and soreness around ... the first few days, weeks, or months after surgery. Some other questions to ask are How long ...

  19. Putting a face and context on pediatric surgery cancelations: The development of parent personas to guide equitable surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Lisa M; DeJonckheere, Melissa; Pratap, Jayant Nick

    2016-06-09

    Last-minute cancelation of planned surgery can have substantial psychological, social, and economic effects for patients/families and also leads to wastage of expensive health-care resources. In order to have a deeper understanding of the contextual, psychological, practical, and behavioral factors that potentially impact pediatric surgery cancelation, we conducted a qualitative study to create 'personas' or fictional portraits of parents who are likely to cancel surgery. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 21 parents of children who were considered 'at risk' for surgical cancelation and whose scheduled surgery was canceled at late notice. From the themes, patterns, and associated descriptive phrases in the data, we developed and validated five different personas of typical scenarios reflecting parent experiences with surgery and surgery cancelations. The personas are being employed to guide contextualized development of interventions tailored to prototypical families as they prepare and attend for surgery. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Increasing volume and complexity of pediatric epilepsy surgery with stable seizure outcome between 2008 and 2014: A nationwide multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Carmen; Specchio, Nicola; Guerrini, Renzo; Tassi, Laura; De Masi, Salvatore; Cardinale, Francesco; Pellacani, Simona; De Palma, Luca; Battaglia, Domenica; Tamburrini, Gianpiero; Didato, Giuseppe; Freri, Elena; Consales, Alessandro; Nozza, Paolo; Zamponi, Nelia; Cesaroni, Elisabetta; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Esposito, Vincenzo; Giulioni, Marco; Tinuper, Paolo; Colicchio, Gabriella; Rocchi, Raffaele; Rubboli, Guido; Giordano, Flavio; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Marras, Carlo Efisio; Cossu, Massimo

    2017-10-01

    The objective of the study was to assess common practice in pediatric epilepsy surgery in Italy between 2008 and 2014. A survey was conducted among nine Italian epilepsy surgery centers to collect information on presurgical and postsurgical evaluation protocols, volumes and types of surgical interventions, and etiologies and seizure outcomes in pediatric epilepsy surgery between 2008 and 2014. Retrospective data on 527 surgical procedures were collected. The most frequent surgical approaches were temporal lobe resections and disconnections (133, 25.2%) and extratemporal lesionectomies (128, 24.3%); the most frequent etiologies were FCD II (107, 20.3%) and glioneuronal tumors (105, 19.9%). Volumes of surgeries increased over time independently from the age at surgery and the epilepsy surgery center. Engel class I was achieved in 73.6% of patients (range: 54.8 to 91.7%), with no significant changes between 2008 and 2014. Univariate analyses showed a decrease in the proportion of temporal resections and tumors and an increase in the proportion of FCDII, while multivariate analyses revealed an increase in the proportion of extratemporal surgeries over time. A higher proportion of temporal surgeries and tumors and a lower proportion of extratemporal and multilobar surgeries and of FCD were observed in low (epilepsy surgery in Italy between 2008 and 2014, associated with a stable seizure outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. “A journey around the world”: Parent narratives of the journey to pediatric resective epilepsy surgery and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baca, Christine B.; Pieters, Huibrie C.; Iwaki, Tomoko J.; Mathern, Gary W.; Vickrey, Barbara G.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although shorter time to pediatric resective epilepsy surgery is strongly associated with greater disease severity, other non-clinical diagnostic and sociodemographic factors also play a role. We aimed to examine parent-reported barriers to timely receipt of pediatric epilepsy surgery. METHODS We conducted 37 interviews of parents of children who previously had resective epilepsy surgery at UCLA (2006–2011). Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and systematically coded using thematic analysis by two independent coders and subsequently checked for agreement. Clinical data, including `time to surgery' (age of epilepsy onset to surgery) were abstracted from medical records. RESULTS The mean time to surgery was 5.3 years (SD=3.8); surgery types included 32% hemispherectomy, 43% lobar/focal, 24% multilobar. At surgery, parents were on average 38.4 years (SD=6.6) and children were 8.2 years (SD=4.7). The more arduous and longer aspect of the journey to surgery was perceived by parents to be experienced prior to presurgical referral. The time from second anti-epileptic drug failure to presurgical referral was ≥1 year in 64% of children. Thematic analysis revealed four themes (with subthemes) along the journey to surgery and beyond: (1) recognition: “something is wrong” (unfamiliarity with epilepsy, identification of medical emergency), (2) searching and finding: “a circuitous journey” (information seeking, finding the right doctors, multiple medications, insurance obstacles, parental stress), (3) surgery is a viable option: “the right spot” (surgery as last resort, surgery as best option, hoping for candidacy), and (4) life now: “we took the steps we needed to” (a new life, giving back). SIGNIFICANCE Multi-pronged interventions targeting parent-, provider- and system-based barriers should focus on the critical presurgical referral period; such interventions are needed to remediate delays and improve access to subspecialty care for

  2. Revascularization surgery for pediatric moyamoya disease. Significance of peri-operative management to avoid surgical complication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Miki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2011-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a chronic occlusive cerebrovascular disease with unknown etiology, which is one of the most common causes of child-onset stroke in Japan. Surgical revascularizations, both direct and indirect procedures, prevent cerebral ischemic attack by improving cerebral blood flow, while neurological deterioration during the acute stage after revascularization is not rare. The objective of this study was to clarify the concept of revascularization surgery for pediatric moyamoya disease while considering the risk of surgical complications in the acute stage. The present study includes 19 consecutive patients with moyamoya disease aged from 2 to 14 years old (mean 8.5), who underwent superficial temporal artery (STA)-middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis with indirect pial synangiosis for 32 affected hemispheres. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed 1 and 7 days after surgery in all cases to evaluate hemodynamic alteration after surgery. Long-term outcome was evaluated by the neurological status 3 months after surgery, and the underlying pathology of surgical complications in the acute stage was diagnosed based on SPECT and magnetic resonance findings. In 28 of 32 hemispheres (87.5%), patients showed a complete disappearance of ischemic attack, 4 of 32 hemispheres (12.5%) showed a reduction of ischemic attack, while none showed deterioration of their symptoms (0%). Transient focal neurologic deterioration due to cerebral hyperperfusion was evident in 2 patients (6.3%), and was resolved by blood pressure lowering. One patient developed pseudo-laminar necrosis probably due to a thrombosis one week after surgery (3.1%), which did not affect his long-term outcome. STA-MCA anastomosis with pial synangiosis is a safe and effective treatment for pediatric moyamoya disease. Routine cerebral blood flow measurement in the acute stage is essential to avoid surgical complications including both cerebral ischemia and hyperperfusion. (author)

  3. Preemptive Analgesia with Ibuprofen and Acetaminophen in Pediatric Lower Abdominal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kashefi

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative pain is a significant problem in pediatrics. Preemptive administration of analgesics has recently emerged as a method to enhance pain management associated with surgery. The objective of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of a single-dose of preoperative oral ibuprofen versus acetaminophen in preventing pain after lower abdominal surgery in pediatrics. Methods: In this randomized, double-blind study, following lower abdominal surgery, 75 children, aging 3 to 12 years, were assigned to receive either ibuprofen 20 mg /kg (n=25 or acetaminophen 35 mg/kg (n=25 or placebo (n=25 2 hours before surgery. Agitation in recovery was measured and postoperative pain was quantified 3 and 24 hours after surgery by Oucher’s scale. The amount of postoperative analgesic needed in the ward was also assessed. Results: It was found that preoperative administration of ibuprofen and acetaminophen can reduce agitation in recovery but there was no difference in the agitation score between ibuprofen and acetaminophen groups (P=0.145. Agitation score was significantly lower in ibuprofen group compared to placebo (P>0.005. Similarly, patients in the acetaminophen group were considerably less agitated than those in the placebo group (P=0.002. No significant difference was observed in pain intensity 3 and 24 hours after operation between the three groups [(P=0.495 and (P=0.582 respectively]. The amount of postoperative analgesic needed during ward hospitalization was not significantly different among the three groups (P>0.005. Conclusion: These results provide evidence that preemptive acetaminophen and ibuprofen may reduce agitation during recovery but they neither improve the postoperative pain nor reduce analgesics consumption in ward Key words: Postoperative analgesia, Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen, Preemptive analgesia

  4. Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: Clinical Experience and Impact on Ventilation Pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crulli, Benjamin; Khebir, Mariam; Toledano, Baruch; Vobecky, Suzanne; Poirier, Nancy; Emeriaud, Guillaume

    2018-02-01

    After pediatric cardiac surgery, ventilation with high airway pressures can be detrimental to right ventricular function and pulmonary blood flow. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) improves patient-ventilator interactions, helping maintain spontaneous ventilation. This study reports our experience with the use of NAVA in children after a cardiac surgery. We hypothesize that using NAVA in this population is feasible and allows for lower ventilation pressures. We retrospectively studied all children ventilated with NAVA (invasively or noninvasively) after undergoing cardiac surgery between January 2013 and May 2015 in our pediatric intensive care unit. The number and duration of NAVA episodes were described. For the first period of invasive NAVA in each subject, detailed clinical and ventilator data in the 4 h before and after the start of NAVA were extracted. 33 postoperative courses were included in 28 subjects with a median age of 3 [interquartile range (IQR) 1-12] months. NAVA was used invasively in 27 courses for a total duration of 87 (IQR 15-334) h per course. Peak inspiratory pressures and mean airway pressures decreased significantly after the start of NAVA (mean differences of 5.8 cm H 2 O (95% CI 4.1-7.5) and 2.0 cm H 2 O (95% CI 1.2-2.8), respectively, P < .001 for both). There was no significant difference in vital signs or blood gas values. NAVA was used noninvasively in 14 subjects, over 79 (IQR 25-137) h. NAVA could be used in pediatric subjects after cardiac surgery. The significant decrease in airway pressures observed after transition to NAVA could have a beneficial impact in this specific population, which should be investigated in future interventional studies. Copyright © 2018 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  5. Capsular Outcomes After Pediatric Cataract Surgery Without Intraocular Lens Implantation: Qualitative Classification and Quantitative Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xuhua; Lin, Haotian; Lin, Zhuoling; Chen, Jingjing; Tang, Xiangchen; Luo, Lixia; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate capsular outcomes 12 months after pediatric cataract surgery without intraocular lens implantation via qualitative classification and quantitative measurement.This study is a cross-sectional study that was approved by the institutional review board of Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center of Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China.Digital coaxial retro-illumination photographs of 329 aphakic pediatric eyes were obtained 12 months after pediatric cataract surgery without intraocular lens implantation. Capsule digital coaxial retro-illumination photographs were divided as follows: anterior capsule opening area (ACOA), posterior capsule opening area (PCOA), and posterior capsule opening opacity (PCOO). Capsular outcomes were qualitatively classified into 3 types based on the PCOO: Type I-capsule with mild opacification but no invasion into the capsule opening; Type II-capsule with moderate opacification accompanied by contraction of the ACOA and invasion to the occluding part of the PCOA; and Type III-capsule with severe opacification accompanied by total occlusion of the PCOA. Software was developed to quantitatively measure the ACOA, PCOA, and PCOO using standardized DCRPs. The relationships between the accurate intraoperative anterior and posterior capsulorhexis sizes and the qualitative capsular types were statistically analyzed.The DCRPs of 315 aphakic eyes (95.8%) of 191 children were included. Capsular outcomes were classified into 3 types: Type I-120 eyes (38.1%); Type II-157 eyes (49.8%); Type III-38 eyes (12.1%). The scores of the capsular outcomes were negatively correlated with intraoperative anterior capsulorhexis size (R = -0.572, P PCOA increased in size from Type I to Type II, and the PCOO increased from Type II to Type III (all P < 0.05).Capsular outcomes after pediatric cataract surgery can be qualitatively classified and quantitatively measured by acquisition, division, definition, and user

  6. Safety and effects of two red blood cell transfusion strategies in pediatric cardiac surgery patients: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gast-Bakker, D. H.; de Wilde, R. B. P.; Hazekamp, M. G.; Sojak, V.; Zwaginga, J. J.; Wolterbeek, R.; de Jonge, E.; Gesink-van der Veer, B. J.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the safety and effects of a restrictive red blood cell (RBC) transfusion strategy in pediatric cardiac surgery patients. Randomized controlled trial. Pediatric ICU in an academic tertiary care center, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. One hundred seven

  7. The effects of perioperative music interventions in pediatric surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.E. Van Der Heijden (Marianne J. E.); S.O. Araghi (Sadaf Oliai); M. Van Dijk (Monique); J. Jeekel (Johannes); M.G.M. Hunink (Myriam)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Music interventions are widely used, but have not yet gained a place in guidelines for pediatric surgery or pediatric anesthesia. In this systematic review and meta-analysis we examined the effects of music interventions on pain, anxiety and distress in children undergoing

  8. Emergency pediatric surgery: Comparing the economic burden in specialized versus nonspecialized children's centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvasnovsky, Charlotte L; Lumpkins, Kimberly; Diaz, Jose J; Chun, Jeannie Y

    2018-05-01

    The American College of Surgeons has developed a verification program for children's surgery centers. Highly specialized hospitals may be verified as Level I, while those with fewer dedicated resources as Level II or Level III, respectively. We hypothesized that more specialized children's centers would utilize more resources. We performed a retrospective study of the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission (HSCRC) database from 2009 to 2013. We assessed total charge, length of stay (LOS), and charge per day for all inpatients with an emergency pediatric surgery diagnosis, controlling for severity of illness (SOI). Using published resources, we assigned theoretical level designations to each hospital. Two hospitals would qualify as Level 1 hospitals, with 4593 total emergency pediatric surgery admissions (38.5%) over the five-year study period. Charges were significantly higher for children treated at Level I hospitals (all P<0.0001). Across all SOI, children at Level I hospitals had significantly longer LOS (all P<0.0001). Hospitals defined as Level II and Level III provided the majority of care and were able to do so with shorter hospitalizations and lower charges, regardless of SOI. As care shifts towards specialized centers, this charge differential may have significant impact on future health care costs. Level III Cost Effectiveness Study. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Benefit of neurophysiologic monitoring for pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, E H; Edmonds, H L; Auden, S M; Seremet, V; Niznik, G; Sehic, A; Sowell, M K; Cheppo, C D; Corlett, K M

    1997-11-01

    Pediatric patients undergoing repair of congenital cardiac abnormalities have a significant risk of an adverse neurologic event. Therefore this retrospective cohort study examined the potential benefit of interventions based on intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring in decreasing both postoperative neurologic sequelae and length of hospital stay as a cost proxy. With informed parental consent approved by the institutional review board, electroencephalography, transcranial Doppler ultrasonic measurement of middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity, and transcranial near-infrared cerebral oximetry were monitored in 250 patients. An interventional algorithm was used to detect and correct specific deficiencies in cerebral perfusion or oxygenation or to increase cerebral tolerance to ischemia or hypoxia. Noteworthy changes in brain perfusion or metabolism were observed in 176 of 250 (70%) patients. Intervention that altered patient management was initially deemed appropriate in 130 of 176 (74%) patients with neurophysiologic changes. Obvious neurologic sequelae (i.e., seizure, movement, vision or speech disorder) occurred in five of 74 (7%) patients without noteworthy change, seven of 130 (6%) patients with intervention, and 12 of 46 (26%) patients without intervention (p = 0.001). Survivors' median length of stay was 6 days in the no-change and intervention groups but 9 days in the no-intervention group. In addition, the percentage of patients in the no-intervention group discharged from the hospital within 1 week (32%) was significantly less than that in either the intervention (51%, p = 0.05) or no-change (58%, p = 0.01) groups. On the basis of an estimated hospital neurologic complication cost of $1500 per day, break-even analysis justified a hospital expenditure for neurophysiologic monitoring of $2142 per case. Interventions based on neurophysiologic monitoring appear to decrease the incidence of postoperative neurologic sequelae and reduce the length of stay

  10. Left hemisphere structural connectivity abnormality in pediatric hydrocephalus patients following surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Weihong; Meller, Artur; Shimony, Joshua S; Nash, Tiffany; Jones, Blaise V; Holland, Scott K; Altaye, Mekibib; Barnard, Holly; Phillips, Jannel; Powell, Stephanie; McKinstry, Robert C; Limbrick, David D; Rajagopal, Akila; Mangano, Francesco T

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging research in surgically treated pediatric hydrocephalus patients remains challenging due to the artifact caused by programmable shunt. Our previous study has demonstrated significant alterations in the whole brain white matter structural connectivity based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and graph theoretical analysis in children with hydrocephalus prior to surgery or in surgically treated children without programmable shunts. This study seeks to investigate the impact of brain injury on the topological features in the left hemisphere, contratelateral to the shunt placement, which will avoid the influence of shunt artifacts and makes further group comparisons feasible for children with programmable shunt valves. Three groups of children (34 in the control group, 12 in the 3-month post-surgery group, and 24 in the 12-month post-surgery group, age between 1 and 18 years) were included in the study. The structural connectivity data processing and analysis were performed based on DTI and graph theoretical analysis. Specific procedures were revised to include only left brain imaging data in normalization, parcellation, and fiber counting from DTI tractography. Our results showed that, when compared to controls, children with hydrocephalus in both the 3-month and 12-month post-surgery groups had significantly lower normalized clustering coefficient, lower small-worldness, and higher global efficiency (all p  hydrocephalus surgically treated with programmable shunts.

  11. Completion rates of anterior and posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorrhexis in pediatric cataract surgery for surgery performed by trainee surgeons with the use of a low-cost viscoelastic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Muralidhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Pediatric cataract surgery is traditionally done with the aid of high-molecular-weight viscoelastics which are expensive. It needs to be determined if low-cost substitutes are just as successful. Aims : The study aims to determine the success rates for anterior and posterior capsulorrhexis and intraocular lens (IOL implantation in the bag for pediatric cataract surgery performed with the aid of a low-molecular-weight viscoelastic. Settings and Design : Nonrandomized observational study. Materials and Methods: Children less than 6 years of age who underwent cataract surgery with IOL implantation in the period May 2008-May 2009 were included. The surgeries were done by pediatric ophthalmology fellows. A standard procedure of anterior capsulorrhexis, lens aspiration with primary posterior capsulorrhexis, anterior vitrectomy, and IOL implantation was followed. Three parameters were studied: successful completion of anterior and posterior capsulorrhexis and IOL implantation in the bag. Results: 33 eyes of 28 children were studied. The success rate for completion was 66.7% and 88.2 % for anterior and posterior capsulorrhexis, respectively. IOL implantation in the bag was successful in 87.9%. Conclusions: 2% hydroxypropylmethylcellulose is a viable low-cost alternative to more expensive options similar to high-molecular-weight viscoelastics. This is of great relevance to hospitals in developing countries.

  12. Face-to-face handoff: improving transfer to the pediatric intensive care unit after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergales, Jeffrey; Addison, Nancy; Vendittelli, Analise; Nicholson, Evelyn; Carver, D Jeannean; Stemland, Christopher; Hoke, Tracey; Gangemi, James

    2015-01-01

    The goal was to develop and implement a comprehensive, primarily face-to-face handoff process that begins in the operating room and concludes at the bedside in the intensive care unit (ICU) for pediatric patients undergoing congenital heart surgery. Involving all stakeholders in the planning phase, the framework of the handoff system encompassed a combination of a formalized handoff tool, focused process steps that occurred prior to patient arrival in the ICU, and an emphasis on face-to-face communication at the conclusion of the handoff. The final process was evaluated by the use of observer checklists to examine quality metrics and timing for all patients admitted to the ICU following cardiac surgery. The process was found to improve how various providers view the efficiency of handoff, the ease of asking questions at each step, and the overall capability to improve patient care regardless of overall surgical complexity. © 2014 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  13. Clinical efficacy of dexmedetomidine in the diminution of fentanyl dosage in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yingying; Ye, Hongwu; Xia, Yin; Li, Yuanhai; Yuan, Xianren; Wang, Xing

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to explore the clinical efficacy of dexmedetomidine (DEX) in the diminution of fentanyl dosage in pediatric cardiac surgery based on some clinical and biochemical parameters. Fifty pediatric patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists II), 1-6 years old, were randomly allocated into two groups: group F (control group), in which patients received normal saline and high dosage of fentanyl (30 μg/kg), and group D, in which patients were given DEX and low dosage of fentanyl (15 μg/kg). Some hemodynamic and clinical parameters of the two groups were recorded. Furthermore, stress hormone (serum cortisol, norepinephrine, blood glucose) levels and cytokine (interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor alpha) levels in the two groups were compared with each other. Stress hormone levels, cytokine levels, hemodynamic parameters and the consumption of sevoflurane did not differ between the two groups. Meanwhile, the extubation time was significantly shorter in Group D than F (Pfentanyl supplemented with DEX almost had the same anesthesia effects and inflammation extent compared with high dose of fentanyl, which suggested that infusion DEX might decrease fentanyl consumption in pediatric cardiac surgery.

  14. International attitudes of early adopters to current and future robotic technologies in pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundy, Thomas P; Marcus, Hani J; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Najmaldin, Azad S; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara

    2014-10-01

    Perceptions toward surgical innovations are critical to the social processes that drive technology adoption. This study aims to capture attitudes of early adopter pediatric surgeons toward robotic technologies in order to clarify 1) specific features that are driving appeal, 2) limiting factors that are acting as diffusion barriers, and 3) future needs. Electronic surveys were distributed to pediatric surgeons with personal experience or exposure in robotic surgery. Participants were classified as experts or nonexperts for subgroup analysis. Coded Likert scale responses were analyzed using the Friedman or Mann-Whitney test. A total of 48 responses were received (22 experts, 26 nonexperts), with 14 countries represented. The most highly rated benefits of robot assistance were wristed instruments, stereoscopic vision, and magnified view. The most highly rated limitations were capital outlay expense, instrument size, and consumables/maintenance expenses. Future technologies of greatest interest were microbots, image guidance, and flexible snake robots. Putative benefits and limitations of robotic surgery are perceived with widely varied weightings. Insight provided by these responses will inform relevant clinical, engineering, and industry groups such that unambiguous goals and priorities may be assigned for the future. Pediatric surgeons seem most receptive toward technology that is smaller, less expensive, more intelligent and flexible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Left hemisphere structural connectivity abnormality in pediatric hydrocephalus patients following surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihong Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging research in surgically treated pediatric hydrocephalus patients remains challenging due to the artifact caused by programmable shunt. Our previous study has demonstrated significant alterations in the whole brain white matter structural connectivity based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and graph theoretical analysis in children with hydrocephalus prior to surgery or in surgically treated children without programmable shunts. This study seeks to investigate the impact of brain injury on the topological features in the left hemisphere, contratelateral to the shunt placement, which will avoid the influence of shunt artifacts and makes further group comparisons feasible for children with programmable shunt valves. Three groups of children (34 in the control group, 12 in the 3-month post-surgery group, and 24 in the 12-month post-surgery group, age between 1 and 18 years were included in the study. The structural connectivity data processing and analysis were performed based on DTI and graph theoretical analysis. Specific procedures were revised to include only left brain imaging data in normalization, parcellation, and fiber counting from DTI tractography. Our results showed that, when compared to controls, children with hydrocephalus in both the 3-month and 12-month post-surgery groups had significantly lower normalized clustering coefficient, lower small-worldness, and higher global efficiency (all p < 0.05, corrected. At a regional level, both patient groups showed significant alteration in one or more regional connectivity measures in a series of brain regions in the left hemisphere (8 and 10 regions in the 3-month post-surgery and the 12-month post-surgery group, respectively, all p < 0.05, corrected. No significant correlation was found between any of the global or regional measures and the contemporaneous neuropsychological outcomes [the General Adaptive Composite (GAC from the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System, Second

  16. Clinical observation of ondansetron administration at different time in preventing nausea and vomiting after pediatric strabismus surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Gang Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the efficacy of ondansetron by intravenous injection at different time in preventing nausea and vomiting after pediatric strabismus surgery. METHODS: Totally 90 children aged 3-11y were randomly selected for pediatric strabismus surgery from June 2013 to August 2013 in our hospital. The ASA grade of all children were Ⅰ-Ⅱ. Children were randomly divided into three groups with 30 cases each. Group A received intravenous drip of ondansetron 0.1mg/kg before surgery. Group B received intravenous drip of ondansetron 0.1mg/kg after surgery. Group C as control group was not given ondansetron. The number and severity of nausea and vomiting were observed within 24h after surgery. RESULTS: There were no statistical significance in patients' gender, weight, age, duration of anesthesia, ketamine dosage and vital signs intraoperative between the three groups(P>0.05. The incidence rate of postoperative nausea and vomiting(PONVof group A and B were significantly lower than group C(PP>0.05. CONCLUSION: Using ondansetron is effective and safe in preventing PONV before and at the end of the pediatric strabismus surgery, which can also improve safety and be lower cost. It is a worthy promoting antiemetic approach for eye surgery.

  17. Fluid Overload and Cumulative Thoracostomy Output Are Associated With Surgical Site Infection After Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochet, Anthony A; Nyhan, Aoibhinn; Spaeder, Michael C; Cartron, Alexander M; Song, Xiaoyan; Klugman, Darren; Brown, Anna T

    2017-08-01

    To determine the impact of cumulative, postoperative thoracostomy output, amount of bolus IV fluids and peak fluid overload on the incidence and odds of developing a deep surgical site infection following pediatric cardiothoracic surgery. A single-center, nested, retrospective, matched case-control study. A 26-bed cardiac ICU in a 303-bed tertiary care pediatric hospital. Cases with deep surgical site infection following cardiothoracic surgery were identified retrospectively from January 2010 through December 2013 and individually matched to controls at a ratio of 1:2 by age, gender, Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery score, Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgery category, primary cardiac diagnosis, and procedure. None. Twelve cases with deep surgical site infection were identified and matched to 24 controls without detectable differences in perioperative clinical characteristics. Deep surgical site infection cases had larger thoracostomy output and bolus IV fluid volumes at 6, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively compared with controls. For every 1 mL/kg of thoracostomy output, the odds of developing a deep surgical site infection increase by 13%. By receiver operative characteristic curve analysis, a cutoff of 49 mL/kg of thoracostomy output at 48 hours best discriminates the development of deep surgical site infection (sensitivity 83%, specificity 83%). Peak fluid overload was greater in cases than matched controls (12.5% vs 6%; p operative characteristic curve analysis, a threshold value of 10% peak fluid overload was observed to identify deep surgical site infection (sensitivity 67%, specificity 79%). Conditional logistic regression of peak fluid overload greater than 10% on the development of deep surgical site infection yielded an odds ratio of 9.4 (95% CI, 2-46.2). Increased postoperative peak fluid overload and cumulative thoracostomy output were associated with deep surgical site infection after pediatric

  18. Implementation of a patient blood management program in pediatric scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ferrer, A; Gredilla-Díaz, E; de Vicente-Sánchez, J; Sánchez Pérez-Grueso, F; Gilsanz-Rodríguez, F

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether the implementation of a blood conservation program, and the adoption and progressive association of different methods, reduces transfusion requirements in pediatric patients undergoing scoliosis surgery of different origins. Quasi-experimental, nonrandomized, descriptive study, approved by the Ethics Committee for Research of our institution. 50 pediatric patients (ASA I-III) aged 5 to 18 years, undergoing scoliosis surgery of any etiology by a single posterior or double approach (anterior and posterior) were included. A historical group with no alternatives to transfusion: Group No ahorro=15 patients (retrospective data collection) was compared with another 3 prospective study groups: Group HNA (acute normovolemic hemodilution)=9 patients; Group HNA+Rec (intraoperative blood salvage)=14 patients, and Group EPO (HNA+Rec+erythropoietin±preoperative donation)=12 patients; according with the implementation schedule of the transfusion alternatives in our institution. The rate of transfusion in different groups (No ahorro, HNA, HNA+Rec, EPO) was 100, 66, 57, and 0% of the patients, respectively, with a mean±SD of 3.40±1.59; 1.33±1.41; 1.43±1.50; 0±0 RBC units transfused per patient, respectively. Statistically significant differences (P<.001) were found in both the transfusion rate and number of RBC units. The application of a multimodal blood transfusion alternatives program, individualized for each pediatric patient undergoing scoliosis surgery can avoid transfusion in all cases. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Working and training conditions of residents in pediatric surgery: a nationwide survey in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reismann, M; Ellerkamp, V; Dingemann, J

    2010-09-01

    As in other surgical specialties, increasing concern has been expressed worldwide about the shortage of trainees in pediatric surgery training programs. We performed a nationwide survey to investigate the current situation in Germany. An internet-based nationwide survey comprising 36 questions on training conditions in pediatric surgery was linked to the homepage of the German Society of Pediatric Surgery from June to September 2008. Statements on the following aspects were evaluated by responding residents using a scale from 1 (I do not agree at all) to 5 (I fully agree): workplace, cooperation with colleagues, head of the department, cooperation with other specialties, training and research conditions. A median value of 3 indicated an unsatisfactory assessment, with at least 50% of respondents giving an indifferent or negative response. 70 questionnaires were completed. Some of the evaluations revealed problematic areas. In particular, statements regarding working hours revealed dissatisfaction among the responding doctors. The median value accorded the statement "I am satisfied with the current working time regulation" was 2.9. With regard to departmental heads, some criticisms were directed against a perceived lack of soft skills. According to the respondents, their involvement in decision-making processes was insufficient ("We are involved in decision-making processes affecting our working conditions" - median value 2.4). Residents were also dissatisfied with the feedback they received for their work ("I get enough feedback regarding my achievement" - median value 2.6). Another problem area was career development ("I will finish my specialist training in time" - median value 2.9). However, these points did not affect overall satisfaction. Trainee satisfaction with regulations on working hours is low. Despite a general satisfaction with all fields appraised, improvements in various individual areas, e. g., the attitude of departmental heads and strategies of

  20. Longitudinal and Temporal Associations Between Daily Pain and Sleep Patterns After Major Pediatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbitts, Jennifer A; Zhou, Chuan; Narayanan, Arthi; Palermo, Tonya M

    2017-06-01

    Approximately 20% of children develop persistent pain after major surgery. Sleep disruption has been implicated as a predictor of children's acute postsurgical pain. However, perioperative sleep patterns have not been longitudinally assessed, and the role of sleep in persistence of postsurgical pain has not been explored. We aimed to examine sleep patterns over 4 months in children having major surgery, and temporal relationships between daily sleep and pain. Sixty children age 10 to 18 (mean = 14.7) years having major surgery completed 7 days of actigraphy sleep monitoring (sleep duration, efficiency), twice daily electronic diaries (sleep quality, pain intensity, medication use), and validated questionnaires at presurgery, 2 weeks, and 4 months postsurgery. Generalized linear models, controlling for age, sex, naps, and medication, showed sleep quality (β [B] = -.88, P sleep quality was significantly associated with greater next day pain intensity (B = -.15, P = .005). Sleep duration and efficiency were not associated with subsequent pain; daytime pain was not associated with subsequent sleep. Findings suggest sleep quality may be an important target for intervention after surgery in children; research is needed to understand how other sleep parameters may relate to recovery. This study assessed longitudinal sleep patterns over 4 months after major pediatric surgery using actigraphy, diaries, and validated measures. Sleep quality and efficiency were significantly reduced at 2 weeks. Poorer sleep quality was associated with greater next day pain intensity suggesting that sleep quality may be an important target for intervention. Copyright © 2017 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Late Causes of Death After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: A 60-Year Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raissadati, Alireza; Nieminen, Heta; Haukka, Jari; Sairanen, Heikki; Jokinen, Eero

    2016-08-02

    Comprehensive information regarding causes of late post-operative death following pediatric congenital cardiac surgery is lacking. The study sought to analyze late causes of death after congenital cardiac surgery by era and defect severity. We obtained data from a nationwide pediatric cardiac surgery database and Finnish population registry regarding patients who underwent cardiac surgery at Causes of death were determined using International Classification of Diseases diagnostic codes. Deaths among the study population were compared to a matched control population. Overall, 10,964 patients underwent 14,079 operations, with 98% follow-up. Early mortality (death rates correlated with defect severity. Heart failure was the most common mode of CHD-related death, but decreased after surgeries performed between 1990 and 2009. Sudden death after surgery for atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, tetralogy of Fallot, and transposition of the great arteries decreased to zero following operations from 1990 to 2009. Deaths from neoplasms, respiratory, neurological, and infectious disease were significantly more common among study patients than controls. Pneumonia caused the majority of non-CHD-related deaths among the study population. CHD-related deaths have decreased markedly but remain a challenge after surgery for severe cardiac defects. Premature deaths are generally more common among patients than the control population, warranting long-term follow-up after congenital cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. MR imaging of the pediatric spine: Comparison of myelography, MCT, and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.C.; Hoffman, J.C.; Ball, T.I.; Wyly, J.B.; Braun, I.F.; Fry, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    Results of MR imaging of 53 pediatric patients with suspected spinal abnormalities were compared findings on metrizamide myelography, MCT, and surgery. Prototype surface coil studies with multisection multiplanar imaging (0.5 and 1.5 T) using T1-weighted sequences were optimum for anatomic definition, while T2-weighted sequences were utilized for intramedullary pathology. Diseases studied included neoplasia, infection, trauma, scoliosis, and dysrhaphsium. Surface coils were essential for imaging the thoracic and lumbar spine. MR imaging yielded approximately equivalent information to that obtained on myelography or MCT in 25 of 31 patients. Limitations to MR imaging included bony spurs, small eccentric lesions, tumor seeding, metal artifacts, postoperative scarring, and motion. With further refinements, MR imaging may replace more invasive techniques for pediatric spinal imaging

  3. De-hospitalization of the pediatric day surgery by means of a freestanding surgery center: pilot study in the lazio region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangia Giovanni

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Day surgery should take place in appropriate organizational settings. In the presence of high volumes, the organizational models of the Lazio Region are represented by either Day Surgery Units within continuous-cycle hospitals or day-cycle Day Surgery Centers. This pilot study presents the regional volumes provided in 2010 and the additional volumes that could be provided based on the best performance criterion with a view to suggesting the setting up of a regional Freestanding Center of Pediatric Day Surgery. Methods This is an observational retrospective study. The activity volumes have been assessed by means of a DRG (Diagnosis Related Group-specific indicator that measures the ratio of outpatients to the total number of treated patients (freestanding indicator, FI. The included DRGs had an FI exceeding the 3rd quartile present in at least a health-care facility and a volume exceeding 0.5% of the total patients of the pediatric surgery and urology facilities of the Lazio Region. The relevant data have been provided by the Public Health Agency and relate to 2010. The best performance FI has been used to calculate the theoretical volume of transferability of the remaining facilities into freestanding surgery centers. Patients under six months of age and DRGs common to other disciplines have been excluded. The Chi Square test has been used to compare the FI of the health-care facilities and the FI of the places of origin of the patients. Results The DRG provided in 2010 amounted to a total of 5768 belonging to 121 types of procedures. The application of the criteria of inclusion have led to the selection of seven final DRG categories of minor surgery amounting to 3522 cases. Out of this total number, there were 2828 outpatients and 694 inpatients. The recourse of the best performance determines a potential transfer of 497 cases. The total outpatient volume is 57%. The Chi Square test has pointed to a statistically significant

  4. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws ... out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws ...

  5. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in the endoscopy room. GENERAL SURGERY. T du Toit, O C Buchel, S J A Smit. Department of Surgery, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, ... The lack of video instrumentation in developing countries: Redundant fibre-optic instruments (the old. “eye scope”) are still being used. This instrument brings endoscopists ...

  6. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mean time to first surgery post burn was 11.5 days with a median volume of 0.73 mls/kg/% ..... Mode. Mean (SD). Upper limit. 95% CI. Lower limit. 95% CI. Mode. Elective surgery .... evaluating single-unit red blood cell transfusions in reducing.

  7. [Pediatric anesthesia emergence delirium after elective ambulatory surgery: etiology, risk factors and prevalence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gololobov, Alik; Todris, Liat; Berman, Yakov; Rosenberg-Gilad, Zipi; Schlaeffer, Pnina; Kenett, Ron; Ben-Jacob, Ron; Segal, Eran

    2015-04-01

    Emergence delirium (ED) is a common problem among children and adults recovering from general anesthesia after surgery. Its symptoms include psychomotor agitation, hallucinations, and aggressive behavior. The phenomenon, which is most probably an adverse effect of general anesthesia agents, harms the recovery process and endangers the physical safety of patients and their health. Ranging between 10% and 80%, the exact prevalence of ED is unknown, and the risk factors of the phenomenon are unclear. The aim of the current retrospective study was to determine the prevalence rate of ED in 3947 children recovering from general anesthesia after short elective ambulatory surgery, and to map the influence of various risk factors on this phenomenon. Data were collected using electronic medical records. ED severity was assessed using the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium Scale. Results showed the prevalence of ED among children. ED was significantly correlated with patients' age, type of surgery and premedication. ED was not correlated with severity of pain, type of anesthesia or with patients' sex.

  8. Single visit surgery for pediatric ambulatory surgical procedures: a satisfaction and cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jacob K; Deming, Lisa A; King, Denis R; Rager, Terrence M; Gartner, Sarah; Huibregtse, Natalie; Moss, R Lawrence; Besner, Gail E

    2017-10-10

    Single visit surgery (SVS) consists of same-day pre-operative assessment and operation with telephone post-operative follow-up. This reduces family time commitment to 1 hospital trip rather than 2-3. We began SVS for ambulatory patients with clear surgical indications in 2013. We sought to determine family satisfaction, cost savings to families, and institutional financial feasibility of SVS. SVS patients were compared to age/case matched conventional surgery (CS) patients. Satisfaction was assessed by post-operative telephone survey. Family costs were calculated as the sum of lost revenue (based on median income) and transportation costs ($0.50/mile). Satisfaction was high in both groups (98% for SVS vs. 93% for CS; p=0.27). 40% of CS families indicated that they would have preferred SVS, whereas no SVS families indicated preference for the CS option (p<0.001). Distance from the hospital did not correlate with satisfaction. Estimated cost savings for an SVS family was $188. Reimbursement, hospital and physician charges, and day-of-surgery cancellation rates were similar. SVS provides substantial cost savings to families while maintaining patient satisfaction and equivalent institutional reimbursement. SVS is an effective approach to low-risk ambulatory surgical procedures that is less disruptive to families, facilitates access to pediatric surgical care, and reduces resource utilization. Cost Effectiveness Study. Level II. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hyperkalemic Cardioplegia for Adult and Pediatric Surgery: End of an Era?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Phillip Dobson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite surgical proficiency and innovation driving low mortality rates in cardiac surgery, the disease severity, comorbidity rate and operative procedural difficulty have increased. Today’s cardiac surgery patient is older, has a sicker heart and often presents with multiple comorbidities; a scenario that was relatively rare 20 years ago. The global challenge has been to find new ways to make surgery safer for the patient and more predictable for the surgeon. A confounding factor that may influence clinical outcome is high K+ cardioplegia. For over 40 years, potassium depolarization has been linked to transmembrane ionic imbalances, arrhythmias and conduction disturbances, vasoconstriction, coronary spasm, contractile stunning, and low output syndrome. Other than inducing rapid electrochemical arrest, high K+ cardioplegia offers little or no inherent protection to adult or pediatric patients. This review provides a brief history of high K+ cardioplegia, five areas of increasing concern with prolonged membrane K+ depolarization, and the basic science and clinical data underpinning a new normokalemic, ‘polarizing’ cardioplegia comprising adenosine and lidocaine (AL with magnesium (Mg2+ (ALM. We argue that improved cardioprotection, better outcomes, faster recoveries and lower healthcare costs are achievable and, despite the early predictions from the stent industry and cardiology, the cath lab may not be the place where the new wave of high-risk morbid patients are best served.

  10. Choosing surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstensson, Carina; Lohmander, L; Frobell, Richard

    2009-01-01

    -depth qualitative interviews were conducted with young (aged 18-35), physically active individuals with ACL rupture who were participating in a RCT comparing training and surgical reconstruction with training only. 22/34 were randomised to training only but crossed over to surgery. Of these, 11 were interviewed......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The objective was to understand patients' views of treatment after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and their reasons for deciding to request surgery despite consenting to participate in a randomised controlled trial (to 'cross-over'). METHODS: Thirty-four in...... before surgery, and 11 were interviewed at least 6 months after surgery. To provide additional information, 12 patients were interviewed before randomisation. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using the Framework approach. RESULTS: Strong preference for surgery was commonplace...

  11. Time to pediatric epilepsy surgery is longer and developmental outcomes lower for government compared with private insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptman, Jason S; Dadour, Andrew; Oh, Taemin; Baca, Christine B; Vickrey, Barbara G; Vassar, Stefanie; Sankar, Raman; Salamon, Noriko; Vinters, Harry V; Mathern, Gary W

    2013-07-01

    It is unclear if socioeconomic factors like type of insurance influence time to referral and developmental outcomes for pediatric patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. This study determined whether private compared with state government insurance was associated with shorter intervals of seizure onset to surgery and better developmental quotients for pediatric patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. A consecutive cohort (n = 420) of pediatric patients undergoing epilepsy surgery were retrospectively categorized into those with Medicaid (California Children's Services; n = 91) or private (Preferred Provider Organization, Health Maintenance Organization, Indemnity; n = 329) insurance. Intervals from seizure onset to referral and surgery and Vineland developmental assessments were compared by insurance type with the use of log-rank tests. Compared with private insurance, children with Medicaid had longer intervals from seizure onset to referral for evaluation (log-rank test, P = .034), and from seizure onset to surgery (P = .017). In a subset (25%) that had Vineland assessments, children with Medicaid compared with private insurance had lower Vineland scores presurgery (P = .042) and postsurgery (P = .003). Type of insurance was not associated with seizure severity, types of operations, etiology, postsurgical seizure-free outcomes, and complication rate. Compared with Medicaid, children with private insurance had shorter intervals from seizure onset to referral and to epilepsy surgery, and this was associated with lower Vineland scores before surgery. These findings may reflect delayed access for uninsured children who eventually obtained state insurance. Reasons for the delay and whether longer intervals before epilepsy surgery affect long-term cognitive and developmental outcomes warrant further prospective investigations.

  12. Changes in central corneal thickness and endothelial cell count pediatric cataract surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the mean changes in Central Corneal Thickness (CCT) and Endothelial Cell Count (ECC) in eyes after pediatric cataract surgery with foldable intraocular lens using scleral tunnel incision micro-surgical technique. Study Design: Qausi experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Al-Shifa Trust Eye Hospital, Rawalpindi, from May 2011 to March 2012. Methodology: Fifty-two eyes of 37 children with pediatric cataract were included in the study. Extracapsular Cataract Extraction (ECE) with foldable Intra Ocular Lens (IOL) implantation using sclera tunnel incision was performed in all children. Endothelial Cell Count (ECC) and Central Corneal Thickness (CCT) were recorded before surgery and 1 month, 3 months and 6 months after surgery and the effect of currently practiced surgical technique on ECC and CCTwas evaluated. Results: The mean age at the time of surgery was 8.8 ± 2.7 years (range: 4 to 15 years). The postoperative ECC and CCT were significantly different from the pre-operative values. Mean pre-operative ECC was 3175.3 ± 218.4 cell/mm2 and in first postoperative month the mean ECC was 3113.4 ± 210.8 cell/mm2 (p<0.0001). In the 3rd and 6th month postoperative means ECC were 3052 ± 202.5 cell/mm2 (p<0.0001) and 3015 ±190.6 cell/mm2 (p<0.0001), respectively. The mean cell loss at first postoperative month was 1.95% and at 3rd and 6th postoperative month were 3.9% and 5.05%, respectively. Mean pre-operative CCT was 514 ± 49.9 micro m and first postoperative mean CCT after 1 month was 524.1 ± 25 micro m (p = 0.084). After the 3rd and 6th months postoperative, mean CCT were 527.3 ± 24.6 micro m, and 530 ± 24.5 micro m, respectively. Third and 6th months postoperative means were significantly higher than baseline CCT, p = 0.024 and 0.007, respectively. Conclusion: Endothelial cell loss with closed chamber micro-surgical technique using scleral tunnel incision is within acceptable limits and

  13. Laparoscopic skills assessment: an additional modality for pediatric surgery fellowship selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazboun, Rajaie; Rodriguez, Samuel; Thirumoorthi, Arul; Baerg, Joanne; Moores, Donald; Tagge, Edward P

    2017-12-01

    The Pediatric Surgery fellow selection is a multi-layered process which has not included assessment of surgical dexterity. Data was collected prospectively as part of the 2016 Pediatric Surgery Match interview process. Applicants completed a questionnaire to document laparoscopic experience and fine motor skills activities. Actual laparoscopic skills were assessed using a simulator. Time to complete an intracorporeal knot was tabulated. An initial rank list was formulated based only on the ERAS application and interview scores. The rank list was re-formulated following the laparoscopic assessment. Un-paired T-test and regression were utilized to analyze the data. Forty applicants were interviewed with 18 matched (45%). The mean knot tying time was 201.31s for matched and 202.35s for unmatched applicants. Playing a musical instrument correlated with faster knot tying (p=0.03). No correlation was identified between knot tying time and either video game experience (p=0.4) or passing the FLS exam (p=0.78). Laparoscopic skills assessment lead to significant reordering of rank list (p=0.01). Laparoscopic skills performance significantly impacted ranking. Playing a musical instrument correlated with faster knot tying. No correlation was identified between laparoscopic performance and passing the FLS exam or other activities traditionally believed to improve technical ability. Prospective study. Level II. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Incidence and risk factors associated with nosocomial infection in pediatric heart surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Raya, Fidencia; Baeza-Zarco, Fabiola Janet

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are responsible for a high rate of morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients undergoing heart surgery. Our objective was to determine the incidence and associated risk factors to nosocomial infections in this group of patients. A descriptive, prospective, clinical study was conducted in a tertiary hospital for a year. We calculated the rate of incidence, accumulated incidence and devices used. Was Applied the EPIDAT 2004 version 3.1 program OPS for obtaining of Chi-square with Yates correction for p with a confidence of 95 %, alpha of 0.05 with a degree of freedom, we calculated odds ratio, besides of the identification of microorganisms, their sensitivity and resistance to antibiotics. We calculated rates of: 45 % the incidence, 80.6 % cumulative incidence, 7.4 % of mortality, 13.3 % of case-fatality rate of infected and 2.7 % non-infected. The 44.4 % with pneumonia, 74 % associated with mechanical ventilation, 100 % nasogastric tube. The most frequently isolated microorganisms are: Acinetobacter baumanni, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with high resistance to antibiotics. Pediatric patients undergoing heart surgery have high risk of infection heart disease, cyanogen's have 5 times more risk. We observed a statistically significant association with infection using nasogastric probe and endotracheal tube, the risk increases to increased hospital stay. Infected patients have 4 times the risk of death.

  15. Using bibliometrics to analyze the state of academic productivity in US pediatric surgery training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Nidhi; Veras, Laura V; Gosain, Ankush

    2018-06-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Common Program Requirements state that faculty must establish and maintain an environment of inquiry and scholarship. Bibliometrics, the statistical analysis of written publications, assesses scientific productivity and impact. The goal of this study was to understand the state of scholarship at Pediatric Surgery training programs. Following IRB approval, Scopus was used to generate bibliometric profiles for US Pediatric Surgery training programs and faculty. Statistical analyses were performed. Information was obtained for 430 surgeons (105 female) from 48 US training programs. The mean lifetime h-index/surgeon for programs was 14.4 +/- 4.7 (6 programs above 1 SD, 9 programs below 1 SD). The mean 5-yearh-index/surgeon for programs was 3.92 +/- 1.5 (7 programs above 1 SD, 8 programs below 1 SD). Programs accredited after 2000 had a lower lifetime h-index than those accredited before 2000 (p=0.0378). Female surgeons had a lower lifetime h-index (pproductivity of faculty and programs and as an adjunct in promotion/tenure decisions. Original Research. n/a. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Multicenter Quality Improvement Project to Prevent Sternal Wound Infections in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Cathy; Taylor, Richard; Son, Minnette; Taeed, Roozbeh; Jacobs, Marshall L; Kane, Lauren; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Husain, S Adil

    2017-07-01

    Children undergoing cardiac surgery are at risk for sternal wound infections (SWIs) leading to increased morbidity and mortality. Single-center quality improvement (QI) initiatives have demonstrated decreased infection rates utilizing a bundled approach. This multicenter project was designed to assess the efficacy of a protocolized approach to decrease SWI. Pediatric cardiac programs joined a collaborative effort to prevent SWI. Programs implemented the protocol, collected compliance data, and provided data points from local clinical registries using Society of Thoracic Surgery Congenital Heart Surgery Database harvest-compliant software or from other registries. Nine programs prospectively collected compliance data on 4,198 children. Days between infections were extended from 68.2 days (range: 25-82) to 130 days (range: 43-412). Protocol compliance increased from 76.7% (first quarter) to 91.3% (final quarter). Ninety (1.9%) children developed an SWI preprotocol and 64 (1.5%) postprotocol, P = .18. The 657 (15%) delayed sternal closure patients had a 5% infection rate with 18 (5.7%) in year 1 and 14 (4.3%) in year 2 P = .43. Delayed sternal closure patients demonstrated a trend toward increased risk for SWI of 1.046 for each day the sternum remained open, P = .067. Children who received appropriately timed preop antibiotics developed less infections than those who did not, 1.9% versus 4.1%, P = .007. A multicenter QI project to reduce pediatric SWIs demonstrated an extension of days between infections and a decrease in SWIs. Patients who received preop antibiotics on time had lower SWI rates than those who did not.

  17. Sustainability of protocolized handover of pediatric cardiac surgery patients to the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenault, Kristin; Moga, Michael-Alice; Shin, Minah; Petersen, Emily; Backer, Carl; De Oliveira, Gildasio S; Suresh, Santhanam

    2016-05-01

    Transfer of patient care among clinicians (handovers) is a common source of medical errors. While the immediate efficacy of these initiatives is well documented, sustainability of practice changes that results in better processes of care is largely understudied. The objective of the current investigation was to evaluate the sustainability of a protocolized handover process in pediatric patients from the operating room after cardiac surgery to the intensive care unit. This was a prospective study with direct observation assessment of handover performance conducted in the cardiac ICU (CICU) of a free-standing, tertiary care children's hospital in the United States. Patient transitions from the operating room to the CICU, including the verbal handoff, were directly observed by a single independent observer in all phases of the study. A checklist of key elements identified errors classified as: (1) technical, (2) information omissions, and (3) realized errors. Total number of errors was compared across the different times of the study (preintervention, postintervention, and the current sustainability phase). A total of 119 handovers were studied: 41 preintervention, 38 postintervention, and 40 in the current sustainability phase. The median [Interquartile range (IQR)] number of technical errors was significantly reduced in the sustainability phase compared to the preintervention and postintervention phase, 2 (1-3), 6 (5-7), and 2.5 (2-4), respectively P = 0.0001. Similarly, the median (IQR) number of verbal information omissions was also significantly reduced in the sustainability phase compared to the preintervention and postintervention phases, 1 (1-1), 4 (3-5) and 2 (1-3), respectively. We demonstrate sustainability of an improved handover process using a checklist in children being transferred to the intensive care unit after cardiac surgery. Standardized handover processes can be a sustainable strategy to improve patient safety after pediatric cardiac surgery.

  18. Incisional hernia in pediatric surgery - experience at a single UK tertiary centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullassery, Dhanya; Pedersen, Ami; Robb, Andrew; Smith, Nicola

    2016-11-01

    Incisional hernia (IH) is a recognized complication of open and laparoscopic visceral surgery, with reported rates of 10-50% in adult surgical literature. There is a paucity of data relating to incisional hernias in children. The aim of our study was to analyze the incidence and treatment of IH in children. Retrospective review of all patients admitted for incisional hernia repair at a tertiary pediatric surgical centre in the UK more than a 7-year period was performed. Data collected included age at initial surgery, time to IH repair, and type of IH repair and postoperative complications. Twenty one patients (14 male) underwent IH repair during the study period. The incidence of IH among children who had primary abdominal surgery in our institution less than the age of 6months was 2.3%. Median age at repair was 7.9months (range: 18days-5years). Median time from primary surgery to diagnosis of IH was 2months (range 0day-3years), with 81% (17/21) diagnosed within 1year of the preceding abdominal procedure. The most common pathology necessitating the primary operative procedure was necrotising enterocolitis (n=9) in babies of gestational age less than 30weeks. The highest rates of IH were noted in infants following closure of stoma (7.5%) and pyloromyotomy (2.52%). Primary closure was undertaken in all cases. Two children had recurrence of IH, one of which underwent surgical repair. Incidence of IH in children is low but significant. IH was most commonly diagnosed following closure of stoma for NEC in this study. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Anesthesia through an intraosseous line using an 18-gauge intravenous needle for emergency pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Riyadh Khudeir; Hartmans, Sharon; Gausche-Hill, Marianne

    2013-09-01

    To describe the success and complication rate of intraosseous (IO) access for delivery of anesthesia with the use of an 18-gauge (G) intravenous (IV) needle. Prospective study. Children's Welfare Teaching Hospital, Baghdad, Iraq. 300 critically ill infants and toddlers, age 3 weeks to 16 months, requiring emergency surgery for intra-abdominal or pelvic conditions, in whom peripheral or central access was not obtainable. Patients presented for surgery between 2007 and 2010. In 26 patients, the IO catheter was established when peripheral access was not obtained at the outset of surgery; in 4 patients standard peripheral vascular access failed during the surgical procedure and IO access was obtained. An 18-G IV needle was placed into the proximal tibia and attached to an extension set with a 3-way stopcock to deliver anesthesia. For 26 critically ill children and 4 other children, IV access failed during delivery of anesthesia; vascular access was successfully obtained within minutes in all 30 infants (100%) using the intraosseous route. Ninety percent (27/30) of patients awoke immediately postoperatively in good condition; 10% (3/30) went to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) for further care due to their critical preoperative condition. Complications associated with use of the IO route were considered minor (3/30 pts [10%]) and included extravasation of fluid in two cases and cellulitis in one. The IO route provided for rapid delivery of anesthesia, induction, and maintenance in this series of critically ill infants undergoing emergency surgery when other vascular access routes failed. Few complications were noted. Intraosseous access was achieved through a simple technique using an 18-gauge IV needle. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Negative pressure wound therapy in pediatric surgery: How and when to use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Lisieux Eyer; Martins, Alana Bandeira; Oliveira, Pablo Baptista; Gomes, Fernanda; Leve, Thais; Dekermacher, Samuel

    2018-04-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been widely adopted to treat laparostomy, abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) and complicated wounds associated with tissue loss. The method presents specific aspects, advantages and indications in Pediatrics. Our aim is to review the evidence available about NPWT in children. Active search for papers about NPWT in Pediatric patients. Papers referring to orthopedic problems, wound complications after Cardiac Surgery or burns were excluded. The method shows good results to treat ACS, complicated wounds and abdominal wall malformations in neonates, including prematures. Periwound skin protection, monitoring of fluid losses and fine tuning of negative pressure levels according to age are necessary. Less pain, quicker recovery, less frequent dressing changes, possible recovery of exposed surgical hardware, granulation and shrinkage of the wound are advantages of the method over other kinds of dressing. NPWT is contraindicated over blood vessels and exposed nerves. Debridement is needed before usage over necrotic areas. Enteric fistulae are not contraindications. Complications are rare, mainly foam retention and dermatitis/skin maceration. The possibility of fistulae being caused by NPWT remains debatable. NPWT is widely used in Pediatrics, including neonates and premature, but the evidence available about the method is scarce and low quality. Complications are uncommon and mostly manageable. A possible causal relationship between NPWY and enteric fistula remains unclear. Adult devices and parameters have been adapted to children's use. Extra care is needed to protect the delicate tissues of Pediatric patients. Comparative research to define differential costs, indications and advantages of the method, specific indications and limits of NWTP in Pediatrics is needed. Review. IV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Seventh World Congress of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery, Istanbul, Turkey, June 19-24, 2017: "Bridge together".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciçek, Sertaç

    2013-12-01

    The Seventh World Congress of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery will held in Istanbul, the only city in the world that is located on two continents, June 19-24, 2017. This World Congress promises academic excellence in a culturally stimulating environment. All those interested in the care of patients with pediatric and congenital cardiac disease should attend this meeting, which represents "The Olympics of our Profession".

  2. The impact of obesity on 30-day complications in pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Train, A T; Cairo, S B; Meyers, H A; Harmon, C M; Rothstein, D H

    2017-11-01

    To examine the effects of obesity on specialty-specific surgical outcomes in children. Retrospective cohort study using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, Pediatric, 2012-2014. Patients included those aged 2-17 years who underwent a surgical procedure in one of six specialties. Obesity was the primary patient variable of interest. Outcomes of interest were postoperative complications and operative times. Odds ratios for development of postoperative complications were calculated using stepwise multivariate regression analysis. Obesity was associated with a significantly greater risk of wound complications (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.13-1.36), but decreased risk of non-wound complications (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.63-0.73) and morbidity (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.75-0.84). Obesity was not a significant factor in predicting postoperative complications in patients undergoing otolaryngology or plastic surgery procedures. Anesthesia times and operative times were significantly longer for obese patients undergoing most types of pediatric surgical procedures. Obesity confers an increased risk of wound complications in some pediatric surgical specialties and is associated with overall decreased non-wound complications and morbidity. These findings suggest that the relationship between obesity and postoperative complications is complex and may be more dependent on underlying procedure- or specialty-related factors than previously suspected.

  3. Analysis of the impact of race on blood transfusion in pediatric scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Keila M; Owusu-Akyaw, Kwadwo; Zhou, Jingzhu; Cooter, Mary; Ross, Allison K; Lark, Robert K; Taicher, Brad M

    2018-04-01

    Surgical correction of pediatric scoliosis is associated with significant blood loss. Minimizing estimated blood loss and blood transfusion is beneficial as transfusions have been associated with increased morbidity, including risk of surgical site infections, longer hospitalizations, and increased cost. Although there is evidence that African-American or Black adults are more likely to require intraoperative blood transfusion compared with Caucasian or White adults, the reasons for this difference are unclear. The electronic records for all patients blood loss/transfusion in primary pediatric scoliosis surgery. In a multivariate model, Black race was independently associated with 1.61 times higher estimated blood loss than White race (P blood transfusion was 6.25 times higher (P = .03; 95% CI = 1.56-25.06) and among the patients who received blood transfusion, Black race was independently associated with 2.61 times greater volume of blood transfusion than White race (P blood loss, increased rate of blood transfusion, and increased amount of blood transfused during surgical correction of pediatric scoliosis. Further investigation is needed to better understand the etiology of the disparity and assess opportunities for improving outcomes. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Music benefits on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Calcaterra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative effect of music listening has not been established in pediatric age. Response on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery has been evaluated. Forty-two children were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to the music-group (music intervention during awakening period or the non-music group (standard postoperative care. Slow and fast classical music and pauses were recorded and played via ambient speakers. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, glucose and cortisol levels, faces pain scale and Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC Pain Scale were considered as indicators of response to stress and pain experience. Music during awakening induced lower increase of systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. The non-music group showed progressive increasing values of glycemia; in music-group the curve of glycemia presented a plateau pattern (P<0.001. Positive impact on reactions to pain was noted using the FLACC scale. Music improves cardiovascular parameters, stress-induced hyperglycemia. Amelioration on pain perception is more evident in older children. Positive effects seems to be achieved by the alternation of fast, slow rhythms and pauses even in pediatric age.

  5. Music benefits on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Ostuni, Selene; Bonomelli, Irene; Mencherini, Simonetta; Brunero, Marco; Zambaiti, Elisa; Mannarino, Savina; Larizza, Daniela; Albertini, Riccardo; Tinelli, Carmine; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2014-08-12

    Postoperative effect of music listening has not been established in pediatric age. Response on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery has been evaluated. Forty-two children were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to the music-group (music intervention during awakening period) or the non-music group (standard postoperative care). Slow and fast classical music and pauses were recorded and played via ambient speakers. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, glucose and cortisol levels, faces pain scale and Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) Pain Scale were considered as indicators of response to stress and pain experience. Music during awakening induced lower increase of systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. The non-music group showed progressive increasing values of glycemia; in music-group the curve of glycemia presented a plateau pattern (PMusic improves cardiovascular parameters, stress-induced hyperglycemia. Amelioration on pain perception is more evident in older children. Positive effects seems to be achieved by the alternation of fast, slow rhythms and pauses even in pediatric age.

  6. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  7. Foot Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... coding trends along with compliance guidelines and practice marketing materials, APMA has you covered whether you are ... crutches after the surgery or in a cast. Fusions: Fusions are usually performed to treat arthritic or ...

  8. Hemorrhoid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002939.htm Hemorrhoid surgery To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hemorrhoids are swollen veins around the anus. They may ...

  9. PLASTIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Sefako Makgatho Health Science University, ... We report on a pilot study on the use of a circumareolar excision and the use of .... and 1 gynecomastia patient) requested reduction in NAC size.

  10. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    influence medical students in pursuing a career in surgery. ... training, females reported significantly higher levels of agreement that surgical training would be better overseas when ..... mentoring surgical research or educational lectures and.

  11. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 Department of Surgery, Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, University of ... in 51 reports. Four reports were illegible; one was conducted by a junior consultant, two by a fourth year trainee specialist ... The study period was 12 months from.

  12. Sinus Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sinus computed tomography (CT) scan (without contrast), nasal physiology (rhinomanometry and nasal cytology), smell testing, and selected ... altered anatomical landmarks, or where a patient’s sinus anatomy is very unusual, making typical surgery difficult. Image ...

  13. Emergency surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoneham, M; Murray, D; Foss, N

    2014-01-01

    National reports recommended that peri-operative care should be improved for elderly patients undergoing emergency surgery. Postoperative mortality and morbidity rates remain high, and indicate that emergency ruptured aneurysm repair, laparotomy and hip fracture fixation are high-risk procedures...... undertaken on elderly patients with limited physiological reserve. National audits have reported variations in care quality, data that are increasingly being used to drive quality improvement through professional guidance. Given that the number of elderly patients presenting for emergency surgery is likely...

  14. Ocular hypertension after pediatric cataract surgery: baseline characteristics and first-year report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haotian Lin

    Full Text Available Monitoring intraocular pressure (IOP is essential for pediatric cataract treatment but always difficult due to lack of cooperation in young children. We present the baseline characteristics and the first-year results of a long-term prospective cohort study, which are aimed to determine the relationship of the incidence of ocular hypertension (OH in children after cataract surgery during the first-year period and the risk of developing late-onset glaucoma. Children were included with the following criteria: they were ≤10 years old and scheduled to undergo cataract surgery with/without intraocular lens implantation; they were compliant with our follow-up protocol, which included monitoring IOP using a Tono-Pen under sedation or anesthesia. Incidence of OH, peak OH value, OH onset time and OH duration within a 12-month period following surgery were measured. In brief, 206 patients (379 eyes were included and OH developed in 66 of 379 (17.4% eyes. The mean follow-up period was 14.0±3.2 months (median, 12 months; range, 10-16 months. Moreover, 33 of 196 (16.8% aphakic eyes and 33 of 183 (18.0% IOL eyes were diagnosed with OH. The peak OH onset times were at 1-week (34/66, 51.5% and 1-month (14/66, 21.2% appointments postsurgery. The peak IOP value in the OH eyes was 29.9±7.5 mmHg (median, 29 mmHg; range, 21-48 mmHg. The duration of OH was 30.9±31.2 days (median, 30 days; range, 3-150 days. OH recurred in 13 eyes with a history of OH diagnosed within 1 month postsurgery (13/54, 24.1%, which needed temporary or long term use of antiglaucoma medications. In conclusion, the incidence of OH in children after cataract surgery was 17.4% during the first-year period. Children who have suffered elevated IOP in the first year after cataract surgery should be followed closely to determine if there is an increased risk of developing late-onset glaucoma.

  15. Neuroprotective Anesthesia Regimen and Intensive Management for Pediatric Cardiac Surgery with Cardiopulmonary Bypass: a Review and Initial Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyrson Guilherme Klamt

    Full Text Available Abstract This article describes our proposal for routine anesthesia, intraoperative medical management, cerebral and physiological monitoring during pediatric cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass that intend to provide appropriate anesthesia (analgesia, hypnosis, neuroprotection, adequate cerebral and systemic oxygen supply, and preventing against drugs neurotoxicity. A concise retrospective data is presented.

  16. Decreasing adhesions and avoiding further surgery in a pediatric patient involved in a severe pedestrian versus motor vehicle accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda D. Rice

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this case study, we report the use of manual physical therapy in a pediatric patient experiencing complications from a life-threatening motor vehicle accident that necessitated 19 surgeries over the course of 12 months. Post-surgical adhesions decreased the patient’s quality of life. He developed multiple medical conditions including recurrent partial bowel obstructions and an ascending testicle. In an effort to avoid further surgery for bowel obstruction and the ascending testicle, the patient was effectively treated with a manual physical therapy regimen focused on decreasing adhesions. The therapy allowed return to an improved quality of life, significant decrease in subjective reports of pain and dysfunction, and apparent decreases in adhesive processes without further surgery, which are important goals for all patients, but especially for pediatric patients.

  17. Oral triiodothyronine normalizes triiodothyronine levels after surgery for pediatric congenital heart disease*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwali, Eva M; Boom, Cindy E; Sakidjan, Indriwanto; Santoso, Anwar; Fakhri, Dicky; Kartini, Ay; Kekalih, Aria; Schwartz, Steven M; Haas, Nikolaus A

    2013-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine if oral triiodothyronine supplementation could prevent the decrease of serum triiodothyronine levels that commonly occurs after cardiopulmonary bypass for pediatric congenital heart surgery. Secondary objectives included identifying any significant adverse effects of oral triiodothyronine supplementation, including any effects on the thyroid/pituitary axis. Randomized, placebo-controlled, doubleblind clinical trial Operating room and ICU. Infants and children younger than 2 years of age undergoing congenital heart surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass (n = 43). Subjects were assigned to placebo (n = 15, group A) or one of two treatment groups: a low-dose group (group B, n = 14, 0.5 mcg/kg triiodothyronine orally every 24 hr for 3 d) or a high-dose group (group C, n = 14, 0.5 mcg/kg triiodothyronine orally every 12 hr for 3 d). Thyroid hormone, including total and free triiodothyronine levels at predetermined time points, potential side effects indicating hyperthyroidism, indicators of the thyroid-pituitary axis, and clinical endpoints. Oral triiodothyronine supplementation twice-daily maintained serum triiodothyronine levels within normal limits in group C, whereas serum levels progressively declined in groups A and B. A statistically significant difference in triiodothyronine levels between the treatment groups occurred between 18 and 36 hours post cross-clamp release, with the largest difference in serum levels between group C and group A noted at 36 hours post cross-clamp release (total triiodothyronine, 0.71 ± 0.15 [0.34-1.08] ng/mL [p triiodothyronine, 2.56 ± 0.49 [1.33-3.79] pg/mL [p triiodothyronine supplementation at a dose of 0.5 mcg/kg every 12 hours for 3 days can maintain total and free triiodothyronine levels within normal limits after open-heart surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass for congenital heart disease.

  18. Tennis elbow surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateral epicondylitis - surgery; Lateral tendinosis - surgery; Lateral tennis elbow - surgery ... Surgery to repair tennis elbow is often an outpatient surgery. This means you will not stay in the hospital overnight. You will be given ...

  19. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  20. Mohs micrographic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Basal cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Squamous cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery ... Mohs surgery usually takes place in the doctor's office. The surgery is started early in the morning and is ...

  1. Pelvic Fixation in Adult and Pediatric Spine Surgery: Historical Perspective, Indications, and Techniques: AAOS Exhibit Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit; Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Strike, Sophia A; Menga, Emmanuel N; Sponseller, Paul D; Kebaish, Khaled M

    2015-09-16

    Achieving solid osseous fusion across the lumbosacral junction has historically been, and continues to be, a challenge in spine surgery. Robust pelvic fixation plays an integral role in achieving this goal. The goals of this review are to describe the history of and indications for spinopelvic fixation, examine conventional spinopelvic fixation techniques, and review the newer S2-alar-iliac technique and its outcomes in adult and pediatric patients with spinal deformity. Since the introduction of Harrington rods in the 1960s, spinal instrumentation has evolved substantially. Indications for spinopelvic fixation as a means to achieve lumbosacral arthrodesis include a long arthrodesis (five or more vertebral levels) or use of three-column osteotomies in the lower thoracic or lumbar spine, surgical treatment of high-grade spondylolisthesis, and correction of lumbar deformity and pelvic obliquity. A variety of techniques have been described over the years, including Galveston iliac rods, Jackson intrasacral rods, the Kostuik transiliac bar, iliac screws, and S2-alar-iliac screws. Modern iliac screws and S2-alar-iliac screws are associated with relatively low rates of pseudarthrosis. S2-alar-iliac screws have the advantages of less implant prominence and inline placement with proximal spinal anchors. Collectively, these techniques provide powerful methods for obtaining control of the pelvis in facilitating lumbosacral arthrodesis. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  2. Do Routine Preoperative and Intraoperative Urine Cultures Benefit Pediatric Vesicoureteral Reflux Surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Hettel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine if routine preoperative and intraoperative urine cultures (UCx are necessary in pediatric vesicoureteral (VUR reflux surgery by identifying their association with each other, preoperative symptoms, and surgical outcomes. Materials and Methods. A retrospective review of patients undergoing ureteral reimplant(s for primary VUR at a tertiary academic medical center between years 2000 and 2014 was done. Preoperative UCx were defined as those within 30 days before surgery. A positive culture was defined as >50,000 colony forming units of a single organism. Results. A total of 185 patients were identified and 87/185 (47.0% met inclusion criteria. Of those, 39/87 (45% completed a preoperative UCx. Only 3/39 (8% preoperative cultures returned positive, and all of those patients were preoperatively symptomatic. No preoperatively asymptomatic patients had positive preoperative cultures. Intraoperative cultures were obtained in 21/87 (24.1% patients; all were negative. No associations were found between preoperative culture results and intraoperative cultures or between culture result and postoperative complications. Conclusions. In asymptomatic patients, no associations were found between the completion of a preoperative or intraoperative UCx and surgical outcomes, suggesting that not all patients may require preoperative screening. Children presenting with symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI prior to ureteral reimplantation may benefit from preoperative UCx.

  3. [Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery: risk factors and outcomes. Proposal for a predictive model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Bárbara; Laranjo, Sérgio; Gomes, Inês; Freitas, Isabel; Trigo, Conceição; Fragata, Isabel; Fragata, José; Pinto, Fátima

    2016-02-01

    To characterize the epidemiology and risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI) after pediatric cardiac surgery in our center, to determine its association with poor short-term outcomes, and to develop a logistic regression model that will predict the risk of AKI for the study population. This single-center, retrospective study included consecutive pediatric patients with congenital heart disease who underwent cardiac surgery between January 2010 and December 2012. Exclusion criteria were a history of renal disease, dialysis or renal transplantation. Of the 325 patients included, median age three years (1 day-18 years), AKI occurred in 40 (12.3%) on the first postoperative day. Overall mortality was 13 (4%), nine of whom were in the AKI group. AKI was significantly associated with length of intensive care unit stay, length of mechanical ventilation and in-hospital death (p<0.01). Patients' age and postoperative serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and lactate levels were included in the logistic regression model as predictor variables. The model accurately predicted AKI in this population, with a maximum combined sensitivity of 82.1% and specificity of 75.4%. AKI is common and is associated with poor short-term outcomes in this setting. Younger age and higher postoperative serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and lactate levels were powerful predictors of renal injury in this population. The proposed model could be a useful tool for risk stratification of these patients. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical study of anti-reflux surgery for pediatric patients with primary vesico-ureteral reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamae, Koichi; Kitani, Kosuke; Miyamoto, Kenji; Nakakuma, Kensuke; Hamada, Yasuyuki; Nagano, Koji; Kawano, Tomoyasu; Nakamura, Toshiro

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed the characteristics of 25 pediatric patients (41 ureters) with primary vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) who underwent anti-reflux surgery. The patients comprised 14 males and 11 females. The median age at diagnosis and at operation was 5 years 3 months and 6 years 5 months, respectively. VUR grade comprised grade I, 4 cases, grade II, 3 cases, grade III, 11 cases, grade IV, 11 cases and grade V, 12 cases. We utilized the Cohen method as the anti-reflux surgery technique. VUR recurrence was detected in 1 case (2.9%) during follow-up. Moreover, there were no cases with progressive renal dysfunction or breakthrough infection. The rate of kidney with renal scar on scintigraphy before the operation was 48.9%, and the rate of kidney with renal dysfunction before the operation was 60.0%. As a result of Fisher's exact probability test, the risk factors of breakthrough infection (BTI) were high grade VUR and renal scar on scintigraphy. Based on our clinical results, our future strategy for the management of pediatric patients with primary VUR is proposed as follows. In all patients younger than 1 year old, antibacterial prophylaxis should be applied. For patients younger than 6 years old, the initial treatment should be antibacterial prophylaxis, but for patients with VUR of grade III or more, in cases of breakthrough infection or in cases with progressive renal dysfunction, surgical treatment should be considered. For patients older than 6 years with VUR of grade III or more, surgical treatment is strongly recommended. (author)

  5. Pre-operative simulation of pediatric mastoid surgery with 3D-printed temporal bone models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Austin S; Webster, Caroline E; Harrysson, Ola L A; Formeister, Eric J; Rawal, Rounak B; Iseli, Claire E

    2015-05-01

    As the process of additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3D) printing, has become more practical and affordable, a number of applications for the technology in the field of pediatric otolaryngology have been considered. One area of promise is temporal bone surgical simulation. Having previously developed a model for temporal bone surgical training using 3D printing, we sought to produce a patient-specific model for pre-operative simulation in pediatric otologic surgery. Our hypothesis was that the creation and pre-operative dissection of such a model was possible, and would demonstrate potential benefits in cases of abnormal temporal bone anatomy. In the case presented, an 11-year-old boy underwent a planned canal-wall-down (CWD) tympano-mastoidectomy for recurrent cholesteatoma preceded by a pre-operative surgical simulation using 3D-printed models of the temporal bone. The models were based on the child's pre-operative clinical CT scan and printed using multiple materials to simulate both bone and soft tissue structures. To help confirm the models as accurate representations of the child's anatomy, distances between various anatomic landmarks were measured and compared to the temporal bone CT scan and the 3D model. The simulation allowed the surgical team to appreciate the child's unusual temporal bone anatomy as well as any challenges that might arise in the safety of the temporal bone laboratory, prior to actual surgery in the operating room (OR). There was minimal variability, in terms of absolute distance (mm) and relative distance (%), in measurements between anatomic landmarks obtained from the patient intra-operatively, the pre-operative CT scan and the 3D-printed models. Accurate 3D temporal bone models can be rapidly produced based on clinical CT scans for pre-operative simulation of specific challenging otologic cases in children, potentially reducing medical errors and improving patient safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  6. Comparing the effect of preoperative administration of methylprednisolone and its administration before and during surgery on the clinical outcome in pediatric open heart surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Ghasem; Abbasi Tashnizi, Mohammad; Moeinipour, Ali Asghar; Ganjifard, Mahmoud; Esfahanizadeh, Jamil; Sepehri Shamloo, Alireza; Purafzali Firuzabadi, Seyed Javad; Zirak, Nahid

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac surgery under Cardiopulmonary bypass causes a systemic inflammatory response with a multifactorial etiology including direct tissue damage, ischemia and stimulation of immune system induced by cardiopulmonary bypass. This study was designed due to the high prevalence and complications of this stimulated immune system in mortality, morbidity, length of ICU stay, and mechanical ventilation. This study was aimed to compare preoperative and intraoperative methylprednisolone (MP) to intraoperative MP alone with respect to postbypass inflammation and clinical outcome. Sixty pediatric patients (age 0.05). No significant difference in amount of inotropic medications used for hemodynamic supports, duration of mechanical ventilation, peak and average temperature and length of ICU stay was observed. Among the laboratory tests (WBC, BUN, creatinine, CRP) only WBC counts raised more in group 2 when compared to group 1(P < 0.05). There was no difference in clinical outcome after cardiac surgery when we administered an additional dose of methylprednisolone compared to a single dose of methylprednisolone.

  7. E-learning teaches attendings "how to" objectively assess pediatric urology trainees' surgery skills for orchiopexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Nicolas; Maizels, Max; Farhat, Walid; Smith, Edwin; Liu, Dennis; Chua, Michael; Bhanji, Yasin

    2018-04-01

    Established methods to train pediatric urology surgery by residency training programs require updating in response to administrative changes such as new, reduced trainee duty hours. Therefore, new objective methods must be developed to teach trainees. We approached this need by creating e-learning to teach attendings objective assessment of trainee skills using the Zwisch scale, an established assessment tool. The aim of this study was to identify whether or not e-learning is an appropriate platform for effective teaching of this assessment tool, by assessing inter-rater correlation of assessments made by the attendings after participation in the e-learning. Pediatric orchiopexy was used as the index case. An e-learning tool was created to teach attending surgeons objective assessment of trainees' surgical skills. First, e-learning content was created which showed the assessment method videotape of resident surgery done in the operating room. Next, attendings were enrolled to e-learn this method. Finally, the ability of enrollees to assess resident surgery skill performance was tested. Namely, test video was made showing a trainee performing inguinal orchiopexy. All enrollees viewed the same online videos. Assessments of surgical skills (Zwisch scale) were entered into an online survey. Data were analyzed by intercorrelation coefficient kappa analysis (strong correlation was ICC ≥ 0.7). A total of 11 attendings were enrolled. All accessed the online learning and then made assessments of surgical skills trainees showed on videotapes. The e-learning comprised three modules: 1. "Core concepts," in which users learned the assessment tool methods; 2. "Learn to assess," in which users learned how to assess by watching video clips, explaining the assessment method; and 3. "Test," in which users tested their skill at making assessments by watching video clips and then actively inputting their ratings of surgical and global skills as viewed in the video clips (Figure

  8. Blood transfusion determines postoperative morbidity in pediatric cardiac surgery applying a comprehensive blood-sparing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlin, Matthias; Kukucka, Marian; Boettcher, Wolfgang; Schoenfeld, Helge; Huebler, Michael; Kuppe, Hermann; Habazettl, Helmut

    2013-09-01

    Recently we suggested a comprehensive blood-sparing approach in pediatric cardiac surgery that resulted in no transfusion in 71 infants (25%), postoperative transfusion only in 68 (24%), and intraoperative transfusion in 149 (52%). We analyzed the effects of transfusion on postoperative morbidity and mortality in the same cohort of patients. The effect of transfusion on the length of mechanical ventilation and intensive care unit stay was assessed using Kaplan-Meier curves. To assess whether transfusion independently determined the length of mechanical ventilation and length of intensive care unit stay, a multivariate model was applied. Additionally, in the subgroup of transfused infants, the effect of the applied volume of packed red blood cells was assessed. The median length of mechanical ventilation was 11 hours (interquartile range, 9-18 hours), 33 hours (interquartile range, 18-80 hours), and 93 hours (interquartile range, 34-161 hours) in the no transfusion, postoperative transfusion only, and intraoperative transfusion groups, respectively (P interquartile range, 1-2 days), 3.5 days (interquartile range, 2-5 days), and 8 days (interquartile range, 3-9 days; P < .00001). The multivariate hazard ratio for early extubation was 0.24 (95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.35) and 0.37 (95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.55) for the intraoperative transfusion and postoperative transfusion only groups, respectively (P < .00001). In addition, the cardiopulmonary time, body weight, need for reoperation, and hemoglobin during cardiopulmonary bypass affected the length of mechanical ventilation. Similar results were obtained for the length of intensive care unit stay. In the subgroup of transfused infants, the volume of packed red blood cells also independently affected both the length of mechanical ventilation and the length of intensive care unit stay. The incidence and volume of blood transfusion markedly affects postoperative morbidity in pediatric cardiac surgery. These

  9. Orthognathic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard Larsen, Marie; Thygesen, Torben Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The literature shows that the indications for orthognathic surgery (OS) are often functional problems and unsatisfactory facial esthetics. This study investigated the esthetic outcomes and overall satisfaction following OS. Somatosensory change is a relatively common complication and its influence...... on the level of satisfaction was studied. The social-networking web site Facebook was used to identify the study population. An online questionnaire was performed using the website SurveyMonkey. In all, 105 (9%) respondents from the Danish Facebook group about OS, called Kaebeoperation (jaw surgery), were...... in beauty than women (P = 0.030). Sixty-four percent replied that their attractiveness had been increased after OS. Eighty-six percent were happy with the results and 89% would recommend the surgery to others in need. No significant differences in esthetic results and satisfaction were seen with regard...

  10. Intestinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrochers, André; Anderson, David E

    2016-11-01

    A wide variety of disorders affecting the intestinal tract in cattle may require surgery. Among those disorders the more common are: intestinal volvulus, jejunal hemorrhage syndrome and more recently the duodenal sigmoid flexure volvulus. Although general principles of intestinal surgery can be applied, cattle has anatomical and behavior particularities that must be known before invading the abdomen. This article focuses on surgical techniques used to optimize outcomes and discusses specific disorders of small intestine. Diagnoses and surgical techniques presented can be applied in field conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The 2017 Seventh World Congress of Pediatric Cardiology & Cardiac Surgery: week in review - ambulatory pediatric cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Devyani

    2017-12-01

    The Seventh World Congress of Pediatric Cardiology was held in Barcelona in July, 2017. The central philosophy of the congress was "bridging together" all major specialties in the field. This article summarises the highlights of the meeting as it relates to ambulatory paediatric cardiology. There is a now a more unified approach to children with CHD, including assessment of neuro-developmental outcomes. The new World Heart Foundation criteria for the diagnosis of rheumatic fever remain controversial.

  12. Survival outcomes of pediatric osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma: a comparison of surgery type within the SEER database, 1988-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrager, Justin; Patzer, Rachel E; Mink, Pamela J; Ward, Kevin C; Goodman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Survival following diagnosis of pediatric Ewing's sarcoma or osteosarcoma is increasing in the United States, but whether survival differs between patients who receive limb salvage surgery compared to amputation has not been evaluated in nationally representative, population-based data. Multivariable-adjusted survival was calculated using Cox regression models among surgically treated pediatric (age Ewing's sarcoma patients with bone cancer of the limbs or joints reported to the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program during 1988-2007. Over half (66.3%) of the 890 osteosarcoma patients underwent limb salvage surgery. Five-year overall survival among patients who received limb salvage was 72.7% for osteosarcoma patients and 71.8% for Ewing's sarcoma patients. Among patients who received amputation, 5-year survival was 60.1% for osteosarcoma and 63.1% for Ewing's sarcoma patients. After multivariable adjustment, the mortality was 35% greater for amputation vs limb salvage (HR=1.35, 95% CI: 1.05-1.75). Among 165 Ewing's sarcoma patients, 73.9% underwent limb salvage (vs amputation), and the adjusted mortality was higher for patients receiving amputation, although results were not statistically significant (HR=1.61, 95% CI: 0.80-3.21). Limb salvage surgery (vs amputation) is associated with longer survival among pediatric patients with bone cancer of the limbs or joints. Patient and physician characteristics and the effectiveness of neoadjuvant therapy may play a role in surgery choice, but we were unable to control for these factors.

  13. State of the practice for pediatric surgery--career satisfaction and concerns. A report from the American Pediatric Surgical Association Task Force on Family Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Aviva; Mallory, Baird; Gilbert, James C; Bethel, Colin; Hayes-Jordan, Andrea A; Saito, Jacqueline M; Tomita, Sandra S; Walsh, Danielle S; Shin, Cathy E; Wesley, John R; Farmer, Diana

    2010-10-01

    There has been increasing interest and concern raised in the surgical literature regarding changes in the culture of surgical training and practice, and the impact these changes may have on surgeon stress and the appeal of a career in surgery. We surveyed pediatric surgeons and their partners to collect information on career satisfaction and work-family balance. The American Pediatric Surgical Association Task Force on Family Issues developed separate survey instruments for both pediatric surgeons and their partners that requested demographic data and information regarding the impact of surgical training and practice on the surgeon's opportunity to be involved with his/her family. We found that 96% of pediatric surgeons were satisfied with their career choice. Of concern was the lack of balance, with little time available for family, noted by both pediatric surgeons and their partners. The issues of work-family balance and its impact on surgeon stress and burnout should be addressed in both pediatric surgery training and practice. The American Pediatric Surgical Association is positioned to play a leading role in this effort. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surgery. Since the first laparoscopic treatment of hydatid disease was described in 1992,14 there has been a steady growth in reports of the laparoscopic treatment of hydatid cysts of liver. Although early reported laparoscopic treatment of liver hydatid disease was confined to simple drainage, more advanced laparoscopic ...

  15. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Surgery, University of Cape Town Health Sciences Faculty, Groote Schuur Hospital, Observatory, Cape Town,. South Africa ... included all district, regional and tertiary hospitals in the nine provinces. Clinics and so-called ..... large contingency of senior general surgeons from countries such as Cuba, who have ...

  16. TRAUMA SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    meet the criteria for damage control surgery, and ligation of the AVC is a .... There were two vertebral body fractures, one penetrating brain injury from a gunshot wound to the head, one ... two hand fractures, three haemothoraces, one pelvic fracture, .... One patient with an intimal flap injury to his left common iliac artery ...

  17. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schwab , using a three-phase approach.5 In 1998, Moore et al. extended the concept and described the five-stage approach.6. The aim of damage control surgery is to prevent severely injured patients from developing the “lethal triad” of hypothermia, coagulopathy and worsening acidosis, as this confers a dismal prognosis ...

  18. Rodding Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physical activity prior to surgery,  Length of the operation; anesthesia issues,  Reason for the choice of rod,  Time in the hospital,  Length of recovery time at home,  Pain management including control of muscle spasms,  The rehabilitation plan. ...

  19. Chiari malformation Type I surgery in pediatric patients. Part 1: validation of an ICD-9-CM code search algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Travis R; Greenberg, Jacob K; Guerrero, Nicole; Olsen, Margaret A; Shannon, Chevis N; Yarbrough, Chester K; Piccirillo, Jay F; Anderson, Richard C E; Feldstein, Neil A; Wellons, John C; Smyth, Matthew D; Park, Tae Sung; Limbrick, David D

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Administrative billing data may facilitate large-scale assessments of treatment outcomes for pediatric Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I). Validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code algorithms for identifying CM-I surgery are critical prerequisites for such studies but are currently only available for adults. The objective of this study was to validate two ICD-9-CM code algorithms using hospital billing data to identify pediatric patients undergoing CM-I decompression surgery. METHODS The authors retrospectively analyzed the validity of two ICD-9-CM code algorithms for identifying pediatric CM-I decompression surgery performed at 3 academic medical centers between 2001 and 2013. Algorithm 1 included any discharge diagnosis code of 348.4 (CM-I), as well as a procedure code of 01.24 (cranial decompression) or 03.09 (spinal decompression or laminectomy). Algorithm 2 restricted this group to the subset of patients with a primary discharge diagnosis of 348.4. The positive predictive value (PPV) and sensitivity of each algorithm were calculated. RESULTS Among 625 first-time admissions identified by Algorithm 1, the overall PPV for CM-I decompression was 92%. Among the 581 admissions identified by Algorithm 2, the PPV was 97%. The PPV for Algorithm 1 was lower in one center (84%) compared with the other centers (93%-94%), whereas the PPV of Algorithm 2 remained high (96%-98%) across all subgroups. The sensitivity of Algorithms 1 (91%) and 2 (89%) was very good and remained so across subgroups (82%-97%). CONCLUSIONS An ICD-9-CM algorithm requiring a primary diagnosis of CM-I has excellent PPV and very good sensitivity for identifying CM-I decompression surgery in pediatric patients. These results establish a basis for utilizing administrative billing data to assess pediatric CM-I treatment outcomes.

  20. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  1. OSA screening with the pediatric sleep questionnaire for adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery in teen-LABS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishman, Stacey; Heubi, Christine; Jenkins, Todd; Michalsky, Marc; Simakajornboon, Narong; Inge, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is reported in 70% of adolescents who present for bariatric surgery. The Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ) was developed to identify children at risk for OSA but is not validated in adolescents with obesity. The aims of this study were: (1) to assess validity of the PSQ to detect OSA and (2) to determine the correlation between anthropometric and polysomnography measurements. A cross-sectional assessment of Teen-Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery participants at high risk for OSA was performed. Participants completed an overnight polysomnography, and caregivers completed the PSQ. Forty-five participants (84% female, 78% Caucasian, mean age = 16.7 ± 1.5 years) were evaluated. Mean BMI was 51.3 ± 7.7 kg/m 2 and mean obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (oAHI) was 6.1 ± 5.9 events/h. For diagnosis of OSA (oAHI ≥5), the total PSQ score sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) were 86%, 38%, and 55%, respectively. For snoring >50% of the time, PPV was 84%, sensitivity was 64%, and specificity was 43%. Sagittal abdominal diameter correlated with oAHI and oxygen saturation nadir (ρ = 0.34, P = 0.027), whereas BMI, neck, and waist circumference correlated with neither. The PSQ demonstrated low specificity, and PPV and the question regarding snoring >50% of the time did not effectively identify OSA. Sagittal abdominal diameter correlated with oAHI and oxygen saturation nadir. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  2. Pediatric cardiac surgery Parent Education Discharge Instruction (PEDI) program: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staveski, Sandra L; Zhelva, Bistra; Paul, Reena; Conway, Rosalind; Carlson, Anna; Soma, Gouthami; Kools, Susan; Franck, Linda S

    2015-01-01

    In developing countries, more children with complex cardiac defects now receive treatment for their condition. For successful long-term outcomes, children also need skilled care at home after discharge. The Parent Education Discharge Instruction (PEDI) program was developed to educate nurses on the importance of discharge teaching and to provide them with a structured process for conducting parent teaching for home care of children after cardiac surgery. The aim of this pilot study was to generate preliminary data on the feasibility and acceptability of the nurse-led structured discharge program on an Indian pediatric cardiac surgery unit. A pre-/post-design was used. Questionnaires were used to evaluate role acceptability, nurse and parent knowledge of discharge content, and utility of training materials with 40 nurses and 20 parents. Retrospective audits of 50 patient medical records (25 pre and 25 post) were performed to evaluate discharge teaching documentation. Nurses' discharge knowledge increased from a mean of 81% to 96% (P = .001) after participation in the training. Nurses and parents reported high levels of satisfaction with the education materials (3.75-4 on a 4.00-point scale). Evidence of discharge teaching documentation in patient medical records improved from 48% (12 of 25 medical records) to 96% (24 of 25 medical records) six months after the implementation of the PEDI program. The structured nurse-led parent discharge teaching program demonstrated feasibility, acceptability, utility, and sustainability in the cardiac unit. Future studies are needed to examine nurse, parent, child, and organizational outcomes related to this expanded nursing role in resource-constrained environments. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Surgical checklist application and its impact on patient safety in pediatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S N Oak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical care is an essential component of health care of children worldwide. Incidences of congenital anomalies, trauma, cancers and acquired diseases continue to rise and along with that the impact of surgical intervention on public health system also increases. It then becomes essential that the surgical teams make the procedures safe and error proof. The World Health Organization (WHO has instituted the surgical checklist as a global initiative to improve surgical safety. Aims: To assess the acceptance, application and adherence to the WHO Safe Surgery Checklist in Pediatric Surgery Practice at a university teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: In a prospective study, spanning 2 years, the checklist was implemented for all patients who underwent operative procedures under general anesthesia. The checklist identified three phases of an operation, each corresponding to a specific period in the normal flow of work: Before the induction of anesthesia ("sign in", before the skin incision ("time out" and before the patient leaves the operating room ("sign out". In each phase, an anesthesiologist,-"checklist coordinator," confirmed that the anesthesia, surgery and nursing teams have completed the listed tasks before proceeding with the operation and exit. The checklist was used for 3000 consecutive patients. Results: No major perioperative errors were noted. In 54 (1.8% patients, children had the same names and identical surgical procedure posted on the same operation list. The patient identification tag was missing in four (0.1% patients. Mention of the side of procedures was missing in 108 (3.6% cases. In 0.1% (3 of patients there was mix up of the mention of side of operation in the case papers and consent forms. In 78 (2.6% patients, the consent form was not signed by parents/guardians or the side of the procedure was not quoted. Antibiotic orders were missing in five (0.2% patients. In 12 (0.4% cases, immobilization of the

  4. [Bariatric surgery in obese adolescents: When and how should the transition from pediatric to adult medical management be made?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paepegaey, A-C; Dubern, B; Karsenty, A; Chantereau, H; Aron-Wisnewsky, J; Oderda, L; Hadoux, M; Robert-Gary, A; Bouillot, J-L; Oppert, J-M; Tounian, P; Poitou, C

    2015-12-01

    In young obese patients, the transition from adolescence to adulthood, i.e., the transition from the pediatric to the adult medical team, is a new issue. In particular, it is important to define when and how this transition should be made in the setting of bariatric surgery. Fourteen young obese patients (under the age of 20), who underwent bariatric surgery, were included in the study (nine cases of Roux-en-Y gastric by-pass, three sleeve gastrectomy, one gastric banding). After surgery, the patients were followed in both the pediatric and adult departments (protocol 1) or only in the pediatric department during the 1st year and then in the adult department afterwards (protocol 2). Anthropometric and metabolic data, before and after surgery, and compliance monitoring were analyzed using a retrospective design. Twelve patients completed a questionnaire assessing how they experienced the transition. Before surgery, mean age±SD was 16.3±1.8 years old and mean body mass index (BMI) 55.0±8.6kg/m(2). At 1 year after surgery, mean weight loss was -32.1±8.2% of initial body weight. Adherence to vitamin supplementation was judged to be adequate (vitamins were not taken less than once a week) for only 57.5% patients. Mean follow-up was 34.8±25.1 months [95% CI, 9.5-78.4]. None of the patients was lost to follow-up. Compliance was significantly better for patients following protocol 2. Adolescents reported being satisfied with meetings and newsletters about surgery, specific to this age group (91.7%). They also reported that information on the adult department was sufficient and 91.7% of them expressed satisfaction on the first outpatient visit in the adult department. However, all patients spontaneously reported having difficulties identifying members of the different teams: nutritionist pediatrician, nutritionist, and adult surgeon. These preliminary data suggest that, in obese adolescents, it is important to differentiate the transition period and the time and

  5. Metabolic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Manan; Schauer, Philip R; Kaplan, Lee M

    2018-01-01

    The alarming rise in the worldwide prevalence of obesity is paralleled by an increasing burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metabolic surgery is the most effective means of obtaining substantial and durable weight loss in individuals with obesity. Randomized trials have recently shown...... the superiority of surgery over medical treatment alone in achieving improved glycemic control, as well as a reduction in cardiovascular risk factors. The mechanisms seem to extend beyond the magnitude of weight loss alone and include improvements in incretin profiles, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity....... Moreover, observational data suggest that the reduction in cardiovascular risk factors translates to better patient outcomes. This review describes commonly used metabolic surgical procedures and their current indications and summarizes the evidence related to weight loss and glycemic outcomes. It further...

  6. Preparing for Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Preparing for Surgery Home For Patients Search FAQs Preparing for Surgery ... Surgery FAQ080, August 2011 PDF Format Preparing for Surgery Gynecologic Problems What is the difference between outpatient ...

  7. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft ... Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft ...

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft ... Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft ...

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  10. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  11. Heart bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass; OPCAB; Beating heart surgery; Bypass surgery - heart; CABG; Coronary artery bypass graft; Coronary artery bypass surgery; Coronary bypass surgery; Coronary artery disease - CABG; CAD - CABG; Angina - ...

  12. Individualized prediction of seizure relapse and outcomes following antiepileptic drug withdrawal after pediatric epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberink, Herm J; Boshuisen, Kim; Otte, Willem M; Geleijns, Karin; Braun, Kees P J

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to create a clinically useful tool for individualized prediction of seizure outcomes following antiepileptic drug withdrawal after pediatric epilepsy surgery. We used data from the European retrospective TimeToStop study, which included 766 children from 15 centers, to perform a proportional hazard regression analysis. The 2 outcome measures were seizure recurrence and seizure freedom in the last year of follow-up. Prognostic factors were identified through systematic review of the literature. The strongest predictors for each outcome were selected through backward selection, after which nomograms were created. The final models included 3 to 5 factors per model. Discrimination in terms of adjusted concordance statistic was 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.67-0.69) for predicting seizure recurrence and 0.73 (95% CI 0.72-0.75) for predicting eventual seizure freedom. An online prediction tool is provided on www.epilepsypredictiontools.info/ttswithdrawal. The presented models can improve counseling of patients and parents regarding postoperative antiepileptic drug policies, by estimating individualized risks of seizure recurrence and eventual outcome. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. CHANGING PARADIGMS IN PREOPERATIVE FASTING: RESULTS OF A JOINT EFFORT IN PEDIATRIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Carlos Augusto Leite de Barros; Carvalho, Augusto Aurélio de; Nogueira, Paulo Luiz Batista; Aguilar-Nascimento, José Eduardo de

    2017-01-01

    Current researches associate long fasting periods to several adverse consequences. The fasting abbreviation to 2 h to clear liquids associated with the use of drinks containing carbohydrates attenuates endocrinometabolic response to surgical trauma, but often is observed children advised to not intake food from 00:00 h till the scheduled surgical time, regardless of what it is. To evaluate the safety of a protocol of preoperative fasting abbreviation with a beverage containing carbohydrates, and early postoperative feeding in children underwent elective small/mid-size surgical procedures during a national task-force on pediatric surgery. Thirty-six patients were prospectively included, and for several reasons five were excluded. All 31 who remained in the study received a nutritional supplement containing 150 ml of water plus 12.5% maltodextrin 2 h before the procedure. Data of the pre-operative fasting time, anesthetic complications and time of postoperative refeeding, were collected. Twenty-three (74.2%) were males, the median age was 5 y, and the median weight was 20 kg. The median time of pre-operative fasting was 145 min and the time of post-operative refeeding was 135 min. There were no adverse effects on the anesthetic procedures or during surgery. Post-operatively, two children (6.5%) vomited. The abbreviation of pre-operative fasting to 2 h with beverage containing carbohydrate in pediatric surgery is safe. Early refeeding in elective small/mid-size procedures can be prescribed. Trabalhos atuais associam longos períodos de jejum com diversas consequências adversas. A abreviação do jejum de 2 h para líquidos claros associado ao uso de bebidas contendo carboidratos atenua resposta endocrinometabólica ao trauma, porém frequentemente as crianças são orientadas a não ingerir alimentos a partir das 00:00 h do dia anterior à operação, independente do horário do procedimento cirúrgico. Avaliar a segurança de um protocolo de abreviação do jejum pr

  14. Custodiol versus blood cardioplegia in pediatric cardiac surgery, two-center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebtehal A. Qulisy

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: Custodial cardioplegia is associated with less optimal myocardial protection and higher adverse outcomes compared to cold blood cardioplegia in children undergoing cardiac surgery. A randomized comparison is warranted.

  15. Comparison of maintenance, emergence and recovery characteristics of sevoflurane and desflurane in pediatric ambulatory surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish B Kotwani

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Desflurane provides faster emergence and recovery in comparison to sevoflurane when used for the maintenance of anesthesia through SGA in children. Both sevoflurane and desflurane can be safely used in children for lower abdominal surgeries.

  16. Blood conservation pediatric cardiac surgery in all ages and complexity levels

    OpenAIRE

    Karimi, Mohsen; Sullivan, Jill M; Linthicum, Carrie; Mathew, Anil

    2017-01-01

    AIM To demonstrate the feasibility of blood conservation methods and practice across all ages and risk categories in congenital cardiac surgery. METHODS We retrospectively analyzed a collected database of 356 patients who underwent cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) from 2010-2015. The patients were grouped into blood conservation (n = 138) and non-conservation (n = 218) groups and sub-grouped based on their ages and procedural complexity scores. RESULTS There were no statisti...

  17. Evaluation of a Pilot Project to Introduce Simulation-Based Team Training to Pediatric Surgery Trauma Room Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Lehner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Several studies in pediatric trauma care have demonstrated substantial deficits in both prehospital and emergency department management. Methods. In February 2015 the PAEDSIM collaborative conducted a one and a half day interdisciplinary, simulation based team-training course in a simulated pediatric emergency department. 14 physicians from the medical fields of pediatric surgery, pediatric intensive care and emergency medicine, and anesthesia participated, as well as four pediatric nurses. After a theoretical introduction and familiarization with the simulator, course attendees alternately participated in six simulation scenarios and debriefings. Each scenario incorporated elements of pediatric trauma management as well as Crew Resource Management (CRM educational objectives. Participants completed anonymous pre- and postcourse questionnaires and rated the course itself as well as their own medical qualification and knowledge of CRM. Results. Participants found the course very realistic and selected scenarios highly relevant to their daily work. They reported a feeling of improved medical and nontechnical skills as well as no uncomfortable feeling during scenarios or debriefings. Conclusion. To our knowledge this pilot-project represents the first successful implementation of a simulation-based team-training course focused on pediatric trauma care in German-speaking countries with good acceptance.

  18. Should spikes on post-resection ECoG guide pediatric epilepsy surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Hansel M; Horn, Paul S; Tenney, Jeffrey R; Arya, Ravindra; Jain, Sejal V; Holland, Katherine D; Leach, James L; Miles, Lili; Rose, Douglas F; Fujiwara, Hisako; Mangano, Francesco T

    2016-05-01

    There is wide variation in clinical practice regarding the role of electrocorticography immediately after resection (post-resection ECoG) for pediatric epilepsy surgery. Results can guide further resection of potentially epileptogenic tissue. We hypothesized that post-resection ECoG spiking represents a biomarker of the epileptogenic zone and predicts seizure outcome in children undergoing epilepsy surgery. We retrospectively identified 124 children with post-resection ECoG performed on the margins of resection. ECoG records were scored in a blinded fashion based on presence of frequent spiking. For patients identified as having additional resection based on clinical post-resection ECoG interpretation, these "second-look" ECoG results were re-reviewed for ongoing discharges or completeness of resection. Frequent spike populations were grouped using a standard scoring system into three ranges: 0.1-0.5Hz, 0.5-1Hz, >1Hz. Seizure outcomes were determined at minimum 12-month followup. Of 124 patients who met inclusion criteria, 60 (48%) had an identified spike population on post-resection ECoG. Thirty (50%) of these had further resection based on clinical interpretation. Overall, good outcome (ILAE 1) was seen in 56/124 (45%). Completeness of resection of spiking (absence of spiking on initial post-resection ECoG or resolution of spiking after further resection) showed a trend toward good outcome (OR 2.03, p=0.099). Patients with completeness of resection had good outcome in 41/80 (51%) of cases; patients with continued spikes had good outcome in 15/44 (35%) of cases. Post-resection ECoG identifies residual epileptogenic tissue in a significant number of children. Lower frequency or absence of discharges on initial recording showed a trend toward good outcome. Completeness of resection demonstrated on final ECoG recording did not show a significant difference in outcome. This suggests that post-resection discharges represent a prognostic marker rather than a remediable

  19. A study on the efficacy and safety of combining dental surgery with tonsillectomy in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed F

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Faizaan Syed,1 Joshua C Uffman,1,2 Dmitry Tumin,1 Catherine M Flaitz,3,4 Joseph D Tobias,1,2 Vidya T Raman1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, 3Department of Dentistry, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 4Division of Dentistry, The Ohio State University College of Dentistry, Columbus, OH, USA Purpose: Few data exist on combining pediatric surgical procedures under a single general anesthetic encounter (general anesthesia. We compared perioperative outcomes of combining dental surgical procedures with tonsillectomy during one anesthetic vs separate encounters. Methods: We classified elective tonsillectomy ± adenoidectomy and restorative dentistry as combined (group C or separate (group S. Outcomes included anesthesia time, recovery duration, the need for overnight hospital stay, and postoperative complications. Results: Patients aged 4±1 years underwent tonsillectomy and dental surgery in combination (n=7 or separately (n=27. No differences were noted in total anesthesia time (C: median: 150, interquartile range [IQR]: 99, 165 vs S: median: 109, IQR: 92, 132; 95% CI of difference in median: –58, +10 minutes; P=0.115 and total recovery time (C: median: 54, IQR: 40, 108 vs S: median: 72, IQR: 58, 109; 95% CI of difference in median: –16, +48 minutes; P=0.307. The need for overnight stay (C: 4 of 7, S: 20 of 27; P=0.394 did not differ between the groups. No postoperative complications were noted in either group. Conclusion: These preliminary data support the potential feasibility of combining dental procedures with tonsillectomy during a single anesthetic encounter. Such care may not only reduce costs but also limit parental work absences and increase convenience for patient families. When compared with procedures performed separately, combined procedures did not result in increased morbidity or

  20. Surgical Site Infections in Pediatric Spine Surgery: Comparative Microbiology of Patients with Idiopathic and Nonidiopathic Etiologies of Spine Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesani, Matthieu; Doit, Catherine; Lorrot, Mathie; Vitoux, Christine; Hilly, Julie; Michelet, Daphné; Vidal, Christophe; Julien-Marsollier, Florence; Ilharreborde, Brice; Mazda, Keyvan; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Dahmani, Souhayl

    2016-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a concern in pediatric spine surgery with unusually high rates for a clean surgery and especially for patients with deformity of nonidiopathic etiology. Microbiologic differences between etiologies of spine deformities have been poorly investigated. We reviewed all cases of SSI in spinal surgery between 2007 and 2011. Characteristics of cases and of bacteria according to the etiology of the spine disease were investigated. Of 496 surgeries, we identified 51 SSIs (10.3%) in 49 patients. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent pathogen whatever the etiology (n = 31, 61% of infection cases). The second most frequent pathogens vary according to the etiology of the spine deformity. It was Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) in nonidiopathic cases (n = 19, 45% of cases) and anaerobe in idiopathic cases (n = 8, 38% of cases), particularly Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (n = 5, 24% of cases). Infection rate was 6.8% in cases with idiopathic spine disease (n = 21) and 15.9% in cases with nonidiopathic spine disease (n = 30). Nonidiopathic cases were more frequently male with lower weight. American Society of Anesthesiologists score was more often greater than 2, they had more frequently sacral implants and postoperative intensive care unit stay. GNB were significantly associated with a nonidiopathic etiology, low weight, younger age and sacral fusion. SSIs were polymicrobial in 31% of cases with a mean of 1.4 species per infection cases. S. aureus is the first cause of SSI in pediatric spine surgery. However, Gram-positive anaerobic cocci should be taken into account in idiopathic patients and GNB in nonidiopathic patients when considering antibiotic prophylaxis and curative treatment.

  1. The use of throat packs in pediatric cleft lip/palate surgery: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarius, B J A; Guillaume, C H A L; Jonker, G; van der Molen, A B Mink; Breugem, C C

    2018-02-22

    Throat packs are commonly used to prevent ingestion or aspiration of blood and other debris during cleft lip/palate surgery. However, dislodgement or (partial) retainment after extubation could have serious consequences. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of omitting pharyngeal packing during cleft lip/palate surgery on the incidence of early postoperative complications in children. A retrospective study was performed on all children who underwent cleft lip/palate surgery at the Wilhelmina Children's Hospital. This study compared the period January 2010 through December 2012 when pharyngeal packing was applied according to local protocol (group A) with the period January 2013 till December 2015 when pharyngeal packing was no longer applied after removal from the protocol (group B). Data were collected for sex, age at operation, cleft lip/palate type, type of repair, lateral incisions, length of hospital stay, and complications in the first 6 weeks after surgery. Early complications included wound dehiscence, postoperative bleeding, infection, fever, upper respiratory tract infection (URTI), and lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). This study included 489 cleft lip/palate operations (group A n = 246, group B n = 243). A total of 39 (15.9%) early complications were recorded in group A and a total of 40 (16.5%) in group B. There were no significant differences (P = 0.902) in complications between the two groups; however, there was a significant difference (P cleft lip/palate surgery was not associated with an increased early postoperative complication rate. Therefore, the traditional, routine placement of a throat pack during cleft lip/palate surgery can be questioned. The traditional, routine placement of a throat pack during cleft lip/palate surgery can be questioned.

  2. Computer-assisted operational planning for pediatric abdominal surgery. 3D-visualized MRI with volume rendering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, P.; Holland-Cunz, S.; Waag, K.L.

    2006-01-01

    Exact surgical planning is necessary for complex operations of pathological changes in anatomical structures of the pediatric abdomen. 3D visualization and computer-assisted operational planning based on CT data are being increasingly used for difficult operations in adults. To minimize radiation exposure and for better soft tissue contrast, sonography and MRI are the preferred diagnostic methods in pediatric patients. Because of manifold difficulties 3D visualization of these MRI data has not been realized so far, even though the field of embryonal malformations and tumors could benefit from this. A newly developed and modified raycasting-based powerful 3D volume rendering software (VG Studio Max 1.2) for the planning of pediatric abdominal surgery is presented. With the help of specifically developed algorithms, a useful surgical planning system is demonstrated. Thanks to the easy handling and high-quality visualization with enormous gain of information, the presented system is now an established part of routine surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  3. [Computer-assisted operational planning for pediatric abdominal surgery. 3D-visualized MRI with volume rendering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, P; Tröger, J; Holland-Cunz, S; Waag, K L; Schenk, J P

    2006-08-01

    Exact surgical planning is necessary for complex operations of pathological changes in anatomical structures of the pediatric abdomen. 3D visualization and computer-assisted operational planning based on CT data are being increasingly used for difficult operations in adults. To minimize radiation exposure and for better soft tissue contrast, sonography and MRI are the preferred diagnostic methods in pediatric patients. Because of manifold difficulties 3D visualization of these MRI data has not been realized so far, even though the field of embryonal malformations and tumors could benefit from this.A newly developed and modified raycasting-based powerful 3D volume rendering software (VG Studio Max 1.2) for the planning of pediatric abdominal surgery is presented. With the help of specifically developed algorithms, a useful surgical planning system is demonstrated. Thanks to the easy handling and high-quality visualization with enormous gain of information, the presented system is now an established part of routine surgical planning.

  4. Esophageal replacement by gastric tube: is three-stage surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    useful alternative under a resource-limited condition, with optimal outcome. Ann Pediatr Surg 10:7–9 c 2014 Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Annals of Pediatric Surgery 2014, 10:7–9. Keywords: esophageal replacement, gastric tube, long gap esophageal atresia, pure esophageal atresia. Departments of aPediatric Surgery ...

  5. Establishing a portfolio of quality-improvement projects in pediatric surgery through advanced improvement leadership systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrein, Betsy T; Williams, Christina E; Von Allmen, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Formal quality-improvement (QI) projects require that participants are educated in QI methods to provide them with the capability to carry out successful, meaningful work. However, orchestrating a portfolio of projects that addresses the strategic mission of the institution requires an extension of basic QI training to provide the division or business unit with the capacity to successfully develop and manage the portfolio. Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems is a program to help units create a meaningful portfolio. This program, used by the Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, helped establish a portfolio of targeted QI projects designed to achieve outstanding outcomes at competitive costs in multiple clinical areas aligned with the institution's strategic goals (improve disease-based outcomes, patient safety, flow, and patient and family experience). These objectives are addressed in an institutional strategic plan built around 5 core areas: Safety, Productivity, Care Coordination and Outcomes, Patient and Family Experience, and Value. By combining the portfolio of QI projects with improvements in the divisional infrastructure, effective improvement efforts were realized throughout the division. In the 9 months following the program, divisional capability resulted in a 16.5% increase (5.7% to 22.2%) of formally trained staff working on 10 QI teams. Concurrently, a leadership team, designed to coordinate projects, remove barriers, and provide technical support, provided the capacity to pursue this ongoing effort. The Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems program increased the Division's efficiency and effectiveness in pursing the QI mission that is integral at our hospital.

  6. Establishing a Portfolio of Quality-Improvement Projects in Pediatric Surgery through Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrein, Betsy T; Williams, Christina E; von Allmen, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Formal quality-improvement (QI) projects require that participants are educated in QI methods to provide them with the capability to carry out successful, meaningful work. However, orchestrating a portfolio of projects that addresses the strategic mission of the institution requires an extension of basic QI training to provide the division or business unit with the capacity to successfully develop and manage the portfolio. Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems is a program to help units create a meaningful portfolio. This program, used by the Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, helped establish a portfolio of targeted QI projects designed to achieve outstanding outcomes at competitive costs in multiple clinical areas aligned with the institution’s strategic goals (improve disease-based outcomes, patient safety, flow, and patient and family experience). These objectives are addressed in an institutional strategic plan built around 5 core areas: Safety, Productivity, Care Coordination and Outcomes, Patient and Family Experience, and Value. By combining the portfolio of QI projects with improvements in the divisional infrastructure, effective improvement efforts were realized throughout the division. In the 9 months following the program, divisional capability resulted in a 16.5% increase (5.7% to 22.2%) of formally trained staff working on 10 QI teams. Concurrently, a leadership team, designed to coordinate projects, remove barriers, and provide technical support, provided the capacity to pursue this ongoing effort. The Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems program increased the Division’s efficiency and effectiveness in pursing the QI mission that is integral at our hospital. PMID:24361020

  7. Beneficial impact of high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging on the efficacy of pediatric low-grade glioma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, Constantin; Breitkopf, Martin; Ms; Bisdas, Sotirios; Freitas, Rousinelle da Silva; Dimostheni, Artemisia; Ebinger, Martin; Wolff, Markus; Tatagiba, Marcos; Schuhmann, Martin U

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative MRI (iMRI) is assumed to safely improve the extent of resection (EOR) in patients with gliomas. This study focuses on advantages of this imaging technology in elective low-grade glioma (LGG) surgery in pediatric patients. The surgical results of conventional and 1.5-T iMRI-guided elective LGG surgery in pediatric patients were retrospectively compared. Tumor volumes, general clinical data, EOR according to reference radiology assessment, and progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed. Sixty-five patients were included in the study, of whom 34 had undergone conventional surgery before the iMRI unit opened (pre-iMRI period) and 31 had undergone surgery with iMRI guidance (iMRI period). Perioperative data were comparable between the 2 cohorts, apart from larger preoperative tumor volumes in the pre-iMRI period, a difference without statistical significance, and (as expected) significantly longer surgeries in the iMRI group. According to 3-month postoperative MRI studies, an intended complete resection (CR) was achieved in 41% (12 of 29) of the patients in the pre-iMRI period and in 71% (17 of 24) of those in the iMRI period (p = 0.05). Of those cases in which the surgeon was postoperatively convinced that he had successfully achieved CR, this proved to be true in only 50% of cases in the pre-iMRI period but in 81% of cases in the iMRI period (p = 0.055). Residual tumor volumes on 3-month postoperative MRI were significantly smaller in the iMRI cohort (p surgery was noticeably better for the entire iMRI cohort and in iMRI patients with postoperatively assumed CR, but did not quite reach statistical significance. Moreover, PFS was highly significantly better in patients with CRs than in those with incomplete resections (p < 0.001). Significantly better surgical results (CR) and PFS were achieved after using iMRI in patients in whom total resections were intended. Therefore, the use of high-field iMRI is strongly recommended for electively planned LGG

  8. Blood conservation pediatric cardiac surgery in all ages and complexity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mohsen; Sullivan, Jill M; Linthicum, Carrie; Mathew, Anil

    2017-04-26

    To demonstrate the feasibility of blood conservation methods and practice across all ages and risk categories in congenital cardiac surgery. We retrospectively analyzed a collected database of 356 patients who underwent cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) from 2010-2015. The patients were grouped into blood conservation ( n = 138) and non-conservation ( n = 218) groups and sub-grouped based on their ages and procedural complexity scores. There were no statistical differences in gender, weight, pre-operative and pre-CPB hematocrit levels in both groups. Despite equivalent hematocrit levels during and after CPB for both groups, there was significantly less operative homologous blood utilized in blood conservation group across all ages and complexity levels. Blood conservation surgery can be performed in congenital patients needing cardiac surgery in all age groups and complexity categories. The above findings in addition to attendant risks and side effects of blood transfusion and the rising cost of safer blood products justify blood conservation in congenital cardiac surgery.

  9. Overweight/obesity and gastric fluid characteristics in pediatric day surgery: implications for fasting guidelines and pulmonary aspiration risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Sather, Scott D; Gallagher, Paul R; Kruge, Lydia E; Beus, Jonathan M; Ciampa, Brian P; Welch, Kevin Conor; Shah-Hosseini, Sina; Choi, Jieun S; Pachikara, Reshma; Minger, Kim; Litman, Ronald S; Schreiner, Mark S

    2009-09-01

    The safety of 2-h preoperative clear liquid fasts has not been established for overweight/obese pediatric day surgical patients. Healthy children and obese adults who fasted 2 h have small residual gastric fluid volumes (GFVs), which are thought to reflect low pulmonary aspiration risk. We sought to measure the prevalence of overweight/obesity in our day surgery population. We hypothesized that neither body mass index (BMI) percentile nor fasting duration would significantly affect GFV or gastric fluid pH. In children who were allowed clear liquids up until 2 h before surgery, we hypothesized that overweight/obese subjects would not have increased GFV over lean/normal subjects and that emesis/pulmonary aspiration events would be rare. Demographics, medical history, height, and weight were recorded for 1000 consecutive day surgery patients aged 2-12 yr. In addition, 1000 day surgery patients (age 2-12 yr) undergoing general endotracheal anesthesia were enrolled. After tracheal intubation, a 14-18F orogastric tube was inserted and gastric contents evacuated. Medications, fasting interval, GFV, pH, and emetic episodes were documented. Age- and gender-specific Center for Disease Control and Prevention growth charts (2000) were used to determine ideal body weight (IBW = 50th percentile) and to classify patients as lean/normal (BMI 25th-75th percentile), overweight (BMI > or = 85th to obese (BMI > or = 95th percentile). Of all day surgery patients, 14.0% were overweight and 13.3% were obese. Obese children had lower GFV per total body weight (P fasting duration or age. Decreased gastric fluid acidity was associated with younger age (P = 0.005), increased BMI percentile (P = 0.036), and African American race (P = 0.033). Emesis on induction occurred in eight patients (50% of whom were obese, P = 0.052, and 75% of whom had obstructive sleep apnea, P = 0.061). Emesis was associated with increased ASA physical status (P = 0.006) but not with fasting duration. There were no

  10. Accounting for early job turnover in recent pediatric surgery fellowship graduates: An American Pediatric Surgical Association Membership and Credentials Committee study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crafts, Trevor D; Bell, Teresa M; Srisuwananukorn, Andrew; Applebaum, Harry; Markel, Troy A

    2018-04-27

    Employment opportunities for graduating pediatric surgeons vary from year to year. Significant turnover among new employees indicates fellowship graduates may be unsophisticated in choosing job opportunities which will ultimately be satisfactory for themselves and their families. The purpose of this study was to assess what career, life, and social factors contributed to the turnover rates among pediatric surgeons in their first employment position. American Pediatric Surgical Association members who completed fellowship training between 2011 and 2016 were surveyed voluntarily. Only those who completed training in a pediatric surgery fellowship sanctioned by the American Board of Surgery and whose first employment involved the direct surgical care of patients were included. The survey was completed electronically and the results were evaluated using chi-squared analysis to determine which independent variables contributed to a dependent outcome of changing place of employment. 110 surveys were returned with respondents meeting inclusion criteria. 13 (11.8%) of the respondents changed jobs within the study period and 97 (88.2%) did not change jobs. Factors identified that likely contributed to changing jobs included a perceived lack of opportunity for career [p = career goals unfulfilled by practice [p = 0.011]; lack of mentorship in partners [p = 0.026]; and desire to be closer to the surgeon's or their spouse's family [p = 0.002]. Several factors appear to play a role in motivating young pediatric surgeons to change jobs early in their careers. These factors should be taken into account by senior pediatric fellows and their advisors when considering job opportunities. Survey. IV. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Intraoperative radiation exposure in spinal scoliosis surgery for pediatric patients using the O-arm® imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Ando, Kei; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Machino, Masaaki; Ota, Kyotaro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Imagama, Shiro

    2018-05-01

    The O-arm ® navigation system allows intraoperative CT imaging that can facilitate highly accurate instrumentation surgery, but radiation exposure is higher than with X-ray radiography. This is a particular concern in pediatric surgery. The purpose of this study is to examine intraoperative radiation exposure in pediatric spinal scoliosis surgery using O-arm. The subjects were 38 consecutive patients (mean age 12.9 years, range 10-17) with scoliosis who underwent spinal surgery with posterior instrumentation using O-arm. The mean number of fused vertebral levels was 11.0 (6-15). O-arm was performed before and after screw insertion, using an original protocol for the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine doses. The average scanning range was 6.9 (5-9) intervertebral levels per scan, with 2-7 scans per patient (mean 4.0 scans). Using O-arm, the dose per scan was 92.5 (44-130) mGy, and the mean total dose was 401 (170-826) mGy. This dose was 80.2% of the mean preoperative CT dose of 460 (231-736) mGy (P = 0.11). The total exposure dose and number of scans using intraoperative O-arm correlated strongly and significantly with the number of fused levels; however, there was no correlation with the patient's height. As the fused range became wider, several scans were required for O-arm, and the total radiation exposure became roughly the same as that in preoperative CT. Use of O-arm in our original protocol can contribute to reduction in radiation exposure.

  12. Immune regulation following pediatric cardiac surgery - What goes up must come down

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schadenberg, A.W.L.

    2013-01-01

    The immune system is a dynamic system that is designed to respond rapidly to potential harmful stimuli. Following activation tight control mechanisms are in place to avoid collateral damage. Cardiac surgery is well known to induce an acute systemic inflammatory response and therefore, elective

  13. Panophthalmitis with orbital cellulitis following glaucoma drainage implant surgery in a pediatric patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno L. B. Esporcatte

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Here we report a case of childhood glaucoma refractory to angle and trabeculectomy surgery. The patient was treated with an Ahmed™ drainage implant that was subsequently complicated by rapid-onset panophthalmitis and orbital cellulitis. Intravenous and intravitreal antibiotic therapy was initiated and the drainage tube was removed. The infectious process resolved within 3 weeks; however, phthisis bulbi developed subsequently.

  14. Acute renal insufficiency and renal replacement therapy after pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kist-van Holthe tot Echten, J. E.; Goedvolk, C. A.; Doornaar, M. B.; van der Vorst, M. M.; Bosman-Vermeeren, J. M.; Brand, R.; van der Heijden, A. J.; Schoof, P. H.; Hazekamp, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate renal function and renal replacement therapy after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery in children. Patient characteristics (sex, age, diagnosis), operation type, and death were listed. The study was performed retrospectively using serum creatinine level before,

  15. The Effects of Perioperative Music Interventions in Pediatric Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne J E van der Heijden

    Full Text Available Music interventions are widely used, but have not yet gained a place in guidelines for pediatric surgery or pediatric anesthesia. In this systematic review and meta-analysis we examined the effects of music interventions on pain, anxiety and distress in children undergoing invasive surgery.We searched 25 electronic databases from their first available date until October 2014.Included were all randomized controlled trials with a parallel group, crossover or cluster design that included pediatric patients from 1 month to 18 years old undergoing minimally invasive or invasive surgical procedures, and receiving either live music therapy or recorded music.4846 records were retrieved from the searches, 26 full text reports were evaluated and data was extracted by two independent investigators.Pain was measured with the Visual Analogue Scale, the Coloured Analogue Scale and the Facial Pain Scale. Anxiety and distress were measured with an emotional index scale (not validated, the Spielberger short State Trait Anxiety Inventory and a Facial Affective Scale.Three RCTs were eligible for inclusion encompassing 196 orthopedic, cardiac and day surgery patients (age of 1 day to 18 years receiving either live music therapy or recorded music. Overall a statistically significant positive effect was demonstrated on postoperative pain (SMD -1.07; 95%CI-2.08; -0.07 and on anxiety and distress (SMD -0.34 95% CI -0.66; -0.01 and SMD -0.50; 95% CI -0.84; - 0.16.This systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that music interventions may have a statistically significant effect in reducing post-operative pain, anxiety and distress in children undergoing a surgical procedure. Evidence from this review and other reviews suggests music therapy may be considered for clinical use.

  16. The Effects of Perioperative Music Interventions in Pediatric Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Marianne J E; Oliai Araghi, Sadaf; van Dijk, Monique; Jeekel, Johannes; Hunink, M G Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Music interventions are widely used, but have not yet gained a place in guidelines for pediatric surgery or pediatric anesthesia. In this systematic review and meta-analysis we examined the effects of music interventions on pain, anxiety and distress in children undergoing invasive surgery. We searched 25 electronic databases from their first available date until October 2014. Included were all randomized controlled trials with a parallel group, crossover or cluster design that included pediatric patients from 1 month to 18 years old undergoing minimally invasive or invasive surgical procedures, and receiving either live music therapy or recorded music. 4846 records were retrieved from the searches, 26 full text reports were evaluated and data was extracted by two independent investigators. Pain was measured with the Visual Analogue Scale, the Coloured Analogue Scale and the Facial Pain Scale. Anxiety and distress were measured with an emotional index scale (not validated), the Spielberger short State Trait Anxiety Inventory and a Facial Affective Scale. Three RCTs were eligible for inclusion encompassing 196 orthopedic, cardiac and day surgery patients (age of 1 day to 18 years) receiving either live music therapy or recorded music. Overall a statistically significant positive effect was demonstrated on postoperative pain (SMD -1.07; 95%CI-2.08; -0.07) and on anxiety and distress (SMD -0.34 95% CI -0.66; -0.01 and SMD -0.50; 95% CI -0.84; - 0.16. This systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that music interventions may have a statistically significant effect in reducing post-operative pain, anxiety and distress in children undergoing a surgical procedure. Evidence from this review and other reviews suggests music therapy may be considered for clinical use.

  17. Comparison of Dexmedetomidine and Fentanyl as an Adjuvant to Ropivacaine for Postoperative Epidural Analgesia in Pediatric Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Jun; Shin, Seokyung; Kim, Shin Hyung; Kim, Hyun Woo; Kim, Seung Hyun; Do, Hae Yoon; Choi, Yong Seon

    2017-05-01

    Opioids are commonly used as an epidural adjuvant to local anesthetics, but are associated with potentially serious side effects, such as respiratory depression. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine with that of fentanyl as an adjuvant to epidural ropivacaine in pediatric orthopedic surgery. This study enrolled 60 children (3-12 years old) scheduled for orthopedic surgery of the lower extremities and lumbar epidural patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Children received either dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg) or fentanyl (1 μg/kg) along with 0.2% ropivacaine (0.2 mL/kg) via an epidural catheter at 30 minutes before the end of surgery. Postoperatively, the children were observed for ropivacaine consumption via epidural PCA, postoperative pain intensity, need for rescue analgesics, emergence agitation, and other adverse effects. The mean dose of bolus epidural ropivacaine was significantly lower within the first 6 h after surgery in the dexmedetomidine group, compared with the fentanyl group (0.029±0.030 mg/kg/h vs. 0.053±0.039 mg/kg/h, p=0.012). The median pain score at postoperative 6 h was also lower in the dexmedetomidine group, compared to the fentanyl group [0 (0-1.0) vs. 1.0 (0-3.0), p=0.039]. However, there was no difference in the need for rescue analgesia throughout the study period between groups. The use of dexmedetomidine as an epidural adjuvant had a significantly greater analgesic and local anesthetic-sparing effect, compared to fentanyl, in the early postoperative period in children undergoing major orthopedic lower extremity surgery. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017

  18. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... epicondylitis surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... long as you are told. This helps ensure tennis elbow will not return. You may be prescribed a ...

  19. Lung surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung biopsy - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - discharge; VATS - discharge ... milk) for 2 weeks after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and 6 to 8 weeks after open surgery. ...

  20. Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Gastric Sleeve Surgery KidsHealth / For Teens / Gastric Sleeve Surgery What's in ... or buying healthy food ) Preparing for Gastric Sleeve Surgery Preparing for this major operation takes months of ...

  1. Hip Replacement Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Outreach Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Hip Replacement Surgery Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB ... PDF What is it? Points To Remember About Hip Replacement Surgery Hip replacement surgery removes damaged or ...

  2. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ... to find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring ...

  3. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ... to find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring ...

  4. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  5. A red cell preservation strategy reduces postoperative transfusions in pediatric heart surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Meena; Tishler, Brielle; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Matte, Gregory S; Howe, Robert J; Durham, Linda; Boyle, Sharon; Mathieu, Derek; Fynn-Thompson, Francis; DiNardo, James A; Ibla, Juan C

    2018-03-25

    Blood transfusion has well-documented adverse effects. As part of a blood conservation initiative at our center, we began routine use of cell saver for all congenital heart surgery performed on cardiopulmonary bypass since 2014. This study aimed to compare transfusion rates prior to, and in the first and second year after this initiative. We hypothesized that cell saver use would decrease transfusion requirements in second year after use of the cell saver compared to the pre cell saver group. Consecutive patients under 18 years undergoing congenital heart surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass were retrospectively analyzed as 3 one-year cohorts defined above. We excluded patients who required mechanical support or reoperation at index admission. Baseline characteristics, and use of blood intraoperatively and postoperatively were compared between groups. The 3 groups had similar baseline characteristics. Blood use was significantly lower in year 2 after cell saver initiation as compared to the pre cell saver group both intra- and postoperatively. The median difference in volume of intraoperative blood transfusion was lower by 138 mL/m 2 (-266, -10 mL/m 2 ) in year 2 when compared to the pre cell saver group. Similarly, the proportion of subjects requiring red blood cell transfusion postoperatively on day of surgery was lower by 10% (-15%, -6%). Standardized use of cell saver significantly decreased perioperative blood use in children undergoing cardiac surgery at our center. A risk-adjusted transfusion threshold for children undergoing heart surgery needs to be developed to further decrease exposure to blood products and associated costs. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The digital divide in adoption and use of mobile health technology among caregivers of pediatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Emma C; Saiyed, Faiez; Miller, Charles C; Eguia, Arturo; Fonseca, Alexandra C; Baum, George P; Tsao, KuoJen; Austin, Mary T

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify mobile Health (mHealth) technology utilization among caregivers of pediatric surgery patients. We provided a modified version of the 2012 mobile health survey from the Pew Research Center to English and Spanish-speaking caregivers of children aged technology use. The majority of responders (n=126, 76%) said that they would be very or moderately interested in trying a new smartphone app related to management of their child's health. While the majority of pediatric caregivers are smartphone owners, there are significant racial and socioeconomic differences in mHealth usage. Understanding these differences may be important in identifying barriers to adoption of mHealth technology. Level IV case series with no comparison group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Breast Reduction Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... considering breast reduction surgery, consult a board-certified plastic surgeon. It's important to understand what breast reduction surgery entails — including possible risks and complications — as ...

  8. Role of Surgery in Stages II and III Pediatric Abdominal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A 5-Years Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amany M; Sayd, Heba A; Hamza, Hesham M; Salem, Mohamed A

    2011-03-29

    Abdominal Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are the most common extra nodal presentation of pediatric NHL. Our aim is to assess the role of surgery as a risk factor and to evaluate the impact of risk-adjusted systemic chemotherapy on survival of patients with stages II and III disease. This study included 35 pediatric patients with abdominal NHL treated over five years at South Egypt Cancer Institute (SECI), Assiut University, between January 2005 and January 2010. The data of every patient included: Age, sex, and presentation, staging work up to determine extent of the disease and the type of resection performed, histopathological examination, details of chemotherapy, disease free survival and overall survival. The study included 25 boys and 10 girls with a median age of six years (range: 2.5:15). Thirty patients (86%) presented with abdominal pain, 23 patients (66%) presented with abdominal mass and distention, 13 patients (34%) presented with weight loss, and intestinal obstruction occurred in six patients (17%). The ileo-cecal region and abdominal lymph nodes were the commonest sites (48.5%, 21% respectively). Burkitt's lymphoma was the most common histological type in 29 patients (83%). Ten (28.5%) stage II (group A) and 25 (71.5%) stage III (group B). Complete resections were performed in 10 (28.5%), debulking in 6 (17%) and imaging guided biopsy in 19 (54%). A11 patients received systemic chemotherapy. The median follow up duration was 63 months (range 51-78 months). The parameters that significantly affect the overall survival were stage at presentation complete resection for localized disease. In conclusion, the extent of disease at presentation is the most important prognostic factor in pediatric abdominal NHL. Surgery is restricted to defined situations such as; abdominal emergencies, diagnostic biopsy and total tumor extirpation in localized disease. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone in the management of pediatric abdominal NHL.

  9. Role of Surgery in Stages II and III Pediatric Abdominal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A 5-Years Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Salem

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL are the most common extra nodal presentation of pediatric NHL. Our aim is to assess the role of surgery as a risk factor and to evaluate the impact of risk-adjusted systemic chemotherapy on survival of patients with stages II and III disease. This study included 35 pediatric patients with abdominal NHL treated over five years at South Egypt Cancer Institute (SECI, Assiut University, between January 2005 and January 2010. The data of every patient included: Age, sex, and presentation, staging work up to determine extent of the disease and the type of resection performed, histopathological examination, details of chemotherapy, disease free survival and overall survival. The study included 25 boys and 10 girls with a median age of six years (range: 2.5:15. Thirty patients (86% presented with abdominal pain, 23 patients (66% presented with abdominal mass and distention, 13 patients (34% presented with weight loss, and intestinal obstruction occurred in six patients (17%. The ileo-cecal region and abdominal lymph nodes were the commonest sites (48.5%, 21% respectively. Burkitt's lymphoma was the most common histological type in 29 patients (83%. Ten (28.5% stage II (group A and 25 (71.5% stage III (group B. Complete resections were performed in 10 (28.5%, debulking in 6 (17% and imaging guided biopsy in 19 (54%. A11 patients received systemic chemotherapy. The median follow up duration was 63 months (range 51-78 months. The parameters that significantly affect the overall survival were stage at presentation complete resection for localized disease. In conclusion, the extent of disease at presentation is the most important prognostic factor in pediatric abdominal NHL. Surgery is restricted to defined situations such as; abdominal emergencies, diagnostic biopsy and total tumor extirpation in localized disease. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone in the management of pediatric abdominal NHL.

  10. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vascular changes which occur with intussusception, and is possibly predictive of bowel necrosis.7 Nonoperative reduction is the primary aim once a ..... an alternative method of nonoperative treatment for childhood intussusception. J Pediatr ...

  11. Scintigraphy in the followup of pediatric splenic trauma treated without surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.C.; Eraklis, A.; Rossello, P.; Treves, S.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty patients with blunt abdominal trauma were diagnosed as having splenic rupture by Tc-99m sulfur colloid scintigraphy. Because of the increased risk of infection in children following splenectomy, surgery was not performed and scintigraphic followup of the injured spleens was carried out. Thirteen patients were scanned at least 2 mo after trauma and the longest followup was 1 yr. Only three spleens showed ''scintigraphic healing.'' The remaining ten showed smaller defects, but in two patients the size of the defect did not change after the 2-mo scan. In no case did the scan defect enlarge. Technetium-99m sulfur colloid scintigraphy offers a convenient and sensitive method of following trauma cases if no surgery is performed. Scintigraphic defects can persist for long periods of time while the patient is asymptomatic

  12. [The Analgesic Sparing Effect of Ketamine for Postoperative Pain Management after Pediatric Surgery on the Body Surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Tomoaki; Nakanuno, Ryuichi; Hayase, Kazuma; Sasada, Shogo; Iwamitsu, Reimi; Senami, Masaki

    2016-04-01

    It is reported that ketamine, a N-methyl-D-aspertate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, can provide analgesic effect improving postoperative pain management and decrease the supplementary analgesic requirement. We investigated the analgesic sparing effect of ketamine for postoperative pain in children undergoing surgery of body surface. Fifty eight patients (0-9 yrs) who had surgery of body surface were divided into two groups (ketamine : n = 27, Group K or control : n = 31, Group N). Postoperative analgesia extracted from charts was retrospectively evaluated by the times patients used analgesics until discharge after the operations. Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for statistical analysis. Results : The ketamine group received an intrave- nous bolus of ketamine (1 mg - kg-1) before surgical skin incision. However, there were no significant differ- ences of usage (Group K vs Group N : 4/27 vs 7/31, P=0.45) and frequency of supplementary analgesic us- ages (P=0.85) among groups. In addition, there were also no significant demographic differences between the two groups. Conclusions : Our investigation suggests that the intravenous bolus of ketamine (1 mg - kg-1) before surgical skin incision does not decrease the supple- mentary analgesic requirements on postoperative pain management in pediatric surgery of the body surface.

  13. Approach to pediatric epilepsy surgery: State of the art, Part I: General principles and presurgical workup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Makram; Wyllie, Elaine; Rahi, Amal C; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2009-03-01

    In 1990, the National Institute of Health adopted epilepsy surgery in children as an option when medications fail. In the past few years several concepts have become increasingly recognized as key to a successful approach to epilepsy surgery in children. These include the concepts of neuronal plasticity, the epileptogenic lesion, the ictal onset, symptomatogenic, irritative, and epileptogenic zones. In addition, several techniques have increasingly been utilized to delineate the above areas in an attempt to determine, in each patient, the epileptogenic zone, defined as the zone the resection of which leads to seizure freedom. When seizure semiology (which defines the symptomatogenic zone), ictal EEG (which identifies the ictal onset zone), and structural imaging (which identifies the epileptogenic lesion) can be reconciled to infer the location of the epileptogenic zone, surgery is usually, subsequently, undertaken. When these diagnostic modalities are discordant, not definitive, or when the epileptogenic zone is close to eloquent cortex, invasive EEG, complemented by other imaging techniques may be needed. These include magnetoencephalography, single photon emission tomography, various types of positron emission tomography, various magnetic resonance imaging modalities (functional, diffusion weighted, other) and other emerging and experimental techniques. While MRI, video-EEG, and neuropsychological assessments are well established components of the presurgical evaluation, the use of the new emerging imaging technologies is dictated by the degree of anatomo-electro-clinical correlations, and, awaiting multicentric studies and more detailed guidelines, remains center-dependent.

  14. Cognitive outcome of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Anne; Jambaqué, Isabelle; Lassonde, Maryse

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is now widely accepted as an effective therapeutic option for carefully selected children with medically refractory epilepsy. The surgical procedure may cause cognitive deficits or exacerbate existing impairments, but it may also improve cognitive abilities by the restoration of functions located in adjacent or contralateral areas that had been secondarily affected by the epilepsy or the underlying pathology. Compared to adults, better cognitive outcome has been reported in children, a finding probably due to the developing state of the brain, which possesses considerable structural and functional plasticity. More extensive and effective surgery such as hemispherectomy is more commonly used in the pediatric population, and this must also influence surgical outcome. However, studies related to cognitive outcome of epilepsy surgery in children are limited, and controversial results are often reported. In this chapter, we provide a current overview of the literature on cognitive outcomes in children who undergo different types of epilepsy surgery, including focal resections as well as corpus callosotomy and hemispherectomy. Early surgical intervention appears to be a rational option for the treatment of childhood epilepsy since many cognitive deficits are linked to the epileptic process and may disappear when seizures are controlled. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Health-related quality of life before and after pediatric epilepsy surgery: the influence of seizure outcome on changes in physical functioning and social functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Jeffrey B; Lee, Amy; Kasasbeh, Aimen; Thio, Liu Lin; Stephenson, Jennifer; Steger-May, Karen; Limbrick, David D; Smyth, Matthew D

    2013-06-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is an important outcome in pediatric epilepsy surgery, but there are few studies that utilize presurgical ratings to assess the effect of surgery on HRQOL. We collected parental ratings on the Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE) questionnaire for 28 children who participated in neuropsychological assessment before and after epilepsy surgery. Our results revealed significant improvements in overall HRQOL after surgery, especially in physical and social activities. These changes were apparent despite generally unchanged intellectual and psychological functioning. Children with better seizure outcome had more improvement in HRQOL; however, improvements were not statistically different among children with Engel class I, II, and III outcomes. Our results suggest that children can experience significant improvements in HRQOL following epilepsy surgery even when neuropsychological functioning remains unchanged. Moreover, improvements in HRQOL appear evident in children who experience any worthwhile improvement in seizure control (Engel class III or better). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of a diagnosis- and procedure-based risk model for 30-day outcome after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Sonya; Brown, Kate L; Pagel, Christina; Muthialu, Nagarajan; Cunningham, David; Gibbs, John; Bull, Catherine; Franklin, Rodney; Utley, Martin; Tsang, Victor T

    2013-05-01

    The study objective was to develop a risk model incorporating diagnostic information to adjust for case-mix severity during routine monitoring of outcomes for pediatric cardiac surgery. Data from the Central Cardiac Audit Database for all pediatric cardiac surgery procedures performed in the United Kingdom between 2000 and 2010 were included: 70% for model development and 30% for validation. Units of analysis were 30-day episodes after the first surgical procedure. We used logistic regression for 30-day mortality. Risk factors considered included procedural information based on Central Cardiac Audit Database "specific procedures," diagnostic information defined by 24 "primary" cardiac diagnoses and "univentricular" status, and other patient characteristics. Of the 27,140 30-day episodes in the development set, 25,613 were survivals, 834 were deaths, and 693 were of unknown status (mortality, 3.2%). The risk model includes procedure, cardiac diagnosis, univentricular status, age band (neonate, infant, child), continuous age, continuous weight, presence of non-Down syndrome comorbidity, bypass, and year of operation 2007 or later (because of decreasing mortality). A risk score was calculated for 95% of cases in the validation set (weight missing in 5%). The model discriminated well; the C-index for validation set was 0.77 (0.81 for post-2007 data). Removal of all but procedural information gave a reduced C-index of 0.72. The model performed well across the spectrum of predicted risk, but there was evidence of underestimation of mortality risk in neonates undergoing operation from 2007. The risk model performs well. Diagnostic information added useful discriminatory power. A future application is risk adjustment during routine monitoring of outcomes in the United Kingdom to assist quality assurance. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pediatric surgeons and anesthesiologists expand the dialogue on the neurotoxicity question, rationale for early and delayed surgeries, and practice changes while awaiting definitive evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Mary W; Casale, Pasquale; Garzon, Maria; Hyman, Joshua E; Lin, Albert Y; Lynch, Lisa R; Schleien, Charles L; Stylianos, Steven

    2014-10-01

    The Pediatric Anesthesia NeuroDevelopment Assessment team at Columbia University Medical Center Department of Anesthesiology convened its fourth biennial Symposium to address unresolved issues concerning potential neurotoxic effects of anesthetic agents and sedatives on young children and to assess study findings to date. Dialogue initiated at the third Symposium was continued between anesthesiologists, researchers, and a panel of expert pediatric surgeons representing general surgery and dermatology, orthopedic, and urology specialties. The panel explored the need to balance benefits of early surgery using improved technologies against potential anesthetic risks, practice changes while awaiting definitive answers, and importance of continued interprofessional dialogue.

  18. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ...

  19. Barriers to follow-up for pediatric cataract surgery in Maharashtra, India: How regular follow-up is important for good outcome. The Miraj Pediatric Cataract Study II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikshit Gogate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regular follow up and amblyopia treatment are essential for good outcomes after pediatric cataract surgery. Aim: To study the regularity of follow-up after cataract surgery in children and to gauge the causes of poor compliance to follow up. Subjects: 262 children (393 cataracts who underwent cataract surgery in 2004-8. Materials and Methods: The children were identified and examined in their homes and a "barriers to follow-up" questionnaire completed. Demographic data collected, visual acuity estimated, and ocular examination performed. Statistical Analysis: SPSS version 19. Results: Of the 262 children, only 53 (20.6% had been regularly following up with any hospital, 209 (79.4% had not. A total of 150 (57.3% were boys and the average age was 13.23 years (Std Dev 5 yrs. Poor follow up was associated with the older age group ( P 1 line with regular follow-up. Conclusion: Regular follow-up is important and improves vision; eye care practitioners need to take special efforts to ensure better follow-up.

  20. Comparison of surgical outcomes among infants in neonatal intensive care units treated by pediatric surgeons versus general surgeons: The need for pediatric surgery specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Yoon Jung; Lee, Eun Hee; Lee, Ji Sung

    2017-11-01

    This study compared the outcomes of infants who underwent surgery in neonatal intensive care units by pediatric surgeons and by general surgeons. This was a retrospective study of infants who underwent surgery in neonatal intensive care units between 2010 and 2014. A total of 227 patients were included. Of these patients, 116 were operated on by pediatric surgeons (PS) and 111 were operated on by general surgeons (GS). The outcome measures were the overall rate of operative complications, unplanned reoperation, mortality rate, length of stay, operative time, and number of total number of operative procedures. The overall operative complication rate was higher in the GS group compared with the PS group (18.7% vs. 7.0%, p=0.0091). The rate of unplanned reoperations was also higher in the GS group (10.8% vs. 3.5%, p=0.0331). The median operation time (90min vs. 75min, p=0.0474) and median length of stay (24days vs. 18days, p=0.0075) were significantly longer in the GS group. The adjusted odd ratios of postoperative complications for GS were 2.9 times higher than that of PS (OR 2.90, p=0.0352). The operative quality and patient outcomes of the PS group were superior to those of the GS group. III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Revisiting acute normovolemic hemodilution and blood transfusion during pediatric cardiac surgery: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Roby; Ratliff, Todd; Winch, Peter D; Tumin, Dmitry; Gomez, Daniel; Tobias, Joseph; Galantowicz, Mark; Naguib, Aymen N

    2017-01-01

    The majority of allogeneic transfusions occur in the perioperative setting, especially during cardiac surgery. In addition to the economic implications, there is emerging evidence that blood transfusion may increase both morbidity and mortality. Acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) may limit the need for blood products. The primary objective of this study was to determine if the method of blood collection (syringe or bag) during the ANH process impacted the platelet count and function. The secondary objectives included the need for perioperative blood transfusions during the procedure and in the intensive care unit. In addition, we assessed these outcomes' associations with ANH parameters including the method of collection, time of storage, and volume removed. Data were collected prospectively from 50 patients undergoing cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass over a 6-month period. Platelet count and function were measured for the ANH blood immediately after collection and again prior to transfusing to the patient at the end of cardiopulmonary bypass. Other data collected included ANH volume, length of storage, and the quantity of all blood products given throughout the perioperative period. No change in platelet count or function was noted regardless of the length of time or collection method for the ANH blood. Twenty-three patients received blood or blood products in the operating room or the intensive care unit, while 27 patients received no blood transfusion during their entire hospitalization. Higher ANH volume (ml·kg -1 ) and longer storage time were associated with a greater need for intraoperative transfusions. Acute normovolemic hemodilution protects the platelets from the untoward effects of cardiopulmonary bypass and offers an important autologous blood product that improves hemostasis at the conclusion of surgery. Platelet count and function are preserved regardless of the method of collection or the length of storage. The volume of ANH removed

  2. Elevated cranial ultrasound resistive indices are associated with improved neurodevelopmental outcomes one year after pediatric cardiac surgery: A single center pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Christopher L; Hernandez, Ana; Stavinoha, Peter L; Morris, Michael C; Tian, Fenghua; Liu, Hanli; Garg, Parvesh; Forbess, Joseph M; Koch, Joshua

    To determine if a non-invasive, repeatable test can be used to predict neurodevelopmental outcomes in patients with congenital heart disease. This was a prospective study of pediatric patients less than two months of age undergoing congenital heart surgery at the Children's Health Children's Medical Center at Dallas. Multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was utilized during the surgery, and ultrasound (US) resistive indices (RI) of the major cranial vessels were obtained prior to surgery, immediately post-operatively, and prior to discharge. Pearson's correlation, Fischer exact t test, and Fischer r to z transformation were used where appropriate. A total of 16 patients were enrolled. All had US data. Of the sixteen patients, two died prior to the neurodevelopmental testing, six did not return for the neurodevelopmental testing, and eight patients completed the neurodevelopmental testing. There were no significant correlations between the prior to surgery and prior to discharge US RI and neurodevelopmental outcomes. The immediate post-operative US RI demonstrated a strong positive correlation with standardized neurodevelopmental outcome measures. We were able to demonstrate qualitative differences using multichannel NIRS during surgery, but experienced significant technical difficulties implementing consistent monitoring. A higher resistive index in the major cerebral blood vessels following cardiac surgery in the neonatal period is associated with improved neurological outcomes one year after surgery. Obtaining an ultrasound with resistive indices of the major cerebral vessels prior to and after surgery may yield information that is predictive of neurodevelopmental outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Laser welding in penetrating keratoplasty and cataract surgery of pediatric patients: early results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Francesca; Pini, Roberto; Menabuoni, Luca; Malandrini, Alex; Canovetti, Annalisa; Lenzetti, Ivo; Capozzi, Paolo; Valente, Paola; Buzzonetti, Luca

    2013-03-01

    Diode laser welding of ocular tissues is a procedure that enables minimally invasive closure of a corneal wound. This procedure is based on a photothermal effect: a water solution of Indocyanine Green (ICG) is inserted in the surgical wound, in order to stain the corneal tissue walls. The stained tissue is then irradiated with a low power infrared diode laser, delivering laser light through a 300-μm core diameter optical fiber. This procedure enables an immediate closure of the wounds: it is thus possible to reduce or to substitute the use of surgical threads. This is of particular interest in children, because the immediate closure improves refractive outcome and anti-amblyopic effect; moreover this procedure avoids several general anaesthesia for suture management. In this work, we present the first use of diode laser welding procedure in paediatric patients. 5 selected patients underwent cataract surgery (Group 1), while 4 underwent fs-laserassisted penetrating keratoplasty (Group 2). In Group 1 the conventional surgery procedure was performed, while no stitches were used for the closure of the surgical wounds: these were laser welded and immediately closed. In Group 2 the donor button was sutured upon the recipient by 8 single stitches, instead of 16 single stitches or a running suture. The laser welding procedure was performed in order to join the donor tissue to the recipient bed. Objective observations in the follow up study evidenced a perfect adhesion of the laser welded tissues, no collateral effects and an optimal restoration of the treated tissues.

  4. Improving Surveillance and Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Melissa; Hersey, Diane; Harrison, Sheilah; Joy, Brian; Naguib, Aymen; Galantowicz, Mark; Simsic, Janet

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative cardiovascular surgical site infections are preventable events that may lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. To improve surgical wound surveillance and reduce the incidence of surgical site infections. An institutional review of surgical site infections led to implementation of 8 surveillance and process measures: appropriate preparation the night before surgery and the day of surgery, use of appropriate preparation solution in the operating room, appropriate timing of preoperative antibiotic administration, placement of a photograph of the surgical site in the patient's chart at discharge, sending a photograph of the surgical site to the patient's primary care physician, 30-day follow-up of the surgical site by an advanced nurse practitioner, and placing a photograph of the surgical site obtained on postoperative day 30 in the patient's chart. Mean overall compliance with the 8 measures from March 2013 through February 2014 was 88%. Infections occurred in 10 of 417 total operative cases (2%) in 2012, in 8 of 437 total operative cases (2%) in 2013, and in 7 of 452 total operative cases (1.5%) in 2014. Institution of the surveillance process has resulted in improved identification of suspected surgical site infections via direct rather than indirect measures, accurate identification of all surgical site infections based on definitions of the National Healthcare Safety Network, collaboration with all persons involved, and enhanced communication with patients' family members and referring physicians. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  5. Comparison of topical oxybuprocaine and intravenous fentanyl in pediatric strabismus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousafzai, Ibrahim; Zahoor, Abdul; Andrey, Butrov; Ahmad, Nauman

    2017-01-01

    To compare the outcomes such as postoperative nausea/vomiting, analgesic requirements, and hospital stay following the use of topical oxybuprocaine hydrochloride 0.4% or intravenous (IV) fentanyl in children undergoing strabismus surgery. This was a prospective cohort study. Children operated under general anesthesia for strabismus were given topical oxybuprocaine hydrochloride 0.4% (Group T) and IV fentanyl (Group F) before surgery. The episodes of nausea/vomiting, pain score, requirement of additional analgesia during postoperative period, and duration of hospital stay were compared in two groups. There were 47 children in Group T and 59 children in Group F. The median pain score in two groups were 2.38 (25% quartile; 2.0) and 3.00 (25% quartile; 3.00), respectively. The difference was significant (K W P < 0.03). The episodes of nausea/vomiting in two groups were in 2 and 6 children in Group T and Group F, respectively. The median hospital stay of children of Group T and Group F were 242 and 285 min, respectively. The difference was not statistically significant ( P = 0.22). Using intraoperative topical oxybuprocaine drops, one can achieve better analgesic outcomes and reduce risk of nausea and vomiting compared to intravenous opioid analgesics and therefore, the hospital stay could also be marginally reduced.

  6. Robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palep Jaydeep

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The term "robot" was coined by the Czech playright Karel Capek in 1921 in his play Rossom′s Universal Robots. The word "robot" is from the check word robota which means forced labor.The era of robots in surgery commenced in 1994 when the first AESOP (voice controlled camera holder prototype robot was used clinically in 1993 and then marketed as the first surgical robot ever in 1994 by the US FDA. Since then many robot prototypes like the Endoassist (Armstrong Healthcare Ltd., High Wycombe, Buck, UK, FIPS endoarm (Karlsruhe Research Center, Karlsruhe, Germany have been developed to add to the functions of the robot and try and increase its utility. Integrated Surgical Systems (now Intuitive Surgery, Inc. redesigned the SRI Green Telepresence Surgery system and created the daVinci Surgical System ® classified as a master-slave surgical system. It uses true 3-D visualization and EndoWrist ® . It was approved by FDA in July 2000 for general laparoscopic surgery, in November 2002 for mitral valve repair surgery. The da Vinci robot is currently being used in various fields such as urology, general surgery, gynecology, cardio-thoracic, pediatric and ENT surgery. It provides several advantages to conventional laparoscopy such as 3D vision, motion scaling, intuitive movements, visual immersion and tremor filtration. The advent of robotics has increased the use of minimally invasive surgery among laparoscopically naοve surgeons and expanded the repertoire of experienced surgeons to include more advanced and complex reconstructions.

  7. Global surgery for pediatric hydrocephalus in the developing world: a review of the history, challenges, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Ryan T; Wang, Shelly; Warf, Benjamin C

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Pediatric hydrocephalus is one of the most common neurosurgical conditions and is a major contributor to the global burden of surgically treatable diseases. Significant health disparities exist for the treatment of hydrocephalus in developing nations due to a combination of medical, environmental, and socioeconomic factors. This review aims to provide the international neurosurgery community with an overview of the current challenges and future directions of neurosurgical care for children with hydrocephalus in low-income countries. METHODS The authors conducted a literature review around the topic of pediatric hydrocephalus in the context of global surgery, the unique challenges to creating access to care in low-income countries, and current international efforts to address the problem. RESULTS Developing countries face the greatest burden of pediatric hydrocephalus due to high birth rates and greater risk of neonatal infections. This burden is related to more general global health challenges, including malnutrition, infectious diseases, maternal and perinatal risk factors, and education gaps. Unique challenges pertaining to the treatment of hydrocephalus in the developing world include a preponderance of postinfectious hydrocephalus, limited resources, and restricted access to neurosurgical care. In the 21st century, several organizations have established programs that provide hydrocephalus treatment and neurosurgical training in Africa, Central and South America, Haiti, and Southeast Asia. These international efforts have employed various models to achieve the goals of providing safe, sustainable, and cost-effective treatment. CONCLUSIONS Broader commitment from the pediatric neurosurgery community, increased funding, public education, surgeon training, and ongoing surgical innovation will be needed to meaningfully address the global burden of untreated hydrocephalus.

  8. Anesthetic management of a pediatric patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia undergoing emergency surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiskalioglu, Elif Oral; Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Firinci, Binali; Dostbil, Aysenur; Aksoy, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasias are rare conditions with a triad of hypotrichosis, anodontia and anhidrosis. In literature review there have been only a few reports of anesthetic management of patients with ectodermal dysplasias. Hyperthermia is a very serious risk which may occur due to the defect of sweat glands. The present case involves a 10-year-old child with ectodermal dysplasia who presented with an acute abdomen and was considered for an emergency surgery. Our aim was to demonstrate the successful management of this case using a combination of general and epidural anesthesia. It is important for anesthesiologist to have information about this syndrome in case of emergency operations, since it can prevent serious complications and even save lives. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Anesthetic management of a pediatric patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia undergoing emergency surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Oral Ahiskalioglu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ectodermal dysplasias are rare conditions with a triad of hypotrichosis, anodontia and anhidrosis. In literature review there have been only a few reports of anesthetic management of patients with ectodermal dysplasias. Hyperthermia is a very serious risk which may occur due to the defect of sweat glands. The present case involves a 10-year-old child with ectodermal dysplasia who presented with an acute abdomen and was considered for an emergency surgery. Our aim was to demonstrate the successful management of this case using a combination of general and epidural anesthesia. It is important for anesthesiologist to have information about this syndrome in case of emergency operations, since it can prevent serious complications and even save lives.

  10. Anesthetic management of a pediatric patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia undergoing emergency surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Oral Ahiskalioglu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Ectodermal dysplasias are rare conditions with a triad of hypotrichosis, anodontia and anhidrosis. In literature review there have been only a few reports of anesthetic management of patients with ectodermal dysplasias. Hyperthermia is a very serious risk which may occur due to the defect of sweat glands. The present case involves a 10-year-old child with ectodermal dysplasia who presented with an acute abdomen and was considered for an emergency surgery. Our aim was to demonstrate the successful management of this case using a combination of general and epidural anesthesia. It is important for anesthesiologist to have information about this syndrome in case of emergency operations, since it can prevent serious complications and even save lives.

  11. HYPOMAGNESAEMIA AND ROLE OF MAGNESIUM SUPPLEMENTATION DURING CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS IN PEDIATRICS CARDIAC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Postoperative Junctional Ectopic Tachycardia (JET remains one of the most common arrhythmias (8%-20% after paediatric cardiac surgery. JET is associated with hemodynamic instability, longer mechanical ventilation time and longer stays in the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (ICU. AIM The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of prophylactic administration of magnesium on the occurrence of postoperative arrhythmias in patients undergoing intracardiac repair for Tetralogy of Fallot and to determine the incidence of hypomagnesaemia in paediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery who require CPB. METHODS Forty five patients with Tetralogy of Fallot undergoing intracardiac repair were enrolled to receive saline, 25mg/kg and 50mg/kg of Magnesium as three groups intraoperatively. Postoperative ECG monitored for JET and magnesium levels measured. RESULTS Hypomagnesaemia was present in 28% of patients. None of the patients who were administered magnesium developed hypomagnesaemia. The incidence of JET was found to be increased (53.3% in the placebo group as compared to 13.3% and 6.7% in the groups receiving 25 and 50mg/kg of magnesium (p<0.001. Eleven patients having JET 7 (64% had hypomagnesaemia and rest of the 4(36% occurred in patients with normal magnesium levels (p<0.01. The mean mechanical ventilation time and the mean length of ICU stay were both prolonged those with hypomagnesaemia. The mean mechanical ventilation time and length of ICU stay were both prolonged in the patients with JET (p<.001 CONCLUSIONS Hypomagnesemia is one of the factors responsible for JET and in turn with prolonged ICU stay and prolonged mechanical ventilation.

  12. Single dose caudal tramadol with bupivacaine and bupivacaine alone in pediatric inguinoscrotal surgeries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, A.; Siddiqui, S.Z.; Aftab, S.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the postoperative analgesic effect of Tramadol when given with caudally administered Bupivacaine in children undergoing inguinoscrotal surgeries. A total of 60 children, undergoing inguinoscrotal surgeries, aged from 1 to 12 years, ASA 1 and 2, were included. The patients were divided into two equal groups. The group given Bupivacaine with Tramadol was called group BT and the group which was given only Bupivacaine was labeled as group B. Group BT was given 0.25%, 0.8 ml/kg Bupivacaine and Tramadol 2 mg/kg while the other group B was given 0.25%, 0.8 ml/kg Bupivacaine through caudal route after induction of general anesthesia. No other analgesic was given intraoperatively. The postoperative pain was evaluated by using visual analogue scale/Ocher face scale/CHEOPS and sedation was assessed by 5 points sedation score at immediate postoperative period 1,2,3,4,6,12 and 24 hours. Supplemental analgesia in the form of paracetamol suppositories and syrup ibuprofen was given accordingly. SaO 2, pulse, blood pressure, and motor block were monitored in all the patients. Addition of Tramadol with Bupivacaine resulted in meaningfully increased postoperative analgesic period (16.06 +- 4.04 hours). No other side effects like respiratory depression, pruritus, urinary retention were found in both the groups except for nausea and vomiting. The demand for supplemental analgesia was more in the patients belonging to B group than BT group. The sedation scores were similar in both the groups. The use of Tramadol as an additive with local anesthetics can prolong the postoperative analgesic period when administered caudally. Its use is safe in children. (author)

  13. 3D-printed pediatric endoscopic ear surgery simulator for surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Samuel R; Kozin, Elliott D; Dedmon, Matthew; Lin, Brian M; Lee, Kyuwon; Sinha, Sumi; Black, Nicole; Remenschneider, Aaron K; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-11-01

    Surgical simulators are designed to improve operative skills and patient safety. Transcanal Endoscopic Ear Surgery (TEES) is a relatively new surgical approach with a slow learning curve due to one-handed dissection. A reusable and customizable 3-dimensional (3D)-printed endoscopic ear surgery simulator may facilitate the development of surgical skills with high fidelity and low cost. Herein, we aim to design, fabricate, and test a low-cost and reusable 3D-printed TEES simulator. The TEES simulator was designed in computer-aided design (CAD) software using anatomic measurements taken from anthropometric studies. Cross sections from external auditory canal samples were traced as vectors and serially combined into a mesh construct. A modified tympanic cavity with a modular testing platform for simulator tasks was incorporated. Components were fabricated using calcium sulfate hemihydrate powder and multiple colored infiltrants via a commercial inkjet 3D-printing service. All components of a left-sided ear were printed to scale. Six right-handed trainees completed three trials each. Mean trial time (n = 3) ranged from 23.03 to 62.77 s using the dominant hand for all dissection. Statistically significant differences between first and last completion time with the dominant hand (p 3D-printed simulator is feasible for TEES simulation. Otolaryngology training programs with access to a 3D printer may readily fabricate a TEES simulator, resulting in inexpensive yet high-fidelity surgical simulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Thymus surgery in a general surgery department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Raquel; Coelho, Fátima; Pimentel, Teresa; Ribero, Rui; Matos, Novo de; Araújo, António

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of thymectomy cases between 1990-2003, in a General Surgery Department. Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy in Miastenia Gravis patients. Retrospective study based on evaluation of data from Serviço de Cirurgia, Neurologia and Consult de Neurology processes, between 1990-2003, of 15 patients submitted to total thymectomy. 15 patients, aged 17 to 72, 11 female and 4 male. Miastenia Gravis was the main indication for surgery, for uncontrollable symptoms or suspicion of thymoma. In patients with myasthenia, surgery was accomplish after compensation of symptoms. There weren't post-surgery complications. Pathology were divided in thymic hyperplasia and thymoma. Miastenia patients have there symptoms diminished or stable with reduction or cessation of medical therapy. Miastenia was the most frequent indication for thymectomy. Surgery was good results, with low morbimortality, as long as the protocols are respected.

  15. Thrombosis and Hemostasis in Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Anne-Mette; Larsen, Julie Brogaard; Pasalic, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    .g., bleeding disorders, cancer, or developmental hemostatic changes in pediatric patients), to anticoagulant medication or complications such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), or to inherent risks of a particular surgical procedure or affected organ (e.g., hepatobiliary surgery or renal...... transplantation). All of these factors can have a profound effect on expected outcomes....

  16. Day case surgery in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    practice in Nigeria and how it conforms to ideal practice elsewhere. ... has been an established practice of the pediatric surgery unit of a teaching hospital in South Western Nigeria, for at least two .... and safe anesthetic conditions for surgical procedures, with ..... compete for time and ward space with more major elective.

  17. Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BACK Contact Us DONATE NOW GENERAL DONATION PURPLESTRIDE Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer Diet and Nutrition Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery Ver esta página en ...

  18. Blood donation before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000367.htm Blood donation before surgery To use the sharing features on ... team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Blood Transfusion and Donation Surgery Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., ...

  19. Cosmetic ear surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoplasty; Ear pinning; Ear surgery - cosmetic; Ear reshaping; Pinnaplasty ... Cosmetic ear surgery may be done in the surgeon's office, an outpatient clinic, or a hospital. It can be performed under ...

  20. Open heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002950.htm Open heart surgery To use the sharing features on this ... large arteries connected to the heart. The term "open heart surgery" means that you are connected to a ...

  1. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... misalignment of jaws and teeth. Surgery can improve chewing, speaking and breathing. While the patient's appearance may ... indicate the need for corrective jaw surgery: Difficulty chewing, or biting food Difficulty swallowing Chronic jaw or ...

  2. Refractive corneal surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery. Avoid contact sports (such as boxing and football) for the first 4 weeks after surgery. DO ... herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any ...

  3. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. ... more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, ...

  4. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more surgeries depending on the extent of the repair needed. Click here to find out more. Corrective ... more surgeries depending on the extent of the repair needed. Click here to find out more. Corrective ...

  5. Surgery for pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... laparoscopically (using a tiny video camera) or using robotic surgery depends on: The extent of the surgery ... by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is ...

  6. Anti-reflux surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery. You may need another surgery in the future if you develop new reflux symptoms or swallowing ... Diseases of the esophagus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  7. Blepharoplasty (Eyelid Surgery)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blepharoplasty (BLEF-uh-roe-plas-tee) is a type of surgery that repairs droopy eyelids and may involve ... tobacco and drugs. Your expectations. An honest discussion of your hopes and motivation for surgery will help set the stage for ...

  8. Smoking and surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery - quitting smoking; Surgery - quitting tobacco; Wound healing - smoking ... Tar, nicotine, and other chemicals from smoking can increase your risk of many health problems. These include heart and blood vessel problems, such as: Blood clots and aneurysms in ...

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Jaw Surgery Download Download the ebook for further information Corrective jaw, or orthognathic surgery is performed by ... your treatment. Correction of Common Dentofacial Deformities ​ ​ The information provided here is not intended as a substitute ...

  10. Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000273.htm Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had cosmetic breast surgery to change the size or shape ...

  11. Shoulder surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000179.htm Shoulder surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had shoulder surgery to repair the tissues inside or around your ...

  12. Weight Loss Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight loss surgery helps people with extreme obesity to lose weight. It may be an option if you cannot lose weight ... obesity. There are different types of weight loss surgery. They often limit the amount of food you ...

  13. Robotic liver surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Universe

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an evolving technology that has been successfully applied to a number of surgical specialties, but its use in liver surgery has so far been limited. In this review article we discuss the challenges of minimally invasive liver surgery, the pros and cons of robotics, the evolution of medical robots, and the potentials in applying this technology to liver surgery. The current data in the literature are also presented. PMID:25392840

  14. Breast Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  15. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their surgery, orthognathic surgery is performed to correct functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on many aspects of life. Following are some of the conditions that may ... front, or side Facial injury Birth defects Receding lower jaw and ...

  16. Improving Risk Adjustment for Mortality After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: The UK PRAiS2 Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Libby; Brown, Katherine L; Franklin, Rodney C; Ambler, Gareth; Anderson, David; Barron, David J; Crowe, Sonya; English, Kate; Stickley, John; Tibby, Shane; Tsang, Victor; Utley, Martin; Witter, Thomas; Pagel, Christina

    2017-07-01

    Partial Risk Adjustment in Surgery (PRAiS), a risk model for 30-day mortality after children's heart surgery, has been used by the UK National Congenital Heart Disease Audit to report expected risk-adjusted survival since 2013. This study aimed to improve the model by incorporating additional comorbidity and diagnostic information. The model development dataset was all procedures performed between 2009 and 2014 in all UK and Ireland congenital cardiac centers. The outcome measure was death within each 30-day surgical episode. Model development followed an iterative process of clinical discussion and development and assessment of models using logistic regression under 25 × 5 cross-validation. Performance was measured using Akaike information criterion, the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC), and calibration. The final model was assessed in an external 2014 to 2015 validation dataset. The development dataset comprised 21,838 30-day surgical episodes, with 539 deaths (mortality, 2.5%). The validation dataset comprised 4,207 episodes, with 97 deaths (mortality, 2.3%). The updated risk model included 15 procedural, 11 diagnostic, and 4 comorbidity groupings, and nonlinear functions of age and weight. Performance under cross-validation was: median AUC of 0.83 (range, 0.82 to 0.83), median calibration slope and intercept of 0.92 (range, 0.64 to 1.25) and -0.23 (range, -1.08 to 0.85) respectively. In the validation dataset, the AUC was 0.86 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82 to 0.89), and the calibration slope and intercept were 1.01 (95% CI, 0.83 to 1.18) and 0.11 (95% CI, -0.45 to 0.67), respectively, showing excellent performance. A more sophisticated PRAiS2 risk model for UK use was developed with additional comorbidity and diagnostic information, alongside age and weight as nonlinear variables. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical Factors Associated with Dose of Loop Diuretics After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: Post Hoc Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiberger, Roberta; Favia, Isabella; Romagnoli, Stefano; Cogo, Paola; Ricci, Zaccaria

    2016-06-01

    A post hoc analysis of a randomized controlled trial comparing the clinical effects of furosemide and ethacrynic acid was conducted. Infants undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were included in order to explore which clinical factors are associated with diuretic dose in infants with congenital heart disease. Overall, 67 patients with median (interquartile range) age of 48 (13-139) days were enrolled. Median diuretic dose was 0.34 (0.25-0.4) mg/kg/h at the end of postoperative day (POD) 0 and it significantly decreased (p = 0.04) over the following PODs; during this period, the ratio between urine output and diuretic dose increased significantly (p = 0.04). Age (r -0.26, p = 0.02), weight (r -0.28, p = 0.01), cross-clamp time (r 0.27, p = 0.03), administration of ethacrynic acid (OR 0.01, p = 0.03), and, at the end of POD0, creatinine levels (r 0.3, p = 0.009), renal near-infrared spectroscopy saturation (-0.44, p = 0.008), whole-blood neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin levels (r 0.30, p = 0.01), pH (r -0.26, p = 0.02), urinary volume (r -0.2755, p = 0.03), and fluid balance (r 0.2577, p = 0.0266) showed a significant association with diuretic dose. At multivariable logistic regression cross-clamp time (OR 1.007, p = 0.04), use of ethacrynic acid (OR 0.2, p = 0.01) and blood pH at the end of POD0 (OR 0.0001, p = 0.03) was independently associated with diuretic dose. Early resistance to loop diuretics continuous infusion is evident in post-cardiac surgery infants: Higher doses are administered to patients with lower urinary output. Independently associated variables with diuretic dose in our population appeared to be cross-clamping time, the administration of ethacrynic acid, and blood pH.

  18. Using your shoulder after surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulder surgery - using your shoulder; Shoulder surgery - after ... rotator cuff surgery or other ligament or labral surgery, you need to be careful with your shoulder. Ask the surgeon what arm movements are safe ...

  19. [Contribution of the physical and rehabilitation medicine in pediatric plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottrand, L; Devinck, F; Martinot Duquennoy, V; Guerreschi, P

    2016-10-01

    Physical, non-painful processes guide the scar reshaping in children in order to prevent growth anomalies due to cutaneous shrinkage. The objective of the surgical treatment, coordinated with the reeducation care, is to improve the physical abilities of the skin, to restore the function and avoid the deformations. Reeducation uses various techniques (i.e. sensitive-motility, massage and mobilizations) with or without physical agent (water, aspiration and touch-drive technique). Posture and positioning rely on the small or major aids, from orthosis to prosthesis. Compression is obtained by the adjustment of aids on molding and compression garment. Indications of the reeducation treatment depend on the timing of cutaneous covering and the advance of the healing process. It also depends on the underlying condition including skin traumas (frictions, wounds, burns), skin surgeries (purpura fulminans consequences, skin graft reconstruction after giant nevus resection, malignant lesion or vascular malformations). The final goal is the rehabilitation and development of the child and the adolescent in its entire somatopsychic dimension. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Epsilon aminocaproic acid reduces blood transfusion and improves the coagulation test after pediatric open-heart surgery: a meta-analysis of 5 clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Meng, Haoyu; Meng, Zhaoyi; Sun, Ying; Pribis, John P; Zhu, Chunyan; Li, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Excessive postoperative blood loss after cardiopulmonary bypass is a common problem, especially in patients suffering from congenital heart diseases. The efficacy of epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA) as a prophylactic treatment for postoperative bleeding after pediatric open-heart surgery has not been determined. This meta-analysis investigates the efficacy of EACA in the minimization of bleeding and blood transfusion and the maintenance of coagulation tests after pediatric open-heart surgery. A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify all randomized clinical trials on the subject. PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and the Chinese Medical Journal Network were screened. The primary outcome used for the analysis was postoperative blood loss. Secondary outcomes included postoperative blood transfusion, re-exploration rate and postoperative coagulation tests. The mean difference (MD) and risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used as summary statistics. Five trials were included in this meta-analysis of 515 patients. Prophylactic EACA was associated with a reduction in postoperative blood loss, but this difference did not reach statistical significance (MD: -7.08; 95% CI: -16.11 to 1.95; P = 0.12). Patients treated with EACA received fewer postoperative blood transfusions, including packed red blood cells (MD: -8.36; 95% CI: -12.63 to -4.09; P = 0.0001), fresh frozen plasma (MD: -3.85; 95% CI: -5.63 to -2.08; P open-heart surgery. Prophylactic EACA minimizes postoperative blood transfusion and helps maintain coagulation in pediatric patients undergoing open-heart surgery. Therefore, the results of this study indicate that adjunctive EACA is a good choice for the prevention of postoperative blood transfusion following pediatric cardiac surgery.

  1. Internet Presentation of Departments of Pediatric Surgery in Germany and Their Compliance with Recommended Criteria for Promoting Services and Offering Professional Information for Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Naim; Zoeller, Christoph; Petersen, Claus; Ure, Benno

    2016-08-01

    Introduction The presentation of health institutions in the internet is highly variable concerning marketing features and medical information. We aimed to investigate the structure and the kind of information provided on the Web sites of all departments of pediatric surgery in Germany. Furthermore, we aimed to identify the degree to which these Web sites comply with internet marketing recommendations for generating business. Method The Web sites of all pediatric surgery units referred to as departments on the official Web site of the German Society of Pediatric Surgery (GSPS) were assessed. The search engine Google was used by entering the terms "pediatric surgery" and the name of the city. Besides general data eight content characteristics focusing on ranking, accessibility, use of social media, multilingual sites, navigation options, selected images, contact details, and medical information were evaluated according to published recommendations. Results A total of 85 departments of pediatric surgery were included. On Google search results 44 (52%) ranked number one and 34 (40%) of the department's homepages were accessible directly through the homepage link of the GSPS. A link to own digital and/or social media was offered on 11 (13%) homepages. Nine sites were multilingual. The most common navigation bar item was clinical services on 74 (87%) homepages. Overall, 76 (89%) departments presented their doctors and 17 (20%) presented other staff members with images of doctors on 53 (62%) and contact data access from the homepage on 68 (80%) Web sites. On 25 (29%) Web sites information on the medical conditions treated were presented, on 17 (20%) details of treating concepts, and on 4 (5%) numbers of patients with specific conditions treated in the own department per year. Conclusion We conclude that numerous of the investigated online presentations do not comply with recommended criteria for offering professional information for patients and for promoting

  2. Review of an Atlas of Pediatric Surgery in the Tropics (AAPS)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    handbook and standard text, which makes it portable enough ... should include the qualifications of the contributors, in addition to their ranks. Most standard surgical texts do not have enough materials on common pediatric surgical conditions.

  3. Epidemiology and Outcomes After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Punkaj; Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Hill, Kevin D.; Gaynor, J. William; O’Brien, Sean M.; He, Max; Sheng, Shubin; Schexnayder, Stephen M.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Imamura, Michiaki; Jacobs, Marshall L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Multicenter data regarding cardiac arrest in children undergoing heart operations are limited. We describe epidemiology and outcomes associated with postoperative cardiac arrest in a large multiinstitutional cohort. Methods Patients younger than 18 years in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (2007 through 2012) were included. Patient factors, operative characteristics, and outcomes were described for patients with and without postoperative cardiac arrest. Multivariable models were used to evaluate the association of center volume with cardiac arrest rate and mortality after cardiac arrest, adjusting for patient and procedural factors. Results Of 70,270 patients (97 centers), 1,843 (2.6%) had postoperative cardiac arrest. Younger age, lower weight, and presence of preoperative morbidities (all p < 0.0001) were associated with cardiac arrest. Arrest rate increased with procedural complexity across common benchmark operations, ranging from 0.7% (ventricular septal defect repair) to 12.7% (Norwood operation). Cardiac arrest was associated with significant mortality risk across procedures, ranging from 15.4% to 62.3% (all p < 0.0001). In multivariable analysis, arrest rate was not associated with center volume (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71 to 1.57 in low- versus high-volume centers). However, mortality after cardiac arrest was higher in low-volume centers (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.52 to 2.63). This association was present for both high- and low-complexity operations. Conclusions Cardiac arrest carries a significant mortality risk across the stratum of procedural complexity. Although arrest rates are not associated with center volume, lower-volume centers have increased mortality after cardiac arrest. Further study of mechanisms to prevent cardiac arrest and to reduce mortality in those with an arrest is warranted. PMID:25443018

  4. Routine intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography for pediatric open heart surgery: Is it justifiable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgamal, Mohamed-Adel F.; Najm, Hani K.; Abid-Allah, M.; Omran, Ahmad S.

    2007-01-01

    The routine use of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (IO TEE) in children is still debatable. The aim of this study was to determine the safety, benefit and the possible risk of the routine use of IO TEE. It was performed in all children under the age of 14 years with a complex congenital heart defects undergoing open heart surgery, from July 2001 to December 2002. Simple lesions such as secundum atrial septal defects or simple perimembraneous ventricular septal defects (VSD) and neonates less than 2.7 kg were excluded. All children underwent a pre-repair and post-repair complete IO TEE study. There were 112 children, 65 males and 47 females. Ages ranged from 4 days to 156 month, a median of 9 months. A full study was not done in three neonates (3%) because the probe could not be inserted in one, and because of airway compression resulting in desaturation in another two. A pre-repair study confirmed the preoperative transthoracic echocardiographic findings in 105 children (95%). Diagnostic discrepancy or unexpected lesions not reported preoperative were found in six children (5%). Of the 109 children who had full post-repair studies, 67 (60%) showed optimum repair with no residual lesions and 26 (23%) showed trivial or mild residual lesions accepted by the team. Going back on pump to fix moderate or severe residual lesions occurred in 16 (14%) children. In all of these children, the decision for going back on pump was prompted by the IO TEE examination alone. Mild complications occurred in two children (2%). Based on our results, we recommend the routine use of IO TEE. It is safe, has a low complication rate, adds additional information and has a high impact on the diagnosis of residual lesions required in the operating room. However, careful monitoring of the ventilation and airway pressure, particularly during probe insertion and manipulation in small children, is very essential. (author)

  5. Post-operative benefits of animal-assisted therapy in pediatric surgery: a randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Palestrini, Clara; De Giorgis, Valentina; Raschetti, Roberto; Tumminelli, Massimiliano; Mencherini, Simonetta; Papotti, Francesca; Klersy, Catherine; Albertini, Riccardo; Ostuni, Selene; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Interest in animal-assisted therapy has been fuelled by studies supporting the many health benefits. The purpose of this study was to better understand the impact of an animal-assisted therapy program on children response to stress and pain in the immediate post-surgical period. Forty children (3-17 years) were enrolled in the randomised open-label, controlled, pilot study. Patients were randomly assigned to the animal-assisted therapy-group (n = 20, who underwent a 20 min session with an animal-assisted therapy dog, after surgery) or the standard-group (n = 20, standard postoperative care). The study variables were determined in each patient, independently of the assigned group, by a researcher unblinded to the patient's group. The outcomes of the study were to define the neurological, cardiovascular and endocrinological impact of animal-assisted therapy in response to stress and pain. Electroencephalogram activity, heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, cerebral prefrontal oxygenation, salivary cortisol levels and the faces pain scale were considered as outcome measures. After entrance of the dog faster electroencephalogram diffuse beta-activity (> 14 Hz) was reported in all children of the animal-assisted therapy group; in the standard-group no beta-activity was recorded (100% vs 0%, panimal-assisted therapy, though a higher variability in diastolic pressure was observed. Salivary cortisol levels did not show different behaviours over time between groups (p=0.70). Lower pain perception was noted in the animal-assisted group in comparison with the standard-group (p = 0.01). Animal-assisted therapy facilitated rapid recovery in vigilance and activity after anaesthesia, modified pain perception and induced emotional prefrontal responses. An adaptative cardiovascular response was also present. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02284100.

  6. Prolonged Activated Clotting Time after Protamine Administration Does Not Indicate Residual Heparinization after Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Pediatric Open Heart Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tomohiro; Wolf, Hans-Gerd; Sinzobahamvya, Nicodème; Asfour, Boulos; Hraska, Victor; Schindler, Ehrenfried

    2015-08-01

    In open heart surgery, heparinization is commonly neutralized using an empirical heparin:protamine ratio ranging between 1:1 and 1:1.5. However, these ratios may result in protamine overdose that should be avoided for its negative side effects on the coagulation system. This study aimed to indicate the appropriate treatment for prolonged activated clotting time (ACT) after protamine administration following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in pediatric open heart surgery by investigating the underlying reasons for it. Twenty-seven children (open heart surgery were included. Heparin was administered only before CPB (400 IU/kg) and in the pump priming volume for CPB (2,000 IU) and was neutralized by 1:1 protamine after CPB. The blood heparin concentration was measured using anti-Xa assay. ACT and blood concentrations of heparin, coagulation factors, thrombin-antithrombin complex, and prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 were assessed. A rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM; Tem International GmbH, München, Bayern, Germany) was used to confirm the coagulation status and residual heparin after protamine administration. Anti-Xa assay showed that there is no residual heparin in the blood after 1:1 protamine administration. Nevertheless, ACT (128.89 ± 3.09 seconds before heparin administration) remained prolonged (177.14 ± 5.43 seconds at 10 minutes after protamine, 182.00 ± 5.90 seconds at 30 minutes after protamine). The blood concentrations of coagulation factors were significantly lower than those before heparin administration (p < 0.01). The low FIBTEM MCF of ROTEM (4.43 ± 0.32 mm) at 10 minutes after protamine indicated low fibrinogen concentration. Prolonged ACT after heparin neutralization by 1:1 protamine administration does not necessarily indicate residual heparin, but low blood concentrations of coagulation factors should be considered as a reason as well. Accordingly, supply of coagulation factors instead of additional protamine should be

  7. Epilepsy Surgery for Individuals with TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this video dated June 1, 2017, UCLA pediatric neurosurgeon Aria Fallah, MD, discusses the surgical treatment of ... the epilepsy surgery team, which includes the epileptologist, neurosurgeon, neuroradiologists and neuropsychologists, reviews all the collected data ...

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF PLASTIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećanac, Marija Đ

    2015-01-01

    Plastic surgery is a medical specialty dealing with corrections of defects, improvements in appearance and restoration of lost function. Ancient times. The first recorded account of reconstructive plastic surgery was found in ancient Indian Sanskrit texts, which described reconstructive surgeries of the nose and ears. In ancient Greece and Rome, many medicine men performed simple plastic cosmetic surgeries to repair damaged parts of the body caused by war mutilation, punishment or humiliation. In the Middle Ages, the development of all medical braches, including plastic surgery was hindered. New age. The interest in surgical reconstruction of mutilated body parts was renewed in the XVIII century by a great number of enthusiastic and charismatic surgeons, who mastered surgical disciplines and became true artists that created new forms. Modern era. In the XX century, plastic surgery developed as a modern branch in medicine including many types of reconstructive surgery, hand, head and neck surgery, microsurgery and replantation, treatment of burns and their sequelae, and esthetic surgery. Contemporary and future plastic surgery will continue to evolve and improve with regenerative medicine and tissue engineering resulting in a lot of benefits to be gained by patients in reconstruction after body trauma, oncology amputation, and for congenital disfigurement and dysfunction.

  9. Concurrent Surgery and the Role of the Pediatric Attending Surgeon: Comparing Parents' and Surgeons' Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Jennie K; Ibarra, Christopher; Feinn, Richard S; Rodriguez-Davalos, Manuel I; Carter, Cordelia W

    2018-06-01

    The common practice of performing concurrent or overlapping operations has been intensely scrutinized by lay media and academic press to investigate its safety and cost-effectiveness. However, there is little information about its use within the pediatric population. Even less is known about parents' expectations about the surgeon's role on the day of operation and how they align with those of pediatric surgeons and surgical trainees, despite the potential for significant discrepancies in expectations to erode trust and damage the physician-family relationship. A 5-point Likert-style survey was designed to characterize expectations about the degree of involvement by pediatric attending surgeons throughout a surgical case (1 = strongly disagree, 3 = neutral, 5 = strongly agree). The survey was administered to parents of pediatric patients undergoing elective operations during a 3-month interval at a single academic institution. The survey was also administered to surgeons and surgical residents at the same institution. Multivariate multiplicity-adjusted t-tests were used to identify significant differences between responders. One hundred and ten parents and 84 pediatric surgeons and trainees completed the survey. Parents' responses to the survey ranged from 4.15 to 4.89, compared with 2.75 to 4.86 from surgeons. The differences achieved statistical significance (p children. There is a significant mismatch between parents' expectations and those of pediatric surgeons about the role of the surgeon on the day of operation, with parents consistently expecting more direct involvement by the attending surgeon. These discrepancies can have implications for both parent/patient satisfaction and medical education. Copyright © 2018 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography in congenital heart diseases surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozores Suarez, Francisco Javier; Perez de Ordaz, Luis Bravo

    2010-01-01

    The intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography is very used in pediatric cardiovascular surgery. The aim of present paper was to determine its impact on the surgery immediate results after a previous experience of authors with this type of procedure

  11. Post-operative benefits of animal-assisted therapy in pediatric surgery: a randomised study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Calcaterra

    Full Text Available Interest in animal-assisted therapy has been fuelled by studies supporting the many health benefits. The purpose of this study was to better understand the impact of an animal-assisted therapy program on children response to stress and pain in the immediate post-surgical period.Forty children (3-17 years were enrolled in the randomised open-label, controlled, pilot study. Patients were randomly assigned to the animal-assisted therapy-group (n = 20, who underwent a 20 min session with an animal-assisted therapy dog, after surgery or the standard-group (n = 20, standard postoperative care. The study variables were determined in each patient, independently of the assigned group, by a researcher unblinded to the patient's group. The outcomes of the study were to define the neurological, cardiovascular and endocrinological impact of animal-assisted therapy in response to stress and pain. Electroencephalogram activity, heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, cerebral prefrontal oxygenation, salivary cortisol levels and the faces pain scale were considered as outcome measures.After entrance of the dog faster electroencephalogram diffuse beta-activity (> 14 Hz was reported in all children of the animal-assisted therapy group; in the standard-group no beta-activity was recorded (100% vs 0%, p<0.001. During observation, some differences in the time profile between groups were observed for heart rate (test for interaction p = 0.018, oxygen saturation (test for interaction p = 0.06 and cerebral oxygenation (test for interaction p = 0.09. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were influenced by animal-assisted therapy, though a higher variability in diastolic pressure was observed. Salivary cortisol levels did not show different behaviours over time between groups (p=0.70. Lower pain perception was noted in the animal-assisted group in comparison with the standard-group (p = 0.01.Animal-assisted therapy facilitated rapid recovery in vigilance and

  12. The incidence of emergence delirium and risk factors following sevoflurane use in pediatric patients for day case surgery, Kingston, Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Gooden

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Emergence delirium is a distressing complication of the use of sevoflurane for general anesthesia. This study sought to determine the incidence of emergence delirium and risk factors in patients at a specialist pediatric hospital in Kingston, Jamaica. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, observational study including pediatric patients aged 3-10 years, ASA I and II, undergoing general anesthesia with sevoflurane for elective day-case procedures. Data collected included patients' level of anxiety pre-operatively using the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale, surgery performed, anesthetic duration and analgesics administered. Postoperatively, patients were assessed for emergence delirium, defined as agitation with non-purposeful movement, restlessness or thrashing; inconsolability and unresponsiveness to nursing and/or parental presence. The need for pharmacological treatment and post-operative complications related to emergence delirium episodes were also noted. Results: One hundred and forty-five (145 children were included, with emergence delirium occurring in 28 (19.3%. Emergence delirium episodes had a mean duration of 6.9±7.8 min, required pharmacologic intervention in 19 (67.8% children and were associated with a prolonged recovery time (49.4±11.9 versus 29.7± 10.8 min for non-agitated children; p<0.001. Factors positively associated with emergence delirium included younger age (p = 0.01, OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.2-8.6 and moderate and severe anxiety prior to induction (p <0.001, OR 5.6, 95% CI 2.3-13.0. Complications of emergence delirium included intravenous line removal (n = 1, and surgical site bleeding (n = 3. Conclusion: Children of younger age with greater preoperative anxiety are at increased risk of developing emergence delirium following general anesthesia with sevoflurane. The overall incidence of emergence delirium was 19%.

  13. Dexmedetomidine-related atrial standstill and loss of capture in a pediatric patient after congenital heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Suzanne M; Tejman-Yarden, Shai; Khanna, Sandeep; Davis, Christopher K; Batra, Anjan S

    2011-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine (DEX; Precedex) is an alpha-2 adrenergic receptor agonist that produces anxiolysis and sleep-like sedation without narcosis or respiratory depression and has relatively few cardiovascular side effects. Given its favorable sedative properties combined with its limited effects on hemodynamic and respiratory function, it is widely used in pediatric intensive care and anesthesia settings. Case report. Pediatric intensive care unit. A three-yr-old girl was admitted after mitral valve replacement for persistent severe mitral insufficiency. Her prior history was significant for tetralogy of Fallot which was repaired at nine months of age. A year later the patient developed mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency and subsequently underwent mitral and tricuspid valve repair, pulmonary valve replacement, and a maze procedure (the latter was performed for persistent atrial flutter). Following that operation she developed sinus node dysfunction and had a permanent epicardial dual-chamber pacemaker implanted. Due to remaining severe mitral insufficiency the patient had increasing pulmonary symptoms, necessitating the most recent surgery to replace her mitral valve. On postoperative day two the patient was hemodynamically stable and weaning off mechanical ventilation. Tracheal extubation was anticipated to occur within the next 24 hrs. A DEX infusion of 0.6 mcg/kg/hr was initiated. A pacemaker interrogation performed on postoperative day three, 21 hrs after the initiation of DEX, revealed unsuccessful atrial capture. Dexmedetomidine was subsequently discontinued and the patient's pacemaker was reinterrogated. The interrogation findings were similar to those seen prior to the initiation of DEX. As a result of these findings, caution is warranted in the administration of DEX to patients with predisposing conduction abnormalities and patients who are pacemaker-dependent.

  14. Measuring Anatomic Severity in Pediatric Appendicitis: Validation of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Appendicitis Severity Grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Matthew C; Polites, Stephanie F; Aho, Johnathon M; Haddad, Nadeem N; Kong, Victor Y; Saleem, Humza; Bruce, John L; Laing, Grant L; Clarke, Damian L; Zielinski, Martin D

    2018-01-01

    To assess whether the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) grading system accurately corresponds with appendicitis outcomes in a US pediatric population. This single-institution retrospective review included patients appendicitis from 2008 to 2012. Demographic, clinical, procedural, and follow-up data (primary outcome was measured as Clavien-Dindo grade of complication severity) were abstracted. AAST grades were generated based on intraoperative findings. Summary, univariate, and multivariable regression analyses were performed to compare AAST grade and outcomes. Overall, 331 patients (46% female) were identified with a median age of 12 (IQR, 8-15) years. Appendectomy was laparoscopic in 90% and open in 10%. AAST grades included: Normal (n = 13, 4%), I (n = 152, 46%), II (n = 90, 27%), III (n = 43, 13%), IV (n = 24 7.3%), and V (n = 9 2.7%). Increased AAST grade was associated with increased Clavien-Dindo severity, P =.001. The overall complication rate was 13.6% and was comprised by superficial surgical site infection (n = 13, 3.9%), organ space infection (n = 15, 4.5%), and readmission (n = 17, 5.1%). Median duration of stay increased with AAST grade (P appendicitis grading system is valid in a single-institution pediatric population. Increasing AAST grade incrementally corresponds with patient outcomes including increased risk of complications and severity of complications. Determination of the generalizability of this grading system is required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ergonomics in laparoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supe Avinash

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic surgery provides patients with less painful surgery but is more demanding for the surgeon. The increased technological complexity and sometimes poorly adapted equipment have led to increased complaints of surgeon fatigue and discomfort during laparoscopic surgery. Ergonomic integration and suitable laparoscopic operating room environment are essential to improve efficiency, safety, and comfort for the operating team. Understanding ergonomics can not only make life of surgeon comfortable in the operating room but also reduce physical strains on surgeon.

  16. Gastric and intestinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Theresa W; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2003-09-01

    Gastric surgery is commonly performed to remove foreign bodies and correct gastric dilatation-volvulus and is less commonly performed to treat gastric ulceration or erosion, neoplasia, and benign gastric outflow obstruction. Intestinal surgery, although commonly performed by veterinarians, should never be considered routine. The most common procedures of the small intestinal tract performed in dogs and cats include enterotomy and resection/anastomosis. Surgery of the large intestine is indicated for lesions causing obstruction, perforations, colonic inertia, or chronic inflammation.

  17. Anesthesia and the Developing Brain: Relevance to the Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Wise-Faberowski, Lisa; Quinonez, Zoel A.; Hammer, Gregory B.

    2014-01-01

    Anesthetic neurotoxicity has been a hot topic in anesthesia for the past decade. It is of special interest to pediatric anesthesiologists. A subgroup of children potentially at greater risk for anesthetic neurotoxicity, based on a prolonged anesthetic exposure early in development, are those children receiving anesthesia for surgical repair of congenital heart disease. These children have a known risk of neurologic deficit after cardiopulmonary bypass for surgical repair of congenital heart d...

  18. Surgery: a risky business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, Amit; Nagpal, Kamal; Moorthy, Krishna

    2009-10-01

    The advancement of surgical technology has made surgery an increasingly suitable management option for an increasing number of medical conditions. Yet there is also a growing concern about the number of patients coming to harm as a result of surgery. Studies show that this harm can be prevented by better teamwork and communication in operating theatres. This article discusses the extent of adverse events in surgery and how effective teamwork and communication can improve patient safety. It also highlights the role checklists and briefing in improving teamwork and reducing human error in surgery.

  19. Heart valve surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... replacement; Valve repair; Heart valve prosthesis; Mechanical valves; Prosthetic valves ... surgery. Your heart valve has been damaged by infection ( endocarditis ). You have received a new heart valve ...

  20. Stephen L. Gans Distinguished Overseas Lecture. The neural crest in pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Juan A

    2007-06-01

    This review highlights the relevance of the neural crest (NC) as a developmental control mechanism involved in several pediatric surgical conditions and the investigative interest of following some of its known signaling pathways. The participation of the NC in facial clefts, ear defects, branchial fistulae and cysts, heart outflow tract and aortic arch anomalies, pigmentary disorders, abnormal enteric innervation, neural tumors, hemangiomas, and vascular anomalies is briefly reviewed. Then, the literature on clinical and experimental esophageal atresia-tracheoesophageal fistula (EA-TEF) and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is reviewed for the presence of associated NC defects. Finally, some of the molecular signaling pathways involved in both conditions (sonic hedgehog, Hox genes, and retinoids) are summarized. The association of facial, cardiovascular, thymic, parathyroid, and C-cell defects together with anomalies of extrinsic and intrinsic esophageal innervation in babies and/or animals with both EA-TEF and CDH strongly supports the hypothesis that NC is involved in the pathogenesis of these malformative clusters. On the other hand, both EA-TEF and CDH are observed in mice mutant for genes involved in the previously mentioned signaling pathways. The investigation of NC-related molecular pathogenic pathways involved in malformative associations like EA-TEF and CDH that are induced by chromosomal anomalies, chemical teratogens, and engineered mutations is a promising way of clarifying why and how some pediatric surgical conditions occur. Pediatric surgeons should be actively involved in these investigations.

  1. A practical guide for short-term pediatric surgery global volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Donald E; Fitzgerald, Tamara N; Axt, Jason R

    2016-08-01

    The tremendous need for increasing the quantity and quality of global pediatric surgical care in underserved areas has been well documented. Concomitantly there has been a significant increase in interest by pediatric surgeons in helping to relieve this problem through surgical volunteerism. The intent of the article is to serve as a practical guide for pediatric surgeons contemplating or planning a short-term global volunteer endeavor. The article is based on the authors' personal experiences and on the published experiences of other volunteers. The following aspects of volunteerism are discussed: ethical considerations, where and how to go, what and whom to take with you, what to expect in your volunteer locale, and what to do and what to avoid in order to enhance the volunteer experience. The points discussed in this guide will hopefully make the volunteer activity one that results in greatly improved immediate and long term surgical care for children and improves the chances that the activity will be a meaningful, pleasant, and productive experience for both the volunteer and the host physician. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Epilepsy surgery in a pediatric population: a retrospective study of 129 children from a tertiary care hospital in a developing country along with assessment of quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagar, Amit; Chandra, P Sarat; Chaudhary, Kapil; Avnish, Chauhan; Bal, C S; Gaikwad, Shailesh; Garg, Ajay; Sarkar, Chitra; Srivastava, A; Padma, M V; Rekha, Diwedi; Gulati, Sheffali; Paul, Vinod; Prasad, K; Singh, M B; Tripathi, Manjari

    2011-01-01

    To assess the outcome of a pediatric population operated for drug-resistant epilepsy from a large tertiary care center in India. Retrospectively: quality of life (QOL); prospectively: preoperative assessment included interictal EEG, MRI (as per epilepsy protocol), video-EEG. Ictal SPECT (with subtraction) and PET were performed when required. QOL scores were assessed using the HASS or SSQ for seizure severity, Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE) for QOL, and Child Behavior Check List (CBCL) for behavior. 142 were operated from January 2000 to June 2011 by the senior author. 118 patients with at least 1 year of follow-up were included in the study. Mean age at surgery was 9.8 ± 4.3 years. In addition, 40 patients underwent QOL assessment prospectively both before and after surgery. Mean duration of epilepsy was 5.3 ± 3.3 years. A class I outcome (Engel's) was seen in 79.5% patients, class II in 8.6%, class III in 10.7%, and class IV in 1 patient. As per surgical procedures, class I outcome in patients who underwent temporal resection, hemispherotomy and extratemporal resection was 76, 87 and 72%, respectively. QOL scores correlated with duration of seizures, epileptic encephalopathy and outcome of surgery, but not with side of surgery, age and sex. This study, the largest reported from India, has demonstrated satisfactory results for epilepsy surgery in children. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Less extensive surgery compared to extensive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauszus, Finn F; Petersen, Astrid C; Neumann, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    -up by hospital data files, general practitioner, death certificate, and autopsy report. Revision of histopathology by a single pathologist. Main outcome measures: Survival and relapse by clinical data, stage, and type of surgery. RESULTS: The incidence of AGCT was 1.37 per year per 100,000 women (95% CI: 1.08, 1.......68). The median follow-up time was 15 years and for the 79 surviving women 22 years. Stage I was found in 94% of cases. Relapse occurred in 24% of women in stage I and 100% of the other stages. Survival in stage I was 95%, 89% and 84% after 5, 10 and 20 years respectively. Increased survival of stage I......: The survival of women was better in AGCT than in epithelial ovarian tumor. Age and type of surgery, besides stage, influenced survival. Total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy is the recommended treatment with advancing age. At younger age less extensive surgery was associated...

  4. Anesthesia and the Developing Brain: Relevance to the Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Wise-Faberowski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetic neurotoxicity has been a hot topic in anesthesia for the past decade. It is of special interest to pediatric anesthesiologists. A subgroup of children potentially at greater risk for anesthetic neurotoxicity, based on a prolonged anesthetic exposure early in development, are those children receiving anesthesia for surgical repair of congenital heart disease. These children have a known risk of neurologic deficit after cardiopulmonary bypass for surgical repair of congenital heart disease. Yet, the type of anesthesia used has not been considered as a potential etiology for their neurologic deficits. These children not only receive prolonged anesthetic exposure during surgical repair, but also receive repeated anesthetic exposures during a critical period of brain development. Their propensity to abnormal brain development, as a result of congenital heart disease, may modify their risk of anesthetic neurotoxicity. This review article provides an overview of anesthetic neurotoxicity from the perspective of a pediatric cardiac anesthesiologist and provides insight into basic science and clinical investigations as it relates to this unique group of children who have been studied over several decades for their risk of neurologic injury.

  5. Perioperative management of facial bipartition surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caruselli M

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Marco Caruselli,1 Michael Tsapis,1,2 Fabrice Ughetto,1 Gregoire Pech-Gourg,3 Dario Galante,4 Olivier Paut1 1Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, La Timone Children’s Hospital, 2Pediatric Transport Team, SAMU 13, La Timone Hospital, 3Pediatric Neurosurgery Unit, La Timone Children’s Hospital, Marseille, France; 4Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, University Hospital Ospedali Riuniti of Foggia, Foggia, Italy Abstract: Severe craniofacial malformations, such as Crouzon, Apert, Saethre-Chotzen, and Pfeiffer syndromes, are very rare conditions (one in 50,000/100,000 live births that often require corrective surgery. Facial bipartition is the more radical corrective surgery. It is a high-risk intervention and needs complex perioperative management and a multidisciplinary approach. Keywords: craniofacial surgery, facial bipartition surgery, craniofacial malformations, pediatric anesthesia

  6. Pediatrics Department of the Russian Medical Academy of Continuous Professional Education and Moscow Research Clinical Institute of Pediatry and Children Surgery – half century hand in hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Zakharova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-term cooperation of the two scientific institutions contributing to the professional development of pediatricians is based on the long-term scientific relations of the Department of Pediatrics of the Russian Medical Academy of Continuing Professional Education and the Moscow Research Institute of Pediatrics and Pediatric Surgery (now the Research Institute of Pediatrics named after Academician Yu.E.Veltischev. The role of remarkable pediatric scientists – G.N. Speransky, Yu.E. Veltstschev, M.S. Ignatova, N.A. Korovina in the development of these links and pediatric science in Russia. 

  7. Safety in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siregar, S.

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of safety in cardiac surgery is a complex process, which involves many clinical, practical, methodological and statistical issues. The objective of this thesis was to measure and to compare safety in cardiac surgery in The Netherlands using the Netherlands Association for

  8. What Is Heart Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidneys, liver, and lungs. Stroke , which may cause short-term or permanent damage. Death. (Heart surgery is more likely to be life threatening in people who are very sick before the surgery.) Memory loss and other issues, such as problems concentrating or ...

  9. Annals of African Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of the Annals of African Surgery is to provide a medium for the exchange of current information between surgeons in the African region. The journal embraces surgery in all its aspects; basic science, clinical research, experimental research, surgical education. It will assist surgeons in the region to keep abreast of ...

  10. About Hand Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a hand surgeon near you. © 2009 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Definition developed by ASSH Council. Other Links CME Mission Statement and Disclaimer Policies and Technical Requirements Exhibits and Partners ASSH 822 W. Washington Blvd. ... 2018 by American Society for Surgery of the Hand × Search Tips Tip ...

  11. Lasik eye surgery - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100206.htm Lasik eye surgery - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Laser Eye Surgery A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  12. LASIK - Laser Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Refractive Surgery Procedures What Is Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK)? LASIK — Laser Eye Surgery Leer en Español: LASIK—Cirugía ocular con láser ... loss of close-up focusing power. How the LASIK procedure works LASIK is performed while the patient ...

  13. [Gases in vitreoretinal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janco, L; Vida, R; Bartos, M; Villémová, K; Izák, M

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the importance and benefits of using gases in vitreoretinal surgery. The gases represent a wide group of substances used in eye surgery for more than 100 years. The role of intraocular gases in vitreoretinal surgery is irreplaceable. Their use is still considered to be the "gold standard". An important step in eye surgery was the introduction of expanding gases--sulfur hexafluoride and perfluorocarbons into routine clinical practice. The most common indications for the use of intraocular gases are: retinal detachment, idiopathic macular hole, complications of vitreoretinal surgery and others. The introduction of intraocular gases into routine clinical practice, along with other modern surgical techniques resulted in significant improvement of postoperative outcomes in a wide range of eye diseases. Understanding the principles of intraocular gases use brings the benefits to the patient and physician as well. Due to their physical and chemical properties they pose far the best and most appropriate variant of intraocular tamponade. Gases also bring some disadvantages, such as difficulties in detailed fundus examination, visual acuity testing, ultrasonographic examination, difficulties in application of intravitreal drugs or reduced possibility of retina laser treatment. The gases significantly change optical system properties of the eye. The use of gases in vitreoretinal surgery has significantly increased success rate of retinal detachment surgery, complicated posterior segment cases, trauma, surgery of the macula and other diseases.

  14. Robust surgery loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans, Elias W.; Wullink, Gerhard; van Houdenhoven, Mark; Kazemier, Geert

    2008-01-01

    We consider the robust surgery loading problem for a hospital’s operating theatre department, which concerns assigning surgeries and sufficient planned slack to operating room days. The objective is to maximize capacity utilization and minimize the risk of overtime, and thus cancelled patients. This

  15. [Cognitive deterioration after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmetz, J.; Rasmussen, L.S.

    2008-01-01

    Delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction are important and common complications after surgery. Risk factors are first of all increasing age and type of surgery, whereas the type of anaesthesia does not seem to play an important role. Mortality is higher among patients with cognitive...

  16. Hand Surgery: Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Hand Surgery Anesthesia Email to a friend * required ...

  17. Penile enlargement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, G J

    1998-06-01

    Aesthetic surgery to improve the appearance of the penis, scrotum, and pubic region has successfully evolved. Penile lengthening is performed by releasing the suspensory ligament of the penis followed by use of penile weights. Girth is increased by wrapping a dermal-fat graft around the penile circumference. The choice of surgery is determined by the patient's anatomy and desires.

  18. Pediatric laparoscopic surgery in North-Central Nigeria: Achievements and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukman Olajide Abdur-Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Advances in laparoscopy are making the service accessible even in resource-poor countries where adaptations are made to meet local challenges. We report our experience in the provision of laparoscopy service to children at a tertiary health center in North-central Nigeria. Methods: A team of pediatric surgeons, anesthetists, and nurses collaborated to provide service and train other personnel. A prospective collection of data on biodata, diagnoses, procedure, and outcome over an effective period of 36 months of laparoscopy intervention of the 54 months between September 2009 and February 2014 was done. Consent, which also included the possibility of conversion to open was obtained from the parents of the patients. Results: A total of 73 patients aged 2 weeks to 16 years with a male: female ratio of 3 to 1 had laparoscopy done during the period. Fifty-two (71.2% procedures were therapeutic, and 21 (28.8% cases were done as emergency. Laparoscopic appendectomy was the most commonly performed procedure 25 (34.3%, followed by laparoscopic orchidopexy 17 (23. 3%, and diagnostic laparoscopy for disorders of sexual differentiation in 13 (17.8%. The length of stay in hospital postoperative was 1-3 days with a mean of 1.34 ΁ 0.45 days. The complications recorded included hemorrhage, in a case of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis due to failed electrocautery, one port site burns injury from diathermy dissection, and two periport pain postoperation. There was no mortality recorded. Conclusion: Pediatric laparoscopic service is gaining recognition in our practice in spite of poor resources, incessant industrial actions, and apathy from support staff. The outcomes are encouraging as the patients had minimal morbidities. Skills are improved through practice and retraining and manpower, and instruments are being expanded through our collaboration and training.

  19. Minimally invasive orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Cory M; Kaban, Leonard B; Troulis, Maria J

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is defined as the discipline in which operative procedures are performed in novel ways to diminish the sequelae of standard surgical dissections. The goals of minimally invasive surgery are to reduce tissue trauma and to minimize bleeding, edema, and injury, thereby improving the rate and quality of healing. In orthognathic surgery, there are two minimally invasive techniques that can be used separately or in combination: (1) endoscopic exposure and (2) distraction osteogenesis. This article describes the historical developments of the fields of orthognathic surgery and minimally invasive surgery, as well as the integration of the two disciplines. Indications, techniques, and the most current outcome data for specific minimally invasive orthognathic surgical procedures are presented.

  20. Clinical Databases and Registries in Congenital and Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Cardiology, Critical Care, and Anesthesiology Worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vener, David F; Gaies, Michael; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Pasquali, Sara K

    2017-01-01

    The growth in large-scale data management capabilities and the successful care of patients with congenital heart defects have coincidentally paralleled each other for the last three decades, and participation in multicenter congenital heart disease databases and registries is now a fundamental component of cardiac care. This manuscript attempts for the first time to consolidate in one location all of the relevant databases worldwide, including target populations, specialties, Web sites, and participation information. Since at least 1,992 cardiac surgeons and cardiologists began leveraging this burgeoning technology to create multi-institutional data collections addressing a variety of specialties within this field. Pediatric heart diseases are particularly well suited to this methodology because each individual care location has access to only a relatively limited number of diagnoses and procedures in any given calendar year. Combining multiple institutions data therefore allows for a far more accurate contemporaneous assessment of treatment modalities and adverse outcomes. Additionally, the data can be used to develop outcome benchmarks by which individual institutions can measure their progress against the field as a whole and focus quality improvement efforts in a more directed fashion, and there is increasing utilization combining clinical research efforts within existing data structures. Efforts are ongoing to support better collaboration and integration across data sets, to improve efficiency, further the utility of the data collection infrastructure and information collected, and to enhance return on investment for participating institutions.

  1. The use of irradiated corneal patch grafts in pediatric Ahmed drainage implant surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Kaitlyn Wallace; Lucas, Jordyn; Abbasian, Javaneh

    2015-10-01

    To describe the use of irradiated cornea for scleral reinforcement in Ahmed glaucoma valve drainage implant (AGV) devices in children. The medical records of patients endophthalmitis, and tube/plate self-explantation. A total of 25 procedures (20 patients) met inclusion criteria. Average patient age was 70 months (range, 2 months to 17 years). Mean follow-up was 24.8 months (range, 6 months to 6.2 years). One tube experienced conjunctival exposure through two separate corneal grafts (2/25 cases [8%]), sequentially in the same eye. The first event occurred at month 3.5 after primary implantation of the tube shunt; the second erosion occurred following revision of the existing implant at month 1.5 postoperatively. There were 2 cases of auto-explantation, 2 cases of wound dehiscence, and 1 case of persistent inflammation. There were no cases of endophthalmitis or other infections. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the use of corneal patch grafts in children. Irradiated cornea improves cosmesis and enhances visualization of the tube. The risk of tube exposure was found to be low and comparable to other materials used as a patch graft. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anesthesia management in pediatric patients with laryngeal papillomatosis undergoing suspension laryngoscopic surgery and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Lin; Wang, Bing; Shu, Shi-Yu

    2011-11-01

    The excision of laryngeal papillomas poses a great challenge for both the anesthesiologist and the surgeon. The narrowness of the airways and the great variability of the pathological lesions necessitate close collaboration between the surgical and anesthesia teams to provide optimal operating conditions and ensure adequate ventilation and oxygenation. Our aim was to explore perioperative anesthesia management in pediatric patients during the excision of laryngeal papillomas with a suspension laryngoscope. Fifty-eight pediatric patients suffering from laryngeal papillomas were included in this retrospective study. These patients had degrees of laryngeal obstruction from I to III and underwent suspension laryngoscopic surgery to excise laryngeal papillomas between January 2007 and December 2010. The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status of the patients ranged from I to III. Anesthesia was induced by intravenous administration. Once the child was unconscious, a 2% lidocaine aerosol solution was sprayed over the laryngeal area directly under the laryngoscope. For patients to tolerate suspension laryngoscopy, it is necessary to maintain spontaneous breathing and ensure adequate anesthesia depth. The airway was secured, and sufficient ventilation was established throughout a tracheal tube (ID 2.5 or 3.0) which was placed close to glottis and connected to Jackson Rees system. Hemodynamic parameters and pulse oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) were closely monitored, and adverse events were recorded. Most of the patients 89% (52/58) were hemodynamically stable during the perioperative period. Laryngospasm and laryngeal edema occurred in several children during emergence from the anesthesia. Tracheal intubations were performed in six patients (10.3%). Tracheotomies were performed in two patients. One patient had to be sent to the ICU for comprehensive therapy. The most important consideration for anesthesia during suspension laryngoscopy is (1) the

  3. Barriers to Medical Compassion as a Function of Experience and Specialization: Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, Surgery, and General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Antonio T; Consedine, Nathan S

    2017-06-01

    Compassion is an expectation of patients, regulatory bodies, and physicians themselves. Most research has, however, studied compassion fatigue rather than compassion itself and has concentrated on the role of the physician. The Transactional Model of Physician Compassion suggests that physician, patient, external environment, and clinical factors are all relevant. Because these factors vary both across different specialities and among physicians with differing degrees of experience, barriers to compassion are also likely to vary. We describe barriers to physician compassion as a function of specialization (psychiatry, general practice, surgery, internal medicine, and pediatrics) and physician experience. We used a cross-sectional study using demographic data, specialization, practice parameters, and the Barriers to Physician Compassion Questionnaire. Nonrandom convenience sampling was used to recruit 580 doctors, of whom 444 belonged to the targeted speciality groups. The sample was characterized before conducting a factorial Multivariate Analysis of Covariance and further post hoc analyses. A 5 (speciality grouping) × 2 (more vs. less physician experience) Multivariate Analysis of Covariance showed that the barriers varied as a function of both speciality and experience. In general, psychiatrists reported lower barriers, whereas general practitioners and internal medicine specialists generally reported greater barriers. Barriers were generally greater among less experienced doctors. Documenting and investigating barriers to compassion in different speciality groups have the potential to broaden current foci beyond the physician and inform interventions aimed at enhancing medical compassion. In addition, certain aspects of the training or practice of psychiatry that enhance compassion may mitigate barriers to compassion in other specialities. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Changing Authorship Patterns and Publishing Habits in the European Journal of Pediatric Surgery: A 10-Year Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintér, András

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is an analysis of the changing authorship patterns and publishing habits encountered in papers published in the European Journal of Pediatric Surgery (EJPS) over the past 10 years. Furthermore, it seeks to anticipate the trends in the years ahead. We conducted a retrospective review of articles published in the EJPS during a 10-year period (January 1, 2003-December 31, 2012). Each article was classified as an Original Report/Original Article (OR/OA) or as a Case Report/Case Gallery (CR/CG), and they were analyzed separately. For investigation of the percentage distribution of publications according to the number of authors per articles, papers were combined and into three groups (1-2, 3-5, and 6 ≤ authors). The analysis focused on whether the work was done by members of one institution, or in collaboration with other units of the same institution, or in collaboration with other national or multinational institutes. In the past 10 years, the EJPS published 996 articles (616 ORs/OAs, 380 CRs/CGs). The one and two authored publications (125) have not decreased, the three to five authored articles (552) changed minimally, whereas the number of 6 ≤ authored publications (319) has increased. Of 996 publications, 348 were from single institutes and 648 were written in collaboration with two or more other institutes. In addition, in this 10-year period, the number of multinational articles has increased significantly from 24 to 59. Increase in cooperation within and between institutions is a positive trend, aiming with the goal of improving quality of publications. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. IOL Implants: Lens Replacement and Cataract Surgery (Intraocular Lenses)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Oncology Oculoplastics/Orbit Refractive Management/Intervention Retina/Vitreous Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology ... Are Cataracts? Pediatric Cataracts Cataract Diagnosis and Treatment Cataract Surgery IOL Implants: Lens Replacement After Cataracts ...

  6. Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery. Cleft Lip / Palate and Craniofacial Surgery This type of surgery is ... the carefully orchestrated, multiple-stage correctional program for cleft lip and palate patients. The goal is to help restore the ...

  7. Gamma knife surgery for craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, D.; Steiner, M.; Steiner, L.

    1995-01-01

    We present our results of Gamma Knife surgery for craniopharyngioma in nine patients. The current status of surgery, radiation therapy, intracavitary instillation of radionuclides and Gamma Knife surgery in the management of craniopharyngiomas is discussed. (author)

  8. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure ... problem may cause heart failure or make heart failure worse. Heart valve surgery may be needed to repair or ...

  9. Effects of using WeChat-assisted perioperative care instructions for parents of pediatric patients undergoing day surgery for herniorrhaphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Zheng, Xin; Chai, Shouxia; Lei, Meirong; Feng, Zehui; Zhang, Xuelin; Lopez, Violeta

    2018-02-19

    This study examined the effects of WeChat-assisted perioperative instructions for parents whose children were to undergo herniorrhaphy. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in a day surgery center in China. Participants were randomly assigned to the intervention (WeChat) group (n = 209) and the control (Leaflet) group (n = 209). The primary outcomes of this study were parents' knowledge regarding hernia and rate of cancellation of children's surgery. The secondary outcomes were the rate of lost-to-follow-up and the rate of complications and adverse events during the seventh postoperative follow-up day. There was a significant difference in the rate of cancelling the surgery and the mean knowledge score between the WeChat group and leaflet groups. The lost-to-follow-up rate was significantly lower in the WeChat group (0.54%) than in the leaflet group (3.66%). The incidence of postoperative complications were higher in the control group. WeChat-assisted perioperative care instructions enhanced parents' knowledge on perioperative instructions and promoted the preparation of their children for day surgery resulting in lower rate of cancelling the surgery. WeChat has the ability to expand health services outside the hospital confines and could be used as an important low-cost health educational medium in China. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Epiretinal membrane surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamoudi, Hassan; Correll Christensen, Ulrik; La Cour, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of combined phacoemulsification-vitrectomy and sequential surgery for idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) on refractive error (RE) and macular morphology. Methods: In this prospective clinical trial, we allocated phakic eyes with ERM to (1) cataract surgery and subs......Purpose: To assess the impact of combined phacoemulsification-vitrectomy and sequential surgery for idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) on refractive error (RE) and macular morphology. Methods: In this prospective clinical trial, we allocated phakic eyes with ERM to (1) cataract surgery...... and achieved spherical equivalent); secondary outcomes were best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and incidence of cystoid macular oedema (CME) defined as >10% increment of central subfield macular thickness (CSMT). Results: Sixty-two eyes were enrolled. The mean RE showed a small myopic shift of -0.36D in all...... between the groups. Four cases (17%) in the CAT group had resolved visual complaints and improved BCVA after cataract surgery resulting in no need for PPV within the follow-up period. Conclusion: Surgery for idiopathic ERM in phakic eyes with either phaco-vitrectomy or sequential surgery are equal...

  11. Craniofacial Surgery Fellowship Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Agarwal, Divyansh; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-06-01

    Applicants for craniofacial surgery fellowships utilize Internet-based resources like the San Francisco (SF) Match to manage applications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accessibility and content of craniofacial surgery fellowship websites (CSFWs). A list of available craniofacial surgery fellowships was compiled from directories of the American Society of Craniofacial Surgery (ACSFS) and SF Match. Accessibility of CSFWs was assessed via links from these directories and a Google search. Craniofacial surgery fellowship websites were evaluated on education and recruitment content and compared via program characteristics. Twenty-four of the 28 US-based craniofacial surgery fellowship programs had a CSFW (86%). The ACSFS and SF Match databases had limited CSFW accessibility, but a Google search revealed most CSFWs had the top search result (76%). In total, CSFWs provided an average of 39% of education and recruitment variables. While most programs provided fellowship program descriptions (96%), application links (96%), and faculty listings (83%), relatively few provided rotation schedules (13%), fellow selection process information (13%), or interview dates (8%). CSFW content did not vary by program location, faculty size, accreditation status, or institutional affiliations (P > 0.05). Craniofacial surgery fellowships often lack readily accessible websites from national program lists and have limited information for interested applicants. The consistent lack of online information across programs suggests future opportunities exist to improve these educational resources.

  12. Surveys on surgery theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cappell, Sylvain; Rosenberg, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Surgery theory, the basis for the classification theory of manifolds, is now about forty years old. The sixtieth birthday (on December 14, 1996) of C.T.C. Wall, a leading member of the subject''s founding generation, led the editors of this volume to reflect on the extraordinary accomplishments of surgery theory as well as its current enormously varied interactions with algebra, analysis, and geometry. Workers in many of these areas have often lamented the lack of a single source surveying surgery theory and its applications. Because no one person could write such a survey, the editors ask

  13. Surveys on surgery theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cappell, Sylvain; Rosenberg, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Surgery theory, the basis for the classification theory of manifolds, is now about forty years old. There have been some extraordinary accomplishments in that time, which have led to enormously varied interactions with algebra, analysis, and geometry. Workers in many of these areas have often lamented the lack of a single source that surveys surgery theory and its applications. Indeed, no one person could write such a survey. The sixtieth birthday of C. T. C. Wall, one of the leaders of the founding generation of surgery theory, provided an opportunity to rectify the situation and produce a

  14. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available AAOMS - Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who ... surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and ...

  15. COMPUTERS IN SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BODE

    Key words: Computers, surgery, applications. Introduction ... With improved memory, speed and processing power in an ever more compact ... with picture and voice embedment to wit. With the ... recall the tedium of anatomy, physiology and.

  16. HEAD AND NECK SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    simple and well tolerated, and can be used selectively or as a ... up clinical information was obtained from a review of the patients' .... When a mass is clinically malignant, and facial nerve ... extension of surgery and closer attention to tumour.

  17. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... surgery. It is important to understand that your treatment, which will probably include orthodontics before and after ... to realistically estimate the time required for your treatment. Correction of Common Dentofacial Deformities ​ ​ The information provided ...

  18. Aortic valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007408.htm Aortic valve surgery - open To use the sharing features on this page, ... separates the heart and aorta. The aortic valve opens so blood can flow out. It then closes ...

  19. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We ... surgically treat the soft tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and oral ...

  20. Spine surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... milk). This means you should not lift a laundry basket, grocery bags, or small children. You should ... Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. ...

  1. Pain Medications After Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be used for outpatient procedures or more-involved inpatient surgery. For pain relief lasting several hours, an ... surgical care, such as rest, ice packs, rehabilitative exercises and wound care. Ask to have written instructions ...

  2. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively ...

  3. Scoliosis surgery - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from getting worse. But, when they no longer work, the child's health care provider will recommend surgery. There are several reasons to treat scoliosis: Appearance is a major concern. Scoliosis often causes back pain. If the curve is severe enough, ...

  4. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... performs the actual surgery. It is important to understand that your treatment, which will probably include orthodontics ... several years to complete. Your OMS and orthodontist understand that this is a long-term commitment for ...

  5. Ambulatory paediatric surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reminder and instructions 24 - 48 hours before surgery. Effective communication with ... patients, no abnormal postoperative behaviour patterns were recorded by the ... nursing and administration staff - less desirable is a day- stay ward with ...

  6. Aids and Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2004-12-02

    Dec 2, 2004 ... The correlation between HIV infection and surgery began to be highlighted only two ... expect greater clinical exposure to patients with. HIV/AIDS. .... fractures in HIV patient, although too little is known about the relationship ...

  7. HEAD AND NECK SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    +/-symptoms and signs), intravenous calcium gluconate and oral calcium lactate is .... facilitated by surgical stress, Vitamin D deficiency and hungry .... recurrence after thyroid surgery, excluding cancer. Chirurgie. ... Crea C, Alesina P, et al.

  8. Hip fracture surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clearly. Sometimes, surgery can make this problem worse. Pressure sores ( pressure ulcers or bed sores) from being in bed or ... the hospital for 3 to 5 days. Full recovery will take from 3 to 4 months to ...

  9. Mitral valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Taking warfarin (Coumadin) References Otto CM, Bonow RO. Valvular heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow ... A.M. Editorial team. Heart Surgery Read more Heart Valve Diseases Read more Mitral Valve Prolapse Read more A. ...

  10. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... surgery: Difficulty chewing, or biting food Difficulty swallowing Chronic jaw or jaw joint (TMJ) pain and headache ... Inability to make the lips meet without straining Chronic mouth breathing Sleep apnea (breathing problems when sleeping, ...

  11. Hemorrhoid surgery - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100026.htm Hemorrhoid surgery - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... empties stool from the body through the anus. Hemorrhoids are "cushions" of tissue filled with blood vessels ...

  12. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral ... of sedation and general anesthesia. Click here to find out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery ...

  13. Laser surgery - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bleeding Problem not going away Infection Pain Scarring Skin color changes Some laser surgery is done when you are asleep and ... TG, Elston DM, eds. Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical ... lasers, lights, and tissue interactions. In: Hruza GJ, Avram ...

  14. Aids and Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2004-12-02

    Dec 2, 2004 ... HIV/AIDS patients require surgery sometimes during their illness. The objective of the ... risks to surgical equipes and analysing preventive strategies to HIV ... of Atlanta, and after an assessment of the performance status and ...

  15. Art and Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Julio Wilson; Metka, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    The roots of science and art of plastic surgery are very antique. Anatomy, drawing, painting, and sculpting have been very important to the surgery and medicine development over the centuries. Artistic skills besides shape, volume, and lines perception can be a practical aid to the plastic surgeons' daily work. An overview about the interactions between art and plastic surgery is presented, with a few applications to rhinoplasty, cleft lip, and other reconstructive plastic surgeries. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  16. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the frontal approach takes advantage of normal tissue planes and does not require removal of any bone. ... to the “open” procedure may include: Obesity A history of prior abdominal surgery causing dense scar tissue ...

  17. Gastric Bypass Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery is typically not reversible. It works by decreasing the amount of food you can eat at ... healthy changes in your diet and get regular physical activity and exercise. If you frequently snack on high- ...

  18. Expectations of Sinus Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ARS HOME ANATOMY Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ... reduce the pressure in your nose. Avoid strenuous exercise for the first 2 weeks after surgery. Also ...

  19. Cosmetic surgery: medicolegal considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piras Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetic surgery is one of the two branches of plastic surgery. The characteristic of non-necessity of this surgical speciality implies an increased severity in the evaluation of the risk-benefit balance. Therefore, great care must be taken in providing all the information necessary in order to obtain valid consent to the intervention. We analyzed judgments concerning cosmetic surgery found in national legal databases. A document of National Bioethics Committee (CNB was also analyzed. Conclusion: The receipt of valid, informed consent is of absolute importance not only to legitimise the medical-surgical act, but it also represents the key element in the question concerning the existence of an obligation to achieve certain results/use of certain methods in the cosmetic surgery.

  20. Knee microfracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartilage regeneration - knee ... Three types of anesthesia may be used for knee arthroscopy surgery: Medicine to relax you, and shots of painkillers to numb the knee Spinal (regional) anesthesia General anesthesia (you will be ...

  1. Robotics in Colorectal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Allison; Steele, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, robotic surgery has developed from a futuristic dream to a real, widely used technology. Today, robotic platforms are used for a range of procedures and have added a new facet to the development and implementation of minimally invasive surgeries. The potential advantages are enormous, but the current progress is impeded by high costs and limited technology. However, recent advances in haptic feedback systems and single-port surgical techniques demonstrate a clear role for robotics and are likely to improve surgical outcomes. Although robotic surgeries have become the gold standard for a number of procedures, the research in colorectal surgery is not definitive and more work needs to be done to prove its safety and efficacy to both surgeons and patients. PMID:27746895

  2. Periscopic Spine Surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cleary, Kevin R

    2000-01-01

    .... Key research accomplishments for the first year are: ̂Demonstrated the value of intraoperative CT for visualization and verification of the anatomy in complex spine surgeries in the neurosurgery operating room...

  3. Clinical Trials in Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ANNALS of AFRICAN SURGERY | www.sskenya.org/journal. The ANNALS of ... by two different experiments on small pox by Lady. Mary Wortley Montagu and ... through their 'animal magnetism' were nothing more than an expensive ...

  4. Repetitive endoscopic sinus surgery failure: a role for radical surgery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, Ward J. M.; Wreesmann, Volkert B.; van der Meulen, Freerk W.; Knegt, Paul P.; Fokkens, Wytske J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is considered to be the golden standard for surgery in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. However, there is still a small group of patients unresponsive despite repetitive surgery. Radical surgery aimed at reduction of the

  5. Is day surgery safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majholm, Birgitte; Engbæk, J; Bartholdy, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Day surgery is expanding in several countries, and it is important to collect information about quality. The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and unanticipated hospital visits 0-30 days post-operatively in a large cohort.......Day surgery is expanding in several countries, and it is important to collect information about quality. The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and unanticipated hospital visits 0-30 days post-operatively in a large cohort....

  6. Bariatric Surgery for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, Carel W; Heneghan, Helen M

    2018-01-01

    In this review, the authors discuss the indications for and the published outcomes of commonly performed bariatric procedures, including weight loss, perioperative morbidity and mortality, late complications, as well as the impact of bariatric surgery on comorbidities, cardiovascular risk, and mortality. They also briefly discuss the mechanisms by which bariatric/metabolic surgery causes such significant weight loss and health gain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Robotics in General Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, James; Chandra, Venita; Krummel, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In summary, robotics has made a significant contribution to General Surgery in the past 20 years. In its infancy, surgical robotics has seen a shift from early systems that assisted the surgeon to current teleoperator systems that can enhance surgical skills. Telepresence and augmented reality surgery are being realized, while research and development into miniaturization and automation is rapidly moving forward. The future of surgical robotics is bright. Researchers are working to address th...

  8. Metabolic surgery: quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Rubio Herrera, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The impact of bariatric surgery beyond its effect on weight loss has entailed a change in the way of regarding it. The term metabolic surgery has become more popular to designate those interventions that aim at resolving diseases that have been traditionally considered as of exclusive medical management, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Recommendations for metabolic surgery have been largely addressed and discussed in worldwide meetings, but no definitive consensus has been reached yet. Rates of diabetes remission after metabolic surgery have been one of the most debated hot topics, with heterogeneity being a current concern. This review aims to identify and clarify controversies regarding metabolic surgery, by focusing on a critical analysis of T2D remission rates achieved with different bariatric procedures, and using different criteria for its definition. Indications for metabolic surgery for patients with T2D who are not morbidly obese are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Innovations in robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettman, Matthew; Rivera, Marcelino

    2016-05-01

    Developments in robotic surgery have continued to advance care throughout the field of urology. The purpose of this review is to evaluate innovations in robotic surgery over the past 18 months. The release of the da Vinci Xi system heralded an improvement on the Si system with improved docking, the ability to further manipulate robotic arms without clashing, and an autofocus universal endoscope. Robotic simulation continues to evolve with improvements in simulation training design to include augmented reality in robotic surgical education. Robotic-assisted laparoendoscopic single-site surgery continues to evolve with improvements on technique that allow for tackling previously complex pathologic surgical anatomy including urologic oncology and reconstruction. Last, innovations of new surgical platforms with robotic systems to improve surgeon ergonomics and efficiency in ureteral and renal surgery are being applied in the clinical setting. Urologic surgery continues to be at the forefront of the revolution of robotic surgery with advancements in not only existing technology but also creation of entirely novel surgical systems.

  10. POST OPERATIVE RECOVERY RESTLESSNESS FOLLOWING ENT SURGERIES IN THE PEDIATRIC AGE GROUP - A CLINICAL STUDY OF 246 CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagula

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Post - operative restlessness is observed commonly among children following Ear Nose Throat surgeries. This post anesthetic problem is also termed as Emergence Agitation (EA which interferes with patient’s recovery, presenting a challenging task to the ane sthetist in terms of assessment and convincing the parents. Many factors play a role singly or in combination in producing EA. EA consist of restlessness, excessive crying and spells of breath holding, head banging and incoherent speech. In this prospectiv e clinical study the incidence of post - operative recovery restlessness EA in children aged between 3 to 12 years, enumeration of the causes, and prediction of EA in Indian population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 246 Children undergoing elective surgeries of Ear Nose and throat are selected and their demographic data, socio - economic back ground and emotional attachment with parents were elicited. Parents of the children were interviewed prior to surgery using a questionnaire enquiring of their children’s personal ity, and emotional attachment and meekness. Their preoperative clinical data are documented. Their post - operative general condition, behavior, time taken for awakening, period of total recovery and treatment factors are recorded and analyzed. RESULTS: The incidence of EA was found in 23.6% of the children. EA lasted between 21 minutes to 52 minutes with a mean period of 28.4±9.5 minutes. 67% of the children required medication with sedatives, analgesics and anti - emetics. Post - operative stay in the Surgical ICU ranged between Hrs . 3.12±0.36mts to Hrs . 8.39±2.10mts in the children showing restlessness, compared to those not showing agitation. CONCLUSIONS: The factors associated with EA were, age, emotional attachment, meekness, adaptability, previous surgery, analgesics, sedatives, dose of pentothal sodium for induction, time taken for awakening and duration of surgery. Shorter was the time of awakening

  11. Ostomy Surgery of the Bowel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digestive System & How it Works Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome Ostomy Surgery of the Bowel What is ostomy surgery of the bowel? Ostomy surgery of the ... of the body. Why does a person need ostomy surgery of the bowel? A person may need ...

  12. CT after transsphenoidal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazawa, Satoru

    1991-01-01

    Two hundred and ten CT studies of 95 patients after transsphenoidal surgery were reviewed. Spheno-ethmoid opacificaiton, intrasellar hematoma and gas bubbles were noted within 2 weeks after surgery. Bone defect of the sellar floor and bone stent were seen on coronal scans in most cases. The packing material frequently disappeared on follow-up studies. Hormonal assessment of the functioning tumor, according to which the effect of treatment was evaluated, was correlated with CT findings. Because differentiation between postoperative changes and residual mass was difficult, there was no definite CT criteria to indicate residual functioning tumor except upward convexity of the diaphragma sellae on CT more than 3 months after surgery. Initial follow up CT study is recommended to be performed at about 3 months after surgery, at which time the immediate postoperative inflammatory changes have been disappeared. The incidence of recurrence was 3/47 (6%), which was shown on follow-up CT from 4 to 10 years after surgery. Therefore, subsequent CT study should be done in every year or two, taking the clinical symptoms and hormonal data into consideration. (author)

  13. Innovations in Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Catherine; Pryor, Aurora D

    2015-11-01

    Surgery has consistently been demonstrated to be the most effective long-term therapy for the treatment of obesity. However, despite excellent outcomes with current procedures, most patients with obesity- and weight-related comorbidities who meet criteria for surgical treatment choose not to pursue surgery out of fear of operative risks and complications or concerns about high costs. Novel minimally invasive procedures and devices may offer alternative solutions for patients who are hesitant to pursue standard surgical approaches. These procedures may be used for primary treatment of obesity, early intervention for patients approaching morbid obesity, temporary management prior to bariatric surgery, or revision of bypass surgery associated with weight regain. Novel bariatric procedures can in general be divided into four categories: endoluminal space-occupying devices, gastric suturing and restrictive devices, absorption-limiting devices, and neural-hormonal modulating devices. Many of these are only approved as short-term interventions, but these devices may be effective for patients desiring low-risk procedures or a transient effect. We will see the expansion of indications and alternatives for metabolic surgery as these techniques gain approval.

  14. CT after transsphenoidal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazawa, Satoru [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine

    1991-03-01

    Two hundred and ten CT studies of 95 patients after transsphenoidal surgery were reviewed. Spheno-ethmoid opacificaiton, intrasellar hematoma and gas bubbles were noted within 2 weeks after surgery. Bone defect of the sellar floor and bone stent were seen on coronal scans in most cases. The packing material frequently disappeared on follow-up studies. Hormonal assessment of the functioning tumor, according to which the effect of treatment was evaluated, was correlated with CT findings. Because differentiation between postoperative changes and residual mass was difficult, there was no definite CT criteria to indicate residual functioning tumor except upward convexity of the diaphragma sellae on CT more than 3 months after surgery. Initial follow up CT study is recommended to be performed at about 3 months after surgery, at which time the immediate postoperative inflammatory changes have been disappeared. The incidence of recurrence was 3/47 (6%), which was shown on follow-up CT from 4 to 10 years after surgery. Therefore, subsequent CT study should be done in every year or two, taking the clinical symptoms and hormonal data into consideration. (author).

  15. The features of general anesthesia by sevofluran in pediatric vitreoretinal surgery with different diseases and ophthalmosurgeral pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pronin S.N.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: clinical studies of inhalation anesthesia with sevoflurane as the main anesthetic for various diseases in children with vitreoretinal operations. Material and Methods. There was considered the age groups of children from 3 to 16 years old. Among 76 children: 18 with non-prosperrous psycho-emotional statuses, 2 with ICP, 2 with bronchial asthma, 3 with atopic dermatitis, 5 with small anomalies of heart development, 46 were somatically healthy. All of children had different ophthalmosuregery pathology. Results. The performing of general anesthesia by sevoflurane at vitreoretinal surgeries of children with the different diseases and ophthalmological pathologies displayed appropriateness and safety during the surgeries. Conclusion. The appliance of sevoflurane is the reasonable and optimal scheme in modern ophtalmosurgery and anesthesiology.

  16. The controversy over pediatric bariatric surgery: an explorative study on attitudes and normative beliefs of specialists, parents, and adolescents with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geelen, Stefan M; Bolt, Ineke L E; van der Baan-Slootweg, Olga H; van Summeren, Marieke J H

    2013-06-01

    Despite the reported limited success of conventional treatments and growing evidence of the effectiveness of adult bariatric surgery, weight loss operations for (morbidly) obese children and adolescents are still considered to be controversial by health care professionals and lay people alike. This paper describes an explorative, qualitative study involving obesity specialists, morbidly obese adolescents, and parents and identifies attitudes and normative beliefs regarding pediatric bariatric surgery. Views on the etiology of obesity-whether it should be considered primarily a medical condition or more a psychosocial problem-seem to affect the specialists' normative opinions concerning the acceptability of bariatric procedures as a treatment option, the parents' feelings regarding both being able to influence their child's health and their child being able to control their own condition, and the adolescents' sense of competence and motivation for treatment. Moreover, parents and adolescents who saw obesity as something that they could influence themselves were more in favor of non-surgical treatment and vice versa. Conflicting attitudes and normative views-e.g., with regard to concepts of disease, personal influence on health, motivation, and the possibility of a careful informed consent procedure-play an important role in the acceptability of bariatric surgery for childhood obesity.

  17. Surgery for trigger finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Haroldo Junior; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun; Lenza, Mário; Gomes Dos Santos, Joao Baptista; Faloppa, Flávio; Belloti, Joao Carlos

    2018-02-20

    Trigger finger is a common clinical disorder, characterised by pain and catching as the patient flexes and extends digits because of disproportion between the diameter of flexor tendons and the A1 pulley. The treatment approach may include non-surgical or surgical treatments. Currently there is no consensus about the best surgical treatment approach (open, percutaneous or endoscopic approaches). To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of different methods of surgical treatment for trigger finger (open, percutaneous or endoscopic approaches) in adults at any stage of the disease. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase and LILACS up to August 2017. We included randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials that assessed adults with trigger finger and compared any type of surgical treatment with each other or with any other non-surgical intervention. The major outcomes were the resolution of trigger finger, pain, hand function, participant-reported treatment success or satisfaction, recurrence of triggering, adverse events and neurovascular injury. Two review authors independently selected the trial reports, extracted the data and assessed the risk of bias. Measures of treatment effect for dichotomous outcomes calculated risk ratios (RRs), and mean differences (MDs) or standardised mean differences (SMD) for continuous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). When possible, the data were pooled into meta-analysis using the random-effects model. GRADE was used to assess the quality of evidence for each outcome. Fourteen trials were included, totalling 1260 participants, with 1361 trigger fingers. The age of participants included in the studies ranged from 16 to 88 years; and the majority of participants were women (approximately 70%). The average duration of symptoms ranged from three to 15 months, and the follow-up after the procedure ranged from eight weeks to 23 months.The studies reported nine types of comparisons: open surgery versus steroid injections (two

  18. Laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) for the treatment of different urologic pathologies in pediatrics: single-center single-surgeon experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Karim, Aly M; Elmissery, Mostafa; Elsalmy, Salah; Moussa, Ahmed; Aboelfotoh, Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    Recently LESS has been reported as a valid minimally option for treatment of some urologic pathologies in pediatrics. However, the initial reports of pediatric LESS are still limited to case reports and initial case series. This may be due to the inherent technical difficulty of LESS and the currently available LESS instruments. In this report, we present the largest case series of pediatric LESS for treatment of different urologic pathologies in pediatrics. Included in this study are children who had LESS during the period of January 2011 to June 2013. Both Olympus TriPort (Olympus, New York, USA and Advance Surgical Concept, Wicklow, Ireland) and Covedien SILS access port (Covedien, Chicopec, Massachusetts, USA) were used and were inserted through the umbilicus. Exclusion criteria included children less than 3 years old, history of previous transperitoneal abdominal surgery, malignant indications, and complex urogenital congenital anomalies. All LESS procedures were done by a single experienced laparoscopist and data were reviewed retrospectively. Twenty-two children had 39 LESS procedures without conversion to conventional laparoscopy or open surgery. No intraoperative or postoperative complications were reported and no extra-port was added in any of the patients. The following table shows the mean age, operative time, hospital stay, VAS as well as the overall mean of different LESS procedures. In all patients the umbilical scar was invisible and all patients and their parents had high wound satisfaction. At a mean follow up of 18.6 ± 6.4 months, all patients with UPJO had successful repair. Our study included 13 boys with undescended testis who were managed in different ways according to the length of spermatic vessels and the size of the testis. One of the arguments against LESS management of undescended testis is that it requires a 2.5-cm incision, which is collectively larger than a 5-mm camera and two 3-mm working ports of conventional laparoscopy. However

  19. SURGERY AND CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY JOURNALS ANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanaider, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    To analyze critically the effectiveness and value of bibliometric indicators in journals of Surgery or Cardiovacular Surgery in the context of the postgraduate programs of CAPES Medicine III. A sampling with 16 academic programs and one professional master of Medicine III, encompassing the General and Digestive System Surgery, Cardiovascular Surgery and Multidisciplinary courses with such contents, was evaluated. Thomson Reuters/ISI (JCR), Elsevier/Scopus (SJR), and also Scielo databases were used. Only in seven programs, the teachers had an average of Qualis A1 articles greater than the others strata. Eleven journals in the surgical area are in stratum A1 (5%) and it reaches 25% in Cardiovascular Surgery. Among the six journals with the largest number of publications Qualis A1 in area Medicine III, five are from non-specific areas. The Acta Cirúrgica Brasileira represented 58% of the publications in the stratum A2. There are some obstacles in the Qualis classification with little uniformity among the Medicine areas I, II and III. A permanent committee should be set to update the Qualis, composed by the three medical areas. It should be considered using other index databases and the unification of the Qualis criteria for journals in medicine. Rating criteria of multi and transdisciplinary journals need to be reviewed. It is essential an institutional financial support for national journals chosen by peers aiming to provide a full computerization process and a professional reviewer of the English language, in order to increase the impact factor. Analisar criticamente a eficácia e valor de indicadores bibliométricos dos periódicos da Cirurgia e Cirurgia Cardiovascular no contexto dos Programas de Pós-Graduação da área Medicina III da CAPES. Foi avaliada uma amostragem com 16 programas acadêmicos e um mestrado profissional da área de Medicina III, compreendendo a Cirurgia Geral e do Aparelho Digestivo, a Cirurgia Cardiovascular e Cursos Multidisciplinares

  20. Viscoless microincision cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Sallet

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Guy SalletDepartment of Opthamology, Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, BelgiumAbstract: A cataract surgery technique is described in which incisions, continuous circular capsulorhexis and hydrodissection are made without the use of any viscoelastics. Two small incisions are created through which the different parts of the procedure can take place, maintaining a stable anterior chamber under continuous irrigation. Subsequent bimanual phacoemulsification can be done through these microincisions. At the end of the procedure, an intraocular lens can be inserted through the self-sealing incision under continuous irrigation. 50 consecutive cataract patients were operated on without the use of viscoelastics and then compared with a group of 50 patients who had been helped with viscoelastics. No difference in outcome, endothelial cell count or pachymetry was noted between the two groups. No intraoperative complication was encountered. Viscoless cataract surgery was a safe procedure with potential advantages.Keywords: ophthalmic visco-surgical device, viscoless cataract surgery, microincision

  1. Single port laparoscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Henrik; Istre, Olav

    2012-01-01

    LESS, or laparo-endoscopic single site surgery, is a promising new method in minimally invasive surgery. An increasing number of surgical procedures are being performed using this technique, however, its large-scale adoption awaits results of prospective randomized controlled studies confirming...... potential benefits. Theoretically, cosmetic outcomes, postoperative pain and complication rates could be improved with use of single site surgery. This study describes introduction of the method in a private hospital in Denmark, in which 40 patients have been treated for benign gynecologic conditions....... Although the operations described are the first of their kind reported in Denmark, favorable operating times and very low complication rates are seen. It is the authors' opinion that in addition to being feasible for hysterectomy, single port laparoscopy may become the preferred method for many simple...

  2. Robotic aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Cassidy; Kashef, Elika; El-Sayed, Hosam F; Bismuth, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Surgical robotics was first utilized to facilitate neurosurgical biopsies in 1985, and it has since found application in orthopedics, urology, gynecology, and cardiothoracic, general, and vascular surgery. Surgical assistance systems provide intelligent, versatile tools that augment the physician's ability to treat patients by eliminating hand tremor and enabling dexterous operation inside the patient's body. Surgical robotics systems have enabled surgeons to treat otherwise untreatable conditions while also reducing morbidity and error rates, shortening operative times, reducing radiation exposure, and improving overall workflow. These capabilities have begun to be realized in two important realms of aortic vascular surgery, namely, flexible robotics for exclusion of complex aortic aneurysms using branched endografts, and robot-assisted laparoscopic aortic surgery for occlusive and aneurysmal disease.

  3. Wide Awake Hand Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lied, Line; Borchgrevink, Grethe E; Finsen, Vilhjalmur

    2017-09-01

    "Wide awake hand surgery", where surgery is performed in local anaesthesia with adrenaline, without sedation or a tourniquet, has become widespread in some countries. It has a number of potential advantages and we wished to evaluate it among our patients. All 122 patients treated by this method during one year were evaluated by the surgeons and the patients on a numerical scale from 0 (best/least) to 10 (worst/most). Theatre time was compared to that recorded for a year when regional or general anaesthesia had been used. The patients' mean score for the general care they had received was 0.1 (SD 0.6), for pain during lidocaine injection 2.4 (SD 2.2), for pain during surgery 0.9 (SD 1.5), and for other discomfort during surgery 0.5 (SD 1.4). Eight reported that they would want general anaesthesia if they were to be operated again. The surgeons' mean evaluation of bleeding during surgery was 1.6 (SD 1.8), oedema during surgery 0.4 (SD 1.1), general disadvantages with the method 1.0 (SD 1.6) and general advantages 6.5 (SD 4.3). The estimation of advantages was 9.9 (DS 0.5) for tendon suture. 28 patients needed intra-operative additional anaesthesia. The proportion was lower among trained hand surgeons and fell significantly during the study period. Non-surgical theatre time was 46 (SD 15) minutes during the study period and 55 (SD 22) minutes during the regional/general period (p theatre.

  4. [Bariatric surgery in Denmark.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, P.; Iversen, M.G.; Kehlet, H.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2005 the National Board of Health (NBH) published guidelines on bariatric surgery in Denmark. The aim of the present study was to shed light on the national bariatric effort in relation to these guidelines. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The analysis is based on extraction of the following......, a tendency which was attributable to the activities of one of the private clinics. CONCLUSION: The frequency with which bariatric surgery is performed follows a strongly increasing trend and the procedures are only performed at the public departments selected by the National Board of Health...

  5. Orthognathic surgery: general considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khechoyan, David Y

    2013-08-01

    a patient's appearance and occlusal function can be improved significantly, impacting the patient's sense of self and well-being. Successful outcomes in modern orthognathic surgery rely on close collaboration between the surgeon and the orthodontist across all stages of treatment, from preoperative planning to finalization of occlusion. Virtual computer planning promotes a more accurate analysis of dentofacial deformity and preoperative planning. It is also an invaluable aid in providing comprehensive patient education. In this article, the author describes the general surgical principles that underlie orthognathic surgery, highlighting the sequence of treatment, preoperative analysis of dentofacial deformity, surgical execution of the treatment plan, and possible complications.

  6. Diplopia after Strabismus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Medha; Hunter, David G

    2018-01-01

    Diplopia is a disappointing and, at times, unanticipated consequence of what might otherwise be considered anatomically successful strabismus surgery. In this study, we review the existing literature regarding diplopia after strabismus surgery in the context of the senior author's experience. We divide postoperative diplopia types into cases that occur in the setting of normal binocular vision (or "normal" suppression) vs. cases that are the consequence of rare or anomalous sensorial adaptations. We then discuss how to identify patients at greatest risk based on history and preoperative testing, and we offer strategies for managing these sometimes-challenging cases.

  7. Ovarian cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seibaek, Lene; Blaakaer, Jan; Petersen, Lone Kjeld

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The study objective was to survey general health and coping in women undergoing ovarian cancer surgery, and subsequently to develop and test a supportive care intervention. METHODS/MATERIALS: Women who underwent surgery on the suspicion of ovarian cancer participated in a follow...... standard levels. Concerning mental health, levels were below standard during the entire period, but did improve with time, also in women in whom the potential cancer diagnosis was refuted. The preoperative differences between these groups leveled out postoperatively in terms of physical health. At the end...

  8. Tourniquets in orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Prakash Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourniquets are commonly used in limb surgeries, be it orthopedic or plastic surgeries. But the inflation pressures, the duration, and release guidelines are still not clear. According to a survey, majority of orthopedic surgeons inflate the tourniquet to fixed pressures for the upper and the lower limbs without considering the baseline blood pressure of the patient on whom the tourniquets are being applied. This review was designed to recall and review the safe use of tourniquets and the various techniques that can be employed to minimize the complications of tourniquet use. Google, science direct, and pubmed were searched for appropriate literature and relevant articles were identified.

  9. Current perspectives in robotic assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binet, Aurélien; Ballouhey, Quentin; Chaussy, Yann; de Lambert, Guénolée; Braïk, Karim; Villemagne, Thierry; Becmeur, François; Fourcade, Laurent; Lardy, Hubert

    2018-02-23

    From classical surgery to Robotic Assisted Surgery, there is a long way allowed by Minimal Invasive Surgery' improvements. The last three decades have witnessed a prodigious development of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and especially in the field of laparoscopic pediatric surgery but there are several limitations in the use of conventional laparoscopic surgery and Robotic Assisted Surgery was developed to relieve these drawbacks. This new technology enables today the performance of a wide variety of procedures in children with a minimally invasive approach. As for all new technologies, an objective evaluation is essential with the need to respond to several questions: Is the technology feasible? Is the technology safe? Is the technology efficient? Does it bring about benefits compared with current technology? What are the procedures derived from most benefits of robotic assistance? How to assume the transition from open surgery to Minimal Invasive access for RAS? In the first part of this article, the authors give details about technical concerns and then describe the implementation process with its organization, pitfalls, successes, and issues from human resources and financial standpoints. The learning curve is then described and a special focus on small children weighing less than 15 Kg is developed. Finally, the concept of evaluation of this emerging technology is evocated and financial concerns are developed.

  10. Cosmetic Surgery Training in Plastic Surgery Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colton H. L. McNichols, MD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions:. There is an increase in dedicated cosmetic surgery rotations and fewer residents believe they need a fellowship to practice cosmetic surgery. However, the comfort level of performing facial aesthetic and body contouring procedures remains low particularly among independent residents.

  11. Nigerian Journal of Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Surgery publishes original articles, special articles (by invitation), reviews, case reports, correspondences and notes. Materials cited for publication will include scientific research papers read at the meetings of the Nigerian Surgical Research Society, and of the Association of Surgeons of Nigeria and ...

  12. Surgery for adrenal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamah, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the presentation, localization, pathology, surgical management and outcome of surgery for adrenal gland tumors. Design: Prospective clinico epidemiological study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at the Department of General Surgery, University Unit, Riyadh medical Complex Kingdom of Saudi Rabia from June, 1991 to may, 2001. Subjects and Methods: A total of 21 cases with adrenal tumors were studied for demographic data, clinical presentation, diagnostic workup, localization, surgical management, pathology and outcome. The outcome of these patients was followed prospectively. Results: The study included 12 female and 9 male patients. The mean age at surgery was 36.7 years. Hypertension (69.%) was the commonest presentation in hypersecretory functional tumors. The localization accuracy for ultrasonography, computerized tomography, MRI and MIBG scan was 95.2%, 98.3% 87.8% and 83.6% respectively. Pheochromocytoma was the most common adrenal pathology observed in 14 (66.6%) cases. The overall morbidity was 19% with no hospital mortality. Complete follow-up of available 19 patients (90.5 %) revealed no tumor recurrence and persistent hypertension in 14.3% cases. Conclusion: surgery on adrenal glands is safe in experienced hands and is recommended in institutes with all backup facilities. (author)

  13. Heart valve surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: executive summary: a report of the American College ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Surgery Heart Valve Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  14. Plastic Surgery: Tackling Misconceptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    will succeed. First impressions tend to last, and if young people's first impression of plastic surgeons is that they spend much of their time doing cosmetic surgery then this is a first impression that might be long ... Res 2014;4 Suppl S3:169‑70. Access this article online. Quick Response Code: Website: www.amhsr.org. DOI:.

  15. Abdominal wall surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as liposuction , which is another way to remove fat. But, abdominal wall surgery is sometimes combined with liposuction. ... from the middle and lower sections of your abdomen to make it firmer ... removes excess fat and skin (love handles) from the sides of ...

  16. RADIATION AND SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. S.A. Adewuyi

    Radiation therapy and surgery in cancer management. 1S.A.Adewuyi,. 2 ... cancer, since axillary node status may determine whether or not a ... The principles are 'En-bloc' dissection which ... prevention of symptoms of cancer, including pain alleviation, and .... Pre-Operative And Post-Operative Radiotherapy: These terms ...

  17. Mechanisms in bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Madsbad, Sten; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N

    2018-01-01

    Gastric bypass surgery leads to profound changes in the secretion of gut hormones with effects on metabolism, appetite, and food intake. Here, we discuss their contributions to the improvement in glucose tolerance and the weight loss that results from the operations. We find that the improved glu...

  18. Tendon Transfer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy ... DESCRIPTION The tendon is the strong cord at either end of a muscle that is attached to bone. Tendons , combined with ...

  19. Cataract Surgery in Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupesh Agrawal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cataract surgery in uveitic eyes is often challenging and can result in intraoperative and postoperative complications. Most uveitic patients enjoy good vision despite potentially sight-threatening complications, including cataract development. In those patients who develop cataracts, successful surgery stems from educated patient selection, careful surgical technique, and aggressive preoperative and postoperative control of inflammation. With improved understanding of the disease processes, pre- and perioperative control of inflammation, modern surgical techniques, availability of biocompatible intraocular lens material and design, surgical experience in performing complicated cataract surgeries, and efficient management of postoperative complications have led to much better outcome. Preoperative factors include proper patient selection and counseling and preoperative control of inflammation. Meticulous and careful cataract surgery in uveitic cataract is essential in optimizing the postoperative outcome. Management of postoperative complications, especially inflammation and glaucoma, earlier rather than later, has also contributed to improved outcomes. This manuscript is review of the existing literature and highlights the management pearls in tackling complicated cataract based on medline search of literature and experience of the authors.

  20. Surgery with cooperative robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Amy C; Berg, Kyle A; Dumpert, Jason; Wood, Nathan A; Visty, Abigail Q; Rentschler, Mark E; Platt, Stephen R; Farritor, Shane M; Oleynikov, Dmitry

    2008-03-01

    Advances in endoscopic techniques for abdominal procedures continue to reduce the invasiveness of surgery. Gaining access to the peritoneal cavity through small incisions prompted the first significant shift in general surgery. The complete elimination of external incisions through natural orifice access is potentially the next step in reducing patient trauma. While minimally invasive techniques offer significant patient advantages, the procedures are surgically challenging. Robotic surgical systems are being developed that address the visualization and manipulation limitations, but many of these systems remain constrained by the entry incisions. Alternatively, miniature in vivo robots are being developed that are completely inserted into the peritoneal cavity for laparoscopic and natural orifice procedures. These robots can provide vision and task assistance without the constraints of the entry incision, and can reduce the number of incisions required for laparoscopic procedures. In this study, a series of minimally invasive animal-model surgeries were performed using multiple miniature in vivo robots in cooperation with existing laparoscopy and endoscopy tools as well as the da Vinci Surgical System. These procedures demonstrate that miniature in vivo robots can address the visualization constraints of minimally invasive surgery by providing video feedback and task assistance from arbitrary orientations within the peritoneal cavity.

  1. Patch in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Alizadeh Ghavidel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Excessive bleeding presents a risk for the patient in cardiovascular surgery. Local haemostatic agents are of great value to reduce bleeding and related complications. TachoSil (Nycomed, Linz, Austria is a sterile, haemostatic agent that consists of an equine collagen patchcoated with human fibrinogen and thrombin. This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of TachoSil compared to conventional technique.Methods: Forty-two patients scheduled for open heart surgeries, were entered to this study from August 2010 to May 2011. After primary haemostatic measures, patients divided in two groups based on surgeon’s judgment. Group A: 20 patients for whom TachoSil was applied and group B: 22 patients that conventional method using Surgicel (13 patients or wait and see method (9 cases, were performed in order to control the bleeding. In group A, 10 patients were male with mean age of 56.95±15.67 years and in group B, 9 cases were male with mean age of 49.95±14.41 years. In case group 70% (14/20 of the surgeries were redo surgeries versus 100% (22/22 in control group.Results: Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. In TachoSil group 75% of patients required transfusion versus 90.90% in group B (P=0.03.Most transfusions consisted of packed red blood cell; 2±1.13 units in group A versus 3.11±1.44 in group B (P=0.01, however there were no significant differences between two groups regarding the mean total volume of intra and post-operative bleeding. Re-exploration was required in 10% in group A versus 13.63% in group B (P=0.67.Conclusion: TachoSil may act as a superior alternative in different types of cardiac surgery in order to control the bleeding and therefore reducing transfusion requirement.

  2. ROBOTIC SURGERY: BIOETHICAL ASPECTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Batista, Rodrigo; Souza, Camila Ribeiro; Maia, Polyana Mendes; Siqueira, Sávio Lana

    2016-01-01

    The use of robots in surgery has been increasingly common today, allowing the emergence of numerous bioethical issues in this area. To present review of the ethical aspects of robot use in surgery. Search in Pubmed, SciELO and Lilacs crossing the headings "bioethics", "surgery", "ethics", "laparoscopy" and "robotic". Of the citations obtained, were selected 17 articles, which were used for the preparation of the article. It contains brief presentation on robotics, its inclusion in health and bioethical aspects, and the use of robots in surgery. Robotic surgery is a reality today in many hospitals, which makes essential bioethical reflection on the relationship between health professionals, automata and patients. A utilização de robôs em procedimentos cirúrgicos tem sido cada vez mais frequente na atualidade, o que permite a emergência de inúmeras questões bioéticas nesse âmbito. Apresentar revisão sobre os aspectos éticos dos usos de robôs em cirurgia. Realizou-se revisão nas bases de dados Pubmed, SciELO e Lilacs cruzando-se os descritores "bioética", "cirurgia", "ética", "laparoscopia" e "robótica". Do total de citações obtidas, selecionou-se 17 artigos, os quais foram utilizados para a elaboração do artigo. Ele contém breve apresentação sobre a robótica, sua inserção na saúde e os aspectos bioéticos da utilização dos robôs em procedimentos cirúrgicos. A cirurgia robótica é uma realidade, hoje, em muitas unidades hospitalares, o que torna essencial a reflexão bioética sobre as relações entre profissionais da saúde, autômatos e pacientes.

  3. Variable Operative Experience in Hand Surgery for Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Lin, Ines C; Levin, Lawrence Scott; Chang, Benjamin

    Efforts to standardize hand surgery training during plastic surgery residency remain challenging. We analyze the variability of operative hand experience at U.S. plastic surgery residency programs. Operative case logs of chief residents in accredited U.S. plastic surgery residency programs were analyzed (2011-2015). Trends in fold differences of hand surgery case volume between the 10th and 90th percentiles of residents were assessed graphically. Percentile data were used to calculate the number of residents achieving case minimums in hand surgery for 2015. Case logs from 818 plastic surgery residents were analyzed of which a minority were from integrated (35.7%) versus independent/combined (64.3%) residents. Trend analysis of fold differences in case volume demonstrated decreasing variability among procedure categories over time. By 2015, fold differences for hand reconstruction, tendon cases, nerve cases, arthroplasty/arthrodesis, amputation, arterial repair, Dupuytren release, and neoplasm cases were below 10-fold. Congenital deformity cases among independent/combined residents was the sole category that exceeded 10-fold by 2015. Percentile data suggested that approximately 10% of independent/combined residents did not meet case minimums for arterial repair and congenital deformity in 2015. Variable operative experience during plastic surgery residency may limit adequate exposure to hand surgery for certain residents. Future studies should establish empiric case minimums for plastic surgery residents to ensure hand surgery competency upon graduation. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Limited-Access Heart Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the side of the chest. With traditional open heart surgery, the incision is usually 6 to 8 ... attached to a heart-lung machine. In traditional open heart surgery, patients would be connected to the heart- ...

  5. Infant open heart surgery (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia. ... During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia.

  6. Anti-reflux surgery - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stomach). Problems with these muscles can lead to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This surgery can also be done during a ... Anti-reflux surgery is usually done to treat GERD in children only after medicines have not worked ...

  7. Timing of surgery for sciatica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peul, Wilco C.

    2008-01-01

    The frequently diagnosed lumbar disc herniation can disappear by natural course, but still leads to high low back surgery rates. The optimal period of conservative care, before surgery is executed, was unknown. It is surprising that scientific evidence was lacking which justified “early” surgery.

  8. Nigerian Journal of Plastic Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Plastic Surgery has its objectives in publishing original articles about developments in all areas related to plastic and reconstructive surgery as well as to trauma surgery. It also serves as a means of providing a forum for correspondence, information and discussion. It also accepts review articles that ...

  9. Cataract surgery among Medicare beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Oliver D; Cassard, Sandra D; Tielsch, James M; Gower, Emily W

    2012-10-01

    To present descriptive epidemiology of cataract surgery among Medicare recipients in the United States. Cataract surgery performed on Medicare beneficiaries in 2003 and 2004. Medicare claims data were used to identify all cataract surgery claims for procedures performed in the United States in 2003-2004. Standard assumptions were used to limit the claims to actual cataract surgery procedures performed. Summary statistics were created to determine the number of procedures performed for each outcome of interest: cataract surgery rates by age, sex, race and state; surgical volume by facility type and surgeon characteristics; time interval between first- and second-eye cataract surgery. The national cataract surgery rate for 2003-2004 was 61.8 per 1000 Medicare beneficiary person-years. The rate was significantly higher for females and for those aged 75-84 years. After adjustment for age and sex, blacks had approximately a 30% lower rate of surgery than whites. While only 5% of cataract surgeons performed more than 500 cataract surgeries annually, these surgeons performed 26% of the total cataract surgeries. Increasing surgical volume was found to be highly correlated with use of ambulatory surgical centers and reduced time interval between first- and second-eye surgery in the same patient. The epidemiology of cataract surgery in the United States Medicare population documents substantial variation in surgical rates by race, sex, age, and by certain provider characteristics.

  10. Robotic surgery update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, G; Elli, F; Horgan, S

    2004-08-01

    Minimally invasive surgical techniques have revolutionized the field of surgery. Telesurgical manipulators (robots) and new information technologies strive to improve upon currently available minimally invasive techniques and create new possibilities. A retrospective review of all robotic cases at a single academic medical center from August 2000 until November 2002 was conducted. A comprehensive literature evaluation on robotic surgical technology was also performed. Robotic technology is safely and effectively being applied at our institution. Robotic and information technologies have improved upon minimally invasive surgical techniques and created new opportunities not attainable in open surgery. Robotic technology offers many benefits over traditional minimal access techniques and has been proven safe and effective. Further research is needed to better define the optimal application of this technology. Credentialing and educational requirements also need to be delineated.

  11. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553...... patients, 51 (9%) of whom died within the first 48 hours. Of the 502 patients who survived for more than 48 hours, 109 required ICU therapy for more than 48 hours, whereas 393 patients were in the ICU for less than 48 hours. The incidence of preoperative risk factors was similar for the two groups...... combined failed to permit identification of patients in whom the perioperative survival rate was 0%. Even 20% of patients with multiorgan failure survived for 6 months. Of those patients who needed ICU therapy for more than 48 hours, 41 (38%) were alive at the end of 1988. In response to a questionnaire...

  12. [Stress in surgeries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daian, Márcia Rodrigues; Petroianu, Andy; Alberti, Luiz Ronaldo; Jeunon, Ester Eliane

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide the literature regarding the psychological stress in the peri-operative period of adult patients undergoing operations under general anesthesia. The articles were obtained by surveying the papers published and catalogued in the Medline Pubmed interface database, Lilacs and the Biblioteca Virtual de Saúde (BVS) since 1984, crossing the headings stress, surgery, general anesthesia, psychology. Over 800 articles related to stress and surgery were analyzed with regards to their relevance to the considered subject. Eighteen articles were related to psychological stress. Their results confirmed the presence of psychological and physical stress, during the peri-operative period as well as relation between stress and de clinical post-operative recovery. There is a gap regarding in the peri-operative period. More studies on psychological influence on stress may benefit patients and help professionals during the surgical treatment.

  13. The Canadian Pediatric Surgery Network (CAPSNet): Lessons Learned from a National Registry Devoted to the Study of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia and Gastroschisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Alison E; Puligandla, Pramod S; Skarsgard, Erik D

    2015-12-01

    The Canadian Pediatric Surgery Network (CAPSNet) was created in 2005 by a geographically representative, multidisciplinary group of clinicians and researchers with the intent of establishing a national research registry for gastroschisis (GS) and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Since then, CAPSNet has used this registry and its 16-center network to make contributions to the knowledge base informing best practices for GS and CDH care. More recently, CAPSNet has expanded its focus to include quality assurance and improvement at each of its sites, by issuing a benchmarked outcomes "report card" with its annual report. Finally, a major objective of CAPSNet has been to establish and adopt standardized, evidence-based practice guidelines for GS and CDH across all Canadian perinatal centers. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Hemolysis During Open-Heart Surgery With Vacuum-Assisted Venous Drainage at Different Negative Pressures in Pediatric Patients Weighing Less Than 10 kilograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Jae Gun; Lee, Jinkwon; Park, Minkyoung; Seo, Yu-Jin; Lee, Chang-Ha

    2017-03-01

    This study examined the degree of hemolysis during vacuum-assisted venous drainage at different negative pressures to identify an adequate negative pressure that provides effective venous drainage without significant hemolysis in open-heart surgery in children weighing less than 10 kg. Patients weighing less than 10 kg who underwent surgery for ventricular septal defect or atrial septal defect from 2011 to 2014 were enrolled. We used one of four negative pressures (20, 30, 40, or 60 mm Hg) for each patient. We measured haptoglobin, plasma hemoglobin, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase levels in the patients' blood three times perioperatively and determined the potential correlation between the change in each parameter with the level of negative pressure. Forty-six patients were enrolled in this study (mean age: 7.1 ± 7.0 months, mean body weight: 6.1 ± 1.8 kg). There were no significant differences according to the degree of negative pressure with respect to patient age, body weight, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time, aorta cross-clamping time, blood flow during CPB, or lowest body temperature. All parameters that we measured reflected progression of hemolysis during CPB; however, the degree of change in the parameters did not correlate with negative pressure. In pediatric patients weighing less than 10 kg, the change in the degree of hemolysis did not differ with the amount of negative pressure. We may apply negative pressures up to 60 mm Hg without increasing the risk of hemolysis, with almost same the level of hemolysis using negative pressures of 20, 30, and 40 mm Hg for effective venous drainage and an ideal operative field during open-heart surgery.

  15. Weight-for-age standard score - distribution and effect on in-hospital mortality: A retrospective analysis in pediatric cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the distribution of weight for age standard score (Z score in pediatric cardiac surgery and its effect on in-hospital mortality. Introduction: WHO recommends Standard Score (Z score to quantify and describe anthropometric data. The distribution of weight for age Z score and its effect on mortality in congenital heart surgery has not been studied. Methods: All patients of younger than 5 years who underwent cardiac surgery from July 2007 to June 2013, under single surgical unit at our institute were enrolled. Z score for weight for age was calculated. Patients were classified according to Z score and mortality across the classes was compared. Discrimination and calibration of the for Z score model was assessed. Improvement in predictability of mortality after addition of Z score to Aristotle Comprehensive Complexity (ACC score was analyzed. Results: The median Z score was -3.2 (Interquartile range -4.24 to -1.91] with weight (mean±SD of 8.4 ± 3.38 kg. Overall mortality was 11.5%. 71% and 52.59% of patients had Z score < -2 and < -3 respectively. Lower Z score classes were associated with progressively increasing mortality. Z score as continuous variable was associated with O.R. of 0.622 (95% CI- 0.527 to 0.733, P < 0.0001 for in-hospital mortality and remained significant predictor even after adjusting for age, gender, bypass duration and ACC score. Addition of Z score to ACC score improved its predictability for in-hosptial mortality (δC - 0.0661 [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.0169], IDI- 3.83% [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.00042]. Conclusion: Z scores were lower in our cohort and were associated with in-hospital mortality. Addition of Z score to ACC score significantly improves predictive ability for in-hospital mortality.

  16. Surgery of the Forestomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, Joseph W; Niehaus, Andrew J

    2016-11-01

    Indications for rumen surgery include rumen tympany (bloat), toxic plant ingestion, to provide enteral nutrition, to perform elective cannula placement, and to access other forestomach compartments (reticulum/omasum). The rumen is a highly contaminated viscus and special care should be taken to avoid peritoneal contamination from rumen contents. Diseases causing forestomach dysfunction and surgical procedures on the forestomach compartments are discussed here. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgery of the Trachea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Allen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Surgical procedures on the trachea have only been undertaken within the past 50 years. Knowing the unique blood supply of the trachea and how to reduce tension on any anastomosis are key to a successful outcome. Tracheal conditions requiring surgery usually present with shortness of breath on exertion, and preoperative evaluation involves computed tomography and rigid bronchoscopy. Tracheal resection and reconstruction can be safely performed with excellent outcomes by following a well-described technique.

  18. Pregnancy and bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahawar, Kamal K

    2017-12-01

    A large number of women experience pregnancy after bariatric surgery. The purpose of this review was to understand the evidence base in this area to come up with practical, evidence-based recommendations. We examined PubMed for all published articles on pregnancy in patients who have previously undergone a bariatric surgery. There is an increasing body of evidence pointing towards a beneficial effect of weight loss induced by bariatric surgery on female and male fertility prompting calls for recognition of infertility as a qualifying co-morbidity for patients between the Body Mass Index of 35.0 kg/m2 and 40.0 kg/m2. Women in childbearing age group should be routinely offered contraceptive advice after bariatric surgery and advised to avoid pregnancy until their weight has stabilized. Until more focused studies are available, the advice to wait for 12 months or 2 months after the weight loss has stabilized, whichever is latter, seems reasonable. Patients should be advised to seek clearance from their bariatric teams prior to conception and looked after by a multi-disciplinary team of women health professionals, bariatric surgeons, and dietitians during pregnancy. The main objective of care is to ensure adequate nutritional state to allow for a satisfactory weight gain and fetal growth. There is a relative lack of studies and complete lack of Level 1 evidence to inform practice in this area. This review summarizes current literature and makes a number of practical suggestions for routine care of these women while we develop evidence to better inform future practice.

  19. Cell response to surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the profound alterations in host immunity that are produced by major surgery as demonstrated by experimental and clinical studies, and to evaluate the benefits of therapeutic strategies aimed at attenuating perioperative immune dysfunction. DATA SOURCES: A review of the English-language literature was conducted, incorporating searches of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane collaboration databases to identify laboratory and clinical studies investigating the cellular response to surgery. STUDY SELECTION: Original articles and case reports describing immune dysfunction secondary to surgical trauma were included. DATA EXTRACTION: The results were compiled to show outcomes of different studies and were compared. DATA SYNTHESIS: Current evidence indicates that the early systemic inflammatory response syndrome observed after major surgery that is characterized by proinflammatory cytokine release, microcirculatory disturbance, and cell-mediated immune dysfunction is followed by a compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome, which predisposes the patient to opportunistic infection, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and death. Because there are currently no effective treatment options for multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, measures to prevent its onset should be initiated at an early stage. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that targeted therapeutic strategies involving immunomodulatory agents such as interferon gamma, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, the prostaglandin E(2) antagonist, indomethacin, and pentoxifylline may be used for the treatment of systemic inflammatory response syndrome to prevent the onset of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical trauma produces profound immunological dysfunction. Therapeutic strategies directed at restoring immune homeostasis should aim to redress the physiological proinflammatory-anti-inflammatory cell imbalance associated with major surgery.

  20. Image-guided surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A; Ploder, O; Enislidis, G; Truppe, M; Ewers, R

    1996-04-01

    Interventional video tomography (IVT), a new imaging modality, achieves virtual visualization of anatomic structures in three dimensions for intraoperative stereotactic navigation. Partial immersion into a virtual data space, which is orthotopically coregistered to the surgical field, enhances, by means of a see-through head-mounted display (HMD), the surgeon's visual perception and technique by providing visual access to nonvisual data of anatomy, physiology, and function. The presented cases document the potential of augmented reality environments in maxillofacial surgery.

  1. The utility of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging versus surgery for the characterization of müllerian anomalies in the pediatric and adolescent population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, X M; Krishnamurthy, R; Bercaw-Pratt, J L; Dietrich, J E

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the utility of transabdominal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of American Society for Reproductive Medicine (†)(ASRM)-classified müllerian anomalies compared to surgical findings in the pediatric and adolescent population. Retrospective chart review. Tertiary academic center. Thirty-eight patients with müllerian anomalies seen in our pediatric and adolescent gynecology clinic were identified both on the basis of ICD-9 codes and having magnetic resonance imaging at Texas Children's Hospital between 2004 and 2009. None. Correlation among transabdominal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging findings with surgical findings. Mean age was 12.2 (± 4.1) years. Twenty-eight patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging and required surgical intervention, and 88.5% demonstrated correlative consistency with surgical findings. Twenty-two patients underwent ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and surgery, which revealed consistency among ultrasound and surgical findings (59.1%) and consistency among magnetic resonance imaging and surgical findings (90.9%). In ASRM diagnoses evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging, surgical findings correlated in 92% (Pearson 0.89). Overall, 55.2% of patients had a renal malformation. Magnetic resonance imaging is the gold standard imaging modality for müllerian anomalies and is an effective technique for noninvasive evaluation and accurate classification of the type of anomaly in the pediatric and adolescent population. Magnetic resonance imaging should be considered as an adjunct to transabdominal ultrasound to evaluate müllerian anomalies. Copyright © 2012 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Granisetron versus Granisetron-Dexamethasone for Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Pediatric Strabismus Surgery: A Randomized Double-Blind Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Sinha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Efficacy of granisetron and combination of granisetron and dexamethasone was evaluated for prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV in children undergoing elective strabismus surgery. Methods. A total of 136 children (1–15 years were included. Children received either granisetron (40 mcg/kg [group G] or combination of granisetron (40 mcg/kg and dexamethasone (150 mcg/kg [group GD]. Intraoperative fentanyl requirement and incidence and severity of oculocardiac reflex were assessed. PONV severity was assessed for first 24 hours and if score was >2, it was treated with metoclopramide. Postoperative analgesia was administered with intravenous fentanyl and ibuprofen. Results. The demographic profile, muscles operated, and fentanyl requirement were comparable. Complete response to PONV in first 24 hours was observed in 75% (51/68 of children in group G and 76.9% (50/65 of children in group GD, which was comparable statistically (p=0.96, Fisher exact test; OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.50, 2.46. Incidence of PONV between 0 and 24 hours was comparable. One child in group G required rescue antiemetic in first 24 hours and none of the children had severe PONV in group GD. There was no significant difference in incidence or severity of oculocardiac reflex. Conclusion. Dexamethasone did not increase efficacy of granisetron for prevention of PONV in elective pediatric strabismus surgery. Registration number of clinical trial was CTRI/2009/091/001000.

  3. Art and epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Hunter, Gary; Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco

    2013-10-01

    The impact of health and disease has led many artists to depict these themes for thousands of years. Specifically, epilepsy has been the subject of many famous works, likely because of the dramatic and misunderstood nature of the clinical presentation. It often evokes religious and even mythical processes. Epilepsy surgical treatment has revolutionized the care of selected patients and is a relatively recent advance. Epilepsy surgery has been depicted in very few artistic works. The first portrait showing a potential surgical treatment for patients with epilepsy was painted in the 12th century. During the Renaissance, Bosch famously provided artistic commentary on traditional beliefs in "The stone of madness". Several of these works demonstrate a surgeon extracting a stone from a patient's head, at one time believed to be the source of all "folly", including epileptic seizures, psychosis, intellectual disability, depression, and a variety of other illnesses. There are some contemporary art pieces including themes around epilepsy surgery, all of them depicting ancient Inca Empire procedures such as trepanning. This article reviews the most relevant artistic works related with epilepsy surgery and also its historical context at the time the work was produced. We also present a painting from the Mexican artist Eduardo Urbano Merino that represents the patient's journey through refractory epilepsy, investigations, and ultimately recovery. Through this work, the artist intends to communicate hope and reassurance to patients going through this difficult process. © 2013.

  4. Gamma surgery for hemangiopericytomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, B.R.; Prasad, D.; Steiner, M.; Steiner, L.

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of 12 patients with 15 intracranial hemangiopericytomas treated at the University of Virginia using gamma surgery is presented. Clinical and radiographic follow up of 3 to 56 months is available for 10 patients with 12 tumors. There was one tumor present at the time of initial gamma surgery in each patient. Two new tumors occurred in patients previously treated. Nine of the tumors decreased in volume and three remained stable. Four of the nine tumors that shrank later progressed at an average of 22 months after treatment. Of the tumors that decreased in volume and have not progressed, the response has been for an average of 11 months. The follow-up for two tumors that remained unchanged was 10 and 34 months (average 22 months). A third tumor was unchanged at 42 months but the patient died of new disease adjacent to the treated area in the anterior skull base. There were no complications and the quality of life following the procedure was maintained or improved in every case. Gamma surgery is effective in palliating the patients by decreasing tumor volume and delaying recurrence. (author)

  5. Robotic surgery in gynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean eBouquet De Jolinière

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Minimally invasive surgery (MIS can be considered as the greatest surgical innovation over the past thirty years. It revolutionized surgical practice with well-proven advantages over traditional open surgery: reduced surgical trauma and incision-related complications, such as surgical-site infections, postoperative pain and hernia, reduced hospital stay, and improved cosmetic outcome. Nonetheless, proficiency in MIS can be technically challenging as conventional laparoscopy is associated with several limitations as the two-dimensional (2D monitor reduction in-depth perception, camera instability, limited range of motion and steep learning curves. The surgeon has a low force feedback which allows simple gestures, respect for tissues and more effective treatment of complications.Since 1980s several computer sciences and robotics projects have been set up to overcome the difficulties encountered with conventional laparoscopy, to augment the surgeon's skills, achieve accuracy and high precision during complex surgery and facilitate widespread of MIS. Surgical instruments are guided by haptic interfaces that replicate and filter hand movements. Robotically assisted technology offers advantages that include improved three- dimensional stereoscopic vision, wristed instruments that improve dexterity, and tremor canceling software that improves surgical precision.

  6. Robotic assisted andrological surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekattil, Sijo J; Gudeloglu, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of the operative microscope for andrological surgery in the 1970s provided enhanced magnification and accuracy, unparalleled to any previous visual loop or magnification techniques. This technology revolutionized techniques for microsurgery in andrology. Today, we may be on the verge of a second such revolution by the incorporation of robotic assisted platforms for microsurgery in andrology. Robotic assisted microsurgery is being utilized to a greater degree in andrology and a number of other microsurgical fields, such as ophthalmology, hand surgery, plastics and reconstructive surgery. The potential advantages of robotic assisted platforms include elimination of tremor, improved stability, surgeon ergonomics, scalability of motion, multi-input visual interphases with up to three simultaneous visual views, enhanced magnification, and the ability to manipulate three surgical instruments and cameras simultaneously. This review paper begins with the historical development of robotic microsurgery. It then provides an in-depth presentation of the technique and outcomes of common robotic microsurgical andrological procedures, such as vasectomy reversal, subinguinal varicocelectomy, targeted spermatic cord denervation (for chronic orchialgia) and robotic assisted microsurgical testicular sperm extraction (microTESE). PMID:23241637

  7. Randomized comparative study of intravenous infusion of three different fixed doses of milrinone in pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwal, Neeraj Kumar; Umbarkar, Sanjeeta Rajendra; Sarkar, Manjula Sudeep; Dias, Raylene J

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension secondary to congenital heart disease is a common problem in pediatric patients presenting for open heart surgery. Milrinone has been shown to reduce pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary artery pressure in pediatric patients and neonates postcardiac surgery. We aimed to evaluate the postoperative outcome in such patients with three different fixed maintenance doses of milrinone. Patients were randomized into three groups. All patients received fixed bolus dose of milrinone 50 μg/kg on pump during rewarming. Following this, patients in low-dose group received infusion of milrinone at the rate of 0.375 μg/kg/min, medium-dose group received 0.5 μg/kg/min, and high-dose group received 0.75 μg/kg/min over 24 h. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), mean airway pressure (MaP), oxygenation index (OI), and central venous pressure (CVP) were compared at baseline and 24 h postoperatively. Dose of inotropic requirement, duration of ventilatory support and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay were noted. MAP, MaP, OI, and CVP were comparable in all three groups postoperatively. All patients in the low-dose group required low inotropic support while 70% of patients in the high-dose group needed high inotropic support to manage episodes of hypotension (P = 0.000). Duration of ventilatory support and ICU stay in all three groups was comparable (P = 0.412, P = 0.165). Low-dose infusions while having a clinical impact were more beneficial in avoiding adverse events and decreasing inotropic requirement without affecting duration of ventilatory support and duration of ICU stay.

  8. Randomized comparative study of intravenous infusion of three different fixed doses of milrinone in pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing open heart surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Kumar Barnwal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary hypertension secondary to congenital heart disease is a common problem in pediatric patients presenting for open heart surgery. Milrinone has been shown to reduce pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary artery pressure in pediatric patients and neonates postcardiac surgery. We aimed to evaluate the postoperative outcome in such patients with three different fixed maintenance doses of milrinone. Methodology: Patients were randomized into three groups. All patients received fixed bolus dose of milrinone 50 μg/kg on pump during rewarming. Following this, patients in low-dose group received infusion of milrinone at the rate of 0.375 μg/kg/min, medium-dose group received 0.5 μg/kg/min, and high-dose group received 0.75 μg/kg/min over 24 h. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP, mean airway pressure (MaP, oxygenation index (OI, and central venous pressure (CVP were compared at baseline and 24 h postoperatively. Dose of inotropic requirement, duration of ventilatory support and Intensive Care Unit (ICU stay were noted. Results: MAP, MaP, OI, and CVP were comparable in all three groups postoperatively. All patients in the low-dose group required low inotropic support while 70% of patients in the high-dose group needed high inotropic support to manage episodes of hypotension (P = 0.000. Duration of ventilatory support and ICU stay in all three groups was comparable (P = 0.412, P = 0.165. Conclusion: Low-dose infusions while having a clinical impact were more beneficial in avoiding adverse events and decreasing inotropic requirement without affecting duration of ventilatory support and duration of ICU stay.

  9. Autonomic dysfunction elicited by a medulla oblongata injury after fourth ventricle tumor surgery in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Gallego, A; Andrade-Andrade, I; Dawid-Milner, M S; Domínguez-Páez, M; Romero-Moreno, L; González-García, L; Carrasco-Brenes, A; Segura-Fernández-Nogueras, M; Ros-López, B; Arráez-Sánchez, M A

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 9-year-old male patient with a recurrent fourth ventricle anaplastic ependymoma who developed severe arterial hypertension and blood pressure lability during and after surgery. A punctual bilateral lesion located within mid dorsal medulla oblongata caused by both infiltration and surgical resection was observed in postoperative MRI. Three years later, the patient remained neurologically stable but the family referred the presence of a chronic tachycardia as well as palpitations and sweating with flushing episodes related to environmental stress. On autonomic evaluation, an increase in sympathetic outflow with tachycardia together with orthostatic hypotension caused by baroreceptor reflex dysfunction was observed. We postulate that a bilateral injury to both nuclei of the solitary tract may have caused central dysautonomia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Bariatric surgery insurance requirements independently predict surgery dropout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Kaitlin M; Mehaffey, J Hunter; Safavian, Dana; Schirmer, Bruce; Malin, Steven K; Hallowell, Peter T; Kirby, Jennifer L

    2017-05-01

    Many insurance companies have considerable prebariatric surgery requirements despite a lack of evidence for improved clinical outcomes. The hypothesis of this study is that insurance-specific requirements will be associated with a decreased progression to surgery and increased delay in time to surgery. Retrospective data collection was performed for patients undergoing bariatric surgery evaluation from 2010-2015. Patients who underwent surgery (SGY; n = 827; mean body mass index [BMI] 49.1) were compared with those who did not (no-SGY; n = 648; mean BMI: 49.4). Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to identify specific co-morbidity and insurance specific predictors of surgical dropout and time to surgery. A total of 1475 patients using 12 major insurance payors were included. Univariate analysis found insurance requirements associated with surgical drop out included longer median diet duration (no-SGY = 6 mo; SGY = 3 mo; Psurgery dropout. Additionally, surgical patients had an average interval between initial visit and surgery of 5.8±4.6 months with significant weight gain (2.1 kg, Psurgery insurance requirements were associated with lack of patient progression to surgery in this study. In addition, delays in surgery were associated with preoperative weight gain. Although prospective and multicenter studies are needed, these findings have major policy implications suggesting insurance requirements may need to be reconsidered to improve medical care. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The World Database for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery: The Dawn of a New Era of Global Communication and Quality Improvement in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Louis, James D; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Jonas, Richard A; Sandoval, Nestor; Cervantes, Jorge; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Jacobs, Jeffery P; Sakamoto, Kisaburo; Stellin, Giovanni; Kirklin, James K

    2017-09-01

    The World Society for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery was founded with the mission to "promote the highest quality comprehensive cardiac care to all patients with congenital heart disease, from the fetus to the adult, regardless of the patient's economic means, with an emphasis on excellence in teaching, research, and community service." Early on, the Society's members realized that a crucial step in meeting this goal was to establish a global database that would collect vital information, allowing cardiac surgical centers worldwide to benchmark their outcomes and improve the quality of congenital heart disease care. With tireless efforts from all corners of the globe and utilizing the vast experience and invaluable input of multiple international experts, such a platform of global information exchange was created: The World Database for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease went live on January 1, 2017. This database has been thoughtfully designed to produce meaningful performance and quality analyses of surgical outcomes extending beyond immediate hospital survival, allowing capture of important morbidities and mortalities for up to 1 year postoperatively. In order to advance the societal mission, this quality improvement program is available free of charge to WSPCHS members. In establishing the World Database, the Society has taken an essential step to further the process of global improvement in care for children with congenital heart disease.

  12. Morbidity and mortality of complex spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, Sven; Bari, Tanvir; Gehrchen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    requiring revision. METHODS: All patients undergoing spinal surgery at an academic tertiary referral center in the study period were prospectively included. The newest version of SAVES system was used, and a research coordinator collected all intraoperative and perioperative data prospectively. Once a week...... adverse events (AEs). PURPOSE: This study aimed to determine the mortality and examine the incidence of morbidity in patients undergoing complex spinal surgery, including pediatric patients, and to validate the SAVES system in a European population. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective, consecutive cohort study...

  13. Antifibrinolytics in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achal Dhir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery exerts a significant strain on the blood bank services and is a model example in which a multi-modal blood-conservation strategy is recommended. Significant bleeding during cardiac surgery, enough to cause re-exploration and/or blood transfusion, increases morbidity and mortality. Hyper-fibrinolysis is one of the important contributors to increased bleeding. This knowledge has led to the use of anti-fibrinolytic agents especially in procedures performed under cardiopulmonary bypass. Nothing has been more controversial in recent times than the aprotinin controversy. Since the withdrawal of aprotinin from the world market, the choice of antifibrinolytic agents has been limited to lysine analogues either tranexamic acid (TA or epsilon amino caproic acid (EACA. While proponents of aprotinin still argue against its non-availability. Health Canada has approved its use, albeit under very strict regulations. Antifibrinolytic agents are not without side effects and act like double-edged swords, the stronger the anti-fibrinolytic activity, the more serious the side effects. Aprotinin is the strongest in reducing blood loss, blood transfusion, and possibly, return to the operating room after cardiac surgery. EACA is the least effective, while TA is somewhere in between. Additionally, aprotinin has been implicated in increased mortality and maximum side effects. TA has been shown to increase seizure activity, whereas, EACA seems to have the least side effects. Apparently, these agents do not differentiate between pathological and physiological fibrinolysis and prevent all forms of fibrinolysis leading to possible thrombotic side effects. It would seem prudent to select the right agent knowing its risk-benefit profile for a given patient, under the given circumstances.

  14. Reevaluation of needlescopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagaya, Nobumi; Kubota, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    Although the use of single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) has spread rapidly, most procedures employ additional needlescopic instruments to ensure safety and shorten the operation time. Therefore, on the basis of results obtained in our department, the present study was conducted to reevaluate the current state of needlescopic surgery (NS) to improve the cosmetic results and postoperative quality of life of patients and to reduce cost and degree of stress on surgeons. Between May 1998 and February 2011, we performed NS in 202 patients. The diagnoses included gallbladder diseases in 151 patients, spontaneous pneumothorax in 11, thyroid tumor and axillary lymph node metastases in 10 patients each, splenic cyst and appendicitis in 4 patients each, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and postoperative abdominal wall hernia in 3 patients each, primary aldosteronism and hepatic cyst in 2 patients each, and adhesional bowel obstruction and gastric stromal tumor in 1 patient each. Under general anesthesia, one 12-mm and tow or three 2- or 3-mm ports were introduced into the operative field. The specimen was retrieved via the 12-mm wound using a plastic bag. The operations were completed in all patients without the need to convert to an open procedure. In 8 (5.3%) of the 151 cholecystectomies, a change to 5-mm instruments was required. There were no perioperative complications. Pertinent technical points included avoidance of direct organ mobilization to minimize injury, rotation of the operating table and utilization of organ gravity to create a better operative field, minimum use of needlescope to ensure safe maneuvering, and improvement of the bi-hand technique. NS is a safe and feasible procedure that allows experienced surgeons to achieve minimally invasive surgery with low morbidity, without the need to convert to a conventional or open procedure.

  15. SEBACEOUS CYSTS MINOR SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ayu Agung Laksemi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Minor surgery is small surgery or localized example cut ulcers and boils, cyst excision, and suturing. Somethings that need to be considered in the preparation of the surgery is minor tools, operating rooms and operating tables, lighting, maintenance of tools and equipment, sterilization and desinfection equipment, preparation of patients and anesthesia. In general cysts is walled chamber that consist of fluid, cells and the remaining cells. Cysts are formed not due to inflammation although then be inflamed. Lining of the cysts wall is composed of fibrous tissue and usually coated epithelial cells or endothelial. Cysts formed by dilated glands and closed channels, glands, blood vessels, lymph channels or layers of the epidermis. Contents of the cysts wall consists of the results is serum, lymph, sweat sebum, epithelial cells, the stratum corneum, and hair. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  16. Workplace Bullying in Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Mary; Young, Christopher J; Shepherd, Heather L; Mak, Cindy; Saw, Robyn P M

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the extent and nature of workplace bullying among General Surgery trainees and consultants in Australia. An online questionnaire survey of General Surgery trainees and consultant surgeons in Australia was conducted between March and May 2012. Prevalence of bullying was measured using both a definition of workplace bullying and the revised Negative Acts Questionnaire (NAQ-R). Sources of bullying were also examined, as well as the barriers and outcomes of formal reporting of bullying. The response rate was 34 % (370/1084) with 41 % (n = 152) of respondents being trainees. Overall, 47 % (n = 173) of respondents reported having been bullied to some degree and 68 % (n = 250) reported having witnessed bullying of surgical colleagues in the last 12 months. The prevalence of bullying was significantly higher in trainees and females, with 64 % of trainees and 57 % of females experiencing some degree of bullying. The majority of respondents (83 %) had experienced at least one negative behavior in the last 12 months, but 38 % experienced at least one negative behavior on a weekly or daily basis. The persistent negative behaviors that represent work-related bullying most commonly experienced were 'having opinions ignored' and 'being exposed to an unmanageable workload.' Consultant surgeons were the most common source of bullying for both trainees and consultants, with administration the next common source. Of those who reported being bullied, only 18 % (n = 32) made a formal complaint. Despite increased awareness and interventions, workplace bullying remains a significant problem within General Surgery in Australia. The findings in this study serve as a baseline for future questionnaires to monitor the effectiveness of implemented anti-bullying interventions.

  17. The Economics of Academic Advancement Within Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baimas-George, Maria; Fleischer, Brian; Korndorffer, James R; Slakey, Douglas; DuCoin, Christopher

    The success of an academic surgeon's career is often viewed as directly related to academic appointment; therefore, the sequence of promotion is a demanding, rigorous process. This paper seeks to define the financial implication of academic advancement across different surgical subspecialties. Data was collected from the Association of American Medical College's 2015 report of average annual salaries. Assumptions included 30 years of practice, 5 years as assistant professor, and 10 years as associate professor before advancement. The base formula used was: (average annual salary) × (years of practice [30 years - fellowship/research years]) + ($50,000 × years of fellowship/research) = total adjusted lifetime salary income. There was a significant increase in lifetime salary income with advancement from assistant to associate professor in all subspecialties when compared to an increase from associate to full professor. The greatest increase in income from assistant to associate professor was seen in transplant and cardiothoracic surgery (35% and 27%, respectively). Trauma surgery and surgical oncology had the smallest increases of 8% and 9%, respectively. With advancement to full professor, the increase in lifetime salary income was significantly less across all subspecialties, ranging from 1% in plastic surgery to 8% in pediatric surgery. When analyzing the economics of career advancement in academic surgery, there is a substantial financial benefit in lifetime income to becoming an associate professor in all fields; whereas, advancement to full professor is associated with a drastically reduced economic benefit. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Anesthesia for thoracoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conacher I

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthesia for thoracoscopy is based on one lung ventilation. Lung separators in the airway are essential tools. An anatomical shunt as a result of the continued perfusion of a non-ventilated lung is the principal intraoperative concern. The combination of equipment, technique and process increase risks of hypoxia and dynamic hyperinflation, in turn, potential factors in the development of an unusual form of pulmonary edema. Analgesia management is modelled on that shown effective and therapeutic for thoracotomy. Perioperative management needs to reflect the concern for these complex, and complicating, processes to the morbidity of thoracoscopic surgery.

  19. Revisional Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Noah J; Karmali, Shahzeer; Gill, Richdeep S; Sherman, Vadim

    2016-08-01

    Revisional bariatric procedures are increasingly common. With more primary procedures being performed to manage severe obesity and its complications, 5% to 8% of these procedures will fail, requiring revisional operation. Reasons for revisional bariatric surgery are either primary inadequate weight loss, defined as less than 25% excess body weight loss, or weight recidivism, defined as a gain of more than 10 kg based on the nadir weight; however, each procedure also has inherit specific complications that can also be indications for revision. This article reviews the history of each primary bariatric procedure, indications for revision, surgical options, and subsequent outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Pregnancy after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjær, Mette Mandrup; Torvin-Andersen, Lise Lotte; Dam, Peter; Jensen, Dorte Møller; Lauenborg, Jeanette; Stentebjerg, Louise Laage; Støving, René Klinkeby; Renault, Kristina Martha

    2017-12-04

    This is a review of the recommendations regarding pregnancy after bariatric surgery from the Danish Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. The risk of vitamin/mineral deficiencies should be emphasized and checked with blood samples. Measurements of fetal growth should be offered at gestational age 28 and 34 as a supplement to the standard prenatal procedures because of the increased risk of intrauterine growth retardation. Because of persistent obesity there is still an increased risk of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. In case of abdominal pain internal herniation should be suspected.

  1. Femoroacetabular impingement surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiman, Michael P; Thorborg, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    both the examination and treatment of FAI does not appear to accommodate this exponential growth. In fact, the direction currently taken for FAI is similar to previously described paths of other orthopaedic and sports medicine pathologies (eg, shoulder impingement, knee meniscus tear) for which we have......Femoroacetabuler impingement (FAI) is becoming increasingly recognised as a potential pathological entity for individuals with hip pain. Surgery described to correct FAI has risen exponentially in the past 10 years with the use of hip arthroscopy. Unfortunately, the strength of evidence supporting...

  2. Penile surgery and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovic, Sava V; Djordjevic, Miroslav L J; Kekic, Zoran K; Djakovic, Nenad G

    2002-05-01

    This review will highlight recent advances in the field of penile reconstructive surgery in the paediatric and adult population. It is based on the work published during the year 2001. Besides the anatomical and histological studies of the penis, major contributions have been described in congenital and acquired penile anomalies. Also, a few new techniques and modifications of old procedures are described in order to improve the final functional and aesthetic outcome. The techniques for penile enlargement present a trend in the new millennium, but are still at the stage of investigation.

  3. Laparoscopic surgery in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressler Hernandez, Norlan; Martinez Perez, Elliot; Fernandez Rodriguez, Leopoldo; Torres Core, Ramiro

    2011-01-01

    In the current age of minimally invasive surgery, laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer has been established as oncologically equivalent to conventional open surgery. The advantages of laparoscopic surgery have translated into smaller incisions and shorter recovery. Since the advent of laparoscopy, surgeons have been fueled to develop less invasive operative methods as feasible alternatives to traditional procedures. As techniques evolved and technology advanced, laparoscopy became more widely accepted and is now more commonly used in many institutions. Recently, a trend toward less invasive surgery, driven by patient and surgeon alike, has been a major objective for many institutions because of the ability of laparoscopic surgery to reduce postoperative pain, achieve a quicker recovery time, and improve cosmetic outcomes. Although still evolving, traditional laparoscopy has served as a foundation for even further refinements in the minimally invasive approach and as a result, more advanced equipment and newer techniques have arisen

  4. Robotic surgery of the pancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Daniel; Morris-Stiff, Gareth; Falk, Gavin A; El-Hayek, Kevin; Chalikonda, Sricharan; Walsh, R Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic surgery is one of the most challenging and complex fields in general surgery. While minimally invasive surgery has become the standard of care for many intra-abdominal pathologies the overwhelming majority of pancreatic surgery is performed in an open fashion. This is attributed to the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas, its intimate relationship to major vasculature and the complexity of reconstruction in the case of pancreatoduodenectomy. Herein, we describe the application of robotic technology to minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. The unique capabilities of the robotic platform have made the minimally invasive approach feasible and safe with equivalent if not better outcomes (e.g., decreased length of stay, less surgical site infections) to conventional open surgery. However, it is unclear whether the robotic approach is truly superior to traditional laparoscopy; this is a key point given the substantial costs associated with procuring and maintaining robotic capabilities. PMID:25356035

  5. Evidence-based surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Rems

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgery is setting a new ground by the reign of evidence that was brought up by the Evidence Based Medicine (EBM. While experiences and opinion of an expert count the least by the principles of EBM, randomized controlled trials (RCT and other comparative studies have gained their importance. Recommendations that were included in guidelines represent a demanding shift in surgeon’s professional thinking. Their thinking and classical education have not yet been completely based on the results of such studies and are still very very much master-pupil centred. Assessment of someone’s own experiences is threatened by objectivity as negative experiences get recorded in deeper memory. Randomized studies and meta-analyses do appear also in surgery. However, they demand an extra knowledge about critical assessment.Conclusions: Setting a patient to the foreground brings a surgeon’s decision to the field of EBM. The process has already begun and cannot be avoided. Decision hierarchy moves from the experience field to the evidence territory but to a lesser extent when compared to the rest of medicine. There exist objective restrictions with approving a new paradigm. However, these should not stop the process of EBM implementation. Finally, there is an ethic issue to be considered. Too slow activities in research, education and critical assessment can bring the surgeon to the position when a well-informed patient loses his/her trust.

  6. Future of robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendvay, Thomas Sean; Hannaford, Blake; Satava, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    In just over a decade, robotic surgery has penetrated almost every surgical subspecialty and has even replaced some of the most commonly performed open oncologic procedures. The initial reports on patient outcomes yielded mixed results, but as more medical centers develop high-volume robotics programs, outcomes appear comparable if not improved for some applications. There are limitations to the current commercially available system, and new robotic platforms, some designed to compete in the current market and some to address niche surgical considerations, are being developed that will change the robotic landscape in the next decade. Adoption of these new systems will be dependent on overcoming barriers to true telesurgery that range from legal to logistical. As additional surgical disciplines embrace robotics and open surgery continues to be replaced by robotic approaches, it will be imperative that adequate education and training keep pace with technology. Methods to enhance surgical performance in robotics through the use of simulation and telementoring promise to accelerate learning curves and perhaps even improve surgical readiness through brief virtual-reality warm-ups and presurgical rehearsal. All these advances will need to be carefully and rigorously validated through not only patient outcomes, but also cost efficiency.

  7. Surgery for achalasia: 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiino, Y; Filipi, C J; Awad, Z T; Tomonaga, T; Marsh, R E

    1999-01-01

    Technical controversies abound regarding the surgical treatment of achalasia. To determine the value of a concomitant antireflux procedure, the best antireflux procedure, the correct length for gastric myotomy, the optimal surgical approach (thoracic or abdominal), and the equivalency of minimally invasive surgery, a literature review was carried out. The review is based on 23 articles on open transabdominal or transthoracic myotomy, 14 articles on laparoscopic myotomy, and four articles on thoracoscopic myotomy. Postoperative results of traditional open thoracic or transabdominal myotomy as determined by symptomatology were better with fundoplication than without fundoplication. The incidence of postoperative reflux as proved by pH monitoring was high in patients who had an open transabdominal myotomy without fundoplication. The type of antireflux procedure used and the length of gastric myotomy had little effect on results. The results of transthoracic Heller myotomy do not require a concomitant fundoplication. Laparoscopic and thoracoscopic myotomy had excellent results at short-term follow-up. A fundoplication must be added if the myotomy is performed transabdominally. A randomized prospective study is required to determine the best fundoplication and the extent of gastric myotomy. Although minimally invasive surgery for achalasia has excellent initial results, longer follow-up in a larger population of patients is needed.

  8. Computed tomography, after abdominal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, H.; Toedt, H.C.

    1985-09-01

    The CT-examinations of 131 patients were analyzed after abdominal surgery. After nephrectomy, splenectomy, partial hepatectomy and pancreatectomy a displacement of the neighbouring intraabdominal and retroperitoneal organs was seen. Scar-tissue was observed containing fat, which faciltated the differential diagnosis to tumor recurrency. The changes of the roentgenmorphology were not so obvious after gastrointestinal surgery. After vascular surgery the permeability of an anastomosis or an operated artery could be demonstrated by bolus injection. (orig.).

  9. Computed tomography, after abdominal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.; Toedt, H.C.; Hamburg Univ.

    1985-01-01

    The CT-examinations of 131 patients were analyzed after abdominal surgery. After nephrectomy, splenectomy, partial hepatectomy and pancreatectomy a displacement of the neighbouring intraabdominal and retroperitoneal organs was seen. Scar-tissue was observed containing fat, which fascilated the differentialdiagnosis to tumorrecurrency. The changes of the roentgenmorphology were not so abvious after gastro-intestinal surgery. After vascular surgery the permeability of an anastomosis or an operated artery could be demonstrated by bolusinjection. (orig.) [de

  10. Unfavourable outcomes in orthognathic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy Bonanthaya; P Anantanarayanan

    2013-01-01

    Unfavourable outcomes are part and parcel of performing surgeries of any kind. Unfavourable outcomes are results of such work, which the patient and or the clinician does not like. This is an attempt to review various causes for unfavorable outcomes in orthognathic surgery and discuss them in detail. All causes for unfavorable outcomes may be classified as belonging to one of the following periods A) Pre- Treatment B) During treatment Pre-Treatment: In orthognathic surgery- as in any other di...

  11. Advances in percutaneous stone surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hartman, Christopher; Gupta, Nikhil; Leavitt, David; Hoenig, David; Okeke, Zeph; Smith, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of large renal stones has changed considerably in recent years. The increasing prevalence of nephrolithiasis has mandated that urologists perform more surgeries for large renal calculi than before, and this has been met with improvements in percutaneous stone surgery. In this review paper, we examine recent developments in percutaneous stone surgery, including advances in diagnosis and preoperative planning, renal access, patient position, tract dilation, nephroscopes, lithotripsy, ...

  12. Advances in percutaneous stone surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Christopher; Gupta, Nikhil; Leavitt, David; Hoenig, David; Okeke, Zeph; Smith, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of large renal stones has changed considerably in recent years. The increasing prevalence of nephrolithiasis has mandated that urologists perform more surgeries for large renal calculi than before, and this has been met with improvements in percutaneous stone surgery. In this review paper, we examine recent developments in percutaneous stone surgery, including advances in diagnosis and preoperative planning, renal access, patient position, tract dilation, nephroscopes, lithotripsy, exit strategies, and post-operative antibiotic prophylaxis.

  13. Pre-prosthetic surgery: Mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeramalai Naidu Devaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-prosthetic surgery is that part of oral and maxillofacial surgery which restores oral function and facial form. This is concerned with surgical modification of the alveolar process and its surrounding structures to enable the fabrication of a well-fitting, comfortable, and esthetic dental prosthesis. The ultimate goal of pre-prosthetic surgery is to prepare a mouth to receive a dental prosthesis by redesigning and smoothening bony edges.

  14. Sex reassignment surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bižić Marta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transsexualism, or gender incongruence, presents a state in which a person's assigned sex at birth conflicts with their psychological gender. It is classified in International Classification of Diseases as F64. Treating these persons require multidisciplinary approach, including psychiatrist, endocrinologist, gynecologist, urologist, plastic and reconstructive surgeon. Genital reconstruction is the final step in transition, and can be performed when all other conditions required by World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH are accomplished. Female to male sex reassignment surgery Several surgical procedures can be done in female to male transsexuals, including mastectomy, removal of female genitalia, metoidioplasty, scrotoplasty with implantation of testicular implants, as well as total phalloplasty. The current operative technique of metoidioplasty comprise the following steps: vaginal removal, the release of the ventral chordee and clitoral ligaments, straightening and lengthening of the clitoris, urethroplasty by combining buccal mucosa graft and genital flaps and scrotoplasty with insertion of testicle prostheses. The goal is to perform all these procedures in one stage, and that makes our team famous worldwide. Metoidioplasty results in excellent cosmetic outcome with completely preserved sensitivity and sexual arousal, enables voiding while standing, but without ability to penetrate due to small size of the neophallus. Considering these advantages, including low complication rate, patients often choose this option. For those who require bigger phallus which enables implantation of penile prosthesis, several surgical techniques have been reported using either available local vascularized tissue or microvascular tissue transfer. However, none of them satisfy all the goals of modern penile construction, i.e. reproducibility, tactile and erogenous sensation, a competent neourethra with a meatus at the top of the neophallus

  15. Virtual reality in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uranüs, Selman; Yanik, Mustafa; Bretthauer, Georg

    2004-01-01

    Although the many advantages of laparoscopic surgery have made it an established technique, training in laparoscopic surgery posed problems not encountered in conventional surgical training. Virtual reality simulators open up new perspectives for training in laparoscopic surgery. Under realistic conditions in real time, trainees can tailor their sessions with the VR simulator to suit their needs and goals, and can repeat exercises as often as they wish. VR simulators reduce the number of experimental animals needed for training purposes and are suited to the pursuit of research in laparoscopic surgery.

  16. Surgery Risk Assessment (SRA) Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Surgery Risk Assessment (SRA) database is part of the VA Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP). This database contains assessments of selected surgical...

  17. The role of new information technology meeting the global need and gap of education in pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ure, Benno; Zoeller, Christoph; Lacher, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Traditionally, pediatric surgical education consisted of exposure to patients, textbooks, lectures, team-based education, congresses, and workshops. Over the last decades, however, new information technology (IT) and the internet revolutionized the sharing of information and communication. IT has become relevant in particular for the younger generation of pediatric surgeons. Today, gaps in children's health and the quality of pediatric surgical education persist between countries and regions. Advances in health care are not shared equitably. The use of IT for resource libraries, teleconferences, virtual symposiums, and telementoring has great potential in closing this gap and meeting the global needs for pediatric surgical education. This article focuses on the potential role of IT in this respect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [The role of balneology in plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, N; Binet, A; Caliot, J; Poli Merol, M-L; Bodin, F; François-Fiquet, C

    2016-02-01

    Balneology can be part of the plastic surgery care sector. The objectives of this study were firstly to the state of knowledge about the hydrotherapy and specify the place reserved for hydrotherapy by surgeons as an adjunct in plastic and reconstructive surgery (adult and child). Multicentric national study by poll (Google Drive®) focused at plastic and/or pediatric surgeons. The following information was analyzed: frequency, timing of prescription, indications, the surgeon's feelings towards hydrotherapy and the differences between adult's and children's prescriptions. Fifty-four teams were contacted: 22 responses were received (15 "adult" plastic surgeons, 9 "pediatric" plastic surgeons, 6 pediatric surgeons, with 12 out of 22 working with burnt patients). Eighteen out of 22 prescribed hydrotherapy. Twenty out of 22 thought that hydrotherapy had a role as adjuvant therapy in plastic surgery. The indications were: burns (11/20), skin-graft hypertrophy (10/20), inflammatory and pruritic scar and cutaneous trophic disorders (9/20), psychological (3/20), retractions (2/20), weight loss and smoking (1/20). The timing of the prescription was: 6 months and 1 year (8/20) after surgery/trauma. Twenty out of 22 found a beneficial effect: physical (19/20): reduction of inflammatory signs, pruritus and pain, scar maturation, skin thinning improvement; psychological (14/20): positive for patient/family. Five out of 17 made the difference between child/adult, 10/17 made no difference but only treated adults or children. The respondents in the study are probably more sensitive to the effects of hydrotherapy that non-respondents. It is difficult to assess the real impact of hydrotherapy in plastic surgery because distinguishing spontaneous favorable evolution of a scar from one only due to the hydrotherapy or multidisciplinary management is difficult. However, hydrotherapy seems to have its role among multidisciplinary management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All

  19. TMJ surgery following orthognathic surgery: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Politis

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Orthognathic surgery may affect or cause temporomandibular joint (TMJ complaints. This study evaluated the need for TMJ surgery after orthognathic surgery.A retrospective cohort study was carried out on 630 consecutive patients undergoing at least a Le Fort I or bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO. The mean follow-up time was 2,3 years. Clinical, surgical and radiographic findings were collected.Ten of the 630 patients (1.6% had additional arthroscopic TMJ-surgery in one (9 or in both (1 joints because of internal derangement, resistant to conventional therapy. Only 4/10 patients had successful outcomes following arthroscopic surgery. One patient with unsuccessful outcome required multiple additional open TMJ-surgeries, all remaining ineffective to relieve pain and restricted mouth opening. If arthroscopy failed to relieve symptoms (5/10 patients, further conservative management was opted. Arthroscopy seemed effective mainly in patients without pre-existing TMJ complaints.A further five of the 630 patients (0.8% required more treatment because of bilateral postoperative condylar resorption, but none of them required TMJ-surgery.In contrast to patients with bilateral condylar resorption where the skeletal relapse remained the issue of concern, patients with internal derangement/osteoarthrosis exhibited major occlusal changes in one patient only (1/10, leaving the TMJ complaints as the main concern. Keywords: Sagittal split osteotomy, Le Fort I osteotomy, Orthognathic surgery, Condylar remodelling, Condylar resorption, Osteoarthrosis, Internal derangement, Relapse, Arthroscopy

  20. Additional Surgery after Breast-Conserving Surgery Varies Widely

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study published in the Feb. 1, 2012, issue of JAMA found that the number of women who have one or more additional surgeries to remove suspected residual tumor tissue (re-excisions) following breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer varies widely across surgeons and hospitals.

  1. Development of a Virtual Reality Exposure Tool as Psychological Preparation for Elective Pediatric Day Care Surgery: Methodological Approach for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eijlers, Robin; Legerstee, Jeroen S; Dierckx, Bram; Staals, Lonneke M; Berghmans, Johan; van der Schroeff, Marc P; Wijnen, Rene Mh; Utens, Elisabeth Mwj

    2017-09-11

    Preoperative anxiety in children is highly prevalent and is associated with adverse outcomes. Existing psychosocial interventions to reduce preoperative anxiety are often aimed at distraction and are of limited efficacy. Gradual exposure is a far more effective way to reduce anxiety. Virtual reality (VR) provides a unique opportunity to gradually expose children to all aspects of the operating theater. The aims of our study are (1) to develop a virtual reality exposure (VRE) tool to prepare children psychologically for surgery; and (2) to examine the efficacy of the VRE tool in a randomized controlled trial (RCT), in which VRE will be compared to care as usual (CAU). The VRE tool is highly realistic and resembles the operating room environment accurately. With this tool, children will not only be able to explore the operating room environment, but also get accustomed to general anesthesia procedures. The PREoperative Virtual reality Intervention to Enhance Wellbeing (PREVIEW) study will be conducted. In this single-blinded RCT, 200 consecutive patients (aged 4 to 12 years) undergoing elective day care surgery for dental, oral, or ear-nose-throat problems, will be randomly allocated to the preoperative VRE intervention or CAU. The primary outcome is change in child state anxiety level between baseline and induction of anesthesia. Secondary outcome measures include child's postoperative anxiety, emergence delirium, postoperative pain, use of analgesics, health care use, and pre- and postoperative parental anxiety. The VRE tool has been developed. Participant recruitment began March 2017 and is expected to be completed by September 2018. To our knowledge, this is the first RCT evaluating the effect of a VRE tool to prepare children for surgery. The VRE intervention is expected to significantly diminish preoperative anxiety, postoperative pain, and the use of postoperative analgesics in pediatric patients. The tool could create a less stressful experience for both

  2. Development of a Virtual Reality Exposure Tool as Psychological Preparation for Elective Pediatric Day Care Surgery: Methodological Approach for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eijlers, Robin; Legerstee, Jeroen S; Dierckx, Bram; Staals, Lonneke M; Berghmans, Johan; van der Schroeff, Marc P; Wijnen, Rene MH

    2017-01-01

    Background Preoperative anxiety in children is highly prevalent and is associated with adverse outcomes. Existing psychosocial interventions to reduce preoperative anxiety are often aimed at distraction and are of limited efficacy. Gradual exposure is a far more effective way to reduce anxiety. Virtual reality (VR) provides a unique opportunity to gradually expose children to all aspects of the operating theater. Objective The aims of our study are (1) to develop a virtual reality exposure (VRE) tool to prepare children psychologically for surgery; and (2) to examine the efficacy of the VRE tool in a randomized controlled trial (RCT), in which VRE will be compared to care as usual (CAU). Methods The VRE tool is highly realistic and resembles the operating room environment accurately. With this tool, children will not only be able to explore the operating room environment, but also get accustomed to general anesthesia procedures. The PREoperative Virtual reality Intervention to Enhance Wellbeing (PREVIEW) study will be conducted. In this single-blinded RCT, 200 consecutive patients (aged 4 to 12 years) undergoing elective day care surgery for dental, oral, or ear-nose-throat problems, will be randomly allocated to the preoperative VRE intervention or CAU. The primary outcome is change in child state anxiety level between baseline and induction of anesthesia. Secondary outcome measures include child’s postoperative anxiety, emergence delirium, postoperative pain, use of analgesics, health care use, and pre- and postoperative parental anxiety. Results The VRE tool has been developed. Participant recruitment began March 2017 and is expected to be completed by September 2018. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first RCT evaluating the effect of a VRE tool to prepare children for surgery. The VRE intervention is expected to significantly diminish preoperative anxiety, postoperative pain, and the use of postoperative analgesics in pediatric patients. The tool

  3. A comparative cost analysis of robotic-assisted surgery versus laparoscopic surgery and open surgery: the necessity of investing knowledgeably.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Giorgia; Faggiano, Francesco C; Leo, Erica; Derrico, Pietro; Ritrovato, Matteo

    2016-11-01

    Robotic surgery has been proposed as a minimally invasive surgical technique with advantages for both surgeons and patients, but is associated with high costs (installation, use and maintenance). The Health Technology Assessment Unit of the Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital sought to investigate the economic sustainability of robotic surgery, having foreseen its impact on the hospital budget METHODS: Break-even and cost-minimization analyses were performed. A deterministic approach for sensitivity analysis was applied by varying the values of parameters between pre-defined ranges in different scenarios to see how the outcomes might differ. The break-even analysis indicated that at least 349 annual interventions would need to be carried out to reach the break-even point. The cost-minimization analysis showed that robotic surgery was the most expensive procedure among the considered alternatives (in terms of the contribution margin). Robotic surgery is a good clinical alternative to laparoscopic and open surgery (for many pediatric operations). However, the costs of robotic procedures are higher than the equivalent laparoscopic and open surgical interventions. Therefore, in the short run, these findings do not seem to support the decision to introduce a robotic system in our hospital.

  4. [History of cranial surgery, cerebral tumor surgery and epilepsy surgery in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chico-Ponce de León, F

    2009-08-01

    The first report of intra-cerebral tumor surgery was provided by Bennett & Goodle, in London, 1884. Worldwide this kind of surgery was performed in France by Chipault, in Italy by Durante, in the United States by Keen and in Deutchland by Krause & Oppenheim. Lavista in Mexico City operated on intra-cerebral tumor in 1891, and the report was printed in 1892. In the same publication, Lavista exhibited the first cases of epilepsy surgery. Since now, it is the first report of this kind of surgery in the Spanish-speaking world.

  5. Applications of piezoelectric surgery in endodontic surgery: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Francesc; de Ribot, Joan; Doria, Guillermo; Duran-Sindreu, Fernando; Roig, Miguel

    2014-03-01

    Piezosurgery (piezoelectric bone surgery) devices were developed to cut bone atraumatically using ultrasonic vibrations and to provide an alternative to the mechanical and electrical instruments used in conventional oral surgery. Indications for piezosurgery are increasing in oral and maxillofacial surgery, as in other disciplines, such as endodontic surgery. Key features of piezosurgery instruments include their ability to selectively cut bone without damaging adjacent soft tissue, to provide a clear operative field, and to cut without generating heat. Although piezosurgery instruments can be used at most stages of endodontic surgery (osteotomy, root-end resection, and root-end preparation), no published data are available on the effect of piezosurgery on the outcomes of endodontic surgery. To our knowledge, no study has evaluated the effect of piezosurgery on root-end resection, and only 1 has investigated root-end morphology after retrograde cavity preparation using piezosurgery. We conducted a search of the PubMed and Cochrane databases using appropriate terms and keywords related to the use and applications of piezoelectric surgery in endodontic surgery. A hand search also was conducted of issues published in the preceding 2 years of several journals. Two independent reviewers obtained and analyzed the full texts of the selected articles. A total of 121 articles published between January 2000 and December 2013 were identified. This review summarizes the operating principles of piezoelectric devices and outlines the applications of piezosurgery in endodontic surgery using clinical examples. Piezosurgery is a promising technical modality with applications in several aspects of endodontic surgery, but further studies are necessary to determine the influence of piezosurgery on root-end resection and root-end preparation. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Apparatus for stereotactic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koslow, M.A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for stereotactic surgery consisting of a probe and a computerized tomographic scanning system is described. The scanning system comprises a display and means for reconstructing cross-sectional images on the display using data from partial circumferential scans of source and detectors. It operates on the data with an algorithm that provides the difference between the local values of the linear attenuation coefficient and average of these values within a circle centered at each reconstruction point. The scanning system includes a means of maintaining the frames of reference of the probe and scanning system rigid with respect to one another. The position of the probe, which may be a cryogenic probe, with respect to the actual anatomical structure of the body, particularly a human head, may thus be viewed by the surgeon. (author)

  7. Surgery for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viganò, M; Graffigna, A; Ressia, L; Minzioni, G; Pagani, F; Aiello, M; Gazzoli, F

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms of atrial fibrillation arc multiple reentry circuits spinning around the atrial surface, and these baffle any attempt to direct surgical interruption. The purpose of this article is to report the surgical experience in the treatment of isolated and concomitant atrial fibrillation at the Cardiac Surgical Institute of the University of Pavia. In cases of atrial fibrillation secondary to mitral/valve disease, surgical isolation of the left atrium at the time of mitral valve surgery can prevent atrial fibrillation from involving the right atrium, which can exert its diastolic pump function on the right ventricle. Left atrial isolation was performed on 205 patients at the time of mitral valve surgery. Atrial partitioning ("maze operation") creates straight and blind atrial alleys so that non-recentry circuits can take place. Five patients underwent this procedure. In eight-cases of atrial fibrillation secondary to atrial septal defect, the adult patients with atrial septal defect and chronic or paroxysmal atrial fibrillation underwent surgical isolation of the right atrium associated which surgical correction of the defect, in order to let sinus rhythm govern the left atrium and the ventricles. "Lone" atrial fibrillation occurs in hearts with no detectable organic disease. Bi-atrial isolation with creation of an atrial septal internodal "corridor" was performed on 14 patients. In cases of atrial fibrillation secondary to mitral valve disease, left atrial isolation was performed on 205 patients at the time of mitral valve surgery with an overall sinus rhythm recovery of 44%. In the same period, sinus rhythm was recovered and persisted in only 19% of 252 patients who underwent mitral valve replacement along (P < 0.001). Sinus rhythm was less likely to recover in patients with right atriomegaly requiring tricuspid valve annuloplasty: 59% vs 84% (P < 0.001). Restoration of the right atrial function raised the cardiac index from 2.25 +/- 0.55 1/min per m2

  8. Vascular Surgery and Robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrani Sen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of robotics to Vascular surgery has not progressed as rapidly as of endovascular technology, but this is changing with the amalgamation of these two fields. The advent of Endovascular robotics is an exciting field which overcomes many of the limitations of endovascular therapy like vessel tortuosity and operator fatigue. This has much clinical appeal for the surgeon and hold significant promise of better patient outcomes. As with most newer technological advances, it is still limited by cost and availability. However, this field has seen some rapid progress in the last decade with the technology moving into the clinical realm. This review details the development of robotics, applications, outcomes, advantages, disadvantages and current advances focussing on Vascular and Endovascular robotics

  9. Hernia inguinal laparoscopic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morelli Brum, R. . E mail: raulmorelli@hotmail.com

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to enhance treatment of inguinal hernia through a bibliographic study of its main complications and the analysis of a retrospective series of laparoscopic restorations performed by the author in the same private medical care center. From December 1994 through July 2003, ninety-nine patients were operated in 108 procedures.The technique employed was trans-abdominal peritoneal (TAPP)Follow-up covered over 2 years in 80% of patients with a relapse of 2.8%. Main morbidity was neuralgia due to a nerve being trapped, which fact required re-intervention.There was no mortality.The conclusion arrived at is that it is and excellent technique which requires a long learning curve and its main indication would be relapse of conventional surgery, bilateralism, coexistence with another laparoscopic abdominal pathology and doubts concerning contra lateral hernia

  10. Robotics and general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Brian P; Gagner, Michel

    2003-12-01

    Robotics are now being used in all surgical fields, including general surgery. By increasing intra-abdominal articulations while operating through small incisions, robotics are increasingly being used for a large number of visceral and solid organ operations, including those for the gallbladder, esophagus, stomach, intestines, colon, and rectum, as well as for the endocrine organs. Robotics and general surgery are blending for the first time in history and as a specialty field should continue to grow for many years to come. We continuously demand solutions to questions and limitations that are experienced in our daily work. Laparoscopy is laden with limitations such as fixed axis points at the trocar insertion sites, two-dimensional video monitors, limited dexterity at the instrument tips, lack of haptic sensation, and in some cases poor ergonomics. The creation of a surgical robot system with 3D visual capacity seems to deal with most of these limitations. Although some in the surgical community continue to test the feasibility of these surgical robots and to question the necessity of such an expensive venture, others are already postulating how to improve the next generation of telemanipulators, and in so doing are looking beyond today's horizon to find simpler solutions. As the robotic era enters the world of the general surgeon, more and more complex procedures will be able to be approached through small incisions. As technology catches up with our imaginations, robotic instruments (as opposed to robots) and 3D monitoring will become routine and continue to improve patient care by providing surgeons with the most precise, least traumatic ways of treating surgical disease.

  11. Body dysmorphia and plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Allison

    2012-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder is a mental disorder characterized by a preoccupation with some aspect of one's appearance. In cosmetic surgery, this preoccupation can be overlooked by practitioners resulting in a discrepancy between expected and realistic outcome. Identifying the characteristics of this disorder may be crucial to the practitioner-patient relationship in the plastic surgery setting.

  12. South African Journal of Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Journal of Surgery is published by the South African Medical Association and publishes papers related to surgery. Other websites related to this journal: http://www.sajs.org.za/index.php/sajs. Vol 56, No 1 (2018). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access ...

  13. African Journal of Paediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Paediatric Surgery aims to promote research, post- graduate training and further education among Paediatric surgeons, Paediatric Surgical Trainees and paramedical personnel in the surgery of newborn infants and children particularly in Africa and other tropical regions of the world.AJPS welcomes ...

  14. Mortality after surgery in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearse, Rupert M; Moreno, Rui P; Bauer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Clinical outcomes after major surgery are poorly described at the national level. Evidence of heterogeneity between hospitals and health-care systems suggests potential to improve care for patients but this potential remains unconfirmed. The European Surgical Outcomes Study was an international...... study designed to assess outcomes after non-cardiac surgery in Europe....

  15. Improving Quality in Colorectal Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Slieker (Juliette)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Colorectal surgery is an important aspect of our current health system, due to the high incidence of colorectal cancer combined with an ageing population, improved long-term outcomes after colorectal surgery, and the perfectioning of the operative and postoperative

  16. Early outcome of noma surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, M A; Marck, K W; Griep, J E M; Marck, R E; Huijing, M A; Werker, P M N

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reconstructive noma surgery is performed on many short-term medical missions. The treatment outcome, however, has rarely been studied. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied complications and clinical outcome of reconstructive noma surgery performed during four short-term medical missions.

  17. Basics of LASIK Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vea esta página en español The Basics of LASIK Eye Surgery Share This Page Facebook Twitter Linked- ... Surgery Surgical Alternatives to LASIK For More Information  LASIK Basics If you wear glasses or contact lenses, ...

  18. Epilepsy surgery: Recommendations for India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The following article recommends guidelines for epilepsy surgery for India. This article reviews the indications, the various surgical options available and the outcome of surgery for drug resistant epilepsy based on current evidence. Epilepsy surgery is a well-established option for patients who have been diagnosed to have drug resistant epilepsy (DRE (on at least two appropriate, adequate anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs (either in monotherapy or in combination with continuing seizures, where the presurgical work-up has shown concordance of structural imaging (magnetic resonance imaging and electrical mapping data (electroencephalography (EEG, video EEG. There may be a requirement of functional imaging techniques in a certain number of DRE like positron emission tomography (PET, single photon emission tomography, (SPECT. Invasive monitoring should be restricted to a few when all noninvasive investigations are inconclusive, there is a dual pathology or there is a discordance of noninvasive data. The types of surgery could be curative (resective surgeries: amygdalo hippocampectomy, lesionectomy and multilobar resections; functional surgeries: hemispherotomy and palliative (multiple subpial transaction, corpus callosotomy, vagal nerve stimulation. Epilepsy surgery in indicated cases has a success range from 50 to 86% in achieving seizure freedom as compared with < 5% success rate with AEDs only in persons with DRE. Centers performing surgery should be categorized into Level I and Level II.

  19. Endoscopy and surgery for obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia, Andres Felipe; Unigarro, Ivan; Bolanos, Eduardo; Chaux, Carlos Felipe

    2006-01-01

    Actually bariatric surgery appears to be a secure, feasible and durable option for patients with morbid obesity. Most of the complications that arise from bariatric surgery can be solved with the use of endoscopy avoiding the morbidity and mortality of a surgical intervention. This group of patients has become a challenge for the endoscopist and favours the development of interventional endoscopy

  20. HISTORY OF SURGERY TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Sysolyatin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the main stages of the historical development of the temporo-mandibular joint surgery. It was shown the evolution of treatments for diseases and injuries of joints. It summarizes the main work of domestic and foreign authors that influenced the development of surgery of the temporo-mandibular joint. 

  1. Eponyms in elbow fracture surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somford, Matthijs P.; Wiegerinck, Johannes I.; Hoornenborg, Daniël; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Eygendaal, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Eponyms are common in medicine and in orthopaedic surgery. For future reference and historical considerations, we present common eponyms in elbow fracture surgery. We describe in short the biography of the name giver and give, where possible, the original description on which the eponym was based.

  2. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MIDCAB; Robot-assisted coronary artery bypass; RACAB; Keyhole heart surgery; CAD - MIDCAB; Coronary artery disease - MIDCAB ... To perform this surgery: The heart surgeon will make a 3- to 5-inch (8 to 13 centimeters) surgical cut in the left part of your chest ...

  3. Virtual reality and laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, J; Nduka, C C; Darzi, A

    1994-12-01

    The nature of laparoscopic surgery makes it likely to benefit from current and future developments in virtual reality and telepresence technology. High-definition screens, three-dimensional sensory feedback and remote dextrous manipulation will be the next major developments in laparoscopic surgery. Simulators may be used in surgical training and in the evaluation of surgical capability.

  4. Echocardiographic Evaluation of Pulmonary Pressures and Right Ventricular Function after Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: A Simple Approach for the Intensivist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Beghetti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is diagnosed using cardiac catheterization and is defined as an elevation of mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP greater than 25 mmHg. Although invasive hemodynamics remains the gold standard and is mandatory for disease confirmation, transthoracic echocardiography (TTE is an extremely useful non-invasive and widely available tool that allows for screening and follow-up, in particular, in the acute setting. TTE may be a valuable alternative, allowing for direct measurement and/or indirect assessment of PAP. Because of the complex geometric shape and pattern of contraction of the right ventricle (RV, as well as the inherent complexity of cardiac repair, no single view or measurement can provide definite information on RV function and PAP and/or pulmonary vascular resistance. In addition, specific training and expertise may be necessary to obtain the views and measurements required. Some simple measurements may be of help when rapid evaluation is mandatory and potentially life saving: the assessment of tricuspid and/or pulmonary valve regurgitant jet and the use of the Bernoulli equation allow for measurement of PAP. Measurements such as the analysis of the pulmonary Doppler wave flow, the septal curvature, or the eccentricity index, assessing ventricular interdependence, are useful for indirect assessment. A four-chamber view of the RV gives information on its size, hypertrophy, function (fractional area change, and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion as an evaluation of the longitudinal function. Based on these simple measurements, TTE can provide detection of PH, measurement or estimation of PAP, and assessment of cardiac function. TTE is also of importance in follow up of PH as well as providing an assessment of therapeutic strategies in the postoperative setting of cardiac surgery. However, PAP may be misleading as it is dependent on cardiac output and requires accurate measurements. In the presence of

  5. Robotic surgery in Italy national survey (2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Eugenio; Pansadoro, Vito

    2013-03-01

    Robotic surgery in Italy has become a clinical reality that is gaining increasing acceptance. As of 2011 after the United States, Italy together with Germany is the country with the largest number of active Robotic centers, 46, and da Vinci Robots installed, with at least 116 operators already trained. The number of interventions performed in Italy in 2011 exceeded 6,000 and in 2010 were 4,784, with prevalence for urology, general surgery and gynecology, however these interventions have also begun to be applied in other fields such as cervicofacial, cardiothoracic and pediatric surgery. In Italy Robotic centers are mostly located in Northern Italy, while in the South there are only a few centers, and four regions are lacking altogether. Of the 46 centers which were started in 1999, the vast majority is still operational and almost half handle over 200 cases a year. The quality of the work is also especially high with large diffusion of radical prostatectomy in urology and liver resection and colic in general surgery. The method is very well accepted among operators, over 80 %, and among patients, over 95 %. From the analysis of world literature and a survey carried out in Italy, Robotic surgery, which at the moment could be better defined as telesurgery, represents a significant advantage for operators and a consistent gain for the patient. However, it still has important limits such as high cost and non-structured training of operators.

  6. The future of glaucoma surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsham Sheybani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma surgery is ripe for innovation. In the last few years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of devices approaching commercialization. While not all that is new is necessarily good, the role of these devices in changing glaucoma surgery is equally important in terms of both success and failure. Trabeculectomy, the most commonly performed incisional filtration surgery for glaucoma, is subjective by nature and certainly has risks. As devices aim to standardize glaucoma surgery, specifically subconjunctival filtration surgery, predictability and in turn safety should theoretically improve. This may allow the glaucoma surgeon to intervene earlier in the disease process, prevent more advanced vision loss and potentially decrease the burden of medications.

  7. Perioperative Rosuvastatin in Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhe; Jayaram, Raja; Jiang, Lixin; Emberson, Jonathan; Zhao, Yan; Li, Qi; Du, Juan; Guarguagli, Silvia; Hill, Michael; Chen, Zhengming; Collins, Rory; Casadei, Barbara

    2016-05-05

    Complications after cardiac surgery are common and lead to substantial increases in morbidity and mortality. Meta-analyses of small randomized trials have suggested that perioperative statin therapy can prevent some of these complications. We randomly assigned 1922 patients in sinus rhythm who were scheduled for elective cardiac surgery to receive perioperative rosuvastatin (at a dose of 20 mg daily) or placebo. The primary outcomes were postoperative atrial fibrillation within 5 days after surgery, as assessed by Holter electrocardiographic monitoring, and myocardial injury within 120 hours after surgery, as assessed by serial measurements of the cardiac troponin I concentration. Secondary outcomes included major in-hospital adverse events, duration of stay in the hospital and intensive care unit, left ventricular and renal function, and blood biomarkers. The concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and C-reactive protein after surgery were lower in patients assigned to rosuvastatin than in those assigned to placebo (PSTICS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01573143.).

  8. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery: The Plastic Surgery Paradigm Shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Erica L; Zavlin, Dmitry; Friedman, Jeffrey D; Abdollahi, Aariane; Rappaport, Norman H

    2017-12-14

    With a focus on providing high quality care and reducing facility based expenses there has been an evolution in perioperative care by way of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS). ERAS allows for a multidisciplinary and multimodal approach to perioperative care which not only expedites recovery but maximizes patient outcomes. This paradigm shift has been generally accepted by most surgical specialties, including plastic surgery. The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of ERAS on outcomes in cosmetic plastic surgery. A prospective study consisting of phone call questionnaires was designed where patients from two senior plastic surgeons (N.H.R. and J.D.F.) were followed. The treatment group (n = 10) followed an ERAS protocol while the control group (n = 12) followed the traditional recovery after surgery which included narcotic usage. Patients were contacted on postoperative days (POD) 0 through 7+ and surveyed about a number of outcomes measures. The ERAS group demonstrated a significant reduction in postoperative pain on POD 0, 1, 2, and 3 (all P plastic surgery. The utility lies in the ability to expedite patient's recovery while still providing quality care. This study showed a reduction in postoperative complaints by avoiding narcotics without an increase in complications. Our findings signify the importance of ERAS protocols within cosmetic plastic surgery. 4. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Protocols in Major Urologic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalija Vukovic

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the reviewThe analysis of the components of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS protocols in urologic surgery.Recent findingsERAS protocols has been studied for over 20 years in different surgical procedures, mostly in colorectal surgery. The concept of improving patient care and reducing postoperative complications was also applied to major urologic surgery and especially procedure of radical cystectomy. This procedure is technically challenging, due to a major surgical resection and high postoperative complication rate that may reach 65%. Several clinical pathways were introduced to improve perioperative course and reduce the length of hospital stay. These protocols differ from ERAS modalities in other surgeries. The reasons for this are longer operative time, increased risk of perioperative transfusion and infection, and urinary diversion achieved using transposed intestinal segments. Previous studies in this area analyzed the need for mechanical bowel preparation, postoperative nasogastric tube decompression, as well as the duration of urinary drainage. Furthermore, the attention has also been drawn to perioperative fluid optimization, pain management, and bowel function.SummaryNotwithstanding partial resemblance between the pathways in major urologic surgery and other pelvic surgeries, there are still scarce guidelines for ERAS protocols in urology, which is why further studies should assess the importance of preoperative medical optimization, implementation of thoracic epidural anesthesia and analgesia, and perioperative nutritional management.

  10. [Management of recurrent urethrocutaneous fistula after hypospadias surgery in pediatric patients: initial experience with dermal regeneration sheet Integra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal-Beloy, I; Somoza Argibay, I; García-González, M; García-Novoa, A M; Míguez Fortes, L; Blanco, C; Dargallo Carbonell, T

    2017-10-25

    To present our initial experience using a dermal regeneration sheet as an urethral cover in the repair of recurrent urethrocutaneous fistulae in pediatric patients. Since May 2016 to March a total of 8 fistulaes were repaired using this new technique. We performed the ddissection of the fistulous tract and posterior closure of the urethral defect. A dermal regeneration sheet was used to cover the urethral suture. Finally a rotational flap was performed to avoid overlap sutures. During the follow-up (average 6 months), one patient presented in the immediate postoperative period infection of the surgical wound. This patient presented recurrence of the fistula. 88% of the patients included presented a good evolution with no other complications. In our initial experience the new technique seems easy, safe and effective in the management of the recurrent urethrocutaneous fistulae in pediatric patients. More studies are needed to prove these results.

  11. Analysis of readability and quality of web pages addressing both common and uncommon topics in pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorisio, Ottavio; Silveri, Massimiliano; Rivosecchi, Massimo; Tozzi, Alberto Eugenio; Scottoni, Federico; Buonuomo, Paola Sabrina

    2012-06-01

    The quality medical information on Internet is highly variable. The aim of this study is to determine if Web pages addressing four common pediatric surgical topics (CT) and four uncommon pediatric surgical topics (UT) differ significantly in terms of quality and/or characteristics. We performed an Internet search regarding four CT, addressing more frequent clinical conditions with an incidence≤1:1.500 children (inguinal hernia, varicocele, umbilical hernia, and phimosis) and four UT addressing less frequent clinical conditions with an incidence≥1:1.500 children (anorectal malformation, intestinal atresia, gastroschisis, and omphalocele), using a popular search engine (Google). We evaluated readability with the Flesch reading ease (FRE) and the Flesch-Kincaid grade (FKG) and quality of content using the site checker of the HON Code of Conduct (HON code) for each website. In this study, 30/40 websites addressing CT versus 33/50 addressing UT responded to our criteria. No differences statistically significant in advertisements between the two groups were found (15 vs. 16%) (p>0.05). No differences were found in terms of time from last update, owner/author type, financial disclosure, accreditation, or advertising. CT had higher quality level according to the HON code (6.54±1.38 vs. 5.05±1.82) (p0.05). The mean FKG was 8.1±1.9 for CT versus 8±1.9 for UT (p>0.05). Websites devoted to pediatric surgical topics have higher readability and quality information for disease diagnosis and natural history. Otherwise, the quality of pediatric surgical information on the Internet is high for CT and UT. A high reading level is required to use these resources. Copyright © 2012 by Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Your diet after gastric bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric bypass surgery - your diet; Obesity - diet after bypass; Weight loss - diet after bypass ... You had gastric bypass surgery. This surgery made your stomach smaller by closing off most of your stomach with staples. It changed the way your ...

  13. Long-term disease control and toxicity outcomes following surgery and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in pediatric craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Brad J; Okcu, Mehmet F; Baxter, Patricia A; Chintagumpala, Murali; Teh, Bin S; Dauser, Robert C; Su, Jack; Desai, Snehal S; Paulino, Arnold C

    2015-02-01

    To report long-term progression-free survival (PFS) and late-toxicity outcomes in pediatric craniopharyngioma patients treated with IMRT. Twenty-four children were treated with IMRT to a median dose of 50.4Gy (range, 49.8-54Gy). The clinical target volume (CTV) was the gross tumor volume (GTV) with a 1cm margin. The planning target volume (PTV) was the CTV with a 3-5mm margin. Median follow-up was 107.3months. The 5- and 10-year PFS rates were 65.8% and 60.7%. The 5- and 10-year cystic PFS rates were 70.2% and 65.2% while the 5- and 10-year solid PFS were the same at 90.7%. Endocrinopathy was seen in 42% at initial diagnosis and in 74% after surgical intervention, prior to IMRT. Hypothalamic dysfunction and visual deficits were associated with increasing PTV and number of surgical interventions. IMRT is a viable treatment option for pediatric craniopharyngioma. Despite the use of IMRT, majority of the craniopharyngioma patients experienced long-term toxicity, many of which present prior to radiotherapy. Limitations of retrospective analyses on small patient cohort elicit the need for a prospective multi-institutional study to determine the absolute benefit of IMRT in pediatric craniopharyngioma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-term disease control and toxicity outcomes following surgery and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in pediatric craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, Brad J.; Okcu, Mehmet F.; Baxter, Patricia A.; Chintagumpala, Murali; Teh, Bin S.; Dauser, Robert C.; Su, Jack; Desai, Snehal S.; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report long-term progression-free survival (PFS) and late-toxicity outcomes in pediatric craniopharyngioma patients treated with IMRT. Patients and methods: Twenty-four children were treated with IMRT to a median dose of 50.4 Gy (range, 49.8–54 Gy). The clinical target volume (CTV) was the gross tumor volume (GTV) with a 1 cm margin. The planning target volume (PTV) was the CTV with a 3–5 mm margin. Median follow-up was 107.3 months. Results: The 5- and 10-year PFS rates were 65.8% and 60.7%. The 5- and 10-year cystic PFS rates were 70.2% and 65.2% while the 5- and 10-year solid PFS were the same at 90.7%. Endocrinopathy was seen in 42% at initial diagnosis and in 74% after surgical intervention, prior to IMRT. Hypothalamic dysfunction and visual deficits were associated with increasing PTV and number of surgical interventions. Conclusions: IMRT is a viable treatment option for pediatric craniopharyngioma. Despite the use of IMRT, majority of the craniopharyngioma patients experienced long-term toxicity, many of which present prior to radiotherapy. Limitations of retrospective analyses on small patient cohort elicit the need for a prospective multi-institutional study to determine the absolute benefit of IMRT in pediatric craniopharyngioma

  15. Chapter 12: Surgery for sinonasal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Thomas S; Lane, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    Surgery for chronic rhinosinusitis is an effective complement to a well-designed medical regimen. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery is among the most common surgeries performed for sinonasal disease refractory to maximal medical therapy. Nasal surgery techniques, such as septoplasty and inferior turbinate surgery, may assist in both relieving the symptom of nasal obstruction and providing access for sinus surgery. Although rare, open sinus techniques are occasionally required.

  16. Early extubation after congenital heart surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Halimić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite recent advances in anesthesia, cardiopulmonary bypass and surgical techniques, children undergoing congenital heart surgery require postoperativemechanical ventilation. Early extubation was definedas ventilation shorter than 12 hours. Aim of this study is to identify factors associated with successful early extubation after pediatric cardiac surgery.Methods: The study was performed during period from January 2006 to January 2011 at Pediatric Clinic and Heart Center University Clinical center Sarajevo. One hundred children up to 5 years of age, who have had congenital heart disease, with left–right shunt and obstructive heart disease were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups: Group I - patients extubated within 12 hours after surgery and Group II - patients extubated 12 or more hours after surgery. Results: The most frequently encountered preoperative variables were age with odds ratio 4% 95%CI (1-7%, Down's syndrome 8.5 95%CI (1.6-43.15, failure to thrive 4.3 95%CI( 1-18. Statistically significant postoperative data included lung disease (reactive airways, pneumonia, atelectasis, pneumothorax and with odds ratio 35.1 95 %CI (4-286 and blood transfusion with odds ratio 4.6 95%CI (2-12. Blood transfusion (p=0.002 (Wald=9.2 95%CI (2-12, during as well as after operation procedure has statistically significant influence on prediction time of extubation. Proven markers were age with cut of 21.5 months (sensitivity 74% and specificity 70% and extracorporeal circulation (ECC with cut-of 45.5 minutes (sensitivity 71% and specificity 65%.Conclusion: Early extubation is possible in many children undergoing congenital heart surgery. Younger age and prolonged ECC time are markers associated with prolonged mechanical ventilation.

  17. Bariatric Surgery and Precision Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Carolina F; Cortes-Oliveira, Cristiana; Pinhel, Marcela A S; Nonino, Carla B

    2017-09-06

    This review provides a literature overview of new findings relating nutritional genomics and bariatric surgery. It also describes the importance of nutritional genomics concepts in personalized bariatric management. It includes a discussion of the potential role bariatric surgery plays in altering the three pillars of nutritional genomics: nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics, and epigenetics. We present studies that show the effect of each patient's genetic and epigenetic variables on the response to surgical weight loss treatment. We include investigations that demonstrate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with obesity phenotypes and their influence on weight loss after bariatric surgery. We also present reports on how significant weight loss induced by bariatric surgery impacts telomere length, and we discuss studies on the existence of an epigenetic signature associated with surgery outcomes and specific gene methylation profile, which may help to predict weight loss after a surgical procedure. Finally, we show articles which evidence that bariatric surgery may affect expression of numerous genes involved in different metabolic pathways and consequently induce functional and taxonomic changes in gut microbial communities. The role nutritional genomics plays in responses to weight loss after bariatric surgery is evident. Better understanding of the molecular pathways involved in this process is necessary for successful weight management and maintenance.

  18. Depression, Obesity and Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Lopes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Overweight is an increasing problem worldwide. Data from  2008 show that, in Portugal, 60% of the adult population was overweight and 25% was obese. The relation between mood disorders and obesity is well known and about 2/3 of those who search for bariatric surgery have a psychiatric diagnosis, being depression the most common. Aims: We reviewed the relation between depression and obesity before and after bariatric surgery and evaluated its impact in the pharmacokinetics of antidepressant medication and nutrients that influence depressive symptomatology. Methods: We conducted a non-systematic review of the literature published in English between 1988 and 2015, through research in MEDLINE with the keywords absorption, bioavailability, bariatric surgery, obesity, depression, antidepressants. Results: Depression and obesity potentiates each other in a bidirectional way and the strength of this association is modulated by gender, physical activity, diet and antidepressant medication usage. Bariatric surgery leads to changes in the pharmacokinetics of antidepressant medication and nutrients that have a regulatory role on mood symptomatology. Discussion and Conclusions: Available data show we need to pay special attention to obese depressive patients proposed for bariatric surgery. The existence of depressive symptoms leads to a greater risk of not losing weight after a bariatric surgery but, in the opposite direction, bariatric surgery leads to a lower bioavailability of antidepressant medication.

  19. [Risk management for endoscopic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Taizo

    2010-05-01

    The number of medical accidents in endoscopic surgery has recently increased. Surgical complications caused by inadequate preparation or immature technique or those resulting in serious adverse outcomes may be referred to as medical accidents. The Nationwide Survey of Endoscopic Surgery showed that bile duct injury and uncontrollable bleeding were seen in 0.68% and in 0.58%, respectively, of cholecystectomy patients; interoperative and postoperative complications in 0.84% and in 3.8%, respectively, of gastric cancer surgery patients; and operative complications in 6.74% of bowel surgery patients. Some required open repair, and 49 patients died. The characteristic causes of complications in endoscopic surgery are a misunderstanding of anatomy, handling of organs outside the visual field, burn by electrocautery, and injuries caused by forceps. Bleeding that requires a laparotomy for hemostasis is also a complication. Furthermore, since the surgery is usually videorecorded, immature techniques resulting in complications are easily discovered. To decrease the frequency of accidents, education through textbooks and seminars, training using training boxes, simulators, or animals, proper selection of the surgeon depending on the difficulty of the procedure, a low threshold for conversion to laparotomy, and use of the best optical equipment and surgical instruments are important. To avoid malpractice lawsuits, informed consent obtained before surgery and proper communication after accidents are necessary.

  20. Bariatric Surgery and Precision Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina F. Nicoletti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This review provides a literature overview of new findings relating nutritional genomics and bariatric surgery. It also describes the importance of nutritional genomics concepts in personalized bariatric management. It includes a discussion of the potential role bariatric surgery plays in altering the three pillars of nutritional genomics: nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics, and epigenetics. We present studies that show the effect of each patient’s genetic and epigenetic variables on the response to surgical weight loss treatment. We include investigations that demonstrate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with obesity phenotypes and their influence on weight loss after bariatric surgery. We also present reports on how significant weight loss induced by bariatric surgery impacts telomere length, and we discuss studies on the existence of an epigenetic signature associated with surgery outcomes and specific gene methylation profile, which may help to predict weight loss after a surgical procedure. Finally, we show articles which evidence that bariatric surgery may affect expression of numerous genes involved in different metabolic pathways and consequently induce functional and taxonomic changes in gut microbial communities. The role nutritional genomics plays in responses to weight loss after bariatric surgery is evident. Better understanding of the molecular pathways involved in this process is necessary for successful weight management and maintenance.