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Sample records for surgery pediatric surgery

  1. Pediatric heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... the type of defect, and the type of surgery that was done. Many children recover completely and lead normal, active lives.

  2. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 434. ...

  3. Chair in Pediatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Graña, Francisco; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Inaugural lecture of the course of 1922, Department of Paediatric Surgery, by Dr. Francisco Grana, Professor of Pediatric Surgery and Orthopedics at the Faculty of Medicine of Lima, the National Academy of Medicine, of the Peruvian Society of Surgery. Lección inaugural del curso de 1922, Cátedra de Cirugía Infantil, por el Dr. Francisco Graña, Catedrático de Cirugía Infantil y Ortopedia en la Facultad de Medicina de Lima, de la Academia Nacional de Medicina, de la Sociedad Peruana de Cirug...

  4. [Robotics in pediatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, J I

    2011-10-01

    Despite the extensive use of robotics in the adult population, the use of robotics in pediatrics has not been well accepted. There is still a lack of awareness from pediatric surgeons on how to use the robotic equipment, its advantages and indications. Benefit is still controversial. Dexterity and better visualization of the surgical field are one of the strong values. Conversely, cost and a lack of small instruments prevent the use of robotics in the smaller patients. The aim of this manuscript is to present the controversies about the use of robotics in pediatric surgery.

  5. Pediatric oral and maxillofacial surgery.

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    Kutcipal, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric oral and maxillofacial surgery is rarely seen as a separate entity from adult oral and maxillofacial surgery. Many procedures are similar on adults and children; however, children have unique behavioral, anatomic, and physiologic considerations. Children also have a propensity for certain injuries and pathologic lesions. Children born with congenital anomalies may also have a special subset of needs. This article is a brief review of oral and maxillofacial surgery on the pediatric population.

  6. Pediatric robotic urologic surgery-2014

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    James T Kearns

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We seek to provide a background of the current state of pediatric urologic surgery including a brief history, procedural outcomes, cost considerations, future directions, and the state of robotic surgery in India. Pediatric robotic urology has been shown to be safe and effective in cases ranging from pyeloplasty to bladder augmentation with continent urinary diversion. Complication rates are in line with other methods of performing the same procedures. The cost of robotic surgery continues to decrease, but setting up pediatric robotic urology programs can be costly in terms of both monetary investment and the training of robotic surgeons. The future directions of robot surgery include instrument and system refinements, augmented reality and haptics, and telesurgery. Given the large number of children in India, there is huge potential for growth of pediatric robotic urology in India. Pediatric robotic urologic surgery has been established as safe and effective, and it will be an important tool in the future of pediatric urologic surgery worldwide.

  7. Value of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery.

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    Kocher, Mininder S

    2015-01-01

    Value has become the buzzword of contemporaneous health care reform. Value is defined as outcomes relative to costs. Orthopaedic surgery has come under increasing scrutiny due to high procedural costs. However, orthopaedic surgery may actually be a great value given the benefits of treatment. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) Value Project team was tasked to develop a model for assessing the benefits of orthopaedic surgery including indirect costs related to productivity and health-related quality of life. This model was applied to 5 orthopaedic conditions demonstrating robust societal and economic value. In all cost-effectiveness models, younger patients demonstrated greater cost-effectiveness given increased lifespan and productivity. This has tremendous implications within the field of pediatric orthopedic surgery. Pediatric orthopaedics may be the best value in medicine!

  8. Kerala Pioneering Pediatric Surgery in India

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    TP Joseph

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric surgeons of Kerala are very proud to have led the development of superspeciality in any branch of medicine in Kerala and also superspeciality of Pediatric surgery in whole of India. Late Prof. Raman Nair returned in 1954 after training under Dr. Everett Koop in US. Same year, in his far-sighted vision for future development of the speciality, he moved to SATH, Medical College, Trivandrum and started Pediatric surgery as a speciality attached to Paediatrics department; this was the beginning of Pediatric surgery in India. He opted for Pediatric surgery as a full time job and did not do any general surgery work in adults. He was the first full time Pediatric surgeon of India; during the next few years, 2 surgeons, one in Calcutta, Prof. UC Chakraboty and Prof. D Anjaneyulu in Hyderabad started working as full time Pediatric surgeons. In Mumbai, Delhi and Chennai, Pediatric surgery developed much later and then all over the country.

  9. Complications in pediatric hepatobiliary surgery.

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    Grisotti, Gabriella; Cowles, Robert A

    2016-12-01

    This review highlights the complications and their risk factors encountered in pediatric hepatobiliary surgery, specifically in the context of pediatric hepatic resection, excision of choledochal cyst, and the Kasai hepatoportoenterostomy procedure for biliary atresia as well as other procedures potentially affecting the biliary tree. With the understanding that these are relatively rare procedures, case reports and small case series are included in addition to larger series when available. The review focuses on publications in English over the past 15 years. Complications included both surgery-specific pathology, such as biliary stricture after excision of choledochal cyst, and disease-specific entities, such as malnutrition in biliary atresia. This review may be useful when considering a particular procedure or in the discussion thereof with a patient and family. Additionally, it illuminates the need for additional work with larger patient databases to refine and expand our knowledge of these complications and precipitating risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Innovations in pediatric cataract surgery

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    Sudarshan Kumar Khokhar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in technology have made surgery in children safer and faster. The management of pediatric cataract has made rapid progress in the past decade with the availability of safer anesthesia, newer technique's, more predictable intraocular lens (IOL power calculation, a better understanding of neurobiology, genetics, amblyopia management, improved IOL designs for preventing visual axis opacification, and adjuvant postoperative care. Modern vitrectomy machines with minimally invasive instruments, radiofrequency, diathermy, and plasma blades help immensely in complicated cases. Preoperative evaluation with ultrasound biomicroscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT allows better planning of surgical procedure. The future holds good for stem cell research, customized OCT, and Zepto (precision pulse capsulotomy.

  11. Innovations in pediatric cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Sudarshan Kumar; Pillay, Ganesh; Agarwal, Esha; Mahabir, Manish

    2017-03-01

    Advances in technology have made surgery in children safer and faster. The management of pediatric cataract has made rapid progress in the past decade with the availability of safer anesthesia, newer technique's, more predictable intraocular lens (IOL) power calculation, a better understanding of neurobiology, genetics, amblyopia management, improved IOL designs for preventing visual axis opacification, and adjuvant postoperative care. Modern vitrectomy machines with minimally invasive instruments, radiofrequency, diathermy, and plasma blades help immensely in complicated cases. Preoperative evaluation with ultrasound biomicroscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows better planning of surgical procedure. The future holds good for stem cell research, customized OCT, and Zepto (precision pulse capsulotomy).

  12. Innovations in pediatric cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Sudarshan Kumar; Pillay, Ganesh; Agarwal, Esha; Mahabir, Manish

    2017-01-01

    Advances in technology have made surgery in children safer and faster. The management of pediatric cataract has made rapid progress in the past decade with the availability of safer anesthesia, newer technique's, more predictable intraocular lens (IOL) power calculation, a better understanding of neurobiology, genetics, amblyopia management, improved IOL designs for preventing visual axis opacification, and adjuvant postoperative care. Modern vitrectomy machines with minimally invasive instruments, radiofrequency, diathermy, and plasma blades help immensely in complicated cases. Preoperative evaluation with ultrasound biomicroscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows better planning of surgical procedure. The future holds good for stem cell research, customized OCT, and Zepto (precision pulse capsulotomy). PMID:28440249

  13. Complications in common general pediatric surgery procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnaus, Maria E; Ostlie, Daniel J

    2016-12-01

    Complications related to general pediatric surgery procedures are a major concern for pediatric surgeons and their patients. Although infrequent, when they occur the consequences can lead to significant morbidity and psychosocial stress. The purpose of this article is to discuss the common complications encountered during several common pediatric general surgery procedures including inguinal hernia repair (open and laparoscopic), umbilical hernia repair, laparoscopic pyloromyotomy, and laparoscopic appendectomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Introduction-Pediatric epilepsy surgery techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydenhag, Bertil; Cukiert, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    This supplement includes the proceedings from the Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery Techniques Meeting held in Gothenburg (July 4-5, 2014), which focused on presentations and discussions regarding specific surgical technical issues in pediatric epilepsy surgery. Pediatric epilepsy neurosurgeons from all over the world were present and active in very fruitful and live presentations and discussions. These articles represent a synopsis of the areas and subjects dealt with there. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. [The history of pediatric plastic surgery].

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    Glicenstein, J

    2016-10-01

    The history of pediatric plastic surgery is linked to that of paediatrics. Until the early 19th century, there was no children's hospital. Only some operations were performed before the discovery of anesthesia, aseptic and antisepsis: cleft lip repair, amputation for polydactyly. Many operations were described in the 19th century for cleft lip and palate repair, hypospadias, syndactylies. The first operation for protruding ears was performed in 1881. Pediatric plastic surgery is diversified in the 2nd half of the 20th century: cleft lip and palate, burns, craniofacial surgery, hand surgery become separate parts of the speciality.

  16. Perioperatory antibiotic prophylaxis in Pediatric Surgery (Part I: abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Luis González López

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The surgical wound infection is the biggest cause of infectious morbility in surgical patients. It is an important cause of morbility that causes lincreased hospital demurrages, increased cost of medical attention and serious inconveniences to the patients and their familiies. 25% of all nosocomial infections are surgical wound infection. One of the big advances of the surgery in the last three decades is an introduction of antibiotic prophylaxis in the surgical practice. Is considered that it has saved more lives than any other novel procedure in surgery in the last 20 years. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Antibiotic prophylaxis in abdominal surgery, approved by consensus in the 1st National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Cienfuegos, Cuba, March 7 – 9, 2002.

  17. Evidence-based practice in pediatric surgery.

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    Hardin, W D; Stylianos, S; Lally, K P

    1999-05-01

    The current medical environment demands the provision of quality healthcare at an affordable cost. Both payors and regulators are committed to lowering cost through initiation of best practice strategies that include practice guidelines, clinical pathways, and standards of care. The only practical way to join this debate is through the use of objective, unbiased clinical data. This study was undertaken to review the current state of the pediatric surgery literature and its value in determining best clinical practice. The National Library of Medicine Medline database was accessed using the Ovid Internet client software. All references, abstracts, and keyword indexes from the core pediatric surgery literature, the Journal of Pediatric Surgery, the European Journal of Pediatric Surgery, Pediatric Surgery International, Zeitschrift fur Kinderchirurgie, and Seminars in Pediatric Surgery were downloaded and reviewed. Search criteria were defined to identify prospective, randomized, controlled studies. References were then categorized as case reports; retrospective case series; prospective case series; randomized, controlled studies; laboratory studies; review articles; or miscellaneous studies. As of March 1, 1998, there are 9,373 references, excluding citations of letters or comments, contained in the core pediatric surgery literature, as provided through Medline. Of these, 485 were identified as studies for review, possible prospective case series or prospective, randomized, controlled studies. After review, 34 studies (0.3%) were classified as prospective, randomized, controlled studies, whereas 139 (1.48%) were classified as prospective studies. There were 3,241 (34.6%) case reports, 5,619 (59.9%) retrospective case series, 1,109 (11.8%) laboratory studies, 195 (2.1%) review articles, and 36 (0.3%) miscellaneous studies that did not fit into other categories. When analyzed by decade of publication, prospective studies and prospective, randomized, controlled studies

  18. Robotics in pediatric surgery: perspectives for imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kant, Adrien J.; Klein, Michael D. [Stuart Frankel Foundation Computer-Assisted Robot-Enhanced Surgery Program, Children' s Research Center of Michigan, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Langenburg, Scott E. [Stuart Frankel Foundation Computer-Assisted Robot-Enhanced Surgery Program, Children' s Research Center of Michigan, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Pediatric Surgery, Children' s Hospital of Michigan, 3901 Beaubien, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Robotic surgery will give surgeons the ability to perform essentially tremorless microsurgery in tiny spaces with delicate precision and may enable procedures never before possible on children, neonates, and fetuses. Collaboration with radiologists, engineers, and other scientists will permit refinement of image-guided technologies and allow the realization of truly remarkable concepts in minimally invasive surgery. While robotic surgery is now in clinical use in several surgical specialties (heart bypass, prostate removal, and various gastrointestinal procedures), the greatest promise of robotics lies in pediatric surgery. We will briefly review the history and background of robotic technology in surgery, discuss its present benefits and uses and those being explored, and speculate on the future, with attention to the current and potential involvement of imaging modalities and the role of image guidance. (orig.)

  19. The history of pediatric surgery in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévot, J

    1986-01-01

    In 1741, Nicolas Andry, counsellor of King Louis XV, published a book about "orthopedics," inventing this word. The book is interesting as the author refers to beliefs and habits of the time. In 1864, Guersant published Notes About Pediatric Surgery, a real textbook which was translated into English and German and dealt with the importance of children's psychological training, anesthesia, and water or mother's milk after the operation, and also described tracheotomy, draining of cervical adenitis, and lithotrity. The classification of bone affections was still very confused. Tuberculosis and syphilis have an important place; hypospadias is not treated by surgery. In 1905, Froehlich published Pediatric Surgery Studies dealing exclusively with visceral surgery and demonstrating progress compared to Guersant's study. In 1906, Kirmisson published Pediatric Surgical Textbook, containing the first discussion of radiology and the description of the pathology of the omphalomesenteric duct and of other congenital malformations. Osteomyelitis was given its proper name, and cervical fistulas were explained. In 1914, A. Broca achieved further progress describing treatments of megacolon, intussusception, and the operation of Fredet Ramstedt. The book by Ombredanne, already out of date at the time of its publication, showed that he was not aware of the wartime, progress achieved by Ladd and Gross in the USA. French publications have diminished since then, and French pediatric surgery is still trying to find a precise identity.

  20. [One stop surgery in pediatric surgery. Preliminary report].

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    Sanges, G; Astuto, M; Sentina, P; Morinello, E; Di Benedetto, A

    2002-01-01

    The One-Stop Surgery (OSS) is a new method of Day Surgery, which combines preoperative evaluation and subsequent operation into one visit. This report describes the initial experience of the authors. Referring physicians were informed by fax about method and selected surgical procedures. Included form helped them to gain anamnestic data and to inform parents about preoperative fast. Form was then sent back by fax to the pediatric surgeon and anesthesiologist who determined the patient suitability and scheduled the day of the surgery. At hospital admission, if the diagnosis was confirmed and no anesthesiologic contraindications were discovered, the patient underwent the prescheduled surgical procedure and was discharged as a day case. Another form containing informations about home postoperative care and telephone numbers for emergency call was gave to the parents. From November 2000 through February 2001 43 patients, aged from 2 to 7 years, underwent one-stop surgical procedure: central venous catheter removal (n = 16), umbilical (n = 2) and inguinal (n = 10) hernia repair, prepuce dorsal slit (n = 15). Recovery of all patient was uneventful. None of them called during the period considered necessary for postoperative follow-up. Decreased costs and increased satisfaction of the patients and parents are the most important advantages of the OSS. Potential disadvantages are a not appropriate indication for the planned procedure and/or an anesthesiologic contraindication at hospital admission. It could involve a waste of human and financial resources and an useless psychologic stress for the family. Authors conclude it is not advisable the OSS use on a large scale without a sound experience in pediatric Day Surgery.

  1. Fragmented international volunteerism: need for a global pediatric surgery network.

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    Butler, Marilyn W

    2010-02-01

    Pediatric general surgeons volunteering internationally often work independently, some without prior assessment of the needs of those they wish to assist. Consequently, care may be inefficient, duplicated, or misdirected. A study was performed to assess whether a network for pediatric surgery volunteer work exists. A search of the Internet was performed to determine whether a pediatric surgery network exists. Worldwide pediatric surgery societies were identified and grouped by country according to income. Web sites for medical volunteer organizations were examined for links to a network of pediatric surgery volunteer work. A search of the Internet revealed no pediatric surgery volunteer network. Ninety-seven pediatric surgery societies were identified. Fifty-one of the organizations were identified as residing in low- and middle-income countries. Searching 50 Web sites for these societies revealed no existing pediatric surgery network. Of 45 Web sites for volunteer medical work, 1 surgery networking Web site was identified. Only 4 pediatric general surgery international volunteer opportunities were cited on that Web site. This study demonstrated that no pediatric surgery volunteer network exists. By identifying pediatric surgery organizations in low- and middle-income countries, it is speculated that one might link the surgeons in these regions with those wishing to volunteer their services. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of implementation of a pediatric surgery fellowship on general surgery resident operative volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Rebecca A; Phillips, Sharon E; Terhune, Kyla P

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of the initiation of a pediatric surgery fellowship on general surgery resident operative volume at 1 major academic institution. Retrospective review of operative records obtained from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) general surgery resident and pediatric surgery fellow case logs. Data collected included number and type of pediatric index cases per year, number of total pediatric surgery cases per year, and number of total cases logged as primary surgeon to date. Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Department of Surgery, which has an accredited general surgery program, finishes 7 chief residents per year during the study period, and instituted a new pediatric surgery fellowship in 2007. Case logs submitted by third and fourth year general surgery residents and first and second year pediatric surgery fellows were studied. The number of pediatric attending surgeons, relative value units (RVUs), and hospital admissions increased from 2003 to 2011. The median number of pediatric index cases performed by a resident decreased after the onset of fellowship from 34 cases to 23.5 cases per year (p pediatric surgery rotation also decreased from 74 to 53 cases per year after onset of the fellowship (p surgery resident index and overall case volume in pediatric surgery. Although operative volume is only 1 measure of surgical educational value, these findings suggest that the addition of surgical fellowships affects the educational experience of general surgery residents. We recommend that residency programs establish goals and calculate any potential impact on general surgery resident case volume before initiating a new surgical fellowship. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pediatric cerebral sinovenous thrombosis following cranial surgery.

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    Petrov, Dmitriy; Uohara, Michael Y; Ichord, Rebecca; Ali, Zarina; Jastrzab, Laura; Lang, Shih-Shan; Billinghurst, Lori

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) is an important, though less common subtype of pediatric stroke. It has been linked to several risk factors, including cranial procedures, with few studies highlighting this relationship. The aim of this study was to characterize the diagnosis and treatment of CSVT after cranial surgery. An institutional pediatric stroke research database was used to identify all CSVT cases diagnosed within 30 days of cranial surgery from November 2004 to December 2014. Thirteen subjects were retrospectively analyzed for clinical presentation, surgical details, radiographic characteristics, laboratory study results, treatment, and outcome. Diagnostic testing and treatment adhered to a consensus-based institutional stroke protocol. Cranial vault reconstruction, subdural empyema evacuation, and tumor resection were each observed in three subjects. Eleven (85%) subjects had sinus exposure during surgery, and eight (73%) developed thrombus in a sinus within or adjacent to the operative field. Two (15%) had documented iatrogenic sinus injury. On post-operative testing, ten (77%) subjects had prothrombotic abnormalities. Seven (54%) were treated with anti-coagulation therapy (ACT) starting on a median of post-operative day (POD) 3 (IQR 1-3) for a median of 2.9 months (IQR 2.4-5.4). Median time to imaging evidence of partial or complete recanalization was 2.4 months (IQR 0.7-5.1). No symptomatic hemorrhagic complications were encountered. Pediatric CSVT may be encountered after cranial surgery, and decisions related to anti-coagulation are challenging. The risk of CSVT should be considered in pre-surgical planning and post-operative evaluation of cases with known risk factors. In our study, judicious use of ACT was safe in the post-operative period.

  4. Revascularization and pediatric aneurysm surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalani, M Yashar S; Elhadi, Ali M; Ramey, Wyatt; Nakaji, Peter; Albuquerque, Felipe C; McDougall, Cameron G; Zabramski, Joseph M; Spetzler, Robert F

    2014-06-01

    Aneurysms are relatively rare in the pediatric population and tend to include a greater proportion of large and giant lesions. A subset of these large and giant aneurysms are not amenable to direct surgical clipping and require complex treatment strategies and revascularization techniques. There are limited data available on the management of these lesions in the pediatric population. This study was undertaken to evaluate the outcome of treatment of large and giant aneurysms that required microsurgical revascularization and vessel sacrifice in this population. The authors retrospectively identified all cases in which pediatric patients (age aneurysms were treated using cerebral revascularization in combination with other treatment modalities at their institution between 1989 and 2013. The authors identified 27 consecutive patients (19 male and 8 female) with 29 aneurysms. The mean age of the patients at the time of treatment was 11.5 years (median 13 years, range 1-17 years). Five patients presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage, 11 with symptoms related to mass effect, 2 with stroke, and 3 with seizures; in 6 cases, the aneurysms were incidental findings. Aneurysms were located along the internal carotid artery (n = 7), posterior cerebral artery (PCA) (n = 2), anterior cerebral artery (n = 2), middle cerebral artery (MCA) (n = 14), basilar artery (n = 2), vertebral artery (n = 1), and at the vertebrobasilar junction (n = 1). Thirteen were giant aneurysms (45%). The majority of the aneurysms were fusiform (n = 19, 66%), followed by saccular (n = 10, 34%). Three cases were previously treated using microsurgery (n = 2) or an endovascular procedure (n = 1). A total of 28 revascularization procedures were performed, including superficial temporal artery (STA) to MCA (n = 6), STA to PCA (n = 1), occipital artery to PCA (n = 1), extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass using radial artery graft (n = 3), EC-IC using a saphenous vein graft (n = 7), STA onlay (n = 3), end

  5. Laser applications in pediatric airway surgery

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    Karamzadeh, Amir M.; Ahuja, Gurpreet S.; Nguyen, John D.; Crumley, Roger

    2003-06-01

    The smaller anatomy and limited access to instrumentation pose a challenge to the pediatric airway surgeon. The enhanced precision and ability to photocoagulate tissue while operating with the laser enhances the surgeon"s ability to successfully treat unique pediatric conditions such subglottic hemangiomas, congenital cysts, respiratory papillomatosis, and laryngeal or tracheal stenosis. Due to its shallow tissue penetration and thermal effect, the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is generally considered the laser of choice for pediatric airway applications. The potential for increased scarring and damage to underlying tissue caused by the greater penetration depth and thermal effect of the Nd:YAG and KTP lasers preclude their use in this population. In this review, we will describe the specific advantages of using lasers in airway surgery, the current technology and where the current technology is deficient.

  6. Emerging ethical issues in pediatric surgery.

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    Nwomeh, Benedict C; Caniano, Donna A

    2011-06-01

    With the rapid pace of technological advancement and changing political, social, and legal attitudes, physicians face new ethical dilemmas. For pediatric surgeons, these emerging issues affect our relationship with, and the care we provide, to our patients and their families. In this review, we explore issues related to professionalism in pediatric surgery practice, the value of apology, and the risks associated with sleep deprivation. Furthermore, we discuss how the imperative of patient safety presents an opportunity for specialty-driven effort to define standards for the surgical care of children and a responsible process for introducing surgical innovations. Finally, we remind pediatric surgeons of their ethical and professional duty to support clinical research, and advocate the acceptance of community equipoise as sufficient basis for enrolling children in clinical trials.

  7. Minimally invasive pediatric surgery: Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Departmental survey of the pediatric laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures. Materials and Methods: It is a retrospective study from January 1999 to December 2007. The various types of surgeries, number of patients, complications and conversions of laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures were analyzed. Results: The number of minimally invasive procedures that had been performed over the past 9 years is 734, out of which thoracoscopic procedures alone were 48. The majority of the surgeries were appendicectomy (31%, orchiopexy (19% and diagnostic laparoscopy (16%. The other advanced procedures include laparoscopic-assisted anorectoplasty, surgery for Hirschprung′s disease, thoracosocpic decortication, congenital diaphragmatic hernia repair, nephrectomy, fundoplication, etc. Our complications are postoperative fever, bleeding, bile leak following choledochal cyst excision and pneumothorax following bronchogenic cyst excision. A case of empyema thorax following thoracoscopic decortication succumbed due to disseminated tuberculosis. Our conversion rate was around 5% in the years 1999 to 2001, which has come down to 3% over the past few years. Conversions were for sliding hiatus hernia, nephrectomy, perforated adherent appendicitis, Meckel′s diverticulum, thoracoscopic decortication and ileal perforation. Conclusion: The minimally invasive pediatric surgical technique is increasingly accepted world wide and the need for laparoscopic training has become essential in every teaching hospital. It has a lot of advantages, such as less pain, early return to school and scarlessness. Our conversion rate has come down from 5% to 3% with experience and now we do more advanced procedures with a lower complication rate.

  8. Regionalization of Pediatric Surgery: Trends Already Underway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Jose H; Goldstein, Seth D; Yang, Jingyan; Gause, Colin; Swarup, Abhishek; Hsiung, Grace E; Rangel, Shawn J; Goldin, Adam B; Abdullah, Fizan

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to characterize the delivery of pediatric surgical care based on hospital volume stratified by disease severity, geography, and specialty. Longitudinal regionalization over the 10-year study period is noted and further explored. The Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) was queried from 2000 to 2009 for patients surgery. Hospitals nationwide were grouped into commutable regions and identified as high-volume centers (HVCs) if they had more than 1000 weighted procedures per year. Regions that had at least one HVC and one or more additional lower volume center were included for analysis. Low-risk, high-risk neonatal, and surgical subspecialties were analyzed separately. A total of 385,242 weighted pediatric surgical admissions in 33 geographical regions and 224 hospitals were analyzed. Overall, HVCs comprised 33 (14.7%) hospitals, medium-volume center (MVC) 33 (14.7%), and low-volume center (LVC) 158 (70.5%). The four low-risk procedures analyzed were increasingly regionalized: appendectomy (52% in HVCs in 2000 to 60% in 2009, P surgery showed significant regionalization trends for tracheoesophageal fistula (66% to 87%, P pediatric surgical care has transitioned to HVCs over a recent decade, particularly for low-risk patients. It is important for practitioners and policymakers alike to understand such volume trends in order to ensure hospital capacity while maintaining an optimal quality of care.

  9. Training general surgery residents in pediatric surgery: educational value vs time and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Steven L; Sydorak, Roman M; Applebaum, Harry

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the educational value of pediatric surgery rotations, the likelihood of performing pediatric operations upon completing general surgery (GS) residency, and time and cost of training GS residents in pediatric surgery. A survey was administered to GS residents that evaluated the pediatric surgery rotation and anticipated practice intentions. A retrospective analysis (2005-2006) of operative times for unilateral inguinal hernia repair, bilateral inguinal hernia repair, and umbilical hernia repair was also performed. Procedure times were compared for operations performed by a pediatric surgeon with and without GS residents. Cost analysis was based on time differences. General surgery residents (n = 19) considered the pediatric surgery rotation to have high educational value (4.7 +/- 0.6 of 5) with extensive teaching (4.6 +/- 0.7) and operative experience (4.4 +/- 0.8). Residents listed pediatric surgery exposure, operative technique, and observed work ethic as most valuable. Upon graduation, residents expect to perform pediatric operations 2 to 3 times annually. Thirty-seven percent of residents felt competent to perform appendectomy (patients >5 years), 32% appendectomy (3-5 years), 21% gastrostomy (>1 year), and 11% inguinal herniorrhaphy (>1 year). Operative times and costs were significantly higher in operative procedures performed with a GS resident. General surgery residents considered pediatric surgery as a valuable educational experience. Residents anticipate performing pediatric operations a few times annually. Training GS residents in pediatric surgery increased operative time and cost. This information may be useful in determining the appropriate setting for resident education as well as budget planning for pediatric surgical practices.

  10. [Modern inhalational anesthesia in pediatric maxillofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonin, D V; Afonina, N V; Marusev, D L; Petrova, L L

    2007-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of sevoflurane and isoflurane in elective pediatric maxillofacial surgery. Having outlined the major features of anesthesia in this category of patients, the authors emphasize the application of the conception of the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) and its derivatives (MAC bar and MAC awake) reflecting the analgesic and hypnotic power of an inhalational anesthetic, respectively, and theoretically substantiate the use of certain anesthetic concentrations at particular stages of surgery. The technique described in the paper was used in 82 patients aged 1.5 months to 18 years, undergoing cleft lip and cleft palate repair, residual lip and nose deformation repair, and other elective maxillofacial procedures. The interventions lasted 40 minutes to 8 hours. Sevoflurane was commonly used as an induction agent while isoflurane was applied to maintain anesthesia. The anesthetics were administered at 1 to 1.3 and 0.8 MAC at traumatic and low traumatic stages of surgery, respectively. During the first traumatic period, the dose of fentanyl was not greater than 1.5 and 2.5 microg/kg in old and young children, respectively. Hemodynamics was characterized by moderate controlled hypotension with an average decrease in mean blood pressure by 30% of the age-related value. Emergence occurred 5-15 min after an anesthetic was discontinued. By and large, the technique demonstrated its efficiency and safety in this group of patients.

  11. Analgesia and sedation after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Andrew R; Jackman, Lara

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, the importance of appropriate intra-operative anesthesia and analgesia during cardiac surgery has become recognized as a factor in postoperative recovery. This includes the early perioperative management of the neonate undergoing radical surgery and more recently the care surrounding fast-track and ultra fast-track surgery. However, outside these areas, relatively little attention has focused on postoperative sedation and analgesia within the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). This reflects perceived priorities of the primary disease process over the supporting structure of PICU, with a generic approach to sedation and analgesia that can result in additional morbidities and delayed recovery. Management of the marginal patient requires optimisation of not only cardiac and other attendant pathophysiology, but also every aspect of supportive care. Individualized sedation and analgesia strategies, starting in the operating theater and continuing through to hospital discharge, need to be regarded as an important aspect of perioperative care, to speed the process of recovery. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Minimal invasive surgery in pediatric solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kin Wai; Lee, K H; Tam, Y H; Yeung, C K

    2007-12-01

    There is only limited experience of using the minimally invasive surgery (MIS) technique in resecting pediatric solid tumors. In this paper, we report our experience of using the MIS technique in the management of pediatric solid tumors. A retrospective review was undertaken on all children who had undergone MIS for their solid tumors between 1995 and 2005. Over a 10-year period, there were 38 patients who had undergone MIS for tumor resection. The mean age at the time of surgery was 7.5 years (range, 1 day to 15 years). There were 22 ovarian tumors, 4 sacrococcygeal tumors, 3 adrenal tumors, 3 retroperitoneal tumors, 1 kidney tumor, 1 liver mass, 1 intra-abdominal testicular tumor, and 3 intrathoracic masses. Thirty of 38 patients had undergone a successful resection using the MIS technique (78.9%). Eight patients required a conversion to the open procedure because of limited intraperitoneal space in 7 and excessive bleeding in 1. Of the 28 successfully MIS-resected intra-abdominal tumors, 18 required enlargement of the umbilical incision and 5 required an additional Pfannenstiel incision for tumor retrieval. Enlargement of the thoracic port site for specimen retrieval was required in the 2 successfully MIS-resected intrathoracic masses. The mean operation time was 171 minutes (range, 45-275). There was no postoperative complication encountered. On an average follow-up of 3.1 years, there was no recurrence observed, even in the 7 patients with malignant tumors, and all patients with successful MIS tumor excision had good cosmetic results. With the advance of laparoscopic instruments and techniques, a variety of pediatric solid tumors can be resected safely by the MIS technique. This has the potential benefit of a more rapid postoperative recovery and better cosmetic results. The role of the MIS technique in resecting malignant tumors is uncertain, as the number of cases in the current series is too small to draw any conclusion.

  13. Risk of Retinal Detachment After Pediatric Cataract Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haargaard, Birgitte; Andersen, Elisabeth W; Oudin, Anna;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the long-term risk of retinal detachment following pediatric cataract surgery and to identify risk factors for retinal detachment. METHODS: We included all children (aged 0 to 17 years) who during the time period of 1977 to 2005 underwent pediatric cataract surgery in Denmark...... was based on medical chart review. RESULTS: Among 1043 eyes of 656 children undergoing surgery for pediatric cataract, 25 eyes (23 children) developed retinal detachment at a median time of 9.1 years after surgery. The overall 20-year risk of retinal detachment was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3...... (16% [95% CI: 6%-24%]). CONCLUSIONS: The estimated overall risk of retinal detachment 20 years after pediatric cataract surgery was 7%, but only 3% for isolated cataract. Particularly high risks of retinal detachment after cataract surgery were associated with mental retardation and having other...

  14. Blood glucose concentration in pediatric outpatient surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somboonviboon, W; Kijmahatrakul, W

    1996-04-01

    Blood glucose concentration was measured in 84 pediatric patients who were scheduled for outpatient surgery at Chulalongkorn Hospital. They were allocated into 3 groups according to their ages, group 1:less than 1 year of age, group 2:1 to 5 years of age and group 3:over 5 years. The fasting times were approximately 8-12 hours. All patients received standard general anesthesia under mask. No glucose solution was given during operation. Preoperative mean blood glucose were 91.09 +/- 17.34, 89.55 +/- 18.69 and 82.14 +/- 16.14 mg/dl in group 1, 2 and 3 while the postoperative mean glucose values were 129.07 +/- 37.90, 115.62 +/- 29.63 and 111.53 +/- 23.07 mg/dl respectively. The difference between pre- and post-operative values were statistically significant difference (P postoperative glucose values may be due to stress response from surgery and anesthesia. We would suggest that the parents give the fluid to their children according to our instructions in order to prevent dehydration and hypoglycemia especially in small infants.

  15. Ghost publications in the pediatric surgery match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasior, Alessandra C; Knott, E Marty; Fike, Frankie B; Moratello, Vincent E; St Peter, Shawn D; Ostlie, Daniel J; Snyder, Charles L

    2013-09-01

    Pediatric surgery fellowship is considered one of the most competitive subspecialties in medicine. With fierce competition increasing the stakes, publications and first authorship are paramount to the success rate of matching. We analyzed Electronic Residency Application Service applications for verification of authorship to determine rate of misrepresentation. After institutional review board approval, the bibliographies of fellowship applications from 2007-2009 were reviewed to allow time for publication. Only peer-reviewed journal articles were evaluated. A Medline search was conducted for the article, by author or by title. If the article could not be found, other authors and journal were used as search parameters. If the article was still not found, the website for the journal was searched for abstract or manuscript. Finally, an experienced medical sciences librarian was consulted for remaining unidentified articles. Differences between misrepresented and accurate applications were analyzed, including: age, gender, medical and undergraduate school parameters, advanced degrees, other fellowships, number of publications, first author publications, American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination scores, and match success. There were 147 applications reviewed. Evidence of misrepresentation was found in 17.6% of the applicants (24/136), with 34 instances in 785 manuscripts (4.3%). Manuscripts classified as published were verified 96.7% of the time, were not found in 1.4%, and had incorrect authors or journal in less than 1% each. "In press" manuscripts were verified 88.3% of the time, 6.4% could not be found, and 4.3% had an incorrect journal listing. Number of publications (P = 0.026) and first author publications (P = 0.037) correlated with misrepresentation. None of the remaining variables was significant. The pediatric surgical pool has a very low incidence of suspicious citations; however, authorship claims should be verified. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc

  16. Pediatric bariatric surgery: the clinical pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Aayed R; Elahmedi, Mohamed O

    2015-05-01

    Despite the rising interest in bariatric surgery (BS) for children and adolescents, algorithms that incorporate BS in weight management (WM) programs are lacking. This study presents the results of the pediatric bariatric surgery clinical pathway employed in our institution. Starting March 2008, we enrolled obese children and adolescents in a standardized multidisciplinary obesity management program. Weight loss, complications, comorbidities, and growth results of those who eventually underwent BS were compared with a matched (age, gender, and height z-score) group of patients on non-surgical WM only. Up to July 2014, a total of 659 patients received care through the pathway, of whom 291 patients underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Mean age and pre-LSG body mass index (BMI) were 14.4 ± 4.0 years (range; 5 to 21 years) and 48.3 ± 10.0 (range; 31.8-109.6). Mean BMI change (% excess weight loss) at 1, 2, 3, and 4 postoperative years was -16.9 ± 4.9 (56.6 ± 22.6), -17.5 ± 5.2 (69.8 ± 22.5), -18.9 ± 4.3 (75.1 ± 26.8), and -19.6 ± 6.4 (73.6 ± 24.3), respectively. Postoperatively, complications occurred in 12 patients (4.1%), with no leaks or mortality, and more than 90% of comorbidities were resolved or improved without recurrence. Additionally, LSG patients exhibited significantly higher postoperative growth velocity compared to WM patients. Applying this standardized clinical pathway with its BS component results in safe and successful weight loss for pediatric patients, with low complication rates, maximum comorbidity resolution, and minimum morbidity.

  17. Robotic surgery may not "make the cut" in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas E. Bruns

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of robotic surgery in children in 2001, it has been employed by select pediatric laparoscopic surgeons but not to the degree of adult surgical specialists. It has been suggested that the technical capabilities of the robot may be ideal for complex pediatric surgical cases that require intricate dissection. However, due to the size constraints of the robot for small pediatric patients, the tight financial margins that pediatric hospitals face, and the lack of high level data displaying patient benefit when compared to conventional laparoscopic surgery, it may be some time before the robotic surgical platform is widely embraced in pediatric surgical practice.

  18. A survey of the pediatric surgery program directors: optimizing resident research to make pediatric surgery training more efficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markel, Troy A; Rescorla, Frederick J

    2015-06-01

    Resident Research (RR) has been a presumed requirement for pediatric surgery fellowship candidates. We hypothesized that: 1) pediatric surgery leaders would no longer feel that RR was necessary for fellowship candidates, 2) the type of study performed would not impact a program's opinion of candidates, and 3) the timing of RR could be altered for those interested in a research career. An anonymous survey was sent to pediatric surgery fellowship program directors (PDs). Sixty-three percent responded, and answers were compared via Chi square analysis with ppediatric surgery fellowship candidates. Seventy-five percent had no preference between one or two years of research (p=0.0005), 79% placed no heavier weight on basic or clinical research (psurgery may not be necessary. Pediatric surgery candidates who partake in RR are not penalized for their choice of study. Increasing efficiency of training is important in today's era of medical training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Venturing into the overlap between pediatric orthopaedics and hand surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozin, Scott H; Zlotolow, Dan A; Ratner, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    There is an overlap between pediatric orthopaedic surgery and hand surgery. A pediatric orthopaedic surgeon is accustomed to the intricacies of the immature skeleton, whereas a hand surgeon is more familiar with the regional anatomy and finer surgical techniques. Many hand diagnoses and surgical techniques are appropriate for the pediatric orthopaedic surgeon, including straightforward duplicated thumb reconstruction of a trigger thumb. Many pediatric diagnoses are more suitable for treatment by a hand surgeon, including simple syndactyly release and complex duplicated thumb reconstruction. Other procedures, such as pollicization, cleft hand reconstruction, synpolydactyly release, and macrodactyly management, require more advanced expertise for successful treatment. It is helpful for pediatric orthopaedic surgeons and hand surgeons to be familiar with the indications, surgical techniques, outcomes, and complications of pediatric hand surgery.

  20. [Pulmonary hypertension in pediatric heart surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, N

    2001-12-01

    Congenital heart disease can increase or decrease pulmonary blood flow, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) or pulmonary artery pressure (PAP). PAP is the product of PVR and pulmonary minute volume (Qp), such that pulmonary hypertension (PHT) may develop as a result of an increase in either PVR or Qp or both. Given that the pulmonary vascular bed is a low pressure system with high flow, any increase in resistance would generate PHT. The normal value of PVR is 2 Woods units (mm Hg/l/min). Increased PAP is due to hypoxic lesions of the endothelium, which release proteolytic enzymes that alter the balance of metabolites of arachidonic acid, regulators of pulmonary vasomotor tone. Hypoxia and acidosis cause intense pulmonary vasoconstriction (hypoxic vasoconstrictor reflex). An increase of PVR is due to a combination of vasoconstrictive processes and remodeling, with hypertrophy of the pulmonary artery. Structural lesions are related to hypertrophy of the endothelium, the transformation of fibroblasts to myocytes and the decrease of the alveolar/arteriolar ratio with the formation of new vessels.PHT may be primary or secondary to another disease. Primary PHT is a rare genetic disease. The most common secondary forms of PHT in pediatrics are due to persistence of neonatal anatomy (neonatal PHT), to heart diseases with left-right shunt (CIV, DAP, etc.), to diseases of the pulmonary parenchyma (interstitial viral infection, mucoviscidosis), and complications of heart surgery. All congenital heart diseases can lead to PHT if not treated promptly. Clinical signs of PHT are highly non-specific: dyspnea, fatigue, syncopes, exercise intolerance, precordialgia, cyanosis and edema. The best approaches to diagnosis and prognosis are echocardiography and cardiac catheterization with vasodilators. Anesthetics that do not alter PVR should be used in such patients, who are sensitive to changes in pulmonary ventilation, to changes in cardiac output and to anesthetics. The treatment of

  1. Pain prevalence and trajectories following pediatric spinal fusion surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sieberg, Christine B; Simons, Laura E.; Edelstein, Mark R.; DeAngelis, Maria R.; Pielech, Melissa; Sethna, Navil; Hresko, M. Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Factors contributing to pain following surgery are poorly understood with previous research largely focused on adults. With approximately 6 million children undergoing surgery each year8, there is a need to study pediatric persistent postsurgical pain. The present study includes patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion surgery enrolled in a prospective, multi-centered registry examining post-surgical outcomes. The Scoliosis Research Society Questionnaire- Version...

  2. Surgical Site Infections Following Pediatric Ambulatory Surgery: An Epidemiologic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Michael L; Jan, Dominique; Nassim, Janelle; Choi, Jaeun; Choi, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify surgical site infection (SSI) rates following pediatric ambulatory surgery, SSI outcomes and risk factors, and sensitivity and specificity of SSI administrative billing codes. DESIGN Retrospective chart review of pediatric ambulatory surgeries with International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for SSI, and a systematic random sampling of 5% of surgeries without SSI ICD-9 codes, all adjudicated for SSI on the basis of an ambulatory-adapted National Healthcare Safety Network definition. SETTING Urban pediatric tertiary care center April 1, 2009-March 31, 2014. METHODS SSI rates and sensitivity and specificity of ICD-9 codes were estimated using sampling design, and risk factors were analyzed in case-rest of cohort, and case-control, designs. RESULTS In 15,448 pediatric ambulatory surgeries, 34 patients had ICD-9 codes for SSI and 25 met the adapted National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. One additional SSI was identified with systematic random sampling. The SSI rate following pediatric ambulatory surgery was 2.9 per 1,000 surgeries (95% CI, 1.2-6.9). Otolaryngology surgeries demonstrated significantly lower SSI rates compared with endocrine (P=.001), integumentary (P=.001), male genital (Psurgeries. Almost half of patients with an SSI were admitted, 88% received antibiotics, and 15% returned to the operating room. No risk factors were associated with SSI. The sensitivity of ICD-9 codes for SSI following ambulatory surgery was 55.31% (95% CI, 12.69%-91.33%) and specificity was 99.94% (99.89%-99.97%). CONCLUSIONS SSI following pediatric ambulatory surgery occurs at an appreciable rate and conveys morbidity on children. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:931-938.

  3. Personality traits within a pediatric surgery fellowship applicant pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazboun, Rajaie; Rodriguez, Samuel; Thirumoorthi, Arul; Baerg, Joanne; Moores, Donald; Tagge, Edward P

    2017-10-01

    The Big Five framework examines five factors that represent a description of human personality. These factors correlate with success measures and job satisfaction. The Big Five Inventory is a 44-item instrument designed to measure the Big Five framework. Our aim was to document the distribution of Big Five personality traits among Pediatric Surgery fellowship applicants, compare with community norms, surgical residents, between genders, and correlate to the fellowship match results. Forty Pediatric Surgery fellowship applicants at a university hospital completed the Big Five Inventory during the interview process. It was analyzed and compared with general surgery residents' results and community norms. The data were compared regarding gender and match results. Continuous variables were compared by unpaired t-tests and Mann-Whitney tests. A P value surgery residents and community norms, applicants of both genders scored higher on agreeableness (P Pediatric Surgery fellowship applicants expressed higher levels of desirable professional traits compared with general surgery residents and community norms. Male applicants demonstrated higher emotional stability than females. Conscientiousness was higher in matching applicants. This first reported experience with personality testing in Pediatric Surgery fellow selection demonstrated potential utility in applicant matching. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pediatric craniofacial surgery: a review for the multidisciplinary team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Peter J; Lampert, Joshua A

    2011-11-01

    Pediatric craniofacial surgery is a specialty that grew dramatically in the 20th century and continues to evolve today. Out of the efforts to correct facial deformities encountered during World War II, the techniques of modern craniofacial surgery developed. An analysis of the relevant literature allowed the authors to explore this historical progression. Current advances in technology, tissue engineering, and molecular biology have further refined pediatric craniofacial surgery. The development of distraction osteogenesis and the progressive study of craniosynostosis provide remarkable examples of this momentum. The growing study of genetics, biotechnology, the influence of growth factors, and stem cell research provide additional avenues of innovation for the future. The following article is intended to reveal a greater understanding of pediatric craniofacial surgery by examining the past, present, and possible future direction. It is intended both for the surgeon, as well as for the nonsurgical individual specialists vital to the multidisciplinary craniofacial team.

  5. Establishing a pediatric robotic surgery program in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bütter, Andreana; Merritt, Neil; Dave, Sumit

    2016-10-26

    Despite the introduction of robotic surgery in 2000, few pediatric surgeons outside the United States have embraced this technology. We discuss our experience with establishing the first Canadian pediatric robotic surgery program. After simulator training, live animal surgery and observation of robotically assisted cases at an outside institution, we performed our first pediatric da Vinci(®) surgery in July 2013. A prospective database was established to assess outcomes. Forty one children have undergone robotically assisted surgery for the following 42 procedures: (a) pyeloplasty (17), (b) ureteral reimplantations (12), (c) uretero-uretostomy (1), (d) cholecystectomies (10), (e) interval appendectomy (1) and (f) distal pancreatectomy (1). The average age was 9.7 years (range 1.6-17.9) and 66% of patients were female. Average operative time was 174 min (range 47-301). Length of stay was 3 days (range 0-20). All procedures were completed without conversion to open or laparoscopy. There were no technical failures. Two post re-implantation patients had urine leaks which required conservative treatment. Despite the lack of haptic feedback, we have noted that the markedly enhanced three-dimensional visualization and instrument dexterity offer significant advantages for complex reconstructive pediatric surgery. This platform may also enable trainees to perform more advanced minimally invasive pediatric surgery. We have successfully established the first pediatric robotic surgery program in Canada. Our da Vinci(®) system is shared with our adult colleagues, which enables more frequent use as well as some cost sharing. A dedicated group of operative nurses and surgeons are required to allow adoption of this new technology.

  6. The use of arthrography in pediatric orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Philip D; Duhn, Ryan

    2014-08-01

    Surgery near pediatric joints can be challenging because it is difficult to visualize vital articular structures. Assessment of underlying pathology is also challenging because the joint structures have not yet ossified. Arthrography is a useful tool that is quick and minimally invasive and allows adequate visualization of joint anatomy during surgery, which aids intraoperative decision making. In pediatric patients, arthrography is most useful for visualization of the elbow, knee, and hip joints. This tool can help the surgeon to refine the diagnosis and management of pediatric fractures and aids in surgical assessment during joint and limb reconstruction. Arthrography adds minimal time to surgery and carries a low risk of complications; it should be part of the armamentarium of any surgeon who treats pediatric orthopaedic patients. Copyright 2014 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  7. Cognitive development and pediatric epilepsy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh George Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with intractable epilepsy are at considerable risk for cognitive impairment, school failure, behaviour and mental health problems and overall compromised quality of life. It influences the development of cognitive functions during the period of brain plasticity. Fifty percent of patients with intractable epilepsy have surgically remediable epilepsy syndromes. Epilepsy surgery can lead to seizure freedom following which development of functions in the residual brain occur which leads to cognitive improvement. Social aspects, side effects of antiepileptics, seizure perception and the overall level of quality of life are found to improve after surgery. The nature of the underlying brain disorder giving rise to the seizures appears to affect outcome. Follow up period is essential to determine effects of cognition after epilepsy surgery. It should be long enough for reconfiguration of the individual, family functioning and for restitution at the level of brain plasticity to occur.

  8. Perception of undergraduate pediatric surgery clerkship in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenze, Sebastian O; Obi, Uchechukwu M

    2014-01-01

    Medical students' perception of their clerkship may influence their choice of ultimate career. In most medical schools, pediatric surgery clerkship (PSC) is not compulsory. This study evaluates the perception of PSC by students and determines the importance of this on the choice of pediatric surgery as a career. We surveyed 2009 and 2010 graduating medical classes of University of Nigeria, Nsukka, using self-administered questionnaires. The clerkship evaluation was assessed using a 3-point scale (1 = poor and 3 = excellent). Students who had PSC were analyzed to compare their rating of pediatric surgery vis-à-vis other clinical clerkships and determine the effect of the clerkship on their ultimate choice of a career. Overall response rate was 70.3% (275/391), and 119 (43.3%) had PSC. For overall quality, PSC rated (2.16) compared with general surgery (2.04), internal medicine (2.11), obstetrics and gynecology (2.13), and pediatrics (2.37). Aspects of PSC that rated poorly include opportunity to participate in direct patient care, feedback on performance during clerkship, ability to manage problem in a general medical setting, and experience in learning history-taking skills and interpretation of laboratory data. Among the students who had PSC, 14 (11.8%) selected pediatric surgery as a specialty choice compared with 13 (8.3%) who did not have PSC (p = 0.457). Of those that had PSC, pediatric surgery was selected as a career by 2 of 19 (10.5%), 6 of 63 (9.5%), and 6 of 37 (16.2%) who rated PSC as poor, just right, and excellent, respectively. The decision to select pediatric surgery was influenced mostly by clerkship experience in 37% (10/27) and personal satisfaction in 40.7% (11/27). Improvement in the quality of PSC may involve more participation of the students in direct patient care (n = 54; 45.4%) and enhancement in student-faculty interaction (n = 31; 26.1%). PSC may have a good rating in our setting. Nonetheless, improving the quality and experience of the

  9. Nurse practitioner role in preparing families for pediatric outpatient surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Ashley M; Johnson, Arlene; Timmons, Shirley; Weatherford, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Due to medical advances in surgery and anesthesia and cost of hospital stays, more elective pediatric surgical procedures are being performed in outpatient settings. One proposed advantage of outpatient surgery is decreased anxiety or a shorter period of anxiety for pediatric patients and their families because they are able to go home shortly after the surgery. A literature review was conducted to describe anxiety experienced by pediatric patients and their families in the outpatient surgery setting and to explore ways to decrease that anxiety. Both children and parents reported not feeling emotionally and educationally prepared for outpatient surgery. Developmentally appropriate pre-surgical educational programs and parental involvement in the surgical experience can help alleviate the anxiety of both children and parents during the pediatric surgical experience. Nurse practitioners (NPs) are currently being used in pre-operative outpatient settings to conduct physical examinations and provide pre-op education. Pre-op education programs provided by NPs are beneficial in decreasing the anxiety state among children and parents prior to surgery.

  10. The current state of evidence-based pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostlie, Daniel J; St Peter, Shawn D

    2010-10-01

    The efficiency of medical care in the United States has become intensely scrutinized with expectations from patients, families, payors, lawmakers, and, currently, the President. The most effective vehicle to bring more efficient care is the employment of evidence-based medicine whenever possible. Evidence-based medicine is dependent on best evidence, and best evidence is generated from prospective trials. To evaluate current state of evidence based practice in pediatric surgery we reviewed the literature for trials conducted in our field the past 10 years. All randomized controlled trials from January 1999 through December 2009 published in the English literature were identified through a literature search using PubMed (www.pubmed.com). We included only those in pediatric general surgery excluding transplant, oncology, and the other nongeneral subspecialties. The search criteria produced 56 manuscripts, of which 51 described appropriate randomization techniques. A definitive trial design with a sample size calculation was utilized in only 19 studies (34%). A statistically significant difference between treatment arms was identified in 29 of the 56 (52%) trials. There were 26 different journals of publication, with the Journal of Pediatric Surgery being most common (20) followed by Pediatric Surgery International (7). The combined total publications from January 1999 through December 2009 for the 26 journals these randomized trials represent 0.04% of all publications. Appendicitis was the most common condition that was studied (n = 10) followed by pyloric stenosis (n = 4). Trials originated in 19 different countries led by the United States (28%), United Kingdom (14%), and Turkey (12%). There was a generally progressive increase in published trials from 1999 to 2009, however, the percentage of prospective articles published in pediatric surgery was similar to a previous review published in 1999. The current state of evidence-based surgery in pediatric surgery has

  11. Retrograde intrarenal surgery in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resorlu, Berkan; Sancak, Eyup Burak; Resorlu, Mustafa; Gulpinar, Murat Tolga; Adam, Gurhan; Akbas, Alpaslan; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-11-01

    Urinary tract stone disease is seen at a level of 1%-2% in childhood (stone disease, particularly in adolescence. A carbohydrate- and salt-heavy diet and a more sedentary lifestyle are implicated in this increase. Although stone disease is rare in childhood, its presence is frequently associated with metabolic or anatomical disorders or infectious conditions, for which reason there is a high possibility of post-therapeutic recurrence. Factors such as a high possibility of recurrence and increasing incidence further enhance the importance of minimally invasive therapeutic options in children, with their expectations of a long life. In children in whom active stone removal is decided on, the way to achieve the highest level of success with the least morbidity is to select the most appropriate treatment modality. Thanks to today's advanced technology, renal stones that were once treated only by surgery can now be treated with minimally invasive techniques, from invasion of the urinary system in an antegrade (percutaneous nephrolithotomy) or retrograde (retrograde intrarenal surgery) manner or shock wave lithotripsy to laparoscopic stone surgery. This compilation study examined studies involving the RIRS procedure, the latest minimally invasive technique, in children and compared the results of those studies with those from other techniques.

  12. Rationale for implementation of warm cardiac surgery in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves eDurandy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery was developed thanks to the introduction of hypothermia and cardiopulmonary bypass in the early 1950s. The deep hypothermia protective effect has been essential to circulatory arrest complex cases repair. During the early times of open-heart surgery, a major concern was to decrease mortality and to improve short-term outcomes. Both mortality and morbidity dramatically decreased over a few decades. As a consequence, the drawbacks of deep hypothermia, with or without circulatory arrest, became more and more apparent. The limitation of hypothermia was particularly evident for the brain and regional perfusion was introduced as a response to this problem. Despite a gain in popularity, the results of regional perfusion were not fully convincing.In the 1990s, warm surgery was introduced in adults and proved to be safe and reliable. This option eliminates the deleterious effect of ischemia reperfusion injuries through a continuous, systemic coronary perfusion with warm oxygenated blood. Intermittent warm blood cardioplegia was introduced later, with impressive results.We were convinced by the easiness, safety and efficiency of warm surgery and shifted to warm pediatric surgery in a two-step program.This article outlines the limitations of hypothermic protection and the basic reasons that led us to implement pediatric warm surgery. After tens of thousands of cases performed across several centers, this reproducible technique proved a valuable alternative to hypothermic surgery.

  13. Perioperatory antibiotic prophylaxis in Pediatric Surgery (Part II: non-abdominal surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Luis González López

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The surgical wound infection is the biggest cause of infectious morbility in surgical patients. It is an important cause of morbility that causes lincreased hospital demurrages, increased cost of medical attention and serious inconveniences to the patients and their familiies. 25% of all nosocomial infections are surgical wound infection. One of the big advances of the surgery in the last three decades is an introduction of antibiotic prophylaxis in the surgical practice. Is considered that it has saved more lives than any other novel procedure in surgery in the last 20 years. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Antibiotic prophylaxis in no-abdominal surgery, approved by consensus in the 1st National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Cienfuegos, Cuba, March 7 – 9, 2002.

  14. [Minimally Invasive Surgery in Pediatric Oncology. Tertiary center experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Chacón Villalba, J; Rodríguez Caraballo, L; Marco Macián, A; Segarra Llido, V; Vila Carbó, J J

    2015-07-20

    To describe our experience using Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) techniques in tertiary center with specific oncological pediatric surgery unit. Retrospective review of patients undergoing MIS techniques in pediatric oncology surgery unit between January 2011 and December 2014. MIS procedures were considered made by both techniques such as laparoscopy and thoracoscopy with both diagnostic and therapeutic intent. 4 procedures were diagnostic and the rest were therapeutic: During the study, 56 procedures were performed by MIS. By type of technique, 13 were thoracoscopic (7 metastasectomies, 6 thoracic masses) and 43 laparoscopic (3 hepatic masses, 3 pancreatic masses 7 abdominal masses, 2 ovarian masses, 2 typhlitis 1 splenic mass and 25 oophorectomy for ovarian cryopreservation). In 5 cases (2 thoracic masses 1 pancreatic mass abdominal masses) conversion to open surgery to complete the procedure (2 for caution in the absence of vascular control bleeding 1 and 2 for lack of space) was necessary. In all cases safety principles of oncological surgery were respected. Providing an adecuate selection of patiens, MIS techniques are safe, reproducible and fulfill the objectives of quality of cancer surgery.

  15. Recent progress of pediatric cardiac surgery in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Kai-hong; L(U) Xiao-dong; LIU Ying-long

    2006-01-01

    @@ Pediatric cardiac surgery in China has made great progress since the first successful open heart operation for correction of ventricular septal defect (VSD) with an artificial heart-lung machine in 1958.1 In recent years, the state has paid much attention to both the basic research and the primary,secondary and tertiary prevention of congenital heart disease.

  16. Utility of onsite interviews in the pediatric surgery match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downard, Cynthia D; Goldin, Adam; Garrison, Michelle M; Waldhausen, John; Langham, Max; Hirschl, Ronald

    2015-06-01

    The value of onsite interviews for the pediatric surgery match remains undefined despite substantial cost to applicants. This study assesses the impact of onsite interviews on the rank order lists submitted to the match by pediatric surgery residency training program directors (PDs). PDs were asked prospectively to evaluate pediatric surgery residency candidates based solely on their ERAS application and generate a "pre-interview rank list." Interviews were then held based on the usual practice of each program. PDs then submitted de-identified pre-interview and final rank lists. The impact of the interview process upon rank list movement of candidates was assessed. Of 44 programs, 16 (36%) provided data for analysis. Onsite interviews resulted in candidates moving a mean of 5.2 ± 1.2 rank positions, whereas candidates ranked in the first 5 positions moved an average of 4 ± 2 places, 81% of the initial top-ranked candidates moved out of this position, and 36% of top 10 candidates moved out of the top 10. Onsite interviews are high-stakes events which substantially affect the final rank order list in the pediatric surgery match. Programs should take these data into account when determining the number of interview invitations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. What Is Refractive Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  18. LASIK - Laser Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  19. Pain prevalence and trajectories following pediatric spinal fusion surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieberg, Christine B; Simons, Laura E; Edelstein, Mark R; DeAngelis, Maria R; Pielech, Melissa; Sethna, Navil; Hresko, M Timothy

    2013-12-01

    Factors contributing to pain following surgery are poorly understood, with previous research largely focused on adults. With approximately 6 million children undergoing surgery each year, there is a need to study pediatric persistent postsurgical pain. The present study includes patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion surgery enrolled in a prospective, multicentered registry examining postsurgical outcomes. The Scoliosis Research Society Questionnaire-Version 30, which includes pain, activity, mental health, and self-image subscales, was administered to 190 patients prior to surgery and at 1 and 2 years postsurgery. A subset (n = 77) completed 5-year postsurgery data. Pain prevalence at each time point and longitudinal trajectories of pain outcomes derived from SAS PROC TRAJ were examined using analyses of variance and post hoc pairwise analyses across groups. Thirty-five percent of patients reported pain in the moderate to severe range presurgery. One year postoperation, 11% reported pain in this range, whereas 15% reported pain at 2 years postsurgery. At 5 years postsurgery, 15% of patients reported pain in the moderate to severe range. Among the 5 empirically derived pain trajectories, there were significant differences on self-image, mental health, and age. Identifying predictors of poor long-term outcomes in children with postsurgical pain may prevent the development of chronic pain into adulthood. This investigation explores the prevalence of pediatric pain following surgery, up to 5 years after spinal fusion surgery. Five pain trajectories were identified and were distinguishable on presurgical characteristics of age, mental health, and self-image. This is the largest study to examine longitudinal pediatric pain trajectories after surgery. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Current problems in training of minimally invasive surgery: vision of residents in pediatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, C; Cano, I; Peláez, D; Fuentes, S; Tardáguila, A R

    2013-01-01

    Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) is getting more and more important in our specialty. However, the formation of the residents on MIS is, in many cases, irregular. The purpose of this study is to assess the state of training in MIS among the residents of Pediatric Surgery and their potential weaknesses. An electronic survey was distributed among 71 residents of Pediatric Surgery from 17 national hospitals. The response rate was 70.2%.100% of the residents are interested in a broadening of training activities in MIS. The main areas of interest are gastrointestinal (92%) and thoracic (47%) surgery. Only 57% have access to training facilities and less than half of them attend to courses and conferences. 80% believe that they are not given adequate attention from specialized associations. 52% think they should do rotations at referral centers, 86% that courses and seminars should be enhanced, and 44% that the responsibility of the resident in surgery should be increased. The main defects encountered in their training are scarce volume of patients, lack of financial support and overcoming the learning curve of surgeons in their services. Despite the advance of the MIS, resident's training in this discipline still has shortcomings, as expressed in their views. Knowledge of the current state of training should be the starting point for designing a training strategy that ensures adequate skills.

  1. Pediatric endoscopic surgery: pride and prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarue, A; Guys, J M; Louis-Borrione, C; Simeoni, J; Esposito, C

    1994-12-01

    82 endoscopic surgical procedures (abdominal: 77; thoracic: 5) were performed by the same surgeon on 75 children aged from 1 month to 17 years (median 8.1 years) during the two-year period from January 1991 to December 1992. Due to the multispecialization of the Children's Hospital, a variety of pathologies were explored or treated with appendectomy accounting for 33% (27/82). There were no perioperative deaths. Three major complications occurred (1 post-appendectomy peritonitis, 1 hemorrhage during splenectomy and 1 post-operative occlusion). 14 patients required conversion to open surgery. Indications for endoscopic exploration of advanced lesions, prospective indications, and policy when confronted with a healthy appendix are discussed.

  2. Tales from previous times: important eponyms in pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Michael; Muensterer, Oliver; Harmon, Carroll M

    2014-01-01

    The use of eponyms in medicine has a long and captivating tradition, which applies to pediatric surgery as well. Unfortunately, even though these eponyms are widely used, oftentimes the fascinating personalities and lives behind these names remain unrecognized or underappreciated, especially among residents, fellows and younger-generation pediatric surgeons. Therefore, in this article, we review 15 names that are frequently used as eponyms in modern pediatric surgery and hereby enlighten the personalities behind them. Given their particular frequency, we choose the following eponyms: Ramstedt pylorotomy, Nissen fundoplication, Murphy's sign and sequence, McBurney's sign and incision, Meckel's diverticulum, Kasai portoenterostomy, Ladd's procedure, Morgagni and Bochdalek hernia, Ravitch operation, Nuss procedure, Hirschsprung disease, Swenson pullthrough, Peña procedure and Wilms tumor. A detailed description of the historical importance of these personalities and their contribution to our field is given. Without the appropriate historical background, it is difficult for the current younger and next generation pediatric surgeons to grasp the full spectrum of the ongoing progress in our field. Therefore, our article conveys not only important insight into the past, but also provides young surgeons with an important historical perspective essential to understand the current and future developments in modern pediatric surgery.

  3. A pilot investigation of a Pediatric Surgery Journal Club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, William Shihao; Puligandla, Pramod; Baird, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The CanMEDS competency "scholar" encompasses the creation, dissemination, application, and translation of medical knowledge. We hypothesize that a structured journal club (JC) for pediatric surgical trainees would meet these objectives in an enjoyable and long-lasting manner. A JC involving two pediatric surgery training programs was created with each session focusing on a specific study design. Pre-tests/post-tests were administered before/after each session with durability of learning assessed during the following session. Metrics analyzed included participant satisfaction and an appraisal of evidence-based medicine (EBM) principals. Test results were analyzed using the paired T-test with pPediatric Surgery Journal Club addresses scholarly training objectives in a highly satisfactory manner and yields durable learning. A web-based curriculum based on this model could serve as an important educational tool for trainees and attending staff alike. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Financing pediatric surgery in low-, and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Grace; Abdullah, Fizan

    2016-02-01

    Congenital anomalies once considered fatal, are now surgically correctable conditions that now allow children to live a normal life. Pediatric surgery, traditionally thought of as a privilege of the rich, as being too expensive and impractical, and which has previously been overlooked and excluded in resource-poor settings, is now being reexamined as a cost-effective strategy to reduce the global burden of disease-particularly in low, and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, to date, global pediatric surgical financing suffers from an alarming paucity of data. To leverage valuable resources and prioritize pediatric surgical services, timely, accurate and detailed global health spending and financing for pediatric surgical care is needed to inform policy making, strategic health-sector budgeting and resource allocation. This discussions aims to characterize and highlight the evidence gaps that currently exist in global financing and funding flow for pediatric surgical care in LMICs. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. First employment characteristics for the 2011 pediatric surgery fellowship graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolar, Charles J H; Aspelund, Gudrun

    2013-01-01

    Information regarding initial employment of graduating pediatric surgery fellows is limited. More complete data could yield benchmarks of initial career environment. An anonymous survey was distributed in 2011 to 41 pediatric surgery graduates from all ACGME training programs interrogating details of initial positions and demographics. Thirty-seven of 41 (90%) fellows responded. Male to female ratio was equal. Graduates carried a median debt of $220,000 (range: $0-$850,000). The majority of fellows were married with children. 70% were university/hospital employees, and 68% were unaware of a business plan. Median starting compensation was $354,500 (range: $140,000-$506,000). Starting salary was greatest for >90% clinical obligation appointments (median $427,500 vs. $310,000; p=0.002), independent of geographic location. Compensation had no relationship to private practice vs. hospital/university/military position, coastal vs. inland location, and practice sites number. Median clinical time was 75% and research time 10%. 49% identified a formal mentor. Graduates covered 1-5 different offices (median 1) and 1-5 surgery sites (median 2). 60% were satisfied with their compensation. Recent pediatric surgery graduates are engaged mainly in clinical care. Research is not incentivized. Compensation is driven by clinical obligations. Graduates have limited knowledge of the business plan supporting their compensation, nature of malpractice coverage, and commitments to resources including research. Graduates have important fiscal and parenting obligations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Risk-reduction surgery in pediatric surgical oncology: A perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, John A; Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Malkan, Alpin D

    2016-04-01

    A small percentage of pediatric solid cancers arise as a result of clearly identified inherited predisposition syndromes and nongenetic lesions. Evidence supports preemptive surgery for children with genetic [multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2), familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome (FAP), hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), and hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) and nongenetic [thyroglossal duct cysts (TGDC), congenital pulmonary airway malformations (CPAM), alimentary tract duplication cysts (ATDC), and congenital choledochal cysts (CCC)] developmental anomalies. Our aim was to explore the utility of risk reduction surgery to treat and prevent cancer in children. A systematic review of the available peer-reviewed literature on PubMed was performed using a PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) search strategy, where possible. Search items included "risk reduction surgery", "hereditary cancer predisposition syndrome", "multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2", "familial adenomatous polyposis", "hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer", "hereditary diffuse gastric cancer", "thyroglossal duct cysts", congenital pulmonary airway malformations", "alimentary tract duplication cysts", "malignant transformation", and "guidelines". We identified 67 articles that met the inclusion criteria describing the indications for prophylactic surgery in surgical oncology. For the genetic predisposition syndromes, 7 studies were related to professional endorsed guidelines, 7 were related to surgery for MEN2, 11 were related to colectomy for FAP, 6 were related to colectomy for HNPCC, and 12 related to gastrectomy for HDGC. Articles for the nongenetic lesions included 5 for techniques related to TGDC resection, 9 for surgery for CPAMs, and 10 for resection of ATDCs. Guidelines and strategies varied significantly especially related to the extent and timing of surgical intervention; the exception was for the timing of

  7. Kidney Outcomes 5 Years After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jason H.; Zappitelli, Michael; Devarajan, Prasad; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather R.; Krawczeski, Catherine; Li, Simon; Garg, Amit X.; Coca, Steve; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Acute kidney injury (AKI) after pediatric cardiac surgery is associated with high short-term morbidity and mortality; however, the long-term kidney outcomes are unclear. OBJECTIVE To assess long-term kidney outcomes after pediatric cardiac surgery and to determine if perioperative AKI is associated with worse long-term kidney outcomes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This prospective multicenter cohort study recruited children between ages 1 month to 18 years who underwent cardiopulmonary bypass for cardiac surgery and survived hospitalization from 3 North American pediatric centers between July 2007 and December 2009. Children were followed up with telephone calls and an in-person visit at 5 years after their surgery. EXPOSURES Acute kidney injury defined as a postoperative serum creatinine rise from preoperative baseline by 50% or 0.3 mg/dL or more during hospitalization for cardiac surgery. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Hypertension (blood pressure ≥95th percentile for height, age, sex, or self-reported hypertension), microalbuminuria (urine albumin to creatinine ratio >30 mg/g), and chronic kidney disease (serum creatinine estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] <90 mL/min/1.73 m2 or microalbuminuria). RESULTS Overall, 131 children (median [interquartile range] age, 7.7 [5.9–9.9] years) participated in the 5-year in-person follow-up visit; 68 children (52%) were male. Fifty-seven of 131 children (44%) had postoperative AKI. At follow-up, 22 children (17%) had hypertension (10 times higher than the published general pediatric population prevalence), while 9 (8%), 13 (13%), and 1 (1%) had microalbuminuria, an eGFR less than 90 mL/min/1.73 m2, and an eGFR less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively. Twenty-one children (18%) had chronic kidney disease. Only 5 children (4%) had been seen by a nephrologist during follow-up. There was no significant difference in renal outcomes between children with and without postoperative AKI. CONCLUSIONS AND

  8. Pediatric minimally invasive surgery in Africa: limitations and current situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveland, Jerome; Numanoglu, Alp; Hay, Sameh Abdel

    2012-05-01

    The second largest and most populous continent, with an exploding pediatric population, Africa has an overwhelming burden on its very limited pediatric surgical services. In an international environment of progressively advancing endoscopic and robotic surgical techniques, the authors focus on the current role of endoscopic surgery on the continent and explore the potential reasons for its delayed acceptance and implementation. They proceed to document the spectrum of what is available and, using their "African experience," expand on financially viable models of further rolling out these techniques, including discussion around suitable training models for surgeons and their teams. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Screening for Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea before Ambulatory Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishman, Stacey L.; Tawfik, Kareem O.; Smith, David F.; Cheung, Kristin; Pringle, Lauren M.; Stephen, Matthew J.; Everett, Tiffany L.; Stierer, Tracey L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The American Society of Anesthesia practice guidelines recommend that pediatric and adult patients who undergo ambulatory surgery be screened for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). With this in mind, our objective was to assess the frequency of screening by anesthesia providers for the signs and symptoms of OSA in children undergoing surgery in an ambulatory setting. Methods: Prospective single-blinded observational study of anesthesia providers' preoperative interview of caregivers of consecutive patients younger than age 18 who were scheduled for ambulatory surgery. Results: One hundred one children (30 females) were identified, with a mean age of 6.9 ± 5.0 years; 54 were classified as white, 33 as black, and 14 as other. Total OSA-18 scores ranged from 18 to 97, with a mean of 33.1 ± 14.8. The mean score for adenotonsillectomy patients was higher than that for children who underwent procedures other than adenotonsillectomy. Thirty-one percent of children were screened for OSA, and snoring was the most common symptom recorded (28%). Patients who were screened for OSA were more likely to have snoring (p Tawfik KO, Smith DF, Cheung K, Pringle LM, Stephen MJ, Everett TL, Stierer TL. Screening for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea before ambulatory surgery. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(7):751–755. PMID:25902820

  10. Ancient Greek terminology in pediatric surgery: about the word meaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soutis, Michael

    2006-07-01

    It is widely accepted that the medical terminology has its roots in ancient Greek and Latin. Greek words have been used not only in the field of medicine but also in every day language for many centuries. The aim of this article is to provide an abbreviated guide to the etymology and the meaning of Greek words used in the medical literature today, emphasizing on the field of pediatric surgery. Thus, the term paediatric is constructed from the words paedion, meaning "child", and iatriki, meaning "medicine", literally, "medicine for children." Surgery, however, is not a Greek word. The corresponding Greek term is chirourgiki, derived from cheir and ergon, that is, "hand and action," meaning the action made by hands. This term is also found in the French and German medical literature as chirourgie and chirurgie, respectively. Some general terms in surgery are also of Greek origin. The word trauma has been transferred into the English literature without modification and comes from the verb diatitreno, meaning to "penetrate." Other such terms include diagnosis, from the verb diagignosko, meaning to "discriminate"; symptom, from the verb sympipto, that is, "to coinside"; and the adjectives clinical and clinic, from the noun klini, meaning "bed." Focusing on special fields of pediatric surgery, the etymology and the meaning of Greek words used in the medical literature will be shown and analyzed.

  11. Intraperitoneal Local Anesthetic in Pediatric Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, James K; Rahiri, Jamie-Lee; Liley, Andrew; Hill, Andrew G

    2016-12-01

    Introduction Systematic reviews report intraperitoneal local anesthetic (IPLA) effective in adults but until now no review has addressed IPLA in children. The objective of this review was to answer the question, does IPLA compared with control reduce pain after pediatric abdominal surgery. Materials and Methods Data sources: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane databases, trials registries, ProQuest, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Open Gray.

  12. [Effectiveness of sub-Tenon's block in pediatric strabismus surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzcu, Kasim; Coskun, Mesut; Tuzcu, Esra Ayhan; Karcioglu, Murat; Davarci, Isil; Hakimoglu, Sedat; Aydın, Suzan; Turhanoglu, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Strabismus surgery is a frequently performed pediatric ocular procedure. A frequently occurring major problem in patients receiving this treatment involves the oculocardiac reflex. This reflex is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative nausea, vomiting, and pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a sub-Tenon's block on the oculocardiac reflex, pain, and postoperative nausea and vomiting. 40 patients aged 5-16 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists status I-II undergoing elective strabismus surgery were included in this study. Patients included were randomly assigned into two groups by using a sealed envelope method. In group 1 (n=20), patients did not receive sub-Tenon's anesthesia. In group 2 (n=20), following intubation, sub-Tenon's anesthesia was performed with the eye undergoing surgery. Atropine use, pain scores, oculocardiac reflex, and postoperative nausea and vomiting incidences were compared between groups. There were no significant differences between groups with regard to oculocardiac reflex and atropine use (p>0.05). Pain scores 30min post-surgery were significantly lower in group 2 than in group 1 (p<0.05). Additional analgesic needed during the postoperative period was significantly lower in group 2 compared to group 1 (p<0.05). In conclusion, we think that a sub-Tenon's block, combined with general anesthesia, is not effective and reliable in decreasing oculocardiac reflex and postoperative nausea and vomiting. However, this method is safe for reducing postoperative pain and decreasing additional analgesia required in pediatric strabismus surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Effectiveness of sub-Tenon's block in pediatric strabismus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzcu, Kasim; Coskun, Mesut; Tuzcu, Esra Ayhan; Karcioglu, Murat; Davarci, Isil; Hakimoglu, Sedat; Aydın, Suzan; Turhanoglu, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Strabismus surgery is a frequently performed pediatric ocular procedure. A frequently occurring major problem in patients receiving this treatment involves the oculocardiac reflex. This reflex is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative nausea, vomiting, and pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a sub-Tenon's block on the oculocardiac reflex, pain, and postoperative nausea and vomiting. Forty patients aged 5-16 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists status I-II undergoing elective strabismus surgery were included in this study. Patients included were randomly assigned into two groups by using a sealed envelope method. In group 1 (n=20), patients did not receive sub-Tenon's anesthesia. In group 2 (n=20), following intubation, sub-Tenon's anesthesia was performed with the eye undergoing surgery. Atropine use, pain scores, oculocardiac reflex, and postoperative nausea and vomiting incidences were compared between groups. There were no significant differences between groups with regard to oculocardiac reflex and atropine use (p>0.05). Pain scores 30min post-surgery were significantly lower in group 2 than in group 1 (p<0.05). Additional analgesic needed during the postoperative period was significantly lower in group 2 compared to group 1 (p<0.05). In conclusion, we think that a sub-Tenon's block, combined with general anesthesia, is not effective and reliable in decreasing oculocardiac reflex and postoperative nausea and vomiting. However, this method is safe for reducing postoperative pain and decreasing additional analgesia required in pediatric strabismus surgery. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. The Hispanic Clinic for Pediatric Surgery: A model to improve parent-provider communication for Hispanic pediatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Joshua; Snyder, Elizabeth; Dunlap, Jonathan L; Wright, Robert; Mendoza, Fernando; Bruzoni, Matias

    2016-04-01

    26 million Americans have limited English proficiency (LEP). It is well established that language barriers adversely affect health and health care. Despite growing awareness of language barriers, there is essentially a void in the medical literature regarding the influence of language disparity on pediatric surgery patients. This study was designed to assess the impact of patient-provider language concordance on question-asking behavior and patient satisfaction for pediatric surgery patients. Participants included families of patients in a General Pediatric Surgery Clinic categorized into 3 groups by patient-provider language concordance: concordant English-speaking, LEP concordant Spanish-speaking, and LEP discordant Spanish-speaking using an interpreter. Clinical visits were audio recorded and the number of patient-initiated questions and the length of clinical encounter were measured. Families were administered a surgery-specific, 5-point Likert scale questionnaire modeled after validated surveys concerning communication, trust, perceived discrimination and patient-provider language concordance. Regression models were performed to analyze associations between language concordance and patient's question-asking behavior and between language concordance and survey results. A total of 156 participants were enrolled including 57 concordant-English, 52 LEP concordant-Spanish and 47 LEP-discordant-Spanish. There was significant variation in the mean number of patient-initiated questions among the groups (p=0.002). Both the English and Spanish concordant groups asked a similar number of questions (p=0.9), and they both asked more questions compared to the Spanish-discordant participants (p=0.002 and p=0.001). Language discordance was associated with fewer questions asked after adjustment for socioeconomic status. Language concordant participants rated higher scores of communication. Both Spanish-concordant and Spanish-discordant patients reported significantly increased

  15. Spinal stenosis surgery in pediatric patients with achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciubba, Daniel M; Noggle, Joseph C; Marupudi, Neena I; Bagley, Carlos A; Bookland, Markus J; Carson, Benjamin S; Ain, Michael C; Jallo, George I

    2007-05-01

    Achondroplasia is a hereditary form of dwarfism caused by a defect in endochondral bone formation, resulting in skeletal abnormalities including short stature, shortened limb bones, macrocephaly, and small vertebral bodies. In the pediatric population, symptomatic spinal stenosis occurs at all spinal levels due to the abnormally narrow bone canal. In this study, clinical outcomes were assessed in children with achondroplasia after spinal canal decompression. A retrospective review was conducted involving pediatric patients with heterozygous achondroplasia and symptomatic stenosis after decompressive procedures at the authors' institution within a 9-year period. Measured outcomes included resolution of symptoms, need for repeated surgery, presence of fusion, development of deformity, and complications. Forty-four pediatric patients underwent a total of 60 decompressive procedures. The average patient age at surgery was 12.7 years (range 5-21 years). Forty-nine operations were performed for initial treatment of stenosis, and 11 were performed as revision surgeries on previously operated levels. A large proportion of patients (> 60%) required additional cervicomedullary decompressions, most often preceding the symptoms of spinal stenosis. Of the initial procedures, decompression locations included 32 thoracolumbar (65%), 10 lumbar (20%), four cervical (8%), two cervicothoracic (4%), and one thoracic (2%). Forty-three of the decompressive procedures (72%) included spinal fusion procedures. Of the 11 revisions, five were fusion procedures for progressive deformity at levels previously decompressed but not fused (all thoracolumbar), five were for decompressions of symptomatic junctional stenosis with extension of fusion, and one was for repeated decompression at the same level due to recurrence of symptomatic stenosis. Decompression of the spinal canal in pediatric patients with achondroplasia can be accomplished safely with significant clinical benefit. Patients with a

  16. Deep Surgical Site Infections Following Pediatric Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David A; Glotzbecker, Michael P; Timothy Hresko, M; Hedequist, Daniel J

    2016-06-08

    This is the first reported series looking specifically at factors associated with deep surgical site infections (SSI) following pediatric cervical spine surgery. To identify risk factors present in pediatric patients who are at risk for SSI following cervical spine surgery. Level of evidence: level IV-retrospective case series. To date there are no studies regarding SSI in pediatric cervical spine surgery and thus no benchmark data or risk factors have been identified. Patients with acute deep SSIs occurring within 90 days of the index operation were identified. Patient and surgical characteristics were analyzed for possible predictors of SSI outcome using penalized likelihood logistic regression analysis. Characteristics analyzed included: age, diagnosis, comorbidity, levels fused, approach, implants used, allograft, halo, body mass index, revision, antibiotic dosing, and occipital plating. A total of 112 patients were included in the study at a mean age of 12.5 years (2 to 18 y). Comorbidities were present in 51 (46%) patients, 15 patients had a documented connective tissue disorder (CTD). The mean number of levels fused was 3.7 (2 to 7) and mean number of screws was 4.4 (2 to 11). Allograft was used alone in 48 patients, occipital plating in 28 patients, and a halo in 39 patients. Deep SSI occurred in 3 patients: two of which had a CTD (1 Trisomy 21, 1 Ehlers-Danlos) and 1 patient with postradiation cervical kyphosis. All were gram-positive infections requiring return to operating room with prolonged IV antibiotics. All patients recovered and fused with spinal implant retention. The incidence of deep SSI was 2.7%. It was determined that a CTD was the only significant predictor of SSI. Subjects with a CTD had 12 times the odds of SSI [odds ratio=12 (1.5, 137.0); P=0.02]. In our series of pediatric patients the incidence of a deep SSI was 2.7%. The only predictor of SSI was the presence of a CTD.

  17. Postoperative Adiponectin Levels in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Open Heart Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Thaler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adipose tissue is an important endocrine organ that secretes cytokines, including adiponectin, levels of which are negatively correlated with the severity of the inflammatory process. Aim. To assess the time course of adiponectin levels following open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and its correlation with early postoperative outcomes. Materials and Methods. Blood samples were obtained from 24 children undergoing cardiac surgery and analyzed for adiponectin, C-reactive protein, and other inflammatory markers. Results. Baseline adiponectin levels were negatively correlated with patients’ preoperative weight and age. Postoperative adiponectin levels decreased compared to baseline ( and correlated negatively with duration of cardiopulmonary bypass (, , length of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit (, , and the inotropic score (, . Adiponectin levels were positively correlated with sVCAM 1 levels; however, there was no correlation between adiponectin levels and sP selectin, tPA, MCP1, and sCD40. Conclusions. The inflammatory response after open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with a reduction in adiponectin levels. Prolonged or more complicated surgery induced a more substantial inflammatory process characterized by a significant reduction in adiponectin levels over time and a delayed return to baseline levels.

  18. Global general pediatric surgery partnership: The UCLA-Mozambique experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, Vanda; Martins, Deborah B; Karan, Abraar; Johnson, Brittni; Shekherdimian, Shant; Miller, Lee T; Taela, Atanasio; DeUgarte, Daniel A

    2017-09-01

    There has been increasing recognition of the disparities in surgical care throughout the world. Increasingly, efforts are being made to improve local infrastructure and training of surgeons in low-income settings. The purpose of this study was to review the first 5-years of a global academic pediatric general surgery partnership between UCLA and the Eduardo Mondlane University in Maputo, Mozambique. A mixed-methods approach was utilized to perform an ongoing needs assessment. A retrospective review of admission and operative logbooks was performed. Partnership activities were summarized. The needs assessment identified several challenges including limited operative time, personnel, equipment, and resources. Review of logbooks identified a high frequency of burn admissions and colorectal procedures. Partnership activities focused on providing educational resources, on-site proctoring, training opportunities, and research collaboration. This study highlights the spectrum of disease and operative case volume of a referral center for general pediatric surgery in sub-Saharan Africa, and it provides a context for academic partnership activities to facilitate training and improve the quality of pediatric general surgical care in limited-resource settings. Level IV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Outcomes research in pediatric surgery. Part 1: overview and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Fizan; Ortega, Gezzer; Islam, Saleem; Barnhart, Douglas C; St Peter, Shawn D; Lee, Steven L; Glynn, Loretto; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Arca, Marjorie J; Chang, David C

    2011-01-01

    Outcomes research in pediatric surgery can be defined as the analysis of pediatric surgical outcomes and their predictors at different levels in the health care delivery system. The objectives of this article are to understand the differences between outcomes research and clinical trials as well as to gain familiarity with public multispecialty and specialty-specific databases. The utility of outcomes research extends to benchmarking the quality of care, refinement of management strategies, patient education, and marketing. Assessment of the integration of a new surgical technique into the health care system is best determined by examining a population-based registry, whereas comparative efficacy of surgical procedures is best assessed by randomized clinical trials. In the first part of this 2-part series, an overview and brief outline of available resources for outcomes research in pediatric surgery are reviewed. In part 2, a template is presented on how to structure and design an outcomes research question. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Trypan blue-assisted posterior capsulorhexis in pediatric cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfy, Ayman; Abdelrahman, Ayman

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the safety and efficacy of staining the posterior capsule with trypan blue during capsulorhexis in pediatric cataract surgery. Patients and methods This was a prospective randomized comparative study carried out at Alpha Vision Center, Zagazig, Egypt. This study included 2 groups of children with pediatric cataract randomly allocated to undergo irrigation and aspiration. In the trypan group, which included 11 eyes, trypan blue was used to stain the posterior capsule during posterior capsulorhexis. In the control group, which included 10 eyes, no staining was performed. All surgeries were performed by the same surgeon. The 2 groups were compared for criteria such as completion of capsulorhexis, disruption of vitreous face and in-the-bag intraocular lens implantation. Results This study included 21 eyes of 16 patients (age range: 6 months–4 years). A statistically significant difference was observed for the following parameters between the 2 groups: capsulorhexis completion (P=0.04), vitreous face disruption (P=0.01) and in-the-bag intraocular lens implantation (P=0.022). Conclusion This study suggests that staining of the posterior capsule during capsulorhexis in pediatric cataract operation gives better results than capsulorhexis without staining. The stain changes the capsule texture making capsulorhexis easier with fewer complications. PMID:28182152

  1. Pediatric and adolescent obesity: management, options for surgery, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitsman, Jeffrey L; Inge, Thomas H; Reichard, Kirk W; Browne, Allen F; Harmon, Carroll M; Michalsky, Marc P

    2014-03-01

    The past four decades have witnessed a marked rise in the number of children and adolescents with obesity. Severe obesity has also become increasingly prevalent. More young patients who have obesity are being referred for weight management and weight loss surgery, thus posing new challenges to both the medical personnel who care for them as well as the institutions in which that care is provided. This manuscript is generated from the material presented at the Education Day symposium entitled "Surgical Care of the Obese Child" held at the 42nd Annual Meeting of the American Pediatric Surgical Association in Palm Desert, CA, on May 22, 2011. Herein the presenters at the symposium update the material addressing evaluation of a young person for weight loss surgery (including the team approach to patient evaluation and institutional infrastructure and responsibilities). The procedures most frequently available to young patients with obesity are identified, and current outcomes, trends, and future direction are also discussed.

  2. Systematic traction techniques in minimal-access pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiwa, Hiroshi; Ishida, Ryoichi; Sudo, Kenichi

    2004-11-01

    Minimal-access pediatric cardiac surgery is now common in the treatment of simple congenital heart defects. However, methods of securing a good, unobstructed view for surgery and the difficulties of working in a deep, narrow field jeopardize safety in surgical procedures, especially for less experienced surgeons have been described. Our systematic, step-by-step traction techniques on the skin, the pericardium, the right atrial appendage, the aortic root, both venae cavae, and the free wall of the right ventricular outflow, using a mechanical retractor and traction sutures, facilitate surgical field exposure and the achievement of safety. As described below, our procedures are simple, allow direct inspection, and assist those working toward technical mastery.

  3. Vitrectorhexis versus forceps posterior capsulorhexis in pediatric cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lav Kochgaway

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was done to compare the results of posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis created using forceps with those created using vitrector in eyes suffering from congenital cataract. Vitrectorhexis term was first used by Wilson et al in 1999. [1] Fifty eyes with congenital and developmental cataract were included in this study. The posterior capsulorhexis was created using utrata forceps in 17 eyes or through a vitrector in 33 eyes. Forceps capsulorhexis was performed before IOL implantation, while vitrectorhexis was performed after IOL implantation in the bag. The results of both the surgery were compared using the following criteria: incidence of extension of rhexis, ability to achieve posterior rhexis of appropriate size, ability to implant the IOL in the bag, the surgical time, and learning curve. Vitrectorhexis after IOL implantation was an easy to learn alternative to manual posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis in pediatric cataract surgery. It was more predictable and reproducible, with a short learning curve and lesser surgical time.

  4. Microscopic and macroscopic infarct complicating pediatric epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinger, Luc; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Ahmed, Raheel; Rutka, James; Snead, Carter; Widjaja, Elysa

    2017-03-01

    There is some suggestion that microscopic infarct could be associated with invasive monitoring, but it is unclear if the microscopic infarct is also visible on imaging and associated with neurologic deficits. The aims of this study were to assess the rates of microscopic and macroscopic infarct and other major complications of pediatric epilepsy surgery, and to determine if these complications were higher following invasive monitoring. We reviewed the epilepsy surgery data from a tertiary pediatric center, and collected data on microscopic infarct on histology and macroscopic infarct on postoperative computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) done one day after surgery and major complications. Three hundred fifty-two patients underwent surgical resection and there was one death. Forty-two percent had invasive monitoring. Thirty patients (9%) had microscopic infarct. Univariable analyses showed that microscopic infarct was higher among patients with invasive monitoring relative to no invasive monitoring (20% vs. 0.5%, respectively, p microscopic infarct had transient right hemiparesis, and two with both macroscopic and microscopic infarct had unexpected persistent neurologic deficits. Thirty-two major complications (9.1%) were reported, with no difference in major complications between invasive monitoring and no invasive monitoring (10% vs. 7%, p = 0.446). In the multivariable analysis, invasive monitoring increased the odds of microscopic infarct (odds ratio [OR] 15.87, p = 0.009), but not macroscopic infarct (OR 2.6, p = 0.173) or major complications (OR 1.4, p = 0.500), after adjusting for age at surgery, sex, age at seizure onset, operative type, and operative location. Microscopic infarct was associated with invasive monitoring, and none of the patients had permanent neurologic deficits. Macroscopic infarct was not associated with invasive monitoring, and two patients with macroscopic infarct had persistent neurologic deficits. Wiley

  5. The ACGME case log: general surgery resident experience in pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Kenneth W; Drake, F Thurston; Aarabi, Shahram; Waldhausen, John H

    2013-08-01

    General surgery (GS) residents in ACGME programs log cases performed during their residency. We reviewed designated pediatric surgery (PS) cases to assess for changes in performed cases over time. The ACGME case logs for graduating GS residents were reviewed from academic year (AY) 1989-1990 to 2010-2011 for designated pediatric cases. Overall and designated PS cases were analyzed. Data were combined into five blocks: Period I (AY1989-90 to AY1993-94), Period II (AY1994-95 to AY1998-99), Period III (AY1999-00 to AY2002-03), Period IV (AY2003-04 to AY2006-07), and Period V (AY2007-08 to AY2010-11). Periods IV and V were delineated by implementation of duty hour restrictions. Student t-tests compared averages among the time periods with significance at P pediatric cases declined for each period from an average of 47.7 in Period I to 33.8 in Period V. These changes are due to a decline in hernia repairs, which account for half of cases. All other cases contributed only minimally to the pediatric cases. The only laparoscopic cases in the database were anti-reflux procedures, which increased over time. GS residents perform a diminishing number of designated PS cases. This decline occurred before the onset of work-hour restrictions. These changes have implications on the capabilities of the current graduating workforce. However, the case log does not reflect all cases trainees may be exposed to, so revision of this list is recommended. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The ACGME case log: General surgery resident experience in pediatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Kenneth W.; Drake, F. Thurston; Aarabi, Shahram; Waldhausen, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Background General surgery (GS) residents in ACGME programs log cases performed during their residency. We reviewed designated pediatric surgery (PS) cases to assess for changes in performed cases over time. Methods The ACGME case logs for graduating GS residents were reviewed from academic year (AY) 1989–1990 to 2010–2011 for designated pediatric cases. Overall and designated PS cases were analyzed. Data were combined into five blocks: Period I (AY1989–90 to AY1993–94), Period II (AY1994–95 to AY1998–99), Period III (AY1999–00 to AY2002–03), Period IV (AY2003–04 to AY2006–07), and Period V (AY2007–08 to AY2010–11). Periods IV and V were delineated by implementation of duty hour restrictions. Student t-tests compared averages among the time periods with significance at P < .05. Results Overall GS case load remained relatively stable. Of total cases, PS cases accounted for 5.4% in Period I and 3.7% in Period V. Designated pediatric cases declined for each period from an average of 47.7 in Period I to 33.8 in Period V. These changes are due to a decline in hernia repairs, which account for half of cases. All other cases contributed only minimally to the pediatric cases. The only laparoscopic cases in the database were anti-reflux procedures, which increased over time. Conclusions GS residents perform a diminishing number of designated PS cases. This decline occurred before the onset of work-hour restrictions. These changes have implications on the capabilities of the current graduating workforce. However, the case log does not reflect all cases trainees may be exposed to, so revision of this list is recommended. PMID:23932601

  7. Local anesthesia: A feasible option for pediatric frontalis sling surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William, Jerald; Abbott, Joseph; Kipioti, Athina; Reuser, Tristan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the suitability of local anesthesia in the pediatric age group for oculoplastic procedures. The authors present a case of frontalis sling surgery performed under local anesthesia in a 15-year-old boy with bilateral congenital ptosis. No significant technical difficulties were encountered during the procedure. Optimal intraoperative eyelid placement was facilitated by the patient's comfort and cooperation. For some selected children, local anesthesia is a good alternative to general anesthesia to obtain the best outcome.

  8. The role of pediatric surgery in the medical school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, M P; Hassett, J M; Doerr, R J; Booth, F M; Petrelli, N; Allen, J E; Jewett, T C; Cooney, D R; Flint, L M

    1989-01-01

    In most medical schools, exposure to pediatric surgery is presented as a subspecialty elective. We have offered it as an integral part of the surgical clerkship for 10 years in the belief that it provides an excellent educational environment. To confirm this concept, the quizzes (Q), final examinations (FE), and grades of students assigned to the pediatric surgical service were prospectively studied. All students (N = 139) in the surgical clerkship entered the study. Thirty-two students were randomly selected and assigned to the surgical service of a major pediatric hospital (P-Surg) for 50% of their clerkship. The other students (N = 107) were assigned to a variety of adult surgical services (G-Surg) and served as the control group. All students attended the same seminars, used the same educational materials, were examined with the same test items, and were evaluated by the same oral examiners. Test items were electronically scored and the database was analyzed on an IBM computer. The statistical analysis was performed using a Student's t test and chi 2 analysis. There was no significant difference in the demonstrated cognitive performance and grades awarded to the two groups of students. We conclude that a pediatric surgical service provides an atmosphere that is educationally comparable to the adult general surgical service.

  9. Dexmedetomidine in combination with midazolam after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tomomi; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Maruo, Ayako; Matsuhisa, Hironori; Tanaka, Akiko; Noda, Rei; Matsushima, Shunsuke

    2015-09-01

    Although midazolam is one of the most commonly used sedatives for infants in the intensive care unit, it has well-known disadvantages including a dose-dependent potential to induce tolerance, withdrawal, and hemodynamic depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effects of dexmedetomidine combined with midazolam in postoperative intensive care following pediatric cardiac surgery. Forty consecutive infants who underwent cardiac surgery for isolated ventricular septal defects from January 2011 to July 2013 were enrolled in this retrospective study. They were divided into two groups according to postoperative sedation regimen: dexmedetomidine sedation with midazolam (n = 20), or midazolam sedation without dexmedetomidine (control group, n = 20). Perioperative variables were compared between the two groups. There were no significant differences in patient characteristics between the two groups. During the first 24 h after intensive care unit admission, heart rate and serum lactate levels were significantly lower in the dexmedetomidine group compared to the control group (p = 0.0292 and p = 0.0027, respectively). The maximal midazolam dose was also significantly lower in the dexmedetomidine group (0.12 ± 0.09 vs. 0.20 ± 0.08 mg kg(-1) h(-1), p = 0.0059). There were no adverse effects of dexmedetomidine such as bradycardia, hypotension, agitation, or seizures. Three (15%) patients in the control group and none in the dexmedetomidine group experienced sudden cardiopulmonary decompensation. Dexmedetomidine can provide favorable sedative properties with a reduced requirement for concomitant midazolam and stable hemodynamics with tachycardia prevention, for postoperative intensive care following pediatric cardiac surgery. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Innovation in Pediatric Surgical Education for General Surgery Residents: A Mobile Web Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouch, Joshua D; Wagner, Justin P; Scott, Andrew; Sullins, Veronica F; Chen, David C; DeUgarte, Daniel A; Shew, Stephen B; Tillou, Areti; Dunn, James C Y; Lee, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    General surgery residents lack a standardized educational experience in pediatric surgery. We hypothesized that the development of a mobile educational interface would provide general surgery residents broader access to pediatric surgical education materials. We created an educational mobile website for general surgery residents rotating on pediatric surgery, which included a curriculum, multimedia resources, the Operative Performance Rating Scale (OPRS), and Twitter functionality. Residents were instructed to consult the curriculum. Residents and faculty posted media using the Twitter hashtag, #UCLAPedSurg, and following each surgical procedure reviewed performance via the OPRS. Site visits, Twitter posts, and OPRS submissions were quantified from September 2013 to July 2014. The pediatric surgery mobile website received 257 hits; 108 to the homepage, 107 to multimedia, 28 to the syllabus, and 19 to the OPRS. All eligible residents accessed the content. The Twitter hashtag, #UCLAPedSurg, was assigned to 20 posts; the overall audience reach was 85 individuals. Participants in the mobile OPRS included 11 general surgery residents and 4 pediatric surgery faculty. Pediatric surgical education resources and operative performance evaluations are effectively administered to general surgery residents via a structured mobile platform. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Capsular Outcomes After Pediatric Cataract Surgery Without Intraocular Lens Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xuhua; Lin, Haotian; Lin, Zhuoling; Chen, Jingjing; Tang, Xiangchen; Luo, Lixia; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate capsular outcomes 12 months after pediatric cataract surgery without intraocular lens implantation via qualitative classification and quantitative measurement. This study is a cross-sectional study that was approved by the institutional review board of Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center of Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China. Digital coaxial retro-illumination photographs of 329 aphakic pediatric eyes were obtained 12 months after pediatric cataract surgery without intraocular lens implantation. Capsule digital coaxial retro-illumination photographs were divided as follows: anterior capsule opening area (ACOA), posterior capsule opening area (PCOA), and posterior capsule opening opacity (PCOO). Capsular outcomes were qualitatively classified into 3 types based on the PCOO: Type I—capsule with mild opacification but no invasion into the capsule opening; Type II—capsule with moderate opacification accompanied by contraction of the ACOA and invasion to the occluding part of the PCOA; and Type III—capsule with severe opacification accompanied by total occlusion of the PCOA. Software was developed to quantitatively measure the ACOA, PCOA, and PCOO using standardized DCRPs. The relationships between the accurate intraoperative anterior and posterior capsulorhexis sizes and the qualitative capsular types were statistically analyzed. The DCRPs of 315 aphakic eyes (95.8%) of 191 children were included. Capsular outcomes were classified into 3 types: Type I—120 eyes (38.1%); Type II—157 eyes (49.8%); Type III—38 eyes (12.1%). The scores of the capsular outcomes were negatively correlated with intraoperative anterior capsulorhexis size (R = −0.572, P < 0.001), but no significant correlation with intraoperative posterior capsulorhexis size (R = −0.16, P = 0.122) was observed. The ACOA significantly decreased from Type I to Type II to Type III, the PCOA increased in size from Type I to Type

  12. Minimally invasive pediatric surgery: Increasing implementation in daily practice and resident's training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.T. Velde (Te); N.M.A. Bax (Klaas); S.H.A.J. Tytgat; J.R. de Jong (Justin); D.V. Travassos (Vieira); W.L.M. Kramer; D.C. van der Zee (David)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In 1998, the one-year experience in minimally invasive abdominal surgery in children at a pediatric training center was assessed. Seven years later, we determined the current status of pediatric minimally invasive surgery in daily practice and surgical training. Methods: A

  13. Minimally invasive pediatric surgery : Increasing implementation in daily practice and resident's training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, E. A. te; Bax, N. M. A.; Tytgat, S. H. A. J.; de Jong, J. R.; Travassos, D. Vieira; Kramer, W. L. M.; van der Zee, D. C.

    Background: In 1998, the one-year experience in minimally invasive abdominal surgery in children at a pediatric training center was assessed. Seven years later, we determined the current status of pediatric minimally invasive surgery in daily practice and surgical training. Methods: A retrospective

  14. Body temperature increases during pediatric full mouth rehabilitation surgery under general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Shan Chuang

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Body temperature transiently increased during pediatric full mouth rehabilitation surgery. The increase in body temperature was associated with operation duration. The etiology is uncertain. Continuous body temperature monitoring and the application of both heating and cooling devices during pediatric full mouth rehabilitation surgery should be mandatory.

  15. Pediatric heart surgery in Ghana: three ethical questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Nir

    2014-01-01

    When a group of doctors and nurses from Boston, Massachusetts, provided evaluation and heart surgery to children in Ghana, they encountered three rationing dilemmas: (1) What portion of surgery slots should they reserve for the simplest, most cost-effective surgeries? (2) How much time should be reserved for especially simple, nonsurgical interventions? (3) How much time should be reserved to training local staff to perform such surgeries? This article investigates these three dilemmas.

  16. ILAE survey of neuropsychology practice in pediatric epilepsy surgery evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berl, Madison M; Smith, Mary Lou; Bulteau, Christine

    2017-06-01

    To determine the extent to which specific neuropsychological measures are in common use around the world for the assessment of children who are candidates for epilepsy surgery. As part of the work of the International League Against Epilepsy Pediatric Surgical Task Force, a survey was developed and distributed online. The survey consisted of questions related to demographics, training experience, general practice, and specific measures used and at what frequency. Seventy-eight clinicians with an average of 13.5 years of experience from 19 countries responded to the survey; 69% were English-speaking. Pre- and post-neuropsychological evaluations were conducted with a majority of children undergoing surgical resection for epilepsy. There was high consistency (>90%) among the domains evaluated, while consistency rate among specific measures was more variable (range: 0-100%). Consistency rates were also lower among respondents in non-English-speaking countries. For English-speaking respondents, at least one measure within each domain was used by a majority (>75%) of clinicians; 19 specific measures met this criterion. There is consensus of measures used in neuropsychological studies of pediatric epilepsy patients which provides a basis for determining which measures to include in establishing a collaborative data repository to study surgical outcomes of pediatric epilepsy. Challenges include selecting measures that promote collaboration with centers in non-English-speaking countries and providing data from children under age 5.

  17. Ovarian-Sparing Surgery in Pediatric Benign Ovarian Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Paulette I; Dietrich, Jennifer E; Francis, Jessica A; Brandt, Mary L; Cass, Darrell L; Lopez, Monica E

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate outcomes of children after ovarian-sparing surgery (OSS) for non-neoplastic and benign neoplastic ovarian lesions. Retrospective cohort study from January 2003 to January 2012. Single, high-volume, tertiary care hospital. Children 18 years of age and younger. None. Postoperative complications and tumor recurrence after OSS. One hundred nine patients underwent OSS with a median age of 13.3 years (interquartile range [IQR], 11.4-15.1 years). Eighty-two patients were treated laparoscopically with 4 conversions to an open procedure. Postoperative complications included surgical site infections in 7 patients (6%). Pathology most commonly revealed functional ovarian cysts (n = 57) and mature teratomas (n = 37). Ninety-four patients (86%) were followed for a median of 10.4 months (IQR, 0.72-30.8 months). Fifty-five patients (60%) had subsequent imaging surveillance a median of 7.6 months postoperatively (IQR, 3.9-13 months). Ten patients (10%) developed a second ipsilateral lesion within a median time of 11 months (IQR, 7.7-24 months), of whom 5 girls had repeated surgery for mass enlargement or persistent abdominal pain at a median time of 10.5 months (IQR, 8.0-12.65 months). Fifty-eight patients (63%) began or resumed menses at their most recent follow-up. Three girls became pregnant after OSS at a median follow-up of 5 years (range, 2.4-6.7 years). Benign ovarian lesions in children can be treated successfully with OSS with low recurrence and repeat surgery rates. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dexamethasone reduces gut permeability in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagon, Ignacio; Onkenhout, Willem; Klok, Margreet; Linthorst, Lisa; van der Poel, Petrus F H; Bovill, James G; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2005-08-01

    Little attention has been paid to the effect of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome on intestinal dysfunction in the postoperative period. Several proinflammatory cytokines have been reported to increase the permeability of intestinal mucosa in vitro. We investigated the effect of dexamethasone on gut permeability in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery by using the dual sugar permeability test and absorption of 2 other saccharides. Thirty-four patients scheduled for cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were prospectively randomized to either act as control subjects or to receive dexamethasone (1 mg . kg -1) during induction of anesthesia. Intestinal permeability was measured with 3-O-methyl-D-glucose, D-xylose, L-rhamnose, and lactulose administered orally after induction of anesthesia and 12 and 24 hours later. Lactulose/rhamnose ratios were increased from the outset in both groups (mean 0.57 [95% confidence interval, 0.24-0.91] for the control group and 0.76 [95% confidence interval, 0.35-1.17] for patients receiving dexamethasone). Although the ratios decreased 12 hours (0.29 [95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.42]) and 24 hours later (0.17 [95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.15]) in the dexamethasone group, in the control group there was a rise at 12 hours (0.77 [95% confidence interval, 0-1.64]), with a slight reduction 24 hours later (0.46 [95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.85]). Infants and children undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass show a significant reduction in gut permeability when dexamethasone is used during induction of anesthesia. Dexamethasone does not affect the intestinal barrier at the functional level, as assessed on the basis of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose and D-xylose absorption.

  19. Assessment of the Mexican Board of Pediatric Surgery Certification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras-Hernandez, Juan D; Mora-Fol, Jose R; Lezama-Del Valle, Pablo; Yanowsky-Reyes, Guillermo; Perez-Lorenzana, Hector; Ortega-Salgado, Arturo; Aguirre-Jauregui, Oscar; Bracho-Blanchet, Eduardo; Sanchez-Mendiola, Melchor

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the quality of the Mexican Board of Pediatric Surgery (MBPS) certifying system, using contemporary international guidelines. Retrospective assessment of evidence collected during the design and implementation processes of 2 consecutive applications of the MBPS certifying examination, using Cizek's checklist for evaluating credential-testing programs. It includes the relevant guidelines from the American Education Research Association, the American Psychological Association, the National Council on Measurement in Education, and the National Commission for Certifying Agencies. Four independent and previously trained raters used the checklist. They underwent a 2-week training using frame-of-reference and performance dimensions methodologies. Certification examinations of MBPS. The 2013 and 2014 MBPS certification examinations, with 111 evidence items of the processes, followed for the assessment of 86 examinees. The checklist internal consistency was 0.89. Absolute interrater agreement was 0.34 for the 2013 and 0.66 for the 2014 editions of the examination. The 2013 examination complied with 55 (64%) of the checklist 86 items, in 2014 with 72 (84%). In 2014, the certifying system reached a quality of 84%. For optimal fulfillment of its social responsibility, the MBPS is required to maintain its level of quality and attempt to improve its performance. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. NORMOTHERMIA FOR PEDIATRIC AND CONGENITAL HEART SURGERY: AN EXPANDED HORIZON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mahir eShamsuddin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB in pediatric cardiac surgery is generally performed with hypothermia, flow reduction and hemodilution. From 10/2013 to 12/2014 55 patients, median age 6 years (range 2 months to 52 years, median weight 18.5kg (range 3.2 to 57 kg, underwent surgery with normothermic high flow CPB in a new unit.There were no early or late deaths. Fifty patients (90.9% were extubated within 3 hrs, 3 (5.5% within 24 hrs and 2 (3.6% within 48 hrs. Twentyfour patients (43.6% didn’t require inotropic support, 31 (56.4% received dopamine or dobutamine: 21 ≤5 mcg/kg/min, 8 5-10 mcg/kg/min, and 2 >10 mcg/kg/min. Two patients (6.5% required noradrenaline 0.05-0.1 mcg/kg/min.On arrival to ICU and after 3 and 6 hrs and 8:00 am the next morning, mean lactate levels were 1.9±09, 2.0±1.2, 1.6±0.8 and 1.4±0.7 mmol/L (0.6-5.2 mmol/L respectively. From arrival to ICU to 8:00 am the next morning mean urine output was 3.8±1.5 mL/kg/hr (0.7-7.6 mL/kg/hr, and mean chest drainage was 0.6±0.5 mL/kg/hr (0.1-2.3 mL/kg/hr. Mean ICU and hospital stay were 2.7±1.4 days (2-8 days and 7.2±2.2 days (4-15 days respectively. In conclusion, normothermic high flow CPB allows pediatric and congenital heart surgery with favorable outcomes even in a new unit. The immediate post-operative period is characterized by low requirement for inotropic and respiratory support, low lactate production, adequate urine output, minimal drainage from the chest drains, shorter ICU and hospital stay.

  1. Pediatric surgery - a changing field: national trends in pediatric surgical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Nicholas E; Shah, M Abid; Dorsey, Amelia N; Ponsky, Todd A; Soldes, Oliver S

    2016-06-01

    Over the last decade, our institution has experienced a relative increase in the number of mundane cases, such as appendectomy and incision and drainage of abscess, versus index (complex) cases. We sought to determine if this trend is present at the national level. A retrospective review of surgical case volume at 36 freestanding children's hospitals was performed between January 2004 and December 2013 using the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) database. Procedures were classified as "mundane" or "index", and 10 procedures of each type were selected for analysis. Results were reported as a percentage of total cases. Statistical analysis of linear trends was performed with the Mann-Kendall test. Overall, index procedures had a significant downward trend (ppediatric surgery is undergoing change with mundane procedures constituting an increasing proportion of the surgical caseload, while complex procedures are proportionately decreasing. These trends may be useful to inform decisions regarding future pediatric surgery workforce planning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Survey on Robot-Assisted Surgical Techniques Utilization in US Pediatric Surgery Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizlin, Ilan I; Shroyer, Michelle C; Yu, David C; Martin, Colin A; Chen, Mike K; Russell, Robert T

    2017-02-01

    Robotic technology has transformed both practice and education in many adult surgical specialties; no standardized training guidelines in pediatric surgery currently exist. The purpose of our study was to assess the prevalence of robotic procedures and extent of robotic surgery education in US pediatric surgery fellowships. A deidentified survey measured utilization of the robot, perception on the utility of the robot, and its incorporation in training among the program directors of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) pediatric surgery fellowships in the United States. Forty-one of the 47 fellowship programs (87%) responded to the survey. While 67% of respondents indicated the presence of a robot in their facility, only 26% reported its utilizing in their surgical practice. Among programs not utilizing the robot, most common reasons provided were lack of clear supportive evidence, increased intraoperative time, and incompatibility of instrument size to pediatric patients. While 58% of program directors believe that there is a future role for robotic surgery in children, only 18% indicated that robotic training should play a part in pediatric surgery education. Consequently, while over 66% of survey respondents received training in robot-assisted surgical technique, only 29% of fellows receive robot-assisted training during their fellowship. A majority of fellowships have access to a robot, but few utilize the technology in their current practice or as part of training. Further investigation is required into both the technology's potential benefits in the pediatric population and its role in pediatric surgery training.

  3. Increasing Utilization Of Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery In The United States Between 1997 and 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestana Knight, Elia M.; Schiltz, Nicholas K.; Bakaki, Paul M.; Koroukian, Siran M.; Lhatoo, Samden D.; Kaiboriboon, Kitti

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY OBJECTIVE To examine national trends of pediatric epilepsy surgery usage in the United States between 1997 and 2009. METHODS We performed a serial cross-sectional study of pediatric epilepsy surgery using triennial data from the Kids’ Inpatient Database from 1997 to 2009. The rates of epilepsy surgery for lobectomies, partial lobectomies, and hemispherectomies in each study year were calculated based on the number of prevalent epilepsy cases in the corresponding year. The age-race-sex adjusted rates of surgeries were also estimated. Mann-Kendall trend test was used to test for changes in the rates of surgeries over time. Multivariable regression analysis was also performed to estimate the effect of time, age, race, and sex on the annual incidence of epilepsy surgery. RESULTS The rates of pediatric epilepsy surgery significantly increased from 0.85 epilepsy surgeries per 1,000 children with epilepsy in 1997 to 1.44 epilepsy surgeries per 1,000 children with epilepsy in 2009. An increment in the rates of epilepsy surgeries was noted across all age groups, in boys and girls, all races, and all payer types. The rate of increase was lowest in blacks and in children with public insurance. The overall number of surgical cases for each study year was lower than 35% of children who were expected to have surgery, based on the estimates from the Connecticut Study of Epilepsy. SIGNIFICANCE In contrast to adults, pediatric epilepsy surgery numbers have increased significantly in the past decade. However, epilepsy surgery remains an underutilized treatment for children with epilepsy. In addition, black children and those with public insurance continue to face disparities in the receipt of epilepsy surgery. PMID:25630252

  4. Impact of minimally invasive surgery on the pediatric surgical profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Vinci S; Biesheuvel, Cornelis J; Cohen, Ralph C

    2008-12-01

    We conducted a survey among pediatric surgeons to examine the impact of the advent of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) on the pediatric surgical profession with respect to job satisfaction and training challenges. An invitation to participate in a web-based questionnaire was sent out to 306 pediatric surgeons. Apart from demographic details and training recommendations, parameters relevant to job satisfaction, including patient interaction, peer pressure, ethical considerations, academic progress, ability to train residents, and financial remuneration, were studied. The response rate was 38.2%. Working in a unit performing MIS was identified by 71% of respondents as the most effective and feasible modality of training in MIS. Inability to get away from a busy practice was the most common reason cited for inability to acquire MIS training. The overall responses to the job satisfaction parameters showed a positive trend in the current MIS era for patient interaction, ethical considerations, academic progress, and training residents, with a negative trend for peer pressure and financial remuneration. The enthusiastic minimally invasive surgeons (EMIS) were defined as those having more than 5 years of MIS experience and also performing more than 10% of their work using MIS. Of the 113 responses analyzed, 67 belonged to the EMIS category. Those belonging to the EMIS group were less likely to feel inadequate in training their residents, in meeting the felt needs of the patients, or to complain about peer pressure. They were more likely to consider MIS to be as relevant and beneficial in children as in adults. Embracing MIS, as represented by the EMIS group, correlated with an overall greater job satisfaction.

  5. Heart Surgery: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon? (American Academy of Pediatrics) Also in Spanish Patient Handouts Aortic valve surgery - open (Medical Encyclopedia) ... Spanish Open heart surgery (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish ... heart surgery Pediatric heart surgery - discharge Sternal exploration or closure Related ...

  6. Technical innovation, standardization, and skill qualification for pediatric minimally invasive surgery in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaka, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    This is a presentation of sharing endeavors at modifying and standardizing surgical procedures as well as establishing endoscopic surgical skill qualification in the field of pediatric surgery in Japan.

  7. Socioeconomic status influences time to surgery and surgical outcome in pediatric epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinger, Luc; Chan, Carol; Andrade, Danielle; Go, Cristina; Smith, Mary Lou; Snead, O Carter; Rutka, James T; Widjaja, Elysa

    2016-02-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the influence of socioeconomic status (SES) on time-to-surgery (TTS) and surgical outcome in children with treatment-resistant epilepsy in a universal health care system. The cohort consisted of children who had undergone resective epilepsy surgery between 2001 and 2013 in Canada. The patients' postal codes were linked to Statistics Canada National Household Survey data to obtain dissemination area income, which was used to infer SES. Time-to-surgery was defined as the interval from date of epilepsy onset to date of surgery. Seizure outcome was classified using ILAE classification. The associations between SES and TTS, as well as SES and surgical outcome, were assessed. Two hundred eighty-four children who had epilepsy surgery were included. Patients in the lowest income quintile had a significantly higher TTS relative to the highest income quintile (β=0.121, p=0.044). There were no significant associations between income quintiles and seizure-free surgical outcome (odds ratio (OR)=0.746-1.494, all p>0.05). However, patients in the lowest income quintile had a significantly lower odds of an improvement in seizure frequency relative to the highest income quintile (OR=0.262, p=0.046). The TTS was not uniform across SES in spite of the existence of a universal health care system. This finding highlights the need to address social and economic barriers for epilepsy surgery to improve access to this potentially curative treatment. Those with lower SES had lower likelihood of improvement in seizure control following epilepsy surgery and may require additional support including social and financial support to mitigate the discrepancies in seizure control following surgery between SES levels.

  8. Obstruction of endotracheal tube with relevant respiratory acidosis during pediatric cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morei, N.M.; Mungroop, H. E.; Michielon, Guido; Scheeren, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of pediatric cardiac surgery in a 21- days old baby, in whom a nasal endotracheal tube (ETT) was inserted. At the end of surgery both ventilatory pressures and end-tidal CO2 increased suggesting airway obstruction. Suctioning of the ETT lumen did not relieve the problem, only ETT

  9. Obstruction of endotracheal tube with relevant respiratory acidosis during pediatric cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morei, N.M.; Mungroop, H. E.; Michielon, Guido; Scheeren, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of pediatric cardiac surgery in a 21- days old baby, in whom a nasal endotracheal tube (ETT) was inserted. At the end of surgery both ventilatory pressures and end-tidal CO2 increased suggesting airway obstruction. Suctioning of the ETT lumen did not relieve the problem, only ETT

  10. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation and pediatric cardiac surgery : Yes, we can!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.

    2011-01-01

    In the previous issue of Critical Care, Bojan and colleagues reported their experiences with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) after pediatric cardiac surgery. A total of 120 patients were treated with HFOV on the day of surgery, thus excluding rescue HFOV use. The main finding of the

  11. Perioperatory antibiotic prophylaxis in Pediatric Surgery (Part I: abdominal surgery) Profilaxis antibiótica perioperatoria en Cirugía Pediátrica (Parte I: cirugía abdominal)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berta Fonseca Romero; Guillermo Cortiza Orbe; Lorenzo Pérez Romano; Carlos Cabrera Machado; Zoe Quintero Delgado; Rafael Trinchet Soler; Luis Marcano Sanz; Sergio Luis González López

    2005-01-01

    .... We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Antibiotic prophylaxis in abdominal surgery, approved by consensus in the 1st National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery...

  12. Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery MedlinePlus What is bariatric surgery? Bariatric surgery helps people who are very obese to ... What are the endocrine-related benefits of bariatric surgery? Bariatric surgery and the weight loss that results can: ...

  13. Nursing Care of the Laryngeal Mask Airway in Pediatric Cataract Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aihuan Chen; Ronghua Ye; Yanchan Liu; Weici Liu; Jingyi Lin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:To investigate the important experience of nursing care of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in children under-going cataract surgery. Methods: Fifty-five children undergoing cataract surgery were anesthetized by inhaling sevoflurane through a LMA and re-ceived perioperative nursing care. The safety of perioperative nursing for these children was also evaluated. Results:Through perioperative nursing care and psychological counseling for children with LMA,.all patients were anes-thetized without complications and underwent successful surgeries..No severe postoperative complications were ob-served. Conclusion: Nursing care specific for LMA is a vital part of the success of anesthesia and pediatric cataract surgery.

  14. An augmented reality navigation system for pediatric oncologic surgery based on preoperative CT and MRI images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souzaki, Ryota; Ieiri, Satoshi; Uemura, Munenori; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Tomikawa, Morimasa; Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Koga, Yuhki; Suminoe, Aiko; Kohashi, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshinao; Hara, Toshiro; Hashizume, Makoto; Taguchi, Tomoaki

    2013-12-01

    In pediatric endoscopic surgery, a limited view and lack of tactile sensation restrict the surgeon's abilities. Moreover, in pediatric oncology, it is sometimes difficult to detect and resect tumors due to the adhesion and degeneration of tumors treated with multimodality therapies. We developed an augmented reality (AR) navigation system based on preoperative CT and MRI imaging for use in endoscopic surgery for pediatric tumors. The patients preoperatively underwent either CT or MRI with body surface markers. We used an optical tracking system to register the reconstructed 3D images obtained from the CT and MRI data and body surface markers during surgery. AR visualization was superimposed with the 3D images projected onto captured live images. Six patients underwent surgery using this system. The median age of the patients was 3.5 years. Two of the six patients underwent laparoscopic surgery, two patients underwent thoracoscopic surgery, and two patients underwent laparotomy using this system. The indications for surgery were local recurrence of a Wilms tumor in one case, metastasis of rhabdomyosarcoma in one case, undifferentiated sarcoma in one case, bronchogenic cysts in two cases, and hepatoblastoma in one case. The average tumor size was 22.0±14.2 mm. Four patients were treated with chemotherapy, three patients were treated with radiotherapy before surgery, and four patients underwent reoperation. All six tumors were detected using the AR navigation system and successfully resected without any complications. The AR navigation system is very useful for detecting the tumor location during pediatric surgery, especially for endoscopic surgery. Crown Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved.

  15. Management of pediatric and adolescent adnexal masses by gasless laparoendoscopic single-site surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Akihiro; Imoto, Sanae; Nakamura, Hiromi

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the safety and feasibility of gasless transumbilical laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery for the management of adnexal masses in pediatric and adolescent girls aged 19 years or younger. Retrospective study of 28 pediatric and adolescent girls each undergoing gasless LESS surgery and gasless multiport laparoscopic surgery for adnexal masses. In each case, laparoscopic surgery was performed by the abdominal-wall lift method under endotracheal general anesthesia. The two groups were compared for their patient demographics and surgical outcome measures. In the LESS surgery group, median age of the patients including three pre-menarcheal girls was 17.5 years. The most common symptom was abdominal pain. Median tumor diameter in the LESS surgery group was 7.4cm. There were no statistical differences in clinical features between LESS surgery and multiport laparoscopic surgery groups. In the LESS surgery group, adnexal masses were managed by unilateral cystectomy (n=20), unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (n=5), bilateral cystectomy (n=2), and unilateral salpingectomy (n=1). Emergency LESS surgery was performed for seven cases due to adnexal torsion and one case due to cyst rupture. Preservation of affected ovary was not achieved in three emergency cases with adnexal torsion due to severe necrosis, and in one case each of recurrent mucinous cystadenoma and huge mucinous cystadenoma. In 24 adnexal masses from 22 girls who received adnexal cystectomy by LESS surgery, LESS-assisted extracorporeal cystectomy, was possible in 14 masses while intracorporeal cystectomy was required in other 10. In a case of dermoid cyst managed by LESS-assisted extracorporeal cystectomy, additional hemostasis was required by intracorporeal suturing due to laceration of utero-ovarian ligament. Median-excised tissue weight in the LESS surgery group was 111g. Significant differences between LESS surgery and multiport laparoscopic surgery groups were not noted in surgical outcomes

  16. How to successfully implement a robotic pediatric surgery program: lessons learned after 96 procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lambert, Guénolée; Fourcade, Laurent; Centi, Joachim; Fredon, Fabien; Braik, Karim; Szwarc, Caroline; Longis, Bernard; Lardy, Hubert

    2013-06-01

    Both our teams were the first to implement pediatric robotic surgery in France. The aim of this study was to define the key points we brought to light so other pediatric teams that want to set up a robotic surgery program will benefit. We reviewed the medical records of all children who underwent robotic surgery between Nov 2007 and June 2011 in both departments, including patient data, installation and changes, operative time, hospital stay, intraoperative complications, and postoperative outcome. The department's internal organization, the organization within the hospital complex, and cost were evaluated. A total of 96 procedures were evaluated. There were 38 girls and 56 boys with average age at surgery of 7.6 years (range, 0.7-18 years) and average weight of 26 kg (range, 6-77 kg). Thirty-six patients had general surgery, 57 patients urologic surgery, and 1 thoracic surgery. Overall average operative time was 189 min (range, 70-550 min), and average hospital stay was 6.4 days (range, 2-24 days). The procedures of 3 patients were converted. Median follow-up was 18 months (range, 0.5-43 months). Robotic surgical procedure had an extra cost of 1934 compared to conventional open surgery. Our experience was similar to the findings described in the literature for feasibility, security, and patient outcomes; we had an overall operative success rate of 97 %. Three main actors are concerned in the implementation of a robotic pediatric surgery program: surgeons and anesthetists, nurses, and the administration. The surgeon is at the starting point with motivation for minimally invasive surgery without laparoscopic constraints. We found that it was possible to implement a long-lasting robotic surgery program with comparable quality of care.

  17. Anesthesia for Ambulatory Pediatric Surgery in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Pilot Study in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabré, Yvette B; Traoré, Idriss S S; Kaboré, Flavien A R; Ki, Bertille; Traoré, Alain I; Ouédraogo, Isso; Bandré, Emile; Wandaogo, Albert; Ouédraogo, Nazinigouba

    2017-02-01

    Long surgical wait times and limited hospital capacity are common obstacles to surgical care in many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Introducing ambulatory surgery might contribute to a solution to these problems. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of introducing ambulatory surgery into a pediatric hospital in SSA. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study that took place over 6 months. It includes all patients assigned to undergo ambulatory surgery in the Pediatric University Hospital in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Eligibility criteria for the ambulatory surgery program included >1 year of age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) 1 status, surgery with a low risk of bleeding, lasting surgery, of whom 515 were elective cases; 115 of these met the criteria for ambulatory surgery; 103 patients, with an average age of 59.74 ± 41.57 months, actually underwent surgery. The principal indications for surgery were inguinal (62) and umbilical (47) hernias. All patients had general anesthesia with halothane. Sixty-five percent also received regional or local anesthesia consisting of caudal block in 79.23% or nerve block in 20.77%. The average duration of surgery was 33 ± 17.47 minutes. No intraoperative complications were noted. All the patients received acetaminophen and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in the recovery room. Twelve (11.7%) patients had complications in recovery, principally nausea and vomiting. Eight (7.8%) patients were admitted to the hospital. No serious complications were associated with ambulatory surgery. Its introduction could possibly be a solution to improving pediatric surgical access in low-income countries.

  18. Problems in the educational process during the pediatric surgery area teaching of fourth year medicine students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Luis González López

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Very typical situations of the Pediatric Surgery Services in the Pediatric Hospital of Cienfuegos may interfere with the appropriate development of the educational process. Consequently, students might not master the principles of medical practice in the most common surgical diseases in children, thus limiting its further application in their professional performances as basic general practitioners. To obtain more accurate information on the causes of this phenomenon is considered to be paramount in order to search for practical solutions to improve the educational process and to fulfil the goals of the teaching stage. The contents on the following information sources are analyzed in this paper: documents for higher education and for medicine career, publications and papers presented in scientific events (directly or indirectly related to the practice of Pediatric Surgery and hospital statistics. This review was aimed at analyzing the situations that negatively affect the educational process during the pediatric surgery area teaching of fourth year medicine students.

  19. Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery in Pediatric Patients: The Taiwan Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Kai Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive technology or laparoscopic surgery underwent a major breakthrough over the past two decades. The first experience of thoracoscopy in children was reported around 1980 for diagnosis of intrathoracic pathology and neoplasia. Up until the middle of the 1990s, the surgical community in Taiwan was still not well prepared to accept the coming era of minimally invasive surgery. In the beginning, laparoscopy was performed in only a few specialties and only relatively short or simple surgeries were considered. But now, the Taiwan’s experiences over the several different clinical scenarios were dramatically increased. Therefore, we elaborated on the experience about pectus excavatum: Nuss procedure, primary spontaneous hemopneumothorax, thoracoscopic thymectomy, and empyema in Taiwan.

  20. Practice patterns and outcomes of pediatric partial nephrectomy in the United States: Comparison between pediatric urology and general pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suson, Kristina D; Wolfe-Christensen, Cortney; Elder, Jack S; Lakshmanan, Yegappan

    2015-08-01

    In the United States, both pediatric urologists (PUROs) and general pediatric surgeons (GPSs) perform nephrectomies in children, with PUROs performing more nephrectomies overall, most commonly for benign causes. GPSs perform more nephrectomies for malignant causes. We questioned whether the same trends persisted for partial nephrectomy. We hypothesized that PUROs performed more partial nephrectomies for all causes, including malignancy. Our primary aim was to characterize the number of partial nephrectomies performed by PUROs and GPSs. We also compared short-term outcomes between subspecialties. We analyzed the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS), a database encompassing data from 44 children's hospitals. Patients were ≤18 years old and had a partial nephrectomy (ICD-9 procedure code 554) carried out by PUROs or GPSs between 1 January, 2004 and June 30, 2013. Queried data points included surgeon subspecialty, age, gender, 3M™ All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Groups (3M™ APR DRG) code, severity level, mortality risk, length of stay (LOS), and medical/surgical complication flags. Data points were compared in patients on whom PUROs and GPSs had operated. Statistical analysis included the Student t test, chi-square test, analysis of covariance, and logistic regression. Results are presented in the table. While PUROs performed the majority of partial nephrectomies, GPSs operated more commonly for malignancy. For surgeries performed for non-malignant indications, PURO patients had a shorter LOS and lower complication rate after controlling for statistically identified covariates. There was no difference in LOS or complication rate for patients with malignancy. A Pediatric Health Information System study of pediatric nephrectomy demonstrated PUROs performed more nephrectomies overall, but GPSs performed more surgeries for malignancy. The difference was less dramatic for partial nephrectomies (63% GPS, 37% PURO) than for radical nephrectomies (90% GPS, 10

  1. Developing criteria for pediatric/adolescent bariatric surgery programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsky, Marc; Kramer, Robert E; Fullmer, Michelle A; Polfuss, Michele; Porter, Renee; Ward-Begnoche, Wendy; Getzoff, Elizabeth A; Dreyer, Meredith; Stolzman, Stacy; Reichard, Kirk W

    2011-09-01

    The prevalence of morbid obesity in adolescents is rising at an alarming rate. Comorbidities known to predispose to cardiovascular disease are increasingly being diagnosed in these children. Bariatric surgery has become an acceptable treatment alternative for morbidly obese adults, and criteria have been developed to establish center-of-excellence designation for adult bariatric surgery programs. Evidence suggests that bariatric surgical procedures are being performed with increasing numbers in adolescents. We have examined and compiled the current expert recommendations for guidelines and criteria that are needed to deliver safe and effective bariatric surgical care to adolescents.

  2. Thyroid Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fax/Phone Home » Thyroid Surgery Leer en Español Thyroid Surgery GENERAL INFORMATION Your doctor may recommend that ... made in conjunction with your endocrinologist and surgeon. Thyroid Surgery FAQs QUESTIONS AND CONSIDERATIONS When thyroid surgery ...

  3. Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Plastic Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Plastic Surgery Print A A ... forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word "plastic" ...

  4. Sub-Tenon's injection versus paracetamol in pediatric strabismus surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A N Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Sub-Tenon block in strabismus surgery in children decreased the incidence of postoperative agitation and vomiting compared with IV paracetamol then rectal paracetamol. There was no difference between sub-Tenon block and paracetamol in the incidence of oculocardiac reflex.

  5. Surgery in Pediatric Crohn's Disease: Indications, Timing and Post-Operative Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric onset Crohn's disease (CD) tends to have complicated behavior (stricture or penetration) than elderly onset CD at diagnosis. Considering the longer duration of the disease in pediatric patients, the accumulative chance of surgical treatment is higher than in adult onset CD patients. Possible operative indications include perianal CD, intestinal stricture or obstruction, abdominal abscess or fistula, intestinal hemorrhage, neoplastic changes and medically untreatable inflammation. Growth retardation is an operative indication only for pediatric patients. Surgery can affect a patient's clinical course, especially for pediatric CD patient who are growing physically and mentally, so the decision should be made by careful consideration of several factors. The complex and diverse clinical conditions hinder development of a systemized treatment algorithm. Therefore, timing of surgery in pediatric CD patients should be determined with individualized approach by an experienced and well organized multidisciplinary inflammatory bowel disease team. Best long-term outcomes will require proactive post-operative monitoring and therapeutic modifications according to the conditions.

  6. What are the prospects for non-scheduled robotic procedures in pediatric surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballouhey, Quentin; Fouracde, Laurent; Longis, Bernard; Vacquerie, Virginie; Clermidi, Pauline; Carcauzon Couvrat, Véronique; Cros, Jérôme; Berenguer, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Robotic technology allows for the management of complex surgical cases with a minimally invasive approach. The aim of this study was to communicate our experience using robotic technology for non-scheduled pediatric procedures (NSP). We performed a prospective study over the last 5 years including all consecutive cases where surgery was performed with a robot. NSP procedures were defined as a time to surgery of surgery was 19 h (11-24 h). Conversion rate to open procedure was 40 %. Fifteen NSP had to be performed without robotic plateform. Robotic surgery is a potentially relevant option for most pediatric thoracic or abdominal procedures performed in a non-scheduled setting and offers technical advantages.

  7. Outcomes following Pediatric Auditory Brainstem Implant Surgery: Early Experiences in a North American Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puram, Sidharth V; Barber, Samuel R; Kozin, Elliott D; Shah, Parth; Remenschneider, Aaron; Herrmann, Barbara S; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Barker, Fred G; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-07-01

    There are no approved Food and Drug Administration indications for pediatric auditory brainstem implant (ABI) surgery in the United States. Our prospective case series aims to determine the safety and feasibility of ABI surgery in pediatric patients age, 2.52 ± 0.39 years). Four patients underwent ABI surgery (age, 19.2 ± 3.43 months), including 4 primary procedures and 1 revision for device failure. Spontaneous device failure occurred in another subject postoperatively. No major/minor complications occurred, including cerebrospinal fluid leak, facial nerve injury, hematoma, and nonauditory stimulation. All subjects detected sound with environmental awareness, and several demonstrated babbling and mimicry. Poor durability of older implants underscores need for updated technology. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  8. Efficacy of Seprafilm for reducing reoperative risk in pediatric surgical patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Mikihiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Miki, Chikao; Kusunoki, Masato

    2005-08-01

    The safety and efficacy of Seprafilm (Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, Mass) in adult surgery patients have been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Seprafilm in pediatric surgical patients. One hundred twenty-two pediatric abdominal surgery patients were enrolled. Sixty-seven patients received Seprafilm application. Of these patients, 18 again received Seprafilm at abdominal closure during a second surgery, and of the 18, 4 received Seprafilm at closure after a third surgery. Of the 55 control patients who did not receive Seprafilm, 14 had a second surgery, and of these 14 patients, 4 had a third surgery. Adverse events, operation time, and blood loss were compared with assessed Seprafilm safety. Seprafilm efficacy evaluations included incidence and severity of adhesions in those patients who required relaparotomy. The incidence (Seprafilm, 40.9%; control, 82.4%) and severity (Seprafilm: 59.1%, grade 0; control: 17.6%, grade 0) of adhesions under the abdominal incision site were significantly reduced in the Seprafilm group (P = .007 and P = .0009, respectively). In addition, mean relaparotomy operation time was significantly shorter for Seprafilm patients (P = .004). At relaparotomy, blood loss/body weight ratio for Seprafilm patients compared with control patients showed a trend toward but did not reach significance (P = .09). Decreased incidence and severity of postsurgical adhesions with Seprafilm in pediatric patients may lead to reduction of the risks associated with subsequent operation.

  9. Single-Incision Single-Instrument Adnexal Surgery in Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Loux

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pediatric surgeons often practice pediatric gynecology. The single-incision single-instrument (SISI technique used for appendectomy is applicable in gynecologic surgery. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the records of patients undergoing pelvic surgery from 2008 to 2013. SISI utilized a 12 mm transumbilical trocar and an operating endoscope. The adnexa can be detorsed intracorporeally or extracorporealized via the umbilicus for lesion removal. Results. We performed 271 ovarian or paraovarian surgeries in 258 patients. In 147 (54%, the initial approach was SISI; 75 cases (51% were completed in patients aged from 1 day to 19.9 years and weighing 4.7 to 117 kg. Conversion to standard laparoscopy was due to contralateral oophoropexy, solid mass, inability to mobilize the adnexa, large mass, bleeding, adhesions, or better visualization. When SISI surgery was converted to Pfannenstiel, the principal reason was a solid mass. SISI surgery was significantly shorter than standard laparoscopy. There were no major complications and the overall cohort had an 11% minor complication rate. Conclusion. SISI adnexal surgery is safe, quick, inexpensive, and effective in pediatric patients. SISI was successful in over half the patients in whom it was attempted and offers a scarless result. If unsuccessful, the majority of cases can be completed with standard multiport laparoscopy.

  10. Apoptosis of circulating lymphocytes during pediatric cardiac surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocsi, J.; Pipek, M.; Hambsch, J.; Schneider, P.; Tárnok, A.

    2006-02-01

    There is a constant need for clinical diagnostic systems that enable to predict disease course for preventative medicine. Apoptosis, programmed cell death, is the end point of the cell's response to different induction and leads to changes in the cell morphology that can be rapidly detected by optical systems. We tested whether apoptosis of T-cells in the peripheral blood is useful as predictor and compared different preparation and analytical techniques. Surgical trauma is associated with elevated apoptosis of circulating leukocytes. Increased apoptosis leads to partial removal of immune competent cells and could therefore in part be responsible for reduced immune defence. Cardiovascular surgery with but not without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) induces transient immunosuppression. Its effect on T-cell apoptosis has not been shown yet. Flow-cytometric data of blood samples from 107 children (age 3-16 yr.) who underwent cardiac surgery with (78) or without (29) CPB were analysed. Apoptotic T-lymphocytes were detected based on light scatter and surface antigen (CD45/CD3) expression (ClinExpImmunol2000;120:454). Results were compared to staining with CD3 antibodies alone and in the absence of antibodies. T-cell apoptosis rate was comparable when detected with CD45/CD3 or CD3 alone, however not in the absence of CD3. Patients with but not without CPB surgery had elevated lymphocyte apoptosis. T-cell apoptosis increased from 0.47% (baseline) to 0.97% (1 day postoperatively). In CPB patients with complication 1.10% significantly higher (ANOVA p=0.01) comparing to CPB patients without complications. Quantitation of circulating apoptotic cells based on light scatter seems an interesting new parameter for diagnosis. Increased apoptosis of circulating lymphocytes and neutrophils further contributes to the immune suppressive response to surgery with CPB. (Support: MP, Deutsche Herzstiftung, Frankfurt, Germany)

  11. Training and practice of pediatric surgery in Africa: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhalaby, Essam A; Uba, Francis A; Borgstein, Eric S; Rode, Heinz; Millar, Alastair J W

    2012-05-01

    The evolution and recognition of pediatric surgery as a specialty in Africa can be divided into 4 distinct phases, starting from early 1920s till the present. The pace of development has been quite variable in different parts of Africa. Despite all recent developments, the practice of pediatric surgery in Africa continues to face multiple challenges, including limited facilities, manpower shortages, the large number of sick children, disease patterns specific to the region, late presentation and advanced pathology, lack of pediatric surgeons outside the tertiary hospitals, and inadequate governmental support. Standardization of pediatric surgery training across the continent is advocated. Collaboration with well-established pediatric surgical training centers in Africa and other developed countries is necessary. The problems of delivery of pediatric surgical services need to be addressed urgently, if the African child is to have access to essential pediatric surgical services like his or her counterpart in the high-income parts of the world. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Music Benefits on Postoperative Distress and Pain in Pediatric Day Care Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Valeria Calcaterra; Selene Ostuni; Irene Bonomelli; Simonetta Mencherini; Marco Brunero; Elisa Zambaiti; Savina Mannarino; Daniela Larizza; Riccardo Albertini; Carmine Tinelli; Gloria Pelizzo

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative effect of music listening has not been established in pediatric age. Response on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery has been evaluated. Forty-two children were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to the music-group (music intervention during awakening period) or the non-music group (standard postoperative care). Slow and fast classical music and pauses were recorded and played via ambient speakers. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, g...

  13. [Immunological status of the pediatric patient who has undergone heart surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela Flores, A; Wakida, G; Limón Rojas, A; Obregón, C; Orihuela, O; Romero, C

    1995-01-01

    Communication of results a study the effect of open and closed-heart surgery in the immune system of infants and children. Data collected 24 hrs before anesthesia and surgery and five days after surgery. Operating room and pediatric intensive care of Hospital Central de Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) in the South, Mexico City. Children undergoing surgery for correction of congenital heart disease (age 16 months to 14 years). A total of 16 patients. increased neutrophil counts with luymphopenia in both groups (p < 0.05), serum levels of the complement components C3 and C4 were higher after surgery, serum immunoglobulin IgG, IgA and IgM were higher after surgery, serum immunoglobulin IgG, IgA and IgM were decreased form preoperative levels (p < 0.01). Two patients had infection in the surgical wound. The effect of open and closed-heart surgery produced transitory immunodeficiency with recuperation of his immune systems and 5th day after surgery.

  14. Pain after pediatric otorhinolaryngologic surgery: a prospective multi-center trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Volk, Gerd Fabian; Geissler, Katharina; Komann, Marcus; Meissner, Winfried

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe postoperative pain within the first day after pediatric otorhinolaryngologic surgery and to identify factors influencing postoperative pain. Using a prospective evaluation and a Web-based multi-center registry, children ≥4 years of age (n = 365) rated their pain using questionnaires of the project Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Treatment for Children including faces numeric rating scales (FNRS, 0-10) for the determination of patient's pain on ambulation and his/her maximal and minimal pain within 8 h after day case surgery or at the first postoperative day for inpatient cases. Additionally, functional interference and therapy-related side effects were assessed. Half of the children were 4 or 5 years of age. The predominant types of surgery were adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy ± ear ventilation tubes. Although analgesics were applied preoperatively, intraoperatively, in the recovery room and on ward, maximal pain within the first day after surgery reached 4.4 ± 3.3 (FNRS). Pain was highest after oral surgery, especially after tonsillectomy and nose surgery. 39% of the children reported pain interference with breathing (39%). The most frequent side effect was drowsiness (55%). Multivariate analysis revealed that maximal pain was independently associated with the non-standardized use of opioids in the recovery room, or use of non-opioid or opioids on ward. Analgesia and perioperative pain management in pediatric otorhinolaryngologic surgery seems to be highly variable. Tonsillectomy and nose surgery are very painful. After otorhinolaryngologic surgery many children seem to receive less analgesia than needed or ineffective analgesic drug regimes.

  15. [A paradigm shift in pediatric surgery created by the National Clinical Database].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kosaku

    2014-01-01

    The use of data from the National Clinical Database (NCD) is becoming more important in pediatric surgery. First, it is possible to review all surgical data in the NCD. Although pediatric surgeons treat a wide variety of conditions, with the exceptions of common ones such as appendicitis or inguinal hernia, rare anomalies with an incidence of only one in 1,000 births account for most cases. Therefore the number of surgeries for each type of rare anomaly performed in institutions specializing in pediatric surgery annually is very few. If many institutions do not accumulate large numbers of cases over the short-term, it will be impossible to analyze useful surgical data. The use of NCD data can therefore contribute to safe, clear medical care. Second, the Japanese neonate/infant mortality rate is the world's lowest, but on the other hand, the mortality rate of 1-3-year-olds is around the 20th lowest. The leading cause of death in this age-group is accident, and therefore the development of a childhood emergency medical system is important to improve this situation. Pediatric surgeons have an important role to play in emergency care and only they can prevent complications from surgery. However, until the creation of the NCD it was not clear which types of medical care were given at which institutions. Analysis of the reasonable placement of specialists or the ideal system of pediatric surgical emergency care can now be conducted based on scientific grounds by analyzing data from the NCD provided by all surgeons. For those performing pediatric surgery, the true value of the NCD will be determined in the future based on how they cope with this paradigm shift.

  16. Nasal methicillin-resistant S. aureus is a major risk for mediastinitis in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayanagi, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Mediastinitis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a serious complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. An outbreak of surgical site infections (SSIs) provided the motivation to implement SSI prevention measures in our institution. Subjects comprised 174 pediatric patients who underwent open-heart surgery after undergoing preoperative nasal culture screening. The incidence of SSIs and mediastinitis was compared between an early group, who underwent surgery before SSI measures (Group E, n = 73), and a recent group, who underwent surgery after these measures (Group R, n = 101), and factors contributing to the occurrence of mediastinitis were investigated. The incidence of both SSIs and Mediastinitis has significantly decreased after SSI measures. With regard to factors that significantly affected mediastinitis, preoperative factors were "duration of preoperative hospitalization" and "preoperative MRSA colonization," intraoperative factors were "Aristotle basic complexity score," "operation time," "cardiopulmonary bypass circuit volume" and "lowest rectal temperature." And postoperative factor was "blood transfusion volume." Patients whose preoperative nasal cultures were MRSA-positive suggested higher risk of MRSA mediastinitis. SSI prevention measures significantly reduced the occurrence of SSIs and mediastinitis. Preoperative MRSA colonization should be a serious risk factor for mediastinitis following pediatric cardiac surgeries.

  17. Is expertise in pediatric surgery necessary to perform laparoscopic splenectomy in children? An experience from a department of general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaglio, Marcello; Romano, Fabrizio; Garancini, Mattia; Degrate, Luca; Luperto, Margherita; Uggeri, Fabio; Scotti, Mauro; Uggeri, Franco

    2012-06-01

    Splenectomy is frequently required in children for various hematologic pathologic findings. Because of progress in minimally invasive techniques, laparoscopic splenectomy (LS) has become feasible. The objective of this report is to present a monocentric experience and to evaluate the efficacy of and complications observed after laparoscopic splenic procedures in a department of general surgery. 57 consecutive LSs have been performed in a pediatric population between January 2000 and October 2010. There were 33 females and 24 males with a median age of 12 years (range 4-17). Indications were: hereditary spherocytosis 38 cases, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura 10, sickle cell disease (SCD) 6, thrombocytopenic thrombotic purpura 2 and non-hodgkin lymphoma 1 case. Patients were operated on using right semilateral position, employing Atlas Ligasure vessel sealing system in 49 cases (86%) and Harmonic Scalpel + EndoGIA in 8. In 24 patients (42.1%), a cholecystectomy was associated. Two patients required conversion to open splenectomy (3.5%). In three cases, a minilaparotomy was performed for spleen removal (5.2%). Accessory spleens were identified in three patients (5.2%). Complications (8.8%) included bleeding (two), abdominal collection (one) and pleural effusion (two). There was no mortality. Average operative time was 128 min (range 80-220). Average length of stay was 3 days (range 2-7). Mean blood loss was 80 ml (range 30-500) with a transfusion rate of 1.7% (one patient). Laparoscopic spleen surgery is safe, reliable and effective in the pediatric population with hematologic disorders and is associated with minimal morbidity, zero mortality, and a short length of stay. Ligasure vessel sealing system shortened operative time and blood loss. On the basis of the results, we consider laparoscopic approach the gold standard for the treatment of these patients even in a department of general surgery.

  18. Technical aspects of pediatric epilepsy surgery: Report of a multicenter, multinational web-based survey by the ILAE Task Force on Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukiert, Arthur; Rydenhag, Bertil; Harkness, William; Cross, J Helen; Gaillard, William D

    2016-02-01

    Surgical techniques may vary extensively between centers. We report on a web-based survey aimed at evaluating the current technical approaches in different centers around the world performing epilepsy surgery in children. The intention of the survey was to establish technical standards. A request was made to 88 centers to complete a web-based survey comprising 51 questions. There were 14 questions related to general issues, 13 questions investigating the different technical aspects for children undergoing epilepsy surgery, and 24 questions investigating surgical strategies in pediatric epilepsy surgery. Fifty-two centers covering a wide geographic representation completed the questionnaire. The median number of resective procedures per center per year was 47. Some important technical practices appeared (>80% of the responses) such as the use of prophylactic antibiotics (98%), the use of high-speed drills for bone opening (88%), nonresorbable material for bone flap closure (85%), head fixation (90%), use of the surgical microscope (100%), and of free bone flaps. Other questions, such as the use of drains, electrocorticography (ECoG) and preoperative withdrawal of valproate, led to mixed, inconclusive results. Complications were noted in 3.8% of the patients submitted to cortical resection, 9.9% hemispheric surgery, 5% callosotomy, 1.8% depth electrode implantation, 5.9% subdural grids implantation, 11.9% hypothalamic hamartoma resection, 0.9% vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), and 0.5% deep brain stimulation. There were no major differences across regions or countries in any of the subitems above. The present data offer the first overview of the technical aspects of pediatric epilepsy surgery worldwide. Surprisingly, there seem to be more similarities than differences. That aside many of the evaluated issues should be examined by adequately designed multicenter randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Further knowledge on these technical issues might lead to increased

  19. The 100 classic papers of pediatric orthopaedic surgery: a bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, R G; Kelly, J C; Kelly, P M; Moore, D P

    2013-09-18

    Pediatric orthopaedic surgery owes its development to many pioneering individuals, and the studies that these individuals have undertaken form the basis for the clinical decisions made on the modern pediatric orthopaedic service. The aim of our study was to use citation analysis to identify the top 100 papers in pediatric orthopaedic surgery. Using the Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge, we searched for citations of all papers relevant to pediatric orthopaedics. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, and country and institution of origin were recorded for each paper. The most cited paper was found to be the classic paper from 1963 by Salter and Harris that introduced the now-eponymous classification system for physeal injuries in the skeletally immature patient. The second most cited was Salter's paper describing the widely used osteotomy for the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip, and the third most cited was Catterall's description of the natural history of Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease. Most papers originated in the U.S., and most were published in this journal. A number of authors including Salter, Ponseti, Graf, and Loder had more than one paper in the top-100 list. This paper's identification of the classic papers of pediatric orthopaedic surgery gives us a unique insight into the development of pediatric orthopaedic surgery in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries and identifies those individuals who have contributed the most to the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision-making in pediatric orthopaedics today.

  20. National practice patterns and outcomes of pediatric nephrectomy: comparison between urology and general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suson, Kristina D; Wolfe-Christensen, Cortney; Elder, Jack S; Lakshmanan, Yegappan

    2015-05-01

    In adults nephrectomy is under the purview of urologists, but pediatric urologists and pediatric general surgeons perform extirpative renal surgery in children. We compared the contemporary performance and outcome of all-cause nephrectomy at pediatric hospitals as performed by pediatric urologists and pediatric general surgeons. We queried the Pediatric Health Information System to identify patients 0 to 18 years old who were treated with nephrectomy between 2004 and 2013 by pediatric urologists and pediatric general surgeons. Data points included age, gender, severity level, mortality risk, complications and length of stay. Patients were compared by APR DRG codes 442 (kidney and urinary tract procedures for malignancy) and 443 (kidney and urinary tract procedures for nonmalignancy). Pediatric urologists performed more all-cause nephrectomies. While pediatric urologists were more likely to operate on patients with benign renal disease, pediatric general surgeons were more likely to operate on children with malignancy. Patients on whom pediatric general surgeons operated had a higher average severity level and were at greater risk for mortality. After controlling for differences patients without malignancy operated on by pediatric urologists had a shorter length of stay, and fewer medical and surgical complications. There was no difference in length of stay, or medical or surgical complications in patients with malignancy. Overall compared to pediatric general surgeons more nephrectomies are performed by pediatric urologists. Short-term outcomes, including length of stay and complication rates, appear better in this data set in patients without malignancy who undergo nephrectomy by pediatric urologists but there is no difference in outcomes when nephrectomy is performed for malignancy. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Lung surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pneumonectomy; Lobectomy; Lung biopsy; Thoracoscopy; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery; VATS ... You will have general anesthesia before surgery. You will be asleep and unable to feel pain. Two common ways to do surgery on your lungs are thoracotomy and video- ...

  2. Turbinate surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery; Nasal obstruction - turbinate surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or ... This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  3. Cataract Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Videos: What Do Cataracts Look Like? Cataract Surgery Written By: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed By: Elena M ... how they work. What to expect with cataract surgery Before surgery: Your ophthalmologist will measure your eye ...

  4. Comparison of pediatric appendectomy outcomes between pediatric surgeons and general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Ido; Mazeh, Haggi; Levy, Yair; Karavani, Gilad; Ghanem, Muhammad; Armon, Yaron; Vromen, Amos; Eid, Ahmed; Udassin, Raphael

    2013-04-01

    Appendectomy is the most common urgent procedure in children, and surgical outcomes may be affected by the surgeon's experience. This study's aim is to compare appendectomy outcomes performed by pediatric surgeons (PSs) and general surgery residents (GSRs). A retrospective review of all patients younger than 16y treated for appendicitis at two different campuses of the same institution during the years 2008-2009 was performed. Appendectomies were performed by PS in one campus and GSR in the other. Primary end points included postoperative morbidity and hospital length of stay. During the study period, 246 (61%) patients were operated by senior GSR (postgraduate year 5-7) versus 157 (39%) patients by PS. There was no significant difference in patients' characteristics at presentation to the emergency room and the rate of appendeceal perforation (11% versus 15%, P=0.32), and noninfectious appendicitis (5% versus 5% P=0.78) also was similar. Laparoscopic surgery was performed more commonly by GSR (16% versus 9%, P=0.02) with shorter operating time (54±1.5 versus 60±2.1, P=0.01). Interestingly, the emergency room to operating room time was shorter for GSR group (419±14 versus 529±24min, P<0.001). The hospital length of stay was shorter for the GSR group (4.0±0.2 versus 4.5±0.2, P=0.03), and broad-spectrum antibiotics were used less commonly (20% versus 53%, P<0.0001) and so was home antibiotics continuation (13% versus 30%, P<0.0001). Nevertheless, postoperative complication rate was similar (5% versus 7%, P=0.29) and so was the rate of readmissions (2% versus 5%, P=0.52). The results of this study suggest that the presence of a PS does not affect the outcomes of appendectomies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Communicating pediatric surgery suspension: feelings of the relatives involved in the process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Amanda Creste Martins da Costa Ribeiro; Braga, Eliana Mara

    2010-06-01

    Hospitalization is a complex experience; this can be made worse if surgical intervention is required, especially when the patient is a child. When surgery is suspended, patient and family can experience feelings of insecurity, distress, and anxiety. The objective of this study was to identify and describe the perceptions of fifteen mothers or guardians of children between 0 and 18 years old admitted in a teaching hospital, after receiving news that surgery for their child was suspended. This was a descriptive qualitative study which used Interpersonal Communication as theoretical reference and Analysis of Content as the methodology. Results showed that suspension of pediatric surgery in our institution causes repercussions to patients, their families, and institution organisation; that communication between health team professionals, patients and families is inadequate; and that the nurses' participation in informing surgery suspension must be effective.

  6. Pediatric Vascular Surgery Review with a 30-Year-Experience in a Tertiary Referral Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seung-Kee; Cho, Sungsin; Kim, Hyun-Young; Kim, Sang Joon

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric vascular disease is rare, and remains a big challenge to vascular surgeons. In contrast to adults, surgery for pediatric vascular disease is complicated by issues related to small size, future growth, and availability of suitable vascular conduit. During the last 30 years, 131 major vascular operations were performed in a tertiary referral center, Seoul National University Hospital, including aortoiliac aneurysm, acute or chronic arterial occlusion, renovascular hypertension, portal venous hypertension, trauma, tumor invasion to major abdominal vessels, and others. Herein we review on the important pediatric vascular diseases and share our clinical experiences on these rare diseases. PMID:28690995

  7. Pyeloplasty techniques using minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrà, Francesco; Escolino, Maria; Farina, Alessandra; Settimi, Alessandro; Esposito, Ciro; Varlet, François

    2016-10-01

    Hydronephrosis is the most common presentation of ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction. We reviewed literature, collecting data from Medline, to evaluate the current status of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) approach to pyeloplasty. Since the first pyeloplasty was described in 1939, several techniques has been applied to correct UPJ obstruction, but Anderson-Hynes dismembered pyeloplasty is established as the gold standard, to date also in MIS technique. According to literature several studies underline the safety and effectiveness of this approach for both trans- and retro-peritoneal routes, with a success rate between 81-100% and an operative time between 90-228 min. These studies have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of this procedure in the management of UPJ obstruction in children. Whether better the transperitoneal, than the retroperitoneal approach is still debated. A long learning curve is needed especially in suturing and knotting.

  8. The "weekend effect" in pediatric surgery - increased mortality for children undergoing urgent surgery during the weekend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Seth D; Papandria, Dominic J; Aboagye, Jonathan; Salazar, Jose H; Van Arendonk, Kyle; Al-Omar, Khaled; Ortega, Gezzer; Sacco Casamassima, Maria Grazia; Abdullah, Fizan

    2014-07-01

    For a number of pediatric and adult conditions, morbidity and mortality are increased when patients present to the hospital on a weekend compared to weekdays. The objective of this study was to compare pediatric surgical outcomes following weekend versus weekday procedures. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and the Kids' Inpatient Database, we identified 439,457 pediatric (Pediatric patients undergoing common urgent surgical procedures during a weekend admission have a higher adjusted risk of death, blood transfusion, and procedural complications. While the exact etiology of these findings is not clear, the timing of surgical procedures should be considered in the context of systems-based deficiencies that may be detrimental to pediatric surgical care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Be Smart About Social Media Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) KidsHealth > For Parents > Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) ... bariatric surgery might be an option. About Bariatric Surgery Bariatric surgery had its beginnings in the 1960s, ...

  10. Seizure outcomes after resective surgery for extra-temporal lobe epilepsy in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J; Breshears, Jonathan D; Sun, Peter P; Chang, Edward F; Auguste, Kurtis I

    2013-08-01

    While temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common epilepsy syndrome in adults, seizures in children are more often extratemporal in origin. Extra-temporal lobe epilepsy (ETLE) in pediatric patients is often medically refractory, leading to significantly diminished quality of life. Seizure outcomes after resective surgery for pediatric ETLE vary tremendously in the literature, given diverse patient and epilepsy characteristics and small sample sizes. The authors performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies including 10 or more pediatric patients (age ≤ 19 years) published over the last 20 years examining seizure outcomes after resective surgery for ETLE, excluding hemispherectomy. Thirty-six studies were examined. These 36 studies included 1259 pediatric patients who underwent resective surgery for ETLE. Seizure freedom (Engel Class I outcome) was achieved in 704 (56%) of these 1259 patients postoperatively, and 555 patients (44%) continued to have seizures (Engel Class II-IV outcome). Shorter epilepsy duration (≤ 7 years, the median value in this study) was more predictive of seizure freedom than longer (> 7 years) seizure history (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07-2.14), suggesting that earlier intervention may be beneficial. Also, lesional epilepsy was associated with better seizure outcomes than nonlesional epilepsy (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.19-1.49). Other predictors of seizure freedom included an absence of generalized seizures (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.18-2.35) and localizing ictal electroencephalographic findings (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.24-1.93). In conclusion, seizure outcomes after resective surgery for pediatric ETLE are less favorable than those associated with temporal lobectomy, but seizure freedom may be more common with earlier intervention and lesional epilepsy etiology. Children with continued debilitating seizures despite failure of multiple medication trials should be referred to a comprehensive pediatric epilepsy center

  11. Efficacy of Prophylactic Dexmedetomidine in Preventing Postoperative Junctional Ectopic Tachycardia After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Amrousy, Doaa Mohamed; Elshmaa, Nagat S; El-Kashlan, Mohamed; Hassan, Samir; Elsanosy, Mohamed; Hablas, Nahed; Elrifaey, Shimaa; El-Feky, Wael

    2017-03-01

    Postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia is one of the most serious arrhythmias that occur after pediatric cardiac surgery, difficult to treat and better to be prevented. Our aim was to assess the efficacy of prophylactic dexmedetomidine in preventing junctional ectopic tachycardia after pediatric cardiac surgery. A prospective controlled study was carried out on 90 children who underwent elective cardiac surgery for congenital heart diseases. Patients were randomized into 2 groups. Group I (dexmedetomidine group): 60 patients received dexmedetomidine; Group II (Placebo group): 30 patients received the same amount of normal saline intravenously. The primary outcome was the incidence of postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia. Secondary outcomes included bradycardia, hypotension, vasoactive inotropic score, ventilation time, pediatric cardiac care unit stay, length of hospital stay, and perioperative mortality. The incidence of junctional ectopic tachycardia was significantly reduced in the dexmedetomidine group (3.3%) compared with the placebo group (16.7%) with P0.005). Prophylactic use of dexmedetomidine is associated with significantly decreased incidence of postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia in children after congenital heart surgery without significant side effects. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  12. Predictors of Acute Renal Failure During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Pediatric Patients After Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lin; Long, Cun; Liu, Jinping; Hei, Feilong; Ji, Bingyang; Yu, Kun; Hu, Qiang; Hu, Jinxiao; Yuan, Yuan; Gao, Guodong

    2016-05-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is associated with increased mortality in pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The aim of this study was to identify predictors of ARF during ECMO in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery. A retrospective study analyzed 42 children (≤15 years) after cardiac surgery requiring venous-arterial ECMO between December 2008 and December 2014 at Fuwai Hospital. ARF was defined as ≥300% rise in serum creatinine (SCr) concentration from baseline or application of dialysis. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify the predictors of ARF during ECMO. A total of 42 children (age, interquartile range [IQR], 13.0 [7.2-29.8] months; weight, IQR, 8.5 [6.7-11.0] kg) after cardiac surgery requiring ECMO were included in this study. The total survival rate was 52.4%, and the incidence of ARF was 40.5%. As the result of univariate analysis, ECMO duration, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, maximum free hemoglobin (FHB) during ECMO, lactate level, and mean blood pressure before initiation of ECMO were entered in multiple logistic regression analysis. In multiple logistic regression analysis, FHB during ECMO (OR 1.136, 95% CI 1.023-1.261) and lactate level before initiation of ECMO (OR 1.602, 95% CI 1.025-2.502) were risk factors for ARF during ECMO after pediatric cardiac surgery. There was a linear correlation between maximum SCr and maximum FHB (Pearson's r = 0.535, P = 0.001). Maximum SCr during ECMO has also a linear correlation with lactate level before initiation of ECMO (Pearson's r = 0.342, P = 0.044). Increased FHB during ECMO and high lactate level before initiation of ECMO were risk factors for ARF during ECMO in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery.

  13. MIS-behavior: practical heuristics for precise pediatric minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinman, Thane A

    2015-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has changed pediatric urology and general surgery, offering less morbidity and new surgical options for many procedures. This promise goes unrealized when technical methods lag. Application of MIS in children is uneven after more than 2 decades of application. Principles of versatile and proficient technique may remain unstated and implicit in surgical training, often leaving surgical training an exercise in inference and imitation. This article describes some essential practical principles of precision MIS applied to patients of any size. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Extratemporal resections in pediatric epilepsy surgery-an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Jeffrey P

    2017-04-01

    Despite optimized medical treatment, approximately one third of all patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures and by definition have medically resistant epilepsy (MRE). For these patients, surgical disruption of the epileptogenic network may enable freedom or great improvement in control of their seizures. The success of surgery is dependent on accurate localization of the epileptogenic zone and network. Epilepsy arising from regions of cortical dysplasia within the neocortex of the frontal, parietal, and occipital lobes show a propensity for reorganization and progressive decline in seizure freedom and consequent poorer surgical outcome. These procedures often require staged investigation with intracranial electrodes via subdural grids or stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) and are considered extratemporal resections (ETRs). Central concepts include the following: (1) localization of epileptogenic and eloquent functional regions, (2) safe and effective placement of intracranial electrode arrays, (3) resection of epileptogenic cortex, and (4) avoidance of complications. Each of these concepts is summarized and developed in this summary paper. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. The effects of the addition of a pediatric surgery fellow on the operative experience of the general surgery resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Alexander; Garwe, Tabitha; Adeseye, Ademola; Ruiz-Elizalde, Alejandro; Churchill, Warren; Tuggle, David; Mantor, Cameron; Lees, Jason

    2015-06-01

    Adding fellows to surgical departments with residency programs can affect resident education. Our specific aim was to evaluate the effect of adding a pediatric surgery (PS) fellow on the number of index PS cases logged by the general surgery (GS) residents. At a single institution with both PS and GS programs, we examined the number of logged cases for the fellows and residents over 10 years [5 years before (Time 1) and 5 years after (Time 2) the addition of a PS fellow]. Additionally, the procedure related relative value units (RVUs) recorded by the faculty were evaluated. The fellows averaged 752 and 703 cases during Times 1 and 2, respectively, decreasing by 49 (P = 0.2303). The residents averaged 172 and 161 cases annually during Time 1 and Time 2, respectively, decreasing by 11 (P = 0.7340). The total number of procedure related RVUs was 4627 and 6000 during Times 1 and 2, respectively. The number of cases logged by the PS fellows and GS residents decreased after the addition of a PS fellow; however, the decrease was not significant. Programs can reasonably add an additional PS fellow, but care should be taken especially in programs that are otherwise static in size.

  16. Quality, Safety, and Value in Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotzbecker, Michael P; Wang, Kevin; Waters, Peter M; McCarthy, James; Flynn, John M; Vitale, Michael G

    2016-09-01

    Enhancing patient safety and the quality of care continues to be a focus of considerable public and professional interest. We have made dramatic strides in our technical ability to care for children with pediatric orthopaedic problems, but it has become increasingly obvious that there are also significant opportunities to improve the quality, safety, and value of the care we deliver. The purpose of this article is to introduce pediatric orthopaedic surgeons to the rationale for and principles of quality improvement and to provide an update on quality, safety, and value projects within Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America.

  17. The burden of waiting: DALYs accrued from delayed access to pediatric surgery in Kenya and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poenaru, Dan; Pemberton, Julia; Cameron, Brian H

    2015-05-01

    Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) have become the standard metric for estimating burden of disease (BoD), but have not yet been applied to delayed access to surgical procedures. This study estimates the DALYs accrued from delayed access to surgical care in two pediatric surgical units in Kenya and Canada. Records of operations for 13 congenital health states in a Kenyan and a Canadian hospital were prospectively collected for 2012. DALYs caused by delayed presentation were estimated using disability weights and ideal and actual age at surgery. 1208 first-time procedures in general surgery, neurosurgery, plastic surgery, and urology were included. Delays were longest in general surgery and longer in Kenya than in Canada in all specialties. The longest delays in Kenya were for orchidopexy (72 months) and anorectoplasty (PSARP) (74 months), and in Canada for orchidopexy (40 months). Corresponding total delayed BoD was highest in general surgery and neurosurgery and higher again in Kenya than in Canada (484 cf. 84 DALYs). Estimating BoD resulting from delayed surgery is feasible and reflects both late presentation and limited access to care. Further exploration of these factors can make delayed DALYs a useful measure of health care coverage and waitlist prioritization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cirurgia da catarata infantil unilateral Unilateral pediatric cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Maria Drummond Brandão

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar os resultados visuais de uma série de crianças operadas de catarata unilateral. MÉTODOS: Um estudo retrospectivo foi realizado através da análise de 35 prontuários médicos do Serviço de Catarata Congênita da UNIFESP/EPM. RESULTADOS: Quanto à etiologia, a primeira causa de catarata foi idiopática, a segunda causa foi o trauma e a terceira foi a rubéola congênita. Em 51,4% dos olhos tinham acuidade visual pré-operatória de ausência de fixação. E em 42,8% dos casos operados a acuidade visual final foi igual ou melhor que 20/200. DISCUSSÃO: Embora a cirurgia em catarata unilateral seja motivo de controvérsias entre os oftalmologistas, obteve-se melhora de acuidade visual em número significativo de casos.PURPOSE: To analyze the results in a series of children submitted to unilateral cataract surgery. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted through the analysis of 35 patient files from the Congenital Cataract Service of UNIFESP/EPM. RESULTS: The main cause of unilateral cataract was idiopathic, the second cause was ocular trauma and the third cause was congenital rubella. Initial visual acuity was very poor in 51.4% of the cases (did not fix or follow, and the best corrected final visual acuity was better than 20/200 in 42.8% of the eyes. DISCUSSION: Although controversial, the surgical treatment of unilateral cataract, in this study, showed improvement in many cases.

  19. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  20. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  1. [Effect of pediatric TCI system for propofol plus remifentanil in pediatric short-duration surgery with laryngeal mask airway anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-cheng; Li, Jun; Yang, Bo; Shangguan, Wang-ning; Cai, Ming-yang; Lian, Qing-quan

    2011-03-08

    To study the effect of a pediatric TCI patent system for propofol plus remifentanil in pediatric short-duration surgery with laryngeal mask airway (LMA) anesthesia. A total of 120 pediatric patients underwent short-duration elective surgery, aged 3 - 9 years old, weighted 13 - 26 kg, ASAI grade, were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 40 each). The propofol concentrations of effect compartment were set at 2 µg/ml in Group A, 3 µg/ml in Group B and 4 µg/ml in Group C. The remifentanil initial concentration of plasma compartment was 2 ng/ml and increased stepwise by 0.5 ng/ml until a successful insertion of LMA. The remifentanil concentration was recorded when LMA was successfully inserted and the cases were numerated at the each remifentanil concentration. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), BIS (bispectral index) values and postoperative adverse events were also recorded at the time points of pre-induction (T0), 2 min post-remifentanil TCI (T1), LMA insertion (T2), skin incision (T3), 5 min post-skin incision (T4), 10 min post-skin incision, (T5) and beginning surgery (T6). The satisfactory ratios of a successful insertion of LMA were highest in remifentanil 3.0 ng/ml (AR subgroup), 2.5 ng/ml (BR subgroup) and 2.0 ng/ml (CR subgroup) respectively. The laryngeal mask satisfactory ratio was high in BR subgroup (P propofol 3 µg/ml effect compartment concentration plus remifentanil 2.5 ng/ml plasma concentration TCI displays stable hemodynamics, less stress, fewer complications and better clinical outcomes in pediatric short-duration surgery with LMA anesthesia.

  2. Pediatric health care provider perceptions of weight loss surgery in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanguri, Poornima; Lanning, David; Wickham, Edmond P; Anbazhagan, Aruna; Bean, Melanie K

    2014-01-01

    This study explored pediatric health care providers' obesity treatment practices and perceptions about adolescent weight loss surgery (WLS). Surveys were e-mailed to pediatric listservs. After descriptive analyses, correlations, chi-squares, and one-way analyses of variance compared responses by provider characteristics. Surveys were completed by 109 providers. Almost half do not routinely measure body mass index. Providers typically counsel patients about lifestyle change, with limited perceived benefit; pediatrics" (17%) as reasons. However, when presented with patient scenarios of different ages and comorbidities, likeliness to refer for WLS increased substantially. Surgeons, younger providers and those with fewer years of experience were more likely to refer for WLS (P pediatric provider resistance to refer obese adolescents remains. Improved referral and management practices are needed.

  3. The quantitative and qualitative responses of platelets in pediatric patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignjatovic, Vera; Than, Jenny; Summerhayes, Robyn; Newall, Fiona; Horton, Steve; Cochrane, Andrew; Monagle, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This prospective, single-center study aimed to evaluate the platelet response during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery in a large cohort of children up to 6 years of age. Blood samples were drawn at four time points: after induction of anesthesia, after initiation of the CPB, before protamine, and immediately after chest closure. The study recruited 60 children requiring CPB for surgical repair of congenital heart defects. The platelet count decreased throughout CPB surgery, but during the same period, platelet activity increased. The more pronounced decrease in platelet count observed in children younger than 1 year compared with that of children 1 to 6 years of age was not associated with an age-specific change in platelet activity. The overall increase in platelet function observed in this study could provide a mechanism that compensates for the decrease in platelet count. This study provides a new foundation for future studies investigating requirements of platelet supplementation in the setting of pediatric CPB surgery.

  4. Fluid Overload and Cumulative Thoracostomy Output Are Associated With Surgical Site Infection After Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochet, Anthony A; Nyhan, Aoibhinn; Spaeder, Michael C; Cartron, Alexander M; Song, Xiaoyan; Klugman, Darren; Brown, Anna T

    2017-08-01

    To determine the impact of cumulative, postoperative thoracostomy output, amount of bolus IV fluids and peak fluid overload on the incidence and odds of developing a deep surgical site infection following pediatric cardiothoracic surgery. A single-center, nested, retrospective, matched case-control study. A 26-bed cardiac ICU in a 303-bed tertiary care pediatric hospital. Cases with deep surgical site infection following cardiothoracic surgery were identified retrospectively from January 2010 through December 2013 and individually matched to controls at a ratio of 1:2 by age, gender, Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery score, Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgery category, primary cardiac diagnosis, and procedure. None. Twelve cases with deep surgical site infection were identified and matched to 24 controls without detectable differences in perioperative clinical characteristics. Deep surgical site infection cases had larger thoracostomy output and bolus IV fluid volumes at 6, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively compared with controls. For every 1 mL/kg of thoracostomy output, the odds of developing a deep surgical site infection increase by 13%. By receiver operative characteristic curve analysis, a cutoff of 49 mL/kg of thoracostomy output at 48 hours best discriminates the development of deep surgical site infection (sensitivity 83%, specificity 83%). Peak fluid overload was greater in cases than matched controls (12.5% vs 6%; p thoracostomy output were associated with deep surgical site infection after pediatric cardiothoracic surgery. We suspect the observed increased thoracostomy output, fluid overload, and IV fluid boluses may have altered antimicrobial prophylaxis. Although analysis of additional pharmacokinetic data is warranted, providers may consider modification of antimicrobial prophylaxis dosing or alterations in fluid management and diuresis in response to assessment of peak fluid overload and fluid

  5. Trends in Pediatric Surgery Operative Volume among Residents and Fellows: Improving the Experience for All.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talutis, Stephanie; McAneny, David; Chen, Catherine; Doherty, Gerard; Sachs, Teviah

    2016-06-01

    The ACGME requires general surgery residents (GSR) to perform 20 pediatric surgery cases as part of the total 750 cases before graduation. We queried the ACGME General Surgery (1999 to 2014) and Pediatric Surgery (2003 to 2014) Case Logs for all pediatric operations performed during training. Means (±SD) and medians (10(th):90(th) percentiles) were compared, and R(2) was calculated for all trends. The number of pediatric surgery fellows (PSF) increased 63% (23 to 39; R(2) = 0.82), while GSR numbers increased 12% (989 to 1,105; R(2) = 0.77). Total and average pediatric surgery case volume for GSR decreased from 39,309 to 32,156 (R(2) = 0.90) and 39.7 ± 13 to 29.1 ± 10 (R(2) = 0.91), respectively. Meanwhile, average PSF case volume increased from 980 ± 208 to 1,137 ± 202 (R(2) = 0.83). These trends persisted for inguinal/umbilical hernia (GSR 22.1 ± 13 to 15.6 ± 10; R(2) = 0.93; PSF 90.5 ± 17.6 to 104.4 ± 20.7; R(2) = 0.34), pyloric stenosis (GSR 3.9 ± 3 to 2.8 ± 3; R(2) = 0.60; PSF 29.6 ± 15 to 39.7 ± 16.8; R(2) = 0.69), and intestinal atresia (GSR 1.3 ± 2 to 1.1 ± 2; R(2) = 0.34; PSF 4.3 ± 4 to 11.8 ± 8; R(2) = 0.21). The mean number of GSR pediatric operations diminished for both junior (37.1 ± 20 to 27.3 ± 16; R(2) = 0.88) and chief (2.6 ± 5 to 1.7 ± 5; R(2) = 0.75) years. Teaching cases in pediatric surgery decreased at all levels. Although the percentage of GSR teaching cases performed during chief years fell modestly (6.6% to 4.7%; R(2) = 0.53), median teaching cases dropped from 2 (0:11 [10(th):90(th) percentiles]) to zero (0:0 [10(th):90(th) percentiles]). Mean PSF teaching cases declined (100.7 ± 396 to 44.5 ± 42; R(2) = 0.72), while the percentage of operations that were teaching cases decreased more sharply (10.3% to 3.5%; R(2) = 0.82). Total pediatric surgery cases and PSF operative volume have increased, while GSR operative volume has decreased. Opportunities may exist to increase resident participation while

  6. Regional anesthesia for pediatric knee surgery: a review of the indications, procedures, outcomes, safety, and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhly WT

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Wallis T Muhly, Harshad G Gurnaney, Arjunan GaneshDepartment of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, PA, USAAbstract: The indications for surgery on the knee in children and adolescents share some similarity to adult practice in that there are an increasing number of sports-related injuries requiring surgical repair. In addition, there are some unique age-related conditions or congenital abnormalities that may present as indications for orthopedic intervention at the level of the knee. The efficacy and safety of peripheral nerve blocks (PNBs for postoperative analgesia following orthopedic surgery has been well established in adults. Recent studies have also demonstrated earlier functional recovery after surgery in patients who received PNBs. In children, PNB is gaining popularity, and increasing data are emerging to demonstrate the feasibility, efficacy, and safety in this population. In this paper, we will review some of the most common indications for surgery involving the knee in children and the anatomy of knee, associated dermatomal and osteotomal innervation, and the PNBs most commonly used to produce analgesia at the level of the knee. We will review the evidence in support of regional anesthesia in children in terms of both the quality conferred to the immediate postoperative care and the role of continuous PNBs in maintaining effective analgesia following discharge. Also we will discuss some of the subtle challenges in utilizing regional anesthesia in the pediatric patient including the use of general anesthesia when performing regional anesthesia and the issue of monitoring for compartment syndrome. Finally, we will offer some thoughts about areas of practice that are in need of further investigation.Keywords: pediatric surgery, regional anesthesia, analgesia, knee surgery

  7. [Laparoscopic training--the guarantee of a future in pediatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drăghici, I; Drăghici, L; Popescu, M; Copăescu, C; Mitoiu, D; Dragomirescu, C

    2009-01-01

    Laparoscopy is considered today the highlight of modern surgery, the forerunner of the fascinating world of video and robotic surgery, both of them derived from the sophisticated areas of aeronautic industry. Remarkably, Romanian specialists keep up with the pace of worldwide technological developments, assimilating one by one each and every video endoscopic procedure. In the early 90s, the Romanian laparos-copic school was founded with the contribution of many important personalities; their activities and achievements have been an inspiration for the following generation of laparoscopic surgeons. In this last decade, the newest branch of laparoscopic surgery in our country, pediatric laparoscopy, managed to evolve from its "shy" beginnings to become an important method of improving the quality of surgical procedures, to the benefit of our "small patients". The purpose of this article is to encourage and promote minimally invasive video endoscopic surgery training, emphasizing its crucial role in the education and professional development of the next generation of pediatric surgeons, and not only. The modem concept of laparoscopic training includes experimental scientific practices, as well as the newest technical acquisitions such as virtual reality video-electronic simulation.

  8. Methodological Issues in Predicting Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery Candidates Through Natural Language Processing and Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Kevin Bretonnel; Glass, Benjamin; Greiner, Hansel M; Holland-Bouley, Katherine; Standridge, Shannon; Arya, Ravindra; Faist, Robert; Morita, Diego; Mangano, Francesco; Connolly, Brian; Glauser, Tracy; Pestian, John

    2016-01-01

    We describe the development and evaluation of a system that uses machine learning and natural language processing techniques to identify potential candidates for surgical intervention for drug-resistant pediatric epilepsy. The data are comprised of free-text clinical notes extracted from the electronic health record (EHR). Both known clinical outcomes from the EHR and manual chart annotations provide gold standards for the patient's status. The following hypotheses are then tested: 1) machine learning methods can identify epilepsy surgery candidates as well as physicians do and 2) machine learning methods can identify candidates earlier than physicians do. These hypotheses are tested by systematically evaluating the effects of the data source, amount of training data, class balance, classification algorithm, and feature set on classifier performance. The results support both hypotheses, with F-measures ranging from 0.71 to 0.82. The feature set, classification algorithm, amount of training data, class balance, and gold standard all significantly affected classification performance. It was further observed that classification performance was better than the highest agreement between two annotators, even at one year before documented surgery referral. The results demonstrate that such machine learning methods can contribute to predicting pediatric epilepsy surgery candidates and reducing lag time to surgery referral.

  9. Effect of continuous infusion of midazolam on immune function in pediatric patients after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H B; Jia, Y P; Liang, Z H; Zhou, R; Zheng, J Q

    2015-08-21

    The current study was performed to investigate the effects of midazolam on immune function in pediatric patients after surgery and possible mechanism involved. Patients who needed sedation for more than 2 consecutive days after undergoing surgery in the Pediatric Surgery Department of our hospital were enrolled for the study. Fifty-six patients (5-14 years old) were randomly divided into midazolam and propofol treatment groups (N = 28 each in each group). Pediatric patients received midazolam or profolol via continuous intravenous administration, and their plasma cytokine levels were compared after 48 h. Cultured rat C6 brain glioma cells were pretreated with a range of concentrations of midazolam or propofol for 60 minutes prior to incubation with 10 ng/mL IL-1β in serum-free medium or vehicle for 36 h. IL-6 concentration was subsequently measured using ELISA. In comparison with levels measured before the infusion of midazolam for 48 h, concentrations of all cytokines decreased, with the differences in IL-1β, IL-8, and TNF-α concentrations reaching significance (all P Midazolam significantly suppressed the IL-1β-induced release of IL-6 in rat C6 glioma cells. This inhibition was concentration-dependent between 0.3 and 3 μM, with 3 μM concentration of midazolam decreasing the IL-1β-induced release of IL-6 by 43.58%. Midazolam can significantly inhibit the release of cytokines in pediatric patients after surgery. One of the mechanisms may be the inhibition of IL-1β- induced release of IL-6 in the central nervous system.

  10. The Effects of Perioperative Music Interventions in Pediatric Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Van Der Heijden, Marianne J. E.; Sadaf Oliai Araghi; Monique van Dijk; Johannes Jeekel; M G Myriam Hunink

    2015-01-01

    Objective Music interventions are widely used, but have not yet gained a place in guidelines for pediatric surgery or pediatric anesthesia. In this systematic review and meta-analysis we examined the effects of music interventions on pain, anxiety and distress in children undergoing invasive surgery. Data Sources We searched 25 electronic databases from their first available date until October 2014. Study Selection Included were all randomized controlled trials with a parallel group, crossove...

  11. Development of a multi-institutional clinical research consortium for pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschl, Ronald B; Minneci, Peter; Gadepalli, Samir; Saito, Jacqueline M; Askegard-Giesmann, Johanna; Deans, Katherine; Downard, Cynthia; Fallat, Mary; Finnell, Maria; Helmrath, Michael; Kabre, Rashmi; Lal, David; Leys, Charles; Mak, Grace; Ostlie, Daniel; Rescorla, Fred; Sato, Thomas; St Peter, Shawn; von Allmen, Daniel; Warner, Brad

    2017-07-01

    Multicenter clinical research studies in pediatric surgery have been largely limited to relatively small case-series and retrospective reviews because of the rarity of many of the diseases we treat and difficulty coordinating and executing multi-institutional studies. Creation of a collaborative research network can provide the needed patient population and infrastructure to perform high quality multi-institutional studies. In 2013, eleven academic pediatric surgery centers within the United States formed a research consortium to develop and conduct multicenter clinical research projects to advance the practice of pediatric surgery. We present our process for creating, developing, and maintaining this consortium including initial regional geographic limitation, charter development with by-laws and procedures for adopting studies, and research infrastructure including a central website for study monitoring and central reliance institutional review board process. Our model could be reproduced or adapted by other institutions to develop or strengthen other research collaboratives. Type of study: retrospective, IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Results of consecutive training procedures in pediatric cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell David N

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report from a single institution describes the results of consecutive pediatric heart operations done by trainees under the supervision of a senior surgeon. The 3.1% mortality seen in 1067 index operations is comparable across procedures and risk bands to risk-stratified results reported by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. With appropriate mentorship, surgeons-in-training are able to achieve good results as first operators.

  13. The Spectrum of General Surgery Interventions in Pediatric Patients with Ventricular Assist Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Fady; Buchholz, Holger; Dicken, Bryan; Conway, Jennifer

    2017-06-13

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) have positively impacted the management of heart failure. However, they come with a range of complications. Although general surgical complications have been assessed in adults with VADs, there is no study to date that has assessed general surgery intervention in the pediatric population. Fifty-two patients who received VADs from 2005 to 2015 at the Stollery Children's Hospital were assessed for general surgery intervention and anticoagulation status at the time of intervention. Eighteen patients (35%) had general surgery intervention; there were 21 nonemergency procedures and six emergency procedures performed. For nonemergency procedures, 89% of patients had anticoagulation held within 24 hours of surgery and 84% had anticoagulation resumed within 4 hours postoperatively. Antiplatelet therapy was not held perioperatively. In both emergency and nonemergency procedures, anticoagulation status was not a factor in the success of the procedure. This study shows that it is safe to have general surgery intervention on the same admission as a VAD implant provided an appropriate interdisciplinary healthcare team is involved with the perioperative management of the patient.

  14. Putting a face and context on pediatric surgery cancelations: The development of parent personas to guide equitable surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Lisa M; DeJonckheere, Melissa; Pratap, Jayant Nick

    2016-06-09

    Last-minute cancelation of planned surgery can have substantial psychological, social, and economic effects for patients/families and also leads to wastage of expensive health-care resources. In order to have a deeper understanding of the contextual, psychological, practical, and behavioral factors that potentially impact pediatric surgery cancelation, we conducted a qualitative study to create 'personas' or fictional portraits of parents who are likely to cancel surgery. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 21 parents of children who were considered 'at risk' for surgical cancelation and whose scheduled surgery was canceled at late notice. From the themes, patterns, and associated descriptive phrases in the data, we developed and validated five different personas of typical scenarios reflecting parent experiences with surgery and surgery cancelations. The personas are being employed to guide contextualized development of interventions tailored to prototypical families as they prepare and attend for surgery.

  15. Influence of Arousal, Previous Experience, and Age on Surgery Preparation of Same Day of Surgery and In-Hospital Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Jan; Melamed, Barbara G.

    1984-01-01

    Studied two pediatric surgery populations (N=66) to determine differences in retention of preparatory information. Results showed that children exposed to a hospital-relevant film retained more information than those children not prepared regardless of age, IQ, previous experience, sex, and time of film preparation. (LLL)

  16. Nose Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Health Home Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery. Reproduction or republication strictly ... Terms of Use © Copyright 2017. American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery 1650 Diagonal Rd Alexandria, ...

  17. After Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There may also be swelling and soreness around ... the first few days, weeks, or months after surgery. Some other questions to ask are How long ...

  18. “A journey around the world”: Parent narratives of the journey to pediatric resective epilepsy surgery and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baca, Christine B.; Pieters, Huibrie C.; Iwaki, Tomoko J.; Mathern, Gary W.; Vickrey, Barbara G.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although shorter time to pediatric resective epilepsy surgery is strongly associated with greater disease severity, other non-clinical diagnostic and sociodemographic factors also play a role. We aimed to examine parent-reported barriers to timely receipt of pediatric epilepsy surgery. METHODS We conducted 37 interviews of parents of children who previously had resective epilepsy surgery at UCLA (2006–2011). Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and systematically coded using thematic analysis by two independent coders and subsequently checked for agreement. Clinical data, including `time to surgery' (age of epilepsy onset to surgery) were abstracted from medical records. RESULTS The mean time to surgery was 5.3 years (SD=3.8); surgery types included 32% hemispherectomy, 43% lobar/focal, 24% multilobar. At surgery, parents were on average 38.4 years (SD=6.6) and children were 8.2 years (SD=4.7). The more arduous and longer aspect of the journey to surgery was perceived by parents to be experienced prior to presurgical referral. The time from second anti-epileptic drug failure to presurgical referral was ≥1 year in 64% of children. Thematic analysis revealed four themes (with subthemes) along the journey to surgery and beyond: (1) recognition: “something is wrong” (unfamiliarity with epilepsy, identification of medical emergency), (2) searching and finding: “a circuitous journey” (information seeking, finding the right doctors, multiple medications, insurance obstacles, parental stress), (3) surgery is a viable option: “the right spot” (surgery as last resort, surgery as best option, hoping for candidacy), and (4) life now: “we took the steps we needed to” (a new life, giving back). SIGNIFICANCE Multi-pronged interventions targeting parent-, provider- and system-based barriers should focus on the critical presurgical referral period; such interventions are needed to remediate delays and improve access to subspecialty care for

  19. Innovation in pediatric surgery: the surgical innovation continuum and the ETHICAL model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jennifer A T

    2014-04-01

    Innovations are indispensable to the practice and advancement of pediatric surgery. Children represent a special type of vulnerable population and must be protected since they do not have legal capacity to consent, and their parent's judgment may be compromised in circumstances when the child is very ill or no adequate therapy exists. In an effort to protect patients, legislators could pass and enforce laws that prohibit or curtail surgical innovations and thus stifle noble advancement of the practice. The goals of this paper are, 1) To clearly define the characteristics of surgical innovation types so interventions may be classified into 1 of 3 distinct categories along a continuum: Practice Variation, Transition Zone, and Experimental Research, and 2) To propose a practical systematic method to guide surgeon decision-making when approaching interventions that fall into the "Transition Zone" category on the Surgical Intervention Continuum. The ETHICAL model allows those that know the intricacies and nuances of pediatric surgery best, the pediatric surgeons and professional pediatric surgical societies, to participate in self-regulation of innovation in a manner that safeguards patients without stifling creativity or unduly hampering surgical progress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. ANALYSIS OF SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS AFTER ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY: A CASE-CONTROL STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas, Mariana de Queiroz Leite; Costa, Ana Maria Magalhães; Mendes, Pedro Henrique Barros; Gomes, Saint Clair

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To describe the rate of surgical site infections in children undergoing orthopedic surgery in centers of excellence and analyze the patients’ profiles. Methods: Medical records of pediatric patients undergoing orthopedic surgery in the Jamil Haddad National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics from January 2012 to December 2013 were analyzed and monitored for one year. Patients diagnosed with surgical site infection were matched with patients without infection by age, date of admission, field of orthopedic surgery and type of surgical procedure. Patient, surgical and follow-up variables were examined. Descriptive, bivariate and correspondence analyses were performed to evaluate the patients’ profiles. Results: 347 surgeries and 10 surgical site infections (2.88%) were identified. There was association of infections with age - odds ratio (OR) 11.5 (confidence interval - 95%CI 1.41-94.9) -, implant - OR 7.3 (95%CI 1.46-36.3) -, preoperative period - OR 9.8 (95%CI 1.83-53.0), and length of hospitalization - OR 20.6 (95%CI 3.7-114.2). The correspondence analysis correlated the infection and preoperative period, weight, weight Z-score, age, implant, type of surgical procedure, and length of hospitalization. Average time to diagnosis of infection occurred 26.5±111.46 days after surgery. Conclusions: The rate of surgical site infection was 2.88%, while higher in children over 24 months of age who underwent surgical implant procedures and had longer preoperative periods and lengths of hospitalization. This study identified variables for the epidemiological surveillance of these events in children. Available databases and appropriate analysis methods are essential to monitor and improve the quality of care offered to the pediatric population.

  1. Assessing residents' operative skills for external ventricular drain placement and shunt surgery in pediatric neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldave, Guillermo; Hansen, Daniel; Briceño, Valentina; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jea, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors previously demonstrated the use of a validated Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) tool for evaluating residents' operative skills in pediatric neurosurgery. However, no benchmarks have been established for specific pediatric procedures despite an increased need for meaningful assessments that can either allow for early intervention for underperforming trainees or allow for proficient residents to progress to conducting operations independently with more passive supervision. This validated methodology and tool for assessment of operative skills for common pediatric neurosurgical procedures-external ventricular drain (EVD) placement and shunt surgery- was applied to establish its procedure-based feasibility and reliability, and to document the effect of repetition on achieving surgical skill proficiency in pediatric EVD placement and shunt surgery. METHODS A procedure-based technical skills assessment for EVD placements and shunt surgeries in pediatric neurosurgery was established through the use of task analysis. The authors enrolled all residents from 3 training programs (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston Methodist Hospital, and University of Texas-Medical Branch) who rotated through pediatric neurosurgery at Texas Children's Hospital over a 26-month period. For each EVD placement or shunt procedure performed with a resident, the faculty and resident (for self-assessment) completed an evaluation form (OSATS) based on a 5-point Likert scale with 7 categories. Data forms were then grouped according to faculty versus resident (self) assessment, length of pediatric neurosurgery rotation, postgraduate year level, and date of evaluation ("beginning of rotation," within 1 month of start date; "end of rotation," within 1 month of completion date; or "middle of rotation"). Descriptive statistical analyses were performed with the commercially available SPSS statistical software package. A p value skills. The learning curves

  2. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws and ... Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by ...

  3. The effects of perioperative music interventions in pediatric surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.E. Van Der Heijden (Marianne J. E.); S.O. Araghi (Sadaf Oliai); M. Van Dijk (Monique); J. Jeekel (Johannes); M.G.M. Hunink (Myriam)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Music interventions are widely used, but have not yet gained a place in guidelines for pediatric surgery or pediatric anesthesia. In this systematic review and meta-analysis we examined the effects of music interventions on pain, anxiety and distress in children undergoing

  4. The effects of perioperative music interventions in pediatric surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.E. Van Der Heijden (Marianne J. E.); S.O. Araghi (Sadaf Oliai); M. Van Dijk (Monique); J. Jeekel (Johannes); M.G.M. Hunink (Myriam)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Music interventions are widely used, but have not yet gained a place in guidelines for pediatric surgery or pediatric anesthesia. In this systematic review and meta-analysis we examined the effects of music interventions on pain, anxiety and distress in children undergoing inv

  5. [Minimally invasive surgery in pediatric patients within a general urology department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Jorge Subirá; Zalabardo, José Manuel Sánchez; Gil, Joaquín Navarro; Conejos, José Ignacio Hijazo; Alonso, Jesús García-Magariño; Calero, David García; López, José Antonio López; Uría, José Gabriel Valdivia

    2008-01-01

    The advances of minimally invasive surgery in urology over the last years have enabled a progressive and constant implementation of endourology and laparoscopy in pediatric patients. We perform a review of our experience, as a general hospital, with minimally invasive surgery performed in pediatric patients over the last ten years. We retrospectively analyzed the endourological and laparoscopic operations performed between 1997 and 2007 in children up to the age of 16 years, collecting data about patient's age and gender, type of disease, techniques, anesthesia, and perioperative events. seventy-two surgical operations were performed in patients with an age range between 28 days and 16 years, with a mean age of 6.8 years. 56% of the patients were boys and 44% girls. Indications for surgery was vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in 28 cases (38.8%); lithiasis 17 cases (23.6%) which were distributed in 4 cystolithotripsies, 9 ureterorenoscopy with lithotripsy, one pure percutaneous nephrolithotomy and three mixed; ureterocele 9 cases (12.5%); urethral obstruction 7 cases (9.7%); 3 diagnostic laparoscopies for cryptorchidism (4. 1%), 2 laparoscopic procedures for cystic pathology (2.7%), another 2 laparoscopic renal biopsies (2.7%), and one laparoscopic repair of a ureteropyelic junction syndrome; 1 case of emergency percutaneous nephrostomy in the supine position after open pyeloplasty with subsequent reoperation with percutaneous resection of a granuloma; and 1 case of botulin toxin injection into the detrusor muscle. The consolidation of pediatric endourology in our department, and more recently laparoscopy, has contributed to improve the quality of care in pediatric patients; it has been achieved thanks to our previous know-how in general endourological techniques and the existence of adequate technical and human resources.

  6. IOL Implants: Lens Replacement and Cataract Surgery (Intraocular Lenses)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  7. The effort and outcomes of the Pediatric Surgery match process: Are we interviewing too many?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadepalli, Samir K; Downard, Cynthia D; Thatch, Keith A; Islam, Saleem; Azarow, Kenneth S; Chen, Mike K; Lillehei, Craig W; Puligandla, Pramod S; Reynolds, Marleta; Waldhausen, John H; Oldham, Keith T; Langham, Max R; Tracy, Thomas F; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2015-11-01

    Increasing numbers of programs participating in the pediatric surgery match has resulted in economic and logistical issues for candidates, General Surgery residencies, and Pediatric Surgery training programs (PSTP). We sought to determine the ideal number of interviews conducted by programs based on resultant rank order lists (ROL) of matched candidates. PSTPs received 4 online surveys regarding interview practices (2011-2012, 2014), and matched candidate ROL (2008-2010, 2012, 2014). Program directors (PD) also provided estimates regarding minimum candidate interview numbers necessary for an effective match (2011-2012, 2014). Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-populations rank tests compared ROL and interview numbers conducted. Quartile regression predicted ROL based on the interview numbers. Wilcoxon signed rank-sum tests compared the interview numbers to the minimal interview number using a matched pair. p Values<0.05 were significant. Survey response rates ranged from 85-100%. Median ROL of matched candidates (2-3.5) did not differ between programs (p=0.09) and the lowest matched ROL for any year was 10-12. Interview numbers did not affect the final candidate ROL (p=0.22). While PDs thought the minimum median interview number should be 20, the number actually conducted was significantly higher (p<0.001). These data suggest that PSTPs interview excessive numbers of candidates. Programs and applicants should evaluate mechanisms to reduce interviews to limit costs and effort associated with the match. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Outcomes of Disconnective Surgery in Intractable Pediatric Hemispheric and Subhemispheric Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh George Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study the outcome of disconnective epilepsy surgery for intractable hemispheric and sub-hemispheric pediatric epilepsy. Methods: A retrospective analysis of the epilepsy surgery database was done in all children (age <18 years who underwent a peri-insular hemispherotomy (PIH or a peri-insular posterior quadrantectomy (PIPQ from April 2000 to March 2011. All patients underwent a detailed pre surgical evaluation. Seizure outcome was assessed by the Engel’s classification and cognitive skills by appropriate measures of intelligence that were repeated annually. Results: There were 34 patients in all. Epilepsy was due to Rasmussen’s encephalitis (RE, Infantile hemiplegia seizure syndrome (IHSS, Hemimegalencephaly (HM, Sturge Weber syndrome (SWS and due to post encephalitic sequelae (PES. Twenty seven (79.4% patients underwent PIH and seven (20.6% underwent PIPQ. The mean follow up was 30.5 months. At the last follow up, 31 (91.1% were seizure free. The age of seizure onset and etiology of the disease causing epilepsy were predictors of a Class I seizure outcome. Conclusions: There is an excellent seizure outcome following disconnective epilepsy surgery for intractable hemispheric and subhemispheric pediatric epilepsy. An older age of seizure onset, RE, SWS and PES were good predictors of a Class I seizure outcome.

  9. Willingness to pay for one-stop anesthesia in pediatric day surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Caro Elisabetta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study assesses the parents' Willingness To Pay (WTP for One Stop Anesthesia (OSA. OSA is part of a free screening procedure that determines the timing of the anesthesiological assessment. In OSA-positive patients, the preoperative assessment is carried out on the same day as the surgery. The OSA allows patients who have to undergo surgery in a pediatric day surgery to avoid accessing the pre-admission clinic. Method This is a descriptive cohort study. A sample of 106 parents were interviewed directly by means of a questionnaire. The questionnaire builds a hypothetical scenario where the interviewee has a chance to buy the OSA health service with the WTP. The WTP values are distributed in classes and are contingent to the market built in the questionnaire. The Chi Square and Cramer's V tests evaluate the WTP dependence on the parents' place of origin and occupation. Results The approximate average of the WTP classes is €87.21 per family. The Chi Square test relative to the WTP classes and the places of origin is statistically significant (p Conclusion Nearly 90% of pediatric patients who were screened for timing the preoperative assessment are true positives to OSA. This allows doing away with the pre-hospitalization, with definite advantages for the families. This screening is a health service that families would be hypothetically willing to pay.

  10. The impact of human rhinovirus infection in pediatric patients undergoing heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Corcoran, Claudia; Witte, Madolin K; Ampofo, Krow; Castillo, Ramon; Bodily, Stephanie; Bratton, Susan L

    2014-12-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV), the most common cause of upper respiratory infection in children, can present as bronchiolitis, pneumonia, or asthma exacerbations. The impact of HRV in infants and toddlers with congenital heart disease is poorly defined. A case-control study was performed to compare the clinical course for 19 young children with respiratory symptoms who tested positive for rhinovirus after heart surgery with that of 56 matched control subjects. The control subjects were matched by surgical repair, age, weight, and time of the year. Patients with known HRVs before surgery and control subjects with respiratory symptoms or positive test results for viruses were excluded from the study. Human rhinovirus infection was associated with more than a tenfold increase in the odds of noninvasive ventilation after extubation (odds ratio [OR] 11.45; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 3.97-38.67), a 12-fold increase in the probability of extubation failure (OR 12.84; 95 % CI 2.93-56.29), and increased use of pulmonary medications including bronchodilator and nitric oxide (p rhinovirus increases resource use and prolongs postoperative recovery after pediatric heart surgery. Surgery timing should be delayed for patients with rhinovirus if possible.

  11. Completion rates of anterior and posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorrhexis in pediatric cataract surgery for surgery performed by trainee surgeons with the use of a low-cost viscoelastic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Muralidhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Pediatric cataract surgery is traditionally done with the aid of high-molecular-weight viscoelastics which are expensive. It needs to be determined if low-cost substitutes are just as successful. Aims : The study aims to determine the success rates for anterior and posterior capsulorrhexis and intraocular lens (IOL implantation in the bag for pediatric cataract surgery performed with the aid of a low-molecular-weight viscoelastic. Settings and Design : Nonrandomized observational study. Materials and Methods: Children less than 6 years of age who underwent cataract surgery with IOL implantation in the period May 2008-May 2009 were included. The surgeries were done by pediatric ophthalmology fellows. A standard procedure of anterior capsulorrhexis, lens aspiration with primary posterior capsulorrhexis, anterior vitrectomy, and IOL implantation was followed. Three parameters were studied: successful completion of anterior and posterior capsulorrhexis and IOL implantation in the bag. Results: 33 eyes of 28 children were studied. The success rate for completion was 66.7% and 88.2 % for anterior and posterior capsulorrhexis, respectively. IOL implantation in the bag was successful in 87.9%. Conclusions: 2% hydroxypropylmethylcellulose is a viable low-cost alternative to more expensive options similar to high-molecular-weight viscoelastics. This is of great relevance to hospitals in developing countries.

  12. Left hemisphere structural connectivity abnormality in pediatric hydrocephalus patients following surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Weihong; Meller, Artur; Shimony, Joshua S; Nash, Tiffany; Jones, Blaise V; Holland, Scott K; Altaye, Mekibib; Barnard, Holly; Phillips, Jannel; Powell, Stephanie; McKinstry, Robert C; Limbrick, David D; Rajagopal, Akila; Mangano, Francesco T

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging research in surgically treated pediatric hydrocephalus patients remains challenging due to the artifact caused by programmable shunt. Our previous study has demonstrated significant alterations in the whole brain white matter structural connectivity based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and graph theoretical analysis in children with hydrocephalus prior to surgery or in surgically treated children without programmable shunts. This study seeks to investigate the impact of brain injury on the topological features in the left hemisphere, contratelateral to the shunt placement, which will avoid the influence of shunt artifacts and makes further group comparisons feasible for children with programmable shunt valves. Three groups of children (34 in the control group, 12 in the 3-month post-surgery group, and 24 in the 12-month post-surgery group, age between 1 and 18 years) were included in the study. The structural connectivity data processing and analysis were performed based on DTI and graph theoretical analysis. Specific procedures were revised to include only left brain imaging data in normalization, parcellation, and fiber counting from DTI tractography. Our results showed that, when compared to controls, children with hydrocephalus in both the 3-month and 12-month post-surgery groups had significantly lower normalized clustering coefficient, lower small-worldness, and higher global efficiency (all p regional connectivity measures in a series of brain regions in the left hemisphere (8 and 10 regions in the 3-month post-surgery and the 12-month post-surgery group, respectively, all p < 0.05, corrected). No significant correlation was found between any of the global or regional measures and the contemporaneous neuropsychological outcomes [the General Adaptive Composite (GAC) from the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System, Second Edition (ABAS-II)]. However, one global network measure (global efficiency) and two regional network measures in the insula

  13. Left hemisphere structural connectivity abnormality in pediatric hydrocephalus patients following surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihong Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging research in surgically treated pediatric hydrocephalus patients remains challenging due to the artifact caused by programmable shunt. Our previous study has demonstrated significant alterations in the whole brain white matter structural connectivity based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and graph theoretical analysis in children with hydrocephalus prior to surgery or in surgically treated children without programmable shunts. This study seeks to investigate the impact of brain injury on the topological features in the left hemisphere, contratelateral to the shunt placement, which will avoid the influence of shunt artifacts and makes further group comparisons feasible for children with programmable shunt valves. Three groups of children (34 in the control group, 12 in the 3-month post-surgery group, and 24 in the 12-month post-surgery group, age between 1 and 18 years were included in the study. The structural connectivity data processing and analysis were performed based on DTI and graph theoretical analysis. Specific procedures were revised to include only left brain imaging data in normalization, parcellation, and fiber counting from DTI tractography. Our results showed that, when compared to controls, children with hydrocephalus in both the 3-month and 12-month post-surgery groups had significantly lower normalized clustering coefficient, lower small-worldness, and higher global efficiency (all p < 0.05, corrected. At a regional level, both patient groups showed significant alteration in one or more regional connectivity measures in a series of brain regions in the left hemisphere (8 and 10 regions in the 3-month post-surgery and the 12-month post-surgery group, respectively, all p < 0.05, corrected. No significant correlation was found between any of the global or regional measures and the contemporaneous neuropsychological outcomes [the General Adaptive Composite (GAC from the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System, Second

  14. Hyperglycemia after pediatric cardiac surgery: impact of age and residual lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moga, Michael-Alice; Manlhiot, Cedric; Marwali, Eva M; McCrindle, Brian W; Van Arsdell, Glen S; Schwartz, Steven M

    2011-02-01

    We evaluated the effect of patient age and significant residual cardiac lesions on the association between hyperglycemia and adverse outcomes in children after cardiac surgery. The incidence, severity, and duration of hyperglycemia in this patient population and perioperative factors predisposing to hyperglycemia were also delineated. Retrospective, observational cohort study. Eighteen-bed pediatric cardiac critical care unit. Seven hundred seventy-two children undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass during 2006 and 2007. None. Postoperative glucose levels were reviewed in all children who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass at our institution during 2006 and 2007 who met all inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria (n = 772). The composite morbidity-mortality outcome included hospital death, cardiac arrest, renal/hepatic failure, lactic acidosis, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use, or infection. Hyperglycemia occurred in 90% of patients and resolved within 72 hrs in most without exogenous insulin. Preoperative factors, including prostaglandins, mechanical ventilation, and cyanosis, were significantly associated with increased odds of significant hyperglycemia (>180 mg/dL for >12 hrs or any level >270 mg/dL) as were increased surgical complexity and perioperative steroid administration. Thirty-one percent of the entire cohort reached the composite outcome and the odds were significantly increased after 54 hrs of mild (elevated, but 270 mg/dL). Neonates (<1 month of age) tolerated longer periods of hyperglycemia before showing increased odds of reaching the composite morbidity-mortality end point. In the setting of important residual cardiac lesions, mild or moderate hyperglycemia was not as strongly associated with adverse outcomes. Age and residual cardiac lesions are important modifiers of the association between hyperglycemia and suboptimal outcomes after pediatric cardiac surgery. Use of insulin therapy for

  15. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome after pediatric congenital heart surgery: Incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehne, Martin; Sasse, Michael; Karch, André; Dziuba, Friederike; Horke, Alexander; Kaussen, Torsten; Mikolajczyk, Rafael; Beerbaum, Philipp; Jack, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is frequent after cardiac surgery, but data on its incidence and perioperative risk factors are scarce for children with congenital heart disease. SIRS incidence within 72 hours following cardiac surgery was evaluated in a secondary analysis of children enrolled to a treatment-free control group of a randomized controlled trial. Intraoperative parameters were investigated for their association with SIRS using multivariable fractional polynomial logistic regression models. Effects of SIRS on various organ functions and length of stay were evaluated using time-varying Cox regression models. In 116 children after cardiac surgery (median age [range]: 7.4 month [1 day-16.2 years]) SIRS occurred in n = 39/102 with and n = 1/14 without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Duration of CPB (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.28 per hour; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17; 4.42) and amount of fresh frozen plasma (HR: 1.23 per 10 mL/kg; 95%CI 1.06; 1.42) were identified as predictors for SIRS; neonates seemed to be less susceptible for SIRS development (HR: 0.86; 95%CI 0.79; 0.95). SIRS was associated with organ dysfunction (HR: 2.69; 95%CI 1.41; 5.12) and extended stay in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) (median: 168 vs. 96 hours; p = 0.007). SIRS is a frequent complication after pediatric congenital heart surgery; it affects nearly one third of children and prolongs PICU stay significantly. Duration of CPB and amount of fresh frozen plasma were identified as important risk factors. Neonates seem to be less susceptible to SIRS development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Analysis of the pediatric orthopedic surgery questions on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination, 2002 through 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Derek F; Ting, Beverlie L; Sargent, M Catherine; Frassica, Frank J

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric orthopedics has been a frequently tested topic on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE). Our goal was to provide direction for resident education efforts by: (1) analyzing the exam's number, topics, and types of pediatric orthopedic surgery questions; (2) examining references cited in the postexam answer packet supplied by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons; and (3) examining the efficacy of the Orthopaedic Knowledge Update (OKU): Pediatrics 3 book as a source for answers to the pediatric orthopedic questions. We reviewed 5 years (2002 through 2006) of OITEs and the associated American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons' answer packets and assessed the OKU: Pediatrics 3 book for topic relativity. Each question was classified into 1 of 6 categories and labeled with a cognitive taxonomy level: 1 (simple recall), 2 (interpretation of data), or 3 (advanced problem-solving). The 6 categories included: (1) pediatric orthopedic knowledge; (2) knowledge of treatment modalities; (3) diagnosis; (4) diagnosis with recognition of associated conditions; (5) diagnosis with further studies; and (6) diagnosis with treatment. The overall percentage of pediatric questions was 14.1%. The most commonly addressed were pediatric elbow fractures, osteomyelitis, and scoliosis. The most common question types were categories 1 (pediatric orthopedic knowledge) and 6 (diagnosis with treatment). The most frequently referenced textbooks were Lovell and Winter's Pediatric Orthopaedics (31%) and Tachdjian's Pediatric Orthopaedics (16%). The most frequently referenced journals were the Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics (American) (29%) and the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American) (19%). Using only the OKU: Pediatrics 3 review textbook, 65% of the questions could be answered. Knowledge of the topics more likely to be tested may help the orthopedic educator direct a didactic curriculum geared toward the OITE and American Board of Surgery examinations. Although the

  17. The prevalence of abnormal preoperative coagulation tests in pediatric patients undergoing spinal surgery for scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Katie M; O'Brien, Kirsty; Regan, Irene; O'Byrne, John M; Moore, David; Kelly, Paula M; Noel, Jacques; Butler, Joseph; Nolan, Beatrice; Kiely, Patrick J

    2015-06-01

    Multilevel spinal fusion surgery for deformity correcting spinal surgery in pediatric patients with scoliosis has typically been associated with significant blood loss. The mechanism of bleeding in such patients is not fully understood. Coagulation abnormalities, which may be associated with scoliosis, are thought to play a role. To document and compare the prevalence of preoperative coagulation abnormalities among patients with scoliosis attending a pediatric orthopedic department for spinal fusion surgery with patients attending for minor surgery. An observational study. All patients were recruited from a pediatric tertiary referral center in Dublin, Ireland. Coagulation profile results were prospectively collected over a 2-year period from 165 spinal surgery patients. In total, 175 patients were included in the non-scoliosis group. These patients attended the day ward for minor procedures and were recruited over a 4-month period. The primary outcome measure was the coagulation profiles, which included prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and thrombin time (TT). Levels of Coagulation Factors II, V, VII, and X were also recorded. All blood samples were sent to the haematology laboratory to establish the coagulation profile. The primary outcome was the presence of an abnormal coagulation screening test (if any of PT, APTT, or TT were abnormal). Prothrombin time, APTT, and TT were also analyzed as individual continuous variables, as well as Coagulation Factors II, V, VII, and X. Regression analysis was used to compare the coagulation profile of scoliosis patients with that of non-scoliosis patients. There were no outside funding sources or any potential conflict of interest associated with this study. The scoliosis patients were more likely to have an abnormal preoperative screening test compared with non-scoliosis patients, with an odds ratio of 2.6. Further analysis showed statistically significant longer clotting times for patients with

  18. Working and training conditions of residents in pediatric surgery: a nationwide survey in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reismann, M; Ellerkamp, V; Dingemann, J

    2010-09-01

    As in other surgical specialties, increasing concern has been expressed worldwide about the shortage of trainees in pediatric surgery training programs. We performed a nationwide survey to investigate the current situation in Germany. An internet-based nationwide survey comprising 36 questions on training conditions in pediatric surgery was linked to the homepage of the German Society of Pediatric Surgery from June to September 2008. Statements on the following aspects were evaluated by responding residents using a scale from 1 (I do not agree at all) to 5 (I fully agree): workplace, cooperation with colleagues, head of the department, cooperation with other specialties, training and research conditions. A median value of 3 indicated an unsatisfactory assessment, with at least 50% of respondents giving an indifferent or negative response. 70 questionnaires were completed. Some of the evaluations revealed problematic areas. In particular, statements regarding working hours revealed dissatisfaction among the responding doctors. The median value accorded the statement "I am satisfied with the current working time regulation" was 2.9. With regard to departmental heads, some criticisms were directed against a perceived lack of soft skills. According to the respondents, their involvement in decision-making processes was insufficient ("We are involved in decision-making processes affecting our working conditions" - median value 2.4). Residents were also dissatisfied with the feedback they received for their work ("I get enough feedback regarding my achievement" - median value 2.6). Another problem area was career development ("I will finish my specialist training in time" - median value 2.9). However, these points did not affect overall satisfaction. Trainee satisfaction with regulations on working hours is low. Despite a general satisfaction with all fields appraised, improvements in various individual areas, e. g., the attitude of departmental heads and strategies of

  19. Implementation of a patient blood management program in pediatric scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ferrer, A; Gredilla-Díaz, E; de Vicente-Sánchez, J; Sánchez Pérez-Grueso, F; Gilsanz-Rodríguez, F

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether the implementation of a blood conservation program, and the adoption and progressive association of different methods, reduces transfusion requirements in pediatric patients undergoing scoliosis surgery of different origins. Quasi-experimental, nonrandomized, descriptive study, approved by the Ethics Committee for Research of our institution. 50 pediatric patients (ASA I-III) aged 5 to 18 years, undergoing scoliosis surgery of any etiology by a single posterior or double approach (anterior and posterior) were included. A historical group with no alternatives to transfusion: Group No ahorro=15 patients (retrospective data collection) was compared with another 3 prospective study groups: Group HNA (acute normovolemic hemodilution)=9 patients; Group HNA+Rec (intraoperative blood salvage)=14 patients, and Group EPO (HNA+Rec+erythropoietin±preoperative donation)=12 patients; according with the implementation schedule of the transfusion alternatives in our institution. The rate of transfusion in different groups (No ahorro, HNA, HNA+Rec, EPO) was 100, 66, 57, and 0% of the patients, respectively, with a mean±SD of 3.40±1.59; 1.33±1.41; 1.43±1.50; 0±0 RBC units transfused per patient, respectively. Statistically significant differences (P<.001) were found in both the transfusion rate and number of RBC units. The application of a multimodal blood transfusion alternatives program, individualized for each pediatric patient undergoing scoliosis surgery can avoid transfusion in all cases. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Statewide and national impact of California's Staffing Law on pediatric cardiac surgery outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Patricia A; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Jenkins, Kathy; Fawcett, Jacqueline; Hayman, Laura

    2011-05-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the impact of staffing ratios on risk-adjusted outcomes for pediatric cardiac surgery programs in California and relative to other states combined. California performs 20% of the nation's pediatric cardiac surgery and is the only state with a nurse ratio law. Understanding the imposition of mandated ratios on pediatric outcomes is necessary to inform the debate about nurse staffing. Patient variables were extracted from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database. The American Hospital Association database was used for institutional variables. Descriptive analyses were used to identify and describe patient, nursing, and hospital characteristics. Changes in nursing ratios and full-time equivalents (FTEs) between 2003 and 2006 were examined. Associations between nursing characteristics and each outcome variable were examined using general estimating equation models. The RACHS-1 (Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery) risk adjustment method was used for mortality. Hospitals in California significantly increased RN FTEs (P = .025) and RN ratios (P = .036) after enactment of AB 394 in 2006. Neither RN FTEs nor RN ratios were associated with mortality, complications, or resource utilization after risk adjustment. After the law, California's standardized mortality ratio (SMR) decreased more (33%) than in all other states combined (29%). Standardized complication ratio (SCR) increased by 5% but decreased by 5% for all other states combined, and the increase in charge differential ($53,443) was more than twice the increase ($23,119) for other states combined. Hospitals in California made upward adjustments in nursing FTEs and ratios after enactment of AB 394. There was a substantial increase in California's charge differential, a decrease in SMR, and an increase in SCR after enactment of the legislation.

  1. Current readings: long-term management of patients undergoing successful pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBardino, Daniel J; Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    in all patients; and (3) concomitant procedures to treat associated lesions. The need for pulmonary valve replacement is increasing for many adults with congenital heart disease. In the past, chronic pulmonary regurgitation following repair of tetralogy of Fallot was considered benign. Current evidence demonstrates that chronic pulmonary regurgitation causes significant morbidity by producing right ventricular dilatation and dysfunction, exercise intolerance, arrhythmias, and sudden death. Multiple options exist for pulmonary valve replacement including several recent developments such as pulmonary valve replacement with a hand-sewn polytetrafluoroethylene bicuspid valve and percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement. Reoperative cardiac surgery is common in adults with congenital heart disease. Although a history of previous cardiac surgery does not independently confer a significant incremental risk of operative mortality, patients with the greatest number of previous surgeries appear to be a higher risk group. Multi-institutional data about adults with congenital heart disease from The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database can be used to estimate prognosis and council patients and their families. The six manuscripts reviewed in this article have been selected to give a flavor of the state of the art in the domain of caring for adults with congenital heart disease and to provide important information about the long term management of patients undergoing successful pediatric cardiac surgery.

  2. An investment in knowledge: Research in global pediatric surgery for the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Sarah L M; Ng-Kamstra, Joshua S; Ameh, Emmanuel A; Ozgediz, Doruk E; Poenaru, Dan; Bickler, Stephen W

    2016-02-01

    The body of literature addressing surgical and anesthesia care for children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is small. This lack of research hinders full understanding of the nature of many surgical conditions in LMICs and compromises potential efforts to alleviate the significant health, welfare and economic burdens surgical conditions impose on children, families and countries. This article will evaluate the need for improved global pediatric surgery research by (1) presenting the current state of surgical research for children in LMICs and (2) discussing methods and opportunities for improvement within the political context of current global health priorities. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Mechanical support availability in pediatric cardiac surgery: program size should not matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Eduardo M; Beghetti, Maurice; Kalangos, Afksendyios; Berner, Michel; Sierra, Jorge; Aggoun, Yacine; Tissot, Cécile; Pellegrini, Michel; Saudan, Sonja; Habre, Walid; Rimensberger, Peter C

    2008-09-26

    Intractable heart failure may require Extracorporeal Life Support (ECLS) techniques for rescue therapy. Nevertheless, in many small to middle-sized centers in Europe, this valuable resource is not available. In our University pediatric intensive care unit 0.9% of 1360 open-heart surgical patients required mechanical assistance over the latest 9 years with a survival rate of 69.2% and low residual morbidity. This favorable overall outcome suggests that regardless of the program size, it is possible to ensure the availability of efficient mechanical assistance that appears to be fundamental in a center performing surgery for complex congenital or acquired cardiac diseases.

  4. Effect of heparin in the intraocular irrigating solution on postoperative inflammation in the pediatric cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelda B Özkurt

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Yelda B Özkurt, Arzu Taskiran, Nadire Erdogan, Baran Kandemir, Ömer K Dog?anDepartment of Ophthalmology, Kartal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, TurkeyPurpose: To evaluate the influence of irrigation of the anterior chamber with heparin sodium on postoperative inflammation after pediatric cataract surgery. Setting: Kartal Training and Research Hospital, First Eye Clinic, Istanbul, Turkey.Design: Randomized prospective double-blind study.Methods: Fourteen consecutive eyes from 14 patients aged 8.9 ± 5.9 years, (range 3–18 years (group 1 and 19 eyes from 19 patients aged 9.1 ± 5.2 (range 1.5–18 years (group 2 underwent pediatric cataract surgery. Five patients in group 1 were between three and five years old. One patient was 1.5 years old and six patients in group 2 were between three and five years old. During the procedure, group 1 received anterior chamber irrigation with heparin sodium (5 IU/cc and 1 ml of heparin sodium (concentration 10 IU/ml added to the irrigating balanced salt solution (BSS Plus; Alcon Laboratories, Inc., Fort Worth, TX, USA while group 2 received BSS without heparin sodium only. Cases aged under three years received anterior vitrectomy in addition to posterior capsulorrhexis. One eye received anterior vitrectomy in group 1 and two eyes received anterior vitrectomy in group 2. Cases with preoperative complications were not included in the study. Early and late postoperative inflammatory complications, including fibrin formation, anterior and posterior synechia, cyclitic and pupillary membrane formation were recorded and compared.Results: Mild anterior chamber reaction was observed in three patients in Group 1, while nine cases in group 2 experienced marked anterior chamber reaction. In four of nine patients from group 2, anterior chamber reaction was severe and resulted in pupillary membrane and synechia despite treatment in the postoperative 7th day, while in all three cases in group 1, reaction

  5. Endodontic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, B S; Rhodes, J S

    2014-03-01

    A better understanding of endodontic disease and the causes of treatment failure has refined the role of surgery in endodontics. The advent of newer materials, advances in surgical armamentarium and techniques have also led to an improved endodontic surgical outcome. The aim of this article is to provide a contemporary and up-to-date overview of endodontic surgery. It will focus primarily on the procedures most commonly performed in endodontic surgery.

  6. Advances in Pediatric Surgical Education: A Critical Appraisal of Two Consecutive Minimally Invasive Pediatric Surgery Training Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gause, Colin D; Hsiung, Grace; Schwab, Ben; Clifton, Matthew; Harmon, Carroll M; Barsness, Katherine A

    2016-08-01

    Mandates for improved patient safety and increasing work hour restrictions have resulted in changes in surgical education. Educational courses increasingly must meet those needs. We sought to determine the experience, skill level, and the impact of simulation-based education (SBE) on two cohorts of pediatric surgery trainees. After Institutional Review Board (IRB) exempt determination, a retrospective review was performed of evaluations for an annual advanced minimally invasive surgery (MIS) course over 2 consecutive years. The courses included didactic content and hands-on skills training. Simulation included neonatal/infant models for rigid bronchoscopy-airway foreign body retrieval, laparoscopic common bile duct exploration, and real tissue diaphragmatic hernia (DH), duodenal atresia (DA), pulmonary lobectomy, and tracheoesophageal fistula models. Categorical data were analyzed with chi-squared analyses with t-tests for continuous data. Participants had limited prior advanced neonatal MIS experience, with 1.95 ± 2.84 and 1.16 ± 1.54 prior cases in the 2014 and 2015 cohorts, respectively. The 2015 cohort had significantly less previous experience in lobectomy (P = .04) and overall advanced MIS (P = .007). Before both courses, a significant percentage of participants were not comfortable with DH repair (39%-42%), DA repair (50%-74%), lobectomy (34%-43%), and tracheoesophageal fistula repair (54%-81%). After course completion, > 60% of participants reported improvement in comfort with procedures and over 90% reported that the course significantly improved their perceived ability to perform each operation safely. Pediatric surgery trainees continue to have limited exposure to advanced MIS during clinical training. SBE results in significant improvement in both cognitive knowledge and trainee comfort with safe operative techniques for advanced MIS.

  7. Complications in neonatal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Mauricio A; Caty, Michael G

    2016-12-01

    Neonatal surgery is recognized as an independent discipline in general surgery, requiring the expertise of pediatric surgeons to optimize outcomes in infants with surgical conditions. Survival following neonatal surgery has improved dramatically in the past 60 years. Improvements in pediatric surgical outcomes are in part attributable to improved understanding of neonatal physiology, specialized pediatric anesthesia, neonatal critical care including sophisticated cardiopulmonary support, utilization of parenteral nutrition and adjustments in fluid management, refinement of surgical technique, and advances in surgical technology including minimally invasive options. Nevertheless, short and long-term complications following neonatal surgery continue to have profound and sometimes lasting effects on individual patients, families, and society. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by a trained ... Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by a trained ...

  9. Identifying children at risk of death within 30 days of surgery at an NSQIP pediatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langham, Max R; Walter, Arianne; Boswell, Timothy C; Beck, Robert; Jones, Tamekia L

    2015-12-01

    Informed consent for operative procedures performed on children relies on the ability of the surgeon to estimate and describe accurately the risks and benefits of the planned operation to the parents. Understanding patient-specific risks is also an important prerequisite for surgeons and hospital administrators who wish to change hospital processes and improve patient safety. This study tests the feasibility of estimating the risk of death within 30 days of surgery using National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP)-Pediatric data from a single children's hospital. Patient data submitted to NSQIP-Pediatric from our hospital were analyzed to identify variables predictive of death within 30 days of operation. A multiple logistic regression model was constructed using 3 years of data and validated using data submitted the following year. The model was then tested using the participant use file provided by NSQIP-Pediatric for 2012. The model identified 7 variables predictive of death: neonatal status, respiratory support, inotropic support, having a blood disorder, cerebrovascular injury, previous cardiac intervention, and the work relative value unit for the procedure. The resulting final model had a c statistic = 0.97. It is possible for a participating children's hospital to use NSQIP-Pediatric data to develop risk models for patient mortality occurring within 30 days of operation at their institution. The model presented may be generalizable to other institutions, but needs further testing and refining. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of a preanesthetic video for facilitation of parental education and anxiolysis before pediatric ambulatory surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassady, J F; Wysocki, T T; Miller, K M; Cancel, D D; Izenberg, N

    1999-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of viewing an educational videotape about pediatric anesthesia on measures of parental knowledge of anesthesia and preoperative anxiety using a randomized, controlled design. During their routine preoperative visit, 85 parents of children scheduled to undergo ambulatory surgical procedures under general anesthesia were randomized to view either the experimental videotape about pediatric anesthesia or a control videotape with no medical content. Before and immediately after viewing the assigned videotape, parents completed measures of situational anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-State), preoperative anxiety and need for information (Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale), and anesthesia knowledge (Standard Anesthesia Learning Test). Repeated-measures analyses of variance showed that parents who viewed the experimental videotape showed a significant increase in anesthesia knowledge (P anxiety (P anxiety, and need for information (P preoperative educational videotape about pediatric anesthesia can provide immediate educational and anxiolytic benefits for parents of children undergoing ambulatory surgery. The duration of these benefits remains to be determined. In this study, we demonstrated the benefits of viewing an educational videotape about pediatric anesthesia on measures of parental knowledge of anesthesia and preoperative anxiety using a randomized, controlled design. We found that videotape viewing facilitated preoperative preparation and lessened preoperative anxiety.

  11. Hyperkalemic cardioplegia for adult and pediatric surgery: end of an era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Geoffrey P; Faggian, Giuseppe; Onorati, Francesco; Vinten-Johansen, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Despite surgical proficiency and innovation driving low mortality rates in cardiac surgery, the disease severity, comorbidity rate, and operative procedural difficulty have increased. Today's cardiac surgery patient is older, has a "sicker" heart and often presents with multiple comorbidities; a scenario that was relatively rare 20 years ago. The global challenge has been to find new ways to make surgery safer for the patient and more predictable for the surgeon. A confounding factor that may influence clinical outcome is high K(+) cardioplegia. For over 40 years, potassium depolarization has been linked to transmembrane ionic imbalances, arrhythmias and conduction disturbances, vasoconstriction, coronary spasm, contractile stunning, and low output syndrome. Other than inducing rapid electrochemical arrest, high K(+) cardioplegia offers little or no inherent protection to adult or pediatric patients. This review provides a brief history of high K(+) cardioplegia, five areas of increasing concern with prolonged membrane K(+) depolarization, and the basic science and clinical data underpinning a new normokalemic, "polarizing" cardioplegia comprising adenosine and lidocaine (AL) with magnesium (Mg(2+)) (ALM™). We argue that improved cardioprotection, better outcomes, faster recoveries and lower healthcare costs are achievable and, despite the early predictions from the stent industry and cardiology, the "cath lab" may not be the place where the new wave of high-risk morbid patients are best served.

  12. Hyperkalemic Cardioplegia for Adult and Pediatric Surgery: End of an Era?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Phillip Dobson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite surgical proficiency and innovation driving low mortality rates in cardiac surgery, the disease severity, comorbidity rate and operative procedural difficulty have increased. Today’s cardiac surgery patient is older, has a sicker heart and often presents with multiple comorbidities; a scenario that was relatively rare 20 years ago. The global challenge has been to find new ways to make surgery safer for the patient and more predictable for the surgeon. A confounding factor that may influence clinical outcome is high K+ cardioplegia. For over 40 years, potassium depolarization has been linked to transmembrane ionic imbalances, arrhythmias and conduction disturbances, vasoconstriction, coronary spasm, contractile stunning, and low output syndrome. Other than inducing rapid electrochemical arrest, high K+ cardioplegia offers little or no inherent protection to adult or pediatric patients. This review provides a brief history of high K+ cardioplegia, five areas of increasing concern with prolonged membrane K+ depolarization, and the basic science and clinical data underpinning a new normokalemic, ‘polarizing’ cardioplegia comprising adenosine and lidocaine (AL with magnesium (Mg2+ (ALM. We argue that improved cardioprotection, better outcomes, faster recoveries and lower healthcare costs are achievable and, despite the early predictions from the stent industry and cardiology, the cath lab may not be the place where the new wave of high-risk morbid patients are best served.

  13. A review of repeat general anesthesia for pediatric dental surgery in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, Robert J; Smith, W F

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review data from the province of Alberta, Canada for First Nations children who required more than 1 general anesthesia (GA) procedure for dental surgery from 1996 to 2005. This study was limited to First Nations and Inuit children younger than 18 years old in Alberta who received 2 or more GA procedures to facilitate dental treatment Data spanning 1996 to 2005 were provided from the Alberta Regional Office of First Nations & Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada. The entire database contained claims for 339 children who received repeat GA procedures for rehabilitative dental core. Seventy-six percent received 2 procedures, while the remainder underwent 3 or more surgeries. Twenty-four percent of First Nations children in this cohort were subjected to >2 GA procedures. Retreatment of previously restored teeth was a common observation. The majority of children were treated by general practitioners instead of pediatric dentists. Seventy-four percent who had 2 or more surgeries were treated by general dentists at the time of the first GA procedure. The mean age of children at the time of the first GA procedure was not associated with whether children received 2 or more GA procedures for dental care (P=.07). These data suggest that there may be on over-reliance on GA to treat dental caries for First Notions children in Alberta.

  14. An initial experience with a digital drainage system during the postoperative period of pediatric thoracic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Altair da Silva; Bachichi, Thiago; Holanda, Caio; Rizzo, Luiz Augusto Lucas Martins De

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To report an initial experience with a digital drainage system during the postoperative period of pediatric thoracic surgery. Methods: This was a prospective observational study involving consecutive patients, ≤ 14 years of age, treated at a pediatric thoracic surgery outpatient clinic, for whom pulmonary resection (lobectomy or segmentectomy via muscle-sparing thoracotomy) was indicated. The parameters evaluated were air leak (as quantified with the digital system), biosafety, duration of drainage, length of hospital stay, and complications. The digital system was used in 11 children (mean age, 5.9 ± 3.3 years). The mean length of hospital stay was 4.9 ± 2.6 days, the mean duration of drainage was 2.5 ± 0.7 days, and the mean drainage volume was 270.4 ± 166.7 mL. The mean maximum air leak flow was 92.78 ± 95.83 mL/min (range, 18-338 mL/min). Two patients developed postoperative complications (atelectasis and pneumonia, respectively). The use of this digital system facilitated the decision-making process during the postoperative period, reducing the risk of errors in the interpretation and management of air leaks. PMID:28117476

  15. Thyroid Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... etc.). Surgery is also an option for the treatment of hyperthyroidism (Grave’s disease or a “toxic nodule” (see Hyperthyroidism brochure ), for large and multinodular goiters and for any goiter that may be causing ... MEANS OF TREATMENT? Surgery is definitely indicated to remove nodules suspicious ...

  16. Systematic review of risk factors for surgical site infection in pediatric scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanyam, Rajeev; Schaffzin, Joshua; Cudilo, Elizabeth M; Rao, Marepalli B; Varughese, Anna M

    2015-06-01

    Risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) in children derived from the studies in the adult population are potentially misleading because of differences in pathophysiology and management. This systematic review addresses the key question: What are the risk factors for SSI in pediatric patients undergoing scoliosis surgery? This is a qualitative systematic literature review. Retrospective and observational trials of children undergoing scoliosis surgery reported on the occurrence of risk factors for SSI and the occurrence of SSI. Pubmed (Medline), Ovid Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews (EBMR), Scopus, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL) were searched electronically for relevant articles in all the languages between January 1, 1991 and August 27, 2012, and cross-references were checked. Two independent reviewers identified articles and appraised quality with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) criteria based on a weighted scoring of 0 to 100. Our search identified 135 abstracts and 14 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. The AHRQ grading showed that five articles were high quality with a score of greater than 67, and five articles were moderate quality with a score between 50 and 67. The percent agreement between the two independent reviewers was 84%, and kappa agreement score was 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78-1.03). There were 76 risk factors identified, of which 22 factors were reported in more than one study. Odds ratios and 95% CIs were reported inconsistently. Pooled p analysis of high- and moderate-quality articles identified five risk factors predictive of SSI: inappropriate antibiotic use (p=.001), neuromuscular scoliosis (p=.014), instrumentation (p=.023), increased hospital stay days (p=.003), and residual postoperative curve (p=.003). The systematic review identified inappropriate antibiotic use, neuromuscular scoliosis, instrumentation, increased hospital stay days, and residual postoperative curve

  17. Choosing surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstensson, Carina; Lohmander, L; Frobell, Richard

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The objective was to understand patients' views of treatment after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and their reasons for deciding to request surgery despite consenting to participate in a randomised controlled trial (to 'cross-over'). METHODS: Thirty-four in......-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with young (aged 18-35), physically active individuals with ACL rupture who were participating in a RCT comparing training and surgical reconstruction with training only. 22/34 were randomised to training only but crossed over to surgery. Of these, 11 were interviewed...... before surgery, and 11 were interviewed at least 6 months after surgery. To provide additional information, 12 patients were interviewed before randomisation. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using the Framework approach. RESULTS: Strong preference for surgery was commonplace...

  18. Capsular Outcomes After Pediatric Cataract Surgery Without Intraocular Lens Implantation: Qualitative Classification and Quantitative Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xuhua; Lin, Haotian; Lin, Zhuoling; Chen, Jingjing; Tang, Xiangchen; Luo, Lixia; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate capsular outcomes 12 months after pediatric cataract surgery without intraocular lens implantation via qualitative classification and quantitative measurement.This study is a cross-sectional study that was approved by the institutional review board of Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center of Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China.Digital coaxial retro-illumination photographs of 329 aphakic pediatric eyes were obtained 12 months after pediatric cataract surgery without intraocular lens implantation. Capsule digital coaxial retro-illumination photographs were divided as follows: anterior capsule opening area (ACOA), posterior capsule opening area (PCOA), and posterior capsule opening opacity (PCOO). Capsular outcomes were qualitatively classified into 3 types based on the PCOO: Type I-capsule with mild opacification but no invasion into the capsule opening; Type II-capsule with moderate opacification accompanied by contraction of the ACOA and invasion to the occluding part of the PCOA; and Type III-capsule with severe opacification accompanied by total occlusion of the PCOA. Software was developed to quantitatively measure the ACOA, PCOA, and PCOO using standardized DCRPs. The relationships between the accurate intraoperative anterior and posterior capsulorhexis sizes and the qualitative capsular types were statistically analyzed.The DCRPs of 315 aphakic eyes (95.8%) of 191 children were included. Capsular outcomes were classified into 3 types: Type I-120 eyes (38.1%); Type II-157 eyes (49.8%); Type III-38 eyes (12.1%). The scores of the capsular outcomes were negatively correlated with intraoperative anterior capsulorhexis size (R = -0.572, P < 0.001), but no significant correlation with intraoperative posterior capsulorhexis size (R = -0.16, P = 0.122) was observed. The ACOA significantly decreased from Type I to Type II to Type III, the PCOA increased in size from Type I to Type II, and the PCOO increased

  19. Laser welding in penetrating keratoplasty and cataract surgery in pediatric patients: early results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzonetti, Luca; Capozzi, Paolo; Petrocelli, Gianni; Valente, Paola; Petroni, Sergio; Menabuoni, Luca; Rossi, Francesca; Pini, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of diode laser welding to close corneal wounds in penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) and cataract surgery in pediatric patients. Ophthalmology Department, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Rome, Italy. Prospective observational study. Patients had surgery for congenital cataract (Group 1) or femtosecond laser-assisted PKP (Group 2). The surgery was followed by corneal wound closure using diode laser welding of the stroma. In Group 1, no standard suturing was used. In Group 2, the donor button was sutured onto the recipient using 8 single nylon sutures or a 10-0 nylon running suture (12 passages). Laser welding was then used as an adjunct to the traditional suturing procedure. Group 1 comprised 7 eyes (7 patients; mean age 8.1 years ± 5.3 [SD], range 1 to 15 years) and Group 2, 5 eyes (5 patients; mean age 10.6 ± 3.3 years, range 6 to 15 years). The adhesion of the laser-welded tissues was perfect; there were no collateral effects, and restoration of the treated tissues was optimum. Seidel testing showed no wound leakage during the follow-up. Postoperative astigmatism did not change significantly from the first day after cataract surgery and shifted moderately 3 months after PKP. Laser welding of corneal tissue appeared to be safe and effective in children for whom a sutureless surgical procedure is important to reduce the use of anesthesia for suture management, prevent endophthalmitis, and improve the antiamblyopic effect. Copyright © 2013 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 30-year International Pediatric Craniofacial Surgery Partnership: Evolution from the “Third World” Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Jordan W.; Skirpan, Jan; Stanek, Beata; Kowalczyk, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Background: Craniofacial diseases constitute an important component of the surgical disease burden in low- and middle-income countries. The consideration to introduce craniofacial surgery into such settings poses different questions, risks, and challenges compared with cleft or other forms of plastic surgery. We report the evolution, innovations, and challenges of a 30-year international craniofacial surgery partnership. Methods: We retrospectively report a partnership between surgeons at the Uniwersytecki Szpital Dzieciecy in Krakow, Poland, and a North American craniofacial surgeon. We studied patient conditions, treatment patterns, and associated complications, as well as program advancements and limitations as perceived by surgeons, patient families, and hospital administrators. Results: Since partnership inception in 1986, the complexity of cases performed increased gradually, with the first intracranial case performed in 1995. In the most recent 10-year period (2006–2015), 85 patients have been evaluated, with most common diagnoses of Apert syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, and single-suture craniosynostosis. In the same period, 55 major surgical procedures have been undertaken, with LeFort III midface distraction, posterior vault distraction, and frontoorbital advancement performed most frequently. Key innovations have been the employment of craniofacial distraction osteogenesis, the use of Internet communication and digital photography, and increased understanding of how craniofacial morphology may improve in the absence of surgical intervention. Ongoing challenges include prohibitive training pathways for pediatric plastic surgeons, difficulty in coordinating care with surgeons in other institutions, and limited medical and material resources. Conclusion: Safe craniofacial surgery can be introduced and sustained in a resource-limited setting through an international partnership. PMID:27200233

  1. Correlation of Post-Operative Hypoalbuminemia with Outcome of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ghaderian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoalbuminemia may be caused by liver disease, nephrotic syndrome, burns, protein-losing entropathy, malnutrition, and metabolic stress. Alterations in albumin in metabolic stress such as cardiac surgery have been previously investigated. We studied serum albumin concentration in children with congenital heart disease and also the association of hypoalbuminemia with mortality and morbidity after pediatric cardiac surgery.Methods: We measured serum albumin concentration prospectively in 300 children with congenital heart disease who underwent surgery between July and September 2008 in Shaheed Rajaee hospital. Serum albumin concentration was measured before and 48 hours after cardiac surgery and was subsequently compared between 2 groups: cyanotic and acyanotic and also with normal values.Results: Serum albumin concentration decreased on the second post-operative day in 70 (23.3% patients. There was a positive correlation between the post-surgical hypoalbuminemia and cyanotic heart disease. The cyanotic children had lower serum albumin concentration than the acyanotic ones (P value <0.001. There was a significant association between post-operative serum albumin concentration and acute renal failure (P value <0.001 and death (P value <0.001. Drop in serum albumin concentration was more prominent in the males than in the females (P value=0.038 and in the cyanotic patients than in the acyanotic ones (P value <0.001 as well as in those with acute renal failure (P value <0.001, pericardial effusion (P value=0.050, seizure (P value <0.001, and death (P value <0.001. Hypoalbuminemia was not associated with longer hospital (P value=0.142 or intensive care unit stay (P value=0.199 .Conclusion: Post-operative serum albumin concentration was lower in the cyanotic children and male patients in our study. In addition, the post-operative decrease in albumin was associated with an increased risk of pericardial effusion, renal failure, seizure, and

  2. Role of Surgery in Stages II and III Pediatric Abdominal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A 5-Years Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Salem, Mohamed A.; Hamza, Hesham M.; Sayd, Heba A.; Ali, Amany M.

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are the most common extra nodal presentation of pediatric NHL. Our aim is to assess the role of surgery as a risk factor and to evaluate the impact of risk-adjusted systemic chemotherapy on survival of patients with stages II and III disease. This study included 35 pediatric patients with abdominal NHL treated over five years at South Egypt Cancer Institute (SECI), Assiut University, between January 2005 and January 2010. The data of every patient include...

  3. Music benefits on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Calcaterra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative effect of music listening has not been established in pediatric age. Response on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery has been evaluated. Forty-two children were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to the music-group (music intervention during awakening period or the non-music group (standard postoperative care. Slow and fast classical music and pauses were recorded and played via ambient speakers. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, glucose and cortisol levels, faces pain scale and Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC Pain Scale were considered as indicators of response to stress and pain experience. Music during awakening induced lower increase of systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. The non-music group showed progressive increasing values of glycemia; in music-group the curve of glycemia presented a plateau pattern (P<0.001. Positive impact on reactions to pain was noted using the FLACC scale. Music improves cardiovascular parameters, stress-induced hyperglycemia. Amelioration on pain perception is more evident in older children. Positive effects seems to be achieved by the alternation of fast, slow rhythms and pauses even in pediatric age.

  4. Music benefits on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Ostuni, Selene; Bonomelli, Irene; Mencherini, Simonetta; Brunero, Marco; Zambaiti, Elisa; Mannarino, Savina; Larizza, Daniela; Albertini, Riccardo; Tinelli, Carmine; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2014-08-12

    Postoperative effect of music listening has not been established in pediatric age. Response on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery has been evaluated. Forty-two children were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to the music-group (music intervention during awakening period) or the non-music group (standard postoperative care). Slow and fast classical music and pauses were recorded and played via ambient speakers. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, glucose and cortisol levels, faces pain scale and Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) Pain Scale were considered as indicators of response to stress and pain experience. Music during awakening induced lower increase of systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. The non-music group showed progressive increasing values of glycemia; in music-group the curve of glycemia presented a plateau pattern (PMusic improves cardiovascular parameters, stress-induced hyperglycemia. Amelioration on pain perception is more evident in older children. Positive effects seems to be achieved by the alternation of fast, slow rhythms and pauses even in pediatric age.

  5. The Analysis for Pediatric Surgery Nursing Match%小儿手术护理配合分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玲玲; 刘春红; 李艳荣

    2014-01-01

    Objective To discuss the pediatric surgery nursing match characteristics. Methods To analysis the children's psychological activity characteristic, intraoperative care coordination, operation position and fixed method, intravenous infusion in pediatric surgery and blood transfusion management. Results Did wel in pediatric surgery nursing match in order to cooperate smoothly with surgery. Conclusion According to child psychology, physiology, anatomy and pathology of different ages with different characteristics, combined with surgery do the nursing work wel .%目的:探讨小儿手术患者特点及手术护理配合。方法对儿童心理活动特点,术中护理配合,手术体位及固定法,小儿术中静脉输液、输血的管理进行分析。结果做好手术护理配合工作,配合手术顺利完成。结论根据不同年龄期小儿的心理、生理、解剖和病理的不同特点,配合小儿手术,做好护理工作。

  6. CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lbadan, Nigeria. Reprint requests to: Dr. V. O. Adegboye, Department Of Surgery, University College Hospital, Iberian,. Nigeria. ... been shown to be related to the rate of bleeding. .... patients after an interval of conservative/medical treatment.

  7. General Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bbshehu

    underwent major colonic restorative resection between July 1997 and September 199 in order to ... factors, the level of anastomosis and the experience of the surgeon are perhaps the ... indications for surgery and cancer stage were similar.

  8. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  9. Hemorrhoid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and hemorrhoidectomy. In: Delaney CP, ed. Netter's Surgical Anatomy and Approaches . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 26. Review Date 4/5/2015 Updated by: Debra G. Wechter, MD, FACS, general surgery practice specializing in breast cancer, Virginia Mason ...

  10. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The traditional operative approach is an open surgical one to drain the cysts and ... early outcomes of laparoscopic treatment of liver hydatid cysts at our institution. .... O. Radical vs. conservative surgery for hydatid liver cysts: Experience from ...

  11. Outpatient Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thirds of all operations are performed in outpatient facilities, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Outpatient surgery provides patients with the convenience of recovering at home, and can cost less. ...

  12. Laparoscopic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgeon’s perspective, laparoscopic surgery may allow for easier dissection of abdominal scar tissue (adhesions), less surgical trauma, ... on Facebook About ACG ACG Store ACG Patient Education & Resource Center Home GI Health and Disease Recursos ...

  13. Emergency surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoneham, M; Murray, D; Foss, N

    2014-01-01

    National reports recommended that peri-operative care should be improved for elderly patients undergoing emergency surgery. Postoperative mortality and morbidity rates remain high, and indicate that emergency ruptured aneurysm repair, laparotomy and hip fracture fixation are high-risk procedures...... undertaken on elderly patients with limited physiological reserve. National audits have reported variations in care quality, data that are increasingly being used to drive quality improvement through professional guidance. Given that the number of elderly patients presenting for emergency surgery is likely...

  14. [Robotic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Portillo, Mucio; Valenzuela-Salazar, Carlos; Quiroz-Guadarrama, César David; Pachecho-Gahbler, Carlos; Rojano-Rodríguez, Martín

    2014-12-01

    Medicine has experienced greater scientific and technological advances in the last 50 years than in the rest of human history. The article describes relevant events, revises concepts and advantages and clinical applications, summarizes published clinical results, and presents some personal reflections without giving dogmatic conclusions about robotic surgery. The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) defines robotic surgery as a surgical procedure using technology to aid the interaction between surgeon and patient. The objective of the surgical robot is to correct human deficiencies and improve surgical skills. The capacity of repeating tasks with precision and reproducibility has been the base of the robot´s success. Robotic technology offers objective and measurable advantages: - Improving maneuverability and physical capacity during surgery. - Correcting bad postural habits and tremor. - Allowing depth perception (3D images). - Magnifying strength and movement limits. - Offering a platform for sensors, cameras, and instruments. Endoscopic surgery transformed conceptually the way of practicing surgery. Nevertheless in the last decade, robotic assisted surgery has become the next paradigm of our era.

  15. [Aesthetic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Johannes C

    2006-01-01

    The WHO describes health as physical, mental and social well being. Ever since the establishment of plastic surgery aesthetic surgery has been an integral part of this medical specialty. It aims at reconstructing subjective well-being by employing plastic surgical procedures as described in the educational code and regulations for specialists of plastic surgery. This code confirms that plastic surgery comprises cosmetic procedures for the entire body that have to be applied in respect of psychological exploration and selection criteria. A wide variety of opinions resulting from very different motivations shows how difficult it is to differentiate aesthetic surgery as a therapeutic procedure from beauty surgery as a primarily economic service. Jurisdiction, guidelines for professional conduct and ethical codes have tried to solve this question. Regardless of the intention and ability of the health insurances, it has currently been established that the moral and legal evaluation of advertisements for medical procedures depends on their purpose: advertising with the intent of luring patients into cosmetic procedures that do not aim to reconstruct a subjective physical disorder does not comply with a medical indication. If, however, the initiative originates with the patient requesting the amelioration of a subjective disorder of his body, a medical indication can be assumed.

  16. Decreasing adhesions and avoiding further surgery in a pediatric patient involved in a severe pedestrian versus motor vehicle accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda D. Rice

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this case study, we report the use of manual physical therapy in a pediatric patient experiencing complications from a life-threatening motor vehicle accident that necessitated 19 surgeries over the course of 12 months. Post-surgical adhesions decreased the patient’s quality of life. He developed multiple medical conditions including recurrent partial bowel obstructions and an ascending testicle. In an effort to avoid further surgery for bowel obstruction and the ascending testicle, the patient was effectively treated with a manual physical therapy regimen focused on decreasing adhesions. The therapy allowed return to an improved quality of life, significant decrease in subjective reports of pain and dysfunction, and apparent decreases in adhesive processes without further surgery, which are important goals for all patients, but especially for pediatric patients.

  17. Pediatric cardiac surgery in low- and middle-income countries or emerging economies: a continuing challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nguyenvu; Pezzella, A Thomas

    2015-04-01

    A number of recent publications, addresses, seminars, and conferences have addressed the global backlog and increasing incidence of both congenital and acquired cardiac diseases in children, with reference to early and delayed recognition, late referral, availability of and access to services, costs, risks, databases, and early and long-term results and follow-up. A variety of proposals, recommendations, and projects have been outlined and documented. The ultimate goal of these endeavors is to increase the quality and quantity of pediatric cardiac care and surgery worldwide and particularly in underserved areas. A contemporary review of past and present initiatives is presented with a subsequent focus on the more challenging areas. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Parent perceptions of pediatric ambulatory surgery: using family feedback for program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voepel-Lewis, T; Andrea, C M; Magee, S S

    1992-04-01

    Pediatric ambulatory surgery programs have grown tremendously during the past decade. However, limited nursing time places severe constraints on the care and education of surgical outpatients. Preoperative teaching, patient support, and postoperative instruction, previously conducted over days, is now completed in several hours. The ambulatory surgical program at Mott Children's Hospital was designed to provide thorough patient and family education, comprehensive patient care, and short-term follow-up. A formal evaluation of the program was conducted to ensure quality care for outpatients. This study evaluated preoperative and discharge preparation, postoperative problems and follow-up, preoperative waiting, stress, and privacy. The sample was composed of 332 families. Of the respondents, 289 (87%) felt very prepared overall for outpatient surgery; 33 families (10%) attended the preoperative tour, and felt significantly better prepared for surgery than families who did not attend; 322 families (97%) felt adequately prepared to very prepared for discharge; 245 families (76%) felt that the recovery time was just right; 40 parents (12%) felt that their children experienced more pain and 34 (10.4%) more nausea and vomiting than expected postoperatively; 54 families called a PACU nurse postoperatively with questions, and 92% rated the call as very helpful; 31 families called the surgical service with concerns, and 61% rated the surgeon as helpful; 83 families (25%) perceived the outpatient experience as being very stressful. Stress correlated significantly with preoperative preparation, preoperative wait, previous outpatient experience, and perceived postoperative pain. Privacy in the environment was rated as fair to poor by 192 families (59%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. A comparison of dexamethasone and clonidine as an adjuvant for caudal blocks in pediatric urogenital surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Chandni; Kumar, Bindey; Bhadani, Umesh Kumar; Kumar, Ajeet; Kumar, Amarjeet; Ranjan, Alok

    2016-01-01

    Background: Caudal block is a reliable regional analgesic technique for pediatric urogenital surgeries. Various adjuvants have been tried to enhance the duration of action of bupivicaine. Though clonidine is extensively used as an adjuvant in caudal anaesthesia, it can have troublesome adverse effects like bradycardia, hypotension and sedation. Lately dexamethasone has become popular as an adjuvant in paediatric caudals due to its safety profile. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare dexamethasone and clonidine coadministered with bupivicaine caudally in paediatric patients undergoing urogenital surgeries in terms of analgesia and adverse effects. Settings and Design: Prospective, double blinded randomised study. Subjects and Method: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II children, aged 1-6 years undergoing urogenital surgeries were allocated in 2 groups: Group I: 0.5 mL.kg−1 of 0.25% bupivicaine with dexamethasone 0.1 mg.kg−1 in 1 ml normal saline (NS) Group II: 0.5 mL.kg−1 of 0.25% bupivicaine with clonidine 1 μg.kg−1 diluted in 1 ml normal saline. The parameters studied included duration of analgesia, intraoperative and postoperative hemodynamics, sedation scores and incidence of adverse effects like wound dehiscence, bleeding, vomiting and respiratory depression. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was carried out using Stata Version 10. After checking for the normality assumption, t-test for comparing means of two independent samples was used for comparing baseline continuous variables. P values <0.05 were considered significant. Results: Patients in Group II had longer duration of analgesia postoperatively. Patients in this group also had lower heart rate and more sedation scores. Conclusion: Our study shows that caudal dexamethasone is a good alternative to clonidine with more stable hemodynamics and lesser sedation scores in the immediate postoperative period. Both the drugs offer good analgesia

  20. Implementation assessment of perioperatory antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines in pediatric abdominal surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmaris Losa Pérez

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: since the beginning of the 80s the term perioperative profilaxis is introduced, changing the previous criteria on antimicrobial profilaxis. This method helps to reduce the perioperative sepsis phenomenon and the medical cost, achieving more quality in pacient attention. In the surgical service area of the pediatric and universitary hospital ¨Paquito Gonzalez Cueto¨ a guide with good clinical practices in perioperative antibiotic profilaxis for abdominal surgery has been in use since the year 2000. Objective: To evaluate the following of this guide. Methods: a retrospective and descriptive study of a series of cases since february 2000 until february 2002. 235 pacients operated from abdominal affections were analized. The fallowing of the guide were tested by 4 questions, expressing the results in percentage lists. Conclussions: Despite the use of antibiotic profilaxis in more than 96% of the cases, there was a low percentage of global guide following (33,5%, since there were problems with the employed outline, dosis and moment of administration of the antibiotic, specially in surgery with high risk of developing infection of surgical injury.

  1. Joint Use of Skull Base Surgery in a Case of Pediatric Parotid Gland Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Ueda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parotid gland carcinoma is extremely rare in children. We report a case of pediatric parotid gland carcinoma with extensive infiltration into surrounding tissues including the skin and temporomandibular joint capsule at initial examination. Total resection of the parotid gland was conducted together with skull base surgery and mandibular dissection. The patient was a 14-year-old girl. In addition to the skin and temporomandibular joint, infiltration into the anterior wall of the external auditory meatus and masseter muscle was also seen, and T4N0M0 stage IV parotid carcinoma was diagnosed. Skin was resected together with the pinna, and temporal craniotomy and skull base surgery were performed to resect the temporomandibular joint capsule and external auditory meatus en bloc, and mandible dissection was conducted. Facial nerves were resected at the same time. Level I to level IV neck dissection was also conducted. A latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap was used for reconstruction. The postoperative permanent pathology diagnosis was high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma with a low-grade component. Postoperatively, radiotherapy at 50 Gy alone has been conducted, with no recurrence or metastasis observed for over 4 years.

  2. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CAUDAL ROPIVACAINE WITH CAUDAL ROPIVACAINE AND DEXMEDETOMIDINE IN PEDIATRIC LOWER ABDOMINAL SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of caudal dexmedetomidine combined with Ropivacaine to provide postoperative analgesia in children and also to establish its safety in the pediatric patients. METHODS: In a randomized, prospective, parallel group, double-blinded study, 80 children of 1 year to 6years posted for lower abdominal surgeries were recruited and allocated into two groups: Group RD (n=40 received 0.25% Ropivacaine 1 ml/kg with dexmedetomidine2 μg/kg, making the volume to 0.5 ml and Group R (n=40 received 0.25% Ropivacaine1 ml/kg + 0.5 ml normal saline. Induction of anesthesia was achieved with Inj. Ketamine 2mg/kg + Inj. Succinylcholine 2mg/kg. Intubated with appropriate-sized Endotracheal tube and caudal block was performed in all patients. Maintained with 66% nitrous oxide in Oxygen and isoflurane 0.2-0.4%.Post-operative pain assessed with FLACC score. RESULTS: The duration of postoperative analgesia recorded a mean of 339 minutes (5.6hrs ± 2.4 hrs. in Group R compared with 884 minutes (14.7 hrs. ±5hrs in Group RD, with a p value of <0.001. Group RD patients achieved a statistically significant higher FLACC score compared with Group RD patients. The peri-operative hemodynamics were stable among both the groups. CONCLUSION: Caudal dexmedetomidine (2 μg/kg with 0.25%Ropivacaine (1 ml/kg for pediatric lower abdominal surgeries provides significant postoperative pain relief and better quality of sleep and a prolonged duration of arousable sedation.

  3. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... find out more. Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Oral and facial surgeons ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ...

  4. Tennis elbow surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateral epicondylitis - surgery; Lateral tendinosis - surgery; Lateral tennis elbow - surgery ... Surgery to repair tennis elbow is usually an outpatient surgery. This means you will not stay in the hospital overnight. You will be given ...

  5. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  6. Mohs micrographic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Basal cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Squamous cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery ... Mohs surgery usually takes place in the doctor's office. The surgery is started early in the morning and is ...

  7. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  8. Robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, M; Marescaux, J

    2015-01-01

    Proficiency in minimally invasive surgery requires intensive and continuous training, as it is technically challenging for unnatural visual and haptic perceptions. Robotic and computer sciences are producing innovations to augment the surgeon's skills to achieve accuracy and high precision during complex surgery. This article reviews the current use of robotically assisted surgery, focusing on technology as well as main applications in digestive surgery, and future perspectives. The PubMed database was interrogated to retrieve evidence-based data on surgical applications. Internal and external consulting with key opinion leaders, renowned robotics laboratories and robotic platform manufacturers was used to produce state-of-the art business intelligence around robotically assisted surgery. Selected digestive procedures (oesophagectomy, gastric bypass, pancreatic and liver resections, rectal resection for cancer) might benefit from robotic assistance, although the current level of evidence is insufficient to support widespread adoption. The surgical robotic market is growing, and a variety of projects have recently been launched at both academic and corporate levels to develop lightweight, miniaturized surgical robotic prototypes. The magnified view, and improved ergonomics and dexterity offered by robotic platforms, might facilitate the uptake of minimally invasive procedures. Image guidance to complement robotically assisted procedures, through the concepts of augmented reality, could well represent a major revolution to increase safety and deal with difficulties associated with the new minimally invasive approaches. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Validity and reliability of a pain location tool for pediatric abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, James K; Cole, Alana M; Liley, Andrew; Hill, Andrew G

    2015-06-01

    For children with surgical problems, pain location conveys important clinical information. We developed a Location and Level of Intensity of Postoperative Pain (Lolipops) tool consisting of a body outline with a seven-sector abdominal grid, the International Association for the Study of Pain Revised Faces Pain Scale, and a recording chart. The aim of the study was to assess the validity and reliability of Lolipops. Children aged 5-14 years who had undergone laparoscopic appendectomy took both nurse- and investigator-administered Lolipops, and an investigator administered Varni Thompson Pediatric Pain Questionnaires, within 24 hours of surgery. The average age of the 42 participants was 10.7 years; 64% were boys; 24 (57.1%) had acute appendicitis, 13 (31%) had perforated appendicitis, and 5 (11.9%) were uninflamed. Pain scores were higher at the laparoscopic port incision sites than in upper abdominal sites distant from incisions or expected inflammation, mean (SD) 3.3 (2.3) and 1.1 (1.8), respectively (p Lolipops demonstrated a more widespread pain pattern. Correlations between nurse and investigator were fair to moderate with an overall intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.597. This study presents a new tool to measure the location of pain in pediatric surgical patients and shows it to be valid and reliable.

  10. Hyperkalemic Cardioplegia for Adult and Pediatric Surgery: End of an Era?

    OpenAIRE

    Geoffrey Phillip Dobson; Giuseppe eFaggian; Francesco eOnorati; Jakob eVinten-Johansen

    2013-01-01

    Despite surgical proficiency and innovation driving low mortality rates in cardiac surgery, the disease severity, comorbidity rate and operative procedural difficulty have increased. Today’s cardiac surgery patient is older, has a sicker heart and often presents with multiple comorbidities; a scenario that was relatively rare 20 years ago. The global challenge has been to find new ways to make surgery safer for the patient and more predictable for the surgeon. A confounding factor that may in...

  11. Hyperkalemic cardioplegia for adult and pediatric surgery: end of an era?

    OpenAIRE

    Dobson, Geoffrey P.; Faggian, Giuseppe; Onorati, Francesco; Vinten-Johansen, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Despite surgical proficiency and innovation driving low mortality rates in cardiac surgery, the disease severity, comorbidity rate, and operative procedural difficulty have increased. Today's cardiac surgery patient is older, has a “sicker” heart and often presents with multiple comorbidities; a scenario that was relatively rare 20 years ago. The global challenge has been to find new ways to make surgery safer for the patient and more predictable for the surgeon. A confounding factor that may...

  12. Orthognathic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard Larsen, Marie; Thygesen, Torben Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The literature shows that the indications for orthognathic surgery (OS) are often functional problems and unsatisfactory facial esthetics. This study investigated the esthetic outcomes and overall satisfaction following OS. Somatosensory change is a relatively common complication and its influence...... on the level of satisfaction was studied. The social-networking web site Facebook was used to identify the study population. An online questionnaire was performed using the website SurveyMonkey. In all, 105 (9%) respondents from the Danish Facebook group about OS, called Kaebeoperation (jaw surgery), were...... in beauty than women (P = 0.030). Sixty-four percent replied that their attractiveness had been increased after OS. Eighty-six percent were happy with the results and 89% would recommend the surgery to others in need. No significant differences in esthetic results and satisfaction were seen with regard...

  13. Importance of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging for pediatric brain tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Jawad; Avula, Shivaram; Abernethy, Laurence J; Mallucci, Conor L

    2012-01-01

    High-field intraoperative MRI (IoMRI) is gaining increasing recognition as an invaluable tool in pediatric brain tumor surgery where the extent of tumor resection is a major prognostic factor. We report the initial experience of a dedicated pediatric 3-T intraoperative MRI (IoMRI) unit with integrated neuronavigation in the management of pediatric brain tumors. Seventy-three children (mean age 9.5 years; range 0.2-19 years) underwent IoMRI between October 2009 and January 2012, during 79 brain tumor resections using a 3-T MR scanner located adjacent to the neurosurgical operating theater that is equipped with neuronavigation facility. IoMRI was performed either to assess the extent of tumor resection after surgical impression of complete/intended tumor resection or to update neuronavigation. The surgical aims, IoMRI findings, extent of tumor resection, and follow-up data were reviewed. Complete resection was intended in 47/79 (59%) operations. IoMRI confirmed complete resection in 27/47 (57%). IoMRI findings led to further resection in 12/47 (26%). In 7/47 (15%), IoMRI was equivocal for residual tumor and no evidence of residual tumor was found on re-inspection. In 32/79 (41%) operations, the surgical aim was partial tumor resection. In this subset, surgical resection was extended following IoMRI in 13/32 (41%) operations. None of the patients required early second look procedure for residual disease. At our institution, IoMRI has led to increased rate of tumor resection and a change in surgical strategy with further tumor resection in 32% of patients. While interpreting IoMRI, it is important to be aware of the known pitfalls.

  14. Effect of dexamethasone on postoperative cardiac troponin T production in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagon, Ignacio; Hogenbirk, Karin; van Pelt, Johanes; Hazekamp, Mark G; Bovill, James G

    2005-10-01

    Pediatric cardiac surgery is associated with a temporary rise in cardiac troponin T (cTnT) during the postoperative period. We examined whether dexamethasone given before cardiopulmonary bypass has myocardial protective effects as assessed by the postoperative production of cTnT. Prospective randomized interventional study in the pediatric intensive care unit in a university hospital. Patients were randomly allocated to act as controls or receive a single dose of dexamethasone (1 mg/kg) during induction of anesthesia. cTnT was measured four times postoperatively: immediately after admission to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and 8, 15, and 24 h thereafter. The two groups had similar mean cTnT concentrations on PICU admission: those receiving dexamethasone 1.85 ng/ml (1.55-2.15) and those not receiving it 2 ng/ml (95% confidence interval 1.56-2.51). Concentrations of cTnT 8 h after admission to the PICU differed significantly after 8 h: 1.99 ng/ml (1.53-2.45) in those receiving dexamethasone and 3.08 ng/ml (2.46-3.69) in those not receiving it. After subgroup statistical analysis differences between the two groups remained significant only at 8 h, not those after 15 or 24 h. The use of dexamethasone (1 mg/kg) before cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with a brief but significant reduction in postoperative cTnT production. The clinical significance of this effect is unclear.

  15. The effects of language concordant care on patient satisfaction and clinical understanding for Hispanic pediatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Jonathan L; Jaramillo, Joshua D; Koppolu, Raji; Wright, Robert; Mendoza, Fernando; Bruzoni, Matias

    2015-09-01

    Hispanics account for over 60% of the U.S. population growth and 25% speak little-to-no English. This language barrier adversely affects both access to and quality of care. Surgical specialties trail other medical fields in assessing the effects of language barriers to surgical clinical care and patient satisfaction. This study was designed to assess the effects of patient-provider language concordance on a pediatric surgery practice. A surgery-specific, 7-point Likert scale questionnaire was designed with 14 questions modeled after validated patient satisfaction surveys from the literature. Questions concerning provider-patient language concordance, quality of understanding, and general satisfaction were included. Surveys were administered to families of patients in the General Pediatric Surgery Clinic at our institution. Families were categorized into three groups: English-speaking, regardless of race/ethnicity; Spanish-speaking using interpreter services with an English-speaking medical team; and Spanish-speaking communicating directly with a Spanish-speaking medical team (Hispanic Center for Pediatric Surgery, HCPS). One-way analysis of variance was used to test for group differences. We administered 226 surveys; 49 were removed due to lack literacy proficiency. Families in the HCPS group reported a higher level of satisfaction than the interpreter and English groups (ppediatric surgery clinic, language concordant care improves patient satisfaction and understanding for Hispanic families in comparison to language discordant care. Other clinics in other surgery sub-specialties may consider using this model to eliminate language barriers and improve patient satisfaction and understanding of surgical care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A comparative study of the effect of caudal dexmedetomidine versus morphine added to bupivacaine in pediatric infra-umbilical surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam A El Shamaa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the most commonly used regional anesthetic techniques in pediatric surgeries is the caudal epidural block. Its main disadvantage remains the short duration of action. Hence, different additives have been used. Dexmedetomidine is a potent as well as highly selective α2 adrenergic receptor agonist. The aim of this randomized, double-blinded, study was to compare the duration of postoperative analgesia of caudal dexmedetomidine versus morphine in combination with bupivacaine in pediatric patients undergoing lower abdominal or perineal surgery. Patients and Methods: A total of 50 pediatric patients 1-5 years old The American Society of Anesthesiologists status I, II scheduled for lower abdominal and perineal surgeries were included in the study. The patients were enrolled into 2 equal groups: Group A patients (n = 25 received dexmedetomidine with bupivacaine while Group B patients (n = 25 received morphine with bupivacaine. Patients were placed in a supine position then inhalational general anesthesia was induced, and laryngeal mask airway (LMA was placed. Patients were then given caudal epidural analgesia. By the end of surgery reversal of muscle relaxation was done and the LMA was removed. Post-operatively, the sedation as well as pain score were observed and recorded. Results: The current study showed that minor complications were recorded in the post-anesthesia care unit; in addition, significantly longer periods of analgesia and sedation were detected in Group A. However, no significant differences in demographic data, as well as in the duration of surgery, and the time of emergence from anesthesia and patient condition during recovery were detected. Conclusion: The present study suggested that use of dexmedetomidine, during single dose injection, as an additive to the local anesthetic bupivacaine in caudal epidural analgesia prolongs the duration of post-operative analgesia following lower abdominal as well as perineal

  17. [Geriatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino-Netto, Augusto

    2005-10-01

    Modern medicine, which is evidence-based and overly scientific, has forgotten its artistic component, which is very important for surgery in general and for geriatric surgery in particular. The surgeon treating an old patient must be a politician more than a technician, more an artist than a scientist. Like Leonardo da Vinci, he or she must use scientific knowledge with intelligence and sensitivity, transforming the elderly patient's last days of life into a beautiful and harmonious painting and not into something like an atomic power station which, while no doubt useful, is deprived of beauty and sometimes very dangerous.

  18. State of the practice for pediatric surgery--career satisfaction and concerns. A report from the American Pediatric Surgical Association Task Force on Family Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Aviva; Mallory, Baird; Gilbert, James C; Bethel, Colin; Hayes-Jordan, Andrea A; Saito, Jacqueline M; Tomita, Sandra S; Walsh, Danielle S; Shin, Cathy E; Wesley, John R; Farmer, Diana

    2010-10-01

    There has been increasing interest and concern raised in the surgical literature regarding changes in the culture of surgical training and practice, and the impact these changes may have on surgeon stress and the appeal of a career in surgery. We surveyed pediatric surgeons and their partners to collect information on career satisfaction and work-family balance. The American Pediatric Surgical Association Task Force on Family Issues developed separate survey instruments for both pediatric surgeons and their partners that requested demographic data and information regarding the impact of surgical training and practice on the surgeon's opportunity to be involved with his/her family. We found that 96% of pediatric surgeons were satisfied with their career choice. Of concern was the lack of balance, with little time available for family, noted by both pediatric surgeons and their partners. The issues of work-family balance and its impact on surgeon stress and burnout should be addressed in both pediatric surgery training and practice. The American Pediatric Surgical Association is positioned to play a leading role in this effort. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. CLINICAL EVALUATION OF EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF DEXMEDETOMEDINE AS AN ADJUNCT TO CAUDAL ROPIVACAINE IN PEDIATRIC INFRAUMBILICAL SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urmila

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caudal epidural is one of the most popular reliable & safe technique mainly used for intra and post-op analgesia in pediatric patients undergoing infra umbilical surgeries. To prolong the duration of analgesia various adjuvants like epinephrine, opioids, ketamine, midazolam, tramadol, clonidine, were added to local anesthetic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of CAUDAL administration of plain Ropivacaine 0.2% (1miligram/kilogram body weight with and without dexmedetomedine (2 microgram/kilogram body weight in children undergoing infraumbilical surgeries; in terms of quality of surgical anesthesia and the duration of post-operative analgesia.

  20. The long-term anterior segment configuration after pediatric cataract surgery and the association with secondary glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ding; Gong, Xian-hui; Xie, He; Zhu, Xue-ning; Li, Jin; Zhao, Yun-e

    2017-01-01

    Secondary glaucoma constitutes major sight-threatening complication of pediatric cataract surgery, yet the etiology remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term anterior segment configuration and the association with secondary glaucoma in pediatric pseudophakia. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) was performed on 40 eyes of 26 children underwent pediatric cataract surgery and intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. The anterior chamber depth (ACD), angle-opening distance at 500 μm (AOD500), trabecular-iris angle (TIA), central corneal thickness (CCT), structural abnormities, IOL position, IOP, and incidence of glaucoma were evaluated. High insertion of iris, in which the iris root is attached more anteriorly than normal, was seen in 13 eyes (32.50%). IOL was located in the capsular bag in 19 eyes and in the ciliary sulcus in 21 eyes. Logistic regression analysis identified high insertion of iris (OR 3.40, 95% CI 1.03–11.17, p = 0.03) and IOL implantation in sulcus (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.07–4.85, p = 0.04) as independent risk factors for glaucoma. The presence of high insertion of iris and IOL implantation in ciliary sulcus may increase the long-term risk of the development of secondary glaucoma after pediatric cataract surgery. PMID:28220849

  1. Chiari malformation Type I surgery in pediatric patients. Part 1: validation of an ICD-9-CM code search algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Travis R; Greenberg, Jacob K; Guerrero, Nicole; Olsen, Margaret A; Shannon, Chevis N; Yarbrough, Chester K; Piccirillo, Jay F; Anderson, Richard C E; Feldstein, Neil A; Wellons, John C; Smyth, Matthew D; Park, Tae Sung; Limbrick, David D

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Administrative billing data may facilitate large-scale assessments of treatment outcomes for pediatric Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I). Validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code algorithms for identifying CM-I surgery are critical prerequisites for such studies but are currently only available for adults. The objective of this study was to validate two ICD-9-CM code algorithms using hospital billing data to identify pediatric patients undergoing CM-I decompression surgery. METHODS The authors retrospectively analyzed the validity of two ICD-9-CM code algorithms for identifying pediatric CM-I decompression surgery performed at 3 academic medical centers between 2001 and 2013. Algorithm 1 included any discharge diagnosis code of 348.4 (CM-I), as well as a procedure code of 01.24 (cranial decompression) or 03.09 (spinal decompression or laminectomy). Algorithm 2 restricted this group to the subset of patients with a primary discharge diagnosis of 348.4. The positive predictive value (PPV) and sensitivity of each algorithm were calculated. RESULTS Among 625 first-time admissions identified by Algorithm 1, the overall PPV for CM-I decompression was 92%. Among the 581 admissions identified by Algorithm 2, the PPV was 97%. The PPV for Algorithm 1 was lower in one center (84%) compared with the other centers (93%-94%), whereas the PPV of Algorithm 2 remained high (96%-98%) across all subgroups. The sensitivity of Algorithms 1 (91%) and 2 (89%) was very good and remained so across subgroups (82%-97%). CONCLUSIONS An ICD-9-CM algorithm requiring a primary diagnosis of CM-I has excellent PPV and very good sensitivity for identifying CM-I decompression surgery in pediatric patients. These results establish a basis for utilizing administrative billing data to assess pediatric CM-I treatment outcomes.

  2. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Globally, the entry of female students into medical schools has ... how female registrars perceived the impact of gender on their training and practice of surgery. ... male-dominated specialty, their choice of mentors and the challenges that they encountered ..... Social Determinants of Health2007 (Accessed on 23 Sep 2016).

  3. Pediatric cardiac surgery Parent Education Discharge Instruction (PEDI) program: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staveski, Sandra L; Zhelva, Bistra; Paul, Reena; Conway, Rosalind; Carlson, Anna; Soma, Gouthami; Kools, Susan; Franck, Linda S

    2015-01-01

    In developing countries, more children with complex cardiac defects now receive treatment for their condition. For successful long-term outcomes, children also need skilled care at home after discharge. The Parent Education Discharge Instruction (PEDI) program was developed to educate nurses on the importance of discharge teaching and to provide them with a structured process for conducting parent teaching for home care of children after cardiac surgery. The aim of this pilot study was to generate preliminary data on the feasibility and acceptability of the nurse-led structured discharge program on an Indian pediatric cardiac surgery unit. A pre-/post-design was used. Questionnaires were used to evaluate role acceptability, nurse and parent knowledge of discharge content, and utility of training materials with 40 nurses and 20 parents. Retrospective audits of 50 patient medical records (25 pre and 25 post) were performed to evaluate discharge teaching documentation. Nurses' discharge knowledge increased from a mean of 81% to 96% (P = .001) after participation in the training. Nurses and parents reported high levels of satisfaction with the education materials (3.75-4 on a 4.00-point scale). Evidence of discharge teaching documentation in patient medical records improved from 48% (12 of 25 medical records) to 96% (24 of 25 medical records) six months after the implementation of the PEDI program. The structured nurse-led parent discharge teaching program demonstrated feasibility, acceptability, utility, and sustainability in the cardiac unit. Future studies are needed to examine nurse, parent, child, and organizational outcomes related to this expanded nursing role in resource-constrained environments. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  5. Evaluation of closed-loop anesthesia delivery for propofol anesthesia in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Indranil; Mathew, Preethy J; Singh, Rana S; Puri, Goverdhan D

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the feasibility of closed-loop anesthesia delivery with manual control of propofol in pediatric patients during cardiac surgery. Forty ASA II-III children, undergoing elective cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in a tertiary care hospital, were randomized to receive propofol either through a closed-loop anesthesia delivery system (CL group) or through traditional manual control (manual group) to achieve a target BIS of 50. Patients were induced and subsequently maintained with a propofol infusion. The propofol usage and the efficacy of closed-loop system in controlling BIS within ±10 of the target were compared with that of manual control. The maintenance of BIS within ±10 of target and intraoperative hemodynamic stability were similar between the two groups. However, induction dose of propofol was less in the CL group (2.06 ± 0.79 mg·kg(-1) ) than the manual group (2.95 ± 1.03 mg·kg(-1) ) (P = 0.006) with less overshoot of BIS during induction in the closed-loop group (P = 0.007). Total propofol used in the off-CPB period was less in the CL group (6.29 ± 2.48 mg·kg(-1) h(-1) vs 7.82 ± 2.1 mg·kg(-1) h(-1) ) (P = 0.037). Phenylephrine use in the pre-CPB period was more in the manual group (16.92 ± 10.92 μg·kg(-1) vs 5.79 ± 5.98 μg·kg(-1) ) (P = 0.014). Manual group required a median of 18 (range 8-29) dose adjustments per hour, while the CL group required none. This study demonstrated the feasibility of closed-loop controlled propofol anesthesia in children, even in challenging procedures such as cardiac surgery. Closed-loop system needs further and larger evaluation to establish its safety and efficacy. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Surgical checklist application and its impact on patient safety in pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oak, S N; Dave, N M; Garasia, M B; Parelkar, S V

    2015-01-01

    Surgical care is an essential component of health care of children worldwide. Incidences of congenital anomalies, trauma, cancers and acquired diseases continue to rise and along with that the impact of surgical intervention on public health system also increases. It then becomes essential that the surgical teams make the procedures safe and error proof. The World Health Organization (WHO) has instituted the surgical checklist as a global initiative to improve surgical safety. To assess the acceptance, application and adherence to the WHO Safe Surgery Checklist in Pediatric Surgery Practice at a university teaching hospital. In a prospective study, spanning 2 years, the checklist was implemented for all patients who underwent operative procedures under general anesthesia. The checklist identified three phases of an operation, each corresponding to a specific period in the normal flow of work: Before the induction of anesthesia ("sign in"), before the skin incision ("time out") and before the patient leaves the operating room ("sign out"). In each phase, an anesthesiologist,-"checklist coordinator," confirmed that the anesthesia, surgery and nursing teams have completed the listed tasks before proceeding with the operation and exit. The checklist was used for 3000 consecutive patients. No major perioperative errors were noted. In 54 (1.8%) patients, children had the same names and identical surgical procedure posted on the same operation list. The patient identification tag was missing in four (0.1%) patients. Mention of the side of procedures was missing in 108 (3.6%) cases. In 0.1% (3) of patients there was mix up of the mention of side of operation in the case papers and consent forms. In 78 (2.6%) patients, the consent form was not signed by parents/guardians or the side of the procedure was not quoted. Antibiotic orders were missing in five (0.2%) patients. In 12 (0.4%) cases, immobilization of the patients was suboptimal, which led to displacement of diathermy

  7. Surgical checklist application and its impact on patient safety in pediatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S N Oak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical care is an essential component of health care of children worldwide. Incidences of congenital anomalies, trauma, cancers and acquired diseases continue to rise and along with that the impact of surgical intervention on public health system also increases. It then becomes essential that the surgical teams make the procedures safe and error proof. The World Health Organization (WHO has instituted the surgical checklist as a global initiative to improve surgical safety. Aims: To assess the acceptance, application and adherence to the WHO Safe Surgery Checklist in Pediatric Surgery Practice at a university teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: In a prospective study, spanning 2 years, the checklist was implemented for all patients who underwent operative procedures under general anesthesia. The checklist identified three phases of an operation, each corresponding to a specific period in the normal flow of work: Before the induction of anesthesia ("sign in", before the skin incision ("time out" and before the patient leaves the operating room ("sign out". In each phase, an anesthesiologist,-"checklist coordinator," confirmed that the anesthesia, surgery and nursing teams have completed the listed tasks before proceeding with the operation and exit. The checklist was used for 3000 consecutive patients. Results: No major perioperative errors were noted. In 54 (1.8% patients, children had the same names and identical surgical procedure posted on the same operation list. The patient identification tag was missing in four (0.1% patients. Mention of the side of procedures was missing in 108 (3.6% cases. In 0.1% (3 of patients there was mix up of the mention of side of operation in the case papers and consent forms. In 78 (2.6% patients, the consent form was not signed by parents/guardians or the side of the procedure was not quoted. Antibiotic orders were missing in five (0.2% patients. In 12 (0.4% cases, immobilization of the

  8. Exploring predictors of surgery and comparing operative treatment approaches for pediatric intracranial arachnoid cysts: a case series of 83 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohsin; Bennardo, Michael; Almenawer, Saleh A; Zagzoog, Nirmeen; Smith, Alston A; Dao, Dyda; Ajani, Olufemi; Farrokhyar, Forough; Singh, Sheila K

    2015-09-01

    Although intracranial arachnoid cysts are a common incidental finding on pediatric brain imaging, only a subset of patients require surgery for them. For the minority who undergo surgery, the comparative effectiveness of various surgical approaches is debated. The authors explored predictors of surgery and compared operative techniques for pediatric patients with an intracranial arachnoid cyst seen at a tertiary care center. The authors reviewed records of pediatric patients with an intracranial arachnoid cyst. For each patient, data on baseline characteristics, the method of intervention, and surgical outcomes for the initial surgery were extracted, and cyst size at diagnosis was calculated (anteroposterior × craniocaudal × mediolateral). Baseline variables were analyzed as predictors of surgery by using logistic regression modeling, excluding patients whose surgery was not related to cyst size (i.e., those with obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to the cyst compressing a narrow CSF flow pathway or cyst rupture/hemorrhage). Data collected regarding surgical outcomes were analyzed descriptively. Among 83 pediatric patients with an intracranial arachnoid cyst seen over a 25-year period (1989-2013), 27 (33%) underwent surgery; all had at least 1 cyst-attributed symptom/finding. In the multivariate model, age at presentation and cyst size at diagnosis were independent predictors of surgery. Cyst size had greater predictive value; specifically, the area under the curve for the receiver-operating-characteristic curve was 0.89 (95% CI 0.82-0.97), with an ideal cutoff point of ≥ 68 cm(3). This cutoff point had 100% sensitivity (95% CI 79%-100%), 75% specificity (95% CI 61%-85%), a 53% positive predictive value (95% CI 36%-70%), and a 100% negative predictive value (95% CI 91%-100%); the positive likelihood ratio was 4.0 (95% CI 2.5-6.3), and the negative likelihood ratio was 0 (95% CI 0-0.3). Although the multivariate model excluded 7 patients who underwent surgery

  9. Wound classification in pediatric general surgery: significant variation exists among providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Rebecca A; Johnson, Lisa; Tice, Jamie; Wingo, Tammy; Williams, Dana; Wang, Li; Blakely, Martin L

    2013-11-01

    Risk-adjusted rates of surgical site infections (SSI) are used as a quality metric to facilitate improvement within a hospital system and allow comparison across institutions. The NSQIP-Pediatric, among others, uses surgical wound classification as a variable in models designed to predict risk-adjusted postoperative morbidity, including SSI rates. The purpose of this study was to measure the level of agreement in wound classification assignment among 3 providers: surgeons, operating room (OR) nurses, and NSQIP surgical clinical reviewers (SCR). An analysis was performed of pediatric general surgery operations from 2010 to 2011. Wound classification was assigned at the time of operation by the OR nurse and surgeon, and by the NSQIP SCR postoperatively, according to NSQIP methodology. Disagreement was defined as any discrepancy in classification among the 3 providers, and the level of agreement was determined using the kappa statistic. For the 374 procedures reviewed, there was an overall disagreement of 48% among all providers, kappa 0.48 (95% CI 0.43 to 0.53). When comparing wound classification by surgeon and NSQIP SCR, 23% of cases were in disagreement, kappa 0.74 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.78). Disagreement between OR nurse and either surgeon or NSQIP SCR was higher: 38%, kappa 0.45 (95% CI 0.38 to 0.53) and 40%, kappa 0.44 (95% CI 0.37 to 0.51). Fundoplication, appendectomy, and cholecystectomy demonstrated the highest overall disagreement (73%, 71%, and 60%, respectively). There is significant variation in assigning surgical wound classification among health care providers. For future SSI comparative analyses, it will be critical to improve uniformity and understanding of wound class assignment among providers and institutions. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Weight-for-age standard score - distribution and effect on in-hospital mortality: A retrospective analysis in pediatric cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Antony George; Pushpa Jagannath; Joshi, Shreedhar S.; A M Jagadeesh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the distribution of weight for age standard score (Z score) in pediatric cardiac surgery and its effect on in-hospital mortality. Introduction: WHO recommends Standard Score (Z score) to quantify and describe anthropometric data. The distribution of weight for age Z score and its effect on mortality in congenital heart surgery has not been studied. Methods: All patients of younger than 5 years who underwent cardiac surgery from July 2007 to June 2013, under single surgical...

  11. The effects of desflurane and sevoflurane on the intraocular pressure associated with endotracheal intubation in pediatric ophthalmic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Taek; Lim, Hyun Kyo; Jang, Kyu-Yong; Um, Dea Ja

    2013-02-01

    For ophthalmic surgery anesthesia, it is vital that intraocular pressure (IOP) is controlled. Most anesthetic drugs affect IOP dose-dependently, and inhalational anesthetics dose-dependently decrease IOP. In this study, we compared the effects of desflurane and sevoflurane on IOP and hemodynamics in pediatric ophthalmic surgery. Thirty eight pediatric patients from the age of 6 to 15 years, who were scheduled for strabismus surgery and entropion surgery, were randomized to be administered desflurane (group D, n = 19) or sevoflurane (group S, n = 19). IOPs and hemodynamic parameters were measured before induction of anesthesia (B), after induction but immediately before intubation (AI), 1 min after intubation (T1), 3 min after intubation (T3), and 5 min after intubation (T5). The mean arterial pressure (MAP) at T1 and heart rates (HRs) at T1 and T3 were significantly higher in group D than those in group S. There was no significant difference between the groups in IOP, cardiac index (CI) and stroke index (SI). There was a significant difference within the group in IOP, SI, MAP and HR. There was no significant difference within the group in CI. There was no significant difference between the groups in IOP and hemodynamic parameters. The two anesthetic agents maintained IOP and hemodynamic parameters in the normal range during anesthetic induction.

  12. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education ... implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education ...

  13. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Treatment Surgery for Breast Cancer Surgery is a common treatment for breast cancer, ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  14. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  15. Preparing for Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Preparing for Surgery Home For Patients Search FAQs Preparing for Surgery ... Surgery FAQ080, August 2011 PDF Format Preparing for Surgery Gynecologic Problems What is the difference between outpatient ...

  16. Refractive corneal surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearsightedness surgery - discharge; Refractive surgery - discharge; LASIK - discharge; PRK - discharge ... You had refractive corneal surgery to help improve your vision. This surgery uses a laser to reshape your cornea. It corrects mild-to-moderate nearsightedness, ...

  17. Preparing for Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Preparing for Surgery Home For Patients Search FAQs Preparing for Surgery ... Surgery FAQ080, August 2011 PDF Format Preparing for Surgery Gynecologic Problems What is the difference between outpatient ...

  18. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ...

  19. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ...

  20. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ...

  1. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  2. Pediatric craniofacial surgery: comparison of milling and stereolithography for 3D model manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, H M; Schneider, W; Alzen, G; Voy, E D; Günther, R W

    1992-01-01

    To improve the planning phase for pediatric craniofacial surgery, 3D reconstructions of CT image series were performed on a personal computer. For construction of true models of the surgical site, two concepts were pursued. CT image data of six patients were used for model manufacturing by a conventional 2 1/2 axis milling system. The material used was polyurethane foam. Alternatively, in one patient a stereolithography was produced on the basis of the 3D reconstructed CT data. This new manufacturing device uses a photocurable monomer, hardened by a UV-laser. The spatial resolution of the system is about 0.1 mm. 3D-reconstructions were performed on a personal computer. Data were then transferred into a surface oriented structure to control a stereolithographic modeling device. Time for transfer was 70 min. The production of the modelled cranium took a total time of 59 h. Accuracy was found to be much higher in stereolithography than in milled models. The model served for surgical planning. The long time for production was caused by inadequate computer capacities, which are configured for much less complex objects in computer aided design. Furthermore the programs for the machine control are optimized for technical purposes. If these conditions are improved, stereolithography could be an attractive alternative to milling of medical models.

  3. Central Corneal Thickness, Corneal Endothelial Characteristics and Intraocular Pressure after Pediatric Cataract Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Nilforushan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To investigate central corneal thickness (CCT, endothelial cell characteristics and intraocular pressure (IOP in eyes with prior pediatric cataract surgery and to compare them with eyes of normal age and sex matched controls. METHODS: Specular microscopy CCT and IOP measurements were performed in 31 eyes of 17 patients with prior congenital cataract extraction and 40 eyes of 20 age and sex matched subjects. The mean of three pachymetric and specular microscopic measurements were recorded. IOP was measured using Goldmann applanation tonometry. RESULTS: Mean CCT was 632±45 µm in eyes with prior pediatric cataract surgery vs 546±33 µm in control eyes (P < 0.001, independent t test and Mann Whitney U-test. Mean IOP was 22.1±3.9 mmHg in eyes with prior pediatric cataract surgery and 14.0±1.6 mmHg in the control group (P < 0.001, independent t-test. There was no significant difference between the two groups in cell count, polymegethism and mean cell area of corneal endothelial cells. CONCLUSIONS: Although the corneas were clinically clear and there was no significant difference in endothelial characteristics in eyes with prior pediatric cataract surgery as compared to normal controls, central corneal thickness in the operated eyes was significantly greater. To differentiate actual glaucoma from artifactual IOP

  4. Pelvic Fixation in Adult and Pediatric Spine Surgery: Historical Perspective, Indications, and Techniques: AAOS Exhibit Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit; Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Strike, Sophia A; Menga, Emmanuel N; Sponseller, Paul D; Kebaish, Khaled M

    2015-09-16

    Achieving solid osseous fusion across the lumbosacral junction has historically been, and continues to be, a challenge in spine surgery. Robust pelvic fixation plays an integral role in achieving this goal. The goals of this review are to describe the history of and indications for spinopelvic fixation, examine conventional spinopelvic fixation techniques, and review the newer S2-alar-iliac technique and its outcomes in adult and pediatric patients with spinal deformity. Since the introduction of Harrington rods in the 1960s, spinal instrumentation has evolved substantially. Indications for spinopelvic fixation as a means to achieve lumbosacral arthrodesis include a long arthrodesis (five or more vertebral levels) or use of three-column osteotomies in the lower thoracic or lumbar spine, surgical treatment of high-grade spondylolisthesis, and correction of lumbar deformity and pelvic obliquity. A variety of techniques have been described over the years, including Galveston iliac rods, Jackson intrasacral rods, the Kostuik transiliac bar, iliac screws, and S2-alar-iliac screws. Modern iliac screws and S2-alar-iliac screws are associated with relatively low rates of pseudarthrosis. S2-alar-iliac screws have the advantages of less implant prominence and inline placement with proximal spinal anchors. Collectively, these techniques provide powerful methods for obtaining control of the pelvis in facilitating lumbosacral arthrodesis.

  5. Caudal analgesia and cardiothoracic surgery: a look at postoperative pain scores in a pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khoa N; Byrd, Heather S; Tan, Jonathan M

    2016-11-01

    Caudal epidural anesthesia has been shown to reduce stress response and shorten the time to extubation in children after cardiac surgery. Combined with general anesthesia, regional anesthesia has been proven to be safe and efficacious in the pediatric population. It is not known, however, whether the use of caudal anesthesia actually reduces postoperative pain scores and decreases postoperative opioid use. We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 199 children who underwent repair for atrial septal defect (ASD), ventricular septal defect (VSD), and Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) at a major academic children's hospital between 2010 and 2013. Eighty-six patients underwent preoperative placement of caudal anesthesia (bupivacaine 0.25% 1 ml·kg(-1) up to 20 ml + clonidine 2mcg·kg(-1) + Duramorph 40 mcg·kg(-1) up to 2.5 mg) and 113 patients did not have a caudal block. Postoperative cardiac intensive care pain scores were analyzed according to standard nurse-recorded patient-appropriate pain scales ranging from 0 to 10 (CRIES for neonates and FLACC for 2 months-7 years). There was no statistical difference between caudal and noncaudal groups with respect to postoperative pain scores or with postoperative opioid requirements. There was a statistical significance with regard to intraoperative opioid use as noncaudal patients invariably received more opioid during the procedure. Although regional anesthesia reduced intraoperative opioid usage, there was no difference in postoperative opioid usage or pain scores. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Hepatectomia parcial em cirurgia pediátrica Partial hepatectomy in pediatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Oliveira Cardoso dos Santos

    2003-02-01

    . METHODS: A retrospective review of clinical and surgical data of 12 patients submitted to hepatic lobectomy, at Pediatric Surgery Service of Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de São Paulo and Hospital Santa Lydia, Ribeirão Preto (Brazil, between 1985 and 1995. RESULTS: There were eight left lobectomies and four right lobectomies. The indication of surgery were neoplastic diseases in 10 children, and complicated hepatic trauma in two. The age range was six days to 16 months in children with hepatic tumors, and the mean age was 3,8 months. Histopathological diagnosis were hemangioendothelioma in five (50%, hepatic adenoma in two (20%, hepatoblastoma in two (20%, and hepatic carcinoma in one (10%. Mean tumor weight was 7,1 % of body weight. Mean surgical time was 2h 58m. Postoperative follow-up was up to 141 months, and mean follow-up was 76,5 months. Seven patients received intraoperative blood transfusion, corresponding to 23,3 % of volemy. Only one patient had a late reoperation for resection of a new tumor. There were no postoperative complications. CONCLUSION: Although hepatic lobectomy is a major surgery, and undoubtedly technically difficult, it can be safely performed without expensive devices and sophisticated methods (some of them not always available in common hospitals if the surgeon is skilled and well prepared for such a procedure.

  7. CHANGING PARADIGMS IN PREOPERATIVE FASTING: RESULTS OF A JOINT EFFORT IN PEDIATRIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Carlos Augusto Leite de Barros; Carvalho, Augusto Aurélio de; Nogueira, Paulo Luiz Batista; Aguilar-Nascimento, José Eduardo de

    2017-01-01

    Current researches associate long fasting periods to several adverse consequences. The fasting abbreviation to 2 h to clear liquids associated with the use of drinks containing carbohydrates attenuates endocrinometabolic response to surgical trauma, but often is observed children advised to not intake food from 00:00 h till the scheduled surgical time, regardless of what it is. To evaluate the safety of a protocol of preoperative fasting abbreviation with a beverage containing carbohydrates, and early postoperative feeding in children underwent elective small/mid-size surgical procedures during a national task-force on pediatric surgery. Thirty-six patients were prospectively included, and for several reasons five were excluded. All 31 who remained in the study received a nutritional supplement containing 150 ml of water plus 12.5% maltodextrin 2 h before the procedure. Data of the pre-operative fasting time, anesthetic complications and time of postoperative refeeding, were collected. Twenty-three (74.2%) were males, the median age was 5 y, and the median weight was 20 kg. The median time of pre-operative fasting was 145 min and the time of post-operative refeeding was 135 min. There were no adverse effects on the anesthetic procedures or during surgery. Post-operatively, two children (6.5%) vomited. The abbreviation of pre-operative fasting to 2 h with beverage containing carbohydrate in pediatric surgery is safe. Early refeeding in elective small/mid-size procedures can be prescribed. Trabalhos atuais associam longos períodos de jejum com diversas consequências adversas. A abreviação do jejum de 2 h para líquidos claros associado ao uso de bebidas contendo carboidratos atenua resposta endocrinometabólica ao trauma, porém frequentemente as crianças são orientadas a não ingerir alimentos a partir das 00:00 h do dia anterior à operação, independente do horário do procedimento cirúrgico. Avaliar a segurança de um protocolo de abreviação do jejum pr

  8. Evaluation of a Pilot Project to Introduce Simulation-Based Team Training to Pediatric Surgery Trauma Room Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Lehner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Several studies in pediatric trauma care have demonstrated substantial deficits in both prehospital and emergency department management. Methods. In February 2015 the PAEDSIM collaborative conducted a one and a half day interdisciplinary, simulation based team-training course in a simulated pediatric emergency department. 14 physicians from the medical fields of pediatric surgery, pediatric intensive care and emergency medicine, and anesthesia participated, as well as four pediatric nurses. After a theoretical introduction and familiarization with the simulator, course attendees alternately participated in six simulation scenarios and debriefings. Each scenario incorporated elements of pediatric trauma management as well as Crew Resource Management (CRM educational objectives. Participants completed anonymous pre- and postcourse questionnaires and rated the course itself as well as their own medical qualification and knowledge of CRM. Results. Participants found the course very realistic and selected scenarios highly relevant to their daily work. They reported a feeling of improved medical and nontechnical skills as well as no uncomfortable feeling during scenarios or debriefings. Conclusion. To our knowledge this pilot-project represents the first successful implementation of a simulation-based team-training course focused on pediatric trauma care in German-speaking countries with good acceptance.

  9. Transfusion of Leukocyte-Depleted RBCs Is Independently Associated With Increased Morbidity After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; Grotenhuis, Femke; Berger, Rolf F. M.; Ebels, Tjark W.; Burgerhof, Johannes G. M.; Albers, Marcel J. I. J.

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that transfusion of leukocyte-depleted RBC preparations within the first 48 hours of PICU stay was independently associated with prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation, irrespective of surgery type and disease severity. Design: Retrospective, observational

  10. Custodiol versus blood cardioplegia in pediatric cardiac surgery, two-center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebtehal A. Qulisy

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: Custodial cardioplegia is associated with less optimal myocardial protection and higher adverse outcomes compared to cold blood cardioplegia in children undergoing cardiac surgery. A randomized comparison is warranted.

  11. Surgery for childhood epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sita Jayalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 60% of all patients with epilepsy suffer from focal epilepsy syndromes. In about 15% of these patients, the seizures are not adequately controlled with antiepileptic drugs; such patients are potential candidates for surgical treatment and the major proportion is in the pediatric group (18 years old or less. Epilepsy surgery in children who have been carefully chosen can result in either seizure freedom or a marked (>90% reduction in seizures in approximately two-thirds of children with intractable seizures. Advances in structural and functional neuroimaging, neurosurgery, and neuroanaesthesia have improved the outcomes of surgery for children with intractable epilepsy. Early surgery improves the quality of life and cognitive and developmental outcome and allows the child to lead a normal life. Surgically remediable epilepsies should be identified early and include temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis, lesional temporal and extratemporal epilepsy, hemispherical epilepsy, and gelastic epilepsy with hypothalamic hamartoma. These syndromes have both acquired and congenital etiologies and can be treated by resective or disconnective surgery. Palliative procedures are performed in children with diffuse and multifocal epilepsies who are not candidates for resective surgery. The palliative procedures include corpus callosotomy and vagal nerve stimulation while deep brain stimulation in epilepsy is still under evaluation. For children with "surgically remediable epilepsy," surgery should be offered as a procedure of choice rather than as a treatment of last resort.

  12. Classification and discrimination of pediatric patients undergoing open heart surgery with and without methylprednisolone treatment by cytomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocsi, Jozsef; Mittag, Anja; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Osmancik, Pavel; Dähnert, Ingo; Tárnok, Attila

    2011-02-01

    Introduction: Methylprednisolone (MP) is frequently preoperatively administered in children undergoing open heart surgery. The aim of this medication is to inhibit overshooting immune responses. Earlier studies demonstrated cellular and humoral immunological changes in pediatric patients undergoing heart surgeries with and without MP administration. Here in a retrospective study we investigated the modulation of the cellular immune response by MP. The aim was to identify suitable parameters characterizing MP effects by cluster analysis. Methods: Blood samples were analysed from two aged matched groups with surgical correction of septum defects. Group without MP treatment consisted of 10 patients; MP was administered on 21 patients (median dose: 11mg/kg) before cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). EDTA anticoagulated blood was obtained 24 h preoperatively, after anesthesia, at CPB begin and end (CPB2), 4h, 24h, 48h after surgery, at discharge and at out-patient followup (8.2; 3.3-12.2 month after surgery; median and IQR). Flow cytometry showed the biggest MP relevant changes at CPB2 and 4h postoperatively. They were used for clustering analysis. Classification was made by discriminant analysis and cluster analysis by means of Genes@work software. Results & conclusion: 146 parameters were obtained from analysis. Cross-validation revealed several parameters being able to discriminate between MP groups and to identify immune modulation. MP administration resulted in a delayed activation of monocytes, increased ratio of neutrophils, reduced T-lymphocytes counts. Cluster analysis demonstrated that classification of patients is possible based on the identified cytomics parameters. Further investigation of these parameters might help to understand the MP effects in pediatric open heart surgery.

  13. Developing pediatric surgery in low- and middle-income countries: An evaluation of contemporary education and care delivery models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Marilyn W

    2016-02-01

    There are several different models of education and care delivery models in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and many endeavors combine more than one of the described models. This article summarizes the burden of pediatric surgical disease and discusses the benefits and shortcomings of the following: faith-based missions; short-term surgical trips; partnerships, twinning, and academic collaborations; teaching workshops, "train the trainer," and pediatric surgery camps; specialty treatment centers; online conferences, telemedicine, and mobile health; specific programs for exchange and education; and training in high-income countries (HICs), fellowships, and observorships. It then addresses ethical concerns common to all humanitarian pediatric surgical efforts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pediatric robotic surgery: A single-institutional review of the first 100 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, John J; Sandler, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Robotic surgery is a new technology which may expand the variety of operations a surgeon can perform with minimally invasive techniques. We present a retrospective review of our first 100 consecutive robotic cases in children. A three-arm robot was used with one camera arm and two instrument arms. Additional accessory ports were utilized as necessary. Two different attending surgeons performed the procedures. Twenty-four different types of procedures were completed using the robot. The majority of the procedures (89%) were abdominal procedures with 11% thoracic. No urology or cardiac procedures were performed. Age ranged from 1 day to 23 years with an average age of 8.4 years. Weight ranged from 2.2 to 103 kg with a median weight of 27.9 kg. Twenty-two patients were less than 10.0 kg. Examples of cases included gastrointestinal (GI) surgery, hepatobiliary, surgical oncology, and congenital anomalies. The overall majority of cases had never been performed minimally invasively by the authors. The overall intraoperative conversion rate to open surgery was 13%. One case (1%) was converted to thoracoscopic because of lack of domain for the articulating instruments. No conversions or complications occurred as a result of injuries from the robotic instruments. Interestingly, four abdominal cases were converted to open surgery due to equipment failures or injuries from standard laparoscopic instruments used through non-robotic accessory ports. Robotic surgery is safe and effective in children. An enormous variety of cases can be safely performed including complex cases in neonates and small children. Simple operations such as cholecystectomies have minimal advantages by using robotic technology but can serve as excellent teaching tools for residents and newcomers to this form of minimally invasive surgery (MIS). The technology is ideal for complex hepatobiliary cases and thoracic surgery, particularly solid chest masses.

  15. Influence of sub-specialty surgical care on outcomes for pediatric emergency general surgery patients in a low-middle income country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Adil A; Shakoor, Amarah; Zogg, Cheryl K; Oyetunji, Tolulope; Ashfaq, Awais; Garvey, Erin M; Latif, Asad; Riviello, Robert; Qureshi, Faisal G; Mateen, Arif; Haider, Adil H; Zafar, Hasnain

    2016-05-01

    Whether adult general surgeons should handle pediatric emergencies is controversial. In many resource-limited settings, pediatric surgeons are not available. The study examined differences in surgical outcomes among children/adolescents managed by pediatric and adult general surgery teams for emergency general surgical (EGS) conditions at a university-hospital in South Asia. Pediatric patients (pediatric surgical management team. Outcome measures included: length of stay (LOS), mortality, and occurrence of ≥1 complication(s). Descriptive statistics and multivariable regression analyses with propensity scores to account for potential confounding were used to compare outcomes between the two groups. Quasi-experimental counterfactual models further examined hypothetical outcomes, assuming that all patients had been treated by pediatric surgeons. A total of 2323 patients were included. Average age was 7.1y (±5.5 SD); most patients were male (77.7%). 1958 (84.3%) were managed by pediatric surgery. The overall probability of developing a complication was 1.8%; 0.9% died (all adult general surgery). Patients managed by adult general surgery had higher risk-adjusted odds of developing complications (OR [95%CI]: 5.42 [2.10-14.00]) and longer average LOS (7.98 vs. 5.61 days, p pediatric surgery. Pediatric patients had better post-operative outcomes under pediatric surgical supervision, suggesting that, where possible in resource-constrained settings, resources should be allocated to promote development and staffing of pediatric surgical specialties parallel to adult general surgical teams. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of critical care nursing and organizational characteristics on pediatric cardiac surgery mortality in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Patricia A; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Curley, Martha A Q; Connor, Jean A

    2014-10-01

    This study explored pediatric critical care nursing and organizational factors that impact in-hospital mortality for cardiac surgery patients across children's hospitals in the United States. Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect and the no. 1 cause of death for infants with a congenital defect. Little is known about the impact of pediatric critical care nursing and organizational factors on pediatric mortality. Nursing leaders from 38 children's hospitals that contribute data to the Pediatric Health Information System data set completed an organizational assessment for years 2009 and 2010. These data were linked with patient-level data. The Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery method was used to adjust for baseline patient differences in patients younger than 18 years. The odds of death increased as the institutional percentage of pediatric critical care unit nurses with 2 years' clinical experience or less increased. The odds of mortality were highest when the percentage of RNs with 2 years' clinical experience or less was 20% or greater. The odds of death decreased as the institutional percentage of critical care nurses with 11 years' clinical experience or more increased and for hospitals participating in national quality metric benchmarking. Clinical experience was independently associated with in-hospital mortality. These data are the 1st to link clinical nursing experience with pediatric patient outcomes. A cut point of 20% RNs or greater with 2 years' clinical experience or less was determined to significantly affect inpatient mortality. Participation in national quality metric benchmarking programs was significantly associated with improved mortality.

  17. An initial experience with a digital drainage system during the postoperative period of pediatric thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Altair da Silva; Bachichi, Thiago; Holanda, Caio; Rizzo, Luiz Augusto Lucas Martins De

    2016-01-01

    To report an initial experience with a digital drainage system during the postoperative period of pediatric thoracic surgery. This was a prospective observational study involving consecutive patients, ≤ 14 years of age, treated at a pediatric thoracic surgery outpatient clinic, for whom pulmonary resection (lobectomy or segmentectomy via muscle-sparing thoracotomy) was indicated. The parameters evaluated were air leak (as quantified with the digital system), biosafety, duration of drainage, length of hospital stay, and complications. The digital system was used in 11 children (mean age, 5.9 ± 3.3 years). The mean length of hospital stay was 4.9 ± 2.6 days, the mean duration of drainage was 2.5 ± 0.7 days, and the mean drainage volume was 270.4 ± 166.7 mL. The mean maximum air leak flow was 92.78 ± 95.83 mL/min (range, 18-338 mL/min). Two patients developed postoperative complications (atelectasis and pneumonia, respectively). The use of this digital system facilitated the decision-making process during the postoperative period, reducing the risk of errors in the interpretation and management of air leaks. Relatar a experiência inicial com um sistema de drenagem digital no pós-operatório de cirurgia torácica pediátrica. Estudo observacional e prospectivo envolvendo pacientes consecutivos do ambulatório de cirurgia torácica pediátrica da instituição, com idade até 14 anos, e com indicação de ressecção pulmonar (lobectomia e/ou segmentectomia através de toracotomia poupadora muscular). Os parâmetros avaliados foram perda aérea (quantificada com o sistema digital), biossegurança, tempo de drenagem, tempo de internação e complicações. O sistema digital foi utilizado em 11 crianças, com média de idade de 5,9 ± 3,3 anos. A média do tempo de internação foi de 4,9 ± 2,6 dias, a de tempo de drenagem foi de 2,5 ± 0,7 dias, e a de volume de drenagem foi de 270,4 ± 166,7 ml. A média da perda aérea máxima foi de 92,78 ± 95,83 ml

  18. Experience with a propofol-ketamine mixture for sedation during pediatric orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherall, Andrew; Venclovas, Rasa

    2010-11-01

    Various combinations of propofol and ketofol have been described for the provision of procedural sedation in both adults and children. Utilization of 'ketofol' for deep sedation during prolonged pediatric orthopedic procedures has not previously been described. During an orthopedic aid trip, a 1:1 mixture of propofol and ketamine (200 mg of each drawn up to 22 ml) was utilized to provide deep sedation or general anesthesia as an adjunct to regional analgesia for lower limb surgery. Details for 18 patients having a total of 19 procedures were recorded with a record of intraoperative and postoperative parameters including initial bolus doses and infusion rates of ketofol required to produce deep sedation. Mean operating time was 153.7 min (range 64-241 min). The mean initial bolus dose of ketofol was 0.19 ml·kg(-1) (range 0.1-0.5 ml·kg(-1) ) or 1.7 mg·kg(-1) each of propofol and ketamine (range 0.9-4.5 mg·kg(-1) ). The mean upper limit of the infusion rate required to maintain deep sedation was 0.19 ml·kg(-1) ·h(-1) (range 0.07-0.26 ml·kg(-1) ·h(-1) ) or 1.7 mg·kg(-1) ·h(-1) (range 0.6-2.4 mg·kg(-1) ·h(-1) ) and the mean lower limit of the infusion rate was 0.08 ml·kg(-1) ·h(-1) (range 0.02-0.13 ml·kg(-1) ·h(-1) ) or 0.7 mg·kg(-1) ·h(-1) (range 0.2-1.2 mg·kg(-1) ·h(-1) ). The mean initial bolus dose of ketofol was 0.19 ml·kg(-1) (range 0.1-0.5 ml·kg(-1) ). There were no episodes of hypo- or hypertension or of desaturation. Mean time to eye opening after infusion cessation was 5.1 min (median 2 min; range 0-17 min). Ketofol successfully produced deep sedation for prolonged pediatric orthopedic procedures in conjunction with regional analgesia. Further research to confirm its safety and applicability to a wider range of settings is required. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. NASA Model of "Threat and Error" in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: Patterns of Error Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Edward; Pham-Hung, Eric; Nosikova, Yaroslavna; Halvorsen, Fredrik; Gritti, Michael; Schwartz, Steven; Caldarone, Christopher A; Van Arsdell, Glen

    2017-04-01

    We introduced the National Aeronautics and Space Association threat-and-error model to our surgical unit. All admissions are considered flights, which should pass through stepwise deescalations in risk during surgical recovery. We hypothesized that errors significantly influence risk deescalation and contribute to poor outcomes. Patient flights (524) were tracked in real time for threats, errors, and unintended states by full-time performance personnel. Expected risk deescalation was wean from mechanical support, sternal closure, extubation, intensive care unit (ICU) discharge, and discharge home. Data were accrued from clinical charts, bedside data, reporting mechanisms, and staff interviews. Infographics of flights were openly discussed weekly for consensus. In 12% (64 of 524) of flights, the child failed to deescalate sequentially through expected risk levels; unintended increments instead occurred. Failed deescalations were highly associated with errors (426; 257 flights; p < 0.0001). Consequential errors (263; 173 flights) were associated with a 29% rate of failed deescalation versus 4% in flights with no consequential error (p < 0.0001). The most dangerous errors were apical errors typically (84%) occurring in the operating room, which caused chains of propagating unintended states (n = 110): these had a 43% (47 of 110) rate of failed deescalation (versus 4%; p < 0.0001). Chains of unintended state were often (46%) amplified by additional (up to 7) errors in the ICU that would worsen clinical deviation. Overall, failed deescalations in risk were extremely closely linked to brain injury (n = 13; p < 0.0001) or death (n = 7; p < 0.0001). Deaths and brain injury after pediatric cardiac surgery almost always occur from propagating error chains that originate in the operating room and are often amplified by additional ICU errors. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Establishing a portfolio of quality-improvement projects in pediatric surgery through advanced improvement leadership systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrein, Betsy T; Williams, Christina E; Von Allmen, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Formal quality-improvement (QI) projects require that participants are educated in QI methods to provide them with the capability to carry out successful, meaningful work. However, orchestrating a portfolio of projects that addresses the strategic mission of the institution requires an extension of basic QI training to provide the division or business unit with the capacity to successfully develop and manage the portfolio. Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems is a program to help units create a meaningful portfolio. This program, used by the Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, helped establish a portfolio of targeted QI projects designed to achieve outstanding outcomes at competitive costs in multiple clinical areas aligned with the institution's strategic goals (improve disease-based outcomes, patient safety, flow, and patient and family experience). These objectives are addressed in an institutional strategic plan built around 5 core areas: Safety, Productivity, Care Coordination and Outcomes, Patient and Family Experience, and Value. By combining the portfolio of QI projects with improvements in the divisional infrastructure, effective improvement efforts were realized throughout the division. In the 9 months following the program, divisional capability resulted in a 16.5% increase (5.7% to 22.2%) of formally trained staff working on 10 QI teams. Concurrently, a leadership team, designed to coordinate projects, remove barriers, and provide technical support, provided the capacity to pursue this ongoing effort. The Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems program increased the Division's efficiency and effectiveness in pursing the QI mission that is integral at our hospital.

  1. Low free triiodothyronine levels in mexican pediatric population with congenital heart disease after cardiac surgery undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Araujo Martínez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low free triiodothyronine level in patients undergoing heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB is well described in literature, but the prevalence in pediatric Mexican population is yet unknown. OBJECTIVE: To know the prevalence of postoperative low free triiodothyronine level and the associated complications after cardiopulmonary bypass exposure in pediatric population in Mexico. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A sample of free triiodothyronine (FT3 blood was obtained in the early postoperative period of patients undergoing CPB heart surgery. Postoperative low FT3 level (PLFT3 was defined as any blood value under 2.9 pg/mL. Logistical regression models were used for analysis of independent variables, adjusted for complexity score (RACHS-1 and Aristotle Comprehensive Complexity Score. RESULTS. PLFT3 was present in 35.7% of the patients (n=109. Correlation with PLFT3 the following variables were observed: prolonged CPB time (p=0.001 prolonged aortic cross clamp (p=0.002 level of complexity of the surgery as measured by Aristotle ≥3 (p=0.001 and RACHS-1 ≥3 (p=0.021. Associated complications were: postoperative arrhythmias (p=0.008 extended intubation period (p=0.008 and higher infection rate (p=0.002.

  2. Development of pediatric and congenital heart surgery in latin america: accomplishments and remaining challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzer, Christian; Capelli, Horacio; Sandoval, Nestor; Jatene, Marcelo; Kreutzer, Guillermo

    2011-04-01

    In the last 70 years, congenital heart surgery has dramatically evolved, and Latin America has completed this journey with unique regional features. Since the first ligation of a patent arterial duct by Enrique Finochietto in 1941 in Buenos Aires, the development of congenital heart surgery was deeply influenced by funding restrictions and scarcity of technology. However, the determined work of cardiovascular surgery pioneers as Hugo Filipozzi, Euriclides Zerbini, and Adib Jatene in Brazil; Helmut Jaeger in Chile; Hugo Baz and Clemente Robles in Mexico; Alberto Bejarano in Colombia; and Mario Brea and Fernando Tricerri in Argentina made cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass available by the late 1950s. In the following five decades new generations of cardiovascular surgeons received the legacy of these outstanding leaders and made several important contributions to the field in tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, tricuspid atresia, single ventricle, truncus arteriosus, heart transplantation, and many others. Many centers in Latin America routinely perform congenital heart disease surgery with excellent results, covering the entire spectrum from the newborn to the adult congenital heart patient. The most important challenge that remains is to provide access to care to all children with congenital heart disease in Latin America, since currently only 42% of them receive surgical treatment.

  3. Complications in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischer, Jason S; Rymeski, Beth

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal pediatric surgery is a diverse field that encompasses many different procedures. The pullthrough for Hirschsprung disease, the posterior sagittal anorectoplasty for anorectal malformations including complex cloaca reconstructions and the ileal pouch anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatous polyposis present some of the most technically challenging procedures pediatric surgeons undertake. Many children prevail successfully following these surgical interventions, however, a small number of patients suffer from complications following these procedures. Anticipated postoperative problems are discussed along with medical and surgical strategies for managing these complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Extent, risk factors, and outcome of fluid overload after pediatric heart surgery*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, Jade; Albright, Benjamin; Vertullo, Laura; Lai, Pamela; Dancea, Adrian; Bernier, Pierre-Luc; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Calaritis, Christos; Drullinsky, David; Gottesman, Ronald; Zappitelli, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Fluid overload is associated with poor PICU outcomes in different populations. Little is known about fluid overload in children undergoing cardiac surgery. We described fluid overload after cardiac surgery, identified risk factors of worse fluid overload and also determined if fluid overload predicts longer length of PICU stay, prolonged mechanical ventilation (length of ventilation) and worse lung function as estimated by the oxygenation index. Retrospective cohort study. Montreal Children's Hospital PICU, Montreal, Canada. Patients 18 years or younger undergoing cardiac surgery (2005-2007). None. Cumulative fluid overload % was calculated as [(total fluid in - out in L)/admission weight (kg) × 100] and expressed as PICU peak cumulative fluid overload % throughout admission and PICU day 2 cumulative fluid overload %. Primary outcomes were length of stay and length of ventilation. The secondary outcome was oxygenation index. Fluid overload risk factors were evaluated using stepwise linear regression. Fluid overload-outcome relations were evaluated using stepwise Cox regression (length of stay, length of ventilation) and generalized estimating equations (daily PICU cumulative fluid overload % and oxygenation index repeated measures). There were 193 eligible surgeries. Peak cumulative fluid overload % was 7.4% ± 11.2%. Fluid overload peaked on PICU day 2. Lack of past cardiac surgery (p = 0.04), cyanotic heart disease (p = 0.03), and early postoperative fluids (p = 0.0001) was independently associated with higher day 2 fluid overload %. Day 2 fluid overload % predicted longer length of stay (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.99; p = 0.009) and length of ventilation (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.94-0.99; p = 0.03). In patients without cyanotic heart disease, worse daily fluid overload % predicted worse daily oxygenation index. Fluid overload occurs early after cardiac surgery and is associated with prolonged PICU length of stay and ventilation

  5. Transient cortical blindness as a complication of posterior spinal surgery in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Senthil T; Jain, Viral; Lykissas, Marios G; Crawford, Alvin H; West, Constance E

    2013-09-01

    Postoperative vision loss after spinal surgery is a well-known but devastating complication that may result from direct ocular ischemia, embolism to the central retinal artery, ischemic optic neuropathy, or occipital cortical ischemia. The occipital cortex is situated in the posterior border zone of the middle and posterior cerebral arteries and is susceptible to ischemic damage. Transient cortical blindness as a cause of postoperative vision loss has never been reported after spine surgery in a child. We report an 11-year-old female patient with muscular dystrophy who underwent posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation under hypotensive anesthesia for scoliosis who developed transient cortical blindness.

  6. Laparoscopic renal surgery in infants and children: is it a feasible and safe procedure for all pediatric age groups?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco T. Denes

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Although laparoscopy is considered the mainstay for most renal procedures in adults, its role in the pediatric population is still controversial, especially for smaller children. We reviewed our experience in pediatric renal laparoscopic surgery in three pediatric age groups in an attempt to identify if age has an impact on feasibility and surgical outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From November 1995 to May 2006, 144 pediatric laparoscopic renal procedures were performed at our institution. The charts of these patients were reviewed for demographic data, urologic pathology and surgical procedure, as well as perioperative complications and post-operative outcomes. The findings were stratified into 3 groups, according to patient age (A: < 1 year, B: 1 to 5 years and C: 6-18 years. RESULTS: Median age of the patients was 4.2 years (42 days - 18 years. We performed 54 nephrectomies, 33 nephroureterectomies, 19 upper pole nephrectomies, 11 radical nephrectomies, 22 pyeloplasties and 4 miscellaneous procedures. The 3 age groups were comparable in terms of the procedures performed. Conversion rates were 0%, 1.4% and 1.9% for groups A, B and C, respectively (p = 0.72. Incidence of perioperative complications was 5%, 8.2% and 7.8% for age groups A to C, respectively (p = 0.88. CONCLUSIONS: Most renal procedures can be performed safely by laparoscopy in the pediatric population, with excellent aesthetic and functional outcomes. The morbidity related to the procedure was minimal irrespective of the age group.

  7. The application of laryngeal mask in anesthesia of minor surgeries in pediatric surgery%喉罩在儿外科短小手术麻醉中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾兰芹

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the application effect of laryngeal mask in anesthesia of minor surgeries in pediatric surgery. Methods:60 pediatric patients with elective minor surgery were selected,they were divided into the laryngeal mask group and the tracheal intubation group on average,we compared the anesthetic effect and complications of the two groups.Results:The time of extubation of the tracheal intubation group was longer than the laryngeal mask group,the incidence of postoperative restlessness and sore throat of the tracheal intubation group were higher than the control group(P<0.05).Conclusion:The effect of laryngeal mask in anesthesia of minor surgeries in pediatric surgery is good and the complication is low.%目的:探讨喉罩在儿外科短小手术麻醉中的应用效果.方法:收治择期外科短小手术小儿60例,平均分为喉罩组和气管插管组,比较两组麻醉效果及并发症情况.结果:气管插管组拔管时间较喉罩组长;咽痛和术后躁动发生率较喉罩组高(P<0.05).结论:小儿外科短小手术喉罩麻醉效果好,麻醉后并发症少.

  8. The Effects of Perioperative Music Interventions in Pediatric Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne J E van der Heijden

    Full Text Available Music interventions are widely used, but have not yet gained a place in guidelines for pediatric surgery or pediatric anesthesia. In this systematic review and meta-analysis we examined the effects of music interventions on pain, anxiety and distress in children undergoing invasive surgery.We searched 25 electronic databases from their first available date until October 2014.Included were all randomized controlled trials with a parallel group, crossover or cluster design that included pediatric patients from 1 month to 18 years old undergoing minimally invasive or invasive surgical procedures, and receiving either live music therapy or recorded music.4846 records were retrieved from the searches, 26 full text reports were evaluated and data was extracted by two independent investigators.Pain was measured with the Visual Analogue Scale, the Coloured Analogue Scale and the Facial Pain Scale. Anxiety and distress were measured with an emotional index scale (not validated, the Spielberger short State Trait Anxiety Inventory and a Facial Affective Scale.Three RCTs were eligible for inclusion encompassing 196 orthopedic, cardiac and day surgery patients (age of 1 day to 18 years receiving either live music therapy or recorded music. Overall a statistically significant positive effect was demonstrated on postoperative pain (SMD -1.07; 95%CI-2.08; -0.07 and on anxiety and distress (SMD -0.34 95% CI -0.66; -0.01 and SMD -0.50; 95% CI -0.84; - 0.16.This systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that music interventions may have a statistically significant effect in reducing post-operative pain, anxiety and distress in children undergoing a surgical procedure. Evidence from this review and other reviews suggests music therapy may be considered for clinical use.

  9. Panophthalmitis with orbital cellulitis following glaucoma drainage implant surgery in a pediatric patient

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    Bruno L. B. Esporcatte

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Here we report a case of childhood glaucoma refractory to angle and trabeculectomy surgery. The patient was treated with an Ahmed™ drainage implant that was subsequently complicated by rapid-onset panophthalmitis and orbital cellulitis. Intravenous and intravitreal antibiotic therapy was initiated and the drainage tube was removed. The infectious process resolved within 3 weeks; however, phthisis bulbi developed subsequently.

  10. Same-Day Surgery Preparation: Reduction of Pediatric Patient Arousal and Distress through Participant Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Jan; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Children (n=26) were exposed to one of three surgery preparatory conditions: participant modeling alone, participant modeling with mother, and standard procedure control. Children exposed to modeling alone had significant reductions in physiological arousal after treatment compared to other groups. Both modeling groups exhibited significantly…

  11. Transfusion of Leukocyte-Depleted RBCs Is Independently Associated With Increased Morbidity After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; Grotenhuis, Femke; Berger, Rolf F. M.; Ebels, Tjark W.; Burgerhof, Johannes G. M.; Albers, Marcel J. I. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that transfusion of leukocyte-depleted RBC preparations within the first 48 hours of PICU stay was independently associated with prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation, irrespective of surgery type and disease severity. Design: Retrospective, observational stu

  12. Immune regulation following pediatric cardiac surgery - What goes up must come down

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schadenberg, A.W.L.

    2013-01-01

    The immune system is a dynamic system that is designed to respond rapidly to potential harmful stimuli. Following activation tight control mechanisms are in place to avoid collateral damage. Cardiac surgery is well known to induce an acute systemic inflammatory response and therefore, elective cardi

  13. [Minimally invasive surgery and robotic surgery: surgery 4.0?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feußner, H; Wilhelm, D

    2016-03-01

    Surgery can only maintain its role in a highly competitive environment if results are continuously improved, accompanied by further reduction of the interventional trauma for patients and with justifiable costs. Significant impulse to achieve this goal was expected from minimally invasive surgery and, in particular, robotic surgery; however, a real breakthrough has not yet been achieved. Accordingly, the new strategic approach of cognitive surgery is required to optimize the provision of surgical treatment. A full scale integration of all modules utilized in the operating room (OR) into a comprehensive network and the development of systems with technical cognition are needed to upgrade the current technical environment passively controlled by the surgeon into an active collaborative support system (surgery 4.0). Only then can the true potential of minimally invasive surgery and robotic surgery be exploited.

  14. Hospital for Special Surgery Pediatric Functional Activity Brief Scale predicts physical fitness testing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabricant, Peter D; Robles, Alex; McLaren, Son H; Marx, Robert G; Widmann, Roger F; Green, Daniel W

    2014-05-01

    An eight-item activity scale was recently developed and validated for use as a prognostic tool in clinical research in children and adolescents. It is unclear, however, if this brief questionnaire is predictive of quantitative metrics of physical activity and fitness. The purposes of this study were to prospectively administer the Hospital for Special Surgery Pediatric Functional Activity Brief Scale to a large cohort of healthy adolescents to determine (1) if the activity scale exhibits any floor or ceiling effects; (2) if scores on the activity scale are correlated with standardized physical fitness metrics; and if so, (3) to determine the discrimination ability of the activity scale to differentiate between adolescents with healthy or unhealthy levels of aerobic capacity and calculate an appropriate cutoff value for its use as a screening tool. One hundred eighty-two adolescents (mean, 15.3 years old) prospectively completed the activity scale and four standardized metrics of physical fitness: pushups, sit-ups, shuttle run exercise (Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run), and calculated VO2-max. Age, sex, and body mass index were also recorded. Pearson correlations, regression analyses, and receiver operating characteristic analyses were used to evaluate activity scale performance. The activity scale did not exhibit any floor or ceiling effects. Pushups (ρ = 0.28), sit-ups (ρ = 0.23), performance on the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (ρ = 0.44), and VO2-max (ρ = 0.43) were all positively correlated with the activity scale score (Pearson correlations, all p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that those with an activity score of ≤ 14 were at higher risk of having low levels of aerobic capacity. In the current study, activity score was free of floor and ceiling effects and predictive of all four physical fitness metrics. An activity score of ≤ 14 was associated with at-risk aerobic capacity previously

  15. CLINICAL EVALUATION OF CLONIDINE AS AN ADJUNCT TO CAUDAL ROPIVACAINE IN PEDIATRIC INFRAUMBILICAL SURGERIES

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    Urmila

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The addition of clonidine as an adjuvant has allowed the use of lower concentration of the local anaesthetic for achieving the same level of anaesthesia but with the prolonged duration of analgesia which increases the margin of safety and reduces the inci dence of unwanted motor blockades. With these facts in mind we undertook the study to compare the analgesic properties of 0.25% ropivacaine with the addition of clonidine (1 μ g/kg to that of ropivacaine 0.25% following caudal administration in children. ME THODS: After approval from ethical committee 60 children of age 1 - 10 yrs of ASA grade I or II undergoing elective sub umbilical surgeries were selected for the study. We gave caudal bloc k with 0.25% ropivacaine 1ml/kg +1ml normal saline for group R or 0.25% ropivacaine 1ml/kg + clonidine 1microgram/kg+1ml normal saline to make volume 1ml for group C. To perform caudal block all patient received IV injection glycopyrolate - 0.01mg/kg, IV injection midazolam - 0.1mg/kg and IV Injection ketamine - 1mg/kg. Hemodynam ic parameters were observed before, during and after the surgical procedure. Quality of surgical anesthesia & requirement of supplemental midazolam/ketamine were also noted. Duration of Post - operative analgesia, pain scores, level of sedation and side effe cts if any were looked for and duly recorded. RESULT: Duration of analgesia in group R was 6.45±0.52 hrs. and in group C was 13.01±0.89hrs i.e. significantly prolonged in group C (P<0.0001. Post - operative pain score and sedation score were also significan tly better in group C (P<0.0001. The quality of surgical analgesia was also significantly excellent in group C. Other vital parameters were not statistically significant in both the groups. CONCLUSION: Ropivacaine (0.25% with clonidine (1μg/kg in caudal block showed prolong duration of analgesia as well as better quality of surgical anaesthesia than plain ropivacaine (0.25% in pediatric patients without any

  16. Open heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - open ... lung machine is used in most cases during open heart surgery. While the surgeon works on the ... with these procedures, the surgeon may have to open the chest to do the surgery.

  17. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Access to Care Toolkit EHB Access Toolkit Bariatric Surgery Procedures Bariatric surgical procedures cause weight loss by restricting the ... Online Education Directory Search Patient Learning Center Bariatric Surgery ... Surgery Procedures BMI Calculator Childhood and Adolescent Obesity ...

  18. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... epicondylitis surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... long as you are told. This helps ensure tennis elbow will not return. You may be prescribed a ...

  19. Plastic Surgery Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PSN PSEN GRAFT Contact Us News Plastic Surgery Statistics Plastic surgery procedural statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Statistics by Year Print 2016 Plastic Surgery Statistics 2015 ...

  20. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Soft Tissue Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Obstructive Sleep Apnea TMJ and Facial Pain Treatment of Facial Injury Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Administration of Anesthesia Administration of Anesthesia Oral ...

  1. Who Needs Heart Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Needs Heart Surgery? Heart surgery is used to treat ... will work with you to decide whether you need heart surgery. A cardiologist specializes in diagnosing and ...

  2. Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Gastric Sleeve Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Gastric Sleeve Surgery Print A ... buying healthy food ) continue Preparing for Gastric Sleeve Surgery Preparing for this major operation takes months of ...

  3. Cavus Foot Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Treatments Cavus Foot Surgery Page Content What is a cavus foot? A ... problems. What are the goals of cavus foot surgery? The main goal of surgery is to reduce ...

  4. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Administration of Anesthesia Administration ... Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries ...

  5. Laser surgery - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery using a laser ... used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue ... Laser surgery can be used to: Close small blood vessels to reduce blood loss Remove warts , moles , sunspots, and ...

  6. Smoking and surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery - quitting smoking; Surgery - quitting tobacco; Wound healing - smoking ... Smokers who have surgery have a higher chance than nonsmokers of blood clots forming in their legs. These clots may travel to and ...

  7. Lung surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung biopsy - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - discharge; VATS - discharge ... milk) for 2 weeks after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and 6 to 8 weeks after open surgery. ...

  8. Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & ... Surgery Types of Surgery Gastric Bypass ... or intestines removed due to ulcers or cancer tended to lose a lot of weight after ...

  9. Doctor-patient interaction and informed consent in pediatric surgery: theory and reality in the regional practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Luis González López

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Informed consent is a core element in the doctor-patient interaction. With the objective of reviewing the essentials and legal basis of its procedure and relation with pediatric surgery in the regional context we developed a bibliographic review of national and international biomedical publications. It is widely accepted that the recognition of patient´s autonomy and the informed consent process have led to a change in the doctor-patients interaction, which is closely linked to the pediatric surgical practice in the particular Cuban modern environment. In addition to the study of bioethical principles and their enforcement by those who are to provide medical services, it is also necessary to look for useful answers to bioethical questions affecting the legal tools that support the procedure.

  10. Diplopia after strabismus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holgado, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    The presence of diplopia is an undesirable result following strabismus surgery. There are a variety of scenarios where diplopia exists prior to strabismus surgery, and, after surgery, has either been alleviated or decreased to a magnitude amenable to prism correction. In other cases, the patient does not experience diplopia prior to the strabismus surgery, but there exists a definite risk of diplopia after the surgery. In the current review, I examine the literature to help determine the incidence of diplopia after strabismus surgery.

  11. Single incision laparoscopic surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arun; Prasad

    2010-01-01

    As a complement to standard laparoscopic surgery and a safe alternative to natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery,single incision laparoscopic surgery is gaining popularity.There are expensive ports,disposable hand instruments and flexible endoscopes that have been suggested to do this surgery and would increase the cost of operation.For a simple surgery like laparoscopic cholecystectomy,these extras are not needed and the surgery can be performed using standard ports,instruments and telescopes.Tri...

  12. Role of Surgery in Stages II and III Pediatric Abdominal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A 5-Years Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Salem

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL are the most common extra nodal presentation of pediatric NHL. Our aim is to assess the role of surgery as a risk factor and to evaluate the impact of risk-adjusted systemic chemotherapy on survival of patients with stages II and III disease. This study included 35 pediatric patients with abdominal NHL treated over five years at South Egypt Cancer Institute (SECI, Assiut University, between January 2005 and January 2010. The data of every patient included: Age, sex, and presentation, staging work up to determine extent of the disease and the type of resection performed, histopathological examination, details of chemotherapy, disease free survival and overall survival. The study included 25 boys and 10 girls with a median age of six years (range: 2.5:15. Thirty patients (86% presented with abdominal pain, 23 patients (66% presented with abdominal mass and distention, 13 patients (34% presented with weight loss, and intestinal obstruction occurred in six patients (17%. The ileo-cecal region and abdominal lymph nodes were the commonest sites (48.5%, 21% respectively. Burkitt's lymphoma was the most common histological type in 29 patients (83%. Ten (28.5% stage II (group A and 25 (71.5% stage III (group B. Complete resections were performed in 10 (28.5%, debulking in 6 (17% and imaging guided biopsy in 19 (54%. A11 patients received systemic chemotherapy. The median follow up duration was 63 months (range 51-78 months. The parameters that significantly affect the overall survival were stage at presentation complete resection for localized disease. In conclusion, the extent of disease at presentation is the most important prognostic factor in pediatric abdominal NHL. Surgery is restricted to defined situations such as; abdominal emergencies, diagnostic biopsy and total tumor extirpation in localized disease. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone in the management of pediatric abdominal NHL.

  13. Role of Surgery in Stages II and III Pediatric Abdominal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A 5-Years Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amany M; Sayd, Heba A; Hamza, Hesham M; Salem, Mohamed A

    2011-03-29

    Abdominal Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are the most common extra nodal presentation of pediatric NHL. Our aim is to assess the role of surgery as a risk factor and to evaluate the impact of risk-adjusted systemic chemotherapy on survival of patients with stages II and III disease. This study included 35 pediatric patients with abdominal NHL treated over five years at South Egypt Cancer Institute (SECI), Assiut University, between January 2005 and January 2010. The data of every patient included: Age, sex, and presentation, staging work up to determine extent of the disease and the type of resection performed, histopathological examination, details of chemotherapy, disease free survival and overall survival. The study included 25 boys and 10 girls with a median age of six years (range: 2.5:15). Thirty patients (86%) presented with abdominal pain, 23 patients (66%) presented with abdominal mass and distention, 13 patients (34%) presented with weight loss, and intestinal obstruction occurred in six patients (17%). The ileo-cecal region and abdominal lymph nodes were the commonest sites (48.5%, 21% respectively). Burkitt's lymphoma was the most common histological type in 29 patients (83%). Ten (28.5%) stage II (group A) and 25 (71.5%) stage III (group B). Complete resections were performed in 10 (28.5%), debulking in 6 (17%) and imaging guided biopsy in 19 (54%). A11 patients received systemic chemotherapy. The median follow up duration was 63 months (range 51-78 months). The parameters that significantly affect the overall survival were stage at presentation complete resection for localized disease. In conclusion, the extent of disease at presentation is the most important prognostic factor in pediatric abdominal NHL. Surgery is restricted to defined situations such as; abdominal emergencies, diagnostic biopsy and total tumor extirpation in localized disease. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone in the management of pediatric abdominal NHL.

  14. The effects of bispectral index monitoring on hemodynamics and recovery profile in developmentally delayed pediatric patients undergoing dental surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargin, Mehmet; Uluer, Mehmet Selcuk; Ozmen, Sadık

    2015-09-01

    General anesthesia is often preferred for dental surgery or rehabilitation in developmentally delayed pediatric patients. Bispectral index monitoring is used to monitor the depth of anesthesia and to ensure early recovery. However, studies on the topic in developmentally delayed pediatric patients are limited. To evaluate the effects of Bispectral Index Scale (BIS) on hemodynamics and recovery profile in developmentally delayed pediatric patients undergoing dental surgery. Forty children between the ages of 6-16 years were studied in this prospective and randomized study. The children were randomized into two groups. In Group 1 (n = 20), general anesthesia was maintained with 1-2 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in oxygen by standard practice. In Group 2 (n = 20), the depth of anesthesia was monitored by BIS. BIS values were continuously recorded from awake status to tracheal extubation. The duration of the surgical procedure, anesthesia, postanesthesia care unit (PACU) stay was noted. To evaluate recovery profile, time to spontaneous ventilation, extubation, open eyes, and PACU discharge were also noted. There were significant differences between recovery times and Non-communicating Children's Pain Checklist - Postoperative Version (NCCPC-PV) scores of two groups. Time to spontaneous ventilation [Difference in means (95% CI); 3.17 (1.79-4.54) P < 0.001], extubation [Difference in means (95% CI); 3.13 (1.66-4.60) P < 0.001], open eyes [Difference in means (95% CI); 3.97 (2.34-5.59) P < 0.001], and PACU stay time [Difference in means (95% CI); 23.55 (18.08-29.01) P < 0.001] were significantly shorter in Group 2. In conclusion, results suggest that routine BIS monitoring may be beneficial due to its favorable effects on the recovery profile in developmentally delayed pediatric patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The effect of weekend and after-hours surgery on morbidity and mortality rates in pediatric neurosurgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Virendra; Gonda, David; Ryan, Sheila L; Briceño, Valentina; Lam, Sandi K; Luerssen, Thomas G; Syed, Sohail H; Jea, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have indicated that the 30-day morbidity and mortality risks are higher among pediatric and adult patients who are admitted on the weekends. This "weekend effect" has been observed among patients admitted with and for a variety of diagnoses and procedures, including myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, stroke, peptic ulcer disease, and pediatric surgery. In this study, morbidity and mortality outcomes for emergency pediatric neurosurgical procedures carried out on the weekend or after hours are compared with emergency surgical procedures performed during regular weekday business hours. A retrospective analysis of operative data was conducted. Between December 1, 2011, and August 20, 2014, a total of 710 urgent or emergency neurosurgical procedures were performed at Texas Children's Hospital in children younger than than 18 years of age. These procedures were then stratified into 3 groups: weekday regular hours, weekday after hours, and weekend hours. By cross-referencing these events with a prospectively collected morbidity and mortality database, the impact of the day and time on complication incidence was examined. Outcome metrics were compared using logistic regression models. The weekday regular hours and after-hours (weekday after hours and weekends) surgery groups consisted of 341 and 239 patients and 434 and 276 procedures, respectively. There were no significant differences in the types of cases performed (p = 0.629) or baseline preoperative health status as determined by American Society of Anesthesiologists classifications (p = 0.220) between the 2 cohorts. After multivariate adjustment and regression, children undergoing emergency neurosurgical procedures during weekday after hours or weekends were more likely to experience complications (p = 0.0227). Weekday after-hours and weekend emergency pediatric neurosurgical procedures are associated with significantly increased 30-day morbidity and

  16. Plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin as an early biomarker for prediction of acute kidney injury after cardio-pulmonary bypass in pediatric cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Fatina I Fadel; Abdel Rahman, Azza M.O.; Mohamed, Mohamed Farouk; Habib, Sonia A.; Ibrahim, Mona H.; Sleem, Zeinab S.; Bazaraa, Hafez M; Soliman, Mohamed M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery is considered one of the most frequent surgical procedures in which acute kidney injury (AKI) represents a frequent and serious complication. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) as an early AKI biomarker after CPB in pediatric cardiac surgery. Material and methods The study included forty children aged 2 to 78 months undergoing CPB. They were divided into group I: pat...

  17. Anesthesia for pediatric day-case dental surgery: a study comparing the classic laryngeal mask airway with nasal trachea intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Deng, Feng; Yu, Cong

    2014-05-01

    To study sevoflurane inhalation general anesthesia using the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) and nasal endotracheal (ET) intubation to maintain the airway in pediatric day-case dental surgery. A total of 171 children aged 2 to 7 years received elective day-case dental surgical procedure under general anesthesia. Children were randomly grouped into LMA groups (L) and nasal ET intubation group (N). In L groups, LMA was inserted after induction of anesthesia using 8% sevoflurane and were allowed to breathe spontaneously. Rocuronium and remifentanil were given intravenously during 8% sevoflurane induction by nasal ET intubation in the N group . The time of anesthetic induction, maintenance, recovery, surgical access, and bispectral index score were recorded. Postoperative nausea and vomiting and the incidence of adverse events during induction and recovery period were also recorded. The insertion time of LMA was significantly shorter than nasal ET (P index were not different between the 2 groups. However, recovery time was significantly shorter in group L (P < 0.05). The incidence of sore throat and postoperative nausea and vomiting (P < 0.01) were much less in group L as well. Sevoflurane inhalation anesthesia through LMA is a safe and reliable method for pediatric day-case dental surgery.

  18. The effect of surgical training and hospital characteristics on patient outcomes after pediatric surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ceri; van Woerden, Hugo C

    2011-11-01

    A systematic review aimed to compare patient outcomes after (1) appendicectomy and (2) pyloromyotomy performed by different surgical specialties, surgeons with different annual volumes, and in different hospital types, to inform the debate surrounding children's surgery provision. Embase, Medline, Cochrane Library, and Health Management Information Consortium were searched from January 1990 to February 2010 to identify relevant articles. Further literature was sought by contacting experts, citation searching, and hand-searching appropriate journals. Seventeen relevant articles were identified. These showed that (1) rates of wrongly diagnosed appendicitis were higher among general surgeons, but there were little differences in other outcomes and (2) outcomes after pyloromyotomy were superior in patients treated by specialist surgeons. Surgical specialty was a better predictor of morbidity than hospital type, and surgeons with higher operative volumes had better results. Existing evidence is largely observational and potentially subject to selection bias, but general pediatric surgery outcomes were clearly dependent on operative volumes. Published evidence suggests that (1) pediatric appendicectomy should not be centralized because children can be managed effectively by general surgeons; (2) pyloromyotomy need not be centralized but should be carried out in children's units by appropriately trained surgeons who expect to see more than 4 cases per year. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) for major urological procedures in the pediatric population: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symeonidis, Evangelos N; Nasioudis, Dimitrios; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P

    2016-05-01

    Improvements in laparoscopic surgery have led to the introduction of laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) as an alternative to conventional laparoscopy conferring a number of possible advantages. In this review, we aim to elucidate the aspects of LESS for major urological procedures in the pediatric population. An in-depth search of the literature was performed in the databases of PubMed and Scopus, for studies investigating the technical aspects and clinical outcomes of partial nephrectomies, nephrectomies, nephroureterectomies, varicocelectomies and pyeloplasties in children. Data on parameters such as operation time, instrumentation, perioperative complications, hospital stay and follow up period were collected and further analyzed cumulatively. Twenty nine studies met the inclusion criteria incorporating 386 patients who underwent 401 procedures. There were no major intraoperative complications, with only 19 patients (4.73%) facing postoperative complications. No perioperative deaths were reported. In the hands of experienced surgeons LESS seems a feasible, efficient and less invasive alternative to standard laparoscopy in the field of pediatric urology. There is an eminent need of well-designed randomized controlled trials comparing the two techniques. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of preoperative intravenous paracetamol administration on postoperative fever in pediatrics cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Mohammad-Hasan; Foruzan-Nia, Khalil; Behjati, Mostafa; Bagheri, Babak; Khanbabayi-Gol, Mehdi; Dareshiri, Shahla; Pishgahi, Alireza; Zarezadeh, Rafie; Lotfi-Naghsh, Nazgol; Lotfi-Naghsh, Ainaz; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    Post-operative fever is a common complication of cardiac operations, which is known to be correlated with a greater degree of cognitive dysfunction 6 weeks after cardiac surgery. The aim of the present study was to examine efficacy and safety of single dose intravenous Paracetamol in treatment of post-operative fever in children undergoing cardiac surgery. In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 80 children, aged 1-12 years, presenting for open heart surgery were entered in the trial and randomly allocated into two groups: Placebo and Paracetamol. After induction of anaesthesia, 15 mg/kg intravenous Paracetamol solution was infused during 1 h in the Paracetamol group. Patients in placebo group received 15 mg/kg normal saline infusion during the same time. Since the end of operation until next 24 h in intensive care unit, axillary temperature of the two group patients was recorded in 4-h intervals. Any fever that occurred during this period had been treated with Paracetamol suppository (125 mg) and the amount of antipyretic drug consumption for each patient had been recorded. In order to examine the safety of Paracetamol, patients were evaluated for drug complication at the same time. Mean axillary temperature during first 24 h after operation was significantly lower in Paracetamol group compared with placebo group (P = 0.001). Overall fever incidence during 24 h after operation was higher in placebo group compared with Paracetamol group (P = 0.012). Of Paracetamol group patients, 42.5% compared with 15% of placebo group participants had no consumption of antipyretic agent (Paracetamol suppository) during 24 h after operation (P = 0.001). This study suggests that single dose administration of intravenous Paracetamol before paediatric cardiac surgeries using cardiopulmonary bypass; reduce mean body temperature in the first 24 h after operation.

  1. The effect of preoperative intravenous paracetamol administration on postoperative fever in pediatrics cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Hasan Abdollahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post-operative fever is a common complication of cardiac operations, which is known to be correlated with a greater degree of cognitive dysfunction 6 weeks after cardiac surgery. The aim of the present study was to examine efficacy and safety of single dose intravenous Paracetamol in treatment of post-operative fever in children undergoing cardiac surgery. Materials and Methods: In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 80 children, aged 1-12 years, presenting for open heart surgery were entered in the trial and randomly allocated into two groups: Placebo and Paracetamol. After induction of anaesthesia, 15 mg/kg intravenous Paracetamol solution was infused during 1 h in the Paracetamol group. Patients in placebo group received 15 mg/kg normal saline infusion during the same time. Since the end of operation until next 24 h in intensive care unit, axillary temperature of the two group patients was recorded in 4-h intervals. Any fever that occurred during this period had been treated with Paracetamol suppository (125 mg and the amount of antipyretic drug consumption for each patient had been recorded. In order to examine the safety of Paracetamol, patients were evaluated for drug complication at the same time. Results: Mean axillary temperature during first 24 h after operation was significantly lower in Paracetamol group compared with placebo group (P = 0.001. Overall fever incidence during 24 h after operation was higher in placebo group compared with Paracetamol group (P = 0.012. Of Paracetamol group patients, 42.5% compared with 15% of placebo group participants had no consumption of antipyretic agent (Paracetamol suppository during 24 h after operation (P = 0.001. Conclusion: This study suggests that single dose administration of intravenous Paracetamol before paediatric cardiac surgeries using cardiopulmonary bypass; reduce mean body temperature in the first 24 h after operation.

  2. Quantification of chemotaxis during pediatric cardiac surgery by flow and laser scanning cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnok, Attila; Schmid, Joerg W.; Osmancik, Pavel; Lenz, Dominik; Pipek, Michal; Hambsch, Joerg; Gerstner, Andreas O.; Schneider, Peter

    2002-05-01

    Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) alters the leukocyte composition of the peripheral blood (PB). This response contributes to the sometimes adverse outcome with capillary leakage. Migration of activated cells to sites of inflammation, driven by chemokines is part of this response. In order to determine the chemotactic activity of patients serum during and after surgery we established an assay for PB leukocytes (PBL). PBL from healthy donors were isolated and 250,000 cells were placed into a migration chamber separated by a filter from a second lower chamber filled with patient serum. After incubation cells from top and bottom chamber were removed and stained with a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies for leukocyte subsets and analyzed on a flow cytometer (FCM). Cells at the bottom of the filter belong to the migrating compartment and were quantified by LSC after staining of nucleated cells. Increased chemotactic activity started at onset of anaesthesia followed by a phase of low activity immediately after surgery and a second phase of a high post-operative activity. The in vitro results correlated with results obtained by immunopenotyping of circulating PBL. Manipulation of the chemokine pattern might prove beneficial to prevent extravasation of cells leading to tissue damage. In chemotaxis assays with low amount of available serum the combined use of FCM and Laser Scanning LSC proved as an appropriate analytical tool.

  3. The Influence of Fluid Overload on the Length of Mechanical Ventilation in Pediatric Congenital Heart Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Tatiana Z A L; O'Hearn, Katie; Reddy, Deepti; Menon, Kusum

    2015-12-01

    Fluid overload and prolonged mechanical ventilation lead to worse outcomes in critically ill children. However, the association between these variables in children following congenital heart surgery is unknown. The objectives of this study were to describe the association between fluid overload and duration of mechanical ventilation, oxygen requirement and radiologic findings of pulmonary and chest wall edema. This study is a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent congenital heart surgery between June 2010 and December 2013. Univariate and multivariate associations between maximum cumulative fluid balance and length of mechanical ventilation and OI were tested using the Spearman correlation test and multiple linear regression models, respectively. There were 85 eligible patients. Maximum cumulative fluid balance was associated with duration of mechanical ventilation (adjusted analysis beta coefficient = 0.53, CI 0.38-0.66, P Fluid overload is associated with prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation and PICU length of stay after congenital heart surgery. Fluid overload was also associated with physiological markers of respiratory restriction. A randomized controlled trial of a restrictive versus liberal fluid replacement strategy is necessary in this patient population, but in the meantime, accumulating observational evidence suggests that cautious use of fluid in the postoperative care may be warranted.

  4. Does a kaolin-impregnated hemostatic dressing reduce intraoperative blood loss and blood transfusions in pediatric spinal deformity surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Emily M; Nandyala, Sreeharsha V; Schwend, Richard M

    2014-09-01

    Retrospective case-control study. To evaluate the hemostatic benefits of using a kaolin-impregnated dressing during pediatric spinal deformity correction surgery. Minimizing blood loss and transfusions are clear benefits for patient safety. A technique common in both severe trauma and combat medicine that has not been reported in the spine literature is wound packing with a kaolin-impregnated hemostatic dressing. Estimated blood loss and transfusion amounts were analyzed in a total of 117 retrospectively identified cases. The control group included 65 patients (46 females, 19 males, 12.7±4.5 yr, 10.2±4.8 levels fused) who received standard operative care with gauze packing between June 2007 and March 2010. The treatment group included 52 patients (33 females, 19 males, 13.9±3.2 yr, 10.4±4.3 levels fused) who underwent intraoperative packing with QuikClot Trauma Pads (QCTP, Z-Medica Corporation) for all surgical procedures from July 2010 to August 2011. No other major changes in the use of antifibrinolytics or perioperative, surgical, or anesthesia technique were noted. Statistical differences were analyzed using analysis of covariance in R with P value of less than 0.05. The statistical model included sex, age, weight, scoliosis type, the number of vertebral levels fused, and surgery duration as covariates. The treatment group had 40% less intraoperative estimated blood loss than the control group (974 mL vs. 1620 mL) (Pkaolin-impregnated intraoperative trauma pad seems to be an effective and inexpensive method to reduce intraoperative blood loss and transfusion volume in pediatric spinal deformity surgery. 3.

  5. Image guidance in endoscopic sinus surgery and skull base surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mitchell R.Gore; Brent A.Senior

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to review the current clinical applications and impact of intraoperative imaging on endoscopic sinonasal and skull base procedures in adult and pediatric patients.Methods The PubMed database was searched for articles related to the use of image guidance in otolaryngology using the search terms "image guidance otolaryngology".This was supplemented by the authors′ experience utilizing image guidance in nearly 3000 endoscopic sinus and skull base procedures.Results The literature demonstrates that intraoperative image guidance has utility in primary and revision endoscopic sinus surgery,as well as endoscopic surgery of the skull base.Image guidance also has applications in pediatric endoscopic surgery,such as pediatric sinus surgery and repair of choanal atresia.Conclusions Intraoperative image guidance,when combined with a thorough knowledge of paranasal sinus and skull base anatomy and technical proficiency,can provide improved safety when performing otolaryngologic procedures from endoscopic sinus surgery to endoscopic skull base surgery.While not a substitute for knowledge of anatomy,the increased availability and usability of image guidance systems make them a useful tool in the armamentarium of the otolaryngologist/head and neck surgeon and neurosurgeon.

  6. Barriers to follow-up for pediatric cataract surgery in Maharashtra, India: How regular follow-up is important for good outcome. The Miraj Pediatric Cataract Study II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikshit Gogate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regular follow up and amblyopia treatment are essential for good outcomes after pediatric cataract surgery. Aim: To study the regularity of follow-up after cataract surgery in children and to gauge the causes of poor compliance to follow up. Subjects: 262 children (393 cataracts who underwent cataract surgery in 2004-8. Materials and Methods: The children were identified and examined in their homes and a "barriers to follow-up" questionnaire completed. Demographic data collected, visual acuity estimated, and ocular examination performed. Statistical Analysis: SPSS version 19. Results: Of the 262 children, only 53 (20.6% had been regularly following up with any hospital, 209 (79.4% had not. A total of 150 (57.3% were boys and the average age was 13.23 years (Std Dev 5 yrs. Poor follow up was associated with the older age group ( P 1 line with regular follow-up. Conclusion: Regular follow-up is important and improves vision; eye care practitioners need to take special efforts to ensure better follow-up.

  7. Association of blood products administration during cardiopulmonary bypass and excessive post-operative bleeding in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Hemant S; Barrett, Sarah S; Barry, Kristen; Xu, Meng; Saville, Benjamin R; Donahue, Brian S; Harris, Zena L; Bichell, David P

    2015-03-01

    Our objectives were to study risk factors and post-operative outcomes associated with excessive post-operative bleeding in pediatric cardiac surgeries performed using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) support. A retrospective observational study was undertaken, and all consecutive pediatric heart surgeries over 1 year period were studied. Excessive post-operative bleeding was defined as 10 ml/kg/h of chest tube output for 1 h or 5 ml/kg/h for three consecutive hours in the first 12 h of pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) stay. Risk factors including demographics, complexity of cardiac defect, CPB parameters, hematological studies, and post-operative morbidity and mortality were evaluated for excessive bleeding. 253 patients were studied, and 107 (42 %) met the criteria for excessive bleeding. Bayesian model averaging revealed that greater volume of blood products transfusion during CPB was significantly associated with excessive bleeding. Multiple logistic regression analysis of blood products transfusion revealed that increased volume of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) administration for CPB prime and during CPB was significantly associated with excessive bleeding (p = 0.028 and p = 0.0012, respectively). Proportional odds logistic regression revealed that excessive bleeding was associated with greater time to achieve negative fluid balance, prolonged mechanical ventilation, and duration of PCICU stay (p after adjusting for multiple parameters. A greater volume of blood products administration, especially PRBCs transfusion for CPB prime, and during the CPB period is associated with excessive post-operative bleeding. Excessive bleeding is associated with worse post-operative outcomes.

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of jaws and teeth. Surgery can improve chewing, speaking and breathing. While the patient's appearance may be dramatically enhanced as a result of their surgery, orthognathic surgery is performed to correct functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on ...

  9. Gastric bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Roux-en-Y; Weight-loss surgery - gastric bypass; Obesity surgery - gastric bypass ... bypass surgery is not a quick fix for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. After this surgery, you must eat healthy foods, control portion sizes of ...

  10. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ...

  11. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ...

  12. Comparison of surgical outcomes among infants in neonatal intensive care units treated by pediatric surgeons versus general surgeons: The need for pediatric surgery specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Yoon Jung; Lee, Eun Hee; Lee, Ji Sung

    2017-01-31

    This study compared the outcomes of infants who underwent surgery in neonatal intensive care units by pediatric surgeons and by general surgeons. This was a retrospective study of infants who underwent surgery in neonatal intensive care units between 2010 and 2014. A total of 227 patients were included. Of these patients, 116 were operated on by pediatric surgeons (PS) and 111 were operated on by general surgeons (GS). The outcome measures were the overall rate of operative complications, unplanned reoperation, mortality rate, length of stay, operative time, and number of total number of operative procedures. The overall operative complication rate was higher in the GS group compared with the PS group (18.7% vs. 7.0%, p=0.0091). The rate of unplanned reoperations was also higher in the GS group (10.8% vs. 3.5%, p=0.0331). The median operation time (90min vs. 75min, p=0.0474) and median length of stay (24days vs. 18days, p=0.0075) were significantly longer in the GS group. The adjusted odd ratios of postoperative complications for GS were 2.9 times higher than that of PS (OR 2.90, p=0.0352). The operative quality and patient outcomes of the PS group were superior to those of the GS group. III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Predictors of language skills in the long term after pediatric epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puka, Klajdi; Smith, Mary Lou

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate language skills in a heterogeneous cohort of patients who underwent or were considered for epilepsy surgery in childhood 4-11years earlier. The few existing studies that have evaluated cognitive function in the long term after surgery have examined intelligence and memory. Participants were 97 patients, of whom 61 underwent surgery. They completed standardized tests of picture naming, vocabulary, letter fluency, semantic fluency and intelligence at baseline and, on average, 7years later. Among all patient groups, scores across language tasks were similar at baseline and follow-up. Language skills were largely independent of surgical status but were associated with seizure control. Seizure freedom and/or a longer proportion of life without seizures were associated with higher scores across all language tasks at follow-up. However, few patients showed meaningful improvements or deterioration at the individual level. Older age at epilepsy onset, higher IQ, and higher baseline scores were associated with higher follow-up scores on all language tasks. Localization and lateralization of epileptogenic foci and language lateralization were associated with higher scores on some language tasks at follow-up. Most of these variables were also predictive of change in scores over time on some of the language tasks. Language skills largely remained similar at baseline and follow-up. Seizure freedom was associated with a modest advantage at the group level, and no significant change at the individual level, suggesting an abnormal neural substrate or epileptic activity prior to seizure control may hinder the long-term capacity for improvement, even in the absence of seizure activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Accidental burns during surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Erhan; O'Dey, Dan Mon; Pallua, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to increase awareness of intraoperative burns during standard procedures, to discuss their possible causes and warning signs and to provide recommendations for prevention and procedures to follow after their occurrence. A total of 19 patients associated with intraoperative burn accidents were treated surgically and analyzed after a mean follow-up of 5 +/- 3.5 months. Review included retrospective patient chart analysis, clinical examination, and technical device and equipment testing. A total of 15 patients recently underwent cardiac surgery, and 4 pediatric patients recovered after standard surgical procedures. A total of 15 patients had superficial and 4 presented with deep dermal or full-thickness burns. The average injured TBSA was 2.1 +/- 1% (range, 0.5-4%). Delay between primary surgery and consultation of plastic surgeons was 4.5 +/- 3.4 days. A total of 44% required surgery, including débridment, skin grafting or musculocutaneous gluteus maximus flaps, and the remaining patients were treated conservatively. Successful durable soft-tissue coverage of the burn region was achieved in 18 patients, and 1 patient died after a course of pneumonia. Technical analysis demonstrated one malfunctioning electrosurgical device, one incorrect positioned neutral electrode, three incidents occurred after moisture under the negative electrode, eight burns occurred during surgery while fluid or blood created alternate current pathways, five accidents were chemical burns after skin preparation with Betadine solution, and in one case, the cause was not clear. The surgical team should pay more attention to the probability of burns during surgery. Early patient examination and immediate involvement of plastic and burn surgeons may prevent further complications or ease handling after the occurrence.

  15. Postoperative Pediatric Cerebellar Mutism After Posterior Fossa Surgery: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jerry Y; Liu, Che; Shetty, Naveen; Shah, Ushma

    2017-04-15

    Cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS) is a common complication of posterior fossa surgery that can confound the postanesthetic examination and have long-lasting impacts. There is confusion surrounding its precise description, diagnostic features, and associated morbidity. Here, we discuss the most up-to-date knowledge of CMS drawing from a clinical case in the context of 3 new reports: (1) an international consensus paper presenting a new proposed working definition by the Iceland Delphi Group, (2) a knowledge update by Gadgil et al, (3) and a review of neuroimaging-based data elucidating the etiology of CMS by Patay.

  16. Oral surgery: part 2. Endodontic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, I

    2013-09-01

    In the past, the interaction between dentoalveolar surgery and restorative dentistry has been limited to the removal of teeth with pulp and/or periradicular disease or those that were unrestorable. However, with the increasing dental awareness of the population and the retention of teeth into later life, the interaction between dentoalveolar surgery and restorative dentistry is becoming a fundamental aspect of clinical practice. Indeed, endodontic and implant surgery are core activities that facilitate the retention of a functional dentition.

  17. Laser welding in penetrating keratoplasty and cataract surgery of pediatric patients: early results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Francesca; Pini, Roberto; Menabuoni, Luca; Malandrini, Alex; Canovetti, Annalisa; Lenzetti, Ivo; Capozzi, Paolo; Valente, Paola; Buzzonetti, Luca

    2013-03-01

    Diode laser welding of ocular tissues is a procedure that enables minimally invasive closure of a corneal wound. This procedure is based on a photothermal effect: a water solution of Indocyanine Green (ICG) is inserted in the surgical wound, in order to stain the corneal tissue walls. The stained tissue is then irradiated with a low power infrared diode laser, delivering laser light through a 300-μm core diameter optical fiber. This procedure enables an immediate closure of the wounds: it is thus possible to reduce or to substitute the use of surgical threads. This is of particular interest in children, because the immediate closure improves refractive outcome and anti-amblyopic effect; moreover this procedure avoids several general anaesthesia for suture management. In this work, we present the first use of diode laser welding procedure in paediatric patients. 5 selected patients underwent cataract surgery (Group 1), while 4 underwent fs-laserassisted penetrating keratoplasty (Group 2). In Group 1 the conventional surgery procedure was performed, while no stitches were used for the closure of the surgical wounds: these were laser welded and immediately closed. In Group 2 the donor button was sutured upon the recipient by 8 single stitches, instead of 16 single stitches or a running suture. The laser welding procedure was performed in order to join the donor tissue to the recipient bed. Objective observations in the follow up study evidenced a perfect adhesion of the laser welded tissues, no collateral effects and an optimal restoration of the treated tissues.

  18. Perioperative concerns in pediatric patients undergoing different types of scoliosis correction surgery: A retrospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjolie Chhabra

    2013-01-01

    Patients and Methods: After taking parental consent, data were collected retrospectively for 33 patients who underwent 37 procedures (four patients had both anterior and posterior procedures on 2 days of the week mainly from August 2008 to February 2010 at a tertiary care institution. Results: Children undergoing GR surgery were younger (8.1 ± 2.1 years than patients undergoing AR (12.9 ± 1.7 years or posterior fusion (14.2 ± 2.2 years. AR children had a significantly higher Cobb′s angle and more rigid curves. (P = 0.057 Associated congenital abnormalities especially neurological were commoner in the GR children. Surgical duration and blood loss was significantly more for PF (2207.5 ± 1224.13 ml than GR (456 ± 337.5 ml, or AR (642.85 ± 304.72 ml, (P = 0.0002. PF patients needed Intensive care unit (ICU care mainly due to the blood loss and prolonged surgery (35%. AR performed via thoracotomy was associated with the need for mechanical ventilation in 28.6%. The GR patients had major intraoperative hemodynamic events and 20% needed ICU care. Conclusions: Post-operative ventilation may be required in 20-35% patients undergoing procedures for scoliosis correction. Despite GR insertion involving lesser blood loss; younger age, congenital abnormalities, positioning, and surgical manipulation resulted in life threatening events in these patients.

  19. Comparison of topical oxybuprocaine and intravenous fentanyl in pediatric strabismus surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousafzai, Ibrahim; Zahoor, Abdul; Andrey, Butrov; Ahmad, Nauman

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the outcomes such as postoperative nausea/vomiting, analgesic requirements, and hospital stay following the use of topical oxybuprocaine hydrochloride 0.4% or intravenous (IV) fentanyl in children undergoing strabismus surgery. Methods: This was a prospective cohort study. Children operated under general anesthesia for strabismus were given topical oxybuprocaine hydrochloride 0.4% (Group T) and IV fentanyl (Group F) before surgery. The episodes of nausea/vomiting, pain score, requirement of additional analgesia during postoperative period, and duration of hospital stay were compared in two groups. Results: There were 47 children in Group T and 59 children in Group F. The median pain score in two groups were 2.38 (25% quartile; 2.0) and 3.00 (25% quartile; 3.00), respectively. The difference was significant (K W P statistically significant (P = 0.22). Conclusions: Using intraoperative topical oxybuprocaine drops, one can achieve better analgesic outcomes and reduce risk of nausea and vomiting compared to intravenous opioid analgesics and therefore, the hospital stay could also be marginally reduced. PMID:28217057

  20. Improving Surveillance and Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Melissa; Hersey, Diane; Harrison, Sheilah; Joy, Brian; Naguib, Aymen; Galantowicz, Mark; Simsic, Janet

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative cardiovascular surgical site infections are preventable events that may lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. To improve surgical wound surveillance and reduce the incidence of surgical site infections. An institutional review of surgical site infections led to implementation of 8 surveillance and process measures: appropriate preparation the night before surgery and the day of surgery, use of appropriate preparation solution in the operating room, appropriate timing of preoperative antibiotic administration, placement of a photograph of the surgical site in the patient's chart at discharge, sending a photograph of the surgical site to the patient's primary care physician, 30-day follow-up of the surgical site by an advanced nurse practitioner, and placing a photograph of the surgical site obtained on postoperative day 30 in the patient's chart. Mean overall compliance with the 8 measures from March 2013 through February 2014 was 88%. Infections occurred in 10 of 417 total operative cases (2%) in 2012, in 8 of 437 total operative cases (2%) in 2013, and in 7 of 452 total operative cases (1.5%) in 2014. Institution of the surveillance process has resulted in improved identification of suspected surgical site infections via direct rather than indirect measures, accurate identification of all surgical site infections based on definitions of the National Healthcare Safety Network, collaboration with all persons involved, and enhanced communication with patients' family members and referring physicians. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  1. [Clinical profile of systemic inflammatory response after pediatric cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Leonardo Cavadas da Costa; Ribas, Denise; Spring, Regine; Silva, Jean Marcelo Ferreira da; Miyague, Nelson Itiro

    2010-01-01

    the postoperative period of congenital cardiomyopathies correction is frequently accompanied by systemic inflammatory response. To assess the frequency of occurrence and clinical manifestations of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome after cardiopulmonary bypass (SIRS-CPB) in children submitted to cardiac surgery. Historical cohort study including patients up to 3 years old that were submitted to elective corrective surgeries for congenital cardiopathies with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). A total of 101 patients were assessed by means of clinical criteria of organ dysfunction through score tests, as comparing predisponent factors and aggregated morbidity to the presence of SIRS-CPB. Twenty-two patients (21.9%) fulfilled the criteria for SIRS-CPB. The sex or type of cardiopathy did not differ between groups (p = NS). Patients diagnosed with SIRS-CPB (compared to patients without SIRS-CPB) presented lower mean age (6.8 +/- 5.5 versus 10.8 +/- 5.1 months, p SIRS-CPB, which presented lower weight and longer CPB duration as predisponent factors. Patients with SIRS-CPB remain in mechanical ventilation, in ICU and in hospitalization for a longer period of time.

  2. Cognitive consequences of early versus late antiepileptic drug withdrawal after pediatric epilepsy surgery, the TimeToStop (TTS) trial : study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuisen, Kim; Lamberink, Herm J; van Schooneveld, Monique MJ; Cross, J Helen; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; Geleijns, Karin; Uiterwaal, Cuno Spm; Braun, Kees PJ

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The goals of intentional curative pediatric epilepsy surgery are to achieve seizure-freedom and antiepileptic drug (AED) freedom. Retrospective cohort studies have indicated that early postoperative AED withdrawal unmasks incomplete surgical success and AED dependency sooner, but not at

  3. Does ICU structure impact patient outcomes after congenital heart surgery? A critical appraisal of "care models and associated outcomes in congenital heart surgery" by Burstein et al (Pediatrics 2011; 127: e1482-e1489).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilvers, Pamela S; Thammasitboon, Satid

    2014-01-01

    To review the findings and discuss the implications of different ICU care models on morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients after congenital heart surgery. The electronic PubMed database was used to perform the clinical query, as well as to search for additional pertinent literature. The article by Burstein DS et al "Care Models and Associated Outcomes in Congenital Heart Surgery. Pediatrics 2011; 15:77-81" was selected for critical appraisal and literature review. The authors evaluated in-hospital mortality, postoperative length of stay, and postoperative complications in pediatric patients after congenital heart surgery and compared the odds of these outcomes by model of care received (cardiac ICU or mixed ICU). The data for the study was extracted from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgery (STS-EACTS) database. Overall, the cardiac ICU group represented hospitals with higher surgical volumes and included more patients with high-risk defects. After multivariate analysis, the adjusted in-hospital mortality was not associated with the care model (cardiac ICU vs. ICU). The only significant finding was a lower morality in the STS-EACTS risk category 3 (odds ratio, 0.47 [95% CI, 0.25-0.86]). There were no significant differences between groups for adjusted postoperative length of stay or postoperative complications. This paper suggests that the composition of the ICU is not a critical factor in determining outcomes after congenital heart surgery. Other factors, such as expertise of the nurses, physicians, and surgeons, as well as technical performance, should be considered.

  4. Robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palep Jaydeep

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The term "robot" was coined by the Czech playright Karel Capek in 1921 in his play Rossom′s Universal Robots. The word "robot" is from the check word robota which means forced labor.The era of robots in surgery commenced in 1994 when the first AESOP (voice controlled camera holder prototype robot was used clinically in 1993 and then marketed as the first surgical robot ever in 1994 by the US FDA. Since then many robot prototypes like the Endoassist (Armstrong Healthcare Ltd., High Wycombe, Buck, UK, FIPS endoarm (Karlsruhe Research Center, Karlsruhe, Germany have been developed to add to the functions of the robot and try and increase its utility. Integrated Surgical Systems (now Intuitive Surgery, Inc. redesigned the SRI Green Telepresence Surgery system and created the daVinci Surgical System ® classified as a master-slave surgical system. It uses true 3-D visualization and EndoWrist ® . It was approved by FDA in July 2000 for general laparoscopic surgery, in November 2002 for mitral valve repair surgery. The da Vinci robot is currently being used in various fields such as urology, general surgery, gynecology, cardio-thoracic, pediatric and ENT surgery. It provides several advantages to conventional laparoscopy such as 3D vision, motion scaling, intuitive movements, visual immersion and tremor filtration. The advent of robotics has increased the use of minimally invasive surgery among laparoscopically naοve surgeons and expanded the repertoire of experienced surgeons to include more advanced and complex reconstructions.

  5. Global surgery for pediatric hydrocephalus in the developing world: a review of the history, challenges, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Ryan T; Wang, Shelly; Warf, Benjamin C

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Pediatric hydrocephalus is one of the most common neurosurgical conditions and is a major contributor to the global burden of surgically treatable diseases. Significant health disparities exist for the treatment of hydrocephalus in developing nations due to a combination of medical, environmental, and socioeconomic factors. This review aims to provide the international neurosurgery community with an overview of the current challenges and future directions of neurosurgical care for children with hydrocephalus in low-income countries. METHODS The authors conducted a literature review around the topic of pediatric hydrocephalus in the context of global surgery, the unique challenges to creating access to care in low-income countries, and current international efforts to address the problem. RESULTS Developing countries face the greatest burden of pediatric hydrocephalus due to high birth rates and greater risk of neonatal infections. This burden is related to more general global health challenges, including malnutrition, infectious diseases, maternal and perinatal risk factors, and education gaps. Unique challenges pertaining to the treatment of hydrocephalus in the developing world include a preponderance of postinfectious hydrocephalus, limited resources, and restricted access to neurosurgical care. In the 21st century, several organizations have established programs that provide hydrocephalus treatment and neurosurgical training in Africa, Central and South America, Haiti, and Southeast Asia. These international efforts have employed various models to achieve the goals of providing safe, sustainable, and cost-effective treatment. CONCLUSIONS Broader commitment from the pediatric neurosurgery community, increased funding, public education, surgeon training, and ongoing surgical innovation will be needed to meaningfully address the global burden of untreated hydrocephalus.

  6. Influence of surgeon experience, hospital volume, and specialty designation on outcomes in pediatric surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAteer, Jarod P; LaRiviere, Cabrini A; Drugas, George T; Abdullah, Fizan; Oldham, Keith T; Goldin, Adam B

    2013-05-01

    Analyses of volume-outcome relationships in adult surgery have found that hospital and physician characteristics affect patient outcomes, such as length of stay, hospital charges, complications, and mortality. Similar investigations in children's surgical specialties are fewer in number, and their conclusions are less clear. To review the evidence regarding surgeon or hospital experience and their influence on outcomes in children's surgery. A MEDLINE and EMBASE search was conducted for English-language studies published from January 1, 1980, through April 13, 2012. Titles and abstracts were screened in a standardized manner by 2 reviewers. Studies selected for inclusion had to use a measure of hospital or surgeon experience as a predictor variable and had to report postoperative outcomes as dependent response variables. Included studies were reviewed with regard to methodologic quality, and study results were extracted. Sixty-three studies were reviewed. Significant heterogeneity was detected in exposure definitions, outcome measures, and risk adjustment, with the greatest heterogeneity seen in appendectomy studies. Various exposure levels were examined: hospital level in 48 (68%) studies, surgeon level in 11 (17%), and both in 9 (14%). Nineteen percent of studies did not adjust for confounding, and 57% did not adjust for sample clustering. The most consistent methods and reproducible results were seen in the pediatric cardiac surgical literature. Forty-nine studies (78%) showed positive correlation between experience and most primary outcomes, but differences in outcomes and exposure definitions made comparisons between studies difficult. In general, hospital-level factors tended to correlate with outcomes for high-complexity procedures, whereas surgeon-level factors tended to correlate with outcomes for more common procedures. Data on experience-related outcomes in children's surgery are limited in number and vary widely in methodologic quality. Future studies

  7. Differences in perioperative femoral and radial arterial blood pressure in neonates and infants undergoing pediatric cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hwa Jin; Lee, Sang Hoon; Jeong, In Seok; Yoon, Nam Sik; Ma, Jae Sook; Ahn, Byoung Hee

    2017-08-30

    Several reports claim that blood pressure (BP) in the radial artery may underestimate the accurate BP in critically ill patients. Here, the authors evaluated differences in mean blood pressure (MBP) between the radial and femoral artery during pediatric cardiac surgery to determine the effectiveness of femoral arterial BP monitoring. The medical records of children under 1 year of age who underwent open-heart surgery between 2007 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Radial and femoral BP were measured simultaneously, and the differences between these values were analyzed at various times: after catheter insertion, after the initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB-on), after aortic cross clamping (ACC), after the release of ACC, after weaning from CPB, at arrival in the intensive care unit (ICU), and every 6h during the first day in the ICU. A total of 121 patients who underwent open-heart surgery met the inclusion criteria. During the intraoperative period, from the beginning to the end of CPB, radial MBPs were significantly lower than femoral MBPs at each time-point measured (p60min, odds ratio: 7.47) was a risk factor for lower radial pressure. However, discrepancies between these two values disappeared after arrival in the ICU. There was no incidence of ischemic complications associated with the catheterization of both arteries. The authors suggest that femoral arterial pressure monitoring can be safely performed, even in neonates, and provides more accurate BP values during CPB-on periods, and immediately after weaning from CPB, especially when CPB time was greater than 60min. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Cosmetic and functional outcomes of frontalis suspension surgery using autologous fascia lata or silicone rods in pediatric congenital ptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hsi-Wei; Seah, Lay Leng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cosmetic and functional outcomes of frontalis suspension surgery using autologous fascia lata (FL) or silicone rods (SRs) in pediatric congenital ptosis. Design Retrospective case series. Study subjects Patients with congenital ptosis, aged 18 years or younger, during the period under study (2005–2011) at the Singapore National Eye Centre. Methods Review of case records for functional and cosmetic outcome measures after frontalis suspension surgery using either SRs or autologous FL. Results A total of 18 patients were studied (14 eyelids had FL, 16 eyelids had SRs) with mean ages of 7.1 (range 5–12) and 7.2 (range 4–18) years for the FL and SR groups, respectively. Mean follow-up period was 41.6 (range 11.2–77.9) and 48.6 (16.1–87.4) months, respectively. Patients in the FL group had better functional and cosmetic results compared to those in silicone group, with no recurrence of ptosis. More complications were experienced by patients in the SR group. Conclusion Autologous FL for frontalis suspension remains an excellent choice for (and should be considered as useful surgical armamentarium for) repair of severe congenital ptosis. PMID:27695282

  9. Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: Increasing incidence, decreasing surgery rate, and compromised nutritional status: A prospective population-based cohort study 2007-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Christian; Paerregaard, Anders; Munkholm, Pia

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim was to evaluate the incidence, treatment, surgery rate, and anthropometry at diagnosis of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods: Patients diagnosed between January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2009 in Eastern Denmark, Funen, and Aarhus were included from a backgro...... pediatric population. Conclusions: Over the past 12 years we found an increase in the incidence of IBD in children, an increasing use of IM, and decreasing 1-year surgery rates. CD patients had poor nutritional status.......Background: The aim was to evaluate the incidence, treatment, surgery rate, and anthropometry at diagnosis of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods: Patients diagnosed between January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2009 in Eastern Denmark, Funen, and Aarhus were included from...... a background population of 668,056 children surgery rate, a subcohort from Eastern Denmark was extracted for comparison with a previously published population-based cohort from the same geographical area (1998–2006). Results: In all, 130 children...

  10. Infections in outpatient surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarian Mobin, Sheila S; Keyes, Geoffrey R; Singer, Robert; Yates, James; Thompson, Dennis

    2013-07-01

    In the plastic surgery patient population, outpatient surgery is cost effective and will continue to grow as the preferred arena for performing surgery in healthy patients. Although there is a widespread myth that outpatient surgery centers may suffer from increased infection rates due to lax infection control, the data presented from American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities-accredited facilities prove the contrary. There is a lack of data investigating infection prevention in the perioperative period in plastic surgery patients. As data collection becomes more refined, tracking the postoperative care environment should offer additional opportunities to lower the incidence of postoperative infections.

  11. Anesthetic management of a pediatric patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia undergoing emergency surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiskalioglu, Elif Oral; Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Firinci, Binali; Dostbil, Aysenur; Aksoy, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasias are rare conditions with a triad of hypotrichosis, anodontia and anhidrosis. In literature review there have been only a few reports of anesthetic management of patients with ectodermal dysplasias. Hyperthermia is a very serious risk which may occur due to the defect of sweat glands. The present case involves a 10-year-old child with ectodermal dysplasia who presented with an acute abdomen and was considered for an emergency surgery. Our aim was to demonstrate the successful management of this case using a combination of general and epidural anesthesia. It is important for anesthesiologist to have information about this syndrome in case of emergency operations, since it can prevent serious complications and even save lives. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. [Anesthetic management of a pediatric patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia undergoing emergency surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiskalioglu, Elif Oral; Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Firinci, Binali; Dostbil, Aysenur; Aksoy, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasias are rare conditions with a triad of hypotrichosis, anodontia and anhidrosis. In literature review there have been only a few reports of anesthetic management of patients with ectodermal dysplasias. Hyperthermia is a very serious risk which may occur due to the defect of sweat glands. The present case involves a 10-year-old child with ectodermal dysplasia who presented with an acute abdomen and was considered for an emergency surgery. Our aim was to demonstrate the successful management of this case using a combination of general and epidural anesthesia. It is important for anesthesiologist to have information about this syndrome in case of emergency operations, since it can prevent serious complications and even save lives. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Anesthetic management of a pediatric patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia undergoing emergency surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Oral Ahiskalioglu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Ectodermal dysplasias are rare conditions with a triad of hypotrichosis, anodontia and anhidrosis. In literature review there have been only a few reports of anesthetic management of patients with ectodermal dysplasias. Hyperthermia is a very serious risk which may occur due to the defect of sweat glands. The present case involves a 10-year-old child with ectodermal dysplasia who presented with an acute abdomen and was considered for an emergency surgery. Our aim was to demonstrate the successful management of this case using a combination of general and epidural anesthesia. It is important for anesthesiologist to have information about this syndrome in case of emergency operations, since it can prevent serious complications and even save lives.

  14. Cognitive development from two to ten years after pediatric epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggedal, Gerd; Kristjansdottir, Ragnhildur; Olsson, Ingrid; Rydenhag, Bertil; Uvebrant, Paul

    2012-09-01

    The development of cognitive functions and the sustainability of seizure control between two and ten years after epilepsy surgery were prospectively investigated in 17 children and adolescents. Intelligence quotient remained stable. Learning capacity improved. Verbal memory improved in half of the subjects and declined in half, whereas figurative memory declined in most patients. Working memory improved as did attention regarding sustained attention and impulse control. In contrast, reaction times were longer, and the auditory attention span was shorter. Executive functions were not affected. Six subjects (35%) were seizure free at the 10-year follow-up, and a seizure reduction of more than 75% had been achieved in 13 (76%). Seizure control improved in five and seizures recurred in two subjects between the two- and the 10-year follow-up.

  15. Improving quality on the pediatric surgery service: Missed opportunities and making it happen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Loren; Vinocur, Charles D

    2015-12-01

    In surgery, quality improvement efforts have evolved from the traditional case-by-case review typical for morbidity and mortality conferences to more accurate and comprehensive data collection accomplished through participation in national registries such as the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Gaining administrative support to participate in these kinds of initiatives and commitment of the faculty and staff to make change in a data-driven manner rather than as a reaction to individual events can be a challenge. This article guides the reader through the process of interacting with administrative leadership to gain support for evidence-based quality improvement endeavors. General principles that are discussed include stakeholder engagement, taking advantage of preexisting resources, and the sharing of data in order to shape QI efforts and demonstrate their effectiveness.

  16. Endotracheal tube cuff lidocaine is not superior to intravenous lidocaine in short pediatric surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Mehrdad; Hajimohamadi, Fatemeh; Alagha, Afshar Etemadi; Abouzari, Mehdi; Rashidi, Armin

    2010-05-01

    Instillation of lidocaine into the endotracheal tube cuff is a method with reported efficiency in promoting a smoother emergence from anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. However, whether or not this method is helpful in children and in surgeries with short duration has not been investigated previously. 176 ASA I-II children undergoing adenotonsillectomy were enrolled in this prospective, double-blind, randomized clinical trial. Patients were randomly allocated to two groups. Patients in the ECL group (n=88) were injected 2% lidocaine into their endotracheal tube cuff and received saline (1.5mg/kg) intravenously. The IVL group (n=88) received 1.5mg/kg of 2% lidocaine intravenously and saline into the endotracheal tube cuff. In both groups, intra-cuff injections were initiated immediately after insertion of the endotracheal tube and terminated before the cuff pressure reached 20 cmH(2)O. The parameters measured were: coughing (graded by a scale of 3 at the time of extubation), systolic and diastolic blood pressures and heart rate (from the time of extubation up to 5 min after extubation at 1-min intervals), and laryngospasm (defined as the presence of hoarseness or absence of airflow). The groups were not different in sex, age, weight, height, body mass index, anesthesia duration, and baseline hemodynamic parameters. The grade of coughing was significantly higher in the ECL group. The incidence of laryngospasm and hemodynamic trends did not differ between the groups. Our results indicate that intra-cuff lidocaine may not be beneficial in children and in surgeries with a short duration. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 3D-printed pediatric endoscopic ear surgery simulator for surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Samuel R; Kozin, Elliott D; Dedmon, Matthew; Lin, Brian M; Lee, Kyuwon; Sinha, Sumi; Black, Nicole; Remenschneider, Aaron K; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-11-01

    Surgical simulators are designed to improve operative skills and patient safety. Transcanal Endoscopic Ear Surgery (TEES) is a relatively new surgical approach with a slow learning curve due to one-handed dissection. A reusable and customizable 3-dimensional (3D)-printed endoscopic ear surgery simulator may facilitate the development of surgical skills with high fidelity and low cost. Herein, we aim to design, fabricate, and test a low-cost and reusable 3D-printed TEES simulator. The TEES simulator was designed in computer-aided design (CAD) software using anatomic measurements taken from anthropometric studies. Cross sections from external auditory canal samples were traced as vectors and serially combined into a mesh construct. A modified tympanic cavity with a modular testing platform for simulator tasks was incorporated. Components were fabricated using calcium sulfate hemihydrate powder and multiple colored infiltrants via a commercial inkjet 3D-printing service. All components of a left-sided ear were printed to scale. Six right-handed trainees completed three trials each. Mean trial time (n = 3) ranged from 23.03 to 62.77 s using the dominant hand for all dissection. Statistically significant differences between first and last completion time with the dominant hand (p < 0.05) and average completion time for junior and senior residents (p < 0.05) suggest construct validity. A 3D-printed simulator is feasible for TEES simulation. Otolaryngology training programs with access to a 3D printer may readily fabricate a TEES simulator, resulting in inexpensive yet high-fidelity surgical simulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Thymus surgery in a general surgery department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Raquel; Coelho, Fátima; Pimentel, Teresa; Ribero, Rui; Matos, Novo de; Araújo, António

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of thymectomy cases between 1990-2003, in a General Surgery Department. Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy in Miastenia Gravis patients. Retrospective study based on evaluation of data from Serviço de Cirurgia, Neurologia and Consult de Neurology processes, between 1990-2003, of 15 patients submitted to total thymectomy. 15 patients, aged 17 to 72, 11 female and 4 male. Miastenia Gravis was the main indication for surgery, for uncontrollable symptoms or suspicion of thymoma. In patients with myasthenia, surgery was accomplish after compensation of symptoms. There weren't post-surgery complications. Pathology were divided in thymic hyperplasia and thymoma. Miastenia patients have there symptoms diminished or stable with reduction or cessation of medical therapy. Miastenia was the most frequent indication for thymectomy. Surgery was good results, with low morbimortality, as long as the protocols are respected.

  19. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Access to Care Toolkit EHB Access Toolkit Bariatric Surgery Procedures Bariatric surgical procedures cause weight loss by ... Bariatric procedures also often cause hormonal changes. Most weight loss surgeries today are performed using minimally invasive techniques (laparoscopic ...

  20. Complications of Sinus Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... further intracranial surgeries. Impaired sense of taste or smell : The sense of smell usually improves after the procedure because airflow is ... in their voice after sinus surgery. Impairment of smell or taste: (see above) Infection: The most common ...

  1. Bariatric Surgery Misconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from depression or anxiety and to have lower self-esteem and overall quality of life than someone who ... is a Candidate for Bariatric Surgery? Childhood and Adolescent Obesity Find a Provider Benefits of Bariatric Surgery ...

  2. Breast Reduction Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breastfeeding: A systematic review. Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery. 2010;63:1688. Kerrigan CL, et al. Evidence-based medicine: Reduction mammoplasty. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2013;132: ...

  3. Aids and Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    HIV/AIDS patients require surgery sometimes during their illness. ... risks to surgical equipes and analysing preventive strategies to HIV ... problems in patients presenting HIV, AIDS and ... Dentistry, Surgery of Awolowo University in Nigeria3.

  4. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, ...

  5. Weight Loss Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight loss surgery helps people with extreme obesity to lose weight. It may be an option if you ... caused by obesity. There are different types of weight loss surgery. They often limit the amount of food ...

  6. Ear Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Plastic Surgery Ear Plastic Surgery Patient Health Information ... they may improve appearance and self-confidence. Can Ear Deformities Be Corrected? Formation of the ear during ...

  7. Scoliosis surgery - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007383.htm Scoliosis surgery - child To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Scoliosis surgery repairs abnormal curving of the spine ( scoliosis ). ...

  8. Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000273.htm Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had cosmetic breast surgery to change the size or shape ...

  9. LASIK Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are nearsighted. You may need another refractive surgery (enhancement surgery) within a year to remove more tissue. ... may happen due to certain conditions, such as abnormal wound healing, hormonal imbalances or pregnancy. Visual loss ...

  10. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Exhibit Opportunities Sponsorship Opportunities Log In Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Download PDF Find a SAGES Surgeon Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Your spine surgeon has determined that you need ...

  11. Types of Heart Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Heart Surgery Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Coronary artery bypass grafting ( ... TAHs) might be used to treat these patients. Surgery To Place Ventricular Assist Devices or Total Artificial ...

  12. Cosmetic ear surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoplasty; Ear pinning; Ear surgery - cosmetic; Ear reshaping; Pinnaplasty ... Cosmetic ear surgery may be done in the surgeon's office, an outpatient clinic, or a hospital. It can be performed under ...

  13. Hip fracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neck fracture repair; Trochanteric fracture repair; Hip pinning surgery; Osteoarthritis - hip ... You may receive general anesthesia for this surgery. This means you ... spinal anesthesia . With this kind of anesthesia, medicine is ...

  14. Surgery for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage Testicular Cancer Treating Testicular Cancer Surgery for Testicular Cancer Surgery is typically the first treatment for all ... Testicular Cancer, by Type and Stage More In Testicular Cancer About Testicular Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  15. Heart valve surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tricuspid valve stenosis Risks The risks of having cardiac surgery include: Death Heart attack Heart failure Bleeding requiring ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Heart Surgery Read more Heart Valve Diseases Read more Latest ...

  16. Otoplasty (Cosmetic Ear Surgery)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... By Mayo Clinic Staff Otoplasty — also known as cosmetic ear surgery — is a procedure to change the ... Society of Plastic Surgeons. http://www.plasticsurgery.org/Cosmetic-Procedures/Ear-Surgery.html. Accessed June 16, 2015. ...

  17. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, ...

  18. A comparison of micro-PERC and retrograde intrarenal surgery results in pediatric patients with renal stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Haluk; Seckiner, Ilker; Bayrak, Omer; Dogan, Kazim; Erturhan, Sakip

    2017-06-19

    With advancements in endoscopic surgery, open surgical techniques for urinary system stones have paved the way for the application of less invasive treatment modalities in patients with pediatric kidney stone disease. These treatment options include extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), and retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS). We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of RIRS and micro-PCNL techniques in the surgical treatment of kidney stones in pediatric patients. A total of 48 pediatric patients, who underwent RIRS or micro-PERC for pediatric kidney stone disease, were retrospectively analyzed. Urinalysis, urine culture, serum creatinine (Cr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone, 24-hour urine sample, complete blood count (CBC), urinary system X-ray, kidney ureter bladder (KUB), and urinary system ultrasonography (USG) test results were evaluated prior to the procedure. Intravenous pyelography (IVP), non-contrast computed tomography (CT), and renal scintigraphy evaluations were also performed, if necessary. The patients were divided into two groups: micro-PERC group (n = 25) and RIRS group (n = 23). Data relating to the duration of the operation, duration of fluoroscopy, length of hospitalization, complication rates, and stone-free rates were recorded. The mean ages of the micro-PERC and RIRS groups were 4 ± 2.3 and 10.9 ± 3 years, respectively (p = 0.001). However, the mean stone sizes were 12.2 ± 2.8 and 13.7 ± 3.5 mm, respectively (p > 0.05). The mean duration of operation was 75.1 ± 18.9 min in the micro-PERC group and 62.3 ± 15.3 min in the RIRS group (p > 0.05). In addition, the mean duration of fluoroscopy was 115 ± 35.4 s in the micro-PERC group and 39.9 ± 15.3 s in the RIRS group. The stone-free rates in the micro-PERC and RIRS groups following the procedure were reported to be 84% (21/25) and 82.6% (19/23), respectively (p > 0

  19. Breast Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  20. Clinical Factors Associated with Dose of Loop Diuretics After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: Post Hoc Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiberger, Roberta; Favia, Isabella; Romagnoli, Stefano; Cogo, Paola; Ricci, Zaccaria

    2016-06-01

    A post hoc analysis of a randomized controlled trial comparing the clinical effects of furosemide and ethacrynic acid was conducted. Infants undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were included in order to explore which clinical factors are associated with diuretic dose in infants with congenital heart disease. Overall, 67 patients with median (interquartile range) age of 48 (13-139) days were enrolled. Median diuretic dose was 0.34 (0.25-0.4) mg/kg/h at the end of postoperative day (POD) 0 and it significantly decreased (p = 0.04) over the following PODs; during this period, the ratio between urine output and diuretic dose increased significantly (p = 0.04). Age (r -0.26, p = 0.02), weight (r -0.28, p = 0.01), cross-clamp time (r 0.27, p = 0.03), administration of ethacrynic acid (OR 0.01, p = 0.03), and, at the end of POD0, creatinine levels (r 0.3, p = 0.009), renal near-infrared spectroscopy saturation (-0.44, p = 0.008), whole-blood neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin levels (r 0.30, p = 0.01), pH (r -0.26, p = 0.02), urinary volume (r -0.2755, p = 0.03), and fluid balance (r 0.2577, p = 0.0266) showed a significant association with diuretic dose. At multivariable logistic regression cross-clamp time (OR 1.007, p = 0.04), use of ethacrynic acid (OR 0.2, p = 0.01) and blood pH at the end of POD0 (OR 0.0001, p = 0.03) was independently associated with diuretic dose. Early resistance to loop diuretics continuous infusion is evident in post-cardiac surgery infants: Higher doses are administered to patients with lower urinary output. Independently associated variables with diuretic dose in our population appeared to be cross-clamping time, the administration of ethacrynic acid, and blood pH.

  1. [Contribution of the physical and rehabilitation medicine in pediatric plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottrand, L; Devinck, F; Martinot Duquennoy, V; Guerreschi, P

    2016-10-01

    Physical, non-painful processes guide the scar reshaping in children in order to prevent growth anomalies due to cutaneous shrinkage. The objective of the surgical treatment, coordinated with the reeducation care, is to improve the physical abilities of the skin, to restore the function and avoid the deformations. Reeducation uses various techniques (i.e. sensitive-motility, massage and mobilizations) with or without physical agent (water, aspiration and touch-drive technique). Posture and positioning rely on the small or major aids, from orthosis to prosthesis. Compression is obtained by the adjustment of aids on molding and compression garment. Indications of the reeducation treatment depend on the timing of cutaneous covering and the advance of the healing process. It also depends on the underlying condition including skin traumas (frictions, wounds, burns), skin surgeries (purpura fulminans consequences, skin graft reconstruction after giant nevus resection, malignant lesion or vascular malformations). The final goal is the rehabilitation and development of the child and the adolescent in its entire somatopsychic dimension.

  2. Multiple burr hole surgery as a treatment modality for pediatric moyamoya disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindranath Kapu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To re-emphasize that indirect revascularization surgery alone, where multiple burr holes and arachnoid openings are made over both cerebral hemispheres, is beneficial in the treatment of moyamoya disease (MMD in children. Clinical Presentation : We report a 10-year-old boy who presented with complaints of episodic headache for the last 5 years. At the peak of his headache he had visual disturbances and acute onset weakness of left-sided limbs, recovering within a few minutes. He had no focal neurological deficits. Radiological investigations revealed abnormal findings, demonstrating the features of MMD. Surgical Management : He underwent bilateral multiple burr holes, dural and arachnoid opening over the frontal, parietal and temporal regions of each hemisphere. The elevated periosteal flap was placed in contact with the exposed brain through each burr hole. Results : On 6-months follow-up he had only one episode of transient ischemic attack. Postoperative four vessel angiogram demonstrated excellent cerebral revascularization around the burr hole sites, and single photon emission computerized tomography imaging showed hypoperfusion in the right temporo-occipital area suggestive of an old infarct with no other perfusion defect in the rest of the brain parenchyma. Conclusion : In children with MMD this relatively simple surgical technique is effective and safe, and can be used as the only treatment without supplementary revascularization procedures. This procedure can be done in a single stage on both sides and the number of burr holes made over each hemisphere depends on the extent of the disease.

  3. Surgery Videos: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Winston-Salem, NC, 1/15/2009) Weight Loss Surgery Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery (University of Miami Hospital ... Boston, Boston, MA, 6/08/2010) Weight Loss Surgery Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery (University of Miami Hospital ...

  4. Internet Presentation of Departments of Pediatric Surgery in Germany and Their Compliance with Recommended Criteria for Promoting Services and Offering Professional Information for Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Naim; Zoeller, Christoph; Petersen, Claus; Ure, Benno

    2016-08-01

    Introduction The presentation of health institutions in the internet is highly variable concerning marketing features and medical information. We aimed to investigate the structure and the kind of information provided on the Web sites of all departments of pediatric surgery in Germany. Furthermore, we aimed to identify the degree to which these Web sites comply with internet marketing recommendations for generating business. Method The Web sites of all pediatric surgery units referred to as departments on the official Web site of the German Society of Pediatric Surgery (GSPS) were assessed. The search engine Google was used by entering the terms "pediatric surgery" and the name of the city. Besides general data eight content characteristics focusing on ranking, accessibility, use of social media, multilingual sites, navigation options, selected images, contact details, and medical information were evaluated according to published recommendations. Results A total of 85 departments of pediatric surgery were included. On Google search results 44 (52%) ranked number one and 34 (40%) of the department's homepages were accessible directly through the homepage link of the GSPS. A link to own digital and/or social media was offered on 11 (13%) homepages. Nine sites were multilingual. The most common navigation bar item was clinical services on 74 (87%) homepages. Overall, 76 (89%) departments presented their doctors and 17 (20%) presented other staff members with images of doctors on 53 (62%) and contact data access from the homepage on 68 (80%) Web sites. On 25 (29%) Web sites information on the medical conditions treated were presented, on 17 (20%) details of treating concepts, and on 4 (5%) numbers of patients with specific conditions treated in the own department per year. Conclusion We conclude that numerous of the investigated online presentations do not comply with recommended criteria for offering professional information for patients and for promoting

  5. Changing profiles of pediatric epilepsy surgery candidates over time : A nationwide single-center experience from 1990 to 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberink, Herm J.; Boshuisen, K; van Rijen, Peter C.; Gosselaar, Peter H.; Braun, Kees P. J.

    ObjectiveOver the past decades, the number of epilepsy surgeries in children has increased and indications for surgery have broadened. We studied the changes in patient characteristics between 1990 and 2011 in a nationwide cohort and related these to seizure outcome and postoperative medication

  6. Gastric Bypass Surgery: Who Is It For?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children and adolescents with and without nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. 2015;60:550. Inge TH. Weight loss and health status 3 years after bariatric surgery in adolescents. The New England Journal of Medicine. ...

  7. Pediatric retrograde intra-renal surgery for renal stones <2 cm in solitary kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Mohamed Gamal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Management of renal stones in children with a solitary kidney is a challenge. In the current study, the efficacy and safety of retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS in these children were determined. Patients and Methods: Records of children with renal stones who were treated at our institute between August 2011 and August 2014 were retrospectively assessed. Inclusion criteria were: Children with single renal stone <2 cm size, in a solitary kidney. A 7.5 Fr flexible ureteroscope (FURS was introduced into the ureter over a hydrophilic guidewire under visual and fluoroscopic guidance - applying a back-loading technique. The stone was completely dusted using 200 μm laser fiber (0.2-0.8 joules power and10-30 Hz frequency. At the end of the maneuver, a 5 Fr JJ stent was inserted into the ureter. The children were discharged home 24 h postoperative - provided that no complications were detected. Results: Fourteen children (3 girls and 11 boys with median age 9.5 years (range 6-12 were included. The mean stone burden was 12.2 ± 1.5 mm (range 9-20. Stones were successfully accessed in all of the cases by the FURS except for 2 cases in whom a JJ stent was inserted into the ureter and left in place for 2 weeks to achieve passive dilatation. All of the stones were dusted completely. The immediate postoperative stone-free rate (SFR was 79%, and the final SFR was 100% after 3 weeks. No intraoperative complications were observed. Conclusions: RIRS for renal stone <2 cm in children with a solitary kidney is a single-session procedure with a high SFR, low complication rate, and is a minimally invasive, natural orifice technique.

  8. Levels of Evidence in the Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics: Update and Comparison to the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Robert F; Cibulas, Andrew M; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Spence, David D; Kelly, Derek M

    2015-01-01

    Periodic review of the published research in pediatric orthopaedics is helpful to evaluate the state of scientific methodology. The purpose of this paper was to review the levels of evidence (LOE) and types of evidence (TOE) published in the Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics (JPO) from 2009 to 2013 and to compare the percentage of articles with each LOE to pediatric orthopaedic articles published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery-American Volume (JBJS) during the same time. All articles published in JPO from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2013, were reviewed. Articles were classified as scientific studies, case reports, commentaries/letters to editor, reviews, expert opinion, and basic science articles. All scientific articles in the pediatrics section of the online version of JBJS were reviewed. If listed, the LOE was recorded from all clinical scientific studies. In addition, articles were abstracted for self-reported TOE (therapeutic, diagnostic, prognostic, or economic analysis). We found 850 citations in JPO over the study period; 646 (76%) were identified as scientific articles and, of those, 552 (85%) had a LOE listed. There were 18 level I articles (3%), 101 level II (18%), 184 level III (34%), and 289 level IV (45%). The TOE was listed in 213 (39%) articles: 114 (54%) therapeutic, 37 (17%) prognostic, 55 diagnostic (26%), and 7 (3%) economic analysis. Comparing 2009 to 2013, the percentage of scientific studies with a self-reported LOE improved significantly (from 81% to 93%, P=0.001). Compared with JPO, JBJS had a significantly higher rate of level I (12% vs. 3%, P=0.006) and a significantly lower rate of level III (23% vs. 34%, P=0.01) articles. From 2009 to 2013, 3% of articles in JPO were level I. Significantly more articles are now including a level of evidence designation. Approximately half of published studies are level IV, and most are therapeutic type. A higher percentage of level I studies were published in JBJS during the same time

  9. Development of plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pećanac Marija Đ.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Plastic surgery is a medical specialty dealing with corrections of defects, improvements in appearance and restoration of lost function. Ancient Times. The first recorded account of reconstructive plastic surgery was found in ancient Indian Sanskrit texts, which described reconstructive surgeries of the nose and ears. In ancient Greece and Rome, many medicine men performed simple plastic cosmetic surgeries to repair damaged parts of the body caused by war mutilation, punishment or humiliation. In the Middle Ages, the development of all medical braches, including plastic surgery was hindered. New age. The interest in surgical reconstruction of mutilated body parts was renewed in the XVIII century by a great number of enthusiastic and charismatic surgeons, who mastered surgical disciplines and became true artists that created new forms. Modern Era. In the XX century, plastic surgery developed as a modern branch in medicine including many types of reconstructive surgery, hand, head and neck surgery, microsurgery and replantation, treatment of burns and their sequelae, and esthetic surgery. Contemporary and future plastic surgery will continue to evolve and improve with regenerative medicine and tissue engineering resulting in a lot of benefits to be gained by patients in reconstruction after body trauma, oncology amputation, and for congenital disfigurement and dysfunction.

  10. [The incidence of emergence delirium and risk factors following sevoflurane use in pediatric patients for day case surgery, Kingston, Jamaica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooden, Rachel; Tennant, Ingrid; James, Brian; Augier, Richard; Crawford-Sykes, Annette; Ehikhametalor, Kelvin; Gordon-Strachan, Georgiana; Harding-Goldson, Hyacinth

    2014-01-01

    Emergence delirium is a distressing complication of the use of sevoflurane for general anesthesia. This study sought to determine the incidence of emergence delirium and risk factors in patients at a specialist pediatric hospital in Kingston, Jamaica. This was a cross-sectional, observational study including pediatric patients aged 3-10 years, ASA I and II, undergoing general anesthesia with sevoflurane for elective day-case procedures. Data collected included patients' level of anxiety pre-operatively using the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale, surgery performed, anesthetic duration and analgesics administered. Postoperatively, patients were assessed for emergence delirium, defined as agitation with non-purposeful movement, restlessness or thrashing; inconsolability and unresponsiveness to nursing and/or parental presence. The need for pharmacological treatment and post-operative complications related to emergence delirium episodes were also noted. 145 children were included, with emergence delirium occurring in 28 (19.3%). Emergence delirium episodes had a mean duration of 6.9±7.8min, required pharmacologic intervention in 19 (67.8%) children and were associated with a prolonged recovery time (49.4±11.9 versus 29.7±10.8min for non-agitated children; p<0.001). Factors positively associated with emergence delirium included younger age (p=0.01, OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.2-8.6) and moderate and severe anxiety prior to induction (p<0.001, OR 5.6, 95% CI 2.3-13.0). Complications of emergence delirium included intravenous line removal (n=1), and surgical site bleeding (n=3). Children of younger age with greater preoperative anxiety are at increased risk of developing emergence delirium following general anesthesia with sevoflurane. The overall incidence of emergence delirium was 19%. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. The incidence of emergence delirium and risk factors following sevoflurane use in pediatric patients for day case surgery, Kingston, Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Gooden

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Emergence delirium is a distressing complication of the use of sevoflurane for general anesthesia. This study sought to determine the incidence of emergence delirium and risk factors in patients at a specialist pediatric hospital in Kingston, Jamaica. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, observational study including pediatric patients aged 3-10 years, ASA I and II, undergoing general anesthesia with sevoflurane for elective day-case procedures. Data collected included patients' level of anxiety pre-operatively using the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale, surgery performed, anesthetic duration and analgesics administered. Postoperatively, patients were assessed for emergence delirium, defined as agitation with non-purposeful movement, restlessness or thrashing; inconsolability and unresponsiveness to nursing and/or parental presence. The need for pharmacological treatment and post-operative complications related to emergence delirium episodes were also noted. Results: One hundred and forty-five (145 children were included, with emergence delirium occurring in 28 (19.3%. Emergence delirium episodes had a mean duration of 6.9±7.8 min, required pharmacologic intervention in 19 (67.8% children and were associated with a prolonged recovery time (49.4±11.9 versus 29.7± 10.8 min for non-agitated children; p<0.001. Factors positively associated with emergence delirium included younger age (p = 0.01, OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.2-8.6 and moderate and severe anxiety prior to induction (p <0.001, OR 5.6, 95% CI 2.3-13.0. Complications of emergence delirium included intravenous line removal (n = 1, and surgical site bleeding (n = 3. Conclusion: Children of younger age with greater preoperative anxiety are at increased risk of developing emergence delirium following general anesthesia with sevoflurane. The overall incidence of emergence delirium was 19%.

  12. Post-operative benefits of animal-assisted therapy in pediatric surgery: a randomised study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Calcaterra

    Full Text Available Interest in animal-assisted therapy has been fuelled by studies supporting the many health benefits. The purpose of this study was to better understand the impact of an animal-assisted therapy program on children response to stress and pain in the immediate post-surgical period.Forty children (3-17 years were enrolled in the randomised open-label, controlled, pilot study. Patients were randomly assigned to the animal-assisted therapy-group (n = 20, who underwent a 20 min session with an animal-assisted therapy dog, after surgery or the standard-group (n = 20, standard postoperative care. The study variables were determined in each patient, independently of the assigned group, by a researcher unblinded to the patient's group. The outcomes of the study were to define the neurological, cardiovascular and endocrinological impact of animal-assisted therapy in response to stress and pain. Electroencephalogram activity, heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, cerebral prefrontal oxygenation, salivary cortisol levels and the faces pain scale were considered as outcome measures.After entrance of the dog faster electroencephalogram diffuse beta-activity (> 14 Hz was reported in all children of the animal-assisted therapy group; in the standard-group no beta-activity was recorded (100% vs 0%, p<0.001. During observation, some differences in the time profile between groups were observed for heart rate (test for interaction p = 0.018, oxygen saturation (test for interaction p = 0.06 and cerebral oxygenation (test for interaction p = 0.09. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were influenced by animal-assisted therapy, though a higher variability in diastolic pressure was observed. Salivary cortisol levels did not show different behaviours over time between groups (p=0.70. Lower pain perception was noted in the animal-assisted group in comparison with the standard-group (p = 0.01.Animal-assisted therapy facilitated rapid recovery in vigilance and

  13. Presurgical chemotherapy compared with immediate surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy for nonmetastatic osteosarcoma: Pediatric Oncology Group Study POG-8651.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorin, Allen M; Schwartzentruber, Douglas J; Devidas, Meenakshi; Gebhardt, Mark C; Ayala, Alberto G; Harris, Michael B; Helman, Lee J; Grier, Holcombe E; Link, Michael P

    2003-04-15

    Successful therapeutic interventions to prevent disease progression in patients with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma have included surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy. Presurgical chemotherapy has been advocated for these patients because of putative improvement in event-free survival (EFS). The advantages of presurgical chemotherapy include early administration of systemic chemotherapy, shrinkage of primary tumor, and pathologic identification of risk groups. The theoretic disadvantage is that it exposes a large tumor burden to marginally effective chemotherapy. The contribution of chemotherapy and surgery timing has not been tested rigorously. Between 1986 and 1993, we conducted a prospective trial in patients with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma who were assigned randomly to immediate surgery or presurgical chemotherapy. Except for the timing of surgery (week 0 or 10), patients received 44 weeks of identical combination chemotherapy that included high-dose methotrexate with leucovorin rescue, doxorubicin, cisplatin, bleomycin, cyclophosphamide, and dactinomycin. One hundred six patients were enrolled onto this study. Six were excluded from analysis. Of the remaining 100 patients, 45 were randomly assigned to immediate chemotherapy, and 55 were randomly assigned to immediate surgery. Sixty-seven patients remain disease-free. At 5 years, the projected EFS +/- SE is 65% +/- 6% (69% +/- 8% for immediate surgery and 61% +/- 8% for presurgical chemotherapy; P =.8). The treatment arms had similar incidence of limb salvage (55% for immediate surgery and 50% for presurgical chemotherapy). Chemotherapy was effective in both treatment groups. There was no advantage in EFS for patients given presurgical chemotherapy.

  14. Pediatric cardiac surgery: a challenge and outcome analysis of the Guatemala effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Wyss, Juan R; Veshti, Altin; Veras, Oscar; Gaitán, Guillermo A; O'Connell, Mauricio; Mack, Ricardo A; Calvimontes, Gonzalo; Garcia, Flor; Hidalgo, Amilcar; Reyes, Alfredo; Castañeda, Aldo R

    2009-01-01

    A large underserved population of children with congenital cardiac malformation (CCM) exists in many developing countries. In recent years, several strategies have been implemented to supplement this need. These strategies include transferring children to first-world countries for surgical care or the creation of local pediatric cardiovascular surgical programs. In 1997, an effort was made to create a comprehensive pediatric cardiac care program in Guatemala. The objective of this study is to examine the outcome analysis of the Guatemala effort. The goals of our new and first pediatric cardiac care program were to: 1) provide diagnosis and treatment to all children with a CCM in Guatemala; 2) train of local staff surgeons, 3) established a foundation locally and in the United States in 1997 to serve as a fundraising instrument to acquire equipment and remodeling of the pediatric cardiac unit and also to raise funds to pay the hospital for the almost exclusively poor pediatric cardiac patients. The staff now includes 3 surgeons from Guatemala, trained by the senior surgeon (A.R.C.), seven pediatric cardiologists, 3 intensivists, and 2 anesthesiologists, as well as intensive care and ward nurses, respiratory therapists, echocardiography technicians, and support personnel. The cardiovascular program expanded in 2005 to 2 cardiac operating rooms, 1 cardiac catheterization laboratory, 1 cardiac echo lab, 4 outpatients clinics a 6-bed intensive care unit and a 4-bed stepdown unit, a 20 bed general ward (2 beds/room) and a genetics laboratory. Our center has become a referral center for children from Central America. A total of 2,630 surgical procedures were performed between February 1997 and December 2007, increasing the number of operations each year. Postoperative complication occurred in 523 of 2,630 procedures (20%). A late follow-up study was conducted of all the patients operated from 1997 to 2005. Late mortality was 2.7%. Development of a sustainable pediatric

  15. Acute traumatic posterior fracture dislocation of the elbow in pediatric patients: impact of surgery time and associated fractures on outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgili, Fuat; Dikmen, Goksel; Baş, Ali; Asma, Ali; Batibay, Sefa G; Şirikçi, Murat; Atalar, Ata Can

    2016-09-01

    This study assessed the effect of the time interval from initial injury to surgery and the presence of associated fracture on functional outcomes after acute posterior elbow fracture dislocation. Twenty-six pediatric patients were evaluated with respect to operation time point (within 24 h vs. later) and associated fracture retrospectively. The Mayo Elbow Performance Index (MEPI) score was used to assess functional results. The MEPI score was 91 (80-100) in patients with one associated fracture and 83 (75-95) (P=0.02) in patients with more than one associated fracture. The MEPI score in patients treated within 24 h was 90.3 (75-95) and in those treated later than 24 h, it was 88.6 (75-100) (P=0.6). Treatment time (within 24 h vs. later) does not affect outcomes, but increasing numbers of associated injuries affect outcomes negatively. Level of study: Level IV case series.

  16. Perioperative management for pediatric transoral surgery%儿童经口手术的围手术期处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建华; 夏虹; 尹庆水; 马向阳; 艾福志; 戴建强; 邓小玲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore perioperative management for transoral surgery in children, and to reduce the incidence of postoperative complications. Methods From March 2007 to December 2012, 18 children with upper cervical diseases underwent transoral surgery and were received perioperative management in Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command. Postoperative spinal cord functional restoration, decompression and pharyngolaryngeal wound healing were observed. Results Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores and cervicomedullary angle (CMA) were improved from preoperative (9.1 ± 1.5), (135 ± 14)° to postoperative (14.5 ± 2.1) and (156 ± 10)° respectively, the differences had statistical significance (P <0.05). No incision infection had happened, and wound healing was obtained in 8-10 d in all children. Conclusion Perioperative management including thorough preoperative examinations and evaluations, strict perioperative mouth care, intensive postoperative airway management and early nutrition support, could reduce incidence of postoperative complications effectively for pediatric transoral surgery, ensure safty of surgery and improve clinical effects.%目的:探讨儿童经口手术的围手术期处理方法,降低术后并发症发生率。方法对2007年3月至2012年12月广州军区广州总医院骨科医院手术治疗的18例儿童上颈椎疾患进行围手术期处理,观察患儿术后脊髓功能恢复和压迫改善情况,以及咽喉部切口愈合情况。结果日本骨科学会(JOA)评分由术前的(9.1±1.5)分改善为术后的(14.5±2.1)分,脑干延髓角(CMA)由术前的(135±14)°改善为术后的(156±10)°,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05)。无一例出现伤口感染,切口于8~10 d内愈合。结论采取周密的术前检查和评估,实施严格的围术期口腔护理,加强术后气道管理和早期营养支持,可有效降低儿童经口手术术后并发症

  17. Ergonomics in Laparoscopic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Supe Avinash; Kulkarni Gaurav; Supe Pradnya

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery provides patients with less painful surgery but is more demanding for the surgeon. The increased technological complexity and sometimes poorly adapted equipment have led to increased complaints of surgeon fatigue and discomfort during laparoscopic surgery. Ergonomic integration and suitable laparoscopic operating room environment are essential to improve efficiency, safety, and comfort for the operating team. Understanding ergonomics can not only make life of surgeon comf...

  18. Ergonomics in laparoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supe Avinash

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic surgery provides patients with less painful surgery but is more demanding for the surgeon. The increased technological complexity and sometimes poorly adapted equipment have led to increased complaints of surgeon fatigue and discomfort during laparoscopic surgery. Ergonomic integration and suitable laparoscopic operating room environment are essential to improve efficiency, safety, and comfort for the operating team. Understanding ergonomics can not only make life of surgeon comfortable in the operating room but also reduce physical strains on surgeon.

  19. General surgery career resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsee, Ana M; Ross, Sharona B; Gantt, Nancy L; Kichler, Kandace; Hollands, Celeste

    2013-11-01

    General surgery residency training can lead to a rewarding career in general surgery and serve as the foundation for careers in several surgical subspecialties. It offers broad-based training with exposure to the cognitive and technical aspects of several surgical specialties and prepares graduating residents for a wide range of career paths. This career development resource discusses the training aspects of general surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The pediatric surgery workforce in low- and middle-income countries: problems and priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswami, Sanjay; Nwomeh, Benedict C; Ameh, Emmanuel A

    2016-02-01

    Most of the world is in a surgical workforce crisis. While a lack of human resources is only one component of the myriad issues affecting surgical care in resource-poor regions, it is arguably the most consequential. This article examines the current state of the pediatric surgical workforce in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) and the reasons for the current shortfalls. We also note progress that has been made in capacity building and discuss priorities going forward. The existing literature on this subject has naturally focused on regions with the greatest workforce needs, particularly sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). However, wherever possible we have included workforce data and related literature from LMICs worldwide. The pediatric surgeon is of course critically dependent on multi-disciplinary teams. Surgeons in high-income countries (HICs) often take for granted the ready availability of excellent anesthesia providers, surgically trained nurses, radiologists, pathologists, and neonatologists among many others. While the need exists to examine all of these disciplines and their contribution to the delivery of surgical services for children in LMICs, for the purposes of this review, we will focus primarily on the role of the pediatric surgeon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Crohn's disease surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, Zdeněk; Marek, Filip; Válek, Vlastimil A; Bartušek, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Surgery of Crohns disease is an important part of the general treatment algorithm. The role of surgery is changing with the development of conservative procedures. The recent years have seen the return to early treatment of patients with Crohns disease. Given the character of the disease and its intestinal symptoms, a specific approach to these patients is necessary, especially regarding the correct choice of surgery. The paper focuses on the luminal damage of the small and large intestine including complications of the disease. We describe the individual indications for a surgical solution, including the choice of anastomosis or multiple / repeated surgeries.

  2. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553......, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems....

  3. Hyperoxaluria and Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplin, John R.

    2007-04-01

    Bariatric surgery as a means to treat obesity is becoming increasingly common in the United States. An early form of bariatric surgery, the jejunoileal bypass, had to be abandoned in 1980 due to numerous complications, including hyperoxaluria and kidney stones. Current bariatric procedures have not been systematically evaluated to determine if they cause hyperoxaluria. Presented here are data showing that hyperoxaluria is the major metabolic abnormality in patients with bariatric surgery who form kidney stones. Further studies are needed to assess the prevalence of hyperoxaluria in all patients with bariatric surgery.

  4. Complications of strabismus surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott E Olitsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All surgeries carry risks of complications, and there is no way to avoid ever having a complication. Strabismus surgery is no different in this regard. There are methods to reduce the risk of a complication during or after surgery, and these steps should always be taken. When a complication occurs, it is important to first recognize it and then manage it appropriately to allow for the best outcome possible. This article will discuss some of the more common and/or most devastating complications that can occur during or after strabismus surgery as well as thoughts on how to avoid them and manage them should they happen.

  5. Integrated bariatric surgery residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eltorai AE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adam EM Eltorai Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, RI, USA Abstract: Obesity is a major public health concern. Given its lasting efficacy for improving obesity and obesity-related diseases, bariatric surgery is an increasingly common treatment option. As the implementation of the Affordable Care Act progresses, the impending physician shortage will become more severe. Thus there will be an even greater need for doctors specialized in the management and treatment of obese patients. The development of integrated bariatric surgery residency programs could be considered and is discussed herein. Keywords: obesity, bariatric surgery, integrated residency, surgery education

  6. Surgery center joint ventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasa, R J

    1999-01-01

    Surgery centers have been accepted as a cost effective, patient friendly vehicle for delivery of quality ambulatory care. Hospitals and physician groups also have made them the vehicles for coming together. Surgery centers allow hospitals and physicians to align incentives and share benefits. It is one of the few types of health care businesses physicians can own without anti-fraud and abuse violation. As a result, many surgery center ventures are now jointly owned by hospitals and physician groups. This article outlines common structures that have been used successfully to allow both to own and govern surgery centers.

  7. Successful use of levosimendan as a primary inotrope in pediatric cardiac surgery: An observational study in 110 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Khantwal Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Levosimendan-based inotropic regime offers optimized cardiac output with a well-controlled heart rate and a low incidence of arrhythmias in patients undergoing all categories of congenital heart surgeries.

  8. Less extensive surgery compared to extensive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauszus, Finn F; Petersen, Astrid C; Neumann, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the outcome of adult granulosa cell tumor (AGCT) with respect to initial clinical findings, methods of surgery, and perioperative treatment. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective follow-up study. Setting: All hospitals in Jutland. Sample: 163 women diagnosed with AGCT. Methods: Follow......-up by hospital data files, general practitioner, death certificate, and autopsy report. Revision of histopathology by a single pathologist. Main outcome measures: Survival and relapse by clinical data, stage, and type of surgery. RESULTS: The incidence of AGCT was 1.37 per year per 100,000 women (95% CI: 1.08, 1...... in postmenopausal women was associated with surgery including hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy (psurgery. Endometrial carcinoma was found 138 times (95% CI: 48, 275) more prevalent than the expected rate. CONCLUSION...

  9. Perioperative management of facial bipartition surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caruselli M

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Marco Caruselli,1 Michael Tsapis,1,2 Fabrice Ughetto,1 Gregoire Pech-Gourg,3 Dario Galante,4 Olivier Paut1 1Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, La Timone Children’s Hospital, 2Pediatric Transport Team, SAMU 13, La Timone Hospital, 3Pediatric Neurosurgery Unit, La Timone Children’s Hospital, Marseille, France; 4Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, University Hospital Ospedali Riuniti of Foggia, Foggia, Italy Abstract: Severe craniofacial malformations, such as Crouzon, Apert, Saethre-Chotzen, and Pfeiffer syndromes, are very rare conditions (one in 50,000/100,000 live births that often require corrective surgery. Facial bipartition is the more radical corrective surgery. It is a high-risk intervention and needs complex perioperative management and a multidisciplinary approach. Keywords: craniofacial surgery, facial bipartition surgery, craniofacial malformations, pediatric anesthesia

  10. Anesthesia and the Developing Brain: Relevance to the Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Wise-Faberowski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetic neurotoxicity has been a hot topic in anesthesia for the past decade. It is of special interest to pediatric anesthesiologists. A subgroup of children potentially at greater risk for anesthetic neurotoxicity, based on a prolonged anesthetic exposure early in development, are those children receiving anesthesia for surgical repair of congenital heart disease. These children have a known risk of neurologic deficit after cardiopulmonary bypass for surgical repair of congenital heart disease. Yet, the type of anesthesia used has not been considered as a potential etiology for their neurologic deficits. These children not only receive prolonged anesthetic exposure during surgical repair, but also receive repeated anesthetic exposures during a critical period of brain development. Their propensity to abnormal brain development, as a result of congenital heart disease, may modify their risk of anesthetic neurotoxicity. This review article provides an overview of anesthetic neurotoxicity from the perspective of a pediatric cardiac anesthesiologist and provides insight into basic science and clinical investigations as it relates to this unique group of children who have been studied over several decades for their risk of neurologic injury.

  11. [Haemorrhage after thyroid surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swirta, Jarosław S; Barczyński, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Haemorrhage after thyroid surgery is rare, but if it occurs it is a life-threatening condition necessitating emergency surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate prevalence and risk factors of haemorrhage after thyroid surgery. A retrospective analysis was undertaken in a group of 8931 consecutive patients with various thyroid diseases treated in 2004-2013 at our institution. Potential risk factors for postoperative haemorrhage after thyroid surgery were analysed using logistic regression model. Haemorrhage after thyroid operation necessitating emergency surgery occurred in 40 (0.45%) of 8931 patients. None of the patients died within the perioperative period. Bleeding occurred within first 24 hours following surgery in 38 (95%) patients, and in the remaining 2 (5%) patients in more than 24 hours after initial surgery. The following risk factors for bleeding after thyroid operation were identified: male sex (OR 3.618; 1.762-7.430; p or = 70 years (OR 3.052; 1.275-7.304; p = 0.012), surgery for hyperthyroidism (OR 2.873; 1.511-5.462; p = 0.001), smoking (OR 2.855; 1.502-5.428; p = 0.001), subtotal thyroidectomy in contrast to total thyroidectomy or lobectomy (OR 2.853; 1.356-6.004; p=0.006), and thyroid operation undertaken by resident in training in general surgery (OR 2.596; 1.393-4.837; p = 0.003). Haemorrhage after thyroid operation necessitating emergency surgical intervention occurs most frequently within first 24 hour following surgery. Hence, for safety reasons a minimum of 24-hour hospital stay is recommended in all patients with risk factors for postoperative bleeding after thyroid operation. Quality monitoring of thyroid surgery should include also risk factors for postoperative bleeding.

  12. Accessibility and quality of online information for pediatric orthopaedic surgery fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Austin R; Murphy, Robert F; Spence, David D; Kelly, Derek M; Warner, William C; Sawyer, Jeffrey R

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric orthopaedic fellowship applicants commonly use online-based resources for information on potential programs. Two primary sources are the San Francisco Match (SF Match) database and the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) database. We sought to determine the accessibility and quality of information that could be obtained by using these 2 sources. The online databases of the SF Match and POSNA were reviewed to determine the availability of embedded program links or external links for the included programs. If not available in the SF Match or POSNA data, Web sites for listed programs were located with a Google search. All identified Web sites were analyzed for accessibility, content volume, and content quality. At the time of online review, 50 programs, offering 68 positions, were listed in the SF Match database. Although 46 programs had links included with their information, 36 (72%) of them simply listed http://www.sfmatch.org as their unique Web site. Ten programs (20%) had external links listed, but only 2 (4%) linked directly to the fellowship web page. The POSNA database does not list any links to the 47 programs it lists, which offer 70 positions. On the basis of a Google search of the 50 programs listed in the SF Match database, web pages were found for 35. Of programs with independent web pages, all had a description of the program and 26 (74%) described their application process. Twenty-nine (83%) listed research requirements, 22 (63%) described the rotation schedule, and 12 (34%) discussed the on-call expectations. A contact telephone number and/or email address was provided by 97% of programs. Twenty (57%) listed both the coordinator and fellowship director, 9 (26%) listed the coordinator only, 5 (14%) listed the fellowship director only, and 1 (3%) had no contact information given. The SF Match and POSNA databases provide few direct links to fellowship Web sites, and individual program Web sites either do not exist or do not

  13. Diagnosis and Treatment of Pediatric Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis and the Implications for Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardee, Perrie E.; Lavine, Joel E.; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the diagnosis, risk factors, prevalence, pathogenesis and treatment of pediatric nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH is a progressive form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children. The factors that account for differences between children with NASH versus children with milder forms of NAFLD are unclear. The diagnosis of NASH requires interpretation of liver histology because no noninvasive markers predict the presence or severity of NASH. There is no proven treatment for NASH. Several clinical trials for NAFLD are in progress, however, clinical trials focusing on NASH are needed. Heightened physician awareness of NAFLD, NASH, and associated risk factors is important to identify and treat affected children. PMID:19573756

  14. Effects of He-Ne regional irradiation on 53 cases in the field of pediatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing-Zhen

    1991-06-01

    We report the clinical observation of the effect on 53 surgical cases with Helium-Neon laser local irradiation therapy. Of those cases 15 were suffered from chronic and acute infection, 5 were traumatic, 15 of hemangioma had been treated by solid CO freezing therapy and sclerosing injection previously. 18 cases were received incisional irradiation postoperatively. All showed remarkable results. There were no infection, and the healing process was shortened by Helium-Neon laser local irradiation for 2-3 days. The results showed that the curative rate was 88.68%, the marked effective rate was 9.43%, and the fair was 1.89$. We emphasize that because of the characteristic of anatomical physiology and histology in children. so the result in children is better than in adults. Thus, we strongly recommend using Helium-Laser local irradiation in surgical pediatric field. It is reliable, safe, painless, convenient, economic, and no side effects at all.

  15. [Robotic surgery in gynecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorba, Roland

    2012-06-24

    Minimally invasive surgery has revolutionized gynecological interventions over the past 30 years. The introduction of the da Vinci robotic surgery in 2005 has resulted in large changes in surgical management. The robotic platform allows less experienced laparoscopic surgeons to perform more complex procedures. It can be utilized mainly in general gynecology and reproductive gynecology. The robot is being increasingly used for procedures such as hysterectomy, myomectomy, adnexal surgery, and tubal anastomosis. In urogynecology, the robot is being utilized for sacrocolopexy as well. In the field of gynecologic oncology, the robot is being increasingly used for hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy in oncologic diseases. Despite the rapid and widespread adaption of robotic surgery in gynecology, there are no randomized trials comparing its efficacy and safety to other traditional surgical approaches. This article presents the development, technical aspects and indications of robotic surgery in gynecology, based on the previously published reviews. Robotic surgery can be highly advantageous with the right amount of training, along with appropriate patient selection. Patients will have less blood loss, less post-operative pain, faster recovery, and fewer complications compared to open surgery and laparoscopy. However, until larger randomized control trials are completed which report long-term outcomes, robotic surgery cannot be stated to have priority over other surgical methods.

  16. Contemporary endodontic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Richard; Torabinejad, Mahmoud

    2004-06-01

    During the past decade, endodontics has seen a dramatic shift in the application of periradicular surgery and the role it plays in endodontic treatment. With the introduction of enhanced magnification, periradicular ultrasonics and other associative technologies, teeth that might otherwise be extracted now have a chance for retention. This article describes the role of these advances in contemporary endodontic surgery.

  17. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on many aspects of life. Following are some of the conditions that may indicate the need for corrective jaw surgery: Difficulty chewing, or biting food Difficulty swallowing Chronic jaw or jaw joint (TMJ) ...

  18. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    In coronary artery disease (CAD), the arteries that supply blood and oxygen to your heart muscle grow hardened and narrowed. You may try ... these treatments don't help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new ...

  19. [Cognitive deterioration after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmetz, J.; Rasmussen, L.S.

    2008-01-01

    Delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction are important and common complications after surgery. Risk factors are first of all increasing age and type of surgery, whereas the type of anaesthesia does not seem to play an important role. Mortality is higher among patients with cognitive...

  20. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available AAOMS - Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We ... may require one or more surgeries depending on the extent of the repair needed. Click here to ...

  1. ROBOTIC SURGERY: BIOETHICAL ASPECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    SIQUEIRA-BATISTA, Rodrigo; SOUZA, Camila Ribeiro; MAIA, Polyana Mendes; SIQUEIRA, Sávio Lana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The use of robots in surgery has been increasingly common today, allowing the emergence of numerous bioethical issues in this area. Objective: To present review of the ethical aspects of robot use in surgery. Method: Search in Pubmed, SciELO and Lilacs crossing the headings "bioethics", "surgery", "ethics", "laparoscopy" and "robotic". Results: Of the citations obtained, were selected 17 articles, which were used for the preparation of the article. It contains brief presentation on robotics, its inclusion in health and bioethical aspects, and the use of robots in surgery. Conclusion: Robotic surgery is a reality today in many hospitals, which makes essential bioethical reflection on the relationship between health professionals, automata and patients. PMID:28076489

  2. Systematic review of level 1 evidence for laparoscopic pediatric surgery: do our procedures comply with the requirements of evidence-based medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemann, Jens; Ure, Benno M

    2013-12-01

    Laparoscopic techniques have evolved quickly in recent years and are regarded as standard procedures in pediatric surgery today. However, most studies comparing laparoscopic operations with the corresponding open procedure do not reach a high level of evidence according to the criteria of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. For evidence Level 1a, a meta-analysis (MA) of different randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is required. For evidence Level 1b, at least one RCT is required. The aim of our study was to evaluate the availability of Level 1 studies comparing laparoscopic procedures with the corresponding open operation in pediatric surgery. Systematic review of clinical Level 1 studies using PubMed. All MA and RCT were identified and individually reviewed. Only studies comparing pediatric laparoscopic procedures with the corresponding open operation were included. RCTs included in MA were only individually analyzed if they focused on additional endpoints. Endpoints of the study were advantages and disadvantages of laparoscopy compared with the open operation. A total of 20 manuscripts met the inclusion criteria (9 MA and 11 RCT). Studies providing evidence Level 1a were identified for five types of laparoscopic procedures (laparoscopic appendectomy, inguinal hernia repair, orchidopexy, pyloromyotomy, and varicocelectomy). Studies providing evidence Level 1b were identified for two types of laparoscopic procedures (fundoplication and pyeloplasty). The advantages of laparoscopy were less wound infections, ileus and postoperative pain (appendectomy), less retching (fundoplication), lower incidence of metachronous inguinal hernia, shorter hospital stay (appendectomy, orchiopexy, and pyeloplasty), and shorter time to full feeds (pyloromyotomy). Studies providing evidence Level 1 are only available for seven laparoscopic procedures in pediatric surgery. Effort has to be made to extend the existing Level 1 evidence and to gain high level evidence for further

  3. SURGERY AND CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY JOURNALS ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Schanaider

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze critically the effectiveness and value of bibliometric indicators in journals of Surgery or Cardiovacular Surgery in the context of the postgraduate programs of CAPES Medicine III. Methods: A sampling with 16 academic programs and one professional master of Medicine III, encompassing the General and Digestive System Surgery, Cardiovascular Surgery and Multidisciplinary courses with such contents, was evaluated. Thomson Reuters/ISI (JCR, Elsevier/Scopus (SJR, and also Scielo databases were used. Results: Only in seven programs, the teachers had an average of Qualis A1 articles greater than the others strata. Eleven journals in the surgical area are in stratum A1 (5% and it reaches 25% in Cardiovascular Surgery. Among the six journals with the largest number of publications Qualis A1 in area Medicine III, five are from non-specific areas. The Acta Cirúrgica Brasileira represented 58% of the publications in the stratum A2. There are some obstacles in the Qualis classification with little uniformity among the Medicine areas I, II and III. Conclusions: A permanent committee should be set to update the Qualis, composed by the three medical areas. It should be considered using other index databases and the unification of the Qualis criteria for journals in medicine. Rating criteria of multi and transdisciplinary journals need to be reviewed. It is essential an institutional financial support for national journals chosen by peers aiming to provide a full computerization process and a professional reviewer of the English language, in order to increase the impact factor.

  4. Cerebral blood flow during cardiopulmonary bypass in pediatric cardiac surgery: the role of transcranial Doppler – a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders Stephen P

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound (TCD is a sensitive, real time tool for monitoring cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV. This technique is fast, accurate, reproducible and noninvasive. In the setting of congenital heart surgery, TCD finds application in the evaluation of cerebral blood flow variations during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. Methodology We performed a search on human studies published on the MEDLINE using the keyword "trans cranial Doppler" crossed with "pediatric cardiac surgery" AND "cardio pulmonary by pass", OR deep hypothermic cardiac arrest", OR "neurological monitoring". Discussion Current scientific evidence suggests a good correlation between changes in cbral blood flow and mean cerebral artery (MCA blood flow velocity. The introduction of Doppler technology has allowed an accurate monitorization of cerebral blood flow (CBF during circulatory arrest and low-flow CPB. TCD has also been utilized in detecting cerebral emboli, improper cannulation or cross clamping of aortic arch vessels. Limitations of TCD routine utilization are represented by the need of a learning curve and some experience by the operators, as well as the need of implementing CBF informations with, for example, data on brain tissue oxygen delivery and consumption. Conclusion In this light, TCD plays an essential role in multimodal neurological monitorization during CPB (Near Infrared Spectroscopy, TCD, processed electro encephalography that, according to recent studies, can help to significantly improve neurological outcome after cardiac surgery in neonates and pediatric patients.

  5. Cancer Surgery: Physically Removing Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in cancer diagnosis, staging, treatment and symptom relief. Robotic surgery. In robotic surgery, the surgeon sits away from the operating table ... to maneuver surgical tools to perform the operation. Robotic surgery helps the surgeon operate in hard-to-reach ...

  6. Gamma knife surgery for craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, D; Steiner, M; Steiner, L

    1995-01-01

    We present our results of Gamma Knife surgery for craniopharyngioma in nine patients. The current status of surgery, radiation therapy, intracavitary instillation of radionucleides and Gamma Knife surgery in the management of craniopharyngiomas is discussed.

  7. Preparing for Breast Reconstruction Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Breast Reconstruction Surgery Preparing for Breast Reconstruction Surgery Your surgeon can help you know what to ... The plan for follow-up Costs Understanding your surgery costs Health insurance policies often cover most or ...

  8. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intracraneal en Espanol. STORE Shop the IHRF Store Medication and Surgery Medication and Surgery Both drugs and surgery are used ... to treat the headache that accompanies chronic IH. Medications for chronic headache like tricyclic anti-depressants, beta- ...

  9. Tests and visits before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before surgery - tests; Before surgery - doctor visits ... Pre-op is the time before your surgery. It means "before operation." During this time, you will meet with one of your doctors. This may be your surgeon or primary care ...

  10. Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery. Cleft Lip / Palate and Craniofacial Surgery This type of surgery is ... the carefully orchestrated, multiple-stage correctional program for cleft lip and palate patients. The goal is to help restore the ...

  11. Single port laparoscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Henrik; Istre, Olav

    2012-01-01

    LESS, or laparo-endoscopic single site surgery, is a promising new method in minimally invasive surgery. An increasing number of surgical procedures are being performed using this technique, however, its large-scale adoption awaits results of prospective randomized controlled studies confirming...... potential benefits. Theoretically, cosmetic outcomes, postoperative pain and complication rates could be improved with use of single site surgery. This study describes introduction of the method in a private hospital in Denmark, in which 40 patients have been treated for benign gynecologic conditions...

  12. Physical Therapy and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Onate, Rafael; Ward, Michael M.; Kerr, Gail S.

    2012-01-01

    Physical therapy and orthopedic surgery are important components in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Supervised physical therapy is more effective that individual or unsupervised exercise in improving symptoms, but controlled trials suggest than combined inpatient and outpatient therapy provides the greatest improvement. Recommendations for exercise are universal, but the best types and sequence of therapies are not known. Total hip replacement is the surgery most commonly performed for AS, with good long-term implant survival. Heterotopic ossification may occur no more frequently after hip replacement in patients with AS than in patients with other diseases. Corrective spinal surgery is rarely performed and requires specialized centers and experienced surgeons. PMID:22543536

  13. Surveys on surgery theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cappell, Sylvain; Rosenberg, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Surgery theory, the basis for the classification theory of manifolds, is now about forty years old. There have been some extraordinary accomplishments in that time, which have led to enormously varied interactions with algebra, analysis, and geometry. Workers in many of these areas have often lamented the lack of a single source that surveys surgery theory and its applications. Indeed, no one person could write such a survey. The sixtieth birthday of C. T. C. Wall, one of the leaders of the founding generation of surgery theory, provided an opportunity to rectify the situation and produce a

  14. Surveys on surgery theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cappell, Sylvain; Rosenberg, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Surgery theory, the basis for the classification theory of manifolds, is now about forty years old. The sixtieth birthday (on December 14, 1996) of C.T.C. Wall, a leading member of the subject''s founding generation, led the editors of this volume to reflect on the extraordinary accomplishments of surgery theory as well as its current enormously varied interactions with algebra, analysis, and geometry. Workers in many of these areas have often lamented the lack of a single source surveying surgery theory and its applications. Because no one person could write such a survey, the editors ask

  15. Standing equine sinus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakzai, Safia Z; Dixon, Padraic M

    2014-04-01

    Trephination of the equine sinuses is a common surgical procedure in sedated standing horses. Standing sinus flap surgery has become increasingly popular in equine referral hospitals and offers several advantages over sinusotomy performed under general anesthesia, including reduced patient-associated risks and costs; less intraoperative hemorrhage, allowing better visualization of the operative site; and allows surgeons to take their time. Other minimally invasive surgical procedures include sinoscopic surgery, balloon sinuplasty, and transnasal laser sinonasal fenestration. Despite the procedure used, appropriate indications for surgery, good patient selection, and familiarity with regional anatomy and surgical techniques are imperative for good results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Safe Surgery Trainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-15

    CDRL A001 For: Safe Surgery Trainer Prime Contract: N00014-14-C-0066 For the Period July 1, 2015 to July 31, 2015 Submitted: 15 Aug 2015...DATE 15 AUG 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2015 to 31-07-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Safe Surgery Trainer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b... Surgery Trainer ONR N00014-14-C-0066 Unclassified Unclassified Use or disclosure of the data contained on this page is subject to the restriction

  17. Potential Usefulness of 99mTc-DMSA for Radio-Guided Surgery in Pediatric Renal Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familiari, Demetrio; Di Franco, Davide; Cacciaguerra, Sebastiano; Ruggeri, Antonella; Russo, Simona; Fornito, Maria Concetta

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of an ectopic/hypoplastic kidney removed by radio-guided surgery. A 7-year-old girl, with a history of vaginal drainage of urine, underwent renal scintigraphy with Tc-DMSA. SPECT/CT revealed a focal uptake in the pelvis, corresponding to hypoplastic kidney as confirmed by MRI. Based on SPECT/CT findings, the patient underwent laparoscopic surgery, using Tc-DMSA scan to help the surgeon to detect the small ectopic kidney. Intraoperatory histological report confirmed the renal origin of the specimen.

  18. Development of the 24/7 Nurse Practitioner Model on the Inpatient Pediatric General Surgery Service at a Large Tertiary Care Children's Hospital and Associated Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejtar, Marketa; Ranstrom, Lee; Allcox, Christina

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) have been providing high-quality and safe patient care for a few decades, and evidence showing the extent of their impact is emerging. This article describes the implementation of a 24/7 NP patient care model on an inpatient pediatric general surgery service in a tertiary free-standing Children's Hospital in the Northeastern United States. The literature shows that there is limited evidence regarding NP models of care and their effect on patient outcomes. In response to policy changes leading to reduction of resident work hours and a more acute and complex inpatient pediatric general surgery patient population, our existing NP model evolved into a 24/7 NP Model in June 2011. The results from two quality improvement projects showed positive registered nurse and attending surgeon staff satisfaction with the 24/7 NP Model of care and a decreased trend of unplanned intensive care unit patient transfers after the 24/7 NP Model implementation. These findings further support the evidence in the literature that NPs provide safe and quality patient care. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pediatric Circulatory System of Guardianship After Open-heart Surgery%小儿心内直视手术后循环系统的监护

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董云芳

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the analysis of pediatric open-heart surgery treatment of posterior circulation system monitoring measures. Methods Selected 64 cases in January 2014 to December 2014 in our hospital during open-heart surgery treatment,after surgery to give close monitoring to the circulatory system. Results In 64 cases,63 cases recovered and discharged,only 1 cases was death because of the low cardiac. Conclusion Pediatric heart surgery treatment,strict monitoring circulation system is the key to ensure the operation curative effect,help children better in disease and rehabilitation.%目的:研究分析小儿心内直视手术治疗后循环系统的监护措施。方法选择2014年1月~2014年12月期间在我院进行心内直视手术治疗的64例患儿,在术后对循环系统给予严密监护。结果本组64例患儿中,63例患儿痊愈出院,仅1例患儿因为低心排而死亡。结论小儿心脏手术治疗后,严格监护循环系统是确保手术疗效的关键,有助于患儿疾病的好转及康复。

  20. [Bariatric surgery. Would you undergo surgery again?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaina Landaluce, E; Díez Andrés, A; Navaridas Berganzo, A; Ruiz de Arcaute, I I

    2001-04-01

    The authors analyze the negative repercussions of morbid obesity; then they explain what baryatric surgery, a surgical technique employed with a high degree of success, consists of. They study the results, in terms of satisfaction, obtained from patients operated on in the Txagorritxu Hospital in Vitoria. The project on which this article is based was presented as a Main Project in a Course on Health Research Methodology, extension class section, "IDER", at the University of Alcalá and the University of Antioquia.

  1. About Hand Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... us eat, dress, write, earn a living, create art and do many other activities. To accomplish these ... 2009 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Definition developed by ASSH Council. Other Links CME Mission ...

  2. INDIRECT MICROLARYNGOSTROBOSCOPIC SURGERY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAHIEU, HF; DIKKERS, FG

    Detailed preoperative laryngostroboscopic examination is a prerequisite for phonosurgical correction of organic dysphonia. Although suspension microlaryngoscopic surgery has proved its value in the past, it excludes functional control during the removal of vocal fold swellings. Using an indirect

  3. American Board of Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... separate application is no longer required. The American Board of Surgery is an independent, nonprofit organization founded in 1937 to provide board certification to individuals who have met a defined ...

  4. Cosmetic surgery: medicolegal considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piras Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetic surgery is one of the two branches of plastic surgery. The characteristic of non-necessity of this surgical speciality implies an increased severity in the evaluation of the risk-benefit balance. Therefore, great care must be taken in providing all the information necessary in order to obtain valid consent to the intervention. We analyzed judgments concerning cosmetic surgery found in national legal databases. A document of National Bioethics Committee (CNB was also analyzed. Conclusion: The receipt of valid, informed consent is of absolute importance not only to legitimise the medical-surgical act, but it also represents the key element in the question concerning the existence of an obligation to achieve certain results/use of certain methods in the cosmetic surgery.

  5. Abdominal wall surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pregnancy. Skin and muscle cannot regain its normal tone. This can be a problem for very overweight people who lost a lot of weight. Tummy tuck is major surgery. It is important to read about the procedure before having it. ...

  6. Surgery for pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... using a tiny video camera) or using a robot depends on: The extent of the surgery The ... Procedure Meet with your doctor to make sure medical problems, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and ...

  7. Surgery for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage Cervical Cancer Treating Cervical Cancer Surgery for Cervical Cancer Many women with cervical cancer will have some ... Options for Cervical Cancer, by Stage More In Cervical Cancer About Cervical Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  8. Robotics in Colorectal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Allison; Steele, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, robotic surgery has developed from a futuristic dream to a real, widely used technology. Today, robotic platforms are used for a range of procedures and have added a new facet to the development and implementation of minimally invasive surgeries. The potential advantages are enormous, but the current progress is impeded by high costs and limited technology. However, recent advances in haptic feedback systems and single-port surgical techniques demonstrate a clear role for robotics and are likely to improve surgical outcomes. Although robotic surgeries have become the gold standard for a number of procedures, the research in colorectal surgery is not definitive and more work needs to be done to prove its safety and efficacy to both surgeons and patients. PMID:27746895

  9. INDIRECT MICROLARYNGOSTROBOSCOPIC SURGERY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAHIEU, HF; DIKKERS, FG

    1992-01-01

    Detailed preoperative laryngostroboscopic examination is a prerequisite for phonosurgical correction of organic dysphonia. Although suspension microlaryngoscopic surgery has proved its value in the past, it excludes functional control during the removal of vocal fold swellings. Using an indirect mic

  10. Septoplasty and Turbinate Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nose. Surgery on the septum can lead to stretching or injury to these nerves. This can lead ... a painless procedure that is performed in our office. A small endoscope is used to visualize the ...

  11. Ear surgery - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100016.htm Ear surgery - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Overview This image demonstrates normal appearance of the ears in relation to the face. Review Date 10/ ...

  12. Retrosternal thyroid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007558.htm Retrosternal thyroid surgery To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The thyroid gland is normally located at the front of ...

  13. Pain Medications After Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aspx?id=23897. Accessed Dec. 16, 2013. Winn HR. Youmans Neurological Surgery. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders ... Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a ...

  14. Ambulatory paediatric surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    operating time. Scarce nursing resources were also ... elective admission, treatment and discharge of a patient during the ... professional nurses and 5 auxiliary nurses, It has 2 fully ..... drawn, with the basic premise the provision of safe surgery.

  15. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the sleeve above and below the stain and sewing the cuff back onto the shortened sleeve. A ... because it requires a great deal of technical skill. Possible risks and side effects of lung surgery ...

  16. Carotid artery surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AHA/AANN/AANS/ACR/ASNR/CNS/SAIP/SCAI/SIR/SNIS/SVM/SVS guideline on the management of ... Interventions, Society of Interventional Radiology, Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery, Society for Vascular Medicine, and Society for Vascular ...

  17. Knee microfracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartilage regeneration - knee ... Three types of anesthesia may be used for knee arthroscopy surgery: Medicine to relax you, and shots of painkillers to numb the knee Spinal (regional) anesthesia General anesthesia (you will be ...

  18. Is day surgery safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majholm, Birgitte; Engbæk, J; Bartholdy, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Day surgery is expanding in several countries, and it is important to collect information about quality. The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and unanticipated hospital visits 0-30 days post-operatively in a large cohort.......Day surgery is expanding in several countries, and it is important to collect information about quality. The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and unanticipated hospital visits 0-30 days post-operatively in a large cohort....

  19. Complications of pancreatic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many diseases, including pancreatitis benign tumors and cancer, may require pancreas surgery. Pancreatic resection can lead to a prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer and even a potential chance for cure. However, the pancreatic surgery can result in complications, and high postoperative morbidity rates are still presence. This article reviews the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011, which involves the more common complications, their prevention and treatment.

  20. Future of cosmetic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert Alan

    2014-04-01

    Changes in cosmetic surgery will be driven by several key forces. The patient's self-image, and perceived place in society, will continue to drive patients to the cosmetic surgeon as well as to demand newer and better treatments. Technological advances, especially those based on an enhanced understanding of cellular and tissue physiology, promise enhanced tools other than the scalpel for the surgeon. Conceptual advances in our understanding of beauty and patient psychology will lead to a more integrative approach to cosmetic surgery.

  1. Physical Therapy and Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Valle-Onate, Rafael; Ward, Michael M.; Kerr, Gail S.

    2012-01-01

    Physical therapy and orthopedic surgery are important components in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Supervised physical therapy is more effective that individual or unsupervised exercise in improving symptoms, but controlled trials suggest than combined inpatient and outpatient therapy provides the greatest improvement. Recommendations for exercise are universal, but the best types and sequence of therapies are not known. Total hip replacement is the surgery most commonly perfor...

  2. Comparison of Cobra perilaryngeal airway (CobraPLA TM with flexible laryngeal mask airway in terms of device stability and ventilation characteristics in pediatric ophthalmic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani A Sunder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Supraglottic airway devices play an important role in ophthalmic surgery. The flexible laryngeal mask airway (LMA TM is generally the preferred airway device. However, there are no studies comparing it with the Cobra perilaryngeal airway (CobraPLA TM in pediatric ophthalmic procedures. Aims: To analyze the intraoperative device stability and ability to maintain normocarbia of CobraPLA TM and compare it to that with flexible LMA TM . Materials and Methods: Ninety children of American Society for Anesthesiologists physical status 1 and 2, aged 3-15 years scheduled for elective ophthalmic surgeries were randomly assigned to either the CobraPLA TM or the flexible LMA TM group. After placement of each airway device, oropharyngeal leak pressure (OLP was noted. Adequate seal of the devices was confirmed at an inspired pressure of 15 cm H 2 O and pressure-controlled ventilation was initiated. Device displacement was diagnosed if there was a change in capnograph waveform, audible or palpable gas leak, change in expired tidal volume to 6 kPa, or need to increase inspired pressure to >18 cm H 2 O to maintain normocarbia. Results: Demographic data, duration, and type of surgery in both the groups were similar. A higher incidence of intraoperative device displacement was noted with the CobraPLA TM in comparison to flexible LMA TM (P < 0.001. Incidence of displacement was higher in strabismus surgery (7/12. Insertion characteristics and ventilation parameters were comparable. The OLP was significantly higher in CobraPLA TM group (28 ± 6.8 cm H 2 O compared to the flexible LMA TM group (19.9 ± 4.5 cm H 2 O (P < 0.001. Higher surgeon dissatisfaction (65.9% was seen in the CobraPLA TM group. Conclusion: The high incidence of device displacement and surgeon dissatisfaction make CobraPLA TM a less favorable option than flexible LMA TM in ophthalmic surgery.

  3. Metabolic surgery: quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Rubio Herrera, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The impact of bariatric surgery beyond its effect on weight loss has entailed a change in the way of regarding it. The term metabolic surgery has become more popular to designate those interventions that aim at resolving diseases that have been traditionally considered as of exclusive medical management, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Recommendations for metabolic surgery have been largely addressed and discussed in worldwide meetings, but no definitive consensus has been reached yet. Rates of diabetes remission after metabolic surgery have been one of the most debated hot topics, with heterogeneity being a current concern. This review aims to identify and clarify controversies regarding metabolic surgery, by focusing on a critical analysis of T2D remission rates achieved with different bariatric procedures, and using different criteria for its definition. Indications for metabolic surgery for patients with T2D who are not morbidly obese are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Robotic surgery in gynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rooma Sinha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available FDA approved Da Vinci Surgical System in 2005 for gynecological surgery. It has been rapidly adopted and it has already assumed an important position at various centers where this is available. It comprises of three components: A surgeon′s console, a patient-side cart with four robotic arms and a high-definition three-dimensional (3D vision system. In this review we have discussed various robotic-assisted laparoscopic benign gynecological procedures like myomectomy, hysterectomy, endometriosis, tubal anastomosis and sacrocolpopexy. A PubMed search was done and relevant published studies were reviewed. Surgeries that can have future applications are also mentioned. At present most studies do not give significant advantage over conventional laparoscopic surgery in benign gynecological disease. However robotics do give an edge in more complex surgeries. The conversion rate to open surgery is lesser with robotic assistance when compared to laparoscopy. For myomectomy surgery, Endo wrist movement of robotic instrument allows better and precise suturing than conventional straight stick laparoscopy. The robotic platform is a logical step forward to laparoscopy and if cost considerations are addressed may become popular among gynecological surgeons world over.

  5. Photobiomodulation in laser surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Rong, Dong-Liang; Huang, Jin; Deng, Xiao-Yuan; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-01-01

    Laser surgery provides good exposure with clear operating fields and satisfactory preliminary functional results. In contrast to conventional excision, it was found that matrix metalloproteinases and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases -1 mRNA expression is higher, myofibroblasts appeared and disappeared slower in laser excision wounds. It has been suggested that the better anatomical and functional results achieved following laser cordectomy may be explained by the fact that such procedures result in better, more rapid healing processes to recover vocal cord for early glottic tumors and better. In this paper, the role of photobiomodulation in laser surgery will be discussed by the cultured monolayer normal human skin fibroblast model of the photobiomodulation of marginal irradiation of high intensity laser beam, the photobiomodulation related to the irradiated tissue, the biological information model of photobiomodulation and the animal models of laser surgery. Although high intensity laser beam is so intense that it destroys the irradiated cells or tissue, its marginal irradiation intensity is so low that there is photobiomodulation on non-damage cells to modulate the regeneration of partly damaged tissue so that the surgery of laser of different parameters results in different post-surgical recovery. It was concluded that photobiomodulation might play an important role in the long-term effects of laser surgery, which might be used to design laser surgery.

  6. The scope of plastic surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-03

    Aug 3, 2013 ... areas of surgery (especially general surgery), plastic surgeons are arguably the .... Who do you feel are experts in laparoscopic surgery? e (general surgeons) a. Maxillofacial .... of pressure sore. ORIF = open reduction internal fixation. ... Plastic versus cosmetic surgery: What's the difference? Plast Reconstr.

  7. Laparoscopic Surgery - What Is It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery - What is it? Laparoscopic Surgery - What is it? Laparoscopic Surgery - What is it? | ASCRS WHAT IS LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY? Laparoscopic or “minimally ... information about the management of the conditions addressed. It should be recognized that these brochures should not ...

  8. Understanding Antegrade Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enema (ACE) Surgery Understanding Antegrade Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery Antegrade colonic enema surgery (ACE) or Malone antegrade ... Email Print What is antegrade colonic enema (ACE) surgery? Antegrade colonic enema surgery (ACE) or Malone antegrade ...

  9. Understanding Antegrade Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enema (ACE) Surgery Understanding Antegrade Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery Antegrade colonic enema surgery (ACE) or Malone antegrade ... Full Article What is antegrade colonic enema (ACE) surgery? Antegrade colonic enema surgery (ACE) or Malone antegrade ...

  10. Building consensus: development of a Best Practice Guideline (BPG) for surgical site infection (SSI) prevention in high-risk pediatric spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Michael G; Riedel, Matthew D; Glotzbecker, Michael P; Matsumoto, Hiroko; Roye, David P; Akbarnia, Behrooz A; Anderson, Richard C E; Brockmeyer, Douglas L; Emans, John B; Erickson, Mark; Flynn, John M; Lenke, Lawrence G; Lewis, Stephen J; Luhmann, Scott J; McLeod, Lisa M; Newton, Peter O; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Richards, B Stephens; Shah, Suken A; Skaggs, David L; Smith, John T; Sponseller, Paul D; Sucato, Daniel J; Zeller, Reinhard D; Saiman, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Perioperative surgical site infection (SSI) after pediatric spine fusion is a recognized complication with rates between 0.5% and 1.6% in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and up to 22% in "high risk" patients. Significant variation in the approach to infection prophylaxis has been well documented. The purpose of this initiative is to develop a consensus-based "Best Practice" Guideline (BPG), informed by both the available evidence in the literature and expert opinion, for high-risk pediatric patients undergoing spine fusion. For the purpose of this effort, high risk was defined as anything other than a primary fusion in a patient with idiopathic scoliosis without significant comorbidities. The ultimate goal of this initiative is to decrease the wide variability in SSI prevention strategies in this area, ultimately leading to improved patient outcomes and reduced health care costs. An expert panel composed of 20 pediatric spine surgeons and 3 infectious disease specialists from North America, selected for their extensive experience in the field of pediatric spine surgery, was developed. Using the Delphi process and iterative rounds using a nominal group technique, participants in this panel were as follows: (1) surveyed for current practices; (2) presented with a detailed systematic review of the relevant literature; (3) given the opportunity to voice opinion collectively; and (4) asked to vote regarding preferences privately. Round 1 was conducted using an electronic survey. Initial results were compiled and discussed face-to-face. Round 2 was conducted using the Audience Response System, allowing participants to vote for (strongly support or support) or against inclusion of each intervention. Agreement >80% was considered consensus. Interventions without consensus were discussed and revised, if feasible. Repeat voting for consensus was performed. Consensus was reached to support 14 SSI prevention strategies and all participants agreed to implement the BPG in their

  11. Lack of difference between continuous versus intermittent heparin infusion on maintenance of intra-arterial catheter in postoperative pediatric surgery: a randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Witkowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare two systems of arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery using intermittent or continuous infusion of heparin solution and to analyze adverse events related to the site of catheter insertion and the volume of infused heparin solution. METHODS: Randomized control trial with 140 patients selected for continuous infusion group (CIG and intermittent infusion group (IIG. The variables analyzed were: type of heart disease, permanence time and size of the catheter, insertion site, technique used, volume of heparin solution and adverse events. The descriptive variables were analyzed by Student's t-test and the categorical variables, by chi-square test, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: The median age was 11 (0-22 months, and 77 (55% were females. No significant differences between studied variables were found, except for the volume used in CIG (12.0±1.2mL/24 hours when compared to IIG (5.3±3.5mL/24 hours with p<0.0003. CONCLUSIONS: The continuous infusion system and the intermittent infusion of heparin solution can be used for intra-arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery, regardless of patient's clinical and demographic characteristics. Adverse events up to the third postoperative day occurred similarly in both groups. However, the intermittent infusion system usage in underweight children should be considered, due to the lower volume of infused heparin solution [ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01097031].

  12. Lack of difference between continuous versus intermittent heparin infusion on maintenance of intra-arterial catheter in postoperative pediatric surgery: a randomized controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Maria Carolina; de Moraes, Maria Antonieta P.; Firpo, Cora Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare two systems of arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery using intermittent or continuous infusion of heparin solution and to analyze adverse events related to the site of catheter insertion and the volume of infused heparin solution. METHODS: Randomized control trial with 140 patients selected for continuous infusion group (CIG) and intermittent infusion group (IIG). The variables analyzed were: type of heart disease, permanence time and size of the catheter, insertion site, technique used, volume of heparin solution and adverse events. The descriptive variables were analyzed by Student's t-test and the categorical variables, by chi-square test, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: The median age was 11 (0-22) months, and 77 (55%) were females. No significant differences between studied variables were found, except for the volume used in CIG (12.0±1.2mL/24 hours) when compared to IIG (5.3±3.5mL/24 hours) with p<0.0003. CONCLUSIONS: The continuous infusion system and the intermittent infusion of heparin solution can be used for intra-arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery, regardless of patient's clinical and demographic characteristics. Adverse events up to the third postoperative day occurred similarly in both groups. However, the intermittent infusion system usage in underweight children should be considered, due to the lower volume of infused heparin solution [ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01097031]. PMID:24473958

  13. Development and suggestions for pediatric cardiac surgery in China%我国小儿心脏外科的发展和建议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁文祥

    2011-01-01

    自1974年创建小儿先天性心脏病外科以来,经过40余年努力,目前复杂先天性心脏病的手术技术已与国际先进水平相近;但尚存在一些问题,如地区间、单位间的水平还有差距,医疗保险和医疗政策尚需进一步完善,专用器材国产化等尚待进一步提高.该文主要阐述了我国小儿心脏外科的现状.%Since the establishment of Department of Pediatric Congenital Heart Surgery in 1974, the surgical technique for complicated congenital heart diseases has reached the advanced international level. However, there is room for improvement in some issues such as regional differences, medical insurance and medical policy. Besides, the localization of specialized equipment should be enhanced. This paper describes the current status of pediatric cardiac surgery in China.

  14. Robotic surgery in gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkatout, Ibrahim; Mettler, Liselotte; Maass, Nicolai; Ackermann, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgery is the most dynamic development in the sector of minimally invasive operations currently. It should not be viewed as an alternative to laparoscopy, but as the next step in a process of technological evolution. The advancement of robotic surgery, in terms of the introduction of the Da Vinci Xi, permits the variable use of optical devices in all four trocars. Due to the new geometry of the "patient cart," an operation can be performed in all spatial directions without re-docking. Longer instruments and the markedly narrower mechanical elements of the "patient cart" provide greater flexibility as well as access similar to those of traditional laparoscopy. Currently, robotic surgery is used for a variety of indications in the treatment of benign gynecological diseases as well as malignant ones. Interdisciplinary cooperation and cooperation over large geographical distances have been rendered possible by telemedicine, and will ensure comprehensive patient care in the future by highly specialized surgery teams. In addition, the second operation console and the operation simulator constitute a new dimension in advanced surgical training. The disadvantages of robotic surgery remain the high costs of acquisition and maintenance as well as the laborious training of medical personnel before they are confident with using the technology.

  15. Innovations in Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Catherine; Pryor, Aurora D

    2015-11-01

    Surgery has consistently been demonstrated to be the most effective long-term therapy for the treatment of obesity. However, despite excellent outcomes with current procedures, most patients with obesity- and weight-related comorbidities who meet criteria for surgical treatment choose not to pursue surgery out of fear of operative risks and complications or concerns about high costs. Novel minimally invasive procedures and devices may offer alternative solutions for patients who are hesitant to pursue standard surgical approaches. These procedures may be used for primary treatment of obesity, early intervention for patients approaching morbid obesity, temporary management prior to bariatric surgery, or revision of bypass surgery associated with weight regain. Novel bariatric procedures can in general be divided into four categories: endoluminal space-occupying devices, gastric suturing and restrictive devices, absorption-limiting devices, and neural-hormonal modulating devices. Many of these are only approved as short-term interventions, but these devices may be effective for patients desiring low-risk procedures or a transient effect. We will see the expansion of indications and alternatives for metabolic surgery as these techniques gain approval.

  16. Percutaneous forefoot surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, T

    2014-02-01

    Percutaneous methods can be used to perform many surgical procedures on the soft tissues and bones of the forefoot, thereby providing treatment options for all the disorders and deformities seen at this site. Theoretical advantages of percutaneous surgery include lower morbidity rates and faster recovery with immediate weight bearing. Disadvantages are the requirement for specific equipment, specific requirements for post-operative management, and lengthy learning curve. At present, percutaneous hallux valgus correction is mainly achieved with chevron osteotomy of the first metatarsal, for which internal fixation and a minimally invasive approach (2 cm incision) seem reliable and reproducible. This procedure is currently the focus of research and evaluation. Percutaneous surgery for hallux rigidus is simple and provides similar outcomes to those of open surgery. Lateral metatarsal malalignment and toe deformities are good indications for percutaneous treatment, which produces results similar to those of conventional surgery with lower morbidity rates. Finally, fifth ray abnormalities are currently the ideal indication for percutaneous surgery, given the simplicity of the procedure and post-operative course, high reliability, and very low rate of iatrogenic complications. The most commonly performed percutaneous techniques are described herein, with their current indications, main outcomes, and recent developments.

  17. Cardiac surgery 2015 reviewed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doenst, Torsten; Strüning, Constanze; Moschovas, Alexandros; Gonzalez-Lopez, David; Essa, Yasin; Kirov, Hristo; Diab, Mahmoud; Faerber, Gloria

    2016-10-01

    For the year 2015, almost 19,000 published references can be found in PubMed when entering the search term "cardiac surgery". The last year has been again characterized by lively discussions in the fields where classic cardiac surgery and modern interventional techniques overlap. Lacking evidence in the field of coronary revascularization with either percutaneous coronary intervention or bypass surgery has been added. As in the years before, CABG remains the gold standard for the revascularization of complex stable triple-vessel disease. Plenty of new information has been presented comparing the conventional to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) demonstrating similar short- and mid-term outcomes at high and low risk, but even a survival advantage with transfemoral TAVI at intermediate risk. In addition, there were many relevant and interesting other contributions from the purely operative arena. This review article will summarize the most pertinent publications in the fields of coronary revascularization, surgical treatment of valve disease, heart failure (i.e., transplantation and ventricular assist devices), and aortic surgery. While the article does not have the expectation of being complete and cannot be free of individual interpretation, it provides a condensed summary that is intended to give the reader "solid ground" for up-to-date decision-making in cardiac surgery.

  18. Perioperatory antibiotic prophylaxis in Pediatric Surgery (Part II: non-abdominal surgery. Profilaxis antibiótica perioperatoria en Cirugía Pediátrica (Parte II: cirugía no abdominal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Cortiza Orbe

    Full Text Available The surgical wound infection is the biggest cause of infectious morbility in surgical patients. It is an important cause of morbility that causes lincreased hospital demurrages, increased cost of medical attention and serious inconveniences to the patients and their familiies. 25% of all nosocomial infections are surgical wound infection. One of the big advances of the surgery in the last three decades is an introduction of antibiotic prophylaxis in the surgical practice. Is considered that it has saved more lives than any other novel procedure in surgery in the last 20 years. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Antibiotic prophylaxis in no-abdominal surgery, approved by consensus in the 1st National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Cienfuegos, Cuba, March 7 – 9, 2002.

    La infección posoperatoria de la herida quirúrgica es la mayor causa de morbilidad infecciosa en el paciente quirúrgico. Ocasiona prolongadas estadías hospitalarias, incremento de los costos de la atención médica y serios inconvenientes a los pacientes y sus familiares. El 25 % de todas las infecciones nosocomiales son infecciones de la herida quirúrgica. Uno de los grandes avances que ha experimentado la cirugía en las tres últimas décadas, es la introducción de la profilaxis antibiótica perioperatoria en la práctica quirúrgica. Se considera que en los últimos 20 años ha salvado más vidas que cualquier otro procedimiento novedoso en cirugía. Se presenta la Guía de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas para profilaxis antibiótica perioperatoria en cirugía abdominal, aprobada por consenso en el 1er Taller Nacional de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas en Cirugía Pediátrica (Cienfuegos, 7 al 9 de marzo del 2002.

  19. Perioperatory antibiotic prophylaxis in Pediatric Surgery (Part I: abdominal surgery Profilaxis antibiótica perioperatoria en Cirugía Pediátrica (Parte I: cirugía abdominal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Fonseca Romero

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The surgical wound infection is the biggest cause of infectious morbility in surgical patients. It is an important cause of morbility that causes lincreased hospital demurrages, increased cost of medical attention and serious inconveniences to the patients and their familiies. 25% of all nosocomial infections are surgical wound infection. One of the big advances of the surgery in the last three decades is an introduction of antibiotic prophylaxis in the surgical practice. Is considered that it has saved more lives than any other novel procedure in surgery in the last 20 years. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Antibiotic prophylaxis in abdominal surgery, approved by consensus in the 1st National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Cienfuegos, Cuba, March 7 – 9, 2002.

    La infección posoperatoria de la herida quirúrgica es la mayor causa de morbilidad infecciosa en el paciente quirúrgico. Ocasiona prolongadas estadías hospitalarias, incremento de los costos de la atención médica y serios inconvenientes a los pacientes y sus familiares. El 25 % de todas las infecciones nosocomiales son infecciones de la herida quirúrgica. Uno de los grandes avances que ha experimentado la cirugía en las tres últimas décadas, es la introducción de la profilaxis antibiótica perioperatoria en la práctica quirúrgica. Se considera que en los últimos 20 años ha salvado más vidas que cualquier otro procedimiento novedoso en cirugía. Se presenta la Guía de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas para profilaxis antibiótica perioperatoria en cirugía abdominal, aprobada por consenso en el 1er Taller Nacional de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas en Cirugía Pediátrica (Cienfuegos, 7 al 9 de marzo del 2002.

  20. Ensayos clínicos en Cirugía Pediátrica: Consideraciones bioéticas Clinical trials in Pediatric Surgery: Bioethical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Bueno Rodríguez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Los ensayos clínicos son considerados como una de las mejores fuentes primarias de evidencia; sin embargo, este tipo de estudio es poco utilizado en Cirugía. El presente trabajo revisa algunas particularidades bioéticas de los ensayos clínicos en Cirugía Pediátrica. Las principales dificultades y limitaciones bioéticas son: la poca tradición de los cirujanos en la realización de ensayos clínicos, la irreversibilidad del tratamiento quirúrgico, la necesidad de entrenamiento técnico y experiencia manual, la ausencia de criterios de calidad de la técnica empleada y la influencia del periodo de aprendizaje en los resultados. Se presentan posibles soluciones para estas particularidades. Cuando se utilice el ensayo clínico como la mejor opción de diseño para contestar una pregunta de investigación clínica en cirugía con niños, deberán valorarse tanto las ventajas como las limitaciones y las dificultades bioéticas de este tipo de estudio.Clinical trials are considered the best primary source of evidence; however, this kind of study is slightly used in surgery. This paper revises some of the bioethical characteristics of clinical trials in Pediatric Surgery. The main bioethical difficulties and limitations are: surgeons´ little experience in clinical trials, irreversibility of surgical treatments, need of technical training and manual experience, absence of quality criteria concerning the technique used, and influence of the learning period in the results. Possible solutions to these aspects are presented. When clinical trials are used as the best option to answer any clinical research questions in pediatric surgery, their advantages and bioethical limitations and difficulties should taken into consideration.